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Sample records for dual dna vaccination

  1. Dual recombinant Lactococcus lactis for enhanced delivery of DNA vaccine reporter plasmid pPERDBY.

    PubMed

    Yagnik, Bhrugu; Sharma, Drashya; Padh, Harish; Desai, Priti

    2017-03-04

    Food grade Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) has been widely used as an antigen and DNA delivery vehicle. We had previously reported the use of non-invasive L. lactis for the delivery of newly constructed immunostimulatory DNA vaccine reporter plasmid, pPERDBY. In the present report, we outline the construction of dual recombinant L. lactis expressing Internalin A of Listeria monocytogenes and harbouring pPERDBY (LL InlA+ pPERDBY) to enhance the DNA delivery efficiency of L. lactis. After confirmation and validation of LL InlA+ pPERDBY, its DNA delivery potential was compared with previously developed non-invasive r- L. lactis::pPERDBY. The use of invasive L. lactis resulted in around three fold increase in number of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein expressing Caco- cells. Thus, these findings reinforce the prospective application of invasive strain of L. lactis in delivery of DNA/RNA and antigens.

  2. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  3. Phase IIb trial of in vivo electroporation mediated dual-plasmid hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine in chronic hepatitis B patients under lamivudine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fu-Qiang; Rao, Gui-Rong; Wang, Gui-Qiang; Li, Yue-Qi; Xie, Yao; Zhang, Zhan-Qing; Deng, Cun-Liang; Mao, Qing; Li, Jun; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Mao-Rong; Han, Tao; Chen, Shi-Jun; Pan, Chen; Tan, De-Ming; Shang, Jia; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Zhang, Yue-Xin; Yang, Ji-Ming; Chen, Guang-Ming

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the efficacy and safety of in vivo electroporation (EP)-mediated dual-plasmid hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA vaccine vs placebo for sequential combination therapy with lamivudine (LAM) in patients with chronic hepatitis B. METHODS Two hundred and twenty-five patients were randomized to receive either LAM + vaccine (vaccine group, n = 109) or LAM + placebo (control group, n = 116). LAM treatment lasted 72 wk. Patients received the DNA vaccine or placebo by intramuscular injection mediated by EP at weeks 12 (start of treatment with vaccine or placebo, SOT), 16, 24, and 36 (end of treatment with vaccine or placebo, EOT). RESULTS In the modified intent-to-treat population, more patients had a decrease in HBV DNA > 2 log10 IU/mL in the vaccine group at week 12 after EOT compared with the control group. A trend toward a difference in the number of patients with undetectable HBV DNA at week 28 after EOT was obtained. Adverse events were similar. In the dynamic per-protocol set, which excluded adefovir (ADV) add-on cases at each time point instantly after ADV administration due to LAM antiviral failure, more patients had a decrease in HBV DNA > 2 log10 IU/mL in the vaccine group at week 12 and 28 after EOT compared with the control group. More patients with undetectable HBV DNA at week 28 after EOT in the vaccine group were also observed. Among patients with a viral load < 1000 copies/mL at week 12, more patients achieved HBeAg seroconversion in the vaccine group than among controls at week 36 after EOT, as well as less virological breakthrough and YMDD mutations. CONCLUSION The primary endpoint was not achieved using the HBV DNA vaccine. The HBV DNA vaccine could only be beneficial in subjects that have achieved initial virological response under LAM chemotherapy. PMID:28127204

  4. DNA Vaccination in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Dey, Sohini; Chellappa, Madhan Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Robust and sustainable development of poultry industry requires prevention of deadly infectious diseases. Vigorous vaccination of the birds is a routine practice; however, the live and inactivated vaccines that are used have inherent disadvantages. New-generation vaccines such as DNA vaccines offer several advantages over conventional vaccines. DNA vaccines, which encode an antigen of interest or multiple antigens in the target host, are stable, easy to produce and administer, do not require cold chain maintenance, and are not affected by the maternal antibodies. In addition, DNA vaccines can also be administered in ovo, and thus, mass vaccination and early induction of immune response can effectively be achieved. In this chapter, we focus on the development of DNA vaccines against important infectious viral as well as parasitic diseases of poultry.

  5. Dual DNA vaccination of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) against two different rhabdoviruses, VHSV and IHNV, induces specific divalent protection.

    PubMed

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Delgado, Lourdes; Lorenzen, Ellen; Bovo, Giuseppe; Evensen, Øystein; Lapatra, Scott; Lorenzen, Niels

    2009-02-18

    DNA vaccines encoding the glycoprotein genes of the salmonid rhabdoviruses VHSV and IHNV are very efficient in eliciting protective immune responses against their respective diseases in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The early anti-viral response (EAVR) provides protection by 4 days post vaccination and is non-specific and transient while the specific anti-viral response (SAVR) is long lasting and highly specific. Since both VHSV and IHNV are endemic in rainbow trout in several geographical regions of Europe and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) on the Pacific coast of North America, co-vaccination against the two diseases would be a preferable option. In the present study we demonstrated that a single injection of mixed DNA vaccines induced long-lasting protection against both individual and a simultaneous virus challenge 80 days post vaccination. Transfected muscle cells at the injection site expressed both G proteins. This study confirms the applied potential of using a combined DNA vaccination for protection of fish against two different rhabdoviral diseases.

  6. DNA vaccines: a review.

    PubMed

    Lewis, P J; Babiuk, L A

    1999-01-01

    Therapeutic and prophylactic DNA vaccine clinical trials for a variety of pathogens and cancers are underway (Chattergoon et al., 1997; Taubes, 1997). The speed with which initiation of these trials occurred is no less than astounding; clinical trials for a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp160 DNA-based vaccine were underway within 36 months of the first description of "genetic immunization" (Tang et al., 1992) and within 24 months of publication of the first article describing intramuscular delivery of a DNA vaccine (Ulmer et al., 1993). Despite the relative fervor with which clinical trials have progressed, it can be safely stated that DNA-based vaccines will not be an immunological "silver bullet." In this regard, it was satisfying to see a publication entitled "DNA Vaccines--A Modern Gimmick or a Boon to Vaccinology?" (Manickan et al., 1997b). There is no doubt that this technology is well beyond the phenomenology phase of study. Research niches and models have been established and will allow the truly difficult questions of mechanism and application to target species to be studied. These two aspects of future studies are intricately interwoven and will ultimately determine the necessity for mechanistic understanding and the evolution of target species studies. The basic science of DNA vaccines has yet to be clearly defined and will ultimately determine the success or failure of this technology to find a place in the immunological arsenal against disease. In a commentary on a published study describing DNA vaccine-mediated protection against heterologous challenge with HIV-1 in chimpanzees, Ronald Kennedy (1997) states, "As someone who has been in the trenches of AIDS vaccine research for over a decade and who, together with collaborators, has attempted a number of different vaccine approaches that have not panned out, I have a relatively pessimistic view of new AIDS vaccine approaches." Kennedy then goes on to summarize a DNA-based multigene vaccine

  7. DNA Vaccination Techniques.

    PubMed

    Fissolo, Nicolás; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory, demyelinating, and neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) in humans. Although the etiology of MS remains unknown, several lines of evidence support the notion that autoimmunity against components of the myelin sheath plays a major role in susceptibility to and development of the disease. At present, there are no approved MS therapies aimed specifically toward downregulating antigen-specific autoreactive immune cells. One antigen-specific approach that appears promising for the treatment of MS is DNA vaccination. This technique has demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials while maintaining safety.Here, we describe the generation of DNA vaccines containing immunologically relevant antigens of MS. Moreover, we present a detailed protocol for the prophylactic and therapeutic administration of DNA vaccines via intramuscular injection targeting on the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model resembling MS.

  8. DNA vaccines: roles against diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kishwar Hayat

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is the most successful application of immunological principles to human health. Vaccine efficacy needs to be reviewed from time to time and its safety is an overriding consideration. DNA vaccines offer simple yet effective means of inducing broad-based immunity. These vaccines work by allowing the expression of the microbial antigen inside host cells that take up the plasmid. These vaccines function by generating the desired antigen inside the cells, with the advantage that this may facilitate presentation through the major histocompatibility complex. This review article is based on a literature survey and it describes the working and designing strategies of DNA vaccines. Advantages and disadvantages for this type of vaccines have also been explained, together with applications of DNA vaccines. DNA vaccines against cancer, tuberculosis, Edwardsiella tarda, HIV, anthrax, influenza, malaria, dengue, typhoid and other diseases were explored. PMID:24432284

  9. DNA vaccines in veterinary use

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Laurel; Werner, David B

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines represent a new frontier in vaccine technology. One important application of this technology is in the veterinary arena. DNA vaccines have already gained a foothold in certain fields of veterinary medicine. However, several important questions must be addressed when developing DNA vaccines for animals, including whether or not the vaccine is efficacious and cost effective compared with currently available options. Another important question to consider is how to apply this developing technology in a wide range of different situations, from the domestic pet to individual fish in fisheries with several thousand animals, to wildlife programs for disease control. In some cases, DNA vaccines represent an interesting option for vaccination, while in others, currently available options are sufficient. This review will examine a number of diseases of veterinary importance and the progress being made in DNA vaccine technology relevant to these diseases, and we compare these with the conventional treatment options available. PMID:19722897

  10. DNA vaccines in veterinary use.

    PubMed

    Redding, Laurel; Weiner, David B

    2009-09-01

    DNA vaccines represent a new frontier in vaccine technology. One important application of this technology is in the veterinary arena. DNA vaccines have already gained a foothold in certain fields of veterinary medicine. However, several important questions must be addressed when developing DNA vaccines for animals, including whether or not the vaccine is efficacious and cost effective compared with currently available options. Another important question to consider is how to apply this developing technology in a wide range of different situations, from the domestic pet to individual fish in fisheries with several thousand animals, to wildlife programs for disease control. In some cases, DNA vaccines represent an interesting option for vaccination, while in others, currently available options are sufficient. This review will examine a number of diseases of veterinary importance and the progress being made in DNA vaccine technology relevant to these diseases, and we compare these with the conventional treatment options available.

  11. DNA/genetic vaccination (minireview).

    PubMed

    Kucerova, L

    1998-01-01

    An important new approach to vaccination is plasmid DNA injection in vivo that can elicit an immune response against protein(s) encoded. Antigen that is expressed from the in vivo transfected cells induces both humoral and cellular immune response. DNA immunization is generally applicable for a wide range of proteins. It can provide an organism with immunity against viruses, bacteria, parasites, and tumors. DNA vaccines can overcome the disadvantages of vaccines presently used as well as provide various new vaccines that are currently not available. This minireview provides an overview of evaluated DNA vaccine candidates against infectious agents and certain cancers.

  12. Development of dengue DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Danko, Janine R; Beckett, Charmagne G; Porter, Kevin R

    2011-09-23

    Vaccination with plasmid DNA against infectious pathogens including dengue is an active area of investigation. By design, DNA vaccines are able to elicit both antibody responses and cellular immune responses capable of mediating long-term protection. Great technical improvements have been made in dengue DNA vaccine constructs and trials are underway to study these in the clinic. The scope of this review is to highlight the rich history of this vaccine platform and the work in dengue DNA vaccines accomplished by scientists at the Naval Medical Research Center. This work resulted in the only dengue DNA vaccine tested in a clinical trial to date. Additional advancements paving the road ahead in dengue DNA vaccine development are also discussed.

  13. DNA vaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Jeang, Jessica; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as an attractive immunotherapeutic approach against cancer due to its simplicity, stability, and safety. Results from numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that DNA vaccines are well tolerated by patients and do not trigger major adverse effects. DNA vaccines are also very cost effective and can be administered repeatedly for long-term protection. Despite all the practical advantages, DNA vaccines face challenges in inducing potent antigen specific cellular immune responses as a result of immune tolerance against endogenous self-antigens in tumors. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against self-antigens have been investigated including encoding of xenogeneic versions of antigens, fusion of antigens to molecules that activate T cells or trigger associative recognition, priming with DNA vectors followed by boosting with viral vector, and utilization of immunomodulatory molecules. This review will focus on discussing strategies that circumvent immune tolerance and provide updates on findings from recent clinical trials. PMID:25625927

  14. DNA vaccines: a simple DNA sensing matter?

    PubMed

    Coban, Cevayir; Kobiyama, Kouji; Jounai, Nao; Tozuka, Miyuki; Ishii, Ken J

    2013-10-01

    Since the introduction of DNA vaccines two decades ago, this attractive strategy has been hampered by its low immunogenicity in humans. Studies conducted to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines have shown that understanding the mechanism of action of DNA vaccines might be the key to successfully improving their immunogenicity. Our current understanding is that DNA vaccines induce innate and adaptive immune responses in two ways: (1) encoded protein (or polypeptide) antigen(s) by the DNA plasmid can be expressed in stromal cells (i.e., muscle cells) as well as DCs, where these antigens are processed and presented to naïve CD4 or CD8 T cells either by direct or cross presentation, respectively; and (2) the transfected DNA plasmid itself may bind to an un-identified cytosolic DNA sensor and activate the TBK1-STING pathway and the production of type I interferons (IFNs) which function as an adjuvant. Recent studies investigating double-stranded cytosolic DNA sensor(s) have highlighted new mechanisms in which cytosolic DNA may release secondary metabolites, which are in turn recognized by a novel DNA sensing machinery. Here, we discuss these new metabolites and the possibilities of translating this knowledge into improved immunogenicity for DNA vaccines.

  15. Biotechnology and DNA vaccines for aquatic animals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    Biotechnology has been used extensively in the development of vaccines for aquaculture. Modern molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloning and microarray analysis have facilitated antigen discovery, construction of novel candidate vaccines, and assessments of vaccine efficacy, mode of action, and host response. This review focuses on DNA vaccines for finfish to illustrate biotechnology applications in this field. Although DNA vaccines for fish rhabdoviruses continue to show the highest efficacy, DNA vaccines for several other viral and bacterial fish pathogens have now been proven to provide significant protection against pathogen challenge. Studies of the fish rhabdovirus DNA vaccines have elucidated factors that affect DNA vaccine efficacy as well as the nature of the fish innate and adaptive immune responses to DNA vaccines. As tools for managing aquatic animal disease emergencies, DNA vaccines have advantages in speed, flexibility, and safety, and one fish DNA vaccine has been licensed.

  16. Biotechnology and DNA vaccines for aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Kurath, G

    2008-04-01

    Biotechnology has been used extensively in the development of vaccines for aquaculture. Modern molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloning and microarray analysis have facilitated antigen discovery, construction of novel candidate vaccines, and assessments of vaccine efficacy, mode of action, and host response. This review focuses on DNA vaccines for finfish to illustrate biotechnology applications in this field. Although DNA vaccines for fish rhabdoviruses continue to show the highest efficacy, DNA vaccines for several other viral and bacterial fish pathogens have now been proven to provide significant protection against pathogen challenge. Studies of the fish rhabdovirus DNA vaccines have elucidated factors that affect DNA vaccine efficacy as well as the nature of the fish innate and adaptive immune responses to DNA vaccines. As tools for managing aquatic animal disease emergencies, DNA vaccines have advantages in speed, flexibility, and safety, and one fish DNA vaccine has been licensed.

  17. DNA Vaccines for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNeel, Douglas G.; Becker, Jordan T.; Johnson, Laura E.; Olson, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding an antigen of interest has been demonstrated to be an effective means of immunization, capable of eliciting antigen-specific T cells. Plasmid DNA vaccines offer advantages over other anti-tumor vaccine approaches in terms of simplicity, manufacturing, and possibly safety. The primary disadvantage is their poor transfection efficiency and subsequent lower immunogenicity relative to other genetic vaccine approaches. However, multiple preclinical models demonstrate anti-tumor efficacy, and many efforts are underway to improve the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effect of these vaccines. Clinical trials using DNA vaccines as treatments for prostate cancer have begun, and to date have demonstrated safety and immunological effect. This review will focus on DNA vaccines as a specific means of antigen delivery, advantages and disadvantages of this type of immunization, previous experience in preclinical models and human trials specifically conducted for the treatment of prostate cancer, and future directions for the application of DNA vaccines to prostate cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24587772

  18. DNA Vaccine Electroporation and Molecular Adjuvants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-16

    Suschak and Schmaljohn DNA Vaccine Electroporation and Molecular Adjuvants 1 Abstract To date, there is no protective vaccine for Ebola virus...infection. Safety concerns have prevented the use of live-attenuated vaccines , and forced researchers to examine new vaccine formulations. DNA... vaccination is an attractive method for inducing protective immunity to a variety of pathogens, but the low immunogenicity seen in larger animals and

  19. Potent tetravalent replicon vaccines against botulinum neurotoxins using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus replicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Guo, Jin-Peng; An, Huai-Jie; Zhang, Shu-Ming; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-05-07

    Human botulism is commonly associated with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A, B, E and F. This suggests that the greatest need is for a tetravalent vaccine that provides protection against all four of these serotypes. In current study, we investigated the feasibility of generating several tetravalent vaccines that protected mice against the four serotypes. Firstly, monovalent replicon vaccine against BoNT induced better antibody response and protection than that of corresponding conventional DNA vaccine. Secondly, dual-expression DNA replicon pSCARSE/FHc or replicon particle VRP-E/FHc vaccine was well resistant to the challenge of BoNT/E and BoNT/F mixture as a combination vaccine composed of two monovalent replicon vaccines. Finally, the dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle tetravalent vaccine could simultaneously and effectively neutralize and protect the four BoNT serotypes. Protection correlated directly with serum ELISA titers and neutralization antibody levels to BoNTs. Therefore, replicon-based DNA or particle might be effective vector to develop BoNT vaccines, which might be more desirable for use in clinical application than the conventional DNA vaccines. Our studies demonstrate the utility of combining dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle vaccines into multi-agent formulations as potent tetravalent vaccines for eliciting protective responses to four serotypes of BoNTs.

