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Sample records for du ganglion sentinelle

  1. Oncoplastie avec conservation mammaire dans le traitement du cancer du sein: à propos de 16 cas

    PubMed Central

    Bouzoubaa, Wail; Laadioui, Meryam; Jayi, Sofia; Alaoui, Fatime Zahra Fdili; Bouguern, Hakima; Chaara, Hikmat; Melhouf, Moulay Abdelilah

    2015-01-01

    Le cancer du sein est actuellement le cancer le plus fréquent chez la femme, et pose un véritable problème diagnostique et thérapeutique. Le dépistage des lésions à un stade de plus en plus précoce, a permis une extension des indications du traitement conservateur radiochirurgical, qui était initialement limitées aux tumeurs de moins de 3 cm, unifocales, non inflammatoires. Par ailleurs, l'utilisation de traitements préopératoires permet d’étendre les indications du traitement conservateur à des tumeurs plus volumineuses. Parallèlement à cette extension des indications de conservation mammaire, on a observé le développement de nouvelles approches thérapeutiques notamment la chirurgie oncoplastique, technique du ganglion sentinelle et chirurgie stéréotaxique, dont les résultats initiaux sont très encouragent. A travers cette étude réalisée dans le service de gynécologie et obstétrique II du CHU HASSAN II de FES au MAROC, après l'analyse rétrospective de 16 patientes traitées par traitement conservateur et oncoplastie, nous avons voulus montrer notre aptitude a réalisé ses techniques chirurgicales et a bien prendre en charge ces patientes, mais aussi évaluer ces techniques en termes de résultat carcinologique et de résultat esthétique, aussi en terme de survie globale, survie sans métastase et en termes de récidive locale entre les plasties mammaires et les traitements usuels: mastectomie et traitement conservateur classique. PMID:26430477

  2. Cortical Basal Ganglionic Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Chin, Steven S.; Marder, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a retired mason's assistant with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). CBGD is an extremely rare neurodegenerative disease that is categorized under both Parkinsonian syndromes and frontal lobe dementias. It affects men and women nearly equally, and the age of onset is usually in the sixth decade of life. CBGD is characterized by Parkinson's-like motor symptoms and by deficits of movement and cognition, indicating focal brain pathology. Neuronal cell loss is ultimately responsible for the neurological symptoms. PMID:14602941

  3. Proximal Sciatic Nerve Intraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Karin R.; Wilson, Dianne; Boland, Michael; Fee, Dominic B.

    2009-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are nonneoplastic, mucinous cysts within the epineurium of peripheral nerves which usually involve the peroneal nerve at the knee. A 37-year-old female presented with progressive left buttock and posterior thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sciatic nerve mass at the sacral notch which was subsequently revealed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. An intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the proximal sciatic nerve has only been reported once prior to 2009. PMID:20069041

  4. The three faces of vestibular ganglionitis.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Richard R; Gacek, Mark R

    2002-02-01

    We present temporal bone and clinical evidence that common syndromes of recurrent vertigo are caused by a viral infection of the vestibular ganglion. In the present series, histopathologic and radiologic changes in the vestibular ganglion and meatal ganglion were consistent with a viral inflammation of ganglion cells in cases of Meniere's disease, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and vestibular neuronitis. Clinical observations of multiple neuropathies involving cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII on the same side in patients with recurrent vertigo are best explained by a cranial polyganglionitis caused by a neurotrophic virus, which is reactivated by a stressful event later in life. The reactivation of the latent virus may manifest as one of the above vertigo syndromes, depending on the part of the vestibular ganglion that is inflamed, the type and strain of the virus, and host resistance.

  5. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Michael Tri Hoang; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-10-01

    Life on earth is subject to alternating cycles of day and night imposed by the rotation of the earth. Consequently, living things have evolved photodetective systems to synchronize their physiology and behavior with the external light-dark cycle. This form of photodetection is unlike the familiar "image vision," in that the basic information is light or darkness over time, independent of spatial patterns. "Nonimage" vision is probably far more ancient than image vision and is widespread in living species. For mammals, it has long been assumed that the photoreceptors for nonimage vision are also the textbook rods and cones. However, recent years have witnessed the discovery of a small population of retinal ganglion cells in the mammalian eye that express a unique visual pigment called melanopsin. These ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive and drive a variety of nonimage visual functions. In addition to being photoreceptors themselves, they also constitute the major conduit for rod and cone signals to the brain for nonimage visual functions such as circadian photoentrainment and the pupillary light reflex. Here we review what is known about these novel mammalian photoreceptors. PMID:20959623

  6. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  7. Molecular biology of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, M; Zhou, H; Nathans, J

    1996-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells are the output neurons that encode and transmit information from the eye to the brain. Their diverse physiologic and anatomic properties have been intensively studied and appear to account well for a number of psychophysical phenomena such as lateral inhibition and chromatic opponency. In this paper, we summarize our current view of retinal ganglion cell properties and pose a number of questions regarding underlying molecular mechanisms. As an example of one approach to understanding molecular mechanisms, we describe recent work on several POU domain transcription factors that are expressed in subsets of retinal ganglion cells and that appear to be involved in ganglion cell development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8570601

  8. Aspergillus granuloma of the trigeminal ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Wiles, C M; Kocen, R S; Symon, L; Scaravilli, F

    1981-01-01

    A patient is described with aspergillus flavus granuloma of the trigeminal ganglion. The patient was effectively treated by surgical excision of most of the infected tissue followed by intensive chemotherapy with amphotericin B and flucytosine. Images PMID:6973615

  9. Changes in ganglion cells during retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Saha, Susmita; Greferath, Ursula; Vessey, Kirstan A; Grayden, David B; Burkitt, Anthony N; Fletcher, Erica L

    2016-08-01

    Inherited retinal degeneration such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is associated with photoreceptor loss and concomitant morphological and functional changes in the inner retina. It is not known whether these changes are associated with changes in the density and distribution of synaptic inputs to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). We quantified changes in ganglion cell density in rd1 and age-matched C57BL/6J-(wildtype, WT) mice using the immunocytochemical marker, RBPMS. Our data revealed that following complete loss of photoreceptors, (∼3months of age), there was a reduction in ganglion cell density in the peripheral retina. We next examined changes in synaptic inputs to A type ganglion cells by performing double labeling experiments in mice with the ganglion cell reporter lines, rd1-Thy1 and age-matched wildtype-Thy1. Ribbon synapses were identified by co-labelling with CtBP2 (RIBEYE) and conventional synapses with the clustering molecule, gephyrin. ON RGCs showed a significant reduction in RIBEYE-immunoreactive synapse density while OFF RGCs showed a significant reduction in the gephyrin-immmunoreactive synapse density. Distribution patterns of both synaptic markers across the dendritic trees of RGCs were unchanged. The change in synaptic inputs to RGCs was associated with a reduction in the number of immunolabeled rod bipolar and ON cone bipolar cells. These results suggest that functional changes reported in ganglion cells during retinal degeneration could be attributed to loss of synaptic inputs. PMID:27132232

  10. Evaluation of the percentage of ganglion cells in the ganglion cell layer of the rodent retina

    PubMed Central

    Schlamp, Cassandra L.; Montgomery, Angela D.; Mac Nair, Caitlin E.; Schuart, Claudia; Willmer, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ganglion cells comprise a percentage of the neurons actually residing in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of the rodent retina. This estimate is useful to extrapolate ganglion cell loss in models of optic nerve disease, but the values reported in the literature are highly variable depending on the methods used to obtain them. Methods We tested three retrograde labeling methods and two immunostaining methods to calculate ganglion cell number in the mouse retina (C57BL/6). Additionally, a double-stain retrograde staining method was used to label rats (Long-Evans). The number of total neurons was estimated using a nuclear stain and selecting for nuclei that met specific criteria. Cholinergic amacrine cells were identified using transgenic mice expressing Tomato fluorescent protein. Total neurons and total ganglion cell numbers were measured in microscopic fields of 104 µm2 to determine the percentage of neurons comprising ganglion cells in each field. Results Historical estimates of the percentage of ganglion cells in the mouse GCL range from 36.1% to 67.5% depending on the method used. Experimentally, retrograde labeling methods yielded a combined estimate of 50.3% in mice. A retrograde method also yielded a value of 50.21% for rat retinas. Immunolabeling estimates were higher at 64.8%. Immunolabeling may introduce overestimates, however, with non-specific labeling effects, or ectopic expression of antigens in neurons other than ganglion cells. Conclusions Since immunolabeling methods may overestimate ganglion cell numbers, we conclude that 50%, which is consistently derived from retrograde labeling methods, is a reliable estimate of the ganglion cells in the neuronal population of the GCL. PMID:23825918

  11. Ultrasound findings of ganglions of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Päivänsalo, M; Jalovaara, P

    1991-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with a palpable swelling of a wrist or finger of suspected ganglion origin were examined by ultrasound (US). Forty-five were operated on, and a ganglion was found in 35. The ganglions took the form of cysts 0.4-4 cm in diameter (mean 1.4 cm) with a projection into the joint or tendon in 19 cases. Two patients had multiple ganglia, and two a wrist lipoma, one echo-rich and the other echo-poor with a thick wall. One patient had a giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath which was moderately echogenic in appearance, one had carpal tunnel syndrome and a ganglion-like finding at US, one had tenosynovitis and negative US and one had a prominent tendon due to postoperative sequelae, with US showing a longish echo-poor lesion. Two had hypertrophied muscle forming a long echo-poor structure, one had an exostosis and one had no abnormality in the wrist at operation. Our experiences suggest that ultrasound is useful in many cases with impression of a ganglion at palpation showing multiplicity of a lesion or for assisting in differential diagnosis, although a physical examination is mostly sufficient for diagnostic purposes. PMID:1756743

  12. Stem Cells, Retinal Ganglion Cells, and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Sluch, Valentin M.; Zack, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells represent an essential neuronal cell type for vision. These cells receive inputs from light-sensing photoreceptors via retinal interneurons and then relay these signals to the brain for further processing. Retinal ganglion cell diseases that result in cell death, e.g. glaucoma, often lead to permanent damage since mammalian nerves do not regenerate. Stem cell differentiation can generate cells needed for replacement or can be used to generate cells capable of secreting protective factors to promote survival. In addition, stem cell-derived cells can be used in drug screening research. Here, we discuss the current state of stem cell research potential for interference in glaucoma and other optic nerve diseases with a focus on stem cell differentiation to retinal ganglion cells. PMID:24732765

  13. Cardiac ganglionitis associated with sudden unexpected death.

    PubMed

    James, T N; Zipes, D P; Finegan, R E; Eisele, J W; Carter, J E

    1979-11-01

    In a postmortem study of the hearts of two young women who died suddenly and unexpectedly, we found a remarkably similar and distinctive ganglionitis, predominantly in the region of the sinus node. Both women had ventricular fibrillation at the time of collapse. Vesicular neuritis and older neural degeneration were present in other regions of the heart. Except for focal fibromuscular dysplasia of the sinus node artery and atrioventricular node artery of one heart, there was no other significant anatomic abnormality in either heart. The functional significance of this cardiac ganglionitis is unclear, but its location in and around the conduction system makes it a possible cause of the fatal electrical instability. Recognition that ganglionitis of the heart may be associated with sudden death should stimulate a number of additionally useful studies.

  14. Stratification of alpha ganglion cells and ON/OFF directionally selective ganglion cells in the rabbit retina

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIAN; LI, WEI; HOSHI, HIDEO; MILLS, STEPHEN L.; MASSEY, STEPHEN C.

    2007-01-01

    The correlation between cholinergic sensitivity and the level of stratification for ganglion cells was examined in the rabbit retina. As examples, we have used ON or OFF α ganglion cells and ON/OFF directionally selective (DS) ganglion cells. Nicotine, a cholinergic agonist, depolarized ON/OFF DS ganglion cells and greatly enhanced their firing rates but it had modest excitatory effects on ON or OFF α ganglion cells. As previously reported, we conclude that DS ganglion cells are the most sensitive to cholinergic drugs. Confocal imaging showed that ON/OFF DS ganglion cells ramify precisely at the level of the cholinergic amacrine cell dendrites, and co-fasciculate with the cholinergic matrix of starburst amacrine cells. However, neither ON or OFF α ganglion cells have more than a chance association with the cholinergic matrix. Z-axis reconstruction showed that OFF α ganglion cells stratify just below the cholinergic band in sublamina a while ON α ganglion cells stratify just below cholinergic b. The latter is at the same level as the terminals of calbindin bipolar cells. Thus, the calbindin bipolar cell appears to be a prime candidate to provide the bipolar cell input to ON α ganglion cells in the rabbit retina. We conclude that the precise level of stratification is correlated with the strength of cholinergic input. Alpha ganglion cells receive a weak cholinergic input and they are narrowly stratified just below the cholinergic bands. PMID:16212709

  15. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  16. Stellate ganglion blockade-techniques and modalities.

    PubMed

    Ghai, A; Kaushik, T; Wadhera, R; Wadhera, S

    2016-01-01

    Stellate ganglion block (SGB) is utilized in the diagnosis and management of various vascular disorders and sympathetically mediated pain in upper extremity, head and neck. The stellate ganglion lies medial to the scalene muscles, lateral to longus coli muscle, esophagus, trachea and recurrent laryngeal nerve, anterior to C7 transverse process and prevertebral fascia, superior to the subclavian artery and posterior to vertebral vessels. Consequently, inadvertent placement of the needle tip into these soft tissues and vessels occur with blind technique. Henceforth, various interventional modalities are being used for SGB, these have been reviewed in this paper. Various techniques of SGB have been described, and vary from the use of standard blind technique to the use of fluoroscopy, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and radio nucleotide tracers. However, these techniques may not be practical in a clinical setting, insofar as they are time consuming, costly, and may involve radiation exposure. The use of fluoroscopy does not visualize the blood vessels close to the stellate ganglion. Ultrasounds are the alternative. They help in visualization of soft tissues to prevent complications and help in deposition of drug subfascially, under direct visual control. PMID:27363208

  17. Concerted Signaling by Retinal Ganglion Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Markus; Lagnado, Leon; Baylor, Denis A.

    1995-11-01

    To analyze the rules that govern communication between eye and brain, visual responses were recorded from an intact salamander retina. Parallel observation of many retinal ganglion cells with a microelectrode array showed that nearby neurons often fired synchronously, with spike delays of less than 10 milliseconds. The frequency of such synchronous spikes exceeded the correlation expected from a shared visual stimulus up to 20-fold. Synchronous firing persisted under a variety of visual stimuli and accounted for the majority of action potentials recorded. Analysis of receptive fields showed that concerted spikes encoded information not carried by individual cells; they may represent symbols in a multineuronal code for vision.

  18. Symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cyst of the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jean; O'Donnell, Kevin; Lesniak, Bryson

    2011-01-01

    Ganglion cysts have been previously described throughout the body, most commonly about the wrist, hand, knee, ankle, and feet. When symptomatic, they may interfere with joint mechanics, resulting in snapping, catching, and locking. Intratendinous ganglion cysts lack a synovial epithelial lining and are thought to develop from the mucoid degeneration of connective tissue caused by chronic irritation, chronic repetitive injury, and chronic ischemia. On magnetic resonance imaging, ganglion cysts originating from tendons, ligaments, tendon sheaths, menisci, or joint capsules appear as well-defined lobulated masses that follow simple or complex fluid signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with enhancing walls and internal septations on post-contrast images. There may be appreciable degeneration and partial tearing of the structure of origin, particularly if associated with tendons. On ultrasonography, they present as hypoechoic masses, with internal septations and lobulations of varying sizes, without significant vascularity on power or color Doppler sampling. A thin fluid neck extending from the structure of origin (tail sign), when present, is a reliable sign of a ganglion cyst. This article describes a sonographically guided technique to treat symptomatic ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon. Complete evacuation of the ganglion cyst, with disappearance of the tail sign, is considered the determining factor for a successful procedure. A similar technique can be used for the treatment of other symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts elsewhere in the body. To our knowledge, symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon and their treatment have not been previously reported.

  19. Bilateral Thoracic Ganglion Cyst : A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kazanci, Burak; Tehli, Ozkan; Guclu, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts usually arise from the tissues around the facet joints. It is usually associated with degenerative cahanges in facet joints. Bilateral thoracic ganglion cysts are very rare and there is no previous case that located in bilateral intervertebral foramen compressing the L1 nerve root associated with severe radiculopathy. We report a 53 years old woman who presented with bilateral groin pain and severe numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral cystic mass in the intervertebral foramen between 12th thoracal and 1st lumbar vertebrae. The cystic lesions were removed after bilateral exposure of Th12-L1 foramens. The result of hystopathology confirmed the diagnosis as ganglion cyst. The ganglion cyst may compromise lumbar dorsal ganglion when it located in the intervertebral foramen. The surgeon should keep this rare entity in their mind for differential diagnosis. PMID:23908708

  20. Adrenal medullary ganglion neurons project into the splanchnic nerve.

    PubMed

    Dagerlind, A; Pelto-Huikko, M; Diez, M; Hökfelt, T

    1995-12-01

    Retrograde tract-tracing was used to study the projections of adrenal medullary ganglion neurons. The splanchnic nerve was cut close to the suprarenal ganglia and the retrograde tracer FluoroGold was applied at the site of nerve transection. Groups of adrenal medullary ganglion neurons exhibited FlurorGold- or Fast Blue-induced fluorescence restricted to the perikarya. Using immunohistochemistry most retrogradely labelled ganglion neurons showed immunoreactivity for neuropeptide Y. In addition, after splanchnicotomy most ganglion neurons expressed galanin and galanin message-associated peptide immunoreactivities which could not be observed in control adrenals. Taken together, the present results strongly indicate that adrenal medullary ganglion neurons project back into the splanchnic nerve perhaps representing feedback system modulating the preganglionic innervation of the adrenal gland.

  1. [Trophic disorders in ganglionitis of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion under experimental and clinical conditions].

    PubMed

    Tebloev, I K; Karlov, V A; Gemonov, V V

    1976-01-01

    The paper is concerned with a clinical study of 9 patients where ganglionitis of the upper cervical sympathic node proceeded with an atrophy of the soft tissues in the form of facial hemiatrophy. Besides in experiments on 18 guinea pigs the authors either removed or irritated the upper cervical sympathic node and then after a certain period during 30 days performed histological and histochemical studies of the soft tissues of the animal muzzle. It was possible to mark a prevalent lesion of the skin and subcutaneous fatty tissue. In the early periods of the experiment there was a more expressed change in the metabolic reactions and less-structural disorders which developed eventually and had a secondary character due to disorders of metabolic processes. These data permit to consider that such changes take place in the faces of patients with ganglionitis of the upper cervical sympathic node.

  2. Selectivity for multiple stimulus features in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Fairhall, Adrienne L; Burlingame, C Andrew; Narasimhan, Ramesh; Harris, Robert A; Puchalla, Jason L; Berry, Michael J

    2006-11-01

    Under normal viewing conditions, retinal ganglion cells transmit to the brain an encoded version of the visual world. The retina parcels the visual scene into an array of spatiotemporal features, and each ganglion cell conveys information about a small set of these features. We study the temporal features represented by salamander retinal ganglion cells by stimulating with dynamic spatially uniform flicker and recording responses using a multi-electrode array. While standard reverse correlation methods determine a single stimulus feature--the spike-triggered average--multiple features can be relevant to spike generation. We apply covariance analysis to determine the set of features to which each ganglion cell is sensitive. Using this approach, we found that salamander ganglion cells represent a rich vocabulary of different features of a temporally modulated visual stimulus. Individual ganglion cells were sensitive to at least two and sometimes as many as six features in the stimulus. While a fraction of the cells can be described by a filter-and-fire cascade model, many cells have feature selectivity that has not previously been reported. These reverse models were able to account for 80-100% of the information encoded by ganglion cells. PMID:16914609

  3. Neuronal cell lines as model dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kathleen; Baillie, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Background Dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived immortal cell lines including ND7/23 and F-11 cells have been used extensively as in vitro model systems of native peripheral sensory neurons. However, while it is clear that some sensory neuron-specific receptors and ion channels are present in these cell lines, a systematic comparison of the molecular targets expressed by these cell lines with those expressed in intact peripheral neurons is lacking. Results In this study, we examined the expression of RNA transcripts in the human neuroblastoma-derived cell line, SH-SY5Y, and two dorsal root ganglion hybridoma cell lines, F-11 and ND7/23, using Illumina next-generation sequencing, and compared the results with native whole murine dorsal root ganglions. The gene expression profiles of these three cell lines did not resemble any specific defined dorsal root ganglion subclass. The cell lines lacked many markers for nociceptive sensory neurons, such as the Transient receptor potential V1 gene, but expressed markers for both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. Global gene ontology analysis on whole dorsal root ganglions and cell lines showed similar enrichment of biological process terms across all samples. Conclusions This paper provides insights into the receptor repertoire expressed in common dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived cell lines compared with whole murine dorsal root ganglions, and illustrates the limits and potentials of these cell lines as tools for neuropharmacological exploration. PMID:27130590

  4. Degeneration and regeneration of ganglion cell axons.

    PubMed

    Weise, J; Ankerhold, R; Bähr, M

    2000-01-15

    The retino-tectal system has been used to study developmental aspects of axon growth, synapse formation and the establishment of a precise topographic order as well as degeneration and regeneration of adult retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons after axonal lesion. This paper reviews some novel findings that provide new insights into the mechanisms of developmental RGC axon growth, pathfinding, and target formation. It also focuses on the cellular and molecular cascades that underlie RGC degeneration following an axonal lesion and on some therapeutic strategies to enhance survival of axotomized RGCs in vivo. In addition, this review deals with problems related to the induction of regeneration after axonal lesion in the adult CNS using the retino-tectal system as model. Different therapeutic approaches to promote RGC regeneration and requirements for specific target formation of regenerating RGCs in vitro and in vivo are discussed. PMID:10649506

  5. T-cell-mediated ganglionitis associated with acute sensory neuronopathy.

    PubMed

    Hainfellner, J A; Kristoferitsch, W; Lassmann, H; Bernheimer, H; Neisser, A; Drlicek, M; Beer, F; Budka, H

    1996-04-01

    A 67-year-old man presented with acute painful sensory loss, areflexia, ataxia, urinary retention, and severe constipation and became unable to walk within 2 weeks. He died suddenly 5 weeks after the onset of symptoms. Autopsy revealed widespread inflammation of sensory and autonomic ganglia with immunocytochemical evidence of a CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxic attack against ganglion neurons. This observation suggests a novel pathogenetic mechanism of immune-mediated human ganglion cell damage comparable to mechanisms operating in polymyositis.

  6. "Cirque du Freak."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivett, Miriam

    2002-01-01

    Considers the marketing strategies that underpin the success of the "Cirque du Freak" series. Describes how "Cirque du Freak" is an account of events in the life of schoolboy Darren Shan. Notes that it is another reworking of the vampire narrative, a sub-genre of horror writing that has proved highly popular with both adult and child readers. (SG)

  7. [Application of ganglion impar block in patient with coccyx dislocation].

    PubMed

    Sağır, Ozlem; Ozaslan, Sabri; Köroğlu, Ahmet

    2011-07-01

    Sacrococcygeal dislocation is a rare injury. The ganglion impar (also called the ganglion of Walther) is a single, small solitary, sympathetic ganglion located in the retrorectal space, anterior to the sacrococcygeal joint or coccyx. It provides the nociceptive and sympathetic supply to the perineal structure. Ganglion impar blockade is not a routinely used anesthetic and analgesic procedure in clinical practice. An elective intrarectal manuel treatment was planned for a woman patient with coccyx dislocation due to falling down from a chair 5 days ago. Ganglion impar block was performed with saccrococcygeal approach using 22 gauge spinal needle along with fluoroscopy following routine monitorization. Blood pressure, heart rate, peripheral oxygen saturation and visual analog scale (VAS) were recorded before and, after block with three minute intervals. VAS value of the patient, 8 before the procedure, decreased 50% 6 minutes after block. Intrarectal manuel treatment was applied to the patient with VAS of 0 at 9th minute. Hemodynamic values were within normal limits during and after the procedure and no motor block was observed. The patient with VAS of 0 at 2nd and 6th hour after block was discharged. VAS of 0 was determined at 24th and 48th hour by phone call. In conclusion, ganglion impar block provided adequate analgesia without causing any complications during and after the intrarectal manuel treatment for the patient with coccyx dislocation. However, we believe that further clinical studies are required to establish the safety and efficiency of this technique for other procedures at perianal region.

  8. Ganglion ultrastructure in phylactolaemate Bryozoa: evidence for a neuroepithelium.

    PubMed

    Gruhl, Alexander; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    In contrast to other Bryozoa, members of the subtaxon Phylactolaemata bear a subepithelial cerebral ganglion that resembles a hollow vesicle rather than being compact. In older studies this ganglion was said to originate by an invagination of the pharyngeal epithelium. Unfortunately, documentation for this is fragmentary. In chordates the central nervous system also arises by an invagination-like process, but this mode is uncommon among invertebrate phyla. As a first attempt to gather more data about this phenomenon, cerebral ganglia in two phylactolaemate species, Fredericella sultana and Plumatella emarginata, were examined at the ultrastructural level. In both species the ganglion bears a small central lumen. The ganglionic cells are organized in the form of a neuroepithelium. They are polarized and interconnected by adherens junctions on their apical sides and reside on a basal lamina. The nerve cell somata are directed towards the central lumen, whereas the majority of nervous processes are distributed basally. Orientation of the neuroepithelial cells can be best explained by the possibility that they develop by invagination. A comparison with potential outgroups reveals that a neuroepithelial ganglion is at least derived. Since, however, a reliable phylogenetic system of the Bryozoa is missing, a decision on whether such a ganglion is apomorphic for Bryozoa or evolved within this taxon can hardly be made.

  9. Polymodal Sensory Integration in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An animal's ability to perceive the external world is conditioned by its capacity to extract and encode specific features of the visual image. The output of the vertebrate retina is not a simple representation of the 2D visual map generated by photon absorptions in the photoreceptor layer. Rather, spatial, temporal, direction selectivity and color "dimensions" of the original image are distributed in the form of parallel output channels mediated by distinct retinal ganglion cell (RGC) populations. We propose that visual information transmitted to the brain includes additional, light-independent, inputs that reflect the functional states of the retina, anterior eye and the body. These may include the local ion microenvironment, glial metabolism and systemic parameters such as intraocular pressure, temperature and immune activation which act on ion channels that are intrinsic to RGCs. We particularly focus on light-independent mechanical inputs that are associated with physical impact, cell swelling and intraocular pressure as excessive mechanical stimuli lead to the counterintuitive experience of "pressure phosphenes" and/or debilitating blinding disease such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. We point at recently discovered retinal mechanosensitive ion channels as examples through which molecular physiology brings together Greek phenomenology, modern neuroscience and medicine. Thus, RGC output represents a unified picture of the embodied context within which vision takes place. PMID:26427477

  10. Advances in retinal ganglion cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Balendra, S I; Normando, E M; Bloom, P A; Cordeiro, M F

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide and will affect 79.6 million people worldwide by 2020. It is caused by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), predominantly via apoptosis, within the retinal nerve fibre layer and the corresponding loss of axons of the optic nerve head. One of its most devastating features is its late diagnosis and the resulting irreversible visual loss that is often predictable. Current diagnostic tools require significant RGC or functional visual field loss before the threshold for detection of glaucoma may be reached. To propel the efficacy of therapeutics in glaucoma, an earlier diagnostic tool is required. Recent advances in retinal imaging, including optical coherence tomography, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and adaptive optics, have propelled both glaucoma research and clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. However, an ideal imaging technique to diagnose and monitor glaucoma would image RGCs non-invasively with high specificity and sensitivity in vivo. It may confirm the presence of healthy RGCs, such as in transgenic models or retrograde labelling, or detect subtle changes in the number of unhealthy or apoptotic RGCs, such as detection of apoptosing retinal cells (DARC). Although many of these advances have not yet been introduced to the clinical arena, their successes in animal studies are enthralling. This review will illustrate the challenges of imaging RGCs, the main retinal imaging modalities, the in vivo techniques to augment these as specific RGC-imaging tools and their potential for translation to the glaucoma clinic. PMID:26293138

  11. Polymodal Sensory Integration in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An animal's ability to perceive the external world is conditioned by its capacity to extract and encode specific features of the visual image. The output of the vertebrate retina is not a simple representation of the 2D visual map generated by photon absorptions in the photoreceptor layer. Rather, spatial, temporal, direction selectivity and color "dimensions" of the original image are distributed in the form of parallel output channels mediated by distinct retinal ganglion cell (RGC) populations. We propose that visual information transmitted to the brain includes additional, light-independent, inputs that reflect the functional states of the retina, anterior eye and the body. These may include the local ion microenvironment, glial metabolism and systemic parameters such as intraocular pressure, temperature and immune activation which act on ion channels that are intrinsic to RGCs. We particularly focus on light-independent mechanical inputs that are associated with physical impact, cell swelling and intraocular pressure as excessive mechanical stimuli lead to the counterintuitive experience of "pressure phosphenes" and/or debilitating blinding disease such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. We point at recently discovered retinal mechanosensitive ion channels as examples through which molecular physiology brings together Greek phenomenology, modern neuroscience and medicine. Thus, RGC output represents a unified picture of the embodied context within which vision takes place.

  12. Evaluating retinal ganglion cell loss and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mead, Ben; Tomarev, Stanislav

    2016-10-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGC) bear the sole responsibility of propagating visual stimuli to the brain. Their axons, which make up the optic nerve, project from the retina to the brain through the lamina cribrosa and in rodents, decussate almost entirely at the optic chiasm before synapsing at the superior colliculus. For many traumatic and degenerative ocular conditions, the dysfunction and/or loss of RGC is the primary determinant of visual loss and are the measurable endpoints in current research into experimental therapies. To actually measure these endpoints in rodent models, techniques must ascertain both the quantity of surviving RGC and their functional capacity. Quantification techniques include phenotypic markers of RGC, retrogradely transported fluorophores and morphological measurements of retinal thickness whereas functional assessments include electroretinography (flash and pattern) and visual evoked potential. The importance of the accuracy and reliability of these techniques cannot be understated, nor can the relationship between RGC death and dysfunction. The existence of up to 30 types of RGC complicates the measuring process, particularly as these may respond differently to disease and treatment. Since the above techniques may selectively identify and ignore particular subpopulations, their appropriateness as measures of RGC survival and function may be further limited. This review discusses the above techniques in the context of their subtype specificity.

  13. Genetic Networks in Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Struebing, Felix L.; Lee, Richard K.; Williams, Robert W.; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the output neuron of the eye, transmitting visual information from the retina through the optic nerve to the brain. The importance of RGCs for vision is demonstrated in blinding diseases where RGCs are lost, such as in glaucoma or after optic nerve injury. In the present study, we hypothesize that normal RGC function is transcriptionally regulated. To test our hypothesis, we examine large retinal expression microarray datasets from recombinant inbred mouse strains in GeneNetwork and define transcriptional networks of RGCs and their subtypes. Two major and functionally distinct transcriptional networks centering around Thy1 and Tubb3 (Class III beta-tubulin) were identified. Each network is independently regulated and modulated by unique genomic loci. Meta-analysis of publically available data confirms that RGC subtypes are differentially susceptible to death, with alpha-RGCs and intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) being less sensitive to cell death than other RGC subtypes in a mouse model of glaucoma. PMID:27733864

  14. Distribution of substance P-like immunoreactive retinal ganglion cells and their pattern of termination in the optic tectum of chick (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, D; Keyser, K T; Karten, H J

    1987-12-01

    Substance P-like immunoreactive (SP-LI) neurons were identified within the inner nuclear layer and ganglion cell layer of the chick retina. The SP-LI cells in the inner nuclear layer consisted of several subtypes of neurons, differing in soma size and dendritic arborization. In the ganglion cell layer a population of moderately labelled SP-LI neurons was also present. About 6-9 microns in diameter and spaced 50-80 microns apart, they formed a regular array across the entire retina, with a density of about 400 cells/mm2 in the superior temporal retina, declining to less than 100 cells/mm2 in the peripheral retina. The total number of SP-LI cells in the ganglion cell layer was approximately 75,000. Individual axons could be followed toward the optic nerve head. Lesions near the optic nerve head resulted in axotomy of ganglion cells within a limited portion of the retina. Two days of postaxotomy there were numerous SP-LI swellings in the proximal segments of axotomized axons. SP-LI neurons in the axotomized zone were larger, more numerous, and showed increased staining of their processes. Fourteen days following a retinal lesion, there was depletion of all SP-LI cells in the ganglion cell layer within the axotomized zone, but the SP-LI neurons in the inner nuclear layer were not noticeably affected. Following a localized injection of rhodamine-coupled latex beads into the optic tectum, a population of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the contralateral retina was retrogradely labelled. Many of these cells also exhibited SP-like immunoreactivity. Examination of the optic tectum indicated the presence of SP-LI fibres in laminae 2-13 (nomenclature of Cajal: Histologie du Systeme Nerveux. Vol. 2. Paris: Maloine, '11), with immunoreactive terminal regions present mainly in laminae 2-4, 7, and 9-13. SP-LI cell bodies were found predominantly in laminae 10-12 and 13. Fourteen days following a retinal lesion, SP-LI processes and terminals were depleted from laminae 2 and 3

  15. Frequency Responses of Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cloherty, Shaun L.; Hung, Yu-Shan; Kameneva, Tatiana; Ibbotson, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    There are 15–20 different types of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in the mammalian retina, each encoding different aspects of the visual scene. The mechanism by which post-synaptic signals from the retinal network generate spikes is determined by each cell’s intrinsic electrical properties. Here we investigate the frequency responses of morphologically identified rat RGCs using intracellular injection of sinusoidal current waveforms, to assess their intrinsic capabilities with minimal contributions from the retinal network. Recorded cells were classified according to their morphological characteristics (A, B, C or D-type) and their stratification (inner (i), outer (o) or bistratified) in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Most cell types had low- or band-pass frequency responses. A2, C1 and C4o cells were band-pass with peaks of 15–30 Hz and low-pass cutoffs above 56 Hz (A2 cells) and ~42 Hz (C1 and C4o cells). A1 and C2i/o cells were low-pass with peaks of 10–15 Hz (cutoffs 19–25 Hz). Bistratified D1 and D2 cells were also low-pass with peaks of 5–10 Hz (cutoffs ~16 Hz). The least responsive cells were the B2 and C3 types (peaks: 2–5 Hz, cutoffs: 8–11 Hz). We found no difference between cells stratifying in the inner and outer IPL (i.e., ON and OFF cells) or between cells with large and small somas or dendritic fields. Intrinsic physiological properties (input resistance, spike width and sag) had little impact on frequency response at low frequencies, but account for 30–40% of response variability at frequencies >30 Hz. PMID:27341669

  16. Expression of Aquaporin-6 in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sun Young; Lee, Eung Suk; Ohn, Young-Hoon; Park, Tae Kwann

    2016-08-01

    Several aquaporins (AQPs) have been identified to be present in the eyes, and it has been suggested that they are involved in the movement of water and small solutes. AQP6, which has low water permeability and transports mainly anions, was recently discovered in the eyes. In the present study, we investigate the localization of AQP6 in the rat retina and show that AQP6 is selectively localized to the ganglion cell layer and the outer plexiform layer. Along with the gradual decrease in retinal ganglion cells after a crushing injury of optic nerve, immunofluorescence signals of AQP6 gradually decreased. Confocal microscope images confirmed AQP6 expression in retinal ganglion cells and Müller cells in vitro. Therefore, AQP6 might participate in water and anion transport in these cells. PMID:26526333

  17. Idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis underlying intractable vomiting in a young adult.

    PubMed

    De Giorgio, R; Barbara, G; Stanghellini, V; Cogliandro, R F; Arrigoni, A; Santini, D; Ceccarelli, C; Salvioli, B; Rossini, F P; Corinaldesi, R

    2000-06-01

    Inflammatory infiltration of intestinal myenteric plexuses (i.e. myenteric ganglionitis), along with severe intestinal motor abnormalities, may accompany paraneoplastic syndromes, neurological disorders and gastrointestinal infections, although rare cases can be idiopathic. In this report, we describe the case of a patient who presented with chronic intractable vomiting and weight loss associated with idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis mainly involving the stomach. Tissue analysis showed that the inflammatory infiltrate comprised T lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+), and peptide immunolabelling revealed a marked decrease of substance P/tachykinin immunoreactive staining in nerve fibres and myenteric neurones. Following systemic steroid therapy, the patient's symptoms dramatically improved, and after one year of follow-up his general condition remains satisfactory. The possible mechanisms leading to symptom generation and gastric dysmotility in the context of an idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis are discussed.

  18. Retinal ganglion cell topography and spatial resolving power in penguins.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, João Paulo; Nolan, Paul M; Collin, Shaun P; Hart, Nathan S

    2012-01-01

    Penguins are a group of flightless seabirds that exhibit numerous morphological, behavioral and ecological adaptations to their amphibious lifestyle, but little is known about the topographic organization of neurons in their retinas. In this study, we used retinal wholemounts and stereological methods to estimate the total number and topographic distribution of retinal ganglion cells in addition to an anatomical estimate of spatial resolving power in two species of penguins: the little penguin, Eudyptula minor, and the king penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus. The total number of ganglion cells per retina was approximately 1,200,000 in the little penguin and 1,110,000 in the king penguin. The topographic distribution of retinal ganglion cells in both species revealed the presence of a prominent horizontal visual streak with steeper gradients in the little penguin. The little penguin retinas showed ganglion cell density peaks of 21,867 cells/mm², affording spatial resolution in water of 17.07-17.46 cycles/degree (12.81-13.09 cycles/degree in air). In contrast, the king penguin showed a relatively lower peak density of ganglion cells of 14,222 cells/mm², but--due to its larger eye--slightly higher spatial resolution in water of 20.40 cycles/degree (15.30 cycles/degree in air). In addition, we mapped the distribution of giant ganglion cells in both penguin species using Nissl-stained wholemounts. In both species, topographic mapping of this cell type revealed the presence of an area gigantocellularis with a concentric organization of isodensity contours showing a peak in the far temporal retina of approximately 70 cells/mm² in the little penguin and 39 cells/mm² in the king penguin. Giant ganglion cell densities gradually fall towards the outermost isodensity contours revealing the presence of a vertically organized streak. In the little penguin, we confirmed our cytological characterization of giant ganglion cells using immunohistochemistry for microtubule

  19. Eosinophilic myenteric ganglionitis is associated with functional intestinal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Schäppi, M G; Smith, V V; Milla, P J; Lindley, K J

    2003-05-01

    The diagnostic features and clinical course of three children (aged 1 month to 15 years) with severe functional intestinal obstruction and inflammation of the colonic lamina propria and myenteric plexus are described. The myenteric inflammatory infiltrate was eosinophil predominant with none of the immunological characteristics of lymphocytic ganglionitis. Neurones in the myenteric ganglia expressed the potent eosinophil chemoattractant interleukin 5. None responded to dietary exclusion but all three responded symptomatically to immunosuppression/anti-inflammatory treatments. Eosinophilic ganglionitis is associated with a pseudo-obstructive syndrome which is amenable to anti-inflammatory treatment.

  20. Ganglion Cyst Associated with Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear That Caused Ulnar Nerve Compression

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Can; Tasdelen, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Ganglions are the most frequently seen soft-tissue tumors in the hand. Nerve compression due to ganglion cysts at the wrist is rare. We report 2 ganglion cysts arising from triangular fibrocartilage complex, one of which caused ulnar nerve compression proximal to the Guyon's canal, leading to ulnar neuropathy. Ganglion cysts seem unimportant, and many surgeons refrain from performing a general hand examination. PMID:25878929

  1. Gustatory neuron types in rat geniculate ganglion.

    PubMed

    Lundy, R F; Contreras, R J

    1999-12-01

    We used extracellular single-cell recording procedures to characterize the chemical and thermal sensitivity of the rat geniculate ganglion to lingual stimulation, and to examine the effects of specific ion transport antagonists on salt transduction mechanisms. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the responses from 73 single neurons to 3 salts (0.075 and 0.3 M NaCl, KCl, and NH(4) Cl), 0.5 M sucrose, 0.01 M HCl, and 0.02 M quinine HCl (QHCl) indicated 3 main groups that responded best to either sucrose, HCl, or NaCl. Eight narrowly tuned neurons were deemed sucrose-specialists and 33 broadly tuned neurons as HCl-generalists. The NaCl group contained three identifiable subclusters: 18 NaCl-specialists, 11 NaCl-generalists, and 3 QHCl-generalists. Sucrose- and NaCl-specialists responded specifically to sucrose and NaCl, respectively. All generalist neurons responded to salt, acid, and alkaloid stimuli to varying degree and order depending on neuron type. Response order was NaCl > HCl = QHCl > sucrose in NaCl-generalists, HCl > NaCl > QHCl > sucrose in HCl-generalists, and QHCl = NaCl = HCl > sucrose in QHCl-generalists. NaCl-specialists responded robustly to low and high NaCl concentrations, but weakly, if at all, to high KCl and NH(4) Cl concentrations after prolonged stimulation. HCl-generalist neurons responded to all three salts, but at twice the rate to NH(4) Cl than to NaCl and KCl. NaCl- and QHCl-generalists responded equally to the three salts. Amiloride and 5-(N,N-dimethyl)-amiloride (DMA), antagonists of Na(+) channels and Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, respectively, inhibited the responses to 0.075 M NaCl only in NaCl-specialist neurons. The K(+) channel antagonist, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), was without a suppressive effect on salt responses, but, when applied alone in solution, it evoked a response in many HCl-generalists and one QHCl-generalist neuron so tested. Of the 39 neurons tested for their sensitivity to temperature, 23 responded to cooling and chemical

  2. Dorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Gary E.; So, Kwok-Fai; Pu, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely what this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/escape responses, which dis-facilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26363667

  3. Arthroscopic Treatment of Intraosseous Ganglion Cyst of the Lunate Bone

    PubMed Central

    Cerlier, Alexandre; Gay, André-Mathieu; Levadoux, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts are rare causes of wrist pain. Surgical treatment of this pathologic condition yields good results and a low recurrence rate. The main complications are joint stiffness and vascular disturbances of the lunate bone. Wrist arthroscopy is a surgical technique that reduces the intra-articular operative area and therefore minimizes postoperative stiffness. This article describes an arthroscopic technique used for lunate intraosseous cyst resection associated with an autologous bone graft in a series of cases to prevent joint stiffness while respecting the scapholunate ligament. This study was based on a series of 4 patients, all of whom had wrist pain because of intraosseous ganglion cysts. Arthrosynovial cyst resection, ganglion curettage, and bone grafting were performed arthroscopically. Pain had totally disappeared within 2 months after the operation in 100% of patients. The average hand grip strength was estimated at 100% compared with the opposite side, and articular ranges of motion were the same on both sides in 100% of cases. No complications were reported after surgery. On the basis of these results, arthroscopic treatment of intraosseous synovial ganglion cysts seems to be more efficient and helpful in overcoming the limitations of classic open surgery in terms of complications. PMID:26697314

  4. Molecular Responses of the Spiral Ganglion to Aminoglycosides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balaban, Carey D.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are toxic to both the inner ear hair cells and the ganglion cells that give rise to the eighth cranial nerve. According to recent studies, these cells have a repertoire of molecular responses to aminoglycoside exposure that engages multiple neuroprotective mechanisms. The responses appear to involve regulation of ionic homeostasis,…

  5. The outcome of ganglion clipping in hyperhidrosis and blushing.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shah-Hwa; Kao, Eing-Long; Lin, Chien-Chih; Huang, Meei-Feng

    2006-06-01

    A total of 114 patients with various sympathetic disorders underwent endoscopic sympathetic block over different thoracic ganglions by the clipping method. The advantages of this method include the recognition of the clipped level, changeability, and reversibility. However, 4.4% of patients were unilaterally clipped at the wrong level. PMID:16763754

  6. Type II cochlear ganglion cells in the chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Ruggero, M A; Santi, P A; Rich, N C

    1982-12-01

    In order to ascertain whether Type II cochlear ganglion cells project to the brain, we have studied the retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) from the cochlear nucleus to the spiral ganglion of the chinchilla. In this animal there exist two types of ganglion neurons, which closely correspond to those previously described in guinea pigs, cats and rats. As in the guinea pig, the majority population (Type I) consists of relatively large, myelinated neurons. The minority population (Type II, 10% of the total population) consists of small, mostly unmyelinated cells, with filamentous cytoplasm and finely grained nuclear chromatin. Type II neurons tend to be clustered toward the peripheral side of Rosenthal's canal, often in close proximity to the intraganglionic spiral bundle. By 24 h after injections of HRP into the cochlear nucleus, incubation of the cochlear ganglion in diaminobenzidine/H2O2 reveals abundant HRP label in both Type I and Type II neurons. Type II neurons, however, tend to be labelled less intensely than Type I neurons. Control experiments, consisting of spillage of HRP solution over the cochlear nucleus, were carried out to determine how much HRP might be picked up by neurons after HRP diffusion. Comparison of cochleae from injected animals and from the control animals suggests that most of the label that was found in ganglion neurons after cochlear nucleus injections represents axonally transported HRP. We conclude, at least tentatively, that Type II neurons project to the brain. The fact that less label is found in Type II neurons that in Type I neurons suggests that the former have thinner axons and/or finer terminals in the cochlear nucleus. PMID:6185462

  7. Retinal Ganglion Cell Adaptation to Small Luminance Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Graña, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    To accommodate the wide input range over which the visual system operates within the narrow output range of spiking neurons, the retina adjusts its sensitivity to the mean light level so that retinal ganglion cells can faithfully signal contrast, or relative deviations from the mean luminance. Given the large operating range of the visual system, the majority of work on luminance adaptation has involved logarithmic changes in light level. We report that luminance gain controls are recruited for remarkably small fluctuations in luminance as well. Using spike recordings from the rat optic tract, we show that ganglion cell responses to a brief flash of light are modulated in amplitude by local background fluctuations as little as 15% contrast. The time scale of the gain control is rapid (<125 ms), at least for on cells. The retinal locus of adaptation precedes the ganglion cell spike generator because response gain changes of on cells were uncorrelated with firing rate. The mechanism seems to reside within the inner retinal network and not in the photoreceptors, because the adaptation profiles of on and off cells differed markedly. The response gain changes follow Weber's law, suggesting that network mechanisms of luminance adaptation described in previous work modulates retinal ganglion cell sensitivity, not just when we move between different lighting environments, but also as our eyes scan a visual scene. Finally, we show that response amplitude is uniformly reduced for flashes on a modulated background that has spatial contrast, indicating that another gain control that integrates luminance signals nonlinearly over space operates within the receptive field center of rat ganglion cells. PMID:20538771

  8. Retinal ganglion cell adaptation to small luminance fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Daniel K; Graña, Gilberto; Passaglia, Christopher L

    2010-08-01

    To accommodate the wide input range over which the visual system operates within the narrow output range of spiking neurons, the retina adjusts its sensitivity to the mean light level so that retinal ganglion cells can faithfully signal contrast, or relative deviations from the mean luminance. Given the large operating range of the visual system, the majority of work on luminance adaptation has involved logarithmic changes in light level. We report that luminance gain controls are recruited for remarkably small fluctuations in luminance as well. Using spike recordings from the rat optic tract, we show that ganglion cell responses to a brief flash of light are modulated in amplitude by local background fluctuations as little as 15% contrast. The time scale of the gain control is rapid (<125 ms), at least for on cells. The retinal locus of adaptation precedes the ganglion cell spike generator because response gain changes of on cells were uncorrelated with firing rate. The mechanism seems to reside within the inner retinal network and not in the photoreceptors, because the adaptation profiles of on and off cells differed markedly. The response gain changes follow Weber's law, suggesting that network mechanisms of luminance adaptation described in previous work modulates retinal ganglion cell sensitivity, not just when we move between different lighting environments, but also as our eyes scan a visual scene. Finally, we show that response amplitude is uniformly reduced for flashes on a modulated background that has spatial contrast, indicating that another gain control that integrates luminance signals nonlinearly over space operates within the receptive field center of rat ganglion cells.

  9. Flexor Tendon Sheath Ganglions: Results of Surgical Excision

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Edwin E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to review the clinical features and determine the results following surgical excision of a flexor tendon sheath ganglion. A retrospective analysis of 24 consecutive patients (25 ganglions) who underwent excision of a painful flexor tendon sheath ganglion by the same surgeon was performed. The patient’s medical and operative records were reviewed. Each patient was invited to return for an evaluation, which consisted of a clinical interview, completion of a questionnaire, and physical examination. Those patients that were unable to return underwent a detailed telephone interview. Sixteen patients returned for a clinical evaluation, while eight patients underwent a telephone interview. There were 15 women and nine men, with an average age of 43 years (range, 21–68 years). The dominant hand was involved in 15 patients. The long finger was most commonly involved (11 cases). The ganglion arose from the A1 pulley in 13 cases, between the A1 and A2 pulleys in three cases, and from the A2 pulley in nine cases. At an average follow-up of 18.5 months (range, 5–38 months), all of the patients were satisfied with their final result. No patient developed a recurrence and all returned to their previous functional level. There were two minor complications that resolved uneventfully; one patient experienced mild incisional tenderness, while an additional patient experienced transient digital nerve paresthesias. We conclude that surgical excision is a simple, safe, and effective method for treating a painful ganglion of the digital flexor tendon sheath. PMID:18780066

  10. Incomplete segregation of endorgan-specific vestibular ganglion cells in mice and rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maklad, A.; Fritzsch, B.

    1999-01-01

    The endorgan-specific distribution of vestibular ganglion cells was studied in neonatal and postnatal rats and mice using indocarbocyanine dye (DiI) and dextran amines for retrograde and anterograde labeling. Retrograde DiI tracing from the anterior vertical canal labeled neurons scattered throughout the whole superior vestibular ganglion, with denser labeling at the dorsal and central regions. Horizontal canal neurons were scattered along the dorsoventral axis with more clustering toward the dorsal and ventral poles of this axis. Utricular ganglion cells occupied predominantly the central region of the superior vestibular ganglion. This utricular population overlapped with both the anterior vertical and horizontal canals' ganglion cells. Posterior vertical canal neurons were clustered in the posterior part of the inferior vestibular ganglion. The saccular neurons were distributed in the two parts of the vestibular ganglion, the superior and inferior ganglia. Within the inferior ganglion, the saccular neurons were clustered in the anterior part. In the superior ganglion, the saccular neurons were widely scattered throughout the whole ganglion with more numerous neurons at the posterior half. Small and large neurons were labeled from all endorgans. Examination of the fiber trajectory within the superior division of the vestibular nerve showed no clear lamination of the fibers innervating the different endorgans. These results demonstrate an overlapping pattern between the different populations within the superior ganglion, while in the inferior ganglion, the posterior canal and saccular neurons show tighter clustering but incomplete segregation. This distribution implies that the ganglion cells are assigned for their target during development in a stochastic rather than topographical fashion.

  11. An Unusual Cause of Foot Drop: Peroneal Extraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Zumrut, Murat; Demirayak, Mehmet; Kucukapan, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies caused by ganglion cysts are quite rare, especially in the lower extremities. The case of a 64-year-old male with a 2-day history of foot drop and tenderness in the region of the left fibular neck is presented. Physical examination and electromyogram findings verified peroneal nerve palsy. Ultrasonography showed cystic mass localized proximal of the peroneal muscle structures. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic-appearing mass around the fibular neck that compressed the common peroneal nerve. Surgical excision and ligation of the cyst pedicle were performed. The pathology reports confirmed the diagnosis of a ganglion cyst. The patient regained full function within two months of the surgery. Early sensory symptoms before foot drop should be considered as an indication of surgical excision to prevent delayed damage. Ligation or electrocoagulation of the cyst pedicle should be a part of surgical procedure to avoid recurrences.

  12. An Unusual Cause of Foot Drop: Peroneal Extraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Zumrut, Murat; Demirayak, Mehmet; Kucukapan, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies caused by ganglion cysts are quite rare, especially in the lower extremities. The case of a 64-year-old male with a 2-day history of foot drop and tenderness in the region of the left fibular neck is presented. Physical examination and electromyogram findings verified peroneal nerve palsy. Ultrasonography showed cystic mass localized proximal of the peroneal muscle structures. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic-appearing mass around the fibular neck that compressed the common peroneal nerve. Surgical excision and ligation of the cyst pedicle were performed. The pathology reports confirmed the diagnosis of a ganglion cyst. The patient regained full function within two months of the surgery. Early sensory symptoms before foot drop should be considered as an indication of surgical excision to prevent delayed damage. Ligation or electrocoagulation of the cyst pedicle should be a part of surgical procedure to avoid recurrences. PMID:27648065

  13. The functional diversity of retinal ganglion cells in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Baden, Tom; Berens, Philipp; Franke, Katrin; Román Rosón, Miroslav; Bethge, Matthias; Euler, Thomas

    2016-01-21

    In the vertebrate visual system, all output of the retina is carried by retinal ganglion cells. Each type encodes distinct visual features in parallel for transmission to the brain. How many such 'output channels' exist and what each encodes are areas of intense debate. In the mouse, anatomical estimates range from 15 to 20 channels, and only a handful are functionally understood. By combining two-photon calcium imaging to obtain dense retinal recordings and unsupervised clustering of the resulting sample of more than 11,000 cells, here we show that the mouse retina harbours substantially more than 30 functional output channels. These include all known and several new ganglion cell types, as verified by genetic and anatomical criteria. Therefore, information channels from the mouse eye to the mouse brain are considerably more diverse than shown thus far by anatomical studies, suggesting an encoding strategy resembling that used in state-of-the-art artificial vision systems. PMID:26735013

  14. The functional diversity of retinal ganglion cells in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Baden, Tom; Berens, Philipp; Franke, Katrin; Román Rosón, Miroslav; Bethge, Matthias; Euler, Thomas

    2016-01-21

    In the vertebrate visual system, all output of the retina is carried by retinal ganglion cells. Each type encodes distinct visual features in parallel for transmission to the brain. How many such 'output channels' exist and what each encodes are areas of intense debate. In the mouse, anatomical estimates range from 15 to 20 channels, and only a handful are functionally understood. By combining two-photon calcium imaging to obtain dense retinal recordings and unsupervised clustering of the resulting sample of more than 11,000 cells, here we show that the mouse retina harbours substantially more than 30 functional output channels. These include all known and several new ganglion cell types, as verified by genetic and anatomical criteria. Therefore, information channels from the mouse eye to the mouse brain are considerably more diverse than shown thus far by anatomical studies, suggesting an encoding strategy resembling that used in state-of-the-art artificial vision systems.

  15. An Unusual Cause of Foot Drop: Peroneal Extraneural Ganglion Cyst.

    PubMed

    Zumrut, Murat; Demirayak, Mehmet; Kucukapan, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies caused by ganglion cysts are quite rare, especially in the lower extremities. The case of a 64-year-old male with a 2-day history of foot drop and tenderness in the region of the left fibular neck is presented. Physical examination and electromyogram findings verified peroneal nerve palsy. Ultrasonography showed cystic mass localized proximal of the peroneal muscle structures. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic-appearing mass around the fibular neck that compressed the common peroneal nerve. Surgical excision and ligation of the cyst pedicle were performed. The pathology reports confirmed the diagnosis of a ganglion cyst. The patient regained full function within two months of the surgery. Early sensory symptoms before foot drop should be considered as an indication of surgical excision to prevent delayed damage. Ligation or electrocoagulation of the cyst pedicle should be a part of surgical procedure to avoid recurrences. PMID:27648065

  16. Colocalization of HCN Channel Subunits in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Ogata, Genki; Partida, Gloria J.; Oi, Hanako; Greenberg, Kenneth P.; Krempely, Kalen S.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The current-passing pore of mammalian hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ("HCN") channels is formed by subunit isoforms denoted HCN1-4. In various brain areas, antibodies directed against multiple isoforms bind to single neurons and the current ("Ih") passed during hyperpolarizations differs from that of heterologously expressed homomeric channels. By contrast, retinal rod, cone, and bipolar cells appear to use homomeric HCN channels. Here, we assess the generality of this pattern by examining HCN1 and HCN4 immunoreactivity in rat retinal ganglion cells, measuring Ih in dissociated cells, and testing whether HCN1 and HCN4 protein coimmunoprecipitate. Nearly half of the ganglion cells in whole-mounted retinae bound antibodies against both isoforms. Consistent with colocalization and physical association, 8-bromo-cAMP shifted the voltage-sensitivity of Ih less than that of HCN4 channels and more than that of HCN1 channels, and HCN1 coimmunoprecipitated with HCN4 from membrane fraction proteins. Lastly, the immunopositive somata ranged in diameter from the smallest to the largest in rat retina, the dendrites of immunopositive cells arborized at various levels of the inner plexiform layer and over fields of different diameters, and Ih activated with similar kinetics and proportions of fast and slow components in small, medium, and large somata. These results show that different HCN subunits colocalize in single retinal ganglion cells, identify a subunit that can reconcile native Ih properties with the previously reported presence of HCN4 in these cells, and indicate that Ih is biophysically similar in morphologically diverse retinal ganglion cells and differs from Ih in rods, cones, and bipolar cells. PMID:21456027

  17. Wide-field ganglion cells in macaque retinas

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, ELIZABETH S.; BORDT, ANDREA S.; MARSHAK, DAVID W.

    2012-01-01

    To describe the wide-field ganglion cells, they were injected intracellularly with Neurobiotin using an in vitro preparation of macaque retina and labeled with streptavidin-Cy3. The retinas were then labeled with antibodies to choline acetyltransferase and other markers to indicate the depth of the dendrites within the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and analyzed by confocal microscopy. There were eight different subtypes of narrowly unistratified cells that ramified in each of the 5 strata, S1–5, including narrow thorny, large sparse, large moderate, large dense, large radiate, narrow wavy, large very sparse, and fine very sparse. There were four types of broadly stratified cells with dendritic trees extending from S4 to S2. One type resembled the parvocellular giant cell and another the broad thorny type described previously in primates. Another broadly stratified cell was called multi-tufted based on its distinctive dendritic branching pattern. The fourth type had been described previously, but not named; we called it broad wavy. There was a bistratified type with its major arbor in S5, the same level as the blue cone bipolar cell; it resembled the large, bistratified cell with blue ON-yellow OFF responses described recently. Two wide-field ganglion cell types were classified as diffuse because they had dendrites throughout the IPL. One had many small branches and was named thorny diffuse. The second was named smooth diffuse because it had straighter dendrites that lacked these processes. Dendrites of the large moderate and multi-tufted cells cofasciculated with ON-starburst cell dendrites and were, therefore, candidates to be ON- and ON–OFF direction-selective ganglion cells, respectively. We concluded that there are at least 15 morphoplogical types of wide-field ganglion cells in macaque retinas. PMID:16212697

  18. Ganglion cyst in children: Reviewing treatment and recurrence rates

    PubMed Central

    Simon Cypel, Tatiana Karine; Mrad, Amir; Somers, Gino; Zuker, Ronald Melvin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric hand and wrist ganglia seem to have different epidemiological characteristics than those of adults – a majority are found on the volar aspect of the hands and wrists of patients younger than 10 years of age. OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology, etiological factors, clinical presentation, treatment and outcome of patients with ganglion cysts at The Hospital for Sick Children (Toronto, Ontario). METHODS: The records of the pathology department at The Hospital for Sick Children were searched for all cases of ganglion cyst operated on between January 2000 and December 2008. RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients underwent treatment for symptomatic ganglion cyst. The mean age of the patients was 9.6 years, and there were 23 females. A mobile nodule was the initial presentation of the ganglion in 64% of the cases. Pain was the most common indication for surgical removal. Only 11.4% of patients experienced previous trauma. In 70% of the cases, the diagnosis was made clinically. The most common sites of occurrence were volar wrist (25.7%), dorsal wrist (22.8%) and the volar aspect of the base of the ring finger (17.1%). Surgical excision was the treatment of choice for 94.2% of the patients with symptomatic lesions. The minimum follow-up period was 12 months. Only one patient (2.8%) presented with recurrence in the series. CONCLUSION: Although it is possible that these findings might change with longer follow-up, the present data provide information to help guide the treatment of these cysts. Complete surgical removal is a very effective treatment, with low rates of recurrence. PMID:22654533

  19. Immunologically induced neuromodulation of guinea pig nodose ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Undem, B J; Hubbard, W; Weinreich, D

    1993-07-01

    The influence of specific antigen challenge on the excitability of C-cells in nodose ganglia isolated from actively sensitized guinea pigs was evaluated using intracellular recording techniques. Antigen (ovalbumin) caused a significant depolarization (approximately 8 mV) of the resting membrane potential. Antigen exposure had differing effects on the membrane input impedance; decreasing it in 15 neurons, increasing it in 6 neurons, and having no effect in 8 neurons. About 20% of guinea pig nodose C-cells reveal a long-lasting after-spike hyperpolarization (AHPslow). Antigen challenge reversibly blocked the AHPslow in 4 of 18 neurons studied in 18 ganglia. About 30% of the nodose ganglion neurons display a time- and voltage-dependent inward rectification at membrane potentials more negative than -75 mV. Exposing the ganglion to the sensitizing antigen consistently blocked this response in 8 of 8 neurons. Histological assessment of toluidine blue stained cells revealed that the nodose ganglion contained approximately 100 mast cells. Exposing the ganglion to ovalbumin stimulated mast cell degranulation, as measured by a decrease in number of stained cells, and evoked the release of histamine, PGD2, and immunoreactive peptidoleukotrienes from the tissue. The results support the hypothesis that endogenous inflammatory mediators released during the immediate hypersensitivity (allergic) reactions can modulate the excitability of primary C-fiber afferents. Mechanisms underlying antigen-induced neuromodulation of these neurons include depolarization of the resting membrane potential, changes in membrane resistance, blockade of a time- and voltage-dependent anomalous rectifier, and, in some cells, blockade of the AHPslow.

  20. White Matter Consequences of Retinal Receptor and Ganglion Cell Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Shumpei; Takemura, Hiromasa; Horiguchi, Hiroshi; Terao, Masahiko; Haji, Tomoki; Pestilli, Franco; Yeatman, Jason D.; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Wandell, Brian A.; Masuda, Yoichiro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) have central vision loss; but CRD damages the retinal photoreceptor layer, and LHON damages the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer. Using diffusion MRI, we measured how these two types of retinal damage affect the optic tract (ganglion cell axons) and optic radiation (geniculo-striate axons). Methods. Adult onset CRD (n = 5), LHON (n = 6), and healthy controls (n = 14) participated in the study. We used probabilistic fiber tractography to identify the optic tract and the optic radiation. We compared axial and radial diffusivity at many positions along the optic tract and the optic radiation. Results. In both types of patients, diffusion measures within the optic tract and the optic radiation differ from controls. The optic tract change is principally a decrease in axial diffusivity; the optic radiation change is principally an increase in radial diffusivity. Conclusions. Both photoreceptor layer (CRD) and retinal ganglion cell (LHON) retinal disease causes substantial change in the visual white matter. These changes can be measured using diffusion MRI. The diffusion changes measured in the optic tract and the optic radiation differ, suggesting that they are caused by different biological mechanisms. PMID:25257055

  1. Paracoccygeal corkscrew approach to ganglion impar injections for tailbone pain.

    PubMed

    Foye, Patrick M; Patel, Shounuck I

    2009-01-01

    A new technique for performing nerve blocks of the ganglion impar (ganglion Walther) is presented. These injections have been reported to relieve coccydynia (tailbone pain), as well as other malignant and nonmalignant pelvic pain syndromes. A variety of techniques have been previously described for blocking this sympathetic nerve ganglion, which is located in the retrorectal space just anterior to the upper coccygeal segments. Prior techniques have included approaches through the anococcygeal ligament, through the sacrococcygeal joint, and through intracoccygeal joint spaces. This article presents a new, paracoccygeal approach whereby the needle is inserted alongside the coccyx and the needle is guided through three discrete steps with a rotating or corkscrew trajectory. Compared with some of the previously published techniques, this paracoccygeal corkscrew approach has multiple potential benefits, including ease of fluoroscopic guidance using the lateral view, ability to easily use a stylet for the spinal needle, and use of a shorter, thinner needle. While no single technique works best for all patients and each technique has potential advantages and disadvantages, this new technique adds to the available options.

  2. Characterization of a transformed rat retinal ganglion cell line.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, R R; Agarwal, P; Prasanna, G; Vopat, K; Lambert, W; Sheedlo, H J; Pang, I H; Shade, D; Wordinger, R J; Yorio, T; Clark, A F; Agarwal, N

    2001-01-31

    The purpose of the present study was to establish a rat retinal ganglion cell line by transformation of rat retinal cells. For this investigation, retinal cells were isolated from postnatal day 1 (PN1) rats and transformed with the psi2 E1A virus. In order to isolate retinal ganglion cells (RGC), single cell clones were chosen at random from the transformed cells. Expression of Thy-1 (a marker for RGC), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a positive marker for Muller cells), HPC-1/syntaxin (a marker for amacrine cells), 8A1 (a marker for horizontal and ganglion cells) and neurotrophins was studied using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. One of the retinal cell clones, designated RGC-5, was positive for Thy-1, Brn-3C, Neuritin, NMDA receptor, GABA-B receptor, and synaptophysin expression and negative for GFAP, HPC-1, and 8A1, suggesting that it represented a putative RGC clone. The results of RT-PCR analysis were confirmed by immunocytochemistry for Thy-1 and GFAP. Upon further characterization by immunoblotting, the RGC-5 clone was positive for Thy-1, negative for GFAP, 8A1 and syntaxin. RGC 5 cells were also positive for the expression of neurotrophins and their cognate receptors. To establish the physiological relevance of RGC-5, the effects of serum/trophic factor deprivation and glutamate toxicity were analyzed to determine if these cells would undergo apoptosis. The protective effects of neurotrophins on RGC-5 after serum deprivation was also investigated. Apoptosis was studied by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated fluoresceinated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Serum deprivation resulted in apoptosis and supplementation with both BDNF and NT-4 in the growth media, protected the RGC-5 cells from undergoing apoptosis. On differentiation with succinyl concanavalin A (sConA), RGC-5 cells became sensitive to glutamate toxicity, which could be reversed by inclusion of ciplizone (MK801

  3. The morphology, topography and cytoarchitectonics of the ciliary ganglion in the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo domesticus).

    PubMed

    Radzimirska, Małgorzata

    2003-11-01

    The ciliary ganglion of the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo domesticus) is located between the posterior wall of the eyeball and the optic nerve. It is closely connected with the oculomotor nerve; in particular with its inferior branch. The ganglion has a cask-like shape and is adjacent to the inferior branch of the oculomotor nerve. From this ganglion postganglionic fibres emerge which are arranged in two fasciculi. These are termed the long ciliary nerves and the short ciliary nerves. A cross-section of the ciliary ganglion revealed two populations of cells: small ones - choroid cells and large ones - ciliary cells.

  4. Fine structure of the ganglion of Cephalodiscus gracilis (Pterobranchia, Hemichordata).

    PubMed

    Rehkämper, G; Welsch, U; Dilly, P N

    1987-05-01

    The ganglion of Cephalodiscus gracilis M'Intosh 1882 is entirely intraepithelial and located in the dorsal epidermis immediately behind the tentacular apparatus that is formed by the mesosome (collar). A characteristic feature of the ganglion is a well-developed neuropile in which different types of nerve fibres can be discerned, many of which contain small granules with electron-dense contents. There are no glia-like cells in association with these fibres. Only slender basal processes of epidermal epithelial cells traverse the neuropile. In the depth of the epithelium the neuropile borders the epidermal basal lamina; apically it is covered by a layer of cell bodies, the majority of which belong to what appear to be ordinary ciliated epidermal cells. Besides these epidermal cells the perikarya of two additional types of cells, which are considered to be neurons, can be discerned. One type is characterised by many rough endoplasmic reticulum cisterns and mitochondria, the other by abundant small, electron-dense granules. The nuclei of these cells are comparatively pale and contain a prominent nucleolus. The neuron cell bodies do not form a distinct layer; but they are loosely distributed somewhat deeper than those of the ordinary epidermal cells. They probably send off an apical process to the epidermal surface and a basally directed one into the neuropile. The ganglion has been compared to the nervous systems in cnidarians, some spiralians, and especially other hemichordates, echinoderms, and chordates; it is found to be of primitive rather than degenerate nature. Furthermore, the possible functional significance of its close connection to the food-capturing tentacular apparatus is discussed. PMID:3584559

  5. Fine structure of the ganglion of Cephalodiscus gracilis (Pterobranchia, Hemichordata).

    PubMed

    Rehkämper, G; Welsch, U; Dilly, P N

    1987-05-01

    The ganglion of Cephalodiscus gracilis M'Intosh 1882 is entirely intraepithelial and located in the dorsal epidermis immediately behind the tentacular apparatus that is formed by the mesosome (collar). A characteristic feature of the ganglion is a well-developed neuropile in which different types of nerve fibres can be discerned, many of which contain small granules with electron-dense contents. There are no glia-like cells in association with these fibres. Only slender basal processes of epidermal epithelial cells traverse the neuropile. In the depth of the epithelium the neuropile borders the epidermal basal lamina; apically it is covered by a layer of cell bodies, the majority of which belong to what appear to be ordinary ciliated epidermal cells. Besides these epidermal cells the perikarya of two additional types of cells, which are considered to be neurons, can be discerned. One type is characterised by many rough endoplasmic reticulum cisterns and mitochondria, the other by abundant small, electron-dense granules. The nuclei of these cells are comparatively pale and contain a prominent nucleolus. The neuron cell bodies do not form a distinct layer; but they are loosely distributed somewhat deeper than those of the ordinary epidermal cells. They probably send off an apical process to the epidermal surface and a basally directed one into the neuropile. The ganglion has been compared to the nervous systems in cnidarians, some spiralians, and especially other hemichordates, echinoderms, and chordates; it is found to be of primitive rather than degenerate nature. Furthermore, the possible functional significance of its close connection to the food-capturing tentacular apparatus is discussed.

  6. The Sphenopalatine Ganglion: Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Therapeutic Targeting in Headache.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S; Robertson, Carrie E; Kaplan, Eugene; Ailani, Jessica; Charleston, Larry; Kuruvilla, Deena; Blumenfeld, Andrew; Berliner, Randall; Rosen, Noah L; Duarte, Robert; Vidwan, Jaskiran; Halker, Rashmi B; Gill, Nicole; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2016-02-01

    The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) has attracted the interest of practitioners treating head and face pain for over a century because of its anatomical connections and role in the trigemino-autonomic reflex. In this review, we discuss the anatomy of the SPG, as well as what is known about its role in the pathophysiology of headache disorders, including cluster headache and migraine. We then address various therapies that target the SPG, including intranasal medication delivery, new SPG blocking catheter devices, neurostimulation, chemical neurolysis, and ablation procedures.

  7. Ganglionic adrenergic action modulates ovarian steroids and nitric oxide in prepubertal rat.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Silvia Marcela; Casais, Marilina; Sosa, Zulema; Rastrilla, Ana María

    2006-08-01

    Both peripheral innervation and nitric oxide (NO) participate in ovarian steroidogenesis. The purpose of this work was to analyse the ganglionic adrenergic influence on the ovarian release of steroids and NO and the possible steroids/NO relationship. The experiments were carried out in the ex vivo coeliac ganglion-superior ovarian nerve (SON)-ovary system of prepubertal rats. The coeliac ganglion-SON-ovary system was incubated in Krebs Ringer-bicarbonate buffer in presence of adrenergic agents in the ganglionic compartment. The accumulation of progesterone, androstenedione, oestradiol and NO in the ovarian incubation liquid was measured. Norepinephrine in coeliac ganglion inhibited the liberation of progesterone and increased androstenedione, oestradiol and NO in ovary. The addition of alpha and beta adrenergic antagonists also showed different responses in the liberation of the substances mentioned before, which, from a physiological point of view, reveals the presence of adrenergic receptors in coeliac ganglion. In relation to propranolol, it does not revert the effect of noradrenaline on the liberation of progesterone, which leads us to think that it might also have a "per se" effect on the ganglion, responsible for the ovarian response observed for progesterone. Finally, we can conclude that the ganglionic adrenergic action via SON participates on the regulation of the prepubertal ovary in one of two ways: either increasing the NO, a gaseous neurotransmitter with cytostatic characteristics, to favour the immature follicles to remain dormant or increasing the liberation of androstenedione and oestradiol, the steroids necessary for the beginning of the near first estral cycle.

