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Sample records for du golfe arabo-persique

  1. Petroleum exploration contribution to the structural history of Golfe du Lin

    SciTech Connect

    Curnelle, R.

    1988-08-01

    Petroleum exploration has strongly contributed to the knowledge of the post-Hercynian structural history of the Golfe du Lion. It shows three stages: (1) Pyrenean orogenesis which started in the Late Cretaceous and culminated during the Eocene (40-75 Ma), (2) Oligocene rifting associated with the oceanic accretion of the Provencal basin, and (3) post-Messinian deformations due to salt tectonics. Pyrenean deformation of the area seems to have been controlled by its Hercynian inheritance: the major transcurrent faults of the Cevenole belt, Nimes, and the Durance. They favored displacement of the deformation in a northeasterly direction along the fault corridors, inside which the overthrust units were put into place. These east-west-oriented structures show northward vergence. The Pyrenean axial zone in this downthrown part of the belt consist of progressively more northerly units offset by transverse faults. The Oligocene rifting is represented by a series of horsts and deeply subsiding grabens linked to preexisting major faults. The horst are deeply eroded and the Mesozoic carbonates are karstified. The extension of the Messinian evaporitic deposits known throughout the Mediterranean basin is located north of the shallower deep-water well. The gravitational deformation of the salt is expressed by a large number of listric faults which originate in the salt bodies. The sedimentary sequence ends with a thick discordant, erosional, undeformed Pliocene-Quaternary series.

  2. Origin and Depositional Processes of Coastal Sands Revealed by Grain-Size Analysis (golfe du Lion, Mediterranean Sea, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barusseau, J. P.; Braud, R.

    2014-12-01

    The study focused on the lower beach and nearshore zone of the Golfe du Lion (northwestern Mediterranean Sea -France). We looked at grain-size distribution in the berm, collision zone, inner and outer bars, lower shoreface applying parametric methods, grain-size modal analysis and a deconvolution program (LNDoGS).Results indicate a mixture of three recognizable sedimentary types (ST1 - ST3 - ST4) and explain grain-size distribution (GSD) of the sands in both multimodal and apparently unimodal GSDs. ST1 flows from the River Rhone, ST3 and 4 are local components originating from either fluvial input or nearshore reworking of Quaternary sediments.A fourth component (ST2), derived in situ from ST1, is found far from the overwhelming footprint of the Rhone river sands, westward in the lower shoreface.The mixing process entails significant variations in grain-size indices and skewness appears as a very sensitive and meaningful parameter. Skewness and bimodality, generated in all zones, are two aspects of the mixing process, depending on the relative proportions of STs.Using LNDoGS makes deciphering the STs a lot easier. It also reveals that some GSDs can result from a combination of 3 sedimentary variants (SVs) belonging to the same ST (monotype grain-size distributions). Monotype mixtures are very abundant on the lower shoreface, significantly present on the berm and inner bar but rare in the most dynamic zones. On the berm they tend towards a lognormal model for only bedload is present in the swash. This trend towards a lognormal model can also be observed on the lower shoreface, possibly indicating the occurrence of suspension as a dominant process.Thus, each segment of the nearshore - foreshore profile can be characterized using coarseness, skewness sign, the presence of locally generated ST2, abundance of bimodalities, occurrence of SVs. Finally, a more detailed description of the spatial properties of grain-size distributions could help explore possible mechanisms

  3. Golf Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... main causes of these injuries include: Lack of flexibility Poor conditioning Excessive play or practice Poor swing mechanics Ground impact forces Intermittent play Poor flexibility is a key risk factor for a golf ...

  4. Stacking pattern and stratigraphic model of reservoirs from a modern analogue to ancient deltaic and siliciclastic deposits: Golfe du Lion, SE France

    SciTech Connect

    Tesson, M.; Bernard, G.; Georges, A.; Christian, R.

    1995-08-01

    The {open_quotes}Golfe du Lion{close_quotes} Pleistocene shelf deposits are used as modern analogues of ancient deltaic and shallow water siliciclastic deposits. At least 6 cyclic superimposed sedimentary packages constituting a seaward thickening wedge are documented, including major progradational clinoforms units bounded by regional unconformities, with their updip terminations. Seismic correlations and geometry models, together with age dating and facies analysis of the uppermost units have been used at regional scale. They allowed to differentiate allocyclic from autocyclic events, to improve our knowledge of the nature of tectonic control on architecture, and to rely the different seismic units, inside the packages, to the environmental changes from interglacial highstand to glacial lowstand in 4 to 5th order cycles. An alternative model of {open_quotes}forced regression{close_quotes} during sea level lowstand was documented and validated. The different illustrated sedimentary units, related to specific parts of the relative sea level curve along a short duration/high amplitude cycle, are: (i) the {open_quotes}forced regression{close_quotes} deposits (ii) the late lowstand massive sands onto the outer shelf (iii) the early transgressive backstepping (?) beach sands, (iii) the late transgressive backslapping parasequences. The sand content inferred from the seismic facies, comforted with the uppermost units facies from data cores, is in agreement with this model.

  5. Video Golf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    George Nauck of ENCORE!!! invented and markets the Advanced Range Performance (ARPM) Video Golf System for measuring the result of a golf swing. After Nauck requested their assistance, Marshall Space Flight Center scientists suggested video and image processing/computing technology, and provided leads on commercial companies that dealt with the pertinent technologies. Nauck contracted with Applied Research Inc. to develop a prototype. The system employs an elevated camera, which sits behind the tee and follows the flight of the ball down range, catching the point of impact and subsequent roll. Instant replay of the video on a PC monitor at the tee allows measurement of the carry and roll. The unit measures distance and deviation from the target line, as well as distance from the target when one is selected. The information serves as an immediate basis for making adjustments or as a record of skill level progress for golfers.

  6. Golf Ball

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Ultra 500 Series golf balls, introduced in 1995 by Wilson Sporting Goods Company, has 500 dimples arranged in a pattern of 60 spherical triangles. The design employs NASA's aerodynamics technology analysis of air loads of the tank and Shuttle orbiter that was performed under the Space Shuttle External Tank program. According to Wilson, this technology provides 'the most symmetrical ball surface available, sustaining initial velocity longer and producing the most stable ball flight for unmatched accuracy and distance.' The dimples are in three sizes, shapes and depths mathematically positioned for the best effect. The selection of dimples and their placement optimizes the interaction of opposing forces of lift and drag. Large dimples reduce air drag, enhance lift, and maintain spin for distance. Small dimples prevent excessive lift that destabilizes the ball flight and the medium size dimples blend the other two.

  7. Le Golf, El Golf, and Le Baseball.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Philip

    Three bilingual booklets are presented listing technical terms for golf and baseball. The golf terms are in French-English and Spanish-English lists; the baseball terms are in French-English. The French terms are taken from French-Canadian newspapers, books, and periodicals, while the Spanish terms are taken from Mexican newspapers, books, and…

  8. The physics of golf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, A. Raymond

    2003-02-01

    An overview of the application of physics to the game of golf is given. The golf swing is modelled as a double pendulum. This model and its variations have been used extensively by researchers in determining the effect that various swing parameters have on clubhead speed. These results as well as examples of three-link models are discussed. Kinematic and kinetic measurements taken on the recorded downswings of golfers as well as force measurements are reviewed. These measurements highlight differences between the swings of skilled and unskilled golfers. Several aspects of the behaviour of a golf ball are examined. Measurements and models of the impact of golf balls with barriers are reviewed. Such measurements have allowed researchers to determine the effect that different golf ball constructions have on their launch parameters. The launch parameters determine not only the length of the golf shot but also the behaviour of the golf ball on impact with the turf. The effect of dimples on the aerodynamics of a golf ball and the length of the golf shot is discussed. Models of the bounce and roll of a golf ball after impact with the turf as well as models of the motion of a putted ball are presented. Researchers have measured and modelled the behaviour of both the shaft and the clubhead during the downswing and at impact. The effect that clubhead mass and loft as well as the shaft length and mass have on the length of a golf shot are considered. Models and measurements of the flexing of the shaft as well as research into the flexing of the clubface and the effects of its surface roughness are presented. An important consideration in clubhead design is its behaviour during off-centre impacts. In line with this, the effects that the curvature of a clubface and the moments of inertia of the clubhead have on the launch parameters and trajectory of an off-centred impacted golf ball are examined.

  9. Memory Golf Clubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Memory Corporation's investigation of shape memory effect, stemming from Marshall Space Flight Center contracts to study materials for the space station, has aided in the development of Zeemet, a proprietary, high-damping shape memory alloy for the golf industry. The Nicklaus Golf Company has created a new line of golf clubs using Zeemet inserts. Its superelastic and high damping attributes translate into more spin on the ball, greater control, and a solid feel.

  10. Upper extremity golf injuries.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Michael A; Lee, Steven K; Strauss, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Golf is a global sport enjoyed by an estimated 60 million people around the world. Despite the common misconception that the risk of injury during the play of golf is minimal, golfers are subject to a myriad of potential pathologies. While the majority of injuries in golf are attributable to overuse, acute traumatic injuries can also occur. As the body's direct link to the golf club, the upper extremities are especially prone to injury. A thorough appreciation of the risk factors and patterns of injury will afford accurate diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of further injury.

  11. Golf injuries. An overview.

    PubMed

    Thériault, G; Lachance, P

    1998-07-01

    Over the years, golf has become an increasingly popular sport, attracting new players of almost all ages and socioeconomic groups. Golf is practised by up to 10 to 20% of the overall adult population in many countries. Beyond the enjoyment of the sport itself, the health-related benefits of the exercise involved in walking up to 10 km and of relaxing in a pleasant natural environment are often reported to be the main motives for adhering to this activity by recreational golfers. Golf is considered to be a moderate risk activity for sports injury; however, excessive time spent golfing and technical deficiencies lead to overuse injuries. These are the 2 main causes of injuries among golfers, and each has specific differences in the pattern in which they occur in professional and amateur golfers. Golf injuries originate either from overuse or from a traumatic origin and primarily affect the elbow, wrist, shoulder and the dorsolumbar sites. Professional and weekend golfers, although showing a similar overall anatomical distribution of injuries by body segment, tend to present differences in the ranking of injury occurrence by anatomical site; these differences can be explained by their playing habits and the biomechanical characteristics of their golf swing. Many of these injuries can be prevented by a preseason, and year-round, sport-specific conditioning programme including: (i) muscular strengthening, flexibility and aerobic exercise components; (ii) a short, practical, pre-game warm-up routine; and (iii) the adjustment of an individual's golf swing to meet their physical capacities and limitations through properly supervised golf lessons. Finally, the correct selection of golf equipment and an awareness of the environmental conditions and etiquette of golf can also contribute to making golf a safe and enjoyable lifetime activity.

  12. Playing Golf Is Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jill S.; Pfluge, Kevin F.

    2010-01-01

    Golf is a lifelong activity that people of all ages can enjoy if they experience success and have fun. Early involvement in the sport facilitates the development of the ability to strike an object with an implement. Striking with implements can be challenging for young children and teachers, but golf can be taught in all elementary school settings…

  13. Playing Golf Is Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jill S.; Pfluge, Kevin F.

    2010-01-01

    Golf is a lifelong activity that people of all ages can enjoy if they experience success and have fun. Early involvement in the sport facilitates the development of the ability to strike an object with an implement. Striking with implements can be challenging for young children and teachers, but golf can be taught in all elementary school settings…

  14. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  15. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  16. Golf: A Game of Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Golf has become a popular sport for kids throughout the world; however, many do not realize that it is also a sport that offers benefits to children with physical challenges. Golf can be used for recreational purposes and as a motivational tool for rehabilitation. These two principles serve as the foundation upon which Texas Scottish Rite Hospital…

  17. Sideline and event management in golf.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, L Tyler

    2011-01-01

    Golf has great popularity as a spectator sport, as well as a participation sport. Providing coverage for golf events can range from mass event coverage for large professional tournaments to provision of injury care at local golf events. This article provides a brief introduction to the game of golf for those unfamiliar with its play, an overview of the types of injuries seen, and consideration in providing care for a variety of golf competitions.

  18. Children's misadventures with golfing equipment.

    PubMed

    Fradkin, Andrea J; Cameron, Peter A; Gabbe, Belinda J

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe injuries sustained by children less than 15 years of age associated with golfing equipment resulting in presentation to an emergency department. These findings can then be used to highlight potential injury prevention strategies. Retrospective analysis of data from the Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset was performed. Golf-related injury cases were identified for the period April 1997 - December 2002. Cases where the text description of the injury event included the word "golf" were extracted for analysis. Text narratives of all cases were reviewed and cases occurring during golf play or practice or at a golf course were excluded from the analysis. There were 309 presentations to an emergency department for treatment of an injury caused by golfing equipment in children less than 15 years of age. The majority of presentations were male (71.5%) and children aged 5-9 years presented most commonly (53.1%). Head injuries were the most common reason for presentation (84.4%), with open wounds being the most common type of injury (68.5%). Being struck by an object (96.8%) was the most frequent cause of injury. Whilst relatively uncommon, golf equipment injuries to children could be prevented by attention to community safety and awareness of correct storage of golfing equipment. In addition, education of children regarding the safe handling and use of golf equipment could be useful. This could help reduce the number of emergency department visits and hospital admissions, thereby contributing to the reduction of costs associated with injury.

  19. Golf courses and wetland fauna.

    PubMed

    Colding, Johan; Lundberg, Jakob; Lundberg, Stefan; Andersson, Erik

    2009-09-01

    Golf courses are often considered to be chemical-intensive ecosystems with negative impacts on fauna. Here we provide evidence that golf courses can contribute to the support and conservation of wetland fauna, i.e., amphibians and macroinvertebrates. Comparisons of amphibian occurrence, diversity of macroinvetebrates, and occurrence of species of conservation concern were made between permanent freshwater ponds surveyed on golf courses around Sweden's capital city, Stockholm, and off-course ponds in nature-protected areas and residential parklands. A total of 71 macroinvertebrate species were recorded in the field study, with no significant difference between golf course ponds and off-course ponds at the species, genus, or family levels. A within-group similarities test showed that golf course ponds have a more homogenous species composition than ponds in nature-protected areas and ponds in residential parkland. Within the macroinvertebrate group, a total of 11 species of odonates were identified, with no difference detected between the categories of ponds, nor any spatial autocorrelation. Significant differences were found between pond categories in the occurrence of five species of amphibians, although anuran occurrence did not differ between ponds. The great crested newt (Triturus cristatus) was significantly associated with golf course ponds, but the smooth newt (Triturus vulgaris) was not. We found no evidence of any correlation between pond size and occurrence of amphibians. Among the taxa of conservation concern included in the sample, all amphibians are nationally protected in Sweden, with the internationally threatened T. cristatus more frequently found in golf course ponds. Among macroinveterbrates of conservation status, the large white-faced darter dragonfly (Leucorrhinia pectoralis) was only detected in golf course ponds, and Tricholeiochiton fagesi (Trichoptera) was only found in one off-course pond. GIS results revealed that golf courses provide over

  20. Golf ball-related head injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jimmy; Kaplan, Allen M

    2008-08-01

    Golf has become one of the most popular sports in the world. Golf-related head injuries are well-documented and include golf club, golf cart, and more recently golf ball trauma. We report on 2 cases of golf ball-associated traumatic brain injuries. The unique biomechanics of golf ball head trauma are reviewed. Initially golf injuries may cause minor clinical signs, with absence of skull fractures. However, the association of significant underlying intracranial hemorrhage should prompt a thorough neurologic evaluation.

  1. What Research Tells the Golf Instructor about the Golf Swing and Putting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Robert E.

    The purpose of this survey was to clarify some misconceptions and challenge some common practices in teaching golf skills. Over 100 research studies in golf have been reviewed and summarized. The following categories relating to the golf swing were examined: (1) grip; (2) videotape; (3) electronic golf swing analyzer; (4) teaching methods; (5)…

  2. What Research Tells the Golf Instructor about the Golf Swing and Putting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Robert E.

    The purpose of this survey was to clarify some misconceptions and challenge some common practices in teaching golf skills. Over 100 research studies in golf have been reviewed and summarized. The following categories relating to the golf swing were examined: (1) grip; (2) videotape; (3) electronic golf swing analyzer; (4) teaching methods; (5)…

  3. Physiological correlates of golf performance.

    PubMed

    Wells, Greg D; Elmi, Maryam; Thomas, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Golf is now a sport where physical training is an integral component of elite players' practice and contributes to the ability to play at a high level consistently and without injury. Relationships between physical conditioning and golf performance have not been reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to identify physiological correlates of golf performance in elite golfers under laboratory (ball speed and distance) and tournament conditions (average score, greens in regulation, short game measures, and putting accuracy).The correlation analysis revealed significant associations between mass, height, body mass index, sit height, arm length, and predicted Vo2max and golf measures. Significant correlations were noted between anterior abdominal muscle endurance and driver carry distance (r = 0.38; P = 0.04) and average putt distance after a chip shot (r = -0.44; P = 0.03), between dominant side abdominal muscle endurance and average putt distance after a chip shot (r = -0.43; P = 0.03), and between nondominant-side abdominal muscle endurance and average putt distance after a sand shot (r = -0.59; P = 0.001). Further correlations were found among sit and reach and driver carry distance (r = -0.36; P = 0.04), 5-iron ball speed (r = - 0.41; P = 0.02), 5-iron carry distance (r = -0.44; P = 0.01), and score (r = 0.43; P = 0.03). Correlation analysis revealed significant associations among peripheral muscle test results, golf driver results, 5-iron ball measures, score, and putting efficacy.These results may be important for developing training programs based on sound physiological rationale and for the development of talent identification programs. Results suggest that core strength and stability, flexibility, balance, and peripheral muscle strength are correlated with golf performance and should be included in golf training programs.

  4. Golf Injuries: They Really Do Happen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1987-01-01

    Although golf is not a rigorous sport, it has its share of injuries. Greater attention to preplay stretching and conditioning programs and to the proper mechanics of the golf swing can help prevent injuries. (Author/CB)

  5. Golf Injuries: They Really Do Happen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1987-01-01

    Although golf is not a rigorous sport, it has its share of injuries. Greater attention to preplay stretching and conditioning programs and to the proper mechanics of the golf swing can help prevent injuries. (Author/CB)

  6. Bringing Golf Links Up to Par

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fream, Ronald

    1976-01-01

    When the process of remodeling a golf course is undertaken with professional and thorough planning, creative design, and proper construction techniques, the finished product can provide many years of challenging and esthetically pleasing golf play. (JD)

  7. Disc Golf, a Growing Sport

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Joseph T.; Jones, Richard E.; Runstrom, Michael; Hardy, Jolene

    2015-01-01

    Background Disc golf is a sport played much like traditional golf, but rather than using a ball and club, players throw flying discs with various throwing motions. It has been played by an estimated 8 to 12 million people in the United States. Like all sports, injuries sustained while playing disc golf are not uncommon. Although formalized in the 1970s, it has grown at a rapid pace; however, disc golf–related injuries have yet to be described in the medical literature. Purpose To describe the most common injuries incurred by disc golf players while comparing the different types of throwing styles. Study Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods The data in this study were collected from 883 disc golf players who responded to an online survey collected over a 1-month period. Respondents answered 49 questions related to demographics, experience, style of play, and injury details. Using a chi-square analysis, common injuries sustained in players using backhand and forehand throwing styles were compared. Results More than 81% of respondents stated that they had sustained an injury playing disc golf, including injuries to the elbow (n = 325), shoulder (n = 305), back (n = 218), and knee (n = 199). The injuries were most commonly described as a muscle strain (n = 241), sprain (n = 162), and tendinitis (n = 145). The type of throw primarily used by players varied, with 86.2% using backhand, 12.7% using forehand, and 1.1% using an overhead throw. Players using a forehand throw were more likely to sustain an elbow injury (P = .014). Many players (n = 115) stated they had undergone surgery due to a disc golf–related injury, with the most common surgeries including meniscal, shoulder, spine, and foot/ankle surgeries. Conclusion The majority of surveyed disc golfers sustained at least 1 injury while playing disc golf, with many requiring surgery. The types of injuries sustained by players varied by the types of throw primarily used. As the sport of disc golf continues

  8. Proper swing technique and biomechanics of golf.

    PubMed

    Adlington, G S

    1996-01-01

    Golf is an alluring sport because there are many different ways for an individual to create good, effective golf swings. The key for teachers and players is to design good swings that are not physically debilitating. The human body certainly was not designed with golf in mind. That does not mean, however, that golf must be physically damaging. The current fixation on injury has more to do today with the type of player than the game itself. Many of the new players in golf today are older, generally between 30 and 55 years. They come to golf from other sports, such as tennis, jogging, basketball, baseball, and so on. The injuries we see today in golf have probably been brewing in other sports for many years. Golf is simply the current sport of choice, but it often is seen as the culprit for injury. This is all the more reason for continuing to educate players and teachers in the hope that they can create pain-free and injury-free golf swings. If injury prevention moves to the forefront of modern-day teaching, there will be an opportunity to change the way golf is taught and played. That is a mission well worth undertaking.

  9. Golf and racquet sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jon A; Miller, Bruce S; Morag, Yoav

    2005-12-01

    There are specific injuries that are common in golf and racquet sports. These abnormalities have a predilection for specific structures as well and can be divided into two categories on the basis of etiology as either chronic repetitive injury or acute trauma. With golf injuries, upper extremity abnormalities prevail and include rotator cuff disease, epicondylitis, wrist tenosynovitis, and hamate hook fracture. Thoracolumbar spine pain can also occur. The order of frequency of these ailments is different for professional and recreational athletes. With racquet injuries, as in tennis, lower extremity injuries are more common and include medial gastrocnemius and Achilles tendon abnormalities, although shoulder, elbow, and wrist abnormalities may also occur. Knowledge of the biomechanics behind each sport is also helpful in understanding the pathophysiology of injury and in part explains the findings seen at imaging.

  10. Parks and golf course workers.

    PubMed

    Duvall, K

    2001-01-01

    Most of the work done by parks and golf course workers is performed outside, and they are subject to risks similar to those of other outdoor workers, such as temperature and weather-related problems, infectious diseases, and poisonous plants, snakes, and spiders. They are also exposed to physical hazards related to noise and operation of heavy equipment. Chemical hazards result from use of pesticides and solvents. This chapter reviews pertinent OSHA regulations, pre-placement strategies, and medical surveillance exams, and recommends preventive programs. More research is needed to determine specific hazards and work-related injury and illness rates for parks and golf course workers, so that effective preventive programs can be designed.

  11. Curve Numbers for Golf Course Watersheds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Storm event runoff is a critical component to the environmental and structural design related to hydrology. The curve number (CN) method is a robust and accepted method for determining excess rainfall. Measured CNs for golf course watersheds and for that matter hydrologic data from golf course wate...

  12. Golf clubs: hidden home hazard for children.

    PubMed

    Ridenour, M V

    1998-06-01

    Different accident patterns for golf equipment were noted for adults and children. Children are more likely than adults to be hit by a golf club as bystanders who entered the swing zone of a golf club. Previous publications investigating accidents involving golf clubs and over 2000 incidents involving emergency room treatment of children injured by golf clubs were reviewed. Most injuries occurred when unsupervised children played with golf clubs at home. When studies limit their focus to accident victims, who are currently being treated in the emergency room, hospital, or outpatient facility, no deaths are reported. A separate analysis of death certificates of children between the ages of 4 and 14 years also identified death as a possible consequence as 19 deaths have been reported to the National Injury Information Clearinghouse. Based on these three sources of data, golf clubs should not be used by children unsupervised given the potential for serious and permanent head injury and death. Recommendations for parents and manufactures regarding the safety of golf clubs are provided.

  13. A synoptic view of golf course management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katula, Robert L.

    1996-03-01

    The maintenance, construction, and redesign of private, public, and municipal golf courses in the United States is a multi-billion dollar industry. The entire golf course maintenance market, according to the National Golf Foundation, was 6.2 billion per year in 1991. The average maintenance cost in the United States was approximately 40,000 per hole per year for the over 15,000 golf courses in the United States in 1991. Golf course maintenance costs have risen 500 percent from 1971 to 1991. These costs are projected to continue to increase at a rate of 8 percent per year due to the demand for quality playing surfaces, increased use of non-potable water, and taxes on water and chemicals required to maintain turfgrass. The golf course construction and redesign market continues to maintain a rate of over 300 new golf courses and redesigned courses completed each year. The average construction costs run from 4 to 6 million and the average redesign costs 2 to 3 million per course. In order to create a perfectly maintained golf course, golf course managers may use as many as 25 different pesticides, fertilizers, and herbicides to control insects and turf disease. Further, turfgrass is often stressed to its limits when kept at the unnatural heights required to obtain firm and fast greens and fairways. The daily practice of living on the edge is often done with limited knowledge of changes taking place on the golf course, of the location of soil types and fertility, of surface and subsurface drainage, and of previous maintenance practices. There is a growing concern in the golf course industry that the concentration of chemicals and water required to maintain today's golf course may endanger ground water supplies for the surrounding ecosystem. This paper will describe the general methodology PTS used to develop a new management system for the maintenance, construction, and redesign of golf courses. The management system integrates remote sensing technology, geographic

  14. Golf injuries of the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, Ethan R; Lumsden, Boyd

    2005-01-01

    Golf has demonstrated increasing popularity and with this heightened enthusiasm has come an increased awareness of the significant number of injuries associated with playing golf. While back injuries represent the most commonly injured specific body part, upper extremity injuries are most frequent overall and the most likely to result in loss of play. Patterns of injury differ based on level of play and time spent playing or practicing golf. Among golf professionals, the hand/wrist is the most commonly injured upper extremity structure. Among amateurs, the elbow is most commonly injured. The vast majority of upper extremity injuries are due to overuse. Age, ability, equipment, and swing mechanics also play contributing roles. Most upper extremity golf injuries can be successfully treated with appropriate cessation or modification of play, anti-inflammatory modalities, and rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is rarely required, but if needed can prove successful in a high percentage of patients.

  15. Perceived distance during golf putting.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yumiko; Koyama, Satoshi; Inomata, Kimihiro

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the effect of anxiety states on the relationship between golf-putting distance and performance in an environment requiring high movement accuracy. Twenty-three amateur golfers attempted 15 putts at each of three putting distances, 1.25, 1.50, and 1.75m, under conditions characterized by both control demands and pressure. All attempts were recorded, and kinematic features were analyzed. Under conditions involving an audience and a monetary reward, the mean score on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Y-1 and the mean heart rate increased by 14 points and 11bpm, respectively. We grouped participants on an a posteriori basis using the median split. The backswing of high-anxiety performers shortened, the downswing speed declined, and the relative time to peak club-head velocity changed when putting under pressure from 1.25m. In contrast, no change in backswing or relative time to peak velocity was observed in low-anxiety performers, although impact velocity increased under this condition. These results indicate that the degree to which both low- and high-anxiety golfers were anxious about failure affected motor control at the 1.25-m distance, suggesting that a distortion in perceived distance may result from the interaction between putting distance and anxiety related to failure during golf putting.

  16. Golf-induced injuries of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Murray, P M; Cooney, W P

    1996-01-01

    Golf injuries of the wrist are rare, but when they occur they can be devastating for the avid golfer, competitive amateur golfer, or the professional golfer, as the hand and wrist are so integral to the game. The majority of golf injuries are overuse injuries of the wrist flexor or extensor tendons. The left wrist (in the right-handed golfer) is the most common location. Analysis of the golf swing finds excessive motion of the left wrist (in the right-handed golfer), along with a catapulting function, accounting for vulnerability of the left wrist to injury. Hyperextension and radial deviation of the right wrist may cause impingement syndrome and injury may also occur during impact of the swing phase. The majority of golf-induced overuse syndromes of the wrist are successfully treated nonoperatively, but may require restriction from golf for an extended period of time. Many of the wrist problems that we see can often be related to a strong grip (left hand positioned clockwise on the golf club handle), overgripping (too tight a grip) golf club grips in poor repair, or poor swing techniques. The most common bony injury of the wrist is fracture of the hook of the hamate. This injury is a source of chronic ulnar-sided wrist pain in the golfer and is often diagnosed late or left undiagnosed. Proper-fitting golf clubs, proper swing technique, and avoidance of obstacles may prevent this injury. Like any other sport, golf requires the use of proper equipment, proper technique, and conditioning to prevent injury.

  17. Designing Hollow Nano Gold Golf Balls

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hollow/porous nanoparticles, including nanocarriers, nanoshells, and mesoporous materials have applications in catalysis, photonics, biosensing, and delivery of theranostic agents. Using a hierarchical template synthesis scheme, we have synthesized a nanocarrier mimicking a golf ball, consisting of (i) solid silica core with a pitted gold surface and (ii) a hollow/porous gold shell without silica. The template consisted of 100 nm polystyrene beads attached to a larger silica core. Selective gold plating of the core followed by removal of the polystyrene beads produced a golf ball-like nanostructure with 100 nm pits. Dissolution of the silica core produced a hollow/porous golf ball-like nanostructure. PMID:24937196

  18. Designing hollow nano gold golf balls.

    PubMed

    Landon, Preston B; Mo, Alexander H; Zhang, Chen; Emerson, Chris D; Printz, Adam D; Gomez, Alan F; DeLaTorre, Christopher J; Colburn, David A M; Anzenberg, Paula; Eliceiri, Matthew; O'Connell, Connor; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-07-09

    Hollow/porous nanoparticles, including nanocarriers, nanoshells, and mesoporous materials have applications in catalysis, photonics, biosensing, and delivery of theranostic agents. Using a hierarchical template synthesis scheme, we have synthesized a nanocarrier mimicking a golf ball, consisting of (i) solid silica core with a pitted gold surface and (ii) a hollow/porous gold shell without silica. The template consisted of 100 nm polystyrene beads attached to a larger silica core. Selective gold plating of the core followed by removal of the polystyrene beads produced a golf ball-like nanostructure with 100 nm pits. Dissolution of the silica core produced a hollow/porous golf ball-like nanostructure.

  19. Golf hand prosthesis performance of transradial amputees.

    PubMed

    Carey, Stephanie L; Wernke, Matthew M; Lura, Derek J; Kahle, Jason T; Dubey, Rajiv V; Highsmith, M Jason

    2015-06-01

    Typical upper limb prostheses may limit sports participation; therefore, specialized terminal devices are often needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of transradial amputees to play golf using a specialized terminal device. Club head speed, X-factor, and elbow motion of two individuals with transradial amputations using an Eagle Golf terminal device were compared to a non-amputee during a golf swing. Measurements were collected pre/post training with various stances and grips. Both prosthesis users preferred a right-handed stance initially; however, after training, one preferred a left-handed stance. The amputees had slower club head speeds and a lower X-factor compared to the non-amputee golfer, but increased their individual elbow motion on the prosthetic side after training. Amputees enjoyed using the device, and it may provide kinematic benefits indicated by the increase in elbow flexion on the prosthetic side. The transradial amputees were able to swing a golf club with sufficient repetition, form, and velocity to play golf recreationally. Increased elbow flexion on the prosthetic side suggests a potential benefit from using the Eagle Golf terminal device. Participating in recreational sports can increase amputees' health and quality of life. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  20. Archery - Golf Guide with Official Rules. June 1972 - June 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Margaret L., Ed.; Michalson, Doddy, Ed.

    This guide for women's archery and golf dated June 1972 - June 1974 details rules and standards as well as the Division for Girls and Women's Sports (DGWS) statement of beliefs. Articles on archery nomenclature, archery interest builders, and archery golf are included in the section on archery. Articles dealing with golf take up such topics as…

  1. Expert Golf Instructors' Student-Teacher Interaction Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schempp, Paul; McCullick, Bryan; St. Pierre, Peter; Woorons, Sophie; You, JeongAe; Clark, Betsy

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the dominant instructional interaction patterns of expert golf instructors. Instructors (N = 22) were selected by the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) Teaching based on the following criteria: (a) 10 or more years of golf teaching experience, (b) LPGA certification, (c) awards received for the…

  2. The Four Keys to Teaching Golf in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasil, Jay

    2006-01-01

    Golf is a lifetime sport that can have a positive influence on children in many ways. Golf provides physical educators a means of teaching character education, etiquette, and interdisciplinary concepts such as math, in addition to physical education objectives such as motor skills, coordination, and flexibility. When teaching golf in schools,…

  3. The Four Keys to Teaching Golf in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasil, Jay

    2006-01-01

    Golf is a lifetime sport that can have a positive influence on children in many ways. Golf provides physical educators a means of teaching character education, etiquette, and interdisciplinary concepts such as math, in addition to physical education objectives such as motor skills, coordination, and flexibility. When teaching golf in schools,…

  4. On the efficiency of the golf swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rod

    2006-12-01

    A non-driven double pendulum model is used to explain the principle underlying the surprising efficiency of the golf swing. The principle can be described as a parametric energy transfer between the arms and the club head due to the changing moment of inertia of the club. The transfer is a consequence of conservation of energy and angular momentum. Because the pendulum is not driven by an external force, it shows that the golfer need do little more than accelerate the arms with the wrists cocked and let the double pendulum transfer kinetic energy to the club head. A driven double pendulum model is used to study factors affecting the efficiency of a real golf swing. It is concluded that the wrist-cock angle is the most significant efficiency-determining parameter under the golfer's control and that improvements in golf technology have had a significant impact on driving distance.

  5. Effects of fatigue on golf performance.

    PubMed

    Higdon, Nicholas R; Finch, W Holmes; Leib, Daniel; Dugan, Eric L

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if body position, weight transfer, and/or pelvis/trunk rotations changed as a result of a golf specific fatiguing protocol and whether these changes affected resultant club head velocity at impact and shot consistency. Six male golfers and one female golfer participated in the study, who had a mean age, height, and body mass of 23.9 +/- 3.9 years, 177.4 +/- 4.9 cm, and 75.3 +/- 9.9 kg, respectively. Path analysis was used to determine the relationships between fatigue, biomechanical variables, and resultant club head velocity at impact and shot consistency. In the statistical models representing the effects of biomechanical variables calculated at the top of the swing and ball contact, golf specific fatigue was associated with a 2.0% and 2.5% reduction in the club head velocity and a 7.1% and 9.4% improvement in the shot consistency, respectively. These data suggest that golf specific fatigue was not related to the initial lower body sagittal plane angles at address nor was simulated golf specific fatigue related to peak transverse plane pelvis and trunk rotational velocities (or their timings) in a manner that indicates a relationship to resultant club head velocity and shot consistency.

  6. Golf in the Wind: Exploring the Effect of Wind on the Accuracy of Golf Shots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghoobian, Neda; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Golf play is highly dependent on the weather conditions with wind being the most significant factor in the unpredictability of the ball landing position. The direction and strength of the wind alters the aerodynamic forces on a ball in flight, and consequently its speed, distance and direction of travel. The fact that local wind conditions on any particular hole change over times-scales ranging all the way from a few seconds to minutes, hours and days introduces an element of variability in the ball trajectory that is not understood. Any such analysis is complicated by the effect of the local terrestrial and vegetation topology, as well as the inherent complexity of golf-ball aerodynamics. In the current study, we use computational modeling to examine the unpredictability of the shots under different wind conditions over Hole-12 at the Augusta National Golf Club, where the Masters Golf Tournament takes place every year. Despite this being the shortest hole on the course, the presence of complex vegetation canopy around this hole introduces a spatial and temporal variability in wind conditions that evokes uncertainty and even fear among professional golfers. We use our model to examine the effect of wind direction and wind-speed on the accuracy of the golf shots at this hole and use the simulations to determine the key aerodynamic factors that affect the accuracy of the shot.

  7. The effects of golf expertise and presentation modality on memory for golf and everyday items.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Katinka; MacMahon, Clare; Misirlisoy, Mine

    2008-06-01

    The present study assessed whether golf expertise, presentation modality, and domain relevance affected memory for golf-related and everyday items. Forty-eight experienced golfers and 48 non-golfers were compared in their memory for golf-related ("putt to the hole") and everyday ("turn on the lamp") items. To-be-remembered items were presented verbally, visually, or were enacted. Enacted information was recalled best, followed by visually presented information. Combined effects of modality and golf expertise on recall of golf items were demonstrated on immediate but not on delayed recall. The findings suggest that recall of domain-relevant information is optimal when one has relevant background knowledge, and under conditions of visual encoding. The data support research on facilitation of domain-relevant knowledge on recall [Weber, N., & Brewer, N. (2003). Expert memory: The interaction of stimulus structure, attention, and expertise. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 17, 295-308]. Interpersonal body representation may have played a role in recall processes among experts [Thomas, R., Press, C., & Haggard, P. (2006). Shared representations in body perception. Acta Psychologica, 121, 317-330].

  8. Sensorimotor Rhythm Neurofeedback Enhances Golf Putting Performance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming-Yang; Huang, Chung-Ju; Chang, Yu-Kai; Koester, Dirk; Schack, Thomas; Hung, Tsung-Min

    2015-12-01

    Sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) activity has been related to automaticity during skilled action execution. However, few studies have bridged the causal link between SMR activity and sports performance. This study investigated the effect of SMR neurofeedback training (SMR NFT) on golf putting performance. We hypothesized that preelite golfers would exhibit enhanced putting performance after SMR NFT. Sixteen preelite golfers were recruited and randomly assigned into either an SMR or a control group. Participants were asked to perform putting while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded, both before and after intervention. Our results showed that the SMR group performed more accurately when putting and exhibited greater SMR power than the control group after 8 intervention sessions. This study concludes that SMR NFT is effective for increasing SMR during action preparation and for enhancing golf putting performance. Moreover, greater SMR activity might be an EEG signature of improved attention processing, which induces superior putting performance.

  9. 2012 Problem 15: Frustrating Golf Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan; Zhu, Zheyuan; Gao, Wenli; Wang, Sihui

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the condition for a golf ball to escape from a hole. The two determining factors are the ball's initial velocity v0 and its deviation from the center of the hole d. There is a critical escaping velocity vc for every deviation d. The ball's motion is analyzed by calculating the change of velocity whenever the ball collides with the hole. The critical conditions predicted by our theory are verified through experiment.

  10. Development of a simulated round of golf.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Philip R; van Paridon, Kjell; French, Duncan N; Thomas, Kevin; Gordon, Dan A

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a laboratory-based treadmill simulation of the on-course physiological demands of an 18-hole round of golf and to identify the underlying physiological responses. Eight amateur golfers completed a round of golf during which heart rate (HR), steps taken, and global positioning system (GPS) data were assessed. The GPS data were used to create a simulated discontinuous round on a treadmill. Steps taken and HR were recorded during the simulated round. During the on-course round, players covered a mean (+/-SD) of 8,251 +/- 450 m, taking 12,766 +/- 1,530 steps. The mean exercise intensity during the on-course round was 31.4 +/- 9.3% of age-predicted heart rate reserve (%HRR) or 55.6 +/- 4.4% of age-predicted maximum HR (%HRmax). There were no significant differences between the simulated round and the on-course round for %HRR (P = .537) or %HRmax (P = .561) over the entire round or for each individual hole. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between the two rounds for steps taken. Typical error values for steps taken, HR, %HRmax, and %HRR were 1,083 steps, +/-7.6 b x min(-1), +/-4.5%, and +/-8.1%, respectively. Overall, the simulated round of golf successfully recreated the demands of an on-course round. This simulated round could be used as a research tool to assess the extent of fatigue during a round of golf or the impact of various interventions on golfers.

  11. OVERHILLS GOLF COURSE LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SPECTATOR SHELTER BACK UP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERHILLS GOLF COURSE LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SPECTATOR SHELTER BACK UP FAIRWAY #1 - Overhills, Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Approximately 15 miles NW of Fayetteville, Overhills, Harnett County, NC

  12. Leidos Reclaims Defelice Cup at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Leidos Biomedical Research reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from NCI at the eighth annual Ronald H. Defelice golf tournament, held October 14. The final score was 15–7, with Leidos Biomed tying the series 4 to 4. Fourteen players on each team battled it out at Rattlewood golf course in Mount Airy, Md.

  13. Neuromotor Issues in the Learning and Control of Golf Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Christopher A.

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical and practical issues related to the neuromotor control of a golf swing are presented in this paper. The typical strategy for golf training consists of high volume repetition with an emphasis on a large variety of isolated swing characteristics. The student is frequently instructed to maintain consistent performance in each swing with…

  14. Environmental factors in golf course development: a case study

    Treesearch

    Lisa Mason-Fradette; Robert S. Bristow

    1995-01-01

    Environmental constraints become apparent when one considers the maintenance and operation of a golf course. The high demand for water, proximity to surface or ground water supplies and the potential threats by the perpetuation of the grounds. This investigation of a new golf course construction site will identify the threats to the environment.

  15. Neuromotor Issues in the Learning and Control of Golf Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Christopher A.

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical and practical issues related to the neuromotor control of a golf swing are presented in this paper. The typical strategy for golf training consists of high volume repetition with an emphasis on a large variety of isolated swing characteristics. The student is frequently instructed to maintain consistent performance in each swing with…

  16. Leidos Reclaims Defelice Cup at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Leidos Biomedical Research reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from NCI at the eighth annual Ronald H. Defelice golf tournament, held October 14. The final score was 15–7, with Leidos Biomed tying the series 4 to 4. Fourteen players on each team battled it out at Rattlewood golf course in Mount Airy, Md.

  17. Using Sport Education to Teach the Lifetime Sport of Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarboro, Shot; Pritchard, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Golf is a lifetime sport activity that can be taught in physical education classes. How one teaches golf in physical education could influence whether students will want to continue to participate outside of physical education. The sport education model (SEM) is an instructional model that promotes student learning in all three domains by ensuring…

  18. Using Sport Education to Teach the Lifetime Sport of Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarboro, Shot; Pritchard, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Golf is a lifetime sport activity that can be taught in physical education classes. How one teaches golf in physical education could influence whether students will want to continue to participate outside of physical education. The sport education model (SEM) is an instructional model that promotes student learning in all three domains by ensuring…

  19. The relationships between golf and health: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Murray, A D; Daines, L; Archibald, D; Hawkes, R A; Schiphorst, C; Kelly, P; Grant, L; Mutrie, N

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationships between golf and health. Design Scoping review. Data sources Published and unpublished reports of any age or language, identified by searching electronic databases, platforms, reference lists, websites and from consulting experts. Review methods A 3-step search strategy identified relevant published primary and secondary studies as well as grey literature. Identified studies were screened for final inclusion. Data were extracted using a standardised tool, to form (1) a descriptive analysis and (2) a thematic summary. Results and discussion 4944 records were identified with an initial search. 301 studies met criteria for the scoping review. Golf can provide moderate intensity physical activity and is associated with physical health benefits that include improved cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic profiles, and improved wellness. There is limited evidence related to golf and mental health. The incidence of golfing injury is moderate, with back injuries the most frequent. Accidental head injuries are rare, but can have serious consequences. Conclusions Practitioners and policymakers can be encouraged to support more people to play golf, due to associated improved physical health and mental well-being, and a potential contribution to increased life expectancy. Injuries and illnesses associated with golf have been identified, and risk reduction strategies are warranted. Further research priorities include systematic reviews to further explore the cause and effect nature of the relationships described. Research characterising golf's contribution to muscular strengthening, balance and falls prevention as well as further assessing the associations and effects between golf and mental health are also indicated. PMID:27697939

  20. Mapping soil water content on golf course greens with GPR

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be an effective and efficient method for high-resolution mapping of volumetric water content in the sand layer directly beneath the ground surface at a golf course green. This information could potentially be very useful to golf course superintendents for determi...

  1. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf.

    PubMed

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and severity of injury, and functional outcomes. Seventy percent of the children sustained a TBI from a fall. We also found that playing golf was associated with 40% of the TBIs, with three (30%) children being unrestrained passengers in a moving golf cart and another one (10%) was struck by a golf club. Injury awareness could have benefited or prevented most injuries, and school nurses are in the best position to provide preventative practice education. In golf-centric communities, prevention of golf-related injuries should include education within the schools.

  2. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    PubMed Central

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0–15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and severity of injury, and functional outcomes. Seventy percent of the children sustained a TBI from a fall. We also found that playing golf was associated with 40% of the TBIs, with three (30%) children being unrestrained passengers in a moving golf cart and another one (10%) was struck by a golf club. Injury awareness could have benefited or prevented most injuries, and school nurses are in the best position to provide preventative practice education. In golf-centric communities, prevention of golf-related injuries should include education within the schools. PMID:25899097

  3. Golf cart-related injuries in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Watson, Daniel S; Mehan, Tracy J; Smith, Gary A; McKenzie, Lara B

    2008-07-01

    Golf carts today are used in a variety of public and private settings. Injuries related to golf carts are an important and increasing problem for people of all ages. This study analyzes trends and potential causes of nonfatal golf cart-related injury on a national level. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database was used to examine all cases of nonfatal golf cart-related injury treated in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) from 1990 to 2006. Analysis was conducted in 2007. An estimated 147,696 (95% CI=144,404; 150,987) injuries, involving individuals aged 2 months to 96 years, were treated in EDs in the U.S. for golf cart-related injuries during the study period. Injuries to children (aged<16) constituted 31.2% of the cases. The most common type of injury was soft tissue damage (47.7%). Patients required hospitalization in 7.8% of the cases. Falling from a golf cart was the most common cause of injury (38.3%). Of golf cart-related injuries with a reported location, 70.3% occurred at sports facilities, 15.2% occurred on streets or public property, and 14.5% occurred around a home or farm. The number of golf cart-related injuries increased steadily each year, with an increase of 132.3% over the 17-year study period. Given the growing capabilities and popularity of golf carts, coupled with the marked increase in golf cart-related injuries observed over the study period (>130%), intensified efforts are needed to prevent these injuries, especially among children.

  4. Medical cover for 'The Open' golf championship.

    PubMed Central

    Hadden, W A; Kelly, S; Pumford, N

    1992-01-01

    A review of 10 years' provision of medical cover at a major golf championship is presented. The average consultation rate was approximately 1 in 200 of those attending of whom 3% required transfer to hospital, the majority to orthopaedic or general medical departments. Familiarity with acute resuscitation and musculoskeletal complaints is required of the medical attendants. The provision of physiotherapy and chiropody services is essential, especially for the participants' complaints, two-thirds of which affected the axial skeleton. Good communications and close liaison with the Chief Marshal, Police and Ambulance Services are vital. PMID:1422644

  5. Movement Variability in the Golf Swing: Theoretical, Methodological, and Practical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazier, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Movement variability in the golf swing has recently been identified as a priority for future research in golf science. Although this ubiquitous aspect of golf performance has featured in previous empirical investigations of the golf swing, it has tended to be subordinate and studied as an adjunct to other more conventional research questions.…

  6. Movement Variability in the Golf Swing: Theoretical, Methodological, and Practical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazier, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Movement variability in the golf swing has recently been identified as a priority for future research in golf science. Although this ubiquitous aspect of golf performance has featured in previous empirical investigations of the golf swing, it has tended to be subordinate and studied as an adjunct to other more conventional research questions.…

  7. Kinetic Assessment of Golf Shoe Outer Sole Design Features

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Neal A.; Dyson, Rosemary J.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed human kinetics in relation to golf shoe outer sole design features during the golf swing using a driver club by measuring both within the shoe, and beneath the shoe at the natural grass interface. Three different shoes were assessed: metal 7- spike shoe, alternative 7-spike shoe, and a flat soled shoe. In-shoe plantar pressure data were recorded using Footscan RS International pressure insoles and sampling at 500 Hz. Simultaneously ground reaction force at the shoe outer sole was measured using 2 natural grass covered Kistler force platforms and 1000 Hz data acquisition. Video recording of the 18 right-handed golfers at 200 Hz was undertaken while the golfer performed 5 golf shots with his own driver in each type of shoe. Front foot (nearest to shot direction) maximum vertical force and torque were greater than at the back foot, and there was no significant difference related to the shoe type. Wearing the metal spike shoe when using a driver was associated with more torque generation at the back foot (p < 0. 05) than when the flat soled shoe was worn. Within shoe regional pressures differed significantly with golf shoe outer sole design features (p < 0.05). Comparison of the metal spike and alternative spike shoe results provided indications of the quality of regional traction on the outer sole. Potential golf shoe outer sole design features and traction were presented in relation to phases of the golf swing movement. Application of two kinetic measurement methods identified that moderated (adapted) muscular control of foot and body movement may be induced by golf shoe outer sole design features. Ground reaction force measures inform comparisons of overall shoe functional performance, and insole pressure measurements inform comparisons of the underfoot conditions induced by specific regions of the golf shoe outer sole. Key points Assessments of within golf shoe pressures and beneath shoe forces at the natural grass interface were conducted

  8. Dynamic stretching and golf swing performance.

    PubMed

    Moran, K A; McGrath, T; Marshall, B M; Wallace, E S

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of dynamic stretching, static stretching and no stretching, as part of a general warm-up, on golf swing performance with a five-iron. Measures of performance were taken 0 min, 5 min, 15 min and 30 min after stretching. Dynamic stretching produced significantly greater club head speeds than both static stretching (Delta=1.9m.s (-1); p=0.000) and no stretching (Delta=1.7 m.s (-1); p=0.000), and greater ball speeds than both static stretching (Delta=3.5m.s (-1); p=0.003) and no stretching (Delta=3.3m.s (-1); p=0.001). Dynamic stretching produced significantly straighter swing-paths than both static stretching (Delta=-0.61 degrees , p=0.000) and no stretching (Delta=-0.72 degrees , p=0.01). Dynamic stretching also produced more central impact points than the static stretch (Delta=0.7 cm, p=0.001). For the club face angle, there was no effect of either stretch or time. For all of the variables measured, there was no significant difference between the static stretch and no stretch conditions. All of the results were unaffected by the time of measurement after stretching. The results indicate that dynamic stretching should be used as part of a general warm-up in golf.

  9. Some applications of mathematics in golf.

    PubMed

    Otto, S R

    2017-08-01

    At its core, like many other sports, golf is a game of integers. The minimization of the number of strokes played is generally what determines the winner, whether each of these are associated with the shortest of putts or the longest of drives. The outcomes of these shots are influenced by very slight changes, but hopefully in a deterministic sense. Understanding the mechanics of golf necessitates the development of models and this is coupled more often than not to the use of statistics. In essence, the individual aspects of the sport can be modelled adequately via fairly simplistic models, but the presence of a human at one end of the kinematic chain has a significant impact on the variability of the entire process. In this paper, we will review some of the ways that mathematics has been used to develop the understanding of the physical processes involved in the sport, including some of the analysis which is exploited within the Equipment Rules. We will also discuss some of the future challenges.

  10. Some applications of mathematics in golf

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    At its core, like many other sports, golf is a game of integers. The minimization of the number of strokes played is generally what determines the winner, whether each of these are associated with the shortest of putts or the longest of drives. The outcomes of these shots are influenced by very slight changes, but hopefully in a deterministic sense. Understanding the mechanics of golf necessitates the development of models and this is coupled more often than not to the use of statistics. In essence, the individual aspects of the sport can be modelled adequately via fairly simplistic models, but the presence of a human at one end of the kinematic chain has a significant impact on the variability of the entire process. In this paper, we will review some of the ways that mathematics has been used to develop the understanding of the physical processes involved in the sport, including some of the analysis which is exploited within the Equipment Rules. We will also discuss some of the future challenges. PMID:28878570

  11. How well does club head speed correlate with golf handicaps?

    PubMed

    Fradkin, A J; Sherman, C A; Finch, C F

    2004-12-01

    The velocity at which a golf club impacts with a golf ball is known as club head speed. Although club head speed has been used to measure performance changes in a number of golf studies, it has not been validated as a golf performance measure. As handicap is the usual measure of performance, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between club head speed and handicap, and to determine whether club head speed at impact is a valid measure of golfing performance. Forty-five male golfers aged 18-80 years, all with registered golfing handicaps (2-27), participated in this study. Each golfer performed 10 golf swings captured by a high-speed camera. Golfers' club head speeds were determined using Video Expert 2, a biomechanical computer program. Golfers with a lower handicap (i.e., a better skill level) had faster club head speeds than higher handicap golfers. Linear regression analysis found club head speed to be highly correlated with handicap (r = 0.950). This relationship was described by the equation: In (club head speed)= 4.065 - 0.0214 x handicap. In conclusion, this study has shown that club head speed is a valid indicator of performance in golfers and may therefore be a useful performance measure in future laboratory-based studies.

  12. COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF GOLF-RELATED OCULAR INJURIES.

    PubMed

    Crane, Elliot S; Kolomeyer, Anton M; Kim, Eliott; Chu, David S

    2016-07-01

    The authors aimed to analyze the causes and outcomes of golf-related ocular injuries in this retrospective meta-analysis, literature review, and original case series. Forty-one articles identified by PubMed search resulted in 11 included studies yielding 102 subjects. Included articles described all ocular golf injuries that presented to an institution during a determined period. Eight factors were analyzed: age, sex, location and mechanism of injury, protective eyewear use, resulting open-globe injury, resulting enucleation, and visual acuity changes. No subjects wore adequate protective eyewear. Significantly more subjects were injured by golf balls (72%) than golf clubs (27%) or foreign body (1%) (P < 0.0001). The ratio of golf ball to club injuries was significantly higher in adults (92%) than in children (23%) (P < 0.0001). Forty-seven of 93 (51%) injuries resulted in an open globe, whereas 27/82 (33%) injuries resulted in enucleation. The mean ± SD logMAR visual acuity improved by -0.641 ± 0.745 after treatment (>6 lines of improvement; P = 0.0001). Reported ocular golf injuries occur less frequently than other ocular sports injuries, but may result in devastating outcomes. Supervision of children using golf equipment should be encouraged.

  13. Resistance training for performance and injury prevention in golf

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Gregory J

    2006-01-01

    This introductory resistance training program is designed to minimize injury risk, improve golf swing speed and the overall fitness of recreational golfers. This article aims to introduce to the Chiropractor the basic concepts sport specific resistance training, periodization models of resistance training and proposes a year round conditioning resistance training program specific to golf. The exercises have been chosen based on the best biomechanical evidence to minimize injury risk and on the research supporting the use of movement specific training adaptations. Upper body strength exercises are performed standing to develop both trunk and hip stabilizing musculature and the primary movement of the golf swing. PMID:17549167

  14. Frequency-effect of playing screen golf on body composition and golf performance in middle-aged men

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jung-Hoon; Jee, Yong-Seok; Oh, Hye-Won

    2014-01-01

    There are many studies showing that physical training improves body composition including bone mineral density (BMD) in almost all subjects. However, the frequency-dependent effect of playing golf on body composition is still not clearly comprehended. Moreover, the effect of screen golf in relations with exercise-frequency on body composition and golf performance has not been documented. Forty year old men participated and were classified into 4 groups: Control group (n= 10), BMD1 group (n= 10) played screen golf less than 1 day per a week, BMD2–3 group (n= 10) played screen golf 2–3 days per a week, and BMD5 group (n= 10) played screen golf 5 days per week. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed on 30 male recreational golfers and 10 sedentary individuals. The data gained through DXA were fat mass, lean mass, regional (head, rib, arm, leg, pelvis, spine and trunk) BMD level, and total BMD level summed by regional scores. The club speeds were measured using the Golfzon Vision machine and the handicap points were measured using a simple questionnaire. The present results suggest that the long-frequency of playing screen golf does not improve bone mineral density, lean mass, and handicap point yet improves fat mass and club speed in the middle-aged men. PMID:25426463

  15. Differences in wrist mechanics during the golf swing based on golf handicap.

    PubMed

    Fedorcik, Gregory G; Queen, Robin M; Abbey, Alicia N; Moorman, Claude T; Ruch, David S

    2012-05-01

    Variation in swing mechanics between golfers of different skill levels has been previously reported. To investigate if differences in three-dimensional wrist kinematics and the angle of golf club descent between low and high handicap golfers. A descriptive laboratory study was performed with twenty-eight male golfers divided into two groups, low handicap golfers (handicap = 0-5, n = 15) and high handicap golfers (handicap ≥ 10, n = 13). Bilateral peak three-dimensional wrist mechanics, bilateral wrist mechanics at ball contact (BC), peak angle of descent from the end of the backswing to ball contact, and the angle of descent when the forearm was parallel to the ground (DEC-PAR) were determined using an 8 camera motion capture system. Independent t-tests were completed for each study variable (α = 0.05). Pearson correlation coefficients were determined between golf handicap and each of the study variables. The peak lead arm radial deviation (5.7 degrees, p = 0.008), lead arm radial deviation at ball contact (7.1 degrees, p = 0.001), and DEC-PAR (15.8 degrees, p = 0.002) were significantly greater in the high handicap group. In comparison with golfers with a low handicap, golfers with a high handicap have increased radial deviation during the golf swing and at ball contact. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ejection of a rear facing, golf cart passenger.

    PubMed

    Schau, Kyle; Masory, Oren

    2013-10-01

    The following report details the findings of a series of experiments and simulations performed on a commercially available, shuttle style golf cart during several maneuvers involving rapid accelerations of the vehicle. It is determined that the current set of passive restraints on these types of golf carts are not adequate in preventing ejection of a rear facing passenger during rapid accelerations in the forward and lateral directions. Experimental data and simulations show that a hip restraint must be a minimum of 13 in. above the seat in order to secure a rear facing passenger during sharp turns, compared to the current restraint height of 5 in. Furthermore, it is determined that a restraint directly in front of the rear facing passenger is necessary to prevent ejection. In addressing these issues, golf cart manufacturers could greatly reduce the likelihood of injury due to ejection of a rear facing, golf cart passenger.

  17. 7. Chandler Falls, looking upstream (from north). Golf tee of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Chandler Falls, looking upstream (from north). Golf tee of the Mesa Country Club on right. Photographer: Mark Durben, February 1989. Source: SRPA - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. Golf in the United States: an evolution of accessibility.

    PubMed

    Parziale, John R

    2014-09-01

    Golf affords physical and psychological benefits to persons who are physically challenged. Advances in adaptive technology, changes in golf course design, and rules modifications have enabled persons with neurological, musculoskeletal, and other impairments to play golf at a recreational, elite amateur, or professional level. The Americans with Disabilities Act has been cited in both federal and US Supreme Court rulings that have improved access for physically challenged golfers. Medical specialties, including physiatry, have played an important role in this process. This article reviews the history of golf's improvements in accessibility, and provides clinicians and physically challenged golfers with information that will facilitate participation in the sport. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Golf science research at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Farrally, M R; Cochran, A J; Crews, D J; Hurdzan, M J; Price, R J; Snow, J T; Thomas, P R

    2003-09-01

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century, there are 30,000 golf courses and 55 million people who play golf worldwide. In the USA alone, the value of golf club memberships sold in the 1990s was US dollar 3.2 billion. Underpinning this significant human activity is a wide variety of people researching and applying science to sustain and develop the game. The 11 golf science disciplines recognized by the World Scientific Congress of Golf have reported 311 papers at four world congresses since 1990. Additionally, scientific papers have been published in discipline-specific peer-reviewed journals, research has been sponsored by the two governing bodies of golf, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews and the United States Golf Association, and confidential research is undertaken by commercial companies, especially equipment manufacturers. This paper reviews much of this human endeavour and points the way forward for future research into golf.