  20. Molecular mechanisms for enhanced DNA vaccine immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    Summary In the two decades since their initial discovery, DNA vaccines technologies have come a long way. Unfortunately, when applied to human subjects inadequate immunogenicity is still the biggest challenge for practical DNA vaccine use. Many different strategies have been tested in preclinical models to address this problem, including novel plasmid vectors and codon optimization to enhance antigen expression, new gene transfection systems or electroporation to increase delivery efficiency, protein or live virus vector boosting regimens to maximise immune stimulation, and formulation of DNA vaccines with traditional or molecular adjuvants. Better understanding of the mechanisms of action of DNA vaccines has also enabled better use of the intrinsic host response to DNA to improve vaccine immunogenicity. This review summarizes recent advances in DNA vaccine technologies and related intracellular events and how these might impact on future directions of DNA vaccine development. PMID:26707950

  1. Molecular mechanisms for enhanced DNA vaccine immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    In the two decades since their initial discovery, DNA vaccines technologies have come a long way. Unfortunately, when applied to human subjects inadequate immunogenicity is still the biggest challenge for practical DNA vaccine use. Many different strategies have been tested in preclinical models to address this problem, including novel plasmid vectors and codon optimization to enhance antigen expression, new gene transfection systems or electroporation to increase delivery efficiency, protein or live virus vector boosting regimens to maximise immune stimulation, and formulation of DNA vaccines with traditional or molecular adjuvants. Better understanding of the mechanisms of action of DNA vaccines has also enabled better use of the intrinsic host response to DNA to improve vaccine immunogenicity. This review summarizes recent advances in DNA vaccine technologies and related intracellular events and how these might impact on future directions of DNA vaccine development.

  2. Chemical adjuvants for plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Greenland, John R; Letvin, Norman L

    2007-05-10

    Plasmid DNA vaccines are a promising modality for immunization against a variety of human pathogens. Immunization via multiple routes with plasmid DNA can elicit potent cellular immune responses, and these immunogens can be administered repeatedly without inducing anti-vector immunity. Nonetheless, the immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines has been limited by problems associated with delivery. A number of adjuvants have been designed to improve plasmid DNA immunogenicity, either by directly stimulating the immune system or by enhancing plasmid DNA expression. Chemical adjuvants for enhancing plasmid DNA expression include liposomes, polymers, and microparticles, all of which have shown promise for enhancing the expression and immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines in animal models. Micro- and nanoparticles have not been shown to enhance immune responses to plasmid DNA vaccines. However, formulation of plasmid DNA with some non-particulate polymeric adjuvants has led to a statistically significant enhancement of immune responses. Further development of these technologies will significantly improve the utility of plasmid DNA vaccination.

  3. DNA vaccines: developing new strategies against cancer.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, Daniela; Iurescia, Sandra; Fazio, Vito Michele; Rinaldi, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Due to their rapid and widespread development, DNA vaccines have entered into a variety of human clinical trials for vaccines against various diseases including cancer. Evidence that DNA vaccines are well tolerated and have an excellent safety profile proved to be of advantage as many clinical trials combines the first phase with the second, saving both time and money. It is clear from the results obtained in clinical trials that such DNA vaccines require much improvement in antigen expression and delivery methods to make them sufficiently effective in the clinic. Similarly, it is clear that additional strategies are required to activate effective immunity against poorly immunogenic tumor antigens. Engineering vaccine design for manipulating antigen presentation and processing pathways is one of the most important aspects that can be easily handled in the DNA vaccine technology. Several approaches have been investigated including DNA vaccine engineering, co-delivery of immunomodulatory molecules, safe routes of administration, prime-boost regimen and strategies to break the immunosuppressive networks mechanisms adopted by malignant cells to prevent immune cell function. Combined or single strategies to enhance the efficacy and immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are applied in completed and ongoing clinical trials, where the safety and tolerability of the DNA platform are substantiated. In this review on DNA vaccines, salient aspects on this topic going from basic research to the clinic are evaluated. Some representative DNA cancer vaccine studies are also discussed.

  4. Novel approaches to tuberculosis prevention: DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R

    2014-03-01

    It is estimated that there are approximately eight million new cases of active tuberculosis (TB) worldwide annually. There is only 1 vaccine available for prevention: bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). This has variable efficacy and is only protective for certain extrapulmonary TB cases in children, therefore new strategies for the creation of novel vaccines have emerged. One of the promising approaches is the DNA vaccine, used as a direct vaccination or as a prime-boost vaccine. This review describes the experimental data obtained during the design of DNA vaccines for TB.

  5. DNA Vaccines: Regulatory Considerations and Safety Aspects.

    PubMed

    Myhr, Anne Ingeborg

    2017-01-01

    DNA vaccines have great potential as preventive or therapeutic vaccines against viral, bacterial, or parasitic diseases as well as cancer, and may also be used as gene therapy products. Although many human and veterinary DNA vaccines have been investigated in laboratory trials, only four of these have been approved for commercial use. In this paper an overview of the regulatory requirements for the development of DNA vaccines is given. The regulatory process in EU and USA is described. A discussion concerning the relevance of national regulations on gene technology is included. In addition the main safety concerns associated with DNA vaccines, relating to unwanted side effects in the vaccinated mammal or fish, are presented. Finally, the need for greater openness regarding the assessment information is discussed.

  6. HIV vaccine update. DNA vaccination: a promising candidate for a vaccine against HIV-1?

    PubMed

    Van Der Ryst, E

    1996-01-01

    According to animal studies, DNA vaccines employ the genes encoding proteins of pathogens or tumors, in contrast to the more conventional vaccine approaches. In addition, DNA vaccinations do not involve infectious agents, proteins are expressed in their natural form resulting to better recognition of viral proteins by the antibodies, and both strong and durable cellular immune responses as well as neutralizing antibodies are induced. Altogether, this makes DNA vaccinations one of the most promising future candidates in the field of HIV vaccines. However, safety of DNA vaccines should be examined before these vaccines can be considered for large-scale clinical trials in humans. The question of a possible induction of anti-DNA antibodies, with the consequent development of autoimmune manifestations is emphasized. Another is the possible integration of DNA with insertional mutagenesis, which could lead to tumor formation and development of immunologic tolerance of antigen production persists.

  7. Micro- and nanoparticulates for DNA vaccine delivery

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Eric; Brown, Deborah M; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as a promising alternative to traditional protein-based vaccines for the induction of protective immune responses. DNA vaccines offer several advantages over traditional vaccines, including increased stability, rapid and inexpensive production, and flexibility to produce vaccines for a wide variety of infectious diseases. However, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines delivered as naked plasmid DNA is often weak due to degradation of the DNA by nucleases and inefficient delivery to immune cells. Therefore, biomaterial-based delivery systems based on micro- and nanoparticles that encapsulate plasmid DNA represent the most promising strategy for DNA vaccine delivery. Microparticulate delivery systems allow for passive targeting to antigen presenting cells through size exclusion and can allow for sustained presentation of DNA to cells through degradation and release of encapsulated vaccines. In contrast, nanoparticle encapsulation leads to increased internalization, overall greater transfection efficiency, and the ability to increase uptake across mucosal surfaces. Moreover, selection of the appropriate biomaterial can lead to increased immune stimulation and activation through triggering innate immune response receptors and target DNA to professional antigen presenting cells. Finally, the selection of materials with the appropriate properties to achieve efficient delivery through administration routes conducive to high patient compliance and capable of generating systemic and local (i.e. mucosal) immunity can lead to more effective humoral and cellular protective immune responses. In this review, we discuss the development of novel biomaterial-based delivery systems to enhance the delivery of DNA vaccines through various routes of administration and their implications for generating immune responses. PMID:27048557

  8. DNA vaccination against oncoantigens: A promise.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, Manuela; Quaglino, Elena; Amici, Augusto; Lollini, Pier-Luigi; Forni, Guido; Cavallo, Federica

    2012-05-01

    The emerging evidence that DNA vaccines elicit a protective immune response in rodents, dogs and cancer patients, coupled with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an initial DNA vaccine to treat canine tumors is beginning to close the gap between the optimistic experimental data and their difficult application in a clinical setting. Here we review a series of conceptual and biotechnological advances that are working together to make DNA vaccines targeting molecules that play important roles during cancer progression (oncoantigens) a promise with near-term clinical impact.

  9. [Progress of research on DNA vaccines against parasitosis].

    PubMed

    Qi, Wen-Juan; Fang, Qiang

    2011-06-01

    One of the effective prevention and treatment strategies to parasitosis is to develop safe and effective vaccines. The DNA vaccine is a new kind of vaccine developed in last 10 years. In recent years, many advances in DNA vaccines against parasitosis have been made. This article reviews the advances in the mechanism, construction, optimization, adjuvants and delivery ways of DNA vaccines and the advances in the study of DNA vaccines against some parasitosis including malaria, schistosomiasis, cysticercosis and toxoplasmosis in recent years.

  10. Tolerizing DNA vaccines for autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Peggy P; Higgins, John P; Kidd, Brian A; Tomooka, Beren; Digennaro, Carla; Lee, Lowen Y; de Vegvar, Henry E Neuman; Steinman, Lawrence; Robinson, William H

    2006-12-01

    Current therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases non-specifically suppress immune function, and there is great need for fundamental approaches such as antigen-specific tolerizing therapy. In this paper we describe development of antigen-specific tolerizing DNA vaccines to treat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice, and use of protein microarrays to monitor response to therapy and to identify potential additional autoimmune targets for next generation vaccines. We demonstrate that tolerizing DNA vaccines encoding type II collagen (CII) reduced the incidence and severity of CIA. Atorvastatin, a statin drug found to reduce the severity of autoimmunity, potentiated the effect of DNA vaccines encoding CII. Analysis of cytokines produced by collagen-reactive T cells derived from mice receiving tolerizing DNA encoding CII, as compared to control vaccines, revealed reduced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Arthritis microarray analysis demonstrated reduced spreading of autoantibody responses in mice treated with DNA encoding CII. The development of tolerizing DNA vaccines, and the use of antibody profiling to guide design of and to monitor therapeutic responses to such vaccines, represents a promising approach for the treatment of RA and other autoimmune diseases.

  11. Vaccine development using recombinant DNA technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines induce an immune response in the host that subsequently recognizes infectious agents and helps fight off the disease; vaccines must do this without causing the disease. This paper reviews the development of recombinant DNA technologies as a means of providing new ways for attenuating diseas...

  12. M cell-targeted DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunpeng; Wang, Xinhai; Csencsits, Keri L.; Haddad, Asmahan; Walters, Nancy; Pascual, David W.

    2001-07-01

    DNA immunization, although attractive, is poor for inducing mucosal immunity, thus limiting its protective value against most infectious agents. To surmount this shortcoming, we devised a method for mucosal transgene vaccination by using an M cell ligand to direct the DNA vaccine to mucosal inductive tissues and the respiratory epithelium. This ligand, reovirus protein 1, when conjugated to polylysine (PL), can bind the apical surface of M cells from nasal-associated lymphoid tissues. Intranasal immunizations with protein 1-PL-DNA complexes produced antigen-specific serum IgG and prolonged mucosal IgA, as well as enhanced cell-mediated immunity, made evident by elevated pulmonary cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Therefore, targeted transgene vaccination represents an approach for enabling DNA vaccination of the mucosa.

  13. DNA vaccines for targeting bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Ingolotti, Mariana; Kawalekar, Omkar; Shedlock, Devon J; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Weiner, David B

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccination has been of great interest since its discovery in the 1990s due to its ability to elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. DNA vaccines consist of a DNA plasmid containing a transgene that encodes the sequence of a target protein from a pathogen under the control of a eukaryotic promoter. This revolutionary technology has proven to be effective in animal models and four DNA vaccine products have recently been approved for veterinary use. Although few DNA vaccines against bacterial infections have been tested, the results are encouraging. Because of their versatility, safety and simplicity a wider range of organisms can be targeted by these vaccines, which shows their potential advantages to public health. This article describes the mechanism of action of DNA vaccines and their potential use for targeting bacterial infections. In addition, it provides an updated summary of the methods used to enhance immunogenicity from codon optimization and adjuvants to delivery techniques including electroporation and use of nanoparticles. PMID:20624048

  14. DNA vaccination strategies against infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Watts, A M; Kennedy, R C

    1999-08-01

    DNA immunisation represents a novel approach to vaccine and immunotherapeutic development. Injection of plasmid DNA encoding a foreign gene of interest can result in the subsequent expression of the foreign gene products and the induction of an immune response within a host. This is relevant to prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination strategies when the foreign gene represents a protective epitope from a pathogen. The recent demonstration by a number of laboratories that these immune responses evoke protective immunity against some infectious diseases and cancers provides support for the use of this approach. In this article, we attempt to present an informative and unbiased representation of the field of DNA immunisation. The focus is on studies that impart information on the development of vaccination strategies against a number of human and animal pathogens. Investigations that describe the mechanism(s) of protective immunity induced by DNA immunisation highlight the advantages and disadvantages of this approach to developing vaccines within a given system. A variety of systems in which DNA vaccination has resulted in the induction of protective immunity, as well as the correlates associated with these protective immune responses, will be described. Particular attention will focus on systems involving parasitic diseases. Finally, the potential of DNA immunisation is discussed as it relates to veterinary medicine and its role as a possible vaccine strategy against animal coccidioses.

  15. Polymer multilayer tattooing for enhanced DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demuth, Peter C.; Min, Younjin; Huang, Bonnie; Kramer, Joshua A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Barouch, Dan H.; Hammond, Paula T.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2013-04-01

    DNA vaccines have many potential benefits but have failed to generate robust immune responses in humans. Recently, methods such as in vivo electroporation have demonstrated improved performance, but an optimal strategy for safe, reproducible, and pain-free DNA vaccination remains elusive. Here we report an approach for rapid implantation of vaccine-loaded polymer films carrying DNA, immune-stimulatory RNA, and biodegradable polycations into the immune-cell-rich epidermis, using microneedles coated with releasable polyelectrolyte multilayers. Films transferred into the skin following brief microneedle application promoted local transfection and controlled the persistence of DNA and adjuvants in the skin from days to weeks, with kinetics determined by the film composition. These ‘multilayer tattoo’ DNA vaccines induced immune responses against a model HIV antigen comparable to electroporation in mice, enhanced memory T-cell generation, and elicited 140-fold higher gene expression in non-human primate skin than intradermal DNA injection, indicating the potential of this strategy for enhancing DNA vaccination.

  16. Antiparasitic DNA vaccines in 21st century.

    PubMed

    Wedrychowicz, Halina

    2015-06-01

    Demands for effective vaccines to control parasitic diseases of humans and livestock have been recently exacerbated by the development of resistance of most pathogenic parasites to anti-parasitic drugs. Novel genomic and proteomic technologies have provided opportunities for the discovery and improvement of DNA vaccines which are relatively easy as well as cheap to fabricate and stable at room temperatures. However, their main limitation is rather poor immunogenicity, which makes it necessary to couple the antigens with adjuvant molecules. This paper review recent advances in the development of DNA vaccines to some pathogenic protozoa and helminths. Numerous studies were conducted over the past 14 years of 21st century, employing various administration techniques, adjuvants and new immunogenic antigens to increase efficacy of DNA vaccines. Unfortunately, the results have not been rewarding. Further research is necessary using more extensive combinations of antigens; alternate delivery systems and more efficient adjuvants based on knowledge of the immunomodulatory capacities of parasitic protozoa and helminths.

  17. Application of DNA vaccine technology to aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Heppell, J; Davis, H L

    2000-09-15

    The aquaculture industry needs to augment its global production and efficiency to meet the increasing consumer needs for fish and shellfish products. Unfortunately, infectious diseases have been a major impediment to the development and profitability of fish farms. While vaccines offer the most efficient way to control infectious pathogens, current products have only been successful against some diseases. These are mostly bacterial, and there are still several important diseases, mainly of viral and parasitic origin, for which no prophylactic treatment exists. DNA vaccines, compared to traditional antigen vaccines, have several practical and immunological advantages that make them very attractive for the aquaculture industry. The early success of DNA vaccines in animal models was very encouraging, but fish are unique in many aspects, and findings with other classes of vertebrate, namely mammals and birds, do not necessarily apply to aquatic animals. However, more recent studies with reporter genes showed that fish cells efficiently express foreign proteins encoded by eukaryotic expression vectors. A piscine-specific backbone vector might eventually improve immune responses to DNA vaccines, but there is already strong direct evidence for the induction of protective immunity with currently available plasmids. Immune responses to plasmid DNA injected intramuscularly (IM) into fish are characterized by the production of antibodies, which have been shown to be neutralizing in two different viral disease models. There is also indirect evidence suggesting the induction of cell-mediated immunity. Despite this evidence, immune responses to DNA vaccines have only been poorly characterized in fish because of the limited knowledge of the piscine immune system, and the small number of studies on the subject. Apart from optimizing the efficiency of DNA vaccines, other important issues, such as safety and production cost will be determinants for the potential application of this

  18. DNA vaccines: ready for prime time?

    PubMed Central

    Kutzler, Michele A.; Weiner, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery, over a decade and a half ago, that genetically engineered DNA can be delivered in vaccine form and elicit an immune response, there has been much progress in understanding the basic biology of this platform. A large amount of data has been generated in preclinical model systems, and more sustained cellular responses and more consistent antibody responses are being observed in the clinic. Four DNA vaccine products have recently been approved, all in the area of veterinary medicine. These results suggest a productive future for this technology as more optimized constructs, better trial designs and improved platforms are being brought into the clinic. PMID:18781156

  19. Optimization of a DNA vaccine against SARS.

    PubMed

    Zakhartchouk, Alexander N; Viswanathan, Sathiyanarayanan; Moshynskyy, Igor; Petric, Martin; Babiuk, Lorne A

    2007-10-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) first appeared in Southern China in November 2002, and then quickly spread to 33 countries on five continents along international air travel routes. Although the SARS epidemic has been contained, there is a clear need for a safe and effective vaccine should an outbreak of a SARS-CoV infection reappear in human population. In this study, we tested four DNA-vaccine constructs: (1) pLL70, containing cDNA for the SARS-CoV spike (S) gene; (2) pcDNA-SS, containing codon-optimized S gene for SARS-CoV S protein (residues 12-1255) fused with a leader sequence derived from the human CD5 gene; (3) pcDNA-St, containing the gene encoding the N-portion of the codon-optimized S gene (residues 12-532) with the CD5 leader sequence; (4) pcDNA-St-VP22C, containing the gene encoding the N-portion of the codon-optimized S protein with the CD5 leader sequence fused with the C-terminal 138 amino acids of the bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) major tegument protein VP22. Each of these plasmids was intradermally administered to C57BL/6 mice in three separate immunizations. Analysis of humoral and cellular immune responses in immunized mice demonstrated that pcDNA-SS and pcDNA-St-VP22C are the most immunogenic SARS vaccine candidates.