  8. Phenol cauterization for ganglions of the hand, wrist, and foot: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Iida, T; Yoshimura, K; Kawasaki, Y

    2002-06-01

    Many methods have been reported for the treatment of ganglions. The authors present their modified technique for ganglion sclerotherapy. Their modification enables them to perform sclerotherapy safely and consistently, and they have treated 10 patients in this manner. The method is described and the cases are illustrated.

  9. Macro and microstructural organization of the dog's caudal mesenteric ganglion complex (Canis familiaris-Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Gagliardo, K M; Guidi, W L; Da Silva, R A; Ribeiro, A A C M

    2003-08-01

    The caudal mesenteric ganglion (CMG) is located ventral to the abdominal aorta involving the initial portion of the caudal mesenteric artery. Its macro and microstructural organization was studied in 40 domestic dogs. From the CMG, there were three nerves: the main hypogastric, the left hypogastric and the right hypogastric. The main hypogastric nerve emits two branches: the left colonic nerve and the cranial rectal nerve. Afterwards they give rise to branches to the descending colon (colonic nerves) and rectum (rectal nerves). The cranial rectal nerve, and left and right hypogastric nerves were directed to the pelvic ganglia. The microscopic study permitted the observation of the histological organization of the CMG, which is a ganglionic complex composed of an agglomeration of ganglionic units. Each ganglionic unit is composed of three major cell types: principal ganglion neurones (PGNs), glial cells and small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells, and they were separated by nerve fibres, septa of connective tissue (types 1 and 3 collagen fibres), fibroblasts and intraganglionic capillaries. Hence, the ganglionic unit is the morphological support for the microstructural organization of the CMG complex. Further, each ganglionic unit is constituted by a cellular triad (SIF cells, PGN and glial cells), which is the cytological basis for each ganglionic unit.

  10. Sympathetic and sensory innervation of small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells in rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Fumiya; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Kusakabe, Tatsumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    The sympathetic ganglion contains small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells derived from the neural crest. We morphologically characterize SIF cells and focus on their relationship with ganglionic cells, preganglionic nerve fibers and sensory nerve endings. SIF cells stained intensely for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), with a few cells also being immunoreactive for dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH). Vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)-immunoreactive puncta were distributed around some clusters of SIF cells, whereas some SIF cells closely abutted DBH-immunoreactive ganglionic cells. SIF cells contained bassoon-immunoreactive products beneath the cell membrane at the attachments and on opposite sites to the ganglionic cells. Ganglion neurons and SIF cells were immunoreactive to dopamine D2 receptors. Immunohistochemistry for P2X3 revealed ramified nerve endings with P2X3 immunoreactivity around SIF cells. Triple-labeling for P2X3, TH and VAChT allowed the classification of SIF cells into three types based on their innervation: (1) with only VAChT-immunoreactive puncta, (2) with only P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings, (3) with both P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings and VAChT-immunoreactive puncta. The results of retrograde tracing with fast blue dye indicated that most of these nerve endings originated from the petrosal ganglion. Thus, SIF cells in the superior cervical ganglion are innervated by preganglionic fibers and glossopharyngeal sensory nerve endings and can be classified into three types. SIF cells might modulate sympathetic activity in the superior cervical ganglion. PMID:25416508

  11. Virus-like particles associated with intracardiac ganglionitis in 2 cases of sudden unexpected death.

    PubMed

    James, T N; Imamura, K

    1981-05-01

    Two previously healthy young individuals died suddenly and unexpectedly, and in both of them there was ganglionitis in the heart, especially near the sinus node. Electron microscopic examination demonstrated virus-like particles in the vicinity of the ganglionitis of both hearts. Viral cardioneuropathy may play a role in the pathogenesis of sudden unexpected deaths and deserves further investigation.

  12. Ganglion and Synovial Cyst of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Steen, M Willemijn; Hofstede, Diederik J

    2015-09-01

    Ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. Although histopathological findings differ, clinical presentation is comparable. This study adds a case report of a ganglion of the TMJ to existing literature and a review of all available case reports on ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. Including our own case report, we reviewed 49 cases of ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. They occurred in a female:male ratio of 3:1, at an median age of 46 years (range, 11-64 years). Patients mainly presented with preauricular swelling and pain. After imaging, the ganglion or synovial cyst was most commonly excised under general anesthesia. No recurrences were described. PMID:26495237

  13. Ganglion and Synovial Cyst of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Diederik J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. Although histopathological findings differ, clinical presentation is comparable. This study adds a case report of a ganglion of the TMJ to existing literature and a review of all available case reports on ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. Including our own case report, we reviewed 49 cases of ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. They occurred in a female:male ratio of 3:1, at an median age of 46 years (range, 11–64 years). Patients mainly presented with preauricular swelling and pain. After imaging, the ganglion or synovial cyst was most commonly excised under general anesthesia. No recurrences were described. PMID:26495237

  14. The spiral ganglion and Rosenthal's canal in beluga whales.

    PubMed

    Sensor, Jennifer D; Suydam, Robert; George, John C; Liberman, M C; Lovano, Denise; Rhaganti, Mary Ann; Usip, Sharon; Vinyard, Christopher J; Thewissen, J G M

    2015-12-01

    With the increase of human activity and corresponding increase in anthropogenic sounds in marine waters of the Arctic, it is necessary to understand its effect on the hearing of marine wildlife. We have conducted a baseline study on the spiral ganglion and Rosenthal's canal of the cochlea in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) as an initial assessment of auditory anatomy and health. We present morphometric data on the length of the cochlea, number of whorls, neuron densities along its length, Rosenthal's canal length, and cross-sectional area, and show some histological results. In belugas, Rosenthal's canal is not a cylinder of equal cross-sectional area, but its cross-section is greatest near the apex of the basal whorl. We found systematic variation in the numbers of neurons along the length of the spiral ganglion, indicating that neurons are not dispersed evenly in Rosenthal's canal. These results provide data on functionally important structural parameters of the beluga ear. We observed no signs of acoustic trauma in our sample of beluga whales.

  15. Petrosal ganglion: a more complex role than originally imagined.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Mauricio A; Reyes, Edison P; Alcayaga, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The petrosal ganglion (PG) is a peripheral sensory ganglion, composed of pseudomonopolar sensory neurons that innervate the posterior third of the tongue and the carotid sinus and body. According to their electrical properties PG neurons can be ascribed to one of two categories: (i) neurons with action potentials presenting an inflection (hump) on its repolarizing phase and (ii) neurons with fast and brisk action potentials. Although there is some correlation between the electrophysiological properties and the sensory modality of the neurons in some species, no general pattern can be easily recognized. On the other hand, petrosal neurons projecting to the carotid body are activated by several transmitters, with acetylcholine and ATP being the most conspicuous in most species. Petrosal neurons are completely surrounded by a multi-cellular sheet of glial (satellite) cells that prevents the formation of chemical or electrical synapses between neurons. Thus, PG neurons are regarded as mere wires that communicate the periphery (i.e., carotid body) and the central nervous system. However, it has been shown that in other sensory ganglia satellite glial cells and their neighboring neurons can interact, partly by the release of chemical neuro-glio transmitters. This intercellular communication can potentially modulate the excitatory status of sensory neurons and thus the afferent discharge. In this mini review, we will briefly summarize the general properties of PG neurons and the current knowledge about the glial-neuron communication in sensory neurons and how this phenomenon could be important in the chemical sensory processing generated in the carotid body.

  16. The spiral ganglion and Rosenthal's canal in beluga whales.

    PubMed

    Sensor, Jennifer D; Suydam, Robert; George, John C; Liberman, M C; Lovano, Denise; Rhaganti, Mary Ann; Usip, Sharon; Vinyard, Christopher J; Thewissen, J G M

    2015-12-01

    With the increase of human activity and corresponding increase in anthropogenic sounds in marine waters of the Arctic, it is necessary to understand its effect on the hearing of marine wildlife. We have conducted a baseline study on the spiral ganglion and Rosenthal's canal of the cochlea in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) as an initial assessment of auditory anatomy and health. We present morphometric data on the length of the cochlea, number of whorls, neuron densities along its length, Rosenthal's canal length, and cross-sectional area, and show some histological results. In belugas, Rosenthal's canal is not a cylinder of equal cross-sectional area, but its cross-section is greatest near the apex of the basal whorl. We found systematic variation in the numbers of neurons along the length of the spiral ganglion, indicating that neurons are not dispersed evenly in Rosenthal's canal. These results provide data on functionally important structural parameters of the beluga ear. We observed no signs of acoustic trauma in our sample of beluga whales. PMID:26769322

  17. Neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the locust hypocerebral ganglion.

    PubMed

    Rand, David; Ayali, Amir

    2010-08-01

    The insect stomatogastric ganglia control foregut movements. Most previous work on the system has concentrated on the frontal ganglion (FG), including research into the role of the FG in feeding as well as molting-related behavior, mostly in locusts, but also in other insect species. The stomatogastric system exerts its physiological actions by way of careful interaction and coordination between its different neural centers and pattern-generating circuits. One such hitherto unstudied neural center is the hypocerebral ganglion (HG), which is connected to the FG via the recurrent nerve. It sends two pairs of nerves along the esophagus and to the posterior region of the crop, terminating in the paired ingluvial ganglia. Very little is known about the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the insect HG. Here we investigate, for the first time, the neuronal composition of the locust HG, as well as its motor output. We identify rhythmic patterns endogenous to the isolated HG, demonstrating the presence of a central pattern-generating network. Our findings suggest interactions between the HG and FG rhythm-generating circuits leading to complex physiological actions of both ganglia. This work will serve as a basis for future investigation into the physiology of the HG and its role in insect behavior.

  18. Tissue Engineering the Retinal Ganglion Cell Nerve Fiber Layer

    PubMed Central

    Kador, Karl E.; Montero, Ramon B.; Venugopalan, Praseeda; Hertz, Jonathan; Zindell, Allison N.; Valenzuela, Daniel A.; Uddin, Mohammed S.; Lavik, Erin B.; Muller, Kenneth J.; Andreopoulos, Fotios M.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases, such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, affect millions of people worldwide and ultimately lead to retinal cell death and blindness. Cell transplantation therapies for photoreceptors demonstrate integration and restoration of function, but transplantation into the ganglion cell layer is more complex, requiring guidance of axons from transplanted cells to the optic nerve head in order to reach targets in the brain. Here we create a biodegradable electrospun (ES) scaffold designed to direct the growth of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons radially, mimicking axon orientation in the retina. Using this scaffold we observed an increase in RGC survival and no significant change in their electrophysiological properties. When analyzed for alignment, 81% of RGCs were observed to project axons radially along the scaffold fibers, with no difference in alignment compared to the nerve fiber layer of retinal explants. When transplanted onto retinal explants, RGCs on ES scaffolds followed the radial pattern of the host retinal nerve fibers, whereas RGCs transplanted directly grew axons in a random pattern. Thus, the use of this scaffold as a cell delivery device represents a significant step towards the use of cell transplant therapies for the treatment of glaucoma and other retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23489919

  19. Omitting histopathology in wrist ganglions. A risky proposition

    PubMed Central

    Zubairi, Akbar J.; Kumar, Santosh; Mohib, Yasir; Rashid, Rizwan H.; Noordin, Shahryar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify incidence and utility of histopathology in wrist ganglions. Methods: A retrospective study of 112 patients operated for wrist swellings between January 2009 and March 2014 at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, was conducted. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, history, location and associated symptoms, provisional diagnosis and operative details. Histopathology reports were reviewed to confirm the final diagnosis. Results: One hundred and twelve patients were included in the study (34 males and 78 females) with a mean age of 28 ± 12 years. Ninety-five percent of ganglia were dorsally located and 85% were solitary in nature. Histopathology reports confirmed 107 as ganglion cysts, whereas 3 had giant cell tumor of tendon sheath and 2 were reported to be tuberculous tenosynovitis. Conclusion: Although most of the time, the clinical diagnosis conforms to the final diagnosis, the possibility of an alternate diagnosis cannot be ignored (4% in this study). We suggest routine histopathological analysis so that such diagnoses are not missed. PMID:27464871

  20. The functional diversity of retinal ganglion cells in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Baden, Tom; Berens, Philipp; Franke, Katrin; Rosón, Miroslav Román; Bethge, Matthias; Euler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In the vertebrate visual system, all output of the retina is carried by retinal ganglion cells. Each type encodes distinct visual features in parallel for transmission to the brain. How many such “output channels” exist and what each encodes is an area of intense debate. In mouse, anatomical estimates range between 15–20 channels, and only a handful are functionally understood. Combining two-photon calcium imaging to obtain dense retinal recordings and unsupervised clustering of the resulting sample of >11,000 cells, we here show that the mouse retina harbours substantially more than 30 functional output channels. These include all known and several new ganglion cell types, as verified by genetic and anatomical criteria. Therefore, information channels from the mouse’s eye to the mouse’s brain are considerably more diverse than shown thus far by anatomical studies, suggesting an encoding strategy resembling that used in state-of-the-art artificial vision systems. PMID:26735013

  1. Effects of metal ions on fibroblasts and spiral ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Paasche, G; Ceschi, P; Löbler, M; Rösl, C; Gomes, P; Hahn, A; Rohm, H W; Sternberg, K; Lenarz, T; Schmitz, K-P; Barcikowski, S; Stöver, T

    2011-04-01

    Degeneration of spiral ganglion cells (SGC) after deafness and fibrous tissue growth around the electrode carrier after cochlear implantation are two of the major challenges in current cochlear implant research. Metal ions are known to possess antimicrobial and antiproliferative potential. The use of metal ions could therefore provide a way to reduce tissue growth around the electrode array after cochlear implantation. Here, we report on in vitro experiments with different concentrations of metal salts with antiproliferative and toxic effects on fibroblasts, PC-12 cells, and freshly isolated spiral ganglion cells, the target cells for electrical stimulation by a cochlear implant. Standard cell lines (NIH/3T3 and L-929 fibroblasts and PC-12 cells) and freshly isolated SGC were incubated with concentrations of metal ions between 0.3 μmol/liter and 10 mmol/liter for 48 hr. Cell survival was investigated by neutral red uptake, CellQuantiBlue assay, or counting of stained surviving neurons. Silver ions exhibited distinct thresholds for proliferating and confluent cells. For zinc ions, the effective concentration was lower for fibroblasts than for PC-12 cells. SGC showed comparable thresholds for reduced cell survival not only for silver and zinc ions but also for copper(II) ions, indicating that these ions might be promising for reducing tissue growth on the surface of CI electrode arrays. These effects were also observed when combinations of two of these ions were investigated. PMID:21312225

  2. Nuclear Atrophy of Retinal Ganglion Cells Precedes the Bax-Dependent Stage of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Katherine T.; Mac Nair, Caitlin E.; Dietz, Joel A.; Schlamp, Cassandra L.; Nickells, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal ganglion cells atrophy during the execution of the intrinsic apoptotic program. This process, which has been termed the apoptotic volume decrease (AVD) in other cell types, has not been well-characterized in ganglion cells. Methods. Acute optic nerve crush was used to examine neuronal atrophy in the ganglion cell layer in wild-type and Bax-deficient mice. Nuclear size was measured from retinal wholemounts. Heterochromatin formation was assessed using transmission electron microscopy, whereas histone H4 acetylation was monitored using immunofluoresence. Ganglion cell and retinal transcript abundance was measured using quantitative PCR. Results. Nuclear and soma sizes linearly correlated in both control and damaged retinas. Cells in wild-type mice exhibited nuclear atrophy within 1 day after optic nerve damage. Three days after crush, nuclear atrophy was restricted to ganglion cells identified by retrograde labeling, while amacrine cells also exhibited some atrophy by 5 days. Similar kinetics of nuclear atrophy were observed in cells deficient for the essential proapoptotic gene Bax. Bax-deficient cells also exhibited other nuclear changes common in wild-type cells, including the deacetylation of histones, formation of heterochromatin, and the silencing of ganglion cell–specific gene expression. Conclusions. Retinal ganglion cell somas and nuclei undergo the AVD in response to optic nerve damage. Atrophy is rapid and precedes the Bax-dependent committed step of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:23422829

  3. Pituitary adenoma-neuronal choristoma is a pituitary adenoma with ganglionic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michaela T; Lavi, Ehud

    2015-12-01

    The presence of ganglion cells within an endocrine pituitary tumor has been named hamartoma, choristoma, gangliocytoma, or most recently pituitary adenoma-neuronal choristoma (PANCH). The presence of neuronal differentiation in regular pituitary adenomas has been previously suggested, however, its origin, the extent of its presence, and the relationship between the neuronal elements and the pituitary adenoma remain uncertain. Thus, to further explore the neuronal potential of pituitary tumors, we used immunohistochemistry on pituitary tumors of different grades, with a neuronal antigen protein (NeuN) antibody as a specific marker for mature neuronal differentiation. We found NeuN expression in 26.47% (9/34) cases of pituitary tumors without ganglionic differentiation (7 adenomas, 1 atypical adenoma and 1 pituitary carcinoma), in addition to NeuN expression in pituitary adenomas with ganglionic cells (2/2). Thus, neuronal expression is an innate property of pituitary adenomas. We propose that the rare presence of ganglionic cells in pituitary adenomas is not the result of a separate lesion or "collision sellar tumors", as previously suggested, but a ganglionic neuronal differentiation in an endocrine neoplasm. The ganglionic cells may be arising from uncommitted stem/progenitor cells that contain both neuronal and endocrine properties. A label of "pituitary adenoma with ganglionic differentiation" would better reflect the dual differentiation in a neuroendocrine tumor than the current label "PANCH".

  4. Oligomeric proanthocyanidin protects retinal ganglion cells against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Chanjuan; Lu, Dan; Shu, Xiaoming; Zhu, Lihong; Qi, Renbing; So, Kwok-Fai; Lu, Daxiang; Xu, Ying

    2013-09-01

    The death of retinal ganglion cells is a hallmark of many optic neurodegenerative diseases such as glaucoma and retinopathy. Oxidative stress is one of the major reasons to cause the cell death. Oligomeric proanthocyanidin has many health beneficial effects including antioxidative and neuroprotective actions. Here we tested whether oligomeric proanthocyanidin may protect retinal ganglion cells against oxidative stress induced-apoptosis in vitro. Retinal ganglion cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide with or without oligomeric proanthocyanidin. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that treating retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5 cells with 20 μmol/L oligomeric proanthocyanidin significantly decreased the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced death. Results of flow cytometry and Hoechst staining demonstrated that the death of RGC-5 cells was mainly caused by cell apoptosis. We further found that expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and caspase-3 were significantly decreased while anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was greatly increased in H2O2 damaged RGC-5 cells with oligomeric proanthocyanidin by western blot assay. Furthermore, in retinal explant culture, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells in H2O2-damaged retinal ganglion cells with oligomeric proanthocyanidin was significantly increased. Our studies thus demonstrate that oligomeric proanthocyanidin can protect oxidative stress-injured retinal ganglion cells by inhibiting apoptotic process.

  5. Short-wavelength cone-opponent retinal ganglion cells in mammals

    PubMed Central

    MARSHAK, DAVID W.; MILLS, STEPHEN L.

    2014-01-01

    In all of the mammalian species studied to date, the short-wavelength-sensitive (S) cones and the S-cone bipolar cells that receive their input are very similar, but the retinal ganglion cells that receive synapses from the S-cone bipolar cells appear to be quite different. Here, we review the literature on mammalian retinal ganglion cells that respond selectively to stimulation of S-cones and respond with opposite polarity to longer wavelength stimuli. There are at least three basic mechanisms to generate these color-opponent responses, including: (1) opponency is generated in the outer plexiform layer by horizontal cells and is conveyed to the ganglion cells via S-cone bipolar cells, (2) inputs from bipolar cells with different cone inputs and opposite response polarity converge directly on the ganglion cells, and (3) inputs from S-cone bipolar cells are inverted by S-cone amacrine cells. These are not mutually exclusive; some mammalian ganglion cells that respond selectively to S-cone stimulation seem to utilize at least two of them. Based on these findings, we suggest that the small bistratified ganglion cells described in primates are not the ancestral type, as proposed previously. Instead, the known types of ganglion cells in this pathway evolved from monostratified ancestral types and became bistratified in some mammalian lineages. PMID:24759445

  6. Short-wavelength cone-opponent retinal ganglion cells in mammals.

    PubMed

    Marshak, David W; Mills, Stephen L

    2014-03-01

    In all of the mammalian species studied to date, the short-wavelength-sensitive (S) cones and the S-cone bipolar cells that receive their input are very similar, but the retinal ganglion cells that receive synapses from the S-cone bipolar cells appear to be quite different. Here, we review the literature on mammalian retinal ganglion cells that respond selectively to stimulation of S-cones and respond with opposite polarity to longer wavelength stimuli. There are at least three basic mechanisms to generate these color-opponent responses, including: (1) opponency is generated in the outer plexiform layer by horizontal cells and is conveyed to the ganglion cells via S-cone bipolar cells, (2) inputs from bipolar cells with different cone inputs and opposite response polarity converge directly on the ganglion cells, and (3) inputs from S-cone bipolar cells are inverted by S-cone amacrine cells. These are not mutually exclusive; some mammalian ganglion cells that respond selectively to S-cone stimulation seem to utilize at least two of them. Based on these findings, we suggest that the small bistratified ganglion cells described in primates are not the ancestral type, as proposed previously. Instead, the known types of ganglion cells in this pathway evolved from monostratified ancestral types and became bistratified in some mammalian lineages. PMID:24759445

  7. Hyperactivity of ON-type retinal ganglion cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Wang, Lu; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhang, Dao-Qi; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of visual function has been detected in the early stage of diabetes but the underlying neural mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Morphological and functional alterations of retinal ganglion cells, the final output neurons of the vertebrate retina, are thought to be the major cause of visual defects in diabetes but direct evidence to support this notion is limited. In this study we investigated functional changes of retinal ganglion cells in a type 1-like diabetic mouse model. Our results demonstrated that the spontaneous spiking activity of ON-type retinal ganglion cells was increased in streptozotocin-diabetic mice after 3 to 4 months of diabetes. At this stage of diabetes, no apoptotic signals or cell loss were detected in the ganglion cell layer of the retina, suggesting that the functional alterations in ganglion cells occur prior to massive ganglion cell apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that the increased activity of ON-type ganglion cells was mainly a result of reduced inhibitory signaling to the cells in diabetes. This novel mechanism provides insight into how visual function is impaired in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24069457

  8. Melanopsin containing retinal ganglion cells are light responsive from birth.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2004-10-25

    Photoentrainment of the biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) begins shortly after birth. Here we show using c-FOS immunoreactivity as a marker for neuronal activity that the melanopsin/PACAP containing retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) which project to the SCN as the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT) are responsive to light from birth. After postnatal day 12 where the classical photoreceptors become functional other RGCs and cells of the inner nuclear cell layer also respond to light. Light also induces c-FOS immunoreactivity in the retinorecipient SCN from the first postnatal day and accordingly PACAP immunoreactive fibres are visible in the SCN. The results indicate that the retina is light responsive before functional rods and cones and that the RHT is functional from birth supporting that photoentrainment of the biological clock begins shortly after birth.

  9. Identification of cone mechanisms in monkey ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Gouras, Peter

    1968-01-01

    1. Blue, green, and red sensitive cone mechanisms have been studied in two types of on-centre ganglion cells in the Rhesus monkey's retina. 2. One type of cell receives signals from both green and red sensitive cone mechanisms, both of which excite in the centre and inhibit in the periphery of the cell's receptive field. These cells discharge transiently to maintained stimuli of any wave-length and are called phasic. 3. The second type of cell receives excitatory signals from only one cone mechanism, either blue, green or red sensitive, in the centre, and inhibition from another cone mechanism in the periphery of its receptive field. These cells discharge continuously to maintained stimuli of appropriate wave-length and are called tonic. 4. Tonic cells outnumber phasic cells although both are found adjacent to one another throughout the retina. Phasic cells are relatively more common toward the periphery and tonic cells relatively more common toward the fovea. PMID:4974745

  10. Recent advances in basic research on the trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tetsuya; Oh, Seog Bae; Takeda, Mamoru; Shinoda, Masamichi; Sato, Tadasu; Gunjikake, Kaori K; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral tissue inflammation can alter the properties of somatic sensory pathways, causing behavioral hypersensitivity and resulting in increased responses to pain caused by noxious stimulation (hyperalgesia) and normally innocuous stimulation (allodynia). These hypersensitivities for nociception are caused by changes in the excitability of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. These changes alter sensory information processing in the neurons in the medullary trigeminal nucleus of caudalis. Increasing information is becoming available regarding trigeminal neuron-neuron/neuron-satellite glial cells (SGCs) communication. The activation of intraganglionic communication plays an important role in the creation and maintenance of trigeminal pathological pain. Therefore, in this review, we focus on the recent findings for sensory functions and pharmacological modulation of TG neurons and SGCs under normal and pathological conditions, and we discuss potential therapeutic targets in glia-neuronal interactions for the prevention of trigeminal neuropathic and inflammatory pain. PMID:27023716

  11. Purification of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons from Rat by Immunopanning

    PubMed Central

    Zuchero, J. Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGs) are sensory neurons that facilitate somatosensation and have been used to study neurite outgrowth, regeneration, and degeneration and PNS and CNS myelination. Studies of DRGs have relied on cell isolation strategies that generally involve extended culture in the presence of antimitotic agents or other cytotoxic treatments that target dividing cells. The surviving cells typically are dependent on serum for growth. Other methods, involving purification of DRGs based on their large size, produce low yield. In contrast, the immunopanning-based method described here for prospective isolation of DRGs from rodents allows for rapid purification in the absence of antimitotic agents and serum. These DRG cultures take place in a defined medium. They are free of Schwann cells and other glia and thus can be used to study the role of glia in the biology of DRG neurons. PMID:25086011

  12. NBQX suppresses inhibitory glycine currents in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, W; Miller, R F

    1994-08-15

    The quinoxaline NBQX (2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo (F) quinoxaline) is a potent non-NMDA receptor antagonist, which appears to be relatively free of antagonistic action at the glycine binding site of the NMDA receptor. However, we report here that at 50 microM, NBQX significantly attenuated the inhibitory currents induced by the exogenous application of 100 microM glycine as observed using whole-cell recordings from ganglion cells in a slice preparation of the tiger salamander retina. In contrast, NBQX had no effect on GABA-mediated inhibition. This observation suggests that care should be taken when attributing the action of NBQX solely to its antagonism of non-NMDA glutamate receptors, particularly when higher concentrations are used.

  13. In Vitro Functional Assessment of Adult Spiral Ganglion Neurons (SGNs).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Han; Sihn, Choongryoul; Wang, Wanging; Flores, Cristina Maria Perez; Yamoah, Ebenezer N

    2016-01-01

    Spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) faithfully encode acoustic waves from hair cells to the cochlear nucleus (CN) using voltage-dependent ion channels. A sizable portion of our knowledge on SGN functions have been derived from pre-hearing neurons. In post-hearing SGNs, the mechanisms of how they encode the massive sound information without delay and precisely are largely unknown. Mature SGNs are housed in the central bony labyrinth of the cochlea, protected by a well-insulated myelin sheath, making it a technical feat to isolate viable neurons for rigorous functional electrophysiology. Recently, we have overcome the previous intractable hindrance in SGN functional analyses. We provide a step-by-step user-friendly protocol with practical applications, including patch-clamp recordings and imaging by using cultured SGNs. PMID:27259946

  14. Ganglionitis in paraneoplastic subacute sensory neuronopathy: a morphologic study.

    PubMed

    Wanschitz, J; Hainfellner, J A; Kristoferitsch, W; Drlicek, M; Budka, H

    1997-10-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented with subacute sensory neuropathy and autonomic dysfunction of 9 months' duration, associated with high serum titers of anti-Hu antibodies. A small cell carcinoma of the lung was diagnosed by biopsy. She died after cardiorespiratory arrest. At autopsy, spinal and autonomic ganglia showed subacute inflammation with diffuse endoneurial T-cell, B-cell, and plasma cell infiltration. The cytoplasm and nuclei of some ganglion neurons displayed IgG immunocytochemical positivity. CD8+ T cells were tightly attached to, and indented the cell surface of, IgG-positive and IgG-negative neurons. This observation suggests that both cytotoxic T-cell-mediated attack against neurons and humoral mechanisms play a role in paraneoplastic subacute sensory neuronopathy.

  15. EVALUATION OF HYPERALGESIA AND HISTOLOGICAL CHANGES OF DORSAL ROOT GANGLION INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Grava, André Luiz de Souza; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the hyperalgesia and histological abnormalities induced by contact between the dorsal root ganglion and the nucleus pulposus. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats were used, divided into two experimental groups. In one of the groups, a fragment of autologous nucleus pulposus was removed from the sacrococcygeal region and deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. In the other group (control), a fragment of adipose tissue was deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated on the third day and the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation. A L5 dorsal root ganglion was removed in the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation for histological study using HE staining and histochemical study using specific labeling for iNOS. Results: Higher intensity of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion. In this group, the histological study showed abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue, characterized by an inflammatory process and axonal degeneration. The histopathological abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue presented increasing intensity with increasing length of observation, and there was a correlation with maintenance of the hyperalgesia observed in the behavioral assessment. Immunohistochemistry using specific labeling for iNOS in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion showed higher expression of this enzyme in the nuclei of the inflammatory cells (glial cells) surrounding the neurons. Conclusion: Contact between the nucleus pulposus and the dorsal root ganglion induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and caused histological abnormalities in the dorsal root ganglion components. These abnormalities were characterized by an inflammatory and degenerative process in the structures of the dorsal root

  16. A Dopamine- and Protein Kinase A-Dependent Mechanism for Network Adaptation in Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, C. F.; Pignatelli, A.; Partida, G. J.; Ishida, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrates can detect light intensity changes in vastly different photic environments, in part, because post-receptoral neurons undergo “network adaptation”. Previous data implicated dopaminergic, cAMP-dependent inhibition of retinal ganglion cells in this process, yet left unclear how this occurs, and whether this occurs in darkness versus light. To test for light- and dopamine-dependent changes in ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ, we immunostained dark- and light-adapted retinas with anti-cAMP antisera, in the presence and absence of various dopamine receptor ligands. To test for direct effects of dopamine receptor ligands and membrane-permeable protein kinase ligands on ganglion cell excitability, we recorded spikes from isolated ganglion cells in perforated-patch whole-cell mode, before and during application of these agents by microperfusion. Our immunostainings show that light, endogenous dopamine, and exogenous dopamine elevate ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ by activating D1-type dopamine receptors. Our spike recordings show that D1-type agonists and 8-bromo cAMP reduce spike frequency and curtail sustained spike firing, and that these effects entail protein kinase A activation. These effects resemble those of background light on ganglion cell responses to light flashes. Network adaptation could thus be produced, to some extent, by dopaminergic modulation of ganglion cell spike generation, a mechanism distinct from modulation of transmitter release onto ganglion cells or of transmitter-gated currents in ganglion cells. Combining these observations, with results obtained in studies of photoreceptor, bipolar, and horizontal cells, indicates that all three layers of neurons in the retina are equipped with mechanisms for adaptation to ambient light. PMID:11606650

  17. Target areas innervated by PACAP-immunoreactive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2004-04-01

    The retinohypothalamic tract (RHT) originates from a subset of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The cells of the RHT co-store the neurotransmitters PACAP and glutamate, which in a complex interplay mediate light information to the circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). These ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive probably due to expression of melanopsin, a putative photoreceptor involved in light entrainment. In the present study we examined PACAP-containing retinal projections to the brain using intravitreal injection of the anterograde tracer cholera toxin subunit B (ChB) and double immunostaining for PACAP and ChB. Our results show that the PACAP-containing nerve fibres not only constituted the major projections to the SCN and the intergeniculate leaflet of the thalamus but also had a large terminal field in the olivary pretectal nucleus. The contralateral projection dominated except for the SCN, which showed bilateral innervation. PACAP-containing retinal fibres were also found in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus, the anterior and lateral hypothalamic area, the subparaventricular zone, the ventral part of the lateral geniculate nucleus and the nucleus of the optic tract. Retinal projections not previously described in the rat also contained PACAP. These new projections were found in the lateral posterior nucleus, the posterior limitans nucleus, the dorsal part of the anterior pretectal nucleus and the posterior and medial pretectal nuclei. Only a few PACAP-containing retinal fibres were found in the superior colliculus. Areas innervated by PACAP-immunoreactive fibres also expressed the PACAP-specific PAC1 receptor as shown by in situ hybridization histochemistry. The findings suggest that PACAP plays a role as neurotransmitter in non-imaging photoperception to target areas in the brain regulating circadian timing, masking, regulation of sleep-wake cycle and pupillary reflex.

  18. Petrosal ganglion: a more complex role than originally imagined

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; Reyes, Edison P.; Alcayaga, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The petrosal ganglion (PG) is a peripheral sensory ganglion, composed of pseudomonopolar sensory neurons that innervate the posterior third of the tongue and the carotid sinus and body. According to their electrical properties PG neurons can be ascribed to one of two categories: (i) neurons with action potentials presenting an inflection (hump) on its repolarizing phase and (ii) neurons with fast and brisk action potentials. Although there is some correlation between the electrophysiological properties and the sensory modality of the neurons in some species, no general pattern can be easily recognized. On the other hand, petrosal neurons projecting to the carotid body are activated by several transmitters, with acetylcholine and ATP being the most conspicuous in most species. Petrosal neurons are completely surrounded by a multi-cellular sheet of glial (satellite) cells that prevents the formation of chemical or electrical synapses between neurons. Thus, PG neurons are regarded as mere wires that communicate the periphery (i.e., carotid body) and the central nervous system. However, it has been shown that in other sensory ganglia satellite glial cells and their neighboring neurons can interact, partly by the release of chemical neuro-glio transmitters. This intercellular communication can potentially modulate the excitatory status of sensory neurons and thus the afferent discharge. In this mini review, we will briefly summarize the general properties of PG neurons and the current knowledge about the glial-neuron communication in sensory neurons and how this phenomenon could be important in the chemical sensory processing generated in the carotid body. PMID:25538627

  19. Evaluation of new approach to ultrasound guided stellate ganglion block

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Anju; Kaushik, Teshi; Kundu, Zile Singh; Wadhera, Sarthak; Wadhera, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound imaging is an ideal tool for stellate ganglion block (SGB) due to clarity, portability, lack of radiation, and low cost. Ultrasound guided anterior approach requires the application of pressure to the anterior neck and is associated with more risk of injury to inferior thyroid artery, vertebral artery, and esophagus. The lateral approach does not interfere with nerve or vascular structures. Blockade at the C6 vertebral level results in more successful sympathetic blockade of the head and neck with less sympathetic blockade of the upper extremity compared to sympathetic blockade at C7 vertebral level, which produces successful sympathetic blockade of upper extremity. This is helpful in patients of complex regional pain syndrome of the upper limb. Hence, we conducted a study using the lateral approach at C7 level. Materials and Methods: Ultrasound guided SGBs using lateral in-plane technique at C7 level were given in 20 patients suffering from chronic pain patients of upper extremity, head, and neck using 4 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine and 1 ml of 40 mg triamcinolone. The patients were assessed for a numeric pain intensity score (NPIS), the rise in axillary temperature, the range of motion of joints of upper extremity, and resolution of edema at various time intervals up to 3 months. Results: NPIS showed a statistically significant decrease from baseline at 30 min, which was sustained till 3rd month. The rise in axillary temperature after the block was statistically significant, which was sustained till 2nd week. The edema score decreased significantly at all-time intervals (P ≤ 0.001). The restriction of motion in all joints of upper limb decreased from 13 to 3 patients. Conclusion: There is a significant variation in the anatomy of stellate ganglion at the level of C6 and C7. Ultrasound guided lateral approach increases the efficacy of SGB by deposition of drug subfascially with real-time imaging. PMID:27051366

  20. Regional differences in myelination of chick vestibulocochlear ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-Jie; Kobayashi, Hiroto; Yoshida, Saori; Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Naito, Akira

    2013-11-01

    In vertebrates, vestibular and cochlear ganglion (VG and CG, respectively) cells are bipolar neurons with myelinated axons and perikarya. The time course of the myelination of the VG and CG cells during development of chick embryos was investigated. Chick VG and CG from embryonic day at 7-20 (E7-20) were prepared for a transmission electron microscopy, myelin basic protein immunohistochemistry, and real-time quantitative RT-PCR. In the VG cells, myelination was first observed on the peripheral axons of the ampullar nerves at E10, on the utricular and saccular nerves at E12, and on the lagenar and neglecta nerves at E13. In the VG central axons, myelination was first seen on the ampullar nerves at E11, on the utricular and saccular nerves at E13, and on the lagenar nerves at E13. In the CG cells, the myelination was first observed on the peripheral and central axons at E14. In both VG and CG, myelination was observed on the perikarya at E17. These results suggest that the onset of the axonal myelination on the VG cells occurred earlier than that on the CG cells, whereas the perikaryal myelination occurred at about the same time on the both types of ganglion cells. Moreover, the myelination on the ampullar nerves occurred earlier than that on the utricular and saccular nerves. The myelination on the peripheral axons occurred earlier than that on the central axons of the VG cells, whereas that on the central and peripheral axons of the CG cells occurred at about the same time. The regional differences in myelination in relation to the onset of functional activities in the VG and CG cells are discussed.

  1. Adaptation and dynamics of cat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Enroth-Cugell, C; Shapley, R M

    1973-09-01

    1. The impulse/quantum (I/Q) ratio was measured as a function of background illumination for rod-dominated, pure central, linear square-wave responses of retinal ganglion cells in the cat.2. The I/Q ratio was constant at low backgrounds (dark adapted state) and inversely proportional to the 0.9 power of the background at high backgrounds (the light adapted state). There was an abrupt transition from the dark-adapted state to the light-adapted state.3. It was possible to define the adaptation level at a particular background as the ratio (I/Q ratio at that background)/(dark adapted I/Q ratio).4. The time course of the square-wave response was correlated with the adaptation level. The response was sustained in the dark-adapted state, partially transient at the transition level, and progressively more transient the lower the impulse/quantum ratio of the ganglion cell became. This was true both for on-centre and off-centre cells.5. The frequency response of the central response mechanism at different adaptation levels was measured. It was a low-pass characteristic in the dark-adapted state and became progressively more of a bandpass characteristic as the cell became more light-adapted.6. The rapidity of onset of adaptation was measured with a time-varying adapting light. The impulse/quantum ratio is reset within 100 msec of the onset of the conditioning light, and is kept at the new value throughout the time the conditioning light is on.7. These results can be explained by a nonlinear feedback model. In the model, it is postulated that the exponential function of the horizontal cell potential controls transmission from rods to bipolars. This model has an abrupt transition from dark- to light-adapted states, and its response dynamics are correlated with adaptation level.

  2. Ganglion cyst and olecranon physis nonunion in a baseball pitcher: unique treatment after conservative therapy fails.

    PubMed

    Burman, Mark L; Aljassir, Fawzi; Coughlin, Larry P

    2004-06-01

    Although ganglion cysts and stress fractures occur at many joints, the presence of both disorders at the same joint is rare. In this unusual case, a 30-year-old professional pitcher had been treated conservatively for presumed olecranon bursitis in his right (throwing) arm, but, when therapy failed, he sought additional care. A thorough workup and subsequent surgery revealed a ganglion cyst and nonunion of a stress fracture of the olecranon physis. The ganglion cyst had its origin at the fracture site, and both cyst and bone fragment were excised. The patient had a full recovery and was able to resume pitching as an instructor 18 months after surgery.

  3. GABAergic and glycinergic pathways to goldfish retinal ganglion cells: an ultrastructural double label study

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An ultrastructural double label has been employed to compare GABAergic and glycinergic systems in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of the goldfish retina. Electron microscope autoradiography of /sup 3/H-GABA and /sup 3/H-glycine uptake was combined with retrograde HRP-labeling of ganglion cells. When surveyed for distribution, GABAergic and glycinergic synapses were found onto labeled ganglion cells throughout the IPL. This reinforces previous physiological work that described GABAergic and glycinergic influences on a variety of ganglion cells in goldfish and carp; These physiological effects often reflect direct inputs.

  4. Subacute sensory neuronopathy secondary to dorsal root ganglionitis in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Malinow, K; Yannakakis, G D; Glusman, S M; Edlow, D W; Griffin, J; Pestronk, A; Powell, D L; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Eidelman, B H; Medsger, T A

    1986-10-01

    Sensory neuropathies, particularly trigeminal neuropathy, have been recognized as neurological complications of Sjögren's syndrome, but the pathogenesis has not been established. We describe a woman with primary Sjögren's syndrome who developed a progressive debilitating subacute sensory neuronopathy. Results of electrophysiological studies were consistent with involvement of the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. A thoracic dorsal root ganglion biopsy showed lymphocytic infiltration and degeneration of ganglion cells. We believe that this is the first description of biopsy-documented dorsal root ganglionitis in a subacute sensory neuronopathy associated with Sjögren's syndrome and that the finding suggests an immunopathogenic basis.

  5. Spinal nerve root ganglionitis as a cause of disc herniation: case report.

    PubMed

    Roser, Florian; Ritz, Rainer; Morgalla, Matthias; Tatagiba, Marcos; Bornemann, Antje

    2005-04-01

    The authors report on a patient in whom monoradicular pain was caused by ganglionitis of a spinal nerve. Neuroimaging and intraoperative findings identified what were thought to be tumorlike changes in the affected nerve root. The neuropathological examination, however, revealed typical signs of ganglionitis. This rare inflammation usually appears with viral infections, as part of paraneoplastic symptoms, or in the presence of Sjögren disease. Because all of these differential diagnoses were negative in the treated patient, chronic nerve root compression due to disc herniation was suspected as the causative factor for the spinal ganglionitis.

  6. Immunohistochemical study of the neuropeptides in the stellate ganglion of the water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Nasu, T; De Ocampo, G; Molina, H A; Tateyama, S; Morimoto, M

    2000-05-01

    The localization of some neuropeptides including neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), galanin (Gal), methionine enkephalin (M-ENK), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity was studied in the stellate ganglion (SG) of water buffalo. NPY, SP, Gal and TH immunoreactivities were present in almost all of the ganglion cells. NPY, SP, Gal, SP, CGRP, VIP and M-ENK immunoreactive nerve fibers were also seen in the SG. The localization and pattern of distribution of these peptides in the water buffalo stellate ganglion were compared with those in stellate ganglia of other mammalian species.

  7. Pudendal Nerve Entrapment Syndrome due to a Ganglion Cyst: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Wook; Lee, Sung-Moon; Lee, Dong Gyu

    2016-08-01

    Pudendal nerve entrapment syndrome is an unusual cause of chronic pelvic pain. We experienced a case of pudendal neuralgia associated with a ganglion cyst. A 60-year-old male patient with a tingling sensation and burning pain in the right buttock and perineal area visited our outpatient rehabilitation center. Pelvis magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of multiple ganglion cysts around the right ischial spine and sacrospinous ligament, and the pudendal nerve and vessel bundle were located between the ischial spine and ganglion cyst at the entrance of Alcock's canal. We aspirated the lesions under ultrasound guidance, and consequently his symptoms subsided during a 6-month follow-up. This is the first report of pudendal neuralgia caused by compression from a ganglion cyst around the sacrospinous ligament. PMID:27606282

  8. Pudendal Nerve Entrapment Syndrome due to a Ganglion Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pudendal nerve entrapment syndrome is an unusual cause of chronic pelvic pain. We experienced a case of pudendal neuralgia associated with a ganglion cyst. A 60-year-old male patient with a tingling sensation and burning pain in the right buttock and perineal area visited our outpatient rehabilitation center. Pelvis magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of multiple ganglion cysts around the right ischial spine and sacrospinous ligament, and the pudendal nerve and vessel bundle were located between the ischial spine and ganglion cyst at the entrance of Alcock's canal. We aspirated the lesions under ultrasound guidance, and consequently his symptoms subsided during a 6-month follow-up. This is the first report of pudendal neuralgia caused by compression from a ganglion cyst around the sacrospinous ligament. PMID:27606282

  9. Large Ganglion Cyst with Unusual Location on the Back—A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Thomas Wagner; Berg, Jais Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Summary: A ganglion cyst is a soft tissue tumor-like lesion filled with colloid material commonly located on the hand and wrist. We report a case of a large ganglion cyst with an unusual location on the back. The patient presented with a mass growing over 2 months measuring 11.2 × 4.7 × 7.2 cm on magnetic resonance imaging. Ultrasound and puncture was attempted twice without achieving drainage. After surgical removal, histologic examination diagnosed the tumor as a ganglion cyst. We conclude that when evaluating a subcutaneous soft tissue mass, regardless of localization, a ganglion cyst may be a differential diagnosis. PMID:27482477

  10. Compression of the palmar cutaneous nerve by ganglions of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Gessini, L; Jandolo, B; Pietrangeli, A; Senese, A

    1983-01-01

    Two cases of compression of the palmar cutaneous nerve by ganglion of the wrist are presented. The anatomy of the region, compression factors, mechanism and clinical features are discussed. Timely surgical removal of compression is recommended.

  11. The inflammatory reaction of paraneoplastic ganglionitis and encephalitis: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Panegyres, P K; Reading, M C; Esiri, M M

    1993-02-01

    To elucidate the cellular mechanisms of tissue injury in paraneoplastic states, tissues from two patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung and paraneoplastic neurological syndromes were studied. One patient had encephalitis with ganglionitis, and the other ganglionitis. Immunocytochemistry on brain and ganglia was performed using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. The majority of the inflammatory cells in brain and ganglia were T-cells, of both helper and cytotoxic subtypes. There were more macrophages in the inflammatory infiltrate of ganglia than in the brain of encephalitis. Major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigen expression was greater in the mononuclear cells in brain than in ganglia. There was no evidence of complement deposition and little evidence for antibody synthesizing cells. Our findings suggest a T-cell-mediated immune attack in paraneoplastic ganglionitis and encephalitis, with a greater role for macrophages in ganglionitis.

  12. Herpes simplex virus vaccine: protection from stomatitis, ganglionitis, encephalitis and latency.

    PubMed

    Kitces, E N; Payne, W J; Morahan, P S; Tew, J G; Murray, B K

    1978-01-01

    A mouse model system was developed for studying the pathogenesis of oral infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 and the protection offered by prior immunization with a nucleic acid-free vaccine. Of non-immunized mice, 95-100% developed ulcerative lesions 3-5 days following application of virus to abraded oral epithelial surfaces. Infection of the ipsilateral sensory (trigeminal) ganglion and the cerebellum occurred by day 2 and sequentially progressed to the contralateral ganglion by day 4 and to the cerebrum by day 5. Prior immunization of mice with an inactivated virus vaccine, and most importantly, with a vaccine free of nucleic acid, protected mice from subsequent oral virus infection. Protection was demonstrated by: (i) reduction in the incidence and severity of primary oral lesions; (ii) a decrease in the number of mice with acute ganglionic infection or dying of encephalitis; and (iii) a reduction in the incidence of latent trigeminal ganglionic infection.

  13. Pudendal Nerve Entrapment Syndrome due to a Ganglion Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pudendal nerve entrapment syndrome is an unusual cause of chronic pelvic pain. We experienced a case of pudendal neuralgia associated with a ganglion cyst. A 60-year-old male patient with a tingling sensation and burning pain in the right buttock and perineal area visited our outpatient rehabilitation center. Pelvis magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of multiple ganglion cysts around the right ischial spine and sacrospinous ligament, and the pudendal nerve and vessel bundle were located between the ischial spine and ganglion cyst at the entrance of Alcock's canal. We aspirated the lesions under ultrasound guidance, and consequently his symptoms subsided during a 6-month follow-up. This is the first report of pudendal neuralgia caused by compression from a ganglion cyst around the sacrospinous ligament.

  14. Expression of ghrelin in human fetal adrenal glands and paraadrenal nerve ganglions.

    PubMed

    Obara-Moszyńska, Monika; Kedzia, Andrzej; Chmielnicka-Kopaczyk, Maria

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper was assessment of location, expression and role of ghrelin in the development and maturation of human fetal adrenal glands and paraadrenal nerve ganglions. Immunohistochemistry was used. The strongest expression of ghrelin was detected in the fetal zone of the adrenal glands, in the neuroepithelial cells of the medullar portion of the adrenals and in few nerve ganglion cells. Ghrelin takes part in molecular processes of proliferation and maturation, and does not influence on steroidogenesis.

  15. Intraosseous Ganglion of the Distal Tibia: Clinical, Radiological, and Operative Management

    PubMed Central

    Sedeek, Sedeek Mohamed; Choudry, Q.; Garg, S.

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous ganglia are benign cystic lesions located in the subchondral bone. Intraosseous ganglion cysts of the ankle are relatively uncommon. We present a case of recurrent intraosseous ganglion in the ankle of a 41-year-old female who had recurrence after initial surgery. She was treated effectively by curettage and autogenous cancellous bone grafting. At the final follow-up, satisfactory results were obtained with no recurrence or complications. PMID:25664195

  16. Anti-dorsal root ganglion neuron antibody in a case of dorsal root ganglionitis associated with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Satake, M; Yoshimura, T; Iwaki, T; Yamada, T; Kobayashi, T

    1995-10-01

    We report the case of a 59-year-old woman with primary Sjögren's syndrome who developed hypesthesia, hypalgesia, and neurogenic arthropathy in her lower limbs. Neurological examination and electrophysiological studies indicated involvement of the dorsal root ganglia. The immunohistochemistry of sections of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) showed that the IgG in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the patient bound to the neuronal perikarya of small DRG neurons but not to the cerebellum or peripheral nerves. These results, consistent with particular impairment of pain and touch senses, suggest that dorsal root ganglionitis in primary Sjögren's syndrome is mediated by humoral autoimmunity.

  17. Cri du Chat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cerruti Mainardi, Paola

    2006-01-01

    The Cri du Chat syndrome (CdCS) is a genetic disease resulting from a deletion of variable size occurring on the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-). The incidence ranges from 1:15,000 to 1:50,000 live-born infants. The main clinical features are a high-pitched monochromatic cry, microcephaly, broad nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, abnormal dermatoglyphics, and severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Malformations, although not very frequent, may be present: cardiac, neurological and renal abnormalities, preauricular tags, syndactyly, hypospadias, and cryptorchidism. Molecular cytogenetic analysis has allowed a cytogenetic and phenotypic map of 5p to be defined, even if results from the studies reported up to now are not completely in agreement. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies showed a clinical and cytogenetic variability. The identification of phenotypic subsets associated with a specific size and type of deletion is of diagnostic and prognostic relevance. Specific growth and psychomotor development charts have been established. Two genes, Semaphorin F (SEMAF) and δ-catenin (CTNND2), which have been mapped to the "critical regions", are potentially involved in cerebral development and their deletion may be associated with mental retardation in CdCS patients. Deletion of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, localised to 5p15.33, could contribute to the phenotypic changes in CdCS. The critical regions were recently refined by using array comparative genomic hybridisation. The cat-like cry critical region was further narrowed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and three candidate genes were characterised in this region. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical manifestations. Karyotype analysis and, in doubtful cases, FISH analysis will confirm the diagnosis. There is no specific therapy for CdCS but early rehabilitative and educational interventions improve the prognosis and considerable progress has been made in

  18. Pilot evaluation of a stellate ganglion block for the treatment of hot flashes

    PubMed Central

    Pachman, Deirdre R.; Barton, Debra; Carns, Paul E.; Novotny, Paul J.; Wolf, Sherry; Linquist, Breanna; Kohli, Sadhna; Smith, DeAnne R.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Hot flashes are a significant problem in breast cancer patients, especially because the most effective therapy, estrogen, is often contraindicated. Based on recent pilot data from a single group supporting the use of a stellate ganglion block for the treatment of hot flashes, the present pilot trial was done to further evaluate the hypothesis that a stellate ganglion block may be a safe and effective therapy for hot flashes. Methods In women with breast cancer who had hot flashes, a stellate ganglion block was performed after 1 week of baseline hot flash data collection. The main efficacy measures were the changes from baseline in hot flash frequency and hot flash score during the 6th week. Results Ten patients were enrolled between 4/23/2009 and 7/10/2009; eight patients were evaluable. After the stellate ganglion block, the mean hot flash frequency and score decreased from baseline values by over 60% during some of the post-treatment weeks. The mean hot flash frequency and score at week 6 decreased from baseline values by 44% and 45%, respectively. There were no significant adverse events clearly attributed to the stellate ganglion blocks. Conclusions The results of this pilot trial support that stellate ganglion blocks may be a helpful therapy for hot flashes. A prospective placebo-controlled clinical trial should be done to more definitively determine this contention. PMID:20496155

  19. Cell type-specific bipolar cell input to ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Hüser, L; Ondreka, K; Auler, N; Haverkamp, S

    2016-03-01

    Many distinct ganglion cell types, which are the output elements of the retina, were found to encode for specific features of a visual scene such as contrast, color information or movement. The detailed composition of retinal circuits leading to this tuning of retinal ganglion cells, however, is apart from some prominent examples, largely unknown. Here we aimed to investigate if ganglion cell types in the mouse retina receive selective input from specific bipolar cell types or if they sample their synaptic input non-selectively from all bipolar cell types stratifying within their dendritic tree. To address this question we took an anatomical approach and immunolabeled retinae of two transgenic mouse lines (GFP-O and JAM-B) with markers for ribbon synapses and type 2 bipolar cells. We morphologically identified all green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing ganglion cell types, which co-stratified with type 2 bipolar cells and assessed the total number of bipolar input synapses and the proportion of synapses deriving from type 2 bipolar cells. Only JAM-B ganglion cells received synaptic input preferentially from bipolar cell types other than type 2 bipolar cells whereas the other analyzed ganglion cell types sampled their bipolar input most likely from all bipolar cell terminals within their dendritic arbor.

  20. Broad Thorny Ganglion Cells: A Candidate for Visual Pursuit Error Signaling in the Primate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Manookin, Michael B.; Neitz, Jay; Rieke, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Functional analyses exist only for a few of the morphologically described primate ganglion cell types, and their correlates in other mammalian species remain elusive. Here, we recorded light responses of broad thorny cells in the whole-mounted macaque retina. They showed ON-OFF-center light responses that were strongly suppressed by stimulation of the receptive field surround. Spike responses were delayed compared with parasol ganglion cells and other ON-OFF cells, including recursive bistratified ganglion cells and A1 amacrine cells. The receptive field structure was shaped by direct excitatory synaptic input and strong presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition in both ON and OFF pathways. The cells responded strongly to dark or bright stimuli moving either in or out of the receptive field, independent of the direction of motion. However, they did not show a maintained spike response either to a uniform background or to a drifting plaid pattern. These properties could be ideally suited for guiding movements involved in visual pursuit. The functional characteristics reported here permit the first direct cross-species comparison of putative homologous ganglion cell types. Based on morphological similarities, broad thorny ganglion cells have been proposed to be homologs of rabbit local edge detector ganglion cells, but we now show that the two cells have quite distinct physiological properties. Thus, our data argue against broad thorny cells as the homologs of local edge detector cells. PMID:25834063

  1. Curcumin Attenuates Staurosporine-Mediated Death of Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burugula, Balabharathi; Ganesh, Bhagyalaxmi S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Staurosporine (SS) causes retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. Since previous studies on RGC-5 cells indicated that SS induces cell death by elevating proteases, this study was undertaken to investigate whether SS induces RGC loss by elevating proteases in the retina, and curcumin prevents SS-mediated death of RGCs. Methods. Transformed mouse retinal ganglion-like cells (RGC-5) were treated with 2.0 μM SS and various doses of curcumin. Two optimal doses of SS (12.5 and 100 nM) and curcumin (2.5 and 10 μM) were injected into the vitreous of C57BL/6 mice. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) activities were assessed by zymography assays. Viability of RGC-5 cells was assessed by MTT assays. RGC and amacrine cell loss in vivo was assessed by immunostaining with Brn3a and ChAT antibodies, respectively. Frozen retinal cross sections were immunostained for nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Results. Staurosporine induced uPA and tPA levels in RGC-5 cells, and MMP-9, uPA, and tPA levels in the retinas and promoted the death of RGC-5 cells in vitro and RGCs and amacrine cells in vivo. In contrast, curcumin attenuated RGC and amacrine cell loss, despite elevated levels of proteases. An NF-κB inhibitory peptide reversed curcumin-mediated protective effect on RGC-5 cells, but did not inhibit protease levels. Curcumin did not inhibit protease levels in vivo, but attenuated RGC and amacrine cell loss by restoring NF-κB expression. Conclusions. The results show that curcumin attenuates RGC and amacrine cell death despite elevated levels of proteases and raises the possibility that it may be used as a plausible adjuvant therapeutic agent to prevent the loss of these cells in retinal degenerative conditions. PMID:21498608

  2. L'Aventure du LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-11

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  3. Microarray analysis of gene expression in adult retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Dmitry; Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Nathanson, Lubov; McKinnon, Stuart J; Shestopalov, Valery I

    2006-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) transfer visual information to the brain and are known to be susceptible to selective degeneration in various neuropathies such as glaucoma. This selective vulnerability suggests that these highly specialized neurons possess a distinct gene expression profile that becomes altered by neuropathy-associated stresses, which lead to the RGC death. In this study, to identify genes expressed predominantly in adult RGCs, a global transcriptional profile of purified primary RGCs has been compared to that of the whole retina. To avoid alterations of the original gene expression profile by cell culture conditions, we isolated RNA directly from adult RGCs purified by immunopanning without prior sub-cultivation. Genes expressed predominantly in RGCs included: Nrg1, Rgn, 14-3-3 family (Ywhah, Ywhaz, Ywhab), Nrn1, Gap43, Vsnl1, Rgs4. Some of these genes may serve as novel markers for these neurons. Our analysis revealed enrichment in genes controlling the pro-survival pathways in RGCs as compared to other retinal cells. PMID:16376886

  4. Imaging retinal ganglion cells: enabling experimental technology for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Smith, Corey A; Chauhan, Balwantray C

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in clinical ophthalmic imaging have enhanced patient care. However, the ability to differentiate retinal neurons, such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), would advance many areas within ophthalmology, including the screening and monitoring of glaucoma and other optic neuropathies. Imaging at the single cell level would take diagnostics to the next level. Experimental methods have provided techniques and insight into imaging RGCs, however no method has yet to be translated to clinical application. This review provides an overview of the importance of non-invasive imaging of RGCs and the clinically relevant capabilities. In addition, we report on experimental data from wild-type mice that received an in vivo intravitreal injection of a neuronal tracer that labelled RGCs, which in turn were monitored for up to 100 days post-injection with confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. We were able to demonstrate efficient and consistent RGC labelling with this delivery method and discuss the issue of cell specificity. This type of experimental work is important in progressing towards clinically applicable methods for monitoring loss of RGCs in glaucoma and other optic neuropathies. We discuss the challenges to translating these findings to clinical application and how this method of tracking RGCs in vivo could provide valuable structural and functional information to clinicians. PMID:25448921

  5. Neurotrophic effects of taurine on spiral ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Jürgens, Lukas; Scherzad, Agmal; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Radeloff, Andreas; Jablonka, Sibylle; Mlynski, Robert; Hagen, Rudolf

    2014-11-12

    Taurine is an ubiquitary expressed aminosulfonic acid known to play an important role in the development and maintenance of the nervous system. It is distributed in the inner ear, contributing toward the protection of hair cells against aminoglycoside-induced or bilirubin-induced ototoxicity. Thus, the question arises whether taurine also has an influence on the cellular integrity of the auditory neurons. To test this hypothesis, isolated cells of the spiral ganglion were cocultured with taurine or the neurotrophic factors brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) as controls. The analysis included cellular survival rate and neurite outgrowth. With application of taurine, the survival of glial cells and neurons was stimulated in a similar pattern, whereas BDNF and NT-3 only effected neuronal survival. Furthermore, administration of taurine resulted in enhanced neurite outgrowth comparable with the effect of the neurotrophic factors. These new insights on the neuromodulatory effects of taurine on auditory neurons suggest the use of this aminosulfonic acid to reduce the degeneration of auditory neurons in sensorineural hearing loss. Consecutively, a new therapeutical approach for the therapy of hearing impairment could be discussed. PMID:25202928

  6. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine P; Hung, Sandy S C; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E; Nayagam, Bryony A; Cook, Anthony L; Hewitt, Alex W; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  7. Melanopsin, photosensitive ganglion cells, and seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Roecklein, Kathryn A; Wong, Patricia M; Miller, Megan A; Donofry, Shannon D; Kamarck, Marissa L; Brainard, George C

    2013-03-01

    In two recent reports, melanopsin gene variations were associated with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), and in changes in the timing of sleep and activity in healthy individuals. New studies have deepened our understanding of the retinohypothalamic tract, which translates environmental light received by the retina into neural signals sent to a set of nonvisual nuclei in the brain that are responsible for functions other than sight including circadian, neuroendocrine and neurobehavioral regulation. Because this pathway mediates seasonal changes in physiology, behavior, and mood, individual variations in the pathway may explain why approximately 1-2% of the North American population develops mood disorders with a seasonal pattern (i.e., Major Depressive and Bipolar Disorders with a seasonal pattern, also known as seasonal affective disorder/SAD). Components of depression including mood changes, sleep patterns, appetite, and cognitive performance can be affected by the biological and behavioral responses to light. Specifically, variations in the gene sequence for the retinal photopigment, melanopsin, may be responsible for significant increased risk for mood disorders with a seasonal pattern, and may do so by leading to changes in activity and sleep timing in winter. The retinal sensitivity of SAD is hypothesized to be decreased compared to controls, and that further decrements in winter light levels may combine to trigger depression in winter. Here we outline steps for new research to address the possible role of melanopsin in seasonal affective disorder including chromatic pupillometry designed to measure the sensitivity of melanopsin containing retinal ganglion cells.

  8. Cytoarchitectonic study of the trigeminal ganglion in humans

    PubMed Central

    KRASTEV, DIMO STOYANOV; APOSTOLOV, ALEXANDER

    2013-01-01

    The trigeminal ganglion (TG), a cluster of pseudounipolar neurons, is located in the trigeminal impression of the temporal pyramid. It is covered by a sheath of the dura mater and arachnoid and is near the rear end of the cavernous sinus. The peripheral processes of the pseudounipolar cells are involved in the formation of the first and second branch and the sensory part of the third branch of the fifth cranial nerve, and the central ones form the sensory root of the nerve, which penetrates at the level of the middle cerebellar peduncle, aside from the pons, and terminate in the sensory nuclei of the trigeminal complex. We found that the primary sensory neurons involved in sensory innervation of the orofacial complex are a diverse group. Although they possess the general structure of pseudounipolar neurons, there are significant differences among them, seen in varying intensities of staining. Based on our investigations we classified the neurons into 7 groups, i.e. large, subdivided into light and dark, medium, also light and dark, and small light and dark, and, moreover, neurons with an irregular shape of their perikarya. Further research by applying various immunohistochemical methods will clarify whether differences in the morphological patterns of the neurons are associated with differences in the neurochemical composition of various neuronal types. PMID:26527926

  9. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  10. Developmental mechanisms that regulate retinal ganglion cell dendritic morphology

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ning

    2011-01-01

    One of the fundamental features of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is that dendrites of individual RGCs are confined to one or a few narrow strata within the inner plexiform layer (IPL), and each RGC synapses only with a small group of presynaptic bipolar and amacrine cells with axons/dendrites ramified in the same strata to process distinct visual features. The underlying mechanisms which control the development of this laminar-restricted distribution pattern of RGC dendrites have been extensively studied, and it is still an open question whether the dendritic pattern of RGCs is determined by molecular cues or by activity-dependent refinement. Accumulating evidence suggests that both molecular cues and activity-dependent refinement might regulate RGC dendrites in a cell subtype-specific manner. However, identification of morphological subtypes of RGCs before they have achieved their mature dendritic pattern is a major challenge in the study of RGC dendritic development. This problem is now being circumvented through the use of molecular markers in genetically engineered mouse lines to identify RGC subsets early during development. Another unanswered fundamental question in the study of activity-dependent refinement of RGC dendrites is how changes in synaptic activity lead to the changes in dendritic morphology. Recent studies have started to shed light on the molecular basis of activity-dependent dendritic refinement of RGCs by showing that some molecular cascades control the cytoskeleton reorganization of RGCs. PMID:21542137

  11. Characteristics of sodium currents in rat geniculate ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shiro; Bradley, Robert M

    2011-12-01

    Geniculate ganglion (GG) cell bodies of chorda tympani (CT), greater superficial petrosal (GSP), and posterior auricular (PA) nerves transmit orofacial sensory information to the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract. We have used whole cell recording to investigate the characteristics of the Na(+) channels in isolated Fluorogold-labeled GG neurons that innervate different peripheral receptive fields. GG neurons expressed two classes of Na(+) channels, TTX sensitive (TTX-S) and TTX resistant (TTX-R). The majority of GG neurons expressed TTX-R currents of different amplitudes. TTX-R currents were relatively small in 60% of the neurons but were large in 12% of the sampled population. In a further 28% of the neurons, TTX completely abolished all Na(+) currents. Application of TTX completely inhibited action potential generation in all CT and PA neurons but had little effect on the generation of action potentials in 40% of GSP neurons. Most CT, GSP, and PA neurons stained positively with IB(4), and 27% of the GSP neurons were capsaicin sensitive. The majority of IB(4)-positive GSP neurons with large TTX-R Na(+) currents responded to capsaicin, whereas IB(4)-positive GSP neurons with small TTX-R Na(+) currents were capsaicin insensitive. These data demonstrate the heterogeneity of GG neurons and indicate the existence of a subset of GSP neurons sensitive to capsaicin, usually associated with nociceptors. Since there are no reports of nociceptors in the GSP receptive field, the role of these capsaicin-sensitive neurons is not clear.

  12. Neurochemical properties of the middle cervical ganglion in the sheep.

    PubMed

    Arciszewski, Marcin Bartłomiej; Wasowicz, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    The neurochemical properties of the ovine middle cervical ganglion (MCG) were studied using antibodies raised against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and galanin (GAL). Double-labelling immunocytochemistry revealed that the vast majority (95.5 +/- 0.8%) of postganglionic sympathetic MCG neurons expressed simultaneously both catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes (neurons were TH/DbetaH-positive). A large population of noradrenergic neurons exhibited immunoreactivity (IR) to NPY (62.2 +/- 2.2%), but single NPY-positive perikarya-lacking noradrenergic markers were also observed (2.0 +/- 0.3%). None of the examined MCG neuronal somata contained SP, CGRP, GAL or VIP. A moderate number of noradrenergic nerve fibres located amongst neuronal cell bodies was also found. In small number of these terminals the presence of NPYor GAL (but not CGRP or VIP) was detected. The ovine MCG was numerously innervated with SP-immunoreactive nerve fibres which sometimes formed basket-like formations around postganglionic neurons. The MCG exhibited a sparse CGRP-immunoreactive innervation and lacked VIP-positive nerve terminals. In many aspects the chemical coding of MCG postganglionic neurons and nerve terminals resembles that found in other mammalian cervico-thoracic paravertebral ganglia, but some important species-dependent differences exist. The functional implications of these differences remain to be elucidated. PMID:16447916

  13. The first described joint-associated intraneural ganglion cyst.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Robert J; Wang, Huan

    2011-12-01

    This article describes the identification of the first known specimen in which an articular origin for an intraneural cyst was recognized. Prompted by early citations in the 20th century of a valuable 1904 tibial intraneural ganglion housed at St. Bartholomew's Hospital in London, we traveled there to research it. We fortuitously discovered a citation to an earlier joint-related specimen, one that had not previously been referenced correctly in subsequent publications on intraneural cysts for more than a century. The original anatomic description dating to 1884, summarized in 3 lines in a museum catalog, was attributed to T. Swinford Edwards. This cadaveric specimen affected the deep branch of the ulnar nerve and arose from a carpal joint. Additional information was provided in a Transactions in 1884. An original drawing of the specimen was published in a textbook written in 1889 by Anthony Bowlby, a former curator, both of which credited F. (Frederick) Swinford Edwards, a demonstrator in anatomy and surgery at St. Bartholomew's. Unfortunately, the specimen could not be located and is presumed lost. To establish this specimen as the first known example of a joint-related intraneural cyst, we completed a review of >400 other cases and confirmed this statement. The first observation of an articular origin for an intraneural cyst, made by 2 eminent surgeons, has not been properly acknowledged. Considered with a modern perspective, this historical case solidifies the articular (synovial) origin for these unusual intraneural cysts, a finding that has important treatment implications.

  14. Enteric ganglionitis in rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Orandle, Marlene S; Veazey, Ronald S; Lackner, Andrew A

    2007-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a debilitating feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that can occur in the absence of histopathological abnormalities or identifiable enteropathogens. However, the mechanisms of GI dysfunction are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to characterize changes in resident and inflammatory cells in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of macaques during the acute stage of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection to gain insight into potential pathogenic mechanisms of GI disease. Ganglia from duodenum, ileum, and colon were examined in healthy and acutely infected macaques by using a combination of routine histology, double-label immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization. Evaluation of tissues from infected macaques showed progressive infiltration of myenteric ganglia by CD3+ T cells and IBA1+ macrophages beginning as early as 8 days postinfection. Quantitative image analysis revealed that the severity of myenteric ganglionitis increased with time after SIV infection and, in general, was more severe in ganglia from the small intestine than in ganglia from the colon. Despite an abundance of inflammatory cells in myenteric ganglia during acute infection, the ENS was not a target for virus infection. This study provides evidence that the ENS may be playing a role in the pathogenesis of GI disease and enteropathy in HIV-infected people.

  15. THE NISSL SUBSTANCE OF LIVING AND FIXED SPINAL GANGLION CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Deitch, Arline D.; Murray, Margaret R.

    1956-01-01

    Living chick embryo spinal ganglion neurons grown from 1 to 4 weeks in vitro were studied under the phase contrast microscope. In the peripheral cytoplasm of the earliest stages studied, a homogeneous, phase-dense material is seen which corresponds in location to the cytoplasmic basophil material of the same stages. As maturation proceeds, this material increases in extent, and becomes separated by lighter channels into discrete bodies. Short fixation by 1 per cent buffered osmium tetroxide followed by post-fixation with neutral buffered formalin does not significantly alter the size, shape, or distribution of any of the cytoplasmic components, and the fixed, hydrated cell is almost indistinguishable from the living cell. Dehydration causes some shrinkage of the fixed preparations, but if the photographs of the stained preparations are enlarged to correspond with those of the living cell, excellent correspondence can be made between at least the larger basophil masses and the larger dark masses seen with phase contrast. Fixation by a formalin-mercuric chloride procedure also results in satisfactory correspondence between the stained Nissl bodies and the phase-dark homogeneous areas. It is concluded that discrete Nissl bodies preexist in the living neuron and are essentially unchanged after good cytological fixation. Evidence is also presented of the presence of neurofibrils in the living state. PMID:13357508

  16. Bistratified ganglion cells of rabbit retina: neural architecture for contrast-independent visual responses.

    PubMed

    Famiglietti, Edward V

    2009-01-01

    Bistratified (BS) ganglion cells have long been recognized in vertebrate retina. Thirty years ago, it became clear that bistratification allows the integration of ON and OFF retinal pathways to produce contrast-independent responses in ganglion cells. Best studied is the type 1 bistratified (BS1) ganglion cell of rabbit retina, the physiologically well-characterized ON-OFF directionally selective (DS) ganglion cell, which is co-stratified with the two types of starburst amacrine (SA) cells in sublaminae a and b of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). DS responses have recently been documented in the latter. In this report, BS1 cells are further studied and are used as "fiducials" to characterize a second type of BS ganglion cell. An example of a possible third type is shown to be distinct from examples of BS1 and BS2 cells. All three have two distinct, narrowly stratified arborizations, one in sublamina a and one in sublamina b. All have similar dimensions, except for their dendritic trees, differing also in branching pattern. BS1 cells have compact, regular, highly branched trees; BS2 cells have significantly larger, more sparsely branched, irregular, radiate trees; the proposed BS3 type is intermediate in field size, and its branching pattern is different from the first two. BS2 and BS3 cells are co-stratified, branching nearer to the margins of the IPL, out of range of SA cells. In a previous report by others, illustrating the morphology of intracellularly stained ganglion cells, one example each of both "orientation-selective" ganglion cells and "uniformity detectors" resembles the BS2 cell. A rationale is presented for correlating BS2 cells with uniformity detectors.