  20. Golf and upper limb injuries: a summary and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    McHardy, Andrew J; Pollard, Henry P

    2005-01-01

    Background Golf is a popular past time that provides exercise with social interaction. However, as with all sports and activities, injury may occur. Many golf-related injuries occur in the upper limb, yet little research on the potential mechanisms of these injuries has been conducted. Objective To review the current literature on golf-related upper limb injuries and report on potential causes of injury as it relates to the golf swing. Discussion An overview of the golf swing is described in terms of its potential to cause the frequently noted injuries. Most injuries occur at impact when the golf club hits the ball. This paper concludes that more research into golf-related upper limb injuries is required to develop a thorough understanding of how injuries occur. Types of research include epidemiology studies, kinematic swing analysis and electromyographic studies of the upper limb during golf. By conducting such research, preventative measures maybe developed to reduce golf related injury. PMID:15967021

  1. The effect of phosphatidylserine on golf performance

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Ralf; Purpura, Martin; Geiss, Kurt-Reiner; Weiß, Michael; Baumeister, Jochen; Amatulli, Francesco; Schröder, Lars; Herwegen, Holger

    2007-01-01

    Background A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed to evaluate the effect of oral phosphatidylserine (PS) supplementation on golf performance in healthy young golfers with handicaps of 15–40. Methods Perceived stress, heart rate and the quality of the ball flight was evaluated before (pre-test) and after (post-test) 42 days of 200 mg per day PS (n = 10) or placebo (n = 10) intake in the form of a nutritional bar. Subjects teed-off 20 times aiming at a green 135 meters from the tee area. Results PS supplementation significantly increased (p < 0.05) the number of good ball flights (mean: pre-test 8.3 ± 3.5, post-test 10.1 ± 3.0), whereas placebo intake (mean: pre-test 7.8 ± 2.4, post-test 7.9 ± 3.6) had no effect. PS supplementation showed a trend towards improving perceived stress levels during teeing-off (mean: pre-test 5.8 ± 2.0, post-test 4.0 ± 2.0, p = 0.07), whereas stress levels remained unchanged in the placebo group (mean: pre-test: 5.1 ± 2.0, post-test: 5.1 ± 3.1). Supplementation did not influence mean heart rate in either group. Conclusion It is concluded that six weeks of PS supplementation shows a statistically not significant tendency (p = 0.07) to improve perceived stress levels in golfers and significantly improves (p < 0.05) the number of good ball flights during tee-off which might result in improved golf scores. PMID:18053194

  2. The role of physiology in the development of golf performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark F

    2010-08-01

    The attainment of consistent high performance in golf requires effective physical conditioning that is carefully designed and monitored in accordance with the on-course demands the player will encounter. Appreciating the role that physiology plays in the attainment of consistent performance, and how a player's physicality can inhibit performance progression, supports the notion that the application of physiology is fundamental for any player wishing to excel in golf. With cardiorespiratory, metabolic, hormonal, musculoskeletal and nutritional demands acting on the golfer within and between rounds, effective physical screening of a player will ensure physiological and anatomical deficiencies that may influence performance are highlighted. The application of appropriate golf-specific assessment methods will ensure that physical attributes that have a direct effect on golf performance can be measured reliably and accurately. With the physical development of golf performance being achieved through a process of conditioning with the purpose of inducing changes in structural and metabolic functions, training must focus on foundation whole-body fitness and golf-specific functional strength and flexibility activities. For long-term player improvement to be effective, comprehensive monitoring will ensure the player reaches an optimal physical state at predetermined times in the competitive season. Through continual assessment of a player's physical attributes, training effectiveness and suitability, and the associated adaptive responses, key physical factors that may impact most on performance success can be determined.

  3. Braking hazards of golf cars and low speed vehicles.

    PubMed

    Seluga, K J; Ojalvo, I U

    2006-11-01

    Research and analysis of braking issues for golf cars and other low speed vehicles (LSVs) are reported in this study. It is shown that many such vehicles only provide braking for their rear wheels, which can lead to a driver losing control during travel on typical steep downgrades. The braking performance of a golf car equipped with brakes on two or four wheels was analyzed to determine the effects of two and four wheel brake designs on braking efficiency and vehicle yaw stability. Besides reducing braking efficiency, it is demonstrated that installing brakes on only the rear wheels can lead to directional instability (fishtailing) and rollover when the rear wheels are braked until skidding occurs. The nonexistence of golf course standards and the inadequacy of golf car and LSV standards are noted and a connection between this and the comparatively high level of accidents with such vehicles is inferred. Based on these results, it is advisable to install brakes on all four wheels of golf cars and LSVs. In addition, new safety standards should be considered to reduce the occurrence of golf car accidents on steep downhill slopes.

  4. The contribution of golf to daily physical activity recommendations: how many steps does it take to complete a round of golf?

    PubMed

    Kobriger, Samantha L; Smith, Jay; Hollman, John H; Smith, Aynsley M

    2006-08-01

    To quantify the number of steps adults take during an 18-hole round of golf, we recruited 42 healthy volunteers (12 men and 30 women aged 30-80 years) with established United States Golf Association handicaps to complete an 18-hole round of golf on each of 3 municipal golf courses. Subjects walked each course while wearing a pedometer to record step data. Analysis revealed that each golfer took a mean +/- SD 11,948 +/- 1781 steps per 18-hole round of golf. Regardless of handicap level, sex, or course played, most subjects exceeded 10,000 steps during a typical round of golf. Consequently, in most cases, walking 18 holes of golf will meet the recommendation to accumulate 10,000 steps per day as part of a general physical activity plan.

  5. Pediatric head and neck injuries due to golf cart trauma.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brandon; Yelverton, Eden; Monico, Jesus; Replogle, William; Jordan, J Randall

    2016-09-01

    Golf carts are increasingly used off the golf course and are often viewed as innocuous modes of transportation. However, research has shown they can cause significant injuries, particularly to children. Analyze golf cart related head and neck injuries in children and adults from a national database. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was queried for golf cart injuries. The NEISS tracks consumer product related injuries from a sampling of approximately 100 emergency departments across the United States. Age, general diagnosis (concussion, fracture, laceration), body-part injured, disposition (hospitalized, discharged), location injury occurred, and mechanism of injury were analyzed. Over an 11-year period, a total of 3433 total patients were identified. There were 1471 children (16 years old or younger), which compromised 42.9% of the cohort. Children were injured at home or on the road 44.7% of the time compared to only 16.6% of adults (p < 0.003). Children injured their head or neck 42.6% of the time compared to 28.6% of adults (p < 0.0001). Adults who were hit by a car while riding a golf cart or were ejected from the golf cart 44.6% of the time compared to 61.7% of children (p < 0.0001). There were 3.9% of children with a face, head, or neck fracture compared to only 2.4% of adults (p = 0.01). Children are more vulnerable to golf cart related injuries, specifically to the head and neck. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimated Colorado Golf Course Irrigation Water Use, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivahnenko, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Golf course irrigation water-use data were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Use Program's 2005 compilation to provide baseline information, as no golf course irrigation water-use data (separate from crop irrigation) have been reported in previous compilations. A Web-based survey, designed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Rocky Mountain Golf Course Superintendents Association (RMGCSA), was electronically distributed by the association to the 237 members in Colorado. Forty-three percent of the members returned the survey, and additional source water information was collected by telephone for all but 20 of the 245 association member and non-member Colorado golf courses. For golf courses where no data were collected at all, an average 'per hole' coefficient, based on returned surveys from that same county, were applied. In counties where no data were collected at all, a State average 'per hole' value of 13.2 acre-feet was used as the coefficient. In 2005, Colorado had 243 turf golf courses (there are 2 sand courses in the State) that had an estimated 2.27 acre-feet per irrigated course acre, and 65 percent of the source water for these courses was surface water. Ground water, potable water (public supply), and reclaimed wastewater, either partially or wholly, were source waters for the remaining courses. Fifty-three of the 64 counties in Colorado have at least one golf course, with the greatest number of courses in Jefferson (23 courses), Arapahoe (22 courses), and El Paso Counties (20 courses). In 2005, an estimated 5,647.8 acre-feet in Jefferson County, 5,402 acre-feet in Arapahoe County, and 4,473.3 acre-feet in El Paso County were used to irrigate the turf grass.

  7. 75 FR 52360 - Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration Project, El Dorado County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The purpose of the project is to improve geomorphic processes, ecological functions... golf course to restore all or a portion of the golf course footprint to meadow and riparian habitat...

  8. Movement variability in the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Langdown, Ben L; Bridge, Matt; Li, Francois-Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, golf biomechanics has focused upon achieving consistency in swing kinematics and kinetics, whilst variability was considered to be noise and dysfunctional. There has been a growing argument that variability is an intrinsic aspect of skilled motor performance and plays a functional role. Two types of variability are described: 'strategic shot selection' and 'movement variability'. In 'strategic shot selection', the outcome remains consistent, but the swing kinematics/kinetics (resulting in the desired ball flight) are free to vary; 'movement variability' is the changes in swing kinematics and kinetics from trial to trial when the golfer attempts to hit the same shot. These changes will emerge due to constraints of the golfer's body, the environment, and the task. Biomechanical research has focused upon aspects of technique such as elite versus non-elite kinematics, kinetics, kinematic sequencing, peak angular velocities of body segments, wrist function, ground reaction forces, and electromyography, mainly in the search for greater distance and clubhead velocity. To date very little is known about the impact of variability on this complex motor skill, and it has yet to be fully researched to determine where the trade-off between functional and detrimental variability lies when in pursuit of enhanced performance outcomes.

  9. Burrowing owl nesting productivity: A comparison between artificial and natural burrows on and off golf courses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, M.D.; Conway, C.J.; Ellis, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) populations are declining in many portions of their range, and lack of suitable nesting burrows is thought to be one reason for observed declines. Burrowing owls are attracted to golf courses because the birds generally nest and forage in short-grass, open areas, yet golf courses seldom have suitable nesting burrows. We examined the efficacy of installing artificial nesting burrows on golf courses as a way to help restore local burrowing owl populations. From 2001-2004 we monitored over 175 natural burrows off golf courses, 14 natural burrows on golf courses, 86 artificial burrows off golf courses, and 130 artificial burrows on golf courses. Owls located and used 8 of the 130 artificial burrows installed on golf courses (4 were used as nests). Owls selected burrows that were closer to existing natural burrows, farther from maintained areas (areas receiving turf maintenance by golf course staff), and farther from sprinkler heads. All 4 of the artificial burrows used as nests successfully fledged young, and annual site fidelity for owls nesting on golf courses was higher than for owls nesting off golf courses. However, annual fecundity of owls nesting on golf courses was lower than that of owls nesting off golf courses. If golf courses have sufficiently large nonmaintained areas and there are nesting owls nearby, course managers potentially can help in restoring local burrowing owl populations by installing artificial nesting burrows on the periphery of the course. However, the low fecundity on golf courses reported here should be more thoroughly examined before artificial burrows are used to attract owls to golf courses.

  10. Reuse of reclaimed wastewater for golf course irrigation in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Bahri, A; Basset, C; Oueslati, F; Brissaud, F

    2001-01-01

    In Tunisia, golf courses are irrigated with secondary treated effluent stored in landscape impoundments. The impact of the conveyance and storage steps on the physical-chemical and biological quality of irrigation water was evaluated on three golf courses over two years. It was found that the water quality varies all along the water route, from the wastewater treatment plant up to the irrigation site: nutrient and bacteria contents decreased along the route in the three cases. This variation depends on the wastewater quality, the length of the pipes conveying water, the number of regulation reservoirs and ponds, the water residence time in pipes, reservoirs and ponds, and the operation of the ponds. The bacteriological quality of irrigation water deteriorates during the irrigation period in the three golf courses as the ponds are operated as continuous flow reactors. The results obtained in this study indicate the inability of golf water supplies, as currently managed, to properly sanitize reclaimed wastewater and meet target quality criteria recommended by WHO (1989) for water intended for recreational use. For a safe reuse of reclaimed wastewater for golf course irrigation, changes in the design and operation of the ponds should be planned or additional treatment steps provided.

  11. The role of the shaft in the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Milne, R D; Davis, J P

    1992-09-01

    Current marketing of golf clubs places great emphasis on the importance of the correct choice of shaft in relation to the golfer. The design of shafts is based on a body of received wisdom for which there appears to be little in the way of hard evidence, either of a theoretical or experimental nature. In this paper the behaviour of the shaft in the golf swing is investigated using a suitable dynamic computer simulation and by making direct strain gauge measurements on the shaft during actual golf swings. The conclusion is, contrary to popular belief, that shaft bending flexibility plays a minor dynamic role in the golf swing and that the conventional tests associated with shaft specification are peculiarly inappropriate to the swing dynamics; other tests are proposed. A concomitant conclusion is that it should be difficult for the golfer to actually identify shaft flexibility. It is found that if golfers are asked to hit golf balls with sets of clubs having different shafts but identical swingweights the success rate in identifying the shaft is surprisingly low.

  12. The measurement of upper body alignment during the golf drive.

    PubMed

    Wheat, J S; Vernon, T; Milner, C E

    2007-05-01

    Transverse plane rotations of the upper body are often estimated during the golf swing. The aim of this study was to determine the agreement between upper body alignments measured using markers attached to the thorax and markers on the acromion process during the golf drive. Three-dimensional coordinate data from nine markers were collected (300 Hz) during eight golf drives for 10 participants. The transverse plane alignment of the upper body was calculated using three techniques: inter-acromion vector, thorax vector, and Cardan angles. Agreement between the methods was then assessed using intra-class correlation and 95% limits of agreement. Our results suggested that the thorax vector can be used to provide an accurate estimation of thorax alignment at all stages of the golf swing (R > or = 0.97, systematic difference < 1.0 degrees , random difference < 3.8 degrees ). The inter-acromion vector gave an accurate estimation of thorax alignment at address (R = 0.90, systematic difference = 0.0 degrees , random difference = 4.3 degrees ) but it should not be used to estimate thorax alignment at the top of the backswing (R = 0.32, systematic difference = -16.0 degrees , random difference = 8.7 degrees ) or impact (R = 0.90, systematic difference = -5.1 degrees , random difference = 8.3 degrees ) during the golf drive.

  13. Microbiological quality of reclaimed water used for golf courses' irrigation.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M C; Dionisio, L P C; Bosch, A; de Moura, B S Pereira; Garcia-Rosado, E; Borrego, J J

    2006-01-01

    Microbial quality of reclaimed water used for irrigation in two golf courses located in the southern Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) was evaluated. Bacterial indicators for faecal pollution (total and faecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and enterococci) were tested by membrane filtration using appropriate selective media. In addition, somatic E. coli bacteriophages, enteric viruses (entero-, hepatitis A and rota-) and Legionella pneumophila were also analysed. The results obtained showed that all wastewater treatment processes reduced adequately the number of indicator microorganisms although a significant correlation between pathogenic and indicator microorganisms tested was not found. L. pneumophila was detected by PCR but not confirmed by culture. Survival experiments of pathogenic microorganisms in aerosols and irrigated turf are conducted to determine the health hazards for the golf practice and to propose a microbial standard for wastewater used for irrigation of golf courses.

  14. On the acoustic signature of golf ball impact.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kevin; Axe, John D

    2002-08-01

    In this paper, we present results on the measurement and analysis of the sound that is produced by the sharp impact loading of a golf ball by a flat massive object (e.g. the face of a golf club). We discuss: (a) the motivation for such a study; (b) some necessary background information on how golf balls vibrate; (c) the techniques used to acquire and analyse the data; and (d) an analysis of the sound made by dropping balls on a smooth, massive concrete target surface. These results establish a simple method for rapid and non-destructive measurement of the effective high-frequency elastic shear moduli of balls and ball cores.

  15. Energy expenditure and sex differences of golf playing.

    PubMed

    Zunzer, Stefan C; von Duvillard, Serge P; Tschakert, Gerhard; Mangus, Brent; Hofmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the average physical intensity and energy expenditure during a single round of golf on hilly and flat courses in a heterogeneous group of healthy men and women of varying age and golf handicap. Forty-two males and 24 females completed an incremental cycle-ergometer exercise test to determine exercise performance markers. The heart rate (HR), duration, distance, walking speed, ascent and descent were measured via a global positioning system (GPS)/HR monitor during the game and energy expenditure was calculated. Playing 9 or 18-holes of golf, independent of the golf course design, the average HR was not significantly different between sexes or the subgroups. The intensities were light with respect to the percentage of maximal HR and metabolic equivalents of task (METs). Total energy expenditure of all participants was not significantly different for hilly (834 ± 344 kcal) vs. flat courses (833 ± 295 kcal) whereas male players expended significantly greater energy than female players (926 ± 292 vs. 556 ± 180 kcal), but did not have significantly greater relative energy expenditure (2.8 ± 0.8 vs. 2.2 ± 0.7 METs). As a high volume physical activity, playing golf is suggested to yield health benefits. Since the intensity was well below recommended limits, golf may have health related benefits unrelated to the intensity level of the activity.

  16. Ocular Dominance and Handedness in Golf Putting.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Kristine; Guillon, Michel; Naroo, Shehzad A

    2015-10-01

    In golf, the impact of eye-hand dominance on putting performance has long been debated. Eye-hand dominance is thought to impact how golfers judge the alignment of the ball with the target and the club with the ball, as well as how golfers visualize the line of the putt when making decisions about the force needed to hit the ball. Previous studies have all measured ocular dominance in primary gaze only, despite golfers spending a significant amount of their time in a putting stance (bent at the hips, head tilted down). Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess ocular dominance in both primary gaze (aligning the ball with the target) and putting gaze (addressing the ball and aligning the club). This study investigated measuring pointing ocular dominance in both primary and putting gaze positions on 31 golfers (14 amateur, 7 club professionals, and 10 top professionals). All players were right-handed golfers, although one reported having no hand dominance and one reported being strongly left hand dominant. The results showed that (1) primary and putting gaze ocular dominances are not equal, nor are they predictive of each other; (2) the magnitude of putting ocular dominance is significantly less than the magnitude of primary gaze ocular dominance; (3) ocular dominance is not correlated with handedness in either primary or putting gaze; and (4) eye-hand dominance is not associated with increased putting skill, although ocular dominance may be associated with increased putting success. It is important that coaches assess golfers' ocular dominance in both primary and putting gaze positions to ensure they have the most accurate information upon which to base their vision strategy decisions.

  17. Export of nutrients from golf courses on the Precambrian Shield.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jennifer G; Dillon, Peter J

    2006-06-01

    Annual export rates, or fluxes, of total nitrogen (TN), nitrate, total phosphorus (TP) and potassium from four streams on two golf courses on the Precambrian Shield were compared with those from forested reference locations. Overall, the mean annual fluxes of K, TN, NO(3) and TP from golf courses were greater than from forested areas by 10, 2, 6 and 2 times, respectively. The overall mean export coefficients (kg/ha/yr) were 16 for K, 5.2 for TN, 2.1 for NO(3) and 0.14 for TP. For TN and TP, these are similar to those reported from cropland in Canada by Chambers and Dale.

  18. Muscle Strength And Golf Performance: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Ronda, Lorena; Sánchez-Medina, Luis; González-Badillo, Juan J.

    2011-01-01

    Golf has become an increasingly popular sport and a growing body of research trying to identify its main physical requirements is being published. The aim of this review was twofold: first, to examine the existing scientific literature regarding strength training and golf in healthy, non-injured, subjects; and second, to reach conclusions that could provide information on how to design more effective strength training programs to improve golf performance as well as directions for future research. Studies which analyzed the relationship between muscle strength, swing performance variables (club head speed, driving distance, ball speed) and skill (handicap, score) were reviewed. Changes in swing performance following different strength training programs were also investigated. Finally, a critical analysis about the methodologies used was carried out. The results of the reviewed studies seem to indicate that: 1) a positive relationship exists between handicap and swing performance (even though few studies have investigated this issue); 2) there is a positive correlation between skill (handicap and/or score) and muscle strength; and 3) there is a relationship between driving distance, swing speed, ball speed and muscle strength. Results suggest that training leg-hip and trunk power as well as grip strength is especially relevant for golf performance improvement. Studies that analyzed variations in swing performance following resistance-only training programs are scarce, thus it is difficult to prove whether the observed improvements are attributable to changes in strength levels. Many of the studies reviewed presented some methodological errors in their design and not all strength assessment protocols seemed appropriate. Further studies should determine muscle strength needs in relation to final swing performance, using well designed experiments and strict isoinertial assessment protocols which adequately relate to specific golf motion, age and skill level. More

  19. Effects of a dietary supplement on golf drive distance and functional indices of golf performance.

    PubMed

    Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Habowski, Scott M; Lemieux, Robert; Sandrock, Jennifer E; Kedia, A William; Kerksick, Chad M; Lopez, Hector L

    2015-01-01

    Limited research exists examining the impact of nutrition on golfing performance. This study's purpose was to determine the impact of daily supplementation with an over-the-counter dietary supplement on golf performance. Healthy men (30.3 ± 6.9 y, 183.1 ± 5.6 cm, 86.7 ± 11.9 kg), with a 5-15 handicap were assigned in a double-blind, placebo-controlled manner to ingest for 30 days either a placebo (PLA, n = 13) or a dietary supplement containing creatine monohydrate, coffea arabica fruit extract, calcium fructoborate and vitamin D (Strong Drive™, SD, n = 14). Subjects ingested two daily doses for the first two weeks and one daily dose for the remaining two weeks. Participants followed their normal dietary habits and did not change their physical activity patterns. Two identical testing sessions in a pre/post fashion were completed consisting of a fasting blood sample, anthropometric measurements, 1-RM bench press, upper body power and golf swing performance using their driver and 7-iron. Data were analyzed using two-way mixed factorial ANOVAs and ANCOVA when baseline differences were present. Statistical significance was established a priori at p ≤ 0.05. ANCOVA revealed significantly greater (post-test) best drive distance (p = 0.04) for SD (+5.0% [+13.6 yards], ES = 0.75) as well as a tendency (p = 0.07) for average drive distance to increase (+8.4% [+19.6 yards], ES = 0.65), while no such changes were found with PLA (-0.5% [-1.2 yards], ES = 0.04 and +1.3% [+2.8 yards], ES = 0.08, respectively). Both groups experienced significant increases in body mass and 1-RM bench press (p < 0.001). No other significant group × time interactions were found. For the SD group only, within-group analysis confirmed significant improvements in set 1 average (+8.9%, p = 0.001) and peak velocity (+6.8%, p < =0.01). No changes were noted for reported adverse events, pain inventories, quality of life or any measured blood parameter. SD supplementation for 30 days significantly

  20. Assessment of head injury of children due to golf ball impact.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heow Pueh; Wang, Fang

    2010-10-01

    Head trauma injury due to impact by a flying golf ball is one of the most severe possible injury accidents on the golf course. Numerical simulations based on the finite element method are presented to investigate head injury in children due to impact by a flying golf ball. The stress and energy flow patterns in a head model during the golf ball impact are computed for various combinations of striking speed, falling angle of the golf ball before impact, and impact location. It is found that a child is more prone to head injury due to golf ball impact on the frontal and side/temporal areas. The simulated results are found to conform to the clinical reports on children's head injuries from flying golf balls.

  1. Erosion Potential of Various Golf Course Bunker Sands

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sand bunkers are principal golf course features adding aesthetic beauty and challenge for golfers. Bunkers often require substantial resources for proper maintenance particularly where sand is installed on severe slopes in humid climates subject to occasional heavy rainfall. Numerous sands are comme...

  2. Effects of Terrestrial Buffer Zones on Amphibians on Golf Courses

    PubMed Central

    Puglis, Holly J.; Boone, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    A major cause of amphibian declines worldwide is habitat destruction or alteration. Public green spaces, such as golf courses and parks, could serve as safe havens to curb the effects of habitat loss if managed in ways to bolster local amphibian communities. We reared larval Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) and green frogs (Rana clamitans) in golf course ponds with and without 1 m terrestrial buffer zones, and released marked cricket frog metamorphs at the golf course ponds they were reared in. Larval survival of both species was affected by the presence of a buffer zone, with increased survival for cricket frogs and decreased survival for green frogs when reared in ponds with buffer zones. No marked cricket frog juveniles were recovered at any golf course pond in the following year, suggesting that most animals died or migrated. In a separate study, we released cricket frogs in a terrestrial pen and allowed them to choose between mown and unmown grass. Cricket frogs had a greater probability of using unmown versus mown grass. Our results suggest that incorporating buffer zones around ponds can offer suitable habitat for some amphibian species and can improve the quality of the aquatic environment for some sensitive local amphibians. PMID:22761833

  3. Coaching College Women's Golf: Profiling an Emerging Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Nancy; Miller, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Intercollegiate athletics have struggled with the concept of same-sex coaches, asking the question of whether or not those who coach women or men should be of the same gender. With the advent of Title IX, the conversation has grown particularly acute in non-revenue sports, such as women's golf. The current national study profiles NCAA Division I…

  4. Disc Golf Play: Using Recreation to Improve Disruptive Classroom Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Michael Lee; Newgent, Rebecca A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the use of disc golf as a creative, recreational play intervention for improving classroom behaviors in disruptive children. Twenty-two elementary students were randomly selected for either a treatment or control group and rated at pre- and post- by their teachers on the use of nine positive classroom behaviors (e.g., sharing,…

  5. Age, psychological skills, and golf performance: a prospective investigation.

    PubMed

    Hayslip, Bert; Petrie, Trent A

    2014-03-01

    This study explored the influence of age in understanding mental skills utilization in the context of performance at a major national golf competition. Participants, who ranged in age and in skill level, included 1150 male and 170 female amateur golfers competing in the Dupont World Amateur Golf Championship in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Measures targeted general mental skills used in competitions, golf-specific skills, and competitive trait anxiety. Hierarchical linear regression was utilized to explore the potential moderating role that chronological age may play in influencing the impact of psychological skills and anxiety on competitive tournament performance across the adult life span. Findings suggested no significant age-moderating effects and instead pointed to the importance of developing golf-specific psychological skills to enhance or maintain performance, irrespective of age. Although automaticity (performance feels "automatic") predicted performance for all golfers, commitment to the game and confidence in one's putting did so only for the men. These findings reinforce the age-irrelevant role of such skills in fostering the experience of peak performance in a competitive sport context and underscore the importance of interventions targeting older players to help maintain or facilitate the use of psychological skills in helping them manage their games.

  6. Acrchery-Golf Guide. June 1974-June 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shick, Jacqueline, Ed.; Hague, Andrea, Ed.

    This guide is a collection of essays by various authors on archery and golf. There is a separate section for each sport. In the archery section, the topics covered include archery coaching, aiming, the spine of the arrow, do-it-yourself ideas for archery instruction, archery visual aids, and official rules for various archery activities. The…

  7. Electromyography variables during the golf swing: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sérgio; Silva, Luís; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Cabri, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to review systematically the literature available on electromyographic (EMG) variables of the golf swing. From the 19 studies found, a high variety of EMG methodologies were reported. With respect to EMG intensity, the right erector spinae seems to be highly activated, especially during the acceleration phase, whereas the oblique abdominal muscles showed moderate to low levels of activation. The pectoralis major, subscapularis and latissimus dorsi muscles of both sides showed their peak activity during the acceleration phase. High muscle activity was found in the forearm muscles, especially in the wrist flexor muscles demonstrating activity levels above the maximal voluntary contraction. In the lower limb higher muscle activity of the trail side was found. There is no consensus on the influence of the golf club used on the neuromuscular patterns described. Furthermore, there is a lack of studies on average golf players, since most studies were executed on professional or low handicap golfers. Further EMG studies are needed, especially on lower limb muscles, to describe golf swing muscle activation patterns and to evaluate timing parameters to characterize neuromuscular patterns responsible for an efficient movement with lowest risk for injury.

  8. Effects of terrestrial buffer zones on amphibians on golf courses.

    PubMed

    Puglis, Holly J; Boone, Michelle D

    2012-01-01

    A major cause of amphibian declines worldwide is habitat destruction or alteration. Public green spaces, such as golf courses and parks, could serve as safe havens to curb the effects of habitat loss if managed in ways to bolster local amphibian communities. We reared larval Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) and green frogs (Rana clamitans) in golf course ponds with and without 1 m terrestrial buffer zones, and released marked cricket frog metamorphs at the golf course ponds they were reared in. Larval survival of both species was affected by the presence of a buffer zone, with increased survival for cricket frogs and decreased survival for green frogs when reared in ponds with buffer zones. No marked cricket frog juveniles were recovered at any golf course pond in the following year, suggesting that most animals died or migrated. In a separate study, we released cricket frogs in a terrestrial pen and allowed them to choose between mown and unmown grass. Cricket frogs had a greater probability of using unmown versus mown grass. Our results suggest that incorporating buffer zones around ponds can offer suitable habitat for some amphibian species and can improve the quality of the aquatic environment for some sensitive local amphibians.

  9. Assistant Superintendent Hiring Criteria Used by Golf Course Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlossberg, Maxim J.; Greene, Wilmot; Karnok, Keith J.

    2004-01-01

    Of the many opportunities available upon graduating, most turfgrass management/turfgrass science students seek assistant golf course superintendent positions. By tradition, faculty are responsible for preparing graduates to serve as capable assistant superintendents. Moreover, faculty are queried for guidance on how to best compete for these…

  10. On a Simple Formulation of the Golf Ball Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pujol, O.; Perez, J. Ph.

    2007-01-01

    The motion of a ball rolling without slipping on the lateral section inside a fixed vertical cylinder is analysed in the Earth referential frame which is assumed to be Galilean. Equations of motion are rapidly obtained and the golf ball paradox is understood: these equations describe a motion consisting of a vertical harmonic oscillation related…

  11. Acrchery-Golf Guide. June 1974-June 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shick, Jacqueline, Ed.; Hague, Andrea, Ed.

    This guide is a collection of essays by various authors on archery and golf. There is a separate section for each sport. In the archery section, the topics covered include archery coaching, aiming, the spine of the arrow, do-it-yourself ideas for archery instruction, archery visual aids, and official rules for various archery activities. The…

  12. Expert golf instructors' student-teacher interaction patterns.

    PubMed

    Schempp, Paul; McCullick, Bryan; St Pierre, Peter; Woorons, Sophie; You, JeongAe; Clark, Betsy

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the dominant instructional interaction patterns of expert golf instructors. Instructors (N = 22) were selected by the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) Teaching based on the following criteria: (a) 10 or more years of golf teaching experience, (b) LPGA certification, (c) awards received for the quality of their instruction, and (d) peer and student recognition for outstanding teaching. The instructors were videotaped teaching a 60-min lesson to a novice college-age woman with no previous golf experience. The tapes were then analyzed using both the Cheffers Adaptation of Flanders' Interaction Analysis System (CAFIAS) and a qualitative analysis. Based on the findings from descriptive statistics and correlation analyses of the CAFIAS data and qualitative data analysis, several trends were identified. First, the dominant instructional behavior of these teachers was providing information to the students using both explanations and demonstrations. Second, the prevailing instructional interaction pattern of the expert teachers included extensive explanations and demonstrations followed by directions. The student followed the directions by practicing skills and received praise for their achievements. Third, high rates of directions and praise from teachers prompted student practice. Fourth, engaging students in subject-related discussion was positively correlated with teachers' questions but negatively correlated with teachers' criticisms. Finally, teacher acceptance was positively correlated with student analytic behavior, while teachers' talk negatively correlated with students initiating discussions.

  13. Measuring the Area of Golf Greens and Other Irregular Regions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, W. Gary; Ponte, Joao

    1985-01-01

    A real-life problem involving a greenskeeper needing to know the area of golf greens is presented, with solutions using a scale drawing, Maple's methods, and Heron's formula. Methods are checked with a computer and discussed mathematically. Three computer program listings are included. (MNS)

  14. On a Simple Formulation of the Golf Ball Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pujol, O.; Perez, J. Ph.

    2007-01-01

    The motion of a ball rolling without slipping on the lateral section inside a fixed vertical cylinder is analysed in the Earth referential frame which is assumed to be Galilean. Equations of motion are rapidly obtained and the golf ball paradox is understood: these equations describe a motion consisting of a vertical harmonic oscillation related…

  15. Measuring the Area of Golf Greens and Other Irregular Regions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, W. Gary; Ponte, Joao

    1985-01-01

    A real-life problem involving a greenskeeper needing to know the area of golf greens is presented, with solutions using a scale drawing, Maple's methods, and Heron's formula. Methods are checked with a computer and discussed mathematically. Three computer program listings are included. (MNS)

  16. Assistant Superintendent Hiring Criteria Used by Golf Course Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlossberg, Maxim J.; Greene, Wilmot; Karnok, Keith J.

    2004-01-01

    Of the many opportunities available upon graduating, most turfgrass management/turfgrass science students seek assistant golf course superintendent positions. By tradition, faculty are responsible for preparing graduates to serve as capable assistant superintendents. Moreover, faculty are queried for guidance on how to best compete for these…

  17. Evaluating best management practices at an urban golf course.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nate M; Lydy, Michael J

    2002-05-01

    This three-year study evaluated the effects of best management practices (BMPs) in reducing surface water contamination at an urban golf course. Water samples were collected before BMP implementation from two ponds on Braeburn Golf Course (Wichita, KS, USA). The pesticides 2,4-dicholorodiphenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and simazine were periodically found at concentrations above recommended water quality criteria. Excessive nutrients in the form of nitrates and total phosphorus were also measured. In addition, an assessment of macroinvertebrate populations revealed only a few tolerant species. Beginning in year 2, recommendations to alter chemical applications on the course were implemented as part of the BMPs. Surface water sampling during year 2 showed significant declines in nitrate and total phosphorus levels; however, seasonal contamination from pesticides continued to occur. Beginning in year 3, structural changes to the golf course were made as part of the BMPs. Subsequent water sampling indicated further reductions of nitrates (80%) and total phosphorus (40 and 60% in the two ponds, respectively), and elimination of contamination from spring applications of 2,4-D and simazine. Finally, an assessment of macroinvertebrate populations indicated an improvement in taxa richness, as well as repopulation by less tolerant organisms. Results of this study can be used to develop and refine golf course management procedures to protect aquatic environments.

  18. [Application of near-infrared spectroscopy in golf turfgrass management].

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Ying; Han, Jian-Guo

    2008-07-01

    The management of golf course is different from other turfs. Its particularity lies in its higher and more precise requirement during maintenance compare with other turfs. In case something happened to turf of golf course, more effective and higher speed detecting and resolution are required. Only the data about turf growth and environment were mastered precisely in time, the friendly environmental and scientific management goal could be completed effectively and economically. The near infrared spectroscopy is a new kind of effective, convenient and non-destructive analytical method in the turfgrass management of golf course in recent years. Many factors of turf-soil system in golf course could be determined by near infrared spectroscopy at the same time. In this paper, the existing literature that use of near infrared spectroscopy to study turfgrass and soil nutrient content, soil hygroscopic moisture, feasible fertilizer application time and rate, to fix the time and volume of irrigation, turfgrass visual quality evaluation, turfgrass disease prediction and prevention were reviewed. Most researchers considered the nutrition condition of turf impacted the visual and playing quality of golf course directly and then indirectly influenced most of assistant cultivation such as fertilization, mowing and irrigation and so on. The using of NIRS can detect the nutrient content of turfgrass effectively and estimate the nutrient is excessive or deficient quickly. And then the feasible time and rate of fertilizers can be decided. Comparing with the common judgment ways based on the season fertilization and visual estimation, the using of NIRS can reduce the application of fertilizers on the base of keeping the same turf quality simultaneously. NIRS can analysis many items of soil such as moisture, elements concentration, textures on the spot by the thousands. This method can get lots of cover-all data non-destructively. What's more, NIRS can analysis soil betimes quickly

  19. Golf-related lower back injuries: an epidemiological survey

    PubMed Central

    McHardy, Andrew J.; Pollard, Henry P.; Luo, Kehui

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study describes the playing characteristics of golfers who had an injury to their lower back in the course of play or practice in the previous year (12 months). Methods A retrospective survey was mailed to members of randomly selected golf clubs across Australia. Statistical methods used included 2-sample t test to compare means of 2 independent populations and the χ2 test to examine the association between categorical variables/factors in the study. Results Of 1634 Australian amateur golfers surveyed, 17.6% of golfers sustained at least 1 injury in the previous year. The lower back accounted for 25% of all golf-related injuries in the previous year, making the lower back the most common site of injury. The golfer with a golf-related lower back injury was likely to have a previous history of lower back injury, while the injury had a progressive onset compared with an acute single onset. The follow-through phase of the golf swing was reported to be associated with the greatest likelihood of injury compared with other phases of the swing. Most of the injured golfers received treatment of their injury with a general practitioner (69%), a physiotherapist (49%), or a chiropractor (40%). Conclusion Practitioners treating golfers with a history of lower back injury should evaluate the golf swing follow-through to identify potential causes of aggravation to the lower back. Targeted measures such as spinal manipulative therapy, soft tissue and back exercise, and conditioning programs to assist the strength and mobility of the golfer could then be implemented. PMID:19674690

  20. Hazardous materials on golf courses: Experience and knowledge of golf course superintendents and grounds maintenance workers from seven states

    PubMed Central

    Arcury-Quandt, Alice E.; Gentry, Amanda L.; Marín, Antonio J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The golf course industry has a growing Latino work force. Little occupational health research has addressed this work force. This paper examines golf course superintendents’ and Latino grounds maintenance workers’ pesticide knowledge, beliefs, and safety training. In particular, it focuses on knowledge of and adherence to OSHA Right-to-Know regulations. Methods In person, in-depth interviews were conducted with ten golf course superintendents in five states and with sixteen Latino grounds maintenance workers in four states. Results Few superintendents were in compliance with Right-to-Know regulations or did pesticide safety training with all of their workers. Few workers had any pesticide safety knowledge. Most safety training on golf courses was rudimentary and focused on machine safety, and was usually conducted in the off-season or on rainy days, not before workers were assigned tasks. Conclusions More Right-to-Know training is necessary for superintendents and grounds maintenance workers. Culturally and linguistically appropriate Spanish language materials need to be developed or made more widely available to train workers. Better enforcement of safety and training regulations is necessary. PMID:21360723

  1. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong-Chul; Lee, Sung-Wan; Yeo, Yun-Ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed.

  2. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joong-chul; Lee, Sung-wan; Yeo, Yun-ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed. PMID:25995553

  3. Impact of Total Shoulder Arthroplasty on Golfing Activity.

    PubMed

    Papaliodis, Dean; Richardson, Nicholas; Tartaglione, Jason; Roberts, Timothy; Whipple, Richard; Zanaros, George

    2015-07-01

    Golf is a widely popular sport in the United States with 29 million Americans participating in the game. With an aging population and increased incidence of glenohumeral degenerative arthritis, the number of active golfers requiring total shoulder replacement is on the rise. This study aims to evaluate the effect of total shoulder replacement on golfing activity. Retrospective; questionnaire. Survey. Three hundred sixty-seven patients were identified based on Current Procedural Terminology codes who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) between January 2004 and January 2013. A voluntary anonymous questionnaire was sent to patients by mail including both objective and subjective questions about their level of golf activity and ability both before and after the surgery. Two hundred sixty-eight (73%) patients responded with 35 (34 right-handed and 1 left-handed patients) golfers completing the questionnaire. Results including visual analog pain scores, handicap change, and driving distance were evaluated statistically using the Student t test. Thirty-five golfers at an average time of 3.2 years after TSA completed the questionnaire with 31/35 being able to return to the sport at an average time of 8.4 months postoperatively. Thirty of 31 patients reported improvement in their pain level during and after golfing activity by an average of 4.3 (P < 0.05) on a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. On average, driving distances increased by 12.5 yd (P = 0.0012) and handicap improved by 1.4 strokes (P = 0.03). Patients who undergo TSA for primary glenohumeral arthritis can safely return to golfing activity with a significant decrease in their perceived pain level as per VAS scores. Statistically significant findings included an increase in driving distance by 12.5 yd and an improvement in handicap by 1.4. In counseling patients, it is the authors' opinion that based on our experience with golfers undergoing TSA, patients can safely return to sport at an average of 8

  4. Morbidity associated with golf-related injuries among children: findings from a pediatric trauma center.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Melissa A; Mertz, Kristen J; Gaines, Barbara; Zuckerbraun, Noel S

    2011-01-01

    To describe injuries due to golf-related activities among pediatric patients requiring hospital admission. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all sports-related injuries from 2000 to 2006 using a level 1 trauma center database. Of 1005 children admitted with sports-related injuries, 60 (6%) had golf-related injuries. The mean injury severity score was significantly higher for golf-related injuries (11.0) than that for all other sports-related injuries (6.8). Most golf-related injuries occurred in children younger than 12 years (80%), at home (48%), and by a strike from a club (57%) and resulted in trauma to the head or neck (68%). Golf-related injuries, although an infrequent cause of sports-related injuries, have the potential to result in severe injuries, especially in younger children. Preventive efforts should target use of golf clubs by younger children in the home setting.

  5. Managing golf injuries: technique and equipment changes that aid treatment.

    PubMed

    Metz, J P

    1999-07-01

    Proper golf technique and equipment and preventive measures can minimize golf-related injuries of the back, shoulders, elbows, and hands and wrists. Rotating the shoulder and hip a similar amount during the backswing and keeping the spine vertical during the follow-through can reduce lumbar spine strain. A rigid back support may lower the risk of vertebral compression fracture in osteoporotic patients. Shortening the backswing can decrease pressure on a degenerative acromioclavicular joint. Therapy for 'golfer's elbow' includes medial counterforce bracing, larger club grips, and graphite shafts. Treatments for wrist and hand disorders include proper swing and grip technique and larger, softer grips. Diagnosis of the easy-to-miss fracture of the hook of the hamate may require tomogram, CT, or MRI.

  6. Highlight summarization in golf videos using audio signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoung-Gook; Kim, Jin Young

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic summarization of highlights in golf videos based on audio information alone without video information. The proposed highlight summarization system is carried out based on semantic audio segmentation and detection on action units from audio signals. Studio speech, field speech, music, and applause are segmented by means of sound classification. Swing is detected by the methods of impulse onset detection. Sounds like swing and applause form a complete action unit, while studio speech and music parts are used to anchor the program structure. With the advantage of highly precise detection of applause, highlights are extracted effectively. Our experimental results obtain high classification precision on 18 golf games. It proves that the proposed system is very effective and computationally efficient to apply the technology to embedded consumer electronic devices.

  7. Features of Golf-Related Shoulder Pain in Korean Amateur Golfers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Hwa; Hong, Jin Young; Jeon, Po Song; Hwang, Ki Hun; Moon, Won Sik; Han, Yong Hyun; Jeong, Ho Joong

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the causes and characteristics of golf-related shoulder injuries in Korean amateur golfers. Golf-related surveys were administered to, and ultrasonography were conducted on, 77 Korean amateur golfers with golf-related shoulder pain. The correlation between the golf-related surveys and ultrasonographic findings were investigated. The non-dominant shoulder is more likely to have golf-related pain and abnormal findings on ultrasonography than is the dominant shoulder. Supraspinatus muscle tear was the most frequent type of injury on ultrasonography, followed by subscapularis muscle tear. Investigation of the participants' golf-related habits revealed that only the amount of time spent practicing golf was correlated with supraspinatus muscle tear. No correlation was observed between the most painful swing phases and abnormal ultrasonographic findings. Participants who had not previously visited clinics were more likely to present with abnormal ultrasonographic findings, and many of the participants complained of additional upper limb pain. Golf-related shoulder injuries and pain are most likely to be observed in the non-dominant shoulder. The supraspinatus muscle was the most susceptible muscle to damage. A correlation was observed between time spent practicing golf and supraspinatus muscle tear.

  8. Impacts of golf courses on macroinvertebrate community structure in Precambrian shield streams.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jennifer G; Somers, Keith M; Dillon, Peter J; Paterson, Carolyn; Reid, Ron A

    2002-01-01

    The influence of golf course operation on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in Precambrian Shield streams was evaluated using rapid bioassessment and the reference condition approach. Streams were sampled for water chemistry and invertebrates in 1999 and 2000, six on operational golf courses, and seven in forested reference locations. Correspondence analysis (CA) was used to determine the major patterns in the macroinvertebrate taxa, and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to evaluate relationships with environmental variables. The reference streams were used to define the normal range of variation for a variety of summary indices to evaluate the golf course streams. In all cases, golf course streams were higher in nutrients and dissolved ions and more alkaline than the forested reference streams. There was considerable variability in the macroinvertebrate fauna from the golf course streams, which was related to differences in golf course land management practices and to the potential influence of highway runoff. Of the management practices evaluated, fertilizer application rates in particular were important, as was the presence of ponds upstream on the course. Invertebrate taxa with higher abundances in golf course streams included Turbellaria, Isopoda, Amphipoda, Zygoptera, and Trombidiformes. Taxa more common in the reference streams included Ephemeroptera, Megaloptera, Culicidae, and Plecoptera. There were marked differences in the overall benthic macroinvertebrate community in three of the six golf course streams studied relative to the forested reference streams, suggesting that golf course land management on the Precambrian Shield can be associated with significant differences in macroinvertebrate community structure.

  9. Golf-associated head injury in the pediatric population: a common sports injury.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Scott Y; Singh, Harshpal; Yeh, David J; Shaver, Ellen G; Flannery, Ann Marie; Lee, Mark R

    2005-03-01

    Golf-related injuries constitute a common type of sports injury in the pediatric population. The increase in the frequency of these injuries is largely attributed to the increase in the popularity of golf and greater use of golf carts by children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms and complications associated with golf-related injuries in the pediatric population and, by doing so, assist in the prevention of such injuries. We reviewed the charts of 2546 pediatric patients evaluated by the neurosurgery service at the authors' institution over a 6-year period. There were 64 cases of sports-related injuries. Of these, 15 (23%) were golf-related, making these injuries the second-largest group of sports-related injuries. Depressed skull fracture was the most common injury observed. Neurosurgical intervention was required in 33% of the cases. With rare exceptions, patients made good recoveries during a mean follow-up period of 22.2 months. One death occurred due to uncontrollable cerebral edema following a golf cart accident. One child required shunt placement and several revisions following an injury sustained from a golf ball. Children should be advised on the proper use of golf equipment as a preventive measure to avoid these injuries. Precautionary guidelines and safety training guidelines should be established. The institution of a legal minimum age required to operate a golf cart should be considered.

  10. Features of Golf-Related Shoulder Pain in Korean Amateur Golfers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the causes and characteristics of golf-related shoulder injuries in Korean amateur golfers. Methods Golf-related surveys were administered to, and ultrasonography were conducted on, 77 Korean amateur golfers with golf-related shoulder pain. The correlation between the golf-related surveys and ultrasonographic findings were investigated. Results The non-dominant shoulder is more likely to have golf-related pain and abnormal findings on ultrasonography than is the dominant shoulder. Supraspinatus muscle tear was the most frequent type of injury on ultrasonography, followed by subscapularis muscle tear. Investigation of the participants' golf-related habits revealed that only the amount of time spent practicing golf was correlated with supraspinatus muscle tear. No correlation was observed between the most painful swing phases and abnormal ultrasonographic findings. Participants who had not previously visited clinics were more likely to present with abnormal ultrasonographic findings, and many of the participants complained of additional upper limb pain. Conclusion Golf-related shoulder injuries and pain are most likely to be observed in the non-dominant shoulder. The supraspinatus muscle was the most susceptible muscle to damage. A correlation was observed between time spent practicing golf and supraspinatus muscle tear. PMID:28758076

  11. Flight trajectory of a rotating golf ball with grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Moonheum; Kim, Jooha; Choi, Haecheon

    2014-11-01

    Dimples are known to reduce drag on a sphere by the amount of 50% as compared to a smooth surface. Despite the advantage of reducing drag, dimples deteriorate the putting accuracy owing to their sharp edges. To minimize this putting error but maintain the same flight distance, we have devised a grooved golf ball (called G ball hereafter) for several years. In this study, we modify the shape and pattern of grooves, and investigate the flow characteristics of the G ball by performing wind-tunnel experiments at the Reynolds numbers of 0 . 5 ×105 - 2 . 5 ×105 and the spin ratios (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 - 0.6 that include the real golf-ball velocity and rotational speed. We measure the drag and lift forces on the rotating G ball and compare them with those of a smooth ball and two well-known dimpled balls. The lift-to-drag ratio of the G ball is much higher than that of a smooth ball and is in between those of the two dimpled balls. The trajectories of flying golf balls are computed. The flight distance of G ball is almost the same as that of one dimpled ball but slightly shorter than that of the other dimpled ball. The fluid-dynamic aspects of these differences will be discussed at the talk. Supported by 2011-0028032, 2014M3C1B1033980.

  12. Motor abundance and control structure in the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Morrison, A; McGrath, D; Wallace, E S

    2016-04-01

    Variability and control structure are under-represented areas of golf swing research. This study investigated the use of the abundant degrees of freedom in the golf swing of high and intermediate skilled golfers using uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis. The variance parallel to (VUCM) and orthogonal to (VOrth) the UCM with respect to the orientation and location of the clubhead were calculated. The higher skilled golfers had proportionally higher values of VUCM than lower skilled players for all measured outcome variables. Motor synergy was found in the control of the orientation of the clubhead and the combined outcome variables but not for clubhead location. Clubhead location variance zeroed-in on impact as has been previously shown, whereas clubhead orientation variance increased near impact. Both skill levels increased their control over the clubhead location leading up to impact, with more control exerted over the clubhead orientation in the early downswing. The results suggest that to achieve higher skill levels in golf may not lie simply in optimal technique, but may lie more in developing control over the abundant degrees of freedom in the body.

  13. Lumbar spinal loads and muscle activity during a golf swing.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Tae; Chow, John W; Chae, Woen-Sik

    2012-06-01

    This study estimated the lumbar spinal loads at the L4-L5 level and evaluated electromyographic (EMG) activity of right and left rectus abdominis, external and internal obliques, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi muscles during a golf swing. Four super VHS camcorders and two force plates were used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) kinematics and kinetics of golf swings performed by five male collegiate golfers. Average EMG levels for different phases of golf swing were determined. An EMG-assisted optimization model was applied to compute the contact forces acting on the L4-L5. The results revealed a mean peak compressive load of over six times the body weight (BW) during the downswing and mean peak anterior and medial shear loads approaching 1.6 and 0.6 BW during the follow-through phases. The peak compressive load estimated in this study was high, but less than the corresponding value (over 8 BW) reported by a previous study. Average EMG levels of different muscles were the highest in the acceleration and follow-through phases, suggesting a likely link between co-contractions of paraspinal muscles and lumbar spinal loads.

  14. Distance and slope constraints: adaptation and variability in golf putting.

    PubMed

    Dias, Gonçalo; Couceiro, Micael S; Barreiros, João; Clemente, Filipe M; Mendes, Rui; Martins, Fernando M

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of this study is to understand the adaptation to external constraints and the effects of variability in a golf putting task. We describe the adaptation of relevant variables of golf putting to the distance to the hole and to the addition of a slope. The sample consisted of 10 adult male (33.80 ± 11.89 years), volunteers, right handed and highly skilled golfers with an average handicap of 10.82. Each player performed 30 putts at distances of 2, 3 and 4 meters (90 trials in Condition 1). The participants also performed 90 trials, at the same distances, with a constraint imposed by a slope (Condition 2). The results indicate that the players change some parameters to adjust to the task constraints, namely the duration of the backswing phase, the speed of the club head and the acceleration at the moment of impact with the ball. The effects of different golf putting distances in the no-slope condition on different kinematic variables suggest a linear adjustment to distance variation that was not observed when in the slope condition.

  15. Brain networks governing the golf swing in professional golfers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Han, Joung Kyue; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Han, Doug Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Golf, as with most complex motor skills, requires multiple different brain functions, including attention, motor planning, coordination, calculation of timing, and emotional control. In this study we assessed the correlation between swing components and brain connectivity from the cerebellum to the cerebrum. Ten female golf players and 10 age-matched female controls were recruited. In order to determine swing consistency among participants, the standard deviation (SD) of the mean swing speed time and the SD of the mean swing angle were assessed over 30 swings. Functional brain connectivity was assessed by resting state functional MRI. Pro-golfers showed greater positive left cerebellum connectivity to the occipital lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe and both frontal lobes compared to controls. The SD of play scores was positively correlated with the SD of the impact angle. Constant swing speed and back swing angle in professional golfers were associated with functional connectivity (FC) between the cerebellum and parietal and frontal lobes. In addition, the constant impact angle in professional golfers was associated with improved golf scores and additional FC of the thalamus.

  16. Evidence for biomechanics and motor learning research improving golf performance.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Justin W L; Hume, Patria A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this review was to determine how the findings of biomechanics and motor control/learning research may be used to improve golf performance. To be eligible, the biomechanics and motor learning studies had to use direct (ball displacement and shot accuracy) or indirect (clubhead velocity and clubface angle) golf performance outcome measures. Biomechanical studies suggested that reducing the radius path of the hands during the downswing, increasing wrist torque and/or range of motion, delaying wrist motion to late in the downswing, increasing downswing amplitude, improving sequential acceleration of body parts, improving weight transfer, and utilising X-factor stretch and physical conditioning programmes can improve clubhead velocity. Motor learning studies suggested that golf performance improved more when golfers focused on swing outcome or clubhead movement rather than specific body movements. A distributed practice approach involving multiple sessions per week of blocked, errorless practice may be best for improving putting accuracy of novice golfers, although variable practice may be better for skilled golfers. Video, verbal, or a combination of video and verbal feedback can increase mid-short iron distance in novice to mid-handicap (hcp) golfers. Coaches should not only continue to critique swing technique but also consider how the focus, structure, and types of feedback for practice may alter learning for different groups of golfers.

  17. Chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos degradation products in golf course leachate.

    PubMed

    Armbrust, K L

    2001-09-01

    Chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos are commonly used to control disease and insect pests on golf course greens. While they are relatively immobile in the soil profile, their respective soil degradation products, 4-hydroxy-2,5,6-trichloroisophthalonitrile and 3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-ol are more polar and may be present in golf course green leachate. To investigate this possibility, six stainless steel lysimeters were constructed into two practice greens at a country club in a northern Atlanta, Georgia suburb. Over a period of 1 year after rainfall events, lysimeter leachate samples were collected into glass bottles, filtered and directly analyzed by HPLC with UV detection. Chlorpyrifos was not detected in any sample and chlorothalonil was detected only in one sample, at a concentration of 0.12 mg liter-1. With a limit of quantitation of 0.05 mg liter-1, hydroxychlorothalonil and trichloropyridinol were detected in 87% and 63% of the samples at maximum and median concentrations of 2.21 and 0.55 mg liter-1 for hydroxychlorothalonil and 1.77 and 0.15 mg liter-1 for trichloropyridinol. Golf course green leachate often mixes with surface water, thus more data may be warranted to determine the persistence and ecological significance of chronic exposure to these compounds of organisms in the aquatic environment.

  18. Effects of hypnosis on flow states and golf performance.

    PubMed

    Pates, J; Maynard, I

    2000-12-01

    This study examined the effects of an hypnotic intervention on flow states and golf-chipping performance of 3 participants. The study utilized an ideographic ABA single-subject design combined with a procedure to assess the participants' internal experience (Wollman, 1986). The intervention involved relaxation, imagery, hypnotic induction, hypnotic regression, and trigger control procedures over 5 wk. and 7 trials. Analysis indicated the 3 participants increased their mean golf-chipping performance from the trials in Baseline 1 to intervention, with 2 returning to Baseline 1 performance after the intervention phase at Baseline 2. The intensity of flow experienced by the participants during the performance trials was measured using Jackson and Marsh's 1996 Flow State Scale. Two participants experienced higher flow during the intervention phase and much lower flow during Baselines 1 and 2. Finally, participants indicated the intervention seemed useful in keeping them confident, relaxed, and in control. These results support the hypothesis that an hypnotic intervention can improve golf-chipping performance and increase feelings and cognitions associated with flow.

  19. Minimizing Injuries and Enhancing Performance in Golf Through Training Programs

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Erik P.; Brumitt, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Context: Golf is a popular sport, particularly in older populations. Regardless of age and skill level, golfers risk injury to the back, shoulder, wrist and hand, elbow, and knee. Because of the unique compressive, shear, rotational, and lateral bending forces created in the lumbar region during the golf swing, the primary sport-related malady experienced by amateurs and professionals is low back pain. Extrinsic and intrinsic injury risk factors have been reported in the literature. A growing body of evidence supports the prescription of strength training routines to enhance performance and reduce the risk of injury. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant studies were reviewed on golf injuries, swing mechanics, training routines, and general training program design. The following electronic databases were used to identify research relevant to this report: MEDLINE (from 1950–November 2009), CINAHL (1982–November 2009), and SPORTDiscus (1830–November 2009). Results: Injuries may be associated with lack of warm-up, poor trunk flexibility and strength, faulty swing technique, and overuse. Conclusions: Implementing a training program that includes flexibility, strength, and power training with correction of faulty swing mechanics will help the golfer reduce the likelihood of injury and improve overall performance. PMID:23015957

  20. The effect of retinal defocus on golf putting.

    PubMed

    Bulson, Ryan C; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Hung, George K

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of type and magnitude of retinal defocus on golf putting accuracy, and on the related eye, head, and putter movements. Eye, head, and putter movements were assessed objectively along with putting accuracy in 16 young adult, visually normal inexperienced golfers during a fixed 9-foot golf putt. Convex spherical (+0.50 D, +1.00 D, +1.50 D, +2.00 D, +10.00 D) and cylindrical (+1.00 D x 90, +2.00 D x 90) lenses were added binocularly to create various types and magnitudes of retinal defocus. Putting accuracy was significantly reduced only under the highest spherical blur lens condition (+10.00 D). No significant differences were found between any other lens conditions for eye, head or putter movements. Small amounts of spherical and astigmatic retinal defocus had a minimal impact on overall golf putting performance, except for putting accuracy under the highest blur condition. This is consistent with the findings of related studies. For a fixed putting distance, factors other than quality of the retinal image, such as blur adaptation and motor learning, appeared to be sufficient to maintain a high level of motor performance.

  1. Automatic optical inspection system design for golf ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsien-Huang; Su, Jyun-Wei; Chen, Chih-Lin

    2016-09-01

    ith the growing popularity of golf sport all over the world, the quantities of relevant products are increasing year by year. To create innovation and improvement in quality while reducing production cost, automation of manufacturing become a necessary and important issue. This paper reflect the trend of this production automa- tion. It uses the AOI (Automated Optical Inspection) technology to develop a system which can automatically detect defects on the golf ball. The current manual quality-inspection is not only error-prone but also very man- power demanding. Taking into consideration the competition of this industry in the near future, the development of related AOI equipment must be conducted as soon as possible. Due to the strong reflective property of the ball surface, as well as its surface dimples and subtle flaws, it is very difficult to take good quality image for automatic inspection. Based on the surface properties and shape of the ball, lighting has been properly design for image-taking environment and structure. Area-scan cameras have been used to acquire images with good contrast between defects and background to assure the achievement of the goal of automatic defect detection on the golf ball. The result obtained is that more than 973 of the NG balls have be detected, and system maintains less than 103 false alarm rate. The balls which are determined by the system to be NG will be inspected by human eye again. Therefore, the manpower spent in the inspection has been reduced by 903.

  2. Asymmetry of the Isokinetic Trunk Rotation Strength of Korean Male Professional Golf Players

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung Hyun; Kim, Don-Kyu; Kang, Si Hyun; Hwang, Junah

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is side to side difference of the trunk rotation muscle in Korean male professional golf players. Healthy controls who did not play golf were also evaluated and compared with professional golf players. Method Fifty-one professional golf players and 50 healthy controls participated in this study. Bilateral isokinetic trunk rotation strength that represented the aiming side and non-aiming side trunk rotator function in a golf swing and other parameters were evaluated using the Biodex System III Isokinetic Dynamometer at angular velocities of 30, 60, and 120 degree per second. Results The professional golf players' peak torque and total work on their aiming sides were significantly higher than on their non-aiming side at all angular velocities. Additionally, the golf players' peak torque on their aiming side was significantly higher than those of the healthy controls only at the 60 degree per second angular velocity, but there was a slight and consistent trend in the others. Finally, the difference between the aiming side and the non-aiming side of the professional golf players and the healthy controls was also significant. Conclusion The aiming side rotation strength of the male professional golf players was higher than that of non-aiming side. The controls showed no side-to-side differences. This finding is attributed to the repetitive training and practice of professional golf players. A further study is needed to investigate if the strengthening of the trunk rotation muscle, especially on the aiming side, could improve golf performance. PMID:23342315

  3. 76 FR 41691 - Safety Zone; BGSU Football Gridiron Classic Golf and Dinner Fireworks, Catawba Island Club, Port...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; BGSU Football Gridiron Classic Golf and... Lake Erie during the BGSU Football Gridiron Classic Golf and Dinner Fireworks. This temporary safety..., Bowling Green State University will hold its BGSU Football Gridiron Classic Golf and Dinner Fireworks,...

  4. 76 FR 66328 - Callaway Golf Ball Operations, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Reliable Temp Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Employment and Training Administration Callaway Golf Ball Operations, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers..., 2011, applicable to workers of Callaway Golf Ball Operations, Inc., including on-site leased workers... are engaged in activities related to the production of golf balls. The notice was published in...

  5. Promoting Golf as a Lifetime Physical Activity for Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandt, Dawn D.; Flynn, Erin; Turner, Tiffany A.