  20. Influenza Plasmid DNA Vaccines: Progress and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Bicho, Diana; Queiroz, João António; Tomaz, Cândida Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines have long been used to fight flu infectious; however, recent advances highlight the importance of produce new alternatives. Even though traditional influenza vaccines are safe and usually effective, they need to be uploaded every year to anticipate circulating flu viruses. This limitation together with the use of embryonated chicken eggs as the substrate for vaccine production, is time-consuming and could involve potential biohazards in growth of new virus strains. Plasmid DNA produced by prokaryote microorganisms and encoding foreign proteins had emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. This technology allows the expression of a gene of interest by eukaryotic cells in order to induce protective immune responses against the pathogen of interest. In this review, we discuss the strategies to choose the best DNA vaccine to be applied in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Specifically, we give an update of influenza DNA vaccines developments, all involved techniques, their main characteristics, applicability and technical features to obtain the best option against influenza infections.

  1. The Web-Based DNA Vaccine Database DNAVaxDB and Its Usage for Rational DNA Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Racz, Rebecca; He, Yongqun

    2016-01-01

    A DNA vaccine is a vaccine that uses a mammalian expression vector to express one or more protein antigens and is administered in vivo to induce an adaptive immune response. Since the 1990s, a significant amount of research has been performed on DNA vaccines and the mechanisms behind them. To meet the needs of the DNA vaccine research community, we created DNAVaxDB ( http://www.violinet.org/dnavaxdb ), the first Web-based database and analysis resource of experimentally verified DNA vaccines. All the data in DNAVaxDB, which includes plasmids, antigens, vaccines, and sources, is manually curated and experimentally verified. This chapter goes over the detail of DNAVaxDB system and shows how the DNA vaccine database, combined with the Vaxign vaccine design tool, can be used for rational design of a DNA vaccine against a pathogen, such as Mycobacterium bovis.

  2. DNA vaccination of poultry: The current status in 2015.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Marine; Chemaly, Marianne; Dory, Daniel

    2016-01-04

    DNA vaccination is a promising alternative strategy for developing new human and animal vaccines. The massive efforts made these past 25 years to increase the immunizing potential of this kind of vaccine are still ongoing. A relatively small number of studies concerning poultry have been published. Even though there is a need for new poultry vaccines, five parameters must nevertheless be taken into account for their development: the vaccine has to be very effective, safe, inexpensive, suitable for mass vaccination and able to induce immune responses in the presence of maternal antibodies (when appropriate). DNA vaccination should meet these requirements. This review describes studies in this field performed exclusively on birds (chickens, ducks and turkeys). No evaluations of avian DNA vaccine efficacy performed on mice as preliminary tests have been taken into consideration. The review first describes the state of the art for DNA vaccination in poultry: pathogens targeted, plasmids used and different routes of vaccine administration. Second, it presents strategies designed to improve DNA vaccine efficacy: influence of the route of administration, plasmid dose and age of birds on their first inoculation; increasing plasmid uptake by host cells; addition of immunomodulators; optimization of plasmid backbones and codon usage; association of vaccine antigens and finally, heterologous prime-boost regimens. The final part will indicate additional properties of DNA vaccines in poultry: fate of the plasmids upon inoculation, immunological considerations and the use of DNA vaccines for purposes other than preventing infectious diseases.

  3. Optimization of DNA vaccination against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Susana; Belkaid, Yasmine; Seder, Robert A; Sacks, David

    2002-11-01

    The present studies were designed to examine the requirements of dose, route of inoculation and constituent antigens for the maintenance of complete and long lasting protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major conferred by a cocktail DNA vaccine encoding the Leishmania antigens LACK, LmST11 and TSA. Vaccination of C57Bl/6 mice with LACK DNA alone resulted in partial protection, whereas the combination of LmST11 and TSA provided stronger, though still incomplete protection compared to the combination of all three Ag DNAs. When intradermal (i.d), intramuscular (i.m.), and subcutaneous (s.c.) vaccination routes were compared, i.d. immunization reduced by five-fold the dose necessary to maintain complete protection. In vivo depletion of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells provided direct evidence that both populations are necessary to mediate complete protection. These results establish intradermal vaccination using DNA encoding multiple Leishmania antigens as a way to optimize priming of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells necessary for potent and durable protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  4. Second Generation Therapeutic DNA Lymphoma Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    ovalbumin (OVA) (Fig.1A: Protein Vaccine Constructs). Desired recombinant proteins were expressed in a SF9 insect cell/baculovirus expression...1500μg of purified protein per 108 virus infected SF9 cells) of mBD2-OVA protein (Fig. 1B) versus poor yielding (~250μg of purified protein per 108...virus infected SF9 DNA Vaccine Median Survival Time (Days*) Log-rank p-value vs PBS mBD2-gp100F 32.000 .017 MIP-3α-gp100F 32.000 .011 MCP-3-gp100F

  5. DNA vaccines: an historical perspective and view to the future.

    PubMed

    Liu, Margaret A

    2011-01-01

    This review provides a detailed look at the attributes and immunologic mechanisms of plasmid DNA vaccines and their utility as laboratory tools as well as potential human vaccines. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccines in a variety of preclinical models is used to illustrate how they differ from traditional vaccines in novel ways due to the in situ antigen production and the ease with which they are constructed. The ability to make new DNA vaccines without needing to handle a virulent pathogen or to adapt the pathogen for manufacturing purposes demonstrates the potential value of this vaccine technology for use against emerging and epidemic pathogens. Similarly, personalized anti-tumor DNA vaccines can also readily be made from a biopsy. Because DNA vaccines bias the T-helper (Th) cell response to a Th1 phenotype, DNA vaccines are also under development for vaccines against allergy and autoimmune diseases. The licensure of four animal health products, including two prophylactic vaccines against infectious diseases, one immunotherapy for cancer, and one gene therapy delivery of a hormone for a food animal, provides evidence of the efficacy of DNA vaccines in multiple species including horses and pigs. The size of these target animals provides evidence that the somewhat disappointing immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in a number of human clinical trials is not due simply to the larger mass of humans compared with most laboratory animals. The insights gained from the mechanisms of protection in the animal vaccines, the advances in the delivery and expression technologies for increasing the potency of DNA vaccines, and encouragingly potent human immune responses in certain clinical trials, provide insights for future efforts to develop DNA vaccines into a broadly useful vaccine and immunotherapy platform with applications for human and animal health.

  6. Efficient vaccine against pandemic influenza: combining DNA vaccination and targeted delivery to MHC class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Grødeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne

    2015-06-01

    There are two major limitations to vaccine preparedness in the event of devastating influenza pandemics: the time needed to generate a vaccine and rapid generation of sufficient amounts. DNA vaccination could represent a solution to these problems, but efficacy needs to be enhanced. In a separate line of research, it has been established that targeting of vaccine molecules to antigen-presenting cells enhances immune responses. We have combined the two principles by constructing DNA vaccines that encode bivalent fusion proteins; these target hemagglutinin to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Such DNA vaccines rapidly induce hemagglutinin-specific antibodies and T cell responses in immunized mice. Responses are long-lasting and protect mice against challenge with influenza virus. In a pandemic situation, targeted DNA vaccines could be produced and tested within a month. The novel DNA vaccines could represent a solution to pandemic preparedness in the advent of novel influenza pandemics.

  7. Using Plasmids as DNA Vaccines for Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tregoning, John S; Kinnear, Ekaterina

    2014-12-01

    DNA plasmids can be used to induce a protective (or therapeutic) immune response by delivering genes encoding vaccine antigens. That naked DNA (without the refinement of coat proteins or host evasion systems) can cross from outside the cell into the nucleus and be expressed is particularly remarkable given the sophistication of the immune system in preventing infection by pathogens. As a result of the ease, low cost, and speed of custom gene synthesis, DNA vaccines dangle a tantalizing prospect of the next wave of vaccine technology, promising individual designer vaccines for cancer or mass vaccines with a rapid response time to emerging pandemics. There is considerable enthusiasm for the use of DNA vaccination as an approach, but this enthusiasm should be tempered by the successive failures in clinical trials to induce a potent immune response. The technology is evolving with the development of improved delivery systems that increase expression levels, particularly electroporation and the incorporation of genetically encoded adjuvants. This review will introduce some key concepts in the use of DNA plasmids as vaccines, including how the DNA enters the cell and is expressed, how it induces an immune response, and a summary of clinical trials with DNA vaccines. The review also explores the advances being made in vector design, delivery, formulation, and adjuvants to try to realize the promise of this technology for new vaccines. If the immunogenicity and expression barriers can be cracked, then DNA vaccines may offer a step change in mass vaccination.

  8. Strategies and hurdles using DNA vaccines to fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccinations against fish viral diseases as IHNV at commercial level in Canada against VHSV at experimental level are both success stories. DNA vaccination strategies against many other viral diseases have, however, not yet yielded sufficient results in terms of protection. There is an obvious need to combat many other viral diseases within aquaculture where inactivated vaccines fail. There are many explanations to why DNA vaccine strategies against other viral diseases fail to induce protective immune responses in fish. These obstacles include: 1) too low immunogenicity of the transgene, 2) too low expression of the transgene that is supposed to induce protection, 3) suboptimal immune responses, and 4) too high degradation rate of the delivered plasmid DNA. There are also uncertainties with regard distribution and degradation of DNA vaccines that may have implications for safety and regulatory requirements that need to be clarified. By combining plasmid DNA with different kind of adjuvants one can increase the immunogenicity of the transgene antigen – and perhaps increase the vaccine efficacy. By using molecular adjuvants with or without in combination with targeting assemblies one may expect different responses compared with naked DNA. This includes targeting of DNA vaccines to antigen presenting cells as a central factor in improving their potencies and efficacies by means of encapsulating the DNA vaccine in certain carriers systems that may increase transgene and MHC expression. This review will focus on DNA vaccine delivery, by the use of biodegradable PLGA particles as vehicles for plasmid DNA mainly in fish. PMID:24552235

  9. Novel vaccine against Venezuelan equine encephalitis combines advantages of DNA immunization and a live attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tretyakova, Irina; Lukashevich, Igor S; Glass, Pamela; Wang, Eryu; Weaver, Scott; Pushko, Peter

    2013-02-04

    DNA vaccines combine remarkable genetic and chemical stability with proven safety and efficacy in animal models, while remaining less immunogenic in humans. In contrast, live-attenuated vaccines have the advantage of inducing rapid, robust, long-term immunity after a single-dose vaccination. Here we describe novel iDNA vaccine technology that is based on an infectious DNA platform and combines advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. We applied this technology for vaccination against infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), an alphavirus from the Togaviridae family. The iDNA vaccine is based on transcription of the full-length genomic RNA of the TC-83 live-attenuated virus from plasmid DNA in vivo. The in vivo-generated viral RNA initiates limited replication of the vaccine virus, which in turn leads to efficient immunization. This technology allows the plasmid DNA to launch a live-attenuated vaccine in vitro or in vivo. Less than 10 ng of pTC83 iDNA encoding the full-length genomic RNA of the TC-83 vaccine strain initiated replication of the vaccine virus in vitro. In order to evaluate this approach in vivo, BALB/c mice were vaccinated with a single dose of pTC83 iDNA. After vaccination, all mice seroconverted with no adverse reactions. Four weeks after immunization, animals were challenged with the lethal epidemic strain of VEEV. All iDNA-vaccinated mice were protected from fatal disease, while all unvaccinated controls succumbed to infection and died. To our knowledge, this is the first example of launching a clinical live-attenuated vaccine from recombinant plasmid DNA in vivo.

  10. DNA vaccination as a treatment for chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; Alexander, Stephen I

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is one of the major health problems worldwide. DNA vaccination delivers plasmid DNA encoding the target gene to induce both humoral and cellular immune responses. Here, we describe the methods of CD40 DNA vaccine enhanced by dendritic cell (DC) targeting on the development of Heymann nephritis (HN), a rat model of human membranous nephropathy.

  11. DNA vaccines for emerging infectious diseases: what if?

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    A novel and powerful method for vaccine research, colloquially known as DNA vaccines, involves the deliberate introduction into tissues of a DNA plasmid carrying an antigen-coding gene that transfects cells in vivo and results in an immune response. DNA vaccines have several distinct advantages, which include ease of manipulation, use of a generic technology, simplicity of manufacture, and chemical and biological stability. In addition, DNA vaccines are a great leveler among re-searchers around the world because they provide unprecedented ease of experi-mentation. To facilitate diffusion of information, an Internet site has been established called THE DNA VACCINE WEB (URL:http://www.genweb.com/dnavax/dnavax.html). In this review, a brief survey is undertaken of the experimental models and preclinical work on DNA vaccines to contribute to a greater awareness of the possibilities for emerging infectious diseases. PMID:8903226

  12. DNA vaccines against cancer come of age.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Freda K; Ottensmeier, Christian H; Rice, Jason

    2010-04-01

    Genetic technology allows construction of DNA vaccines encoding selected tumor antigens together with molecules to direct and amplify the desired effector pathways. Their enormous promise has been marred by a problem of scaling up to human subjects. This is now largely overcome by electroporation, which increases both antigen expression and the inflammatory milieu. While the principles of vaccine design can be developed in mouse models, the real operative test is in the clinic, using patients in temporary remission. Monitoring of induced immunity, although commonly limited to blood, is providing objective qualitative and quantitative data on T-cell and antibody responses. Prolongation of remission is the goal and an activated immune system should achieve this.

  13. Immunogenicity of a multi-epitope DNA vaccine against hantavirus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Yujie; Wang, Si; Yu, Tongtong; Du, Feng; Yang, X Frank; Luo, Enjie

    2012-02-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a severe epidemic disease caused by hantaviruses including Hantaan virus (HTNV), Seoul virus (SEOV), Dobrava virus (DOBV) and Puumala virus. Three of the four HFRS hantaviruses, HTNV, SEOV, and PUUV are found in China. Currently, there is no effective strategy available to reduce infection risk. In this study, we constructed a multi-epitope chimeric DNA vaccine that encodes expressing 25 glycoprotein epitopes from SEOV, HTNV and PUUV (designated as SHP chimeric gene). Vaccination of BALb/c mice with SHP multi-epitope chimeric DNA vaccine led to a dramatic augmentation of humoral and cellular responses. The SHP vaccine DNA was detected in many organs but not for more than 60 d. There was no risk of mutation due to integration. Thus, the SHP multi-epitope chimeric DNA vaccine is a potential effective and safe DNA vaccine against infection by SEOV, HTNV, and PUUV.

  14. Current progress of DNA vaccine studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia; Grimes-Serrano, Jill M

    2008-03-01

    Despite remarkable progress in the field of DNA vaccine research since its discovery in the early 1990 s, the formal acceptance of this novel technology as a new modality of human vaccines depends on the successful demonstration of its safety and efficacy in advanced clinical trials. Although clinical trials conducted so far have provided overwhelming evidence that DNA vaccines are well tolerated and have an excellent safety profile, the early designs of DNA vaccines failed to demonstrate sufficient immunogenicity in humans. However, studies conducted over the last few years have led to promising results, particularly when DNA vaccines were used in combination with other forms of vaccines. Here, we provide a review of the data from reported DNA vaccine clinical studies with an emphasis on the ability of DNA vaccines to elicit antigen-specific, cell-mediated and antibody responses in humans. The majority of these trials are designed to test candidate vaccines against several major human pathogens and the remaining studies tested the immunogenicity of therapeutic vaccines against cancer.

  15. c-DNA vaccination against parasitic infections: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Kofta, W; Wedrychowicz, H

    2001-09-12

    Recently developed technology for DNA vaccination appears to offer the good prospect for the development of a multivalent vaccines that will effectively activate both the humoral and cell mediated mechanisms of the immune system. Currently, DNA vaccination against such important parasitic diseases like malaria, leishmaniosis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, schistosomosis, fasciolosis offers several new opportunities. However, the outcome of vaccination depends very much on vaccine formulations, dose and route of vaccine delivery, and the species and even strain of the vaccinated host. To overcome these problems much research is still needed, specifically focused on cloning and testing of new c-DNA sequences in the following: genome projects: different ways of delivery: design of vectors containing appropriate immunostimulatory sequences and very detailed studies on safety.