  17. Retinal ganglion cell projections to the hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus, intergeniculate leaflet, and visual midbrain: bifurcation and melanopsin immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Blanchard, Jane H.; Provencio, Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) receives direct retinal input via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT), and the retinal ganglion cells contributing to this projection may be specialized with respect to direct regulation of the circadian clock. However, some ganglion cells forming the RHT bifurcate, sending axon collaterals to the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) through which light has secondary access to the circadian clock. The present studies provide a more extensive examination of ganglion cell bifurcation and evaluate whether ganglion cells projecting to several subcortical visual nuclei contain melanopsin, a putative ganglion cell photopigment. The results showed that retinal ganglion cells projecting to the SCN send collaterals to the IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, and superior colliculus, among other places. Melanopsin-immunoreactive (IR) ganglion cells are present in the hamster retina, and some of these cells project to the SCN, IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, or superior colliculus. Triple-label analysis showed that melanopsin-IR cells bifurcate and project bilaterally to each SCN, but not to the other visual nuclei evaluated. The melanopsin-IR cells have photoreceptive characteristics optimal for circadian rhythm regulation. However, the presence of moderately widespread bifurcation among ganglion cells projecting to the SCN, and projection by melanopsin-IR cells to locations distinct from the SCN and without known rhythm function, suggest that this ganglion cell type is generalized, rather than specialized, with respect to the conveyance of photic information to the brain. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Etude de l'affaiblissement du comportement mecanique du pergelisol du au rechauffement climatique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie

    Le rechauffement climatique predit pour les prochaines decennies, aura des impacts majeurs sur le pergelisol qui sont tres peu documentes pour l'instant. La presente etude a pour but d'evaluer ces impacts sur les proprietes mecaniques du pergelisol et sa stabilite a long terme. Une nouvelle technique d'essai de penetration au cone a taux de deformation controle, a ete developpee pour caracteriser en place le pergelisol. Ces essais geotechniques et la mesure de differentes proprietes physiques ont ete effectues sur une butte de pergelisol au cours du printemps 2000. Le developpement et l'utilisation d'un modele geothermique 1D tenant compte de la thermodependance du comportement mecanique ont permis d'evaluer que les etendues de pergelisol chaud deviendraient instables a la suite d'un rechauffement de l'ordre de 5°C sur cent ans. En effet, la resistance mecanique du pergelisol diminuera alors rapidement jusqu'a 11,6 MPa, ce qui correspond a une perte relative de 98% de la resistance par rapport a un scenario sans rechauffement.

  19. Tetrandrine protects mouse retinal ganglion cells from ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiyi; Yang, Chen; Lu, Jing; Huang, Ping; Barnstable, Colin J; Zhang, Chun; Zhang, Samuel S

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the protective effects of tetrandrine (Tet) on murine ischemia-injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). For this, we used serum deprivation cell model, glutamate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC-5 cell death models, and staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 in vitro. We also investigated cell survival of purified primary-cultured RGCs treated with Tet. An in vivo retinal ischemia/reperfusion model was used to examine RGC survival after Tet administration 1 day before ischemia. We found that Tet affected RGC-5 survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared to dimethyl sulfoxide treatment, Tet increased the numbers of RGC-5 cells by 30% at 72 hours. After 48 hours, Tet protected staurosporine-induced RGC-5 cells from serum deprivation-induced cell death and significantly increased the relative number of cells cultured with 1 mM H2O2 (P<0.01). Several concentrations of Tet significantly prevented 25-mM-glutamate-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Tet also increased primary RGC survival after 72 and 96 hours. Tet administration (10 μM, 2 μL) 1 day before retinal ischemia showed RGC layer loss (greater survival), which was less than those in groups with phosphate-buffered saline intravitreal injection plus ischemia in the central (P=0.005, n=6), middle (P=0.018, n=6), and peripheral (P=0.017, n=6) parts of the retina. Thus, Tet conferred protective effects on serum deprivation models of staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 cells and primary cultured murine RGCs. Furthermore, Tet showed greater in vivo protective effects on RGCs 1 day after ischemia. Tet and ciliary neurotrophic factor maintained the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) of primary cultured RGCs and inhibited the expression of activated caspase-3 and bcl-2 in ischemia/reperfusion-insult retinas. PMID:24711693

  20. Taurine Provides Neuroprotection against Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23115615

  1. Sluggish and Brisk Ganglion Cells Detect Contrast With Similar Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Dhingra, Narender K.; Smith, Robert G.; Sterling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Roughly half of all ganglion cells in mammalian retina belong to the broad class, termed “sluggish.” Many of these cells have small receptive fields and project via lateral geniculate nuclei to visual cortex. However, their possible contributions to perception have been largely ignored because sluggish cells seem to respond weakly compared with the more easily studied “brisk” cells. By selecting small somas under infrared DIC optics and recording with a loose seal, we could routinely isolate sluggish cells. When a spot was matched spatially and temporally to the receptive field center, most sluggish cells could detect the same low contrasts as brisk cells. Detection thresholds for the two groups determined by an “ideal observer” were similar: threshold contrast for sluggish cells was 4.7 ± 0.5% (mean ± SE), and for brisk cells was 3.4 ± 0.3% (Mann-Whitney test: P > 0.05). Signal-to-noise ratios for the two classes were also similar at low contrast. However, sluggish cells saturated at somewhat lower contrasts (contrast for half-maximum response was 14 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2% for brisk cells) and were less sensitive to higher temporal frequencies (when the stimulus frequency was increased from 2 to 4 Hz, the response rate fell by 1.6-fold). Thus the sluggish cells covered a narrower dynamic range and a narrower temporal bandwidth, consistent with their reported lower information rates. Because information per spike is greater at lower firing rates, sluggish cells may represent “cheaper” channels that convey less urgent visual information at a lower energy cost. PMID:15601731

  2. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cell loss in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross‐Cisneros, Fred N.; Koronyo, Yosef; Hannibal, Jens; Gallassi, Roberto; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Sambati, Luisa; Pan, Billy X.; Tozer, Kevin R.; Barboni, Piero; Provini, Federica; Avanzini, Pietro; Carbonelli, Michele; Pelosi, Annalisa; Chui, Helena; Liguori, Rocco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Koronyo‐Hamaoui, Maya; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) are photoreceptors driving circadian photoentrainment, and circadian dysfunction characterizes Alzheimer disease (AD). We investigated mRGCs in AD, hypothesizing that they contribute to circadian dysfunction. Methods We assessed retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in 21 mild‐moderate AD patients, and in a subgroup of 16 we evaluated rest–activity circadian rhythm by actigraphy. We studied postmortem mRGCs by immunohistochemistry in retinas, and axons in optic nerve cross‐sections of 14 neuropathologically confirmed AD patients. We coimmunostained for retinal amyloid β (Aβ) deposition and melanopsin to locate mRGCs. All AD cohorts were compared with age‐matched controls. Results We demonstrated an age‐related optic neuropathy in AD by OCT, with a significant reduction of RNFL thickness (p = 0.038), more evident in the superior quadrant (p = 0.006). Axonal loss was confirmed in postmortem AD optic nerves. Abnormal circadian function characterized only a subgroup of AD patients. Sleep efficiency was significantly reduced in AD patients (p = 0.001). We also found a significant loss of mRGCs in postmortem AD retinal specimens (p = 0.003) across all ages and abnormal mRGC dendritic morphology and size (p = 0.003). In flat‐mounted AD retinas, Aβ accumulation was remarkably evident inside and around mRGCs. Interpretation We show variable degrees of rest–activity circadian dysfunction in AD patients. We also demonstrate age‐related loss of optic nerve axons and specifically mRGC loss and pathology in postmortem AD retinal specimens, associated with Aβ deposition. These results all support the concept that mRGC degeneration is a contributor to circadian rhythm dysfunction in AD. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:90–109 PMID:26505992

  3. Taurine provides neuroprotection against retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases.

  4. Melatonin modulates M4-type ganglion-cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Pack, W; Hill, D D; Wong, K Y

    2015-09-10

    In the retina, melatonin is secreted at night by rod/cone photoreceptors and serves as a dark-adaptive signal. Melatonin receptors have been found in many retinal neurons including melanopsin-containing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), suggesting it could modulate the physiology of these inner retinal photoreceptors. Here, we investigated whether melatonin modulates the alpha-like M4-type ipRGCs, which are believed to mediate image-forming vision as well as non-image-forming photoresponses. Applying melatonin during daytime (when endogenous melatonin secretion is low) caused whole-cell-recorded M4 cells' rod/cone-driven depolarizing photoresponses to become broader and larger, whereas the associated elevation in spike rate was reduced. Melanopsin-based light responses were not affected significantly. Nighttime application of the melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole also altered M4 cells' rod/cone-driven light responses but in the opposite ways: the duration and amplitude of the graded depolarization were reduced, whereas the accompanying spiking increase was enhanced. These luzindole-induced changes confirmed that M4 cells are modulated by endogenous melatonin. Melatonin could induce the above effects by acting directly on M4 cells because immunohistochemistry detected MT1 receptors in these cells, although it could also act presynaptically. Interestingly, the daytime and nighttime recordings showed significant differences in resting membrane potential, spontaneous spike rate and rod/cone-driven light responses, suggesting that M4 cells are under circadian control. This is the first report of a circadian variation in ipRGCs' resting properties and synaptic input, and of melatoninergic modulation of ipRGCs. PMID:26141846

  5. Taurine provides neuroprotection against retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23115615

  6. Sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation for the treatment of cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Puche, Miguel; Garcia, Ana; Gascón, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Cluster headache is a severe, debilitating disorder with pain that ranks among the most severe known to humans. Patients with cluster headaches have few therapeutic options and further, 10–20% develop drug-resistant attacks. The often brief duration of cluster attacks makes abortive therapy a challenge, and preventive medications are almost always provided to patients, but the side effects of these preventive medications can be significant. The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is believed to play a role in headache pain and cranial autonomic symptoms associated with cluster headache, which is a result of activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex. For over 100 years, the SPG has been a clinical target to treat primary headache disorders using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods. Radiofrequency lesioning and nerve-resection therapies, while initially beneficial, are irreversible procedures, and the use of neurostimulation provides one method of interfacing with the neural pathways without causing permanent damage to neural tissue. SPG neurostimulation is both reversible and adjustable, and has recently been tested in both proof-of-concept work and in a randomized, sham-controlled trial for the treatment of cluster headache. A randomized, sham-controlled study of 32 patients was performed to evaluate further the use of SPG stimulation for the acute treatment of chronic cluster headache. Of the 32 patients, 28 completed the randomized experimental period. Overall, 68% of patients experienced an acute response, a frequency response, or both. In this study the majority of adverse events were related to the implantation procedure, which typically resolved or remained mild in nature at 3 months following the implant procedure. This and other studies highlight the promise of using SPG stimulation to treat the pain-associated cluster headache. SPG stimulation could be a safe and effective option for chronic cluster headache. PMID:24790646

  7. Synaptic transmission in the superior cervical ganglion of the cat after reinnervation by vagus fibres

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, B.; Clementi, F.; Mantegazza, P.

    1971-01-01

    1. A vagus-sympathetic anastomosis was performed in the cat by connecting end to end the cranial trunk of the vagus to the cranial end of the cervical sympathetic trunk, both severed under the ganglia. 2. Forty to sixty days after the anastomosis, the ocular signs of sympathetic paralysis (such as myosis and prolapse of the nictitating membrane) which had developed shortly after the operation, had completely disappeared, thus suggesting the recovery of synaptic transmission in the ganglion. In case of plain preganglionic denervation after the same period the ocular signs of cervical sympathetic paralysis were still present. 3. Contraction of the nictitating membrane could be induced by electrical stimulation of both the vagus preanastomotic and the sympathetic postanastomotic—preganglionic trunks. Ganglionic blocking agents induced the blockade of the `new' ganglionic synaptic function, while nicotine and pilocarpine provoked a marked contraction of the nictitating membrane. 4. Electron microscopy showed that the preganglionic regeneration of vagus fibers resulted in the formation of new synapses, mainly of axodendritic type, identical to normal ganglionic synapses. Moreover, after cutting the preanastomotic trunk of the vagus, these new ganglionic presynaptic profiles degenerated, thus proving their vagal origin. 5. During restoration of the synaptic contacts readjustment of dendritic tips occurred. ImagesText-fig. 2Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4326851

  8. Spiral ganglion outgrowth and hearing development in p75-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Brors, Dominik; Hansen, Stefan; Mlynski, Robert; Volkenstein, Stefan; Aletsee, Christoph; Sendtner, Michael; Ryan, Allen F; Dazert, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    To explore the role of nerve growth factor receptor p75(NTR) during the terminal neuronal development of the mammalian cochlea the onset of hearing and the in vitro response of spiral ganglion neurites to neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), which is known to play a critical role during neonatal inner ear development, were investigated in p75(NTR)-deficient mice (p75(NTR)-/-). Auditory-evoked brain stem response recordings from p75(NTR)-/- and wild-type (WT) littermates were measured from postnatal days (PD) 8 to 23. Additionally, spiral ganglion explants from p75(NTR)-/- and WT animals were dissected and cultured in an organotypic tissue culture system. In both groups, spiral ganglion neurite outgrowth was analyzed with and without NT-3 supplementation. No significant differences in the onset of hearing of mutant mice compared to the WT mice were detected, and both groups showed a similar development of hearing until PD 23. After stimulation with NT-3, neurite outgrowth was enhanced in both p75(NTR)-/- and WT mice. However, neurites from p75(NTR)-/- spiral ganglion explants were longer in both culture conditions. Moreover, NT-3 did not significantly enhance neurite number in p75(NTR)-/-, as it did in WT mice. P75(NTR) has a remarkable influence on spiral ganglion neurite growth behavior. However, p75(NTR) does not seem to be essential for the development of basic hearing function in the first 3 postnatal weeks.

  9. Spiral ganglion outgrowth and hearing development in p75-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Brors, Dominik; Hansen, Stefan; Mlynski, Robert; Volkenstein, Stefan; Aletsee, Christoph; Sendtner, Michael; Ryan, Allen F; Dazert, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    To explore the role of nerve growth factor receptor p75(NTR) during the terminal neuronal development of the mammalian cochlea the onset of hearing and the in vitro response of spiral ganglion neurites to neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), which is known to play a critical role during neonatal inner ear development, were investigated in p75(NTR)-deficient mice (p75(NTR)-/-). Auditory-evoked brain stem response recordings from p75(NTR)-/- and wild-type (WT) littermates were measured from postnatal days (PD) 8 to 23. Additionally, spiral ganglion explants from p75(NTR)-/- and WT animals were dissected and cultured in an organotypic tissue culture system. In both groups, spiral ganglion neurite outgrowth was analyzed with and without NT-3 supplementation. No significant differences in the onset of hearing of mutant mice compared to the WT mice were detected, and both groups showed a similar development of hearing until PD 23. After stimulation with NT-3, neurite outgrowth was enhanced in both p75(NTR)-/- and WT mice. However, neurites from p75(NTR)-/- spiral ganglion explants were longer in both culture conditions. Moreover, NT-3 did not significantly enhance neurite number in p75(NTR)-/-, as it did in WT mice. P75(NTR) has a remarkable influence on spiral ganglion neurite growth behavior. However, p75(NTR) does not seem to be essential for the development of basic hearing function in the first 3 postnatal weeks. PMID:18663291

  10. Multiple innervation of normal and re-innervated parasympathetic neurones in the frog cardiac ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, M J; Sargent, P B

    1978-01-01

    1. Multiple innervation of parasympathetic neurones was examined in normal and re-innervated frog cardiac ganglia. The number of synaptic inputs impinging upon individual ganglion cells was determined by recording intracellularly and stimulating the vagosympathetic nerves. 2. In unoperated cardiac ganglia most neurones (93%) received a large, suprathreshold synaptic input. Some ganglion cells received additional, small synaptic inputs. Roughly equal numbers of cells encountered were singly and doubly innervated, and only 8% received more than two inputs. 3. Re-innervation of cardiac ganglion cells began three weeks after bilateral crush of the vagosympathetic nerves. By 7 weeks more than 90% of the ganglion cells were re-innervated. At this stage the pattern of multiple innervation was significantly different than normal: doubly innervated neurones outnumbered singly innervated ones, and 31% of the cells encountered received more than two inputs. This pattern was stable for at least a year. 4. These results indicate that polyneuronal innervation of cardiac ganglion cells is more widespread after re-innervation than it is normally and, furthermore, that synapse elimination does not occur during re-innervation of these cells. Images Plate 1 PMID:212557

  11. Mosaic properties of midget and parasol ganglion cells in the marmoset retina.

    PubMed

    Szmajda, Brett A; Grünert, Ulrike; Martin, Paul R

    2005-01-01

    We measured mosaic properties of midget and parasol ganglion cells in the retina of a New World monkey, the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus . We addressed the functional specialization of these populations for color and spatial vision, by comparing the mosaic of ganglion cells in dichromatic ("red-green color blind") and trichromatic marmosets. Ganglion cells were labelled by photolytic amplification of retrograde marker ("photofilling") following injections into the lateral geniculate nucleus, or by intracellular injection in an in vitro retinal preparation. The dendritic-field size, shape, and overlap of neighboring cells were measured. We show that in marmosets, both midget and parasol cells exhibit a radial bias, so that the long axis of the dendritic field points towards the fovea. The radial bias is similar for parasol cells and midget cells, despite the fact that midget cell dendritic fields are more elongated than are those of parasol cells. The dendritic fields of midget ganglion cells from the same (ON or OFF) response-type array show very little overlap, consistent with the low coverage of the midget mosaic in humans. No large differences in radial bias, or overlap, were seen on comparing retinae from dichromatic and trichromatic animals. These data suggest that radial bias in ganglion cell populations is a consistent feature of the primate retina. Furthermore, they suggest that the mosaic properties of the midget cell population are associated with high spatial resolution rather than being specifically associated with trichromatic color vision. PMID:16212698

  12. Retinal Ganglion Cell Topography and Retinal Resolution in the Baikal Seal (Pusa sibirica).

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, Alexander Y

    2016-01-01

    The total number, size, topographic distribution, and cell density of ganglion cells were studied in retinal wholemounts of Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica). The ganglion cell size varied from 10 to 38 μm. A distinct cell group consisted of large ganglion cells of more than 30 μm in diameter. The topographic distribution of ganglion cells showed a definite area of high cell density similar to the area centralis of terrestrial carnivores. This area was located approximately 6-7 mm dorsotemporally of the geometric center of the wholemount. In this area, the peak cell densities in two wholemounts were 3,800 and 3,400 cells/mm2 (mean 3,600 cells/mm2). With a posterior nodal distance of 24 mm (underwater), this density corresponds to 631 cells/square degree. These values predict a retinal resolution of 2.4' in water and 3.0' in air. The topographic distribution of large cells featured the highest density in the same location as the total ganglion cell population. PMID:27529170

  13. Neuropeptides, amines and amino acids in an elementary insect ganglion: functional and chemical anatomy of the unfused abdominal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Nässel, D R

    1996-01-01

    The insect ventral nerve cord consists of metamerically repeated ganglia subserving the thoracic and abdominal segments. The abdominal ganglia control basic functions such as respiration, circulation, heartbeat, diuresis, hindgut motility, functions of the genitalia and ovipositor and abdominal posture. Some of this control is by efferent innervation of target tissues but hormonal control also is exerted by abdominal neurosecretory cells via release from neurohemal organs or other release sites. The present review summarizes what is known about the distribution of neurotransmitters, monoamines and neuropeptides in the abdominal ganglia of different insect species. Special emphasis is on the unfused abdominal ganglion, since this is the least complex of all central ganglia and therefore may reveal the minimum number of neuroactive compounds utilized in neurotransmission, neuromodulation and neurohormonal control. Both GABA and glutamate are present in both interneurons and motoneurons, whereas biogenic amines such as serotonin, dopamine and histamine are found primarily in interneurons (although some cases of sensory cells and efferent neurons are known). Octopamine can be seen both in interneurons, efferent neurons and neurosecretory cells. A large number (about 20 different main types) of neuropeptides has been indicated in abdominal ganglia. Each peptide has a very specific distribution pattern. Depending on the peptide type, the localization is known to be in interneurons, neurosecretory cells or motoneurons, or combinations of these. The structure and known functions of the different neuropeptides in different insect species are summarized in some detail. Both GABA and glutamate appear to have roles as fast neurotransmitters, whereas amines and neuropeptides seem to have modulatory roles both within the CNS and at peripheral targets. After a comprehensive overview of different substances in studied insect species, the unfused abdominal ganglia from the moth

  14. L'Aventure du LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  15. [Histoenzymologic features of adrenal medulla ganglionic cells 60 days after exposure to detergents].

    PubMed

    Devecerski, V; Marjanov, M; Milićević, S

    1993-01-01

    We investigated histochemical reactions in adrenal medulla sympathic ganglionic cells in the animals who after a 30-day stay in a detergent manufactory department survived 60 days in laboratory conditions. The obtained data show a strong isocytrate dehydrogenase activity in the experimental animals; the reaction to the lactate dehydrogenase activity reflects a decrease of the ganglionic cell volume and a slight decrease of the reaction intensity. The activity of isoenzyme F is mildly increased; similarly was found for isoenzyme S. There was a significant decrease of the succinate dehydrogenase activity--all this was detected in the animals exposed to detergents. Sympathic ganglionic cells within the adrenal medulla are rather sensitive to the influence of detergents. The recovery after the exposure to their toxic effects takes more than 2 months.

  16. Visual pattern recognition based on spatio-temporal patterns of retinal ganglion cells’ activities

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Wei; Liu, Wen-Zhong; Gong, Xin-Wei; Gong, Hai-Qing

    2010-01-01

    Neural information is processed based on integrated activities of relevant neurons. Concerted population activity is one of the important ways for retinal ganglion cells to efficiently organize and process visual information. In the present study, the spike activities of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells in response to three different visual patterns (checker-board, vertical gratings and horizontal gratings) were recorded using multi-electrode arrays. A measurement of subsequence distribution discrepancy (MSDD) was applied to identify the spatio-temporal patterns of retinal ganglion cells’ activities in response to different stimulation patterns. The results show that the population activity patterns were different in response to different stimulation patterns, such difference in activity pattern was consistently detectable even when visual adaptation occurred during repeated experimental trials. Therefore, the stimulus pattern can be reliably discriminated according to the spatio-temporal pattern of the neuronal activities calculated using the MSDD algorithm. PMID:21886670

  17. Evidence for a novel regulatory pathway for herpes simplex virus gene expression in trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Kosz-Vnenchak, M; Jacobson, J; Coen, D M; Knipe, D M

    1993-01-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK)-negative (TK-) mutant strains of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) show reduced expression of alpha and beta viral genes during acute infection of trigeminal ganglion neurons following corneal infection (M. Kosz-Vnenchak, D. M. Coen, and D. M. Knipe, J. Virol. 64:5396-5402, 1990). It was surprising that a defect in a beta gene product would lead to decreased alpha and beta gene expression, given the regulatory pathways demonstrated for HSV infection of cultured cells. In this study, we have examined viral gene expression during reactivation from latent infection in explanted trigeminal ganglion tissue. In explant reactivation studies with wild-type virus, we observed viral productive gene expression over the first 48 h of explant incubation occurring in a temporal order (alpha, beta, gamma) similar to that in cultured cells. This occurred predominantly in latency-associated transcript-positive neurons but was limited to a fraction of these cells. In contrast, TK- mutant viruses showed greatly reduced alpha and beta gene expression upon explant of latently infected trigeminal ganglion tissue. An inhibitor of viral TK or an inhibitor of viral DNA polymerase greatly decreased viral lytic gene expression in trigeminal ganglion tissue latently infected with wild-type virus and explanted in culture. These results indicate that the regulatory mechanisms governing HSV gene expression are different in trigeminal ganglion neurons and cultured cells. We present a new model for viral gene expression in trigeminal ganglion neurons with implications for the nature of the decision process between latent infection and productive infection by HSV. Images PMID:8394454

  18. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided aspiration of an anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: description of technique and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Krill, Michael; Peck, Evan

    2014-12-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst is an infrequent but potentially clinically significant cause of knee pain. Although the cyst may be removed surgically, percutaneous ultrasound-guided anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst aspiration and injection is feasible. To our knowledge, we present the first reported case description of the utilization of ultrasound guidance to perform this procedure with a successful clinical outcome.

  19. Displaced retinal ganglion cells in albino and pigmented rats

    PubMed Central

    Nadal-Nicolás, Francisco M.; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Sobrado-Calvo, Paloma; Villegas-Pérez, María P.; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta

    2014-01-01

    We have studied in parallel the population of displaced retinal ganglion cells (dRGCs) and normally placed (orthotopic RGCs, oRGCs) in albino and pigmented rats. Using retrograde tracing from the optic nerve, from both superior colliculi (SC) or from the ipsilateral SC in conjunction with Brn3 and melanopsin immunodetection, we report for the first time their total number and topography as well as the number and distribution of those dRGCs and oRGCs that project ipsi- or contralaterally and/or that express any of the three Brn3 isoforms or melanopsin. The total number of RGCs (oRGCs+dRGCs) is 84,706 ± 1249 in albino and 90,440 ± 2236 in pigmented, out of which 2383 and 2428 are melanopsin positive (m-RGCs), respectively. Regarding dRGCs: i/ albino rats have a significantly lower number of dRGCs than pigmented animals (0.5% of the total number of RGCs vs. 2.5%, respectively), ii/ dRGCs project massively to the contralateral SC, iii/ the percentage of ipsilaterality is higher for dRGCs than for oRGCs, iv/ a higher proportion of ipsilateral dRGCs is observed in albino than pigmented animals, v/ dRGC topography is very specific, they predominate in the equatorial temporal retina, being densest where the oRGCs are densest, vi/ Brn3a detects all dRGCs except half of the ipsilateral ones and those that express melanopsin, vii/ the proportion of dRGCs that express Brn3b or Brn3c is slightly lower than in the oRGC population, viii/ a higher percentage of dRGCs (13% albino, 9% pigmented) than oRGCs (2.6%) express melanopsin, ix/ few m-RGCs (displaced and orthotopic) project to the ipsilateral SC, x/ the topography of m-dRGCs does not resemble the general distribution of dRGCs, xi/ The soma size in m-oRGCs ranges from 10 to 21 μm and in m-dRGCs from 8 to 15 μm, xii/ oRGCs and dRGCs have the same susceptibility to axonal injury and ocular hypertension. Although the role of mammalian dRGCs remains to be determined, our data suggest that they are not misplaced by an

  20. Chemical ablation of stellate ganglion for head and neck cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Ghai, A; Kaushik, T; Kumar, R; Wadhera, S

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of patient with orofacial cancer having pain on one side of face affecting her ability to speak, chew, swallow and sleep leading to emotional and behavioral deterioration. A diagnostic stellate ganglion block was performed followed by chemical neurolysis using phenol under ultrasound guidance, to prevent complications due to inadvertent spread of drug. Her pain scores decreased drastically, she was able to chew and swallow. Weighing the risk of permanent Horner's syndrome or motor paralysis with benefit of improvement in basic functioning of debilitated patients chemical neurolysis of stellate ganglion can be performed with advanced imaging modalities. PMID:27363209

  1. The relation between resolution measurements and numbers of retinal ganglion cells in the same human subjects.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Zoran; Sjöstrand, Johan

    2005-08-01

    Limiting factors of resolution have previously only been investigated by using resolution data and retinal ganglion cell spacing data from different individuals. We report on our unique opportunity to study the intra-individual relationship in three human subjects between retinal ganglion cell separations and resolution thresholds, measured with high-pass resolution perimetry. Our data show that resolution is directly proportional to half the midget population, in accordance with the hypothesis that a dichotomous midget ON/OFF population mediates resolution. PMID:15924946

  2. Encephalomyeloneuropathy with ganglionitis of the myenteric plexuses in the absence of cancer.

    PubMed

    Horoupian, D S; Kim, Y

    1982-06-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with rapidly progressive brainstem dysfunction which led to death within a month. She also had constipation for three weeks, and barium enema showed ileus. Subacute encephalomyelitis predominantly involving the medulla and pons correlated with the patient's initial symptoms. In addition, ganglionitis of the myenteric plexuses explained the constipation and ileus. Ganglioradiculoneuropathy was another finding. The presence of abundant neuronophagia in the brainstem, dorsal root ganglia, and myenteric plexuses raised the speculation that a putative virus, toxic agent, or immune reaction possessed special affinity for neurons and ganglion cells. The neuropathological findings were similar to paraneoplastic changes, but no neoplasm was found.

  3. FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the ventral ganglion of the fly Sarcophaga bullata: metamorphic changes.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, P

    1991-01-01

    1. Localization of FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity was examined in the ventral ganglion of the fly Sarcophaga bullata using the indirect immunofluorescent method. 2. There are six large cells in the thoracic ganglion which are highly immunoreactive at all stages of development. 3. During metamorphosis the thoracic FLI neurons shift their position from ventrolateral to mid-ventral position and their axons terminate and elaborate a highly immunoreactive dorsal neural sheath. 4. It is suggested that the dorsal neural sheath may function as a neurohaemal organ from which FMRFamide-like substances may be released into the haemolymph to act as neurohormones.

  4. A Thy1-CFP DBA/2J mouse line with cyan fluorescent protein expression in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    RAYMOND, IONA D.; POOL, ANGELA L.; VILA, ALEJANDRO; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2013-01-01

    A DBA/2J (D2) transgenic mouse line with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) reporter expression in ganglion cells was developed for the analysis of ganglion cells during progressive glaucoma. The Thy1-CFP D2 (CFP-D2) line was created by congenically breeding the D2 line, which develops pigmentary glaucoma, and the Thy1-CFP line, which expresses CFP in ganglion cells. Microsatellite marker analysis of CFP-D2 progeny verified the genetic inclusion of the D2 isa and ipd loci. Specific mutations within these loci lead to dysfunctional melanosomal proteins and glaucomatous phenotype in D2 mice. Polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the inclusion of the Thy1-CFP transgene. CFP-fluorescent ganglion cells, 6–20 μm in diameter, were distributed in all retinal regions, CFP processes were throughout the inner plexiform layer, and CFP-fluorescent axons were in the fiber layer and optic nerve head. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies to ganglion cell markers NF-L, NeuN, Brn3a, and SMI32 was used to confirm CFP expression in ganglion cells. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies to amacrine cell markers HPC-1 and ChAT was used to confirm weak CFP expression in cholinergic amacrine cells. CFP-D2 mice developed a glaucomatous phenotype, including iris disease, ganglion cell loss, attrition of the fiber layer, and elevated intraocular pressure. A CFP-D2 transgenic line with CFP-expressing ganglion cells was developed, which has (1) a predominantly D2 genetic background, (2) CFP-expressing ganglion cells, and (3) age-related progressive glaucoma. This line will be of value for experimental studies investigating ganglion cells and their axons in vivo and in vitro during the progressive development of glaucoma. PMID:19930759

  5. Macroanatomical investigation of the aorticorenal ganglion in 1-day-old infant sheep.

    PubMed

    Klećkowska-Nawrot, J; Kaczyńska, K; Jakubowska, W

    2009-06-01

    The aorticorenal gland belongs to the paired splanchnic ganglion, which is the main component of the coeliac plexus. It lies near the renal artery and suprarenal gland. The research was conducted on 13 1-day-old infant sheep - eight males and five females. Based on the conducted studies, it was concluded that the aorticorenal ganglion is characterized by the variable location in relation to the abdominal aorta, renal artery, caudal vena cava and suprarenal gland (holotopy), the thoracic and lumbar segment of the vertebral column (skeletotopy) (between L(1) and L(3)) and also a different shape (elongated, round, triangular, oval) as well as variable length (the aorticorenal ganglion is longer on the left side of the body; 2.72 mm) and distance from the caudal end of the suprarenal gland (longer on the left side of the body; 8.34 mm). With regard to the sex of the animal, the ganglion is the longest on the left side in ewes (3.02 mm), while in rams it is the longest on the right side (2.68 mm). Regarding the division according to sex, the longest segment was observed on the right side in ewes (9.27 mm), and the shortest segment in rams was also on the right side (6.84 mm).

  6. Contribution of the GABAergic pathway(s) to the correlated activities of chicken retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue; Zhou, Yi; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2007-10-26

    In the present study, the spatiotemporal pattern of chicken retinal ganglion cells' firing activity in response to full-field white light stimulation was investigated. Cross-correlation analysis showed that ganglion cells of sustained subtype fired in precise synchrony with their adjacent neurons of the same subtype (delay lag within 2 ms, narrow correlation). On the other hand, the activities of neighboring ganglion cells of transient subtype were correlated with distributed time lags (10-30 ms, medium correlation). Pharmacological studies demonstrated that the intensity of the medium correlations could be strengthened when exogenous GABA was applied and attenuated when GABA receptors were blocked by picrotoxin. Meanwhile, the GABAergic modulation on the narrow correlations was not consistent. These results suggest that, in the chicken retina, GABAergic pathway(s) are likely involved in the formation of medium correlations between ganglion cells. Neurons might fire at a lower rate but with higher level of synchronization to improve the efficiency of information transmission, with the mechanism involving the GABAergic inhibitory input. PMID:17919471

  7. Ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution in the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Ketten, Darlene R; Odell, Daniel K; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2012-01-01

    The topographic organization of retinal ganglion cells was examined in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) to assess ganglion cell size and distribution and to estimate retinal resolution. The ganglion cell layer of the manatee's retina was comprised primarily of large neurons with broad intercellular spaces. Cell sizes varied from 10 to 60 μm in diameter (mean 24.3 μm). The retinal wholemounts from adult animals measured 446-501 mm(2) in area with total ganglion cell counts of 62,000-81,800 (mean 70,200). The cell density changed across the retina, with the maximum in the area below the optic disc and decreasing toward the retinal edges and in the immediate vicinity of the optic disc. The maximum cell density ranged from 235 to 337 cells per millimeter square in the adult retinae. Two wholemounts obtained from juvenile animals were 271 and 282 mm(2) in area with total cell numbers of 70,900 and 68,700, respectively (mean 69,800), that is, nearly equivalent to those of adults, but juvenile retinae consequently had maximum cell densities that were higher than those of adults: 478 and 491 cells per millimeter square. Calculations indicate a retinal resolution of ∼19' (1.6 cycles per degree) in both adult and juvenile retinae.

  8. Expression of squid iridescence depends on environmental luminance and peripheral ganglion control.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bellido, P T; Wardill, T J; Buresch, K C; Ulmer, K M; Hanlon, R T

    2014-03-15

    Squid display impressive changes in body coloration that are afforded by two types of dynamic skin elements: structural iridophores (which produce iridescence) and pigmented chromatophores. Both color elements are neurally controlled, but nothing is known about the iridescence circuit, or the environmental cues, that elicit iridescence expression. To tackle this knowledge gap, we performed denervation, electrical stimulation and behavioral experiments using the long-fin squid, Doryteuthis pealeii. We show that while the pigmentary and iridescence circuits originate in the brain, they are wired differently in the periphery: (1) the iridescence signals are routed through a peripheral center called the stellate ganglion and (2) the iridescence motor neurons likely originate within this ganglion (as revealed by nerve fluorescence dye fills). Cutting the inputs to the stellate ganglion that descend from the brain shifts highly reflective iridophores into a transparent state. Taken together, these findings suggest that although brain commands are necessary for expression of iridescence, integration with peripheral information in the stellate ganglion could modulate the final output. We also demonstrate that squid change their iridescence brightness in response to environmental luminance; such changes are robust but slow (minutes to hours). The squid's ability to alter its iridescence levels may improve camouflage under different lighting intensities.

  9. Post-Ganglionic Horner's Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz e Resende, Lucilene Silva; Gaiolla, Rafael Dezen; Niéro-Melo, Lígia; Custódio Domingues, Maria Aparecida; de Lima Resende, Luiz Antônio

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present the rare case of a patient with cervical lymphadenopathy diagnosed as a T-cell-rich B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that manifested Horner's syndrome due to a post-ganglionic sympathetic neuron lesion caused by the tumor. PMID:22611367

  10. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss. PMID:26379056

  11. Effects of axotomy or target atrophy on membrane properties of rat sympathetic ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Vives, M V; Gallego, R

    1993-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of rat superior cervical ganglion cells were examined in vitro with intracellular microelectrodes after axotomy or atrophy of the submandibular salivary gland. 2. Membrane time constant, input resistance and excitatory synaptic potentials (EPSPs) were decreased to about 50% of their control values 7-10 days after axotomy. 3. Axotomized ganglion cells also showed reduced action potentials and after-hyperpolarizations (AHPs). The AHP duration was reduced to 40% of the control value. 4. In 25% of the axotomized cells, the action potential was followed by an after-depolarization (ADP) instead of the AHP that was always present in control cells. In eleven out of seventeen axotomized cells with ADP, preganglionic stimulation failed to evoke an EPSP, whereas the failure of the synaptic response was never observed in control cells and occurred only in two of fifty-three axotomized cells with AHP. 5. In some axotomized cells with AHP, a depolarizing potential developed after a train of action potentials. This was never observed in control cells. 6. Sympathetic neurones innervating the submandibular gland in control animals had membrane properties similar to those observed in other ganglion cells. 7. The properties of neurones innervating the submandibular gland remained unaltered after the experimentally induced atrophy of the gland. 8. It is concluded that the marked effects of short-term axotomy on membrane properties of sympathetic ganglion cells are not reproduced by long-term atrophy of the target tissue. PMID:8120834

  12. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss.

  13. Ocular anatomy, ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution of a killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, Alexander Y; Abramov, Andrey V; Mukhametov, Lev M; Rozanova, Elena I

    2013-01-01

    Retinal topography, cell density and sizes of ganglion cells in the killer whale (Orcinus orca) were analyzed in retinal whole mounts stained with cresyl violet. A distinctive feature of the killer whale's retina is the large size of ganglion cells and low cell density compared to terrestrial mammals. The ganglion cell diameter ranged from 8 to 100 µm, with the majority of cells within a range of 20-40 µm. The topographic distribution of ganglion cells displayed two spots of high cell density located in the temporal and nasal quadrants, 20 mm from the optic disk. The high-density areas were connected by a horizontal belt-like area passing below the optic disk of the retina. Peak cell densities in these areas were evaluated. Mean peak cell densities were 334 and 288 cells/mm(2) in the temporal and nasal high-density areas, respectively. With a posterior nodal distance of 19.5 mm, these high-density data predict a retinal resolution of 9.6' (3.1 cycles/deg.) and 12.6' (2.4 cycles/deg.) in the temporal and nasal areas, respectively, in water. PMID:23018493

  14. Ocular anatomy, ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution of a killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, Alexander Y; Abramov, Andrey V; Mukhametov, Lev M; Rozanova, Elena I

    2013-01-01

    Retinal topography, cell density and sizes of ganglion cells in the killer whale (Orcinus orca) were analyzed in retinal whole mounts stained with cresyl violet. A distinctive feature of the killer whale's retina is the large size of ganglion cells and low cell density compared to terrestrial mammals. The ganglion cell diameter ranged from 8 to 100 µm, with the majority of cells within a range of 20-40 µm. The topographic distribution of ganglion cells displayed two spots of high cell density located in the temporal and nasal quadrants, 20 mm from the optic disk. The high-density areas were connected by a horizontal belt-like area passing below the optic disk of the retina. Peak cell densities in these areas were evaluated. Mean peak cell densities were 334 and 288 cells/mm(2) in the temporal and nasal high-density areas, respectively. With a posterior nodal distance of 19.5 mm, these high-density data predict a retinal resolution of 9.6' (3.1 cycles/deg.) and 12.6' (2.4 cycles/deg.) in the temporal and nasal areas, respectively, in water.

  15. Infrared-sensitive pit organ and trigeminal ganglion in the crotaline snakes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The infrared (IR) receptors in the pit organ of crotaline snakes are very sensitive to temperature. The sensitivity to IR radiation is much greater in crotaline snakes than in boid snakes because they have a thermosensitive membrane suspended in a pair of pits that comprise the pit organ. The vasculature of the pit membrane, which is located near IR-sensitive terminal nerve masses, the IR receptors, supplies the blood necessary to provide cooling and the energy and oxygen that the IR receptors require. The ophthalmic and maxillary branches of the trigeminal nerve innervate the pit membrane. In crotaline snakes, the trigeminal ganglion (TG) is divided into the ophthalmic and maxillomandibular ganglia; a prominent septum further separates the two divisions of the maxillomandibular ganglion. The TG neurons in the ophthalmic ganglion and the maxillary division of the maxillomandibular ganglion relay IR sensation to the brain. This article reviews the IR-sensitive pit organ and trigeminal sensory system structures in crotaline snakes. PMID:21519544

  16. Ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution in the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Ketten, Darlene R; Odell, Daniel K; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2012-01-01

    The topographic organization of retinal ganglion cells was examined in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) to assess ganglion cell size and distribution and to estimate retinal resolution. The ganglion cell layer of the manatee's retina was comprised primarily of large neurons with broad intercellular spaces. Cell sizes varied from 10 to 60 μm in diameter (mean 24.3 μm). The retinal wholemounts from adult animals measured 446-501 mm(2) in area with total ganglion cell counts of 62,000-81,800 (mean 70,200). The cell density changed across the retina, with the maximum in the area below the optic disc and decreasing toward the retinal edges and in the immediate vicinity of the optic disc. The maximum cell density ranged from 235 to 337 cells per millimeter square in the adult retinae. Two wholemounts obtained from juvenile animals were 271 and 282 mm(2) in area with total cell numbers of 70,900 and 68,700, respectively (mean 69,800), that is, nearly equivalent to those of adults, but juvenile retinae consequently had maximum cell densities that were higher than those of adults: 478 and 491 cells per millimeter square. Calculations indicate a retinal resolution of ∼19' (1.6 cycles per degree) in both adult and juvenile retinae. PMID:21964938

  17. Characterization of a putative acetylcholine receptor in chick ciliary ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Stollberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to the main immunogenic region on the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptors in muscle and electric organ recognize membrane components in chick brain and ciliary ganglia that are candidates for the neuronal receptor. The component in chick brain has been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. It specifically binds nicotine but not alpha-bungarotoxin, and can be affinity labeled with (/sup 3/H)bromoacetylcholine. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is concentrated in synaptic membrane, and can be modulated by exposure of the cells to cholinergic ligands in culture. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is an integral membrane component that binds concanavalin A, and it is distinct from the alpha-bungarotoxin binding component. The acetylcholine receptor function in these neurons can be locked by affinity alkylation with bromoacetylcholine, indicating similarity in this respect to receptors from muscle and electric organ. Antisera raised against the partially purified component from chick brain also block receptor function on ciliary ganglion neurons. The subcellular distribution of the ganglion component in culture is assessed, and it is shown that approximately 2/3 of the cross-reacting components are intracellular; the majority of these seem not to be destined for insertion into the plasma membrane.

  18. Activity of retinal ganglion cells following intense, nanosecond laser flashes. Final report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of intense, but nonlesion-producing, laser exposures of 20-ns duration were determined on the light responses and spontaneous activity of retinal ganglion cells recorded in situ from the rhesus monkey. (Following a single, 20-ns exposure centered on its receptive field, a ganglion cell produced an 'afterdischarge' of maintained action potentials). The duration of the afterdischarge depended on the diameter of the laser beam on the retina and on the beam's intensity. Laser exposures subtending 0.5 to 2.0 deg, and delivering 45 to 60% of the maximum permissible exposure, elicited afterdischarges that lasted up to 80 s. When the beam diameter was decreased to 0.25 deg, the afterdischarge was reduced to 30 s, and to less than 5 s with the 0.12-deg beam. Light sensitivity after the laser exposure recovered rapidly during the first 10 s and then more slowly, but exponentially, until it reached the preflash level. Color-opponent ganglion cells exhibited a phenomenon called 'response-reversal' after the laser exposure, presumably due to selective adaptation of a mid-wavelength cone-input. Because a 20-ns exposure, regardless of intensity, is likely to photoregenerate more than half of the available visual pigment, the effects of ganglion cell response described here are not likely to be due solely to pigment bleaching.

  19. Meningitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria cinerea following a Percutaneous Rhizotomy of the Trigeminal Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Richter, H.; Bruderer, T.; Goldenberger, D.; Emonet, S.; Strahm, C.

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea is a human commensal. The first known case of meningitis and bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea following percutaneous glycerol instillation of the trigeminal ganglion is reported. Conventional phenotypic methods and complete 16S RNA gene sequencing accurately identified the pathogen. Difficulties in differentiation from pathogenic neisseriae are discussed. PMID:26511743

  20. Expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) in the cerebral ganglion and ovary of a protochordate.

    PubMed

    Masini, M A; Sturla, M; Gallinelli, A; Candiani, S; Facchinetti, F; Pestarino, M

    1998-01-01

    The distribution of neurones expressing POMC mRNA in the cerebral ganglion of the protochordate ascidian, Styela plicata, was investigated using a non-radioactive in situ hybridization technique. Nerve cell bodies of mono and bipolar types expressing POMC mRNA, were observed mainly in the outer layer of the ganglion. Discrete groups of neurones containing POMC mRNA were also localized in the inner portion of the ganglion, and few small monopolar perykaria expressing POMC mRNA were visible at the emergence of the main nerve trunks. POMC mRNA labeling was also found at level of the cytoplasm of previtellogenic and vitellogenic oocytes, and of follicular cells. Our results demonstrate the expression of one or more genes in the cerebral ganglion and ovary, that may be similar to one or more regions of the mammalian POMC gene. Therefore POMC-related molecules seem to be involved in neuromodulatory pathways and regulatory mechanisms of the oogenesis of ascidians.

  1. Expression of zinc transporter ZnT7 in mouse superior cervical ganglion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons contain a considerable amount of zinc ions, but little is known about zinc homeostasis in the SCG. It is known that zinc transporter 7 (ZnT7, Slc30a7), a member of the Slc30 ZnT family, is involved in mobilizing zinc ions from the cytoplasm into the Golgi...

  2. Transient structures of the human fetal brain: subplate, thalamic reticular complex, ganglionic eminence.

    PubMed

    Ulfig, N; Neudörfer, F; Bohl, J

    2000-07-01

    Morphological features of the subplate, the thalamic reticular complex and the ganglionic eminence, which represent three major transient structures of the human fetal forebrain, are summarized with special reference to their functional roles. The subplate harboring various neuronal types is an outstandingly wide zone subjacent to the cortical plate in the human fetal brain. Within the subplate various cortical afferents establish synaptic contacts for a prolonged period before entering the cortical plate. Therefore, the subplate is regarded as a "waiting compartment" which is required for the formation of mature cortical connections. Next to the thalamic reticular nucleus, within the fibers of internal capsule, the perireticular nucleus is located which has been established as a distinct entity during development. Its various neuronal types express a number of different neuroactive substances. Perinatally, the perireticular nucleus is drastically reduced in size. It is involved in the guidance of corticofugal and thalamocortical fibers. The ganglionic eminence is a conspicuous proliferative area that persists throughout nearly the entire fetal period. In the human fetal brain it extends medially upon the dorsal thalamic nuclei which receive precursor cells from the ganglionic eminence. Postmitotic cells in the marginal zone of the ganglionic eminence serve as an intermediate target for growing axons. On the whole, all three structures establish transient neural circuitries that may be essential for the formation of adult projections. The characteristics of the three transient structures are particularly relevant for developmental neuropathology as these structures may be damaged in disorders that preferentially occur in preterm infants. PMID:10963122

  3. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a horse: a case of myenteric ganglionitis.

    PubMed

    Chénier, Sonia; Macieira, Susana M; Sylvestre, Doris; Jean, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    An 11-year-old Quarter horse mare was presented for recurrent episodes of colic. A chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction was diagnosed. Medical treatment and surgical resection of the colon were performed but the condition did not improve and the horse was euthanized. Histopathological examination revealed a myenteric ganglionitis of the small intestine and ascending colon.

  4. Autonomic ganglionitis with severe hypertension, migraine, and episodic but fatal hypotension.

    PubMed

    Lee, H C; Coulter, C L; Adickes, E D; Porterfield, J; Robertson, D; Bravo, E; Pettinger, W A

    1996-09-01

    We report the clinical, pathologic, and immunohistochemical features of a severe hypertensive patient with recurrent migraine-induced hypotension. The patient died of migraine-induced vasomotor paralysis despite prompt institutions of fluid and sympathomimetic and parasympatholytic agents. Postmortem study revealed autonomic ganglionitis and neuritis.

  5. Meningitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria cinerea following a Percutaneous Rhizotomy of the Trigeminal Ganglion.

    PubMed

    von Kietzell, M; Richter, H; Bruderer, T; Goldenberger, D; Emonet, S; Strahm, C

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea is a human commensal. The first known case of meningitis and bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea following percutaneous glycerol instillation of the trigeminal ganglion is reported. Conventional phenotypic methods and complete 16S RNA gene sequencing accurately identified the pathogen. Difficulties in differentiation from pathogenic neisseriae are discussed.

  6. A minute fraction of Syrian golden hamster retinal ganglion cells project bilaterally.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, K; Sachs, G M; Schneider, G E

    1984-02-01

    Bilaterally projecting retinal ganglion cells (BPRGCs) in the adult Syrian golden hamster were identified through the use of two retrogradely transported neuronal labels, horseradish peroxidase and Nuclear Yellow, placed separately in each optic tract. The distribution and size of doubly labeled retinal ganglion cells were characterized and their numbers were determined. Strict criteria were used to exclude artifactual doubly labeled cells. This work revealed that: (a) BPRGCs comprise less than 0.01% of the entire retinal ganglion cell population, averaging 7.4 (SD = 3) cells per retina; (b) BPRGCs are found primarily in the upper, peripheral retina and not along the vertical meridian or in the temporal crescent; and (c) BPRGCs correspond in size to ordinary retinal ganglion cells in their immediate vicinity, thus providing no evidence that they comprise a separate population of cells. Electrophysiological collision experiments were also performed, with stimulating electrodes in the two brachia of the superior colliculi and a recording electrode in one optic nerve. A collision effect was not detected, thus supporting the anatomical findings of rare bilateral branching of optic nerve axons. The occurrence of BPRGCs may reflect occasional ambiguities in the cues that guide axons through the chiasm.

  7. Elevation of intracellular calcium levels in spiral ganglion cells by trimethyltin.

    PubMed

    Fechter, L D; Liu, Y

    1995-11-01

    The neurotoxicant, trimethyltin (TMT) produces cochlear impairment at far lower dose levels and far more rapidly than it does central nervous system effects. The initial effects of TMT in the cochlea, in vivo, are consistent with disruption of the inner hair cell type-1 spiral ganglion cell synapse although it is uncertain whether the effect is on presynaptic and/or postsynaptic units. This synapse is believed to be an excitatory glutamatergic one, providing the possibility that TMT could induce an excitotoxic process resulting in elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The objective of this study was to determine whether TMT had direct toxic effects on the postsynaptic spiral ganglion cells studied in primary culture and to identify the role of extracellular calcium in such an effect. The marker of interest was the effect of this agent on [Ca2+]i levels as determined using quantitation of the fluorescent calcium dye, Fura-2. TMT did induce a marked and sustained elevation in [Ca2+]i level in the spiral ganglion cells that appeared to have a rapid initial phase and a slower saturating phase. Studies performed using calcium-free medium showed that elevation of [Ca2+]i in spiral ganglion cells by TMT was attenuated but not entirely blocked. Further, the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, was able to inhibit the initial increase in [Ca2+]i, suggesting that at least this phase of the TMT effect was mediated by calcium channels, although nifedipine had no significant effect on the time to reach the maximal [Ca2+]i level. Parallel control experiments performed using application of exogenous glutamate and depolarizing K+ concentrations also produced elevation in [Ca2+]i levels. The data indicate that TMT elevates [Ca2+]i in isolated spiral ganglion cells both by increasing extracellular uptake via Ca2+ channels and also by releasing Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Thus TMT ototoxicity appears to include a direct postsynaptic toxic event. PMID:8647712

  8. Homocysteine-Mediated Modulation of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Preethi S.; Perry, Richard L.; Tawfik, Amany; Smith, Robert M.; Perry, Elizabeth; Roon, Penny; Bozard, B. Renee; Ha, Yonju

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of excess homocysteine on the regulation of retinal ganglion cell mitochondrial dynamics. Methods. Mice deficient in cystathionine-β-synthase (cbs) were used as a model of hyperhomocysteinemia. Gene and protein expression analyses of Opa1 and Fis1 were performed on cbs+/−neural retinas. Mitochondria within retinal ganglion cell axons underwent systematic ultrastructural analysis to measure area, length, width, and the distance between the mitochondria and the axon wall. Primary mouse ganglion cells were cultured, treated with homocysteine, and assessed for levels of Opa1 and Fis1 protein, the number of mitochondria per length of neurite, and levels of cleaved caspase-3. Results. Opa1 and Fis1 protein levels in cbs+/− neural retinas were elevated to 191.00% ± 26.40% and 226.20% ± 4.57%, respectively, compared with wild-type. Mitochondria of cbs+/− retinas were smaller in all parameters studied, including area (0.32 ± 0.01μm2 vs. 0.42 ± 0.02 μm2), compared with wild-type. Primary ganglion cells treated with homocysteine had elevations in Opa1 and Fis1 proteins, a significantly higher number of mitochondria per length of neurite (0.1781 ± 0.017 vs. 0.1156 ± 0.012), and significantly higher levels of cleaved caspase-3 compared with control. Conclusions. This study provides the first evidence that homocysteine-induced ganglion cell loss involves the dysregulation of mitochondrial dynamics, both in vivo and in vitro. The present data suggest increased mitochondrial fission as a novel mechanism of homocysteine toxicity to neurons. Of particular relevance are glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease, neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and, more recently, have implicated increased mitochondrial fission in their pathogeneses. PMID:21642619

  9. Reactive oxygen species alters the electrophysiological properties and raises [Ca2+]i in intracardiac ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Rimmer, Katrina; Harper, Alexander A

    2010-07-01

    We have investigated the effects of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) on the intrinsic electrophysiological characteristics: ganglionic transmission and resting [Ca(2+)](i) in neonate and adult rat intracardiac ganglion (ICG) neurons. Intracellular recordings were made using sharp microelectrodes filled with either 0.5 M KCl or Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1, allowing recording of electrical properties and measurement of [Ca(2+)](i). H(2)O(2) and t-BHP both hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential and reduced membrane resistance. In adult ICG neurons, the hyperpolarizing action of H(2)O(2) was reversed fully by Ba(2+) and partially by tetraethylammonium, muscarine, and linopirdine. H(2)O(2) and t-BHP reduced the action potential afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude but had no impact on either overshoot or AHP duration. ROS donors evoked an increase in discharge adaptation to long depolarizing current pulses. H(2)O(2) blocked ganglionic transmission in most ICG neurons but did not alter nicotine-evoked depolarizations. By contrast, t-BHP had no significant action on ganglionic transmission. H(2)O(2) and t-BHP increased resting intracellular Ca(2+) levels to 1.6 ( +/- 0.6, n = 11, P < 0.01) and 1.6 ( +/- 0.3, n = 8, P < 0.001), respectively, of control value (1.0, approximately 60 nM). The ROS scavenger catalase prevented the actions of H(2)O(2), and this protection extended beyond the period of application. Superoxide dismutase partially shielded against the action of H(2)O(2), but this was limited to the period of application. These data demonstrate that ROS decreases the excitability and ganglionic transmission of ICG neurons, attenuating parasympathetic control of the heart. PMID:20445155

  10. Inhibition of Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells by D1-type Dopamine Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Yuki; Rodríguez, Carolina Varela; Ogata, Genki; Partida, Gloria J.; Oi, Hanako; Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Lee, Sherwin C.; Colado, Anselmo Felipe; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The spike output of neural pathways can be regulated by modulating output neuron excitability and/or their synaptic inputs. Dopaminergic interneurons synapse onto cells that route signals to mammalian retinal ganglion cells, but it is unknown whether dopamine can activate receptors in these ganglion cells and, if it does, how this affects their excitability. Here, we show D1a-receptor-like immunoreactivity in ganglion cells identified in adult rats by retrogradely transported dextran, and that dopamine, D1-type receptor agonists, and cAMP analogs inhibit spiking in ganglion cells dissociated from adult rats. These ligands curtailed repetitive spiking during constant current injections, and reduced the number and rate of rise of spikes elicited by fluctuating current injections without significantly altering the timing of the remaining spikes. Consistent with mediation by D1-type receptors, SCH-23390 reversed the effects of dopamine on spikes. Contrary to a recent report, spike inhibition by dopamine was not precluded by blocking Ih. Consistent with the reduced rate of spike rise, dopamine reduced voltage-gated Na+ current (INa) amplitude and tetrodotoxin, at doses that reduced INa as moderately as dopamine, also inhibited spiking. These results provide the first direct evidence that D1-type dopamine receptor activation can alter mammalian retinal ganglion cell excitability, and demonstrate that dopamine can modulate spikes in these cells by a mechanism different from the pre- and postsynaptic means proposed by previous studies. To our knowledge, our results also provide the first evidence that dopamine receptor activation can reduce excitability without altering the temporal precision of spike firing. PMID:19940196

  11. Diffuse Bipolar Cells Provide Input to OFF Parasol Ganglion Cells in the Macaque Retina

    PubMed Central

    JACOBY, ROY A.; WIECHMANN, ALLAN F.; AMARA, SUSAN G.; LEIGHTON, BARBARA H.; MARSHAK, DAVID W.

    2012-01-01

    Parasol retinal ganglion cells are more sensitive to luminance contrast and respond more transiently at all levels of adaptation than midget ganglion cells. This may be due, in part, to differences between bipolar cells that provide their input, and the goal of these experiments was to study these differences. Midget bipolar cells are known to be presynaptic to midget ganglion cells. To identify the bipolar cells presynaptic to parasol cells, these ganglion cells were intracellularly injected with Neurobiotin, cone bipolar cells were immunolabeled, and the double-labeled material was analyzed. In the electron microscope, we found that DB3 diffuse bipolar cells labeled by using antiserum to calbindin D-28k were presynaptic to OFF parasol cells. In the confocal microscope, DB3 bipolars costratified with OFF parasol cell dendrites and made significantly more appositions with them than expected due to chance. Flat midget bipolar cells were labeled with antiserum to recoverin. Although they made a few appositions with parasol cells, the number was no greater than would be expected when two sets of processes have overlapping distributions in the inner plexiform layer. DB2 diffuse bipolar cells were labeled with antibodies to excitatory amino acid transporter 2, and they also made appositions with OFF parasol cells. These results suggest that DB2 bipolar cells are also presynaptic to OFF parasol ganglion cells, but midget bipolar cells are not. We estimate that midperipheral OFF parasol cells receive ≈500 synapses from 50 DB3 bipolar cells that, in turn, receive input from 250 cones. PMID:10578099

  12. Classification of retinal ganglion cells in the southern hemisphere lamprey Geotria australis (Cyclostomata).

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Lee Norman; Coimbra, João Paulo; Rodger, Jennifer; Potter, Ian C; Gill, Howard S; Dunlop, Sarah A; Collin, Shaun P

    2014-03-01

    Lampreys are one of two extant representatives of the earliest group of vertebrates, the agnathans or jawless fishes. The single species of the southern hemisphere lamprey family Geotriidae, Geotria australis, possesses the potential for pentachromatic color discrimination opposed to the mono- or dichromacy found in other lampreys. However, little is known of the retinal ganglion cell types that contribute to visual processing in G. australis. A quantitative morphological approach was used to distinguish and describe retinal ganglion cell types in G. australis. The morphology of retinal ganglion cells was revealed by retrograde biocytin labeling from the optic disc. Cells were digitally reconstructed, and somatic area and position and dendritic field size, density, tortuosity, and stratification were subjected to quantitative morphometric analyses. Cluster analysis, in conjunction with similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF), statistically identified five discrete monostratified retinal ganglion cell types, one of which may comprise two subtypes. Two bistratified types were identified separately, including a biplexiform and a bistratified subtype. The use of cluster analysis with SIMPROF provided a robust statistical technique for objectively identifying cell types whose characteristics were similar and significantly different from those of other types and thus provides an objective resolution of the problems posed by "lumpers vs. splitters" when designating cell types. The diversity of retinal ganglion cells suggests that visual information in the lamprey G. australis is processed in parallel streams, as in gnathostomes. These findings, together with the results of previous studies, indicate that the visual system of the lamprey G. australis represents the upper limit of visual complexity in extant agnathans.

  13. Identification of AⅡ amacrine, displaced amacrine, and bistratified ganglion cell types in human retina with antibodies against calretinin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sammy C S; Weltzien, Felix; Madigan, Michele C; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against calretinin are markers for one type of rod pathway interneuron (AⅡ amacrine cell) in the retina of some but not all mammalian species. The AⅡ cells play a crucial role in night-time (scotopic) vision and have been proposed as a target for optogenetic restoration of vision in retinal disease. In the present study we aimed to characterize the AⅡ cells in human retina. Postmortem human donor eyes were obtained with ethical approval and processed for calretinin immunofluorescence. Calretinin-positive somas in the inner nuclear and the ganglion cell layer were filled with the lipophilic dye DiI. The large majority (over 80%) of calretinin-immunoreactive cells is located in the inner nuclear layer, is immunopositive for glycine transporter 1, and shows the typical morphology of AⅡ amacrine cells. In addition, a small proportion of calretinin-positive cells in the inner nuclear layer and in the ganglion cell layer is glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive and shows the morphology of widefield amacrine cells (stellate, semilunar, and thorny amacrine cells). About half of the calretinin cells in the ganglion cell layer are bistratified ganglion cells resembling the small bistratified (presumed blue-ON/yellow-OFF) and the G17 ganglion cell previously described in primates. We conclude that in human retina, antibodies against calretinin can be used to identify AⅡ amacrine cells in the inner nuclear layer as well as widefield amacrine and small bistratified ganglion cells in the ganglion cell layer. PMID:26053777

  14. Approche de prise en charge du trouble du spectre de l’autisme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patrick F.; Thomas, Roger E.; Lee, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Se pencher sur les critères diagnostiques du trouble du spectre de l’autisme (TSA) comme les définit le Manuel diagnostique et statistique des troubles mentaux, cinquième édition (DSM-V), et concevoir une approche de prise en charge du TSA à l’aide du cadre CanMEDS–Médecine familiale (CanMEDS-MF). Sources d’information Le DSM-V, publié par l’American Psychiatric Association en mai 2013, énonce de nouveaux critères diagnostiques du TSA. Le cadre CanMEDS-MF du Collège des médecins de famille du Canada fournit un plan d’orientation pour la prise en charge complexe du TSA. Nous avons utilisé des données recueillies par le Centers for Disease Control and Prevention afin de déterminer la prévalence du TSA, ainsi que la revue systématique et méta-analyse détaillée effectuée par le National Institute for Health and Care Excellence du R.-U. pour ses lignes directrices sur le TSA dans le but d’évaluer les données probantes issues de plus de 100 interventions. Message principal Selon les données du Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, la prévalence du TSA se chiffrait à 1 sur 88 en 2008 aux États-Unis. La classification du TSA dans la quatrième édition du DSM incluait l’autisme, le syndrome d’Asperger, le trouble envahissant du développement et le trouble désintégratif de l’enfance. La dernière révision du DSM-V réunit tous ces troubles sous la mention TSA, avec différents niveaux de sévérité. La prise en charge du TSA est complexe; elle exige les efforts d’une équipe multidisciplinaire ainsi que des soins continus. Les rôles CanMEDS-MF fournissent un cadre de prise en charge. Conclusion Les médecins de famille sont au cœur de l’équipe de soins multidisciplinaire pour le TSA, et le cadre CanMEDS-MF tient lieu de plan détaillé pour guider la prise en charge d’un enfant atteint de TSA et aider la famille de cet enfant.

  15. Lithium Alters the Morphology of Neurites Regenerating from Cultured Adult Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S. M.; Patel, C. H.; Feng, A. S.; Kollmar, R.

    2013-01-01

    The small-molecule drug lithium (as a monovalent ion) promotes neurite regeneration and functional recovery, is easy to administer, and is approved for human use to treat bipolar disorder. Lithium exerts its neuritogenic effect mainly by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3, a constitutively-active serine/threonine kinase that is regulated by neurotrophin and “wingless-related MMTV integration site” (Wnt) signaling. In spiral ganglion neurons of the cochlea, the effects of lithium and the function of glycogen synthase kinase 3 have not been investigated. We, therefore, set out to test whether lithium modulates neuritogenesis from adult spiral ganglion neurons. Primary cultures of dissociated spiral ganglion neurons from adult mice were exposed to lithium at concentrations between 0 and 12.5 mM. The resulting neurite morphology and growth-cone appearance were measured in detail by using immunofluorescence microscopy and image analysis. We found that lithium altered the morphology of regenerating neurites and their growth cones in a differential, concentration-dependent fashion. Low concentrations of 0.5 to 2.5 mM (around the half-maximal inhibitory concentration for glycogen synthase kinase 3 and the recommended therapeutic serum concentration for bipolar disorder) enhanced neurite sprouting and branching. A high concentration of 12.5 mM, in contrast, slowed elongation. As the lithium concentration rose from low to high, the microtubules became increasingly disarranged and the growth cones more arborized. Our results demonstrate that lithium selectively stimulates phases of neuritogenesis that are driven by microtubule reorganization. In contrast, most other drugs that have previously been tested on spiral ganglion neurons are reported to inhibit neurite outgrowth or affect only elongation. Lithium sensitivity is a necessary, but not sufficient condition for the involvement of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Our results are, therefore, consistent with, but do not

  16. Inflammatory infiltration of the trigeminal ganglion after herpes simplex virus type 1 corneal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T; Tang, Q; Hendricks, R L

    1996-01-01

    Following herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection of the cornea, the virus is transmitted to the trigeminal ganglion, where a brief period of virus replication is followed by establishment of a latent infection in neurons. A possible role of the immune system in regulating virus replication and maintaining latency in the sensory neurons has been suggested. We have investigated the phenotype and cytokine pattern of cells that infiltrate the A/J mouse trigeminal ganglion at various times after HSV-1 corneal infection. HSV antigen expression in the trigeminal ganglion (indicative of the viral lytic cycle) increased until day 3 postinfection (p.i.) and then diminished to undetectable levels by day 7 p.i. The period of declining HSV antigen expression. was associated with a marked increase in Mac-1+ cells. These cells did not appear to coexpress the F4/80+ (macrophage) or the CD8+ (T cell) markers, and none showed polymorphonuclear leukocyte morphology, suggesting a possible early infiltration of natural killer cells. There was also a significant increase in the trigeminal ganglion of cells expressing the gamma delta T-cell receptor, and these cells were found almost exclusively in very close association with neurons. This period was also characterized by a rapid and equivalent increase in cells expressing gamma interferon and interleukin-4. The density of the inflammatory infiltrate in the trigeminal ganglion increased until days 12 to 21 p.i., when it was predominated by CD8+, Mac-1+, and tumor necrosis factor-expressing cells, which surrounded many neurons. By day 92 p.i., the inflammatory infiltrate diminished but was heaviest in mice with active periocular skin disease. Our data are consistent with the notion that gamma interferon produced by natural killer cells and/or gamma delta T cells may play an important role in limiting HSV-1 replication in the trigeminal ganglion during the acute stage of infection. In addition, tumor necrosis factor produced by CD8

  17. Les plaies du tendon patellaire

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Mardy, Abdelhak; Elayoubi, Abdelghni; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Les plaies du tendon patellaire sont peu fréquentes et sont peu rapportés dans la littérature, contrairement aux ruptures sous cutanées. Les sections du tendon patellaire nécessitent une réparation immédiate afin de rétablir l'appareil extenseur et de permettre une récupération fonctionnelle précoce. A travers ce travail rétrospectif sur 13 cas, nous analysons les aspects épidémiologiques, thérapeutiques et pronostiques de ce type de pathologie en comparant différents scores. L’âge moyen est de 25 ans avec une prédominance masculine. Les étiologies sont dominées par les accidents de la voie publique (68%) et les agressions par agent tranchant (26%) et contendant (6 %). Tous nos patients ont bénéficié d'un parage chirurgical avec suture tendineuse direct protégée par un laçage au fils d'aciers en légère flexion. La rééducation est débutée après sédation des phénomènes inflammatoires. Au dernier recul les résultats sont excellents et bon à 92%. Nous n'avons pas noté de différence de force musculaire et d'amplitude articulaire entre le genou sain et le genou lésé. Les lésions ouvertes du tendon patellaire est relativement rare. La prise en charge chirurgicale rapide donne des résultats assez satisfaisants. La réparation est généralement renforcée par un semi-tendineux, synthétique ou métallique en forme de cadre de renfort pour faciliter la réadaptation et réduire le risque de récidive après la fin de l'immobilisation. PMID:25170379

  18. Rotatory subluxation of the scaphoid after excision of dorsal carpal ganglion and wrist manipulation--a case report.

    PubMed

    Crawford, G P; Taleisnik, J

    1983-11-01

    Surgical excision of a ganglion on the dorsum of the wrist is usually a benign procedure. The most frequent complications are transient postoperative stiffness and recurrence of the ganglion. This paper reports the development of a rotatory subluxation of the scaphoid after the manipulation of the wrist of a patient who had developed postoperative stiffness after the surgical excision of a dorsal wrist ganglion. This unusual complication was successfully treated by closed pinning under radiographic control followed by immobilization in palmar flexion. Manipulation of the wrist for the management of postoperative stiffness is rarely, if ever, indicated. Limitation of motion of a wrist without underlying structural changes is best managed by gentle, gradual splinting, both static and dynamic. It is suggested that preoperative x-rays should be obtained as part of the routine workup for a dorsal wrist ganglion.

  19. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided aspiration of an anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: description of technique and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Krill, Michael; Peck, Evan

    2014-12-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst is an infrequent but potentially clinically significant cause of knee pain. Although the cyst may be removed surgically, percutaneous ultrasound-guided anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst aspiration and injection is feasible. To our knowledge, we present the first reported case description of the utilization of ultrasound guidance to perform this procedure with a successful clinical outcome. PMID:25088315

  20. Transplantation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons in deaf guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sujeong; Cho, Hyong-Ho; Kim, Song-Hee; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Bum; Park, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Han-Seong

    2016-06-01

    Excessive noise, ototoxic drugs, infections, autoimmune diseases, and aging can cause loss of spiral ganglion neurons, leading to permanent sensorineural hearing loss in mammals. Stem cells have been confirmed to be able to differentiate into spiral ganglion neurons. Little has been reported on adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons. In this study, we hypothesized that transplantation of neural induced-human ADSCs (NI-hADSCs) can repair the injured spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs with neomycin-induced sensorineural hearing loss. NI-hADSCs were induced with culture medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor and forskolin and then injected to the injured cochleae. Guinea pigs that received injection of Hanks' balanced salt solution into the cochleae were used as controls. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the number of surviving spiral ganglion neurons in the cell transplantation group was significantly increased than that in the control group. Also at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, immunohistochemical staining showed that a greater number of NI-hADSCs in the spiral ganglions were detected in the cell transplantation group than in the control group, and these NI-hADSCs expressed neuronal markers neurofilament protein and microtubule-associated protein 2. Within 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the guinea pigs in the cell transplantation group had a gradually decreased auditory brainstem response threshold, while those in the control group had almost no response to 80 dB of clicks or pure tone burst. These findings suggest that a large amount of NI-hADSCs migrated to the spiral ganglions, survived for a period of time, repaired the injured spiral ganglion cells, and thereby contributed to the recovery of sensorineural hearing loss in guinea pigs. PMID:27482231

  1. Transplantation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons in deaf guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sujeong; Cho, Hyong-Ho; Kim, Song-Hee; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Bum; Park, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Han-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive noise, ototoxic drugs, infections, autoimmune diseases, and aging can cause loss of spiral ganglion neurons, leading to permanent sensorineural hearing loss in mammals. Stem cells have been confirmed to be able to differentiate into spiral ganglion neurons. Little has been reported on adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons. In this study, we hypothesized that transplantation of neural induced-human ADSCs (NI-hADSCs) can repair the injured spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs with neomycin-induced sensorineural hearing loss. NI-hADSCs were induced with culture medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor and forskolin and then injected to the injured cochleae. Guinea pigs that received injection of Hanks’ balanced salt solution into the cochleae were used as controls. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the number of surviving spiral ganglion neurons in the cell transplantation group was significantly increased than that in the control group. Also at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, immunohistochemical staining showed that a greater number of NI-hADSCs in the spiral ganglions were detected in the cell transplantation group than in the control group, and these NI-hADSCs expressed neuronal markers neurofilament protein and microtubule-associated protein 2. Within 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the guinea pigs in the cell transplantation group had a gradually decreased auditory brainstem response threshold, while those in the control group had almost no response to 80 dB of clicks or pure tone burst. These findings suggest that a large amount of NI-hADSCs migrated to the spiral ganglions, survived for a period of time, repaired the injured spiral ganglion cells, and thereby contributed to the recovery of sensorineural hearing loss in guinea pigs. PMID:27482231

  2. Learning about Cri du Chat Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chat syndrome - also known as 5p- syndrome and cat cry syndrome - is a rare genetic condition that ... du chat syndrome usually include a high-pitched cat-like cry, mental retardation, delayed development, distinctive facial ...