    2014-01-01

    Golf is one of the most accessible and versatile physical activities and is a viable choice for young adults with disabilities to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Teaching golf to youth with disabilities requires more than making accommodations regarding equipment, technique, and rules in the physical education setting. For…

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF A GOLF COMPLEX ON COASTAL WETLANDS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of contamination to nearby coastal wetlands and other near-shore areas. The chemical and biological magnitude of the problem is almost unknown. To provide perspective on this issue, the effects of golf complex r...

  7. Nitrous oxide emissions from a golf course fairway and rough following application of different nitrogen fertilizers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that destroys stratospheric ozone. There is limited research of golf course N2O emission and the effects of frequent fertilization and irrigation. Three enhanced efficiency nitrogen fertilizers (EENFs) were applied to a Colorado golf course fairway and ...

  8. Golf Ball Roll Distance: A Field Exercise to Explore Management Factors Affecting Putting Green Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Cale A.; Walker, Kristina S.

    2007-01-01

    Putting greens are the most important golf course use area and regularly draw comments regarding their appearance and playing condition. This field laboratory exercise taught students how to properly measure putting green speed, an important functional characteristic, using a Stimpmeter device that measures golf ball roll distance (BRD).…

  9. Golf Tournament Drives in a Win for the Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On September 23, golfers took to the Clustered Spires golf course in Frederick, Md., for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick hosted its inaugural golf tournament, with proceeds benefiting the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Children’s Inn.

  10. Evaluating poverty grass (Danthonia spicata) for golf courses in the Midwest

    Treesearch

    Nadia E. Navarrete-Tindall; J.W. Van Sambeek

    2010-01-01

    Poverty grass (Danthonia spicata (L.) P. beauv. Ex Roem & Schult. ) results presented here are part of ongoing studies to evaluate its adaptation for golf courses as part of low maintenance natural communities at Lincoln University of Missouri. Because its natural adaptation to shade and poor soils, poverty grass could be established in golf...

  11. Golf Ball Roll Distance: A Field Exercise to Explore Management Factors Affecting Putting Green Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Cale A.; Walker, Kristina S.

    2007-01-01

    Putting greens are the most important golf course use area and regularly draw comments regarding their appearance and playing condition. This field laboratory exercise taught students how to properly measure putting green speed, an important functional characteristic, using a Stimpmeter device that measures golf ball roll distance (BRD).…

  12. Ground penetrating radar water content mapping of golf course green sand layers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Information on the spatial distribution of water content across the sand layer component of a golf course green can be important to golf course superintendents for evaluating drainage effectiveness and scheduling irrigation. To estimate the bulk water content of the sand layer at point locations ac...

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF A GOLF COMPLEX ON COASTAL WETLANDS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of contamination to nearby coastal wetlands and other near-shore areas. The chemical and biological magnitude of the problem is almost unknown. To provide perspective on this issue, the effects of golf complex r...

  14. Shufflegolf: Teaching Golf Strategies and Etiquette to Young Children and Learners with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Francis M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share a unique curricular idea with physical educators interested about adding golf concepts to their curriculum. The focus is on a modified golf game that helps teach tactics, strategies, rules, and etiquette to young learners and those with intellectual disabilities. The specific content for this unit focuses on…

  15. Promoting Golf as a Lifetime Physical Activity for Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandt, Dawn D.; Flynn, Erin; Turner, Tiffany A.

    2014-01-01

    Golf is one of the most accessible and versatile physical activities and is a viable choice for young adults with disabilities to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Teaching golf to youth with disabilities requires more than making accommodations regarding equipment, technique, and rules in the physical education setting. For…

  16. Golf Tournament Drives in a Win for the Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On September 23, golfers took to the Clustered Spires golf course in Frederick, Md., for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick hosted its inaugural golf tournament, with proceeds benefiting the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Children’s Inn.

  17. Guidelines for a proposed lightning protection policy of a golf association or tournament sponsor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillyer, Charles C.

    1991-01-01

    Because lightning causes many deaths and injuries each year on golf courses, guidelines are given for measures to be taken during golf events. Recommendations are given relative to warning systems, shelters, suspension of play, and the distribution of written policy statements.

  18. Shufflegolf: Teaching Golf Strategies and Etiquette to Young Children and Learners with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Francis M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share a unique curricular idea with physical educators interested about adding golf concepts to their curriculum. The focus is on a modified golf game that helps teach tactics, strategies, rules, and etiquette to young learners and those with intellectual disabilities. The specific content for this unit focuses on…

  19. Bridging the Generation Gap: "Growing Golf" through an Action Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbert, Norb; Cumiskey, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an action learning simulation designed for a Professional Golf Management (PGM) program housed in a College of Business of a public university. The PGA Golf Management University Program, a 4.5- to 5-year college curriculum for aspiring PGA Professionals is offered at 19 PGA accredited universities nationwide. The program…

  20. A Scoping Review of the Associations of Golf with Eye Injuries in Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Sport presents a risk of ocular trauma and accounts for a significant number of eye injuries that require hospital admission. The sport of golf presents a risk to eyesight from fast moving objects such as golf clubs and balls. This study aims to investigate the associations of golf with eye injuries and the reasons that these injuries occur. Material/Methods. A literature search was conducted using the databases MEDLINE, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, and PsycINFO. Grey literature was searched using the WHO international clinical trials registry platform, Google Scholar, and ProQuest. Data was extracted using a standardised form and summarised into a report. Results and Discussion. Twenty-three studies were found relating to eye injuries in golf. Injuries appear to be rare, but more frequent in men and children. Injuries resulted in high rates of enucleation and visual impairment. Children sustained more injury from golf clubs whereas adults sustained more injuries from golf balls. Conclusion. Efforts are needed to encourage golf participants to understand the risks of ocular and indeed other head injuries. Initiatives to provide appropriate supervision and education on this topic are merited. Further research is needed to investigate the circumstances of eye injury in golf and assess the effects of interventions aimed at reducing risk of injury. PMID:27504485

  1. A good walk spoiled: on the disappearance of golf as an active sport in America.

    PubMed

    Puterbaugh, James S

    2011-07-01

    During the past 60 years, there has been a major transition in the way golf is played in America. Its potential as exercise largely has been negated by the increase in motorized golf cart usage to approximately two of every three rounds played in this country. Accidents in golf carts have increased rapidly, which, by making the sport more dangerous, will likely bring future regulations. Consequently, playing golf has gradually become more of a public health threat than a benefit. The motorized cart also has resulted in an almost doubling of the size of golf courses, which now occupy a large amount of the built environment designated for activity. These changes are a major loss to society, portend future problems, and call for the sport to reevaluate its current model.

  2. The "swing-ding": a golf-related head injury in children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Arthur; Cohen, Alan R; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased incidence of golf-associated head injuries in children and adolescents. At the authors' institution, they have identified a unique pattern of head injury associated with a swinging golf club. In this study, the authors highlight the mechanism of this injury and report their experience treating it. The authors reviewed the database of Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital Trauma Center and performed a retrospective analysis of golf injuries recorded over a 10-year period (January 2000-April 2010). They identified 13 children (9 boys and 4 girls) who sustained head injuries in golfing accidents. All patients were 10 years of age or younger. The medical charts were reviewed and follow-up interviews were conducted to better delineate the details of the injuries. Injuries included 13 depressed skull fractures, 7 epidural hematomas, and 1 cerebral contusion. All 13 patients sustained their injuries after being struck in the head by a golf club. Seven sustained injuries on the follow-through of the initial swing and 3 sustained injuries on the backswing. All but one patient required neurosurgical intervention. Five patients developed neurological sequelae. None of the children had prior experience with golf equipment. All but one injury occurred in the child's own backyard. There was no direct supervision by an adult in any of the cases. Golfing can lead to serious head injuries in children. The authors noticed a unique pattern of golf-related head injuries, previously not described, that they have termed the "swing-ding." This golf club-inflicted injury occurs when a child stands too close to a swinging golfer and is struck in the head, subsequently sustaining a comminuted depressed skull fracture in the frontal or temporal region, with or without further intracranial injury. The study suggests that a lack of adult supervision, minimal previous golf experience, and proximity of the child to the swinging golfer are all

  3. Peer pressure and thai amateur golfers' gambling on their games: the mediating effect of golf self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ariyabuddhiphongs, Vanchai; Promsakha Na Sakolnakorn, Chomnad

    2014-09-01

    Our study hypothesizes that Thai amateur golfers gamble on their game because of peer pressure and their golf self-efficacy. To support our hypothesis, we conducted a study to examine the mediating effect of golf self-efficacy on the peer pressure-golf gambling relationship among 387 amateur golfers in Thailand. Peer pressure was operationally defined as fellow players' influence on the individual golfer to gamble; golf self-efficacy as the judgment of the golfer's skills to play golf; and golf gambling as the frequency and amounts of gambling. Regression analysis with bootstrapping was used to test the mediation effect of golf self-efficacy on the peer pressure-golf gambling relationship. The results support our hypothesis; peer pressure predicted golf gambling, and the indirect effect of peer pressure to golf gambling through the mediation of golf self-efficacy was significant. The results support the influence of peer pressure on gambling, and the social cognitive theory reciprocal relationship model.

  4. Hybrid markerless tracking of complex articulated motion in golf swings.

    PubMed

    Fung, Sim Kwoh; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Kiang, Lam Chee; Nadarajah, Sivadev; Sahayadhas, Arun; Ali, Md Asraf; Islam, Md Anamul; Palaniappan, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    Sports video tracking is a research topic that has attained increasing attention due to its high commercial potential. A number of sports, including tennis, soccer, gymnastics, running, golf, badminton and cricket have been utilised to display the novel ideas in sports motion tracking. The main challenge associated with this research concerns the extraction of a highly complex articulated motion from a video scene. Our research focuses on the development of a markerless human motion tracking system that tracks the major body parts of an athlete straight from a sports broadcast video. We proposed a hybrid tracking method, which consists of a combination of three algorithms (pyramidal Lucas-Kanade optical flow (LK), normalised correlation-based template matching and background subtraction), to track the golfer's head, body, hands, shoulders, knees and feet during a full swing. We then match, track and map the results onto a 2D articulated human stick model to represent the pose of the golfer over time. Our work was tested using two video broadcasts of a golfer, and we obtained satisfactory results. The current outcomes of this research can play an important role in enhancing the performance of a golfer, provide vital information to sports medicine practitioners by providing technically sound guidance on movements and should assist to diminish the risk of golfing injuries.

  5. Regulation of reaction forces during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    McNitt-Gray, J L; Munaretto, J; Zaferiou, A; Requejo, P S; Flashner, H

    2013-06-01

    During the golf swing, the reaction forces applied at the feet control translation and rotation of the body-club system. In this study, we hypothesized that skilled players using a 6-iron would regulate shot distance by scaling the magnitude of the resultant horizontal reaction force applied to the each foot with minimal modifications in force direction. Skilled players (n = 12) hit golf balls using a 6-iron. Shot distance was varied by hitting the ball as they would normally and when reducing shot distance using the same club. During each swing, reaction forces were measured using dual force plates (1200 Hz) and three-dimensional kinematics were simultaneously captured (110 Hz). The results indicate that, on average, the peak resultant horizontal reaction forces of the target leg were significantly less than normal (5%, p < 0.05) when reducing shot distance. No significant differences in the orientation of the peak resultant horizontal reaction forces were observed. Resultant horizontal reaction force-angle relationships within leg and temporal relationships between target and rear legs during the swing were consistent within player across shot conditions. Regulation of force magnitude with minimal modification in force direction is expected to provide advantages from muscle activation, coordination, and performance points of view.

  6. Hip rotational velocities during the full golf swing.

    PubMed

    Gulgin, Heather; Armstrong, Charles; Gribble, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Since labral pathology in professional golfers has been reported, and such pathology has been associated with internal/external hip rotation, quantifying the rotational velocity of the hips during the golf swing may be helpful in understanding the mechanism involved in labral injury. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the peak internal/external rotational velocities of the thigh relative to the pelvis during the golf swing. Fifteen female, collegiate golfers participated in the study. Data were acquired through high-speed three dimensional (3-D) videography using a multi-segment bilateral marker set to define the segments, while the subjects completed multiple repetitions of a drive. The results indicated that the lead hip peak internal rotational velocity was significantly greater than that of the trail hip external rotational velocity (p = 0.003). It appears that the lead hip of a golfer experiences much higher rotational velocities during the downswing than that of the trail hip. In other structures, such as the shoulder, an increased risk of soft tissue injury has been associated with high levels of rotational velocity. This may indicate that, in golfers, the lead hip may be more susceptible to injury such as labral tears than that of the trailing hip. Key pointsLead hip of golfer experiences significantly higher rotational velocities than the trail hip.Golfers may be more susceptible to injuries on the lead hip.Clubhead velocities were consistent with elite female golfers.

  7. Angular Impulse and Balance Regulation During the Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Travis J; Wilcox, Rand R; McNitt-Gray, Jill L

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to determine how skilled players regulate linear and angular impulse while maintaining balance during the golf swing. Eleven highly-skilled golf players performed swings with a 6-iron and driver. Components contributing to linear and angular impulse generated by the rear and target legs (resultant horizontal reaction force [RFh], RFh-angle, and moment arm) were quantified and compared across the group and within a player (α = .05). Net angular impulse generated by both the rear and target legs was greater for the driver than the 6-iron. Mechanisms used to regulate angular impulse generation between clubs varied across players and required coordination between the legs. Increases in net angular impulse with a driver involved increases in target leg RFh. Rear leg RFh-angle was maintained between clubs whereas target leg RFh became more aligned with the target line. Net linear impulse perpendicular to the target line remained near zero, preserving balance, while net linear impulse along the target line decreased in magnitude. These results indicate that the net angular impulse was regulated between clubs by coordinating force generation of the rear and target legs while sustaining balance throughout the task.

  8. The vibrational mode structure of a golf ball.

    PubMed

    Axe, John D; Brown, K; Shannon, Kevin

    2002-08-01

    In this paper, we report the discrete frequencies at which golf balls can vibrate, the mode patterns of these vibrations and how these modes can be excited. There are two broad classes of modes: those that radiate sound waves and those that do not. Both silent and acoustic modes are excited by tangential (i.e. spin-producing) impact forces; only acoustic modes are excited by radial impact forces. Exact analytical results for a homogeneous ball core are compared with finite element numerical results for both a core and a model two-piece ball. Correspondences are readily established for the important low-frequency modes, and the good agreement suggests the validity of these results for real golf balls. The results potentially provide the basis for a rapid, simple and non-destructive method of measuring the effective high-frequency elastic shear modulae of balls (and ball cores) as well as a method for 'tuning' the performance of balls for specific clubs. Some of these aspects are explored further in our companion paper in this issue.

  9. Trunk muscle activation during golf swing: Baseline and threshold.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís; Marta, Sérgio; Vaz, João; Fernandes, Orlando; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    There is a lack of studies regarding EMG temporal analysis during dynamic and complex motor tasks, such as golf swing. The aim of this study is to analyze the EMG onset during the golf swing, by comparing two different threshold methods. Method A threshold was determined using the baseline activity recorded between two maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Method B threshold was calculated using the mean EMG activity for 1000ms before the 500ms prior to the start of the Backswing. Two different clubs were also studied. Three-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare methods, muscles and clubs. Two-way mixed Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) with absolute agreement was used to determine the methods reliability. Club type usage showed no influence in onset detection. Rectus abdominis (RA) showed the higher agreement between methods. Erector spinae (ES), on the other hand, showed a very low agreement, that might be related to postural activity before the swing. External oblique (EO) is the first being activated, at 1295ms prior impact. There is a similar activation time between right and left muscles sides, although the right EO showed better agreement between methods than left side. Therefore, the algorithms usage is task- and muscle-dependent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hip Rotational Velocities During the Full Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Gulgin, Heather; Armstrong, Charles; Gribble, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Since labral pathology in professional golfers has been reported, and such pathology has been associated with internal/external hip rotation, quantifying the rotational velocity of the hips during the golf swing may be helpful in understanding the mechanism involved in labral injury. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the peak internal/external rotational velocities of the thigh relative to the pelvis during the golf swing. Fifteen female, collegiate golfers participated in the study. Data were acquired through high-speed three dimensional (3-D) videography using a multi-segment bilateral marker set to define the segments, while the subjects completed multiple repetitions of a drive. The results indicated that the lead hip peak internal rotational velocity was significantly greater than that of the trail hip external rotational velocity (p = 0.003). It appears that the lead hip of a golfer experiences much higher rotational velocities during the downswing than that of the trail hip. In other structures, such as the shoulder, an increased risk of soft tissue injury has been associated with high levels of rotational velocity. This may indicate that, in golfers, the lead hip may be more susceptible to injury such as labral tears than that of the trailing hip. Key points Lead hip of golfer experiences significantly higher rotational velocities than the trail hip. Golfers may be more susceptible to injuries on the lead hip. Clubhead velocities were consistent with elite female golfers. PMID:24149541

  11. Electromyographic analysis of the hip and knee during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Bechler, J R; Jobe, F W; Pink, M; Perry, J; Ruwe, P A

    1995-07-01

    As golf increases in popularity, more golfers seek the proper mechanics necessary for the perfect golf swing. Surprisingly little scientific work has been published on the contribution of the hip and knee muscles during the golf swing even though most professionals have recognized their vital contribution. Recent studies have described the electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of the shoulder, back, and trunk during the golf swing. The purpose of this study was to describe the electrical muscle activity in seven hip and knee muscles of both the left (lead) and right (trail) leg in competitive golfers while performing the golf swing. Sixteen golfers were studied with indwelling electrodes and high-speed cinematography. The EMG was synchronized with the film to discern five phases of the golf swing. Means, SDs, and t-tests were done. The results revealed that the trail hip extensors and abductors in conjunction with the lead adductor magus initiated pelvic rotation during forward swing. The lead hamstrings maintained a flexed knee and provided a stable base on which pelvic rotation took place. The peak EMG muscle activity recorded in the hips and knees occurred in an earlier phase than that measured previously in the trunk and shoulder. This confirmed the sequential firing pattern of the hip and knee muscles that takes place during the competitive golf swing. Information gained from this study can be used by players and coaches to optimize performance and to minimize injury.

  12. Le role du phytoplancton de petite taille (<20 mum) dans les variations des proprietes optiques des eaux du Saint-Laurent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas, Sebastien

    Les mesures satellitaires de couleur des oceans sont largement determinees par les proprietes optiques inherentes (IOPs) des eaux de surface. D'autre part, le phytoplancton de petite taille (<20 mum) est le plus souvent dominant dans les oceans, et peut donc etre une source importante de variation des IOPs dans les oceans. Dans ce contexte, le but principal de ce doctorat etait de definir l'impact du phytoplancton (<20 mum) sur les variations des proprietes optiques de l'Estuaire et du Golfe du Saint-Laurent (Canada). Afin d'atteindre cet objectif, il etait necessaire de determiner en milieu controle les facteurs de variabilite des proprietes optiques cellulaires et des IOPs du phytoplancton (<20 mum) des eaux du Saint-Laurent, et d'evaluer la contribution du phytoplancton (<20 mum) aux proprietes optiques totales des eaux du Saint-Laurent. Des experiences en laboratoire ont montre que les variations des proprietes optiques des cellules phytoplanctoniques soumises a un cycle jour-nuit, ainsi qu'a des changements concomitants d'intensite lumineuse, peuvent contribuer significativement a la variabilite des proprietes optiques observee en milieu naturel. D'autres experiences ont, quant a elles, mis en evidence que les variations des proprietes optiques des cellules phytoplanctoniques dues aux phases de croissance peuvent alterer les IOPs des oceans, particulierement pendant les periodes de floraison. De plus, la presence de bacteries et de particules detritiques peut egalement affecter la variabilite des IOPs totales, notamment la diffusion. Au printemps, dans l'Estuaire et le Golfe du Saint-Laurent, la contribution du phytoplancton <20 mum aux IOPs presentait des differences regionales evidentes pour les proprietes d'absorption et de diffusion. En plus de la variabilite spatiale, les proprietes optiques cellulaires presentaient des variations journalieres, et ce particulierement pour le picophytoplancton. Enfin, la plupart des differences observees dans les

  13. Correlation of Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screens and golf swing faults.

    PubMed

    Gulgin, Heather R; Schulte, Brian C; Crawley, Amy A

    2014-02-01

    Although some research in the past has examined how physical limitations in strength or flexibility affect a golfer's performance, the performance outcome most measured was driving distance. Currently, there are no data that have examined the relationship between selected strength and flexibility variables and golf swing faults. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screen variables and 14 common golf swing faults. Thirty-six male and female golfers (mean age, 25.4 ± 9.9 years; height, 175.9 ± 16.2 cm; mass, 76.2 ± 14.6 kg; handicap, 14.2 ± 10.4) participated. Twelve physical tests of strength, flexibility, and balance were assessed using the TPI level 1 golf fitness screening tool. Golfers then hit 4 golf shots (with a 5-iron) while being videoed, and those were then analyzed for 14 different golf swing faults (using V1Pro software). Three significant associations between a physical limitation and a particular golf swing fault were found: toe touch and early hip extension (p = 0.015), bridge on right side with both early hip extension (p = 0.050), and loss of posture (p = 0.028). In addition, an odds ratio showed that when a golfer could not overhead deep squat or single leg balance on left side, they were 2-3 times more likely to exhibit a early hip extension, loss of posture, or slide during the golf swing, as compared with those who could perform a correct overhead deep squat. Based on our findings, it is important for the golf fitness professional to particularly address a golfer's core strength, balance, and hamstring flexibility to help avoid common golf swing faults, which affect a golfer's ball striking ability and ultimately their performance.

  14. Suitability of Strain Gage Sensors for Integration into Smart Sport Equipment: A Golf Club Example

    PubMed Central

    Umek, Anton; Zhang, Yuan; Tomažič, Sašo; Kos, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Wearable devices and smart sport equipment are being increasingly used in amateur and professional sports. Smart sport equipment employs various sensors for detecting its state and actions. The correct choice of the most appropriate sensor(s) is of paramount importance for efficient and successful operation of sport equipment. When integrated into the sport equipment, ideal sensors are unobstructive, and do not change the functionality of the equipment. The article focuses on experiments for identification and selection of sensors that are suitable for the integration into a golf club with the final goal of their use in real time biofeedback applications. We tested two orthogonally affixed strain gage (SG) sensors, a 3-axis accelerometer, and a 3-axis gyroscope. The strain gage sensors are calibrated and validated in the laboratory environment by a highly accurate Qualisys Track Manager (QTM) optical tracking system. Field test results show that different types of golf swing and improper movement in early phases of golf swing can be detected with strain gage sensors attached to the shaft of the golf club. Thus they are suitable for biofeedback applications to help golfers to learn repetitive golf swings. It is suggested that the use of strain gage sensors can improve the golf swing technical error detection accuracy and that strain gage sensors alone are enough for basic golf swing analysis. Our final goal is to be able to acquire and analyze as many parameters of a smart golf club in real time during the entire duration of the swing. This would give us the ability to design mobile and cloud biofeedback applications with terminal or concurrent feedback that will enable us to speed-up motor skill learning in golf. PMID:28430147

  15. Suitability of Strain Gage Sensors for Integration into Smart Sport Equipment: A Golf Club Example.

    PubMed

    Umek, Anton; Zhang, Yuan; Tomažič, Sašo; Kos, Anton

    2017-04-21

    Wearable devices and smart sport equipment are being increasingly used in amateur and professional sports. Smart sport equipment employs various sensors for detecting its state and actions. The correct choice of the most appropriate sensor(s) is of paramount importance for efficient and successful operation of sport equipment. When integrated into the sport equipment, ideal sensors are unobstructive, and do not change the functionality of the equipment. The article focuses on experiments for identification and selection of sensors that are suitable for the integration into a golf club with the final goal of their use in real time biofeedback applications. We tested two orthogonally affixed strain gage (SG) sensors, a 3-axis accelerometer, and a 3-axis gyroscope. The strain gage sensors are calibrated and validated in the laboratory environment by a highly accurate Qualisys Track Manager (QTM) optical tracking system. Field test results show that different types of golf swing and improper movement in early phases of golf swing can be detected with strain gage sensors attached to the shaft of the golf club. Thus they are suitable for biofeedback applications to help golfers to learn repetitive golf swings. It is suggested that the use of strain gage sensors can improve the golf swing technical error detection accuracy and that strain gage sensors alone are enough for basic golf swing analysis. Our final goal is to be able to acquire and analyze as many parameters of a smart golf club in real time during the entire duration of the swing. This would give us the ability to design mobile and cloud biofeedback applications with terminal or concurrent feedback that will enable us to speed-up motor skill learning in golf.

  16. Numerical simulation of observations with GOLF on board SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, R. A.; Roca Cortes, T.; Regulo, C.

    1998-03-01

    The main objective of the GOLF Experiment (Global Oscillations at Low Frequencies) on-board the SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) space mission is the quantitative knowledge of the internal structure of the Sun by measuring the spectrum of its global oscillations in a wide frequency range (30 nHz to 6 mHz). There is special interest in detecting the low l p- and g-modes (low frequency modes) which penetrate deeply down into the solar core. The instrument chosen is an improved disk-integrated sunlight resonant scattering spectrophotometer. It obtains the line of sight velocity of the integrated visible solar surface by measuring the Doppler shift of the sodium doublet. Mainly, two innovations have been incorporated to standard earth-based similar apparatus (those from the networks IRIS and BISON). First, GOLF samples each line of the sodium doublet in principle at four points on its wings, using an extra small modulated magnetic field. This new information enables an instantaneous calibration of the measured signal and also opens the possibility to correct from the background solar velocity noise. Second, the use of an extra fixed quarter wave plate, placed at the entrance of the instrument, enables a selection of the circularly polarized solar light. Therefore, the disk averaged solar line-of-sight component of the magnetic field can also be obtained. This is considered as a secondary objective of the mission. In order to study the new information available due to these improvements in the apparatus, the necessity of fully understanding it and the need to write the appropriate software to analyze the data, a complete numerical simulation of the experiment has been built. Running the simulation has yielded two series of 12 months long each, one corresponding to a year of maximum solar activity and the other to a year of minimum solar activity. In this paper the numerical simulation of the GOLF experiment is presented, its sensitivity and instrumental

  17. Golfing Skill Level Postural Control Differences: A Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, James S.; Marclay, Samuel; Najafi, Bijan

    2012-01-01

    Golfers have better balance than their age-matched counterparts; however, it is uncertain if this persists during the swing as a function of skill level. The purpose of the study was to investigate dynamic postural control (center of mass (COM) motion) measured during different phases of the swing in golfers of varying proficiency. Eighteen healthy golfers were grouped by handicap: novice (no handicap, n = 7), intermediate (handicap 15-19, n = 7), and advanced (handicap 9-14, n = 4). Indoor testing was performed hitting 3 tee shots using a common driver. A five-camera (60 Hz) motion analysis system (9 markers) was used to extract kinematics data. There were no significant group differences in gender, age, or BMI. Advanced players had lower COM displacement with respect to address at the time of maximum arm speed (p = 0. 001) compared to intermediate (57%, p = 0.014) and novice (73%, p = 0.023). These changes persisted after COM distance and time normalization. Advanced golfers had improved COM linearity during the downswing (p < 0.001) compared to intermediate (30%, p = 0.029) and novice (51%, p < 0.001). Advanced players had decreased COM displacement at the time of maximum arm speed and a more linear COM path during the early downswing. Further study should focus on these changes during ball launch conditions. Key pointsStudies suggest that static and dynamic balance is important in golf. However, none have investigated dynamic postural control during the golf swing in golfers of varying proficiency.Our findings suggest advanced players demonstrated improved postural control at the point of maximum arm speed when compared to less skilled players. Furthermore, center of mass acceleration in advanced players is closer to impact than less-skilled players.We observed an increased center of mass linearity of trajectory during the early downswing for advanced players over novice players. We theorized this strategy may help advanced golfers to improve the economy of COM

  18. Water repellent soils as they occur on UK golf greens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, C. A.; Canaway, P. M.

    2000-05-01

    Water repellent soils have been identified as a major problem in the management of golf greens in the UK for over 60 years. The cause of this problem has provoked much speculation, but prior to this work, no research into the possible cause of water repellent soils in the UK had been completed. One of the commonly believed links with water repellent soils on UK golf greens was the activity of basidiomycete fungi. This was proposed as a possible causal factor because the symptoms expressed on the turf above affected soils, were similar in many instances to those symptoms expressed by the activity of superficial fairy rings. Since it was impractical to study superficial fairy rings, it was decided to observe other basidiomycete fairy rings (Type 1 fairy rings) to see if any water-repellence could be identified as being associated with them. Three of these rings, caused by the fungus Marasmius oreades (Bolt ex. Fr) Fr., were studied on each of the two different sites. Soil samples were removed at intervals from the centre of the rings, across the obvious symptoms of the rings (i.e. the zone of dead grass bordered on both sides by a zone of stimulated grass growth) and beyond, into the uncolonised soil. These samples were taken to the laboratory, allowed to air dry and were then tested to determine relative levels of water repellence. It was found that on the 'outside' of the fairy rings where the fungus had not yet colonised, the soils were less water repellent than they were in the other zones of the rings (i.e. the dead zone and the inner zone). In the region of the dead zone of these fairy rings, the soil was very water repellent. This may have been expected because the fungus was present in this area in large quantities and the fungus itself repels water. However, of particular interest, were the results from the inner part of the ring where the fungus had been present in the past, but where it no longer colonised the soil. In these soil samples, the rootzone soil

  19. Fabricator tees up with golf-car redesign

    SciTech Connect

    Hallum, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    EZ-Go Textron, Augusta, USA, manufactures 40 models of gasoline- and electric-powered utility vehicles, personnel carriers, and golf cars. Despite its popular product line, EZ-Go management recognized it had a problem; fabricating processes and product design hadn`t changed for 25 years and, at peak production, workers cloistered in dark, dingy shops were fabricating over-designed chassis and car frames using manual gas-metal arc welding. A global production plan, involving redesign of the product and plant modernization, was presented 3 years ago. The plan established volume outputs and shutdown steps for migrating from the old to the new design. The author describes the plan which incorporates linking product redesign, complex stampings, conveyor lines, and robotic welding.

  20. Water quality, pesticide occurrence, and effects of irrigation with reclaimed water at golf courses in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swancar, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Reuse of treated wastewater for golf course irrigation is an increasingly popular water management option in Florida, where growth has put stress on potable water supplies. Surface water, ground water, and irrigation water were sampled at three pairs of golf courses quarterly for one year to determine if pesticides were present, and the effect of irrigation with treated effluent on ground-water quality, with an emphasis on interactions of effluent with pesticides. In addition to the six paired golf courses, which were in central Florida, ground water was sampled for pesticides and other constituents at three more golf courses in other parts of the State. This study was the first to analyze water samples from Florida golf courses for a broad range of pesticides. Statistical methods based on the percentage of data above detection limits were used to determine the effects of irrigation with reclaimed water on ground-water quality. Shallow ground water at golf courses irrigated with treated effluent has higher concentrations of chloride, lower concentrations of bicarbonate, and lower pH than ground water at golf courses irrigated with water from carbonate aquifers. There were no statistically significant differences in nutrient concentrations in ground water between paired golf courses grouped by irrigation water type at a 95 percent confidence level. The number of wells where pesticides occurred was significantly higher at the paired golf courses using ground water for irrigation than at ones using reclaimed water. However, the limited occurrences of individual pesticides in ground water make it difficult to correlate differences in irrigation- water quality with pesticide migration to the water table. At some of the golf courses, increased pesticide occurrences may be associated with higher irrigation rates, the presence of well-drained soils, and shallow depths to the surficial aquifer. Pesticides used by golf courses for turf grass maintenance were detected in

  1. Off site transport of fungicides with snowmelt and rainfall runoff from golf course fairway turf

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pesticides associated with the turfgrass industry have been detected in storm runoff and surface waters of urban watersheds; inferring contaminant contributions from residential, urban, and recreational sources. Golf course turf often requires multiple applications of pesticides at rates that exceed...

  2. Golf course development in a major tourist destination: implications for planning and management.

    PubMed

    Warnken, J; Thompson, D; Zakus, D H

    2001-05-01

    The planning and design of golf course developments is influenced by many factors. This paper focuses on the environmental ramifications of insufficient or lack of compliance with standard environmental and economic planning practices. Specifically, it looks at a tourist destination location that was under the influence of extensive land development and investment speculation. The Gold Coast in Australia was the focal point for large overseas investment due to changes in government legislation regarding foreign investment. Due to the economic climate in the second half of the 1980s many golf course resort developments were built, approved, or planned. Many of these circumvented normal business and environment planning processes. The result has been a dangerous concentration of golf facilities in environmentally sensitive areas and an oversupply of golf facilities. Both of these matters are discussed in terms of the general planning process and the potential economic and environmental impacts to the Gold Coast and similar destinations in other parts of the world.

  3. Improving performance in golf: current research and implications from a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kerrie; Tuttle, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Golf, a global sport enjoyed by people of all ages and abilities, involves relatively long periods of low intensity exercise interspersed with short bursts of high intensity activity. To meet the physical demands of full swing shots and the mental and physical demands of putting and walking the course, it is frequently recommended that golfers undertake golf-specific exercise programs. Biomechanics, motor learning, and motor control research has increased the understanding of the physical requirements of the game, and using this knowledge, exercise programs aimed at improving golf performance have been developed. However, while it is generally accepted that an exercise program can improve a golfer's physical measurements and some golf performance variables, translating the findings from research into clinical practice to optimise an individual golfer's performance remains challenging. This paper discusses how biomechanical and motor control research has informed current practice and discusses how emerging sophisticated tools and research designs may better assist golfers improve their performance. PMID:26537808

  4. Kinetic Constrained Optimization of the Golf Swing Hub Path

    PubMed Central

    Nesbit, Steven M.; McGinnis, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power) of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study. Key Points The hand path trajectory is an important characteristic of the golf swing and greatly affects club head velocity and golfer/club energy transfer. It is possible to increase the energy transfer from the golfer to the club by modifying the hand path and swing trajectories without increasing the kinetic output demands on the golfer. It is possible to identify relative kinetic output strengths and weakness of a golfer through assessment of the hand path and swing trajectories. Increasing any one of the kinetic outputs of the golfer can potentially increase the club head velocity at impact. The hand path trajectory has important influences over the club swing trajectory. PMID:25435779

  5. Root-knot nematodes in golf course greens of the western United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A survey of 238 golf courses in ten of the Western U.S. found root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) in 60 % of the putting greens sampled. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA, D2-D3 of 28S rRNA, ITS-rRNA and mtDNA gene sequences were used to identify specimens from 110 golf courses. The...

  6. Enhanced cell adhesion to the dimpled surfaces of golf-ball-shaped microparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyuk; Lee, Chang-Soo; Cho, Kuk Young

    2014-10-08

    Engineering surface morphology as in honeycomb-structured planar films is of great importance for providing new potential application and improved performance in biomedical fields. We demonstrate potential new applications for the uniform biocompatible golf-ball-shaped microparticles that resembles 3D feature of honeycomb-structured film. Dimple size controllable golf-ball-shaped microparticles were fabricated by microfluidic device. Surface dimples not only can act as picoliter beaker but also enhance cell adhesion without any chemical modification of the surface.

  7. Final Environmental Assessment for New Golf Driving Range at Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-01

    3-13 3.5 Black -Tailed Prairie Dog Wards Near the Proposed Golf Driving Range Site .. 3-19 APPENDIX A: Golf Driving Range Equipment...willow Solidago ssp. A Goldenrod Stipa comata Needle and Thread Thinopyrum ponticum Tall wheatgrass Tragopogon dubius major Salsify Verbascum thapsus...consisting of species that tolerate moderate levels of human activity. The dominant vertebrate at the site is the black -tailed prairie dog (Cynomys

  8. Where do golf driver swings go wrong? Factors influencing driver swing consistency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Shan, G

    2014-10-01

    One of the challenging skills in golfing is the driver swing. There have been a large number of studies characterizing golf swings, yielding insightful instructions on how to swing well. As a result, achieving a sub-18 handicap is no longer the top problem for golfers. Instead, players are now most troubled by a lack of consistency during swing execution. The goal of this study was to determine how to consistently execute good golf swings. Using 3D motion capture and full-body biomechanical modeling, 22 experienced golfers were analysed. For characterizing both successful and failed swings, 19 selected parameters (13 angles, 4 time parameters, and 2 distances) were used. The results showed that 14 parameters are highly sensitive and/or prone to motor control variations. These parameters sensitized five distinct areas of swing to variation: (a) ball positioning, (b) transverse club angle, (c) transition, (d) wrist control, and (e) posture migration between takeaway and impact. Suggestions were provided for how to address these five distinct problem areas. We hope our findings on how to achieve consistency in golf swings will benefit all levels of golf pedagogy and help maintain/develop interests to involve more golf/physical activity for a healthy lifestyle.

  9. The Biomechanics of the Modern Golf Swing: Implications for Lower Back Injuries.

    PubMed

    Cole, Michael H; Grimshaw, Paul N

    2016-03-01

    The modern golf swing is a complex and asymmetrical movement that places an emphasis on restricting pelvic turn while increasing thorax rotation during the backswing to generate higher clubhead speeds at impact. Increasing thorax rotation relative to pelvic rotation preloads the trunk muscles by accentuating their length and allowing them to use the energy stored in their elastic elements to produce more power. As the thorax and pelvis turn back towards the ball during the downswing, more skilled golfers are known to laterally slide their pelvis toward the target, which further contributes to final clubhead speed. However, despite the apparent performance benefits associated with these sequences, it has been argued that the lumbar spine is incapable of safely accommodating the forces they produce. This notion supports a link between the repeated performance of the golf swing and the development of golf-related low back injuries. Of the complaints reported by golfers, low back injuries continue to be the most prevalent, but the mechanism of these injuries is still poorly understood. This review highlights that there is a paucity of research directly evaluating the apparent link between the modern golf swing and golf-related low back pain. Furthermore, there has been a general lack of consensus within the literature with respect to the methods used to objectively assess the golf swing and the methods used to derived common outcome measures. Future research would benefit from a clear set of guidelines to help reduce the variability between studies.

  10. Orbital fracture and eyeball rupture caused by golf-club injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Joo Ho

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of an orbital fracture and an eyeball rupture caused by a golf-club injury. A 75-year-old man was struck in his right eye by a golf club while watching behind his son swinging a hybrid-type golf club at his home. A 70-mm muscle-depth laceration was present in the infraorbital area with active bleeding. Computed tomographic imaging of the face revealed a rupture of the right eyeball; fractures in the superior, medial, lateral, and inferior wall of the right orbit; a fracture in the right zygomaticofrontal junction; and a small amount of pneumocephalus in the parafalx region. Under general anesthesia, evisceration of the right eyeball was performed. Not only golfers but also people just watching or passing by can be injured by an errantly struck golf ball or swung golf club. Elderly people as well as children should be instructed in technique and safety and also be supervised when playing golf. Also, the public should be educated about the risk of eye injuries and the benefits of wearing a protective eyewear.

  11. Golf-related low back pain: a review of causative factors and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, David M; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2014-12-01

    Golf is a popular sport with both perceived and real health benefits. However, certain injury risks are also prevalent, particularly to the lower back. Epidemiological studies have shown that lower back pain (LBP) from golf account for between 18% and 54% of all documented ailments, leading many researchers to regard the condition as the most common golf injury. The purpose of this review was to examine the scientific literature to ascertain the risk factors associated with the development of LBP from playing golf and suggest methods to modify or limit these factors. Results of the review indicate that the high frequency of LBP appears multi-factorial although the asymmetrical and forceful nature of the swing along with excessive play and practice, particularly amongst elite players, appear to be common factors. Other factors include swing flaws leading to excessive side-bend and over-rotation of the spine, abnormal muscle recruitment, poor trunk endurance, restricted lead hip internal rotation and the use of unnecessarily stressful club transportation methods. Methods to help control or eliminate excessive stress on the lower back would include reducing the amount spent playing or practicing, seeking professional assistance to assess and adjust swing mechanics, improve trunk and hip flexibility, increase the strength and endurance of the trunk musculature, consider different footwear options and avoid carrying the golf bag. Adopting some or all of these recommendations should allow players to continue to enjoy the sport of golf well into their senior years.

  12. Golf-Related Low Back Pain: A Review of Causative Factors and Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, David M.; Vandervoort, Anthony A.

    2014-01-01

    Golf is a popular sport with both perceived and real health benefits. However, certain injury risks are also prevalent, particularly to the lower back. Epidemiological studies have shown that lower back pain (LBP) from golf account for between 18% and 54% of all documented ailments, leading many researchers to regard the condition as the most common golf injury. The purpose of this review was to examine the scientific literature to ascertain the risk factors associated with the development of LBP from playing golf and suggest methods to modify or limit these factors. Results of the review indicate that the high frequency of LBP appears multi-factorial although the asymmetrical and forceful nature of the swing along with excessive play and practice, particularly amongst elite players, appear to be common factors. Other factors include swing flaws leading to excessive side-bend and over-rotation of the spine, abnormal muscle recruitment, poor trunk endurance, restricted lead hip internal rotation and the use of unnecessarily stressful club transportation methods. Methods to help control or eliminate excessive stress on the lower back would include reducing the amount spent playing or practicing, seeking professional assistance to assess and adjust swing mechanics, improve trunk and hip flexibility, increase the strength and endurance of the trunk musculature, consider different footwear options and avoid carrying the golf bag. Adopting some or all of these recommendations should allow players to continue to enjoy the sport of golf well into their senior years. PMID:25741420

  13. R&W Club Frederick Hosts Second Annual Golf Tourney for The Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On Sept. 8, more than 40 NCI at Frederick and Leidos Biomedical Research employees, along with family and friends, swapped work clothes for golf gear at Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown. The golfers didn’t just play for fun; they participated in the second annual R&W Club Frederick Golf Tournament to support The Children’s Inn at NIH.

  14. R&W Club Frederick Hosts Second Annual Golf Tourney for The Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On Sept. 8, more than 40 NCI at Frederick and Leidos Biomedical Research employees, along with family and friends, swapped work clothes for golf gear at Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown. The golfers didn’t just play for fun; they participated in the second annual R&W Club Frederick Golf Tournament to support The Children’s Inn at NIH.

  15. Frontal Plane Knee Moments in Golf: Effect of Target Side Foot Position at Address

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Scott K.; Noffal, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    Golf has the potential to keep people active well into their later years. Injuries to the target side knee have been reported in golfers, yet no mechanisms for these injuries have been proposed. The loads on the knee during the golf swing may be insufficient to cause acute injury, yet they may be a factor in the progression of overuse/degenerative conditions; therefore, research developing swing modifications that may alter loading of the knee is warranted. It has been suggested that the proper golf set-up position has the target-side foot externally rotated but no reasoning for this modification has been provided. Frontal plane knee moments have been implicated in many knee pathologies. Therefore, this study used a 3-dimensional link segment model to quantify the frontal plane knee moments during the golf swing in a straight (STR) and externally rotated (EXT) target-side foot position. Subjects were 7 collegiate golfers and knee moments were compared between conditions using repeated measures T-tests. The golf swing knee moment magnitudes were also descriptively compared to those reported for two athletic maneuvers (drop jump landing, side-step cutting) and activities of daily living (gait, stair ascent). The EXT condition decreased the peak knee adduction moment as compared to the STR condition; however, foot position had no effect on the peak knee abduction moment. Also, the magnitude of the knee adduction moments during the two activities of daily living were 9-33% smaller than those experienced during the two different golfing conditions. The drop jump landing and golf swing knee moments were of similar magnitude (STR= - 5%, EXT= + 8%); however, the moments associated with side- step cutting were 50-71% larger than those on the target side knee during the golf swing. The loading of the target side knee during the golf swing may be a factor in the development and progression of knee pathologies and further research should examine ways of attenuating these loads

  16. Difference in peak weight transfer and timing based on golf handicap.

    PubMed

    Queen, Robin M; Butler, Robert J; Dai, Boyi; Barnes, C Lowry

    2013-09-01

    Weight shift during the golf swing has been a topic of discussion among golf professionals; however, it is still unclear how weight shift varies in golfers of different performance levels. The main purpose of this study was to examine the following: (a) the changes in the peak ground reaction forces (GRF) and the timing of these events between high (HHCP) and low handicap (LHCP) golfers and (b) the differences between the leading and trailing legs. Twenty-eight male golfers were recruited and divided based on having an LHCP < 9 or HHCP > 9. Three-dimensional GRF peaks and the timing of the peaks were recorded bilaterally during a golf swing. The golf swing was divided into different phases: (a) address to the top of the backswing, (b) top of the backswing to ball contact, and (c) ball contact to the end of follow through. Repeated measures analyses of variance (α = 0.05) were completed for each study variable: the magnitude and the timing of peak vertical GRF, peak lateral GRF, and peak medial GRF (α = 0.05). The LHCP group had a greater transfer of vertical force from the trailing foot to the leading foot in phase 2 than the HHCP group. The LHCP group also demonstrated earlier timing of peak vertical force throughout the golf swing than the HHCP group. The LHCP and HHCP groups demonstrated different magnitudes of peak lateral force. The LHCP group had an earlier timing of peak lateral GRF in phase 2 and earlier timing of peak medial GRF in phases 1 and 2 than the HHCP group. In general, LHCP golfers demonstrated greater and earlier force generation than HHCP golfers. It may be relevant to consider both the magnitude of the forces and the timing of these events during golf-specific training to improve performance. These data reveal weight shifting differences that can be addressed by teaching professionals to help their students better understand weight transfer during the golf swing to optimize performance.

  17. Efficacy of Methionine Against Ectoparasitic Nematodes on Golf Course Turf

    PubMed Central

    Cuda, James P.; Stevens, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are important pathogens of intensely-managed turf used on golf courses. Two of these nematodes that are common in the southeastern US are Belonolaimus longicaudatus and Mesocriconema ornata. Currently, there is a lack of effective treatments that can be used to manage these important pests. Turfgrass field trials evaluated DL-methionine as a turfgrass nematicide against B. longicaudatus and M. ornata. One trial was on a bermudagrass putting green, the other was on zoysiagrass maintained under putting-green conditions. Two rates of methionine, 1120 kg/ha in a single application, and 112 kg/ha applied twice four weeks apart, were compared with untreated control and fenamiphos treatments. Measurements collected included soil nematode counts, turf density, and root lengths. In both trials, 1120 kg/ha of methionine reduced numbers of both nematode species (P ≤ 0.1), and 112 kg/ha of methionine reduced numbers of both nematode species after two applications. Bermudagrass turf density responded favorably to both methionine rates and root lengths were improved by the 1120 kg/ha rate. Zoysiagrass showed short-term phytotoxicity to methionine, but quickly recovered and treated plots were improved compared to the untreated controls by the end of the trial. These trials indicated that methionine has potential for development as a turfgrass nematicide, but further research is needed to determine how it can best be used. PMID:22736817

  18. Influence of shaft length on golf driving performance.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Ian C; Wallace, Eric S; Otto, Steve R

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how shaft length affects golf driving performance. A range of drivers with lengths between 1.168 m and 1.270 m, representing lengths close to the 1.219 m limit imposed by R&A Rules Limited (2008), were assembled and evaluated. Clubhead and ball launch conditions and drive distance and accuracy were determined for seven category 1 golfers (handicaps 0.21 +/- 2.41) who performed shots on a purpose-built practice hole. As shaft length increased from 1.168 m to 1.270 m, initial ball velocity increased (+ 1.8 m/s, P < 0.01). Ball carry (+ 4.3 m, P = 0.152) also increased, although not significantly so. Furthermore, as shaft length increased, for all club comparisons there was no decrease in accuracy. Ball launch conditions of spin components and launch angle remained unaffected by shaft length. Launch angle increased (0.8 degree, F = 1.074, P = 0.362) as driver shaft length increased. Our results show that clubhead and ball velocity together with ball carry tended to increase with no loss of accuracy.

  19. A model of greenhouse gas emissions from the management of turf on two golf courses.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Mark D; James, Iain T

    2011-03-15

    An estimated 32,000 golf courses worldwide (approximately 25,600 km(2)), provide ecosystem goods and services and support an industry contributing over $ 124 billion globally. Golf courses can impact positively on local biodiversity however their role in the global carbon cycle is not clearly understood. To explore this relationship, the balance between plant-soil system sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions from turf management on golf courses was modelled. Input data were derived from published studies of emissions from agriculture and turfgrass management. Two UK case studies of golf course type were used, a Links course (coastal, medium intensity management, within coastal dune grasses) and a Parkland course (inland, high intensity management, within woodland). Playing surfaces of both golf courses were marginal net sources of greenhouse gas emissions due to maintenance (Links 0.4 ± 0.1Mg CO(2)e ha(-1)y(-1); Parkland 0.7 ± 0.2Mg CO(2)e ha(-1)y(-1)). A significant proportion of emissions were from the use of nitrogen fertiliser, especially on tees and greens such that 3% of the golf course area contributed 16% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The area of trees on a golf course was important in determining whole-course emission balance. On the Parkland course, emissions from maintenance were offset by sequestration from trees which comprised 48% of total area, resulting in a net balance of -4.3 ± 0.9 Mg CO(2e) ha(-1)y(-1). On the Links course, the proportion of trees was much lower (2%) and sequestration from links grassland resulted in a net balance of 0.0 ± 0.2Mg CO(2e) ha(-1)y(-1). Recommendations for golf course management and design include the reduction of nitrogen fertiliser, improved operational efficiency when mowing, the inclusion of appropriate tree-planting and the scaling of component areas to maximise golf course sequestration capacity. The findings are transferrable to the management and design of urban parks and gardens, which range

  20. A model of greenhouse gas emissions from the management of turf on two golf courses.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Mark D; James, Iain T

    2011-11-01

    An estimated 32,000 golf courses worldwide (approximately 25,600 km2), provide ecosystem goods and services and support an industry contributing over $124 billion globally. Golf courses can impact positively on local biodiversity however their role in the global carbon cycle is not clearly understood. To explore this relationship, the balance between plant–soil system sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions from turf management on golf courses was modelled. Input data were derived from published studies of emissions from agriculture and turfgrass management. Two UK case studies of golf course type were used, a Links course (coastal, medium intensity management, within coastal dune grasses) and a Parkland course (inland, high intensity management, within woodland).Playing surfaces of both golf courses were marginal net sources of greenhouse gas emissions due to maintenance (Links −2.2 ± 0.4 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1); Parkland − 2.0 ± 0.4 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1)). A significant proportion of emissions were from the use of nitrogen fertiliser, especially on tees and greens such that 3% of the golf course area contributed 16% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The area of trees on a golf course was important in determining whole-course emission balance. On the Parkland course, emissions from maintenance were offset by sequestration from turfgrass, and trees which comprised 48% of total area, resulting in a net balance of −5.4 ± 0.9 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1). On the Links course, the proportion of trees was much lower (2%) and sequestration from links grassland resulted in a net balance of −1.6 ± 0.3 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1). Recommendations for golf course management and design include the reduction of nitrogen fertiliser, improved operational efficiency when mowing, the inclusion of appropriate tree-planting and the scaling of component areas to maximise golf course sequestration capacity. The findings are transferrable to the management and design of

  1. Care for Cardiac Arrest on Golf Courses: Still Not up to Par?

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Leisa; Paternoster, Ryan; Putman, Kevin; Fales, William; Swor, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Early CPR and use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) have been shown to improve cardiac arrest (CA) outcomes. Placement of AEDs on golf courses has been advocated for more than a decade, with many trade golf publications calling for their use. Objective. To describe the incidence and treatment of CAs at Michigan golf courses and assess the response readiness of their staff. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of CA on Michigan golf courses from 2010 to 2012. Cases were identified from the Michigan EMS Information (MI-EMSIS) database. Cases with "golf" or "country club" were manually reviewed and location type was confirmed using Google Maps. We conducted a structured telephone survey capturing demographics, course preparedness, including CPR training and AED placement, and a description of events, including whether CPR was performed and if an AED was used. Our primary area of interest was the process of care. We also recorded return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) as an outcome measure. EMS Utstein data were collected from MI-EMSIS. Descriptive data are presented. Results. During the study period, there were 14,666 CAs, of which 40 (0.18%) occurred on 39 golf courses (1 arrest/64 courses/year). Of these, 38 occurred between May and October, yielding a rate of 1 arrest/33.5 courses/golf season. Almost all (96.2%) patients were male, mean age 66.3 (range 45-85), 68% had VT/VF, and 7 arrested after EMS arrival. Mean interval from 9-1-1 call to EMS arrival at the patient was 9:45 minutes (range 3-20). Of all cases, 24 (72.3%) patients received CPR with 2 patients having CPR performed by course staff. Although AEDs were available at 9 (22.5%) courses, they were only placed on 2 patients prior to EMS arrival. Sustained ROSC was obtained in 12 (30.0%) patients. Only 7, (17.9%) courses required CPR/AED training of staff. Conclusion. When seasonally adjusted, the rate of cardiac arrest on Michigan golf courses is similar to that of

  2. National Dam Safety Program. Columbia Municipal Golf Course Lower Lake Dam (MO 10895) and Columbia Municipal Golf Course Upper Lake Dam (MO 11068). Appendix A-D. Boone County, Missouri. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    REPORT FOR COLUMBIA MUNICIPAL GOLF COURSE LOWER LAKE DAM. DIVISION II IS THE PHASE I INSPECTION REPORT FOR COLUMBIA MUNICIPAL GOLF COURSE UPPER LAKE...diameter cast iron pipe Principal spillway and a grassed earth channel ungated emergency spillway. Division II of this report covers the Phase I

  3. Synchronized metronome training induces changes in the kinematic properties of the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Marius; Häger, Charlotte; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible effects of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on movement dynamics during golf-swing performance, as captured by kinematic analysis. A one-group, between-test design was applied on 13 male golfers (27.5 +/- 4.6 years old, 12.7 +/- 4.9 handicap) who completed 12 sessions of SMT over a four-week period. Pre- and post-assessments of golf swings with three different clubs (4-iron, 7-iron, and pitching wedge) were performed using a three-dimensional motion capture system. Club velocity at three different swing phases (backswing, downswing, and follow-through) was measured and cross-correlation analysis of time-series signals were made on joint couplings (wrist-elbow-shoulder) of both arms, and between joints and the club, during the full golf swing. There were significantly higher cross-correlations between joint-couplings and concomitant changes of the associated phase-shift differences, as well as reduced phase-shift variability at post-test. No significant effect of SMT was found for the club velocities. We suggest that domain-general influences of SMT on the underlying brain-based motor control strategies lead to a more coordinated movement pattern of the golf-swing performance, which may explain previous observations of significantly improved golf-shot accuracy and decreased variability after SMT.

  4. The role of upper torso and pelvis rotation in driving performance during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Myers, Joseph; Lephart, Scott; Tsai, Yung-Shen; Sell, Timothy; Smoliga, James; Jolly, John

    2008-01-15

    While the role of the upper torso and pelvis in driving performance is anecdotally appreciated by golf instructors, their actual biomechanical role is unclear. The aims of this study were to describe upper torso and pelvis rotation and velocity during the golf swing and determine their role in ball velocity. One hundred recreational golfers underwent a biomechanical golf swing analysis using their own driver. Upper torso and pelvic rotation and velocity, and torso-pelvic separation and velocity, were measured for each swing. Ball velocity was assessed with a golf launch monitor. Group differences (groups based on ball velocity) and moderate relationships (r > or = 0.50; P < 0.001) were observed between an increase in ball velocity and the following variables: increased torso-pelvic separation at the top of the swing, maximum torso-pelvic separation, maximum upper torso rotation velocity, upper torso rotational velocity at lead arm parallel and last 40 ms before impact, maximum torso-pelvic separation velocity and torso-pelvic separation velocity at both lead arm parallel and at the last 40 ms before impact. Torso-pelvic separation contributes to greater upper torso rotation velocity and torso-pelvic separation velocity during the downswing, ultimately contributing to greater ball velocity. Golf instructors can consider increasing ball velocity by maximizing separation between the upper torso and pelvis at the top of and initiation of the downswing.

  5. The metabolic cost of carrying a single- versus double-strap golf bag.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Elizabeth R; Cooper, Laura; Gulick, Patrick; Nguyen, Phong

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare energy expenditure and perceived comfort using two modes of carrying a golf bag. Fifteen men completed 2 trials of walking on a treadmill while carrying a golf bag. During 1 of 2 trials, an extra strap was added to convert a single-strap bag to a double-strap bag. The order was randomized. Oxygen consumption (L x min(-1)), heart rate, perceived exertion, and perceived comfort were measured during the 5-minute walk. Oxygen consumption was significantly lower carrying the double-strap golf bag (L x min(-1), p = 0.0004; ml x kg(-1) x min(-1), p < 0.0003), as were heart rate (p = 0.0013) and rate of perceived exertion (p < 0.005) During the double strap trial, the perceived comfort was higher (p < 0.005). Improvements in metabolic demands and comfort while carrying a double-strap golf bag should increase walking tolerance in golf.

  6. Renouvellement des eaux du fjord du Saguenay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belzile, Melany

    Le fjord du Saguenay, localise dans la region subarctique de l'est du Canada, ala particularite d' etre connecte a un estuaire tres energetique plutot que directement a 1' ocean. L'embouchure du fjord est situee ala rencontre d'un chenal profond et d'un seuil de 20m de profondeur qui limite les echanges d'eau entre le fjord et l'estuaire du Saint-Laurent. Cependant, les grandes amplitudes de maree a son embouchure ont le potentiel d'entrainer des eaux denses du Saint-Laurent a l'interieur du fjord renouvelant ainsi les eaux des differents bassins. Dans le but d' a voir une meilleure comprehension de la dynamique et de la saisonnalite des renouvellements dans le bassin interne, deux mouillages y ont ete deployes pour recolter les premieres donnees de courant, sur toute la colonne d' eau et sur plusieurs mois, ainsi que des observations de temperature et de salinite a differentes profondeurs. L'un de ces mouillages n' a malheureusement pas pu etre analyse en detail dfi a la complexite de ses resultats et au manque de temps. Des profils ont ete recoltes le long de section transversales (transects), couvrant plusieurs saisons et plusieurs annees, ce qui a contribue a une meilleure comprehension de la distribution spatiale des masses d'eau dans le fjord. Les resultats montrent que ladynamique du fjord est plus complexe que ce qui avait ete precedemment presente dans la litterature. Un changement saisonnier abrupte dans la circulation du fjord a ete observe a la rni-fevrier. De plus, des renouvellements non-anticipes juste en-dessous de la thermohalocline (˜ 10 m de profondeur) ont ete observes entre la fin de 1' hiver et le milieu de 1' ete. En fonction des saisons, trois types de renouvellement peuvent etre observes : renouvellements profonds a l'automne et au debut de l'hiver suivis des renouvellements de sous-surface et enfin les renouvellements a des profondeurs intermediaires pendant l'ete. Le changement saisonnier abrupte observe au milieu de l'hiver ainsi que la

  7. 76 FR 2409 - Proclaiming Certain Lands, Golf Course Acquisition, as an Addition to the Bay Mills Indian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Proclaiming Certain Lands, Golf Course Acquisition, as an Addition to the Bay... Reservation by enrollment or tribal membership. Bay Mills Indian Community Reservation, Golf...

  8. Par for the Course: Students Design Their Miniature Golf Course Sculptures while Considering Functional, Technical, and Communication Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassil, Darlene

    2005-01-01

    Designing an eighteen-hole miniature-golf course is not the typical end-of-the-year art project, but at Winfield School it's "par for the course." Students anxiously count the days to the first day of miniature golf, courtesy of the sixth-grade art classes. The design and production of the miniature gold course serves as a great motivator and…

  9. The Effect of Biological Movement Variability on the Performance of the Golf Swing in High- and Low-Handicapped Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth J.; Keogh, Justin W. L.; Hume, Patria A.; Maulder, Peter S.; Nortje, Jacques; Marnewick, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of neuromotor noise on golf swing performance in high- and low-handicap players. Selected two-dimensional kinematic measures of 20 male golfers (n = 10 per high- or low-handicap group) performing 10 golf swings with a 5-iron club was obtained through video analysis. Neuromotor noise was calculated…

  10. The Effect of Biological Movement Variability on the Performance of the Golf Swing in High- and Low-Handicapped Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth J.; Keogh, Justin W. L.; Hume, Patria A.; Maulder, Peter S.; Nortje, Jacques; Marnewick, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of neuromotor noise on golf swing performance in high- and low-handicap players. Selected two-dimensional kinematic measures of 20 male golfers (n = 10 per high- or low-handicap group) performing 10 golf swings with a 5-iron club was obtained through video analysis. Neuromotor noise was calculated…

  11. Effects of golf course construction and operation on water chemistry of headwater streams on the Precambrian Shield.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jennifer G; Dillon, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effects of golf course construction and operation on the water chemistry of Shield streams, we compared the water chemistry in streams draining golf courses under construction (2) and in operation (5) to streams in forested reference locations and to upstream sites where available. Streams were more alkaline and higher in base cation and nitrate concentrations downstream of operational golf courses. Levels of these parameters and total phosphorus increased over time in several streams during golf course construction through to operation. There was evidence of inputs of mercury to streams on two of the operational courses. Nutrient (phosphorus and nitrogen) concentrations were significantly related to the area of unmanaged vegetation in a 30 x 30 m area on either side of the sampling sites, and to River Bank Quality Index scores, suggesting that maintaining vegetated buffers along the stream on golf courses will reduce in-stream nutrient concentrations.