  16. Oral vaccination with a liposome-encapsulated influenza DNA vaccine protects mice against respiratory challenge infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wu, Jianqi; Wang, Bing; Zeng, Sheng; Qi, Feifei; Lu, Changlong; Kimura, Yoshinobu; Liu, Beixing

    2014-05-01

    It is well accepted that vaccination by oral administration has many advantages over injected parenteral immunization. The present study focuses on whether oral vaccination with a DNA vaccine could induce protective immunity against respiratory challenge infection. The M1 gene of influenza A virus was used to construct DNA vaccine using pcDNA 3.1(+) plasmid, a eukaryotic expression vector. The cationic liposomes were used to deliver the constructed DNA vaccine. In vitro and in vivo expression of M1 gene was observed in the cell line and in the intestine of orally vaccinated C57BL/6 mice, respectively. It became clear that this type of oral DNA vaccination was capable of inducing both humoral and cellular immune responses, together with an augmentation of IFN-γ production. In addition, oral vaccination with liposome-encapsulated DNA vaccine could protect the mice against respiratory challenge infection. These results suggest that gastrointestinal tract, a constituent member of the common mucosal immune system, is a potent candidate applicable as a DNA vaccine route against virus respiratory diseases.

  17. Licensed DNA Vaccines against Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV).

    PubMed

    Alonso, Marta; Leong, Jo-Ann C

    2013-04-01

    This article reviews some of the recent patents on DNA vaccines against fish viruses, in particular against the novirhabdovirus infectious hematopoitic necrosis virus (IHNV). Although very effective in protecting fish against IHNV, only one DNA vaccine has been approved to date for use in Canada. In Europe and in US, its commercialization is restricted due to safety concerns.

  18. Enhancing the Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Dengue DNA Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0029 TITLE: Enhancing the Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Dengue DNA Vaccine PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Maya...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing the Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Dengue DNA 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Vaccine 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...the top infectious diseases that afflict US Military personnel deployed overseas. Developing a successful vaccine to prevent dengue fever in DoD

  19. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  20. Systems Vaccinology Applied to DNA Vaccines: Perspective and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Lever, Melissa; Silveira, Eduardo L; Nakaya, Helder I

    2017-01-01

    DNA vaccination represents a new milestone in our technological efforts to avoid infectious diseases. Although this method of vaccination has had success in providing protection in animals, these vaccines suffer from low immunogenicity in humans. Questions remain over the molecular mechanism of DNA vaccination, the best ways in which to safely increase vaccine reactogenecity, and what biomarkers can be used as correlates of protection. Systems vaccinology, which utilizes modern experimental and computational approaches to provide an integrated view of the vaccination process, offers the potential to answer these questions. In this review we discuss the current tools utilized in systems vaccinology, the ways in which they have and can be applied to DNA vaccinology, and challenges faced in the field.

  1. Vector Design for Improved DNA Vaccine Efficacy, Safety and Production

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a disruptive technology that offers the promise of a new rapidly deployed vaccination platform to treat human and animal disease with gene-based materials. Innovations such as electroporation, needle free jet delivery and lipid-based carriers increase transgene expression and immunogenicity through more effective gene delivery. This review summarizes complementary vector design innovations that, when combined with leading delivery platforms, further enhance DNA vaccine performance. These next generation vectors also address potential safety issues such as antibiotic selection, and increase plasmid manufacturing quality and yield in exemplary fermentation production processes. Application of optimized constructs in combination with improved delivery platforms tangibly improves the prospect of successful application of DNA vaccination as prophylactic vaccines for diverse human infectious disease targets or as therapeutic vaccines for cancer and allergy. PMID:26344110

  2. West Nile virus seroconversion in penguins after vaccination with a killed virus vaccine or a DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michelle R; Langan, Jennifer N; Johnson, Yvette J; Ritchie, Branson W; Van Bonn, William

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the serologic response of penguins to West Nile virus (WNV) vaccines, four species of exclusively indoor-housed penguins, negative for WNV by serology, were evaluated: Humboldt (Spheniscus humboldti), Magellanic (Spheniscus magellanicus), Gentoo (Pygoscelis papua), and Rockhopper (Eudyptes chrysoscome) penguins. Birds were inoculated with either a killed virus vaccine or a plasmid-mediated DNA WNV vaccine, and postinoculation serology was evaluated. Both vaccines induced seroconversion in all four species, and no adverse reactions were noted. Postvaccination serology results varied across species and vaccine types. However, in all four species, the killed virus vaccine resulted in a greater seroconversion rate than the DNA vaccine and in a significantly shorter time period. Additionally, the duration of the seropositive titer was significantly longer in those birds vaccinated with the killed virus vaccine compared with those vaccinated with the DNA vaccine. A subset of unvaccinated penguins serving as negative controls remained negative throughout the duration of the study despite the presence of WNV in the geographic locations of the study, suggesting that indoor housing may minimize exposure to the virus and may be an additional means of preventing WNV infection in penguins.

  3. DNA vaccination by electroporation and boosting with recombinant proteins enhances the efficacy of DNA vaccines for Schistosomiasis japonica.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yang; Zhu, Yinchang; Harn, Donald A; Wang, Xiaoting; Tang, Jianxia; Zhao, Song; Lu, Fei; Guan, Xiaohong

    2009-12-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica is an endemic, zoonotic disease of major public health importance in China. Control programs combining chemotherapy and snail killing have not been able to block transmission of infection in lakes and marsh regions. Vaccination is needed as a complementary approach to the ongoing control programs. In the present study, we wanted to determine if the efficacies of DNA vaccines encoding the 23-kDa tetraspanin membrane protein (SjC23), triose phosphate isomerase (SjCTPI), and sixfold-repeated genes of the complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) in the H chain of NP30 could be enhanced by boosting via electroporation in vivo and/or with cocktail protein vaccines. Mice vaccinated with cocktail DNA vaccines showed a significant worm reduction of 32.88% (P < 0.01) and egg reduction of 36.20% (P < 0.01). Vaccine efficacy was enhanced when animals were boosted with cocktail protein vaccines; adult worm and liver egg burdens were reduced 45.35% and 48.54%, respectively. Nearly identical results were obtained in mice boosted by electroporation in vivo, with adult worm and egg burdens reduced by 45.00% and 50.88%, respectively. The addition of a protein vaccine boost to this regimen further elevated efficacy to approximately 60% for adult worm burden and greater than 60% for liver egg reduction. The levels of interleukin-2, gamma interferon, and the ratios of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a)/IgG1 clearly showed that cocktail DNA vaccines induced CD4(+) Th1-type responses. Boosting via either electroporation or with recombinant proteins significantly increased associated immune responses over those seen in mice vaccinated solely with DNA vaccines. Thus, schistosome DNA vaccine efficacy was significantly enhanced via boosting by electroporation in vivo and/or cocktail protein vaccines.

  4. Hepatitis E virus DNA vaccine elicits immunologic memory in mice.

    PubMed

    He, J; Hayes, C G; Binn, L N; Seriwatana, J; Vaughn, D W; Kuschner, R A; Innis, B L

    2001-01-01

    Injection of an expression vector pJHEV containing hepatitis E virus (HEV) structural protein open reading frame 2 gene generates a strong antibody response in BALB/c mice that can bind to and agglutinate HEV. In this study, we tested for immunologic memory in immunized mice whose current levels of IgG to HEV were low or undetectable despite 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine 18 months earlier. Mice previously vaccinated with vector alone were controls. All mice were administered a dose of HEV DNA vaccine to simulate an infectious challenge with HEV. The endpoint was IgG to HEV determined by ELISA. Ten days after the vaccine dose, 5 of 9 mice previously immunized with HEV DNA vaccine had a slight increase in IgG to HEV. By 40 days after the vaccine dose, the level of IgG to HEV had increased dramatically in all 9 mice (108-fold increase in geometric mean titer). In contrast, no control mice became seropositive. These results indicate that mice vaccinated with 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine retain immunologic memory. In response to a small antigenic challenge delivered as DNA, possibly less than delivered by a human infective dose of virus, mice with memory were able to generate high levels of antibody in less time than the usual incubation period of hepatitis E. We speculate that this type of response could protect a human from overt disease.

  5. Preclinical and clinical development of DNA vaccines for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Colluru, V T; Johnson, Laura E; Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. It is also the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men, making it one of the largest public health concerns today. Prostate cancer is an ideal disease for immunotherapies because of the generally slow progression, the dispensability of the target organ in the patient population, and the availability of several tissue-specific antigens. As such, several therapeutic vaccines have entered clinical trials, with one autologous cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) recently gaining Food and Drug Administration approval after demonstrating overall survival benefit in randomized phase III clinical trials. DNA-based vaccines are safe, economical, alternative "off-the-shelf" approaches that have undergone extensive evaluation in preclinical models. In fact, the first vaccine approved in the United States for the treatment of cancer was a DNA vaccine for canine melanoma. Several prostate cancer-specific DNA vaccines have been developed in the last decade and have shown promising results in early phase clinical trials. This review summarizes anticancer human DNA vaccine trials, with a focus on those conducted for prostate cancer. We conclude with an outline of special considerations important for the development and successful translation of DNA vaccines from the laboratory to the clinic.

  6. Humoral response to calicivirus in captive tigers given a dual-strain vaccine.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Harrison, Scott H; Sikarskie, James G; Armstrong, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The current feline vaccine with a single strain of calicivirus has been used for captive tigers, yet it may not protect against virulent systemic calicivirus infections. A cross-institutional study investigated the humoral response to a new dual-strain, killed-virus calicivirus vaccine for nine captive tigers. The subspecies of these tigers were Amur (Panthera tigris altaica), Bengal (Panthera tigris tigris), and Malayan (Panthera tigris jacksoni). Serum neutralization titers for virulent feline calicivirus strain FCV-DD1 were higher following dual-strain vaccine administration. There were no reports of adverse vaccine reactions. Dual-strain vaccination may afford broadened cross-protection against different calicivirus strains and is desirable to reduce the risk of virulent systemic calicivirus disease in tigers.

  7. DNA-based influenza vaccines as immunoprophylactic agents toward universality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is an illness of global public health concern. Influenza viruses have been responsible for several pandemics affecting humans. Current influenza vaccines have proved satisfactory safety; however, they have limitations and do not provide protection against unexpected emerging influenza virus strains. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative approaches to conventional influenza vaccines. The development of universal influenza vaccines will help alleviate the severity of influenza pandemics. Influenza DNA vaccines have been the subject of many studies over the past decades due to their ability to induce broad-based protective immune responses in various animal models. The present review highlights the recent advances in influenza DNA vaccine research and its potential as an affordable universal influenza vaccine.

  8. DNA vaccines: a rational design against parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Joana A; Rodgers, Jean; Atouguia, Jorge; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2010-02-01

    Parasitic diseases are one of the most devastating causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although immunization against these infections would be an ideal solution, the development of effective vaccines has been hampered by specific challenges posed by parasitic pathogens. Plasmid-based DNA vaccines may prove to be promising immunization tools in this area because vectors can be designed to integrate several antigens from different stages of the parasite life cycle or different subspecies; vaccines, formulations and immunization protocols can be tuned to match the immune response that offers protective immunity; and DNA vaccination is an affordable platform for developing countries. Partial and full protective immunity have been reported following DNA vaccination against the most significant parasitic diseases in the world.

  9. Development of a DNA vaccine targeting Merkel cell polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qi; Gomez, Bianca P; Viscidi, Raphael P; Peng, Shiwen; He, Liangmei; Ma, Barbara; Wu, T-C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2012-02-08

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but devastating skin disease that is increasing in incidence within the United States. The poor prognosis of MCC patients and limited understanding of MCC pathogenesis warrants innovative treatments to control MCC. Several lines of evidence have pointed to Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) as the etiological agent of MCC. In particular, the amino terminus of MCPyV large T antigen (LT) (aa1-258) is expressed in all MCPyV-positive tumors and plays an important role in MCC oncogenesis, rendering it an ideal therapeutic target for vaccination. In the current study, we developed a DNA vaccine encoding MCPyV LT aa1-258 (pcDNA3-LT). Within our pcDNA3-LT DNA vaccine, we identified that MCPyV LT aa136-160 likely contains an LT-specific CD4+ T helper epitope. We have also created an LT-expressing B16/LT tumor model using B16, a murine melanoma cell line, to characterize the potency of our DNA vaccine. Using this tumorigenic B16/LT tumor model, we found that pcDNA3-LT DNA vaccine generates antitumor effects mainly mediated by CD4+ T cells against B16/LT tumors in vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Thus, immunotherapy using pcDNA3-LT DNA vaccine may represent a promising approach for the control of MCPyV-associated lesions. The B16/LT tumor model further serves as a useful model for testing various vaccine strategies against MCC.

  10. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine.

  11. Current trends in separation of plasmid DNA vaccines: a review.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Ashraf; Healey, Robert; Adly, Frady G

    2013-01-14

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines offer more rapid avenues for development and production if compared to those of conventional virus-based vaccines. They do not rely on time- or labour-intensive cell culture processes and allow greater flexibility in shipping and storage. Stimulating antibodies and cell-mediated components of the immune system are considered as some of the major advantages associated with the use of pDNA vaccines. This review summarizes the current trends in the purification of pDNA vaccines for practical and analytical applications. Special attention is paid to chromatographic techniques aimed at reducing the steps of final purification, post primary isolation and intermediate recovery, in order to reduce the number of steps necessary to reach a purified end product from the crude plasmid.

  12. Dual-pharmacophore DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to single-pharmacophore DNA-encoded libraries, where only one chemical moiety is linked to DNA, dual-pharmacophore DNA-encoded chemical libraries feature the display of two independent small-molecules in close proximity. This, in principle, allows to explore adjacent epitopes on a pharmaceutical target of choice and hence the discovery of simultaneously binding pairs of fragments, by virtue of the chelate effect.

  13. Approaches towards the development of a vaccine against tuberculosis: recombinant BCG and DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nor, Norazmi Mohd; Musa, Mustaffa

    2004-01-01

    The last few years have witnessed intense research on vaccine development against tuberculosis. This has been driven by the upsurge of tuberculosis cases globally, especially those caused by multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Various vaccine strategies are currently being developed which can be broadly divided into the so-called living and non-living vaccines. Examples are attenuated members of the M. tuberculosis complex, recombinant mycobacteria, subunit proteins and DNA vaccines. Given current developments, we anticipate that recombinant BCG and DNA vaccines are the most promising. Multiple epitopes of M. tuberculosis may need to be cloned in a vaccine construct for the desired efficacy to be achieved. The technique of assembly polymerase chain reaction could facilitate such a cloning procedure.

  14. Assessment of a DNA Vaccine Encoding Burkholderia pseudomallei Bacterioferritin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    bacterioferritin gene from Brucella abortus, when delivered to mice as a DNA vaccine, evokes a potent Th1 immune response, including strong IFN-γ...blocking buffer containing goat anti-mouse IgG alkaline phosphatase conjugate (Sigma) at a dilution of 1:30000 for 1hr at room temperature. Following...Walravens, and J. J. Letesson. 2001. Induction of immune response in BALB/c mice with a DNA vaccine encoding bacterioferritin or P39 of Brucella

  15. Synthesis of biodegradable polymer-mesoporous silica composite microspheres for DNA prime-protein boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jenny; Huang, Yi; Danquah, Michael K; Wang, Huanting; Forde, Gareth M

    2010-03-18

    DNA vaccines or proteins are capable of inducing specific immunity; however, the translation to the clinic has generally been problematic, primarily due to the reduced magnitude of immune response and poor pharmacokinetics. Herein we demonstrate a composite microsphere formulation, composed of mesoporous silica spheres (MPS) and poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), enables the controlled delivery of a prime-boost vaccine via the encapsulation of plasmid DNA (pDNA) and protein in different compartments. Method with modified dual-concentric-feeding needles attached to a 40 kHz ultrasonic atomizer was studied. These needles focus the flow of two different solutions, which passed through the ultrasonic atomizer. The process synthesis parameters, which are important to the scale-up of composite microspheres, were also studied. These parameters include polymer concentration, feed flowrate, and volumetric ratio of polymer and pDNA-PEI/MPS-BSA. This fabrication technique produced composite microspheres with mean D[4,3] ranging from 6 to 34 microm, depending upon the microsphere preparation. The resultant physical morphology of composite microspheres was largely influenced by the volumetric ratio of pDNA-PEI/MPS-BSA to polymer, and this was due to the precipitation of MPS at the surface of the microspheres. The encapsulation efficiencies were predominantly in the range of 93-98% for pDNA and 46-68% for MPS. In the in vitro studies, the pDNA and protein showed different release kinetics in a 40 day time frame. The dual-concentric-feeding in ultrasonic atomization was shown to have excellent reproducibility. It was concluded that this fabrication technique is an effective method to prepare formulations containing a heterologous prime-boost vaccine in a single delivery system.

  16. Targeting DNA Vaccines to Myeloid Cells Using a Small Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein antigens to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein, fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, that results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient antigen presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WN neutralizing antibodies that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses. PMID:25270431

  17. Targeting DNA vaccines to myeloid cells using a small peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2015-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein Ags to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, which results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able to prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient Ag presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WNV-neutralizing Abs that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses.

  18. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus proviral DNA vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Sparger, Ellen E. Dubie, Robert A.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Cole, Kelly S.; Chang, W.L.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2008-05-10

    Studies in non-human primates, with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have demonstrated that live-attenuated viral vaccines are highly effective; however these vaccine viruses maintain a low level of pathogenicity. Lentivirus attenuation associated with deletion of the viral vif gene carries a significantly reduced risk for pathogenicity, while retaining the potential for virus replication of low magnitude in the host. This report describes a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 provirus that was tested as an attenuated proviral DNA vaccine by inoculation of female rhesus macaques. SIV-specific interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot responses of low magnitude were observed after immunization with plasmid containing the vif-deleted SIV provirus. However, vaccinated animals displayed strong sustained virus-specific T cell proliferative responses and increasing antiviral antibody titers. These immune responses suggested either persistent vaccine plasmid expression or low level replication of vif-deleted SIV in the host. Immunized and unvaccinated macaques received a single high dose vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. A transient suppression of challenge virus load and a greater median survival time was observed for vaccinated animals. However, virus loads for vaccinated and unvaccinated macaques were comparable by twenty weeks after challenge and overall survival curves for the two groups were not significantly different. Thus, a vif-deleted SIVmac239 proviral DNA vaccine is immunogenic and capable of inducing a transient suppression of pathogenic challenge virus, despite severe attenuation of the vaccine virus.