  3. Site of origin and mechanism of action of adenosine in the frog sympathetic ganglion

    SciTech Connect

    Bencherif, M.

    1987-01-01

    The contribution of pre and postsynaptic activation on the release of {sup 3}H-purines was studied in the isolated sympathetic paravertebral ganglion of the frog. Preganglionic stimulation induced an overall release of {sup 3}H-purines. This release is blocked by atropine and curare and can be induced by carbachol and antidromic stimulation. Analyses of the effluent by anion exchange chromatography and by HPLC showed that the non-nucleotide fractions constituted most of the counts released. Hence, nucleosides are the main products released by the ganglion and did not arise from hydrolysis of extracellular ATP. We studied the effect of synaptic activity on tritiated inositol release (IR). This release did not change during orthodromic stimulation. However, upon cessation of the stimulation, release increased rapidly and remained elevated for at least 45 minutes. This increase in IR was reduced by suffusion of the ganglia with either acetylcholine or adenosine.

  4. Lethal effect of the serotonin-xylocaineR association in ganglion-blocked rats.

    PubMed

    Valle, L B; Oliveira-Filho, R M; Armonia, P L; Saraceni, G; Nassif, M; De Lucia, R

    1976-12-01

    In rats anestetized with urethane and under ganglionic blockade by hexamethonium (20 mg/kg, i.v.), the i.v. injection of serotonin (60 mug/kg) determined apnea, ECG alterations and a brief hypotensive response which is similar to that as elicited when 5-HT is given to intact rats. During the hypertension which follows that initial response, apnea is still present along with more severe ECG changes. After that, blood pressure falls into a prolonged hypotension, which is invariably accompanied by death. Neither norepinephrine, nor respiratory analeptics (CoramineR, RemeflinF) were able to prevent the fatal outcome. Only artificial respiration was found to be useful in some instances. It was concluded that the association serotonin plus lidocaine becomes lethal when given to ganglion-blocked rate, and this toxic effect can be ascribed mainly to the respiratory depressor activity of the drugs.

  5. Unilateral reduction of head pain and facial vasodilatation after gasserian ganglion lesion.

    PubMed

    De Marinis, M; Fraioli, B; Esposito, V; Gagliardi, F M; Agnoli, A

    1993-02-01

    The features of histamine-induced headache and its associated vascular responses were studied in 52 patients with different surgical lesions of the gasserian ganglion and in 12 control subjects. Certain features of headache (eg, intensity, type, and duration) were similar in patients and control subjects. However, the pain was absent on the side of the trigeminal lesion in 26 (50%) of the patients. This unilateral absence of pain was not related to the hypoesthesia that was caused by the operation, and it was associated with a decrease in vascular responses (histamine-induced facial flushing and increase in temperature) on the side operated on. These abnormalities were more prevalent in patients who had undergone thermocoagulation and presented with more severe damage of the trigeminal ganglion than in those who were subjected to trigeminal compression or glycerolization. The trigemino-vascular system seems to control headache of a vascular type and associated craniofacial vasodilatation in human subjects.

  6. The pterygopalatine ganglion and its role in various pain syndromes: from anatomy to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Piagkou, Maria; Demesticha, Theano; Troupis, Theodore; Vlasis, Konstantinos; Skandalakis, Panayiotis; Makri, Aggeliki; Mazarakis, Antonios; Lappas, Dimitrios; Piagkos, Giannoulis; Johnson, Elizabeth O

    2012-06-01

    The postsynaptic fibers of the pterygopalatine or sphenopalatine ganglion (PPG or SPG) supply the lacrimal and nasal glands. The PPG appears to play an important role in various pain syndromes including headaches, trigeminal and sphenopalatine neuralgia, atypical facial pain, muscle pain, vasomotor rhinitis, eye disorders, and herpes infection. Clinical trials have shown that these pain disorders can be managed effectively with sphenopalatine ganglion blockade (SPGB). In addition, regional anesthesia of the distribution area of the SPG sensory fibers for nasal and dental surgery can be provided by SPGB via a transnasal, transoral, or lateral infratemporal approach. To arouse the interest of the modern-day clinicians in the use of the SPGB, the advantages, disadvantages, and modifications of the available methods for blockade are discussed.▪

  7. Fireworks in the primate retina: in vitro photodynamics reveals diverse LGN-projecting ganglion cell types.

    PubMed

    Dacey, Dennis M; Peterson, Beth B; Robinson, Farrel R; Gamlin, Paul D

    2003-01-01

    Diverse cell types and parallel pathways are characteristic of the vertebrate nervous system, yet it remains a challenge to define the basic components of most neural structures. We describe a process termed retrograde photodynamics that allowed us to rapidly make the link between morphology, physiology, and connectivity for ganglion cells in the macaque retina that project to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). Rhodamine dextran injected into the LGN was transported retrogradely and sequestered within the cytoplasm of ganglion cell bodies. Exposure of the retina to light in vitro liberated the tracer and allowed it to diffuse throughout the dendrites, revealing the cell's complete morphology. Eight previously unknown LGN-projecting cell types were identified. Cells could also be targeted in vitro for intracellular recording and physiological analysis. The photodynamic process was also observed in pyramidal cells in a rat neocortical slice.

  8. A ganglion cyst causing lumbar radiculopathy in a baseball pitcher: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Wisneski, R J; Lutz, G E

    2000-06-01

    This report describes a case of a professional baseball pitcher who developed acute left lumbar radicular symptoms after a baseball game and was subsequently sidelined for the rest of the season. Physical examination revealed depressed reflexes in the left posterior tibialis and left medial hamstring muscles, mild weakness in the left extensor hallucis longus, and positive dural tension signs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an ovoid mass at the L4-L5 level, causing compression of the dura. Surgical resection of the mass resulted in resolution of his symptoms. Pathology revealed that the mass was a ganglion cyst. A ganglion cyst is a rare cause of lumbar radiculopathy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if a patient with lumbar radiculopathy fails to respond to conservative treatment.

  9. Clinical functional anatomy of the pterygopalatine ganglion, cephalgia and related dysautonomias: A review

    PubMed Central

    Khonsary, Seyed Ali; Ma, Quanfeng; Villablanca, Pablo; Emerson, Josh; Malkasian, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain the anatomy of the pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG), its location in the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) in the skull, and the relationship it has to the Vidian nerve terminal branches and the fifth cranial nerve. An overview of the neuro-anatomical/clinical correlations, a spectrum of pathologies affecting the seventh cranial nerve and some therapies both medical and surgical are noted. The focus is the pterygopalatine region with discussion of the proximal courses of the seventh and fifth cranial nerves and their pathological processes. The ganglion is used as an example of neuro-anatomical model for explaining cluster headaches (CH). Radiological correlation is included to clarify the location of the PPF and its clinical importance. PMID:24349865

  10. Type II spiral ganglion afferent neurons drive medial olivocochlear reflex suppression of the cochlear amplifier.

    PubMed

    Froud, Kristina E; Wong, Ann Chi Yan; Cederholm, Jennie M E; Klugmann, Matthias; Sandow, Shaun L; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Ryan, Allen F; Housley, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic adjustment of hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity is mediated by the medial olivocochlear efferent reflex, which suppresses the gain of the 'cochlear amplifier' in each ear. Such efferent feedback is important for promoting discrimination of sounds in background noise, sound localization and protecting the cochleae from acoustic overstimulation. However, the sensory driver for the olivocochlear reflex is unknown. Here, we resolve this longstanding question using a mouse model null for the gene encoding the type III intermediate filament peripherin (Prph). Prph((-/-)) mice lacked type II spiral ganglion neuron innervation of the outer hair cells, whereas innervation of the inner hair cells by type I spiral ganglion neurons was normal. Compared with Prph((+/+)) controls, both contralateral and ipsilateral olivocochlear efferent-mediated suppression of the cochlear amplifier were absent in Prph((-/-)) mice, demonstrating that outer hair cells and their type II afferents constitute the sensory drive for the olivocochlear efferent reflex.

  11. Idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis underlying acute 'dramatic' intestinal pseudoobstruction: report of an exceptional case.

    PubMed

    Racalbuto, A; Magro, G; Lanteri, R; Aliotta, I; Santangelo, M; Di Cataldo, A

    2008-09-01

    Inflammation of the myenteric plexus of the gastrointestinal tract is a very rare pathological condition, with few reports in the medical literature. This pathological condition causes atonic gut motor dysfunction and is principally secondary to other diseases, being reported nearly solely as a paraneoplastic phenomenon in neuroendocrine lung tumors, including small cell carcinomas or neuroblastomas. In addition it can also be associated with disorders of the central nervous system, although it has rarely been described in Chagas disease. It has been named 'idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis' because no apparent causes can be demonstrated. We report the clinicopathologic findings of an exceptional case of a young woman affected by severe chronic constipation suddenly changing into acute intestinal pseudoobstruction with dramatic evolution. Relationships between ganglionitis, idiopathic constipation and acute intestinal pseudoobstruction as well as therapeutic implications are discussed.

  12. [The concept of "ganglionitis" in the modern science of the autonomic nervous system].

    PubMed

    Veĭn, A M; Golubev, V L; Alimova, E Ia; Danilov, A B

    1990-01-01

    The authors review the concept of vegetative "ganglionitis" formed in the Soviet literature in the 40-60s. Consider the etiological, clinical and diagnostic aspects thereof. Provide the modern concepts of the clinical manifestations related to the lesions of the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia. Relate some hypotheses concerning the origin of painful phenomena within the framework of the syndrome of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Indicate that verified lesions of the sympathetic ganglia are associated with well-defined clinical symptoms which absolutely differ in their appearance from the reported descriptions of "ganglionitis", which are unjustifiedly widely used in the Soviet literature over the recent decades. The conclusion is made about the necessity of reviewing the outdated concepts of the pathology of the vegetative sympathetic ganglia from the standpoint of the modern concept of peripheral vegetative insufficiency.

  13. Three forms of spatial temporal feedforward inhibition are common to different ganglion cell types in rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Hsueh, Hain-Ann; Greenberg, Kenneth; Werblin, Frank S

    2010-05-01

    There exist more than 30 different morphological amacrine cell types, but there may be fewer physiological types. Here we studied the amacrine cell outputs by measuring the temporal and spatial properties of feedforward inhibition to four different types of ganglion cells. These ganglion cells, each with concentric receptive field organization, appear to receive a different relative contribution of the same three forms of feed-forward inhibition, namely: local glycinergic, local sustained GABAergic, and broad transient GABAergic inhibition. Two of these inhibitory components, local glycinergic inhibition and local sustained GABAergic inhibition were localized to narrow regions confined to the dendritic fields of the ganglion cells. The third, a broad transient GABAergic inhibition, was driven from regions peripheral to the dendritic area. Each inhibitory component is also correlated with characteristic kinetics expressed in all ganglion cells: broad transient GABAergic inhibition had the shortest latency, local glycinergic inhibition had an intermediate latency, and local sustained GABAergic inhibition had the longest latency. We suggest each of these three inhibitory components represents the output from a distinct class of amacrine cell, mediates a specific visual function, and each forms a basic functional component for the four ganglion cell types. Similar subunits likely exist in the circuits of other ganglion cell types as well.

  14. A phospholipase A₂ isolated from Lachesis muta snake venom increases the survival of retinal ganglion cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    da Silva Cunha, Karinne Cristinne; Fuly, André Lopes; de Araujo, Elizabeth Giestal

    2011-03-15

    We have previously showed that a phospholipase A₂ isolated from Lachesis muta snake venom and named LM-PLA₂-I displayed particular biological activities, as hemolysis, inhibition on platelet aggregation, edema induction and myotoxicity. In the present work, we evaluated the effect of LM-PLA₂-I on the survival of axotomized rat retinal ganglion cells kept in vitro, as well as its mechanism of action. Our results clearly showed that treatment with LM-PLA₂-I increased the survival of ganglion cells (100% when compared to control cultures) and the treatment of LM-PLA₂-I with p-bromophenacyl bromide abolished this effect. This result indicates that the effect of LM-PLA₂-I on ganglion cell survival is entirely dependent on its enzymatic activity and the generation of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) may be a prerequisite to the observed survival. In fact, commercial LPC mimicked the effect of LM-PLA₂-I upon ganglion cell survival. To investigate the mechanism of action of LM-PLA₂-I, cultures were treated with chelerythrine chloride, BAPTA-AM, rottlerin and also with an inhibitor of c-junc kinase (JNKi). Our results showed that rottlerin and JNK inhibitor abolished the LM-PLA₂-I on ganglion cell survival. Taken together, our results showed that LM-PLA₂-I and its enzymatic product, LPC promoted survival of retinal ganglion cells through the protein kinase C pathway and strongly suggest a possible role of the PLA₂ enzyme and LPC in controlling the survival of axotomized neuronal cells. PMID:21223976

  15. Specific projection of displaced retinal ganglion cells upon the accessory optic system in the pigeon (Columbia livia).

    PubMed

    Karten, J H; Fite, K V; Brecha, N

    1977-04-01

    In the pigeon, the nucleus of the basal optic root, a component of the accessory optic system, projects directly upon the vestibulo-cerebellum. This nucleus receives a prominent projection composed of large-diameter retinal axons, known as the basal optic root. The cells of origin of this tract were identified using horseradish peroxidase (donor:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.7) as a retrograde marker. Injections of horseradish peroxidase confined primarily to the basal optic root nucleus labeled displaced ganglion cells of the contralateral retina. Cell sizes were 18-30 micronm and the dendrites of these cells were confined to the first stratum of the inner plexiform layer. Approximately 3700 displaced ganglion cells were labeled after injections of horseradish peroxidase into basal optic root. In contrast, no displaced ganglion cells were labeled after injections of horseradish peroxidase into the optic tectum, which labeled only cells in the ganglion cell layer proper. These findings indicate that displaced ganglion cells constitute a unique population of retinal neurons that give rise to a bisynaptic pathway directed to the cerebellum via the nucleus of the basal optic root. These displaced ganglion cells may play a major role inoculomotor reflexes.

  16. Effects of low level laser treatment on the survival of axotomized retinal ganglion cells in adult Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    So, Kwok-Fai; Leung, Mason Chin Pang; Cui, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Injury to axons close to the neuronal bodies in the mammalian central nervous system causes a large proportion of parenting neurons to degenerate. It is known that optic nerve transection close to the eye in rodents leads to a loss of about half of retinal ganglion cells in 1 week and about 90% in 2 weeks. Using low level laser treatment in the present study, we demonstrated that treatment with helium-neon (660 nm) laser with 15 mW power could delay retinal ganglion cell death after optic nerve axotomy in adult hamsters. The effect was most apparent in the first week with a short period of treatment time (5 minutes) in which 65–66% of retinal ganglion cells survived the optic nerve axotomy whereas 45–47% of retinal ganglion cells did so in optic nerve axotomy controls. We also found that single dose and early commencement of laser irradiation were important in protecting retinal ganglion cells following optic nerve axotomy. These findings thus convincingly show that appropriate laser treatment may be neuroprotective to retinal ganglion cells. PMID:25558230

  17. Effects of low level laser treatment on the survival of axotomized retinal ganglion cells in adult Hamsters.

    PubMed

    So, Kwok-Fai; Leung, Mason Chin Pang; Cui, Qi

    2014-11-01

    Injury to axons close to the neuronal bodies in the mammalian central nervous system causes a large proportion of parenting neurons to degenerate. It is known that optic nerve transection close to the eye in rodents leads to a loss of about half of retinal ganglion cells in 1 week and about 90% in 2 weeks. Using low level laser treatment in the present study, we demonstrated that treatment with helium-neon (660 nm) laser with 15 mW power could delay retinal ganglion cell death after optic nerve axotomy in adult hamsters. The effect was most apparent in the first week with a short period of treatment time (5 minutes) in which 65-66% of retinal ganglion cells survived the optic nerve axotomy whereas 45-47% of retinal ganglion cells did so in optic nerve axotomy controls. We also found that single dose and early commencement of laser irradiation were important in protecting retinal ganglion cells following optic nerve axotomy. These findings thus convincingly show that appropriate laser treatment may be neuroprotective to retinal ganglion cells. PMID:25558230

  18. Seasonally Changing Cryptochrome 1b Expression in the Retinal Ganglion Cells of a Migrating Passerine Bird.

    PubMed

    Nießner, Christine; Gross, Julia Christina; Denzau, Susanne; Peichl, Leo; Fleissner, Gerta; Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes, blue-light absorbing proteins involved in the circadian clock, have been proposed to be the receptor molecules of the avian magnetic compass. In birds, several cryptochromes occur: Cryptochrome 2, Cryptochrome 4 and two splice products of Cryptochrome 1, Cry1a and Cry1b. With an antibody not distinguishing between the two splice products, Cryptochrome 1 had been detected in the retinal ganglion cells of garden warblers during migration. A recent study located Cry1a in the outer segments of UV/V-cones in the retina of domestic chickens and European robins, another migratory species. Here we report the presence of cryptochrome 1b (eCry1b) in retinal ganglion cells and displaced ganglion cells of European Robins, Erithacus rubecula. Immuno-histochemistry at the light microscopic and electron microscopic level showed eCry1b in the cell plasma, free in the cytosol as well as bound to membranes. This is supported by immuno-blotting. However, this applies only to robins in the migratory state. After the end of the migratory phase, the amount of eCry1b was markedly reduced and hardly detectable. In robins, the amount of eCry1b in the retinal ganglion cells varies with season: it appears to be strongly expressed only during the migratory period when the birds show nocturnal migratory restlessness. Since the avian magnetic compass does not seem to be restricted to the migratory phase, this seasonal variation makes a role of eCry1b in magnetoreception rather unlikely. Rather, it could be involved in physiological processes controlling migratory restlessness and thus enabling birds to perform their nocturnal flights. PMID:26953690

  19. Chemically defined medium enhances bioelectric activity in mouse spinal cord-dorsal root ganglion cultures.

    PubMed

    Habets, A M; Baker, R E; Brenner, E; Romijn, H J

    1981-02-23

    Co-cultures of mouse spinal cord with dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures were grown either in horse serum (HS)-supplemented medium or in a serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM). The cytoarchitecture of cord--DRG explants was fully retained in CDM, with little or no distortion due to flattening of the explant, as is invariably observed in HS-supplemented cultures. Functional properties such as bioelectric activity and DRG--spinal cord interconnectivity were well sustained in CDM.

  20. Characterization and localization of nerve growth factor receptors in the embryonic otic vesicle and cochleovestibular ganglion

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd, P.; Represa, J. )

    1989-07-01

    We have investigated the possibility that nerve growth factor (NGF) may play a role in the development of the inner ear. Primordia of the inner ear, the otic vesicle (OV) and cochleovestibular ganglion (CVG), were isolated from 72-hr (stage 19-20) quail embryos and examined for the presence of NGF receptors. Quantitative binding studies revealed that both OV and CVG exhibited specific 125I-NGF binding; levels of nonspecific binding were 6 to 26% of total binding. Scatchard analysis yielded a linear plot, indicating the presence of a single class of NGF receptor. The average binding constant (Kd) was 8.0 nM for OV and 8.6 nM for CVG, corresponding to the low affinity (site II) NGF receptor. Examination of light microscopic radioautographs indicated that most of the specific 125I-NGF binding was located in the ventromedial wall of the OV, with little or no binding in the lateral wall and endolymphatic primordia. These studies were corroborated by microdissection of OV, in which 70% of the radioactivity was found to be localized in the medial half of the OV. In CVG, specific 125I-NGF binding was more concentrated in the cochlear portion of the ganglion, with silver grains primarily over areas containing support cells and immature neurons. Quantitative binding studies with isolated cochlear and vestibular ganglia obtained from 144-hr (stage 29-30) quail embryos revealed that the cochlear ganglion exhibited three times more specific 125I-NGF binding than the vestibular ganglion. The presence of NGF receptors on OV and CVG suggests that these structures are responsive to and/or dependent upon NGF. The following paper examines the question of whether NGF serves either as a mitogen, a survival factor, or a differentiation factor in this system.

  1. Retinal ganglion cell density of the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis): calculating visual resolution.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, John D; Manger, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    A single right retina from a black rhinoceros was whole mounted, stained and analyzed to determine the visual resolution of the rhinoceros, an animal with reputedly poor eyesight. A range of small (15-microm diameter) to large (100-microm diameter) ganglion cell types was seen across the retina. We observed two regions of high density of retinal ganglion cells at either end of a long, but thin, horizontal streak. The temporal specialization, which receives light from the anterior visual field, exhibited a ganglion cell density of approximately 2000/mm2, while the nasal specialization exhibited a density of approximately 1500/mm2. The retina exhibited a ganglion cell density bias toward the upper half, especially so, the upper temporal quadrant, indicating that the rhinoceros would be processing visual information from the visual field below the anterior horizon for the most part. Our calculations indicate that the rhinoceros has a visual resolution of 6 cycles/degree. While this resolution is one-tenth that of humans (60 cycles/deg) and less than that of the domestic cat (9 cycles/deg), it is comparable to that of the rabbit (6 cycles/deg), and exceeds that seen in a variety of other mammals including seals, dolphins, microbats, and rats. Thus, the reputation of the rhinoceros as a myopic, weakly visual animal is not supported by our observations of the retina. We calculate that the black rhinoceros could readily distinguish a 30 cm wide human at a distance of around 200 m given the appropriate visual background. PMID:18442443

  2. Autoradiographic measurement of relative changes in ornithine decarboxylase in axotomized superior cervical ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.R.

    1986-05-01

    An autoradiographic method is described for detecting changes in ornithine decarboxylase in axotomized superior cervical ganglion neurons of rats using (3H)difluoromethylornithine. An increase in binding to neurons was seen at 12 h and 1 day after crushing the postganglionic nerves. Binding returned to control values between 3 and 5 days postoperation. The patterns found using this method were in general agreement with prior reports of enzymatic changes in whole ganglia.

  3. Growth interaction between locus coeruleus and trigeminal ganglion after intraocular double grafting.

    PubMed

    Seiger, A

    1980-06-01

    Fetal trigeminal ganglia were combined in the anterior chamber of eyes of rat recipients with sequentially grafted fetal locus coeruleus transplants. After maturation of both grafts in oculo the growth pattern of locus coeruleus derived noradrenaline fibres in the iris was examined with Falck-Hillarp fluorescence histochemistry. Contrary to what was expected from earlier studies, which revealed a radiating halo of fibres around the CNS tissue on the iris, the locus coeruleus-derived fibres radiated to a large extent from the adjacent trigeminal ganglion attachment. Thus, the presence of a grafted trigeminal ganglion changed the distribution of the central monoamine nerves growing out in the iris. The possible cause of this changed distribution is discussed. Maturated intraocular trigeminal ganglion transplants were retransplanted, together with the whole iris to which it was attached, into a new eye which already harboured a maturated locus coeruleus graft attached to its host iris. The expected reinitiated locus coeruleus fibre ingrowths into the iris transplants were then compared in those iris transplants that had trigeminal ganglia and controls that had not. The surface area of the iris grafts covered by newly formed locus coeruleus noradrenaline fibres was significantly smaller (27% reduction) if trigeminal ganglia were situated on them during the reinnervation process. This finding strongly supports our earlier studies, which suggested that the presence of sensory nerves in the iris inhibits growth of locus coeruleus in that receptor tissue, and furthermore, that the sensory nerves responsible for this inhibitory interaction have their origin within the trigeminal ganglion itself. PMID:7253725

  4. Scene from above: retinal ganglion cell topography and spatial resolving power in the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    Coimbra, João Paulo; Hart, Nathan S; Collin, Shaun P; Manger, Paul R

    2013-06-15

    The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is a browser that uses its extensible tongue to selectively collect leaves during foraging. As the tallest extant terrestrial mammal, its elevated head height provides panoramic surveillance of the environment. These aspects of the giraffe's ecology and phenotype suggest that vision is of prime importance. Using Nissl-stained retinal wholemounts and stereological methods, we quantitatively assessed the retinal specializations in the ganglion cell layer of the giraffe. The mean total number of retinal ganglion cells was 1,393,779 and their topographic distribution revealed the presence of a horizontal visual streak and a temporal area. With a mean peak of 14,271 cells/mm(2), upper limits of spatial resolving power in the temporal area ranged from 25 to 27 cycles/degree. We also observed a dorsotemporal extension (anakatabatic area) that tapers toward the nasal retina giving rise to a complete dorsal arch. Using neurofilament-200 immunohistochemistry, we also detected a dorsal arch formed by alpha ganglion cells with density peaks in the temporal (14-15 cells/mm(2)) and dorsonasal (10 cells/mm(2)) regions. As with other artiodactyls, the giraffe shares the presence of a horizontal streak and a temporal area which, respectively, improve resolution along the horizon and in the frontal visual field. The dorsal arch is related to the giraffe's head height and affords enhanced resolution in the inferior visual field. The alpha ganglion cell distribution pattern is unique to the giraffe and enhances acquisition of motion information for the control of tongue movement during foraging and the detection of predators. PMID:23595815

  5. Connecting the eye to the brain: the molecular basis of ganglion cell axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Oster, S F; Sretavan, D W

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, a great deal has been learnt about the molecular basis through which specific neural pathways in the visual system are established during embryonic development. This review provides a framework for understanding the principles of retinal ganglion cell axon guidance, and introduces some of the families of axon guidance molecules involved. In addition, the potential relevance of retinal axon guidance to human visual developmental disorders, and to retinal axon regeneration, is discussed. PMID:12714414

  6. Seasonally Changing Cryptochrome 1b Expression in the Retinal Ganglion Cells of a Migrating Passerine Bird

    PubMed Central

    Nießner, Christine; Gross, Julia Christina; Denzau, Susanne; Peichl, Leo; Fleissner, Gerta; Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes, blue-light absorbing proteins involved in the circadian clock, have been proposed to be the receptor molecules of the avian magnetic compass. In birds, several cryptochromes occur: Cryptochrome 2, Cryptochrome 4 and two splice products of Cryptochrome 1, Cry1a and Cry1b. With an antibody not distinguishing between the two splice products, Cryptochrome 1 had been detected in the retinal ganglion cells of garden warblers during migration. A recent study located Cry1a in the outer segments of UV/V-cones in the retina of domestic chickens and European robins, another migratory species. Here we report the presence of cryptochrome 1b (eCry1b) in retinal ganglion cells and displaced ganglion cells of European Robins, Erithacus rubecula. Immuno-histochemistry at the light microscopic and electron microscopic level showed eCry1b in the cell plasma, free in the cytosol as well as bound to membranes. This is supported by immuno-blotting. However, this applies only to robins in the migratory state. After the end of the migratory phase, the amount of eCry1b was markedly reduced and hardly detectable. In robins, the amount of eCry1b in the retinal ganglion cells varies with season: it appears to be strongly expressed only during the migratory period when the birds show nocturnal migratory restlessness. Since the avian magnetic compass does not seem to be restricted to the migratory phase, this seasonal variation makes a role of eCry1b in magnetoreception rather unlikely. Rather, it could be involved in physiological processes controlling migratory restlessness and thus enabling birds to perform their nocturnal flights. PMID:26953690

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament ganglion causing flexion restriction: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Thean Howe Bryan; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2016-01-01

    Ganglion cysts originating from the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are uncommon. Often asymptomatic, they infrequently present with non-specific symptoms such as knee pain, stiffness, clicks, locking or restriction of knee extension. However, the patient we report presented with knee flexion restriction. A 37-year-old Chinese gentleman, with no history of knee trauma, presented with left knee pain. Left knee range of motion (ROM) was from 0 to 110 degrees. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed a 1.5 cm × 3.3 cm × 1.7 cm cyst located in the intercondylar region arising from the ACL and extending predominantly posteriorly. Arthroscopy confirmed an intrasubstance ACL ganglion cyst, which was extending posteriorly. Complete excision of the cyst was performed. At 1-year follow-up, the patient regained knee flexion of 130 degrees. We describe one of the largest ACL ganglion cysts. Such cysts often extend anteriorly and impinge onto the roof of the intercondylar notch during knee extension, thus restricting extension. The restriction in knee motion in our patient was in flexion instead; this was because the cyst took an unusual course of extension predominantly in the posterior direction. Although rare, it must be included as a possible differential diagnosis when patients present with such knee symptoms. PMID:27386493

  8. Functional segregation of retinal ganglion cell projections to the optic tectum of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Novales Flamarique, Iñigo; Wachowiak, Matt

    2015-11-01

    The interpretation of visual information relies on precise maps of retinal representation in the brain coupled with local circuitry that encodes specific features of the visual scenery. In nonmammalian vertebrates, the main target of ganglion cell projections is the optic tectum. Although the topography of retinotectal projections has been documented for several species, the spatiotemporal patterns of activity and how these depend on background adaptation have not been explored. In this study, we used a combination of electrical and optical recordings to reveal a retinotectal map of ganglion cell projections to the optic tectum of rainbow trout and characterized the spatial and chromatic distribution of ganglion cell fibers coding for increments (ON) and decrements (OFF) of light. Recordings of optic nerve activity under various adapting light backgrounds, which isolated the input of different cone mechanisms, yielded dynamic patterns of ON and OFF input characterized by segregation of these two fiber types. Chromatic adaptation decreased the sensitivity and response latency of affected cone mechanisms, revealing their variable contributions to the ON and OFF responses. Our experiments further demonstrated restricted input from a UV cone mechanism to the anterolateral optic tectum, in accordance with the limited presence of UV cones in the dorsotemporal retina of juvenile rainbow trout. Together, our findings show that retinal inputs to the optic tectum of this species are not homogeneous, exhibit highly dynamic activity patterns, and are likely determined by a combination of biased projections and specific retinal cell distributions and their activity states. PMID:26334009

  9. Multiple Components of Ganglion Cell Desensitization in Response to Prosthetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K; Fried, Shelley I

    2011-01-01

    Retinal prostheses aim to restore functional vision to those blinded by outer retinal diseases using electric stimulation of surviving neurons. Previous work indicates that repetitive stimulation with stimuli that activate the synaptic network reduces the sensitivity of retinal neurons to further stimulation. Such desensitization may contribute to the fading of visual percepts over time reported by human subjects. Here, we show that desensitization may be more complex than previously considered. We recorded spike trains from rabbit retinal ganglion cells and found that desensitization persists in the presence of inhibitory blockers (strychnine and picrotoxin), indicating amacrine cell inhibition is not solely responsible for reducing sensitivity in response to electric stimulation. The threshold for direct activation of the ganglion cell changes little during the simultaneous desensitization of the synaptically mediated response, indicating that desensitization likely occurs upstream of the spike generator. In addition to the rapid desensitization acting over hundreds of milliseconds (τ = 176.4 ± 8.8ms), we report the presence of a slow acting desensitization with a time course of seconds (τ = 14.0 ± 1.1sec). The time course of the two components of desensitization that we found are similar to the two phases of brightness fading seen in human subjects. This suggests that the reduction in ganglion cell firing due to desensitization may be responsible for the fading of visual percepts over time in response to prosthetic stimulation. PMID:21248379

  10. Moniliform deformation of retinal ganglion cells by formaldehyde-based fixatives.

    PubMed

    Stradleigh, Tyler W; Greenberg, Kenneth P; Partida, Gloria J; Pham, Aaron; Ishida, Andrew T

    2015-03-01

    Protocols for characterizing cellular phenotypes commonly use chemical fixatives to preserve anatomical features, mechanically stabilize tissue, and stop physiological responses. Formaldehyde, diluted in either phosphate-buffered saline or phosphate buffer, has been widely used in studies of neurons, especially in conjunction with dyes and antibodies. However, previous studies have found that these fixatives induce the formation of bead-like varicosities in the dendrites and axons of brain and spinal cord neurons. We report here that these formaldehyde formulations can induce bead formation in the dendrites and axons of adult rat and rabbit retinal ganglion cells, and that retinal ganglion cells differ from hippocampal, cortical, cerebellar, and spinal cord neurons in that bead formation is not blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists, a voltage-gated Na(+) channel toxin, extracellular Ca(2+) ion exclusion, or temperature shifts. Moreover, we describe a modification of formaldehyde-based fixatives that prevents bead formation in retinal ganglion cells visualized by green fluorescent protein expression and by immunohistochemistry.

  11. Changes in ganglion cell physiology during retinal degeneration influence excitability by prosthetic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Alice; Ratliff, Charles; Sampath, Alapakkam; Weiland, James

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Here we investigate ganglion cell physiology in healthy and degenerating retina to test its influence on threshold to electrical stimulation. Approach. Age-related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa cause blindness via outer retinal degeneration. Inner retinal pathways that transmit visual information to the central brain remain intact, so direct electrical stimulation from prosthetic devices offers the possibility for visual restoration. Since inner retinal physiology changes during degeneration, we characterize physiological properties and responses to electrical stimulation in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of both wild type mice and the rd10 mouse model of retinal degeneration. Main results. Our aggregate results support previous observations that elevated thresholds characterize diseased retinas. However, a physiology-driven classification scheme reveals distinct sub-populations of ganglion cells with thresholds either normal or strongly elevated compared to wild-type. When these populations are combined, only a weakly elevated threshold with large variance is observed. The cells with normal threshold are more depolarized at rest and exhibit periodic oscillations. Significance. During degeneration, physiological changes in RGCs affect the threshold stimulation currents required to evoke action potentials.

  12. Inner retinal inhibition shapes the receptive field of retinal ganglion cells in primate

    PubMed Central

    Protti, D A; Di Marco, S; Huang, J Y; Vonhoff, C R; Nguyen, V; Solomon, S G

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The centre–surround organisation of receptive fields is a feature of most retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and is critical for spatial discrimination and contrast detection. Although lateral inhibitory processes are known to be important in generating the receptive field surround, the contribution of each of the two synaptic layers in the primate retina remains unclear. Here we studied the spatial organisation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs onto ON and OFF ganglion cells in the primate retina. All RGCs showed an increase in excitation in response to stimulus of preferred polarity. Inhibition onto RGCs comprised two types of responses to preferred polarity: some RGCs showed an increase in inhibition whilst others showed removal of tonic inhibition. Excitatory inputs were strongly spatially tuned but inhibitory inputs showed more variable organisation: in some neurons they were as strongly tuned as excitation, and in others inhibitory inputs showed no spatial tuning. We targeted one source of inner retinal inhibition by functionally ablating spiking amacrine cells with bath application of tetrodotoxin (TTX). TTX significantly reduced the spatial tuning of excitatory inputs. In addition, TTX reduced inhibition onto those RGCs where a stimulus of preferred polarity increased inhibition. Reconstruction of the spatial tuning properties by somatic injection of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances verified that TTX-mediated inhibition onto bipolar cells increases the strength of the surround in RGC spiking output. These results indicate that in the primate retina inhibitory mechanisms in the inner plexiform layer sharpen the spatial tuning of ganglion cells. PMID:24042496

  13. Response variability to high rates of electric stimulation in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Changsi; Ren, Qiushi; Desai, Neal J; Rizzo, Joseph F; Fried, Shelley I

    2011-07-01

    To improve the quality of prosthetic vision, it is important to understand how retinal neurons respond to electric stimulation. Previous studies present conflicting reports as to the maximum rate at which retinal ganglion cells can "follow" pulse trains, i.e., generate one spike for each pulse of the train. In the present study, we measured the response of 5 different types of rabbit retinal ganglion cells to pulse trains of 100-700 Hz. Surprisingly, we found significant heterogeneity in the ability of different types to follow pulse trains. For example, brisk transient (BT) ganglion cells could reliably follow pulse rates up to 600 pulses per second (PPS). In contrast, other types could not even follow rates of 200 PPS. There was additional heterogeneity in the response patterns across those types that could not follow high-rate trains. For example, some types generated action potentials in response to approximately every other pulse, whereas other types generated one spike per pulse for a few consecutive pulses and then did not generate any spikes in response to the next few pulses. Interestingly, in the types that could not follow high-rate trains, we found a second type of response: many pulses of the train elicited a biphasic waveform with an amplitude much smaller than that of standard action potentials. This small waveform was often observed following every pulse for which a standard spike was not elicited. A possible origin of the small waveform and its implication for effective retinal stimulation are discussed.

  14. Multiple components of ganglion cell desensitization in response to prosthetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Fried, Shelley I.

    2011-02-01

    Retinal prostheses aim to restore functional vision to those blinded by outer retinal diseases using electric stimulation of surviving neurons. Previous work indicates that repetitive stimulation with stimuli that activate the synaptic network reduces the sensitivity of retinal neurons to further stimulation. Such desensitization may contribute to the fading of visual percepts over time reported by human subjects. Here, we show that desensitization may be more complex than previously considered. We recorded spike trains from rabbit retinal ganglion cells and found that desensitization persists in the presence of inhibitory blockers (strychnine and picrotoxin), indicating amacrine cell inhibition is not solely responsible for reducing sensitivity in response to electric stimulation. The threshold for direct activation of the ganglion cell changes little during the simultaneous desensitization of the synaptically mediated response, indicating that desensitization likely occurs upstream of the spike generator. In addition to rapid desensitization acting over hundreds of milliseconds (τ = 176.4 ± 8.8 ms), we report the presence of slow acting desensitization with a time course of seconds (τ = 14.0 ± 1.1 s). The time courses of the two components of desensitization that we found are similar to the two phases of brightness fading seen in human subjects. This suggests that the reduction in ganglion cell firing due to desensitization may be responsible for the fading of visual percepts over time in response to prosthetic stimulation.

  15. Amacrine cells in the ganglion cell layer of the cat retina.

    PubMed

    Wässle, H; Chun, M H; Müller, F

    1987-11-15

    Following transection of the optic nerve, ganglion cells in the cat retina undergo retrograde degeneration. However, many small profiles (less than or equal to 10 micron) survive in the ganglion cell layer. Previously considered to be neuroglia, there is now substantial evidence that they are displaced amacrine cells. Their density increases from approximately 1,000 cells/mm2 in peripheral retina to 7,000 cells/mm2 in the central area. Their total number was found to be 850,000, which is five times the number of ganglion cells and also five times the number of astrocytes. Uptake of 3H-muscimol followed by autoradiography labelled 75% of the displaced amacrine cells; hence, the majority seem to be GABAergic. Immunocytochemistry with an antibody directed against choline-acetyl-transferase labelled approximately 10% of the displaced amacrines in the peripheral retina and 17% in the central area. Uptake of serotonin (5-HT) followed by immunocytochemistry was found in 25-30% of displaced amacrines. NADPH diaphorase histochemistry labelled approximately 5% of displaced amacrine cells. The sum of the various percentages make colocalization likely. Intracellular injection of Lucifer Yellow under microscopic control revealed that displaced amacrine cells constitute several morphological types. PMID:3693612

  16. Ouabain-Induced Apoptosis in Cochlear Hair Cells and Spiral Ganglion Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yong; Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Salvi, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Ouabain is a common tool to explore the pathophysiological changes in adult mammalian cochlea in vivo. In prior studies, locally administering ouabain via round window membrane demonstrated that the ototoxic effects of ouabain in vivo varied among mammalian species. Little is known about the ototoxic effects in vitro. Thus, we prepared cochlear organotypic cultures from postnatal day-3 rats and treated these cultures with ouabain at 50, 500, and 1000 μM for different time to elucidate the ototoxic effects of ouabain in vitro and to provide insights that could explain the comparative ototoxic effects of ouabain in vivo. Degeneration of cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons was evaluated by hair-cell staining and neurofilament labeling, respectively. Annexin V staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. A quantitative RT-PCR apoptosis-focused gene array determined changes in apoptosis-related genes. The results showed that ouabain-induced damage in vitro was dose and time dependent. 500 μM ouabain and 1000 μM ouabain were destructively traumatic to both spiral ganglion neurons and cochlear hair cells in an apoptotic signal-dependent pathway. The major apoptotic pathways in ouabain-induced spiral ganglion neuron apoptosis culminated in the stimulation of the p53 pathway and triggering of apoptosis by a network of proapoptotic signaling pathways. PMID:24228256

  17. Adult Human Nasal Mesenchymal-Like Stem Cells Restore Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Neurons After Experimental Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Bas, Esperanza; Van De Water, Thomas R.; Lumbreras, Vicente; Rajguru, Suhrud; Goss, Garrett; Hare, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    A loss of sensory hair cells or spiral ganglion neurons from the inner ear causes deafness, affecting millions of people. Currently, there is no effective therapy to repair the inner ear sensory structures in humans. Cochlear implantation can restore input, but only if auditory neurons remain intact. Efforts to develop stem cell-based treatments for deafness have demonstrated progress, most notably utilizing embryonic-derived cells. In an effort to bypass limitations of embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells that may impede the translation to clinical applications, we sought to utilize an alternative cell source. Here, we show that adult human mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) obtained from nasal tissue can repair spiral ganglion loss in experimentally lesioned cochlear cultures from neonatal rats. Stem cells engraft into gentamicin-lesioned organotypic cultures and orchestrate the restoration of the spiral ganglion neuronal population, involving both direct neuronal differentiation and secondary effects on endogenous cells. As a physiologic assay, nasal MSC-derived cells engrafted into lesioned spiral ganglia demonstrate responses to infrared laser stimulus that are consistent with those typical of excitable cells. The addition of a pharmacologic activator of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway concurrent with stem cell treatment promoted robust neuronal differentiation. The availability of an effective adult autologous cell source for inner ear tissue repair should contribute to efforts to translate cell-based strategies to the clinic. PMID:24172073

  18. The Role of Cyclooxygenase in Multiplication and Reactivation of HSV-1 in Vestibular Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuehong; Li, Shufeng; Wang, Zhengmin

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of latent herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) and nerve inflammation have been shown to be involved in vertigo-related vestibular pathogenesis. Treatments of such diseases have been less than perfect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to suppress reactivation of HSV-1 in trigeminal ganglions. However, whether this drug can affect reactivation of HSV-1 in vestibular ganglions is unclear. Due to the difficulties of constructing in vivo animal models, in this study, we developed a vestibular ganglion culture system, in which vestibular neurons were latently or lytically infected with HSV-1. Indomethacin and celecoxib were selected to measure their effects on HSV-1. Trichostatin A was used to reactivate HSV-1 in latently infected neurons. Cycloxygenase-2, which is the target of NSAIDs, was induced by HSV-1 in the lytically infected cultures, with an increase of 14-fold. Although it appeared that indomethacin and celecoxib showed limited but concentration-dependent inhibition effects on viral production under our condition, indomethacin decreased reactivation rate of HSV-1 by about 20%. Though more in vitro or in vivo studies are needed to confirm the effects of the drugs, our study may provide a potential way to investigate the mechanism of HSV-related vestibular pathogenesis as well as new treatments of vertigo-related diseases. PMID:24688447

  19. Organ of Corti explants direct tonotopically graded morphology of spiral ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, Felicia L; Davis, Robin L

    2016-08-01

    The spiral ganglion is a compelling model system to examine how morphological form contributes to sensory function. While the ganglion is composed mainly of a single class of type I neurons that make simple one-to-one connections with inner hair cell sensory receptors, it has an elaborate overall morphological design. Specific features, such as soma size and axon outgrowth, are graded along the spiral contour of the cochlea. To begin to understand the interplay between different regulators of neuronal morphology, we cocultured neuron explants with peripheral target tissues removed from distinct cochlear locations. Interestingly, these "hair cell microisolates" were capable of both increasing and decreasing neuronal somata size, without adversely affecting survival. Moreover, axon characteristics elaborated de novo by the primary afferents in culture were systematically regulated by the sensory endorgan. Apparent peripheral nervous system (PNS)-like and central nervous system (CNS)-like axonal profiles were established in our cocultures allowing an analysis of putative PNS/CNS axon length ratios. As predicted from the in vivo organization, PNS-like axon bundles elaborated by apical cocultures were longer than their basal counterparts and this phenotype was methodically altered when neuron explants were cocultured with microisolates from disparate cochlear regions. Thus, location-dependent signals within the organ of Corti may set the "address" of neurons within the spiral ganglion, allowing them to elaborate the appropriate tonotopically associated morphological features in order to carry out their signaling function. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2182-2207, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Moniliform Deformation of Retinal Ganglion Cells by Formaldehyde-Based Fixatives

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Greenberg, Kenneth P.; Partida, Gloria J.; Pham, Aaron; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Protocols for characterizing cellular phenotypes commonly use chemical fixatives to preserve anatomical features, mechanically stabilize tissue, and stop physiological responses. Formaldehyde, diluted in either phosphate-buffered saline or phosphate buffer, has been widely used in studies of neurons, especially in conjunction with dyes and antibodies. However, previous studies have reported that these fixatives induce the formation of bead-like varicosities in the dendrites and axons of brain and spinal cord neurons. We report here that these formaldehyde formulations can induce bead formation in the dendrites and axons of adult rat and rabbit retinal ganglion cells, and that retinal ganglion cells differ from hippocampal, cortical, cerebellar, and spinal cord neurons in that bead formation is not blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists, a voltage-gated Na+ channel toxin, extracellular Ca2+ ion exclusion, or temperature shifts. Moreover, we describe a modification of formaldehyde-based fixatives that prevents bead formation in retinal ganglion cells visualized by green fluorescent protein expression and by immunohistochemistry. PMID:25283775

  1. Pru du 2S albumin or Pru du vicilin?

    PubMed

    Garino, Cristiano; De Paolis, Angelo; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Arlorio, Marco

    2015-06-01

    A short partial sequence of 28 amino acids is all the information we have so far about the putative allergen 2S albumin from almond. The aim of this work was to analyze this information using mainly bioinformatics tools, in order to verify its rightness. Based on the results reported in the paper describing this allergen from almond, we analyzed the original data of amino acids sequencing through available software. The degree of homology of the almond 12kDa protein with any other known 2S albumin appears to be much lower than the one reported in the paper that firstly described it. In a publicly available cDNA library we discovered an expressed sequence tag which translation generates a protein that perfectly matches both of the sequencing outputs described in the same paper. A further analysis indicated that the latter protein seems to belong to the vicilin superfamily rather than to the prolamin one. The fact that also vicilins are seed storage proteins known to be highly allergenic would explain the IgE reactivity originally observed. Based on our observations we suggest that the IgE reactive 12kDa protein from almond currently known as Pru du 2S albumin is in reality the cleaved N-terminal region of a 7S vicilin like protein.

  2. Acquired color vision loss and a possible mechanism of ganglion cell death in glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Nork, T M

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: First, to study the cellular mechanisms of acquired color vision loss in retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy. Second, to learn why, in glaucoma, the type of color vision deficit that is observed is more characteristic of a retinal injury than it is of an optic neuropathy. Third, to test a hypothesis of photoreceptor-induced, ganglion cell death in glaucoma. METHODS: Various histologic techniques were employed to distinguish the L/M-cones (long/medium wavelength-sensitive cones, or red/green sensitive cones) from the S-cones (short wavelength-sensitive cones, or blue sensitive cones) in humans and monkeys with retinal detachment, humans with diabetic retinopathy, and both humans and monkeys with glaucoma. To test if the photoreceptors were contributing to ganglion cell death, laser photocoagulation was used in a experimental model of glaucoma to focally eliminate the photoreceptors. As a control, optic nerve transection was done following retinal laser photocoagulation in one animal. RESULTS: Selective and widespread loss of the S-cones was found in retinal detachment as well as diabetic retinopathy. By contrast, in human as well as experimental glaucoma, marked swelling of the L/M-cones was the predominant histopathologic feature. Retinal laser photocoagulation followed by experimental glaucoma resulted in selective protection of ganglion cells overlying the laser spots. This was not seen with retinal laser photocoagulation by optic nerve transection. CONCLUSIONS: In retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy, acquired tritan-like color vision loss could be caused, or contributed to, by selective loss of the S-cones. Both L- and M-cones are affected in glaucoma, which is also consistent with a tritan-like deficit. Although not a therapeutic option, protection of ganglion cells by retinal laser in experimental glaucoma is consistent with an hypothesis of anterograde, photoreceptor-induced, ganglion cell death. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3

  3. Biokinetics and dosimetry of depleted uranium (DU) in rats implanted with DU fragments.

    SciTech Connect

    Guilmette, Ray A.; Hahn, Fletcher F.; Durbin, P. W.

    2004-01-01

    A number of U. S. veterans of the Persian Gulf War were wounded with depleted uranium (DU) metal fragments as a result of 'friendly fire' incidents, in which Abrams tanks and Bradley fighting vehicles were struck by DU anti-armor munitions. Some of the crew members who survived were left with multiple small fragments of DU in their muscles and soft tissues. The number, size and location of the fragments made them inoperable in general, and therefore subject to long-term retention. Because there was inadequate data to predict the potential carcinogenicity of DU fragments in soft tissues, Hahn et al. (2003) conducted a lifespan cancer study in rats. As part of that study, a number of rats were maintained to study the biokinetics and dosimetry of DU implanted intramuscularly in male Wistar rats. Typically, four metal fragments, either as cylindrical pellets or square wafers were implanted into the biceps femoris muscles of the rats. Urine samples were collected periodically during their lifespans, and DU was analyzed in kidneys and eviscerated carcass (minus the implant sites) at death. The daily DU urinary excretion rate increased steeply during the first 30 d after implantation peaking at about 90 d at 3-10 x 10{sup -3}%/d. During the first 150 d, the average excretion rate was 2.4 x 10{sup -3}%/d, decreasing thereafter to about 1 x 10{sup -3}%/d. Serial radiographs were made of the wound sites to monitor gross morphologic changes in the DU implant and the surrounding tissue. As early as 1 w after implantation, radiographs showed the presence of surface corrosion and small, dense bodies near the original implant, presumably DU. This corrosion from the surface of the implant continued with time, but did not result in an increasing amount of DU reaching the blood and urine after the first 3 mo. During this 3-mo period, connective tissue capsules formed around the implants, and are hypothesized to have reduced the access of DU to tissue fluids by limiting the diffusion

  4. Identification of retinal ganglion cells and their projections involved in central transmission of information about upward and downward image motion.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Keisuke; Ishikane, Hiroshi; Sakuta, Hiraki; Shintani, Takafumi; Nakamura-Yonehara, Kayo; Kamiji, Nilton L; Usui, Shiro; Noda, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    The direction of image motion is coded by direction-selective (DS) ganglion cells in the retina. Particularly, the ON DS ganglion cells project their axons specifically to terminal nuclei of the accessory optic system (AOS) responsible for optokinetic reflex (OKR). We recently generated a knock-in mouse in which SPIG1 (SPARC-related protein containing immunoglobulin domains 1)-expressing cells are visualized with GFP, and found that retinal ganglion cells projecting to the medial terminal nucleus (MTN), the principal nucleus of the AOS, are comprised of SPIG1+ and SPIG1(-) ganglion cells distributed in distinct mosaic patterns in the retina. Here we examined light responses of these two subtypes of MTN-projecting cells by targeted electrophysiological recordings. SPIG1+ and SPIG1(-) ganglion cells respond preferentially to upward motion and downward motion, respectively, in the visual field. The direction selectivity of SPIG1+ ganglion cells develops normally in dark-reared mice. The MTN neurons are activated by optokinetic stimuli only of the vertical motion as shown by Fos expression analysis. Combination of genetic labeling and conventional retrograde labeling revealed that axons of SPIG1+ and SPIG1(-) ganglion cells project to the MTN via different pathways. The axon terminals of the two subtypes are organized into discrete clusters in the MTN. These results suggest that information about upward and downward image motion transmitted by distinct ON DS cells is separately processed in the MTN, if not independently. Our findings provide insights into the neural mechanisms of OKR, how information about the direction of image motion is deciphered by the AOS.

  5. Résultats du traitement du synovialosarcome des members

    PubMed Central

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Ismail, Farid; Kharmaz, Mohammed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Les synovialosarcomes, sarcomes de haut grade, sont de diagnostic tardif et le traitement est complexe et onéreux, nécessitant la mise en œuvre d'une équipe pluridisciplinaire. Le but de ce travail était d'apprécier les résultats de l'association de la chirurgie à la radio chimiothérapie des synovialosarcomes des membres. Il s'agissait d'une étude rétrospective portant sur des patients présentant de synovialosarcomes des membres pris en charge dans le service de chirurgie orthopédique et traumatologique du CHU Ibn SINA de Rabat allant de Janvier 2006 à Décembre 2011 (6 ans). Nous avons inclus les malades présentant de synovialosarcomes des membres dont la clinique et l'imagerie médicale étaient en faveur, confirmés par l'examen anatomopathologique et la prise en charge effectuée dans le service. Les patients ont été revus avec un recul moyen de 3 ans. Nous n'avons pas retenu les patients dont les dossiers étaient incomplets, perdus de vue. Nous avons apprécié les résultats selon les critères carcinologiques et le score MSTS (Musculoskeletal Tumor Society). La saisie et l'analyse des données ont été faites sur le logiciel SPSS Stastic 17.0 Nous avons colligé 20 cas de synovialosarcome des membres dans le Service de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique au CHU Ibn SINA de Rabat Le sexe masculin a prédominé avec 65% (n = 13) avec un sex ratio 1,85. L’âge moyen a été de 42,6 ans avec des extrêmes allant de 20 ans et 70 ans. Notre délai moyen de consultation était de 14,42 mois. Tous les malades ont consulté pour une tuméfaction dans 100% (localisée au membre inférieur dans 65% (n = 13), membre supérieur dans 35% (n = 7). La douleur était associée à la tuméfaction dans 55% (n = 11), quant à l'altération de l’état général et l'ulcération de la masse, elles ont été notées dans 3 cas chacune. Nous avons réalisé un bilan d'imagerie médicale comprenant: radiographie standard, échographie, écho doppler

  6. Cirque du Monde as a health intervention

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Cynthia; Drouin, Mélodie-Anne; Marcoux, Jérémie; Garel, Patricia; Bochud, Emmanuel; Théberge, Julie; Aubertin, Patrice; Favreau, Gil; Fleet, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present Cirque du Soleil’s social circus program, Cirque du Monde, to explore its potential as a primary health care tool for family physicians. Data sources A review of the literature in PubMed, the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, LaPresse, Eureka, Google Scholar, and Érudit using the key words circus, social circus, Cirque du Monde, and Cirque du Soleil; a Montreal-based initiative, Espace Transition, modeled on Cirque du Monde; and personal communication with Cirque du Soleil’s Social Circus Training Advisor. Study selection The first 50 articles or websites identified for each key word in each of the databases were examined on the basis of their titles and abstracts in the case of articles, and on the basis of their titles and page content in the case of websites. Articles and websites that explored an aspect of social circuses or that described an intervention that involved circuses were then retained for analysis. Because all literature on social circuses was searched, no criterion for year of publication was used. Synthesis No articles on the social circus as a health intervention were found. One study on the use of the circus as an intervention in schools was identified. It demonstrated an increase in self-esteem in the children who took part. One study on the use of the circus in a First Nations community was found; it contained nonspecific, qualitative findings. The other articles identified were merely descriptions of social circuses. One website was identified on the use of the social circus to help youth who had been treated in a hospital setting for major psychiatric disorders to re-enter the community. The team in the pediatric psychiatry department at Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, the children’s hospital in Montreal, Que, was contacted; they were leading this project, called Espace Transition. The unpublished preliminary findings of its pilot project demonstrate substantial improvements in overall patient

  7. Optical properties of retinal tissue and the potential of adaptive optics to visualize retinal ganglion cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Martina; Rauscher, Franziska Georgia; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Francke, Mike

    2013-08-01

    Many efforts have been made to improve the diagnostic tools used to identify and to estimate the progress of ganglion cell and nerve fibre degeneration in glaucoma. Imaging by optical coherence tomography and measurements of the dimensions of the optic nerve head and the nerve fibre layer in central retinal areas is currently used to estimate the grade of pathological changes. The visualization and quantification of ganglion cells and nerve fibres directly in patients would dramatically improve glaucoma diagnostics. We have investigated the optical properties of cellular structures of retinal tissue in order to establish a means of visualizing and quantifying ganglion cells in the living retina without staining. We have characterized the optical properties of retinal tissue in several species including humans. Nerve fibres, blood vessels, ganglion cells and their cell processes have been visualized at high image resolution by means of the reflection mode of a confocal laser scanning microscope. The potential of adaptive optics in current imaging systems and the possibilities of imaging single ganglion cells non-invasively in patients are discussed.

  8. Indirect activation elicits strong correlations between light and electrical responses in ON but not OFF retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Im, Maesoon; Fried, Shelley I

    2015-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of microelectronic retinal prosthetics it will be necessary to better understand the response of retinal neurons to electric stimulation. While stimulation that directly activates ganglion cells generally has the lowest threshold, the similarity in responsiveness across cells makes it extremely difficult for such an approach to re-create cell-type specific patterns of neural activity that arise normally in the healthy retina. In contrast, stimulation that activates neurons presynaptic to ganglion cells utilizes at least some of the existing retinal circuitry and therefore is thought to produce neural activity that better matches physiological signalling. Surprisingly, the actual benefit(s) of this approach remain unsubstantiated. Here, we recorded from ganglion cells in the rabbit retinal explant in response to electrical stimuli that activated the network. Targeted cells were first classified into known types via light responses so that the consistency of electrical responses within individual types could be evaluated. Both transient and sustained ON ganglion cells exhibited highly consistent electrical response patterns which were distinct from one another. Further, properties of the response (interspike interval, latency, peak firing rate, and spike count) in a given cell were well correlated to the corresponding properties of the light response for that same cell. Electric responses in OFF ganglion cells formed two groups, distinct from ON groups, and the correlation levels between electric and light responses were much weaker. The closer match in ON pathway responses may help to explain some preferential reporting of bright stimuli during psychophysical testing. PMID:26033477

  9. Concomitant activation of two types of glutamate receptor mediates excitation of salamander retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mittman, S; Taylor, W R; Copenhagen, D R

    1990-01-01

    1. Cells in the ganglion cell layer of salamander retinal slices were voltage clamped using patch pipettes. Light elicited transient excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in on-off ganglion cells and sustained EPSCs in on ganglion cells. Light-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents in these cells could be blocked by 100 microM-bicuculline methobromide and 500 nM-strychnine. 2. In the presence of external Cd2+, at a concentration that blocked light-evoked synaptic inputs, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and the non-NMDA-receptor agonists, quisqualate and kainate, gated conductances in both on-off and on ganglion cells. The current-voltage (I-V) curve for the conductance elicited by NMDA had a negative slope between -40 and -70 mV and a reversal potential near 0 mV. The I-V curves for the non-NMDA-receptor-mediated conductances were nearly linear and also had reversal potentials near 0 mV. 3. I-V curves were measured at an early time point near the peak of transient EPSCs and at a later time point during the decay phase of the responses. The late I-V curve had a negative slope below -40 mV. The early I-V curve had a positive slope over the entire voltage range but the slope was greater at positive than at negative potentials. The evoked current reversed near 0 mV at both time points. 4. The region of negative slope of the late I-V curve was eliminated when Mg2+ was removed from the external saline. A slowly decaying component of transient EPSCs was eliminated in 20 microM-DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoate (AP7), an NMDA-receptor antagonist. 5. Application of 1 microM-6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a non-NMDA-receptor antagonist at this concentration, blocked a fast component of transient EPSCs. 6. Our results demonstrate that the synaptic inputs to on-off ganglion cells have two components: a slower NMDA-receptor-mediated component having a time-to-peak of 110 +/- 45 ms and an e-fold decay time of 209 +/- 35 ms at -31 mV (mean +/- S.D., n = 5), and a

  10. Unilateral hyperhydrosis in Pourfour du Petit syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kara, Murat; Dikmen, Erkan; Akarsu, Cengiz; Birol, Ahu

    2004-08-01

    Upper limp hyperhydrosis is an idiopathic disease with bilateral involvement. However, Pourfour du Petit syndrome, the opposite of Horner syndrome, may result in unilateral upper limb hyperhydrosis. It occurs following hyperactivity of the sympathetic cervical chain as a consequence of irritation secondary to trauma. We report herein two cases with Pourfour du Petit syndrome showing unilateral upper limb hyperhydrosis. The patients presented with right-sided mydriasis and ipsilateral hemifacial hyperhydrosis. The onset of disease was followed by a trauma in both patients. They underwent upper thoracic sympathectomy with favorable outcome. A history of an antecedent trauma in patients with unilateral upper limb hyperhydrosis and anisocoria may imply a possible diagnosis of Pourfour du Petit syndrome. PMID:15296919

  11. Adenosine modulates light responses of rat retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors througha cAMP-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is an established neuromodulator in the mammalian retina, with A1 adenosine receptors being especially prevalent in the innermost ganglion cell layer. Activation of A1 receptors causes inhibition of adenylate cyclase, decreases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). In this work, our aim was to characterize the effects of adenosine on the light responses of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) and to determine whether these photoreceptors are subject to neuromodulation through intracellular cAMP-related signalling pathways. Using multielectrode array recordings from postnatal and adult rat retinas, we demonstrated that adenosine significantly shortened the duration of ipRGC photoresponses and reduced the number of light-evoked spikes fired by these neurons. The effects were A1 adenosine receptor-mediated, and the expression of this receptor on melanopsin-containing ipRGCs was confirmed by calcium imaging experiments on isolated cells in purified cultures. While inhibition of the cAMP/PKA pathway by adenosine shortened ipRGC light responses, stimulation of this pathway with compounds such as forskolin had the opposite effect and lengthened the duration of ipRGC spiking. Our findings reveal that the modification of ipRGC photoresponses through a cAMP/PKA pathway is a general feature of rat ganglion cell photoreceptors, and this pathway can be inhibited through activation of A1 receptors by adenosine. As adenosine levels in the retina rise at night, adenosinergic modulation of ipRGCs may serve as an internal regulatory mechanism to limit transmission of nocturnal photic signals by ipRGCs to the brain. Targeting retinal A1 adenosine receptors for ipRGC inhibition represents a potential therapeutic target for sleep disorders and migraine-associated photophobia. PMID:25038240

  12. Organ of Corti explants direct tonotopically graded morphology of spiral ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, Felicia L; Davis, Robin L

    2016-08-01

    The spiral ganglion is a compelling model system to examine how morphological form contributes to sensory function. While the ganglion is composed mainly of a single class of type I neurons that make simple one-to-one connections with inner hair cell sensory receptors, it has an elaborate overall morphological design. Specific features, such as soma size and axon outgrowth, are graded along the spiral contour of the cochlea. To begin to understand the interplay between different regulators of neuronal morphology, we cocultured neuron explants with peripheral target tissues removed from distinct cochlear locations. Interestingly, these "hair cell microisolates" were capable of both increasing and decreasing neuronal somata size, without adversely affecting survival. Moreover, axon characteristics elaborated de novo by the primary afferents in culture were systematically regulated by the sensory endorgan. Apparent peripheral nervous system (PNS)-like and central nervous system (CNS)-like axonal profiles were established in our cocultures allowing an analysis of putative PNS/CNS axon length ratios. As predicted from the in vivo organization, PNS-like axon bundles elaborated by apical cocultures were longer than their basal counterparts and this phenotype was methodically altered when neuron explants were cocultured with microisolates from disparate cochlear regions. Thus, location-dependent signals within the organ of Corti may set the "address" of neurons within the spiral ganglion, allowing them to elaborate the appropriate tonotopically associated morphological features in order to carry out their signaling function. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2182-2207, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26663318

  13. Time-Lapse Retinal Ganglion Cell Dendritic Field Degeneration Imaged in Organotypic Retinal Explant Culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas V.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Cone-Kimball, Elizabeth; Jefferys, Joan; Quigley, Harry A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an ex vivo organotypic retinal explant culture system suitable for multiple time-point imaging of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dendritic arbors over a period of 1 week, and capable of detecting dendrite neuroprotection conferred by experimental treatments. Methods Thy1-YFP mouse retinas were explanted and maintained in organotypic culture. Retinal ganglion cell dendritic arbors were imaged repeatedly using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Maximal projection z-stacks were traced by two masked investigators and dendritic fields were analyzed for characteristics including branch number, size, and complexity. One group of explants was treated with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) added to the culture media. Changes in individual dendritic fields over time were detected using pair-wise comparison testing. Results Retinal ganglion cells in mouse retinal explant culture began to degenerate after 3 days with 52.4% surviving at 7 days. Dendritic field parameters showed minimal change over 8 hours in culture. Intra- and interobserver measurements of dendrite characteristics were strongly correlated (Spearman rank correlations consistently > 0.80). Statistically significant (P < 0.001) dendritic tree degeneration was detected following 7 days in culture including: 40% to 50% decreases in number of branch segments, number of junctions, number of terminal branches, and total branch length. Scholl analyses similarly demonstrated a significant decrease in dendritic field complexity. Treatment of explants with BDNF+CNTF significantly attenuated dendritic field degeneration. Conclusions Retinal explant culture of Thy1-YFP tissue provides a useful model for time-lapse imaging of RGC dendritic field degeneration over a course of several days, and is capable of detecting neuroprotective amelioration of dendritic pruning within individual RGCs. PMID:26811145

  14. A model of high-frequency oscillatory potentials in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    KENYON, GARRETT T.; MOORE, BARTLETT; JEFFS, JANELLE; DENNING, KATE S.; STEPHENS, GREG J.; TRAVIS, BRYAN J.; GEORGE, JOHN S.; THEILER, JAMES; MARSHAK, DAVID W.

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency oscillatory potentials (HFOPs) have been recorded from ganglion cells in cat, rabbit, frog, and mudpuppy retina and in electroretinograms (ERGs) from humans and other primates. However, the origin of HFOPs is unknown. Based on patterns of tracer coupling, we hypothesized that HFOPs could be generated, in part, by negative feedback from axon-bearing amacrine cells excited via electrical synapses with neighboring ganglion cells. Computer simulations were used to determine whether such axon-mediated feedback was consistent with the experimentally observed properties of HFOPs. (1) Periodic signals are typically absent from ganglion cell PSTHs, in part because the phases of retinal HFOPs vary randomly over time and are only weakly stimulus locked. In the retinal model, this phase variability resulted from the nonlinear properties of axon-mediated feedback in combination with synaptic noise. (2) HFOPs increase as a function of stimulus size up to several times the receptive-field center diameter. In the model, axon-mediated feedback pooled signals over a large retinal area, producing HFOPs that were similarly size dependent. (3) HFOPs are stimulus specific. In the model, gap junctions between neighboring neurons caused contiguous regions to become phase locked, but did not synchronize separate regions. Model-generated HFOPs were consistent with the receptive-field center dynamics and spatial organization of cat alpha cells. HFOPs did not depend qualitatively on the exact value of any model parameter or on the numerical precision of the integration method. We conclude that HFOPs could be mediated, in part, by circuitry consistent with known retinal anatomy. PMID:14977326

  15. Biophysical properties and responses to glutamate receptor agonists of identified subpopulations of rat geniculate ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    King, M S; Bradley, R M

    2000-06-01

    The goal of the current study was to evaluate the electrophysiological properties and responses to glutamate receptor agonists of rat geniculate ganglion (GG) neurons innervating the tongue. Subpopulations of GG neurons were labeled by injecting Fluoro-Gold (FG) or True Blue chloride into the anterior tongue and soft palate (AT and SP neurons) and applying FG crystals to the posterior auricular branch of the facial nerve (PA neurons). Three to 12 days later, the GG neurons were acutely isolated and patch clamped. Although many biophysical properties of the AT, SP and PA neurons were similar, significant differences were found among these groups in properties related to cell excitability. For example, the average amount of current necessary to elicit an action potential was 61 pA in AT neurons (n=55), 90 pA in SP neurons (n=41) and 189 pA in PA neurons (n=35, P<0.001). In addition, AT neurons tended to fire significantly more action potentials during depolarization as well as following hyperpolarizing pulses than SP or PA neuron types. Most GG neurons responded to application of glutamate receptor agonists. The neurons responded with a depolarization accompanied by a reduction in input resistance. These results suggest that subpopulations of neurons in the geniculate ganglion have distinct biophysical properties and express functional glutamate receptors. The differing biophysical properties of GG neurons is possibly related to their functional heterogeneity and glutaminergic neurotransmission may function in the processing of gustatory, and other sensory information, within the geniculate ganglion and its projections. PMID:10825499

  16. Neurotransmissional, structural, and conduction velocity changes in cerebral ganglions of Lumbricus terrestris on exposure to acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Subaraja, Mamangam; Vanisree, A J

    2016-09-01

    Acrylamide (ACR), an environmental toxin though being investigated for decades, remains an enigma with respect to its mechanism/site of actions. We aim to explicate the changes in cerebral ganglions and giant fibers along with the behavior of worms on ACR intoxication (3.5-17.5 mg/mL of medium/7 days). Neurotransmitter analysis revealed increased levels of excitatory glutamate and inhibitory gamma amino butyrate with reduced levels of dopamine, serotonin, melatonin, and epinephrine (p < 0.001). Scanning electron microscopy showed architectural changes in cerebral ganglions at 3.5 mg/mL/ACR. The learning behavior as evidenced by Pavlovian and maze tests was also altered well at 3.5 mg/mL of ACR. Electrophysiological assessment showed a reduction in conduction velocity of the medial and lateral giant nerve fibers. We speculate that the observed dose/time-dependent changes in neurotransmission, neurosecretion, and conduction velocity on ACR intoxication at 17.5 mg/ml, possibly, could be due to its effect on nerve fibers governing motor functions. The bioaccumulation factor in the range of 0.38-0.99 mg/g of ACR causes a detrimental impact on giant fibers affecting behavior of worm. The observations made using the simple invertebrate model implicate that the cerebral ganglionic variations in the worms may be useful to appreciate the pathology of the neurological diseases which involve motor neuron dysfunction, esp where the availability of brain samples from the victims are scarce. PMID:27215980

  17. The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway and synaptic plasticity in the rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Southam, E.; Charles, S. L.; Garthwaite, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have investigated the possibility that nitric oxide (NO) and soluble guanylyl cyclase, an enzyme that synthesizes guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in response to NO, contributes to plasticity of synaptic transmission in the rat isolated superior cervical ganglion (SCG). 2. Exposure of ganglia to the NO donor, nitroprusside, caused a concentration-dependent accumulation of cyclic GMP which was augmented in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. The compound, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), a selective inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, completely blocked this cyclic GMP response. 3. As assessed by extracellular recording, nitroprusside (100 microM) and another NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (30 microM) increased the efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission in response to electrical stimulation of the preganglionic nerve, an effect that was reversible and which could be replicated by the cyclic GMP analogue, 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. Ganglionic depolarizations resulting from stimulation of nicotinic receptors with carbachol were not increased by nitroprusside. The potentiating actions of the NO donors on synaptic transmission, but not that of 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, were inhibited by ODQ. 4. Brief tetanic stimulation of the preganglionic nerve resulted in a long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission that was unaffected by ODQ, either in the absence or presence of the NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 100 microM). A lack of influence of L-NOARG was confirmed in intracellular recordings of LTP of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. Furthermore, under conditions where tetanically-induced LTP was saturated, nitroprusside was still able to potentiate synaptic transmission, as judged from extracellular recording. 5. We conclude that NO is capable of potentiating ganglionic neurotransmission and this effect is mediated through the stimulation of soluble guanylyl

  18. An intra-articular ganglion cyst in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Donna Y; Yee, Keolamau; Burkhalter, William; Okimoto, Kelley Chinen; Kon, Kevin; Kurahara, David K

    2014-01-01

    We report an intra-articular ganglion cyst (IAGC) presenting as knee pain and a mass in a patient with longstanding Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). We could not find a similar case of an IAGC occurring in the knee of JIA patients in the literature. IAGC may need to be included as a possibility in patients with inflammatory arthritis with new-onset knee pain, especially in those with a palpable mass. MRI was useful in distinguishing IAGC from more worrisome causes of a knee mass. Orthopedic input was helpful in diagnosis and treatment. In addition, methotrexate therapy was effective in bringing about a long-lasting remission.