  12. How the use of chlorothalonil on golf courses impacts Paenibacillus sp., a pathogen of Ataenius spretulus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Smitley, David R; Rothwell, Nikki L

    2003-06-01

    One of the most frequently used fungicides on golf courses, chlorothalonil, was applied to field plots at four different golf courses to determine how Ataenius spretulus Haldeman, Aphodius granarius L., carabids, staphylinids, formicids and Paenibacillus sp. were affected. Chlorothalonil had no influence on the incidence of Paenibacillus sp. infection of A. spretulus larvae in golf course fairways. The incidence of Paenibacillus sp. infection of A. spretulus larvae was much greater in the rough (47.4%) compared with the fairway (26.4%) at Cattails Golf Club despite a more dense population (fourfold) of larvae in the fairway. Chlorothalonil treatment of turf plots had no influence on the number of staphylinids, carabids, formicids, or A. spretulus adults caught in pitfall traps. It also did not affect the density of A. spretulus larvae. Data from this study suggest that the widespread use of chlorothalonil on fairways is not likely to cause outbreaks of A. spretulus on golf courses.

  13. Accuracy of pattern detection methods in the performance of golf putting.

    PubMed

    Couceiro, Micael S; Dias, Gonçalo; Mendes, Rui; Araújo, Duarte

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a comparison of the classification accuracy of 5 pattern detection methods in the performance of golf putting. The detection of the position of the golf club was performed using a computer vision technique followed by the estimation algorithm Darwinian particle swarm optimization to obtain a kinematical model of each trial. The estimated parameters of the models were subsequently used as sample of five classification algorithms: (a) linear discriminant analysis, (b) quadratic discriminant analysis, (c) naive Bayes with normal distribution, (d) naive Bayes with kernel smoothing density estimate, and (e) least squares support vector machines. Beyond testing the performance of each classification method, it was also possible to identify a putting signature that characterized each golf player. It may be concluded that these methods can be applied to the study of coordination and motor control on the putting performance, allowing for the analysis of the intra- and interpersonal variability of motor behavior in performance contexts.

  14. Effect of an 8-week combined weights and plyometrics training program on golf drive performance.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Iain M; Hartwell, Matthew

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a combined weights and plyometrics program on golf drive performance. Eleven male golfers' full golf swing was analyzed for club head speed (CS) and driving distance (DD) before and after an 8-week training program. The control group (n = 5) continued their normal training, while the experimental group (n = 6) performed 2 sessions per week of weight training and plyometrics. Controls showed no significant (p > or = 0.05) changes, while experimental subjects showed a significant increase (p < or = 0.05) in CS and DD. The changes in golf drive performance were attributed to an increase in muscular force and an improvement in the sequential acceleration of body parts contributing to a greater final velocity being applied to the ball. It was concluded that specific combined weights and plyometrics training can help increase CS and DD in club golfers.

  15. Evaluation of golf courses water demand in southern of Portugal for the last three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago Pedras, Celestina M.; Lança, Rui M.; Martins, Fernando; Fernandez, Helena; Vieira, Cristina; Monteiro, José Paulo; Guerrero, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Golf is an economic activity with a prominent position in the tourist-sport offer in the region of Algarve. Located in southern of Portugal, this region is the most suitable region for the growth of the golf industry. The climate is characterized by mild winters with slight rainfall and hot and dry summers. The region has an annual average temperature of 14oC and annual precipitation that rarely exceeds 500 mm year-1. Since most of the rainfall occurs concentrated in the winter, irrigation is needed during the remaining months of the year to meet the water demand from plants. A proper irrigation management will allow to optimize the use water, thus it constitutes a key issue for the sustainability of this activity in areas subjected to water scarcity. Currently, remote sensing provides the tools to assess the evolution of the greenish quality of the area in the golf courses. In this study, based on Landsat images, vegetation indices were calculated the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), for the spring and summer seasons during the last 30 years. For the same period, according the data collected from weather stations distributed in the region, maps of precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity and wind were produced. According the current maintenance practices and irrigation cycles, maps of potential and real evapotranspiration and with basis on the water balance were calculated, and water deficit maps estimated. Upon crossing this information with the NDVI maps, trends were identified in the consumption of water for irrigation due to the growth of the occupied area by golf courses in the region of Algarve. Since drought problems tend to increase due to climate changes, it becomes relevant the need to conduct this study aiming the research of strategies to ensure the beneficial use of water on golf courses and other turfgrass areas. Keywords: evapotranspiration, golf, irrigation, NDVI, water deficit

  16. The effects of orthotic intervention and 9 holes of simulated golf on gait in experienced golfers.

    PubMed

    Stude, D E; Gullickson, J

    2001-05-01

    This investigation evaluated the effects of orthotic intervention on gait patterns and fatigue associated with 9 holes of simulated golf among a group of experienced golfers. Northwestern Health Sciences University, Bloomington, Minn. Twelve experienced golfers. By means of video freeze-frame analysis, gait was assessed in each subject before and after 9 holes of simulated golf. Subjects wore custom-made, flexible orthotics daily for 6 weeks, and gait was then reassessed through use of the same objective measurement parameters. Fatigue was introduced by having participants complete 9-hole rounds of simulated golf before and after wearing custom-made, flexible orthotics for 6 weeks. Parameters associated with gait (ie, stride length and pelvic rotation) were measured in all subjects before and after they used custom-fit, flexible orthotics for 6 weeks and before and after they completed 9 holes of simulated golf. The data indicate that for experienced golfers, wearing the custom-fit, flexible orthotics used in this study for 6 weeks influenced the parameters associated with gait and reduced the effects of fatigue associated with 9 holes of simulated golf. The use of custom-fit, flexible orthotics in this study had a significant influence on the elements of gait measured in the investigation-specifically, pelvic rotation and stride length. There was an average increase in pelvic rotation of between 29% and 36%, and there were concomitant changes in stride length after subjects had used the orthotics for 6 weeks. In addition, use of these custom orthoses reduced the effects of fatigue associated with playing 9 holes of simulated golf; they could thus improve the likelihood of more consistent performance, possibly as a result of a more efficient gait pattern.

  17. Return to Golf Following Left Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Golfer Who is Right Handed

    PubMed Central

    Betlach, Michael; Senkarik, Ryan; Smith, Robyn; Voight, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Research indicates return to golf is a safe activity following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Frequently, individuals have shown both physical faults and swing faults after THA, which can persist even following rehabilitation. Physical limitations and pain often lead to faults in the golfers swing, most notably “hanging back.” These problems may not be improved after surgery unless the proper re-training takes place. Objectives Using pre-surgical as well as post-surgical information, physical faults and swing faults were identified. A corrective training protocol was developed to normalize physical and swing limitations. Case description The patient is a 52-year old male golfer who underwent left total hip arthroplasty secondary to left hip osteoarthritis. Video analysis both pre and post surgery indicated the patient was “hanging back.” This “hanging back” can lead to an inefficient golf swing and potential injury. Following a physical evaluation, a training protocol was designed to correct abnormal physical findings to assist the patient in creating an efficient golf swing. Outcomes The patient was able to swing the golf club with proper weighting of the lead lower extremity, significant improvement of swing efficiency, and return to play at a zero handicap following a corrective training protocol. Discussion A return to full weight bearing, functional strength, range of motion, stability, and balance are critical to regaining the physical skills necessary to properly swing the golf club. Further, mastery of these objective components lend themselves to the trust needed to load the lead leg with confidence during the golf swing. PMID:21509144

  18. Effects of turbulence on the drag force on a golf ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are presented of the drag force on a golf ball dropped vertically into a tank of water. As observed previously in air, the drag coefficient drops sharply when the flow becomes turbulent. The experiment would be suitable for undergraduate students since it can be undertaken at low ball speeds and since the effects of turbulence are easily observed on video film. A modified golf ball was used to show how a ball with a smooth and a rough side, such as a cricket ball, is subject to a side force when the ball surface itself is asymmetrical in the transverse direction.

  19. View of javelin and golf ball on lunar surface during Apollo 14 EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-06

    AS14-66-9337 (6 Feb. 1971) --- This view shows the "javelin" and golf ball used by astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, during the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA) on Feb. 6, 1971. Just to the left of center lies the "javelin", with the golf ball just below it, almost perpendicular to it. Dark colored trails are the results of tracks made by the lunar overshoes of the astronauts and the wheels of the modular equipment transporter (MET). This photograph was made through the right window of the Lunar Module (LM), looking northwest.

  20. The role of biomechanics in maximising distance and accuracy of golf shots.

    PubMed

    Hume, Patria A; Keogh, Justin; Reid, Duncan

    2005-01-01

    Golf biomechanics applies the principles and technique of mechanics to the structure and function of the golfer in an effort to improve golf technique and performance. A common recommendation for technical correction is maintaining a single fixed centre hub of rotation with a two-lever one-hinge moment arm to impart force on the ball. The primary and secondary spinal angles are important for conservation of angular momentum using the kinetic link principle to generate high club-head velocity. When the golfer wants to maximise the distance of their drives, relatively large ground reaction forces (GRF) need to be produced. However, during the backswing, a greater proportion of the GRF will be observed on the back foot, with transfer of the GRF on to the front foot during the downswing/acceleration phase. Rapidly stretching hip, trunk and upper limb muscles during the backswing, maximising the X-factor early in the downswing, and uncocking the wrists when the lead arm is about 30 degrees below the horizontal will take advantage of the summation of force principle. This will help generate large angular velocity of the club head, and ultimately ball displacement. Physical conditioning will help to recruit the muscles in the correct sequence and to optimum effect. To maximise the accuracy of chipping and putting shots, the golfer should produce a lower grip on the club and a slower/shorter backswing. Consistent patterns of shoulder and wrist movements and temporal patterning result in successful chip shots. Qualitative and quantitative methods are used to biomechanically assess golf techniques. Two- and three-dimensional videography, force plate analysis and electromyography techniques have been employed. The common golf biomechanics principles necessary to understand golf technique are stability, Newton's laws of motion (inertia, acceleration, action reaction), lever arms, conservation of angular momentum, projectiles, the kinetic link principle and the stretch

  1. High resolution electrical resistivity tomography of golf course greens irrigated with reclaimed wastewater: Hydrological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapias, Josefina C.; Lovera, Raúl; Himi, Mahjoub; Gallardo, Helena; Sendrós, Alexandre; Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Casas, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Actually, there are over 300 golf courses and more than three thousand licensed players in Spain. For this reason golf cannot be considered simply a hobby or a sport, but a very significant economic activity. Considered as one of the most rapidly expanding land-use and water demanding business in the Mediterranean, golf course development generates controversy. In the recent years there has been a considerable demand for golf courses to adopt environmentally sustainable strategies and particularly water authorities are forcing by law golf managers to irrigate with alternative water resources, mainly reclaimed wastewater. Watering practices must be based on soil properties that are characterized by samples removed from the different zones of the golf course and submitted to an accredited physical soil testing laboratory. Watering schedules are critical on greens with poor drainage or on greens with excessively high infiltration rates. The geophysical survey was conducted over the greens of the Girona Golf Club. Eighteen electrical resistivity tomographies were acquired using a mixed Wenner-Schlumberger configuration with electrodes placed 0.5 meter apart. Small stainless-steel nails were used as electrodes to avoid any damage in the fine turfgrass of greens The resistivity meter was set for systematically and automatically selects current electrodes and measurement electrodes to sample apparent resistivity values. Particle size analysis (PSA) has been performed on soil materials of any putting green. The PSA analysis has been composed of two distinct phases. The first has been the textural analysis of the soils for determining the content of sand, silt, and clay fraction via the use of a stack of sieves with decreasing sized openings from the top sieve to the bottom. Subsequently, the hydraulic conductivity of the substrates has been evaluated by means of Bredding and Hazen empirical relationships. The results of this research show that the electrical resistivity

  2. View of javelin and golf ball on lunar surface during Apollo 14 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    View shows the javelin and golf ball used by Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Apollo 14 commander, during the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA-2) on Feb. 6, 1971. Just to the left of center lies the javelin, with the golf ball just below it, almost perpendicular to it. Dark colored trails are the results of tracks made by the lunar overshoes of the astronauts and the wheels of the Modularized Equipment Transporter (MET). This photograph was made through the right window of the Lunar Module, looking northwest.

  3. Spontaneous dissection of the external iliac artery secondary to golf club manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Yoong, S; Heyes, G; Davison, G W; Hannon, R; O'Donnell, M E

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous dissection of the external iliac artery in the absence of aortic disease is extremely uncommon. We report the conservative treatment of a 46-year-old male patient who presented with acute left lower limb ischemia due to an isolated dissection of the external iliac artery secondary to repetitive swinging movements during golf club manufacturing. Although syndromes of nonatherosclerotic vascular disease secondary to repetitive movements in high-level athletic activity have been previously described in cyclists, long distance runners, and rugby players, we believe this to be the first occupational case associated with golf.

  4. "Cirque du Freak."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivett, Miriam

    2002-01-01

    Considers the marketing strategies that underpin the success of the "Cirque du Freak" series. Describes how "Cirque du Freak" is an account of events in the life of schoolboy Darren Shan. Notes that it is another reworking of the vampire narrative, a sub-genre of horror writing that has proved highly popular with both adult and…

  5. "Cirque du Freak."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivett, Miriam

    2002-01-01

    Considers the marketing strategies that underpin the success of the "Cirque du Freak" series. Describes how "Cirque du Freak" is an account of events in the life of schoolboy Darren Shan. Notes that it is another reworking of the vampire narrative, a sub-genre of horror writing that has proved highly popular with both adult and…

  6. A Comparison of Golf Shoe Designs Highlights Greater Ground Reaction Forces with Shorter Irons

    PubMed Central

    Worsfold, Paul; Smith, Neal A.; Dyson, Rosemary J.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to reduce golf turf damage the traditional metal spike golf shoe has been redesigned, but shoe-ground biomechanical evaluations have utilised artificial grass surfaces. Twenty-four golfers wore three different golf shoe traction designs (traditional metal spikes, alternative spikes, and a flat-soled shoe with no additional traction) when performing shots with a driver, 3 iron and 7 iron. Ground action forces were measured beneath the feet by two natural grass covered force platforms. The maximum vertical force recorded at the back foot with the 3 iron and 7 iron was 0.82 BW (body weight) and at the front foot 1.1 BW approximately in both the metal spike and alternative spike golf shoe designs. When using the driver these maximal vertical values were 0.49 BW at the back foot and 0.84 BW at the front foot. Furthermore, as performance of the backswing and then downswing necessitates a change in movement direction the range of force generated during the complete swing was calculated. In the metal spike shoe the vertical force generated at the back foot with both irons was 0.67 BW and at the front foot 0.96 BW with the 3 iron and 0.92 BW with the 7 iron. The back foot vertical force generated with the driver was 0.33 BW and at the front foot 0.83 BW wearing the metal spike shoe. Results indicated the greater force generation with the irons. When using the driver the more horizontal swing plane associated with the longer club reduced vertical forces at the back and front foot. However, the mediolateral force generated across each foot in the metal and alternative spike shoes when using the driver was greater than when the irons were used. The coefficient of friction was 0. 62 at the back and front foot whichever shoe was worn or club used. Key pointsDuring the golf swing ground reaction forces at the golf shoe to natural grass turf interface were greater with irons than with the longer driver.In the golf swing maximal vertical forces were greater at the

  7. Military Application of Space-Time Adaptive Processing (Les applications militaires du traitement adaptatif espace-temps)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    et spatiaux. Comparé aux autres capteurs ( optiques et infrarouges, visibles), le radar offre des performances complémentaires telles qu’un...SET-057) Synthèse La surveillance de la terre par des capteurs aéroportés et spatiaux est devenu un facteur essentiel de la guerre moderne. Des...opérations récentes (la guerre du Golfe, la Bosnie, l’Afghanistan), ont démontré l’intérêt des informations fournies par les capteurs aéroportés

  8. The Sequence of Hip and Selected Upper-Extremity Joint Movements During the Golf Drive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Charles L.

    This study analyzed wrist, elbow, and hip actions of golfers who were accurately driving a golf ball a maximum distance. Electrogoniometry and cinematography were used to measure wrist, forearm, elbow, and hip actions during the downswing of 10 low-handicap golfers who were attempting to drive a minimum of 225 yards within a 50-yard corridor.…

  9. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from epoxy resin in a golf club repairman.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Marléne; Möller, Halvor; Pontén, Ann

    2008-01-01

    A golfer presented with facial and hand eczema. He had exacerbations of his hand eczema prior to golf tournaments. Being an authorized golf club repairman, he had been working with a two-part glue containing an epoxy resin (ER) based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and the hardener diethylenetriamine (DETA) for approximately 4 years before he developed any skin problems. He was patch-tested with the standard, which contains an ER based on DGEBA (DGEBA-R), epoxy (containing DETA), and rubber glove series and had positive reactions to DGEBA-R only. Other work materials (a latex glove, a golf glove made of leather, and part of the handle of his own golf club "as is" and in a methyl tert-butyl ether extract) were tested, with negative results. Allergic contact dermatitis from ER affects the skin by direct contact; the dermatitis is usually localized to the hands and forearms. If the face and eyelids are involved, the dermatitis may be due to exposure to airborne hardeners or reactive diluents, exposure to airborne dust from residual monomers, or ectopic allergic reactions. Our repairman had sandpapered an old glued surface, which may have led to possible airborne dust formation, thus explaining the facial eczema. Therefore, a worker with contact allergy to ER may continue working provided the skin is protected from contamination.

  10. SEDIMENT CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH A COASTAL GOLF COURSE COMPLEX.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of sediment contamination to nearby coastal areas, the chemical and biological magnitude of which is almost unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of contaminants and toxicities...

  11. You Don't Have to Be a Professional Golfer to Teach Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kory; Thornburg, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Although physical educators cannot be experts on every sport or activity, there is still a need to include specialized activities in the curriculum that a physical educator may not initially feel comfortable teaching because of inexperience and a lack of expertise. Golf, like other activities such as tennis, requires a specificity of training that…

  12. EFFECTS OF A COASTAL GOLF COMPLEX ON WATER QUALITY, PERIPHYTON, AND SEAGRASS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a golf course complex on water quality, colonized periphyton and seagrass meadows in adjacent freshwater, near-coastal and wetland areas. The environmental impact of the recreational facility, which uses spray wastewater...

  13. A methodological approach for the biomechanical cause analysis of golf-related lumbar spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Sim, Taeyong; Jang, Dong-Jin; Oh, Euichaul

    2014-01-01

    A new methodological approach employing mechanical work (MW) determination and relative portion of its elemental analysis was applied to investigate the biomechanical causes of golf-related lumbar spine injuries. Kinematic and kinetic parameters at the lumbar and lower limb joints were measured during downswing in 18 golfers. The MW at the lumbar joint (LJ) was smaller than at the right hip but larger than the MWs at other joints. The contribution of joint angular velocity (JAV) to MW was much greater than that of net muscle moment (NMM) at the LJ, whereas the contribution of NMM to MW was greater rather than or similar to that of JAV at other joints. Thus, the contribution of JAV to MW is likely more critical in terms of the probability of golf-related injury than that of NMM. The MW-based golf-related injury index (MWGII), proposed as the ratio of the contribution of JAV to MW to that of NMM, at the LJ (1.55) was significantly greater than those at other joints ( < 1.05). This generally corresponds to the most frequent occurrence of golf-related injuries around the lumbar spine. Therefore, both MW and MWGII should be considered when investigating the biomechanical causes of lumbar spine injuries.

  14. Addition of biochar to simulated golf greens promotes creeping bentgrass growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic amendments such as peat moss and various composts are typically added to sand-based root zones such as golf greens to increase water and nutrient retention. However, these attributes are generally lost as these amendments decompose in a few years. Biochar is a high carbon, extremely porous ...

  15. GOLF COURSES AS A SOURCE OF COASTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY: A FLORIDA EXPERIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical and biological impacts of two coastal golf courses that receive wastewater spray irrigation were determined during a two-year period. A variety of techniques were used to assess the spatial and temporal variability of contaminant levels and their bioavailability in t...

  16. CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH A COASTAL GOLF COURSE COMPLEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of contamination to nearby coastal areas, the chemical and biological magnitude of which is almost unknown. The objective of this study was to compare the concentrations of contaminants and toxicities of sedime...

  17. A pilot study of indoor air quality in screen golf courses.

    PubMed

    Goung, Sun-Ju Nam; Yang, Jinho; Kim, Yoon Shin; Lee, Cheol Min

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this study were to provide basic data for determining policies on air quality for multi-user facilities, including the legal enrollment of the indoor air quality regulation as designated by the Ministry of Environment, and to establish control plans. To this end, concentrations of ten pollutants (PM10, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs), radon (Rn), oxone (O3), total bacteria counts (TBC), and asbestos) in addition to nicotine, a smoking index material used to determine the impact of smoking on the air quality, were investigated in indoor game rooms and lobbies of 64 screen golf courses. The average concentration of none of the ten pollutants in the game rooms and lobbies of screen golf courses was found to exceed the limit set by the law. There were, however, pollutant concentrations exceeding limits in some screen golf courses, in order to establish a control plan for the indoor air quality of screen golf courses, a study on the emission sources of each pollutant was conducted. The major emission sources were found to be facility users' activities such as smoking and the use of combustion appliances, building materials, and finishing materials.

  18. Biochar-compost mixtures added to simulated golf greens increase creeping bentgrass growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mixtures of 85% sand and 15% mixtures of peat (control), a commercial biochar, a commercial biochar-compost product (CarbonizPN), and seven biochar-commercial compost mixtures were tested on the growth of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L. "007") in simulated golf greens. Physical properti...

  19. EFFECTS OF A COASTAL GOLF COMPLEX ON WATER QUALITY, PERIPHYTON, AND SEAGRASS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a golf course complex on water quality, colonized periphyton and seagrass meadows in adjacent freshwater, near-coastal and wetland areas. The environmental impact of the recreational facility, which uses spray wastewater...

  20. Managing phosphorus export from golf courses using industrial byproducts as filter materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Golf courses, and in particular the tees, fairways, and putting greens, are vulnerable to loss of phosphorus (P) as dissolved reactive P (DRP) through sandy, porous grass rooting media and subsurface tile drainage. Excess levels of phosphorus (P) in surface waters promotes eutrophication, which in t...

  1. Evaluation of a Florida coastal golf complex as a local and watershed source of bioavailable contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Robert L. Quarles, Darrin D. Dantin and James C. Moore. 2004. Evaluation of a Coastal Golf Complex as a Local and Watershed Source of Bioavailable Contaminants. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 48(3-4):254-262. (ERL,GB 1183).

    Contaminant fate in coastal areas impacte...

  2. Evaluation of a Florida coastal golf complex as a local and watershed source of bioavailable contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Robert L. Quarles, Darrin D. Dantin and James C. Moore. 2004. Evaluation of a Coastal Golf Complex as a Local and Watershed Source of Bioavailable Contaminants. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 48(3-4):254-262. (ERL,GB 1183).

    Contaminant fate in coastal areas impacte...

  3. 76 FR 58108 - Safety Zone; Ryder Cup Captain's Duel Golf Shot, Chicago River, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Ryder Cup Captain's Duel Golf Shot, Chicago River, Chicago, IL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the Chicago River near Chicago, Illinois. This zone is intended...

  4. SEDIMENT CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH A COASTAL GOLF COURSE COMPLEX.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of sediment contamination to nearby coastal areas, the chemical and biological magnitude of which is almost unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of contaminants and toxicities...

  5. Beating the Bunker: The Effect of PETTLEP Imagery on Golf Bunker Shot Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dave; Wright, Caroline J.; Cantwell, Cara

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of physical practice with PETTLEP-based (Physical, Environment, Task, Timing, Learning, Emotion and Perspective; Holmes & Collins, 2001) imagery and PETTLEP + physical practice interventions on golf bunker shot performance. Thirty-two male county- or international-level golfers were assigned to one…

  6. A Survey of Golf Courses as a Source of Invasive C3 Grasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.; CBG), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.; KBG), and fine fescue species (Festuca spp.; FF) are commonly used as turf on golf courses. All have been identified as invasive species by governmental or non-governmental groups. We hypothesized that abundan...

  7. Beating the Bunker: The Effect of PETTLEP Imagery on Golf Bunker Shot Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dave; Wright, Caroline J.; Cantwell, Cara

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of physical practice with PETTLEP-based (Physical, Environment, Task, Timing, Learning, Emotion and Perspective; Holmes & Collins, 2001) imagery and PETTLEP + physical practice interventions on golf bunker shot performance. Thirty-two male county- or international-level golfers were assigned to one…

  8. CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH A COASTAL GOLF COURSE COMPLEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of contamination to nearby coastal areas, the chemical and biological magnitude of which is almost unknown. The objective of this study was to compare the concentrations of contaminants and toxicities of sedime...

  9. Use of industrial byproducts to filter PO43- and pesticides in golf green drainage water

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Golf courses are vulnerable to phosphate (PO43-) and pesticide loss by infiltration because of the sandy, porous grass rooting media used and presence of subsurface tile drainage. In this study, a blend of industrial byproducts, including granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), cement kiln dust (CKD),...

  10. Visual outcome and ocular survival after sports related ocular trauma in playing golf.

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Ursula; Wackernagel, Werner; Oetsch, Katharine

    2004-03-01

    To study eye injuries. More specifically, to study the visual performance and ocular findings in people generating the eye trauma while golfing and to define the main mechanisms of injury. We retrospectively reviewed a case series of seven patients with golf-related eye injuries treated at Austrian hospitals over the last seven years in a multicenter setting. Five men and two women received treatment. The mean age was 46 (range, 29-63), and three of the patients had blunt close globe trrauma and four suffered from a ruptured globe. Following the injuries, the patients' initial visual acuity ranged from no light perception to 20/40. All of the patients recquired surgery, with the resulting visual acuily ranging from moving hands to 20/20. It should be noted that three eyes required enucleation. Visual outcome from surgery is frequently very poor in golf related injuries. This is further complicated by these traumas frequently being accompanied by a high enucleation rate. Among the patients reviewed, it was observed that ruptured globe trauma has a worse prognosis than close blunt trauma. Due to the severe resulting complications of golf-related ocular injuries, we believe eye protection should be considered and emphasized.

  11. The effectiveness of an unstable sandal on low back pain and golf performance.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Benno M; Davis, Elysia; Lindsay, David; Emery, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the effect of unstable sandals on (1) low back pain (LBP) in golfers with undiagnosed moderate LBP, (2) static and dynamic balance, and (3) golf performance. This was a 6-week prospective study where subjects were randomized to a control group and an intervention group. Baseline measurements were recorded in the Human Performance Laboratory. Forty male golfers with nonspecific moderate LBP. The intervention group wore unstable shoes for 6 weeks, and the control group wore their regular golf shoes. Low back pain, timed balance, and golf performance were assessed at baseline and at 6 weeks. Changes were compared through independent samples t tests. (1) There was a significant difference between groups in the change of perceived LBP scores in the laboratory (test group: -17.5/100 mm, control: -3.6/100 mm) and in the comparison of the first week entries to the last week entries recorded in logbooks (test group: -10.7/100 mm, control group: +2.6/100 mm). (2) There was no significant change in the static or dynamic balance times. (3) There was no significant change in golf performance between the intervention and control groups. The results indicate that unstable sandals can be used to reduce moderate lower back pain in this population of golfers without negatively affecting performance.

  12. Three-dimensional trunk kinematics in golf: between-club differences and relationships to clubhead speed.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Christopher; Burnett, Angus; Cochrane, Jodie; Ball, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to determine whether significant three-dimensional (3D) trunk kinematic differences existed between a driver and a five-iron during a golf swing; and (ii) to determine the anthropometric, physiological, and trunk kinematic variables associated with clubhead speed. Trunk range of motion and golf swing kinematic data were collected from 15 low-handicap male golfers (handicap = 2.5 +/- 1.9). Data were collected using a 10-camera motion capture system operating at 250 Hz. Data on clubhead speed and ball velocity were collected using a real-time launch monitor. Paired t-tests revealed nine significant (p < or = 0.0019) between-club differences for golf swing kinematics, namely trunk and lower trunk flexion/extension and lower trunk axial rotation. Multiple regression analyses explained 33.7-66.7% of the variance in clubhead speed for the driver and five-iron, respectively, with both trunk and lower trunk variables showing associations with clubhead speed. Future studies should consider the role of the upper limbs and modifiable features of the golf club in developing clubhead speed for the driver in particular.

  13. A new method to identify the location of the kick point during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Christopher; Burnett, Angus; Matthews, Miccal

    2013-12-01

    No method currently exists to determine the location of the kick point during the golf swing. This study consisted of two phases. In the first phase, the static kick point of 10 drivers (having identical grip and head but fitted with shafts of differing mass and stiffness) was determined by two methods: (1) a visual method used by professional club fitters and (2) an algorithm using 3D locations of markers positioned on the golf club. Using level of agreement statistics, we showed the latter technique was a valid method to determine the location of the static kick point. In phase two, the validated method was used to determine the dynamic kick point during the golf swing. Twelve elite male golfers had three shots analyzed for two drivers fitted with stiff shafts of differing mass (56 g and 78 g). Excellent between-trial reliability was found for dynamic kick point location. Differences were found for dynamic kick point location when compared with static kick point location, as well as between-shaft and within-shaft. These findings have implications for future investigations examining the bending behavior of golf clubs, as well as being useful to examine relationships between properties of the shaft and launch parameters.

  14. Performance processes within affect-related performance zones: a multi-modal investigation of golf performance.

    PubMed

    van der Lei, Harry; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2012-12-01

    Individual affect-related performance zones (IAPZs) method utilizing Kamata et al. (J Sport Exerc Psychol 24:189-208, 2002) probabilistic model of determining the individual zone of optimal functioning was utilized as idiosyncratic affective patterns during golf performance. To do so, three male golfers of a varsity golf team were observed during three rounds of golf competition. The investigation implemented a multi-modal assessment approach in which the probabilistic relationship between affective states and both, performance process and performance outcome, measures were determined. More specifically, introspective (i.e., verbal reports) and objective (heart rate and respiration rate) measures of arousal were incorporated to examine the relationships between arousal states and both, process components (i.e., routine consistency, timing), and outcome scores related to golf performance. Results revealed distinguishable and idiosyncratic IAPZs associated with physiological and introspective measures for each golfer. The associations between the IAPZs and decision-making or swing/stroke execution were strong and unique for each golfer. Results are elaborated using cognitive and affect-related concepts, and applications for practitioners are provided.

  15. Kinetic and Kinematic Differences in a Golf Swing in One and Both Lower Limb Amputees

    PubMed Central

    Stastny, Petr; Maszczyk, Adam; Tománková, Kristina; Kubový, Petr; Richtrová, Michaela; Otáhal, Jakub; Čichoň, Rostislav; Mostowik, Aleksandra; Żmijewski, Piotr; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Amputee golfers need to cope with the absence of sole proprioception, a decreased range of swing motion and other factors which should be recognized for training purposes. The aim of this study was to determine the kinetic and kinematic differences in the golf swing in one leg and two legs amputees. The participants consisted of two males and one female at a professional or amateur level with a different degree of disability. Each participant was taped by 3D markers and performed five golf swings with the iron 6. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) did not vary between individuals in kinematics, however, it was low in kinetic variables of two leg amputees. The Kendal rank correlation showed a significant relationship between the level of amputation and a large number of kinetic and kinematic variables such as X factor, O factor, S factor and individual body angles. The fluency and similarity of the golf swing did not depend on the level of amputation. One lower limb amputation did not seem to increase movement variability contrary to two lower limb amputation. The most variable parameter was a weight-shift in all golfers. The takeaway and horizontal force angle depended on the level of amputation rather than individual technique, thus, their modification by training may be difficult. Estimation of golf swing „mistakes” in amputees in respect to the leading arm in an early follow or late follow position appeared to be useless. PMID:26834871

  16. Skin cancer prevention and detection campaign at golf courses on Spain's Costa del Sol.

    PubMed

    del Boz, J; Fernández-Morano, T; Padilla-España, L; Aguilar-Bernier, M; Rivas-Ruiz, F; de Troya-Martín, M

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer prevention and detection campaigns targeting specific groups are necessary and have proven to be more effective than those aimed at the general population. Interventions in outdoor tourist spots have proven successful, although none have specifically targeted golf courses. The aims of this study were to describe the risk profile of golfers and golf course workers and evaluate the impact of a skin cancer prevention and early detection intervention. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted at 6 golf courses. The intervention included a skin examination and completion of a questionnaire about demographic details, risk factors, and sun exposure and sun protection habits. Participants were also given advice on sun protection measures, self-examination, and use of sunscreens, and were asked about their satisfaction with the intervention and their intention to change their current behaviors. The effect was measured in terms of the diagnoses made, satisfaction with the intervention, reported intention to change, and potential effect in terms of existing risk factors. Of the 351 participants (57% golfers and 43% golf course workers), 70.4% had fair skin, 11.7% had a family history of skin cancer, and 8.5% had a personal history of skin cancer. Skin cancer and actinic keratoses were diagnosed in 10.7% and 40% of the golfers, respectively. The session was rated positively by 99.4% of the participants; 93.9% stated that they intended to improve their sun exposure habits and 93.4% said that they planned to examine their skin more frequently. Our findings confirm that golf course workers and, in particular, golfers are an important target for skin cancer prevention campaigns. This is the first intervention to specifically target golf courses, and it proved to be both feasible and useful. Its success appears to be attributable to numerous factors: it was conducted at golf courses, had multiple components, and was preceded by a motivational campaign

  17. Estimating watershed level nonagricultural pesticide use from golf courses using geospatial methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, G.A.; Thelin, G.P.; Sabbagh, G.J.; Fuchs, J.W.; Kelly, I.D.

    2008-01-01

    Limited information exists on pesticide use for nonagricultural purposes, making it difficult to estimate pesticide loadings from nonagricultural sources to surface water and to conduct environmental risk assessments. A method was developed to estimate the amount of pesticide use on recreational turf grasses, specifically golf course turf grasses, for watersheds located throughout the conterminous United States (U.S.). The approach estimates pesticide use: (1) based on the area of recreational turf grasses (used as a surrogate for turf associated with golf courses) within the watershed, which was derived from maps of land cover, and (2) from data on the location and average treatable area of golf courses. The area of golf course turf grasses determined from these two methods was used to calculate the percentage of each watershed planted in golf course turf grass (percent crop area, or PCA). Turf-grass PCAs derived from the two methods were used with recommended application rates provided on pesticide labels to estimate total pesticide use on recreational turf within 1,606 watersheds associated with surface-water sources of drinking water. These pesticide use estimates made from label rates and PCAs were compared to use estimates from industry sales data on the amount of each pesticide sold for use within the watershed. The PCAs derived from the land-cover data had an average value of 0.4% of a watershed with minimum of 0.01% and a maximum of 9.8%, whereas the PCA values that are based on the number of golf courses in a watershed had an average of 0.3% of a watershed with a minimum of <0.01% and a maximum of 14.2%. Both the land-cover method and the number of golf courses method produced similar PCA distributions, suggesting that either technique may be used to provide a PCA estimate for recreational turf. The average and maximum PCAs generally correlated to watershed size, with the highest PCAs estimated for small watersheds. Using watershed specific PCAs, combined

  18. Effect of Caffeine on Golf Performance and Fatigue during a Competitive Tournament.

    PubMed

    Mumford, Petey W; Tribby, Aaron C; Poole, Christopher N; Dalbo, Vincent J; Scanlan, Aaron T; Moon, Jordan R; Roberts, Michael D; Young, Kaelin C

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of a caffeine-containing supplement on golf-specific performance and fatigue during a 36-hole competitive golf tournament. Twelve male golfers (34.8 ± 13.9 yr, 175.9 ± 9.3 cm, 81.23 ± 13.14 kg) with a United States Golf Association handicap of 3-10 participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design in which they played an 18-hole round of golf on two consecutive days (36-hole tournament) and were randomly assigned to consume a caffeine-containing supplement (CAF) or placebo (PLA). CAF/PLA was consumed before and after nine holes during each 18-hole round. Total score, drive distance, fairways and greens in regulation, first putt distance, HR, breathing rate, peak trunk acceleration, and trunk posture while putting were recorded. Self-perceived ratings of energy, fatigue, alertness and concentration were also recorded. Total score (76.9 ± 8.1 vs 79.4 ± 9.1, P = 0.039), greens in regulation (8.6 ± 3.3 vs 6.9 ± 4.6, P = 0.035), and drive distance (239.9 ± 33.8 vs 233.2 ± 32.4, P = 0.047) were statistically better during the CAF condition compared with those during PLA. Statistically significant main effects for condition (P < 0.05) and time (P < 0.001) occurred for perceived feelings of energy and fatigue. Compared with PLA, CAF reported more energy (P = 0.025) and less fatigue (P = 0.05) over the competitive round of golf. There were no substantial differences in HR or breathing rates, peak trunk acceleration, or putting posture between conditions or over the round (P > 0.05). A moderate dose (1.9 ± 0.3 mg · kg(-1)) of caffeine consumed before and during a round of golf improves golf-specific measures of performance and reduces fatigue in skilled golfers.

  19. The Development and Validation of a Golf Swing and Putt Skill Assessment for Children

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Lisa M.; Hardy, Louise L.; Brian, Ali S.; Robertson, Sam

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to describe development of a process-oriented instrument designed to assess the golf swing and putt stroke, and to assess the instrument’s discriminative validity in terms of age and reliability (intra-rater and re-test). A Delphi consultation (with golf industry professionals and researchers in movement skill assessment) was used to develop an assessment for each skill based on existing skill assessment protocols. Each skill had six components to be marked as present/absent. Individual scores were based on the number of performance components successfully demonstrated over two trials for each skill (potential score range 0 to 24). Children (n = 43) aged 6-10 years (M = 7.8 years, SD = 1.3) were assessed in both skills live in the field by one rater at Time 1(T1). A subset of children (n = 28) had consent for assessments to be videoed. Six weeks later 19 children were reassessed, five days apart (T2, T3). An ANOVA assessed discriminative validity i.e. whether skill competence at T1 differed by age (6 years, 7/8 years and 9/10 years). Intraclass correlations (ICC) assessed intra-rater reliability between the live and video assessment at T1 and test-retest reliability (between T2 and T3). Paired t-tests assessed any systematic differences between live and video assessments (T1) and between T2 and T3. Older children were more skilled (F (2, 40) = 11.18, p < 0.001). The live assessment reflected the video assessment (ICC = 0.79, 95% CI 0.59, 0.90) and scores did not differ between live and video assessments. Test retest reliability was acceptable (ICC = 0.60, 95% CI 0.23, 0.82), although the mean score was slightly higher at retest. This instrument could be used reliably by golf coaches and physical education teachers as part of systematic early player assessment and feedback. Key points Golf is becoming an increasingly popular sport among young children, however there is no standard protocol available to assess and identify skill deficits, mastery level

  20. Investigation report on golf cart fire at the U.S. DOE Pinellas Plant on May 11, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report documents the results of an accident investigation of a golf cart fire that occurred May 11, 1993, at the Pinellas Plant. The direct cause of the fire was determined to be excessive heat generation in the cart`s resistor coil box. The current flow creating the excessive heat was caused by the defeat of cart safety systems and a partially depressed accelerator pedal. The root cause of the fire is inadequate training of golf cart operators. Recommendations to prevent further recurrence of this type of accident include operator training and golf cart inspections.

  1. Analysis of impact noise induced by hitting of titanium head golf driver.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Young Chul; Lee, Jun Hee; An, Yong-Hwi; Park, Kyung Tae; Kang, Kyung Min; Kang, Yeon June

    2014-11-01

    The hitting of titanium head golf driver against golf ball creates a short duration, high frequency impact noise. We analyzed the spectra of these impact noises and evaluated the auditory hazards from exposure to the noises. Noises made by 10 titanium head golf drivers with five maximum hits were collected, and the spectra of the pure impact sounds were studied using a noise analysis program. The noise was measured at 1.7 m (position A) and 3.4 m (position B) from the hitting point in front of the hitter and at 3.4 m (position C) behind the hitting point. Average time duration was measured and auditory risk units (ARUs) at position A were calculated using the Auditory Hazard Assessment Algorithm for Humans. The average peak levels at position A were 119.9 dBA at the sound pressure level (SPL) peak and 100.0 dBA at the overall octave level. The average peak levels (SPL and overall octave level) at position B were 111.6 and 96.5 dBA, respectively, and at position C were 111.5 and 96.7 dBA, respectively. The average time duration and ARUs measured at position A were 120.6 ms and 194.9 units, respectively. Although impact noises made by titanium head golf drivers showed relatively low ARUs, individuals enjoying golf frequently may be susceptible to hearing loss due to the repeated exposure of this intense impact noise with short duration and high frequency. Unprotected exposure to impact noises should be limited to prevent cochleovestibular disorders.

  2. Kinematic relationship between rotation of lumbar spine and hip joints during golf swing in professional golfers.

    PubMed

    Mun, Frederick; Suh, Seung Woo; Park, Hyun-Joon; Choi, Ahnryul

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the kinematics of the lumbar spine and hip joints during a golf swing is a basic step for identifying swing-specific factors associated with low back pain. The objective of this study was to examine the kinematic relationship between rotational movement of the lumbar spine and hip joints during a golf swing. Fifteen professional golfers participated in this study with employment of six infrared cameras to record their golf swings. Anatomical reference system of the upper torso, pelvis and thigh segments, and the location of each hip and knee joint were defined by the protocols of the kinematic model of previous studies. Lumbar spine and hip joint rotational angle was calculated utilizing the Euler angle method. Cross-correlation and angle-angle plot was used to examine the degree of kinematic relationship between joints. A fairly strong coupling relationship was shown between the lumbar spine and hip rotational movements with an average correlation of 0.81. Leading hip contribution to overall rotation was markedly high in the early stage of the downswing, while the lumbar spine contributed greater towards the end of the downswing; however, the relative contributions of the trailing hip and lumbar spine were nearly equal during the entire downswing. Most of the professional golfers participated in this study used a similar coordination strategy when moving their hips and lumbar spine during golf swings. The rotation of hips was observed to be more efficient in producing the overall rotation during the downswing when compared to the backswing. These results provide quantitative information to better understand the lumbar spine and hip joint kinematic characteristics of professional golfers. This study will have great potential to be used as a normal control data for the comparison with kinematic information among golfers with low back pain and for further investigation of golf swing-specific factors associated with injury.

  3. Evaluation of water demand in golf courses from southern Portugal during the last three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago Pedras, Celestina M.; Lança, Rui M.; Granja-Martins, Fernando M.; Neto-Paixão, Helena M.; Vieira, Cristina; Monteiro, José P.; Guerrero, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Golf is an economic activity with a prominent position in the tourist-sport offer in the region of Algarve. Located in southern of Portugal, this region is the most suitable region for the growth of the golf industry. The climate is characterized by mild winters with slight rainfall and hot and dry summers. The region has an annual average temperature of 14oC and annual precipitation that rarely exceeds 500 mm year-1. Since most of the rainfall occurs concentrated in the winter, irrigation is needed during the remaining months of the year to meet the water demand from plants. A proper irrigation management will allow to optimize the use water, thus it constitutes a key issue for the sustainability of this activity in areas subjected to water scarcity. Currently, remote sensing provides the tools to assess the evolution of the greenish quality of the area in the golf courses. In this study, based on Landsat images, vegetation indices were calculated the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), for the spring and summer seasons during the last 30 years. For the same period, according the data collected from weather stations distributed in the region, maps of precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity and wind were produced. According the current maintenance practices and irrigation cycles, maps of potential and real evapotranspiration and with basis on the water balance were calculated, and water deficit maps estimated. Upon crossing this information with the NDVI maps, trends were identified in the consumption of water for irrigation due to the growth of the occupied area by golf courses in the region of Algarve. Since drought problems tend to increase due to climate changes, it becomes relevant the need to conduct this study aiming the research of strategies to ensure the beneficial use of water on golf courses and other turfgrass areas.

  4. Golf cart related injuries in a North Carolina island community, 1992-4.

    PubMed Central

    Passaro, K. T.; Cole, T. B.; Morris, P. D.; Matthews, D. L.; MacKenzie, W. R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: The use of electric golf carts for roadway transportation is increasing in many regions of the United States, but injuries associated with the operation of these vehicles have not been previously described. In response to reports of golf cart related injuries in a North Carolina island community, we reviewed ambulance call report (ACR) information to identify and describe all injuries related to golf cart operation in this community in 1992-4. We also conducted telephone interviews with the subset of injured people who consented to be contacted. SETTING: Bald Head Island, North Carolina. RESULTS: Twenty two people were included in the case series, and 55% of these provided interview information to supplement ACR data. Fifty nine per cent of the 22 injured people were injured when they fell from a moving golf cart; of those injured in this manner, all with available information on seating position were passengers (rather than drivers). Eighty six per cent received immediate medical treatment at a mainland hospital. Thirty two per cent of injury incidents occurred among children aged 10 or younger. Forty per cent of injured adults were known to have been drinking alcohol before their injuries occurred, while alcohol was not known to have been involved in any of the children's injuries (in terms of drinking either by children or by accompanying adults). CONCLUSIONS: In settings where golf carts are used for road transportation, their users and traffic safety officials should be aware of potential safety hazards associated with the use of these vehicles, and installation of appropriate occupant restraints should be considered seriously. PMID:9346075

  5. La naissance du parsec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenou, F.

    2010-01-01

    Les définitions du parsec et de la magnitude absolue sont le fruit de compromis pour régler trois problèmes entremêlés au début du XXème siècle: quelle unité de distance stellaire adopter? Quel nom lui donner? Comment comparer les luminosités intrinsèques des différentes étoiles?

  6. R&W Club Frederick Raises $1,500 for The Children’s Inn at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Forty-four government and contractor employees, along with their friends and family members, took to the Maryland National Golf Club course this fall for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick held its third annual golf tournament at the Middletown, Md., golf course on Sept. 14 to raise funds for The Children’s Inn at NIH, which celebrated its 25th anniversary this year. The Inn provides support and a home away from home for seriously ill children and their families receiving treatment at the NIH Clinical Center. Through the tournament, the club raised approximately $1,500 for The Children’s Inn, according to Tanya Ransom, biologist, NCI Center for Cancer Research, and secretary of the R&W Club Frederick. She also coordinated the golf tournament. After the tournament, a silent auction of sports memorabilia and collectibles, sponsored by Great Moments, Frederick, was held, and a portion of the proceeds also went to the Inn.

  7. R&W Club Frederick Raises $1,500 for The Children’s Inn at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Forty-four government and contractor employees, along with their friends and family members, took to the Maryland National Golf Club course this fall for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick held its third annual golf tournament at the Middletown, Md., golf course on Sept. 14 to raise funds for The Children’s Inn at NIH, which celebrated its 25th anniversary this year. The Inn provides support and a home away from home for seriously ill children and their families receiving treatment at the NIH Clinical Center. Through the tournament, the club raised approximately $1,500 for The Children’s Inn, according to Tanya Ransom, biologist, NCI Center for Cancer Research, and secretary of the R&W Club Frederick. She also coordinated the golf tournament. After the tournament, a silent auction of sports memorabilia and collectibles, sponsored by Great Moments, Frederick, was held, and a portion of the proceeds also went to the Inn.

  8. R&W Club Frederick Hosts 4th Annual Golf Tournament Benefiting The Children’s Inn at NIH | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The R&W Club Frederick’s 4th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit the Children’s Inn at NIH teed off on time despite cloudy weather and scattered showers. Employees from NCI at Frederick, the main NIH campus, and Leidos Biomed, along with family and friends, came to enjoy an afternoon at the beautiful Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown and to support a wonderful charity.

  9. R&W Club Frederick Hosts 4th Annual Golf Tournament Benefiting The Children’s Inn at NIH | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The R&W Club Frederick’s 4th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit the Children’s Inn at NIH teed off on time despite cloudy weather and scattered showers. Employees from NCI at Frederick, the main NIH campus, and Leidos Biomed, along with family and friends, came to enjoy an afternoon at the beautiful Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown and to support a wonderful charity.

  10. Effects of orthotic intervention and nine holes of simulated golf on club-head velocity in experienced golfers.

    PubMed

    Stude, D E; Gullickson, J

    2000-01-01

    This study was an initial investigation evaluating the effects of orthotic intervention on club-head velocity (CHV) among a group of experienced golfers before and after 9 holes of simulated golf. Northwestern College of Chiropractic, Bloomington, Minnesota. Twelve experienced golfers were included in the study. CHV was measured with a device used by many Professional Golf Association and Ladies Professional Golf Association teaching professionals before and after wearing orthotics and before and after completing 9 holes of simulated golf. Subjects wore custom-made, flexible orthotics daily for 6 weeks and then were retested with the same objective measurement parameters. CHV (swing speed in miles per hour) was measured in all subjects before and after wearing custom-fit, flexible orthotics for 6 weeks and before and after completing 9 holes of simulated golf. There was an approximate increase in CHV of between 3 and 5 mph, or a relative increase in CHV by up to 7%, after subjects had worn custom-made, weight-bearing, flexible orthotics daily for 6 weeks. A 5-mph increase in CHV is equivalent to an approximate increase in golf ball travel distance of 15 yards, a significant increase for the tour player for whom small increases in performance can reflect large position changes on the roster board. In addition, the use of these custom of those eliminated the effects of fatigue associated with playing 9 holes of golf (relative to CHV) and therefore may improve the likelihood for more consistent golf performance. The use of the custom-fit, flexible orthotics in this study had a positive influence on CHV in experienced golfers.

  11. Electromyographic Patterns during Golf Swing: Activation Sequence Profiling and Prediction of Shot Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Verikas, Antanas; Vaiciukynas, Evaldas; Gelzinis, Adas; Parker, James; Olsson, M. Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes muscle activity, recorded in an eight-channel electromyographic (EMG) signal stream, during the golf swing using a 7-iron club and exploits information extracted from EMG dynamics to predict the success of the resulting shot. Muscles of the arm and shoulder on both the left and right sides, namely flexor carpi radialis, extensor digitorum communis, rhomboideus and trapezius, are considered for 15 golf players (∼5 shots each). The method using Gaussian filtering is outlined for EMG onset time estimation in each channel and activation sequence profiling. Shots of each player revealed a persistent pattern of muscle activation. Profiles were plotted and insights with respect to player effectiveness were provided. Inspection of EMG dynamics revealed a pair of highest peaks in each channel as the hallmark of golf swing, and a custom application of peak detection for automatic extraction of swing segment was introduced. Various EMG features, encompassing 22 feature sets, were constructed. Feature sets were used individually and also in decision-level fusion for the prediction of shot effectiveness. The prediction of the target attribute, such as club head speed or ball carry distance, was investigated using random forest as the learner in detection and regression tasks. Detection evaluates the personal effectiveness of a shot with respect to the player-specific average, whereas regression estimates the value of target attribute, using EMG features as predictors. Fusion after decision optimization provided the best results: the equal error rate in detection was 24.3% for the speed and 31.7% for the distance; the mean absolute percentage error in regression was 3.2% for the speed and 6.4% for the distance. Proposed EMG feature sets were found to be useful, especially when used in combination. Rankings of feature sets indicated statistics for muscle activity in both the left and right body sides, correlation-based analysis of EMG dynamics and features

  12. Methodological considerations for the 3D measurement of the X-factor and lower trunk movement in golf.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Christopher; Burnett, Angus; Ball, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    It is believed that increasing the X-factor (movement of the shoulders relative to the hips) during the golf swing can increase ball velocity at impact. Increasing the X-factor may also increase the risk of low back pain. The aim of this study was to provide recommendations for the three-dimensional (3D) measurement of the X-factor and lower trunk movement during the golf swing. This three-part validation study involved; (1) developing and validating models and related algorithms (2) comparing 3D data obtained during static positions representative of the golf swing to visual estimates and (3) comparing 3D data obtained during dynamic golf swings to images gained from high-speed video. Of particular interest were issues related to sequence dependency. After models and algorithms were validated, results from parts two and three of the study supported the conclusion that a lateral bending/flexion-extension/axial rotation (ZYX) order of rotation was deemed to be the most suitable Cardanic sequence to use in the assessment of the X-factor and lower trunk movement in the golf swing. The findings of this study have relevance for further research examining the X-factor its relationship to club head speed and lower trunk movement and low back pain in golf.

  13. The effect of leisure activity golf practice on motor imagery: an fMRI study in middle adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Bezzola, Ladina; Mérillat, Susan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    Much is known about practice-induced plasticity of the motor system. But it is not clear how a physical training influences the mental rehearsal of the practiced task and its associated hemodynamic responses. In the present longitudinal study with two measurement time-points, we used the method of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a motor imagery task, in order to explore the dynamic neuro-functional changes induced by a highly complex physical training. The 11 golf novices between the age of 40 and 60 years practiced the motor training as leisure activity. Additionally, data from an age and sex-matched control group without golf training was collected. As a main result, we demonstrate that changes between the two measurement time-points were only found in the golf novice group. The golf novices showed a decrease in hemodynamic responses during the mental rehearsal of the golf swing in non-primary motor areas after the 40 h of golf practice. Thus, the results indicate that a complex physical leisure activity induces functional neuroplasticity in the seldom studied population of middle-aged adults, and that this effect is evident during mental rehearsal of the practiced task. This finding supports the idea that (a) a skill improvement is associated with a modified activation pattern in the associated neuronal network that can be identified during mental rehearsal of the practiced task, and that (b) a strict training protocol is not necessary to induce functional neuroplasticity. PMID:22479243

  14. La Sierra Madre orientale (Mexique). Une rampe homoclinale mésocrétacée en bordure du golfe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona, Elizabeth Lara; Canerot, Joseph; Bilotte, Michel

    1998-05-01

    New data from the Sierra Madre Oriental, in thé Metztitlan, Xilitla and Sierra de El Abra areas, indicate a gradual, homoclinal ramp-type evolution from the Lower Cretaceous thin bedded outer-shelf Tamaulipas limestones to the Mid-Cretaceous massive innershelf Abra limestones. The common sedimentary model of an isolated Abra platform towering above the Tamaulipas basin through a reef barrier (Taninul fades) or through marine slope breccias (Tamabra Fm.) is rejected. The proposed interpretation can be extended to different platforms which developed in the western margin of the Gulf of Mexico and specially to the Golden Lane and Poza Rica areas where the Mid Cretaceous Abra carbonates provided important oil fields.

  15. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (156). Golf-induced hamate hook fracture.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hsien Khai; Chew, Nicholas; Chew, Kelvin T L; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2014-10-01

    The wrist is a common site of injury and the most frequently injured body part among professional golfers. A 37-year-old, right-handed male golfer presented with pain at the ulnar aspect of his left palm, which grew worse after an initial traumatic impact from the golf club handle. There was tenderness over the hypothenar eminence of the left palm. Computed tomography of the left wrist showed an undisplaced fracture through the base of the hamate hook. The golf-induced hamate hook fracture was managed conservatively, with cessation of physical activity involving the left hand and wrist for eight weeks. The patient made a full recovery. Repetitive trauma, exacerbated by improper wrist motion, leads to typical wrist injuries affecting golfers, such as ulnar impaction syndrome, de Quervain's disease, and tendinopathy affecting the flexor carpi ulnaris and extensor carpi ulnaris, all of which can be diagnosed on imaging.

  16. Vertebral artery dissection caused by swinging a golf club: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shoko M; Goto, Yoshiaki; Murakami, Mineko; Hoya, Katsumi; Matsuno, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Vertebral artery (VA) dissection caused by swinging a golf club is extremely rare, and the mechanism of the dissection has not been elucidated. A 39-year-old man suddenly felt sharp neck pain and dizziness when he swung a driver while playing golf and visited our clinic. Imaging studies showed acute right cerebellar infarction and complete occlusion of the right VA at the C2 (axis) level. After 1 month of 100 mg aspirin treatment, the occluded right VA was completely recanalized and the patient became totally asymptomatic. Professional golfers look at the position of the ball on the ground or tee until completion of their follow-through. However, some amateur golfers look in the direction that the ball travels at the beginning of their follow-through. It is hypothesized that this rapid disproportionate head rotation produces VA elongation and distortion, mainly at the C2 level, causing stenosis or occlusion of the artery.

  17. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (156). Golf-induced hamate hook fracture.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hsien Khai; Chew, Nicholas; Chew, Kelvin TL; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2014-01-01

    The wrist is a common site of injury and the most frequently injured body part among professional golfers. A 37-year-old, right-handed male golfer presented with pain at the ulnar aspect of his left palm, which grew worse after an initial traumatic impact from the golf club handle. There was tenderness over the hypothenar eminence of the left palm. Computed tomography of the left wrist showed an undisplaced fracture through the base of the hamate hook. The golf-induced hamate hook fracture was managed conservatively, with cessation of physical activity involving the left hand and wrist for eight weeks. The patient made a full recovery. Repetitive trauma, exacerbated by improper wrist motion, leads to typical wrist injuries affecting golfers, such as ulnar impaction syndrome, de Quervain’s disease, and tendinopathy affecting the flexor carpi ulnaris and extensor carpi ulnaris, all of which can be diagnosed on imaging. PMID:25631891

  18. Putting like a pro: the role of positive contagion in golf performance and perception.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charles; Linkenauger, Sally A; Bakdash, Jonathan Z; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A; Profitt, Dennis R

    2011-01-01

    Many amateur athletes believe that using a professional athlete's equipment can improve their performance. Such equipment can be said to be affected with positive contagion, which refers to the belief of transference of beneficial properties between animate persons/objects to previously neutral objects. In this experiment, positive contagion was induced by telling participants in one group that a putter previously belonged to a professional golfer. The effect of positive contagion was examined for perception and performance in a golf putting task. Individuals who believed they were using the professional golfer's putter perceived the size of the golf hole to be larger than golfers without such a belief and also had better performance, sinking more putts. These results provide empirical support for anecdotes, which allege that using objects with positive contagion can improve performance, and further suggest perception can be modulated by positive contagion.

  19. Putting Like a Pro: The Role of Positive Contagion in Golf Performance and Perception

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Charles; Linkenauger, Sally A.; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Profitt, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01

    Many amateur athletes believe that using a professional athlete's equipment can improve their performance. Such equipment can be said to be affected with positive contagion, which refers to the belief of transference of beneficial properties between animate persons/objects to previously neutral objects. In this experiment, positive contagion was induced by telling participants in one group that a putter previously belonged to a professional golfer. The effect of positive contagion was examined for perception and performance in a golf putting task. Individuals who believed they were using the professional golfer's putter perceived the size of the golf hole to be larger than golfers without such a belief and also had better performance, sinking more putts. These results provide empirical support for anecdotes, which allege that using objects with positive contagion can improve performance, and further suggest perception can be modulated by positive contagion. PMID:22028804

  20. Helioseismic inferences of the solar cycles 23 and 24: GOLF and VIRGO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Jiménez, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Sun-as-a star helioseismic spectrophotometer GOLF and photometer VIRGO instruments onboard the SoHO spacecraft are collecting high-quality, continuous data since April 1996. We analyze here these unique datasets in order to investigate the peculiar and weak on-going solar cycle 24. As this cycle 24 is reaching its maximum, we compare its rising phase with the rising phase of the previous solar cycle 23.