  19. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8+ T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3−/− mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way. PMID:26667202

  20. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-12-15

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8(+) T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3(-/-) mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way.

  1. Next generation sequencing of DNA-launched Chikungunya vaccine virus

    SciTech Connect

    Hidajat, Rachmat; Nickols, Brian; Forrester, Naomi; Tretyakova, Irina; Weaver, Scott; Pushko, Peter

    2016-03-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) represents a pandemic threat with no approved vaccine available. Recently, we described a novel vaccination strategy based on iDNA® infectious clone designed to launch a live-attenuated CHIKV vaccine from plasmid DNA in vitro or in vivo. As a proof of concept, we prepared iDNA plasmid pCHIKV-7 encoding the full-length cDNA of the 181/25 vaccine. The DNA-launched CHIKV-7 virus was prepared and compared to the 181/25 virus. Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing revealed that with the exception of the 3′ untranslated region, CHIKV-7 viral RNA consistently showed a lower frequency of single-nucleotide polymorphisms than the 181/25 RNA including at the E2-12 and E2-82 residues previously identified as attenuating mutations. In the CHIKV-7, frequencies of reversions at E2-12 and E2-82 were 0.064% and 0.086%, while in the 181/25, frequencies were 0.179% and 0.133%, respectively. We conclude that the DNA-launched virus has a reduced probability of reversion mutations, thereby enhancing vaccine safety. - Highlights: • Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging pandemic threat. • In vivo DNA-launched attenuated CHIKV is a novel vaccine technology. • DNA-launched virus was sequenced using HiSeq2000 and compared to the 181/25 virus. • DNA-launched virus has lower frequency of SNPs at E2-12 and E2-82 attenuation loci.

  2. Delivery methods to increase cellular uptake and immunogenicity of DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, S H T; Gowans, E J; Grubor-Bauk, B; Wijesundara, D K

    2016-11-04

    DNA vaccines are ideal candidates for global vaccination purposes because they are inexpensive and easy to manufacture on a large scale such that even people living in low-income countries can benefit from vaccination. However, the potential of DNA vaccines has not been realized owing mainly to the poor cellular uptake of DNA in vivo resulting in the poor immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In this review, we discuss the benefits and shortcomings of several promising and innovative non-biological methods of DNA delivery that can be used to increase cellular delivery and efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  3. Next Generation Sequencing of DNA-Launched Chikungunya Vaccine Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hidajat, Rachmat; Nickols, Brian; Forrester, Naomi; Tretyakova, Irina; Weaver, Scott; Pushko, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) represents a pandemic threat with no approved vaccine available. Recently, we described a novel vaccination strategy based on iDNA® infectious clone designed to launch a live-attenuated CHIKV vaccine from plasmid DNA in vitro or in vivo. As a proof of concept, we prepared iDNA plasmid pCHIKV-7 encoding the full-length cDNA of the 181/25 vaccine. The DNA-launched CHIKV-7 virus was prepared and compared to the 181/25 virus. Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing revealed that with the exception of the 3’ untranslated region, CHIKV-7 viral RNA consistently showed a lower frequency of single-nucleotide polymorphisms than the 181/25 RNA including at the E2-12 and E2-82 residues previously identified as attenuating mutations. In the CHIKV-7, frequencies of reversions at E2-12 and E2-82 were 0.064% and 0.086%, while in the 181/25, frequencies were 0.179% and 0.133%, respectively. We conclude that the DNA-launched virus has a reduced probability of reversion mutations, thereby enhancing vaccine safety. PMID:26855330

  4. Broad humoral and cellular immunity elicited by a bivalent DNA vaccine encoding HA and NP genes from an H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Ling, Zhi-Yang; Sun, Liang; Xu, Ying; Bian, Chao; He, Yuan; Lu, Wei; Chen, Ze; Sun, Bing

    2011-02-01

    Influenza A virus is highly variable and a major viral respiratory pathogen that can cause severe illness in humans. Therefore it is important to induce a sufficient immune response specific to current strains and to heterosubtypic viruses with vaccines. In this study, we developed a dual-promoter-based bivalent DNA vaccine that encodes both hemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) proteins from a highly pathogenic A/Chicken/Henan/12/2004 (H5N1) virus. Our results show that the expression levels of HA and NP genes from the dual-promoter plasmid are similar to those seen when they are expressed individually in independent plasmids. When the bivalent DNA vaccine was inoculated via intramuscular injection and in vivo electroporation, high levels of both humoral and cellular immune responses were elicited against homologous H5N1 virus and heterosubtypic H9N2 virus. Furthermore, no obvious antigenic competition was observed between HA and NP proteins in the dual-promoter-based bivalent vaccine compared to monovalent vaccines. Our data suggest that a combination of influenza surface and internal viral genes in a dual-promoter-expressing plasmid may provide a new approach for developing a DNA vaccine that may protect not only specifically against a currently circulating strain, but also may cross-protect broadly against new heterosubtypic viruses.

  5. Overview of recent DNA vaccine development for fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Since the first description of DNA vaccines for fish in 1996, numerous studies of genetic immunisation against the rhabdovirus pathogens infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) have established their potential as both highly efficacious biologicals and useful basic research tools. Single small doses of rhabdovirus DNA constructs provide extremely strong protection against severe viral challenge under a variety of conditions. DNA vaccines for several other important fish viruses, bacteria, and parasites are under investigation, but they have not yet shown high efficacy. Therefore, current research is focussed on mechanistic studies to understand the basis of protection, and on improvement of the nucleic acid vaccine applications against a wider range of fish pathogens.

  6. Rapid outer-surface protein C DNA tattoo vaccination protects against Borrelia afzelii infection.

    PubMed

    Wagemakers, A; Mason, L M K; Oei, A; de Wever, B; van der Poll, T; Bins, A D; Hovius, J W R

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia afzelii is the predominant Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis in Europe. Currently there is no human vaccine against Lyme borreliosis, and most research focuses on recombinant protein vaccines against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. DNA tattooing is a novel vaccination method that can be applied in a rapid vaccination schedule. We vaccinated C3H/HeN mice with B. afzelii strain PKo OspC (outer-surface protein C) using a codon-optimized DNA vaccine tattoo and compared this with recombinant protein vaccination in a 0-2-4 week vaccination schedule. We also assessed protection by DNA tattoo in a 0-3-6 day schedule. DNA tattoo and recombinant OspC vaccination induced comparable total IgG responses, with a lower IgG1/IgG2a ratio after DNA tattoo. Two weeks after syringe-challenge with 5 × 10(5) B. afzelii spirochetes most vaccinated mice had negative B. afzelii tissue DNA loads and all were culture negative. Furthermore, DNA tattoo vaccination in a 0-3-6 day regimen also resulted in negative Borrelia loads and cultures after challenge. To conclude, DNA vaccination by tattoo was fully protective against B. afzelii challenge in mice in a rapid vaccination protocol, and induces a favorable humoral immunity compared to recombinant protein vaccination. Rapid DNA tattoo is a promising vaccination strategy against spirochetes.

  7. DNA vaccine prime and recombinant FPV vaccine boost: an important candidate immunization strategy to control bluetongue virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Junping; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Feng, Yufei; Lv, Shuang; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Haixiu; Wu, Donglai

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue (BT), an important sheep disease that caused great economic loss to the sheep industry. There are 26 BTV serotypes based on the outer protein VP2. However, the serotypes BTV-1 and BTV-16 are the two most prevalent serotypes in China. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing viral infections. Therefore, the need for an effective vaccine against BTV is urgent. In this study, DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) vaccines expressing VP2 alone or VP2 in combination with VP5 or co-expressing the VP2 and VP5 proteins of BTV-1 were evaluated in both mice and sheep. Several strategies were tested in mice, including DNA vaccine prime and boost, rFPV vaccine prime and boost, and DNA vaccine prime and rFPV vaccine boost. We then determined the best vaccine strategy in sheep. Our results indicated that a strategy combining a DNA vaccine prime (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) followed by an rFPV vaccine boost (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) induced a high titer of neutralizing antibodies in sheep. Therefore, our data suggest that a DNA vaccine consisting of a pCAG-(VP2+VP5) prime and an rFPV-(VP2+VP5) boost is an important candidate for the design of a novel vaccine against BTV-1.

  8. A DNA vaccine against yellow fever virus: development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T A; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies.

  9. Transcriptional IL-15-Directed in vivo DC Targeting DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tian, S; Liu, Z; Donahue, C; Noh, HS; Falo, LD; You, Z

    2009-01-01

    DC engineered in vitro by DNA encoding OVAhsp70 and IL-15 up-regulated their expressions of CD80, CD86, CCR7 and IL-15Rα and promoted their productions of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α. Transcriptional IL-15-directed in vivo DC targeting DNA vaccine encoding OVAhsp70 elicited long-lasting Th1 and CTL responses and anti-B16OVA activity. CD8 T cell-mediated primary tumor protection was abrogated by DC or CD4 T cell depletion during the induction phase of immune responses. However, CD4 T cell depletion during immunization did not impair CD8 T cell-dependent long-lasting tumor protection. Furthermore, in vivo DC-derived IL-15 exerted the enhancements of cellular and humoral immune responses and antitumor immunity elicited by OVAhsp70 DNA vaccine. Importantly, the potency of this novel DNA vaccine strategy was proven using a self/tumor Ag (TRP2) in a clinically relevant B16 melanoma model. These findings have implications for developing next generation DNA vaccines against cancers and infectious diseases in both healthy and CD4 deficient individuals. PMID:19727134

  10. Naked DNA vaccination of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar against IHNV.

    PubMed

    Traxler, G S; Anderson, E; LaPatra, S E; Richard, J; Shewmaker, B; Kurath, G

    1999-11-30

    A naked plasmid DNA encoding the glycoprotein (pCMV4-G) of a 1976 isolate of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) obtained from steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss was used to vaccinate Atlantic salmon Salmo salar against IHNV. Eight weeks post-vaccination the fish were challenged with a strain of IHNV originally isolated from farmed Atlantic salmon undergoing an epizootic. Fish injected with the glycoprotein-encoding plasmid were significantly (p < 0.05) protected against IHNV by both immersion and cohabitation challenge. Survivors of the first challenges were pooled and re-challenged by immersion 12 wk after the initial challenge. Significant (p < 0.05) protection was observed in all of the previously challenged groups including those receiving the complete vaccine. Fish injected with the glycoprotein-encoding plasmid produced low levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies prior to the first challenge. Neutralizing antibodies increased in all groups after exposure to the IHNV. Passive transfer of pooled sera from pCMV4-G vaccinates and IHN survivors provided relative survivals of 40 to 100% compared to fish injected with sera collected from fish immunized with control vaccines or left unhandled. In this study, DNA vaccination effectively protected Atlantic salmon smolts against challenges with IHNV.

  11. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (p<0.0001) than individual construct vaccination. From this pilot study we could envisage that the chimeric DNA vaccine construct may offer an attractive strategy in controlling co-infection of leishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design.

  12. Prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Rios-Castro, Martha; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia del Carmen; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia

    2015-02-24

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in which the most affected organ is the heart. Conventional chemotherapy has a very low effectiveness; despite recent efforts, there is currently no better or more effective treatment available. DNA vaccines provide a new alternative for both prevention and treatment of a variety of infectious disorders, including Chagas disease. Recombinant DNA technology has allowed some vaccines to be developed using recombinant proteins or virus-like particles capable of inducing both a humoral and cellular specific immune response. This type of immunization has been successfully used in preclinical studies and there are diverse models for viral, bacterial and/or parasitic diseases, allergies, tumors and other diseases. Therefore, several research groups have been given the task of designing a DNA vaccine against experimental infection with T. cruzi. In this review we explain what DNA vaccines are and the most recent studies that have been done to develop them with prophylactic or therapeutic purposes against Chagas disease.

  13. Bacillus subtilis spores as adjuvants for DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Aps, Luana R M M; Diniz, Mariana O; Porchia, Bruna F M M; Sales, Natiely S; Moreno, Ana Carolina R; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2015-05-11

    Recently, Bacillus subtilis spores were shown to be endowed with strong adjuvant capacity when co-administered with purified antigenic proteins. In the present study we assessed whether spores possess adjuvant properties when combined with DNA vaccines. We showed that B. subtilis spores promoted the activation of dendritic cells in vitro and induced migration of pro-inflammatory cells after parenteral administration to mice. Likewise, co-administration of spores with a DNA vaccine encoding the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 protein enhanced the activation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo. Mice immunized with the DNA vaccine admixed with spores presented a protective immunity increase to previously implanted tumor cells, capable of expressing HPV-16 oncoproteins. Finally, we observed that the adjuvant effect can vary accordingly to the number of co-administered spores which may be ascribed with the ability to induce. Collectively, the present results demonstrate for the first time that B. subtilis spores can also confer adjuvant effects to DNA vaccines.

  14. Protective immunity elicited by a divalent DNA vaccine encoding both the L7/L12 and Omp16 genes of Brucella abortus in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Deyan; Ni, Bing; Li, Peng; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Songle; Han, Yue; Mao, Liwei; He, Yangdong; Wu, Yuzhang; Wang, Xiliang

    2006-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity and the protective efficacy of a divalent fusion DNA vaccine encoding both the Brucella abortus L7/L12 protein (ribosomal protein) and Omp16 protein (outer membrane lipoprotein), designated pcDNA3.1-L7/L12-Omp16. Intramuscular injection of this divalent DNA vaccine into BALB/c mice elicited markedly both humoral and cellular immune responses. The specific antibodies exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) over IgG1. In addition, the dual-gene DNA vaccine elicited a strong T-cell proliferative response and induced a large amount of gamma interferon-producing T cells upon restimulation in vitro with recombinant fusion protein L7/L12-Omp16, suggesting the induction of a typical T-helper-1-dominated immune response in vivo. This divalent DNA vaccine could also induce a significant level of protection against challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 544 in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, the protection level induced by the divalent DNA vaccine was significantly higher than that induced by the univalent DNA vaccines pcDNA3.1-L7/L12 or pcDNA3.1-Omp16. Taken together, the results of this study verify for the first time that the Omp16 gene can be a candidate target for a DNA vaccine against brucellosis. Additionally, a divalent genetic vaccine based on the L7/L12 and Omp16 genes can elicit a stronger cellular immune response and better immunoprotection than the relevant univalent vaccines can.

  15. Second-Generation Therapeutic DNA Lymphoma Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    suppressive cells ( MDSC /Treg) in tumor-bearing, but not naïve mice, an effect that was independent of tumor burden reduction, suggesting a role of...vaccine-potentiating effect of lenalidomide. Lenalidomide did not affect MDSC , Treg or NK cell numbers in naïve mice To further explore...similar extent (6.59%  0.15). Lenalidomide effects on MDSC , Treg, and NK cells in tumor-bearing mice We then investigated the effects of lenalidomide

  16. Enhancement of HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunogenicity by BCG-PSN, a novel adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Hou, Jue; Li, Dingfeng; Liu, Yong; Hu, Ningzhu; Hao, Yanling; Fu, Jingjing; Hu, Yunzhang; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-07

    Although the importance of DNA vaccines, especially as a priming immunization has been well established in numerous HIV vaccine studies, the immunogenictiy of DNA vaccines is generally moderate. Novel adjuvant is in urgent need for improving the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Polysaccharide and nucleic acid fraction extracted by hot phenol method from Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin, known as BCG-PSN, is a widely used immunomodulatory product in China clinical practice. In this study, we evaluated whether the BCG-PSN could serve as a novel adjuvant of DNA vaccine to trigger better cellular and humoral immune responses against the HIV-1 Env antigen in Balb/C mouse model. The BCG-PSN was mixed with 10 μg or 100 μg of pDRVI1.0gp145 (HIV-1 CN54 gp145 gene) DNA vaccine and intramuscularly immunized two or three times. We found that BCG-PSN could significantly improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine when co-administered with DNA vaccine. Further, at the same vaccination schedule, BCG-PSN co-immunization with 10 μg DNA vaccine could elicit cellular and humoral immune responses which were comparable to that induced by 100 μg DNA vaccine alone. Moreover, our results demonstrate that BCG-PSN can activate TLR signaling pathways and induce Th1-type cytokines secretion. These findings suggest that BCG-PSN can serve as a novel and effective adjuvant for DNA vaccination.

  17. MG7 mimotope-based DNA vaccination for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dexin; Chen, Yu; Fan, Daiming

    2006-04-01

    Gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Prevention and treatment of gastric cancer through vaccination has been difficult owing to lack of a specific target and poor immunity. A number of vaccination strategies have been used to augment immune responses against gastric cancer and some progress has been made. In a series of studies, the authors have focused on gastric cancer vaccination approaches based on MG7 mimotopes, which are mimicry epitopes selected from phage-displayed oligopeptide libraries with a gastric cancer cell-specific monoclonal antibody, MG7-Ab. Strategies employed in these studies include viral or plasmid vectors in combination with carrier sequence or unmethylated CpG with synthetic peptides in nanoemulsion. The results demonstrated that MG7 mimotopes could effectively and specifically induce both cellular and humoral immune reactions and in vivo antitumor responses. In particular, a four-MG7 mimotope DNA vaccine was found to elicit much stronger antitumor immune responses in mice compared with its single-mimotope counterpart. These encouraging findings might pave the way for the development of novel MG7 antigen-based vaccination approaches for human gastric cancer. The review also discusses other immune-enhancing vaccination strategies for gastric cancer.