  19. Mitochondrial variations in the spinal ganglion cells of the slow loris: an electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M M; Kanagasuntheram, R

    1976-04-01

    The fine structure os spinal ganglia from seven slow lorises (Nycticebus coucang coucang) was studied following perfusion fixation using different concentrations of glutaraldehyde and post-fixation in 1% osmic acid. Two cell types, one light (63%), and the other dark (37%) were reported out of the total number of 425 neurons counted. Almost all the light cells contained filamentous mitochondria, whereas only 35% of the dark cells contained filamentous mitochondria, the other 65% having vacuolated mitochondria. The significance of this mitochondrial variation in the spinal ganglion cells of the slow loris is undecided.

  20. Selective labeling of retinal ganglion cells with calcium indicators by retrograde loading in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Behrend, Matthew R.; Ahuja, Ashish K.; Humayun, Mark S.; Weiland, James D.; Chow, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present a retrograde loading technique that makes it possible for the first time to rapidly load a calcium indicator in the majority of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in salamander retina, and then to observe physiological activity of these dye-loaded cells. Dextran-conjugated calcium indicator, dissolved in water, was applied to the optic nerve stump. Following dye loading, the isolated retina was mounted on a microelectrode array to demonstrate that electrical activity and calcium activity were preserved, as the retina responded to electrical stimuli. PMID:19428523

  1. Radiofrequency ablation of stellate ganglion in a patient with complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Chinmoy; Chatterjee, Nilay

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is characterized by a combination of sensory, motor, vasomotor, pseudomotor dysfunctions and trophic signs. We describe the use of radiofrequency (RF) ablation of Stellate ganglion (SG) under fluoroscopy, for long-term suppression of sympathetic nervous system, in a patient having CRPS-not otherwise specified. Although the effects of thermal RF neurolysis may be partial or temporary, they may promote better conditions toward rehabilitation. The beneficial effect obtained by the RF neurolysis of SG in this particular patient strongly advocates the use of this mode of therapy in patients with CRPS. PMID:25191200

  2. Gibbs distribution analysis of temporal correlations structure in retina ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, J. C.; Marre, O.; Palacios, A.G.; Berry, M.J.; Cessac, B.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to estimate Gibbs distributions with spatio-temporal constraints on spike trains statistics. We apply this method to spike trains recorded from ganglion cells of the salamander retina, in response to natural movies. Our analysis, restricted to a few neurons, performs more accurately than pairwise synchronization models (Ising) or the 1-time step Markov models (Marre et al. (2009)) to describe the statistics of spatio-temporal spike patterns and emphasizes the role of higher order spatio-temporal interactions. PMID:22115900

  3. Characterization of the cardiac ganglion in the crab Neohelice granulata and immunohistochemical evidence of GABA-like extrinsic regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Margarita; Carbó Tano, Martín; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Hermitte, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to provide an anatomical description of the cardiac system in the crab Neohelice granulata and evidence of the presence of GABA by means of immunohistochemistry. The ganglionic trunk was found lying on the inner surface of the heart's dorsal wall. After dissection, this structure appeared as a Y-shaped figure with its major axis perpendicular to the major axis of the heart. Inside the cardiac ganglion, we identified four large neurons of 63.7 μm ± 3.7 in maximum diameter, which were similar to the motor neurons described in other decapods. All the GABA-like immunoreactivity (GABAi) was observed as processes entering mainly the ganglionic trunk and branching in slender varicose fibers, forming a network around the large neurons suggesting that GABAi processes contact them. Our findings strengthen previous results suggesting that the GABAergic system mediates the cardio-inhibitory response upon sensory stimulation.

  4. Ultrasound-guided aspiration and steroid injection of a posterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Vilella, Giuseppe Maria; Guerrisi, Pietro; Lucignani, Giulia; Pasquali, Gaia; Drudi, Francesco Maria

    2015-09-01

    Ganglion cysts are benign masses that originate from mucinous degeneration of the connective tissues and are quite rare when arising from the knee joint. Symptoms are often represented by pain, joint tenderness, effusion and occasional swelling with a palpable mass in the popliteal region of the knee. Percutaneous aspiration followed by a corticosteroid injection of a ganglion cyst has either a diagnostic or therapeutic meaning and its guidance through ultrasound allows the operator to make more accurate the procedure, ensuring the correct placement of the needle inside the lesion. We report our experience in the treatment of a voluminous ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament performed through the ultrasound guidance in a symptomatic young patient.

  5. Cyan fluorescent protein expression in ganglion and amacrine cells in a thy1-CFP transgenic mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Alejandro; Huynh, Uyen-Chi N.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) expression in the retina of the thy1-CFP (B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J) transgenic mouse line. Methods CFP expression was characterized using morphometric methods and immunohistochemistry with antibodies to neurofilament light (NF-L), neuronal nuclei (NeuN), POU-domain protein (Brn3a) and calretinin, which immunolabel ganglion cells, and syntaxin 1 (HPC-1), glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), GABA plasma membrane transporter-1 (GAT-1), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which immunolabel amacrine cells. Results CFP was extensively expressed in the inner retina, primarily in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), ganglion cell layer (GCL), nerve fiber layer, and optic nerve. CFP fluorescent cell bodies were in all retinal regions and their processes ramified in all laminae of the IPL. Some small, weakly CFP fluorescent somata were in the inner nuclear layer (INL). CFP-containing somata in the GCL ranged from 6 to 20 μm in diameter, and they had a density of 2636±347 cells/mm2 at 1.5 mm from the optic nerve head. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated colocalization of CFP with the ganglion cell markers NF-L, NeuN, Brn3a, and calretinin. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies to HPC-1, GAD67, GAT-1, and ChAT indicated that the small, weakly fluorescent CFP cells in the INL and GCL were cholinergic amacrine cells. Conclusions The total number and density of CFP-fluorescent cells in the GCL were within the range of previous estimates of the total number of ganglion cells in the C57BL/6J line. Together these findings suggest that most ganglion cells in the thy1-CFP mouse line 23 express CFP. In conclusion, the thy1-CFP mouse line is highly useful for studies requiring the identification of ganglion cells. PMID:18728756

  6. A method for electrophysiological characterization of hamster retinal ganglion cells using a high-density CMOS microelectrode array

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ian L.; Russell, Thomas L.; Farrow, Karl; Fiscella, Michele; Franke, Felix; Müller, Jan; Jäckel, David; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of neuronal cell types in the mammalian retina is important for the understanding of human retinal disease and the advancement of sight-restoring technology, such as retinal prosthetic devices. A somewhat less utilized animal model for retinal research is the hamster, which has a visual system that is characterized by an area centralis and a wide visual field with a broad binocular component. The hamster retina is optimally suited for recording on the microelectrode array (MEA), because it intrinsically lies flat on the MEA surface and yields robust, large-amplitude signals. However, information in the literature about hamster retinal ganglion cell functional types is scarce. The goal of our work is to develop a method featuring a high-density (HD) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) MEA technology along with a sequence of standardized visual stimuli in order to categorize ganglion cells in isolated Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) retina. Since the HD-MEA is capable of recording at a higher spatial resolution than most MEA systems (17.5 μm electrode pitch), we were able to record from a large proportion of RGCs within a selected region. Secondly, we chose our stimuli so that they could be run during the experiment without intervention or computation steps. The visual stimulus set was designed to activate the receptive fields of most ganglion cells in parallel and to incorporate various visual features to which different cell types respond uniquely. Based on the ganglion cell responses, basic cell properties were determined: direction selectivity, speed tuning, width tuning, transience, and latency. These properties were clustered to identify ganglion cell types in the hamster retina. Ultimately, we recorded up to a cell density of 2780 cells/mm2 at 2 mm (42°) from the optic nerve head. Using five parameters extracted from the responses to visual stimuli, we obtained seven ganglion cell types. PMID:26528115

  7. Ganglion Cell and Displaced Amacrine Cell Density Distribution in the Retina of the Howler Monkey (Alouatta caraya)

    PubMed Central

    Muniz, José Augusto Pereira Carneiro; de Athaide, Luana Modesto; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Finlay, Barbara L.; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

    2014-01-01

    Unlike all other New World (platyrrine) monkeys, both male and female howler monkeys (Alouatta sp.) are obligatory trichromats. In all other platyrrines, only females can be trichromats, while males are always dichromats, as determined by multiple behavioral, electrophysiological, and genetic studies. In addition to obligatory trichromacy, Alouatta has an unusual fovea, with substantially higher peak cone density in the foveal pit than every other diurnal anthropoid monkey (both platyrrhines and catarrhines) and great ape yet examined, including humans. In addition to documenting the general organization of the retinal ganglion cell layer in Alouatta, the distribution of cones is compared to retinal ganglion cells, to explore possible relationships between their atypical trichromacy and foveal specialization. The number and distribution of retinal ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells were determined in six flat-mounted retinas from five Alouatta caraya. Ganglion cell density peaked at 0.5 mm between the fovea and optic nerve head, reaching 40,700–45,200 cells/mm2. Displaced amacrine cell density distribution peaked between 0.5–1.75 mm from the fovea, reaching mean values between 2,050–3,100 cells/mm2. The mean number of ganglion cells was 1,133,000±79,000 cells and the mean number of displaced amacrine cells was 537,000±61,800 cells, in retinas of mean area 641±62 mm2. Ganglion cell and displaced amacrine cell density distribution in the Alouatta retina was consistent with that observed among several species of diurnal Anthropoidea, both platyrrhines and catarrhines. The principal alteration in the Alouatta retina appears not to be in the number of any retinal cell class, but rather a marked gradient in cone density within the fovea, which could potentially support high chromatic acuity in a restricted central region. PMID:25546077

  8. Alpha and beta subunits of CaM-kinase II are localized in different neurons in chick ciliary ganglion.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, I; Nichol, K A; Bennett, M R; Heath, J W; Little, G J; Rostas, J A

    1998-08-24

    The ciliary ganglion of the chicken contains only two types of neurons. Using monoclonal antibodies against the alpha and the beta subunits of Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMPK-II) we found that the alpha-subunit was localized to the choroid neurons while beta subunit was associated with the ciliary neurons. As both neurons receive their inputs from the oculomotor nerve, while their postganglionic axons leave via different nerves, the ciliary ganglion of the chicken is a neuronal system in which the functional differences between alpha and beta CaMPK-II homopolymers in the regulation of synaptic transmission can be investigated.

  9. Ganglion cyst at the fibular head causing common peroneal neuropathy diagnosed with ultrasound and electrodiagnostic examination: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lawrence P; Chen, Boqing; Kumar, Suneil; Desai, Raj; Mendoza, Justin; Foye, Patrick M; Stitik, Todd P

    2014-09-01

    The common peroneal nerve is a major source of innervation to the lower limb, but it is sometimes compressed or entrapped at the fibular head. The authors present what they believe is the first reported case where peroneal nerve impingement caused by ganglion cyst compression of the nerve at the fibular head was diagnosed using a combination of ultrasound imaging and electrodiagnostic studies. The authors described the history, physical examination, electrodiagnostic findings, and musculoskeletal ultrasound findings of a patient with a left foot drop caused by a ganglion cyst compressing the common peroneal nerve at the fibular head. The increasing role of ultrasound imaging to evaluate musculoskeletal pathology is discussed. PMID:24919081

  10. Peripheral nerve connections influence the appearance of neurosecretary material in neural sheath of ventral ganglion of the fly Sarcophaga bullata: an immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, P; Sood, Prem Prakash

    2002-02-01

    This study examined the role of the brain and peripheral connections with the target organs in the appearance of neurosecretary material within the dorsal neural sheath of the ventral ganglion of the fly S. bullata. Specifically, the accumulation of the neuropeptide FMRFamide (the neurosecretary material) was examined by immunocytochemistry. Immunoreactions were performed on: (1) a normal intact ventral ganglion, (2) an isolated ventral ganglion that was cultured in vivo, and (3) a ventral ganglion that was isolated by transection from the brain, but retained its peripheral nerve connections. The results demonstrate that (a) the neurons of the ganglia survive and exhibit FMRFamide immune reaction independent of their peripheral connections, and (b) the accumulation of neuropeptide in the dorsal neural sheath is controlled by intact peripheral nerve connections with the ganglion. It is suggested that in the absence of their peripheral connections, the axons of FMRFamide immunoreactive neurons fail to invade the neural sheath resulting in the accumulation of neurosecretary material.

  11. Visual pattern discrimination by population retinal ganglion cells' activities during natural movie stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ru-Bin; Pan, Xiao-Chuan; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-02-01

    In the visual system, neurons often fire in synchrony, and it is believed that synchronous activities of group neurons are more efficient than single cell response in transmitting neural signals to down-stream neurons. However, whether dynamic natural stimuli are encoded by dynamic spatiotemporal firing patterns of synchronous group neurons still needs to be investigated. In this paper we recorded the activities of population ganglion cells in bullfrog retina in response to time-varying natural images (natural scene movie) using multi-electrode arrays. In response to some different brief section pairs of the movie, synchronous groups of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) fired with similar but different spike events. We attempted to discriminate the movie sections based on temporal firing patterns of single cells and spatiotemporal firing patterns of the synchronous groups of RGCs characterized by a measurement of subsequence distribution discrepancy. The discrimination performance was assessed by a classification method based on Support Vector Machines. Our results show that different movie sections of the natural movie elicited reliable dynamic spatiotemporal activity patterns of the synchronous RGCs, which are more efficient in discriminating different movie sections than the temporal patterns of the single cells' spike events. These results suggest that, during natural vision, the down-stream neurons may decode the visual information from the dynamic spatiotemporal patterns of the synchronous group of RGCs' activities. PMID:24465283

  12. Intraosseous ganglion cyst of the humeral head in a competitive flat water paddler: case report

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Brad; Kissel, Jaclyn A.; Yedon, Dominique Forand

    2011-01-01

    Objective To present the diagnostic and clinical features of an intraosseous ganglion cyst of the humeral head of a female flat water canoe athlete. Clinical Features An 18-year old female flat water canoeist complaining of right shoulder pain following a strenuous paddling training camp. Intervention and outcome A trial of passive care was conducted, including soft tissue therapy, spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, and rehabilitation. The patient seemed to be responding with treatment, but pain would always resume with paddling. A diagnostic ultrasound displayed mild thickening and effusion in the subacromial/subdeltoid bursae. Continued passive care was not able to resolve the symptoms and she underwent an MRI which revealed an intraosseus ganglion cyst subjacent to the lesser tuberosity and floor of the intertubercular groove. A subsequent MRA was ordered to assess the labrum, which was intact, but the cyst had progressed in size. She was referred to an orthopedic surgeon who performed surgery. Conclusion An IOG cyst within the humeral head is a rare, potentially painful condition that can mimic other pathologies including impingement and labral tear. It is important to be aware of the clinical features to obtain a prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this condition. PMID:22131566

  13. The sodium channel band shapes the response to electric stimulation in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, J; Tang, S; Molnar, A; Desai, N J; Fried, S I

    2011-01-01

    To improve the quality of prosthetic vision, it is desirable to understand how targeted retinal neurons respond to stimulation. Unfortunately, the factors that shape the response of a single neuron to stimulation are not well understood. A dense band of voltage gated sodium channels within the proximal axon of retinal ganglion cells is the site most sensitive to electric stimulation, suggesting that band properties are likely to influence the response to stimulation. Here, we examined how three band properties influence sensitivity using a morphologically realistic ganglion cell model in NEURON. Longer bands were more sensitive to short-duration pulses than shorter bands and increasing the distance between band and soma also increased sensitivity. Simulations using the known limits of band length and location resulted in a sensitivity difference of approximately two. Additional simulations tested how changes to sodium channel conductance within the band influenced threshold and found that the sensitivity difference increased to a factor of nearly three. This is close to the factor of 5 difference measured in physiological studies suggesting that band properties contribute significantly to the sensitivity differences found between different types of retinal neurons. PMID:21558602

  14. Visual pattern discrimination by population retinal ganglion cells' activities during natural movie stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ru-Bin; Pan, Xiao-Chuan; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-02-01

    In the visual system, neurons often fire in synchrony, and it is believed that synchronous activities of group neurons are more efficient than single cell response in transmitting neural signals to down-stream neurons. However, whether dynamic natural stimuli are encoded by dynamic spatiotemporal firing patterns of synchronous group neurons still needs to be investigated. In this paper we recorded the activities of population ganglion cells in bullfrog retina in response to time-varying natural images (natural scene movie) using multi-electrode arrays. In response to some different brief section pairs of the movie, synchronous groups of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) fired with similar but different spike events. We attempted to discriminate the movie sections based on temporal firing patterns of single cells and spatiotemporal firing patterns of the synchronous groups of RGCs characterized by a measurement of subsequence distribution discrepancy. The discrimination performance was assessed by a classification method based on Support Vector Machines. Our results show that different movie sections of the natural movie elicited reliable dynamic spatiotemporal activity patterns of the synchronous RGCs, which are more efficient in discriminating different movie sections than the temporal patterns of the single cells' spike events. These results suggest that, during natural vision, the down-stream neurons may decode the visual information from the dynamic spatiotemporal patterns of the synchronous group of RGCs' activities.

  15. Role of CtBP2 in the Apoptosis of Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Guowei; Gu, Hui; Liu, Ye; Lao, Jifeng; Li, Kuifang; Guan, Huaijin

    2015-07-01

    Glaucoma damages the optic nerve and is a leading cause of irreversible blindness, and its pathogenesis remains unclear. C-terminal-binding protein 2 (CtBP2) is a transcriptional repressor which plays an important role in central nervous system injury and repair. Using the glaucoma model of DBA/2J mouse whose retina ganglion cells (RGCs) were degenerating with the process of glaucoma, we demonstrated for the first time the special relationship between CtBP2 protein and RGCs. Our research indicated that the expression of CtBP2 was gradually decreased with aging by the means of Western blotting. The CtBP2 immunoreactivity-positive cells were present in the various retinal layers, and CtBP2-positive cells were dramatically decreased in ganglion cell layer. Our research also found ectopic expression of CtBP2 can protect the apoptosis of primary mouse RGC cells induced by L-glutamate. These results suggest that CtBP2 may have a potential therapeutic effect in protecting RGC.

  16. Central projections of the nodose ganglion and the origin of vagal efferents in the lamb.

    PubMed Central

    Wild, J M; Johnston, B M; Gluckman, P D

    1991-01-01

    Injections of WGA-HRP and CTB-HRP were made into the cervical vagus or the nodose ganglion in a series of lambs, in order to define the sensory projections and motor origins of the vagus nerve. Injections into the nodose ganglion were much more successful than injections into the cervical vagus in effecting the desired result. The former produced labelling of both descending and ascending components of the solitary tract (TS). The descending component terminated massively in all ipsilateral and certain contralateral subnuclei of the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS) and in the upper cervical spinal cord. Patchy terminations were also observed within the interpolated subnucleus of the nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract, and within Lamina I of the upper cervical cord. The ascending component of TS terminated in rostral regions of the nTS, and in specific portions of the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus and the lateral parabrachial and Kölliker-Fuse nuclei. The motor origins of the vagus nerve arose almost completely ipsilaterally in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, the nucleus ambiguus, and the caudal portion of the nucleus retroambiguus situated in the lateral part of the intermediate grey at upper cervical spinal levels. Labelled neurons in the nucleus dorsomedialis of the upper spinal cord were thought not to project their axons into the cervical vagus. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 (cont.) Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:2050558

  17. Implementing dynamic clamp with synaptic and artificial conductances in mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin Y; Stiefel, Klaus M; Protti, Dario A

    2013-05-16

    Ganglion cells are the output neurons of the retina and their activity reflects the integration of multiple synaptic inputs arising from specific neural circuits. Patch clamp techniques, in voltage clamp and current clamp configurations, are commonly used to study the physiological properties of neurons and to characterize their synaptic inputs. Although the application of these techniques is highly informative, they pose various limitations. For example, it is difficult to quantify how the precise interactions of excitatory and inhibitory inputs determine response output. To address this issue, we used a modified current clamp technique, dynamic clamp, also called conductance clamp (1, 2, 3) and examined the impact of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs on neuronal excitability. This technique requires the injection of current into the cell and is dependent on the real-time feedback of its membrane potential at that time. The injected current is calculated from predetermined excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances, their reversal potentials and the cell's instantaneous membrane potential. Details on the experimental procedures, patch clamping cells to achieve a whole-cell configuration and employment of the dynamic clamp technique are illustrated in this video article. Here, we show the responses of mouse retinal ganglion cells to various conductance waveforms obtained from physiological experiments in control conditions or in the presence of drugs. Furthermore, we show the use of artificial excitatory and inhibitory conductances generated using alpha functions to investigate the responses of the cells.

  18. Somatic tetraploidy in specific chick retinal ganglion cells induced by nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Sandra M.; Escoll, Pedro; de la Hera, Antonio; Frade, José M.

    2009-01-01

    A subset of neurons in the normal vertebrate nervous system contains double the normal amount of DNA in their nuclei. These neurons are all thought to derive from aberrant mitoses in neuronal precursor cells. Here we show that endogenous NGF induces DNA replication in a subpopulation of differentiating chick retinal ganglion cells that express both the neurotrophin receptor p75 and the E2F1 transcription factor, but that lack the retinoblastoma protein. Many of these neurons avoid G2/M transition and remain alive in the retina as tetraploid cells with large cell somas and extensive dendritic trees, and most of them express β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits, a specific marker of retinal ganglion cells innervating lamina F in the stratum-griseum-et-fibrosum-superficiale of the tectal cortex. Tetraploid neurons were also observed in the adult mouse retina. Thus, a developmental program leading to somatic tetraploidy in specific retinal neurons exists in vertebrates. This program might occur in other vertebrate neurons during normal or pathological situations. PMID:20018664

  19. Coding Properties of Three Intrinsically Distinct Retinal Ganglion Cells under Periodic Stimuli: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Qiu, Yi-Hong; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    As the sole output neurons in the retina, ganglion cells play significant roles in transforming visual information into spike trains, and then transmitting them to the higher visual centers. However, coding strategies that retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) adopt to accomplish these processes are not completely clear yet. To clarify these issues, we investigate the coding properties of three types of RGCs (repetitive spiking, tonic firing, and phasic firing) by two different measures (spike-rate and spike-latency). Model results show that for periodic stimuli, repetitive spiking RGC and tonic RGC exhibit similar spike-rate patterns. Their spike- rates decrease gradually with increased stimulus frequency, moreover, variation of stimulus amplitude would change the two RGCs' spike-rate patterns. For phasic RGC, it activates strongly at medium levels of frequency when the stimulus amplitude is low. While if high stimulus amplitude is applied, phasic RGC switches to respond strongly at low frequencies. These results suggest that stimulus amplitude is a prominent factor in regulating RGCs in encoding periodic signals. Similar conclusions can be drawn when analyzes spike-latency patterns of the three RGCs. More importantly, the above phenomena can be accurately reproduced by Hodgkin's three classes of neurons, indicating that RGCs can perform the typical three classes of firing dynamics, depending on the distinctions of ion channel densities. Consequently, model results from the three RGCs may be not specific, but can also applicable to neurons in other brain regions which exhibit part(s) or all of the Hodgkin's three excitabilities. PMID:27721751

  20. DERF: distinctive efficient robust features from the biological modeling of the P ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Weng, Dawei; Wang, Yunhong; Gong, Mingming; Tao, Dacheng; Wei, Hui; Huang, Di

    2015-08-01

    Studies in neuroscience and biological vision have shown that the human retina has strong computational power, and its information representation supports vision tasks on both ventral and dorsal pathways. In this paper, a new local image descriptor, termed distinctive efficient robust features (DERF), is derived by modeling the response and distribution properties of the parvocellular-projecting ganglion cells in the primate retina. DERF features exponential scale distribution, exponential grid structure, and circularly symmetric function difference of Gaussian (DoG) used as a convolution kernel, all of which are consistent with the characteristics of the ganglion cell array found in neurophysiology, anatomy, and biophysics. In addition, a new explanation for local descriptor design is presented from the perspective of wavelet tight frames. DoG is naturally a wavelet, and the structure of the grid points array in our descriptor is closely related to the spatial sampling of wavelets. The DoG wavelet itself forms a frame, and when we modulate the parameters of our descriptor to make the frame tighter, the performance of the DERF descriptor improves accordingly. This is verified by designing a tight frame DoG, which leads to much better performance. Extensive experiments conducted in the image matching task on the multiview stereo correspondence data set demonstrate that DERF outperforms state of the art methods for both hand-crafted and learned descriptors, while remaining robust and being much faster to compute.

  1. Visual responses of ganglion cells of a New-World primate, the capuchin monkey, Cebus apella

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L; Yamada, Elizabeth S; Hunt, David M; Kremers, Jan; Martin, Paul R; Troy, John B; da Silva-Filho, Manoel

    2000-01-01

    The genetic basis of colour vision in New-World primates differs from that in humans and other Old-World primates. Most New-World primate species show a polymorphism; all males are dichromats and most females trichromats. In the retina of Old-World primates such as the macaque, the physiological correlates of trichromacy are well established. Comparison of the retinae in New- and Old-World species may help constrain hypotheses as to the evolution of colour vision and the pathways associated with it. Ganglion cell behaviour was recorded from trichromatic and dichromatic members of a New-World species (the capuchin monkey, Cebus apella) and compared with macaque data. Despite some differences in quantitative detail (such as a temporal response extended to higher frequencies), results from trichromatic animals strongly resembled those from the macaque. In particular, cells of the parvocellular (PC) pathway showed characteristic frequency-dependent changes in responsivity to luminance and chromatic modulation, cells of the magnocellular (MC) pathway showed frequency-doubled responses to chromatic modulation, and the surround of MC cells received a chromatic input revealed on changing the phase of heterochromatically modulated lights. Ganglion cells of dichromats were colour-blind versions of those of trichromats. This strong physiological homology is consistent with a common origin of trichromacy in New- and Old-World monkeys; in the New-World primate the presence of two pigments in the middle-to-long wavelength range permits full expression of the retinal mechanisms of trichromatic vision. PMID:11432364

  2. Chloride channel protein 2 prevents glutamate-induced apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Miao-Miao; Hong, Sen; Ma, Ling-Jun; Zhou, Hong-Yan; Lu, Jia; Zhao, Jing; Zheng, Ya-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of chloride channel protein 2 (ClC-2) in glutamate-induced apoptosis in the retinal ganglion cell line (RGC-5). Materials and Methods: RGC-5 cells were treated with 1 mM glutamate for 24 hr. The expression of ClC-2, Bax, and Bcl-2 was detected by western blot analysis. Cell survival and apoptosis were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry assays, respectively. Caspase-3 and -9 activities were determined by a colorimetric assay. The roles of ClC-2 in glutamate-induced apoptosis were examined by using ClC-2 complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) and small inference ribonucleic acid (RNA) transfection technology. Results: Overexpression of ClC-2 in RGC-5 cells significantly decreased glutamate-induced apoptosis and increased cell viability, whereas silencing of ClC-2 with short hairpin (sh) RNA produced opposite effects. ClC-2 overexpression increased the expression of Bcl-2, decreased the expression of Bax, and decreased caspase-3 and -9 activation in RGC-5 cells treated with glutamate, but silencing of ClC-2 produced opposite effects. Conclusion: Our data suggest that ClC-2 chloride channels might play a protective role in glutamate-induced apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway.

  3. Eye Histology and Ganglion Cell Topography of Northern Elephant Seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Smodlaka, Hrvoje; Khamas, Wael A; Palmer, Lauren; Lui, Bryan; Borovac, Josip A; Cohn, Brian A; Schmitz, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Northern elephant seals are one of the deepest diving marine mammals. As northern elephant seals often reach the bathypelagic zone, it is usually assumed that their eyes possess evolutionary adaptations that provide better ability to see in dim or scotopic environments. The purpose of this study was to carefully describe anatomical and histological traits of the eye that may improve light sensitivity. Northern elephant seals have large, somewhat elliptical eyes, with equatorial and anteroposterior diameters of 5.03 and 4.4 cm, respectively. The cornea is large in diameter and the lens is completely spherical. The iris has pronounced constrictor and dilator muscles, whereas the ciliary muscle is notably less developed. The tapetum lucidum is more prominent than in other pinnipeds, making up about 63% of retinal thickness in the posterior aspect of the globe. Within the retina, the pigmented epithelium lacks pigment except for the region close to the ora serrata. Parts of the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layers are folded. Although the photoreceptor layer is composed predominantly of rods, cone photoreceptors were also observed. Cells within the retinal ganglion cell layer are arranged in a single level. Ganglion cells reach their maximum density (∼1,300 cells per mm(2) ) dorsal to the optic disc, whereas the periphery of the retina is sparsely populated (<100 cells per mm(2) ). All above mentioned features are consistent with the predicted evolutionary adaptations to the photic environment of the bathypelagic zone. Anat Rec, 299:798-805, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell layer thickness in patients receiving systemic isotretinoin therapy.

    PubMed

    Sekeryapan, Berrak; Dılek, Nursel; Oner, Veysi; Turkyılmaz, Kemal; Aslan, Mehmet Gokhan

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral isotretinoin therapy on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL) thickness by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). This prospective study included newly diagnosed nodulocystic acne patients about to receive isotretinoin treatment. Macular average GCL thickness and peripapillary average, temporal, nasal, inferior, and superior quadrant RNFL thickness were measured by OCT before and after isotretinoin treatment. Pre- and post-treatment measurements were compared with paired t test. Fifty-six eyes of 28 patients were included. The mean duration of the treatment was 6.5 ± 1.3 months. The mean average GCL thickness was 90.04 ± 5.87 (80-96) μm at baseline and 90.75 ± 6.34 (81-96) μm after treatment. The mean average RNFL thickness was 93.25 ± 6.06 μm (84-107) before treatment and 93.05 ± 5.54 μm (82-106) after treatment. There were no statistically significant differences between pre- and post-treatment values (all p > 0.05). A 6-month course of systemic isotretinoin therapy seems to have no unfavorable effect on retinal ganglion cells; however, larger studies with longer follow-up periods are needed to be conclusive.

  5. Paraneoplastic encephalo-myelo-ganglionitis: cellular binding sites of the antineuronal antibody.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Inaba, A; Yamawaki, M; Ishida, K; Yokota, T; Uchihara, T; Eishi, Y; Okeda, R

    1994-01-01

    The cellular binding sites of an antineuronal antibody were characterized in an autopsy case of the paraneoplastic encephalo-myelo-ganglionitis. A 61 year-old woman developed a subacute sensorimotor polyneuropathy and, later, multiple involvement of cranial nerves, disturbance of consciousness, and generalized seizure. An autopsy revealed a small cell lung carcinoma and neuropathological changes that included disseminated encephalitis, spinal anterior horn lesions, severe loss of dorsal root ganglion neurons, and secondary degeneration and loss of the nerve fibers in the spinal posterior column and peripheral nerves. The serum IgG from the patient contained antineuronal antibody(s) including an antibody to 35- to 37-kDa neuronal antigens called anti-Hu as demonstrated in Western blot. In immunohistochemical studies, the serum IgG immunostained neurons of the brains, spinal cords, and dorsal root ganglia of humans or rats. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy revealed binding of the patient's IgG in the neuronal nuclei and cytoplasm, but not in the nucleoli. In immunoelectron microscopic studies, immunolabelling with the IgG was found diffusely in the karyoplasm, excluding nucleoli, and in the cytoplasmic matrix between the cisternae of the reticulums, Golgi apparatus, and mitochondria. Encephalo-myeloganglionitis is a clinicopathological entity frequently associated with the presence of neoplasm and antineuronal antibody, however, the role of the antibody in the pathogenesis remains to be elucidated.

  6. Chloride channel protein 2 prevents glutamate-induced apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Miao-Miao; Hong, Sen; Ma, Ling-Jun; Zhou, Hong-Yan; Lu, Jia; Zhao, Jing; Zheng, Ya-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of chloride channel protein 2 (ClC-2) in glutamate-induced apoptosis in the retinal ganglion cell line (RGC-5). Materials and Methods: RGC-5 cells were treated with 1 mM glutamate for 24 hr. The expression of ClC-2, Bax, and Bcl-2 was detected by western blot analysis. Cell survival and apoptosis were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry assays, respectively. Caspase-3 and -9 activities were determined by a colorimetric assay. The roles of ClC-2 in glutamate-induced apoptosis were examined by using ClC-2 complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) and small inference ribonucleic acid (RNA) transfection technology. Results: Overexpression of ClC-2 in RGC-5 cells significantly decreased glutamate-induced apoptosis and increased cell viability, whereas silencing of ClC-2 with short hairpin (sh) RNA produced opposite effects. ClC-2 overexpression increased the expression of Bcl-2, decreased the expression of Bax, and decreased caspase-3 and -9 activation in RGC-5 cells treated with glutamate, but silencing of ClC-2 produced opposite effects. Conclusion: Our data suggest that ClC-2 chloride channels might play a protective role in glutamate-induced apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. PMID:27635193

  7. Sign Communication in Cri du Chat Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlenkamp, Sonja; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a study on the use of sign supported Norwegian (SSN) in two individuals with Cri du chat syndrome (CCS). The study gives a first account of some selected aspects of production and intelligibility of SSN in CCS. Possible deviance in manual parameters, in particular inter- and/or intra-subject variation in the use…

  8. Prejudice: From Allport to DuBois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Stanley O., Jr.; Reed, Edward S.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the differences between Gordon Allport's and W. E. B. DuBois's theories on the origins of prejudice and the impact of discrimination on the personality and social development of blacks. The article argues that prejudice is a historically developed process, not a universal feature of human psychology. Implications for U.S. race relations…

  9. Allogeneic Transplantation of Müller-Derived Retinal Ganglion Cells Improves Retinal Function in a Feline Model of Ganglion Cell Depletion.

    PubMed

    Becker, Silke; Eastlake, Karen; Jayaram, Hari; Jones, Megan F; Brown, Robert A; McLellan, Gillian J; Charteris, David G; Khaw, Peng T; Limb, G Astrid

    2016-02-01

    Human Müller glia with stem cell characteristics (hMGSCs) have been shown to improve retinal function upon transplantation into rat models of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) depletion. However, their translational potential may depend upon successful engraftment and improvement of retinal function in experimental models with anatomical and functional features resembling those of the human eye. We investigated the effect of allogeneic transplantation of feline Müller glia with the ability to differentiate into cells expressing RGC markers, following ablation of RGCs by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). Unlike previous observations in the rat, transplantation of hMGSC-derived RGCs into the feline vitreous formed aggregates and elicited a severe inflammatory response without improving visual function. In contrast, allogeneic transplantation of feline MGSC (fMGSC)-derived RGCs into the vitrectomized eye improved the scotopic threshold response (STR) of the electroretinogram (ERG). Despite causing functional improvement, the cells did not attach onto the retina and formed aggregates on peripheral vitreous remnants, suggesting that vitreous may constitute a barrier for cell attachment onto the retina. This was confirmed by observations that cellular scaffolds of compressed collagen and enriched preparations of fMGSC-derived RGCs facilitated cell attachment. Although cells did not migrate into the RGC layer or the optic nerve, they significantly improved the STR and the photopic negative response of the ERG, indicative of increased RGC function. These results suggest that MGSCs have a neuroprotective ability that promotes partial recovery of impaired RGC function and indicate that cell attachment onto the retina may be necessary for transplanted cells to confer neuroprotection to the retina. Significance: Müller glia with stem cell characteristics are present in the adult human retina, but they do not have regenerative ability. These cells, however, have potential for

  10. Allogeneic Transplantation of Müller-Derived Retinal Ganglion Cells Improves Retinal Function in a Feline Model of Ganglion Cell Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Silke; Eastlake, Karen; Jayaram, Hari; Jones, Megan F.; Brown, Robert A.; McLellan, Gillian J.; Charteris, David G.; Khaw, Peng T.

    2016-01-01

    Human Müller glia with stem cell characteristics (hMGSCs) have been shown to improve retinal function upon transplantation into rat models of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) depletion. However, their translational potential may depend upon successful engraftment and improvement of retinal function in experimental models with anatomical and functional features resembling those of the human eye. We investigated the effect of allogeneic transplantation of feline Müller glia with the ability to differentiate into cells expressing RGC markers, following ablation of RGCs by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). Unlike previous observations in the rat, transplantation of hMGSC-derived RGCs into the feline vitreous formed aggregates and elicited a severe inflammatory response without improving visual function. In contrast, allogeneic transplantation of feline MGSC (fMGSC)-derived RGCs into the vitrectomized eye improved the scotopic threshold response (STR) of the electroretinogram (ERG). Despite causing functional improvement, the cells did not attach onto the retina and formed aggregates on peripheral vitreous remnants, suggesting that vitreous may constitute a barrier for cell attachment onto the retina. This was confirmed by observations that cellular scaffolds of compressed collagen and enriched preparations of fMGSC-derived RGCs facilitated cell attachment. Although cells did not migrate into the RGC layer or the optic nerve, they significantly improved the STR and the photopic negative response of the ERG, indicative of increased RGC function. These results suggest that MGSCs have a neuroprotective ability that promotes partial recovery of impaired RGC function and indicate that cell attachment onto the retina may be necessary for transplanted cells to confer neuroprotection to the retina. Significance Müller glia with stem cell characteristics are present in the adult human retina, but they do not have regenerative ability. These cells, however, have potential for

  11. Ganglion Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ...

  12. Utility of stellate ganglion block in atypical facial pain: a case report and consideration of its possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shanthanna, Harsha

    2013-01-01

    We present this report of a young patient with chronic severe atypical facial pain who was successfully controlled with stellate ganglion block under ultrasound guidance. The patient had a history of severe disabling, unilateral, facial neuropathic pain with minimal response to analgesic medications. Upon assessment the patient had features suggestive of trigeminal neuralgia, although postherpetic neuralgia could not be ruled out. As a diagnostic test intervention, stellate ganglion block was tried under ultrasound guidance. The patient showed significant improvement in pain control and functional disability lasting beyond 10 weeks. Subsequent blocks reinforced the analgesia. Atypical facial pain has several differential diagnoses. The involvement of sympathetic system in its causation or sustenance is uncertain. Stellate ganglion block achieves sympathetic block of cervicofacial structures, and its blockade has been shown to affect chronic pain conditions. Although its mechanism is not clear, one has to consider its possible role in conditions of stress apart from directly controlling the sympathetic activity. There is certainly a role in exploring the potential benefits of stellate ganglion block in such clinical conditions. The technique of stellate block under ultrasound is also described, as it influences the safety and precision of the block. PMID:24065993

  13. Chiropractic management of work-related upper limb disorder complicated by intraosseous ganglion cysts: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Crafts, Glenn J.; Snow, Gregory J.; Ngoc, Kim Hong

    2011-01-01

    Objective Work-related upper limb disorder (WRULD) encompasses a broad array of occupational upper limb injuries, the most common being carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Carpal tunnel syndrome occasionally presents with concomitant ganglion cysts. The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient with bilateral WRULD complicated by ganglion cysts. Clinical Features The patient was diagnosed previously with bilateral CTS and presented with common CTS symptoms that were nonresponsive to several previous courses of care. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral ganglion cysts, and electrodiagnostic studies found left CTS and bilateral radial neuralgia. Right limb findings appeared more consistent with nonspecific arm pain. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic manipulative therapy, soft-tissue approaches, and physiotherapy modalities were applied to the arms and wrists over a 3-month period. Home care included exercises using elastic tubing and a gyroscopic handheld device. Chiropractic manipulative therapy and other conservative approaches resulted in subjective improvements of decreased hand paresthesias and muscle weakness and objective improvements in range of motion and neurologic deficits. Although the patient's symptoms and function improved, she remained with a level of permanent impairment. Conclusion This case demonstrates successful chiropractic management of a patient with WRULD complicated by ganglion cysts. Further larger-scale studies are recommended to determine if chiropractic management demonstrates positive outcomes for this condition. PMID:22014905

  14. One-day high-fat diet induces inflammation in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus of mice.

    PubMed

    Waise, T M Zaved; Toshinai, Koji; Naznin, Farhana; NamKoong, Cherl; Md Moin, Abu Saleh; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2015-09-01

    A high-fat diet (HFD) induces inflammation in systemic organs including the hypothalamus, resulting in obesity and diabetes. The vagus nerve connects the visceral organs and central nervous system, and the gastric-derived orexigenic peptide ghrelin transmits its starvation signals to the hypothalamus via the vagal afferent nerve. Here we investigated the inflammatory response in vagal afferent neurons and the hypothalamus in mice following one day of HFD feeding. This treatment increased the number of macrophages/microglia in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus. Furthermore, one-day HFD induced expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in the goblet cells of the colon and upregulated mRNA expressions of the proinflammatory biomarkers Emr1, Iba1, Il6, and Tnfα in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus. Both subcutaneous administration of ghrelin and celiac vagotomy reduced HFD-induced inflammation in these tissues. HFD intake triggered inflammatory responses in the gut, nodose ganglion, and subsequently in the hypothalamus within 24 h. These findings suggest that the vagal afferent nerve may transfer gut-derived inflammatory signals to the hypothalamus via the nodose ganglion, and that ghrelin may protect against HFD-induced inflammation.

  15. Quantitative analysis of the retinal ganglion cell layer and optic nerve of the barn owl Tyto alba.

    PubMed

    Wathey, J C; Pettigrew, J D

    1989-01-01

    The visual capacity of the common barn owl (Tyto alba) was studied by quantitative analysis of the retina and optic nerve. Cell counts in the ganglion cell layer of the whole-mounted retina revealed a temporal area centralis with peak cell density of 12,500 cells/mm2 and a horizontal streak of high cell density extending from the area centralis into the nasal retina. Integration of the ganglion cell density map gave an estimated total of 1.4 million cells for the ganglion cell layer. Electron microscopy of a single, complete section of the optic nerve revealed a bimodal fiber diameter spectrum (modes at 0.3 and 0.9 microns; bin width = 0.2 microns), with diameters ranging from 0.15 microns (unmyelinated) to 6.05 microns (myelinated, sheath included). The total axon count for the optic nerve was estimated from sample counts to be about 680,000 axons (25% unmyelinated). Therefore, roughly half of the cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer do not send axons into the optic nerve. With certain assumptions, the data predict a visual spatial acuity for barn owls on the order of 8 cycles/degree, a value similar to the known behaviorally measured acuities of masked owls (10 cycles/degree) and domestic cats (6 cycles/degree). PMID:2758316

  16. Comparison of muscarine- and vasopressin-stimulated inositol phospholipid metabolism in the superior cervical ganglion of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, J.; Anderson, C.; Perlman, R.L.

    1986-03-05

    Both muscarine and vasopressin have previously been shown to increase the accumulation of /sup 3/H-inositol phosphates (/sup 3/H-IP) in superior cervical ganglia in which the phospholipids were labeled with /sup 3/H-inositol. They have compared the effects of muscarine and vasopressin on phospholipid metabolism in the ganglion. The effects of these agents on /sup 3/H-IP accumulation are additive. The response to muscarine plateaus after approximately 10 min whereas the response to vasopressin increases for at least 30 min. Decentralization and maintenance in organ culture appear to potentiate the effect of muscarine on /sup 3/H-IP accumulation but do not effect the response of the ganglia to vasopressin. Muscarine and vasopressin also increase the incorporation of /sup 3/H-inositol into phospholipids in the ganglion. Autoradiographic techniques were used to localize the inositol-containing phospholipids in the ganglion. Muscarine increases phospholipid labeling primarily in the cell bodies of the principal ganglionic neurons, whereas vasopressin increases phospholipid labeling primarily in the neuropil. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that muscarine and vasopressin stimulate the metabolism of different pools of phospholipids.

  17. Retinal ganglion cells projecting to the accessory optic system in optokinetic blind albinotic rats are direction-selective.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin; Distler, Claudia; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter

    2014-07-01

    The optokinetic deficits in albinotic rats and ferrets are caused by the loss of direction selectivity in the accessory optic system (AOS). However, the underlying mechanisms for this loss are still not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that, in albino rats, the retinal input to the AOS lacks direction selectivity and, as a consequence, neurons in the AOS are direction non-selective. We investigated ON-center direction-selective retinal ganglion cells, the major input to the AOS, in pigmented Long Evans and albino Wistar rats using extracellular in vitro patch-clamp techniques. To visualise putative AOS-projecting direction-selective ganglion cells, we retrogradely labeled them by injection of the infrared-sensitive dye indocyanine green into the medial terminal nucleus of the AOS. The present study is the first to present physiological evidence for retinal ON-center direction-selective ganglion cells in rat. Our results show that, in albinotic and pigmented rats, ON-center retinal ganglion cells projecting to the AOS are similarly direction-selective, suggesting that the optokinetic deficit must be caused by the abolition of direction selectivity in the AOS itself. PMID:24698401

  18. Effect of alpha lipoic acid on retinal ganglion cell survival in an optic nerve crush model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruixing; Wang, Yanling; Pu, Mingliang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to determine whether alpha lipoic acid (ALA) promotes the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury and to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of ALA in the retina in this ONC injury model. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (180–220 g) were subjected to ONC injury surgery. ALA (63 mg/kg) was injected intravenously 1 day before or after the ONC injury. Animals were euthanized after 10 days, and the number of ganglion cells positive for RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (Rbpms), which is an RGC marker, were counted on the whole mount retinas. In addition, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting were performed to examine the localization and levels of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT4/5) in the retinas in all experimental groups. To determine whether the EPO/EPOR signaling pathway was involved in the ALA antioxidant pathway, the rats were subjected to ruxolitinib (INCB018424, 0.25 mg/kg, bid, intraperitoneal, i.p.) treatment after the animals were injected intravenously with ALA 1 day before ONC injury. Results The average number of Rbpms-positive cells/mm2 in the control group (sham-operated group), the ONC group, the ALA-ONC group, and the ONC-ALA group retinas was 2219±28, 418±8, 848±22, and 613±18/mm2, respectively. The ALA-ONC and ONC-ALA groups showed a statistically significantly increased RGC survival rate compared to the ONC group. There were statistical differences in the RGC survival rates between the ALA-ONC (39%) and ONC-ALA groups (28%; p<0.05). Immunofluorescent labeling showed that EPOR and NT4/5 expression was significant in the retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL). At the same time, western blot analysis revealed that ALA induced upregulation of EPOR protein and NT4/5 protein expression in the retina after ONC injury. However, INCB018424 reversed the protective effects of ALA on the ONC retinas. Conclusions ALA has

  19. Estimate of size and total number of neurons in superior cervical ganglion of rat, capybara and horse.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Antonio Augusto Coppi Maciel; Davis, Christine; Gabella, Giorgio

    2004-08-01

    The superior (cranial) cervical ganglion was investigated by light microscopy in adult rats, capybaras (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris) and horses. The ganglia were vascularly perfused, embedded in resin and cut into semi-thin sections. An unbiased stereological procedure (disector method) was used to estimate ganglion neuron size, total number of ganglion neurons, neuronal density. The volume of the ganglion was 0.5 mm3 in rats, 226 mm3 in capybaras and 412 mm3 in horses. The total number of neurons per ganglion was 18,800, 1,520,000 and 3,390,000 and the number of neurons per cubic millimetre was 36,700, 7,000 and 8,250 in rats, capybaras and horses, respectively. The average neuronal size (area of the largest sectional profile of a neuron) was 358, 982 and 800 microm2, and the percentage of volume occupied by neurons was 33, 21 and 17% in rats, capybaras and horses, respectively. When comparing the three species (average body weight: 200 g, 40 kg and 200 kg), most of the neuronal quantitative parameters change in line with the variation of body weight. However, the average neuronal size in the capybara deviates from this pattern in being larger than that of in the horse. The rat presented great interindividual variability in all the neuronal parameters. From the data in the literature and our new findings in the capybara and horse, we conclude that some correlations exist between average size of neurons and body size and between total number of neurons and body size. However, these correlations are only approximate and are based on averaged parameters for large populations of neurons: they are less likely to be valid if one considers a single quantitative parameter. Several quantitative features of the nervous tissue have to be taken into account together, rather than individually, when evolutionary trends related to size are considered.

  20. Effect of precursors on the synthesis of catecholamines and on neurotransmission in the superior cervical ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Bordet, S; Karoum, F; Commissiong, J W

    1990-09-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats (325-350 g) were anesthetized with urethane (1.5 g/kg i.p.) and treated with physiological saline, Aspartame (APM; 552 mumols/kg), or tyrosine (Tyr; 552 mumols/kg). Ganglionic transmission and the synthesis of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) were measured in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) following electrical stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk (CST). When the CST was stimulated with single pulses, neither APM nor Tyr affected the synthesis of NE or DA. However, in response to low- (5 Hz, 20 s) and high- (20 Hz, 20 s) frequency pulses, the metabolism of DA was increased (p less than 0.05), but to the same extent after saline, APM, or Tyr. In rats stimulated with similar low- and high-frequency pulses, the synthesis of NE was increased significantly (p less than 0.05) after Tyr, but not after APM or saline. In saline-treated controls, ganglionic transmission was not changed in response to single pulses, or low- or high-frequency stimulation. However, after treatment with APM, ganglionic transmission was depressed significantly (p less than 0.01) in response to high-frequency stimulation (single: 0.46 +/- 0.09 mV; low: 0.39 +/- 0.07 mV; high: 0.27 +/- 0.07 mV). After treatment with Tyr, ganglionic transmission was depressed significantly (p less than 0.05) in response to both low- and high-frequency stimulation (single: 0.44 +/- 0.04 mV; low: 0.22 +/- 0.12 mV; high: 0.26 +/- 0.07 mV). In the nonstimulated SCG, L-3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (25 mg/kg) caused a rapid, significant (p less than 0.01) increase in the synthesis and metabolism of DA, but not of NE.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Role of HDACs in optic nerve damage-induced nuclear atrophy of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Heather M; Schlamp, Cassandra L; Nickells, Robert W

    2016-06-20

    Optic neuropathies are characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death, resulting in the loss of vision. In glaucoma, the most common optic neuropathy, RGC death is initiated by axonal damage, and can be modeled by inducing acute axonal trauma through procedures such as optic nerve crush (ONC) or optic nerve axotomy. One of the early events of RGC death is nuclear atrophy, and is comprised of RGC-specific gene silencing, histone deacetylation, heterochromatin formation, and nuclear shrinkage. These early events appear to be principally regulated by epigenetic mechanisms involving histone deacetylation. Class I histone deacetylases HDACs 1, 2, and 3 are known to play important roles in the process of early nuclear atrophy in RGCs, and studies using both inhibitors and genetic ablation of Hdacs also reveal a critical role in the cell death process. Select inhibitors, such as those being developed for cancer therapy, may also provide a viable secondary treatment option for optic neuropathies.

  2. Atrial ganglionated plexi stimulation may be an effective therapeutic tool for the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Lu, Zhibing; Jiang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    An autonomic imbalance, i.e., increased sympathetic tone and/or decreased parasympathetic tone is a critical characteristic of heart failure, which is associated with progressive ventricular remodeling, ventricular arrhythmia generation and disease progression. Increasing cardiac parasympathetic tone by vagus nerve stimulation has been shown to significantly improve heart failure symptoms, hemodynamics, left ventricular function and quality of life. However, cervical surgery is needed to position vagal stimulation electrode and vagus nerve stimulation may also cause some undesired side effects. Our recent studies showed that ablation of the main atrial ganglionated plexi (GP) facilitated the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias in acute myocardial ischemic heart while low-intensity atrial GP stimulation inhibited the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias during acute myocardial ischemia and ischemia reperfusion. Based on these results, we hypothesize that atrial GP stimulation may ameliorate autonomic dysfunction in heart failure, inhibit heart failure progression and improve heart failure prognosis.

  3. Melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion-cell photoreceptors: cellular diversity and role in pattern vision

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Jennifer L.; Dumitrescu, Olivia N.; Wong, Kwoon Y.; Alam, Nazia M.; Chen, Shih-Kuo; LeGates, Tara; Renna, Jordan M.; Prusky, Glen T.; Berson, David M.; Hattar, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Using the photopigment melanopsin, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) respond directly to light to drive circadian clock resetting and pupillary constriction. We now report that ipRGCs are more abundant and diverse than previously appreciated, project more widely within the brain, and can support spatial visual perception. A Cre-based melanopsin reporter mouse line revealed at least five subtypes of ipRGCs with distinct morphological and physiological characteristics. Collectively, these cells project beyond the known brain targets of ipRGCs to heavily innervate the superior colliculus and dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, retinotopically-organized nuclei mediating object localization and discrimination. Mice lacking classical rod-cone photoreception, and thus entirely dependent on melanopsin for light detection, were able to discriminate grating stimuli from equiluminant gray, and had measurable visual acuity. Thus, non-classical retinal photoreception occurs within diverse cell types, and influences circuits and functions encompassing luminance as well as spatial information. PMID:20624591

  4. Dark-field microspectroscopic analysis of gold nanorods in spiral Ganglion neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, J.; Brown, W. G. A.; Needham, K.; Nayagam, B. A.; Yu, A.; McArthur, S. L.; Stoddart, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Heterogeneous samples of spiral ganglion neuron primary cells were incubated with gold nanorods in order to investigate the photothermal processes induced by exposure to 780 nm laser light. Dark-field microspectroscopy was used to analyze the distribution and spectrum of nanorods in the neurons. The scattering data showed a typical gold nanorod spectrum, while a shift in the peak position suggested changes in the refractive index of the nanorod environment. The relationship between gold nanorods distribution and local temperature has also been examined with an open pipette microelectrode placed in the surrounding bath of the neurons. These temperature measurements confirm that the gold nanorods provide efficient localized heating under 780 nm laser exposure.

  5. Responses and Receptive Fields of Amacrine Cells and Ganglion Cells in the Salamander Retina

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ai-Jun; Wu, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal amacrine cells (ACs) and ganglion cells (GCs) have been shown to display large morphological diversity, and here we show that four types of ACs and three types of GCs exhibit physiologically-distinguishable properties. They are the sustained ON ACs; sustained OFF ACs; transient ON-OFF ACs; transient ON-OFF ACs with wide receptive fields; sustained ON-center/OFF-surround GCs; sustained OFF-center/ON-surround GCs and transient ON-OFF GCs. By comparing response waveforms, receptive fields and relative rod/cone inputs of ACs and GCs with the corresponding parameters of various types of the presynaptic bipolar cells (BCs), we analyze how different types of BCs mediate synaptic inputs to various ACs and GCs. Although more types of third-order retinal neurons may be identified by more refined classification criteria, our observations suggest that many morphologically-distinct ACs and GCs share very similar physiological responses. PMID:20085780

  6. Protective effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide on retinal ganglion cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Gao, Na; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Li-Xia; Lu, Xue-Jing

    2011-01-01

    AIM To observe the effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP) on rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in vitro. METHODS Retinal cells of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were collected 1 to 3 days after birth, and co-cultured with different concentrations of LBP for 24 hours. Absorbance values (OD) were recorded using MTT assay for calculating survival rates. RESULTS All the test groups had protective effects on RGCs. The group with 10mg/mL concentration of LBP had the most significantly difference of OD value compared with that in control group (P<0.01). CONCLUSION LBP can increase the survival rate and promote the growth of mixed cultured rat RGCs. PMID:22553684

  7. [Morphological features of the rat stellate ganglion during early postnatal development].

    PubMed

    Korzina, M B; Korobkin, A A; Vasil'eva, O A; Masliukov, P M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the anatomical characteristics of the stellate ganglion (SG) and the morphometric characteristics of its neurons in rats of different age groups (newborn, 10-, 20-, 30-, 60- and 180-day-old) using anatomical and histological methods. The results obtained indicated that in rats since birth there were three variants of branch origin from the medial margin of SG. No differences were observed in these variants between right and left SG. The sizes of both SG and its neurons increased during the first two months of postnatal development. The density of neurons in SG sections decreased from the moment of birth until the six months of age. The number of SG neurons did not change significantly in the postnatal ontogenesis. Thus, SG in rats is anatomically formed by the moment of birth, while the sizes and morphometric characteristics of SG neurons become finally stabilized by the second month of age. PMID:20572389

  8. [Extensive hip joint ganglion as a rare cause of chronic pain in the groin].

    PubMed

    Scherger, B; Hinkenjann, B; Klein, M; Ostermann, P A W

    2007-09-01

    A 66-year-old woman had complained for 6 months of worsening pain in the left groin with resultant difficulty in walking though there had not been any previous injury. MRI showed a cystic tumor extending from the left hip joint to the inner surface of the os ileum. CT-controlled puncture yielded a small volume of a gelatinous substance that was the content of the cyst, and bacteriological examination of this was negative. We resected the tumor using an ileofemoral approach. Histological examination showed that the tumor was a ganglion of the hip. These ganglia can grow very large without compressing vessels or nerves. They should be included in the diagnosis when patients present with chronic pain in the groin.

  9. Dopamine inhibits ATP-induced responses in the cat petrosal ganglion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alcayaga, Julio; Retamal, Mauricio; Cerpa, Verónica; Arroyo, Jorge; Zapata, Patricio

    2003-03-21

    The petrosal ganglion (PG) provides sensory innervation to the carotid sinus and carotid body through the carotid (sinus) nerve (CN). Application of either acetylcholine (ACh) or adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) to the PG superfused in vitro activates CN fibers. Dopamine (DA) modulates the effects of ACh. We have previously shown that DA when applied to the PG modulates the effects of ACh on carotid sinus nerve fibers. We currently report the effects of DA on the ATP-induced responses in the isolated PG in vitro. While DA had no effect on the basal activity recorded from the CN, it reduced ATP-induced responses in a dose-dependent manner, when preceding ATP applications by 30 s. Our results suggest that DA-a transmitter present in a group of PG neurons and in carotid body cells-may act as an inhibitory modulator of ATP-evoked responses in PG neurons.

  10. Multiple sodium channels and their roles in electrogenesis within dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Anthony M; Cummins, Theodore R; Waxman, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion neurons express an array of sodium channel isoforms allowing precise control of excitability. An increasing body of literature indicates that regulation of firing behaviour in these cells is linked to their patterns of expression of specific sodium channel isoforms, which have been discovered to possess distinct biophysical characteristics. The pattern of expression of sodium channels differs in different subclasses of DRG neurons and is not fixed but, on the contrary, changes in response to a variety of disease insults. Moreover, modulation of channels by their environment has been found to play an important role in the response of these neurons to stimuli. In this review we illustrate how excitability can be finely tuned to provide contrasting firing templates in different subclasses of DRG neurons by selective deployment of various sodium channel isoforms, by plasticity of expression of these proteins, and by interactions of these sodium channel isoforms with each other and with other modulatory molecules. PMID:17158175

  11. Key role of the dorsal root ganglion in neuropathic tactile hypersensibility.

    PubMed

    Sukhotinsky, Inna; Ben-Dor, Efrat; Raber, Pnina; Devor, Marshall

    2004-04-01

    Cutting spinal nerves just distal to the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) triggers, with rapid onset, massive spontaneous ectopic discharge in axotomized afferent A-neurons, and at the same time induces tactile allodynia in the partially denervated hindlimb. We show that secondary transection of the dorsal root (rhizotomy) of the axotomized DRG, or suppression of the ectopia with topically applied local anesthetics, eliminates or attenuates the allodynia. Dorsal rhizotomy alone does not trigger allodynia. These observations support the hypothesis that ectopic firing in DRG A-neurons induces central sensitization which leads to tactile allodynia. The question of how activity in afferent A-neurons, which are not normally nociceptive, might induce allodynia is discussed in light of the current literature. PMID:14987623

  12. Imaging Light Responses of Foveal Ganglion Cells in the Living Macaque Eye

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Benjamin; Dalkara, Deniz; Zhang, Jie; Flannery, John. G.; Schaffer, David V.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The fovea dominates primate vision, and its anatomy and perceptual abilities are well studied, but its physiology has been little explored because of limitations of current physiological methods. In this study, we adapted a novel in vivo imaging method, originally developed in mouse retina, to explore foveal physiology in the macaque, which permits the repeated imaging of the functional response of many retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) simultaneously. A genetically encoded calcium indicator, G-CaMP5, was inserted into foveal RGCs, followed by calcium imaging of the displacement of foveal RGCs from their receptive fields, and their intensity-response functions. The spatial offset of foveal RGCs from their cone inputs makes this method especially appropriate for fovea by permitting imaging of RGC responses without excessive light adaptation of cones. This new method will permit the tracking of visual development, progression of retinal disease, or therapeutic interventions, such as insertion of visual prostheses. PMID:24806684

  13. Gamma knife radiosurgery to the trigeminal ganglion for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Somaza, Salvador; Hurtado, Wendy; Montilla, Eglee; Ghaleb, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Background: We report the result obtained using Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery on the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE). Case Description: Retrospective review of medical records corresponding to one patient with VBE-related trigeminal pain treated with radiosurgery. Because of the impossibility of visualization of the entry zone or the path of trigeminal nerve through the pontine cistern, we proceeded with stereotactic radiosurgery directed to the TG. The maximum radiation dose was 86 Gy with a 8-mm and a 4-mm collimator. The follow-up period was 24 months. The pain disappeared in 15 days, passing from Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) grade V to BNI grade IIIa in 4 months and then to grade I. The patient did not experience noticeable subjective facial numbness. Conclusions: This experience showed that Gamma knife radiosurgery was effective in the management of VBE-related trigeminal pain, using the TG as radiosurgical target. PMID:25593782

  14. NMDA Receptors Multiplicatively Scale Visual Signals and Enhance Directional Motion Discrimination in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Poleg-Polsky, Alon; Diamond, Jeffrey S

    2016-03-16

    Postsynaptic responses in many CNS neurons are typically small and variable, often making it difficult to distinguish physiologically relevant signals from background noise. To extract salient information, neurons are thought to integrate multiple synaptic inputs and/or selectively amplify specific synaptic activation patterns. Here, we present evidence for a third strategy: directionally selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) in the mouse retina multiplicatively scale visual signals via a mechanism that requires both nonlinear NMDA receptor (NMDAR) conductances in DSGC dendrites and directionally tuned inhibition provided by the upstream retinal circuitry. Postsynaptic multiplication enables DSGCs to discriminate visual motion more accurately in noisy visual conditions without compromising directional tuning. These findings demonstrate a novel role for NMDARs in synaptic processing and provide new insights into how synaptic and network features interact to accomplish physiologically relevant neural computations. PMID:26948896

  15. Sulbutiamine counteracts trophic factor deprivation induced apoptotic cell death in transformed retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kui Dong; Majid, Aman Shah Abdul; Kim, Kyung-A; Kang, Kyungsu; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Nho, Chu Won; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2010-11-01

    Sulbutiamine is a highly lipid soluble synthetic analogue of vitamin B(1) and is used clinically for the treatment of asthenia. The aim of our study was to demonstrate whether sulbutiamine is able to attenuate trophic factor deprivation induced cell death to transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5). Cells were subjected to serum deprivation for defined periods and sulbutiamine at different concentrations was added to the cultures. Various procedures (e.g. cell viability assays, apoptosis assay, reactive oxygen species analysis, Western blot analysis, flow cytometric analysis, glutathione (GSH) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) measurement) were used to demonstrate the effect of sulbutiamine. Sulbutiamine dose-dependently attenuated apoptotic cell death induced by serum deprivation and stimulated GSH and GST activity. Moreover, sulbutiamine decreased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and AIF. This study demonstrates for the first time that sulbutiamine is able to attenuate trophic factor deprivation induced apoptotic cell death in neuronal cells in culture. PMID:20809085

  16. [Exclusive radiotherapy for a facial basal cell carcinoma with trigeminal ganglion involvement].

    PubMed

    Longeac, M; Lapeyre, M; Delbet Dupas, C; Barthélémy, I; Pham Dang, N

    2016-06-01

    Basal cell carcinomas with symptomatic perineural invasion are rare entities. We report the case of a 60year-old man (with a grafted kidney), surgically treated in 2007 for a sclerodermiform basal cell carcinoma infiltrating the left nostril. Five years later, a painful left hemifacial hypoesthesia associated with an ulcus rodens of the nasolabial fold appeared. A biopsy confirmed a recurrence. MRI showed an enhancement of the trigeminal ganglion. The patient had a trigeminal perineural invasion secondary to a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma. He received a local intensity-modulated radiotherapy alone (70Gy in 33 sessions), administered from the skin tumour to the skull base. Three years after the end of treatment, the patient is in radiological and clinical remission, with partial recovery of the hypoesthesia. Evolution was marked by iterative corneal ulcers and decreased visual acuity. Modalities of treatment by surgery and/or radiation therapy and complications are poorly described in the literature. PMID:27105681

  17. Postoperative toxic shock syndrome after excision of a ganglion cyst from the ankle.

    PubMed

    Strenge, K Brandon; Mangan, Douglas B; Idusuyi, O B

    2006-01-01

    Postoperative toxic shock syndrome (PTSS) after orthopedic surgery is rare, but early recognition and prompt intervention are essential to minimize morbidity and potential mortality. The diagnosis should be considered in all postoperative patients presenting with fever, hypotension, and systemic illness. The treating surgeon must have not only knowledge of the clinical entity, but also an extremely high index of suspicion, because the diagnosis can be elusive with surgical wounds appearing deceptively benign. Treatment consists of antibiotics, surgical wound debridement, and, more importantly, aggressive supportive care with intravenous fluids and intensive care surveillance. To date, the literature contains relatively few case reports of PTSS after orthopedic procedures, with even fewer cases encountered after foot and ankle surgery. This report describes a patient who developed the rare complication of PTSS after an elective ganglion cyst excision from the ankle. PMID:16818157

  18. Subclinical lumbar polyradiculopathy, polyneuritis and ganglionitis in aged wild and exotic mammalians.

    PubMed

    Anderson, W I; Cummings, J F; Steinberg, H; deLahunta, A; King, J M

    1993-07-01

    Subclinical lumbar polyradiculopathy was present in the intradural dorsal and ventral nerve rootlets of 19 aged individuals of the following wild and exotic mammalian species: woodrat, raccoon, mink, lynx, reindeer, red deer, musk ox, scimitar-horned oryx, Arabian oryx, hybrid waterbuck, Persian onager, Przewalski's wild horse, Malayan sun bear, Asian elephant, East African river hippopotamus, vervet monkey and rhesus monkey. It was characterized by mild to severe multifocal ballooning of myelin sheaths. Occasionally, ballooned myelin sheaths contained thin strands of myelin and macrophages surrounding distorted axons. Additionally, a mild incidental lymphocytic polyneuritis was present in intradural nerve rootlets of the Malayan sun bear, and a moderate lymphocytic spinal ganglionitis in the East African river hippopotamus. PMID:8408784

  19. A Self-Assembling Injectable Biomimetic Microenvironment Encourages Retinal Ganglion Cell Axon Extension in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Laughter, Melissa R; Ammar, David A; Bardill, James R; Pena, Brisa; Kahook, Malik Y; Lee, David J; Park, Daewon

    2016-08-17

    Sensory-somatic nervous system neurons, such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), are typically thought to be incapable of regenerating. However, it is now known that these cells may be stimulated to regenerate by providing them with a growth permissive environment. We have engineered an injectable microenvironment designed to provide growth-stimulating cues for RGC culture. Upon gelation, this injectable material not only self-assembles into laminar sheets, similar to retinal organization, but also possesses a storage modulus comparable to that of retinal tissue. Primary rat RGCs were grown, stained, and imaged in this three-dimensional scaffold. We were able to show that RGCs grown in this retina-like structure exhibited characteristic long, prominent axons. In addition, RGCs showed a consistent increase in average axon length and neurite-bearing ratio over the 7 day culture period, indicating this scaffold is capable of supporting substantial RGC axon extension. PMID:27434231

  20. The first stage of cardinal direction selectivity is localized to the dendrites of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Keisuke; Farrow, Karl; Ghanem, Alexander; Hillier, Daniel; Balint, Kamill; Teixeira, Miguel; Jüttner, Josephine; Noda, Masaharu; Neve, Rachael L; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Roska, Botond

    2013-09-18

    Inferring the direction of image motion is a fundamental component of visual computation and essential for visually guided behavior. In the retina, the direction of image motion is computed in four cardinal directions, but it is not known at which circuit location along the flow of visual information the cardinal direction selectivity first appears. We recorded the concerted activity of the neuronal circuit elements of single direction-selective (DS) retinal ganglion cells at subcellular resolution by combining GCaMP3-functionalized transsynaptic viral tracing and two-photon imaging. While the visually evoked activity of the dendritic segments of the DS cells were direction selective, direction-selective activity was absent in the axon terminals of bipolar cells. Furthermore, the glutamate input to DS cells, recorded using a genetically encoded glutamate sensor, also lacked direction selectivity. Therefore, the first stage in which extraction of a cardinal motion direction occurs is the dendrites of DS cells.

  1. In vivo monitoring of chemically evoked activity patterns in the rat trigeminal ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Lübbert, Matthias; Kyereme, Jessica; Rothermel, Markus; Wetzel, Christian H.; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; Hatt, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    Albeit lacking a sense of smell, anosmic patients maintain a reduced ability to distinguish different volatile chemicals by relying exclusively on their trigeminal system (TS). To elucidate differences in the neuronal representation of these volatile substances in the TS, we performed voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) in the rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) in vivo. We demonstrated that stimulus-specific patterns of bioelectrical activity occur within the TG upon nasal administration of ten different volatile chemicals. With regard to spatial differences between the evoked trigeminal response patterns, these substances could be sorted into three groups. Signal intensity and onset latencies were also dependent on the administered stimulus and its concentration. We conclude that particular compounds detected by the TS are represented by (1) a specific spatial response pattern, (2) the signal intensity, and (3) onset latencies within the pattern. Jointly, these trigeminal representations may contribute to the surprisingly high discriminative skills of anosmic patients. PMID:24115922

  2. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cell loss and circadian dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    FENG, RUIQI; LI, LIJUAN; YU, HAIYAN; LIU, MIN; ZHAO, WEI

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease affects 27 million individuals and is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. The pathology of Alzheimer's disease is primarily due to the β-amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles. These deposits exist largely in the cerebral blood vessels, but have also been shown to exist in retinal vessels. A new class of cells that were recently identified, known as melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs), are involved in the non-image forming functions of the eye. These functions include circadian activities such as temperature rhythms, melatonin release and rest-activity cycles. Circadian dysfunction has been investigated in many cases of Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we outline the current accepted Alzheimer's disease pathology, the role of mRCGs in optic neuropathies and the role of mRCGs, leading to circadian dysfunction, in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26935586

  3. Enhanced antioxidant and protective activities on retinal ganglion cells of carotenoids-overexpressing transgenic carrot.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kee Dong; Kang, Suk-Nam; Bae, Ji-Yeong; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Jang, Insurk; Kim, Il-Suk; Lee, Cheol Ho; Bae, Jung Myung; Lee, Shin Woo; Ahn, Mi-Jeong

    2013-08-01

    Carotenoids are considered to act as antioxidants and protect humans from serious disorders such as skin degeneration and ageing, cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancer, and age-related diseases of the eye. In this study, these chemopreventive activities of a carotenoids-overexpressing transgenic carrot were evaluated. The results of DPPH, hydroxyl, and superoxide radical scavenging tests demonstrate that the acetone extract obtained from the taproots of the carrot plants exhibits significant antioxidant activity. A higher activity was detected in the transgenic carrot extract compared with the wild-type extract. A chemopreventive activity test for degenerative diseases of the eye revealed that pretreatment with the carrot extract reduced cell death in a retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5 cells exposed to 1-buthionine- (R,S)-sulfoximine and L-glutamic acid.

  4. Current Approaches to Neuromodulation in Primary Headaches: Focus on Vagal Nerve and Sphenopalatine Ganglion Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Puledda, Francesca; Goadsby, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Neuromodulation is a promising, novel approach for the treatment of primary headache disorders. Neuromodulation offers a new dimension in the treatment that is both easily reversible and tends to be very well tolerated. The autonomic nervous system is a logical target given the neurobiology of common primary headache disorders, such as migraine and the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). This article will review new encouraging results of studies from the most recent literature on neuromodulation as acute and preventive treatment in primary headache disorders, and cover some possible underlying mechanisms. We will especially focus on vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) since they have targeted autonomic pathways that are cranial and can modulate relevant pathophysiological mechanisms. The initial data suggests these approaches will find an important role in headache disorder management going forward.