  1. Real-time index for predicting successful golf putting motion using multichannel EEG.

    PubMed

    Muangjaroen, Piyachat; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2012-01-01

    A skill in goal-directed sport performance is an ability involving with many factors of both external and internal concernment. External factors are still developed while internal factors are challenged topic to understand for improving the performance. Internal concernment is explained an effective performance as estimation, solving strategy, planning and decision on the brain. These conjunctions are relevant to somatosensory information, focus attention and fine motor control of cortical activity. Five skilled right-handed golfers were recruited to be subjected of studying the criteria on how to predict golf putt success. Each of their putts was calculated in power spectral analysis by comparing to the pre-movement period. Successful and unsuccessful putt were classified by focusing on the frontal-midline(Fz), parietal-midline(Pz), central midline(Cz), left central(C3) and right central(C4) which supported by few consistency studies that they are related to a primary sensory motor area, focus attention and working memory processing. Results were shown that high alpha power on C4, theta power on Fz, theta power and high alpha power on Pz can be calculated to use as index of predicting golf putt success. Real-time monitoring system with friendly GUI was proposed in this study as promising preliminary study. Expected goal in the future is to apply this real-time golf putting prediction system into a biofeedback system to increase the golf putting's accuracy. However, it still needs more subjects to increase credibility and accuracy of the prediction.

  2. Arsenic Transport and Transformation Associated with MSMA Application on a Golf Course Green

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Min; Schrlau, Jill E.; Snyder, Raymond; Snyder, George H.; Chen, Ming; Cisar, John L.; Cai, Yong

    2008-01-01

    The impact of extensively used arsenic-containing herbicides on groundwater beneath golf courses has become a topic of interest. Although currently used organoarsenicals are less toxic, their application into the environment may produce the more toxic inorganic arsenicals. The objective of this work was to understand the behavior of arsenic species in percolate water from monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) applied golf course greens, as well as to determine the influences of root-zone media for United State Golf Association (USGA) putting green construction on arsenic retention and species conversion. The field test was established at the Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center (FLREC), University of Florida. Percolate water was collected after MSMA application for speciation and total arsenic analyses. The results showed that the substrate composition significantly influenced arsenic mobility and arsenic species transformation in the percolate water. In comparison to uncoated sands (S) and uncoated sands and peat (S + P), naturally coated sands and peat (NS + P) showed a higher capacity of preventing arsenic from leaching into percolate water, implying that the coatings of sands with clay reduce arsenic leaching. Arsenic species transformation occurred in soil, resulting in co-occurrence of four arsenic species, arsenite (AsIII), arsenate (AsV), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in percolate water. The results indicated that substrate composition can significantly affect both arsenic retention in soil and arsenic speciation in percolate water. The clay coatings on the soil particles and the addition of peat in the soil changed the arsenic bioavailability, which in turn controlled the microorganism-mediated arsenic transformation. To better explain and understand arsenic transformation and transport after applying MSMA in golf green, a conceptual model was proposed. PMID:15853401

  3. The effect of a carbohydrate-caffeine sports drink on simulated golf performance.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Emma J; Hayes, Philip R; Allison, Sarah J

    2009-08-01

    A round of golf lasts approximately 4 h, during which time homeostasis could be challenged through either hypoglycemia or hypohydration. This might result in impaired motor skill or cognitive performance. Given the high cognitive demand of putting and the potential fatiguing effects from prolonged walking, the combination of a caffeine and carbohydrate drink could be beneficial in offsetting hypoglycemia and hypohydration. This study used a laboratory-simulated round of golf to examine the effect of an isotonic carbohydrate and caffeine sports drink on putting performance during a round of golf. After institutional ethics approval, 20 male golfers (mean +/- standard deviation: age 23 +/- 4 years, stature 176.4 +/- 5.6 cm, mass 72.8 +/- 17.4 kg, handicap 15 +/- 4, daily caffeine consumption 157.3 +/- 47.2 mg) consumed either an isotonic sports drink containing caffeine (6.4 g carbohydrate and 16 mg caffeine per 100 mL) or a no-energy, flavour-matched placebo drink in a double-blind, randomized, counter-balanced crossover design . Drinks were consumed preround (5 mL.kg-1 body mass (BM)) and at holes 6 and 12 (2.5 mL.kg-1 BM). Participants therefore consumed 1.6 mg.kg-1 BM of caffeine and 0.64 g.kg-1 BM of carbohydrate throughout the trial. Five and 2 m putting performance were assessed at each hole. Self-rated mood assessments were carried out every third hole. Putting performance over 5 m and 2 m and self-rated scores for alertness and relaxation showed a main effect for drink (p < 0.05). Ratings of mental fatigue and tiredness significantly increased during the round (p < 0.001). In experienced golfers, the consumption of an isotonic carbohydrate sports drink containing caffeine prior to and during a round of golf improved putting performance and increased feelings of alertness.

  4. Arsenic transport and transformation associated with MSMA application on a golf course green.

    PubMed

    Feng, Min; Schrlau, Jill E; Snyder, Raymond; Snyder, George H; Chen, Ming; Cisar, John L; Cai, Yong

    2005-05-04

    The impact of extensively used arsenic-containing herbicides on groundwater beneath golf courses has become a topic of interest. Although currently used organoarsenicals are less toxic, their application into the environment may produce the more toxic inorganic arsenicals. The objective of this work was to understand the behavior of arsenic species in percolate water from monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) applied golf course greens, as well as to determine the influences of root-zone media for United State Golf Association (USGA) putting green construction on arsenic retention and species conversion. The field test was established at the Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center (FLREC), University of Florida. Percolate water was collected after MSMA application for speciation and total arsenic analyses. The results showed that the substrate composition significantly influenced arsenic mobility and arsenic species transformation in the percolate water. In comparison to uncoated sands (S) and uncoated sands and peat (S + P), naturally coated sands and peat (NS + P) showed a higher capacity of preventing arsenic from leaching into percolate water, implying that the coatings of sands with clay reduce arsenic leaching. Arsenic species transformation occurred in soil, resulting in co-occurrence of four arsenic species, arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in percolate water. The results indicated that substrate composition can significantly affect both arsenic retention in soil and arsenic speciation in percolate water. The clay coatings on the soil particles and the addition of peat in the soil changed the arsenic bioavailability, which in turn controlled the microorganism-mediated arsenic transformation. To better explain and understand arsenic transformation and transport after applying MSMA in golf green, a conceptual model was proposed.

  5. Relationships between field-based measures of strength and power and golf club head speed.

    PubMed

    Read, Paul J; Lloyd, Rhodri S; De Ste Croix, Mark; Oliver, Jon L

    2013-10-01

    Increased golf club head speed (CHS) has been shown to result in greater driving distances and is also correlated with golf handicap. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between field-based measures of strength and power and golf CHS with a secondary aim to determine the reliability of the selected tests. A correlation design was used to assess the following variables: anthropometrics, squat jump (SJ) height and squat jump peak power (SJPP), unilateral countermovement jump (CMJ) heights (right leg countermovement jump and left leg countermovement jump [LLCMJ]), bilateral CMJ heights, countermovement jump peak power (CMJPP), and medicine ball seated throw (MBST) and medicine ball rotational throw (MBRT). Fouty-eight male subjects participated in the study (age: 20.1 ± 3.2 years, height: 1.76 ± 0.07 m, mass: 72.8 ± 7.8 kg, handicap: 5.8 ± 2.2). Moderate significant correlations were reported between CHS and MBRT (r = 0.67; p < 0.01), MBST (r = 0.63; p < 0.01), CMJPP (r = 0.54; p < 0.01), and SJPP (r = 0.53; p < 0.01). Weak significant correlations (r = 0.3-0.5) were identified between CHS and the other remaining variables excluding LLCMJ. Stepwise multiple regression analysis identified that the MBST and SJ were the greatest predictors of CHS, explaining 49% of the variance. Additionally the intraclass correlation coefficients reported for tests of CHS and all performance variables were deemed acceptable (r = 0.7-0.9). The results of this study suggest that the strength and conditioning coach can accurately assess and monitor the physical abilities of golf athletes using the proposed battery of field tests. Additionally, movements that are more concentrically dominant in nature may display stronger relationships with CHS due to MBST and SJ displaying the highest explained variance after a stepwise linear regression.

  6. Golf ball-shaped PLGA microparticles with internal pores fabricated by simple O/W emulsion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ri; Lee, Seungwoo; Park, Jung-Ki; Cho, Kuk Young

    2010-10-21

    Simple oil-in-water emulsion led to structural complexity at both the surface and interior of the PLGA microsphere. A golf ball-like dimpled surface comes from the heteroaggregation of volatile nonsolvent colloid originating from the inside of the organic droplet as supported by in situ optical microscopy. The internal porous structure and encapsulation of hydrophobic agent inside the microparticle implies its potential application as a drug carrier.

  7. Different centre of pressure patterns within the golf stroke I: Cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Ball, K A; Best, R J

    2007-05-01

    Weight transfer research in the golf swing has produced conflicting and inconclusive results. A limitation of previous studies is the assumption that only one swing "style" exists within the golf swing. If different styles, or movement strategies, exist and if the different styles are analysed together in a single group, statistical errors will result. The aim of this study was to determine if different weight transfer styles exist in the golf swing by applying cluster analysis to centre of pressure (CP) patterns in the direction of hit (CPy) and to evaluate cluster analysis issues. Sixty-two professional to high handicap golfers performed simulated drives, hitting a golf ball into a net, while standing on two force plates. Centre of pressure position relative to the feet (CPy%) was quantified at eight swing events identified from 200-Hz video. Cluster analysis identified two major CPy% styles: a "Front Foot" style and a "Reverse" style. Both styles began with CPy% positioned evenly between the feet, moved to the back foot during backswing, and then forward during early downswing. Beyond early downswing, the Front Foot group continued to move CPy% to the Front Foot through to ball contact, while the Reverse group moved CPy% towards the back foot through ball contact and follow-through. Both weight transfer styles were evident across skill levels from professional to high handicap golfers, indicating that neither style was a technical error. Cluster analysis should include hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering and use objective measures combined with theoretical assessment to determine the optimal number of clusters. Furthermore, a number of validation procedures should always be used to validate the solution.

  8. A new device for evaluating distance and directional performance of golf putters.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Johnny; Karlsen, Jon

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct and evaluate the reliability of an apparatus for testing golf putters with respect to distance and direction deviation at different impact points on the clubface. An apparatus was constructed based on the pendulum principle that allowed putter golf clubs to swing at different speeds. The mean speed of the club head before ball impact, and of the ball after impact, was calculated from time measurements with photocells. A pin profile rig was used to determine the directional deviation of the golf ball. Three different putters were used in the study, two that are commercially available (toe-heel weighted and mallet types) and one specially made (wing-type) putter. The points of impact were the sweet spot (as indicated by the manufacturer's aim line), and 1, 2 and 3 cm to the left and right of the sweet spot. Calculation of club head speed before impact, and of ball speed after impact (proportional to distance), showed errors < or = 0.5% of interval duration. The variability in ball impacts was tested by measuring time and direction deviations during 50 impacts on the same ball. The mean duration (+/- s) after ball impact in the test interval (1.16 m long) was 206 (0.8) ms and the standard deviation in the perpendicular spreading of the balls in relation to the direction of the test interval was 0.005 m. A test-retest of one putter on two consecutive days after remounting of the putter on the test apparatus showed less than 1% difference in distance deviation. We conclude that the test apparatus enables a precise recording of distance and direction deviation in golf putters as well as comparisons between different putters. The apparatus and set-up can be used in the laboratory as well as outdoors on the putting green.

  9. Use of industrial byproducts to filter phosphorus and pesticides in golf green drainage water.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sheela G; King, Kevin W; Moore, James F; Levison, Phil; McDonald, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Golf courses are vulnerable to phosphate (PO) and pesticide loss by infiltration of the sandy, porous grass rooting media used and through subsurface tile drainage. In this study, an effort was made to remove PO, chlorothalonil, mefenoxam, and propiconazole in a golf green's drainage water with a filter blend comprised of industrial byproducts, including granulated blast furnace slag, cement kiln dust, silica sand, coconut shell-activated carbon, and zeolite. To test this filter media, two 6-h storm events were simulated by repeat irrigation of the golf green after PO and pesticide application. Drainage flows ranged from 0.0034 to 0.6433 L s throughout the course of the simulations. A significant decrease in the chlorothalonil load for the experimental run (with filter media) was observed compared with the control (without filter media) ( < 0.05). In general, percent reductions in chlorothalonil were very high (>80%) near peak flows. In contrast, filter media was not effective in removing PO, mefenoxam, or propiconazole ( > 0.05). Instead, it appears that the filter blend added PO to the effluent above flow rates of 0.037 L s. Overall, flow rate, the amount of filter media used, and contaminant properties may have influenced the filter media's ability to remove contaminants. More research is needed to determine the optimal blend and configuration for the filter media to remove significant amounts of all contaminants investigated.

  10. Numerical study on the aerodynamics of a golf ball and its comparison with a smooth sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Tsubokura, Makoto; Tsunoda, Masaya

    2014-11-01

    The present study has numerically investigated the flow over a golf ball and a smooth sphere by conducting large-eddy simulation (LES) using hundreds of millions of unstructured elements. Simulations were conducted at various Reynolds numbers ranging from the subcritical to the supercritical regimes. Special attention was paid to the phenomenon of drag crisis as well as the effect of surface roughness on the drag crisis. The simulation result shows that the surface roughness introduced by the dimples of the golf ball causes a local instability of the flow around the ball and subsequently leads to a momentum transfer in the near-wall region inside the dimples. The flow with high momentum in the near-wall region travels further downstream, which consequently results in the drag crisis occurring at a relatively lower Reynolds number compared with that of the smooth sphere. Moreover, the Magnus effect resulting from the rotating motion of a sphere was also one of the main concerns in this study. The simulation result shows that lift forces are imposed on both the rotating smooth sphere and rotating golf ball. For most cases the lift force points to the positive direction, however, the negative lift force appears also under certain conditions.

  11. Effects of a coastal golf complex on water quality, periphyton, and seagrass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, M.A.; Boustany, R.G.; Dantin, D.D.; Quarles, R.L.; Moore, J.C.; Stanley, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide baseline information on the effects of a golf course complex on water quality, colonized periphyton, and seagrass meadows in adjacent freshwater, near-coastal, and wetland areas. The chemical and biological impacts of the recreational facility, which uses reclaimed municipal wastewater for irrigation, were limited usually to near-field areas and decreased seaward during the 2-year study. Concentrations of chromium, copper, and organochlorine pesticides were below detection in surface water, whereas mercury, lead, arsenic, and atrazine commonly occurred at all locations. Only mercury and lead exceeded water quality criteria. Concentrations of nutrients and chlorophyll a were greater in fairway ponds and some adjacent coastal areas relative to reference locations and Florida estuaries. Periphyton ash free dry weight and pigment concentrations statistically differed but not between reference and non-reference coastal areas. Biomass of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) was approximately 43% less in a meadow located adjacent to the golf complex (P < 0.05). The results of the study suggest that the effects of coastal golf courses on water quality may be primarily localized and limited to peripheral near-coastal areas. However, this preliminary conclusion needs additional supporting data. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  12. Examination of the suitability of collecting in event cognitive processes using Think Aloud protocol in golf.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Amy E; Taylor, Jamie A; Polman, Remco C J

    2015-01-01

    Two studies examined the use of Think Aloud (TA) protocol as a means for collecting data of cognitive processes during performance in golf. In Study 1, TA was employed to examine if different verbalisation (Level 2 or Level 3 TA) instructions influence performance of high and low skilled golfers. Participants performed 30 putts using TA at either Levels 2, 3, or no verbalization condition. Although Level 3 verbalization produced a higher volume of verbal data than Level 2, TA at either Level 2 or 3 did not impair putting performance compared to no verbalization. Study 2 examined the congruence between data collected via TA at Level 3 and cued retrospective recall of cognitive processes during golf performance. Experienced golfers performed six holes of golf whilst engaging in Level 3 TA. After performance, three semi-structured retrospective interviews were conducted (10 min after performance, 24 h after performance and 48 h after performance). A comparison of the themes identified large discrepancies between the information reported during TA and at interview, with only 38-41% similarity in variables reported to influence decision making on each hole. Both studies suggest TA is a valuable method for recording cognitive processes of individuals during task performance. TA provides richer verbal data regarding decisions than cued retrospective recall, and TA does not negatively impact performance.

  13. Golf-course and funnel energy landscapes: Protein folding concepts in martensites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankaraiah, N.

    2017-06-01

    We use protein folding energy landscape concepts such as golf course and funnel to study re-equilibration in athermal martensites under systematic temperature quench Monte Carlo simulations. On quenching below a transition temperature, the seeded high-symmetry parent-phase austenite that converts to the low-symmetry product-phase martensite, through autocatalytic twinning or elastic photocopying, has both rapid conversions and incubation delays in the temperature-time-transformation phase diagram. We find the rapid (incubation delays) conversions at low (high) temperatures arises from the presence of large (small) size of golf-course edge that has the funnel inside for negative energy states. In the incubating state, the strain structure factor enters into the Brillouin-zone golf course through searches for finite transitional pathways which close off at the transition temperature with Vogel-Fulcher divergences that are insensitive to Hamiltonian energy scales and log-normal distributions, as signatures of dominant entropy barriers. The crossing of the entropy barrier is identified through energy occupancy distributions, Monte Carlo acceptance fractions, heat emission, and internal work.

  14. Effect of environmental characteristics on Pythium and Mesocriconema spp. in golf course greens in Alabama.

    PubMed

    Allen, T W; Han, D Y; Bowen, K L

    2005-04-01

    The role the environment has on populations of Pythium and Mesocriconema spp. was investigated at 5 golf course locations in east central Alabama. Every 4 to 5 weeks soil samples were collected from 3 golf greens on each of the 5 golf courses. Environmental data, including air and soil temperature, pH and relative humidity, were also collected. Dilution plating and a combined sieving and sugar flotation procedure were conducted to determine the populations of Pythium and Mesocriconema spp. for each month. Isolates of Pythium from 4 months were also identified. Pythium spp. populations increased as soil temperature and ambient air temperature prior to sampling decreased (P < 0.05). Pythium spp. populations were highest in the winter and lowest in the spring. At some locations, populations of Mesocriconema spp. increased as soil acidity and populations of Pythium spp. decreased (P < 0.05) and as ambient air temperature prior to sampling increased (P < 0.05). Eight species of Pythium were isolated from 4 months, with Pythium rostratum being the most commonly isolated. Results suggest that Pythium and Mesocriconema spp. prefer different soil environments.

  15. Examination of the suitability of collecting in event cognitive processes using Think Aloud protocol in golf

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Amy E.; Taylor, Jamie A.; Polman, Remco C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Two studies examined the use of Think Aloud (TA) protocol as a means for collecting data of cognitive processes during performance in golf. In Study 1, TA was employed to examine if different verbalisation (Level 2 or Level 3 TA) instructions influence performance of high and low skilled golfers. Participants performed 30 putts using TA at either Levels 2, 3, or no verbalization condition. Although Level 3 verbalization produced a higher volume of verbal data than Level 2, TA at either Level 2 or 3 did not impair putting performance compared to no verbalization. Study 2 examined the congruence between data collected via TA at Level 3 and cued retrospective recall of cognitive processes during golf performance. Experienced golfers performed six holes of golf whilst engaging in Level 3 TA. After performance, three semi-structured retrospective interviews were conducted (10 min after performance, 24 h after performance and 48 h after performance). A comparison of the themes identified large discrepancies between the information reported during TA and at interview, with only 38–41% similarity in variables reported to influence decision making on each hole. Both studies suggest TA is a valuable method for recording cognitive processes of individuals during task performance. TA provides richer verbal data regarding decisions than cued retrospective recall, and TA does not negatively impact performance. PMID:26284007

  16. Sediment-bound trace metals in Golfe-Juan Bay, northwestern Mediterranean: Distribution, availability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tiquio, Ma Gregoria Joanne; Hurel, Charlotte; Marmier, Nicolas; Taneez, Mehwish; Andral, Bruno; Jordan, Norbert; Francour, Patrice

    2017-05-15

    The concentration, potential mobility, cation exchange capacity and toxicity of eight sediment-bound metals in Golfe-Juan Bay, France were examined. Results revealed significant spatial gradient of metal contamination along Golfe-Juan coast. The distribution and concentration of the metals appear to be influenced by the geochemical properties of the sediment, proximity to anthropogenic sources and general water circulation in the bay. The portion of trace metals found in the exchangeable, carbonate, oxidizable and reducible fractions of the sediment constitute 31%-58% of the total sediment-bound trace metal content, suggesting significant potential for remobilization of metals into the water column. Pb and Ni content of the sediment exceed the limits of the French marine sediment quality. Whole sediment extracts showed acute toxicity to marine rotifers. This study concludes that monitoring and management of sediment-bound trace metals in Golfe-Juan Bay are important so as not to underestimate their availability and risk to the marine ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of 3D kinematics concerning three different clubs in golf swing.

    PubMed

    Egret, C I; Vincent, O; Weber, J; Dujardin, F H; Chollet, D

    2003-08-01

    Although many professionals have produced books or videotapes which offer a novel approach to the game, a review of the scientific literature reports limited research evaluating the actual biomechanics of the golf swing in comparison with other sports. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of kinematic pattern in golf swing using three different clubs: driver, five-iron, pitching-wedge. These three golf clubs have been chosen for their available range of ball flight. The measures of kinematic data during swing were established with the optoelectronic system VICON (Oxford's Metrics, Oxford, UK) with five cameras operating at 50 frames per second. Clubhead speed was measured using a swing made detector (Bell-Tronics, Ltd, Covington, USA). Seven right-handed male golfers with a high level of skill participated in the study. The results showed that there was an identical timing (movement time and proportion for each phase of the swing) between the three clubs tested, but the kinematics and the clubhead speed were different depending on the three different clubs used.

  18. Distribution and adult activity of Popillia quadriguttata (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) on golf courses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woon; Choo, Ho Yul; Smitley, David R; Lee, Sang Myeong; Shin, Hong Kyun; Kaya, Harry K; Park, Chung Gyoo; Park, Jong Kyun

    2007-02-01

    Japanese beetle traps baited with the Popillia japonica Newman (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) pheromone lure and a eugenol feeding attractant were placed at five golf courses in Korea to determine how well they work for detecting activity of a closely related species, Popillia quadriguttata (F.) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), a turf pest in Korea. The traps also were used to determine the time of day and time of year that P. quadriguttata is most active. Nineteen scarab species of 13 genera were attracted to the Japanese beetle traps with P. quadriguttata clearly being the most abundant (383 beetles per trap), followed by Adoretus tenuimaculatus Waterhouse (10 per trap), Popilliaflavosellata Fairmaire (seven per trap), Exomala orientalis Waterhouse (four per trap), and Maladera japonica (two per trap). Other scarab species were trapped at a rate of <1.0 per trap. Popillia quadriguttata adults were active over a 5-wk period in late June and early July. At Yongwon Golf Club in 2002, peak adult activity was during the last week of June in visual counts and approximately 1 wk later in the Japanese beetle traps. In Korea, P. quadriguttata adults are most active between 12:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. This information should be helpful to golf course superintendents in Korea and to entomologists interested in finding natural enemies of P. quadriguttata to evaluate as potential biocontrol organisms for the very closely related species, the Japanese beetle.

  19. The stroke has only a minor influence on direction consistency in golf putting among elite players.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jon; Smith, Gerald; Nilsson, Johnny

    2008-02-01

    In the golf instructional literature, the putting stroke is typically given higher priority than green reading and aiming. The main purpose of this study was to assess the importance of the putting stroke for direction consistency in golf putting. Kinematic stroke parameters were recorded from 71 elite golf players (mean handicap = 1.8, s = 4.2) on 1301 putts from about 4 m. Of the different factors deciding stroke direction consistency, face angle was found to be the most important (80%), followed by putter path (17%) and impact point (3%). This suggests that improvements in consistency of putter path and impact point will have very little effect on overall putting direction consistency and should not be prioritized in the training of elite players. In addition, mean stroke direction variability for an elite player (European Tour) was found to be 0.39 degrees, which is good enough to hole about 95% of all 4-m putts. In practice, however, top professionals in tournaments only hole about 17% of 4-m putts. We conclude that the putting stroke of elite golfers has a relatively minor influence on direction consistency.

  20. Waste minimization assessment for a manufacturer of baseball bats and golf clubs. Environmental research brief

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, M.; Kirsch, F.W.; Maginn, J.C.

    1993-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Center (WMAC) at the University of Louisville performed an assessment at a plant manufacturing baseball bats and golf clubs -- approximately 1,500,000 bats/yr and 550,000 golf clubs/yr. To make the bats, wood billets are oven-dried and machined to a standard dimension. After sanding they are branded and finished. The golf clubs are made by finishing and assembling purchased heads and shafts. The team's report detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that the most waste, other than rinse water discharged to the publicly owned treatment works (POTW) and wood turnings which are sold, consists of scrap cardboard and paper from the shop and offices, and that the greatest savings, including new income, could be obtained by segregating the cardboard and paper wastes for sale to a local recycler.

  1. Comparison between simultaneous GOLF and MDI observations in search of low frequency solar oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henney, Carl John

    One of the mission objectives of both the Global Oscillations at Low Frequency (GOLF) and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instruments aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) is the detection of new low frequency globally coherent solar oscillation modes. After more than two years of nearly continuous observing by both instruments, the clear detection of modes below 1200 μHz has still proven to be elusive. The search for new modes is aided here by combining the high duty cycle of GOLF with the spatial resolution and various data products of MDI. By combining the two data sets, a signal enhancement is anticipated since both instruments provide a low noise data stream and their sources of solar and instrumental noise are expected to be different from each other. Presented here is a comparison between the observed GOLF signal and a selection of spatially masked MDI full-disk signals for a 759 day period from May 25, 1996 through June 22, 1998. The signal-to-background ratio is compared between the various signals for low degree (l <= 3) and low frequency (<2000 μHz) p-modes. It was found that signals from both MDI and GOLF are beneficial for detecting these p-modes. Cross-analysis between GOLF and MDI signals is done to enhance the ability to detect low frequency solar oscillations. Using cross-amplitude and averaged power spectra, an unique list of low degree modes is presented here, along with three new low frequency acoustic mode candidates. Finally, the effects of early main sequence cometary mass accretion with heavy-element diffusion on the solar interior are investigated. For solar models with element diffusion, the addition of mass accretion with a rate suggested by observations of other stars has a negligible effect on the predicted p-mode frequencies for the cases investigated here. The predicted g-mode frequencies exhibit a slight shift of approximately 0.1 μHz with the addition of mass accretion. Compared to previous work, the squared

  2. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT WARM-UP PROGRAMS ON GOLF PERFORMANCE IN ELITE MALE GOLFERS

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Background: The physical demands required of the body to execute a shot in golf are enormous. Current evidence suggests that warm-up involving static stretching is detrimental to immediate performance in golf as opposed to active dynamic stretching. However the effect of resistance exercises during warm-up before golf on immediate performance is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the effects of three different warm-up programs on immediate golf performance. Methods: Fifteen elite male golfers completed three different warm-up programs over three sessions on non-consecutive days. After each warm-up program each participant hit ten maximal drives with the ball flight and swing analyzed with Flightscope® to record maximum club head speed (MCHS), maximal driving distance (MDD), driving accuracy (DA), smash factor (SF) and consistent ball strike (CBS). Results: Repeated measures ANOVA tests showed statistically significant difference within 3 of the 5 factors of performance (MDD, CBS and SF). Subsequently, a paired t-test then showed statistically significant (p<0.05) improvements occurred in each of these three factors in the group performing a combined active dynamic and functional resistance (FR) warm-up as opposed to either the active dynamic (AD) warm-up or the combined AD with weights warm-up (WT). There were no statistically significant differences observed between the AD warm-up and the WT warm-up for any of the five performance factors and no statistical significant difference between any of the warm-ups for maximum clubhead speed (MCHS) and driving accuracy (DA). Conclusion: Performing a combined AD and FR warm up with Theraband® leads to significant increase in immediate performance of certain factors of the golf drive compared to performing an AD warm-up by itself or a combined AD with WT warm-up. No significant difference was observed between the three warm-up groups when looking at immediate effect on driving accuracy or maximum

  3. Integration of Ground Penetrating Radar with Real Time Kinematic - Global Positioning System Receivers for Efficient Mapping of Drainage Pipe Systems Beneath Golf Course Greens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The U.S. alone has over 16,000 golf course facilities. The upkeep of these facilities requires continual maintenance and occasional remodeling. The superintendents and architects responsible for golf course maintenance and remodeling efforts need non-destructive tools for obtaining shallow subsurfac...

  4. Occurrence of Meloidogyne fallax in North America, and molecular characterization of M. fallax and M. minor from U.S. golf course greens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are known to have significant presence on turf grass in golf course greens, particularly in the western United States. Nematodes isolated from a golf course in King Co., Washington were identified as Meloidogyne minor based on analysis of the...

  5. The effect of biological movement variability on the performance of the golf swing in high- and low-handicapped players.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth J; Keogh, Justin W L; Hume, Patria A; Maulder, Peter S; Nortje, Jacques; Marnewick, Michel

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of neuromotor noise on golf swing performance in high- and low-handicap players. Selected two-dimensional kinematic measures of 20 male golfers (n=10 per high- or low-handicap group) performing 10 golf swings with a 5-iron club was obtained through video analysis. Neuromotor noise was calculated by deducting the standard error of the measurement from the coefficient of variation obtained from intra-individual analysis. Statistical methods included linear regression analysis and one-way analysis of variance using SPSS. Absolute invariance in the key technical positions (e.g., at the top of the backswing) of the golf swing appears to be a more favorable technique for skilled performance.

  6. Golf players exhibit changes to grip speed parameters during club release in response to changes in club stiffness.

    PubMed

    Osis, Sean T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2012-02-01

    The influence of golf club stiffness on driving performance is currently unclear, and it is possible that this ambiguity is due in part to golfer adaptation to equipment. The purpose of the current study was to elucidate mechanisms of adaptation to club stiffness, during the golf swing, by employing tendon vibration to distort proprioceptive feedback. Vibration (∼50 Hz, ∼1 mm amplitude) was applied to the upper extremities of 24 golfers using DC motors with eccentric weights. Golfers hit golf balls in a laboratory setting using three clubs of varying shaft stiffness, and club kinematics were recorded using high speed (180 Hz) digital cameras. The results demonstrated significant slowing of the club grip during club release for a high-stiffness shaft with vibration. This suggests that, when proprioceptive feedback is available, players adapt to changes in club stiffness by modifying the release dynamics of the club late in the downswing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of nine holes of simulated golf and orthotic intervention on balance and proprioception in experienced golfers.

    PubMed

    Stude, D E; Brink, D K

    1997-01-01

    To investigate effects of orthotic intervention on balance and proprioception among a group of experienced golfers. Northwestern College of Chiropractic. Twelve experienced golfers were included in the study. Balance and proprioception were measured before and after nine holes of simulated golf using piezo-electric film sensor platforms. Subjects wore custom-made, flexible orthotics daily for 6 wk and were then retested using the same objective measurement parameters. Primary outcome measures included stabilization index and stabilization time. Statistical trends suggest that the custom-made, flexible orthotics used in this study were effective in enhancing balance and proprioception and may have reduced the relative effects of fatigue associated with nine holes of simulated golf. Although individual differences were anticipated, data trends suggest that nine holes of simulated golf promotes changes in standing balance and proprioception and that 6 wk of wearing these custom-made, flexible orthotics has a positive influence in promoting balance and proprioceptive symmetry.

  8. MDI and GOLF simulation and intercomparison via the Mt. Wilson 150-foot tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Scott Edward

    A 24 channel analyzer (Evans and Ulrich, 1995) was designed and built for the Mt. Wilson 150-foot solar tower. This instrument has 4 channels dedicated to the continuance of the existing dataset for the CrII and FeI solar lines. Additionally, the instrument employs 10 channels each for NaD1 and NiI. The latter two lines are those studied by the SOHO instruments GOLF and MDI respectively. Ten-point line profiles are taken for both Ni and NaD1 and analyzed using computer simulations of both the MDI and GOLF instruments. Since the data are taken simultaneously and for a resolved sun, the signal derived from the MDI simulation can be compared on a pixel by pixel basis to the GOLF single wing signal. A correlation is found between MDI Id and GOLF single wing intensity. By removing the Id contribution to the GOLF signal, we hope to achieve a purer velocity signal in GOLF and hence raise the signal to noise ratio. The roll angle of MDI has not been accurately measured due to the failure of SOHO's gyros. At present, a single guide star is being used for spacecraft pointing and the error in roll angle is unkown. Previously (Ulrich and Henney, 1994) the MDI roll angle was estimated by comparing magnetograms from MDI and Mt. Wilson. Observations derived from the new multichannel system at Mt. Wilson can measure the roll angle directly by comparing MDI proxy images to a Mt. Wilson proxy derived from the MDI data. The 38 roll angle measurements spanning selected time frames covering nearly the entire SOHO mission average -.32 degrees. This suggests that a steady, equator-crossing flow of ~-10 m/s would exist due to the error in MDI coordinates. A Southward, equator-crossing flow has been observed (Giles, et al. 1997) whose magnitude is roughly -7 m/s. Thus some or even all of such a flow may be explainable by the MDI roll angle. Sources of error in the Mt. Wilson determination of the MDI roll angle are discussed and found to be relatively small (~3-4 are minutes) when estimated

  9. Report of ground water monitoring for expansion of the golf course, Salt Lake City, Utah, vitro processing site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    To determine the potential impacts of the proposed golf course expansion on the south side of the Vitro site, ground water data from the UMTRA Vitro processing site were evaluated in response to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office request. Golf in the Round, Inc., has proposed an expansion of the present driving range to include a 9-hole golf course on the UMTRA Vitro processing site, which is owned by the Central Valley Water Reclamation Facility (CVWRF). An expanded golf course would increase irrigation and increase the amount of water that could infiltrate the soil, recharging the unconfined aquifer. Increased water levels in the aquifer could alter the ground water flow regime; contaminants in the shallow ground water could then migrate off the site or discharge to surface water in the area. Dewatering of the unconfined aquifer on CVWRF property could also impact site contaminant migration; a significant amount of ground water extraction at CVWRF could reduce the amount of contaminant migration off the site. Since 1978, data have been collected at the site to determine the distribution of tailings materials (removed from the site from 1985 to 1987) and to characterize the presence and migration of contaminants in sediments, soils, surface water, and ground water at the former Vitro processing site. Available data suggest that irrigating an expanded golf course may cause contamination to spread more rapidly within the unconfined aquifer. The public is not at risk from current Vitro processing site activities, nor is risk expected due to golf course expansion. However, ecological risk could increase with increased surface water contamination and the development of ground water seeps.

  10. Immediate Effects of Sports Taping Applied on the Lead Knee of Low- and High-Handicapped Golfers During Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Gyu; Kim, Eun-Kuk; Park, Jong-Chul

    2017-04-01

    Kim, T-G, Kim, E-K, and Park, J-C. Immediate effects of sports taping applied on the lead knee of low- and high-handicapped golfers during golf swing. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 981-989, 2017-Elite golf athletes suffer from various musculoskeletal injuries due to repeated golf swings. Repetitive varus moment during golf swing has been suggested as a possible cause of injuries to the lead knee. The aim of this study was to objectively and quantitatively evaluate the immediate effects of sports taping on the lead knee of elite golfers to restrict varus moment. Thirty-one elite golfers were assigned to the low- (LHG, n = 15) or high-handicapped group (HHG, n = 16). Using 3-dimensional motion analysis, the lead knee position on the frontal plane with and without rigid taping (RT), elastic taping (ET), and placebo taping was identified in 4 separate phases by the 5 events of golf swing as follows: the peak of the backswing (E1), parallel to the ground during downswing (E2), ball impact (E3), parallel to the ground during follow-through (E4), and finish (E5). The LHG when using a driver club had decreased movement toward knee varus with RT and ET than that without it from E1 to E2 (p = 0.001). The LHG when using a 5-iron club decreased movement toward knee varus with RT than that without it from E1 to E2 (p = 0.006) and from E2 to E3 (p = 0.019). The HHG when using a driver club had decreased movement toward knee varus with RT from E1 to E2 (p = 0.014). Sports taping may be helpful for elite golfers in terms of reducing varus moment of the lead knee during the downswing and be useful for the development of preventive strategies for golf-related knee injuries.

  11. Detecting the transport of toxic pesticides from golf courses into watersheds in the Precambrian Shield region of Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Tracy L; Dillon, Peter J; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2008-04-01

    Golf courses impact the environment through alterations to habitat and through the release of nutrients and pesticides. The Precambrian Shield region of central Ontario, Canada, which is a major recreational area, is especially susceptible to the impacts of golf courses as a result of the geology and hydrology of the region. In a monitoring program at two golf courses in the Muskoka region conducted during the spring, summer, and fall of 2002, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed into streams that drain the golf courses. The extracts from the SPMDs were tested for toxicity using bioassays with early life stages of an aquarium fish, the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). Toxicity was assessed using a scoring system developed for the present study. The bioassays with medaka indicated that toxicity was highest in extracts from SPMDs deployed during the spring and the fall. The peaks in toxicity for the SPMDs deployed at the two golf courses corresponded with the presence in the SPMD extracts of pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) at concentrations up to 334 ng/SPMD. Quintozene is the turfgrass fungicide in which PCNB is the active ingredient. Pentachlorothioanisole, an anaerobic degradation product of PCNB, also was detected in the SPMDs deployed during the spring. Extracts prepared from SPMDs with high toxicity contained residues of a surfactant used in pesticide formulations, nonylphenol, at concentrations up to approximately 20 microg/SPMD. Overall, these data indicate that some pesticides applied to golf courses in the Precambrian Shield of central Ontario may have the potential to cause toxic impacts to aquatic organisms in adjacent watersheds.

  12. Evaluating management-induced soil salinization in golf courses in semi-arid landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J.; Udeigwe, T. K.; Weindorf, D. C.; Kandakji, T.; Gautam, P.; Mahmoud, M. M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific information on land management practices are often desired to make better assertions of their environmental impacts. A study was conducted in Lubbock, TX, in the Southern High Plains of the United States, an area characterized by semi-arid climatic conditions, to (1) examine the potential management-induced alteration in soil salinity indicators in golf course facilities and (2) develop predictive relationships for a more rapid soil salinity examination within these urban landscape soils using findings from portable x-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer. Soil samples were collected from the managed (well irrigated) and non-managed (non irrigated) areas of seven golf course facilities at 0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm depths, and analyzed for a suite of chemical properties. Among the extractable cations, sodium (Na) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the managed zones of all the golf facilities. Soil electrical conductivity (EC), exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), parameters often used in characterizing soil salinity and sodicity, were in most part significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the managed areas. Water quality report collected over a 22-year period (1991-2013, all years not available) indicated a gradual increase in pH, EC, SAR, total alkalinity, and extractable ions, thus, supporting the former findings. Findings from the PXRF suggested possible differences in chemical species and sources that contribute to salinity between the managed and non-managed zones. PXRF quantified Cl and S, and to a lesser extent Ca, individually and collectively explained 23-85% of the variability associated with soil salinity at these facilities.

  13. Effects of physical randomness training on virtual and laboratory golf putting performance in novices.

    PubMed

    Pataky, T C; Lamb, P F

    2017-10-09

    External randomness exists in all sports but is perhaps most obvious in golf putting where robotic putters sink only 80% of 5 m putts due to unpredictable ball-green dynamics. The purpose of this study was to test whether physical randomness training can improve putting performance in novices. A virtual random-physics golf-putting game was developed based on controlled ball-roll data. Thirty-two subjects were assigned a unique randomness gain (RG) ranging from 0.1 to 2.0-times real-world randomness. Putter face kinematics were measured in 5 m laboratory putts before and after five days of virtual training. Performance was quantified using putt success rate and "miss-adjustment correlation" (MAC), the correlation between left-right miss magnitude and subsequent right-left kinematic adjustments. Results showed no RG-success correlation (r = -0.066, p = 0.719) but mildly stronger correlations with MAC for face angle (r = -0.168, p = 0.358) and clubhead path (r = -0.302, p = 0.093). The strongest RG-MAC correlation was observed during virtual training (r = -0.692, p < 0.001). These results suggest that subjects quickly adapt to physical randomness in virtual training, and also that this learning may weakly transfer to real golf putting kinematics. Adaptation to external physical randomness during virtual training may therefore help golfers adapt to external randomness in real-world environments.

  14. Evaluating management-induced soil salinization in golf courses in semi-arid landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J.; Udeigwe, T. K.; Weindorf, D. C.; Kandakji, T.; Gautam, P.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Site-specific information on land management practices are often desired to make better assessments of their environmental impacts. A study was conducted in Lubbock, Texas, in the Southern High Plains of the United States, an area characterized by semi-arid climatic conditions, to (1) examine the potential management-induced alterations in soil salinity indicators in golf course facilities and (2) develop predictive relationships for a more rapid soil salinity examination within these urban landscape soils using findings from a portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer. Soil samples were collected from managed (well irrigated) and non-managed (non-irrigated) areas of seven golf course facilities at 0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm depths and analyzed for a suite of chemical properties. Among the extractable cations, sodium (Na) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the managed zones of all the golf facilities. Soil electrical conductivity (EC), exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), parameters often used in characterizing soil salinity and sodicity, were for the most part significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the managed areas. Water quality reports collected over a 22-year period (1991-2013, all years not available) indicated a gradual increase in pH, EC, SAR, total alkalinity, and extractable ions, thus supporting the former findings. Findings from the PXRF suggested possible differences in chemical species and sources that contribute to salinity between the managed and non-managed zones. PXRF-quantified Cl and S, and to a lesser extent Ca, individually and collectively explained 23-85% of the variability associated with soil salinity at these facilities.

  15. Effect of acute mild dehydration on cognitive-motor performance in golf.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark F; Newell, Alex J; Baker, Mistrelle R

    2012-11-01

    Whether mild dehydration (-1 to 3% body mass change [ΔBM]) impairs neurophysiological function during sport-specific cognitive-motor performance has yet to be fully elucidated. To investigate this within a golfing context, 7 low-handicap players (age: 21 ± 1.1 years; mass: 76.1 ± 11.8 kg; stature: 1.77 ± 0.07 m; handicap: 3.0 ± 1.2) completed a golf-specific motor and cognitive performance task in a euhydrated condition (EC) and dehydrated condition (DC) (randomized counterbalanced design; 7-day interval). Dehydration was controlled using a previously effective 12-hour fluid restriction, monitored through ΔBM and urine color assessment (UCOL). Mild dehydration reduced the mean BM by 1.5 ± 0.5% (p = 0.01), with UCOL increasing from 2 (EC) to 4 (DC) (p = 0.02). Mild dehydration significantly impaired motor performance, expressed as shot distance (114.6 vs. 128.6 m; p < 0.001) and off-target accuracy (7.9 vs. 4.1 m; p = 0.001). Cognitive performance, expressed as the mean error in distance judgment to target increased from 4.1 ± 3.0 m (EC) to 8.8 ± 4.7 m (DC) (p < 0.001). The findings support those of previous research that indicates mild dehydration (-1 to 2% ΔBM) significantly impairs cognitive-motor task performance. This study is the first to show that mild dehydration can impair distance, accuracy, and distance judgment during golf performance.

  16. Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome with Nasal Positive Airway Pressure Improves Golf Performance

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Marc L.; Friedman, Neil S.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with impairment of cognitive function, and improvement is often noted with treatment. Golf is a sport that requires a range of cognitive skills. We evaluated the impact of nasal positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy on the handicap index (HI) of golfers with OSAS. Methods: Golfers underwent a nocturnal polysomnogram (NPSG) to determine whether they had significant OSAS (respiratory disturbance index > 15). Twelve subjects with a positive NPSG were treated with PAP. HI, an Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and sleep questionnaire (SQ) were submitted upon study entry. After 20 rounds of golf on PAP treatment, the HI was recalculated, and the questionnaires were repeated. A matched control group composed of non-OSAS subjects was studied to assess the impact of the study construct on HI, ESS, and SQ. Statistical comparisons between pre- and post-PAP treatment were calculated. Results: The control subjects demonstrated no significant change in HI, ESS, or SQ during this study, while the OSAS group demonstrated a significant drop in average HI (11.3%, p = 0.01), ESS, (p = 0.01), and SQ (p = 0.003). Among the more skilled golfers (defined as HI ≤ 12), the average HI dropped by an even greater degree (31.5%). Average utilization of PAP was 91.4% based on data card reporting. Conclusions: Treatment of OSAS with PAP enhanced performance in golfers with this condition. Treatment adherence was unusually high in this study. Non-medical performance improvement may be a strong motivator for selected subjects with OSAS to seek treatment and maximize adherence. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1243. Citation: Benton ML; Friedman NS. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with nasal positive airway pressure improves golf performance. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(12):1237-1242. PMID:24340283

  17. Effect of mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance on kinematic pattern in golf swing.

    PubMed

    Egret, C; Leroy, D; Loret, A; Chollet, D; Weber, J

    2002-02-01

    Experience has shown that repositioning the mandible may have an influence on the athletic performance. Many athletes with or without occlusal problems are now using mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance (MORA) supposedly to optimize their performance. In golf, the players do not have any direct opponent and they have different clubs to reach various distances. Therefore, an automatic swing permits the uncertainty of the movement to be restricted. The aim of this study was to analyze if the use of the MORA could have an effect on the stability of the kinematic pattern in golf swing, connected to the capacity of the golfers to reproduce their swing from kinematic perspective. The measures of kinematic data have been established with the optoelectronic system VICON (Oxford's Metrix, Oxford, UK) with five cameras operating at 50 frames per second. Measurements of the speed of the ball at impact were obtained with a radar (Bridgestone HD.01, Science eye, USA). Six professional (current handicap ranging from 0 to 4) right-handed golfers participated in the study. Six MORA were made and adjusted to fit each player. Each golfer performed five swings without mouthpiece and five with the MORA. The results of this study show that there was no difference related to the MORA on kinematic pattern of the golf swing. Moreover, there were significant differences concerning the ball speed at the impact, among the two test conditions, with or without the appliance (p < 0.03). The percentage of variability indicates that the speed with MORA was more regular than the speed without the appliance.

  18. Peer Effects in the Workplace: Evidence from Random Groupings in Professional Golf Tournaments

    PubMed Central

    Guryan, Jonathan; Kroft, Kory; Notowidigdo, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses random assignment in professional golf tournaments to test for peer effects in the workplace. We find no evidence that playing partners’ ability affects performance, contrary to recent evidence on peer effects in the workplace from laboratory experiments, grocery scanners, and soft-fruit pickers. In our preferred specification we can rule out peer effects larger than 0.043 strokes for a one stroke increase in playing partners’ ability. Our results complement existing studies on workplace peer effects and are useful in explaining how social effects vary across labor markets, across individuals, and with the form of incentives faced. PMID:20454555

  19. Towards solar activity maximum 24 as seen by GOLF and VIRGO/SPM instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, R. A.; Salabert, D.; Mathur, S.; Régulo, C.; Ballot, J.; Davies, G. R.; Jiménez, A.; Simoniello, R.

    2013-06-01

    All p-mode parameters vary with time as a response to the changes induced by the cyclic behavior of solar magnetic activity. After the unusual long solar-activity minimum between cycles 23 and 24 -where the p-mode parameters have shown a different behavior than the surface magnetic proxies- we analyze the temporal variation of low-degree p-mode parameters measured by GOLF (in velocity) and VIRGO (in intensity) Sun-as-a-star instruments on board SoHO. We compare our results with other activity proxies.

  20. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to take a 5–4 victory total,” said Denny Dougherty, one of the team captains for Leidos Biomed and a retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick.

  1. Estimation of Center of Mass Trajectory using Wearable Sensors during Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Bijan; Lee-Eng, Jacqueline; Wrobel, James S; Goebel, Ruben

    2015-06-01

    This study suggests a wearable sensor technology to estimate center of mass (CoM) trajectory during a golf swing. Groups of 3, 4, and 18 participants were recruited, respectively, for the purpose of three validation studies. Study 1 examined the accuracy of the system to estimate a 3D body segment angle compared to a camera-based motion analyzer (Vicon®). Study 2 assessed the accuracy of three simplified CoM trajectory models. Finally, Study 3 assessed the accuracy of the proposed CoM model during multiple golf swings. A relatively high agreement was observed between wearable sensors and the reference (Vicon®) for angle measurement (r > 0.99, random error <1.2° (1.5%) for anterior-posterior; <0.9° (2%) for medial-lateral; and <3.6° (2.5%) for internal-external direction). The two-link model yielded a better agreement with the reference system compared to one-link model (r > 0.93 v. r = 0.52, respectively). On the same note, the proposed two-link model estimated CoM trajectory during golf swing with relatively good accuracy (r > 0.9, A-P random error <1cm (7.7%) and <2cm (10.4%) for M-L). The proposed system appears to accurately quantify the kinematics of CoM trajectory as a surrogate of dynamic postural control during an athlete's movement and its portability, makes it feasible to fit the competitive environment without restricting surface type. Key pointsThis study demonstrates that wearable technology based on inertial sensors are accurate to estimate center of mass trajectory in complex athletic task (e.g., golf swing)This study suggests that two-link model of human body provides optimum tradeoff between accuracy and minimum number of sensor module for estimation of center of mass trajectory in particular during fast movements.Wearable technologies based on inertial sensors are viable option for assessing dynamic postural control in complex task outside of gait laboratory and constraints of cameras, surface, and base of support.

  2. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to take a 5–4 victory total,” said Denny Dougherty, one of the team captains for Leidos Biomed and a retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick.

  3. Estimation of Center of Mass Trajectory using Wearable Sensors during Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Bijan; Lee-Eng, Jacqueline; Wrobel, James S.; Goebel, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    This study suggests a wearable sensor technology to estimate center of mass (CoM) trajectory during a golf swing. Groups of 3, 4, and 18 participants were recruited, respectively, for the purpose of three validation studies. Study 1 examined the accuracy of the system to estimate a 3D body segment angle compared to a camera-based motion analyzer (Vicon®). Study 2 assessed the accuracy of three simplified CoM trajectory models. Finally, Study 3 assessed the accuracy of the proposed CoM model during multiple golf swings. A relatively high agreement was observed between wearable sensors and the reference (Vicon®) for angle measurement (r > 0.99, random error <1.2° (1.5%) for anterior-posterior; <0.9° (2%) for medial-lateral; and <3.6° (2.5%) for internal-external direction). The two-link model yielded a better agreement with the reference system compared to one-link model (r > 0.93 v. r = 0.52, respectively). On the same note, the proposed two-link model estimated CoM trajectory during golf swing with relatively good accuracy (r > 0.9, A-P random error <1cm (7.7%) and <2cm (10.4%) for M-L). The proposed system appears to accurately quantify the kinematics of CoM trajectory as a surrogate of dynamic postural control during an athlete’s movement and its portability, makes it feasible to fit the competitive environment without restricting surface type. Key points This study demonstrates that wearable technology based on inertial sensors are accurate to estimate center of mass trajectory in complex athletic task (e.g., golf swing) This study suggests that two-link model of human body provides optimum tradeoff between accuracy and minimum number of sensor module for estimation of center of mass trajectory in particular during fast movements. Wearable technologies based on inertial sensors are viable option for assessing dynamic postural control in complex task outside of gait laboratory and constraints of cameras, surface, and base of support. PMID:25983585

  4. GOLF: Simulations of the re-emission of the resonance cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumier, P.; Dame, Luc

    1988-12-01

    The re-emission process in the resonance cell of the GOLF (Global Oscillations at Low Frequencies) helioseismometric instrument to be flown on SOHO is analyzed. The cell is filled with a sodium vapor and absorbs selectively in the two sodium lines D1 and D2. The different influence of the physical parameters (cell geometry, temperature) was simulated. The temperature analysis is used to constrain the nominal temperature working point and the required stability, as a function of the operational conditions (orbital velocity variation).

  5. Integrated dynamic policy management methodology and system for strategic environmental assessment of golf course installation policy in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ching-Ho; Liu, Wei-Lin; Liaw, Shu-Liang

    2011-01-15

    Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) focuses primarily on assessing how policies, plans, and programs (PPPs) influence the sustainability of the involved regions. However, the processes of assessing policies and developing management strategies for pollution load and resource use are usually separate in the current SEA system. This study developed a policy management methodology to overcome the defects generated during the above processes. This work first devised a dynamic management framework using the methods of systems thinking, system dynamics, and Managing for Results (MFRs). Furthermore, a driving force-pressure-state-impact-response (DPSIR) indicator system was developed. The golf course installation policy was applied as a case study. Taiwan, counties of Taiwan, and the golf courses within those individual counties were identified as a system, subsystems, and objects, respectively. This study identified an object-linked double-layer framework with multi-stage-option to simultaneously to quantify golf courses in each subsystem and determine ratios of abatement and allocation for pollution load and resource use of each golf course. The DPSIR indicator values for each item of each golf course in each subsystem are calculated based on the options taken in the two decision layers. The summation of indicator values for all items of all golf courses in all subsystems according to various options is defined as the sustainability value of the policy. An optimization model and a system (IDPMS) were developed to obtain the greatest sustainability value of the policy, while golf course quantity, human activity intensity, total quantities of pollution load and resource use are simultaneously obtained. The solution method based on enumeration of multiple bounds for objectives and constraints (EMBOC) was developed for the problem with 1.95 x 10{sup 128} combinations of possible options to solve the optimal solution in ten minutes using a personal computer with 3.0 GHz

  6. Grip pressure distributions and associated variability in golf: a two-club comparison.

    PubMed

    Langlais, Sean M; Broker, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Teaching and playing professionals offer multiple theories concerning the manner in which forces should be applied to the handle of the club during the golf swing. This study extends recent research concerning grip pressures and forces in golf, with the purpose of exploring the similarities and differences between force profiles for a 7-iron and driver swung by proficient golfers. A secondary purpose was to further analyze the way that golfers use grip forces to manipulate the club. Grip forces were measured on eight low handicap golfers (USGA indexes 0 to 7) swinging their own 7-irons and drivers. In total, lead-hand and trail-hand grip forces were isolated as well as anatomically specific forces within the hands. Force profile variability across multiple swings for each golfer and between golfers characterized consistencies and important differences. Correlations between 7-iron and driver force profiles characterized force 'signatures.' The data highlight large fluctuations in grip forces during the swing. Marked differences between participants were observed, involving force magnitudes and phasing. Dominant forces arose primarily from the lead hand, specifically the last three fingers. Force profiles were highly repeatable across swings for a golfer (standard deviations < 7% of total force) and force profile correlations between 7-iron and driver for a golfer were remarkably high (r2 = 0.86). Notably, within swing force variability was greatest during club acceleration, but dramatically decreased at impact.

  7. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P < 0.05), and the resistance duration of the lead knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P < 0.01). The lead knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery.

  8. Recurrence quantification analysis and support vector machines for golf handicap and low back pain EMG classification.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís; Vaz, João Rocha; Castro, Maria António; Serranho, Pedro; Cabri, Jan; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    The quantification of non-linear characteristics of electromyography (EMG) must contain information allowing to discriminate neuromuscular strategies during dynamic skills. There are a lack of studies about muscle coordination under motor constrains during dynamic contractions. In golf, both handicap (Hc) and low back pain (LBP) are the main factors associated with the occurrence of injuries. The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of support vector machines SVM on EMG-based classification to discriminate Hc (low and high handicap) and LBP (with and without LPB) in the main phases of golf swing. For this purpose recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) features of the trunk and the lower limb muscles were used to feed a SVM classifier. Recurrence rate (RR) and the ratio between determinism (DET) and RR showed a high discriminant power. The Hc accuracy for the swing, backswing, and downswing were 94.4±2.7%, 97.1±2.3%, and 95.3±2.6%, respectively. For LBP, the accuracy was 96.9±3.8% for the swing, and 99.7±0.4% in the backswing. External oblique (EO), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST) and rectus femoris (RF) showed high accuracy depending on the laterality within the phase. RQA features and SVM showed a high muscle discriminant capacity within swing phases by Hc and by LBP. Low back pain golfers showed different neuromuscular coordination strategies when compared with asymptomatic.

  9. Electromyographic analysis of lower limb muscles during the golf swing performed with three different clubs.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sérgio; Silva, Luís; Vaz, João Rocha; Castro, Maria António; Reinaldo, Gustavo; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the EMG patterns of select lower limb muscles throughout the golf swing, performed with three different clubs, in non-elite middle-aged players. Fourteen golfers performed eight swings each using, in random order, a pitching wedge, 7-iron and 4-iron. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from lower limb muscles: tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, gastrocnemius medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, rectus femoris and vastus lateralis. Three-dimensional high-speed video analysis was used to determine the golf swing phases. Results showed that, in average handicap golfers, the highest muscle activation levels occurred during the Forward Swing Phase, with the right semitendinosus and the right biceps femoris muscles producing the highest mean activation levels relative to maximal electromyography (70-76% and 68-73% EMG(MAX), respectively). Significant differences between the pitching wedge and the 4-iron club were found in the activation level of the left semitendinosus, right tibialis anterior, right peroneus longus, right vastus medialis, right rectus femuris and right gastrocnemius muscles. The lower limb muscles showed, in most cases and phases, higher mean values of activation on electromyography when golfers performed shots with a 4-iron club.

  10. Quiet eye facilitates sensorimotor preprograming and online control of precision aiming in golf putting.

    PubMed

    Causer, Joe; Hayes, Spencer J; Hooper, James M; Bennett, Simon J

    2017-02-01

    An occlusion protocol was used to elucidate the respective roles of preprograming and online control during the quiet eye period of golf putting. Twenty-one novice golfers completed golf putts to 6-ft and 11-ft targets under full vision or with vision occluded on initiation of the backswing. Radial error (RE) was higher, and quiet eye was longer, when putting to the 11-ft versus 6-ft target, and in the occluded versus full vision condition. Quiet eye durations, as well as preprograming, online and dwell durations, were longer in low-RE compared to high-RE trials. The preprograming component of quiet eye was significantly longer in the occluded vision condition, whereas the online and dwell components were significantly longer in the full vision condition. These findings demonstrate an increase in preprograming when vision is occluded. However, this was not sufficient to overcome the need for online visual control during the quiet eye period. These findings suggest the quiet eye period is composed of preprograming and online control elements; however, online visual control of action is critical to performance.

  11. [Cervical cord infarction associated with unilateral vertebral artery dissection due to golf swing].

    PubMed

    Tokumoto, Kazuki; Ueda, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A-68-year-old man experienced nuchal pain and bilateral shoulder weakness that occurred suddenly after he performed a golf swing. He was conscious. His cranial nerves were normal, but bilateral deltoid and biceps muscle strengths weakened. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed no brain stem infarctions or cervical epidural hematoma. We tentatively diagnosed him with concussion of the spinal cord because of mild recovery of his bilateral upper limb weakness after several hours; he was later discharged. The next day, he suddenly developed serious tetraplegia and was admitted to the emergency department. His breathing was controlled by a respirator as he had expectoration difficulty and respiratory muscle paralysis. A lesion in the cervical cord became apparent on MRI; the right vertebral artery was not detected on magnetic resonance angiography. Cervical MRI showed the intimal flap and a lack of flow void in the right vertebral artery. These findings revealed a right vertebral artery dissection. Cervical cord infarction due to unilateral vertebral artery dissection is rarer than posterior cerebral infarction due to the same pathogenesis; however, some such cases have been reported. We consider the present case to be caused by cervical cord infarction associated with unilateral vertebral artery dissection resulting from golf swing.

  12. Degradation and sorption of the fungicide tebuconazole in soils from golf greens.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Nora; Rosenbom, Annette E; Jensen, Anne M D; Sørensen, Sebastian R

    2016-12-01

    The fungicide tebuconazole (TBZ) is used to repress fungal growth in golf greens and ensure their playability. This study determined the degradation and sorption of TBZ applied as an analytical grade compound, a commercial fungicide formulation or in combination with a surfactant product in thatch and soils below two types of greens (USGA and push-up greens) in 12-cm vertical profiles covered by three different types of turf grass. Only minor TBZ degradation was observed and it was most pronounced in treatments with the commercial fungicide product or in combination with the surfactant compared to the analytical grade compound alone. A tendency for higher TBZ sorption when applied as the formulated product and lowest sorption when applied as a formulated product in combination with the surfactant was observed, with this effect being most distinct on USGA greens. No correlation between occurrence of degradation and soil depth, green type or grass type was observed. Sorption seemed to be the main process governing the leaching risk of TBZ from the greens and a positive correlation to the organic matter content was shown. In light of these findings, organic matter content should be taken into consideration during the construction of golf courses, especially when following USGA guidelines.