  18. Tailoring DNA Vaccines: Designing Strategies Against HER2-Positive Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Cristina; Kalogris, Cristina; Garulli, Chiara; Pietrella, Lucia; Gabrielli, Federico; Curcio, Claudia; Quaglino, Elena; Cavallo, Federica; Amici, Augusto

    2013-01-01

    The crucial role of HER2 in epithelial transformation and its selective overexpression on cancer tissues makes it an ideal target for cancer immunotherapies such as passive immunotherapy with Trastuzumab. There are, however, a number of concerns regarding the use of monoclonal antibodies which include resistance, repeated treatments, considerable costs, and side effects that make active immunotherapies against HER2 desirable alternative approaches. The efficacy of anti-HER2 DNA vaccination has been widely demonstrated in transgenic cancer-prone mice, which recapitulate several features of human breast cancers. Nonetheless, the rational design of a cancer vaccine able to trigger a long-lasting immunity, and thus prevent tumor recurrence in patients, would require the understanding of how tolerance and immunosuppression regulate antitumor immune responses and, at the same time, the identification of the most immunogenic portions of the target protein. We herein retrace the findings that led to our most promising DNA vaccines that, by encoding human/rat chimeric forms of HER2, are able to circumvent peripheral tolerance. Preclinical data obtained with these chimeric DNA vaccines have provided the rationale for their use in an ongoing Phase I clinical trial (EudraCT 2011-001104-34). PMID:23675574

  19. Selection and identification of malaria vaccine target molecule using bioinformatics and DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Shuaibu, M N; Kikuchi, M; Cherif, M S; Helegbe, G K; Yanagi, T; Hirayama, K

    2010-10-04

    Following a genome-wide search for a blood stage malaria DNA-based vaccine using web-based bioinformatic tools, 29 genes from the annotated Plasmodium yoelii genome sequence (www.PlasmoDB.org and www.tigr.org) were identified as encoding GPI-anchored proteins. Target genes were those with orthologues in P. falciparum, containing an N-terminal signal sequence containing hydrophobic amino acid stretch and signal P criteria, a transmembrane-like domain and GPI anchor motif. Focusing on the blood stage, we extracted mRNA from pRBCs, PCR-amplified 22 out of the 29 selected genes, and eventually cloned nine of these into a DNA vaccine plasmid, pVAX 200-DEST. Biojector-mediated delivery of the nine DNA vaccines was conducted using ShimaJET to C57BL/6 mice at a dose of 4 μg/mouse three times at an interval of 3 weeks. Two weeks after the second booster, immunized mice were challenged with P. y. yoelii 17XL-parasitized RBCs and the level of parasitaemia, protection and survival was assessed. Immunization with one gene (PY03470) resulted in 2-4 days of delayed onset and level of parasitaemia and was associated with increased survival compared to non-immunized mice. Antibody production was, however, low following DNA vaccination, as determined by immunofluorescence assay. Recombinant protein from this gene, GPI8p transamidase-related protein (rPyTAM) in PBS or emulsified with GERBU adjuvant was also used to immunize another set of C57BL/6 mice with 10-20 μg/mouse three times at 3-week interval. Higher antibody response was obtained as determined by ELISA with similar protective effects as observed after DNA vaccination.

  20. Induction of protection against porcine cysticercosis in growing pigs by DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Aijiang; Jin, Zhizhong; Zheng, Yadong; Hai, Gang; Yuan, Gailing; Li, Hailong; Cai, Xuepeng

    2007-01-02

    A DNA vaccine, pcDNA3-B, was developed by using the nucleotide sequence of Taenia solium B antigen and cloning into pcDNA3.1 plasmid. The growing pigs were vaccinated by one intramuscular infection of 200 or 1000 microg pcDNA3-B. The immunization with 1000 microg of pcDNA3-B showed 92.6% protection when the pigs were challenged by T. solium eggs and four of the five pigs vaccinated had no viable cysts. The results provide encouraging information on the use of pcDNA3-B vaccination for the prevention of cysticercosis.

  1. A Novel Tumor Antigen and Foxp3 Dual-Targeting Tumor Cell Vaccine Enhances the Immunotherapy in a Murine Model of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    DATES COVERED t 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Novel Tumor Antigen and Foxp3 Dual-Targeting Tumor Cell Vaccine 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhances the...past year I have generated Foxp3-over expressing RENCA cells, as the source of candidate dual targeting tumor cells vaccine . We have performed...controlled vaccine therapy in RENCA model in three different schedules. When applied in a pre- vaccine schedule, RENCA and RENCA Foxp3 tumor cell vaccine

  2. 78 FR 29698 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. The environmental assessment... vaccine and related information, examines the potential effects that field testing this veterinary...

  3. A cGAS-Independent STING/IRF7 Pathway Mediates the Immunogenicity of DNA Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Suschak, John J; Wang, Shixia; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    It has been known since the discovery of DNA vaccines >20 y ago that DNA vaccines can function as adjuvants. Our recent study reported the involvement of Aim2 as the sensor of DNA vaccines in eliciting Ag-specific Ab responses. Our findings indicated the presence of previously unrecognized innate immune response pathways in addition to the TLR9 pathway, which is mainly activated by the CpG motifs of DNA vaccines. Our data further demonstrated the requirement of type I IFN in DNA vaccine-induced immune responses via the Aim2 pathway, but the exact downstream molecular mechanism was not characterized. In the present study, we investigated the roles of the putative DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGas), as well as the downstream IFN regulatory factors (IRF) 3 and 7 in type I IFN induction and Ag-specific immune responses elicited by DNA vaccination. Our results showed that DNA vaccine-induced, Irf7-dependent signaling, as part of the Sting pathway, was critical for generation of both innate cytokine signaling and Ag-specific B and T cell responses. In contrast, Irf3 was not as critical as expected in this pathway and, more surprisingly, immune responses elicited by DNA vaccines were not cGas-dependent in vivo. Data from this study provide more details on the innate immune mechanisms involved in DNA vaccination and further enrich our understanding on the potential utility of DNA vaccines in generating Ag-specific immune responses.

  4. Transposon leads to contamination of clinical pDNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, I; Gomez-Eerland, R; van den Berg, J H; Oosterhuis, K; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G; Beijnen, J H; Nuijen, B

    2013-07-11

    We report an unexpected contamination during clinical manufacture of a Human Papilomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 encoding plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine, with a transposon originating from the Escherichia coli DH5 host cell genome. During processing, presence of this transposable element, insertion sequence 2 (IS2) in the plasmid vector was not noticed until quality control of the bulk pDNA vaccine when results of restriction digestion, sequencing, and CGE analysis were clearly indicative for the presence of a contaminant. Due to the very low level of contamination, only an insert-specific PCR method was capable of tracing back the presence of the transposon in the source pDNA and master cell bank (MCB). Based on the presence of an uncontrolled contamination with unknown clinical relevance, the product was rejected for clinical use. In order to prevent costly rejection of clinical material, both in-process controls and quality control methods must be sensitive enough to detect such a contamination as early as possible, i.e. preferably during plasmid DNA source generation, MCB production and ultimately during upstream processing. However, as we have shown that contamination early in the process development pipeline (source pDNA, MCB) can be present below limits of detection of generally applied analytical methods, the introduction of "engineered" or transposon-free host cells seems the only 100% effective solution to avoid contamination with movable elements and should be considered when searching for a suitable host cell-vector combination.

  5. Novel chemotactic-antigen DNA vaccine against cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuren; Zhang, Youhui

    2008-04-01

    Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in immune induction. Dendritic cells perform antigen uptake, processing and presentation to T cells only when they are matured and in the functional state. In the development of a vaccine, it is of utmost importance to consider how to make dendritic cells' functions immunologically adequate. In this paper, we report the development of a series of antitumor DNA vaccines with similar structural framework, in which a gene encoding tumor-associated antigenic peptide is ligated upstream to the gene coding secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine and downstream to the gene encoding the Fc portion of IgG (named chemotactic-antigen DNA vaccine [CADV]). CCR7(+) T, B, natural killer and dendritic cells can be attracted by secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine, and Fc facilitates antigen uptake via Fc receptors expressed on dendritic cells. In a series of experiments in mice vaccinated by CADV with such tumor-associated antigenic specificities as HPV-16 E7, PSA-PSM-PAP, HER-2/neu, p53 and hTERT, CADV can attract immune cells to the vaccine inoculation site, remarkably inhibit tumor growth and extend survival time in tumor-bearing mice. The antitumor effect is more efficacious than that in mice treated with SLC-Ag or Ag-Fc hybrid gene. Tumor-associated antigenic-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be induced by in vitro experiment in a human system. When combined with measures blocking the negative immune feedback circuits, the therapeutic effect of the vaccine can be further enhanced. Large-scale production of CADV is possible for clinical application.

  6. Magnetoluminescent light switches--dual modality in DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Smolensky, Eric D; Peterson, Katie L; Weitz, Evan A; Lewandowski, Cutler; Pierre, Valérie C

    2013-06-19

    The synthesis and properties of two responsive magnetoluminescent iron oxide nanoparticles for dual detection of DNA by MRI and luminescence spectroscopy are presented. These magnetoluminescent agents consist of iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated with metallointercalators via a polyethylene glycol linker. Two metallointercalators were investigated: Ru(bpy')(phen)(dppz), which turns on upon DNA intercalation, and Eu-DOTA-Phen, which turns off. The characteristic light-switch responses of the metallointercalators are not affected by the iron oxide nanoparticles; upon binding to DNA the luminescence of the ruthenium complexes increases by ca. 20-fold, whereas that of the europium complex is >95% quenched. Additionally, the 17-20 nm magnetite cores, having permeable PEG coatings and stable dopamide anchors, render the two constructs efficient responsive contrast agents for MRI with unbound longitudinal and transverse relaxivities of 12.4-9.2 and 135-128 mM(-1)(Fe)s(-1), respectively. Intercalation of the metal complexes in DNA results in the formation of large clusters of nanoparticles with a resultant decrease of both r1 and r2 by 32-63% and 24-38%, respectively. The potential application of these responsive magnetoluminescent assemblies and their reversible catch-and-release properties for the purification of DNA is presented.

  7. Dual-Colored DNA Comb Polymers for Single Molecule Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Danielle; Marciel, Amanda; Schroeder, Charles

    2014-03-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of branched biopolymers for single molecule rheology. In our work, we utilize a hybrid enzymatic-synthetic approach to graft ``short'' DNA branches to ``long'' DNA backbones, thereby producing macromolecular DNA comb polymers. The branches and backbones are synthesized via polymerase chain reaction with chemically modified deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs): ``short'' branches consist of Cy5-labeled dNTPs and a terminal azide group, and ``long'' backbones contain dibenzylcyclooctyne-modified (DBCO) dNTPs. In this way, we utilize strain-promoted, copper-free cycloaddition ``click'' reactions for facile grafting of azide-terminated branches at DBCO sites along backbones. Copper-free click reactions are bio-orthogonal and nearly quantitative when carried out under mild conditions. Moreover, comb polymers can be labeled with an intercalating dye (e.g., YOYO) for dual-color fluorescence imaging. We characterized these materials using gel electrophoresis, HPLC, and optical microscopy, with atomic force microscopy in progress. Overall, DNA combs are suitable for single molecule dynamics, and in this way, our work holds the potential to improve our understanding of topologically complex polymer melts and solutions.

  8. Preparation and immunological effectiveness of a swine influenza DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Shi, Xingming; Zhao, Yan; Wei, Haixia; Sun, Qingshen; Huang, Tingting; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yunfeng

    2011-11-03

    Preparation conditions of a DNA vaccine against swine influenza encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles were determined. The nanoparticles were prepared according to a complex coacervation method using chitosan as a biodegradable matrix forming polymer. Under the preparation conditions, chitosan nanoparticles containing the DNA vaccine were produced with good morphology, high encapsulation rate and high stability. Transfection test indicated that the vaccine could be expressed as an antigen in cells, and maintained good bioactivity. In addition, better immune responses of mice immunized with the chitosan nanoparticles containing the DNA vaccine were induced and prolonged release of the plasmid DNA was achieved compared to the DNA vaccine alone. These results laid a foundation for further development of DNA vaccines in nanoparticles before ultimate industrial application.

  9. Multivalent immunity targeting tumor-associated antigens by intra-lymph node DNA-prime, peptide-boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    Smith, K A; Qiu, Z; Wong, R; Tam, V L; Tam, B L; Joea, D K; Quach, A; Liu, X; Pold, M; Malyankar, U M; Bot, A

    2011-01-01

    Active immunotherapy of cancer has yet to yield effective therapies in the clinic. To evaluate the translatability of DNA-based vaccines we analyzed the profile of T-cell immunity by plasmid vaccination in a murine model, using transcriptome microarray analysis and flow cytometry. DNA vaccination resulted in specific T cells expressing low levels of co-inhibitory molecules (most notably PD-1), strikingly different from the expression profile elicited by peptide immunization. In addition, the T-cell response primed through this dual-antigen-expressing plasmid (MART-1/Melan-A and tyrosinase) translated into a substantial proliferation capacity and functional conversion to antitumor effector cells after tyrosinase and MART-1/Melan-A peptide analog boost. Furthermore, peptide boost rescued the immune response against the subdominant tyrosinase epitope. This immunization approach could be adapted to elicit potent immunity against multiple tumor antigens, resulting in a broader immune response that was more effective in targeting human tumor cells. Finally, this study sheds light on a novel mechanism of immune homeostasis through synchronous regulation of co-inhibitory molecules on T cells, highly relevant to heterologous prime boost approaches involving DNA vaccines as priming agents.

  10. Vaginal DNA vaccination against infectious diseases transmitted through the vagina.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Takanori; Takashima, Yuuki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2012-06-01

    There is an urgent need for the development of vaccines against genital virus infections that are transmitted through heterosexual intercourse, including the HIV and HPV. In general, the surface of female genital mucosa, including vaginal mucosa, is the most common site of initiation of these infections. Thus, it is becoming clear that successful vaccines must induce both cellular and humoral immune responses in both the local genital tract and systemically. We believe that a strong vaginal immune response could be obtained by inducing strong gene expression of antigen-coding DNA in the local targeted tissue. In order to improve transfection efficiency in the vagina, it is important that methods allowing breakthrough of the various barriers, such as the epithelial layer, cellular and nuclear membrane, are developed. Therefore, systems providing less invasive and more effective delivery into the subepithelial layer are required. In this review, we will introduce our studies into efficient vaginal DNA vaccination methods, focusing on the effects of the menstrual cycle, utilization of the combination of functional peptides, and use of a needle-free injector.

  11. Comparison of dual influenza and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination with influenza vaccination alone for preventing pneumonia and reducing mortality among the elderly: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Yang; Tang, Xue-Feng; Du, Chang-Hui; Wang, Bin-Bing; Bi, Zhen-Wang; Dong, Bi-Rong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis comparing the effectiveness of influenza vaccination alone versus influenza plus pneumococcal dual vaccination for the prevention of pneumonia and mortality in adults ≥ 65 years of age. Medline, Cochrane, CENTRAL, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched. Inclusion criteria were: 1) Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), 2-arm prospective studies, or retrospective cohort studies; 2) Patients were ≥ 65 years of age with or without chronic respiratory disease; 3) Patients received the influenza vaccine alone or dual pneumococcal and influenza vaccination; 4) Results included incidence of recurrent respiratory tract infections, length of hospital stay, and overall mortality rate. The outcomes were pneumonia and all-cause mortality rates. Of 142 studies identified in the database searches, 6 were ultimately included in the systematic review, and 5 were included in meta-analysis. The number of patients that received the influenza vaccination alone ranged from 211 to 29,346 (total = 53,107), and the number that received influenza+pneumococcal vaccination ranged from 246 to 72,107 (total = 102,068). Influenza+pneumococcal vaccination was associated with a significantly lower pneumonia rate than influenza vaccination alone (relative risk [RR] = 0.835, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.718–0.971, P = 0.019), and with a significantly lower all-cause mortality rate than influenza vaccination alone (relative risk [RR] = 0.771, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.707–0.842, P = 0.001). In conclusion, the results of this study support concomitant pneumococcal and influenza vaccination of the elderly as a dual vaccination strategy is associated with lower pneumonia and all-cause mortality rates. PMID:27629584

  12. Improvement influenza HA2 DNA vaccine cellular and humoral immune responses with Mx bio adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Sina; Shahsavandi, Shahla; Maddadgar, Omid

    2017-03-01

    Immunization with DNA vaccines as a novel alternative to conventional vaccination strategy requires adjuvant for improving vaccine efficacy. The conserved immunogenic HA2 subunit, which harbors neutralizing epitopes is a promising vaccine candidate against influenza viruses. In this study, for the first time we explore the idea of using host interferon inducible Mx protein to increase the immunogenicity of HA2 H9N2 influenza DNA vaccine. The potency and safety of the Mx adjuvanted-HA2 vaccine was evaluated in BALB/c mice by different prime-boost strategies. To assess the effect of the vaccination on the virus clearance rate, mice were challenged with homologous influenza virus. Administration of the adjuvanted vaccine and boosting with the same regimen could effectively enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses in treated mice. These data demonstrated that Mx as host defense peptide can be potentiated for improving influenza vaccine efficacy.

  13. DNA vaccine protects ornamental koi (Cyprinus carpio koi) against North American spring viremia of carp virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, E.J.; Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) in the United States constitutes a potentially serious alien pathogen threat to susceptible fish stocks in North America. A DNA vaccine with an SVCV glycoprotein (G) gene from a North American isolate was constructed. In order to test the vaccine a challenge model utilizing a specific pathogen-free domestic koi stock and a cold water stress treatment was also developed. We have conducted four trial studies demonstrating that the pSGnc DNA vaccine provided protection in vaccinated fish against challenge at low, moderate, and high virus doses of the homologous virus. The protection was significant (p < 0.05) as compared to fish receiving a mock vaccine construct containing a luciferase reporter gene and to non-vaccinated controls in fish ranging in age from 3 to 14 months. In all trials, the SVCV-G DNA immunized fish were challenged 28-days post-vaccination (546 degree-days) and experienced low mortalities varying from 10 to 50% with relative percent survivals ranging from 50 to 88%. The non-vaccinated controls and mock construct vaccinated fish encountered high cumulative percent mortalities ranging from 70 to 100%. This is the first report of a SVCV DNA vaccine being tested successfully in koi. These experiments prove that the SVCV DNA (pSGnc) vaccine can elicit specific reproducible protection and validates its potential use as a prophylactic vaccine in koi and other vulnerable North American fish stocks.