  5. Subclinical lumbar polyradiculopathy, polyneuritis and ganglionitis in aged wild and exotic mammalians.

    PubMed

    Anderson, W I; Cummings, J F; Steinberg, H; deLahunta, A; King, J M

    1993-07-01

    Subclinical lumbar polyradiculopathy was present in the intradural dorsal and ventral nerve rootlets of 19 aged individuals of the following wild and exotic mammalian species: woodrat, raccoon, mink, lynx, reindeer, red deer, musk ox, scimitar-horned oryx, Arabian oryx, hybrid waterbuck, Persian onager, Przewalski's wild horse, Malayan sun bear, Asian elephant, East African river hippopotamus, vervet monkey and rhesus monkey. It was characterized by mild to severe multifocal ballooning of myelin sheaths. Occasionally, ballooned myelin sheaths contained thin strands of myelin and macrophages surrounding distorted axons. Additionally, a mild incidental lymphocytic polyneuritis was present in intradural nerve rootlets of the Malayan sun bear, and a moderate lymphocytic spinal ganglionitis in the East African river hippopotamus.

  6. Interneurons of the subesophageal ganglion of Sarcophaga bullata responding to gustatory and mechanosensory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B K; Itagaki, H

    1992-09-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from interneurons in the subesophageal ganglion (SEG) of Sarcophaga bullata while stimulating the labellar lobes with solutions of sucrose, NaCl and with distilled water. Neurons that responded to sucrose did not respond to NaCl and vice versa, while sucrose-sensitive neurons often responded weakly to water. Several of the recorded neurons were filled with Lucifer Yellow, and their morphology was reconstructed. Most showed extensive arborizations within the SEG, suggesting that they were local interneurons involved in the early stages of gustatory processing. Some of the filled neurons had extensive projections to the brain, in addition to arborizations in the SEG. This is the first published record of gustatory interneurons in the higher flies.

  7. Decoupling kinematics and mechanics reveals coding properties of trigeminal ganglion neurons in the rat vibrissal system.

    PubMed

    Bush, Nicholas E; Schroeder, Christopher L; Hobbs, Jennifer A; Yang, Anne Et; Huet, Lucie A; Solla, Sara A; Hartmann, Mitra Jz

    2016-06-27

    Tactile information available to the rat vibrissal system begins as external forces that cause whisker deformations, which in turn excite mechanoreceptors in the follicle. Despite the fundamental mechanical origin of tactile information, primary sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (Vg) have often been described as encoding the kinematics (geometry) of object contact. Here we aimed to determine the extent to which Vg neurons encode the kinematics vs. mechanics of contact. We used models of whisker bending to quantify mechanical signals (forces and moments) at the whisker base while simultaneously monitoring whisker kinematics and recording single Vg units in both anesthetized rats and awake, body restrained rats. We employed a novel manual stimulation technique to deflect whiskers in a way that decouples kinematics from mechanics, and used Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) to show that Vg neurons more directly encode mechanical signals when the whisker is deflected in this decoupled stimulus space.

  8. DU-AGG pilot plant design study

    SciTech Connect

    Lessing, P.A.; Gillman, H.

    1996-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is developing new methods to produce high-density aggregate (artificial rock) primarily consisting of depleted uranium oxide. The objective is to develop a low-cost method whereby uranium oxide powder (UO[sub 2], U[sub 3]O[sub ]8, or UO[sub 3]) can be processed to produce high-density aggregate pieces (DU-AGG) having physical properties suitable for disposal in low-level radioactive disposal facilities or for use as a component of high-density concrete used as shielding for radioactive materials. A commercial company, G-M Systems, conducted a design study for a manufacturing pilot plant to process DU-AGG. The results of that study are included and summarized in this report. Also explained are design considerations, equipment capacities, the equipment list, system operation, layout of equipment in the plant, cost estimates, and the proposed plan and schedule.

  9. Mars' 1995 opposition from PIC du Midi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erard, S.

    1997-03-01

    The last Martian apparition was observed from Pic du Midi between October 1994 and March 1995. Earth-based observation remains the only practicable way to perform continuous surveys of the planets, as opposed to orbital (HST) or space-borne observation. A good planetary site with limited demand for observational time like the 1-m telescope at Pic du Midi provides the optimal opportunity to monitor planetary activity, including atmospheric phenomena, surface variations, and polar caps recession. For instance, HST observations of Mars during this period, though yielding a much better spatial resolution, are limited to very few sessions and do not make it possible to monitor quick processes along a whole Martian season.

  10. The RNA binding protein RBPMS is a selective marker of ganglion cells in the mammalian retina

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Allen R.; de Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    There are few neurochemical markers that reliably identify retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which are a heterogeneous population of cells that integrate and transmit the visual signal from the retina to the central visual nuclei. We have developed and characterized a new set of affinity purified guinea pig and rabbit antibodies against RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS). On Western blots these antibodies recognize a single band at ~24 kDa, corresponding to RBPMS, and they strongly label RGC and displaced RGC (dRGC) somata in mouse, rat, guinea pig, rabbit and monkey retina. RBPMS immunoreactive cells and RGCs identified by other techniques have a similar range of somal diameters and areas. The density of RBPMS cells in mouse and rat retina is comparable to earlier semi-quantitative estimates of RGCs. RBPMS is mainly expressed in medium and large DAPI-, DRAQ5-, NeuroTrace- and NeuN-stained cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL), and RBPMS is not expressed in syntaxin (HPC-1) immunoreactive cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and GCL, consistent with their identity as RGCs, and not displaced amacrine cells. In mouse and rat retina, most RBPMS cells are lost following optic nerve crush or transection at three weeks, and all Brn3a, SMI-32 and melanopsin immunoreactive RGCs also express RBPMS immunoreactivity. RBPMS immunoreactivity is localized to CFP-fluorescent RGCs in the B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J mouse line. These findings show that antibodies against RBPMS are robust reagents that exclusively identify RGCs and dRGCs in multiple mammalian species, and they will be especially useful for quantification of RGCs. PMID:24318667

  11. Effectiveness of Stellate Ganglion Block Under Fuoroscopy or Ultrasound Guidance in Upper Extremity CRPS

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farnad; Hemati, Karim; Kazemi, Mohamad Reza; Hejazian, Kokab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stellate Ganglion Block (SGB) is an effective technique which may be used to manage upper extremities pain due to Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), in this study we tried to evaluate the effectiveness of this procedure under two different guidance for management of this syndrome. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrsound guide SGB by comparing it with the furoscopy guided SGB in upper extermities CRPS patients in reducing pain & dysfuction of the affected link. Materials and Methods Fourteen patients with sympathetic CRPS in upper extremities in a randomized method with block randomization divided in two equal groups (with ultrasound or fluoroscopic guidance). First group was blocked under fluoroscopic guidance and second group blocked under ultrasound guidance. After correct positioning of the needle, a mixture of 5 ml bupivacaine 0.25% and 1 mL of triamcinolone was injected. Results These data represent no meaningful statistical difference between the two groups in terms of the number of pain attacks before the blocks, a borderline correlation between two groups one week and one month after the block and a significant statistical correlation between two groups three month after the block. These data represent no meaningful statistical difference between the patients of any group in terms of the pain intensity (from one week to six months after block), p-value = 0.61. These data represent a meaningful statistical difference among patients of any group and between the two groups in terms of the pain intensity (before the block until six months after block), p-values were 0.001, 0.031 respectively. Conclusion According the above mentioned data, in comparison with fluoroscopic guidance, stellate ganglion block under ultrasound guidance is a safe and effective method with lower complication and better improvement in patient’s disability indexes. PMID:26894152

  12. Mechanism of blood pressure and R-R variability: insights from ganglion blockade in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Rong; Iwasaki, Kenichi; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Behbehani, Khosrow; Crandall, Craig G.; Levine, Benjamin D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Spontaneous blood pressure (BP) and R-R variability are used frequently as 'windows' into cardiovascular control mechanisms. However, the origin of these rhythmic fluctuations is not completely understood. In this study, with ganglion blockade, we evaluated the role of autonomic neural activity versus other 'non-neural' factors in the origin of BP and R-R variability in humans. Beat-to-beat BP, R-R interval and respiratory excursions were recorded in ten healthy subjects (aged 30 +/- 6 years) before and after ganglion blockade with trimethaphan. The spectral power of these variables was calculated in the very low (0.0078-0.05 Hz), low (0.05-0.15 Hz) and high (0.15-0.35 Hz) frequency ranges. The relationship between systolic BP and R-R variability was examined by cross-spectral analysis. After blockade, R-R variability was virtually abolished at all frequencies; however, respiration and high frequency BP variability remained unchanged. Very low and low frequency BP variability was reduced substantially by 84 and 69 %, respectively, but still persisted. Transfer function gain between systolic BP and R-R interval variability decreased by 92 and 88 % at low and high frequencies, respectively, while the phase changed from negative to positive values at the high frequencies. These data suggest that under supine resting conditions with spontaneous breathing: (1) R-R variability at all measured frequencies is predominantly controlled by autonomic neural activity; (2) BP variability at high frequencies (> 0.15 Hz) is mediated largely, if not exclusively, by mechanical effects of respiration on intrathoracic pressure and/or cardiac filling; (3) BP variability at very low and low frequencies (< 0.15 Hz) is probably mediated by both sympathetic nerve activity and intrinsic vasomotor rhythmicity; and (4) the dynamic relationship between BP and R-R variability as quantified by transfer function analysis is determined predominantly by autonomic neural activity rather than other

  13. Cobalamin C Deficiency Shows a Rapidly Progressing Maculopathy With Severe Photoreceptor and Ganglion Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bonafede, Lucas; Ficicioglu, Can H.; Serrano, Leona; Han, Grace; Morgan, Jessica I. W.; Mills, Monte D.; Forbes, Brian J.; Davidson, Stefanie L.; Binenbaum, Gil; Kaplan, Paige B.; Nichols, Charles W.; Verloo, Patrick; Leroy, Bart P.; Maguire, Albert M.; Aleman, Tomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe in detail the retinal structure and function of a group of patients with cobalamin C (cblC) disease. Methods Patients (n = 11, age 4 months to 15 years) with cblC disease (9/11, early onset) diagnosed by newborn screening underwent complete ophthalmic examinations, fundus photography, near-infrared reflectance imaging, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed in a subset of patients. Results Patients carried homozygous or compound heterozygote mutations in the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C (MMACHC) gene. Late-onset patients had a normal exam. All early-onset patients showed a maculopathy; older subjects had a retina-wide degeneration (n = 4; >7 years of age). In general, retinal changes were first observed before 1 year of age and progressed within months to a well-established maculopathy. Pseudocolobomas were documented in three patients. Measurable visual acuities ranged from 20/200 to 20/540. Nystagmus was present in 8/11 patients; 5/6 patients had normal ERGs; 1/6 had reduced rod-mediated responses. Spectral-domain OCT showed macular thinning, with severe ganglion cell layer (GCL) and outer nuclear layer (ONL) loss. Inner retinal thickening was observed in areas of total GCL/ONL loss. A normal lamination pattern in the peripapillary nasal retina was often seen despite severe central and/or retina-wide disease. Conclusions Patients with early-onset cblC and MMACHC mutations showed an early-onset, unusually fast-progressing maculopathy with severe central ONL and GCL loss. An abnormally thickened inner retina supports a remodeling response to both photoreceptor and ganglion cell degeneration and/or an interference with normal development in early-onset cblC. PMID:26658511

  14. Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase Is Required for Retinal Ganglion Cell and Photoreceptor Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Peter X.; Fang, Jiahua; Sang, Alan; Wang, Yan; Kapiloff, Michael S.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We have previously demonstrated that soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is necessary for retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axon growth. Here, we further investigate the role of sAC in neuronal differentiation during retinal development. Methods Chx10 or Math5 promoter-driven Cre-Lox recombination were used to conditionally delete sAC from early and intermediate retinal progenitor cells during retinal development. We examined cell type–specific markers expressed by retinal cells to estimate their relative numbers and characterize retinal laminar morphology by immunofluorescence in adult and newborn mice. Results Retinal ganglion cell and amacrine cell markers were significantly lower in the retinas of adult Math5cre/sACfl/fl and Chx10cre/sACfl/fl mice than in those of wild-type controls. The effect on RGC development was detectable as early as postnatal day 1 and deleting sAC in either Math5- or Chx10-expressing retinal progenitor cells also reduced nerve fiber layer thickness into adulthood. The thickness of the photoreceptor layer was slightly but statistically significantly decreased in both the newborn Chx10cre/sACfl/fl and Math5cre/sACfl/fl mice, but this reduction and abnormal morphology persisted in the adults in only the Chx10cre/sACfl/fl mice. Conclusions sAC plays an important role in the early retinal development of RGCs as well as in the development of amacrine cells and to a lesser degree photoreceptors. PMID:27679853

  15. Visual responses of ganglion cells of a New-World primate, the capuchin monkey, Cebus apella.

    PubMed

    Lee, B B; Silveira, L C; Yamada, E S; Hunt, D M; Kremers, J; Martin, P R; Troy, J B; da Silva-Filho, M

    2000-11-01

    1. The genetic basis of colour vision in New-World primates differs from that in humans and other Old-World primates. Most New-World primate species show a polymorphism; all males are dichromats and most females trichromats. 2. In the retina of Old-World primates such as the macaque, the physiological correlates of trichromacy are well established. Comparison of the retinae in New- and Old-World species may help constrain hypotheses as to the evolution of colour vision and the pathways associated with it. 3. Ganglion cell behaviour was recorded from trichromatic and dichromatic members of a New-World species (the capuchin monkey, Cebus apella) and compared with macaque data. Despite some differences in quantitative detail (such as a temporal response extended to higher frequencies), results from trichromatic animals strongly resembled those from the macaque. 4. In particular, cells of the parvocellular (PC) pathway showed characteristic frequency-dependent changes in responsivity to luminance and chromatic modulation, cells of the magnocellular (MC) pathway showed frequency-doubled responses to chromatic modulation, and the surround of MC cells received a chromatic input revealed on changing the phase of heterochromatically modulated lights. 5. Ganglion cells of dichromats were colour-blind versions of those of trichromats. 6. This strong physiological homology is consistent with a common origin of trichromacy in New- and Old-World monkeys; in the New-World primate the presence of two pigments in the middle-to-long wavelength range permits full expression of the retinal mechanisms of trichromatic vision. PMID:11432364

  16. β2-Adrenoceptor gene variation and systemic vasodilatation during ganglionic blockade

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Christiane; Schroeder, Darrell R; Nicholson, Wayne T; Hart, Emma C; Curry, Timothy B; Penheiter, Alan R; Turner, Stephen T; Joyner, Michael J; Eisenach, John H

    2010-01-01

    Regional infusions of β2-adrenoceptor (ADRB2) agonist have generally shown that individuals homozygous for Gly16 produces greater vasodilatation than those homozygous for Arg16. Systemic infusions have shown an opposite effect on systemic vascular resistance (SVR), possibly confounded by baroreflexes or interactions between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) positions 16 and 27. We tested the hypothesis that ADRB2 gene variation would influence the SVR response to ADRB2 agonist terbutaline (Terb) during ganglionic blockade. Forty healthy young adults were recruited according to the double homozygous haplotypes: Arg16 + Gln27 (n = 13), the rare Gly16 + Gln27 (n = 6), and Gly16 + Glu27 (n = 21). Arterial pressure was measured by brachial arterial catheter, and cardiac output by acetylene breathing. Lymphocytes were sampled for ex vivo analysis of ADRB2 density and binding conformation. Following baroreflex ablation with trimethaphan (3–7 mg min−1), continuous phenylephrine was titrated to restore blood pressure to baseline. Terb was infused i.v. at 33 and 67 ng kg−1 min−1 for 15 min/dose. There was partial evidence to suggest a main effect of haplotype on the change in SVR (P = 0.06). For SNP position 16, the highest dose of Terb produced lower SVR in Gly16 (mean ± s.e.m.: 7.5 ± 0.4) vs. Arg16 (8.9 ± 0.7 units; P = 0.03). Lymphocyte ADRB2 binding conformation was similar but receptor density was greater in Gly16 vs. Arg16 (P = 0.05). We conclude that during ganglionic blockade, the SVR response to systemic ADRB2 agonist is suggestive of augmented ADRB2 function in Gly16 + Glu27 homozygotes, with greater influence from Gly16, providing further evidence that ADRB2 gene variation influences vasodilatation. PMID:20519311

  17. Eye Histology and Ganglion Cell Topography of Northern Elephant Seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Smodlaka, Hrvoje; Khamas, Wael A; Palmer, Lauren; Lui, Bryan; Borovac, Josip A; Cohn, Brian A; Schmitz, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Northern elephant seals are one of the deepest diving marine mammals. As northern elephant seals often reach the bathypelagic zone, it is usually assumed that their eyes possess evolutionary adaptations that provide better ability to see in dim or scotopic environments. The purpose of this study was to carefully describe anatomical and histological traits of the eye that may improve light sensitivity. Northern elephant seals have large, somewhat elliptical eyes, with equatorial and anteroposterior diameters of 5.03 and 4.4 cm, respectively. The cornea is large in diameter and the lens is completely spherical. The iris has pronounced constrictor and dilator muscles, whereas the ciliary muscle is notably less developed. The tapetum lucidum is more prominent than in other pinnipeds, making up about 63% of retinal thickness in the posterior aspect of the globe. Within the retina, the pigmented epithelium lacks pigment except for the region close to the ora serrata. Parts of the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layers are folded. Although the photoreceptor layer is composed predominantly of rods, cone photoreceptors were also observed. Cells within the retinal ganglion cell layer are arranged in a single level. Ganglion cells reach their maximum density (∼1,300 cells per mm(2) ) dorsal to the optic disc, whereas the periphery of the retina is sparsely populated (<100 cells per mm(2) ). All above mentioned features are consistent with the predicted evolutionary adaptations to the photic environment of the bathypelagic zone. Anat Rec, 299:798-805, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26950409

  18. Rhythmic Ganglion Cell Activity in Bleached and Blind Adult Mouse Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Menzler, Jacob; Channappa, Lakshmi; Zeck, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa – a degenerative disease which often leads to incurable blindness- the loss of photoreceptors deprives the retina from a continuous excitatory input, the so-called dark current. In rodent models of this disease this deprivation leads to oscillatory electrical activity in the remaining circuitry, which is reflected in the rhythmic spiking of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). It remained unclear, however, if the rhythmic RGC activity is attributed to circuit alterations occurring during photoreceptor degeneration or if rhythmic activity is an intrinsic property of healthy retinal circuitry which is masked by the photoreceptor’s dark current. Here we tested these hypotheses by inducing and analysing oscillatory activity in adult healthy (C57/Bl6) and blind mouse retinas (rd10 and rd1). Rhythmic RGC activity in healthy retinas was detected upon partial photoreceptor bleaching using an extracellular high-density multi-transistor-array. The mean fundamental spiking frequency in bleached retinas was 4.3 Hz; close to the RGC rhythm detected in blind rd10 mouse retinas (6.5 Hz). Crosscorrelation analysis of neighbouring wild-type and rd10 RGCs (separation distance <200 µm) reveals synchrony among homologous RGC types and a constant phase shift (∼70 msec) among heterologous cell types (ON versus OFF). The rhythmic RGC spiking in these retinas is driven by a network of presynaptic neurons. The inhibition of glutamatergic ganglion cell input or the inhibition of gap junctional coupling abolished the rhythmic pattern. In rd10 and rd1 retinas the presynaptic network leads to local field potentials, whereas in bleached retinas additional pharmacological disinhibition is required to achieve detectable field potentials. Our results demonstrate that photoreceptor bleaching unmasks oscillatory activity in healthy retinas which shares many features with the functional phenotype detected in rd10 retinas. The quantitative physiological differences advance the

  19. Hmx1 is required for the normal development of somatosensory neurons in the geniculate ganglion.

    PubMed

    Quina, Lely A; Tempest, Lynne; Hsu, Yun-Wei A; Cox, Timothy C; Turner, Eric E

    2012-05-01

    Hmx1 is a variant homeodomain transcription factor expressed in the developing sensory nervous system, retina, and craniofacial mesenchyme. Recently, mutations at the Hmx1 locus have been linked to craniofacial defects in humans, rats, and mice, but its role in nervous system development is largely unknown. Here we show that Hmx1 is expressed in a subset of sensory neurons in the cranial and dorsal root ganglia which does not correspond to any specific sensory modality. Sensory neurons in the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of Hmx1dm/dm mouse embryos have no detectable Hmx1 protein, yet they undergo neurogenesis and express sensory subtype markers normally, demonstrating that Hmx1 is not globally required for the specification of sensory neurons from neural crest precursors. Loss of Hmx1 expression has no obvious effect on the early development of the trigeminal (V), superior (IX/X), or dorsal root ganglia neurons in which it is expressed, but results in marked defects in the geniculate (VII) ganglion. Hmx1dm/dm mouse embryos possess only a vestigial posterior auricular nerve, and general somatosensory neurons in the geniculate ganglion are greatly reduced by mid-gestation. Although Hmx1 is expressed in geniculate neurons prior to cell cycle exit, it does not appear to be required for neurogenesis, and the loss of geniculate neurons is likely to be the result of increased cell death. Fate mapping of neural crest-derived tissues indicates that Hmx1-expressing somatosensory neurons at different axial levels may be derived from either the neural crest or the neurogenic placodes. PMID:22586713

  20. Parallel cone bipolar pathways to a ganglion cell use different rates and amplitudes of quantal excitation.

    PubMed

    Freed, M A

    2000-06-01

    The cone signal reaches the cat's On-beta (X) ganglion cell via several parallel circuits (bipolar cell types b1, b2, and b3). These circuits might convey different regions of the cone's temporal bandwidth. To test this, I presented a step of light that elicited a transient depolarization followed by a sustained depolarization. The contribution of bipolar cells to these response components was isolated by blocking action potentials with tetrodotoxin and by blocking inhibitory synaptic potentials with bicuculline and strychnine. Stationary fluctuation analysis of the sustained depolarization gave the rate of quantal bombardment: approximately 5100 quanta sec(-1) for small central cells and approximately 45,000 quanta sec(-1) for large peripheral cells. Normalizing these rates for the vastly different numbers of bipolar synapses (150-370 per small cell vs 2000 per large cell), quantal rate was constant across the retina, approximately 22 quanta synapse(-1) sec(-1). Nonstationary fluctuation analysis gave the mean quantal EPSP amplitude: approximately 240 microV for the transient depolarization and 30 microV for the sustained depolarization. The b1 bipolar cell is known from noise analysis of the On-alpha ganglion cell to have a near-maximal sustained release of only approximately two quanta synapse(-1) sec(-1). This implies that the other bipolar types (b2 and b3) contribute many more quanta to the sustained depolarization (>/=46 synapse(-1) sec(-1)). Type b1 probably contributes large quanta to the transient depolarization. Thus, bipolar cell types b1 and b2/b3 apparently constitute parallel circuits that convey, respectively, high and low frequencies. PMID:10818130

  1. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling.

    PubMed

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi; Rajguru, Suhrud M

    2014-09-15

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca(2+) imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25-1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm(2) resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca(2+)] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca(2+) involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca(2+)]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca(2+) release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses.

  2. On the histamine-induced depolarization of the isolated superior cervical ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Field, J. L.; Newberry, N. R.

    1991-01-01

    1. Using a grease-gap technique, we studied the action of histamine on the d.c. potential recorded between the internal carotid nerve and the main body of the isolated superior cervical ganglion of the rat. 2. A small, slow depolarization was evoked by 10-300 microM histamine. This response was not reduced by lowering the calcium concentration in the superfusing medium (from 2.5 to 0.1 mM), or by superfusing tetrodotoxin, N-methylatropine, or propranolol (all at 1 microM). 3. Mepyramine (10 nM) antagonized this depolarization, but cimetidine (10 microM), metiamide (30 microM), burimamide (10 microM) and impromidine (1 microM) did not. Two other agonists also evoked a mepyramine-sensitive slow depolarization. The rank order of potencies was histamine greater than N alpha-methyl-histamine greater than 2-methyl-histamine. 4. At concentrations greater than 1 mM, histamine also evoked a larger, faster depolarization. This response was undiminished by reducing the calcium concentration of the medium to 0.1 mM or by adding 1 microM tetrodotoxin. The rank order of potency for the agonists was N alpha-methyl-histamine greater than histamine approximately 2-methyl-histamine. The histamine-induced fast response was not antagonized by any of the above-mentioned antagonists. It was slightly reduced by (+)-tubocurarine (100 microM) and N-methylbicuculline (100 microM) but such effects were not consistent with the blockade of nicotinic or GABAA receptor-mediated responses. 5. It was concluded that histamine depolarized the isolated superior cervical ganglion of the rat by activating H1 receptors. Relatively high concentrations of histamine also evoked a fast depolarization of this preparation, but this did not appear to be mediated by H1, H2 or H3 receptors. PMID:1933137

  3. Rescuing axons from degeneration does not affect retinal ganglion cell death

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, S.; Mietto, B.S.; Paula, C.; Muniz, T.; Martinez, A.M.B.; Gardino, P.F.

    2016-01-01

    After a traumatic injury to the central nervous system, the distal stumps of axons undergo Wallerian degeneration (WD), an event that comprises cytoskeleton and myelin breakdown, astrocytic gliosis, and overexpression of proteins that inhibit axonal regrowth. By contrast, injured neuronal cell bodies show features characteristic of attempts to initiate the regenerative process of elongating their axons. The main molecular event that leads to WD is an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration, which activates calpains, calcium-dependent proteases that degrade cytoskeleton proteins. The aim of our study was to investigate whether preventing axonal degeneration would impact the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after crushing the optic nerve. We observed that male Wistar rats (weighing 200-400 g; n=18) treated with an exogenous calpain inhibitor (20 mM) administered via direct application of the inhibitor embedded within the copolymer resin Evlax immediately following optic nerve crush showed a delay in the onset of WD. This delayed onset was characterized by a decrease in the number of degenerated fibers (P<0.05) and an increase in the number of preserved fibers (P<0.05) 4 days after injury. Additionally, most preserved fibers showed a normal G-ratio. These results indicated that calpain inhibition prevented the degeneration of optic nerve fibers, rescuing axons from the process of axonal degeneration. However, analysis of retinal ganglion cell survival demonstrated no difference between the calpain inhibitor- and vehicle-treated groups, suggesting that although the calpain inhibitor prevented axonal degeneration, it had no effect on RGC survival after optic nerve damage. PMID:27007653

  4. The homeodomain transcription factor Phox2 in the stellate ganglion of the squid Loligo pealei

    PubMed Central

    Burbach, J. Peter H.; Hellemons, Anita J. C. G. M.; Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Homeodomain transcription factors regulate development of embryos and cellular physiology in adult systems. Paired-type homeodomain genes constitute a subclass that has been particularly implicated in establishment of neuronal identity in the mammalian nervous system. We isolated fragments of eight homeodomain genes of this subclass expressed in the stellate ganglion of the North Atlantic long finned squid Loligo pealei (lp) [Note: Loligo pealei has been officially renamed Doryteuthis pealei. For reasons of uniformity and clarity Loligo pealei (lp) is used here]. Of the most abundant ones, we cloned a full length cDNA which encoded the squid ortholog of the paired-type homeodomain proteins Phox2a/b. The homology of lpPhox2 to invertebrate and mammalian Phox2 was limited to the homeodomain. In contrast to mouse Phox2b, lpPhox2 was unable to transactivate the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) promoter in a heterologous mammalian transfection system. In vivo, lpPhox2 was expressed in the developing stellate ganglion of stage 27 squid embryos and continued to be expressed in the adult stellate neurons where expression was confined to the giant fiber lobe containing the neurons that form the giant axons. The expression of lpPhox was similarly timed and distributed as the Fmrf gene. Furthermore, the Fmrf upstream region contained putative Phox2a/b binding sites. These results suggest a role of lpPhox2 in the developmental specification of neuronal identity and regulation of neurons of the squid giant axon. PMID:26116657

  5. Retinal Ganglion Cell Topography of Five Species of Ground-Foraging Birds

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Tracy; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2010-01-01

    Birds that forage on the ground have been studied extensively in relation to behavioral trade-offs between foraging and scanning for predators; however, we know little about the topography of their retinas, which can influence how they gather visual information. We characterized the density of retinal ganglion cells across the retina and estimated visual acuity of four Passeriformes (European starling Sturnus vulgaris, brown-headed cowbird Molothrus ater, house sparrow Passer domesticus, house finch Carpodacus mexicanus) and one Columbiforme (mourning dove Zenaida macroura) that forage on the ground. We used cresyl violet to stain retinal ganglion cells and estimated visual acuity based on cell density and eye size. All species contained a single area centralis, where cell densities were >20,000 cells/mm2. The proportion of the retina that fell in each of five cell density ranges varied between species. European starlings and house finches had the largest area of high cell density, mourning doves had the smallest. The largest proportion of the retina (>35%) of brown-headed cowbird and house sparrow was in the second-lowest cell density range. Considering the 25th percentile of highest cell densities, house finches and European starlings showed the highest cell densities and mourning doves the lowest. Estimated visual acuity increased from house finch, house sparrow, brown-headed cowbird, European starling to mourning dove, and was associated with both retinal area and cell density. Our findings suggest that these ground foragers do not have highly specialized retinas in relation to other types of foragers (e.g. tree foragers), probably because foraging on seeds and insects from the ground is not as visually demanding; however, the studied species showed variability in retinal topography that may be related to foraging techniques, eye size constraints, and size of the area centralis. PMID:20516656

  6. The homeodomain transcription factor Phox2 in the stellate ganglion of the squid Loligo pealei.

    PubMed

    Burbach, J Peter H; Hellemons, Anita J C G M; Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2015-01-01

    Homeodomain transcription factors regulate development of embryos and cellular physiology in adult systems. Paired-type homeodomain genes constitute a subclass that has been particularly implicated in establishment of neuronal identity in the mammalian nervous system. We isolated fragments of eight homeodomain genes of this subclass expressed in the stellate ganglion of the North Atlantic long finned squid Loligo pealei (lp) [Note: Loligo pealei has been officially renamed Doryteuthis pealei. For reasons of uniformity and clarity Loligo pealei (lp) is used here]. Of the most abundant ones, we cloned a full length cDNA which encoded the squid ortholog of the paired-type homeodomain proteins Phox2a/b. The homology of lpPhox2 to invertebrate and mammalian Phox2 was limited to the homeodomain. In contrast to mouse Phox2b, lpPhox2 was unable to transactivate the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) promoter in a heterologous mammalian transfection system. In vivo, lpPhox2 was expressed in the developing stellate ganglion of stage 27 squid embryos and continued to be expressed in the adult stellate neurons where expression was confined to the giant fiber lobe containing the neurons that form the giant axons. The expression of lpPhox was similarly timed and distributed as the Fmrf gene. Furthermore, the Fmrf upstream region contained putative Phox2a/b binding sites. These results suggest a role of lpPhox2 in the developmental specification of neuronal identity and regulation of neurons of the squid giant axon. PMID:26116657

  7. The homeodomain transcription factor Phox2 in the stellate ganglion of the squid Loligo pealei.

    PubMed

    Burbach, J Peter H; Hellemons, Anita J C G M; Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2015-06-26

    Homeodomain transcription factors regulate development of embryos and cellular physiology in adult systems. Paired-type homeodomain genes constitute a subclass that has been particularly implicated in establishment of neuronal identity in the mammalian nervous system. We isolated fragments of eight homeodomain genes of this subclass expressed in the stellate ganglion of the North Atlantic long finned squid Loligo pealei (lp) [Note: Loligo pealei has been officially renamed Doryteuthis pealei. For reasons of uniformity and clarity Loligo pealei (lp) is used here]. Of the most abundant ones, we cloned a full length cDNA which encoded the squid ortholog of the paired-type homeodomain proteins Phox2a/b. The homology of lpPhox2 to invertebrate and mammalian Phox2 was limited to the homeodomain. In contrast to mouse Phox2b, lpPhox2 was unable to transactivate the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) promoter in a heterologous mammalian transfection system. In vivo, lpPhox2 was expressed in the developing stellate ganglion of stage 27 squid embryos and continued to be expressed in the adult stellate neurons where expression was confined to the giant fiber lobe containing the neurons that form the giant axons. The expression of lpPhox was similarly timed and distributed as the Fmrf gene. Furthermore, the Fmrf upstream region contained putative Phox2a/b binding sites. These results suggest a role of lpPhox2 in the developmental specification of neuronal identity and regulation of neurons of the squid giant axon.

  8. Some properties of the presynaptic nerve terminals in a mammalian sympathetic ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Dunant, Y.

    1972-01-01

    1. Superior cervical ganglia of adult rats were excised and maintained in vitro in stable conditions. Potentials were recorded with external electrodes. After transmission was blocked by mecamylamine, a small potential change was recorded from the rostral area of the ganglion in response to preganglionic stimulation. 2. This electrical response was identified as the presynaptic action potential recorded from the nerve terminals by a number of criteria based on histological and physiological considerations including the disappearance of the spike in a glucose free solution. As shown by Nicolescu, Dolivo, Rouiller & Foroglou-Kerameus (1966) on the same preparation this condition causes an irreversible and selective lesion of the presynaptic nerve endings. 3. A suitable concentration of mecamylamine permitted the presynaptic response and the excitatory post-synaptic potential (EPSP) to be recorded simultaneously. As the stimulus was increased, the EPSP increased linearly with the amplitude of the presynaptic response. 4. After replacement of potassium ions in the bathing solution by caesium and during the early phase of post-tetanic facilitation there was an increase in the presynaptic response accompanied by a disproportionate increase in the EPSP. 5. No changes in the presynaptic response were found in the presence of the following drugs, all of which depressed the EPSP: acetylcholine, hemicholinium, curare, further doses of ganglion-blocking agents, and high Mg2+ and low Ca2+ concentrations. 6. Ouabain (4·5 × 10-4 M) reversibly decreased the amplitude of the presynaptic response and increased the spontaneous release of transmitter. The EPSP was at first enhanced and then depressed. PMID:4335802

  9. Nonlinear spatial integration in the receptive field surround of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Daisuke; Gollisch, Tim

    2014-05-28

    Throughout different sensory systems, individual neurons integrate incoming signals over their receptive fields. The characteristics of this signal integration are crucial determinants for the neurons' functions. For ganglion cells in the vertebrate retina, receptive fields are characterized by the well-known center-surround structure and, although several studies have addressed spatial integration in the receptive field center, little is known about how visual signals are integrated in the surround. Therefore, we set out here to characterize signal integration and to identify relevant nonlinearities in the receptive field surround of ganglion cells in the isolated salamander retina by recording spiking activity with extracellular electrodes under visual stimulation of the center and surround. To quantify nonlinearities of spatial integration independently of subsequent nonlinearities of spike generation, we applied the technique of iso-response measurements as follows: using closed-loop experiments, we searched for different stimulus patterns in the surround that all reduced the center-evoked spiking activity by the same amount. The identified iso-response stimuli revealed strongly nonlinear spatial integration in the receptive field surrounds of all recorded cells. Furthermore, cell types that had been shown previously to have different nonlinearities in receptive field centers showed similar surround nonlinearities but differed systematically in the adaptive characteristics of the surround. Finally, we found that there is an optimal spatial scale of surround suppression; suppression was most effective when surround stimulation was organized into subregions of several hundred micrometers in diameter, indicating that the surround is composed of subunits that have strong center-surround organization themselves. PMID:24872559

  10. Synaptic transmission at parasympathetic neurons of the major pelvic ganglion from normal and diabetic male mice.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, John D; Vizzard, Margaret A; Parsons, Rodney L

    2013-02-01

    Bladder and erectile dysfunction are common urologic complications of diabetes and are associated with reduced parasympathetic autonomic control. To determine whether disruption of ganglionic neurotransmission contributes to the loss of function, we investigated synaptic transmission at parasympathetic, major pelvic ganglion (MPG) neurons in control and chronically (20 wk) diabetic mice. In contrast to what has been reported for sympathetic neurons, diabetes did not cause an interruption of synaptic transmission at parasympathetic MPG neurons from streptozotocin-treated C57BL/6J (STZ) or db/db mice. Cholinergically mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were suprathreshold during 5-s trains of 5-, 10-, and 20-Hz stimuli. Asynchronous neurotransmitter release, observed as miniature EPSPs (mEPSPs) during and after stimulation, permitted quantitative assessment of postganglionic, cholinergic receptor sensitivity. mEPSP amplitude following tetanic stimulation (recorded at -60 mV) was reduced in STZ (4.95 ± 0.4 vs. 3.71 ± 0.3 mV, P = 0.03), but not db/db mice. The number of posttetanic mEPSPs was significantly greater in db/db mice at all frequencies tested. Assessment of basic electrophysiological properties revealed that parasympathetic MPG neurons from db/db mice had less negative membrane potentials, lower input resistances, and shorter afterhyperpolarizations relative to their control. MPG neurons from STZ had longer afterhyperpolarizations but were otherwise similar to controls. Membrane excitability, measured by the membrane responsiveness to long-duration (1 s), suprathreshold depolarizing pulses, was unchanged in either model. The present study indicates that, while parasympathetic neurotransmission at the MPG is intact in chronically diabetic mice, obese, type 2 diabetic animals exhibit an altered presynaptic regulation of neurotransmitter release.

  11. Retrograde labeling, enrichment, and characterization of retinal ganglion cells from the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Sarthy, P V; Curtis, B M; Catterall, W A

    1983-12-01

    We have developed a method for labeling retinal ganglion cells in neonatal rats by retrograde transport of the fluorescent dye, True Blue (TB), injected into the optic chiasm. Following proteolytic dissociation of labeled retinas into single cells, the labeled cells could be enriched 50- to 100-fold by centrifugation in a 5%/10% metrizamide gradient. When plated in Ham's F-10 medium in the presence of fetal calf serum and chick optic tectum-conditioned medium, the labeled cells could be maintained in vitro up to 48 hr. In these cultures, the ganglion cells (GCS) constituted 50 to 70% of the total cell population. When GC-rich fractions or GC cultures were stained with a monoclonal antibody to Thy-1 antigen, greater than 90% of the TB-labeled cells were reactive. In order to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels, GC-rich cultures were reacted with 125I-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the autoradiograms showed that the density of silver grains was about 10-fold higher on TB-labeled cells than on nonfluorescent cells, or in controls which contained excess of unlabeled toxin. When GC cultures were incubated with micromolar concentrations of putative GC transmitters, aspartate and glutamate, the amino acids were accumulated by 15 to 20% of labeled cells. Several lectin receptors were also localized on TB-labeled cells in situ. Whereas the lectins wheat germ agglutinin, concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin bound to TB-labeled cells, others such as Ricinus communis agglutinin I, Ulex, and Lotus lectins showed no binding. The lectin binding was specific since preincubation with the appropriate hapten sugar blocked lectin binding.

  12. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitor treatment delays recovery from axotomy in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Dupree, J L; Bigbee, J W

    1996-08-01

    We have previously reported that dorsal root ganglion neurons cultured in the presence of the highly specific, reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor 1,5-bis-(4-allyldimethylammoniumphenyl) pentan-3-one dibromide (BW284c51), showed significantly reduced neurite outgrowth and contained massive perikaryal inclusions of neurofilaments. In the present report we have more closely examined these changes in a time course study over a 21-day culture period using a combined morphological, immunocytochemical and enzymatic approach and additionally, describe, the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitor treatment on the state of neurofilament phosphorylation. Finally, we have examined the effects of co-administration of N6,2'-0-dibutyryladenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (dbcAMP) with BW284c51. At 1 day in culture, both control and treated cells displayed eccentrically located nuclei, numerous polysomes and perikaryal accumulations of neurofilaments which were immunoreactive with both phosphorylation- and nonphosphorylation-dependent neurofilament antibodies. These cytological changes, which are common features of the chromatolytic reaction following axotomy in vivo, rapidly resolved in the control neurons, where by 7 days in culture, the neurofilament accumulations had completely disappeared and neurite outgrowth was robust. In contrast, inhibitor-treated neurons retained the post-axotomy features up to 21 days and had significantly reduced neurite outgrowth. In addition, we have investigated a possible role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in the recovery process since it has been shown to enhance neuritic outgrowth in cultured neurons. Our results demonstrate that the addition of dbcAMP, a membrane permeable analog of cAMP, significantly enhanced neuritic outgrowth and accelerated the recovery of BW284c51-treated dorsal root ganglion cells, as gauged by the disappearance of the axotomy-related cytological changes. Treatment with dbcAMP also increased

  13. Effects of gentamicin on guinea pig vestibular ganglion function and on substance P and neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Te; Young, Yi-Ho; Cheng, Po-Wen; Lue, June-Horng

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that following intratympanic gentamicin application in the guinea pigs, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were absent regardless of stimulation mode using either air-conducted sound (ACS) stimuli or galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS). Ultrastructurally, both type I hair cells and their calyx terminals were distorted in the saccular macula. However, little is known about the toxic effects of gentamicin on the vestibular ganglion (VG). In this study, absent ACS- and GVS-VEMPs were noted in all the gentamicin-treated ears (100%), which were confirmed by the substantial loss of sensory hair cells in the saccular macula. Moreover, dramatic up-regulation of growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) expression was detected in the ipsilateral VG neurons. The mean percentage of substance P-like immunoreactive (SP-LI) neurons in the treated VG (81.8±1.9%) was significantly higher than that in the control VG (68.6±3.3%). Conversely, the mean percentage of neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactive (NPY-LI) neurons in the treated VG (13.7±3.8%) was dramatically lower than that in the control VG (49.0±3.8%). Double labeling results shown 82% of SP-LI and 16% of NPY-LI neurons coexpressed with GAP-43, suggested that SP accumulating coincided with NPY decreasing in regenerating VG neurons after gentamicin treatment. Overall, the changes in SP and NPY expression in VG neurons after gentamicin treatment were like to those in the superior cervical ganglion following sympathectomy.

  14. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling

    PubMed Central

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca2+ imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25–1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm2 resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca2+] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca2+ involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca2+]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca2+ release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses. PMID:24920028

  15. Sustainable growth, the DuPont way.

    PubMed

    Holliday, C

    2001-09-01

    Like many manufacturers, DuPont traditionally has grown by making more and more "stuff." And its business growth has been proportional to the amount of raw materials and energy used--as well as the resulting waste and emissions from operations. Over the years, though, DuPont became aware that cheap supplies of nonrenewable resources wouldn't be endlessly available and that the earth's ecosystems couldn't indefinitely absorb the waste and emissions of production and consumption. Chad Holliday, chairman and CEO of DuPont, believes strongly in the challenge of sustainable growth and makes the business case for it: By using creativity and scientific knowledge effectively, he says, companies can provide strong returns for shareholders and grow their businesses--while also meeting the human needs of societies around the world and reducing the environmental footprint of their operations and products. In fact, a focus on sustainability can help identify new products, markets, partnerships, and intellectual property and lead to substantial business growth. Holliday describes how DuPont developed a three-pronged strategy to translate the concept of sustainability into nuts-and-bolts business practices. Focusing on integrated science, knowledge intensity, and productivity improvement, the strategy was accompanied by a new way to measure progress quantitatively. Sustainable growth should be viewed not as a program for stepped-up environmental performance but as a comprehensive way of doing business, one that delivers tremendous economic value and opens up new opportunities. Ultimately, companies will find that they can generate substantial business value through sustainability while both enhancing the quality of life around the world and protecting the environment.

  16. Sustainable growth, the DuPont way.

    PubMed

    Holliday, C

    2001-09-01

    Like many manufacturers, DuPont traditionally has grown by making more and more "stuff." And its business growth has been proportional to the amount of raw materials and energy used--as well as the resulting waste and emissions from operations. Over the years, though, DuPont became aware that cheap supplies of nonrenewable resources wouldn't be endlessly available and that the earth's ecosystems couldn't indefinitely absorb the waste and emissions of production and consumption. Chad Holliday, chairman and CEO of DuPont, believes strongly in the challenge of sustainable growth and makes the business case for it: By using creativity and scientific knowledge effectively, he says, companies can provide strong returns for shareholders and grow their businesses--while also meeting the human needs of societies around the world and reducing the environmental footprint of their operations and products. In fact, a focus on sustainability can help identify new products, markets, partnerships, and intellectual property and lead to substantial business growth. Holliday describes how DuPont developed a three-pronged strategy to translate the concept of sustainability into nuts-and-bolts business practices. Focusing on integrated science, knowledge intensity, and productivity improvement, the strategy was accompanied by a new way to measure progress quantitatively. Sustainable growth should be viewed not as a program for stepped-up environmental performance but as a comprehensive way of doing business, one that delivers tremendous economic value and opens up new opportunities. Ultimately, companies will find that they can generate substantial business value through sustainability while both enhancing the quality of life around the world and protecting the environment. PMID:11550629

  17. Du Pont Classifications of 6 Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrell, N.; Shappee, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    We report optical spectroscopy (range 370-910 nm) of six supernovae from the Backyard Observatory Supernova Search (BOSS) and the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) using the du Pont 2.5-m telescope (+ WFCCD) at Las Campanas Observatory on June 17 2016 UT. We performed a cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  18. The identification and distribution of progesterone receptors in the brain and thoracic ganglion in the mud crab Scylla paramamosain (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Ye, Haihui; Huang, Huiyang; Song, Ping; Wang, Guizhong

    2010-11-01

    The existence of progesterone receptors (PR) in the Scylla paramamosain (mud crab) was studied using immunological techniques. By Western blotting, PR with an apparent molecular weight of 70 kDa is identified in both the brain and the thoracic ganglion. By immunohistochemistry, PR immunoreactive neurons are detected mainly in the protocerebrum, the subesophageal ganglion and the leg ganglion. PR immunoreactivity is localized mainly in the nuclei of these neurons, while only a few neurons show such activities in their cytoplasm. Our results provide evidence that progesterone modulates the neuroendocrine system mainly via nucleus receptors.

  19. [Treatment of a patient with refractory cardiac arrhythmias using stellate ganglion block. Access by the classical and ultrasound-guided approach].

    PubMed

    Mata Francisco, N C; Gómez Pesquera, E; Ruiz López, N; Álvarez López, J C; Jorge-Monjas, P

    2014-10-01

    Stellate ganglion block is a technique that is often used by anesthesiologists for the treatment of complex regional pain syndromes of the upper extremity. This technique interrupts cardiac sympathetic innervation and has been proposed as treatment for refractory arrhythmias. We present the case of a patient with arrhythmias that were refractory to pharmacological treatment, and were finally treated by continuous stellate ganglion block. Left stellate ganglion is a lynchpin of cardiac arrhythmias due to being a structure where the majority of postganglion sympathetic fibers responsible for preferentially innervating the atriventricular node, bundle of His and ventricular mass are originated, fundamentals in the origin and maintenance of ventricular arrhythmias.

  20. Biochemical and immunocytochemical characterization and distribution of phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated subunits of neurofilaments in squid giant axon and stellate ganglion.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R S; Pant, H C; House, S; Gainer, H

    1987-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to squid neurofilament (aNFP) and intermediate filament (aIFA) proteins were used as probes for the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses of neurofilament structure and distribution in the squid giant axon and stellate ganglion. On Western blots the aNFP antibody stained exclusively the 220 kDa and high-molecular-weight (HMW) components of neurofilaments in the giant axon, whereas the aIFA antibody primarily labeled the 60 kDa protein in the giant axon and the 60 and 65 kDa proteins in the stellate ganglion. Dephosphorylation of axoplasmic proteins by alkaline phosphatase resulted in a decrease in the molecular weights of both the 220 kDa and HMW neurofilament proteins and a concomitant loss of reactivity with the aNFP antibody on Western blots. This indicated that the aNFP antibody is specific for a phosphorylated epitope in the neurofilament. Increased dephosphorylation of the 220 kDa protein led to an enhanced immunostaining of the resultant 190 kDa polypeptide by the aIFA antibody, suggesting that the phosphorylated epitope may mask the conserved epitope recognized by aIFA. Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical studies show intense labeling by the aNFP antibody in the giant axon. In contrast, the aIFA antibody labeled the glial cells around the giant axon intensely, while labeling of the giant axon itself was considerably less than that with the aNFP antibody. Since the 60 kDa protein in axoplasm is intensely stained by the aIFA antibody on Western blots, the relatively low amounts of labeling seen on semithin and thin sections of the giant axon by this antibody may be due to the masking of the 60 kDa protein by in situ fixed axoplasmic proteins. However, the aIFA antibody intensely labeled glial cells within the stellate ganglion and "islands" of filaments and nuclear membranes within ganglion cells. No reactivity for either antibody was seen in synapses. The aNFP antibody specifically labeled "beadlike" portions and

  1. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 expression in the retina of ocular hypertension mice: a possible target to reduce ganglion cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    He, Yue; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Shu-Guang; Yuan, Yuan-Sheng; Li, Yan; Lv, Hong-Bin; Gan, Jin-Hua

    2015-03-01

    Glaucoma, a type of optic neuropathy, is characterized by the loss of retinal ganglion cells. It remains controversial whether c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) participates in the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. This study sought to explore a possible mechanism of action of JNK signaling pathway in glaucoma-induced retinal optic nerve damage. We established a mouse model of chronic ocular hypertension by reducing the aqueous humor followed by photocoagulation using the laser ignition method. Results showed significant pathological changes in the ocular tissues after the injury. Apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells increased with increased intraocular pressure, as did JNK3 mRNA expression in the retina. These data indicated that the increased expression of JNK3 mRNA was strongly associated with the increase in intraocular pressure in the retina, and correlated positively with the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. PMID:25878592

  2. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 expression in the retina of ocular hypertension mice: a possible target to reduce ganglion cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yue; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Shu-guang; Yuan, Yuan-sheng; Li, Yan; Lv, Hong-bin; Gan, Jin-hua

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma, a type of optic neuropathy, is characterized by the loss of retinal ganglion cells. It remains controversial whether c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) participates in the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. This study sought to explore a possible mechanism of action of JNK signaling pathway in glaucoma-induced retinal optic nerve damage. We established a mouse model of chronic ocular hypertension by reducing the aqueous humor followed by photocoagulation using the laser ignition method. Results showed significant pathological changes in the ocular tissues after the injury. Apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells increased with increased intraocular pressure, as did JNK3 mRNA expression in the retina. These data indicated that the increased expression of JNK3 mRNA was strongly associated with the increase in intraocular pressure in the retina, and correlated positively with the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. PMID:25878592

  3. La reconstruction du sourcil par greffon composite du cuir chevelu: une astuce pour faciliter la technique

    PubMed Central

    El Omari, Mounia; El Mazouz, Samir; Gharib, Noureddine; EL Abbassi, Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Les sourcils jouent un rôle important dans l’équilibre esthétique du visage. Leur reconstruction ou ophriopoïése, après séquelle de brûlure fait partie intégrante du programme de réhabilitation de la face brûlée. Plusieurs techniques ont été décrites. Nous insistons ici sur l'intérêt d'une technique simple, à la portée de tous les chirurgiens, et dont la méthode et les résultats peuvent être améliorés par un dessin bien planifié des zones donneuse et receveuse: la greffe composite prélevée au niveau du cuir chevelu dessinée à l'aide d'un calque du sourcil controlatéral. PMID:26401195

  4. Suivi après le traitement du cancer du sein

    PubMed Central

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Geneviève; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Offrir aux médecins de famille un résumé des recommandations fondées sur les données probantes pour guider les soins aux survivantes traitées pour le cancer du sein. Qualité des données Une recherche documentaire a été effectuée dans MEDLINE entre 2000 et 2016 à l’aide des mots-clés anglais suivants : breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines et survivorship care plans, en se concentrant sur la revue des lignes directrices publiées récemment par les organismes nationaux de cancérologie. Les données étaient de niveaux I à III. Message principal Les soins aux survivantes comportent 4 facettes : surveillance et dépistage, prise en charge des effets à long terme, promotion de la santé et coordination des soins. La surveillance des récidives ne se traduit que par une mammographie annuelle, et le dépistage d’autres cancers doit suivre les lignes directrices basées sur la population. La prise en charge des effets à long terme du cancer et de son traitement aborde des problèmes courants tels la douleur, la fatigue, le lymphœdème, la détresse et les effets indésirables des médicaments, de même que les préoccupations à long terme comme la santé du cœur et des os. La promotion de la santé met en relief les bienfaits de l’activité chez les survivantes du cancer, avec l’accent mis sur l’activité physique. Les soins aux survivantes sont de meilleure qualité lorsque divers services et professionnels de la santé participent aux soins, et le médecin de famille joue un rôle important dans la coordination des soins. Conclusion Les médecins de famille sont de plus en plus souvent les principaux fournisseurs de soins de suivi après le traitement du cancer du sein. Le cancer du sein doit être considéré comme une affection médicale chronique, même chez les femmes en rémission, et les patientes profitent de la même approche que celle utilisée pour les autres affections chroniques en

  5. ASNT certification of thermographers at DuPont Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eads, Lowry G.; Spring, Robert W.

    1996-03-01

    DuPont is one of the world's largest petrochemical firms. Infrared thermography has been a key nondestructive test method used in the predictive/preventive maintenance (PPM) areas for many years. This paper discusses the reasons why DuPont chooses to use the qualification and certification standards of the American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) to establish a certification program for thermographers.

  6. [Electron microscopy of Aujeszky's disease virus in explants of Gasser's ganglion from pigs with a latent infection].

    PubMed

    Valícek, L; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Jurák, E

    1986-08-01

    Different developmental stages of the Aujeszky's disease virus were demonstrated by electron microscopy in the ultra-thin slices by the cultivated fragments of the Gasserian ganglion (G. g.) of two pigs latently infected with the Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV). In a pig vaccinated with the inactivated vaccine against the disease, the virus was detected in the G. g. cells 186 days after virus challenge, the reactivation of latency being obtained after immunosuppression with dexamethasone. In the non-vaccinated pig the virus was detected in G. g. cells after three months from experimental infection. In the ultra-thin slices the largest amount of virus was located in the nuclei and cytoplasm of satellite and Schwann's cells, in the connective-tissue cells and in the extracellular space. In the ganglion cells the virus was present in the cytoplasm and sporadically in the myelinized axons.

  7. High-wattage pulsed irradiation of linearly polarized near-infrared light to stellate ganglion area for burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Momota, Yukihiro; Kani, Koichi; Takano, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Fumihiro; Aota, Keiko; Takegawa, Daisuke; Yamanoi, Tomoko; Kondo, Chika; Tomioka, Shigemasa; Azuma, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply high-wattage pulsed irradiation of linearly polarized near-infrared light to the stellate ganglion area for burning mouth syndrome (BMS) and to assess the efficacy of the stellate ganglion area irradiation (SGR) on BMS using differential time-/frequency-domain parameters (D parameters). Three patients with BMS received high-wattage pulsed SGR; the response to SGR was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) representing the intensity of glossalgia and D parameters used in heart rate variability analysis. High-wattage pulsed SGR significantly decreased the mean value of VAS in all cases without any adverse event such as thermal injury. D parameters mostly correlated with clinical condition of BMS. High-wattage pulsed SGR was safe and effective for the treatment of BMS; D parameters are useful for assessing efficacy of SGR on BMS. PMID:25386367

  8. Exogenous glycosaminoglycans induce complete inversion of retinal ganglion cell bodies and their axons within the retinal neuroepithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Brittis, P A; Silver, J

    1994-01-01

    Prior to forming an axon, retinal ganglion cells retain a primitive radial configuration while maintaining ventricular and vitreal endfeet attachments. During their subsequent differentiation, ganglion cells polarize their cell body and axon only along the vitreal surface. When the ventricular surfaces of intact retinas in organ culture were exposed to free chondroitin sulfate (CS) in solution, both the cell body and nerve fiber layers were repolarized to the opposite side of the neuroepithelium. However, the basal lamina remained in its usual position. Thus, the ability to initiate an axon is not restricted to the vitreal endfoot region of differentiating neurons, and in addition, the radial position at which the axon emerges can be mediated by the location and concentration of the extracellular CS milieu. Images PMID:8052616

  9. Caudal Ganglionic Eminence Precursor Transplants Disperse and Integrate as Lineage-Specific Interneurons but Do Not Induce Cortical Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Larimer, Phillip; Spatazza, Julien; Espinosa, Juan Sebastian; Tang, Yunshuo; Kaneko, Megumi; Hasenstaub, Andrea R; Stryker, Michael P; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    The maturation of inhibitory GABAergic cortical circuits regulates experience-dependent plasticity. We recently showed that the heterochronic transplantation of parvalbumin (PV) or somatostatin (SST) interneurons from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) reactivates ocular dominance plasticity (ODP) in the postnatal mouse visual cortex. Might other types of interneurons similarly induce cortical plasticity? Here, we establish that caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE)-derived interneurons, when transplanted into the visual cortex of neonatal mice, migrate extensively in the host brain and acquire laminar distribution, marker expression, electrophysiological properties, and visual response properties like those of host CGE interneurons. Although transplants from the anatomical CGE do induce ODP, we found that this plasticity reactivation is mediated by a small fraction of MGE-derived cells contained in the transplant. These findings demonstrate that transplanted CGE cells can successfully engraft into the postnatal mouse brain and confirm the unique role of MGE lineage neurons in the induction of ODP. PMID:27425623

  10. Research on ganglion cell responses after laser exposure of the retina. Final report Jan 77-Dec 78

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbarsht, M.L.

    1980-05-01

    Electrophysiological recordings were made from retinal ganglion cells in the macula (including fovea) of several species of Macaque monkeys. After exposure to high-intensity argon or HeNe lasers both above and below the lesion level, the receptive fields lacked a peripheral portion. This was accompanied by a slight increase in the central portion of the receptive field. Some quite large receptive fields were found around the fovea, often extending through it. The large receptive fields could also extend through the site of a laser lesion. No unsymmetrical changes in the receptive field were seen, even in receptive fields adjacent to, or partially within, a laser lesion site. Histological examination did not show any changes in the retinal organization adjacent to laser lesion even where the ganglion cells had center-only receptive fields.

  11. Focal electrical stimulation of major ganglion cell types in the primate retina for the design of visual prostheses.

    PubMed

    Jepson, Lauren H; Hottowy, Pawel; Mathieson, Keith; Gunning, Deborah E; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Litke, Alan M; Chichilnisky, E J

    2013-04-24

    Electrical stimulation of retinal neurons with an advanced retinal prosthesis may eventually provide high-resolution artificial vision to the blind. However, the success of future prostheses depends on the ability to activate the major parallel visual pathways of the human visual system. Electrical stimulation of the five numerically dominant retinal ganglion cell types was investigated by simultaneous stimulation and recording in isolated peripheral primate (Macaca sp.) retina using multi-electrode arrays. ON and OFF midget, ON and OFF parasol, and small bistratified ganglion cells could all be activated directly to fire a single spike with submillisecond latency using brief pulses of current within established safety limits. Thresholds for electrical stimulation were similar in all five cell types. In many cases, a single cell could be specifically activated without activating neighboring cells of the same type or other types. These findings support the feasibility of direct electrical stimulation of the major visual pathways at or near their native spatial and temporal resolution.

  12. Eosinophilic myenteric ganglionitis: a case of intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a 93-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Chander, Bani; Fiedler, Paul; Jain, Dhanpat

    2011-04-01

    Eosinophilic myenteric ganglionitis is a disorder characterized by infiltration of the Auerbach plexus by eosinophils. It can be associated with a bowel dysmotility and a few cases of intestinal pseudo-obstructive syndrome have been described in children. In this case report, we present an elderly 93-year-old woman who presented with episodes of functional bowel obstruction of unknown etiology. After several admissions for recurrent obstipation requiring fecal disimpaction, she had a Hartmann procedure performed with a resection of the sigmoid colon. The sigmoid colon was markedly dilated and the only significant finding on histology was infiltration of the Auerbach plexus by eosinophils. The mucosa and the muscular layers appeared unremarkable. Her symptoms resolved after the resection and the patient is currently well after 5 months. Recurrent gastrointestinal pseudo-obstruction can arise secondary to eosinophilic myenteric ganglionitis even in adults. Clinical improvement is likely if this disease entity is promptly recognized and treated.

  13. Gender difference in the neuroprotective effect of rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Yu, Jian-xiong

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can reduce retinal ganglion cell death and effectively prevent vision loss. Previously, we found that during differentiation, female rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells acquire a higher neurogenic potential compared with male rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests that female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have a stronger neuroprotective effect than male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we first isolated and cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from female and male rats by density gradient centrifugation. Retinal tissue from newborn rats was prepared by enzymatic digestion to obtain primary retinal ganglion cells. Using the transwell system, retinal ganglion cells were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay. We found a marked increase in apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells after 24 hours of hypoxia compared with normoxia. Moreover, apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells significantly decreased with both female and male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell co-culture under hypoxia compared with culture alone, with more significant effects from female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells exert a neuroprotective effect against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and also that female cells have greater neuroprotective ability compared with male cells. PMID:27335573

  14. Gender difference in the neuroprotective effect of rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Yu, Jian-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can reduce retinal ganglion cell death and effectively prevent vision loss. Previously, we found that during differentiation, female rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells acquire a higher neurogenic potential compared with male rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests that female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have a stronger neuroprotective effect than male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we first isolated and cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from female and male rats by density gradient centrifugation. Retinal tissue from newborn rats was prepared by enzymatic digestion to obtain primary retinal ganglion cells. Using the transwell system, retinal ganglion cells were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay. We found a marked increase in apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells after 24 hours of hypoxia compared with normoxia. Moreover, apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells significantly decreased with both female and male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell co-culture under hypoxia compared with culture alone, with more significant effects from female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells exert a neuroprotective effect against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and also that female cells have greater neuroprotective ability compared with male cells. PMID:27335573

  15. Modelisation par elements finis du muscle strie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Mathieu

    Ce present projet de recherche a permis. de creer un modele par elements finis du muscle strie humain dans le but d'etudier les mecanismes engendrant les lesions musculaires traumatiques. Ce modele constitue une plate-forme numerique capable de discerner l'influence des proprietes mecaniques des fascias et de la cellule musculaire sur le comportement dynamique du muscle lors d'une contraction excentrique, notamment le module de Young et le module de cisaillement de la couche de tissu conjonctif, l'orientation des fibres de collagene de cette membrane et le coefficient de poisson du muscle. La caracterisation experimentale in vitro de ces parametres pour des vitesses de deformation elevees a partir de muscles stries humains actifs est essentielle pour l'etude de lesions musculaires traumatiques. Le modele numerique developpe est capable de modeliser la contraction musculaire comme une transition de phase de la cellule musculaire par un changement de raideur et de volume a l'aide des lois de comportement de materiau predefinies dans le logiciel LS-DYNA (v971, Livermore Software Technology Corporation, Livermore, CA, USA). Le present projet de recherche introduit donc un phenomene physiologique qui pourrait expliquer des blessures musculaires courantes (crampes, courbatures, claquages, etc.), mais aussi des maladies ou desordres touchant le tissu conjonctif comme les collagenoses et la dystrophie musculaire. La predominance de blessures musculaires lors de contractions excentriques est egalement exposee. Le modele developpe dans ce projet de recherche met ainsi a l'avant-scene le concept de transition de phase ouvrant la porte au developpement de nouvelles technologies pour l'activation musculaire chez les personnes atteintes de paraplegie ou de muscles artificiels compacts pour l'elaboration de protheses ou d'exosquelettes. Mots-cles Muscle strie, lesion musculaire, fascia, contraction excentrique, modele par elements finis, transition de phase

  16. Influence of bone morphogenetic protein-2 on spiral ganglion neurite growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, D; Hansen, S; Minovi, A; Laub, M; Jennissen, H P; Dazert, S; Neumann, A

    2009-09-01

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is a growth factor of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. Members of this protein family are involved in the development of various mammalian tissues, including the inner ear. As their notations indicate, they also have well-known effects on bone formation and regeneration. In this study, we examined the influence of rhBMP-2 on spiral ganglion (SG) neurite growth in vitro and showed the presence of its most preferred receptor BMPR-IB in spiral ganglion cells both in vitro and in vivo. SG explants of postnatal day 4 rats were analysed for neurite length and number after organotypical cell culture for 72 h, fixation and immunolabeling. Different concentrations of rhBMP-2 were used in a serum-free culture media. Neurite growth was compared with control groups that lacked stimulative effects; with neutrophin-3 (NT-3), which is a well-established positive stimulus on neurite length and number; and with combinations of these parameters. The results display that neurite number and total neurite length per explant in particular concentrations of rhBMP-2 increased by a maximum factor of two, while the mean neurite length was not affected. NT-3 demonstrated a much more potent effect, delivering a maximum increase of a factor of five. Furthermore, a combination of both growth factors shows a predominant effect on NT-3. Immunohistological detection of BMPR-IB was successful both in cell culture explants and in paraffin-embedded sections of animals of different ages. The results show that rhBMP-2 is, among other growth factors, a positive stimulus for SG neurite growth in vitro. Most growth factors are unstable and cannot be attached to surfaces without loss of their biological function. In contrast, rhBMP-2 can be attached to metal surfaces without loss of activity. Our findings suggest in vivo studies and a future clinical application of rhBMP-2 in cochlear implant technology to improve the tissue

  17. Inner ear development: Building a spiral ganglion and an organ of Corti out of unspecified ectoderm

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Pan, Ning; Jahan, Israt; Elliott, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear develops from a placodal thickening into a complex labyrinth of ducts with five sensory organs specialized to detect position and movement in space. In addition, the mammalian ear develops a spiraled cochlear duct containing the auditory organ, the organ of Corti (OC), specialized to translate sound into hearing. Developing the OC out of a uniform sheet of ectoderm requires an unparalleled precision in topological developmental engineering of four different general cell types, sensory neurons, hair cells, supporting cells, and general otic epithelium, into a mosaic of ten distinctly recognizable cell types in and around the OC, each with a unique distribution. In addition, the OC receives a unique innervation by ear-derived spiral ganglion afferents and brainstem-derived motor neurons as efferents, and requires neural crest-derived Schwann cells to form myelin and neural crest-derived cells to induce the stria vascularis. To achieve this transformation of a sheet of cells into a complicated interdigitating set of cells necessitates the orchestrated expression of multiple transcription factors that enable the cellular transformation from ectoderm into neurosensory cells forming the spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) while simultaneously transforming the flat epithelium into a tube, the cochlear duct housing the OC. In addition to the cellular and conformational changes to make the cochlear duct with the OC, additional changes in the surrounding periotic mesenchyme form passageways for sound to stimulate the OC. This article reviews molecular developmental data generated predominantly in mice. The available data are ordered into a plausible scenario that integrates the well described expression changes of transcription factors and their actions revealed in mouse mutants for formation of SGNs and OC in the right position and orientation with the right kind of innervation. Understanding the molecular basis of these developmental changes leading to

  18. Mechanism of blood pressure and R-R variability: insights from ganglion blockade in humans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Iwasaki, Kenichi; Zuckerman, Julie H; Behbehani, Khosrow; Crandall, Craig G; Levine, Benjamin D

    2002-01-01

    Spontaneous blood pressure (BP) and R-R variability are used frequently as ‘windows’ into cardiovascular control mechanisms. However, the origin of these rhythmic fluctuations is not completely understood. In this study, with ganglion blockade, we evaluated the role of autonomic neural activity versus other ‘non-neural’ factors in the origin of BP and R-R variability in humans. Beat-to-beat BP, R-R interval and respiratory excursions were recorded in ten healthy subjects (aged 30 ± 6 years) before and after ganglion blockade with trimethaphan. The spectral power of these variables was calculated in the very low (0.0078-0.05 Hz), low (0.05-0.15 Hz) and high (0.15-0.35 Hz) frequency ranges. The relationship between systolic BP and R-R variability was examined by cross-spectral analysis. After blockade, R-R variability was virtually abolished at all frequencies; however, respiration and high frequency BP variability remained unchanged. Very low and low frequency BP variability was reduced substantially by 84 and 69 %, respectively, but still persisted. Transfer function gain between systolic BP and R-R interval variability decreased by 92 and 88 % at low and high frequencies, respectively, while the phase changed from negative to positive values at the high frequencies. These data suggest that under supine resting conditions with spontaneous breathing: (1) R-R variability at all measured frequencies is predominantly controlled by autonomic neural activity; (2) BP variability at high frequencies (> 0.15 Hz) is mediated largely, if not exclusively, by mechanical effects of respiration on intrathoracic pressure and/or cardiac filling; (3) BP variability at very low and low frequencies (< 0.15 Hz) is probably mediated by both sympathetic nerve activity and intrinsic vasomotor rhythmicity; and (4) the dynamic relationship between BP and R-R variability as quantified by transfer function analysis is determined predominantly by autonomic neural activity rather than

  19. SPARCL1-containing neurons in the human brainstem and sensory ganglion.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoya; Sato, Tadasu; Yajima, Takehiro; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sato, Ayumi; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Shimada, Yusuke; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is a member of the osteonectin family of proteins. In this study, immunohistochemistry for SPARCL1 was performed to obtain its distribution in the human brainstem, cervical spinal cord, and sensory ganglion. SPARCL1-immunoreactivity was detected in neuronal cell bodies including perikarya and proximal dendrites, and the neuropil. The motor nuclei of the IIIrd, Vth, VIth, VIIth, IXth, Xth, XIth, and XIIth cranial nerves and spinal nerves contained many SPARCL1-immunoreactive (-IR) neurons with medium-sized to large cell bodies. Small and medium-sized SPARCL1-IR neurons were distributed in sensory nuclei of the Vth, VIIth, VIIIth, IXth, and Xth cranial nerves. In the medulla oblongata, the dorsal column nuclei also had small to medium-sized SPARCL1-IR neurons. In addition, SPARCL1-IR neurons were detected in the nucleus of the trapezoid body and pontine nucleus within the pons and the arcuate nucleus in the medulla oblongata. In the cervical spinal cord, the ventral horn contained some SPARCL1-IR neurons with large cell bodies. These findings suggest that SPARCL1-containing neurons function to relay and regulate motor and sensory signals in the human brainstem. In the dorsal root (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia (TG), primary sensory neurons contained SPARCL1-immunoreactivity. The proportion of SPARCL1-IR neurons in the TG (mean ± SD, 39.9 ± 2.4%) was higher than in the DRG (30.6 ± 2.1%). SPARCL1-IR neurons were mostly medium-sized to large (mean ± SD, 1494.5 ± 708.3 μm(2); range, 320.4-4353.4 μm(2)) in the DRG, whereas such neurons were of various cell body sizes in the TG (mean ± SD, 1291.2 ± 532.8 μm(2); range, 209.3-4326.4 μm(2)). There appears to be a SPARCL1-containing sensory pathway in the ganglion and brainstem of the spinal and trigeminal nervous systems. PMID:27357901

  20. Retinal Ganglion Cell Count Estimates Associated with Early Development of Visual Field Defects in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Felipe A.; Lisboa, Renato; Weinreb, Robert N.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Girkin, Christopher; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To estimate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) losses associated with the earliest development of visual field defects in glaucoma. Design Observational cohort study. Participants The study group included 53 eyes of 53 patients suspected of having glaucoma who were followed as part of the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma (DIGS) study. These eyes had normal standard automated perimetry (SAP) visual fields at baseline and developed repeatable (3 consecutive) abnormal tests during a median follow-up of 6.7 years. An age-matched control group of 124 eyes of 124 healthy subjects recruited from the general population was included. Methods Estimates of RGC counts were obtained using a previously published model which combines estimates of RGC numbers from SAP sensitivity thresholds and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). For eyes converting to glaucoma, estimates of RGC counts were obtained at the time (within ± 3 months) of the first abnormal visual field, representing the time of earliest detection of visual field losses. Main Outcome Measures Estimates of RGC counts in eyes converting to glaucoma versus healthy eyes. Results The average RGC count estimate in the eyes with early visual field defects was 652057 ± 115829 cells, which was significantly lower than the average of 910584 ± 142412 cells found in healthy eyes (P<0.001). Compared to the average number of RGCs in the healthy group, glaucoma eyes had an average RGC loss of 28.4%, ranging from 6% to 57%, at the time of the earliest visual field defect on SAP. RGC counts performed significantly better than the SDOCT average RNFL thickness parameter in discriminating glaucomatous from healthy eyes with ROC curve areas of 0.95 ± 0.02 versus 0.88 ±0.03, respectively (P=0.001). Conclusion Glaucomatous eyes with the earliest detectable visual field loss on automated perimetry may already show substantial loss of retinal ganglion cells

  1. Genetically Identified Suppressed-by-Contrast Retinal Ganglion Cells Reliably Signal Self-Generated Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Nai-Wen; Pearson, James T.; Heller, Charles R.; Demas, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Spike trains of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the sole source of visual information to the brain; and understanding how the ∼20 RGC types in mammalian retinae respond to diverse visual features and events is fundamental to understanding vision. Suppressed-by-contrast (SbC) RGCs stand apart from all other RGC types in that they reduce rather than increase firing rates in response to light increments (ON) and decrements (OFF). Here, we genetically identify and morphologically characterize SbC-RGCs in mice, and target them for patch-clamp recordings under two-photon guidance. We find that strong ON inhibition (glycine > GABA) outweighs weak ON excitation, and that inhibition (glycine > GABA) coincides with decreases in excitation at light OFF. These input patterns explain the suppressive spike responses of SbC-RGCs, which are observed in dim and bright light conditions. Inhibition to SbC-RGC is driven by rectified receptive field subunits, leading us to hypothesize that SbC-RGCs could signal pattern-independent changes in the retinal image. Indeed, we find that shifts of random textures matching saccade-like eye movements in mice elicit robust inhibitory inputs and suppress spiking of SbC-RGCs over a wide range of texture contrasts and spatial frequencies. Similarly, stimuli based on kinematic analyses of mouse blinking consistently suppress SbC-RGC spiking. Receiver operating characteristics show that SbC-RGCs are reliable indicators of self-generated visual stimuli that may contribute to central processing of blinks and saccades. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study genetically identifies and morphologically characterizes suppressed-by-contrast retinal ganglion cells (SbC-RGCs) in mice. Targeted patch-clamp recordings from SbC-RGCs under two-photon guidance elucidate the synaptic mechanisms mediating spike suppression to contrast steps, and reveal that SbC-RGCs respond reliably to stimuli mimicking saccade-like eye movements and blinks. The similarity of

  2. Responses of macaque ganglion cells to the relative phase of heterochromatically modulated lights.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, V C; Lee, B B; Pokorny, J; Martin, P R; Valberg, A

    1992-01-01

    1. We measured the response of macaque ganglion cells to sinusoidally modulated red and green lights as the relative phase, theta, of the lights was varied. 2. At low frequencies, red-green ganglion cells of the parvocellular (PC-) pathway with opponent inputs from middle-wavelength sensitive (M-) and long-wavelength sensitive (L-) cones were minimally sensitive to luminance modulation (theta = 0 deg) and maximally sensitive to chromatic modulation (theta = 180 deg). With increasing frequency, the phase, theta, of minimal amplitude gradually changed, in opposite directions for cells with M- and L-cone centres. 3. At high frequencies (at and above 20 Hz), phasic cells of the magnocellular (MC-) pathway were maximally responsive when theta approximately 0 deg and minimally responsive when theta approximately 180 deg, as expected from an achromatic mechanism. At lower frequencies, the phase of minimal response shifted, for both on- and off-centre cells, to values of theta intermediate between 0 and 180 deg. This phase asymmetry was absent if the centre alone was stimulated with a small field. 4. For PC-pathway cells, it was possible to provide an account of response phase as a function of theta, using a model involving three parameters; phases of the L- and M-cone mechanisms and a L/M cone weighting term. For red-green cells, the phase parameters were monotonically related to temporal frequency and revealed a centre-surround phase difference. The phase difference was linear with a slope of 1-3 deg Hz-1. If this represents a latency difference, it would be 3-8 ms. Otherwise, temporal properties of the M- and L-cones appeared similar if not identical. By addition of a scaling term, the model could be extended to give an adequate account of the amplitude of responses. 5. We were able to activate selectively the surrounds of cells with short-wavelength (S-) cone input to their centres, and so were able to assess L/M cone weighting to the surround. M- and L-cone inputs

  3. Intrinsic Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells in the Diurnal Rodent, Arvicanthis ansorgei

    PubMed Central

    Karnas, Diana; Hicks, David; Mordel, Jérôme; Pévet, Paul; Meissl, Hilmar

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) represent a new class of photoreceptors which support a variety of non-image forming physiological functions, such as circadian photoentrainment, pupillary light reflex and masking responses to light. In view of the recently proposed role of retinal inputs for the regulation of diurnal and nocturnal behavior, we performed the first deep analysis of the ipRGC system in a diurnal rodent model, Arvicanthisansorgei, and compared the anatomical and physiological properties of ipRGCs with those of nocturnal mice. Based on somata location, stratification pattern and melanopsin expression, we identified two main ipRGC types in the retina of Arvicanthis: M1, constituting 74% of all ipRGCs and non-M1 (consisting mainly of the M2 type) constituting the following 25%. The displaced ipRGCs were rarely encountered. Phenotypical staining patterns of ganglion cell markers showed a preferential expression of Brn3 and neurofilaments in non-M1 ipRGCs. In general, the anatomical properties and molecular phenotyping of ipRGCs in Arvicanthis resemble ipRGCs of the mouse retina, however the percentage of M1 cells is considerably higher in the diurnal animal. Multi-electrode array recordings (MEA) identified in newborn retinas of Arvicanthis three response types of ipRGCs (type I, II and III) which are distinguished by their light sensitivity, response strength, latency and duration. Type I ipRGCs exhibited a high sensitivity to short light flashes and showed, contrary to mouse type I ipRGCs, robust light responses to 10 ms flashes. The morphological, molecular and physiological analysis reveals very few differences between mouse and Arvicanthis ipRGCs. These data imply that the influence of retinal inputs in defining the temporal niche could be related to a stronger cone input into ipRGCs in the cone-rich Arvicanthis retina, and to the higher sensitivity of type I ipRGCs and elevated proportion of M1 cells. PMID:23951350

  4. Response profiles of murine spiral ganglion neurons on multi-electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnewald, Stefan; Tscherter, Anne; Marconi, Emanuele; Streit, Jürg; Widmer, Hans Rudolf; Garnham, Carolyn; Benav, Heval; Mueller, Marcus; Löwenheim, Hubert; Roccio, Marta; Senn, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Cochlear implants (CIs) have become the gold standard treatment for deafness. These neuroprosthetic devices feature a linear electrode array, surgically inserted into the cochlea, and function by directly stimulating the auditory neurons located within the spiral ganglion, bypassing lost or not-functioning hair cells. Despite their success, some limitations still remain, including poor frequency resolution and high-energy consumption. In both cases, the anatomical gap between the electrode array and the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) is believed to be an important limiting factor. The final goal of the study is to characterize response profiles of SGNs growing in intimate contact with an electrode array, in view of designing novel CI devices and stimulation protocols, featuring a gapless interface with auditory neurons. Approach. We have characterized SGN responses to extracellular stimulation using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). This setup allows, in our view, to optimize in vitro many of the limiting interface aspects between CIs and SGNs. Main results. Early postnatal mouse SGN explants were analyzed after 6-18 days in culture. Different stimulation protocols were compared with the aim to lower the stimulation threshold and the energy needed to elicit a response. In the best case, a four-fold reduction of the energy was obtained by lengthening the biphasic stimulus from 40 μs to 160 μs. Similarly, quasi monophasic pulses were more effective than biphasic pulses and the insertion of an interphase gap moderately improved efficiency. Finally, the stimulation with an external electrode mounted on a micromanipulator showed that the energy needed to elicit a response could be reduced by a factor of five with decreasing its distance from 40 μm to 0 μm from the auditory neurons. Significance. This study is the first to show electrical activity of SGNs on MEAs. Our findings may help to improve stimulation by and to reduce energy consumption of CIs and

  5. Differential Calcium Signaling Mediated by Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Unmyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC) regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury. PMID:24416240

  6. Virtual leak channels modulate firing dynamics and synaptic integration in rat sympathetic neurons: implications for ganglionic transmission in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Mitchell G; Kullmann, Paul H M; Horn, John P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The excitability of rat sympathetic neurons and integration of nicotinic EPSPs were compared in primary cell culture and in the acutely isolated intact superior cervical ganglion using whole cell patch electrode recordings. When repetitive firing was classified by Hodgkin's criteria in cultured cells, 18% displayed tonic class 1 excitability, 36% displayed adapting class 2 excitability and 46% displayed phasic class 3 excitability. In the intact ganglion, 71% of cells were class 1 and 29% were class 2. This diverges from microelectrode reports that nearly 100% of superior cervical ganglion neurons show phasic class 3 firing. The hypothesis that the disparity between patch and microelectrode data arises from a shunt conductance was tested using the dynamic clamp in cell culture. Non-depolarizing shunts of 3–10 nS converted cells from classes 1 and 2 to class 3 dynamics with current–voltage relations that replicated microelectrode data. Primary and secondary EPSPs recorded from the intact superior cervical ganglion were modelled as virtual synapses in cell culture using the dynamic clamp. Stimulating sympathetic neurons with virtual synaptic activity, designed to replicate in vivo recordings of EPSPs in muscle vasoconstrictor neurons, produced a 2.4-fold amplification of presynaptic activity. This gain in postsynaptic output did not differ between neurons displaying the three classes of excitability. Mimicry of microelectrode damage by virtual leak channels reduced and eventually obliterated synaptic gain by inhibiting summation of subthreshold EPSPs. These results provide a framework for interpreting sympathetic activity recorded from intact animals and support the hypothesis that paravertebral ganglia function as activity-dependent amplifiers of spinal output from preganglionic circuitry. PMID:25398531

  7. Differentiation of postmitotic neuroblasts into substance P-immunoreactive sensory neurons in dissociated cultures of chick dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Barakat, I; Droz, B

    1987-07-01

    Counts performed on dissociated cell cultures of E10 chick embryo dorsal root ganglia (DRG) showed after 4-6 days of culture a pronounced decline of the neuronal population in neuron-enriched cultures and a net gain in the number of ganglion cells in mixed DRG cell cultures (containing both neurons and nonneuronal cells). In the latter case, the increase in the number of neurons was found to depend on NGF and to average 119% in defined medium or 129% in horse serum-supplemented medium after 6 days of culture. The lack of [3H]thymidine incorporation into the neuronal population indicated that the newly formed ganglion cells were not generated by proliferation. On the contrary, the differentiation of postmitotic neuroblasts present in the nonneuronal cell compartment was supported by sequential microphotographs of selected fields taken every hour for 48-55 hr after 3 days of culture. Apparently nonneuronal flat dark cells exhibited morphological changes and gradually evolved into neuronal ovoid and refringent cell bodies with expanding neurites. The ultrastructural organization of these evolving cells corresponded to that of primitive or intermediate neuroblasts. The neuronal nature of these rounding up cell bodies was indeed confirmed by the progressive expression of various neuronal cell markers (150 and 200-kDa neurofilament triplets, neuron specific enolase, and D2/N-CAM). Besides a constant lack of immunoreactivity for tyrosine hydroxylase, somatostatin, parvalbumin, and calbindin-D 28K and a lack of cytoenzymatic activity for carbonic anhydrase, all the newly produced neurons expressed three main phenotypic characteristics: a small cell body, a strong immunoreactivity to MAG, and substance P. Hence, ganglion cells newly differentiated in culture would meet characteristics ascribed to small B sensory neurons and more specifically to a subpopulation of ganglion cells containing substance P-immunoreactive material.