  13. Fertilizer source effects on phosphate and nitrate leaching through simulated golf greens.

    PubMed

    Shuman, L M

    2003-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen leached from high-porosity golf greens can adversely affect surface water and groundwater quality. Greenhouse and field lysimeter experiments were carried out to determine the effects of eight fertilizer sources on P and N leaching from simulated golf greens. Phosphorus appeared in the leachate later than nitrate-N, and the highest concentrations were for the soluble 20-20-20 and the 16-25-12 starter fertilizers. The other six sources resulted in lower P concentrations. The soluble 20-20-20 and the 16-25-12 sources each resulted in 43% of the added P eluting in the leachate, whereas the others varied from 15 to 25%. For nitrate-N the lowest cumulative mass was for the controlled-release 13-13-13 and sulfur-coated urea. A higher percentage of applied P than applied N leached from both field and greenhouse lysimeters. However, the amounts of P leached for the field lysimeters were lower than for the greenhouse columns.

  14. Early Improper Motion Detection in Golf Swings Using Wearable Motion Sensors: The First Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a golf swing to detect improper motion in the early phase of the swing. Led by the desire to achieve a consistent shot outcome, a particular golfer would (in multiple trials) prefer to perform completely identical golf swings. In reality, some deviations from the desired motion are always present due to the comprehensive nature of the swing motion. Swing motion deviations that are not detrimental to performance are acceptable. This analysis is conducted using a golfer's leading arm kinematic data, which are obtained from a golfer wearing a motion sensor that is comprised of gyroscopes and accelerometers. Applying the principal component analysis (PCA) to the reference observations of properly performed swings, the PCA components of acceptable swing motion deviations are established. Using these components, the motion deviations in the observations of other swings are examined. Any unacceptable deviations that are detected indicate an improper swing motion. Arbitrarily long observations of an individual player's swing sequences can be included in the analysis. The results obtained for the considered example show an improper swing motion in early phase of the swing, i.e., the first part of the backswing. An early detection method for improper swing motions that is conducted on an individual basis provides assistance for performance improvement. PMID:23752563

  15. Use of piezoelectric dampers for improving the feel of golf clubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Emanuele; Spangler, Ronald L., Jr.; Pandell, Tracy

    1999-06-01

    Several sports are based upon a tool (club, bat, stick) striking an object (ball, puck) across a field of play. Anytime two structures collide, vibration is created by the impact of the two. The impact of the objects excites the structural modes of the tool, creating a vibration that can be felt by the player, especially if the hit is not at a `sweet spot'. Vibration adversely affects both feel and performance. This paper explains how piezoelectric dampers were developed to reduce vibration and improve the feel of ball-impact sporting goods such as golf clubs. The paper describes how the dynamic characteristics of a golf club were calculated, at first in the free-free condition, and then during its operation conditions (the swing of the club, and the impact with the ball). The dynamic characteristics were used to develop a damper that addressed a specific, or multiple, modes of interest. The damper development and testing are detailed in this paper. Both objective laboratory tests and subjective player tests were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the piezoelectric dampers. The results of the tests, along with published medical data on the sensitivity of the human body, were used to draw a correlation between human feel and vibration reduction.

  16. Looking to Learn: The Effects of Visual Guidance on Observational Learning of the Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Claudia C.; Williams, A. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Skilled performers exhibit more efficient gaze patterns than less-skilled counterparts do and they look more frequently at task-relevant regions than at superfluous ones. We examine whether we may guide novices’ gaze towards relevant regions during action observation in order to facilitate their learning of a complex motor skill. In a Pre-test-Post-test examination of changes in their execution of the full golf swing, 21 novices viewed one of three videos at intervention: i) a skilled golfer performing 10 swings (Free Viewing, FV); ii) the same video with transient colour cues superimposed to highlight key features of the setup (Visual Guidance; VG); iii) or a History of Golf video (Control). Participants in the visual guidance group spent significantly more time looking at cued areas than did the other two groups, a phenomenon that persisted after the cues had been removed. Moreover, the visual guidance group improved their swing execution at Post-test and on a Retention test one week later. Our results suggest that visual guidance to cued areas during observational learning of complex motor skills may accelerate acquisition of the skill. PMID:27224057

  17. A parametric study of golf car and personal transport vehicle braking stability and their deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Seluga, Kristopher J; Baker, Lowell L; Ojalvo, Irving U

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes research and parametric analyses of braking effectiveness and directional stability for golf cars, personal transport vehicles (PTVs) and low speed vehicles (LSVs). It is shown that current designs, which employ brakes on only the rear wheels, can lead to rollovers if the brakes are applied while traveling downhill. After summarizing the current state of existing safety standards and brake system designs, both of which appear deficient from a safety perspective, a previously developed dynamic simulation model is used to identify which parameters have the greatest influence on the vehicles' yaw stability. The simulation results are then used to parametrically quantify which combination of these factors can lead to yaw induced rollover during hard braking. Vehicle velocity, steering input, path slope and tire friction are all identified as important parameters in determining braking stability, the effects of which on rollover propensity are presented graphically. The results further show that when vehicles are equipped with front brakes or four-wheel brakes, the probability of a yaw induced rollover is almost entirely eliminated. Furthermore, the parametric charts provided may be used as an aid in developing guidelines for golf car and PTV path design if rear brake vehicles are used.

  18. Local Navon letter processing affects skilled behavior: a golf-putting experiment.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael B; Dawkins, Gemma

    2015-04-01

    Expert or skilled behaviors (for example, face recognition or sporting performance) are typically performed automatically and with little conscious awareness. Previous studies, in various domains of performance, have shown that activities immediately prior to a task demanding a learned skill can affect performance. In sport, describing the to-be-performed action is detrimental, whereas in face recognition, describing a face or reading local Navon letters is detrimental. Two golf-putting experiments are presented that compare the effects that these three tasks have on experienced and novice golfers. Experiment 1 found a Navon effect on golf performance for experienced players. Experiment 2 found, for experienced players only, that performance was impaired following the three tasks described above, when compared with reading or global Navon tasks. It is suggested that the three tasks affect skilled performance by provoking a shift from automatic behavior to a more analytic style. By demonstrating similarities between effects in face recognition and sporting behavior, it is hoped to better understand concepts in both fields.

  19. Reliability of an experimental method to analyse the impact point on a golf ball during putting.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ashley K; Mitchell, Andrew C S; Hughes, Gerwyn

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the reliability of an experimental method identifying the location of the impact point on a golf ball during putting. Forty trials were completed using a mechanical putting robot set to reproduce a putt of 3.2 m, with four different putter-ball combinations. After locating the centre of the dimple pattern (centroid) the following variables were tested; distance of the impact point from the centroid, angle of the impact point from the centroid and distance of the impact point from the centroid derived from the X, Y coordinates. Good to excellent reliability was demonstrated in all impact variables reflected in very strong relative (ICC = 0.98-1.00) and absolute reliability (SEM% = 0.9-4.3%). The highest SEM% observed was 7% for the angle of the impact point from the centroid. In conclusion, the experimental method was shown to be reliable at locating the centroid location of a golf ball, therefore allowing for the identification of the point of impact with the putter head and is suitable for use in subsequent studies.

  20. Lower extremity work is associated with club head velocity during the golf swing in experienced golfers.

    PubMed

    McNally, M P; Yontz, N; Chaudhari, A M

    2014-08-01

    While the golf swing is a complex whole body movement requiring coordination of all joints to achieve maximum ball velocity, the kinetic contribution of the lower extremities to club head velocity has not been quantified, despite the perception that the legs are a primary source of power during the swing. Mechanical power at the hips, knees, and ankles was estimated during the downswing phase of a full swing with a driver using a passive optical motion capture system and 2 force plates for adult males across a range of age and self-reported skill levels. Total work by the lower extremities was calculated by integrating the powers of all 6 joints over the downswing. Regression analyses showed that total lower extremity work was a strong predictor of club head velocity (R=0.63). Secondary analyses showed different relationships to club head velocity in lead and trail leg lower extremity joints, but none of these were as predictive of club head velocity as the total work performed by the lower extremities. These results provide quantitative evidence that the lower body's kinetic contribution may be an important factor in achieving greater club head velocity, contributing to greater driving distance and overall golf performance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Development and use of one-dimensional models of a golf ball.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Alastair J

    2002-08-01

    One-dimensional models of a golf ball are useful in modelling near-normal (90 degrees) impact. The model described here has two masses connected by a non-linear spring in parallel with a non-linear damper. The behaviour of this system in collision with an infinite rigid mass is compared with the results of tests involving real golf balls. Values of the four unknown constants are found by fitting the model results, over a range of impact speeds from zero to 50 m x s(-1), to the coefficient of restitution and duration of contact found in the tests. The simplest model (Model 1) was a good fit for duration of contact over the whole range of impact speeds, but for the coefficient of restitution only at high speed (above 20 m x s(-1)). However, when used with a similar model of a flexible faced club, the simple model predicted the coefficient of restitution of the club-ball combination, determined by direct testing, quite well and as such is a useful screening tool. More complicated Models 2 and 3 fitted the rigid target coefficients of restitution better at low speed than Model 1. However, Models 2 and 3 have other disadvantages and are no better than Model 1 for high-speed impact with flexible faced clubs.

  2. An examination of the planar nature of golf club motion in the swings of experienced players.

    PubMed

    Coleman, S; Anderson, D

    2007-05-01

    The golf swing has been modelled as a planar movement, but recent findings suggest that the upper limbs and golf club do not move in a single plane. However, the idea that the club alone can be swung in a single inclined plane has not been investigated mathematically. The aims of this study were to determine whether a single plane could be fitted to club motion, and if this plane varied for different clubs. Ten golfers (handicap 1-5) performed repeated, consistent swings with three clubs (driver, 5-iron, and pitching wedge). The motion of each club during the downswing was fitted to a single plane. The fit of the plane varied between golfers and clubs (r(2) = 0.871-0.995, root mean square residual = 44.9-166.2 mm). Mean angles of the plane to the reference horizontal Z axis (driver: 125.5 degrees , s = 3.0; 5-iron: 117.1 degrees , s = 3.0; wedge: 113.6 degrees , s = 2.7) and target line axis (driver: -7.8 degrees , s = 5.9; 5-iron: -4.9 degrees , s = 5.7; wedge: -5.9 degrees , s = 6.0) were significantly (P < 0.05) different. Further analysis revealed a single plane was more appropriate for some participants than others, but that it might be neither desirable nor possible in some cases.

  3. Kinematic analysis of the golf swing in men and women experienced golfers.

    PubMed

    Egret, C I; Nicolle, B; Dujardin, F H; Weber, J; Chollet, D

    2006-06-01

    Golf has become an increasingly popular sport, which is enjoyed by both men and women. This paper addresses the question what differences may exist between men and women golfers. The purpose of this study is to analyze the kinematic pattern of the golf swing in both men and women experienced golfers. Seven male and five female golfers participated in the study. The measurements of kinematic data during swing were obtained with the optoelectronic system VICON (Oxford's Metric, Oxford, UK) with five cameras operating at 50 frames per second. Clubhead speed was measured using a radar system (Bell-Tronics, Ltd, Covington, USA). A Mann-Whitney test (p = 0.05) showed that the women seem to produce a wide swing with larger hip and shoulder joint rotation angles at the top of the backswing. Men flexed their left knee more during the backswing, this may promote a greater weight transfer to the right side. Nevertheless, these two kinematic patterns showed no significant differences in the clubhead speed. Men probably used their increased knee flexion to compensate for their muscular and articular suppleness which is less than that of the women. The results of this study show that there is a specific swing for women.

  4. Different centre of pressure patterns within the golf stroke II: group-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Ball, K A; Best, R J

    2007-05-01

    Although the golf coaching literature stresses the importance of weight transfer during the swing, research has been conflicting or lacking statistical support. A potential problem with previous studies is that no attempt was made to account for different movement strategies in the golf swing. This study evaluated the relationship between centre of pressure measures and club head velocity within two previously identified swing styles, the "Front Foot" and "Reverse" styles. Thirty-nine Front Foot golfers and 19 Reverse golfers performed swings with a driver while standing on two force plates. From the force plate data, centre of pressure displacement, velocity, range, and timing parameters were calculated. Correlation and regression analysis indicated that a larger range of centre of pressure and a more rapid centre of pressure movement in the downswing was associated with a larger club head velocity at ball contact for the Front Foot group. For the Reverse golfers, positioning the centre of pressure further from the back foot at late backswing and a more rapid centre of pressure transfer towards the back foot at ball contact was associated with a larger club head velocity at ball contact. This study has highlighted the importance of identifying different movement strategies before evaluating performance measures, as different parameters were found to be important for the Front Foot and Reverse styles.

  5. Early improper motion detection in golf swings using wearable motion sensors: the first approach.

    PubMed

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2013-06-10

    This paper presents an analysis of a golf swing to detect improper motion in the early phase of the swing. Led by the desire to achieve a consistent shot outcome, a particular golfer would (in multiple trials) prefer to perform completely identical golf swings. In reality, some deviations from the desired motion are always present due to the comprehensive nature of the swing motion. Swing motion deviations that are not detrimental to performance are acceptable. This analysis is conducted using a golfer's leading arm kinematic data, which are obtained from a golfer wearing a motion sensor that is comprised of gyroscopes and accelerometers. Applying the principal component analysis (PCA) to the reference observations of properly performed swings, the PCA components of acceptable swing motion deviations are established. Using these components, the motion deviations in the observations of other swings are examined. Any unacceptable deviations that are detected indicate an improper swing motion. Arbitrarily long observations of an individual player's swing sequences can be included in the analysis. The results obtained for the considered example show an improper swing motion in early phase of the swing, i.e., the first part of the backswing. An early detection method for improper swing motions that is conducted on an individual basis provides assistance for performance improvement.

  6. Analysis of Pelvis-Thorax Coordination Patterns of Professional and Amateur Golfers during Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Sim, Taeyong; Yoo, Hakje; Choi, Ahnryul; Lee, Ki Young; Choi, Mun-Taek; Lee, Soeun; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2017-03-13

    The aim of this research was to quantify the coordination pattern between thorax and pelvis during a golf swing. The coordination patterns were calculated using vector coding technique, which had been applied to quantify the coordination changes in coupling angle (γ) between two different segments. For this, fifteen professional and fifteen amateur golfers who had no significant history of musculoskeletal injuries. There was no significant difference in coordination patterns between the two groups for rotation motion during backswing (p = 0.333). On the other hand, during the downswing phase, there were significant differences between professional and amateur groups in all motions (flexion/extension: professional [γ] = 187.8°, amateur [γ] = 167.4°; side bending: professional [γ] = 288.4°, amateur [γ] = 245.7°; rotation: professional [γ] = 232.0°, amateur [γ] = 229.5°). These results are expected to be a discriminating measure to assess complex coordination of golfers' trunk movements and preliminary study for interesting comparison by golf skilled levels.

  7. An observational study of spectators' step counts and reasons for attending a professional golf tournament in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew D; Turner, Kieran; Archibald, Daryll; Schiphorst, Chloe; Griffin, Steffan Arthur; Scott, Hilary; Hawkes, Roger; Kelly, Paul; Grant, Liz; Mutrie, Nanette

    2017-01-01

    Spectators at several hundred golf tournaments on six continents worldwide may gain health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) during their time at the event. This study aims to investigate spectators' reasons for attending and assess spectator physical activity (PA) (measured by step count). Spectators at the Paul Lawrie Matchplay event in Scotland (August 2016) were invited to take part in this study. They were asked to complete a brief questionnaire with items to assess (1) demographics, (2) reasons for attendance and (3) baseline PA. In addition, participants were requested to wear a pedometer from time of entry to the venue until exit. A total of 339 spectators were recruited to the study and out of which 329 (97.2%) returned step-count data. Spectators took a mean of 11 589 steps (SD 4531). 'Fresh air' (rated median 9 out of 10) then 'watching star players', 'exercise/physical activity', 'time with friends and family' and 'atmosphere' (all median 8 out of 10) were rated the most important reasons for attending. This study is the first to assess spectator physical activity while watching golf (measured by step count). Obtaining exercise/PA is rated as an important reason for attending a tournament by many golf spectators. Spectating at a golf tournament can provide HEPA. 82.9% of spectators achieved the recommended daily step count while spectating. Further research directly assessing whether spectating may constitute a 'teachable moment', for increasing physical activity beyond the tournament itself, is merited.

  8. Distribution of arsenic and risk assessment of activities on a golf course fertilised with arsenic-containing Ascophyllum nodosum seaweed.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Antonia; Gupta, Bhaskar Sen; Phillips, Debra H

    2014-06-01

    The use of seaweed fertilisers in sports green maintenance has become a common practice across the globe due to its image as an "eco-friendly" alternative to chemical fertilisers. The aim of this study was to characterise the risk of human exposure to arsenic (As), via dermal absorption, from golfing activities on a private golf course in the UK, where As contaminated seaweed fertiliser (~100mg/kg d.wt.) is applied. This was fulfilled by, 1) determining As concentrations in shallow soils with GIS geo-statistical analysis, 2) measuring As concentrations from an on-site borehole groundwater well, and (3) developing a risk assessment calculation for golfing activities based on field and questionnaire data. Total As concentrations in shallow soils were less than the UK threshold for domestic soils, however, frequent and sustained dermal contact between site-users and surface soil attributed to a maximum carcinogenic risk value of 2.75×10(-4), which is in the upper limit of the acceptable risk range. Arsenic concentrations in underlying groundwater exceeded the WHO's permissible drinking water standard, demonstrating the risk of groundwater contamination following the application of seaweed fertiliser to golf course soils. This is the first risk study on dermal As absorption via the application of a seaweed fertiliser.

  9. Evaluating poverty grass (Danthonia spicata L.) for use in tees, fairways, or rough areas in golf courses in the midwest

    Treesearch

    Nadia E. Navarrete-Tindall; Brad Fresenburg; J.W. Van Sambeek

    2007-01-01

    Poverty grass (Danthonia spicata L.), a native, cool-season perennial bunchgrass with wide distribution in the United States, is being evaluated for its suitability for use on golf courses. The goal is to identify practices to improve seed germination and successfully establish field plots as monocultures or with other native species to mimic natural...

  10. Design and maintenance considerations for pesticide and fertilizer containment systems used in lawn care and golf course facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hurto, K.A.

    1994-12-31

    The design of pesticide and fertilizer containment facilities for lawn and golf course operations are similar to those designs used for most pesticide handling operations. In lawn care operations, service vehicles are filled from a centralized facility and the diluted mixtures are transported to residential and commercial sites where mixtures are applied to turfgrass areas. Golf course operations involve fewer vehicles and the volume and frequency of spray operations performed are much lower compared to lawn care operations. Rarely are spray mixtures used in golf course operations transported off-site. A golf course operation will involve spray applications to 100 to 200 acres of plantings. Typically, the amount of spray activity conducted averages 3 to 5 days per month, whereas commercial lawn care companies may be providing applications to 10 to 200 acres daily. Because of the potential risk of cross contamination of spray equipment, operations associated with tree and shrub plantings should be segregated from those associated with herbicide and other materials considered toxic to ornamental plants.

  11. Use of industrial byproducts to filter nutrients and pesticides in a golf green’s drainage water

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Golf courses are particularly vulnerable to phosphate (PO43-) and pesticide loss by infiltration because of the sandy, porous grass rooting media used and presence of subsurface tile drainage. In this study, an effort was made to filter PO43-, chlorothalonil, mefenoxam, and propiconazole in putting ...

  12. An electromyographic study of the effect of hand grip sizes on forearm muscle activity and golf performance.

    PubMed

    Sorbie, Graeme G; Hunter, Henry H; Grace, Fergal M; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien S; Ugbolue, Ukadike Chris

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the differences in surface electromyography (EMG) activity of two forearm muscles in the lead and trail arm at specific phases of the golf swing using a 7-iron with three different grip sizes among amateur and professional golfers. Fifteen right-handed male golfers performed five golf swings using golf clubs with three different grip sizes. Surface EMG was used to measure muscle activity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) on both forearms. There were no significant differences in forearm muscle activity when using the three golf grips within the group of 15 golfers (p > 0.05). When using the undersize grip, club head speed significantly increased (p = 0.044). During the backswing and downswing phases, amateurs produced significantly greater forearm muscle activity with all three grip sizes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, forearm muscle activity is not affected by grip sizes. However, club head speed increases when using undersize grips.

  13. Distribution, abundance, and seasonal ecology of Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on golf courses in Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Simard, Louis; Brodeur, Jacques; Dionne, Julie

    2007-08-01

    The weevil Listronotus maculicollis Dietz (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a major pest of annual bluegrass, Poa annua L., on golf courses in northeastern North America. To determine the distribution, abundance, and seasonal ecology of L. maculicollis on golf courses in Québec, Canada, we sampled 19 golf courses (GC1-GC19) from different geographic and climatic conditions during 2001, 2002, and 2003. L. maculicollis was found on all golf courses except GC19, which was located in northeastern Québec. In most sites, L. maculicollis completed two generations per year. A linear regression model comparing L. maculicollis larval densities as a function of spatial coordinates revealed that L. maculicollis were more abundant in western Québec than in eastern Québec. Pearson correlations on the probability of both L. maculicollis larval and pupal presence with soil parameters indicated significant positive correlations for fine sand (larvae) and soil pH (pupae) and negative correlations for gravel.

  14. How the Best Get Better: An Analysis of the Self-Monitoring Strategies Used by Expert Golf Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schempp, Paul G.; Webster, Collin; McCullick, Bryan A.; Busch, Christopher; Mason, Ilse Sannen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the self-monitoring strategies that 31 expert golf instructors used to improve their teaching. Specifically, criteria characteristic of both instructional strengths and weaknesses were identified, as were the strategies these teachers used to continue to develop their strengths and improve their areas of…

  15. New techniques to control salinity-wastewater reuse interactions in golf courses of the Mediterranean regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrao, J.; Costa, M.; Rosado, V.; Gamito, P.; Santos, R.; Khaydarova, V.

    2003-04-01

    Due to the lack water around the Mediterranean regions, potable water luxurious uses - as in golf courses - are increasingly contested. In order to solve this problem, non conventional water resources (effluent, gray, recycled, reclaimed, brackish), like treated wastewater, for irrigation gained increasing role in the planning and development of additional water supplies in golf courses. In most cases, the intense use of effluent for irrigation attracted public awareness in respect of contaminating pathogens and heavy metals. The contaminating effect of salinity in soil and underground water is very often neglected. The objective of this work is to present the conventional techniques to control salinity of treated wastewater and to present some results on new clean techniques to solve this problem, in the framework of the INCO-COPERNICUS project (no. IC-15CT98-0105) "Adaptation of Efficient Water Use Criteria in Marginal Regions of Europe and Middle Asia with Scarce Sources Subject to Environmental Control, Climate Change and Socio-Economic Development" and of the INCO-DC project (no. IC18-CT98-0266) "Control of Salination and Combating Desertification Effects in the Mediterranean Region. Phase II". Saline water is the most common irrigation water in arid climates. Moreover, for each region treated wastewater is always more saline than tap water, and therefore, when treated wastewater is reused in golf courses, more salinity problems occur. Conventional techniques to combat the salination process in golf courses can be characterized by four generations: 1) Problem of root zone salination by soil leaching - two options can occur - when there is an impermeable layer, salts will be concentrated above this layer; on the other hand, when there is no impermeable layer, aquifers contamination can be observed; 2) Use of subsurface trickle irrigation - economy of water, and therefore less additional salts; however the problem of groundwater contamination due to natural rain

  16. Putting to a bigger hole: Golf performance relates to perceived size

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Jessica K.; Linkenauger, Sally A.; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01

    When engaged in a skilled behaviour such as occurs in sports, people's perceptions relate optical information to their performance. In current research we demonstrate the effects of performance on size perception in golfers. We found golfers who played better judged the hole to be bigger than golfers who did not play as well (Study 1). In follow-up laboratory experiments, participants putted on a golf mat from a location near or far from the hole then judged the size of the hole. Participants who putted from the near location perceived the hole to be bigger than participants who putted from the far location. Our results demonstrate that perception is influenced by the perceiver's current ability to act effectively in the environment. PMID:18567258

  17. Relation of eye dominance with performance and subjective ratings in golf putting.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yoshio; Lee, Mi-Sook

    2005-06-01

    Previous research has discussed the interaction of hand preference, eye dominance, and sport performance. In this study, the relation of eye dominance with performance and subjective ratings in golf putting was investigated. 47 right-handed Japanese students from a college of physical education putted 10 balls to a drawn circle 3 m away, each under right-handed and left-handed stance conditions. Putting performance was measured by the number of successful putts. After putting in each condition, they rated subjective visibility and feelings of hitting. Analyses indicated that right-eyed subjects had significantly better performance using the right-handed stance than the left-handed stance, whereas left-eyed subjects showed the opposite. Most subjective ratings were more positive with right-handed stance for both right-eyed and left-eyed subjects. These findings suggest that eye dominance could have some influence on putting performance of Japanese novice golfers.

  18. Correction of a Technical Error in the Golf Swing: Error Amplification Versus Direct Instruction.

    PubMed

    Milanese, Chiara; Corte, Stefano; Salvetti, Luca; Cavedon, Valentina; Agostini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Performance errors drive motor learning for many tasks. The authors' aim was to determine which of two strategies, method of amplification of error (MAE) or direct instruction (DI), would be more beneficial for error correction during a full golfing swing with a driver. Thirty-four golfers were randomly assigned to one of three training conditions (MAE, DI, and control). Participants were tested in a practice session in which each golfer performed 7 pretraining trials, 6 training-intervention trials, and 7 posttraining trials; and a retention test after 1 week. An optoeletronic motion capture system was used to measure the kinematic parameters of each golfer's performance. Results showed that MAE is an effective strategy for correcting the technical errors leading to a rapid improvement in performance. These findings could have practical implications for sport psychology and physical education because, while practice is obviously necessary for improving learning, the efficacy of the learning process is essential in enhancing learners' motivation and sport enjoyment.

  19. Emotions and golf performance: An IZOF-based applied sport psychology case study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander B; Tenenbaum, Gershon; English, R William

    2006-05-01

    A multiple case study investigation is reported in which emotions and performance were assessed within the probabilistic individual zone of optimal functioning (IZOF) model (Kamata, Tenenbaum,& Hanin, 2002) to develop idiosyncratic emotion-performance profiles. These profiles were incorporated into a psychological skills training (PST) intervention, with a focus on three emotional dimensions, that is, arousal, pleasantness, and functionality, and several psychological strategies employed during practice and competition. Two female varsity golfers at a major Division I university in the Southeast participated in the case study during the Spring 2002 season. The PST intervention resulted in enhanced emotional self-regulation skills and improved golf performance. Directions for future research into the IZOF model and implications for practical application of the model are discussed.

  20. Proposed Consent Agreement and Final Order: Joseph O’Meara, Joseph O’Meara Living Trust, and Killarney West Golf Course, Inc.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's proposed Consent Agreement and Final Order in the matter of Joseph O’Meara, Joseph O’Meara Living Trust, and Killarney West Golf Course, Inc. for violations of the Clean Water Act in Hillsboro, Oregon.

  1. Proposed Penalty Against Joseph O’Meara, Joseph O’Meara Living Trust, and Killarney West Golf Course, Inc. for Clean Water Act Violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Public notice of EPA's proposed penalty against Joseph O’Meara, Joseph O’Meara Living Trust, and Killarney West Golf Course, Inc. for violations of the Clean Water Act at their facility in Hillsboro, Oregon.

  2. Development and measurement properties of a putting skill test for high-level golf.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sam; Gupta, Surabhi; Kremer, Peter; Burnett, Angus F

    2015-01-01

    Despite a recent increase in the amount of research investigating performance in golf, a comprehensive putting skill test has not been reported in the peer-reviewed literature. In this study, the Golf Australia Putting Test (GAPT) was developed and a series of measurement properties were assessed. Elite (n = 18) and high-level amateur (HLA; n = 22) participants completed six single putts from various areas on six concentric circles (circle radii = 0.9, 1.5, 3.0, 4.6, 6.1 and 7.6 m). Using a scoring system that rewarded participants for holing putts from longer distances, the maximum score from a single round of the test (i.e. 36 putts) was 27 points. After two rounds of the test were completed by all players, a subsample of participants (elite, n = 15; HLA, n = 7) had their putting performance recorded during tournament play for a period of 90 days to assess criterion (predictive) validity of the test. The reliability, sensitivity and discriminative validity of the GAPT were also assessed. Better agreement between Rounds 1 and 2 scores was noted in the elite group, whilst reliability values were similar for both groups. Further, the GAPT scores were shown to predict players from the elite and high-ability groups with a low classification error. An equation for predicting on-course performance from GAPT scores was also developed. Findings from this study indicate that the GAPT is a valid and reliable tool for high-level players and the GAPT may be used for player evaluation in the field.

  3. Comparison of centre of gravity and centre of pressure patterns in the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aimée C; Roberts, Jonathan R; Kong, Pui Wah; Forrester, Stephanie E

    2017-03-01

    Analysing the centre of pressure (COP) and centre of gravity (COG) could reveal stabilising strategies used by golfers throughout the golf swing. This study identified and compared golfers' COP and COG patterns throughout the golf swing in medial-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions using principal component analysis (PCA) and examined their relationship to clubhead velocity. Three-dimensional marker trajectories were collected using Vicon motion analysis and force plate data from two Kistler force plates for 22 low-handicap golfers during drives. Golfers' COG and COP were expressed as a percentage distance between their feet. PCA was performed on COG and COP in ML and AP directions. Relationships between principal component (PC) scores were examined using Pearson correlation and regression analysis used to examine the relationship with clubhead velocity. ML COP movements varied in magnitude (PC1), rate of change and timing (PC2 and PC3). The COP and COG PC1 scores were strongly correlated in both directions (ML: r = 0.90, P < .05; AP: r = 0.81, P < .05). Clubhead velocity, explained by three PCs (74%), related to timing and rate of change in COPML near downswing (PC2 and PC3) and timing of COGML late backswing (PC2). The relationship between COPML and COGML PC1 scores identified extremes of COP and COG patterns in golfers and could indicate a golfer's dynamic balance. Golfers with earlier movement of COP to the front foot (PC2) and rate of change (PC3) patterns in ML COP, prior to the downswing, may be more likely to generate higher clubhead velocity.

  4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Golf Course Fairway and Rough after Application of Different Nitrogen Fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Gillette, Katrina L; Qian, Yaling; Follett, Ronald F; Del Grosso, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have quantified nitrous oxide (NO) emissions from intensively managed turfgrass systems on golf courses. Fertilizer treatments consisting of urea with inhibitors of nitrification and urease (INU), polymer-coated urea (PCU), and uncoated balanced methylene urea (BMU) chain, which use different mechanisms to control the release of N substrate, were applied to a golf course fairway and rough three times during the 2011 growing season at a rate of 50 kg N ha per application. The vented chamber method was used to measure turf-soil-atmospheric NO exchange. Cumulative emissions from fairway INU, PCU, and BMU treatments totaled 6.5, 1.9, and 7.6 kg NO-N ha yr, representing a 4.02, 1.25, and 4.75% loss of total N applied, respectively. Summer INU and BMU fertilization to the fairway produced the greatest NO fluxes. Rapid fluxes during the summer were likely related to low physiological activity in cool-season turfgrass and to warm, wet soil conditions that increased denitrification rates. However, PCU applied to the fairway was more resistant to NO losses than other fertilizer treatments. Fertilizer treatments applied to the rough had cumulative emissions of 2.4, 1.50, and 1.49 kg NO-N ha yr from INU, PCU, and BMU treatments, corresponding to a 1.21, 0.62, and 0.61% loss of total N applied, respectively. The lower NO emission on roughs was likely associated with greater carbon pools, lower soil moisture, and lower temperatures. This study supports the effectiveness of PCU to reduce NO emission from cool-season turfgrass fairways when soil conditions favored denitrification during warm periods. Applying INU and BMU when soil was cool and dry was effective in moderating NO losses. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. Changes in task self-efficacy and emotion across competitive performances in golf.

    PubMed

    Boardley, Ian D; Jackson, Ben; Simmons, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    This research aimed to investigate (a) the effect of golfers' perceptions of coach motivation efficacy on golfers' precompetition task self-efficacy, (b) the effect of performance on pre-to-postround changes in self-efficacy, (c) the effect of pre-to-postround changes in self-efficacy on pre-to-postround changes in affect and emotion, and (d) whether any effects of performance on pre-to-postcompetition changes in affect and emotion were mediated by pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy. In Study 1, a scale measuring golf self-efficacy was developed and validated using data from 197 golfers. In Study 2, 200 golfers completed this measure alongside measures of coach motivation efficacy, and positive and negative affect before a golf competition; all measures (except coach motivation efficacy) were again completed following the competition. Structural equation modeling showed that coach motivation efficacy positively predicted precompetition self-efficacy, performance positively predicted pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy, which had positive and negative effects, respectively, on pre-to-postcompetition changes in positive and negative affect; mediation analyses demonstrated that pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy mediated effects of performance on pre-to-postcompetition changes in positive and negative affect. In Study 3, the Study-2 procedures were replicated with a separate sample of 212 golfers, except measures of excitement, concentration disruption, somatic anxiety, and worry replaced those for positive and negative affect. Structural analyses showed the findings from Study 2 were largely replicated when specific emotions were investigated in place of general indices of affect. This investigation makes novel contributions regarding the potential importance of perceptions of coach efficacy for golfers' own efficacy beliefs, and the role personal efficacy beliefs may play in facilitating the effects of performance on affective

  6. The 'yips' in golf: a continuum between a focal dystonia and choking.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Adler, Charles H; Crews, Debbie; Wharen, Robert E; Laskowski, Edward R; Barnes, Kelly; Valone Bell, Carolyn; Pelz, Dave; Brennan, Ruth D; Smith, Jay; Sorenson, Matthew C; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2003-01-01

    The definition of the 'yips' has evolved over time. It is defined as a motor phenomenon of involuntary movements affecting golfers. In this paper, we have extended the definition to encompass a continuum from the neurologic disorder of dystonia to the psychologic disorder of choking. In many golfers, the pathophysiology of the 'yips' is believed to be an acquired deterioration in the function of motor pathways (e.g. those involving the basal ganglia) which are exacerbated when a threshold of high stress and physiologic arousal is exceeded. In other golfers, the 'yips' seems to result from severe performance anxiety. Physically, the 'yips' is manifested by symptoms of jerks, tremors or freezing in the hands and forearms. These symptoms can result in: (i) a poor quality of golf performance (adds 4.9 strokes per 18 holes); (ii) prompt use of alcohol and beta-blockers; and (iii) contribute to attrition in golf. Golfers with the 'yips' average 75 rounds per year, although many 'yips'-affected golfers decrease their playing time or quit to avoid exposure to this embarrassing problem. While more investigation is needed to determine the cause of the 'yips', this review article summarises and organises the available research. A small study included in this paper describes the 'yips' phenomenon from the subjective experience of 'yips'-affected golfers. The subjective experience (n = 72) provides preliminary support for the hypothesis suggesting that the 'yips' is on a continuum. Based on the subjective definitions of 72 'yips'-affected golfers, the 'yips' was differentiated into type I (dystonia) and type II (choking). A theoretical model provides a guide for future research on golfers with either type I or type II 'yips'.

  7. Assessment of arsenic mobility in the soils of some golf courses in South Florida.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yong; Cabrera, Julio C; Georgiadis, Myron; Jayachandran, Krish

    2002-05-27

    High concentrations of arsenic have been detected in soils and underlying groundwater of some South Florida golf courses, indicating the possible impact of the application of arsenic-containing herbicides. The mobility of arsenic in the soils from selected golf courses was studied using a simple two-step sequential extraction procedure. Sodium nitrate (0.1 M), potassium dihydrogen phosphate (0.1 M) and concentrated nitric acid were used to obtain mobile, mobilizable, and pseudo total arsenic fractions. Soils were separated into fine (<0.25 mm) and large (0.25-0.75 mm) particle size fractions. Arsenic contents were correlated with the distribution of iron (R2=0.4827), manganese (R2=0.7674) and aluminum (R2=5459) in the particle size fractions, while such correlation was not observed for soil organic matter, indicating that the oxides/hydroxides of iron, manganese and aluminum control the distribution of arsenic in these soils. Sodium nitrate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate extractants used in this study extracted large portions of arsenic from most soil samples studied. This is especially true for the fine fraction where the extractable arsenic ranged from 9.2 to 51.3% with an average of 28.7 +/- 13.3%, whereas in the large fraction, arsenic ranged from 7.2 to 24.7% with an average of 15.4 +/- 6.4%. These extractants, however, release only small amounts of iron, manganese, and aluminum. It seems likely that arsenic can be released by sodium nitrate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate without significant dissolution of the oxides/hydroxides of iron, manganese, and aluminum in these soil samples.

  8. A three-dimensional examination of the planar nature of the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Simon G S; Rankin, Andrew J

    2005-03-01

    Previous planar models of the downswing in golf have suggested that upper limb segments (left shoulder girdle and left arm) move in a consistent fixed plane and that the clubhead also moves only in this plane. This study sought to examine these assumptions. Three-dimensional kinematic analysis of seven right-handed golfers of various abilities (handicap 0- 15) was used to define a plane (named the left-arm plane) containing the 7th cervical vertebra, left shoulder and left wrist. We found that the angles of this plane to the reference horizontal z axis and target line axis (parallel to the reference x axis) were not consistent. The angle to the horizontal z axis varied from a mean of 133 degrees (s = 1 degrees) at the start of the downswing to 102 degrees (s = 4 degrees) at impact, suggesting a "steepening" of the left-arm plane. The angle of the plane to the target line changed from - 9 degrees (s = 16 degrees) to 5 degrees (s = 15 degrees) during the same period, showing anticlockwise (from above) rotation, although there was large inter-individual variation. The distance of the clubhead from the left-arm plane was 0.019 m (s = 0.280 m) at the start at the downswing and 0.291 m (s = 0.077 m) at impact, showing that the clubhead did not lie in the same plane as the body segments. We conclude that the left arm and shoulder girdle do not move in a consistent plane throughout the downswing, and that the clubhead does not move in this plane. Previous models of the downswing in golf may therefore be incorrect, and more complex (but realistic) simulations should be performed.

  9. Learning of a golf putting task with varying contextual interference levels induced by feedback schedule in novices and experts.

    PubMed

    Krause, Daniel; Brüne, Alexander; Fritz, Susanne; Kramer, Pascal; Meisterjahn, Peter; Schneider, Michael; Sperber, Alena

    2014-04-01

    Switching between tasks during practice can affect motor learning. This study tested whether switching feedback content has any effects on learning to perform golf putts without full visibility. 60 participants (44 men, 16 women; M age = 26.3 yr., SD = 6.6) practiced golf putts without seeing the ball movement. 30 of the participants were golfers with moderate expertise, and 30 were novices. They received feedback regarding their putts, either on the angle or on the distance in one of three feedback schedules: blocked, serial-blocked, or serial. Independent of the expertise level, learning was not affected by the feedback schedule. The strong linkage between the two components--direction and distance--may have prevented a sufficient level of contextual interference.

  10. Effort, performance, and motivation: insights from robot-assisted training of human golf putting and rat grip strength.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Jaime E; Gebrekristos, Berkenesh; Perez, Sergi; Rowe, Justin B; Sharp, Kelli; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-06-01

    Robotic devices can modulate success rates and required effort levels during motor training, but it is unclear how this affects performance gains and motivation. Here we present results from training unimpaired humans in a virtual golf-putting task, and training spinal cord injured (SCI) rats in a grip strength task using robotically modulated success rates and effort levels. Robotic assistance in golf practice increased trainees feelings of competence, and, paradoxically, increased their sense effort, even though it had mixed effects on learning. Reducing effort during a grip strength training task led rats with SCI to practice the task more frequently. However, the more frequent practice of these rats did not cause them to exceed the strength gains achieved by rats that exercised less often at higher required effort levels. These results show that increasing success and decreasing effort with robots increases motivation, but has mixed effects on performance gains.

  11. Total hip arthroplasty using the Wroblewski golf ball cup inserted through the posterior approach. A high rate of dislocation.

    PubMed

    Porter, P; Stone, M H

    2004-07-01

    The Wroblewski golf ball acetabular cup was introduced by surgeons using the trochanteric osteotomy approach for revision total hip replacement (THR) in order to reduce the rate of dislocation. We have routinely used the Ogee long posterior wall (Ogee LPW) and the Wroblewski angle bore cups in THR. Although the new Wroblewski golf ball cup performed well there was a significant early rate of dislocation of 20%. Our rate of dislocation over a period of ten years using the Ogee LPW and Wroblewski angle bore cups had been 0.52%. We present our findings and an investigation as to why the new cup has such a high rate of dislocation when used with the posterior approach. We show that a relatively small change in the design of the acetabular component resulted in significant adverse clinical results.

  12. Final Environmental Assessment for Effluent Irrigation of the Golf Course Holloman Air Force Base Otero County, New Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    managers for several reasons. First, neotropical migratory birds play a major role in the health and functioning of ecosystems, as consumers of insects ...shallow standing \\Vater rnay ren1ain for several weeks after heavy rains. Playas may contain a higher 22 Final Environmental Assessment for Golf...bacterial growth that support a substantial insect community that in tum attracts considerable numbers of wetland birds to the area throughout the

  13. An observational study of spectators’ step counts and reasons for attending a professional golf tournament in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Andrew D; Turner, Kieran; Archibald, Daryll; Schiphorst, Chloe; Griffin, Steffan Arthur; Scott, Hilary; Hawkes, Roger; Kelly, Paul; Grant, Liz; Mutrie, Nanette

    2017-01-01

    Background Spectators at several hundred golf tournaments on six continents worldwide may gain health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) during their time at the event. This study aims to investigate spectators’ reasons for attending and assess spectator physical activity (PA) (measured by step count). Methods Spectators at the Paul Lawrie Matchplay event in Scotland (August 2016) were invited to take part in this study. They were asked to complete a brief questionnaire with items to assess (1) demographics, (2) reasons for attendance and (3) baseline PA. In addition, participants were requested to wear a pedometer from time of entry to the venue until exit. Results A total of 339 spectators were recruited to the study and out of which 329 (97.2%) returned step-count data. Spectators took a mean of 11 589 steps (SD 4531). ‘Fresh air’ (rated median 9 out of 10) then ‘watching star players’, ‘exercise/physical activity’, ‘time with friends and family’ and ‘atmosphere’ (all median 8 out of 10) were rated the most important reasons for attending. Conclusion This study is the first to assess spectator physical activity while watching golf (measured by step count). Obtaining exercise/PA is rated as an important reason for attending a tournament by many golf spectators. Spectating at a golf tournament can provide HEPA. 82.9% of spectators achieved the recommended daily step count while spectating. Further research directly assessing whether spectating may constitute a ‘teachable moment’, for increasing physical activity beyond the tournament itself, is merited. PMID:28761718

  14. Simple water analysis of golf link pesticides by means of batch-wise adsorption and supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Chikushi, Hiroaki; Hirota, Kazutoshi; Yoshida, Natsuko; Edamura, Takuya; Toda, Kei

    2009-12-15

    Here, a simple new method is proposed to evaluate water for the presence of pesticides. Specifically, pesticides for golf link maintenance were used as the targets for this investigation. Water samples containing the pesticides were mixed with particulate adsorbent, after which the pesticides were extracted from the adsorbents using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The recoveries of pesticides were examined with several types of adsorbents and found to be related to their octanol/water partition coefficients (K(ow)) for most of the adsorbents. Good recoveries were obtained when the water samples were mixed with octadecylsilane (ODS) and stylene-divinylbenzene copolymer (XAD) resins for 15 and 30 min, respectively. In the supercritical fluid extraction, extraction pressure affected the efficiency of extraction from XAD while a little effect on extraction from ODS, probably due to the internal structure of the adsorbents. The limit of detection ranged from 0.002 to 2.3 microg L(-1) and the method is suitable for the measurement of golf link pesticides in microg L(-1) order to 100 microg L(-1). The procedure of the proposed method was simpler than the conventional solid-phase extraction method. Finally, the method presented here was used to identify pesticides present in actual wastewater from golf links.

  15. Removal of pesticides from wastewater at golf courses using plants (removal by mung beans; Phaseolus radiatus L).

    PubMed

    Azuma, T; Niiro, M; Motobu, H

    1994-01-01

    Many studies have been done on the removal of pollutants from wastewater using aquatic plants. Water hyacinth has been the most widely-used plant, and systems using water hyacinth are well-established. These systems, however, have a few problems in their practical use. In a previous paper, we proposed a new system that could be used as a substitute for a conventional system or, as a secondary system to assist the conventional one. Mung beans will be used to remove pollutants in this system. In the previous experiment, the removal characteristics of nutrient salts such as NO2-, NO3-, NH4+ and phosphorus salts from wastewater in residential areas were examined. Mung beans exhibited good characteristics for removing these nutrient salts. At present, pesticides used at golf courses have become a severe environmental problem polluting water supplies. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to verify whether our new system using mung beans was also effective in removing pesticides from wastewater at golf courses. An experiment was conducted on seven different pesticides. They were three insecticides; Diazinon, Fenitrothion and Chlorpyrifos, three fungicides; Captan, Isoprothiolane and Chlorothalonil, and a herbicide; Simazine. The experimental results showed that, under experimental conditions, the pesticides were rapidly removed and that they exhibited no harmful effects on the growth of the mung beans. Mung beans may be used, therefore, to remove pesticides from wastewater at golf courses although further research is needed.

  16. Real-ear acoustical characteristics of impulse sound generated by golf drivers and the estimated risk to hearing: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Bardsley, Barry

    2014-01-21

    This study investigated real-ear acoustical characteristics in terms of the sound pressure levels (SPLs) and frequency responses in situ generated from golf club drivers at impact with a golf ball. The risk of hearing loss caused by hitting a basket of golf balls using various drivers was then estimated. Cross-sectional study. The three driver clubs were chosen on the basis of reflection of the commonality and modern technology of the clubs. The participants were asked to choose the clubs in a random order and hit six two-piece range golf balls with each club. The experiment was carried out at a golf driving range in South Wales, UK. 19 male amateur golfers volunteered to take part in the study, with an age range of 19-54 years. The frequency responses and peak SPLs in situ of the transient sound generated from the club at impact were recorded bilaterally and simultaneously using the GN Otometric Freefit wireless real-ear measurement system. A swing speed radar system was also used to investigate the relationship between noise level and swing speed. Different clubs generated significantly different real-ear acoustical characteristics in terms of SPL and frequency responses. However, they did not differ significantly between the ears. No significant correlation was found between the swing speed and noise intensity. On the basis of the SPLs measured in the present study, the percentage of daily noise exposure for hitting a basket of golf balls using the drivers described above was less than 2%. The immediate danger of noise-induced hearing loss for amateur golfers is quite unlikely. However, it may be dangerous to hearing if the noise level generated by the golf clubs exceeded 116 dBA.

  17. Real-ear acoustical characteristics of impulse sound generated by golf drivers and the estimated risk to hearing: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Bardsley, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated real-ear acoustical characteristics in terms of the sound pressure levels (SPLs) and frequency responses in situ generated from golf club drivers at impact with a golf ball. The risk of hearing loss caused by hitting a basket of golf balls using various drivers was then estimated. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting The three driver clubs were chosen on the basis of reflection of the commonality and modern technology of the clubs. The participants were asked to choose the clubs in a random order and hit six two-piece range golf balls with each club. The experiment was carried out at a golf driving range in South Wales, UK. Participants 19 male amateur golfers volunteered to take part in the study, with an age range of 19–54 years. Outcome measures The frequency responses and peak SPLs in situ of the transient sound generated from the club at impact were recorded bilaterally and simultaneously using the GN Otometric Freefit wireless real-ear measurement system. A swing speed radar system was also used to investigate the relationship between noise level and swing speed. Results Different clubs generated significantly different real-ear acoustical characteristics in terms of SPL and frequency responses. However, they did not differ significantly between the ears. No significant correlation was found between the swing speed and noise intensity. On the basis of the SPLs measured in the present study, the percentage of daily noise exposure for hitting a basket of golf balls using the drivers described above was less than 2%. Conclusions The immediate danger of noise-induced hearing loss for amateur golfers is quite unlikely. However, it may be dangerous to hearing if the noise level generated by the golf clubs exceeded 116 dBA. PMID:24448845

  18. Cri du Chat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cerruti Mainardi, Paola

    2006-01-01

    The Cri du Chat syndrome (CdCS) is a genetic disease resulting from a deletion of variable size occurring on the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-). The incidence ranges from 1:15,000 to 1:50,000 live-born infants. The main clinical features are a high-pitched monochromatic cry, microcephaly, broad nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, abnormal dermatoglyphics, and severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Malformations, although not very frequent, may be present: cardiac, neurological and renal abnormalities, preauricular tags, syndactyly, hypospadias, and cryptorchidism. Molecular cytogenetic analysis has allowed a cytogenetic and phenotypic map of 5p to be defined, even if results from the studies reported up to now are not completely in agreement. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies showed a clinical and cytogenetic variability. The identification of phenotypic subsets associated with a specific size and type of deletion is of diagnostic and prognostic relevance. Specific growth and psychomotor development charts have been established. Two genes, Semaphorin F (SEMAF) and δ-catenin (CTNND2), which have been mapped to the "critical regions", are potentially involved in cerebral development and their deletion may be associated with mental retardation in CdCS patients. Deletion of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, localised to 5p15.33, could contribute to the phenotypic changes in CdCS. The critical regions were recently refined by using array comparative genomic hybridisation. The cat-like cry critical region was further narrowed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and three candidate genes were characterised in this region. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical manifestations. Karyotype analysis and, in doubtful cases, FISH analysis will confirm the diagnosis. There is no specific therapy for CdCS but early rehabilitative and educational interventions improve the prognosis and considerable progress has been made in

  19. Cri du Chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cerruti Mainardi, Paola

    2006-09-05

    The Cri du Chat syndrome (CdCS) is a genetic disease resulting from a deletion of variable size occurring on the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-). The incidence ranges from 1:15,000 to 1:50,000 live-born infants. The main clinical features are a high-pitched monochromatic cry, microcephaly, broad nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, abnormal dermatoglyphics, and severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Malformations, although not very frequent, may be present: cardiac, neurological and renal abnormalities, preauricular tags, syndactyly, hypospadias, and cryptorchidism. Molecular cytogenetic analysis has allowed a cytogenetic and phenotypic map of 5p to be defined, even if results from the studies reported up to now are not completely in agreement. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies showed a clinical and cytogenetic variability. The identification of phenotypic subsets associated with a specific size and type of deletion is of diagnostic and prognostic relevance. Specific growth and psychomotor development charts have been established. Two genes, Semaphorin F (SEMAF) and delta-catenin (CTNND2), which have been mapped to the "critical regions", are potentially involved in cerebral development and their deletion may be associated with mental retardation in CdCS patients. Deletion of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, localised to 5p15.33, could contribute to the phenotypic changes in CdCS. The critical regions were recently refined by using array comparative genomic hybridisation. The cat-like cry critical region was further narrowed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and three candidate genes were characterised in this region. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical manifestations. Karyotype analysis and, in doubtful cases, FISH analysis will confirm the diagnosis. There is no specific therapy for CdCS but early rehabilitative and educational interventions improve the prognosis and considerable progress has been made

  20. Remote sensing technologies applied to the irrigation water management on a golf course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedras, Celestina; Lança, Rui; Martins, Fernando; Soares, Cristina; Guerrero, Carlos; Paixão, Helena

    2015-04-01

    An adequate irrigation water management in a golf course is a complex task that depends upon climate (multiple microclimates) and land cover (where crops differ in morphology, physiology, plant density, sensitivity to water stress, etc.). These factors change both in time and space on a landscape. A direct measurement provides localized values of the evapotranspiration and climate conditions. Therefore this is not a practical or economical methodology for large-scale use due to spatial and temporal variability of vegetation, soils, and irrigation management strategies. Remote sensing technology combines large scale with ground measurement of vegetation indexes. These indexes are mathematical combinations of different spectral bands mostly in the visible and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. They represent the measures of vegetation activity that vary not only with the seasonal variability of green foliage, but also across space, thus they are suitable for detecting spatial landscape variability. The spectral vegetation indexes may enhance irrigation management through the information contained in spectral reflectance data. This study was carried out on the 18th fairway of the Royal Golf Course, Vale do Lobo, Portugal, and it aims to establish the relationship between direct measurements and vegetation indexes. For that it is required (1) to characterize the soil and climatic conditions, (2) to assessment of the irrigation system, (3) to estimate the evapotranspiration (4) and to calculate the vegetation indices. The vegetation indices were determined with basis on spectral bands red, green and blue, RGB, and near Infrared, NIR, obtained from the analysis of images acquired from a unpiloted aerial vehicle, UAV, platform. The measurements of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) were obtained from two meteorological stations located in the study area. The landscape evapotranspiration, ETL, was determined in the fairway with multiple microclimates

  1. Applications attract DuPont

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1996-08-07

    Scientists at DuPont say they have demonstrated the first chemical processing application for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets. DuPont says the work, which uses a HTS magnet to separate mineral contaminants from kaolin, points to the feasibility of a range of HTS applications in industrial processing, including those involving polymerization. DuPont`s success comes after 10 years of work to commercialize high-temperature superconductors. And while superconductors have lost much of their luster since the late 1980s, the company says it is still bullish on their prospects. {open_quotes}At the moment, there`s no real market for superconductors,{close_quotes} says Alan Lauder, general manager/superconductivity. But, he says, several potentially lucrative applications could be commercialized within the next several years.

  2. Kinematic evaluation of movement smoothness in golf: relationship between the normalized jerk cost of body joints and the clubhead

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When the human body is introduced to a new motion or movement, it learns the placement of different body parts, sequential muscle control, and coordination between muscles to achieve necessary positions, and it hones this new skill over time and repetition. Previous studies have demonstrated definite differences in the smoothness of body movements with different levels of training, i.e., amateurs compared with professionals. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that skilled golfers swing a driver with a smoother motion than do unskilled golfers. In addition, the relationship between the smoothness of body joints and that of the clubhead was evaluated to provide further insight into the mechanism of smooth golf swing. Methods Two subject groups (skilled and unskilled) participated in the experiment. The skilled group comprised 20 male professional golfers registered with the Korea Professional Golf Association, and the unskilled group comprised 19 amateur golfers who enjoy golf as a hobby. Six infrared cameras (VICON460 system) were used to record the 3D trajectories of markers attached to the clubhead and body segments, and the resulting data was evaluated with kinematic analysis. A physical quantity called jerk was calculated to investigate differences in smoothness during downswing between the two study groups. Results The hypothesis that skilled golfers swing a driver with a smoother motion than do unskilled golfers was supported. The normalized jerk of the clubhead of skilled golfers was lower than that of unskilled golfers in the anterior/posterior, medial/lateral, and proximal/distal directions. Most human joints, especially in the lower body, had statistically significant lower normalized jerk values in the skilled group. In addition, the normalized jerk of the skilled group’s lower body joints had a distinct positive correlation with the normalized jerk of the clubhead with r = 0.657 (p < 0.01). Conclusions The result of this study

  3. L'Aventure du LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-11

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  4. DuPont hikes butanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1997-05-14

    Butanediol (BDO) and its derivatives continue to be strong, a positive sign for the many companies planning expansions. DuPont - one of only two global producers not planning capacity additions - has announced that it will discontinue all off-schedule pricing for BDO and two important derivatives, tetrahydrofuran (THF) and polytetramethylene ether glycol (PTMEG). DuPont`s list prices are $1.00/lb fob for BDO, about $1.40/lb for THF, and $2.00/lb for PTMEG. The price adjustment is effective this month or as contracts allow.

  5. Integrated geophysical survey in defining subsidence features on a golf course

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    Subsidence was observed at several places on the Salina Municipal Golf Course in areas known to be built over a landfill in Salina, Kansas. High-resolution magnetic survey (???5400 m2), multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (three 154 m lines) and microgravity profiling (23 gravity-station values) were performed on a subsidence site (Green 16) to aid in determining boundaries and density deficiency of the landfill in the vicinity of the subsidence. Horizontal boundaries of the landfill were confidently defined by both magnetic anomalies and the pseudo-vertical gradient of total field magnetic anomalies. Furthermore, the pseudo-vertical gradient of magnetic anomalies presented a unique anomaly at Green 16, which provided a criterion for predicting other spots with subsidence potential using the same gradient property. Results of multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (ERP) suggested the bottom limit of the landfill at Green 16 was around 21 m below the ground surface based on the vertical gradient of electric resistivity and a priori information on the depth of the landfill. ERP results also outlined several possible landfill bodies based on their low resistivity values. Microgravity results suggested a -0.14 g cm-3 density deficiency at Green 16 that could equate to future surface subsidence of as much as 1.5 m due to gradual compaction. ?? 2007 Nanjing Institute of Geophysical Prospecting.

  6. Spine biomechanics associated with the shortened, modern one-plane golf swing.

    PubMed

    Dale, R Barry; Brumitt, Jason

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare kinetic, kinematic, and performance variables associated with full and shortened modern backswings in a skilled group of modern swing (one-plane) golfers. Shortening the modern golf backswing is proposed to reduce vertebral spine stress, but supporting evidence is lacking and performance implications are unknown. Thirteen male golfers performed ten swings of each swing type using their own 7-iron club. Biomechanical-dependent variables included the X-Factor kinematic data and spine kinetics. Performance-related dependent variables included club head velocity (CHV), shot distance, and accuracy (distance from the target line). Data were analysed with repeated measures ANOVA with an a priori alpha of 0.05 (SPSS 22.0, IBM, Armonk, NY, USA). We found significant reductions for the X-Factor (p < 0.05) between the full and shortened swings. The shortened swing condition ameliorated vertebral compression force from 7.6 ± 1.4 to 7.0 ± 1.7 N (normalised to body weight, p = 0.01) and significantly reduced CHV (p < 0.05) by ~2 m/s with concomitant shot distance diminution by ~10 m (p < 0.05). Further research is necessary to examine the applicability of a shortened swing for golfers with low back pain.

  7. Foraminiferal assemblages from a transitional tropical upwelling zone in the Golfe d'Arguin, Mauritania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reymond, Claire E.; Mateu-Vicens, Guillem; Westphal, Hildegard

    2014-07-01

    With the growing pressure of eutrophication in tropical regions, the Mauritian shelf provides a natural situation to understand the variability in mesotrophic assemblages. Site-specific dynamics occur throughout the 1200 m depth gradient. The shallow assemblages divide into three types of warm-water mesotrophic foraminiferal assemblages, which is not only a consequence of high primary productivity restricting light to the benthos but due to low pore water oxygenation, shelf geomorphology, and sediment partitioning. In the intermediate depth (approx. 500 m), the increase in foraminiferal diversity is due to the cold-water coral habitat providing a greater range of micro niches. Planktonic species characterise the lower bathyal zone, which emphasizes the reduced benthic carbonate production at depth. Although, due to the strong hydrodynamics within the Golf, planktonic species occur in notable abundances through out the whole depth gradient. Overall, this study can easily be compared to other tropical marine settings investigating the long-term effects of tropical eutrophication and the biogeographic distribution of carbonate producing organisms.