  14. Development of a human live attenuated West Nile infectious DNA vaccine: conceptual design of the vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Yamshchikov, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    West Nile virus has become an important epidemiological problem attracting significant attention of health authorities, mass media, and the public. Although there are promising advancements toward addressing the vaccine need, the perspectives of the commercial availability of the vaccine remain uncertain. To a large extent this is due to lack of a sustained interest for further commercial development of the vaccines already undergoing the preclinical and clinical development, and a predicted insignificant cost effectiveness of mass vaccination. There is a need for a safe, efficacious and cost effective vaccine, which can improve the feasibility of a targeted vaccination program. In the present report, we summarize the background, the rationale, and the choice of the development pathway that we selected for the design of a live attenuated human West Nile vaccine in a novel infectious DNA format.

  15. Intranasal DNA Vaccine for Protection against Respiratory Infectious Diseases: The Delivery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yingying; Yuen, Pak-Wai; Lam, Jenny Ka-Wing

    2014-01-01

    Intranasal delivery of DNA vaccines has become a popular research area recently. It offers some distinguished advantages over parenteral and other routes of vaccine administration. Nasal mucosa as site of vaccine administration can stimulate respiratory mucosal immunity by interacting with the nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Different kinds of DNA vaccines are investigated to provide protection against respiratory infectious diseases including tuberculosis, coronavirus, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) etc. DNA vaccines have several attractive development potential, such as producing cross-protection towards different virus subtypes, enabling the possibility of mass manufacture in a relatively short time and a better safety profile. The biggest obstacle to DNA vaccines is low immunogenicity. One of the approaches to enhance the efficacy of DNA vaccine is to improve DNA delivery efficiency. This review provides insight on the development of intranasal DNA vaccine for respiratory infections, with special attention paid to the strategies to improve the delivery of DNA vaccines using non-viral delivery agents. PMID:25014738

  16. Screening of novel malaria DNA vaccine candidates using full-length cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Shibui, Akiko; Nakae, Susumu; Watanabe, Junichi; Sato, Yoshitaka; Tolba, Mohammed E M; Doi, Junko; Shiibashi, Takashi; Nogami, Sadao; Sugano, Sumio; Hozumi, Nobumichi

    2013-11-01

    No licensed malaria vaccine exists, in spite of intensive development efforts. We have been investigating development of a DNA vaccine to prevent malaria infection. To date, we have established a full-length cDNA expression library from the erythrocytic-stage murine malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei. We found that immunization of mice with combined 2000 clones significantly prolonged survival after challenge infection and that splenocytes from the immunized mice showed parasite-specific cytokine production. We determined the 5'-end one-pass sequence of these clones and mapped a draft genomic sequence for P. berghei for use in screening vaccine candidates for efficacy. In this study, we annotated these cDNA clones by comparing them with the genomic sequence of Plasmodium falciparum. We then divided them into several subsets based on their characteristics and examined their protective effects against malaria infection. Consequently, we selected 104 clones that strongly induced specific IgG production and decreased the mortality rate in the early phase. Most of these 104 clones coded for unknown proteins. The results suggest that these clones represent potential novel malaria vaccine candidates.

  17. Phase 1 Study of Pandemic H1 DNA Vaccine in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Crank, Michelle C.; Gordon, Ingelise J.; Yamshchikov, Galina V.; Sitar, Sandra; Hu, Zonghui; Enama, Mary E.; Holman, LaSonji A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Pearce, Melissa B.; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Schwartz, Richard M.; Graham, Barney S.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background A novel, swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus was detected worldwide in April 2009, and the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a global pandemic that June. DNA vaccine priming improves responses to inactivated influenza vaccines. We describe the rapid production and clinical evaluation of a DNA vaccine encoding the hemagglutinin protein of the 2009 pandemic A/California/04/2009(H1N1) influenza virus, accomplished nearly two months faster than production of A/California/07/2009(H1N1) licensed monovalent inactivated vaccine (MIV). Methods 20 subjects received three H1 DNA vaccinations (4 mg intramuscularly with Biojector) at 4-week intervals. Eighteen subjects received an optional boost when the licensed H1N1 MIV became available. The interval between the third H1 DNA injection and MIV boost was 3–17 weeks. Vaccine safety was assessed by clinical observation, laboratory parameters, and 7-day solicited reactogenicity. Antibody responses were assessed by ELISA, HAI and neutralization assays, and T cell responses by ELISpot and flow cytometry. Results Vaccinations were safe and well-tolerated. As evaluated by HAI, 6/20 developed positive responses at 4 weeks after third DNA injection and 13/18 at 4 weeks after MIV boost. Similar results were detected in neutralization assays. T cell responses were detected after DNA and MIV. The antibody responses were significantly amplified by the MIV boost, however, the boost did not increased T cell responses induced by DNA vaccine. Conclusions H1 DNA vaccine was produced quickly, was well-tolerated, and had modest immunogenicity as a single agent. Other HA DNA prime-MIV boost regimens utilizing one DNA prime vaccination and longer boost intervals have shown significant immunogenicity. Rapid and large-scale production of HA DNA vaccines has the potential to contribute to an efficient response against future influenza pandemics. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00973895 PMID:25884189

  18. Molecularly engineered poly(ortho ester) microspheres for enhanced delivery of DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun; Ge, Qing; Ting, David; Nguyen, David; Shen, Hui-Rong; Chen, Jianzhu; Eisen, Herman N.; Heller, Jorge; Langer, Robert; Putnam, David

    2004-03-01

    Genetic vaccination using plasmid DNA presents a unique opportunity for achieving potent immune responses without the potential limitations of many conventional vaccines. Here we report the design of synthetic biodegradable polymers specifically for enhancing DNA vaccine efficacy in vivo. We molecularly engineered poly(ortho ester) microspheres that are non-toxic to cells, protect DNA from degradation, enable uptake by antigen-presenting cells, and release DNA rapidly in response to phagosomal pH. One type of microsphere of poly(ortho esters) that releases DNA vaccines in synchrony with the natural development of adaptive immunity, elicited distinct primary and secondary humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and suppressed the growth of tumour cells bearing a model antigen. This polymer microparticulate system could, with further study, have implications for advancing the clinical utility of DNA vaccines as well as other nucleic-acid-based therapeutics against viral infections and cancer.

  19. DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis: a promising approach for prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Samant, M

    2016-05-01

    The visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani parasite severely affects large populations in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The arsenal of drugs available is limited, and resistance is common in clinical field isolates. Therefore, vaccines could be an important alternative for prevention against VL. Recently, some investigators advocated the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines, which induces the T cell-based immunity against VL. The vaccine antigens are selected as conserved in various Leishmania species and provide a viable strategy for DNA vaccine development. Our understanding for DNA vaccine development against VL is not enough and much technological advancement is required. Improved formulations and methods of delivery are required, which increase the uptake of DNA vaccine by cells; optimization of vaccine vectors/encoded antigens to augment and direct the host immune response in VL. Despite the many genes identified as vaccine candidates, the disappointing potency of the DNA vaccines in VL underscores the challenges encountered in the efforts to translate efficacy in preclinical models into clinical realities. This review will provide a brief background of DNA vaccines including the insights gained about the design, strategy, safety issues, varied candidates, progress and challenges that play a role in their ability against VL.

  20. Electroporation of a multivalent DNA vaccine cocktail elicits a protective immune response against anthrax and plague.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Mark T; Livingston, Brian D; Pesce, John T; Bell, Matt G; Hannaman, Drew; Keane-Myers, Andrea M

    2012-07-06

    Electroporation of DNA vaccines represents a platform technology well positioned for the development of multivalent biodefense vaccines. To evaluate this hypothesis, three vaccine constructs were produced using codon-optimized genes encoding Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen (PA), and the Yersinia pestis genes LcrV and F1, cloned into pVAX1. A/J mice were immunized on a prime-boost schedule with these constructs using the electroporation-based TriGrid Delivery System. Immunization with the individual pDNA vaccines elicited higher levels of antigen-specific IgG than when used in combination. DNA vaccine effectiveness was proven, the pVAX-PA titers were toxin neutralizing and fully protective against a lethal B. anthracis spore challenge when administered alone or co-formulated with the plague pDNA vaccines. LcrV and F1 pVAX vaccines against plague were synergistic, resulting in 100% survival, but less protective individually and when co-formulated with pVAX-PA. These DNA vaccine responses were Th1/Th2 balanced with high levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 in splenocyte recall assays, contrary to complimentary protein Alum vaccinations displaying a Th2 bias with increased IL-4 and low levels of IFN-γ. These results demonstrate the feasibility of electroporation to deliver and maintain the overall efficacy of an anthrax-plague DNA vaccine cocktail whose individual components have qualitative immunological differences when combined.

  1. Infectious bursal disease DNA vaccination conferring protection by delayed appearance and rapid clearance of invading viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Yi; Hsieh, Ming Kun; Tung, Chun-Yu; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2011-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the kinetics of viral load and immune response in protection against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) by DNA vaccination. Chickens were DNA-vaccinated and challenged with IBDV one week after the third vaccination. Tissues were collected at 12 hours postinfection (HPI), 1 day postinfection (DPI), 3, 5, 7 and 10 DPI. The vaccinated chickens had less viral RNA, with delayed appearance and shorter duration in the bursa of Fabricius, spleen, and cecal tonsil than the challenged control chickens. Their ELISA and neutralizing antibody titers were decreased at 12 HPI and significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those in the challenged control chickens at later time points. Their spleen IFNγ expression was up-regulated compared to that in the DNA-vaccinated chickens without IBDV challenge. These results indicate that DNA vaccination confers protection against IBDV challenge by delayed appearance and rapid clearance of the invading viruses.

  2. Protective DNA vaccination against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is associated with induction of IFNbeta.

    PubMed

    Wefer, Judit; Harris, Robert A; Lobell, Anna

    2004-04-01

    DNA vaccines encoding encephalitogenic peptides protect against subsequent development of rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) through unknown mechanisms. We investigated immune cell phenotypes at different time points after DNA vaccination with vaccine encoding myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide 91-108 and subsequent induction of EAE. In protected rats, we observed (i) no alterations in antigen-specific Th2 or Th3 responses, (ii) reduced MHC II expression on splenocytes early after EAE induction, (iii) antigen-specific upregulation of IFNbeta upon recall stimulation and (iv) reduced IL-12Rbeta2 on lymphocytes. We suggest that the underlying mechanism of DNA vaccination is associated with immunomodulation exerted by induced IFNbeta.

  3. Transient global T cell activation after vaccination of rhesus macaques with a DNA-poxvirus vaccine regimen for HIV.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andreia; Müller, Tracey L; Chege, Gerald K; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Burgers, Wendy A

    2015-07-09

    Persistent T cell activation following immunization with HIV vaccines may increase HIV acquisition risk. We investigated the magnitude and kinetics of T cell activation following vaccination of rhesus macaques with a candidate HIV vaccine consisting of a recombinant DNA and MVA vaccination regimen. We show that global CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation, as measured by the expression of Ki67 and Bcl-2, peaked one week after boosting with MVA, but then waned rapidly to pre-vaccination levels. Furthermore, increased frequencies of CD4+ CCR5+ T cells, which represent potential HIV target cells, were short-lived and decreased to baseline levels within two months. Activated CD4+ T cells were predominantly of a central memory phenotype, and activated CD8+ T cells were distributed between central and effector memory phenotypes. Thus, only transient changes in T cell activation occurred following poxvirus vaccination, indicating a lack of persistent immune activation.

  4. Evaluation of Different DNA Vaccines against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Stefano; Ramadori, Giorgio; Villa, Riccardo; Borghetti, Paolo; de Angelis, Elena; Cantoni, Anna Maria; Corradi, Attilio; Amici, Augusto; Ferrari, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there have been different experiences with the plasmid DNA vaccination. In this area and with the hypothesis to demonstrate the effectiveness of different plasmids encoding porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome (PRRS), five DNA vaccines against PRRS were evaluated for their innocuity and efficacy in pigs. Eighteen animals were divided into five groups which were injected with five (A, B, C, D, E) different DNA vaccines. Albeit, none of the proposed vaccines were able to protect the animals against PRRS virus. Only vaccines A and B were able to reduce the clinical signs of the infection. ELISA IgM were detected 30 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine A or B. ELISA IgG were detected 90 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine B or C. Neutralizing antibody were detected Post Challenge Days 61 (PCD) in all groups. In the pigs inoculated with Vaccine C, IFN-γ were detected 90 days after first vaccination, and after challenge exposure they increased. In the other groups, the IFN-γ were detected after challenge infection. Pigs injected with each of the vaccines A, B, C, D and E showed a significantly higher level of CD4−CD8+ lymphocytes (p < 0.001) after infection in comparison with their controls. PMID:26344342

  5. Efficacy of particle-based DNA delivery for vaccination of sheep against FMDV.

    PubMed

    Niborski, V; Li, Y; Brennan, F; Lane, M; Torché, A M; Remond, M; Bonneau, M; Riffault, S; Stirling, C; Hutchings, G; Takamatsu, H; Barnett, P; Charley, B; Schwartz-Cornil, I

    2006-11-30

    As an alternative strategy to classical inactivated viral vaccine against FMDV, naked DNA vaccine is attractive because of safety, flexibility and low cost. However DNA vaccination is usually poorly efficient in target species. Indeed we found that naked DNA plasmids encoding for P1-2A3C3D and GM-CSF proteins did not induce any detectable immunity against FMDV in sheep. Interestingly, we demonstrate herein that formulations of DNA on poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) or in lipofectin triggered divergent types of immune responses: PLG stimulated a T cell response and could elicit significant neutralising antibody titers, whereas lipofectin generated even higher antibody titers but no significant T cell response. The DNA/PLG regimen used in five sheep protected against clinical symptoms and viraemia and prevented the carrier state in four of them. Thus formulated DNA can be remarkably efficient against FMDV in a ruminant species that is usually refractory to DNA vaccination.

  6. Short-Fragment DNA Residue from Vaccine Purification Processes Promotes Immune Response to the New Inactivated EV71 Vaccine by Upregulating TLR9 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jie; Gao, Fan; Lin, Hui-Juan; Mao, Qun-Ying; Chen, Pan; Wu, Xing; Yao, Xin; Kong, Wei; Liang, Zheng-Lun

    2016-01-01

    To reduce potential oncogenic long genomic DNA in vaccines, nuclease treatment has been applied in the purification processes. However, this action increased the residue of short-fragment DNA and its effect on vaccine potency was still elusive. In this study, we found residual sf-DNA in an inactivated EV71 vaccine could enhance humoral immune response in mice. Ag stimulation in vitro and vaccine injection in vivo revealed that TLR9 transcription level was elevated, indicating that sf-DNA could activate TLR9. These new findings will help us to understand the molecular mechanism induced by vero-cell culture-derived vaccines. PMID:27082865

  7. Short-Fragment DNA Residue from Vaccine Purification Processes Promotes Immune Response to the New Inactivated EV71 Vaccine by Upregulating TLR9 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jie; Gao, Fan; Lin, Hui-Juan; Mao, Qun-Ying; Chen, Pan; Wu, Xing; Yao, Xin; Kong, Wei; Liang, Zheng-Lun

    2016-01-01

    To reduce potential oncogenic long genomic DNA in vaccines, nuclease treatment has been applied in the purification processes. However, this action increased the residue of short-fragment DNA and its effect on vaccine potency was still elusive. In this study, we found residual sf-DNA in an inactivated EV71 vaccine could enhance humoral immune response in mice. Ag stimulation in vitro and vaccine injection in vivo revealed that TLR9 transcription level was elevated, indicating that sf-DNA could activate TLR9. These new findings will help us to understand the molecular mechanism induced by vero-cell culture-derived vaccines.

  8. DNA vaccine therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection: immune control of a moving target.

    PubMed

    Sällberg, Matti; Frelin, Lars; Weiland, Ola

    2009-07-01

    The use of DNA plasmids for DNA vaccination was first described in the early 1990 s. DNA vaccinations were successful in small animal models but in larger animals and humans problems appeared. One major obstacle, effective delivery, has been partly overcome by new delivery techniques, such as transdermal delivery with the gene gun, and in vivo electroporation. We are entering a new era of DNA vaccination, where such techniques can be tested in humans. DNA vaccination may be a useful therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. Patients with these infections have a reduced T cell response to the invading virus. The genetic variability of HCV, its immunomodulatory properties and high replication rate contribute to chronicity. By providing the correct stimulus T cells may be activated to clear the infection. The vaccination is intended to induce a coordinated immune-based attack on the continuously moving HCV target. If effective, this should help in clearing the infection.