  8. Voltage-Sensitive K+ Channels Inhibit Parasympathetic Ganglion Transmission and Vagal Control of Heart Rate in Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Torill

    2015-01-01

    Parasympathetic withdrawal plays an important role in the autonomic dysfunctions in hypertension. Since hyperpolarizing, voltage-sensitive K+ channels (KV) hamper transmitter release, elevated KV-activity may explain the disturbed vagal control of heart rate (HR) in hypertension. Here, the KV inhibitor 3,4-diaminopyridine was used to demonstrate the impact of KV on autonomic HR control. Cardiac output and HR were recorded by a flow probe on the ascending aorta in anesthetized, normotensive (WKY), and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), and blood pressure by a femoral artery catheter. 3,4-diaminopyridine induced an initial bradycardia, which was greater in SHR than in WKY, followed by sustained tachycardia in both strains. The initial bradycardia was eliminated by acetylcholine synthesis inhibitor (hemicholinium-3) and nicotinic receptor antagonist/ganglion blocker (hexamethonium), and reversed to tachycardia by muscarinic receptor (mAchR) antagonist (atropine). The latter was abolished by sympatho-inhibition (reserpine). Reserpine also eliminated the late, 3,4-diaminopyridine-induced tachycardia in WKY, but induced a sustained atropine-sensitive bradycardia in SHR. Inhibition of the parasympathetic component with hemicholinium-3, hexamethonium, or atropine enhanced the late tachycardia in SHR, whereas hexamethonium reduced the tachycardia in WKY. In conclusion, 3,4-diaminopyridine-induced acetylcholine release, and thus enhanced parasympathetic ganglion transmission, with subsequent mAchR activation and bradycardia. 3,4-diaminopyridine also activated tachycardia, initially by enhancing sympathetic ganglion transmission, subsequently by activation of norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve terminals. The 3,4-diaminopyridine-induced parasympathetic activation was stronger and more sustained in SHR, demonstrating an enhanced inhibitory control of KV on parasympathetic ganglion transmission. This enhanced KV activity may explain the dysfunctional vagal HR

  9. Each Sensory Nerve Arising From the Geniculate Ganglion Expresses a Unique Fingerprint of Neurotrophin and Neurotrophin Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Farbman, Albert I.; Guagliardo, Nick; Sollars, Suzanne I.; Hill, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons in the geniculate ganglion, like those in other sensory ganglia, are dependent on neurotrophins for survival. Most geniculate ganglion neurons innervate taste buds in two regions of the tongue and two regions of the palate; the rest are cutaneous nerves to the skin of the ear. We investigated the expression of four neurotrophins, nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), and NT-4, and five neurotrophin receptors, trkA, trkB, trkC, p75, and truncated trkB (Trn-B) in single sensory neurons of the adult rat geniculate ganglion associated with the five innervation fields. For fungiform papillae, a glass pipette containing biotinylated dextran was placed over the target papilla and the tracer was iontophoresed into the target papilla. For the other target fields, Fluoro-Gold was microinjected. After 3 days, geniculate ganglia were harvested, sectioned, and treated histochemically (for biotinylated dextran) or immunohistochemically (for Fluoro-Gold) to reveal the neurons containing the tracer. Single labeled neurons were harvested from the slides and subjected to RNA amplification and RT-PCR to reveal the neurotrophin or neurotrophin receptor genes that were expressed. Neurons projecting from the geniculate ganglion to each of the five target fields had a unique expression profile of neurotrophin and neurotrophic receptor genes. Several individual neurons expressed more than one neurotrophin receptor or more than one neurotrophin gene. Although BDNF is significantly expressed in taste buds, its primary high affinity receptor, trkB, was not prominently expressed in the neurons. The results are consistent with the interpretation that at least some, perhaps most, of the trophic influence on the sensory neurons is derived from the neuronal somata, and the trophic effect is paracrine or autocrine, rather than target derived. The BDNF in the taste bud may also act in a paracrine or autocrine manner on the trkB expressed

  10. Intestinal Neuronal Dysplasia-Like Submucosal Ganglion Cell Hyperplasia at the Proximal Margins of Hirschsprung Disease Resections

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Maya; Oron, Assaf P.; Chatterjee, Sumantra; Piper, Hannah; Cope-Yokoyama, Sandy; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Kapur, Raj P.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal neuronal dysplasia type B (IND) denotes an increased proportion of hyperplastic submucosal ganglia, as resolved histochemically in 15 µm-thick frozen sections. IND has been reported proximal to the aganglionic segment in patients with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) and is putatively associated with a higher rate of post-surgical dysmotility. We have developed and validated histological criteria to diagnose IND-like submucosal ganglion cell hyperplasia (IND-SH) in paraffin sections, and used the approach to study the incidence and clinical/genetic associations of IND-SH at the proximal margins of HSCR pull-through resection specimens. Full-circumference paraffin sections from the proximal margins of 64 HSCR colonic pull-through specimens and 24 autopsy controls were immunostained for the neuron-specific Hu antigen and nucleated ganglion cells in each submucosal ganglion were counted. In controls, an age-related decline in the relative abundance of “giant” ganglia (≥7 nucleated Hu+ ganglion cells) was observed. A conservative diagnostic threshold for IND-SH (control mean + 3 times the standard deviation) was derived from 15 controls less than 25 weeks of age. No control exceeded this threshold, whereas in the same age range, IND-SH was observed at the proximal margins in 15% (7/46) of HSCR resections, up to 15 cm proximal to the aganglionic segment. No significant correlation was observed between IND-SH and length of or distance from the aganglionic segment, gender, trisomy 21, RET or SEMA3C/D polymorphisms, or clinical outcome, but analysis of more patients with better long-term follow-up will be required to clarify the significance of this histological phenotype. PMID:26699691

  11. Mitochondrial complex I deficiency leads to inflammation and retinal ganglion cell death in the Ndufs4 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Alfred K.; Song, Lanying; Murray, Karl D.; van der List, Deborah; Sun, Chao; Shen, Yan; Xia, Zhengui; Cortopassi, Gino A.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) is a major contributor to neuronal energetics, and mutations in complex I lead to vision loss. Functional, neuroanatomical and transcriptional consequences of complex I deficiency were investigated in retinas of the Ndufs4 knockout mouse. Whole-eye ERGs and multielectrode arrays confirmed a major retinal ganglion cell functional loss at P32, and retinal ganglion cell loss at P42. RNAseq demonstrated a mild and then sharp increase in innate immune and inflammatory retinal transcripts at P22 and P33, respectively, which were confirmed with QRT-PCR. Intraperitoneal injection of the inflammogen lipopolysaccharide further reduced retinal ganglion cell function in Ndufs4 KO, supporting the connection between inflammatory activation and functional loss. Complex I deficiency in the retina clearly caused innate immune and inflammatory markers to increase coincident with loss of vision, and RGC functional loss. How complex I incites inflammation and functional loss is not clear, but could be the result of misfolded complex I generating a ‘non-self’ response, and induction of innate immune response transcripts was observed before functional loss at P22, including β-2 microglobulin and Cx3cr1, and during vision loss at P31 (B2m, Tlr 2, 3, 4, C1qa, Cx3cr1 and Fas). These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in the retina triggers an innate immune and inflammatory response that results in loss of retinal ganglion cell function and death, as in Leber's hereditary Optic Neuropathy and suggests novel therapeutic routes to counter mitochondrial defects that contribute to vision loss. PMID:25652399

  12. The structural effect of systemic NGF treatment on permanently axotomised dorsal root ganglion cells in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    TANDRUP, T.; VESTERGAARD, S.; TOMLINSON, D. R.; DIEMEL, L. T.; JAKOBSEN, J.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of systemic NGF treatment on loss and shrinkage of dorsal root ganglion cells was studied in adult male rats after permanent axotomy. Nineteen 16 to 18-wk-old rats had their right 5th lumbar spinal nerve ligated and cut approximately 7 mm peripheral to the ganglion. Two days before the operation, treatment with subcutaneous injections of human recombinant NGF (1.0–0.5 mg/kg/day) was started in 9 test rats; 10 controls were given saline injections. After 1 mo the levels of substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) were significantly increased in intact sciatic nerve. The number and mean volume of perikarya were estimated using assumption-free stereological techniques including vertical sections, the Cavalieri principle, optical disectors, the planar rotator and systematic sampling techniques. Systemic NGF administration had no influence on survival of primary sensory neurons after axotomy. The number of perikarya was 14300 ( S.D.=1800) in axotomised ganglia in control rats versus 14700 ( S.D.=2100) in axotomised ganglia of NGF treated rats. The reduction of perikarya volume after axotomy was significantly less after NGF treatment (11600 μm3 in the control group versus 8000 μm3 in the NGF treated group). However, the apparent protection of NGF-treatment on perikaryal volume is explained by a hitherto unrecognised size effect on nonaxotomised dorsal root ganglion cells. The untreated rats had a mean volume of 24700 μm3 ( S.D.=2700 μm 3) whereas rats treated with NGF had a volume of 20400 μm3 ( S.D.=1700 μm3) on the nonaxotomised side. In conclusion, systemic NGF treatment in adult rats has no effect on dorsal root ganglion cell loss in permanent axotomy whereas perikaryal size of intact nonaxotomised cells is reduced. PMID:10386775

  13. Long-term Fluorometholone Topical Use Induces Ganglion Cell Damage in Rats Analyzed With Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Hui; Liao, Po-Lin; Hsiao, George; Li, Ching-Hao; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Tsai, Chi-Hao; Wu, Man-Ru; Lin, Fan-Li; Ho, Jau-Der; Cheng, Hui-Wen; Cheng, Yu-Wen

    2015-10-01

    To determine the toxic effects of long-term topical usage of fluorometholone (FLM) on ganglion cells using a direct in vivo retinopathological Brown Norway (BN) rat model. The BN rat retinal model was investigated with a minimum of 3 rats and a maximum of 4 rats per group. Rats received vehicle and 0.02% FLM suspension via topical administration 3 times a day for 28 days. The fundus images and retinal vessels were detected on days 1, 14, and 28 using Micron III retinal imaging microscope and fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA). For retinal structures, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images were taken after FFA on days 1, 14, and 28 using an SD-OCT Imaging System. For retinal function, electrical signal transduction of photoreceptors and bipolar cells was determined by electroretinographic (ERG) recording on days 1 and 28 and IOP detection. At the end of the experiment on day 28, immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assay were performed to investigate apoptosis in ganglion cells. Total retina and nerve fiber layer (NFL) to the inner plexiform layer (IPL) were significantly thinner following 28 days of FLM treatment. Hematoxylin and eosin stain showed that there were NFL and ganglion cell layer deformations in the FLM group. With FLM treatment, TUNEL assay showed approximately a 4.68-fold increase in apoptotic cells. Moreover, FLM decreased ERG b-wave amplitude by about 56%. Using ophthalmofundoscopy devices, after 28 days of topical administration, FLM decreased NFL-IPL and total retina thickness. This suggests that long-term FLM induces adverse effects with respect to ganglion cell apoptosis. PMID:26141393

  14. La fin du jeûne?

    PubMed Central

    Naugler, Christopher; Sidhu, Davinder

    2014-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter une mise à jour sur l’utilité clinique de ne pas être à jeun par rapport à l’être pour l’analyse des lipides dans le but d’améliorer l’observance par les patients, leur sécurité et l’évaluation clinique dans les tests du cholestérol. Qualité des données Les recommandations sont classées comme étant fondées sur des données probantes fortes, acceptables ou faibles (conflictuelles ou insuffisantes), selon les classifications adoptées par le Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs. Message principal Le dépistage de la dyslipidémie comme facteur de risque de coronaropathie et la prescription de médicaments hypolipidémiants sont des activités importantes en soins primaires. De récentes données probantes remettent en question la nécessité d’être à jeun pour la mesure des lipides. Dans des études sur la population, le cholestérol total, le cholestérol à lipoprotéines de haute densité et le cholestérol à lipoprotéines autres qu’à haute densité variaient tous d’en moyenne 2 % à jeun. Pour un dépistage de routine, la mesure du cholestérol sans être à jeun est maintenant une option de rechange raisonnable à l’analyse à jeun. Pour les patients diabétiques, l’exigence d’être à jeun peut représenter un important problème de sécurité en raison des possibilités d’hypoglycémie. Pour la surveillance des triglycérides et du cholestérol à lipoprotéines de basse densité chez les patients qui prennent des médicaments hypolipidémiants, le jeûne devient important. Conclusion Être à jeun pour la détermination routinière des niveaux lipidiques est largement inutile et il est improbable que le jeûne influence la stratification du risque clinique chez le patient, tandis que la mesure sans être à jeun pourrait améliorer l’observance par le patient et sa sécurité.

  15. Electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells with diamond and the development of an all diamond retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Hadjinicolaou, Alex E; Leung, Ronald T; Garrett, David J; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Fox, Kate; Nayagam, David A X; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Meffin, Hamish; Ibbotson, Michael R; Prawer, Steven; O'Brien, Brendan J

    2012-08-01

    Electronic retinal implants for the blind are already a market reality. A world wide effort is underway to find the technology that offers the best combination of performance and safety for potential patients. Our approach is to construct an epi-retinally targeted device entirely encapsulated in diamond to maximise longevity and biocompatibility. The stimulating array of our device comprises a monolith of electrically insulating diamond with thousands of hermetic, microscale nitrogen doped ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) feedthroughs. Here we seek to establish whether the conducting diamond feedthroughs of the array can be used as stimulating electrodes without further modification with a more traditional neural stimulation material. Efficacious stimulation of retinal ganglion cells was established using single N-UNCD microelectrodes in contact with perfused, explanted, rat retina. Evoked rat retinal ganglion cell action potentials were recorded by patch clamp recording from single ganglion cells, adjacent to the N-UNCD stimulating electrode. Separately, excellent electrochemical stability of N-UNCD was established by prolonged pulsing in phosphate buffered saline at increasing charge density up to the measured charge injection limit for the material.

  16. Melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells in primate retina signal colour and irradiance and project to the LGN.

    PubMed

    Dacey, Dennis M; Liao, Hsi-Wen; Peterson, Beth B; Robinson, Farrel R; Smith, Vivianne C; Pokorny, Joel; Yau, King-Wai; Gamlin, Paul D

    2005-02-17

    Human vision starts with the activation of rod photoreceptors in dim light and short (S)-, medium (M)-, and long (L)- wavelength-sensitive cone photoreceptors in daylight. Recently a parallel, non-rod, non-cone photoreceptive pathway, arising from a population of retinal ganglion cells, was discovered in nocturnal rodents. These ganglion cells express the putative photopigment melanopsin and by signalling gross changes in light intensity serve the subconscious, 'non-image-forming' functions of circadian photoentrainment and pupil constriction. Here we show an anatomically distinct population of 'giant', melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells in the primate retina that, in addition to being intrinsically photosensitive, are strongly activated by rods and cones, and display a rare, S-Off, (L + M)-On type of colour-opponent receptive field. The intrinsic, rod and (L + M) cone-derived light responses combine in these giant cells to signal irradiance over the full dynamic range of human vision. In accordance with cone-based colour opponency, the giant cells project to the lateral geniculate nucleus, the thalamic relay to primary visual cortex. Thus, in the diurnal trichromatic primate, 'non-image-forming' and conventional 'image-forming' retinal pathways are merged, and the melanopsin-based signal might contribute to conscious visual perception. PMID:15716953

  17. Spiral and vestibular ganglion estimates in archival temporal bones obtained by design based stereology and Abercrombie methods.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Gail; Geiger, Christopher; Lopez, Ivan A; Ishiyama, Akira

    2011-03-15

    The objective of this study was to make direct comparisons of the estimates of spiral and vestibular neuronal number in human archival temporal bone specimens using design-based stereology with those using the assumption-based Abercrombie method. Archival human temporal bone specimens from subjects ranging in age from 16 to 80 years old were used. The number of spiral and vestibular ganglia neurons within the counting areas was estimated using the stereology-optical disector technique and compared with estimates obtained using the assumption-based Abercrombie method on the same specimens. Using the optical disector method, there was an average of 41,480 (coefficient of variation=0.12) spiral ganglia neurons and 28,930 (coefficient of variation=0.15) vestibular ganglia neurons. The mean coefficient of error was 0.076 for the spiral ganglion estimates, and 0.091 for the vestibular ganglion estimates. Using the Abercrombie correction method of two-dimensional analysis, an average of 23,110 (coefficient of variation of 0.08) spiral ganglia neurons, and 16,225 vestibular ganglia neurons (coefficient of variation of 0.15) was obtained. We found that there was a large disparity between the estimates with a significant 44% underestimation of the spiral and vestibular ganglion counts obtained using the Abercrombie method when compared with estimates using the optical disector method.

  18. Biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses of GnRH-like peptides in the nerve ganglion of the chiton, Acanthopleura japonica.

    PubMed

    Amano, Masafumi; Yokoyama, Takehiko; Amiya, Noriko; Hotta, Mineka; Takakusaki, Yoko; Kado, Ryusuke; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2010-12-01

    We examined whether a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like peptide is present in the nerve ganglion of the chiton Acanthopleura japonica (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (rpHPLC) combined with time-resolved fluoroimmunoas-say (TR-FIA) analysis, and immunohistochemistry. An extract of the chiton head region showed a similar retention time to that of synthetic lamprey GnRH-II on rpHPLC combined with TR-FIA analysis using a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against chicken GnRH-II (aCII6). Cell bodies immunostained with LRH13 (a mouse monoclonal antibody raised against the common amino acid sequence of vertebrate GnRH) were detected in the cerebrobuccal ring (CBR). Cell bodies immunostained with aCII6 were not only observed in the CBR but also in the lateral nerve cord (LCo). Fibers immunostained with LRH13 and aCII6 were widely distributed throughout the central nervous system in the CBR, subradular ganglion (SubRG), pedal nerve cord (PCo), pedal commissure (P/PCom), lateropedal commissure (L/PCom), and from the LCo to the suprarectal commissure (SupRecCom). The cell bodies and fibers immunostained with these two antisera were distinguishable by dual-label immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that multiple GnRH-like peptides are present in the nerve ganglion of the chiton Acanthopleura japonica.

  19. Biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses of GnRH-like peptides in the nerve ganglion of the chiton, Acanthopleura japonica.

    PubMed

    Amano, Masafumi; Yokoyama, Takehiko; Amiya, Noriko; Hotta, Mineka; Takakusaki, Yoko; Kado, Ryusuke; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2010-12-01

    We examined whether a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like peptide is present in the nerve ganglion of the chiton Acanthopleura japonica (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (rpHPLC) combined with time-resolved fluoroimmunoas-say (TR-FIA) analysis, and immunohistochemistry. An extract of the chiton head region showed a similar retention time to that of synthetic lamprey GnRH-II on rpHPLC combined with TR-FIA analysis using a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against chicken GnRH-II (aCII6). Cell bodies immunostained with LRH13 (a mouse monoclonal antibody raised against the common amino acid sequence of vertebrate GnRH) were detected in the cerebrobuccal ring (CBR). Cell bodies immunostained with aCII6 were not only observed in the CBR but also in the lateral nerve cord (LCo). Fibers immunostained with LRH13 and aCII6 were widely distributed throughout the central nervous system in the CBR, subradular ganglion (SubRG), pedal nerve cord (PCo), pedal commissure (P/PCom), lateropedal commissure (L/PCom), and from the LCo to the suprarectal commissure (SupRecCom). The cell bodies and fibers immunostained with these two antisera were distinguishable by dual-label immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that multiple GnRH-like peptides are present in the nerve ganglion of the chiton Acanthopleura japonica. PMID:21110718

  20. Protein Profiling of Human Nonpigmented Ciliary Epithelium Cell Secretome: The Differentiation Factors Characterization for Retinal Ganglion Cell line

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Hui; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu R.; Jong, Shiang-Bin; Chu, Pei-Yu; Yang, Yuan-Han; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Sharon Chia-Ju; Dibas, Adnan; Yorio, Thomas; Chung, Tze-Wen; Tyan, Yu-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to characterize proteins secreted from the human nonpigmented ciliary epithelial (HNPE) cells, which have differentiated a rat retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5. Undifferentiated RGC-5 cells have been shown to express several marker proteins characteristic of retinal ganglion cells. However, RGC-5 cells do not respond to N-methyl-D aspartate (NMDA), or glutamate. HNPE cells have been shown to secrete numbers of neuropeptides or neuroproteins also found in the aqueous humor, many of which have the ability to influence the activity of neuronal cells. This paper details the profile of HNPE cell-secreted proteins by proteomic approaches. The experimental results revealed the identification of 132 unique proteins from the HNPE cell-conditioned SF-medium. The biological functions of a portion of these identified proteins are involved in cell differentiation. We hypothesized that a differentiation system of HNPE cell-conditioned SF-medium with RGC-5 cells can induce a differentiated phenotype in RGC-5 cells, with functional characteristics that more closely resemble primary cultures of rat retinal ganglion cells. These proteins may replace harsh chemicals, which are currently used to induce cell differentiation. PMID:21860587

  1. Extensive myenteric ganglionitis in a case of equine chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction associated with EHV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Pavone, S; Sforna, M; Gialletti, R; Prato, S; Marenzoni, M L; Mandara, M T

    2013-05-01

    A 7-year-old male trotter horse with a history of recurrent colic displayed clinical findings consistent with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP). At laparotomy, an impaction of the descending colon associated with marked atrophy of the right dorsal colon was found. The horse was humanely destroyed and tissues collected at necropsy examination revealed diffuse enteric ganglionitis comprising an infiltrate of CD3(+) T lymphocytes and plasma cells. At all levels of the intestinal tract the number of myenteric ganglia and of normal ganglion cells was decreased significantly. There were chromatolytic or necrotic neurons and the amount of connective tissue surrounding ganglia was increased. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated slightly reduced expression of neuron-specific enolase and a moderate increase in expression of S100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein in a sample of right dorsal colon taken during the necropsy examination compared with a biopsy sample taken from the same location. Immunolabelling and semi-nested polymerase chain reaction for equine herpesvirus (EHV)-1 performed on the gut were positive, supporting an aetiological relationship between EHV-1 infection and the enteric ganglionitis.

  2. Clinical and morphofunctional features of idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis underlying severe intestinal motor dysfunction: a study of three cases.

    PubMed

    De Giorgio, Roberto; Barbara, Giovanni; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; De Ponti, Fabrizio; Salvioli, Beatrice; Tonini, Marcello; Velio, Pietro; Bassotti, Gabrio; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2002-09-01

    Ganglionitis, i.e., the inflammatory neuropathy characterized by a marked lymphoplasmacellular infiltrate in the myenteric plexus, may underlie a variety of paraneoplastic, infectious, or neurological disorders, although occasional cases are idiopathic in origin. We report clinical, manometric, morphofunctional, and immunological features of three cases of idiopathic ganglionitis. All patients had megacolon and underwent surgery for repeated episodes of intestinal subocclusion. Esophageal, GI, and colonic manometry performed in one patient showed dysmotility of the whole gut. Histological examination of colonic and ileum specimens identified a prominent lymphoplasmacellular infiltrate within the myenteric plexus along with a marked decrease of a wide array of neuronal peptides/transmitters. In one patient, tissue analysis revealed progressive neuronal changes up to marked myenteric neuron damage. The inflammatory infiltrate in all patients comprised CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Abundance of both subclasses of lymphocytes suggests that immune-mediated mechanisms were responsible for neuronal degeneration. In one patient, systemic steroid therapy brought a significant clinical improvement. The immunosuppressive approach deserves further investigation in patients with severe gut motor abnormalities attributable to idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis.

  3. Mesure du taux de la capture radiative du muon par l'hydrogene liquide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkmans, Guy

    À basse énergie, l'interaction faible entre leptons et quarks est décrite par une interaction de la forme courant × courant de type V - A. La présence de l'interaction forte induit des couplages additionnels qui doivent être déterminés expérimentalement. De ceux-ci, le couplage pseudoscalaire induit, gp , est mesuré avec la plus grande incertitude et fait l'objet de la présente recherche. L'hypothèse du Courant Axial Partiellement Conservé (CAPC) et l'usage de la relation de Goldberger-Treiman relie gp au couplage axial ga . Cette relation a été vérifiée traditionnellement par la Capture Ordinaire du Muon (COM) à une valeur fixe du moment de transfert q. La Capture Radiative du Muon (CRM), m- p-->nnmg , est un meilleur outil pour l'étude de gp à cause de sa dépendance variable en q2 qui offre une plus grande sensibilité dans la partie à haute énergie du spectre des photons. Toutefois, le petit rapport d'embranchement (~10-8) de la CRM par rapport à la désintégration du muon a retardé cette mesure jusqu'à ce jour. La théorie et les difficultés expérimentales associées à la détection des photons de CRM sont présentées au deuxième chapitre. On décrit ensuite, au troisième chapitre, les composantes du système de détection. Ce détecteur est un spectromètre à paires de grand angle solide (~3p) et qui permet l'observation des photons par l'analyse des électrons et des positrons de photo-conversion. Ainsi, le bruit de fond important des neutrons de la COM ne constitue pas un problème pour cette mesure. Nous décrivons, au quatrième chapitre, toutes les étapes de l'analyse, nécessaires pour la réduction des multiples bruits de fond. Le cinquième chapitre présente le calcul des efficacités ainsi que l'estimation des erreurs systématiques. Le sixième chapitre démontre comment l'on extrait le rapport d'embranchement pour la CRM ainsi que la valeur ae gp . On insiste sur la dépendance de gp en fonction de la valeur de

  4. NF-Protocadherin Regulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Axon Behaviour in the Developing Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Louis C.; Harris, William A.; Holt, Christine E.; Piper, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules play a central role in mediating axonal tract development within the nascent nervous system. NF-protocadherin (NFPC), a member of the non-clustered protocadherin family, has been shown to regulate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axon and dendrite initiation, as well as influencing axonal navigation within the mid-optic tract. However, whether NFPC mediates RGC axonal behaviour at other positions within the optic pathway remains unclear. Here we report that NFPC plays an important role in RGC axonogenesis, but not in intraretinal guidance. Moreover, axons with reduced NFPC levels exhibit insensitivity to Netrin-1, an attractive guidance cue expressed at the optic nerve head. Netrin-1 induces rapid turnover of NFPC localized to RGC growth cones, suggesting that the regulation of NFPC protein levels may underlie Netrin-1-mediated entry of RGC axons into the optic nerve head. At the tectum, we further reveal a function for NFPC in controlling RGC axonal entry into the final target area. Collectively, our results expand our understanding of the role of NFPC in RGC guidance and illustrate that this adhesion molecule contributes to axon behaviour at multiple points in the optic pathway. PMID:26489017

  5. Inflammatory mediators release calcitonin gene-related peptide from dorsal root ganglion neurons of the rat.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, B; Izydorczyk, I; Kress, M

    2000-01-01

    The interactions between the inflammatory mediators bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2) and acid pH were studied in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. For this purpose, the cultures were stimulated by inflammatory mediators (bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2), 10(-5)M each) or acid solution (pH 6.1) for 5 min and the content of calcitonin gene-related peptide was determined in the supernatant before, during and after stimulation, using an enzyme immunoassay. Acid solution resulted in a threefold increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was entirely dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. The release could not be blocked by the addition of the capsaicin antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M). Bradykinin (10(-5)M) caused a 50% increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was again dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium, whereas serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) were each ineffective at 10(-5)M concentration. The combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) led to a fivefold increase of the calcitonin gene-related peptide release which could not be further enhanced by acidification. The competitive capsaicin receptor antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M) significantly reduced the release induced by the combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2). It is suggested that the inflammatory mediators co-operate and together may act as endogenous agonists at the capsaicin receptor to cause calcium influx and consecutive neuropeptide release. PMID:10858619

  6. Modeling the impact of common noise inputs on the network activity of retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadian, Yashar; Shlens, Jonathon; Pillow, Jonathan W.; Kulkarni, Jayant; Litke, Alan M.; Chichilnisky, E. J.; Simoncelli, Eero; Paninski, Liam

    2013-01-01

    Synchronized spontaneous firing among retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), on timescales faster than visual responses, has been reported in many studies. Two candidate mechanisms of synchronized firing include direct coupling and shared noisy inputs. In neighboring parasol cells of primate retina, which exhibit rapid synchronized firing that has been studied extensively, recent experimental work indicates that direct electrical or synaptic coupling is weak, but shared synaptic input in the absence of modulated stimuli is strong. However, previous modeling efforts have not accounted for this aspect of firing in the parasol cell population. Here we develop a new model that incorporates the effects of common noise, and apply it to analyze the light responses and synchronized firing of a large, densely-sampled network of over 250 simultaneously recorded parasol cells. We use a generalized linear model in which the spike rate in each cell is determined by the linear combination of the spatio-temporally filtered visual input, the temporally filtered prior spikes of that cell, and unobserved sources representing common noise. The model accurately captures the statistical structure of the spike trains and the encoding of the visual stimulus, without the direct coupling assumption present in previous modeling work. Finally, we examined the problem of decoding the visual stimulus from the spike train given the estimated parameters. The common-noise model produces Bayesian decoding performance as accurate as that of a model with direct coupling, but with significantly more robustness to spike timing perturbations. PMID:22203465

  7. Decoupling kinematics and mechanics reveals coding properties of trigeminal ganglion neurons in the rat vibrissal system

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Nicholas E; Schroeder, Christopher L; Hobbs, Jennifer A; Yang, Anne ET; Huet, Lucie A; Solla, Sara A; Hartmann, Mitra JZ

    2016-01-01

    Tactile information available to the rat vibrissal system begins as external forces that cause whisker deformations, which in turn excite mechanoreceptors in the follicle. Despite the fundamental mechanical origin of tactile information, primary sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (Vg) have often been described as encoding the kinematics (geometry) of object contact. Here we aimed to determine the extent to which Vg neurons encode the kinematics vs. mechanics of contact. We used models of whisker bending to quantify mechanical signals (forces and moments) at the whisker base while simultaneously monitoring whisker kinematics and recording single Vg units in both anesthetized rats and awake, body restrained rats. We employed a novel manual stimulation technique to deflect whiskers in a way that decouples kinematics from mechanics, and used Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) to show that Vg neurons more directly encode mechanical signals when the whisker is deflected in this decoupled stimulus space. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13969.001 PMID:27348221

  8. The rod-cone shift and its effect on ganglion cells in the cat's retina.

    PubMed

    Chan, L H; Freeman, A W; Cleland, B G

    1992-12-01

    We examined how several characteristics of cat retinal ganglion cells--receptive field size, spatial resolution, and centre-surround antagonism--change with background illumination. Spectral sensitivity was also measured to see how these changes depend on the rod-cone shift. The radius of the centre mechanism changed very little across the mesopic range. The absence of a change can be attributed to the connections rods make with cones, and to the small spatial spread of rods which connect to a cone. The highest spatial frequency to which a cell could respond dropped sharply with falling background illumination. This loss of spatial resolution is due partly to increasing receptive field size, and partly to loss of contrast gain. Centre-surround antagonism approached zero as background illumination fell. The loss of antagonism could have been due to either a change in the subtractive relationship between centre and surround, or due to a loss of surround strength relative to centre strength; the latter was shown to be the case. PMID:1287998

  9. Tissue-specific neuro-glia interactions determine neurite differentiation in ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, K; Bauch, H; Stier, H; Schlosshauer, B

    2001-03-01

    Guided formation and extension of axons versus dendrites is considered crucial for structuring the nervous system. In the chick visual system, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) extend their axons into the tectum opticum, but not into glial somata containing retina layers. We addressed the question whether the different glia of retina and tectum opticum differentially affect axon growth. Glial cells were purified from retina and tectum opticum by complement-mediated cytolysis of non-glial cells. RGCs were purified by enzymatic delayering from flat mounted retina. RGCs were seeded onto retinal versus tectal glia monolayers. Subsequent neuritic differentiation was analysed by immunofluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation revealed that retinal glia somata inhibited axons. Time-lapse video recording indicated that axonal inhibition was based on the collapse of lamellipodia- and filopodia-rich growth cones of axons. In contrast to retinal glia, tectal glia supported axonal extension. Notably, retinal glia were not inhibitory for neurons in general, because in control experiments axon extension of dorsal root ganglia was not hampered. Therefore, the axon inhibition by retinal glia was neuron type-specific. In summary, the data demonstrate that homotopic (retinal) glia somata inhibit axonal outgrowth of RGCs, whereas heterotopic (tectal) glia of the synaptic target area support RGC axon extension. The data underscore the pivotal role of glia in structuring the developing nervous system. PMID:11322389

  10. Detailed Anatomy of the Cranial Cervical Ganglion in the Dromedary Camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Nourinezhad, Jamal; Mazaheri, Yazdan; Biglari, Zahra

    2015-08-01

    The detailed morphology and topography of the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG) with its surrounding structures were studied in 10 sides of five heads of adult one-humped camel to determine its general arrangement as well as its differences and similarities to other animals. The following detailed descriptions were obtained: (1) the bilateral CCG was constantly present caudal to cranial base at the rostroventral border of the occipital condyle over the caudolateral part of nasopharynx; (2) the CCG was always in close relations medially with the longus capitis muscle, rostrolaterally with the internal carotid artery, and caudally with the vagus nerve; and (3) the branches of the CCG were the internal carotid and external carotid nerves, jugular nerve, cervical interganglionic branch, laryngopharyngeal branch, carotid sinus branch and communicating branches to the vagus, and first spinal nerves. In conclusion, there was no variation regarding topography of dromedary CCG among the specimens, in spite of typical variations in number, and mainly in origin of nerve branches ramifying from the CCG. In comparative anatomy aspect, the close constant relations, and presence of major nerves (internal/external carotid and jugular nerves) of dromedary CCG exhibited a typical reported animal's pattern. However, the shape, structures lateral to the CCG, the origin and course pattern of external carotid and jugular nerves, the number of the major nerves branches, the communicating branches of the CCG to the spinal and cranial nerves, and the separation of most rostral parts of vagosympathetic trunk of dromedary were different from those of most reported animals.

  11. Electrophysiologic effects of unilateral right and left stellate ganglion block on the human heart.

    PubMed

    Cinca, J; Evangelista, A; Montoyo, J; Barutell, C; Figueras, J; Valle, V; Rius, J; Soler-Soler, J

    1985-01-01

    To determine the electrophysiologic effects of stellate ganglion (SG) block on the human heart, the two SGs were anesthetized separately, with a 24-hour interval between the two procedures, in 13 patients with episodes of supraventricular tachycardia (six had Kent bundles). Left SG block caused: (1) a lengthening of the AH interval, measured at fixed atrial rates of 10 +/- 12 msec (p less than 0.01); (2) a marked depression of the VA conduction in six of the seven patients with measurable VA interval (in two patients it produced complete VA block); (3) a slowing of 20 to 40 msec of the cycle of an electrically induced reciprocating tachycardia; and (4) failure to modify the QT interval duration. In contrast, right SG block produced asymmetric or opposite changes and prolonged the QT interval (7.6 +/- 8.8 msec, p less than 0.05). Atrial and ventricular refractoriness was not significantly altered by SG block. Retrograde effective refractory period of the Kent bundle changed 20 to 60 msec after unilateral SG blockade. Thus, this study suggests that the human conduction system and the Kent bundles receive an appreciable sympathetic influence from the SG. Like experimental studies, we also found an asymmetric response to unilateral SG block and a dominance, in most of our patients, of the left SG. The influence on myocardial refractoriness was less apparent. PMID:3966332

  12. Hearing development and spiral ganglion neurite growth in VASP deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Stefan; Schick, Bernhard; Hartensuer, Rene; Volkenstein, Stefan; Aletsee, Christoph; Hansen, Stefan; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa E; Eigenthaler, Martin; Walter, Ulrich; Ryan, Allen F; Brors, Dominik

    2007-10-31

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) has been found to be involved in intracellular signalling pathways and to play an important role in the actin associated organization and formation of the cytoskeleton. Since differential VASP expression was noted in inner ear tissues, the present study was performed to investigate the hearing development in VASP deficient mice. Hearing development in VASP-/- mice and wild type animals was investigated by auditory brain stem (ABR) measurements. In addition, inner ear tissues of wild type animals were tested for VASP expression using PCR, Western blot analysis, in situ hybridisation, and immunohistochemistry. To compare spiral ganglion (SG) neurite growth, SG explants from VASP-/- and wild type mice were analyzed under cell culture conditions. The electroacoustical results of the present study indicate that VASP deficient mice present with a later onset of hearing during postnatal development compared to wild type animals. Transient VASP expression was detected in neonatal SG of wild type mice. Tissue culture experiments with SG explants from VASP-/- animals revealed significant alterations in SG neurite extension compared to wild types. The present findings suggest a role for VASP during neonatal development of the mammalian cochlea and allow speculation on a possible delayed innervation of cochlear hair cells due to changes in SG neurite growth in VASP-deficient mice. Temporary VASP deficits in the neonatal inner ear may be compensated by related proteins like MENA leading to a delayed but complete development of hearing function in VASP-/- animals.

  13. Roles of PACAP-containing retinal ganglion cells in circadian timing.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens

    2006-01-01

    The brain's biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generates circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior. The clock-driven rhythms need daily adjustment (entrainment) to be synchronized with the astronomical day of 24 h. The most important stimulus for entrainment of the clock is the light-dark (LD) cycle. In this review functional elements of the light entrainment pathway will be considered with special focus on the neurotransmitter pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), which is found exclusively in the monosynaptic neuronal pathway mediating light information to the SCN, the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). The retinal ganglion cells of the RHT are intrinsically photosensitive due to the expression of melanopsin and seem to constitute a non-image forming photosensitive system in the mammalian eye regulating circadian timing, masking behavior, light-regulated melatonin secretion, and the pupillary light reflex. Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies and studies of mice lacking PACAP and the specific PACAP receptor (PAC1) indicate that PACAP and glutamate are neurotransmitters in the RHT which in a clock and concentration-dependent manner interact during light entrainment of the clock.

  14. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later.

  15. Growth hormone and retinal ganglion cell function: QNR/D cells as an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos; Andres, Alexis; Giterman, Daniel; Karpinski, Edward; Harvey, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) have been shown to be sites of growth hormone (GH) production and GH action in the embryonic (embryo day 7, ED7) chick neural retina. Primary RGC cell cultures were previously used to determine autocrine or paracrine actions of GH in the retina, but the antibody used in their immunopanning (anti-Thy-1) is no longer available. We have therefore characterized an immortalized neural retina (QNR/D) cell line derived from ED7 embryonic quail as a replacement experimental model. These cells express the GH gene and have GH receptor (GHR)-immunoreactivity. They are also immunoreactive for RGC markers (islet-1, calretinin, RA4) and neural fibers (neurofilament, GAP 43, vimentin) and they express the genes for Thy-1, neurotrophin 3 (NTF3), neuritin 1 (NRN1) and brn3 (POU4F). These cells are also electrically active and therefore resemble the RGCs in the neural retina. They are also similarly responsive to exogenous GH, which induces overexpression of the neurotrophin 3 and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 genes and stimulates cell survival, as in the chick embryo neural retina. QNR/D cells are therefore a useful experimental model to assess the actions of GH in retinal function. PMID:24239556

  16. Dendritic Morphology of Caudal Periaqueductal Gray Projecting Retinal Ganglion Cells in Mongolian Gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus)

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chaoran; Pu, Mingliang; Cui, Qi; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the morphological features of the caudal periaqueductal gray (cPAG)-projecting retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in Mongolian gerbils using retrograde labeling, in vitro intracellular injection, confocal microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction approaches. cPAG-projecting RGCs exhibit small somata (10–17 µm) and irregular dendritic fields (201–298 µm). Sizes of somata and dendritic fields do not show obvious variation at different distance from the optic disk (eccentricity). Dendrites are moderately branched. Morphological analysis (n = 23) reveals that cPAG-projecting RGCs ramified in sublamina a and b in the inner plexiform layer. These cells exhibit different stratification patterns based on the thickness of dendritic bands in sublaminas a and b: majority of analyzed cells (16 out of 23) have two bands of arborizations share similar thickness. The rest of analyzed cells (7 out of 23) exhibit thinner band in sublamina a than in sublamina b. Together, the present study suggests that cPAG of Mongolian gerbil could receive direct retinal inputs from two types of bistratified RGCs. Furthermore, a small subset of melanopsin-expressing RGCs (total 41 in 6 animals) is shown to innervate the rostral PAG (rPAG). Functional characteristics of these non-visual center projecting RGCs remain to be determined. PMID:25054882

  17. Mouse Grueneberg ganglion neurons share molecular and functional features with C. elegans amphid neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brechbühl, Julien; Moine, Fabian; Broillet, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    The mouse Grueneberg ganglion (GG) is an olfactory subsystem located at the tip of the nose close to the entry of the naris. It comprises neurons that are both sensitive to cold temperature and play an important role in the detection of alarm pheromones (APs). This chemical modality may be essential for species survival. Interestingly, GG neurons display an atypical mammalian olfactory morphology with neurons bearing deeply invaginated cilia mostly covered by ensheathing glial cells. We had previously noticed their morphological resemblance with the chemosensory amphid neurons found in the anterior region of the head of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). We demonstrate here further molecular and functional similarities. Thus, we found an orthologous expression of molecular signaling elements that was furthermore restricted to similar specific subcellular localizations. Calcium imaging also revealed a ligand selectivity for the methylated thiazole odorants that amphid neurons are known to detect. Cellular responses from GG neurons evoked by chemical or temperature stimuli were also partially cGMP-dependent. In addition, we found that, although behaviors depending on temperature sensing in the mouse, such as huddling and thermotaxis did not implicate the GG, the thermosensitivity modulated the chemosensitivity at the level of single GG neurons. Thus, the striking similarities with the chemosensory amphid neurons of C. elegans conferred to the mouse GG neurons unique multimodal sensory properties. PMID:24367309

  18. The organization of the cardiac ganglion of the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Melinek, R; Mirolli, M

    1988-09-01

    The heart of the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum was studied with histochemical methods to determine the distribution of neurons containing acetylcholine esterase, catecholamines and 5-hydroxytryptamine. The cardiac ganglion is made up of cholinergic nerve fibers and somata, and of catecholaminergic fibers. Small intensely fluorescent cells were found along blood vessels in the pericardial wall at the base of the heart, but not in the heart itself, except, in a few instances, in the region bordering the pericardial wall. Both the cholinergic and the catecholaminergic innervation of the heart were poorly developed at hatching and reached their mature state after a few months. Cholinesterase staining fibers appeared several weeks before catecholaminergic fibers. The number of postganglionic cholinergic neurons in the heart increased several-fold during the first month after hatching. Histofluorescence studies of organ cultures suggested that all the catecholamine present in the heart are of extrinsic origin. Liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection demonstrated that the dominant catecholamine in the heart is norepinephrine. No neurons containing 5-hydroxytryptamine were found.

  19. Dendritic projections of different types of octopaminergic unpaired median neurons in the locust metathoracic ganglion.

    PubMed

    Kononenko, Natalia L; Pflüger, Hans-Joachim

    2007-10-01

    Octopaminergic dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons of locust thoracic ganglia are important components of motor networks and are divided into various sub-populations. We have examined individually stained metathoracic DUM neurons, their dendritic projection patterns, and their relationship to specific architectural features of the metathoracic ganglion, such as longitudinal tracts, transverse commissures, and well-defined sensory neuropils. The detailed branching patterns of individually characterized DUM neurons of various types were analyzed in vibratome sections in which architectural features were revealed by using antibodies against tubulin and synapsin. Whereas DUM3,4,5 and DUM5 neurons (the group innervating leg and "non-wing-power" muscles) had many ventral and dorsal branches, DUM1 and DUM3,4 neurons (innervating "wing-power" muscles) branched extensively only in dorsal areas. The structure of DUM3 neurons differed markedly from that of the other DUM neurons examined in that they sent branches into dorsal areas and had differently structured side branches that mostly extended laterally. The differences between the branching patterns of these neurons were quantified by using currently available new reconstruction algorithms. These structural differences between the various classes of DUM neurons corresponded to differences in their function and biophysical properties. PMID:17505844

  20. Aquaporin-1 water permeability as a novel determinant of axonal regeneration in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Verkman, A S

    2015-03-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons transduce peripheral pain signals through small-diameter, non-myelinated C-fibers, which, when injured, can regenerate to restore pain sensation. Water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed at the plasma membrane of cell bodies and axons of DRG neurons, where it modulates the sensing of certain types of pain. Here, we found that AQP1 is also involved in DRG axonal growth and regeneration by a mechanism that may involve water transport-facilitated extension of axonal outgrowths. Spontaneous and nerve growth factor-stimulated axonal extension was reduced in cultures of AQP1-deficient DRG neurons and DRG explants compared to the wildtype. Axonal growth in AQP1-deficient DRG cultures was rescued by transfection with AQP1 or a different water-transporting AQP (AQP4), but not by a non-water-transporting AQP1 mutant. Following sciatic nerve compression injury AQP1 expression was increased in DRG neurons in wildtype mice, and DRG axonal growth was impaired in AQP1-deficient mice. Our results indicate AQP1 as a novel determinant of DRG axonal regeneration and hence a potential therapeutic target to accelerate neuronal regeneration.

  1. Modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in rat retinal ganglion cells by gabapentin.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Spring R; Sargoy, Allison; Brecha, Nicholas C; Barnes, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The α2δ auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are important modulators of VGCC function. Gabapentin interacts with α2δ1 and α2δ2 subunits and is reported to reduce Ca2+ channel current amplitude (ICa). This study aimed to determine the effects of gabapentin on VGCCs in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Whole cell patch clamp was used to record ICa in isolated RGCs, and calcium imaging was used to measure Ca2+ transients from RGCs in situ. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the presence of α2δ1-containing VGCCs in isolated RGCs in the absence and presence of gabapentin pretreatment. Acute administration of gabapentin reduced ICa and Ca2+ transients compared to control conditions. In isolated RGCs, pretreatment with gabapentin (4-18 h) reduced ICa, and cell surface α2δ1 staining was reduced compared to nonpretreated cells. Acute administration of gabapentin to isolated RGCs that had been pretreated further reduced ICa. These results show that gabapentin has both short-term and long-term mechanisms to reduce ICa in isolated RGCs. Some Ca2+ channel blockers have been shown to protect RGCs in retinal trauma suggesting that modulation of VGCCs by gabapentin may prevent the deleterious effects of elevated Ca2+ levels in RGCs in trauma and disease.

  2. Temporal response of ganglion cells of the macaque retina to cone-specific modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, T.; Lee, B. B.; Kremers, J.

    1995-03-01

    The temporal response of cone inputs to macaque retinal ganglion cells were compared with cone-specific sinusoidal modulation used to isolate each cone type. For all cell types of the parvocellular (PC) pathway, temporal responsivity was similar for short (S)-, middle (M)-, and long (L)-wavelength-sensitive cone inputs, apart from small latency differences between inputs to center and surround. The temporal response resembled that expected from receptor physiology. Responses of cells of the magnocellular pathway to M- or L-cone modulation showed more complex properties indicative of postreceptoral processing. Human psychophysical temporal-sensitivity functions were acquired with S-cone modulation under conditions similar to those for the physiological measurements. Ratios of psychophysical to physiological data from S-cone cells (the only cells that respond to this stimulus) yielded an estimate of the central filter acting upon PC-pathway signals. The filter characteristic could be described by a four-stage low-pass filter with corner frequency 3-5 Hz.

  3. Neuregulin 1 as an endogenous regulator of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adult major pelvic ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Gyu; Cho, Sung-Min; Lee, Choong-Ku; Jeong, Seong-Woo

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether endogenous neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is released in a soluble form (called sNRG1) and upregulates expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in autonomic major pelvic ganglion (MPG) neurons of adult rats. To elicit the release of sNRG1, either the hypogastric nerve or the pelvic nerve was electrically stimulated. Then, the MPG-conditioned medium (CM) was subjected to western blotting using an antibody directed against the N-terminal ectodomain of NRG1. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activation elicited the release of sNRG1 from MPG neurons in a frequency-dependent manner. The sNRG1 release was also induced by treatment of MPG neurons with either high KCl or neurotrophic factors. The biological activity of the released sNRG1 was detected by tyrosine phosphorylation (p185) of the ErbB2 receptors in MPG neurons. When MPG neurons were incubated for 6 h in the CM, the protein level of the nAChR α3 subunit and ACh-induced current (IACh) density were significantly increased. The CM-induced changes in IACh was abolished by a selective ErbB2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Taken together, these data suggest that NRG1 functions as an endogenous regulator of nAChR expression in adult MPG neurons.

  4. Changes in potassium channel activity following axotomy of B-cells in bullfrog sympathetic ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Jassar, B S; Pennefather, P S; Smith, P A

    1994-01-01

    1. Whole-cell and microelectrode voltage-clamp techniques were used to investigate the changes in ionic currents and action potential shape that follow axotomy of bullfrog paravertebral sympathetic ganglion B-cells. 2. Axotomy increased M-conductance (gM; muscarine-sensitive, voltage- and time-dependent K+ conductance) by 35% at -30 mV and slowed its deactivation kinetics. 3. The delayed rectifier K+ current (IK; at +50 mV) was reduced in axotomized neurones to 61% of control without any change in activation or deactivation kinetics. Steady-state intracellular Ca2+ levels and leak conductance were unchanged. 4. The fast, voltage-sensitive, Ca(2+)-activated K+ current (IC), evoked from -40 mV, was decreased to about 71% of control (at +30 mV) in axotomized neurones, whereas that evoked from -80 mV was largely unaffected. IC kinetics were also similar in control and axotomized neurones. This suggests that IC channels are not changed after axotomy. 5. In axotomized neurones, commands to +10 from -40 mV had to be extended by 16 ms to evoke voltage-insensitive Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (IAHP) responses that were similar in magnitude to those observed in control cells. 6. The previously documented, axotomy-induced decrease in Ca2+ current (ICa) due to increased resting inactivation can account for the reduction in IC and IAHP and for the change in the shape of the action potential. PMID:7837094

  5. Spontaneous Oscillatory Rhythms in the Degenerating Mouse Retina Modulate Retinal Ganglion Cell Responses to Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Yong Sook; Park, Dae Jin; Ahn, Jung Ryul; Senok, Solomon S.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice), where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs). Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties. PMID:26793063

  6. Spontaneous Oscillatory Rhythms in the Degenerating Mouse Retina Modulate Retinal Ganglion Cell Responses to Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Goo, Yong Sook; Park, Dae Jin; Ahn, Jung Ryul; Senok, Solomon S

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice), where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs). Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties.

  7. Electrophysiologic effects of unilateral right and left stellate ganglion block on the human heart.

    PubMed

    Cinca, J; Evangelista, A; Montoyo, J; Barutell, C; Figueras, J; Valle, V; Rius, J; Soler-Soler, J

    1985-01-01

    To determine the electrophysiologic effects of stellate ganglion (SG) block on the human heart, the two SGs were anesthetized separately, with a 24-hour interval between the two procedures, in 13 patients with episodes of supraventricular tachycardia (six had Kent bundles). Left SG block caused: (1) a lengthening of the AH interval, measured at fixed atrial rates of 10 +/- 12 msec (p less than 0.01); (2) a marked depression of the VA conduction in six of the seven patients with measurable VA interval (in two patients it produced complete VA block); (3) a slowing of 20 to 40 msec of the cycle of an electrically induced reciprocating tachycardia; and (4) failure to modify the QT interval duration. In contrast, right SG block produced asymmetric or opposite changes and prolonged the QT interval (7.6 +/- 8.8 msec, p less than 0.05). Atrial and ventricular refractoriness was not significantly altered by SG block. Retrograde effective refractory period of the Kent bundle changed 20 to 60 msec after unilateral SG blockade. Thus, this study suggests that the human conduction system and the Kent bundles receive an appreciable sympathetic influence from the SG. Like experimental studies, we also found an asymmetric response to unilateral SG block and a dominance, in most of our patients, of the left SG. The influence on myocardial refractoriness was less apparent.

  8. LPS-induced dental pulp inflammation increases expression of ionotropic purinergic receptors in rat trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangxi; Zhang, Li; Yang, Jingwen; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Zhi

    2014-09-10

    Severe toothache can be caused by dental pulp inflammation. The ionotropic purinergic receptor family (P2X) is reported to mediate nociception in primary afferent neurons. This study aims to investigate the involvement of P2X receptors in the sensitization of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) caused by dental pulp inflammation. Lipopolysaccharides were unilaterally applied to the pulp of the upper molar of the rat to induce dental pulp inflammation. Increased expression of c-fos, a marker of neuronal activity, was induced in V1-V2 division, indicating the activation of TG neurons. The expressions of P2X2, P2X3, and P2X5 were also increased in the V1-V2 division of TG, primarily in small-sized and medium-sized neurons. Markers of glutamatergic afferents, VGluT1, and GABAergic afferents, GAD67, were induced by lipopolysaccharides and coexpressed with P2X in small-sized TG neurons. The present findings suggest that the P2X2, P2X3, and P2X5 receptors are upregulated as part of the sensitization produced by dental pulp inflammation. PMID:25055139

  9. Effects of 4-aminopyridine on organelle movement in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurites.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Hiromi; Kawakami, Tadashi

    2010-03-01

    Aminopyridines, widely used as a K(+) channel blocker, are membrane-permeable weak bases and have the ability to form vacuoles in the cytoplasm. The vacuoles originate from acidic organelles such as lysosomes. Here, we investigated the effects of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) on organelle movement in neurites of cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by using video-enhanced microscopy. Some experiments were carried out using fluorescent dyes for lysosomes and mitochondria and confocal microscopy. Treatment of DRG neurons with 4 mM 4-AP caused Brownian movement of some lysosomes within 5 min. The Brownian movement gradually became rapid and vacuoles were formed around individual lysosomes 10-20 min after the start of treatment. Axonal transport of organelles was inhibited by 4-AP. Lysosomes showing Brownian movement were not transported in longitudinal direction of the neurite and the transport of mitochondria was interrupted by vacuoles. The 4-AP-induced Brownian movement of lysosomes with vacuole formation and inhibition of axonal transport were prevented by the simultaneous treatment with vacuolar H(+) ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or in Cl(-)-free SO(4)(2-) medium. These results indicate that changes in organelle movement by 4-AP are related to vacuole formation and the vacuolar H(+) ATPase and Cl(-) are required for the effects of 4-AP.

  10. Cold shock induces apoptosis of dorsal root ganglion neurons plated on infrared windows.

    PubMed

    Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim; Mattson, Eric C; O'Hara, Crystal L; Smith, Amanda K; Stucky, Cheryl L; Hirschmugl, Carol J

    2015-06-21

    The chemical status of live sensory neurons is accessible with infrared microspectroscopy of appropriately prepared cells. In this paper, individual dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have been prepared with two different protocols, and plated on glass cover slips, BaF2 and CaF2 substrates. The first protocol exposes the intact DRGs to 4 °C for between 20-30 minutes before dissociating individual neurons and plating 2 hours later. The second protocol maintains the neurons at 23 °C for the entire duration of the sample preparation. The visual appearance of the neurons is similar. The viability was assessed by means of trypan blue exclusion method to determine the viability of the neurons. The neurons prepared under the first protocol (cold exposure) and plated on BaF2 reveal a distinct chemical signature and chemical distribution that is different from the other sample preparations described in the paper. Importantly, results for other sample preparation methods, using various substrates and temperature protocols, when compared across the overlapping spectral bandwidth, present normal chemical distribution within the neurons. The unusual chemically specific spatial variation is dominated by a lack of protein and carbohydrates in the center of the neurons and signatures of unraveling DNA are detected. We suggest that cold shock leads to apoptosis of DRGs, followed by osmotic stress originating from ion gradients across the cell membrane leading to cell lysis. PMID:26000346

  11. Ganglion cysts in the lateral portal region of the knee after arthroscopy: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Sever, Cem; Malkoc, Melih; Acar, Turker; Turkmen, Faik; Oto, Onur

    2015-01-01

    A ganglion cyst (GC) is a mucinous or gelatinous-filled benign tumor overlying a joint or tendon sheath, which commonly arises in the dorsal and volar wrist side but may occur anywhere in the body. Although cystic lesions around the knee are common, the occurrence of GCs are rare. Ganglia may arise from intra or extra-articular, soft tissue, intraosseous, or periosteal location. Symptoms may vary according to the size and location. After the more frequent performance of magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of a knee joint, the number of incidental, asymptomatic lesions have been increasingly diagnosed. The etiology of GC remains unclear; however, trauma and a flaw in the joint tissues may explain its appearance. The authors report two cases of women aged 47 years and 37 years who presented pain and swelling in their left knees following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy. The former was surgically treated and had a favorable outcome, while the latter had conservative treatment and a gloomy outcome. PMID:26894048

  12. A general principle governs vision-dependent dendritic patterning of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Ping; Sun, Jin Hao; Tian, Ning

    2014-10-15

    Dendritic arbors of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) collect information over a certain area of the visual scene. The coverage territory and the arbor density of dendrites determine what fraction of the visual field is sampled by a single cell and at what resolution. However, it is not clear whether visual stimulation is required for the establishment of branching patterns of RGCs, and whether a general principle directs the dendritic patterning of diverse RGCs. By analyzing the geometric structures of RGC dendrites, we found that dendritic arbors of RGCs underwent a substantial spatial rearrangement after eye-opening. Light deprivation blocked both the dendritic growth and the branch patterning, suggesting that visual stimulation is required for the acquisition of specific branching patterns of RGCs. We further showed that vision-dependent dendritic growth and arbor refinement occurred mainly in the middle portion of the dendritic tree. This nonproportional growth and selective refinement suggest that the late-stage dendritic development of RGCs is not a passive stretching with the growth of eyes, but rather an active process of selective growth/elimination of dendritic arbors of RGCs driven by visual activity. Finally, our data showed that there was a power law relationship between the coverage territory and dendritic arbor density of RGCs on a cell-by-cell basis. RGCs were systematically less dense when they cover larger territories regardless of their cell type, retinal location, or developmental stage. These results suggest that a general structural design principle directs the vision-dependent patterning of RGC dendrites.

  13. Degeneration of spiral ganglion cells in the chinchilla after inner hair cell loss induced by carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Takeno, S; Wake, M; Mount, R J; Harrison, R V

    1998-01-01

    The anticancer drug carboplatin has been used to generate inner hair cell (IHC) lesions in the cochlea of chinchillas. This has provided a valuable model for the study of the relative roles of IHCs and outer hair cells (OHCs). In the present study, we examined the pathological and temporal relationships between the degeneration of the cochlear IHCs and type I spiral ganglion cells (SGCs). A single intravenous dose of 200 mg/m2 carboplatin produced extensive IHC loss with no apparent effect on the OHCs. The auditory brainstem response threshold was significantly elevated by 2 weeks following treatment and remained stable through 12 weeks. Elevated thresholds were well correlated with morphological lesions. On the other hand, the SGC population progressively decreased from 2 to 12 weeks after treatment, to about half of the control density values. A positive correlation existed between the density of SGC and the number of surviving IHCs. These results indicate that selective damage to IHCs causes a distinct loss of SGCs. PMID:9705525

  14. BDNF and NT-3 Modulate Neurotransmitter Receptor Expressions on Developing Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Salvi, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) provide the only pathway for transmitting sound evoked activity from the hair cells to the central auditory system. Neurotrophic factor-3 (NT-3) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) released from hair cells and supporting cells exert a profound effect on SGN survival and neural firing patterns; however, it is unclear what the effects NT-3 and BDNF have on the type of neurotransmitter receptors expressed on SGN. To address this question, the whole-cell patch clamp recording technique was used to determine what effect NT-3 and BDNF had on the function and expression of glutamate, GABA and glycine receptors on postnatal SGN. Receptor currents induced by the agonist of each receptor were recorded from SGN cultured with or without BDNF or NT-3. NT-3 and BDNF exerted different effects. NT-3, and to a lesser extent BDNF, enhanced the expression of GABA receptors and had comparatively little effect on glutamate receptors. Absence of BDNF and NT-3 resulted in the emergence of glycine-induced currents; however, glycine receptor currents were absent from the short term cultured SGN. In contrast, NT-3 and BDNF suppressed glycine receptor expression on SGN. These results indicate that NT-3 and BDNF exert a profound effect on the types of neurotransmitter receptors expressed on postnatal SGN, results that may have important implications for neural development and plasticity. PMID:19778585

  15. Sustained Effect of Hyaluronic Acid in Subcutaneous Administration to the Cochlear Spiral Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Yozo; Fujioka, Masato; Kanzaki, Sho; Watanabe, Kotaro; Oishi, Naoki; Itakura, Go; Yasuda, Akimasa; Shibata, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hirotaka James; Okano, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal distribution of drugs in the inner ear cannot be precisely evaluated because of its small area and complex structure. In the present study, we used hyaluronic acid (HA)-dispersed luciferin to image transgenic mice and to determine the effect of HA on controlled drug delivery to the cochlea. GFAP-luc mice, which express luciferase in cochlear spiral ganglion cells, were subcutaneously administered HA-luciferin (HA-sc) or luciferin dissolved in saline (NS-sc) or intraperitoneally administered luciferin dissolved in saline (NS-ip). The bioluminescence of luciferin was monitored in vivo in real time. The peak time and half-life of fluorescence emission were significantly increased in HA-sc-treated mice compared with those in NS-sc- and NS-ip-treated mice; however, significant differences were not observed in peak photon counts. We detected differences in the pharmacokinetics of luciferin in the inner ear, including its sustained release, in the presence of HA. The results indicate the clinical potential of using HA for controlled drug delivery to the cochlea. PMID:27099926

  16. Comprehensive Method for Culturing Embryonic Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons for Seahorse Extracellular Flux XF24 Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Miranda; Zeng, Yan; Knight, Andrew; Windebank, Anthony; Trushina, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Changes in mitochondrial dynamics and function contribute to progression of multiple neurodegenerative diseases including peripheral neuropathies. The Seahorse Extracellular Flux XF24 analyzer provides a comprehensive assessment of the relative state of glycolytic and aerobic metabolism in live cells making this method instrumental in assessing mitochondrial function. One of the most important steps in the analysis of mitochondrial respiration using the Seahorse XF24 analyzer is plating a uniform monolayer of firmly attached cells. However, culturing of primary dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons is associated with multiple challenges, including their propensity to form clumps and detach from the culture plate. This could significantly interfere with proper analysis and interpretation of data. We have tested multiple cell culture parameters including coating substrates, culture medium, XF24 microplate plastics, and plating techniques in order to optimize plating conditions. Here we describe a highly reproducible method to obtain neuron-enriched monolayers of securely attached dissociated primary embryonic (E15) rat DRG neurons suitable for analysis with the Seahorse XF24 platform.