  8. The Effects of Increased Body Temperature on Motor Control during Golf Putting

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, John F.; Grealy, Madeleine A.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of increased core temperature on the performance outcome and movement kinematics of elite golfers during a golf putting task. The study aimed to examine individual differences in the extent to which increased temperature influenced the rate of putting success, whether increased temperature speeded up the timing of the putting downswing and whether elite golfers changed their movement kinematics during times of thermal stress. Six participants performed 20 putts to each of four putt distances (1, 2, 3, and 4 m) under normal temperature conditions and when core body temperature was increased. There was no significant difference in the number of successful putts between the two temperature conditions, but there was an increase in putterhead velocity at ball impact on successful putts to distances of 1 and 4 m when temperature was elevated. This reflected an increase in swing amplitude rather than a reduction in swing duration as hypothesized. There were individual differences in the motor control response to thermal stress as three of the golfers changed the kinematic parameters used to scale their putting movements to achieve putts of different distances at elevated temperatures. Theoretical implications for these findings and the practical implications for elite golfers and future research are discussed. PMID:27630588

  9. Resolution of low-velocity control in golf putting differentiates professionals from amateurs.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yumiko; Fujii, Keisuke; Miura, Akito; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2016-08-11

    It is difficult for humans to apply small amounts of force precisely during motor control. However, experts who have undergone extended training are thought to be able to control low-velocity movement with precision. We investigated the resolution of motor control in golf putting. A total of 10 professional and 10 high-level amateur golfers participated. Putting distances were 0.6-3.3 m, in increments of 0.3 m. We measured the impact velocity and the club-face angle at impact, and the acceleration profile of the downswing. The professionals showed significantly smaller coefficients of variation with respect to impact velocity and smaller root mean square errors in relation to acceleration profiles than did the amateurs. To examine the resolution of motor control for impact velocity, we investigated intra-participant differences in the impact velocity of the club head at two adjacent distances. We found that professionals had higher velocity precision when putting small distance intervals than did amateurs. That is, professionals had higher resolution of low-velocity control than did high-level amateurs. Our results suggest that outstanding performance at a task involves the ability to recognise small distinctions and to produce appropriate movements.

  10. Integrated geophysical survey in defining subsidence features on a golf course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jianghai; Miller, Richard D.

    2007-12-01

    Subsidence was observed at several places on the Salina Municipal Golf Course in areas known to be built over a landfill in Salina, Kansas. High-resolution magnetic survey (~5400 m2), multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (three 154 m lines) and microgravity profiling (23 gravity-station values) were performed on a subsidence site (Green 16) to aid in determining boundaries and density deficiency of the landfill in the vicinity of the subsidence. Horizontal boundaries of the landfill were confidently defined by both magnetic anomalies and the pseudo-vertical gradient of total field magnetic anomalies. Furthermore, the pseudo-vertical gradient of magnetic anomalies presented a unique anomaly at Green 16, which provided a criterion for predicting other spots with subsidence potential using the same gradient property. Results of multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (ERP) suggested the bottom limit of the landfill at Green 16 was around 21 m below the ground surface based on the vertical gradient of electric resistivity and a priori information on the depth of the landfill. ERP results also outlined several possible landfill bodies based on their low resistivity values. Microgravity results suggested a -0.14 g cm-3 density deficiency at Green 16 that could equate to future surface subsidence of as much as 1.5 m due to gradual compaction.

  11. Hip and shoulder rotations during the golf swing of sub-10 handicap players.

    PubMed

    Burden, A M; Grimshaw, P N; Wallace, E S

    1998-02-01

    The motion of the shoulders, arms and club during the golf swing has often been explained using the 'double pendulum' model. Despite subsequent explanations for the actions of the distal segments of the body, the coordination of more proximal segments during the swing is less well understood. To ascertain the pattern of centre of mass motion and hip and shoulder rotations that result in a high clubhead speed at impact, the swing used in driving from the tee of eight low-handicap golfers was videotaped and analysed using three-dimensional techniques. The shoulders rotated in excess of 90 degrees during the backswing and, in 75% of the golfers, continued rotating away from the flag as the hips began turning back towards it. This sequential pattern of hip and shoulder rotation indicated that they conformed to the 'summation of speed' principle, which is hypothesized to result in a greater torque being applied to the club before impact. The speed of the drive was also benefited by the centre of mass shifting exclusively in the intended direction of ball flight during impact.

  12. Analysis of the 5 iron golf swing when hitting for maximum distance.

    PubMed

    Healy, Aoife; Moran, Kieran A; Dickson, Jane; Hurley, Cillian; Smeaton, Alan F; O'Connor, Noel E; Kelly, Philip; Haahr, Mads; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2011-07-01

    Most previous research on golf swing mechanics has focused on the driver club. The aim of this study was to identify the kinematic factors that contribute to greater hitting distance when using the 5 iron club. Three-dimensional marker coordinate data were collected (250 Hz) to calculate joint kinematics at eight key swing events, while a swing analyser measured club swing and ball launch characteristics. Thirty male participants were assigned to one of two groups, based on their ball launch speed (high: 52.9 ± 2.1 m · s(-1); low: 39.9 ± 5.2 m · s(-1)). Statistical analyses were used to identify variables that differed significantly between the two groups. Results showed significant differences were evident between the two groups for club face impact point and a number of joint angles and angular velocities, with greater shoulder flexion and less left shoulder internal rotation in the backswing, greater extension angular velocity in both shoulders at early downswing, greater left shoulder adduction angular velocity at ball contact, greater hip joint movement and X Factor angle during the downswing, and greater left elbow extension early in the downswing appearing to contribute to greater hitting distance with the 5 iron club.

  13. The Effects of Increased Body Temperature on Motor Control during Golf Putting.

    PubMed

    Mathers, John F; Grealy, Madeleine A

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of increased core temperature on the performance outcome and movement kinematics of elite golfers during a golf putting task. The study aimed to examine individual differences in the extent to which increased temperature influenced the rate of putting success, whether increased temperature speeded up the timing of the putting downswing and whether elite golfers changed their movement kinematics during times of thermal stress. Six participants performed 20 putts to each of four putt distances (1, 2, 3, and 4 m) under normal temperature conditions and when core body temperature was increased. There was no significant difference in the number of successful putts between the two temperature conditions, but there was an increase in putterhead velocity at ball impact on successful putts to distances of 1 and 4 m when temperature was elevated. This reflected an increase in swing amplitude rather than a reduction in swing duration as hypothesized. There were individual differences in the motor control response to thermal stress as three of the golfers changed the kinematic parameters used to scale their putting movements to achieve putts of different distances at elevated temperatures. Theoretical implications for these findings and the practical implications for elite golfers and future research are discussed.

  14. The creation of a superstitious belief regarding putters in a laboratory-based golfing task.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Andrew; Taylor, Jamie A; Parkes, Royston

    2015-10-02

    The objective was to determine the extent to which it was possible to induce superstitious behaviour and beliefs in a golf putting task in a laboratory. Participants (N = 28) took part in a putting task using three identical clubs in which visual feedback regarding performance was restricted. Participants were provided with verbal feedback of their performance, which was honest when they used one putter, negative with a second putter (they did better than they were told) and positive with a third (they did worse than they were told). After this initial acquisition phase, a competition was announced and participants were asked to select a putter they would like to use. The participants were then asked to rate various qualities of the putters. Significantly more participants selected the "positive" putter for the competition (N = 22) compared to the "negative" putter (N = 1), p < .001. In addition, participants claimed that the positive putter had a better weight, was more comfortable and easier to use than the negative putter (all p < .001). Overall, this evidence can be taken to show that a superstitious belief can be formed in a short amount of time within a laboratory setting and that it can affect both the perceptions and choices of an individual.

  15. Relationships between clubshaft motions and clubface orientation during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Tokio; Yokozawa, Toshiharu; Inaba, Yuki; Matsuda, Yuji; Shiraki, Hitoshi

    2017-09-01

    Since clubface orientation at impact affects ball direction and ball spin, the ability to control clubface orientation is one of the most important skills for golfers. This study presents a new method to describe clubface orientation as a function of the clubshaft motions (i.e., swing plane orientation, clubshaft angle in the swing plane, and clubshaft rolling angle) during a golf swing and investigates the relationships between the clubshaft motions and clubface orientation at impact. The club motion data of driver shots were collected from eight skilled golfers using a three-dimensional motion capture system. The degrees of influence of the clubshaft motions on the clubface orientation were investigated using sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the swing plane horizontal angle affected the clubface horizontal angle to an extent of 100%, that the clubshaft angle in the swing plane affected both the clubface vertical and horizontal angles to extents of 74 and 68%, respectively, and that the clubshaft rolling angle affected both the clubface vertical and horizontal angles to extents of -67 and 75%, respectively. Since the method presented here relates clubface orientation to clubshaft motions, it is useful for understanding the clubface control of a golfer.

  16. The influence of golf club shaft stiffness on clubhead kinematics at ball impact.

    PubMed

    Worobets, Jay; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2012-06-01

    The role of shaft stiffness on the golf swing is not well understood. Studies in which golfers hit balls with clubs of varying shaft flex have reported changes in ball distance. The results of mathematical models suggest that shaft stiffness affects only the orientation of the clubhead at impact, not the speed of the clubhead, but there are no experimental results validating these findings. The purpose of this study was therefore to experimentally examine the influence of shaft stiffness on clubhead kinematics at ball impact. Forty golfers hit 10 balls with each of five drivers varying in shaft stiffness from 'Ladies' to 'Extra-Stiff', in a double-blind study design. The motions of three reflective markers attached to the clubhead were captured with a high-speed motion analysis system. At ball impact, shaft stiffness had a statistically significant influence on clubhead speed for 27 subjects, on loft angle for 11 subjects, and on lie angle for all 40 subjects. No effect was observed on face angle, in to out path angle, or attack angle. These results show that shaft stiffness can affect ball launch conditions by altering clubhead speed and/or loft angle.

  17. Evaluation of impact sound on the ‘feel’ of a golf shot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J. R.; Jones, R.; Mansfield, N. J.; Rothberg, S. J.

    2005-11-01

    The 'feel' of a golf club is an important characteristic that has a significant influence on a golfer's choice of equipment. The sound from impact varies between different clubs and balls and this has been found to contribute to the feel of a shot. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the impact sound and elite golfers' subjective perceptions of the shot. Suitable test procedures were developed to quantify the golfers' perceptions using a questionnaire and to measure the impact sound from the same shots. Statistical techniques were then employed to identify correlations between parameters of the impact sound and the golfers' subjective ratings. The characteristics sharpness and loudness of sound and pleasantness and liveliness of feel were found to be strongly correlated; a shot was rated as having a pleasant feel if it had a loud, sharp sound and a lively feel. Strong positive correlations were also obtained between the subjective ratings and parameters of the impact sound such as sound pressure level, loudness level (according to ISO 532) and sharpness.

  18. Neurotoxicity associated with exposure to 1-bromopropane in golf-club cleansing workers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Te-Hao; Wu, Ming-Ling; Wu, Ya-Hsueh; Tsai, Wen-Jen; Lin, Kon-Ping; Wang, Chao-Lin; Yang, Chen-Chang; Deng, Jou-Fang

    2015-01-01

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is an alternative to ozone-depleting solvent that is used in degreasing, dry cleaning, spray adhesives, and aerosol solvents. Occupational exposure to 1-BP is associated with adverse peripheral sensory, motor, and central nervous system (CNS) effects. We report our Health Hazard and Medical Evaluation of 6 patients with neurotoxicity associated with occupational exposure to 1-BP. Case series and environmental evaluation. Six workers, 1 male and 5 female, were exposed to high ambient 1-BP concentrations while employed in a golf club cleaning factory. 1-BP was identified in the bulk solvent sample used by the workers and confirmed the workers' daily occupational exposure to 1-BP for 3-10 months. The major presenting symptoms were tingling pain, soreness in lower extremities, and paresthesia. N-acetyl-S-(n-propyl)-L-cysteine (AcPrCys), a 1-BP metabolite, was identified by LC/MS/MS in the urine (0.171-1.74 mg/g-Cr) of these workers 5-26 days following 1-BP exposure. An occupational outbreak of 1-BP poisoning occurred as a result of recurrent power outages, condenser, and exhaust fans malfunction, and inadequate personal protection. Occupational exposure to 1-BP may result in peripheral neuropathy as well as adverse CNS effects. Urine AcPrCys may be a specific biomarker for 1-BP exposure.

  19. Evaluation of vibrotactile sensations in the ‘feel’ of a golf shot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J. R.; Jones, R.; Mansfield, N. J.; Rothberg, S. J.

    2005-07-01

    Players' subjective perceptions of the characteristics, suitability and quality of sports equipment will have a significant bearing on their equipment selection. The 'feel' of a golf club is such a perception and the vibration at impact perceived by the player is generally considered to contribute significantly to 'feel'. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between golfers' subjective perceptions of the feel of a shot and the post-impact vibration of a club. Suitable test procedures were developed to quantify the golfers' perceptions and to obtain measurements of vibration at the hands. The five feel characteristics investigated, 'pleasantness', 'hardness', 'solidity', 'liveliness' and perceived vibration level, were found to be strongly correlated; shots that were regarded as having a pleasant feel were also rated as having felt solid, lively, soft and with little vibration perceived. When these ratings were correlated with raw measurements of impact vibration, the relationships were initially weak. Techniques, such as normalizing the data, weighting the data and using mean data, were developed, resulting in much stronger correlations. Ultimately, a reduction in the total rms vibration level was found to correlate well with the players' subjective descriptions of 'pleasant', 'solid', 'lively' and 'soft' feel.

  20. Centre of pressure patterns in the golf swing: individual-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Ball, Kevin; Best, Russell

    2012-06-01

    Weight transfer has been identified as important in group-based analyses. The aim of this study was to extend this work by examining the importance of weight transfer in the golf swing on an individual basis. Five professional and amateur golfers performed 50 swings with the driver, hitting a ball into a net. The golfer's centre of pressure position and velocity, parallel with the line of shot, were measured by two force plates at eight swing events that were identified from high-speed video. The relationships between these parameters and club head velocity at ball contact were examined using regression statistics. The results did support the use of group-based analysis, with all golfers returning significant relationships. However, results were also individual-specific, with golfers returning different combinations of significant factors. Furthermore, factors not identified in group-based analysis were significant on an individual basis. The most consistent relationship was a larger weight transfer range associated with a larger club head velocity (p < 0.05). All golfers also returned at least one significant relationship with rate of weight transfer at swing events (p < 0.01). Individual-based analysis should form part of performance-based biomechanical analysis of sporting skills.

  1. Club shaft weight in putting accuracy and perception of swing parameters in golf putting.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jon; Nilsson, Johnny

    2007-08-01

    This study assessed how shaft weight influenced golf putting accuracy and subjective perception of swing parameters. Three putters of different shaft weight (100, 420, and 610 gm) were tested by 24 club players. Distance and deviation in direction were measured, and subjective ratings of the putters recorded. Subjects hit the ball further with lighter shafts. The mean distance hit was 100.2, 99.3, and 98.1% of the target distance for the normal, medium, and heavy putter shafts, respectively. Subjectively, the medium heavy putter was rated best on "overall feeling" and it was also rated better than the normal on"feeling of stability in the downswing." The heaviest putter was rated as too heavy by 23 of 24 subjects. There were no significant differences between the putter clubs in distance and directional putting accuracy. The major findings are that the golfers putted 2.1% longer with the 100 gm shaft than with the 610 gm shaft and that the perception of overall feeling of the putter club was not related to performance.

  2. Effects of golf shaft stiffness on strain, clubhead presentation and wrist kinematics.

    PubMed

    Betzler, Nils F; Monk, Stuart A; Wallace, Eric S; Otto, Steve R

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify and explain the effect of shaft stiffness on the dynamics of golf drives. Twenty golfers performed swings with two clubs designed to differ only in shaft bending stiffness. Wrist kinematics and clubhead presentation to the ball were determined using optical motion capture systems in conjunction with a radar device for capturing ball speed, launch angle, and spin. Shaft stiffness had a marginally small effect on clubhead and ball speeds, which increased by 0.45% (p < 0.001) and 0.7% (p = 0.008), respectively, for the less stiff club. Two factors directly contributed to these increases: (i) a faster recovery of the lower flex shaft from lag to lead bending just before impact (p < 0.001); and (ii) an increase of 0.4% in angular velocity of the grip of the lower flex club at impact (p = 0.003). Unsurprisingly, decreases in shaft stiffness led to more shaft bending at the transition from backswing to downswing (p < 0.001). Contrary to previous research, lead bending at impact marginally increased for the stiffer shaft (p = 0.003). Overall, and taking effect sizes into account, the changes in shaft stiffness in isolation did not have a meaningful effect on the measured parameters, for the type of shaft investigated.

  3. Random Versus Blocked Practice to Enhance Mental Representation in Golf Putting.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Davoud; Taheri, HamidReza; Saberi Kakhki, Alireza

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in mental representation from either random or blocked practice when engaged in golf putting. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to random practice, blocked practice, and no-practice groups. First, we measured novice golfers' initial mental representation levels and required them to perform 18 putting trials as a pre-test. We then asked random and blocked groups to practice in accordance with their group assignment for six consecutive days (10 blocks each day, 18 trials each). A week after the last practice session, we re-measured all participants' final mental representation levels and required them to perform 18 putting trials to evaluate learning retention through practice. While those engaged in the random practice method putted more poorly during acquisition (i.e., practice) than those in blocked practice, the random practice group experienced more accurate retention during the final putting trials, and they showed a more structured mental representation than those in blocked practice, one that was more similar to that of skilled golfers. These results support the acquisition of a rich mental representation through random versus blocked practice.

  4. The creation of a superstitious belief regarding putters in a laboratory-based golfing task

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Andrew; Taylor, Jamie A.; Parkes, Royston

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to determine the extent to which it was possible to induce superstitious behaviour and beliefs in a golf putting task in a laboratory. Participants (N = 28) took part in a putting task using three identical clubs in which visual feedback regarding performance was restricted. Participants were provided with verbal feedback of their performance, which was honest when they used one putter, negative with a second putter (they did better than they were told) and positive with a third (they did worse than they were told). After this initial acquisition phase, a competition was announced and participants were asked to select a putter they would like to use. The participants were then asked to rate various qualities of the putters. Significantly more participants selected the “positive” putter for the competition (N = 22) compared to the “negative” putter (N = 1), p < .001. In addition, participants claimed that the positive putter had a better weight, was more comfortable and easier to use than the negative putter (all p < .001). Overall, this evidence can be taken to show that a superstitious belief can be formed in a short amount of time within a laboratory setting and that it can affect both the perceptions and choices of an individual. PMID:26877722

  5. Poumon du puisatier

    PubMed Central

    Elidrissi, Amal Moustarhfir; Zaghba, Nahid; Benjelloun, Hanane; Yassine, Najiba

    2016-01-01

    Le puisatier a pour profession le creusement et l'entretien des puits pour fournir de l'eau. Il est au contact de divers minerais, particulièrement la silice, particule qui présente un risque certain de développement des maladies pulmonaires connues sous le nom de silicose. Le but de notre travail est de préciser le profil épidémiologique, clinique, radiologique et évolutif des patients puisatiers silicotiques. C'est une étude rétrospective concernant 54 cas de puisatiers ayant une silicose, colligés au service des maladies respiratoires du CHU Ibn Rochd de Casablanca, de Mars 1997 à Janvier 2016. Tous les malades étaient des puisatiers, de sexe masculin, avec une moyenne d'âge de 50 ans. Le tabagisme était retrouvé dans 36 cas et un antécédent de tuberculose était noté dans huit cas. La radiographie thoracique retrouvait des grandes opacités dans 39 cas, des petites opacités dans 15 cas, et un épaississement des septats dans 11 cas. Ce tableau de silicose s'était compliqué d'une surinfection bactérienne dans 37% des cas, d' un pneumothorax dans 4% des cas et d'une tuberculose dans 20% des cas. La prise en charge thérapeutique était celle des complications. La déclaration de la maladie professionnelle et de l'indemnisation était faite. L'évolution était bonne dans 12 cas, stationnaire dans 17 cas et mauvaise dans 16 cas. La silicose est une pneumoconiose fréquente chez les puisatiers. Elle retentit sur la fonction respiratoire. Nous soulignons l'association fréquente de tuberculose et nous insistons sur la prévention qui reste le meilleur traitement. PMID:28292119

  6. Effects of irrigating with wastewater on ground-water quality at Fort Carson Military Reservation golf course near Colorado Springs, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edelmann, Patrick

    1984-01-01

    Fort Carson Military Reservation has used treatment wastewater for irrigation of the Fort Carson golf course since 1971. The effect of applied wastewater on groundwater quality at Fort Carson golf course was evaluated using water levels and water-quality data from 20 observation wells. The water-quality constituents analyzed included dissolved solids, major ions, nutrients, detergents, dissolved organic carbon, chemical and biological oxygen demand, and trace elements. Effects of the applied wastewater on ground-water quality for most constituents were obscured by large areal variations and by high concentrations of the constituents upgradient from the golf course. The sources of nitrogen observed in the ground water beneath the golf course were applied wastewater, applied fertilizer, leachate from the organic-rich shale, and from unknown upgradient sources. Nitrogen loading at the golf course from wastewater and applied fertilizer was estimated to be 18 ,900 pounds per year. After 10 years, less than 1 percent of the nitrogen applied was actually present in the ground water. Loss of nitrogen to the atmosphere as nitrous oxides, absorption, and to fixation by grass resulted in the much smaller concentrations observed in the ground water. (USGS)

  7. Du Pont Information Flow System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Warren S.

    1972-01-01

    The Information Flow System is a large-scale information retrieval system developed for processing of Du Pont information files. As currently implemented, the system stores and retrieves information on company technical reports. Extensions of the system for handling chemical structure information and on-line processing are also discussed. (3…

  8. Rupture sous-cutanée du tendon long extenseur du pouce: à propos de 5 cas

    PubMed Central

    Abdelillah, Rachid; Abbassi, Najib; Erraji, Moncef; Abdeljawad, Najib; Yacoubi, Hicham; Daoudi, Abdelkrim

    2014-01-01

    La rupture spontanée du muscle long extenseur du pouce (EPL) du tendon au niveau du poignet est rare et principalement rapportés après fracture du radius distal à tubercule de Lister, dans la synovite, ténosynovite ou la polyarthrite rhumatoïde. Nous rapportons 5 cas de rupture spontanée du tendon long extenseur du pouce, traités par une greffe ou un transfert tendineux. PMID:25317233

  9. Testing of different soil combinations as substrates in slalom slopes and golf courses in the cold climate environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlaja, Jouni

    2010-05-01

    Testing of different soil combinations as substrates in slalom slopes and golf courses in the cold climate environment Jouni Pihlaja, Geological Survey of Finland, Northern Finland Office, P.O. Box 77, FIN-96101 Rovaniemi, Finland. jouni.pihlaja@gtk.fi, www.gtk.fi The Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) is, with some partners, carrying out a cooperative project, POMARA, in the Levi tourist center in northern Finland. The purpose of this applied geology project is to determine which soil combinations work best over the long term as substrates on slalom slopes and golf course areas. Since the tourist center is located in a cold climate area, it gives extra challenges to those landscaping activities. The average temperature in January is about -15°C and in July +14°C. In the Levi area, the slalom slopes have normally been covered by local carex peat during the shaping phase of slopes. The problem has been that on the top part of the fell, the peat has "disappeared" after some years and stones have come up under the peat layer, since these areas are naturally covered by block fields. The main assumption at the beginning of the project was that frost weathering is causing the problems. In this project, test areas have been prepared on the slopes. The most important task is to compare test areas covered by carex peat to areas covered by a combination of sandy till and carex peat. The reason why sandy till was chosen to be the additional material was that it is supposed to stand up better against frost weathering than peat itself. Also, when considering future landscaping, the sandy till is the most economically viable mineral material to be used because of its nearby location . In the golf course areas, a combination of fine sand and sphagnum peat has been used in landscaping. The peat was brought from the Simo area, 300 km south of Levi. In this project, the goal is to determine if the local carex peat is working properly in the green areas of the golf club. The

  10. Evaluating a naturally occurring baculovirus for extended biological control of the black cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in golf course habitats.

    PubMed

    Bixby-Brosi, Andrea J; Potter, Daniel A

    2010-10-01

    Golf courses are a potential market for microbial insecticides, but how intensive management of such sites interacts with efficacy of entomopathogens is poorly known. We evaluated Agrotis ipsilon nucleopolyhedrovirus (AgipMNPV) for suppressing black cutworms, Agrotis ipsilon Hufnagel (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), in turf representative of golf course habitats and on whole tees under actual play. In independent trials on sand- or soil-based putting greens and surrounds, or fairway-height creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.), < or = 1-wk-old AgipMNPV residues (10 x 10(8) occlusion bodies [OBs] per m2) typically gave 50-60% lethal infection of introduced third instars. In most cases, however, there was no residual control beyond 2-4 wk. Spraying fairway-height bentgrass with AgipMNPV alone (10 x 10(9) OBs per m2) gave 90, 85, and 7% infection of second instars introduced 4 d, 3 wk, or 5 wk later, but adjuvants (optical brightener, lignin, or both) intended to synergize and protect the virus from UV degradation did not extend infectivity. Fresh (< 1-wk-old) AgipMNPV residues killed 76-86% of neonates hatching from eggs on tees under play, but levels of control plummeted within a few weeks. Three species of braconids, an encyrtid Copidosoma bakeri (Howard), and a tachinid, Bonnetia comta (Fallen) collectively killed 24-31% of larvae recovered from those tees. AgipMNPV seems better suited for targeted control of early instars than for season-long control. Golf turf is a severe environment for baculoviruses so several applications per growing season would probably be needed to maintain high enough titers on grass foliage to effectively control caterpillar pests.

  11. From Basic Physics to Geoscience Applications: Floating Golf Balls and Levitating Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R. M.; Johnson, R.; Gardiner, E.; Bergman, J.; Genyuk, J.; Lagrave, M.

    2005-12-01

    Basic physics principles often play out in interesting ways in geophysical systems. This presentation touches upon two fundamental notions from the physical sciences: the concept of density and the force of magnetism. "Exploring Density with Salt and Fresh Water: Par 5" helps students explore the concept of density by observing the density difference between fresh water and a hypersaline solution, how a less-dense layer of water can remain "afloat" atop a denser layer for extended periods of time, and how an object with a density that is intermediate between that of the two liquids (in this case, a golf ball) can remain suspended at the interface between the liquid layers. This activity serves as a discussion starter for topics such as density-driven ocean circulation and the gradual mixing of fresh and salt water at estuaries where freshwater rivers flow into the sea. "Magnetic Levitation" reminds students of the basic principles of magnetism, and encourages them to explore the concepts of force equilibrium, oscillatory motion, and damping in multiple-degree-of-freedom systems. This basic physical system also serves as a simple model of increasing density with depth in both the atmosphere and the oceans. "Magnetometer Extensions" has students use a simple, inexpensive magnetometer to simulate magnetic prospecting and to explore the symmetric patterns of polarity embedded in the igneous rocks on either side of a mid-ocean spreading ridge. Finally, in "Terrabagga", students use a magnetometer to explore the magnetic fields of planets as though on board a spacecraft during a planetary fly-by.

  12. Fungicide leaching from golf greens: effects of root zone composition and surfactant use.

    PubMed

    Larsbo, Mats; Aamlid, Trygve S; Persson, Lave; Jarvis, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Soil water repellency in golf putting greens may induce preferential "finger flow," leading to enhanced leaching of surface applied fungicides. We examined the effects of root zone composition, treatment with a non-ionic surfactant, and the use of the fungicide iprodion or a combination of azoxystrobin and propiconazole on soil water repellency, soil water content distributions, fungicide leaching, and turf quality during 1 yr. Soil water repellency was measured using the water drop penetration time (WDPT) test and tension infiltrometers. Our study was made on a 3-yr-old experimental green seeded with creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) 'Penn A-4' at Landvik in southeast Norway. The facility consists of 16 lysimeters with two different root zone materials: (i) straight sand (1% gravel, 96% sand, 3% silt and clay, 4 g kg(-1) organic matter) (SS) and (ii) straight sand mixed with garden compost to an organic matter content of 21 g kg(-1) (Green Mix [GM]). Surfactant treatment resulted in 96% lower average WDPTs at 1 cm depth, three times higher water infiltration rates at the soil surface, and reduced spatial variation in soil water contents. Fungicide leaching was close to zero for the GM lysimeters probably due to stronger sorption. Concentrations in the drainage water from SS lysimeters often exceeded surface water guideline values for all three fungicides, but surfactant treatment dramatically reduced fungicide leaching from these lysimeters. In autumn and winter, surfactant-treated plots were more infected with fungal diseases probably because of higher water content in the turfgrass thatch layer.

  13. Golfing with protons: using research grade simulation algorithms for online games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harold, J.

    2004-12-01

    Scientists have long known the power of simulations. By modeling a system in a computer, researchers can experiment at will, developing an intuitive sense of how a system behaves. The rapid increase in the power of personal computers, combined with technologies such as Flash, Shockwave and Java, allow us to bring research simulations into the education world by creating exploratory environments for the public. This approach is illustrated by a project funded by a small grant from NSF's Informal Science Education program, through an opportunity that provides education supplements to existing research awards. Using techniques adapted from a magnetospheric research program, several Flash based interactives have been developed that allow web site visitors to explore the motion of particles in the Earth's magnetosphere. These pieces were folded into a larger Space Weather Center web project at the Space Science Institute (www.spaceweathercenter.org). Rather than presenting these interactives as plasma simulations per se, the research algorithms were used to create games such as "Magneto Mini Golf", where the balls are protons moving in combined electric and magnetic fields. The "holes" increase in complexity, beginning with no fields and progressing towards a simple model of Earth's magnetosphere. The emphasis of the activity is gameplay, but because it is at its core a plasma simulation, the user develops an intuitive sense of charged particle motion as they progress. Meanwhile, the pieces contain embedded assessments that are measurable through a database driven tracking system. Mining that database not only provides helpful usability information, but allows us to examine whether users are meeting the learning goals of the activities. We will discuss the development and evaluation results of the project, as well as the potential for these types of activities to shift the expectations of what a web site can and should provide educationally.

  14. A Comparison of Trap Types for Assessing Diversity of Scarabaeoidea on South Carolina Golf Courses.

    PubMed

    Chong, Juang-Horng; Hinson, Kevin R

    2015-10-01

    A 2-yr survey was conducted on golf courses in South Carolina to 1) document the species richness and seasonal activity of Scarabaeoidea; 2) assess any species compositional differences among three trap types (ultraviolet light, unbaited flight-intercept, and unbaited pitfall); and 3) identify any dominant taxa in each trap type. A total of 74,326 scarabaeoid beetles were captured, of which 77.4% were Aphodiinae (not identified to species). The remaining specimens belong to 104 species in 47 genera and 6 families. The most abundant species were Cyclocephala lurida Bland, Dyscinetus morator (F.), Euetheola humilis (Burmeister), Hybosorus illigeri Reiche, and Maladera castanea (Arrow). In all trap types, >90% of all specimens and taxa were collected between April and August. Ultraviolet light traps collected ∼94% of total specimens consisting of 83 taxa (of which 51 were unique to this trap type), whereas flight-intercept traps captured ∼2% of all specimens representing 53 taxa (18 of which were unique), and pitfall traps captured ∼4% of all specimens representing 15 taxa (no unique species; all species also captured by ultraviolet light traps). Indicator species analysis identified 2-3 and 10-13 taxa that were most frequently collected by flight-intercept and ultraviolet light traps, respectively. Flight-intercept traps complemented ultraviolet light traps by capturing more species of dung and carrion beetles and diurnal phytophagous scarab beetles. Results suggested that a similar survey for domestic or exotic scarabaeoid beetles in turfgrass systems should be conducted between April and August using ultraviolet light and flight-intercept traps at 13-58 sites.

  15. Competitive elite golf: a review of the relationships between playing results, technique and physique.

    PubMed

    Hellström, John

    2009-01-01

    Elite golfers commonly use fitness and technical training to become more competitive. The aim of this paper was to review the literature regarding the relationships between elite golfers' playing results, technique and physique. The competitive outcome is a direct function of the score. The three golf statistical measures that show the strongest correlations to scoring average are greens in regulation (GIR), scrambling, and putts per GIR. However, more detailed game statistics are needed where the distances to the targets are known before and after the strokes. Players affect ball displacement by controlling clubhead velocity and clubface angle during club and ball impact. X-factor studies have produced ambiguous results, possibly caused by different definitions of upper torso, rotation and top of backswing. Higher clubhead speed is generally associated with larger spinal rotation and shoulder girdle protraction at the top of the backswing. It is also associated with higher ground reaction forces and torques, a bottom-up and sequential increase of body segment angular velocities, a rapid increase of spinal rotation and a late adduction of the wrists during the downswing. Players can increase the clubhead speed generated by a swinging motion by actively adding a force couple. Wrist, elbow and shoulder force couple strategies should be differentiated when investigating the technique. Physical parameters such as anthropometrics, strength and flexibility are associated with skill level and clubhead speed. Current studies have investigated the linear correlation between arm and shaft lengths and clubhead speed, but a quadratic relationship may be stronger due to changes in moment of inertia. Fitness training can increase and perhaps decrease the clubhead speed and striking distance, depending on training methods and the player's fitness and level of skill. Future studies may focus on individual training needs and the relationship between physique, execution and its

  16. Motor control strategies and the effects of fatigue on golf putting performance

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, John F.; Grealy, Madeleine A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the strategies used by elite golfers to scale their putting actions to achieve putts of different distances. There were three aims; to determine if putting actions are scaled by manipulating swing amplitude as predicted by Craig etal. (2000), to establish the test–retest reliability of the Craig et al. model, and to evaluate whether elite golfers changed their putting scaling strategies when fatigued. Putting actions were recorded at baseline (time 1) and 6 months later (time 2) and after walking at 70% of maximum heart rate for 1 h (time 3). Participants performed a total of 80 putts which varied in distance (1 m, 2 m, 3 m, and 4 m) at time 1 and time 2, and 100 putts to the same distances when they were fatigued (time 3). Multiple regression was used to examine how the golfers systematically changed the movement control variables in the Craig etal. (2000) model to achieve golf putts of different distances. Although swing amplitude was a strong predictor of putterhead velocity at ball impact for all of the participants at baseline (time 1), each golfer systematically changed aspects of the timing of their action. A comparison of the regression models between time 1 and time 2 showed no significant changes in the scaling strategies used, indicating that the Craig etal. (2000) model had good test–retest reliability. Fatigue was associated with a decrease in the number of putts that were successfully holed and significant changes in the scaling strategies used by three of the golfers, along with a trend for increasing the putterhead velocity at ball impact. These motor control changes in performance when fatigued were evident in successful putts indicating that even when these elite golfers were able to achieve the goal of holing the putt, moderate levels of fatigue were influencing the consistency of their performance. Theoretical implications for the Craig etal. (2000) model and practical implications for elite golfers are discussed

  17. L'Aventure du LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  18. Biomechanical effect of altered lumbar lordosis on intervertebral lumbar joints during the golf swing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Tae Soo; Cho, Woong; Kim, Kwon Hee; Chae, Soo Won

    2014-11-01

    Although the lumbar spine region is the most common site of injury in golfers, little research has been done on intervertebral loads in relation to the anatomical-morphological differences in the region. This study aimed to examine the biomechanical effects of anatomical-morphological differences in the lumbar lordosis on the lumbar spinal joints during a golf swing. The golf swing motions of ten professional golfers were analyzed. Using a subject-specific 3D musculoskeletal system model, inverse dynamic analyses were performed to compare the intervertebral load, the load on the lumbar spine, and the load in each swing phase. In the intervertebral load, the value was the highest at the L5-S1 and gradually decreased toward the T12. In each lumbar spine model, the load value was the greatest on the kypholordosis (KPL) followed by normal lordosis (NRL), hypolordosis (HPL), and excessive lordosis (EXL) before the impact phase. However, results after the follow-through (FT) phase were shown in reverse order. Finally, the load in each swing phase was greatest during the FT phase in all the lumbar spine models. The findings can be utilized in the training and rehabilitation of golfers to help reduce the risk of injury by considering individual anatomical-morphological characteristics.

  19. Comparison of Two- and Three-Dimensional Methods for Analysis of Trunk Kinematic Variables in the Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aimée C; Roberts, Jonathan R; Wallace, Eric S; Kong, Pui; Forrester, Stephanie E

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional methods have been used to compute trunk kinematic variables (flexion/extension, lateral bend, axial rotation) and X-factor (difference in axial rotation between trunk and pelvis) during the golf swing. Recent X-factor studies advocated three-dimensional (3D) analysis due to the errors associated with two-dimensional (2D) methods, but this has not been investigated for all trunk kinematic variables. The purpose of this study was to compare trunk kinematic variables and X-factor calculated by 2D and 3D methods to examine how different approaches influenced their profiles during the swing. Trunk kinematic variables and X-factor were calculated for golfers from vectors projected onto the global laboratory planes and from 3D segment angles. Trunk kinematic variable profiles were similar in shape; however, there were statistically significant differences in trunk flexion (-6.5 ± 3.6°) at top of backswing and trunk right-side lateral bend (8.7 ± 2.9°) at impact. Differences between 2D and 3D X-factor (approximately 16°) could largely be explained by projection errors introduced to the 2D analysis through flexion and lateral bend of the trunk and pelvis segments. The results support the need to use a 3D method for kinematic data calculation to accurately analyze the golf swing.

  20. Evaluation of Econem™, a Formulated Pasteuria sp. Bionematicide, for Management of Belonolaimus longicaudatus on Golf Course Turf1

    PubMed Central

    Luc, John E.; Giblin-Davis, Robin M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, a turfgrass bionematicide containing in vitro produced Pasteuria sp. for management of Belonolaimus longicaudatus was launched under the tradename Econem™. Greenhouse pot studies and field trials on golf course fairways and tee boxes evaluated Econem at varied rates and application frequencies. Trials on putting greens compared efficacy of three applications of Econem at 98 kg/ha to untreated controls and 1,3-dichloropropene at 53 kg a.i/ha. Further putting green trials evaluated the ability of three applications of Econem at 98 kg/ha to prevent resurgence of population densities of B. longicaudatus following treatment with 1,3-dichloropropene at 53 kg a.i./ha. None of the Econem treatments in pot studies were effective at reducing B. longicaudatus numbers (P ≤ 0.05). Econem was associated with reduction in population densities of B. longicaudatus (P ≤ 0.1) on only a single sampling date in one of the eight field trials and did not improve turf health in any of the trials (P > 0.1). These results did not indicate that Econem is an effective treatment for management of B. longicaudatus on golf course turf. PMID:22791919

  1. Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Over Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Area Promotes Implicit Motor Learning in a Golf Putting Task.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Frank F; Yeung, Andrew Y; Poolton, Jamie M; Lee, Tatia M C; Leung, Gilberto K K; Masters, Rich S W

    2015-01-01

    Implicit motor learning is characterized by low dependence on working memory and stable performance despite stress, fatigue, or multi-tasking. However, current paradigms for implicit motor learning are based on behavioral interventions that are often task-specific and limited when applied in practice. To investigate whether cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) area during motor learning suppressed working memory activity and reduced explicit verbal-analytical involvement in movement control, thereby promoting implicit motor learning. Twenty-seven healthy individuals practiced a golf putting task during a Training Phase while receiving either real cathodal tDCS stimulation over the left DLPFC area or sham stimulation. Their performance was assessed during a Test phase on another day. Verbal working memory capacity was assessed before and after the Training Phase, and before the Test Phase. Compared to sham stimulation, real stimulation suppressed verbal working memory activity after the Training Phase, but enhanced golf putting performance during the Training Phase and the Test Phase, especially when participants were required to multi-task. Cathodal tDCS over the left DLPFC may foster implicit motor learning and performance in complex real-life motor tasks that occur during sports, surgery or motor rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of monetary reward and punishment on psychological, physiological, behavioral and performance aspects of a golf putting task.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to examine kinematic characteristics and force control during a golf-putting task under a pressure condition. The secondary purpose was to provide an exploratory investigation of the relationship between changes in behavior (kinematics and force control) and performance on the one hand, and psychological (attention and affect) and physiological (arousal level) changes on the other hand. Twenty male novices performed 150 acquisition trials, followed by 10 test trials during a pressure condition induced by performance-contingent distracters: a cash reward or punishment. A three-dimensional motion analysis revealed that, during the pressure test, angular displacements of rotational movements at the horizontal plane and movement time of the arms and club during the backswing and downswing phases all decreased, while acceleration of the elbows during the downswing phase increased. Mean performance indices in all participants' were unchanged in spite of the kinematic changes under the pressure condition. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the decrement in performance, as well as increased variability of movement time and speed, were more likely to increase when participants shifted their attention to movements. Furthermore, changes in heart rate and negative affect were related to both the increase in movement acceleration and a decrease in grip force. These findings suggest that performance and behavioral changes during golf-putting under pressure can be associated with attentional changes, along with the influences of physiological-emotional responses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of individual and combined management practices to reduce the off-site transport of pesticides from golf course turf.

    PubMed

    Rice, Pamela J; Horgan, Brian P; Hamlin, Jennifer L

    2017-04-01

    The detection of pesticides, associated with turfgrass management, in storm runoff and surface waters of urban watersheds has raised concerns regarding their source, potential environmental effects and a need for strategies to reduce their inputs. In previous research we discovered that hollow tine core cultivation (HTCC) was more effective than other management practices for reducing the off-site transport of pesticides with runoff from creeping bentgrass turf managed as a golf course fairway. This was primarily the result of enhanced infiltration and reduced runoff volumes associated with turf managed with hollow tines. In this study we evaluated the addition of verticutting (VC) to HTCC (HTCC+VC) in an attempt to further enhance infiltration and mitigate the off-site transport of pesticides with runoff from managed turf. Overall, greater or equal quantities of pesticides were transported with runoff from plots managed with HTCC+VC compared to HTCC or VC alone. For the pesticides evaluated HTCCgolf course managers on selection of management practices that assure quality turf while minimizing off-site transport of pesticides, improving pesticide efficacy and the environmental stewardship of managed biological systems.

  4. The effect of dimple error on the horizontal launch angle and side spin of the golf ball during putting.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ashley K; Mitchell, Andrew C S; Hughes, Gerwyn

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of the impact point on the golf ball on the horizontal launch angle and side spin during putting with a mechanical putting arm and human participants. Putts of 3.2 m were completed with a mechanical putting arm (four putter-ball combinations, total of 160 trials) and human participants (two putter-ball combinations, total of 337 trials). The centre of the dimple pattern (centroid) was located and the following variables were measured: distance and angle of the impact point from the centroid and surface area of the impact zone. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to identify whether impact variables had significant associations with ball roll variables, horizontal launch angle and side spin. Significant associations were identified between impact variables and horizontal launch angle with the mechanical putting arm but this was not replicated with human participants. The variability caused by "dimple error" was minimal with the mechanical putting arm and not evident with human participants. Differences between the mechanical putting arm and human participants may be due to the way impulse is imparted on the ball. Therefore it is concluded that variability of impact point on the golf ball has a minimal effect on putting performance.

  5. Effects of a Commercial Formulation of Bacillus firmus I-1582 on Golf Course Bermudagrass Infested with Belonolaimus longicaudatus

    PubMed Central

    Crow, William T.

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary pests of bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) on golf courses in the southeastern United States is Belonolaimus longicaudatus (sting nematode). In 2011, a commercial formulation of Bacillus firmus I-1582, Nortica 5WG, was launched in the United States for management of plant-parasitic nematodes on turfgrasses. To test the efficacy of late winter/early spring application of this biopesticide on B. longicaudatus, two field trials in 2009 compared B. firmus with fenamiphos and untreated control treatments. In 2011, two additional field trials compared treatment with B. firmus with untreated control only. These trials measured treatment effects on the population density of B. longicaudatus, turf root length, and turf percent green cover. In all four trials, treatment with B. firmus improved root length and decreased numbers of B. longicaudatus in contrast to the untreated. These results indicate that late winter/early spring application of B. firmus is an effective biopesticide treatment for management of B. longicaudatus on golf course bermudagrass. PMID:25580025

  6. Are inertial forces ever of significance in cricket, golf and other sports?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Garry; Robinson, Ian

    2017-04-01

    In previous papers we investigated the motion of a spherical projectile rotating about an arbitrary axis, subject to a drag force, a lift or Magnus force, and in the presence of a wind. The aim was to determine the motion of balls used in sporting games, primarily cricket. Newton’s laws of motion apply in an inertial (unaccelerated) coordinate system, but the rotating Earth is not an inertial system. In such a non-inertial system two additional forces are present, the Coriolis force which produces a side-ways movement, and the centrifugal force. Generally these two inertial forces produce noticeable effects only on the large scale, when either the time of travel and/or the path length is large. In this paper we have added both of these forces to the equations of motion. In addition, we have also included a ground friction force in order to simulate a ball rolling over a surface or, more generally, a body moving through a resistive medium such as water. Here we quantitatively investigate the magnitude and direction of the effect of the inertial forces in a number of cases. It is found that, as expected, the effects of the inertial forces are generally small for ball games. In cricket the side-ways movement is ≲1 cm for a throw from the boundary and ≲1 mm for a slow bowler’s delivery, and for a long drive in golf it is ≲10 cm. In lawn bowls the side-ways movement can be ∼2.8 cm, which may be significant, given the nature of this sport. The inertial forces are also potentially of relevance in sporting events not employing spherical projectiles. For example, in Olympic rowing we find that the side-ways movement can be more than 40 m for a 2 km race if it is not compensated for, and nearly 20 m for a 4 min mile event in athletics. The effect is also of significance in events such as swimming and horse racing. The importance of this is that athletes may not be aware of the effect and, in the case of rowing for example, may attribute it to side-ways currents

  7. Design of a Golf Swing Injury Detection and Evaluation open service platform with Ontology-oriented clustering case-based reasoning mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ku, Hao-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, people can easily use a smartphone to get wanted information and requested services. Hence, this study designs and proposes a Golf Swing Injury Detection and Evaluation open service platform with Ontology-oritened clustering case-based reasoning mechanism, which is called GoSIDE, based on Arduino and Open Service Gateway initative (OSGi). GoSIDE is a three-tier architecture, which is composed of Mobile Users, Application Servers and a Cloud-based Digital Convergence Server. A mobile user is with a smartphone and Kinect sensors to detect the user's Golf swing actions and to interact with iDTV. An application server is with Intelligent Golf Swing Posture Analysis Model (iGoSPAM) to check a user's Golf swing actions and to alter this user when he is with error actions. Cloud-based Digital Convergence Server is with Ontology-oriented Clustering Case-based Reasoning (CBR) for Quality of Experiences (OCC4QoE), which is designed to provide QoE services by QoE-based Ontology strategies, rules and events for this user. Furthermore, GoSIDE will automatically trigger OCC4QoE and deliver popular rules for a new user. Experiment results illustrate that GoSIDE can provide appropriate detections for Golfers. Finally, GoSIDE can be a reference model for researchers and engineers.

  8. Off-site transport of nitrogen fertilizer with runoff from golf course fairway turf: A comparison of creeping bentgrass with a fine fescue mixture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maintaining quality golf course turf often requires irrigation and application of fertilizer. The transport of excess nutrients with runoff water from highly managed and fertilized biological systems to surrounding surface waters has been shown to result in enhanced algal blooms and promotion of eut...

  9. Organismal effects of pesticide exposure on meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) living in golf course ecosystems: developmental instability, clinical hematology, body condition, and blood parasitology.

    PubMed

    Knopper, Loren D; Mineau, Pierre

    2004-06-01

    This is the second of two articles reporting the results of a nonlethal biomonitoring study that quantified the effects of pesticide exposure on meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) living in golf course ecosystems of the Ottawa/Gatineau region (ON and PQ, Canada, respectively). In the present article, we describe results of measurements regarding developmental instability (e.g., fluctuating asymmetry), congenital birth defects (e.g., skeletal terata), clinical hematology (e.g., differential counts), general body condition (e.g., body mass-length relationships), and blood parasite load (Trypanosoma sp. and Bartonella spp.). Voles were captured during the year 2001 to 2003 at six golf courses and two reference sites. Once voles were fully sedated using isoflurane, blood was collected, radiographs taken, and morphometric measurements recorded. Three animals from each course were euthanized to determine body burdens of historically used organochlorine (OC) and metal-based pesticides. Exposure to in-use pesticides was determined from detailed golf course pesticide-use records. None of the endpoints measured was significantly related to body burdens of OC pesticides and metals historically used, nor did any endpoint significantly vary among capture sites in relation to total pesticide application to the capture site or to the number of days since the last application of pesticide. Based on these findings, it appears that voles from golf courses were no less healthy than their conspecifics from reference sites.

  10. Multi-segment trunk models used to investigate the crunch factor in golf and their relationship with selected swing and launch parameters.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Christopher; Chivers, Paola; Sato, Kimitake; Burnett, Angus

    2016-10-01

    The use of multi-segment trunk models to investigate the crunch factor in golf may be warranted. The first aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the trunk and lower trunk for crunch factor-related variables (trunk lateral bending and trunk axial rotation velocity). The second aim was to determine the level of association between crunch factor-related variables with swing (clubhead velocity) and launch (launch angle). Thirty-five high-level amateur male golfers (Mean ± SD: age = 23.8 ± 2.1 years, registered golfing handicap = 5 ± 1.9) without low back pain had kinematic data collected from their golf swing using a 10-camera motion analysis system operating at 500 Hz. Clubhead velocity and launch angle were collected using a validated real-time launch monitor. A positive relationship was found between the trunk and lower trunk for axial rotation velocity (r(35) = .47, P < .01). Cross-correlation analysis revealed a strong coupling relationship for the crunch factor (R(2) = 0.98) between the trunk and lower trunk. Using generalised linear model analysis, it was evident that faster clubhead velocities and lower launch angles of the golf ball were related to reduced lateral bending of the lower trunk.

  11. Métastases gastro-intestinales du cancer du sein: à propos de 2 cas

    PubMed Central

    Loubna, Mezouar; Mohamed, El Hfid; Tijani, El Harroudi; Fouzia, Ghadouani; Hanane, Haj Kacem; Zouhour, Bourhaleb; Asmae, Ouabdelmoumen

    2013-01-01

    Le cancer du sein est le cancer le plus fréquent chez la femme, notamment au Maroc, avec un taux de mortalité élevé. Les métastases gastro-intestinales d'un carcinome canalaire du sein sont rares. Leur diagnostic est difficile du fait de la nature non spécifique des symptômes. Nous rapportons deux observations originales de métastases gastroduodénales d'un cancer canalaire infiltrant du sein. Les métastases gastro-intestinales du cancer du sein sont très rares; la présence de symptômes gastro-intestinaux chez une malade ayant un antécédent de cancer du sein doit faire suspecter une atteinte métastatique gastro-intestinale. PMID:24198876

  12. An analysis of peak pelvis rotation speed, gluteus maximus and medius strength in high versus low handicap golfers during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Sarahann; Glaws, Kate; Mitchell, Melissa; Scerbo, Heather; Voight, Michael; Sells, Pat

    2012-06-01

    The kinematic sequence of the golf swing is an established principle that occurs in a proximal-to-distal pattern with power generation beginning with rotation of the pelvis. Few studies have correlated the influence of peak pelvis rotation to the skill level of the golfer. Furthermore, minimal research exists on the strength of the gluteal musculature and their ability to generate power during the swing. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between peak pelvis rotation, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus strength, and a golfer's handicap. 56 healthy subjects. Each subject was assessed using a hand-held dynamometry device per standardized protocol to determine gluteus maximus and medius strength. The K-vest was placed on the subject with electromagnetic sensors at the pelvis, upper torso, and gloved lead hand to measure the rotational speed at each segment in degrees/second. After K-vest calibration and 5 practice swings, each subject hit 5 golf balls during which time, the sensors measured pelvic rotation speed. A one-way ANOVA was performed to determine the relationships between peak pelvis rotation, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus strength, and golf handicap. A significant difference was found between the following dependent variables and golf handicap: peak pelvis rotation (p=0.000), gluteus medius strength (p=0.000), and gluteus maximus strength (p=0.000). Golfers with a low handicap are more likely to have increased pelvis rotation speed as well as increased gluteus maximus and medius strength when compared to high handicap golfers. The relationships between increased peak pelvis rotation and gluteus maximus and medius strength in low handicap golfers may have implications in designing golf training programs. Further research needs to be conducted in order to further explore these relationships.

  13. Cardiac arrest on the links: are we up to par? Availability of automated external defibrillators on golf courses in southeastern Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Lucas, John; Davila, A Alex; Waninger, Kevin N; Heller, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A growing number of golfers are senior citizens, and it may be predicted that the number of golf-related medical emergencies, including the incidence of cardiac arrest, will increase. This study was designed to survey the level of preparedness of golf courses in southeastern Pennsylvania to respond to cardiac arrest among their members. A telephone survey of all of the 180 golf courses in the area was conducted to determine their type (public/private), volume in rounds per year, presence of automated external defibrillator (AED) devices, number of employees, and percentage of employees with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training. Participants also were asked to estimate the time needed to reach the farthest point on their course in order to estimate a maximum time to the application of an AED device. A total of 131 of 180 golf courses completed the survey (53 private, 78 public) for an overall response rate of 73%. Private courses reported a greater average number of employees with CPR training [private = 9.1, public = 3.6; p = 0.001] and in AED presence [public = 9%, private = 58.5%; p = 0.0001]. Public courses support a higher volume of play than do private courses [public = 32,000, private = 24,000; p = 0.001], yet have far fewer employees [public=25, private=44; p = 0.004]. The longest time necessary to reach the most remote point on the course was between four and five minutes in all courses. Analysis was performed using the Student's t-test and Pearson's Chi-square as appropriate. Neither public nor private golf courses are well equipped to respond to cardiac arrest, but outcomes on public courses likely are to be far worse.

  14. AN ANALYSIS OF PEAK PELVIS ROTATION SPEED, GLUTEUS MAXIMUS AND MEDIUS STRENGTH IN HIGH VERSUS LOW HANDICAP GOLFERS DURING THE GOLF SWING

    PubMed Central

    Glaws, Kate; Mitchell, Melissa; Scerbo, Heather; Voight, Michael; Sells, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Hypothesis: The kinematic sequence of the golf swing is an established principle that occurs in a proximal-to-distal pattern with power generation beginning with rotation of the pelvis. Few studies have correlated the influence of peak pelvis rotation to the skill level of the golfer. Furthermore, minimal research exists on the strength of the gluteal musculature and their ability to generate power during the swing. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between peak pelvis rotation, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus strength, and a golfer's handicap. Subjects: 56 healthy subjects. Material/Methods: Each subject was assessed using a hand-held dynamometry device per standardized protocol to determine gluteus maximus and medius strength. The K-vest was placed on the subject with electromagnetic sensors at the pelvis, upper torso, and gloved lead hand to measure the rotational speed at each segment in degrees/second. After K-vest calibration and 5 practice swings, each subject hit 5 golf balls during which time, the sensors measured pelvic rotation speed. Results: A one-way ANOVA was performed to determine the relationships between peak pelvis rotation, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus strength, and golf handicap. A significant difference was found between the following dependent variables and golf handicap: peak pelvis rotation (p=0.000), gluteus medius strength (p=0.000), and gluteus maximus strength (p=0.000). Conclusion: Golfers with a low handicap are more likely to have increased pelvis rotation speed as well as increased gluteus maximus and medius strength when compared to high handicap golfers. Clinical Relevance: The relationships between increased peak pelvis rotation and gluteus maximus and medius strength in low handicap golfers may have implications in designing golf training programs. Further research needs to be conducted in order to further explore these relationships. PMID:22666643

  15. Seismic sensitivity to sub-surface solar activity from 18 yr of GOLF/SoHO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Turck-Chièze, S.

    2015-06-01

    Solar activity has significantly changed over the last two Schwabe cycles. After a long and deep minimum at the end of Cycle 23, the weaker activity of Cycle 24 contrasts with the previous cycles. In this work, the response of the solar acoustic oscillations to solar activity is used in order to provide insights into the structural and magnetic changes in the sub-surface layers of the Sun during this on-going unusual period of low activity. We analyze 18 yr of continuous observations of the solar acoustic oscillations collected by the Sun-as-a-star GOLF instrument on board the SoHO spacecraft. From the fitted mode frequencies, the temporal variability of the frequency shifts of the radial, dipolar, and quadrupolar modes are studied for different frequency ranges that are sensitive to different layers in the solar sub-surface interior. The low-frequency modes show nearly unchanged frequency shifts between Cycles 23 and 24, with a time evolving signature of the quasi-biennial oscillation, which is particularly visible for the quadrupole component revealing the presence of a complex magnetic structure. The modes at higher frequencies show frequency shifts that are 30% smaller during Cycle 24, which is in agreement with the decrease observed in the surface activity between Cycles 23 and 24. The analysis of 18 yr of GOLF oscillations indicates that the structural and magnetic changes responsible for the frequency shifts remained comparable between Cycle 23 and Cycle 24 in the deeper sub-surface layers below 1400 km as revealed by the low-frequency modes. The frequency shifts of the higher-frequency modes, sensitive to shallower regions, show that Cycle 24 is magnetically weaker in the upper layers of Sun. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe following 68 GOLF frequency tables are available and Table A.1 is also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  16. Development of a methodology for strategic environmental assessment: application to the assessment of golf course installation policy in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Ho; Wu, Ray-Shyan; Liu, Wei-Lin; Su, Wen-Ray; Chang, Yu-Min

    2009-01-01

    Some countries, including Taiwan, have adopted strategic environmental assessment (SEA) to assess and modify proposed policies, plans, and programs (PPPs) in the planning phase for pursuing sustainable development. However, there were only some sketchy steps focusing on policy assessment in the system of Taiwan. This study aims to develop a methodology for SEA in Taiwan to enhance the effectiveness associated with PPPs. The proposed methodology comprises an SEA procedure involving PPP management and assessment in various phases, a sustainable assessment framework, and an SEA management system. The SEA procedure is devised based on the theoretical considerations by systems thinking and the regulative requirements in Taiwan. The positive and negative impacts on ecology, society, and economy are simultaneously considered in the planning (including policy generation and evaluation), implementation, and control phases of the procedure. This study used the analytic hierarchy process, Delphi technique, and systems analysis to develop a sustainable assessment framework. An SEA management system was built based on geographic information system software to process spatial, attribute, and satellite image data during the assessment procedure. The proposed methodology was applied in the SEA of golf course installation policy in 2001 as a case study, which was the first SEA in Taiwan. Most of the 82 existing golf courses in 2001 were installed on slope lands and caused a serious ecological impact. Assessment results indicated that 15 future golf courses installed on marginal lands (including buffer zones, remedied lands, and wastelands) were acceptable because the comprehensive environmental (ecological, social, and economic) assessment value was better based on environmental characteristics and management regulations of Taiwan. The SEA procedure in the planning phase for this policy was completed but the implementation phase of this policy was not begun because the related

  17. Development of a Methodology for Strategic Environmental Assessment: Application to the Assessment of Golf Course Installation Policy in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Ho; Wu, Ray-Shyan; Liu, Wei-Lin; Su, Wen-Ray; Chang, Yu-Min

    2009-01-01

    Some countries, including Taiwan, have adopted strategic environmental assessment (SEA) to assess and modify proposed policies, plans, and programs (PPPs) in the planning phase for pursuing sustainable development. However, there were only some sketchy steps focusing on policy assessment in the system of Taiwan. This study aims to develop a methodology for SEA in Taiwan to enhance the effectiveness associated with PPPs. The proposed methodology comprises an SEA procedure involving PPP management and assessment in various phases, a sustainable assessment framework, and an SEA management system. The SEA procedure is devised based on the theoretical considerations by systems thinking and the regulative requirements in Taiwan. The positive and negative impacts on ecology, society, and economy are simultaneously considered in the planning (including policy generation and evaluation), implementation, and control phases of the procedure. This study used the analytic hierarchy process, Delphi technique, and systems analysis to develop a sustainable assessment framework. An SEA management system was built based on geographic information system software to process spatial, attribute, and satellite image data during the assessment procedure. The proposed methodology was applied in the SEA of golf course installation policy in 2001 as a case study, which was the first SEA in Taiwan. Most of the 82 existing golf courses in 2001 were installed on slope lands and caused a serious ecological impact. Assessment results indicated that 15 future golf courses installed on marginal lands (including buffer zones, remedied lands, and wastelands) were acceptable because the comprehensive environmental (ecological, social, and economic) assessment value was better based on environmental characteristics and management regulations of Taiwan. The SEA procedure in the planning phase for this policy was completed but the implementation phase of this policy was not begun because the related

  18. Impact of Urban Treated Wastewater Reuse During Irrigation of Golf Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabregat, Salvador; Mas, Jordi; Candela, Lucila; Josa, A.