  17. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later. PMID:6481819

  18. Projection of the retinal ganglion cells to the tectum differentiated from the prosencephalon.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Matsui, K A; Takagi, S; Fujisawa, H

    1991-08-01

    The alar plate of the prosencephalon differentiates into a tectum-like structure when transplanted into the mesencephalon around the 10-somite stage. Here, we report on the projection pattern of the retinal ganglion cells to the transplants. Optic nerve fibers were labeled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and 3H-proline, and the innervation of the optic nerve fibers to the chimeric tectum was analyzed by HRP histochemistry on whole-mounted specimens, by autoradiography and by electron microscopy on embryonic day 16. In the chimeric tectum, the transplant was distinguished from the host by difference in nuclear structure between the quail and the chick cells. It was shown that the transplant had the laminar pattern of the optic tectum when the transplant was integrated into the host mesencephalon. The whole-mount HRP histochemistry showed that the optic nerve fibers extend to the transplants. Autoradiography showed that the distribution pattern of silver grains was similar in both the host and the transplant. These results may indicate that the optic nerve fibers turn to the transplant and terminate on the transplant. Electron microscopy further confirmed that optic nerve fibers ended by making synaptic contacts with the dendrites in the transplant region of the tectum. These results indicate that the transplant with the laminar pattern of the optic tectum is a true tectum receiving input from the eye. PMID:1661870

  19. Differentiation of human ESCs to retinal ganglion cells using a CRISPR engineered reporter cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sluch, Valentin M.; Davis, Chung-ha O.; Ranganathan, Vinod; Kerr, Justin M.; Krick, Kellin; Martin, Russ; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Diamond, Jeffrey S.; Mao, Hai-Quan; Zack, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) injury and cell death from glaucoma and other forms of optic nerve disease is a major cause of irreversible vision loss and blindness. Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived RGCs could provide a source of cells for the development of novel therapeutic molecules as well as for potential cell-based therapies. In addition, such cells could provide insights into human RGC development, gene regulation, and neuronal biology. Here, we report a simple, adherent cell culture protocol for differentiation of hPSCs to RGCs using a CRISPR-engineered RGC fluorescent reporter stem cell line. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of the differentiated cultures yields a highly purified population of cells that express a range of RGC-enriched markers and exhibit morphological and physiological properties typical of RGCs. Additionally, we demonstrate that aligned nanofiber matrices can be used to guide the axonal outgrowth of hPSC-derived RGCs for in vitro optic nerve-like modeling. Lastly, using this protocol we identified forskolin as a potent promoter of RGC differentiation. PMID:26563826

  20. Differentiation of human ESCs to retinal ganglion cells using a CRISPR engineered reporter cell line.

    PubMed

    Sluch, Valentin M; Davis, Chung-ha O; Ranganathan, Vinod; Kerr, Justin M; Krick, Kellin; Martin, Russ; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Diamond, Jeffrey S; Mao, Hai-Quan; Zack, Donald J

    2015-11-13

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) injury and cell death from glaucoma and other forms of optic nerve disease is a major cause of irreversible vision loss and blindness. Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived RGCs could provide a source of cells for the development of novel therapeutic molecules as well as for potential cell-based therapies. In addition, such cells could provide insights into human RGC development, gene regulation, and neuronal biology. Here, we report a simple, adherent cell culture protocol for differentiation of hPSCs to RGCs using a CRISPR-engineered RGC fluorescent reporter stem cell line. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of the differentiated cultures yields a highly purified population of cells that express a range of RGC-enriched markers and exhibit morphological and physiological properties typical of RGCs. Additionally, we demonstrate that aligned nanofiber matrices can be used to guide the axonal outgrowth of hPSC-derived RGCs for in vitro optic nerve-like modeling. Lastly, using this protocol we identified forskolin as a potent promoter of RGC differentiation.

  1. Disease Gene Candidates Revealed by Expression Profiling of Retinal Ganglion Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jack T.; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J.; Dugas, Jason C.; Cameron, Meghan; Barres, Ben A.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    To what extent do postmitotic neurons regulate gene expression during development or after injury? We took advantage of our ability to highly purify retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to profile their pattern of gene expression at 13 ages from embryonic day 17 through postnatal day 21. We found that a large proportion of RGC genes are regulated dramatically throughout their postmitotic development, although the genes regulated through development in vivo generally are not regulated similarly by RGCs allowed to age in vitro. Interestingly, we found that genes regulated by developing RGCs are not generally correlated with genes regulated in RGCs stimulated to regenerate their axons. We unexpectedly found three genes associated with glaucoma, optineurin, cochlin, and CYP1B1 (cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily B, polypeptide 1), previously thought to be primarily expressed in the trabecular meshwork, which are highly expressed by RGCs and regulated through their development. We also identified several other RGC genes that are encoded by loci linked to glaucoma. The expression of glaucoma-linked genes by RGCs suggests that, at least in some cases, RGCs may be directly involved in glaucoma pathogenesis rather than indirectly involved in response to increased intraocular pressure. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that CYP1B1 overexpression potentiates RGC survival. PMID:17687037

  2. Inhibitory input to the direction-selective ganglion cell is saturated at low contrast.

    PubMed

    Lipin, Mikhail Y; Taylor, W Rowland; Smith, Robert G

    2015-08-01

    Direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) respond selectively to motion toward a "preferred" direction, but much less to motion toward the opposite "null" direction. Directional signals in the DSGC depend on GABAergic inhibition and are observed over a wide range of speeds, which precludes motion detection based on a fixed temporal correlation. A voltage-clamp analysis, using narrow bar stimuli similar in width to the receptive field center, demonstrated that inhibition to DSGCs saturates rapidly above a threshold contrast. However, for wide bar stimuli that activate both the center and surround, inhibition depends more linearly on contrast. Excitation for both wide and narrow bars was also more linear. We propose that positive feedback, likely within the starburst amacrine cell or its network, produces steep saturation of inhibition at relatively low contrast. This mechanism renders GABA release essentially contrast and speed invariant, which enhances directional signals for small objects and thereby increases the signal-to-noise ratio for direction-selective signals in the spike train over a wide range of stimulus conditions. The steep saturation of inhibition confers to a neuron immunity to noise in its spike train, because when inhibition is strong no spikes are initiated.

  3. Two types of ON direction-selective ganglion cells in rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Kanjhan, Refik; Sivyer, Benjamin

    2010-10-11

    Direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) respond with robust spiking to image motion in a particular direction. Previously, two main types of DSGCs have been described in rabbit retina: the ON-OFF DSGCs respond to both increases and decreases in illumination, whereas the ON DSGCs respond only to increases in illumination. In this study, we show that there are two distinct types of ON DSGCs, which can be separated by differences in their receptive-field properties, dendritic morphology and tracer-coupling pattern. While both types show robust direction-selectivity, one type responds to increases in illumination with sustained firing, whereas the other responds with relatively transient firing. The two types of ON DSGCs also have distinct dendritic morphologies: the sustained cells give rise to shorter and more numerous terminal dendrites, which are distributed throughout the dendritic field forming a space-filling lattice. In addition, the transient ON DSGCs, but not the sustained ON DSGCs, show tracer-coupling to a mosaic of amacrine cells when filled with Neurobiotin. Both types of ON DSGCs have been encountered in previous studies but were not recognized as distinct types. We propose that the two types also differ in their central projections, with only the sustained cells projecting to the medial terminal nucleus (MTN) of the accessory optic system (AOS).

  4. Neuronal Survival, Morphology and Outgrowth of Spiral Ganglion Neurons Using a Defined Growth Factor Combination

    PubMed Central

    Schwieger, Jana; Warnecke, Athanasia; Lenarz, Thomas; Esser, Karl-Heinz; Scheper, Verena

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The functionality of cochlear implants (CI) depends, among others, on the number and excitability of surviving spiral ganglion neurons (SGN). The spatial separation between the SGN, located in the bony axis of the inner ear, and the CI, which is inserted in the scala tympani, results in suboptimal performance of CI patients and may be decreased by attracting the SGN neurites towards the electrode contacts. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) can support neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth. Methods Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is well known for its neuroprotective effect and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) increases neurite outgrowth, we evaluated if the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to an enhanced neuronal survival with extended neurite outgrowth. Both NTFs were added in effective high concentrations (BDNF 50ng/ml, CNTF 100ng/ml), alone and in combination, to cultured dissociated SGN of neonatal rats for 48 hours. Results The neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth were significantly higher in SGN treated with the combination of the two NTFs compared to treatment with each factor alone. Additionally, with respect to the morphology, the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to a significantly higher number of bipolar neurons and a decreased number of neurons without neurites in culture. Conclusion The combination of BDNF and CNTF shows a great potential to increase the neuronal survival and the number of bipolar neurons in vitro and to regenerate retracted nerve fibers. PMID:26263175

  5. Electrical activity of ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianruo; Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Kameneva, Tatiana; Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) demonstrate a large range of variation in their ionic channel properties and morphologies. Cell-specific properties are responsible for the unique way RGCs process synaptic inputs, as well as artificial electrical signals such as that from a visual prosthesis. A cell-specific computational modelling approach allows us to examine the functional significance of regional membrane channel expression and cell morphology. Approach. In this study, an existing RGC ionic model was extended by including a hyperpolarization activated non-selective cationic current as well as a T-type calcium current identified in recent experimental findings. Biophysically-defined model parameters were simultaneously optimized against multiple experimental recordings from ON and OFF RGCs. Main results. With well-defined cell-specific model parameters and the incorporation of detailed cell morphologies, these models were able to closely reconstruct and predict ON and OFF RGC response properties recorded experimentally. Significance. The resulting models were used to study the contribution of different ion channel properties and spatial structure of neurons to RGC activation. The techniques of this study are generally applicable to other excitable cell models, increasing the utility of theoretical models in accurately predicting the response of real biological neurons.

  6. Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss is Delayed Following Optic Nerve Crush in NLRP3 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Puyang, Zhen; Feng, Liang; Chen, Hui; Liang, Peiji; Troy, John B.; Liu, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome, a sensor for a variety of pathogen- and host-derived threats, consists of the adaptor ASC (Apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a Caspase Activation and Recruitment Domain (CARD)), pro-caspase-1, and NLRP3 (NOD-Like Receptor family Pyrin domain containing 3). NLRP3-induced neuroinflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of eye diseases, but it remains unclear whether activation of NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. Here we examined NLRP3-induced neuroinflammation and RGC survival following partial optic nerve crush (pONC) injury. We showed that NLRP3 was up-regulated in retinal microglial cells following pONC, propagating from the injury site to the optic nerve head and finally the entire retina within one day. Activation of NLRP3-ASC inflammasome led to the up-regulation of caspase-1 and a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In NLRP3 knockout mice, up-regulation of ASC, caspase-1, and IL-1β were all reduced, and, importantly, RGC and axon loss was substantially delayed following pONC injury. The average survival time of RGCs in NLRP3 knockout mice was about one week longer than for control animals. Taken together, our study demonstrated that ablating the NLRP3 gene significantly reduced neuroinflammation and delayed RGC loss after optic nerve crush injury. PMID:26893104

  7. Electrical coupling and innexin expression in the stomatogastric ganglion of the crab Cancer borealis

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, David J.; Lett, Kawasi M.; Marder, Eve

    2014-01-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow for the movement of small molecules and ions between the cytoplasm of adjacent cells and form electrical synapses between neurons. In invertebrates, the gap junction proteins are coded for by the innexin family of genes. The stomatogastric ganglion (STG) in the crab Cancer borealis contains a small number of identified and electrically coupled neurons. We identified Innexin 1 (Inx1), Innexin 2 (Inx2), Innexin 3 (Inx3), Innexin 4 (Inx4), Innexin 5 (Inx5), and Innexin 6 (Inx6) members of the C. borealis innexin family. We also identified six members of the innexin family from the lobster Homarus americanus transcriptome. These innexins show significant sequence similarity to other arthropod innexins. Using in situ hybridization and reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we determined that all the cells in the crab STG express multiple innexin genes. Electrophysiological recordings of coupling coefficients between identified pairs of pyloric dilator (PD) cells and PD-lateral posterior gastric (LPG) neurons show that the PD-PD electrical synapse is nonrectifying while the PD-LPG synapse is apparently strongly rectifying. PMID:25210156

  8. Therapeutic effect of bone cement injection in the treatment of intraosseous ganglion of the carpal bones

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kunlun; Shao, Xinzhong; Tian, Dehu; Bai, Jiangbo; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to treat intraosseous ganglia of the carpal bones with injectable bone cement grafting. Between January 2012 and December 2013, 4 patients (3 men and 1 woman) presenting with wrist pain and activity limitation were diagnosed with intraosseous ganglion of the carpal bones by radiography. The patients were treated with minimal invasive curettage and bone cement injection surgery. All patients were followed up for a mean time of 17 months (range, 12–22 months). The wrist pain was significantly reduced in all patients following surgery. In addition, the activity range and grip strength were also improved compared with the preoperative parameters. Subsequent to treatment, the Mayo wrist score and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score presented mean values of 78.8 (range, 75–80) and 11 (range, 7.7–15.0), respectively. These results suggested that the patients showed a good recovery. All patients were satisfied with the postoperative results and returned to work within 4 weeks. In conclusion, bone cement injection is an effective and safe therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraosseous ganglia of the carpal bone. PMID:27588074

  9. Taurine-induced modulation of voltage-sensitive Na+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan-Shan; Yu, Kuai; Gu, Yan; Ruan, Di-Yun

    2005-08-15

    The physiological role of taurine, an abundant free amino acid in the neural system, is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate its effect on TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) and TTX-resistant (TTX-R) Na+ currents in enzymatically dissociated neurons from rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) with conventional whole-cell recording manner under voltage-clamp conditions. A TTX-S Na+ current was recorded preferentially from large DRG neurons and a TTX-R Na+ current preferentially from small ones. For TTX-S Na+ channel, taurine of the concentration > or = 10 mM shifted the activation curve in the depolarizing direction and the inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction. There was no change in the activation curve for TTX-R Na+ channel and the inactivation curve was shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction slightly in the presence of taurine > or = 20 mM. When the recovery kinetics was examined, the presence of taurine resulted in a slower recovery from inactivation of TTX-S currents and no change of TTX-R ones. All the effects of taurine were weakly concentration-dependent and partly recovered quite slowly after washout. Our data indicate that taurine alters the properties of Na+ currents in intact DRG neurons. These may contribute to the understanding of taurine as a natural neuroprotectant and the potential of taurine as a useful medicine for the treatment of sensory neuropathies.

  10. Substance P-mediated membrane currents in voltage-clamped guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Griffith, W H; Hills, J M; Brown, D A

    1988-01-01

    Responses to substance P (SP) and to hypogastric nerve stimulation were recorded from voltage-clamped guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglion (IMG) neurons, and compared with those to muscarine. Muscarine produced a voltage-dependent inward current accompanied by a reduced input conductance and inhibition of IM a time- and voltage-dependent K+-current (Brown and Adams: Nature 283:673-676, 1980). SP also produced an inward current, accompanied by a fall in input conductance (20 out of 31 cells) or a rise in input conductance (7 out of 31 cells). The fall in input conductance was not accompanied by an inhibition of M-current (unlike frog ganglia: Adams et al.: British Journal of Pharmacology 79:330-333, 1983) or an inhibition of the inward rectifier current (unlike globus pallidus neurons: Stanfield et al.: Nature 315:498-501, 1985). Repetitive hypogastric nerve stimulation (10-20 Hz, 2-10 s) produced a slow inward postsynaptic current lasting 1-3 min, with decreases or increases of input conductance matching those produced by SP. The postsynaptic current did not show a consistent or reproducible change in amplitude on varying the holding potential between -90 and -25 mV. It is concluded that SP and hypogastric stimulation produce complex and variable changes in ionic conductance in IMG neurons.

  11. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  12. Endocannabinoid signaling enhances visual responses through modulation of intracellular chloride levels in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Miraucourt, Loïs S; Tsui, Jennifer; Gobert, Delphine; Desjardins, Jean-François; Schohl, Anne; Sild, Mari; Spratt, Perry; Castonguay, Annie; De Koninck, Yves; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Wiseman, Paul W; Ruthazer, Edward S

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) are widely expressed in the vertebrate retina, but the role of endocannabinoids in vision is not fully understood. Here, we identified a novel mechanism underlying a CB1R-mediated increase in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) intrinsic excitability acting through AMPK-dependent inhibition of NKCC1 activity. Clomeleon imaging and patch clamp recordings revealed that inhibition of NKCC1 downstream of CB1R activation reduces intracellular Cl− levels in RGCs, hyperpolarizing the resting membrane potential. We confirmed that such hyperpolarization enhances RGC action potential firing in response to subsequent depolarization, consistent with the increased intrinsic excitability of RGCs observed with CB1R activation. Using a dot avoidance assay in freely swimming Xenopus tadpoles, we demonstrate that CB1R activation markedly improves visual contrast sensitivity under low-light conditions. These results highlight a role for endocannabinoids in vision and present a novel mechanism for cannabinoid modulation of neuronal activity through Cl− regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15932.001 PMID:27501334

  13. Endocannabinoid signaling enhances visual responses through modulation of intracellular chloride levels in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Miraucourt, Loïs S; Tsui, Jennifer; Gobert, Delphine; Desjardins, Jean-François; Schohl, Anne; Sild, Mari; Spratt, Perry; Castonguay, Annie; De Koninck, Yves; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Wiseman, Paul W; Ruthazer, Edward S

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) are widely expressed in the vertebrate retina, but the role of endocannabinoids in vision is not fully understood. Here, we identified a novel mechanism underlying a CB1R-mediated increase in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) intrinsic excitability acting through AMPK-dependent inhibition of NKCC1 activity. Clomeleon imaging and patch clamp recordings revealed that inhibition of NKCC1 downstream of CB1R activation reduces intracellular Cl(-) levels in RGCs, hyperpolarizing the resting membrane potential. We confirmed that such hyperpolarization enhances RGC action potential firing in response to subsequent depolarization, consistent with the increased intrinsic excitability of RGCs observed with CB1R activation. Using a dot avoidance assay in freely swimming Xenopus tadpoles, we demonstrate that CB1R activation markedly improves visual contrast sensitivity under low-light conditions. These results highlight a role for endocannabinoids in vision and present a novel mechanism for cannabinoid modulation of neuronal activity through Cl(-) regulation. PMID:27501334

  14. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways. PMID:26718442

  15. Longitudinal assessment of language and memory impairments in pathologically confirmed cortico-basal ganglionic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tree, Jeremy J; Kay, Janice

    2008-10-01

    We report a longitudinal case study (patient EP) of histologically confirmed cortico-basal ganglionic degeneration (CBD) who presented with non-fluent progressive aphasia (NFPA). While NFPA has been documented in clinical descriptions of other reports of CBD, details are often limited and the majority of studies are cross-sectional in nature. The present study conducted detailed longitudinal assessment with EP over a period of two years that revealed substantial impairments of episodic memory, semantic memory, naming and particular aspects of reading and spelling. Our investigations identify key features of EP's pattern of impairment that warrant further examination with other cases of CBD. In particular, testing of EP's nonword reading and spelling found that both were impaired and declined over time. In addition, verbal recognition deteriorated faster than non-verbal recognition through the course of the disease. Our review of the literature suggests that poor nonword reading and spelling may be consistent features of CBD, but more studies are needed to confirm this suggestion, and to determine whether they warrant inclusion in profiling CBD. PMID:18761137

  16. The action of cholinergic agonists on the squid stellate ganglion giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Stanley, E F

    1984-07-01

    Although the giant synapse in the squid stellate ganglion has served as a model in the understanding of the ionic and electrical changes that occur during the release of transmitter from nerve terminals, little is known about the pharmacology of this synapse or the identity of its neurotransmitter. In the present study, the suggestion that acetylcholine (ACh) is the excitatory transmitter at this synapse was tested by exploring the actions of cholinergic agents on the pre- and postsynaptic giant axons and on the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP). A novel arterial perfusion technique that circumvents the diffusion barrier from the bathing medium to the synapse has been used to demonstrate a depolarizing action of ACh and its agonist carbachol on the post- but not the presynaptic axon. The cholinergic receptors are distinct from receptors activated by amino acids, such as glutamate, have a reversal potential of about -48 mV, are anion-permeable, and desensitize without blocking the EPSP. It is concluded that these receptors are involved in an inhibitory input onto the postsynaptic giant axon and, therefore, that ACh is most probably not the transmitter at the squid giant synapse.

  17. Characterizing and modeling the intrinsic light response of rat ganglion-cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Walch, Olivia J; Zhang, L Samantha; Reifler, Aaron N; Dolikian, Michael E; Forger, Daniel B; Wong, Kwoon Y

    2015-11-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) mediate both image-forming vision and non-image-forming visual responses such as pupillary constriction and circadian photoentrainment. Five types of ipRGCs, named M1-M5, have been discovered in rodents. To further investigate their photoresponse properties, we made multielectrode array spike recordings from rat ipRGCs, classified them into M1, M2/M4, and M3/M5 clusters, and measured their intrinsic, melanopsin-based responses to single and flickering light pulses. Results showed that ipRGC spiking can track flickers up to ∼0.2 Hz in frequency and that flicker intervals between 5 and 14 s evoke the most spikes. We also learned that melanopsin's integration time is intensity and cluster dependent. Using these data, we constructed a mathematical model for each cluster's intrinsic photoresponse. We found that the data for the M1 cluster are best fit by a model that assumes a large photoresponse, causing the cell to enter depolarization block. Our models also led us to hypothesize that the M2/M4 and M3/M5 clusters experience comparable photoexcitation but that the M3/M5 cascade decays significantly faster than the M2/M4 cascade, resulting in different response waveforms between these clusters. These mathematical models will help predict how each ipRGC cluster might respond to stimuli of any waveform and could inform the invention of lighting technologies that promote health through melanopsin stimulation.

  18. Multielectrode array recordings reveal physiological diversity of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Tanja; Ziegler, Christiane; Blau, Axel

    2008-05-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) play important roles in non-image forming photoreception and participate in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and the pupillary light reflex. The aim of the present work was to characterize the light response of ipRGCs at two developmental stages of the embryonic chick. The electrophysiological study was based on comparative multielectrode array recordings from acute retinal slices. To ensure that light was the only source of excitation, intercellular activity modulation by gap junctions and chemical synapses was inhibited by carbenoxolone and bafilomycin A1, respectively. Action potentials evoked by blue light were detected as early as day 13 of embryonic development, which is notably earlier than the completion of the maturation process of functional rods and cones. Three different response types were distinguished by their response latency and sensitivity to different illumination intensities. At this point it is not clear whether these types just represent different maturation stages or have different morphologies and functions with respect to the non-image forming visual system and circadian entrainment.

  19. Differentiation of human ESCs to retinal ganglion cells using a CRISPR engineered reporter cell line.

    PubMed

    Sluch, Valentin M; Davis, Chung-ha O; Ranganathan, Vinod; Kerr, Justin M; Krick, Kellin; Martin, Russ; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Diamond, Jeffrey S; Mao, Hai-Quan; Zack, Donald J

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) injury and cell death from glaucoma and other forms of optic nerve disease is a major cause of irreversible vision loss and blindness. Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived RGCs could provide a source of cells for the development of novel therapeutic molecules as well as for potential cell-based therapies. In addition, such cells could provide insights into human RGC development, gene regulation, and neuronal biology. Here, we report a simple, adherent cell culture protocol for differentiation of hPSCs to RGCs using a CRISPR-engineered RGC fluorescent reporter stem cell line. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of the differentiated cultures yields a highly purified population of cells that express a range of RGC-enriched markers and exhibit morphological and physiological properties typical of RGCs. Additionally, we demonstrate that aligned nanofiber matrices can be used to guide the axonal outgrowth of hPSC-derived RGCs for in vitro optic nerve-like modeling. Lastly, using this protocol we identified forskolin as a potent promoter of RGC differentiation. PMID:26563826

  20. Analysis of the chemical coding of neurons in the intermediate thoracic ganglion of the pig.

    PubMed

    NouriNezhad, J; Wasowicz, K; Bukowski, R; Skobowiat, C

    2010-01-01

    The pig has been widely used as a model in cardiovascular research. A unique feature of the porcine extrinsic sympathetic cardiac nerves is that they arise from intermediate ganglia in the thoracic cavity. The localization and pattern of distribution of nerve cell bodies and fibers containing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine B-hydroxylase (DBH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), galanin (GAL), methionine-enkephalin (MET) as well as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) was studied with immunohistochemistry. Almost all the neurons showed immunoreactivity to TH. Immunoreactivity to NPY, VIP, SOM, GAL, MET and PACAP was displayed by nerve cell bodies while nerve fibers exhibited immunoreactivity to all the neuropeptides studied. Therefore, it seems that the chemical coding of neurons and especially nerve fibers in the porcine intermediate ganglion share general similarities (with certain neurochemical variability), with porcine prevertebral ganglia (e.g., celiacomesenteric and caudal mesenteric ganglia). PMID:21033570

  1. Spontaneous Oscillatory Rhythms in the Degenerating Mouse Retina Modulate Retinal Ganglion Cell Responses to Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Goo, Yong Sook; Park, Dae Jin; Ahn, Jung Ryul; Senok, Solomon S

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice), where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs). Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties. PMID:26793063

  2. Glutamatergic motoneurons in the stomatogastric ganglion of the mantis shrimp Squilla oratoria.

    PubMed

    Chiba, C; Tazaki, K

    1992-07-01

    1. Transmitters of motoneurons in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of Squilla were identified by analyzing the excitatory neuromuscular properties of muscles in the posterior cardiac plate (pcp) and pyloric regions. 2. Bath and iontophoretic applications of glutamate produce depolarizations in these muscles. The pharmacological experiments and desensitization of the junctional receptors elucidate the glutamatergic nature of the excitatory junctional potentials (EJPs) evoked in the constrictor and dilator muscles. The reversal potentials for the excitatory junctional current (EJC) and for the glutamate-induced current are almost the same. 3. Some types of dilator muscle show sensitivity to both glutamate and acetylcholine (ACh) exogenously applied. The pharmacological evidence and desensitization of the junctional receptors indicate the glutamatergic nature of neuromuscular junctions in these dually sensitive muscles. The reversal potentials for the EJC and for the ACh-induced current are not identical. 4. Glutamate is a candidate as an excitatory neuro-transmitter at the neuromuscular junctions which the STG motoneurons named PCP, PY, PD, LA and VC make with the identified muscles. Kainic and quisqualic acids which act on glutamate receptors are potent excitants of these muscles. Extrajunctional receptors to ACh are present in two types of the muscle innervated by LA and VC. 5. Neurotransmitters used by the STG motoneurons of stomatopods are compared to those of decapods. PMID:1359128

  3. The spread of excitation among neurons in the heart ganglion of the stomatopod, Squillia oratoria.

    PubMed

    WATANABE, A; TAKEDA, K

    1963-03-01

    Neurons in the heart ganglion of the mantis shrimp (a stomatopod crustacean) are functionally tightly linked together. The extracellular action potential from the whole trunk very often shows a complex form, but the response is all-or-none to the applied stimulus, indicating that the excitation in one neuron spreads very rapidly to all others. Application of isotonic MgCl(2) solution or repetitive stimulation sometimes separates the spike into its components. The resting potential of the soma membrane is 50 to 60 mv. External stimulation elicits a spike of 60 to 80 mv amplitude with a step on its rising phase. Hyperpolarization reveals one more inflection on the rising phase. These inflections divide the soma action potential into three parts, A(1), A(2), and B spikes in that order from the foot. The B spike disappears on increasing the hyperpolarization, but A(1) and A(2) remain, indicating that B originates from the soma membrane, whereas A(1) and A(2) originate from the two axons of the bipolar cell. Thus the impulse invades the soma from two directions, one from the stimulated side, the other from the other side via the "parallel axons" and the "side-connections;" the latter are presumed to interconnect the axons. When the parallel axons are cut, conduction takes place across the soma with a greatly reduced safety factor and a prolonged conduction time. Neuron-to-neuron transmission takes place in either direction. PMID:13999080

  4. The metabolic landscape of cortico-basal ganglionic degeneration: regional asymmetries studied with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Eidelberg, D; Dhawan, V; Moeller, J R; Sidtis, J J; Ginos, J Z; Strother, S C; Cederbaum, J; Greene, P; Fahn, S; Powers, J M

    1991-01-01

    Regional metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) was estimated using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) in five patients (four men, one woman; mean age 68; mean disease duration 2.4 years) with clinical findings consistent with the syndrome of cortico-basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). Left-right rCMRGlc asymmetry, (L-R)/(L + R) x 100, was calculated for 13 grey matter regions and compared with regional metabolic data from 18 normal volunteers and nine patients with asymmetrical Parkinson's disease (PD). In the CBGD group mean metabolic asymmetry values in the thalamus, inferior parietal lobule and hippocampus were greater than those measured in normal control subjects and patients with asymmetrical PD (p less than 0.02). Parietal lobe asymmetry of 5% or more was evident in all CBGD patients, whereas in PD patients and normal controls, all regional asymmetry measures were less than 5% in absolute value. Measures of frontal, parietal and hemispheric metabolic asymmetry were found to be positively correlated with asymmetries in thalamic rCMRGlc (p less than 0.05). The presence of cortico-thalamic metabolic asymmetry is consistent with the focal neuropathological changes reported in CBGD brains. Our findings suggest that metabolic asymmetries detected with FDG/PET may support a diagnosis of CBGD in life. Images PMID:1744638

  5. [Effect of trimebutine on cholinergic transmission in neurons of the inferior mesenteric ganglion of the rabbit].

    PubMed

    Julé, Y

    1987-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of trimebutine on the synaptic activity of neurons of the rabbit inferior mesenteric ganglion, using intracellular recording techniques. The synaptic activity was produced by subthreshold stimuli (0.5 Hz) applied individually, on lumbar splanchnic and lumbar colonic nerves. These stimuli triggered cholinergic responses corresponding to fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials. In 8 of 20 neurones tested trimebutine (10(-6) g/ml) produced an inhibition of excitatory postsynaptic potentials, without any change in the resting membrane potential. In 6 of 20 neurons tested, trimebutine produced, successively, an early facilitation followed by a late inhibition of excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Both effects occurred without change in the resting membrane potential. The inhibitory and facilitatory effects of trimebutine were accompanied, by an increase and a decrease in the number of failures of nerve stimulation respectively. These results indicate that inhibitory and facilitatory effects of trimebutine correspond respectively to a decrease and an increase in the amount of acetylcholine released from presynaptic nerve terminals originating from the spinal cord and the distal colon. PMID:3038656

  6. Evaluation of catheter ablation of periatrial ganglionic plexi in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Danik, Stephan; Neuzil, Petr; d'Avila, Andre; Malchano, Zachary J; Kralovec, Stepan; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Reddy, Vivek Y

    2008-09-01

    Recent data suggests that the cardiac autonomic nervous system has an important role in the initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). This study investigated (1) the feasibility of identifying and targeting these autonomic ganglia using endocardial radiofrequency stimulation and ablation, respectively; (2) the efficacy of endocardial ablation to completely eliminate the vagal response elicited from epicardial stimulation; and (3) the effect of autonomic ablation on the acute inducibility of AF. The study included 18 patients referred for catheter ablation of suspected vagal-mediated AF. The endocardial left atrial surface was stimulated at high frequency (20 to 50 Hz) to elicit a vagal response. In selected patients (n = 5), pericardial access was obtained using a subxyphoid puncture to permit epicardial stimulation. Catheter ablation of the putative autonomic ganglionic sites was performed from the left atrial endocardium using irrigated radiofrequency energy. After ablation of all identifiable autonomic ganglia, high-frequency pacing was repeated to induce AF. In all patients, stimulation at certain endocardial sites elicited a vagal response. Endocardial ablation abrogated this vagal responsiveness. Furthermore, for sites accessible from the pericardium, the vagal response elicited using epicardial stimulation was also eliminated. Despite successful ablation of these ganglia, AF was still inducible in 17 of 18 patients. In conclusion, successful ablation of autonomic ganglia from an endocardial approach can be reliably achieved using an irrigated catheter. In addition, ablation of these structures in patients with vagal-mediated AF is insufficient to prevent its acute reinduction with high-frequency atrial stimulation. PMID:18721515

  7. AQUAPORIN-1 WATER PERMEABILITY AS A NOVEL DETERMINANT OF AXONAL REGENERATION IN DORSAL ROOT GANGLION NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Verkman, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons transduce peripheral pain signals through small-diameter, non-myelinated C-fibers, which, when injured, can regenerate to restore pain sensation. Water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed at the plasma membrane of cell bodies and axons of DRG neurons, where it modulates the sensing of certain types of pain. Here, we found that AQP1 is also involved in DRG axonal growth and regeneration by a mechanism that may involve water transport-facilitated extension of axonal outgrowths. Spontaneous and nerve growth factor-stimulated axonal extension was reduced in cultures of AQP1-deficient DRG neurons and DRG explants compared to the wildtype. Axonal growth in AQP1-deficient DRG cultures was rescued by transfection with AQP1 or a different water-transporting AQP (AQP4), but not by a non-water-transporting AQP1 mutant. Following sciatic nerve compression injury AQP1 expression was increased in DRG neurons in wildtype mice, and DRG axonal growth was impaired in AQP1-deficient mice. Our results indicate AQP1 as a novel determinant of DRG axonal regeneration and hence a potential therapeutic target to accelerate neuronal regeneration. PMID:25585012

  8. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways.

  9. Neural coding properties based on spike timing and pattern correlation of retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Han-Yan; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2010-01-01

    Correlation between spike trains or neurons sometimes indicates certain neural coding rules in the visual system. In this paper, the relationship between spike timing correlation and pattern correlation is discussed, and their ability to represent stimulus features is compared to examine their coding strategies not only in individual neurons but also in population. Two kinds of stimuli, natural movies and checkerboard, are used to arouse firing activities in chicken retinal ganglion cells. The spike timing correlation and pattern correlation are calculated by cross-correlation function and Lempel–Ziv distance respectively. According to the correlation values, it is demonstrated that spike trains with similar spike patterns are not necessarily concerted in firing time. Moreover, spike pattern correlation values between individual neurons’ responses reflect the difference of natural movies and checkerboard; neurons cooperate with each other with higher pattern correlation values which represent spatiotemporal correlations during response to natural movies. Spike timing does not reflect stimulus features as obvious as spike patterns, caused by their particular coding properties or physiological foundation. As a result, separating the pattern correlation out of traditional timing correlation concept uncover additional insight in neural coding. PMID:22132042

  10. An Approach to Enhance Alignment and Myelination of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Chan, Christina

    2016-08-24

    Axon regeneration is a chaotic process due largely to unorganized axon alignment. Therefore, in order for a sufficient number of regenerated axons to bridge the lesion site, properly organized axonal alignment is required. Since demyelination after nerve injury strongly impairs the conductive capacity of surviving axons, remyelination is critical for successful functioning of regenerated nerves. Previously, we demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) aligned on a pre-stretch induced anisotropic surface because the cells can sense a larger effective stiffness in the stretched direction than in the perpendicular direction. We also showed that an anisotropic surface arising from a mechanical pre-stretched surface similarly affects alignment, as well as growth and myelination of axons. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for preparing a pre-stretched anisotropic surface, the isolation and culture of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on a pre-stretched surface, and show the myelination behavior of a co-culture of DRG neurons with Schwann cells (SCs) on a pre-stretched surface.

  11. Effects of eugenol on Na+ currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jeong Seon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lim, Jae-Min; Song, Jin-Ho

    2008-12-01

    Eugenol is an aromatic molecule found in several plants and widely used in dentistry for analgesic and antiseptic purposes. It inhibits pro-inflammatory mediators including nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase. It also regulates ion channels involved in pain signaling, such as TRPV1 receptor, high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels, NMDA receptor and GABA(A) receptor. The expression and functional properties of voltage-gated Na(+) channels in primary sensory neurons are altered following inflammation or nerve injury. To elucidate an involvement of Na(+) channels in the eugenol-induced analgesia we investigated the effects of eugenol on tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) currents in acutely dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Eugenol inhibited TTX-S and TTX-R Na(+) currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The K(d) values were 308 muM and 543 muM, respectively. Eugenol did not influence the activation voltage of either type of Na(+) current. However, eugenol moved the steady-state inactivation curves of both Na(+) currents to a hyperpolarizing direction and reduced the maximal Na(+) current. Thus eugenol appears to inhibit Na(+) currents through its interaction with both resting and inactivated Na(+) channels. The recovery from inactivation of both Na(+) currents was slowed by eugenol. The eugenol inhibition of Na(+) currents was not dependent on the stimulus frequency. The inhibition of Na(+) currents is considered as one of the mechanisms by which eugenol exerts analgesia.

  12. Intraretinal projection of retinal ganglion cell axons as a model system for studying axon navigation

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zheng-Zheng

    2008-01-01

    The initial step of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axon pathfinding involves directed growth of RGC axons toward the center of the retina, the optic disc, a process termed “intraretinal guidance”. Due to the accessibility of the system, and with various embryological, molecular, and genetic approaches, significant progress has been made in recent years toward understanding the mechanisms involved in the precise guidance of the RGC axons. As axons are extending from RGCs located throughout the retina, a multitude of factors expressed along with the differentiation wave are important for the guidance of the RGC axons. To ensure that the RGC axons are oriented correctly, restricted to the optic fiber layer (OFL) of the retina, and exit the eye properly, different sets of positive and negative factors cooperate in the process. Fasciculation mediated by a number of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and modulation of axonal response to guidance factors provide additional mechanisms to ensure proper guidance of the RGC axons. The intraretinal axon guidance thus serves as an excellent model system for studying how different signals are regulated, modulated and integrated for guiding a large number of axons in three-dimensional space. PMID:17320832

  13. Math5 is required for retinal ganglion cell and optic nerve formation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nadean L.; Patel, Sima; Brzezinski, Joseph; Glaser, Tom

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY The vertebrate retina contains seven major neuronal and glial cell types in an interconnected network that collects, processes and sends visual signals through the optic nerve to the brain. Retinal neuron differentiation is thought to require both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, yet few intrinsic gene products have been identified that direct this process. Math5 (Atoh7) encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that is specifically expressed by mouse retinal progenitors. Math5 is highly homologous to atonal, which is critically required for R8 neuron formation during Drosophila eye development. Like R8 cells in the fly eye, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the first neurons in the vertebrate eye. Here we show that Math5 mutant mice are fully viable, yet lack RGCs and optic nerves. Thus, two evolutionarily diverse eye types require atonal gene family function for the earliest stages of retinal neuron formation. At the same time, the abundance of cone photoreceptors is significantly increased in Math5−/− retinae, suggesting a binary change in cell fate from RGCs to cones. A small number of nascent RGCs are detected during embryogenesis, but these fail to develop further, suggesting that committed RGCs may also require Math5 function. PMID:11493566

  14. An Approach to Enhance Alignment and Myelination of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Axon regeneration is a chaotic process due largely to unorganized axon alignment. Therefore, in order for a sufficient number of regenerated axons to bridge the lesion site, properly organized axonal alignment is required. Since demyelination after nerve injury strongly impairs the conductive capacity of surviving axons, remyelination is critical for successful functioning of regenerated nerves. Previously, we demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) aligned on a pre-stretch induced anisotropic surface because the cells can sense a larger effective stiffness in the stretched direction than in the perpendicular direction. We also showed that an anisotropic surface arising from a mechanical pre-stretched surface similarly affects alignment, as well as growth and myelination of axons. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for preparing a pre-stretched anisotropic surface, the isolation and culture of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on a pre-stretched surface, and show the myelination behavior of a co-culture of DRG neurons with Schwann cells (SCs) on a pre-stretched surface. PMID:27585118

  15. Simultaneous recording of mouse retinal ganglion cells during epiretinal or subretinal stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sim, S.L.; Szalewski, R.J.; Johnson, L.J.; Akah, L.E.; Shoemaker, L.E.; Thoreson, W.B.; Margalit, E.

    2015-01-01

    We compared response patterns and electrical receptive fields (ERF) of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during epiretinal and subretinal electrical stimulation of isolated mouse retina. Retinas were stimulated with an array of 3200 independently controllable electrodes. Four response patterns were observed: a burst of activity immediately after stimulation (Type I cells, Vision Research (2008), 48, 1562–1568), delayed bursts beginning >25 ms after stimulation (Type II), a combination of both (Type III), and inhibition of ongoing spike activity. Type I responses were produced more often by epiretinal than subretinal stimulation whereas delayed and inhibitory responses were evoked more frequently by subretinal stimulation. Response latencies were significantly shorter with epiretinal than subretinal stimulation. These data suggest that subretinal stimulation is more effective at activating intraretinal circuits than epiretinal stimulation. There was no significant difference in charge threshold between subretinal and epiretinal configurations. ERFs were defined by the stimulating array surface area that successfully stimulated spikes in an RGC. ERFs were complex in shape, similar to receptive fields mapped with light. ERF areas were significantly smaller with subretinal than epiretinal stimulation. This may reflect the greater distance between stimulating electrodes and RGCs in the subretinal configuration. ERFs for immediate and delayed responses mapped within the same Type III cells differed in shape and size, consistent with different sites and mechanisms for generating these two response types. PMID:24863584

  16. Rat neurosphere cells protect axotomized rat retinal ganglion cells and facilitate their regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew J; Zwart, Isabel; Samaranayake, Asanka Nuwan; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Girdlestone, John; Mehmet, Huseyin; Navarrete, Roberto; Navarrete, Cristina; Jen, Ling-Sun

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the ability of a population of rat neural stem and precursor cells derived from rat embryonic spinal cord to protect injured neurons in the rat central nervous system (CNS). The neonatal rat optic pathway was used as a model of CNS injury, whereby retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were axotomized by lesion of the lateral geniculate nucleus one day after birth. Neural stem and precursor cells derived from expanded neurospheres (NS) were transplanted into the lesion site at the time of injury. Application of Fast Blue tracer dye to the lesion site demonstrated that significant numbers of RGCs survived at 4 and 8 weeks in animals that received a transplant, with an average of 28% survival, though in some individual cases survival was greater than 50%. No RGCs survived in animals that received a lesion alone. Furthermore, labeled RGCs were also observed when Fast Blue was applied to the superior colliculus (SC) at 4 weeks, suggesting that neurosphere cells also facilitated RGC to regenerate to their normal target. Transplanted cells did not migrate or express neural markers after transplantation, and secreted several neurotrophic factors in vitro. We conclude that NS cells can protect injured CNS neurons and promote their regeneration. These effects are not attributable to cell replacement, and may be mediated via secretion of neurotrophic factors. Thus, neuroprotection by stem cell populations may be a more viable approach for treatment of CNS disorders than cell replacement therapy.

  17. Number and spatial distribution of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in the adult albino rat.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Romero, C; Jiménez-López, M; García-Ayuso, D; Salinas-Navarro, M; Nadal-Nicolás, F M; Agudo-Barriuso, M; Villegas-Pérez, M P; Avilés-Trigueros, M; Vidal-Sanz, M

    2013-03-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) respond directly to light and are responsible of the synchronization of the circadian rhythm with the photic stimulus and for the pupillary light reflex. To quantify the total population of rat-ipRGCs and to assess their spatial distribution we have developed an automated routine and used neighbour maps. Moreover, in all analysed retinas we have studied the general population of RGCs - identified by their Brn3a expression - and the population of ipRGCs - identified by melanopsin immunodetection - thus allowing the co-analysis of their topography. Our results show that the total mean number ± standard deviation of ipRGCs in the albino rat is 2047 ± 309. Their distribution in the retina seems to be complementary to that of Brn3a(+)RGCs, being denser in the periphery, especially in the superior retina where their highest densities are found in the temporal quadrant, above the visual streak. In addition, by tracing the retinas from both superior colliculi, we have also determined that 90.62% of the ipRGC project to these central targets. PMID:23295345

  18. SUBTYPE-SPECIFIC REGENERATION OF RETINAL GANGLION CELLS FOLLOWING AXOTOMY: EFFECTS OF OSTEOPONTIN AND MTOR SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xin; Qiao, Mu; Bei, Fengfeng; Kim, In-Jung; He, Zhigang; Sanes, Joshua R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In mammals, few retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) survive following axotomy and even fewer regenerate axons. This could reflect differential extrinsic influences or the existence of subpopulations that vary in their responses to injury. We tested these alternatives by comparing responses of molecularly distinct subsets of mouse RGCs to axotomy. Survival rates varied dramatically among subtypes, with alpha-RGCs (αRGCs) surviving preferentially. Among survivors, αRGCs accounted for nearly all regeneration following down-regulation of PTEN, which activates the mTOR pathway. αRGCs have uniquely high mTOR signaling levels among RGCs and also selectively express osteopontin (OPN) and receptors for the growth factor, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Administration of OPN plus IGF-1 promotes regeneration as effectively as down-regulation of PTEN; however, regeneration is still confined to αRGCs. Our results reveal dramatic subtype-specific differences in the ability of RGCs to survive and regenerate following injury, and they identify promising agents for promoting axonal regeneration. PMID:25754821

  19. Response properties of ON-OFF retinal ganglion cells to high-order stimulus statistics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lei; Gong, Han-Yan; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji; Zhang, Pu-Ming

    2014-10-17

    The visual stimulus statistics are the fundamental parameters to provide the reference for studying visual coding rules. In this study, the multi-electrode extracellular recording experiments were designed and implemented on bullfrog retinal ganglion cells to explore the neural response properties to the changes in stimulus statistics. The changes in low-order stimulus statistics, such as intensity and contrast, were clearly reflected in the neuronal firing rate. However, it was difficult to distinguish the changes in high-order statistics, such as skewness and kurtosis, only based on the neuronal firing rate. The neuronal temporal filtering and sensitivity characteristics were further analyzed. We observed that the peak-to-peak amplitude of the temporal filter and the neuronal sensitivity, which were obtained from either neuronal ON spikes or OFF spikes, could exhibit significant changes when the high-order stimulus statistics were changed. These results indicate that in the retina, the neuronal response properties may be reliable and powerful in carrying some complex and subtle visual information.

  20. Extraction (DSX) from Erigeron breviscapus modulates outward potassium currents in rat retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shuo; Wang, Zhong-Feng; Duan, Jun-Guo; Ji, Lu; Lu, Xue-Jing

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of DSX, an active component extracted from Erigeron breviscapus, on the voltage-gated outward K+ channel currents in rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) by using electrophysiological method, and to explore the possible mechanisms of DSX on optic nerve protection. METHODS Outward K+ currents were recorded by using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques on acutely isolated rat RGCs. Outward K+ currents were induced by a series of depolarizing voltage pulses from a holding potential of -70 mV to +20 mV in an increment of 10 mV. RESULTS Extracellular application of DSX voltage-dependently suppressed both the steady-state and peak current amplitudes of outward K+ currents in rat RGCs. Furthermore, DSX reversibly and dose-dependently inhibited the amplitudes of outward K+ currents of the cells. At +20 mV membrane potential DSX at the concentrations of 0.02 g/L and 0.05 g/L showed no significant effects on the currents. In contrast, DSX at higher concentrations (0.1 g/L, 0.2 g/L and 0.5 g/L) significantly suppressed the current amplitudes. CONCLUSION These results suggest that DSX reversibly and dose-dependently suppress outward K+ channel currents in rat RGCs, which may be one of the possible mechanisms underlying Erigeron breviscapus prevents vision loss and RGC damage caused by glaucoma. PMID:26682155

  1. Modeling the impact of common noise inputs on the network activity of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Vidne, Michael; Ahmadian, Yashar; Shlens, Jonathon; Pillow, Jonathan W; Kulkarni, Jayant; Litke, Alan M; Chichilnisky, E J; Simoncelli, Eero; Paninski, Liam

    2012-08-01

    Synchronized spontaneous firing among retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), on timescales faster than visual responses, has been reported in many studies. Two candidate mechanisms of synchronized firing include direct coupling and shared noisy inputs. In neighboring parasol cells of primate retina, which exhibit rapid synchronized firing that has been studied extensively, recent experimental work indicates that direct electrical or synaptic coupling is weak, but shared synaptic input in the absence of modulated stimuli is strong. However, previous modeling efforts have not accounted for this aspect of firing in the parasol cell population. Here we develop a new model that incorporates the effects of common noise, and apply it to analyze the light responses and synchronized firing of a large, densely-sampled network of over 250 simultaneously recorded parasol cells. We use a generalized linear model in which the spike rate in each cell is determined by the linear combination of the spatio-temporally filtered visual input, the temporally filtered prior spikes of that cell, and unobserved sources representing common noise. The model accurately captures the statistical structure of the spike trains and the encoding of the visual stimulus, without the direct coupling assumption present in previous modeling work. Finally, we examined the problem of decoding the visual stimulus from the spike train given the estimated parameters. The common-noise model produces Bayesian decoding performance as accurate as that of a model with direct coupling, but with significantly more robustness to spike timing perturbations.

  2. Effect of protons on the inward current evoked by capsaicin in isolated dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Petersen, M; LaMotte, R H

    1993-07-01

    Capsaicin excites a subset of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by inducing an inward current. We have examined this inward current in response to high concentrations of protons in the external medium. The experiments were done in freshly dissociated DRG cells under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions. The amplitude of the current evoked by capsaicin (200-300 nM) was increased with increasing concentrations of protons (pH 6.9-6.3). Increasing the acidification of the external medium from a physiological pH of 7.3 to 6.3 enhanced 7-fold the current induced by capsaicin (300 nM). Cells unresponsive to capsaicin in a physiological pH were also unresponsive to capsaicin in an acidic solution. There was a progressive decrease in the amplitude of the capsaicin-evoked current when the drug was repeatedly applied either at a physiological pH or an acidic pH of 6.3. Exposure of the cell to acidic solutions of capsaicin did not subsequently increase an evoked inward current when capsaicin was applied at a physiological pH nor did it lead to an inward current evoked by proton ions where there had been none. Our results suggest that increased proton concentrations in the extracellular medium could play an important modulatory role in the function of chemosensitive sensory neurons.

  3. Sudden death while driving. Role of sinus perinodal degeneration and cardiac neural degeneration and ganglionitis.

    PubMed

    James, T N; Pearce, W N; Givhan, E G

    1980-05-01

    A young business executive was seen to slump over his steering wheel while driving, after which the automobile veered and turned over. Quickly taken unconscious to a nearby emergency room, he was pronounced dead on arrival. Because there was insufficient physical injury found to account for his death, and because atrial fibrillation had been detected for the first time on a routine physical examination 3 months previously, special examination of the cardiac conduction system was performed. A fibroma was present on the right side of the central fibrous body above the His bundle, similar to several fibromas on the mitral valve. Small foci of neuritis were present in the ventricular myocardium and the atrioventricular node. More extensive neural degeneration and ganglionitis were found near the sinus node, which also exhibited an encircling perinodal fibrosis. Ways in which these abnormalities could have caused a fatal electrical instability of the heart are discussed. Careful examination of the cardiac conduction system is warranted in other fatal automobile accidents under similar circumstances.

  4. Chronic varicella-zoster virus ganglionitis--a possible cause of postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Gilden, Donald H; Cohrs, Randall J; Hayward, Anthony R; Wellish, Mary; Mahalingam, Ravi

    2003-06-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is dermatomal distribution pain that persists for months to years after the resolution of herpes zoster rash. The cause of PHN is unknown. Herein, we report clinical, molecular virological, and immunological findings over an 11-year period in an immunocompetent elderly woman with PHN. Initially, blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) contained varicella-zoster virus (VZV) DNA on two consecutive occasions. Random testing after treatment with famciclovir to relieve pain did not detect VZV DNA. However, the patient was reluctant to continue famciclovir indefinitely and voluntarily stopped drug treatment five times. Pain always recurred within 1 week, and blood MNCs contained many, but not all, regions of the VZV genome on all five occasions. Immunological analysis revealed increased cell-mediated immunity to VZV. Chronic VZV ganglionitis-induced PHN best explains the recurrence of VZV DNA in MNCs whenever famciclovir was discontinued; the detection of only some regions of the viral genome in MNCs, compared to the detection of all regions of the VZV genome in latently infected ganglia; the increased cell-mediated immunity to VZV; and a gratifying clinical response to famciclovir. The presence of fragments of VZV DNA in MNCs likely represents partial degradation of viral DNA in MNCs that trafficked through ganglia during productive infection.

  5. Electrical coupling and innexin expression in the stomatogastric ganglion of the crab Cancer borealis.

    PubMed

    Shruti, Sonal; Schulz, David J; Lett, Kawasi M; Marder, Eve

    2014-12-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow for the movement of small molecules and ions between the cytoplasm of adjacent cells and form electrical synapses between neurons. In invertebrates, the gap junction proteins are coded for by the innexin family of genes. The stomatogastric ganglion (STG) in the crab Cancer borealis contains a small number of identified and electrically coupled neurons. We identified Innexin 1 (Inx1), Innexin 2 (Inx2), Innexin 3 (Inx3), Innexin 4 (Inx4), Innexin 5 (Inx5), and Innexin 6 (Inx6) members of the C. borealis innexin family. We also identified six members of the innexin family from the lobster Homarus americanus transcriptome. These innexins show significant sequence similarity to other arthropod innexins. Using in situ hybridization and reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we determined that all the cells in the crab STG express multiple innexin genes. Electrophysiological recordings of coupling coefficients between identified pairs of pyloric dilator (PD) cells and PD-lateral posterior gastric (LPG) neurons show that the PD-PD electrical synapse is nonrectifying while the PD-LPG synapse is apparently strongly rectifying. PMID:25210156

  6. Macaque retinal ganglion cell responses to visual patterns: harmonic composition, noise, and psychophysical detectability.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Bonnie; Lee, Barry B; Cao, Dingcai

    2016-06-01

    The goal of these experiments was to test how well cell responses to visual patterns can be predicted from the sinewave tuning curve. Magnocellular (MC) and parvocellular (PC) ganglion cell responses to different spatial waveforms (sinewave, squarewave, and ramp waveforms) were measured across a range of spatial frequencies. Sinewave spatial tuning curves were fit with standard Gaussian models. From these fits, waveforms and spatial tuning of a cell's responses to the other waveforms were predicted for different harmonics by scaling in amplitude for the power in the waveform's Fourier expansion series over spatial frequency. Since higher spatial harmonics move at a higher temporal frequency, an additional scaling for each harmonic by the MC (bandpass) or PC (lowpass) temporal response was included, together with response phase. Finally, the model included a rectifying nonlinearity. This provided a largely satisfactory estimation of MC and PC cell responses to complex waveforms. As a consequence of their transient responses, MC responses to complex waveforms were found to have significantly more energy in higher spatial harmonic components than PC responses. Response variance (noise) was also quantified as a function of harmonic component. Noise increased to some degree for the higher harmonics. The data are relevant for psychophysical detection or discrimination of visual patterns, and we discuss the results in this context. PMID:26936977

  7. Diffuse Traumatic Axonal Injury in the Optic Nerve Does Not Elicit Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaqiong; Fox, Michael A.; Povlishock, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Much of the morbidity following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Although most TAI studies focus on corpus callosum white matter, the visual system has received increased interest. To assess visual system TAI, we developed a mouse model of optic nerve TAI. It is unknown, however, whether this TAI causes retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. To address this issue, YFP-16 transgenic mice were subjected to mild TBI and followed from 2 to 28 days. Neither TUNEL-positive or cleaved caspase-3 immunoreactive RGCs were observed from 2 to 28 days post-TBI. Quantification of immunoreactivity of Brn3a, an RGC marker, demonstrated no RGC loss; parallel electron microscopic analysis confirmed RGC viability. Persistent RGC survival was also consistent with the finding of reorganization in the proximal axonal segments following TAI wherein microglia/macrophages remained inactive. In contrast, activated microglia/macrophages closely enveloped the distal disconnected, degenerating axonal segments at 7 to 28 days post-injury, thereby confirming that this model consistently evoked TAI followed by disconnection. Collectively, these data provide novel insight into the evolving pathobiology associated with TAI that will form a foundation for future studies exploring TAI therapy and its downstream consequences. PMID:23860030

  8. Novel High Content Screen Detects Compounds That Promote Neurite Regeneration from Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Whitlon, Donna S.; Grover, Mary; Dunne, Sara F.; Richter, Sonja; Luan, Chi-Hao; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The bipolar spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) carry sound information from cochlear hair cells to the brain. After noise, antibiotic or toxic insult to the cochlea, damage to SGN and/or hair cells causes hearing impairment. Damage ranges from fiber and synapse degeneration to dysfunction and loss of cells. New interventions to regenerate peripheral nerve fibers could help reestablish transfer of auditory information from surviving or regenerated hair cells or improve results from cochlear implants, but the biochemical mechanisms to target are largely unknown. Presently, no drugs exist that are FDA approved to stimulate the regeneration of SGN nerve fibers. We designed an original phenotypic assay to screen 440 compounds of the NIH Clinical Collection directly on dissociated mouse spiral ganglia. The assay detected one compound, cerivastatin, that increased the length of regenerating neurites. The effect, mimicked by other statins at different optimal concentrations, was blocked by geranylgeraniol. These results demonstrate the utility of screening small compound libraries on mixed cultures of dissociated primary ganglia. The success of this screen narrows down a moderately sized library to a single compound which can be elevated to in-depth in vivo studies, and highlights a potential new molecular pathway for targeting of hearing loss drugs. PMID:26521685

  9. The Pic du Midi solar survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koechlin, L.

    2015-12-01

    We carry a long term survey of the solar activity with our coronagraphic system at Pic du Midi de Bigorre in the French Pyrenees (CLIMSO). It is a set of two solar telescopes and two coronagraphs, taking one frame per minute for each of the four channels : Solar disk in H-α (656.28 nm), prominences in H-α, disk in Ca II (393.3 nm), prominences in He I (1083 nm), all year long, weather permitting. Since 2015 we also take images of the FeXIII corona (1074.7 nm) at the rate of one every 10 minutes. These images cover a large field: 1.25 solar diameter, 2k*2K pixels, and are freely downloadable form a database. The improvements made since 2015 concern an autoguiding system for better centering of the solar disk behind the coronagraphic masks, and a new Fe XIII channel at λ=1074.7 nm. In the near future we plan to provide radial velocity maps of the disc and polarimetry maps of the disk and corona. This survey took its present form in 2007 and we plan to maintain image acquisition in the same or better experimental conditions for a long period: one or several solar cycles if possible. During the partial solar eclipse of March 20, 2015, the CLIMSO instruments and the staff at Pic du Midi operating it have provided several millions internet users with real time images of the Sun and Moon during all the phenomenon.

  10. Le spasme du sanglot chez les nourrissons

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ran D.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Question Des enfants qui fréquentent ma clinique ont des épisodes semblables à des convulsions pendant lesquels ils pleurent et retiennent leur souffle au point de faire survenir une cyanose et de perdre conscience. Les résultats à l’examen ou aux investigations sont normaux et les pédiatres consultés ne font pas d’autres investigations. Les spasmes du sanglot sont-ils communs et quels genres d’investigations faut-il faire? Réponse Le spasme du sanglot est un trouble non épileptique paroxysmal bénin qui se produit chez les enfants en santé de six à 48 mois. Les épisodes commencent par une provocation, comme un bouleversement émotionnel ou une blessure mineure, et peuvent progresser en une retenue de la respiration, une cyanose et une syncope. Les épisodes sont extrêmement effrayants à regarder mais ont des conséquences bénignes. Une fois le diagnostic clinique posé, on recommande de faire passer un électrocardiogramme et d’exclure la possibilité d’une anémie, mais aucune autre investigation ou demande de consultation n’est nécessaire.

  11. Neural architecture of the "transient" ON directionally selective (class IIb1) ganglion cells in rabbit retina, partly co-stratified with starburst amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Famiglietti, Edward V

    2016-01-01

    Recent physiological studies coupled with intracellular staining have subdivided ON directionally selective (DS) ganglion cells of rabbit retina into two types. One exhibits more "transient" and more "brisk" responses (ON DS-t), and the other has more "sustained' and more "sluggish" responses (ON DS-s), although both represent the same three preferred directions and show preference for low stimulus velocity, as reported in previous studies of ON DS ganglion cells in rabbit retina. ON DS-s cells have the morphology of ganglion cells previously shown to project to the medial terminal nucleus (MTN) of the accessory optic system, and the MTN-projecting, class IVus1 cells have been well-characterized previously in terms of their dendritic morphology, branching pattern, and stratification. ON DS-t ganglion cells have a distinctly different morphology and exhibit heterotypic coupling to amacrine cells, including axon-bearing amacrine cells, with accompanying synchronous firing, while ON DS-s cells are not coupled. The present study shows that ON DS-t cells are morphologically identical to the previously well-characterized, "orphan" class IIb1 ganglion cell, previously regarded as a member of the "brisk-concentric" category of ganglion cells. Its branching pattern, quantitatively analyzed, is similar to that of the morphological counterparts of X and Y cells, and very different from that of the ON DS-s ganglion cell. Close analysis of the dendritic stratification of class IIb1 ganglion cells together with fiducial cells indicates that they differ from that of the ON DS-s cells. In agreement with one of the three previous studies, class IIb1/ON DS-t cells, unlike class IVus1/ON DS-s ganglion cells, in the main do not co-stratify with starburst amacrine cells. As the present study shows, however, portions of their dendrites do deviate from the main substratum, coming within range of starburst boutons. Parsimony favors DS input from starburst amacrine cells both to ON DS

  12. Élimination du bore du silicium par plasma inductif sous champ électrique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, R.; Morvan, D.; Picard, G.; Amouroux, J.

    1993-05-01

    We analyzed purification mechanisms of silicon by inductive plasma with a fluoride slag. The aim is to study boron elimination from doped electronic grade silicon in function of the nature of the slag to obtain a photovoltaic grade silicon. The steady began with the calculation and the comparison of the stability diagram of boron compounds in presence of CaF2, BaF2 and MgF2. This study led us to conclude that BaF2 is the better slag for silicon purification. This has been confirmed by experience. In a second time, we made purifications under electric bias to enhance slag efficiency. We noticed that BaF2 is more sensitive to electric bias than other slags. Nous avons analysé le mécanisme de purification du silicium sous plasma inductif en présence d'un laitier fluoré. L'objectif principal est d'étudier l'élimination du bore du silicium électronique dopé en fonction de la nature du fluorure pour obtenir un silicium de qualité photovoltaïque. L'étude a commencé par l'établissement et la comparaison de diagrammes des composés du bore en présence de CaF2, de MgF2 et de BaF2. Nous avons déduit de cette première étude que BaF2 est le meilleur laitier pour la purification du silicium. Ceci a été corroboré par l'expérience. Nous avons ensuite opéré en présence d'un champ électrique dans le but d'améliorer encore l'efficacité des laitiers. Nous avons constaté que BaF2 est plus sensible au champ électrique que les deux autres laitiers utilisés.

  13. The Topographic Organization of Retinal Ganglion Cell Density and Spatial Resolving Power in an Unusual Arboreal and Slow-Moving Strepsirhine Primate, the Potto (Perodicticus potto).

    PubMed

    Coimbra, João Paulo; Kaswera-Kyamakya, Consolate; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Manger, Paul R; Collin, Shaun P

    2016-01-01

    The potto (Perodicticus potto) is an arboreal strepsirhine found in the rainforests of central Africa. In contrast to most primates, the potto shows slow-moving locomotion over the upper surface of branches, where it forages for exudates and crawling invertebrates with its head held very close to the substrate. Here, we asked whether the retina of the potto displays topographic specializations in neuronal density that correlate with its unusual lifestyle. Using stereology and retinal wholemounts, we measured the total number and topographic distribution of retinal ganglion cells (total and presumed parasol), as well as estimating the upper limits of the spatial resolution of the potto eye. We estimated ∼210,000 retinal ganglion cells, of which ∼7% (∼14,000) comprise presumed parasol ganglion cells. The topographic distribution of both total and parasol ganglion cells reveals a concentric centroperipheral organization with a nasoventral asymmetry. Combined with the upwardly shifted orbits of the potto, this nasoventral increase in parasol ganglion cell density enhances contrast sensitivity and motion detection skywards, which potentially assists with the detection of predators in the high canopy. The central area of the potto occurs ∼2.5 mm temporal to the optic disc and contains a maximum ganglion cell density of ∼4,300 cells/mm2. We found no anatomical evidence of a fovea within this region. Using maximum ganglion cell density and eye size (∼14 mm), we estimated upper limits of spatial resolving power between 4.1 and 4.4 cycles/degree. Despite their reported reliance on olfaction to detect exudates, this level of spatial resolution potentially assists pottos with foraging for small invertebrates and in the detection of predators.

  14. Ontogenetic changes in retinal ganglion cell distribution and spatial resolving power in the brown-banded bamboo shark Chiloscyllium punctatum (Elasmobranchii).

    PubMed

    Harahush, Blake K; Hart, Nathan S; Collin, Shaun P

    2014-01-01

    The development of the visual system in anamniotic vertebrates is a continual process, allowing for ontogenetic changes in retinal topography and spatial resolving power. We examined the number and distribution of retinal ganglion cells in wholemounted retinae throughout the protracted embryonic development (∼5 months) of a chondrichthyan, i.e. the brown-banded bamboo shark Chiloscyllium punctatum, from the beginning of retinal cell differentiation (approximately halfway through embryogenesis) to adulthood. We also identified and quantified the number of apoptosed cells within the ganglion cell layer to evaluate the contribution of apoptosis to changes in retinal topography. C. punctatum undergoes rapid changes in ganglion cell distribution during embryogenesis, where high levels of apoptosis, especially around the retinal periphery, result in relative increases in ganglion cell density in the central retina which progressively extend nasally and temporally to form a meridional band at hatching. After hatching, C. punctatum forms and maintains a horizontal streak, showing only minor changes in topography during growth, with basal levels of apoptosis. The total number of retinal ganglion cells reaches 547,881 in adult sharks, but the mean (3,228 cells·mm(-2)) and peak (4,983 cells·mm(-2)) retinal ganglion cell densities are highest around the time of hatching. Calculated estimates of spatial resolving power, based on ganglion cell spacing (assuming a hexagonal mosaic) and assessment of the focal length from cryosections of the eye, increase from 1.47 cycles·degree(-1) during embryogenesis to 4.29 cycles·degree(-1) in adults. The increase in spatial resolving power across the retinal meridian would allow this species to hunt and track faster, more mobile prey as it reaches maturity. PMID:24993335

  15. Brain stem hypoplasia associated with Cri-du-Chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries. PMID:24265573

  16. Brain Stem Hypoplasia Associated with Cri-du-Chat Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries. PMID:24265573

  17. Depleted uranium (DU): a holistic consideration of DU and related matters.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, E I

    2001-12-17

    Following the use of depleted uranium (DU) during the Gulf and Balkan conflicts, unnecessary and costly confusion has existed for some 11 years concerning the hazard it constitutes, despite the fact that sufficient data are available to answer most of the relevant questions. In tracing the significance of uranium in the environment and humans, too much reliance is still placed upon the extrapolation of animal data. The existing radiological nomenclature is far too involved and complex to understand, let alone implement. The excellence of early health physics seems to have been lost, and hence there is a failure to utilise the large body of knowledge, and the manner in which it was obtained, in other disciplines. Health physics has failed to understand the nature of some natural processes that ultimately control radiation dose to the environment and humans. Examination of three types of DU, in particular the highly radioactive and potentially hazardous unprocessed, spent-reactor uranium fuel debris (UDU), alluded to as hot particles, has been poorly studied on the basis of scarcity in the environment. Fundamental geological processes are described which illustrate that, as a consequence of routine operation of nuclear reprocessing plants, especially in the past, and following reactor accidents, natural processes can result in an enrichment of DU particles in most types of sediment. Failure to grasp essential geological processes in relation to the dispersion of radionuclides in the environment is detrimental to public acceptance of an essential form of energy in association with others.

  18. Carte du Ciel, San Fernando zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, C.

    2014-06-01

    An updated summary of a future large astrometric catalogue is presented, based on the two most important astrometric projects carried out by the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada de San Fernando (ROA). The goal is to make a catalogue of positions and proper motions based on ROA's Cart du Ciel (CdC) and the Astrographic Catalogue (AC) San Fernando zone plates, and the HAMC2 meridian circle catalogue. The CdC and AC plates are being reduced together to provide first-epoch positions while HAMC2 will provide second-epoch ones. New techniques have been applied, that range from using a commercial flatbed scanner to the proper reduction schemes to avoid systematics from it. Only thirty plates (out of 540) remain to be processed, due to scanning problems that are being solved.

  19. Le mouvement du pôle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Les variations de la rotation terrestre. En conditionnant à la fois notre vie quotidienne, notre perception du ciel, et bon nombre de phénomènes géophysiques comme la formation des cyclones, la rotation de la Terre se trouve au croisement de plusieurs disciplines. Si le phenomena se faisait uniformément, le sujet serait vite discuté, mais c'est parce que la rotation terrestre varie, même imperceptiblement pour nos sens, dans sa vitesse angulaire comme dans la direction de son axe, qu'elle suscite un grand intérêt. D'abord pour des raisons pratiques : non seulement les aléas de la rotation terrestre modi_ent à la longue les pointés astrométriques à un instant donné de la journée mais in_uencent aussi les mesures opérées par les techniques spatiales ; en consequence l'exploitation de ces mesures, par exemple pour déterminer les orbites des satellites impliqués ou pratiquer le positionnement au sol, nécessite une connaissance précise de ces variations. Plus fondamentalement, elles traduisent les propriétés globales de la Terre comme les processus physiques qui s'y déroulent, si bien qu'en analysant les causes des fluctuations observées, on dispose d'un moyen de mieux connaître notre globe. La découverte progressive des fluctuations de la rotation de la Terre a une longue histoire. Sous l'angle des techniques d'observation, trois époques se pro-celle du pointé astrométrique à l'oeil nu, à l'aide d'instruments en bois ou métalliques (quart de cercle muraux par exemple). À partir du XVIIe siècle débute l'astrométrie télescopique dont les pointés sont complétés par des datations de plus en plus précises grâce à l'invention d'horloges régulées par balancier. Cette deuxième époque se termine vers 1960, avec l'avènement des techniques spatiales : les pointés astrométriques sont délaissés au profit de la mesure ultra-précise de durées ou de fréquences de signaux électromagnétiques, grâce à l'invention des horloges

  20. Random Wiring, Ganglion Cell Mosaics, and the Functional Architecture of the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, David; White, Leonard E.; Wolf, Fred

    2015-01-01

    The architecture of iso-orientation domains in the primary visual cortex (V1) of placental carnivores and primates apparently follows species invariant quantitative laws. Dynamical optimization models assuming that neurons coordinate their stimulus preferences throughout cortical circuits linking millions of cells specifically predict these invariants. This might indicate that V1’s intrinsic connectome and its functional architecture adhere to a single optimization principle with high precision and robustness. To validate this hypothesis, it is critical to closely examine the quantitative predictions of alternative candidate theories. Random feedforward wiring within the retino-cortical pathway represents a conceptually appealing alternative to dynamical circuit optimization because random dimension-expanding projections are believed to generically exhibit computationally favorable properties for stimulus representations. Here, we ask whether the quantitative invariants of V1 architecture can be explained as a generic emergent property of random wiring. We generalize and examine the stochastic wiring model proposed by Ringach and coworkers, in which iso-orientation domains in the visual cortex arise through random feedforward connections between semi-regular mosaics of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and visual cortical neurons. We derive closed-form expressions for cortical receptive fields and domain layouts predicted by the model for perfectly hexagonal RGC mosaics. Including spatial disorder in the RGC positions considerably changes the domain layout properties as a function of disorder parameters such as position scatter and its correlations across the retina. However, independent of parameter choice, we find that the model predictions substantially deviate from the layout laws of iso-orientation domains observed experimentally. Considering random wiring with the currently most realistic model of RGC mosaic layouts, a pairwise interacting point process, the