    Starting in July 2000, treated wastewater of urban origin has been used for the irrigation of the golf course "Serres de Pals" (Girona-Spain). This study attempts to evaluate whether and to what extent, the soil and the aquifer underneath are affected by the utilization of this type of water, taking into account microbiological, hydrogeochemical and edafological aspects . Samples have been taken along a period of several months from the wastewater treatment plant, and from the stabilization lagoon together with soil profiles to study the following variables: total coliform and aerobes, measurements of suction and humidity in the soil as well as chemical analyses of both the irrigation water and the interstitial water of the vadose zone. Controls were carried out in the wastewater treatment plant, the irrigation water and the vadose zone, before and after irrigation with this type of water. From a microbiological perspective, total coliforms at the outlet of the treatment plant were relatively low (101-102 ufc/100 mL) as a result of a 5 order of magnitude reduction during the treatment and the subsequent disinfection. Treated water was later stored in an open air reservoir where the number of coliforms suffered a slight increase (from 101-102 to 102-103 ucf/100ml). Soil profiles taken from the irrigated area at several times during the study indicate the absence of coliforms except for a short period during summer, at the peak of the irrigation period, when coliforms could be detected in the top layer of soil at levels ranging between 102 to 103 ucf/g soil. Soil profiles of total aerobic counts did not show significant changes as a consequence of the application of treated wastewater. From a chemical point of view, treated water had a remarkable salinity with an average electrical conductivity of 3100 ? s/cm right at the discharge of the treatment plant. After disinfection with sodium hypochlorite and following evaporation in the open reservoir, conductivity

  19. Verbal-motor attention-focusing instructions influence kinematics and performance on a golf-putting task.

    PubMed

    Munzert, Jörn; Maurer, Heiko; Reiser, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined how varying the content of verbal-motor instructions and requesting an internal versus external focus influenced the kinematics and outcome of a golf putting task. On Day 1, 30 novices performed 120 trials with the instruction to focus attention either on performing a pendulum-like movement (internal) or on the desired ball path (external). After 20 retention trials on Day 2, they performed 20 transfer trials with the opposite instruction. Group differences for retention and a group by block interaction showed that external instruction enhanced movement outcome. Kinematic data indicated that specific instruction content influenced outcomes by eliciting changes in movement execution. Switching from the external to the internal focus instruction resulted in a more pendulum-like movement.

  20. The effects of training and competition on achievement goals, motivational responses, and performance in a golf-putting task.

    PubMed

    van de Pol P, K C; Kavussanu, Maria; Ring, Christopher

    2012-12-01

    This study examined whether (a) training and competition influence achievement goals, effort, enjoyment, tension, and performance; (b) achievement goals mediate the effects of training and competition on effort, enjoyment, tension, and performance; and (c) the context influences the relationships between goals and effort, enjoyment, tension, and performance. Participants (32 males, 28 females; M age = 19.12 years) performed a golf-putting task in a training condition and a competition condition and completed measures of goal involvement, effort, enjoyment, and tension; putting performance was also measured. Both task and ego involvement varied across training and competition, and variation in ego involvement explained variation in effort and enjoyment between these conditions. Ego involvement positively predicted effort in training and performance in competition, and interacted positively with task involvement to predict effort and enjoyment in competition. Our findings suggest that the distinction between training and competition is a valuable one when examining individuals' achievement motivation.

  1. Diversity and Occurrence of Plant-parasitic Nematodes Associated with Golf Course Turfgrasses in North and South Carolina, USA

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yongsan; Ye, Weimin; Bruce Martin, S.; Martin, Matt; Tredway, Lane

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and eleven golf courses from 39 counties in the Carolinas were surveyed for plant-parasitic nematodes. Species diversity within habitats was analyzed with five diversity indices including Diversity index (H’), Evenness (J’), Richness (SR), Dominance (λ) and Diversity (H2). The results revealed a remarkably high diversity of 24 nematode species belonging to 19 genera and 11 families. Of those, 23 species were found in SC, 19 species in NC, and 18 species were detected in both states. Helicotylenchus dihystera, Mesocriconema xenoplax, Hoplolaimus galeatus, Tylenchorhynchus claytoni, Belonolaimus longicaudatus, Meloidogyne graminis and Paratrichodorus minor were the most prevalent and abundant species in golf course turfgrasses in both states. Twelve species were new records of plant parasitic nematodes in turfgrasses in both NC and SC. The results also revealed effects of different habitats on diversity of nematode species in turfgrass ecosystem. H’ and SR values were higher in SC than in NC. H’, J’ and H2 values were significantly higher in sandy than in clay soil in NC, but no significant differences between sand and clay soil were detected in SC or in pooled data from both states. There were no significant differences for all indices among the management zones (putting green, fairway and tee) in NC. However, in SC and pooled data, H’, SR and H2 were significantly higher in putting greens than in fairways and tees. Significant differences from different grass species (bermudagrass, creeping bentgrass and zoysiagrass) were detected only in H’, which was significantly higher in zoysiagrass than in bentgrass or bermudagrass in NC. In pooled data, H’ was significantly higher in zoysiagrass samples than in creeping bentgrass samples but was not significantly different from bermudagrass samples. PMID:23482422

  2. Sorption, degradation and leaching of the fungicide iprodione in a golf green under Scandinavian conditions: measurements, modelling and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Strömqvist, Johan; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2005-12-01

    In cold climates, fungicides are used on golf greens to prevent snow mould causing serious damage to the turf. However, fungicide residues have been detected in runoff from golf courses, which may lead to restrictions on use. There is therefore an urgent need to improve understanding of the processes affecting leaching of fungicides from turfgrass systems to allow identification of green construction and management practices that minimize environmental impacts. In this study we monitored the leaching of the fungicide iprodione in a putting green. Sorption and degradation of iprodione was measured in batch and incubation experiments, and the simulation model MACRO was used as a risk assessment tool. Degradation of iprodione was bi-phasic, with a rapid initial phase (half-life 17 h) caused by enhanced biodegradation. Degradation rates slowed considerably after 5 days, with half-lives of up to 38 days. Sorption of iprodione was linear, with a K(oc) value of ca 400 cm(3) g(-1). MACRO reasonably accurately matched measured drainflows and concentrations of iprodione in soil and drainflow. However, peak concentrations in drainage were underestimated, which was attributed to preferential finger flow due to water repellency. The results also showed the importance of the organic matter content in the green root zone in reducing leaching. It was concluded that, with 'reasonable worst-case' use, losses of iprodione from greens can occur at concentrations exceeding water quality limits for aquatic ecosystems. Snow mould problems should be tackled by adopting green root zone mixes that minimize leaching and 'best management practices' that would avoid the need for intensive prophylactic use of fungicides.

  3. How to quantify the transition phase during golf swing performance: Torsional load affects low back complaints during the transition phase.

    PubMed

    Sim, Taeyong; Choi, Ahnryul; Lee, Soeun; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2017-10-01

    The transition phase of a golf swing is considered to be a decisive instant required for a powerful swing. However, at the same time, the low back torsional loads during this phase can have a considerable effect on golf-related low back pain (LBP). Previous efforts to quantify the transition phase were hampered by problems with accuracy due to methodological limitations. In this study, vector-coding technique (VCT) method was proposed as a comprehensive methodology to quantify the precise transition phase and examine low back torsional load. Towards this end, transition phases were assessed using three different methods (VCT, lead hand speed and X-factor stretch) and compared; then, low back torsional load during the transition phase was examined. As a result, the importance of accurate transition phase quantification has been documented. The largest torsional loads were observed in healthy professional golfers (10.23 ± 1.69 N · kg(-1)), followed by professional golfers with a history of LBP (7.93 ± 1.79 N · kg(-1)), healthy amateur golfers (1.79 ± 1.05 N · kg(-1)) and amateur golfers with a history of LBP (0.99 ± 0.87 N · kg(-1)), which order was equal to that of the transition phase magnitudes of each group. These results indicate the relationship between the transition phase and LBP history and the dependency of the torsional load magnitude on the transition phase.

  4. Approche de prise en charge du trouble du spectre de l’autisme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patrick F.; Thomas, Roger E.; Lee, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Se pencher sur les critères diagnostiques du trouble du spectre de l’autisme (TSA) comme les définit le Manuel diagnostique et statistique des troubles mentaux, cinquième édition (DSM-V), et concevoir une approche de prise en charge du TSA à l’aide du cadre CanMEDS–Médecine familiale (CanMEDS-MF). Sources d’information Le DSM-V, publié par l’American Psychiatric Association en mai 2013, énonce de nouveaux critères diagnostiques du TSA. Le cadre CanMEDS-MF du Collège des médecins de famille du Canada fournit un plan d’orientation pour la prise en charge complexe du TSA. Nous avons utilisé des données recueillies par le Centers for Disease Control and Prevention afin de déterminer la prévalence du TSA, ainsi que la revue systématique et méta-analyse détaillée effectuée par le National Institute for Health and Care Excellence du R.-U. pour ses lignes directrices sur le TSA dans le but d’évaluer les données probantes issues de plus de 100 interventions. Message principal Selon les données du Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, la prévalence du TSA se chiffrait à 1 sur 88 en 2008 aux États-Unis. La classification du TSA dans la quatrième édition du DSM incluait l’autisme, le syndrome d’Asperger, le trouble envahissant du développement et le trouble désintégratif de l’enfance. La dernière révision du DSM-V réunit tous ces troubles sous la mention TSA, avec différents niveaux de sévérité. La prise en charge du TSA est complexe; elle exige les efforts d’une équipe multidisciplinaire ainsi que des soins continus. Les rôles CanMEDS-MF fournissent un cadre de prise en charge. Conclusion Les médecins de famille sont au cœur de l’équipe de soins multidisciplinaire pour le TSA, et le cadre CanMEDS-MF tient lieu de plan détaillé pour guider la prise en charge d’un enfant atteint de TSA et aider la famille de cet enfant.

  5. Les plaies du tendon patellaire

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Mardy, Abdelhak; Elayoubi, Abdelghni; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Les plaies du tendon patellaire sont peu fréquentes et sont peu rapportés dans la littérature, contrairement aux ruptures sous cutanées. Les sections du tendon patellaire nécessitent une réparation immédiate afin de rétablir l'appareil extenseur et de permettre une récupération fonctionnelle précoce. A travers ce travail rétrospectif sur 13 cas, nous analysons les aspects épidémiologiques, thérapeutiques et pronostiques de ce type de pathologie en comparant différents scores. L’âge moyen est de 25 ans avec une prédominance masculine. Les étiologies sont dominées par les accidents de la voie publique (68%) et les agressions par agent tranchant (26%) et contendant (6 %). Tous nos patients ont bénéficié d'un parage chirurgical avec suture tendineuse direct protégée par un laçage au fils d'aciers en légère flexion. La rééducation est débutée après sédation des phénomènes inflammatoires. Au dernier recul les résultats sont excellents et bon à 92%. Nous n'avons pas noté de différence de force musculaire et d'amplitude articulaire entre le genou sain et le genou lésé. Les lésions ouvertes du tendon patellaire est relativement rare. La prise en charge chirurgicale rapide donne des résultats assez satisfaisants. La réparation est généralement renforcée par un semi-tendineux, synthétique ou métallique en forme de cadre de renfort pour faciliter la réadaptation et réduire le risque de récidive après la fin de l'immobilisation. PMID:25170379

  6. Golf ball-assisted electrospray ionization of mass spectrometry for the determination of trace amino acids in complex samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Yen-Hsien; Chen, Chung-Yu; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiung; Lee, Maw-Rong

    2016-09-28

    During the electrospray ionization (ESI) process, ions move through a heated capillary aperture to be detected on arrival at a mass analyzer. However, the ESI process creates an ion plume, which expands into an ion cloud with an area larger than that of the heated capillary aperture, significantly contributing to an ion loss of 50% due to coulombic repulsion. The use of DC and RF fields to focus ions from the ion source into the vacuum chamber has been proposed in the literature, but the improvement of ion transmission efficiency is limited. To improve ion transmission, in this study we propose a novel method using a home-made golf ball positioned between the ion source and the inlet of the mass analyzer to hydrodynamically focus the ions passing through the golf ball. The ion plume produced by the ESI process passes through the golf ball will reduce the size of the ion cloud then be focused and most of them flowed into the mass analyzer. Therefore, the sensitivity will be improved, the aim of this investigation is to study the enhancing of the signal using golf ball-assisted electrospray ionization liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to determine 20 trace amino acids in complex samples, including tea, urine and serum. The results showed that the analytical performance of the determination of the 20 amino acids in tea, urine and serum samples using the home-made golf ball-assisted ESI source is better than that of a commercial ESI source. The signal intensities of the 20 amino acids were enhanced by factors of 2-2700, 11-2525, and 31-342680 in oolong tea, urine and serum analyses, respectively. The precision of the proposed method ranged from 1-9%, 0.4-9% and 0.4-8% at low, medium and high concentration levels of amino acids, respectively. The home-made golf ball-assisted ESI source effectively increased the signal intensity and enhanced the ion transmission efficiency and is also an easy, convenient and economical device. This technique can

  7. DU-127090 Solvay/H Lundbeck.

    PubMed

    Wolf, William

    2003-01-01

    DU-127090 is a mixed dopamine antagonist/serotonin agonist in development by Solvay and H Lundbeck as a potential treatment for psychosis and schizophrenia, for which it is in phase II clinical trials. In August 2002, phase II trials were ongoing and Lundbeck expected to commence phase III trials in 2003 and file an NDA after 2004. DU-127090 is also under development for Parkinson's disease, for which it is in phase I clinical trials.

  8. Environmental Assessment for Improvements to Irrigation System and Land Application of Treated Wastewater Effluent at Existing Golf Course, Mountain Home AFB, Idaho

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Final Environmental Assessment for Improvements to Irrigation System and Land Application of Treated Wastewater Effluent at...Land Application of Treated Wastewater Effluent at Existing Golf Course, Mountain Home AFB, Idaho 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... SBR Sequencing Batch Reactor FONSI Finding of No Significant Impact SDR Scheduled Dimension Ratio Ft/Sec Feet Per Second SIP State Implementation

  9. Excitation and Damping of Low-Degree Solar p-Modes during Activity Cycle 23: Analysis of GOLF and VIRGO Sun Photometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Reyes, S. J.; García, R. A.; Jiménez, A.; Chaplin, W. J.

    2003-09-01

    We have used observations made by the Global Oscillations at Low Frequency (GOLF) and the Variability of Irradiance and Gravity Oscillations Sun Photometer (VIRGO/SPM) instruments on board the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory satellite to study variations in the excitation and damping of low angular degree (low-l) solar p-modes on the rising phase of activity cycle 23. Our analysis includes a correction procedure that for the first time allows GOLF data to be ``treated'' as a single homogeneous set, thereby compensating for the change of operational configuration partway through the mission. Over the range 2.5<=ν<=3.5mHz, we uncover an increase in damping and decrease in mode power that is consistent with previous findings. Furthermore, an excellent level of agreement is found between the variations extracted from the GOLF and VIRGO/SPM data. We find no net long-term changes to the modal energy supply rate. However, an analysis of the residuals uncovers the presence of a quasi-periodic signature of period ~1.5 yr (most pronounced for SPM). While it is true that several workers claim to have uncovered similar periodicities in other phenomena related to the near-surface layers of the Sun here, we are at present more inclined to attribute our finding to an artifact of the mode-fitting procedure. We also uncover a significant change in the asymmetry of mode peaks in the GOLF data, as found in previous studies of much longer data sets. These assumed that the dominant contribution to this arose from the switch in operating configuration partway through the mission (which altered the depth in the solar atmosphere sampled by the instrument). However, our preliminary analysis of data collected over the 100 day period beginning 2002 November 19-when the instrument switched back to its original configuration-suggests that this change may have a solar cycle component.

  10. How LO Can You GO? Using the Dice-Based Golf Game GOLO to Illustrate Inferences on Proportions and Discrete Probability Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Paul; Richardson, Mary; Gabrosek, John; Reischman, Diann

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive activity that revolves around the dice-based golf game GOLO. The GOLO game can be purchased at various retail locations or online at igolo.com. In addition, the game may be played online free of charge at igolo.com. The activity is completed in four parts. The four parts can be used in a sequence or they can be…

  11. Improved determination of dynamic balance using the centre of mass and centre of pressure inclination variables in a complete golf swing cycle.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Golf requires proper dynamic balance to accurately control the club head through a harmonious coordination of each human segment and joint. In this study, we evaluated the ability for dynamic balance during a golf swing by using the centre of mass (COM)-centre of pressure (COP) inclination variables. Twelve professional, 13 amateur and 10 novice golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras, two force platforms and SB-Clinic software were used to measure the net COM and COP trajectories. In order to evaluate dynamic balance ability, the COM-COP inclination angle, COM-COP inclination angular velocity and normalised COM-COP inclination angular jerk were used. Professional golfer group revealed a smaller COM-COP inclination angle and angular velocity than novice golfer group in the lead/trail direction (P < 0.01). In the normalised COM-COP inclination angular jerk, the professional golfer group showed a lower value than the other two groups in all directions. Professional golfers tend to exhibit improved dynamic balance, and this can be attributed to the neuromusculoskeletal system that maintains balance with proper postural control. This study has the potential to allow for an evaluation of the dynamic balance mechanism and will provide useful basic information for swing training and prevention of golf injuries.

  12. The X-Factor: an evaluation of common methods used to analyse major inter-segment kinematics during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Brown, Susan J; Selbie, W Scott; Wallace, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    A common biomechanical feature of a golf swing, described in various ways in the literature, is the interaction between the thorax and pelvis, often termed the X-Factor. There is no consistent method used within golf biomechanics literature however to calculate these segment interactions. The purpose of this study was to examine X-factor data calculated using three reported methods in order to determine the similarity or otherwise of the data calculated using each method. A twelve-camera three-dimensional motion capture system was used to capture the driver swings of 19 participants and a subject specific three-dimensional biomechanical model was created with the position and orientation of each model estimated using a global optimisation algorithm. Comparison of the X-Factor methods showed significant differences for events during the swing (P < 0.05). Data for each kinematic measure were derived as a times series for all three methods and regression analysis of these data showed that whilst one method could be successfully mapped to another, the mappings between methods are subject dependent (P <0.05). Findings suggest that a consistent methodology considering the X-Factor from a joint angle approach is most insightful in describing a golf swing.

  13. Solar Global Oscillations of Low-Degree modes (GOLD): The Status of the Multi-channel Resonance Spectrometer GOLF-NG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.; Carton, P.-H.; Barrière, J.-C.; Pallé, P. L.; Robillot, J.-M.; Ballot, J.; Chenus, A.-C.; Daniel-Thomas, P.; Delbart, A.; García, R. A.; Granelli, R.; Lahonde-Hamdoun, C.; Loiseau, D.; Mathur, S.; Piret, Y.; Salabert, D.; Simoniello, R.; Davies, G. R.

    2012-09-01

    Low-degree pulsation modes are the best way to scrutinize stellar cores. They also provide, due to their intrinsic nature, a way to follow varying activity in important subsurface layers. Following difficulties encountered with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) in 1998, we study a new design that improves the detection at low and high frequencies in comparison with the Global Oscillations at Low Frequency (GOLF) instrument. It is based on a substantial increase in the counting rates to get better photon statistics, and a reduction of the solar turbulent noise in measuring simultaneously the Doppler velocity at 6-7 heights in the strong sodium spectral line. A prototype, GOLF-NG (GOLF New Generation), has been built with numerous laboratory checks of the performance and in situ solar measurements at Tenerife in 2008 and 2010. All the required specifications are now achieved, and so GOLD can be prepared for space observations with balloons or satellites. The substantial improvements allow an improved detection of weak signals at different frequencies and information on activity indicators, as the Na D lines are sensitive to the magnetic field between photosphere and chromosphere.

  14. Factors affecting distribution of the mound-building ant Lasius neoniger (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and implications for management on golf course putting greens.

    PubMed

    Maier, Reid M; Potter, Daniel A

    2005-06-01

    Lasius neoniger (Emery), a cosmopolitan ant species, can be a serious pest when its mound-building activities occur on golf course putting greens and other closely mowed turfgrass sites. We mapped the distribution of 735 ant mounds on 30 sand-based putting greens of three golf courses. We then examined factors that might explain why >90% of the mounds on such greens were concentrated in a 2-m wide band just inside the perimeter. Root aphids (Homoptera: Aphididae) from which L. neoniger obtains honeydew were largely absent from high-sand root zone mix of greens but present in surrounding turfgrass on natural soil. Main ant nests, with brood, also were absent from sand-based greens but abundant in adjacent roughs. Although more root aphids were found within ant nests than away from nests, their numbers seem too low to be the main factor restricting the ants' distribution to edges of putting greens. In manipulative experiments, ants responded to low cut (scalped) turf and to sand-filled holes by increased mound building. We suggest that most ant mounds on sand-based greens are associated with subnests, used by foraging workers, which are connected to main nests located just outside the collar in natural soil. Encroachment of mounds into greens occurs when the polydomous colonies seasonally expand their foraging territories, accounting for mounds being concentrated around the perimeter. Control actions for L. neoniger on golf courses should focus on the perimeter of sand-based greens.

  15. Off-site transport of nitrogen fertilizer with runoff from golf course fairway turf: A comparison of creeping bentgrass with a fine fescue mixture.

    PubMed

    Rice, Pamela J; Horgan, Brian P

    2017-02-15

    Maintaining quality golf course turf often requires irrigation and application of fertilizer. The transport of excess nutrients with runoff water from highly managed and fertilized biological systems to surrounding surface waters has been shown to result in enhanced algal blooms and promotion of eutrophication. Environmental stewardship includes looking for new approaches to reduce adverse environmental impacts of current practices. One strategy is to replace traditional turfgrass with low-maintenance turfgrass species. Fescue grasses have been shown to provide characteristics desirable for golf course fairways. Thus side-by-side studies comparing runoff from plots planted in creeping bentgrass (CGB) or fine fescue mixture (FFM), similarly managed as a golf course fairway, were conducted to measure runoff volumes and the amount of ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) and nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) transported off-site with runoff. Greater runoff volumes and mass of applied nutrients were measured in the runoff from the FFM, representing a 38% and 56% median increase in the off-site mass transport of NH4-N and NO3-N with surface flow. Shoot density, thatch depth and soil moisture were the most important factors related to runoff volume. Results of this research will be useful to grounds superintendents and researchers for selecting and developing management strategies to improve environmental stewardship of managed turf while providing desired turf quality. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Biokinetics and dosimetry of depleted uranium (DU) in rats implanted with DU fragments.

    SciTech Connect

    Guilmette, Ray A.; Hahn, Fletcher F.; Durbin, P. W.

    2004-01-01

    A number of U. S. veterans of the Persian Gulf War were wounded with depleted uranium (DU) metal fragments as a result of 'friendly fire' incidents, in which Abrams tanks and Bradley fighting vehicles were struck by DU anti-armor munitions. Some of the crew members who survived were left with multiple small fragments of DU in their muscles and soft tissues. The number, size and location of the fragments made them inoperable in general, and therefore subject to long-term retention. Because there was inadequate data to predict the potential carcinogenicity of DU fragments in soft tissues, Hahn et al. (2003) conducted a lifespan cancer study in rats. As part of that study, a number of rats were maintained to study the biokinetics and dosimetry of DU implanted intramuscularly in male Wistar rats. Typically, four metal fragments, either as cylindrical pellets or square wafers were implanted into the biceps femoris muscles of the rats. Urine samples were collected periodically during their lifespans, and DU was analyzed in kidneys and eviscerated carcass (minus the implant sites) at death. The daily DU urinary excretion rate increased steeply during the first 30 d after implantation peaking at about 90 d at 3-10 x 10{sup -3}%/d. During the first 150 d, the average excretion rate was 2.4 x 10{sup -3}%/d, decreasing thereafter to about 1 x 10{sup -3}%/d. Serial radiographs were made of the wound sites to monitor gross morphologic changes in the DU implant and the surrounding tissue. As early as 1 w after implantation, radiographs showed the presence of surface corrosion and small, dense bodies near the original implant, presumably DU. This corrosion from the surface of the implant continued with time, but did not result in an increasing amount of DU reaching the blood and urine after the first 3 mo. During this 3-mo period, connective tissue capsules formed around the implants, and are hypothesized to have reduced the access of DU to tissue fluids by limiting the diffusion

  17. Cirque du Monde as a health intervention

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Cynthia; Drouin, Mélodie-Anne; Marcoux, Jérémie; Garel, Patricia; Bochud, Emmanuel; Théberge, Julie; Aubertin, Patrice; Favreau, Gil; Fleet, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present Cirque du Soleil’s social circus program, Cirque du Monde, to explore its potential as a primary health care tool for family physicians. Data sources A review of the literature in PubMed, the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, LaPresse, Eureka, Google Scholar, and Érudit using the key words circus, social circus, Cirque du Monde, and Cirque du Soleil; a Montreal-based initiative, Espace Transition, modeled on Cirque du Monde; and personal communication with Cirque du Soleil’s Social Circus Training Advisor. Study selection The first 50 articles or websites identified for each key word in each of the databases were examined on the basis of their titles and abstracts in the case of articles, and on the basis of their titles and page content in the case of websites. Articles and websites that explored an aspect of social circuses or that described an intervention that involved circuses were then retained for analysis. Because all literature on social circuses was searched, no criterion for year of publication was used. Synthesis No articles on the social circus as a health intervention were found. One study on the use of the circus as an intervention in schools was identified. It demonstrated an increase in self-esteem in the children who took part. One study on the use of the circus in a First Nations community was found; it contained nonspecific, qualitative findings. The other articles identified were merely descriptions of social circuses. One website was identified on the use of the social circus to help youth who had been treated in a hospital setting for major psychiatric disorders to re-enter the community. The team in the pediatric psychiatry department at Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, the children’s hospital in Montreal, Que, was contacted; they were leading this project, called Espace Transition. The unpublished preliminary findings of its pilot project demonstrate substantial improvements in overall patient

  18. Putts that get missed on the right: investigating lateralized attentional biases and the nature of putting errors in golf.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ross; Turnbull, Oliver H

    2010-02-01

    Although the effects of lateral biases in visual attention ("pseudoneglect") have been examined in real-world settings, this phenomenon has yet to be considered within the realm of sporting performance. In the present study, we investigated the effects of pseudoneglect on putting errors in golf. Novice golfers (n = 30) performed 90 putting trials followed by a series of pseudoneglect tasks: requiring participants to bisect lines manually and with a biomechanical bisection tool. All pseudoneglect measures were performed with both the left and right hands. Results demonstrated a leftward bias for all the pseudoneglect tasks, and a rightward bias for putting error. Moreover, the results revealed that individuals who bisected lines to the left on the Bisection Tool (the typical class of pseudoneglect error for humans) with the left hand (the hand that typically produces the greatest pseudoneglect bias) displayed significantly smaller rightward putting errors. Moreover, these individuals also holed more putts. No other pseudoneglect tasks were shown to impact on putting performance. Our findings suggest that lateralized attentional biases have a significant effect on sport performance; they appear to influence a wide range of precision-based sports (e.g. shooting, archery). Findings are also discussed in terms of the processes that are likely to be involved in this effect.

  19. Age effects shrink when motor learning is predominantly supported by nondeclarative, automatic memory processes: evidence from golf putting.

    PubMed

    Chauvel, Guillaume; Maquestiaux, François; Hartley, Alan A; Joubert, Sven; Didierjean, André; Masters, Rich S W

    2012-01-01

    Can motor learning be equivalent in younger and older adults? To address this question, 48 younger (M = 23.5 years) and 48 older (M = 65.0 years) participants learned to perform a golf-putting task in two different motor learning situations: one that resulted in infrequent errors or one that resulted in frequent errors. The results demonstrated that infrequent-error learning predominantly relied on nondeclarative, automatic memory processes whereas frequent-error learning predominantly relied on declarative, effortful memory processes: After learning, infrequent-error learners verbalized fewer strategies than frequent-error learners; at transfer, a concurrent, attention-demanding secondary task (tone counting) left motor performance of infrequent-error learners unaffected but impaired that of frequent-error learners. The results showed age-equivalent motor performance in infrequent-error learning but age deficits in frequent-error learning. Motor performance of frequent-error learners required more attention with age, as evidenced by an age deficit on the attention-demanding secondary task. The disappearance of age effects when nondeclarative, automatic memory processes predominated suggests that these processes are preserved with age and are available even early in motor learning.

  20. Entomopathogenic Nematodes Are Not an Alternative to Fenamiphos for Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes on Golf Courses in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Crow, WT; Porazinska, DL; Giblin-Davis, RM; Grewal, PS

    2006-01-01

    With the cancellation of fenamiphos in the near future, alternative nematode management tactics for plant-parasitic nematodes (PPN) on golf courses need to be identified. The use of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) has been suggested as one possible alternative. This paper presents the results of 10 experiments evaluating the efficacy of EPN at managing PPN on turfgrasses and improving turf performance. These experiments were conducted at various locations throughout Florida over the course of a decade. In different experiments, different EPN species were tested against different species of PPN. Separate experiments evaluated multiple rates and applications of EPN, compared different EPN species, and compared single EPN species against multiple species of PPN. In a few trials, EPN were associated with reductions in certain plant-parasite species, but in other trials were associated with increases. In most trials, EPN had no effect on plant parasites. Because EPN were so inconsistent in their results, we conclude that EPN are not acceptable alternatives to fenamiphos by most turf managers in Florida at this time. PMID:19259430

  1. Thatch biodegradation and antifungal activities of two lignocellulolytic Streptomyces strains in laboratory cultures and in golf green turfgrass.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, K; Crawford, D L

    2000-06-01

    The use of lignocellulolytic Streptomyces spp. as biological agents, to enhance thatch degradation in turf and to slow its rate of accumulation while controlling fungal growth in the thatch layer, was studied. In flask scale studies, two lignocellulolytic Streptomyces violaceusniger (= hygroscopicus) strains (YCED9 and WYE53) decomposed thatch (> 30% dry weight) over a 12-week incubation period. Biodegradation was accompanied by production of extracellular cellulases, xylanases, and peroxidases. The accumulation of the polymeric, water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate acid, precipitable polymeric lignin (APPL), was also observed. Residual thatch from 12-week-old cultures had an increased lignin-to-carbohydrate ratio, an indication that although lignin was metabolized, carbohydrates were preferential carbon sources for these actinomycetes. A spore-containing soluble dry powder formulation was used as an inoculum in an in situ field experiment. This formulation was maintained in storage at 4 degrees C for over two years without viability loss. Results from the golf green experiment showed that although treated thatch layers in established greens were not appreciably reduced over the course of one summer, the Streptomyces were active and maintained their populations within the thatch, while fungal growth was suppressed as compared to controls. The results show that treatment of turfgrass with these Streptomyces may be useful for the long-term control of fungal populations within the thatch. Longer field studies are required to assess the long-term potential for also controlling thatch build-up and fungal pathogens.

  2. Incidence of turf-damaging white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) and associated pathogens and parasitoids on Kentucky golf courses.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Carl T; Potter, Daniel A

    2010-12-01

    Root-feeding grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) were sampled from damaged areas of 61 irrigated roughs on 32 Kentucky golf courses to determine species composition and natural enemy incidence, the first such survey in the United States' transitional turfgrass climatic zone. Masked chafers (Cyclocephala lurida Bland and C. borealis Arrow) and Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newman) accounted for ≈73 and 26% of grubs found in an autumn survey, with Cyclocephala spp. predominating at most sites, although mixed infestations were common. Only a few Phyllophaga spp., and no exotic species other than P. japonica were found. Cyclocephala spp. also predominated in seasonal and statewide surveys regardless of whether a course had cool- or warm-season grass fairways. Pathogenic bacteria, Paenibacillus and Serratia spp., and the autumn-active parasitoid Tiphia pygidialis Allen were the main enemies associated with Cyclocephala spp. Predominant enemies of P. japonica were Paenibacillus, Serratia, and Metarhizium spp. in autumn, and eugregarines, Stictospora sp. (probably S. villani Hays and Clopton) and Tiphia vernalis Rohwer in spring. Entomopathogenic nematodes and the microsporidian Ovavesicula popilliae Andreadis & Hanula were nearly absent in our samples. No predictive relationships were found between soil parameters and proportionate abundance of Cyclocephala or P. japonica, or with natural enemy incidence at particular sites. Although incidence of individual enemies was generally low (<20%; often <5%) in these point-in-time surveys, collectively and over their hosts' prolonged development they may take a significant toll on grub populations.

  3. [Urban culture and physical and sports activities. The "sportification" of parkour and street golf as cultural mediation].

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Florian; Routier, Guillaume; Héas, Stephane; Bodin, Dominique

    2010-08-01

    The article explores the process of "sportification"--i.e., processing physical activity in a sport regulated by a set of rules and standards, legitimized by supervisory institutions--from two originals practices, parkour and urban golf. To study these practices, we crossed the contributions of urban sociology and of the contemporary sociology of sport while respecting the methodological principles of qualitative sociology. A first point concerns the process of"sport" itself, its definition, its various stages, and the role played by communication of stakeholders on public space. The cultural mediation shows us how to institutionalize the movement that represents the "sports" resulted in the same time reconfiguration of physical practices themselves. Recent events illustrate the ongoing reconfiguration, we will detail them. Finally, we show the effects produced by the process on the definition of urban culture and sports: setting sight of activities, enhanced cooperation with the media-cultural, polarization between different types of practical in the case of parkour, around a confrontation between two of the founders.

  4. Cri du Chat: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sparks, S; Hutchinson, B

    1980-01-01

    Since Lejeune et al. (1963) first described the syndrome of Cri du Chat (Cry of the Cat), cases have been described in the literature in terms of genetic abnormalities. All cases were severely retarded and the mental impairment has been believed to be progressive, although no longitudinal studies have been reported. Descriptions of speech and language behavior have been scarce. This paper presents a case of a 7-yr, 6 mo-old girl with Cri du Chat who has received speech and language therapy for five years. Her speech, language, and mental development are noted and are not consistent with cases reported previously.

  5. Atomes du big bang : premiere detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J. M.

    1994-09-01

    Ce fut au Keck d'ouvrir le bal, en debusquant du deuterium a plus de 10 milliards d'annees-lumiere. Puis, en juillet, vint l'annonce qu'Hubble avait apercu de l'helium flottant dans le milieu intergalactque lontain. Que ces deux prouesses realisees a la lumiere de quasars se confirment et elles ouvriraient enfin la chasse aux atomes primordiaux nes dans les trois premieres minutes de l'Univers. Avec toutefois un probleme : l'une apporterait de l'eau au moulin du Big Bang, mais l'autre ferait plutot figure de pave dans la mare ...

  6. Variete Technique du Lambeau Sural dans les Brulures Profondes du Pied

    PubMed Central

    Ezzoubi, M.; Ettalbi, S.; Elmounjid, S.; Fassi, J.; Benchamckha, F.J.; Sakhi, M.; Boukind, E.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Les couvertures des pertes de substance de la jambe, du talon et du pied font souvent appel au lambeau sural, qui reste, de part ses dimensions, une indication limitée. Les Auteurs présentent, à travers deux cas cliniques, une variété technique pour la levée du lambeau sural, permettant d'obtenir des palettes cutanées de grande surface avec une bonne sécurité vasculaire. C'est un lambeau fasciocutané remontant jusqu'à un centimètre du creux poplité et incluant, lors de la levée, l'aponévrose, le nerf sural, la petite veine saphène et le nerf sural latéral. PMID:21990988

  7. Rick and Becky DuFour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2012-01-01

    In 1969, a concern with the deep inequity of students' experiences and opportunities in traditional school systems first drove social studies teacher Rick DuFour to begin advocating for the kind of reforms that would jell into his transformative model, Professional Learning Communities (PLC) at Work, some 16 years later. The core belief of the PLC…

  8. Sign Communication in Cri du Chat Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlenkamp, Sonja; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a study on the use of sign supported Norwegian (SSN) in two individuals with Cri du chat syndrome (CCS). The study gives a first account of some selected aspects of production and intelligibility of SSN in CCS. Possible deviance in manual parameters, in particular inter- and/or intra-subject variation in the use…

  9. Prejudice: From Allport to DuBois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Stanley O., Jr.; Reed, Edward S.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the differences between Gordon Allport's and W. E. B. DuBois's theories on the origins of prejudice and the impact of discrimination on the personality and social development of blacks. The article argues that prejudice is a historically developed process, not a universal feature of human psychology. Implications for U.S. race relations…

  10. The Du Pont OZ Creative Thinking Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, David

    1994-01-01

    The OZ Creative Thinking Network is a volunteer group of Du Pont Corporation employees devoted to educating themselves and others concerning creativity and innovation. This network, organized in 1986, has a current membership of over 600 employees and has produced a book that couples essays expressing concepts in creativity and innovation with…

  11. Prejudice: From Allport to DuBois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Stanley O., Jr.; Reed, Edward S.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the differences between Gordon Allport's and W. E. B. DuBois's theories on the origins of prejudice and the impact of discrimination on the personality and social development of blacks. The article argues that prejudice is a historically developed process, not a universal feature of human psychology. Implications for U.S. race relations…

  12. Rick and Becky DuFour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2012-01-01

    In 1969, a concern with the deep inequity of students' experiences and opportunities in traditional school systems first drove social studies teacher Rick DuFour to begin advocating for the kind of reforms that would jell into his transformative model, Professional Learning Communities (PLC) at Work, some 16 years later. The core belief of the PLC…

  13. Growth study of cri du chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Collins, M S; Eaton-Evans, J

    2001-10-01

    We compared the growth of children with cri du chat (5p-) syndrome with the 1990 UK growth curves. Most subjects had impaired growth, particularly of head circumference. The more emaciated the child the more pronounced the microcephaly, showing the need for growth and nutrition monitoring.

  14. DuSable High School Program Flourishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Pat

    1995-01-01

    Describes the fall and rise of the Panther Press, the scholastic newspaper of the DuSable High School in Chicago. States that despite being located in the midst of public housing projects, the school's newspaper is thriving where others in similar circumstances have failed. Describes how the school's principal and an advisor revitalized and…

  15. Sign Communication in Cri du Chat Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlenkamp, Sonja; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a study on the use of sign supported Norwegian (SSN) in two individuals with Cri du chat syndrome (CCS). The study gives a first account of some selected aspects of production and intelligibility of SSN in CCS. Possible deviance in manual parameters, in particular inter- and/or intra-subject variation in the use…

  16. The effect of prosthetic torsional stiffness on the golf swing kinematics of a left and a right-sided trans-tibial amputee.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J P; Strike, S C; Wallace, E S

    2004-08-01

    The golf swing is a biomechanically complex movement requiring three-dimensional movements at the ankle joint complex (AJC), the hips and shoulders. Trans-tibial amputees lose the natural AJC movements as many prostheses do not allow three dimensional foot movements. Torsion devices have been developed and incorporated into prostheses to facilitate internal and external transverse plane rotations. These devices can help amputees to compensate for the loss of movement and to reduce shearing stresses at the stump-socket interface. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of three torsion devices on body rotations during the golf swing. Two trans-tibial amputees (one right-sided and one left-sided) were analysed using three-dimensional video analysis at address (ADR), the top of the backswing (TBS) and at the end of the follow-through (EFT). The participants played shots with a 3-wood under three different prosthetic conditions (two with a torsion device set to different stiffness values, and one with no torsion device). The results showed that the torsion device served to improve the hip and shoulder rotations of the left-side amputee without increasing perceived stress at the stump. The torsion device had minimal effect on the hip and shoulder rotations of the right-side amputee, although perceived stress was reduced. The difference in results between the right-sided and left-sided amputees was due to the different requirements of each foot during the golf swing. The main problem faced by the right-side amputee was a loss of the sagittal plane movement of ankle joint plantarflexion at EFT, rather than the transverse plane movement.

  17. Comparison of Muscle Onset Activation Sequences between a Golf or Tennis Swing and Common Training Exercises Using Surface Electromyography: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Rebecca; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this pilot study is to use surface electromyography to determine an individual athlete's typical muscle onset activation sequence when performing a golf or tennis forward swing and to use the method to assess to what degree the sequence is reproduced with common conditioning exercises and a machine designed for this purpose. Methods. Data for 18 healthy male subjects were collected for 15 muscles of the trunk and lower extremities. Data were filtered and processed to determine the average onset of muscle activation for each motion. A Spearman correlation estimated congruence of activation order between the swing and each exercise. Correlations of each group were pooled with 95% confidence intervals using a random effects meta-analytic strategy. Results. The averaged sequences differed among each athlete tested, but pooled correlations demonstrated a positive association between each exercise and the participants' natural muscle onset activation sequence. Conclusion. The selected training exercises and Turning Point™ device all partially reproduced our athletes' averaged muscle onset activation sequences for both sports. The results support consideration of a larger, adequately powered study using this method to quantify to what degree each of the selected exercises is appropriate for use in both golf and tennis. PMID:27403454

  18. DU-AGG pilot plant design study

    SciTech Connect

    Lessing, P.A.; Gillman, H.

    1996-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is developing new methods to produce high-density aggregate (artificial rock) primarily consisting of depleted uranium oxide. The objective is to develop a low-cost method whereby uranium oxide powder (UO[sub 2], U[sub 3]O[sub ]8, or UO[sub 3]) can be processed to produce high-density aggregate pieces (DU-AGG) having physical properties suitable for disposal in low-level radioactive disposal facilities or for use as a component of high-density concrete used as shielding for radioactive materials. A commercial company, G-M Systems, conducted a design study for a manufacturing pilot plant to process DU-AGG. The results of that study are included and summarized in this report. Also explained are design considerations, equipment capacities, the equipment list, system operation, layout of equipment in the plant, cost estimates, and the proposed plan and schedule.

  19. Sustainable growth, the DuPont way.

    PubMed

    Holliday, C

    2001-09-01

    Like many manufacturers, DuPont traditionally has grown by making more and more "stuff." And its business growth has been proportional to the amount of raw materials and energy used--as well as the resulting waste and emissions from operations. Over the years, though, DuPont became aware that cheap supplies of nonrenewable resources wouldn't be endlessly available and that the earth's ecosystems couldn't indefinitely absorb the waste and emissions of production and consumption. Chad Holliday, chairman and CEO of DuPont, believes strongly in the challenge of sustainable growth and makes the business case for it: By using creativity and scientific knowledge effectively, he says, companies can provide strong returns for shareholders and grow their businesses--while also meeting the human needs of societies around the world and reducing the environmental footprint of their operations and products. In fact, a focus on sustainability can help identify new products, markets, partnerships, and intellectual property and lead to substantial business growth. Holliday describes how DuPont developed a three-pronged strategy to translate the concept of sustainability into nuts-and-bolts business practices. Focusing on integrated science, knowledge intensity, and productivity improvement, the strategy was accompanied by a new way to measure progress quantitatively. Sustainable growth should be viewed not as a program for stepped-up environmental performance but as a comprehensive way of doing business, one that delivers tremendous economic value and opens up new opportunities. Ultimately, companies will find that they can generate substantial business value through sustainability while both enhancing the quality of life around the world and protecting the environment.

  20. Pourfour Du Petit syndrome after interscalene block

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappji; Pai, Rohini B.; Rao, Raghavendra P.

    2013-01-01

    Interscalene block is commonly associated with reversible ipsilateral phrenic nerve block, recurrent laryngeal nerve block, and cervical sympathetic plexus block, presenting as Horner's syndrome. We report a very rare Pourfour Du Petit syndrome which has a clinical presentation opposite to that of Horner's syndrome in a 24-year-old male who was given interscalene block for open reduction and internal fixation of fracture upper third shaft of left humerus. PMID:23956726

  1. Cri du Chat syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carolina Paes; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; Lessa, Fernanda Campos Rosetti; Orsi, Iara Agusta

    2005-01-01

    Cri du Chat Syndrome occurs as a result of a partial deletion in the short arm of chromosome 5. Among the consequent abnormalities are low birth weight, a striking catlike cry in infancy, mental retardation, epicanthal folds, hypertelorism and dental malocclusions. This paper presents a case report on the dental treatment of a 23-year-old patient who received multidisciplinary treatment, including special education and precocious stimulation for carriers of this syndrome.

  2. DuPont Chemical Vapor Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    MOORE, T.L.

    2003-10-03

    DuPont Safety Resources was tasked with reviewing the current chemical vapor control practices and providing preventive recommendations on best commercial techniques to control worker exposures. The increased focus of the tank closure project to meet the 2024 Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones has surfaced concerns among some CH2MHill employees and other interested parties. CH2MHill is committed to providing a safe working environment for employees and desires to safely manage the tank farm operations using appropriate control measures. To address worker concerns, CH2MHill has chartered a ''Chemical Vapors Project'' to integrate the activities of multiple CH2MHill project teams, and solicit the expertise of external resources, including an independent Industrial Hygiene expert panel, a communications consultant, and DuPont Safety Resources. Over a three-month time period, DuPont worked with CH2MHill ESH&Q, Industrial Hygiene, Engineering, and the independent expert panel to perform the assessment. The process included overview presentations, formal interviews, informal discussions, documentation review, and literature review. DuPont Safety Resources concluded that it is highly unlikely that workers in the tank farms are exposed to chemicals above established standards. Additionally, the conventional and radiological chemistry is understood, the inherent chemical hazards are known, and the risk associated with chemical vapor exposure is properly managed. The assessment highlighted management's commitment to addressing chemical vapor hazards and controlling the associated risks. Additionally, we found the Industrial Hygiene staff to be technically competent and well motivated. The tank characterization data resides in a comprehensive database containing the tank chemical compositions and relevant airborne concentrations.

  3. Pourfour Du Petit syndrome after interscalene block.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappji; Pai, Rohini B; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2013-04-01

    Interscalene block is commonly associated with reversible ipsilateral phrenic nerve block, recurrent laryngeal nerve block, and cervical sympathetic plexus block, presenting as Horner's syndrome. We report a very rare Pourfour Du Petit syndrome which has a clinical presentation opposite to that of Horner's syndrome in a 24-year-old male who was given interscalene block for open reduction and internal fixation of fracture upper third shaft of left humerus.

  4. Proprietes de Transport Electronique du Rutile Stoechiometrique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keroack, Danielle

    Le rutile est un oxyde metallique qui presente beaucoup de similitudes avec certains perovskites notamment le titanate de barium ou de strontium. Il est comme ces derniers, compose d'un agencement d'octaedres d'oxygene centres sur l'atome de titane. Ces octaedres sont responsables de la forte polarisabilite de ces cristaux et de leur grande constante dielectrique. Leurs proprietes optiques, seuil d'absorption et spectre de phonons, sont par exemple forts semblables. La presente etude vise a determiner la nature du transport electronique dans le rutile stoechiometrique pur et d'en comparer les resultats avec les proprietes de certains perovskites. Nous determinerons par differentes mesures optoelectroniques les parametres caracteristiques des pieges et leur influence sur le transport des electrons et des trous. Les resultats de conductivite et de capacitance de meme que les spectres de photoconductivite dans nos echantillons ont mis en evidence la presence d'au moins cinq niveaux energetiques dans la bande interdite du rutile agissant comme pieges pour les electrons ou pour les trous et qui jouent un role de premiere importance dans le comportement electrique du rutile. Par la technique de charge transitoire, nous determinerons pour la premiere fois dans le rutile stoechiometrique la grandeur de la mobilite de derive des trous a la temperature ambiante soit 3,4 cm^2/V cdots et nous etablierons une borne superieure a la mobilite des electrons soit 0,1 cm^2 /Vcdots.

  5. Influence du traitement thermique sur l'usinabilite du laiton monophase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholley, Airy

    La connaissance des proprietes et du comportement d'un materiau en usinage est primordiale pour optimiser son utilisation et obtenir une usinabilite maximale. Dans ce but, l'etude de la modification de la ductilite par traitement thermiques sur plusieurs criteres d'usinabilite tels que les efforts de coupe, la rugosite, les bavures et la formation du copeau a ete menee sur le laiton monophase. A cette fin, l'influence du traitement thermique sur la microstructure du laiton a d'abord ete etudiee. La taille des grains et la durete ont permis de determiner les proprietes mecaniques des etats metallurgiques. Des essais de percage ont ensuite ete effectues sur les etats metallurgiques H01 (99HV), OS100 (88HV) et OS250 (47HV) pour regarder l'influence du traitement thermique sur l'usinabilite. Cette etude experimentale a permis de comprendre l'influence du taux de laminage et de la temperature de recuit sur les proprietes mecaniques. Les essais d'usinabilite ont ensuite permis de prouver que les efforts de coupe sont dependants des conditions de coupe mais pas de la ductilite dans les etats metallurgiques testes. La taille des bavures augmente avec la ductilite et la vitesse de coupe, et diminue avec l'avance. La rugosite de la surface des trous apres l'usinage a egalement ete etudiee. Il a aussi ete prouve par une etude sur les copeaux que la temperature croit avec la vitesse de coupe. L'analyse de la segmentation des copeaux n'a en revanche pas permis de trouver une correlation significative avec les traitements thermiques testes. Enfin, le revetement de l'outil a montre une grande importance sur l'usinabilite du materiau. Il a ete conclu que l'usinabilite du laiton C26000 (CuZn30) est meilleure lorsqu'on travaille dans un etat metallurgique dur. Ces conclusions sont valables pour le laiton monophase etudie, il serait interessant d'examiner aussi le cas des laitons biphases.

  6. La reconstruction du sourcil par greffon composite du cuir chevelu: une astuce pour faciliter la technique

    PubMed Central

    El Omari, Mounia; El Mazouz, Samir; Gharib, Noureddine; EL Abbassi, Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Les sourcils jouent un rôle important dans l’équilibre esthétique du visage. Leur reconstruction ou ophriopoïése, après séquelle de brûlure fait partie intégrante du programme de réhabilitation de la face brûlée. Plusieurs techniques ont été décrites. Nous insistons ici sur l'intérêt d'une technique simple, à la portée de tous les chirurgiens, et dont la méthode et les résultats peuvent être améliorés par un dessin bien planifié des zones donneuse et receveuse: la greffe composite prélevée au niveau du cuir chevelu dessinée à l'aide d'un calque du sourcil controlatéral. PMID:26401195

  7. Suivi après le traitement du cancer du sein

    PubMed Central

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Geneviève; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Offrir aux médecins de famille un résumé des recommandations fondées sur les données probantes pour guider les soins aux survivantes traitées pour le cancer du sein. Qualité des données Une recherche documentaire a été effectuée dans MEDLINE entre 2000 et 2016 à l’aide des mots-clés anglais suivants : breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines et survivorship care plans, en se concentrant sur la revue des lignes directrices publiées récemment par les organismes nationaux de cancérologie. Les données étaient de niveaux I à III. Message principal Les soins aux survivantes comportent 4 facettes : surveillance et dépistage, prise en charge des effets à long terme, promotion de la santé et coordination des soins. La surveillance des récidives ne se traduit que par une mammographie annuelle, et le dépistage d’autres cancers doit suivre les lignes directrices basées sur la population. La prise en charge des effets à long terme du cancer et de son traitement aborde des problèmes courants tels la douleur, la fatigue, le lymphœdème, la détresse et les effets indésirables des médicaments, de même que les préoccupations à long terme comme la santé du cœur et des os. La promotion de la santé met en relief les bienfaits de l’activité chez les survivantes du cancer, avec l’accent mis sur l’activité physique. Les soins aux survivantes sont de meilleure qualité lorsque divers services et professionnels de la santé participent aux soins, et le médecin de famille joue un rôle important dans la coordination des soins. Conclusion Les médecins de famille sont de plus en plus souvent les principaux fournisseurs de soins de suivi après le traitement du cancer du sein. Le cancer du sein doit être considéré comme une affection médicale chronique, même chez les femmes en rémission, et les patientes profitent de la même approche que celle utilisée pour les autres affections chroniques en

  8. Ectopie thyroïdienne: apport du scanner

    PubMed Central

    Abdoulaye, Traore Ababacar; Zakaria, Traore; Ousmane, Camara; Meryem, Boubbou; Moustapha, Maaroufi; Siham, Tizniti; Imane, Kamaoui

    2017-01-01

    L’ectopie thyroïdienne est une malformation pathologique rare. Nous rapportons un cas supplémentaire d’ectopie du lobe thyroïdien droit, découvert lors du bilan tomodensitométrique d’une masse latéro cervicale gauche. PMID:28450999

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of cri du chat syndrome with encephalocele.

    PubMed

    Bakkum, Jamie N; Watson, William J; Johansen, Keith L; Brost, Brian C

    2005-10-01

    A 19-year-old primigravida was found to have an encephalocele on screening ultrasound study. Amniocentesis indicated cri du chat syndrome, 5p-. Although cri du chat syndrome has been noted in association with central nervous system malformations, encephalocele is a rare finding in this syndrome.

  10. 33 CFR 117.443 - Du Large Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Du Large Bayou. 117.443 Section 117.443 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.443 Du Large Bayou. The draw of...

  11. 33 CFR 117.443 - Du Large Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Du Large Bayou. 117.443 Section 117.443 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.443 Du Large Bayou. The draw of...

  12. 33 CFR 117.443 - Du Large Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Du Large Bayou. 117.443 Section 117.443 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.443 Du Large Bayou. The draw of...

  13. 33 CFR 117.443 - Du Large Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Du Large Bayou. 117.443 Section 117.443 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.443 Du Large Bayou. The draw of...

  14. 33 CFR 117.443 - Du Large Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Du Large Bayou. 117.443 Section 117.443 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.443 Du Large Bayou. The draw of...

  15. Modelisation par elements finis du muscle strie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Mathieu

    Ce present projet de recherche a permis. de creer un modele par elements finis du muscle strie humain dans le but d'etudier les mecanismes engendrant les lesions musculaires traumatiques. Ce modele constitue une plate-forme numerique capable de discerner l'influence des proprietes mecaniques des fascias et de la cellule musculaire sur le comportement dynamique du muscle lors d'une contraction excentrique, notamment le module de Young et le module de cisaillement de la couche de tissu conjonctif, l'orientation des fibres de collagene de cette membrane et le coefficient de poisson du muscle. La caracterisation experimentale in vitro de ces parametres pour des vitesses de deformation elevees a partir de muscles stries humains actifs est essentielle pour l'etude de lesions musculaires traumatiques. Le modele numerique developpe est capable de modeliser la contraction musculaire comme une transition de phase de la cellule musculaire par un changement de raideur et de volume a l'aide des lois de comportement de materiau predefinies dans le logiciel LS-DYNA (v971, Livermore Software Technology Corporation, Livermore, CA, USA). Le present projet de recherche introduit donc un phenomene physiologique qui pourrait expliquer des blessures musculaires courantes (crampes, courbatures, claquages, etc.), mais aussi des maladies ou desordres touchant le tissu conjonctif comme les collagenoses et la dystrophie musculaire. La predominance de blessures musculaires lors de contractions excentriques est egalement exposee. Le modele developpe dans ce projet de recherche met ainsi a l'avant-scene le concept de transition de phase ouvrant la porte au developpement de nouvelles technologies pour l'activation musculaire chez les personnes atteintes de paraplegie ou de muscles artificiels compacts pour l'elaboration de protheses ou d'exosquelettes. Mots-cles Muscle strie, lesion musculaire, fascia, contraction excentrique, modele par elements finis, transition de phase

  16. Oncoplastie avec conservation mammaire dans le traitement du cancer du sein: à propos de 16 cas

    PubMed Central

    Bouzoubaa, Wail; Laadioui, Meryam; Jayi, Sofia; Alaoui, Fatime Zahra Fdili; Bouguern, Hakima; Chaara, Hikmat; Melhouf, Moulay Abdelilah

    2015-01-01

    Le cancer du sein est actuellement le cancer le plus fréquent chez la femme, et pose un véritable problème diagnostique et thérapeutique. Le dépistage des lésions à un stade de plus en plus précoce, a permis une extension des indications du traitement conservateur radiochirurgical, qui était initialement limitées aux tumeurs de moins de 3 cm, unifocales, non inflammatoires. Par ailleurs, l'utilisation de traitements préopératoires permet d’étendre les indications du traitement conservateur à des tumeurs plus volumineuses. Parallèlement à cette extension des indications de conservation mammaire, on a observé le développement de nouvelles approches thérapeutiques notamment la chirurgie oncoplastique, technique du ganglion sentinelle et chirurgie stéréotaxique, dont les résultats initiaux sont très encouragent. A travers cette étude réalisée dans le service de gynécologie et obstétrique II du CHU HASSAN II de FES au MAROC, après l'analyse rétrospective de 16 patientes traitées par traitement conservateur et oncoplastie, nous avons voulus montrer notre aptitude a réalisé ses techniques chirurgicales et a bien prendre en charge ces patientes, mais aussi évaluer ces techniques en termes de résultat carcinologique et de résultat esthétique, aussi en terme de survie globale, survie sans métastase et en termes de récidive locale entre les plasties mammaires et les traitements usuels: mastectomie et traitement conservateur classique. PMID:26430477

  17. Emotions and Golf Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Alexander B.; Tenenbaum, Gershon; English, R. William

    2006-01-01

    A multiple case study investigation is reported in which emotions and performance were assessed within the probabilistic individual zone of optimal functioning (IZOF) model (Kamata, Tenenbaum, & Hanin, 2002) to develop idiosyncratic emotion-performance profiles. These profiles were incorporated into a psychological skills training (PST)…

  18. Emotions and Golf Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Alexander B.; Tenenbaum, Gershon; English, R. William

    2006-01-01

    A multiple case study investigation is reported in which emotions and performance were assessed within the probabilistic individual zone of optimal functioning (IZOF) model (Kamata, Tenenbaum, & Hanin, 2002) to develop idiosyncratic emotion-performance profiles. These profiles were incorporated into a psychological skills training (PST)…

  19. Assessment of soil and groundwater impacts by treated urban wastewater reuse. A case study: application in a golf course (Girona, Spain).

    PubMed

    Candela, Lucila; Fabregat, Salvador; Josa, Alejandro; Suriol, Josep; Vigués, Núria; Mas, Jordi

    2007-03-01

    Starting in July 2000, treated wastewater of urban origin has been used for the "Serres de Pals" golf course irrigation (Girona, Spain). To evaluate if the soil and the aquifer underneath are affected by the utilization of this type of water, samples have been taken along a period of several months from the wastewater treatment plant, the stabilization lagoon, groundwater and soil profiles. Analyses have been performed for total coliforms and aerobic bacteria, soil water pressure and soil water content as well as chemical analyses of the irrigation water, aquifer and water of the vadose zone. Soil profiles taken at several times during the study indicate the absence of coliforms except for a short period during summer. In the vadose zone an increase of more than 1000 mg kg(-1) of NaO(2) in the top 60 cm of soil was observed while Cl(-) concentration in the aquifer reached up to 1200 mg l(-1) ten months after starting the irrigation.

  20. La fin du jeûne?

    PubMed Central

    Naugler, Christopher; Sidhu, Davinder

    2014-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter une mise à jour sur l’utilité clinique de ne pas être à jeun par rapport à l’être pour l’analyse des lipides dans le but d’améliorer l’observance par les patients, leur sécurité et l’évaluation clinique dans les tests du cholestérol. Qualité des données Les recommandations sont classées comme étant fondées sur des données probantes fortes, acceptables ou faibles (conflictuelles ou insuffisantes), selon les classifications adoptées par le Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs. Message principal Le dépistage de la dyslipidémie comme facteur de risque de coronaropathie et la prescription de médicaments hypolipidémiants sont des activités importantes en soins primaires. De récentes données probantes remettent en question la nécessité d’être à jeun pour la mesure des lipides. Dans des études sur la population, le cholestérol total, le cholestérol à lipoprotéines de haute densité et le cholestérol à lipoprotéines autres qu’à haute densité variaient tous d’en moyenne 2 % à jeun. Pour un dépistage de routine, la mesure du cholestérol sans être à jeun est maintenant une option de rechange raisonnable à l’analyse à jeun. Pour les patients diabétiques, l’exigence d’être à jeun peut représenter un important problème de sécurité en raison des possibilités d’hypoglycémie. Pour la surveillance des triglycérides et du cholestérol à lipoprotéines de basse densité chez les patients qui prennent des médicaments hypolipidémiants, le jeûne devient important. Conclusion Être à jeun pour la détermination routinière des niveaux lipidiques est largement inutile et il est improbable que le jeûne influence la stratification du risque clinique chez le patient, tandis que la mesure sans être à jeun pourrait améliorer l’observance par le patient et sa sécurité.