  9. Recent patents on immunoregulatory DNA vaccines for autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Shabahang, Shahrokh; Li, Alice F; Escher, Alan

    2010-06-01

    The goal of immunoregulatory DNA vaccination is the antigen- and tissue-specific suppression of pathological inflammation that underlies immune-mediated inflammatory disorders like autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection. Recent patents and patent applications have applied immunoregulatory DNA vaccines in rodent model systems and human clinical trials using plasmid DNA coding for autoantigens such as insulin and glutamic acid decarboxylase for type 1 diabetes, myelin-associated proteins for multiple sclerosis, and heat-sock protein 60 for rheumatoid arthritis. In these cases, the objective is to induce a homeostatic-like regulatory immune response to suppress pathological inflammation. In addition, patent applications have disclosed the use of DNA vaccines encoding the pro-inflammatory MIF cytokine and the CD25 IL-2 receptor subunit to interfere with the inflammatory process. Approaches have also been taken to improve DNA vaccination efficacy, including covalent modification of plasmid DNA, engineering secretion of vaccine-encoded antigen, and co-delivery of DNA coding for anti-inflammatory cytokines, a mutant co-stimulatory molecule, a growth factor, or a pro-apoptotic protein. Furthermore, a patent application has disclosed the use of a DNA vaccine previously shown to treat successfully an autoimmune disease to prolong allograft survival. Taken together, these patents and patent applications indicate a promising bench-to-bedside potential for immunoregulatory DNA vaccination applied to autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection.

  10. Transcriptome profiles associated to VHSV infection or DNA vaccination in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Pereiro, Patricia; Dios, Sonia; Boltaña, Sebastián; Coll, Julio; Estepa, Amparo; Mackenzie, Simon; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding the viral G glycoprotein show the most successful protection capability against fish rhabdoviruses. Nowadays, the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective response remain still poorly understood. With the aim of shedding light on the protection conferred by the DNA vaccines based in the G glycoprotein of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) we have used a specific microarray highly enriched in antiviral sequences to carry out the transcriptomic study associated to VHSV DNA vaccination/infection. The differential gene expression pattern in response to empty plasmid (pMCV1.4) and DNA vaccine (pMCV1.4-G860) intramuscular administration with regard to non-stimulated turbot was analyzed in head kidney at 8, 24 and 72 hours post-vaccination. Moreover, the effect of VHSV infection one month after immunization was also analyzed in vaccinated and non-vaccinated fish at the same time points. Genes implicated in the Toll-like receptor signalling pathway, IFN inducible/regulatory proteins, numerous sequences implicated in apoptosis and cytotoxic pathways, MHC class I antigens, as well as complement and coagulation cascades among others were analyzed in the different experimental groups. Fish receiving the pMCV1.4-G860 vaccine showed transcriptomic patterns very different to the ones observed in pMCV1.4-injected turbot after 72 h. On the other hand, VHSV challenge in vaccinated and non-vaccinated turbot induced a highly different response at the transcriptome level, indicating a very relevant role of the acquired immunity in vaccinated fish able to alter the typical innate immune response profile observed in non-vaccinated individuals. This exhaustive transcriptome study will serve as a complete overview for a better understanding of the crosstalk between the innate and adaptive immune response in fish after viral infection/vaccination. Moreover, it provides interesting clues about molecules with a potential

  11. A comparative evaluation of different DNA vaccine candidates against experimental murine leishmaniasis due to L. major.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sami Ben Hadj; Bahloul, Chokri; Robbana, Cyrine; Askri, Souhir; Dellagi, Koussay

    2004-04-16

    Over the past few years, several reports of DNA vaccines against murine cutaneous experimental leishmaniasis came out with promising but sometimes discordant results. The present studies were designed to compare, under similar conditions, the protective effects in the highly susceptible BALB/c mice of DNA vaccine candidates encoding to various Leishmania major antigens. The candidate DNA vaccines encode to the following antigens: LACK, PSA2, Gp63, LeIF and two newly identified p20 and Ribosomal like protein, in addition to different truncated portions of the LACK antigen. The most promising gene was LACK and it is more protective when it is used as a p24 truncated form. Furthermore, the presence of a tandem repeats of immunostimulating sequences (ISS) in the plasmid backbone played an important adjuvant effect in the observed protective effect induced by the DNA vaccine encoding to the LACKp24. Nevertheless, neither of the DNA vaccine candidates was able to mount a full protection in BALB/c mice challenged with a highly virulent L. major strain. Further improvements of the DNA vaccination approach are still needed to design a fully protective vaccine against leishmaniasis. Three directions of investigations are currently explored: DNA vaccines using a cocktail of antigens; Prime/Boost approach; and association of immune modulators with the candidate antigens.

  12. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a vaxfectin-adjuvanted tetravalent dengue DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kevin R; Ewing, Daniel; Chen, Lan; Wu, Shuenn-Jue; Hayes, Curtis G; Ferrari, Marilyn; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa; Raviprakash, Kanakatte

    2012-01-05

    A prototype dengue-1 DNA vaccine was shown to be safe and immunogenic in a previous Phase 1 clinical trial. Anti-dengue-1 neutralizing antibody responses were detectable only in the group of volunteers receiving the high dose of nonadjuvanted vaccine and the antibody titers were low. Vaxfectin(®), a lipid-based adjuvant, enhances the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. We conducted a nonhuman primate study to evaluate the effect of Vaxfectin(®) on the immunogenicity of a tetravalent dengue DNA vaccine. Animals were immunized on days 0, 28 and 84, with each immunization consisting of 3mg of Vaxfectin(®)-adjuvanted tetravalent dengue DNA vaccine. The use of Vaxfectin(®) resulted in a significant increase in anti-dengue neutralizing antibody responses against dengue-1, -3 and -4. There was little to no effect on T cell responses as measured by interferon gamma ELISPOT assay. Animals immunized with the Vaxfectin(®)-formulated tetravalent DNA vaccine showed significant protection against live dengue-2 virus challenge compared to control animals (0.75 mean days of viremia vs 3.3 days). Animals vaccinated with nonadjuvanted DNA had a mean 2.0 days of viremia. These results support further evaluation of the Vaxfectin(®)-adjuvanted tetravalent dengue DNA vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial.

  13. Gene gun administration of therapeutic HPV DNA vaccination restores the efficacy of prolonged defrosted viral based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Tao; Yen, Chih-Feng; Shaw, Sheng-Wen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Yin-Ju; Soong, Yung-Kuei; Lai, Chyong-Huey

    2009-12-09

    Freshly defrosted vaccines generate promising antitumor immunity by raising both robust CD8 and CD4 responses with a TC1/Th1-dominant cytokine profile. However, prolonged (overnight) defrosted Sindbis virus-E7/HSP70 priming and Vaccinia-E7/HSP70 booster in mouse model only elicited 20% long-term tumor-free survival in comparison with the fresh vaccines. The present study is to search the possible cause of its potency loss, and to evaluate the ability of pcDNA-E7/HSP70 DNA vaccination via gene gun in restoring the efficacy of E7-specific immune responses and antitumor properties. We used prolonged defrosted SINrep5-E7/HSP70 prime and defrosted Vac-E7/HSP70 boost subcutaneously, and administered intradermally cluster (3-day interval) gene gun plasmid E7-HSP70DNA vaccine twice, and evaluated its ability to generate antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell responses using flow cytometry as well as antitumor responses using animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging. The prolonged defrosted vaccines showed a significant reduction in the infectivity and a significant decrease of CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells immune responses. Administration of cluster gene gun plasmid E7-HSP70DNA twice was also found to lead to restoration of immunity that elicits a full recovery of the antitumor efficacy of the prolonged defrosted vaccines. Our study suggested that adding cluster gene gun plasmid E7-HSP70DNA vaccine twice offered a simple solution in restoring the efficacy of the prime-boost vaccination with viral vectors and has potentially significant clinical applications.

  14. Electroporation-mediated administration of candidate DNA vaccines against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Vasan, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines to prevent HIV remain desperately needed, but a number of challenges, including retroviral integration, establishment of anatomic reservoir sites, high sequence diversity, and heavy envelope glycosylation. have precluded development of a highly effective vaccine. DNA vaccines have been utilized as candidate HIV vaccines because of their ability to generate cellular and humoral immune responses, the lack of anti-vector response allowing for repeat administration, and their ability to prime the response to viral-vectored vaccines. Because the HIV epidemic has disproportionately affected the developing world, the favorable thermostability profile and relative ease and low cost of manufacture of DNA vaccines offer additional advantages. In vivo electroporation (EP) has been utilized to improve immune responses to DNA vaccines as candidate HIV-1 vaccines in standalone or prime-boost regimens with both proteins and viral-vectored vaccines in several animal models and, more recently, in human clinical trials. This chapter describes the preclinical and clinical development of candidate DNA vaccines for HIV-1 delivered by EP, including challenges to bringing this technology to the developing world.

  15. Immunogenic and protective effects of an oral DNA vaccine against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in fish.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, Ana I; Rodríguez Saint-Jean, S; Pérez-Prieto, Sara I

    2010-04-01

    DNA vaccines and oral DNA-based immunotherapy against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) have scarcely been studied in salmonid fish. Here, a vector with the capsid VP2 gene inserted was encapsulated in alginate microspheres to avoid the aggressive gastrointestinal conditions experienced following oral administration. Alginate microspheres were effective to protect the pDNA encoding VP2, which was expressed early in different organs of the vaccinated trout and that persisted for at least 60 days. The vaccine induces innate immune responses, raising the expression of IFN more than 10-fold relative to the fish vaccinated with the empty plasmid, at 7 and 15 days post-vaccination. Likewise, maximal expression of the IFN-induced antiviral Mx protein was recorded 15 days post-vaccination and neutralizing antibodies were also detected after 15 days, although their titre rose further at 21 days post-vaccination. Protection was high in the immunized fish, which showed around an 80% relative survival when challenged 15 and 30 days after vaccine delivery. Very low viral load with respect to the control group was detected in the vaccinated fish that survived 45 days after challenge. Thus, this study demonstrates the potential of the encapsulation technique for IPNV-DNA vaccine delivery and the relevance of the IPNV-VP2 gene for future plasmid constructs.

  16. A novel DNA vaccine containing four mimicry epitopes for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Wu, Kaichun; Guo, Changcun; Liu, Changjiang; Han, Shuang; Lin, Tao; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Shi, Rui; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Daiming

    2005-03-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. This paper focuses on the development of a DNA vaccine containing four mimotopes of MG7Ag for gastric cancer (multi-epitope vaccine). By inoculating BALB/c mice, the vaccine was characterized and compared with a similar vaccine containing only one mimotope (mono-epitope vaccine) and other controls. Cellular ELISA indicated that serum titer of antibody against MG7Ag was significantly higher in mice immunized with the multi-epitope vaccine than that in the group immunized with the mono-epitope vaccine (0.8627 vs 0.6754, P < 0.05). And ELISPOT assay showed that the number of INF-gamma spots induced by multi-epitope vaccine was significantly larger than that of the group immunized with mono-epitope vaccine(93.3 vs 70.7, P < 0.05). Two weeks after tumor challenge, the weight of tumor in each mouse was evaluated, and the tumor masses formed in the mice immunized with multi-epitope vaccine were markedly smaller than those formed in the mice immunized with mono-epitope vaccine. These studies demonstrated that both humoral and cellular response were induced by the two vaccines and the efficiency of multi-epitope vaccine is stronger than that of the mono-epitope vaccine.

  17. Immunogenicity of Virus Like Particle Forming Baculoviral DNA Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Yong-Dae; Kim, Sehyun; Cho, Yeondong; Heo, Yoonki; Cho, Hansam; Park, Kihoon; Lee, Hee-Jung; Choi, Jiwon; Poo, Haryoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza H1N1 in 2009, representing the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century, was transmitted to over a million individuals and claimed 18,449 lives. The current status in many countries is to prepare influenza vaccine using cell-based or egg-based killed vaccine. However, traditional influenza vaccine platforms have several limitations. To overcome these limitations, many researchers have tried various approaches to develop alternative production platforms. One of the alternative approach, we reported the efficacy of influenza HA vaccination using a baculoviral DNA vaccine (AcHERV-HA). However, the immune response elicited by the AcHERV-HA vaccine, which only targets the HA antigen, was lower than that of the commercial killed vaccine. To overcome the limitations of this previous vaccine, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, baculovirus-based, virus-like-particle (VLP)–forming DNA vaccine (termed AcHERV-VLP) against pandemic influenza A/California/04/2009 (pH1N1). BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-VLP (1×107 FFU AcHERV-VLP, i.m.) and compared with mice immunized with the killed vaccine or mice immunized with AcHERV-HA. As a result, AcHERV-VLP immunization produced a greater humoral immune response and exhibited neutralizing activity with an intrasubgroup H1 strain (PR8), elicited neutralizing antibody production, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in splenocytes, and diminished virus shedding in the lung after challenge with a lethal dose of influenza virus. In conclusion, VLP-forming baculovirus DNA vaccine could be a potential vaccine candidate capable of efficiently delivering DNA to the vaccinee and VLP forming DNA eliciting stronger immunogenicity than egg-based killed vaccines. PMID:27149064

  18. DNA vaccination of bison to brucellar antigens elicits elevated antibody and IFN-γ responses.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Beata; Walters, Nancy; Thornburg, Theresa; Hoyt, Teri; Yang, Xinghong; Pascual, David W

    2011-07-01

    Brucella abortus remains a threat to the health and well-being of livestock in states bordering the Greater Yellowstone Area. During the past several years, cohabitation of infected wildlife with cattle has jeopardized the brucellosis-free status of Idaho, USA; Wyoming, USA; and Montana, USA. Current livestock B. abortus vaccines have not proven to be efficacious in bison (Bison bison) or elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni). One problem with the lack of vaccine efficacy may stem from the failure to understand wildlife immune responses to vaccines. In an attempt to understand their immune responses, bison were vaccinated with eukaryotic DNA expression vectors encoding the Brucella periplasmic protein, bp26, and the chaperone protein, trigger factor (TF). These DNA vaccines have previously been shown to be protective against Brucella infection in mice. Bison were immunized intramuscularly at weeks 0, 2, and 4 with bp26 and TF DNA vaccines plus CpG adjuvant or empty vector (control) plus CpG. Blood samples were collected before vaccination and at 8, 10, and 12 wk after primary vaccination. The results showed that bison immunized with bp26 and TF DNA vaccines developed enhanced antibody, proliferative T cell, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses upon in vitro restimulation with purified recombinant bp26 or TF antigens, unlike bison immunized with empty vector. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes from the DNA-vaccinated groups were significantly greater than they were for those bison given empty vector. These data suggest that DNA vaccination of bison may elicit strong cellular immune responses and serve as an alternative for vaccination of bison for brucellosis.

  19. Antigen Targeting to Human HLA Class II Molecules Increases Efficacy of DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Løset, Geir Åge; Vikse, Elisabeth; Fugger, Lars

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to translate promising results from DNA vaccination in mice to larger animals and humans. Previously, DNA vaccines encoding proteins that target Ag to MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on APCs have been shown to induce rapid, enhanced, and long-lasting Ag-specific Ab titers in mice. In this study, we describe two novel DNA vaccines that as proteins target HLA class II (HLA-II) molecules. These vaccine proteins cross-react with MHC-II molecules in several species of larger mammals. When tested in ferrets and pigs, a single DNA delivery with low doses of the HLA-II–targeted vaccines resulted in rapid and increased Ab responses. Importantly, painless intradermal jet delivery of DNA was as effective as delivery by needle injection followed by electroporation. As an indication that the vaccines could also be useful for human application, HLA-II–targeted vaccine proteins were found to increase human CD4+ T cell responses by a factor of ×103 in vitro. Thus, targeting of Ag to MHC-II molecules may represent an attractive strategy for increasing efficacy of DNA vaccines in larger animals and humans. PMID:27671110

  20. From plasmids to protection: a review of DNA vaccines against infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Laddy, Dominick J; Weiner, David B

    2006-01-01

    The field of DNA vaccine development began over 16 years ago with the observation that plasmid DNA could be injected into and expressed in vivo and drive adaptive immune responses. Since then, there has been great interest in developing this technology to create a new generation of vaccines with the ability to elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses from an inherently innocuous injection. However, DNA vaccines have yet to proceed past phase I/II clinical trials in humans--primarily due to a desire to induce more potent immune responses. This review will examine how DNA vaccines function to induce an immune response and how this information might be useful in future vaccine design.

  1. Efficacy of DNA vaccines expressing the type F botulinum toxin Hc fragment using different promoters.

    PubMed

    Jathoul, Amit P; Holley, Jane L; Garmory, Helen S

    2004-09-28

    DNA vaccines which expressed the Hc fragment of the Clostridium botulinum type F neurotoxin (BoNT/F Hc) fused to a signal peptide downstream of four different eukaryotic promoters were prepared. Subsequently, the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccines and protection afforded in mice against challenge with 10(4) MLD of type F botulinum toxin was evaluated. The DNA vaccine containing the human ubiquitin gene (UbC) promoter induced the highest BoNT/F Hc-specific antibody concentration following two intramuscular immunisations and afforded 90% protection against challenge. The results from this study indicate that the selection of promoter used in DNA vaccination studies may be of importance in designing optimised vaccines.

  2. Chicken HSP70 DNA vaccine inhibits tumor growth in a canine cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Ying; Chuang, Tien-Fu; Guichard, Cécile; El-Garch, Hanane; Tierny, Dominique; Laio, Albert Taiching; Lin, Ching-Si; Chiou, Kuo-Hao; Tsai, Cheng-Long; Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Li, Wen-Chiuan; Fischer, Laurent; Chu, Rea-Min

    2011-04-18

    Immunization with xenogeneic DNA is a promising cancer treatment to overcome tolerance to self-antigens. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is over-expressed in various kinds of tumors and is believed to be involved in tumor progression. This study tested a xenogeneic chicken HSP70 (chHSP70) DNA vaccine in an experimental canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) model. Three vaccination strategies were compared: the first (PE) was designed to evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of chHSP70 DNA vaccination by delivering the vaccine before tumor inoculation in a prime boost setting, the second (T) was designed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the same prime boost vaccine by vaccinating the dogs after tumor inoculation; the third (PT) was similar to the first strategy (PE), with the exception that the electroporation booster injection was replaced with a transdermal needle-free injection. Tumor growth was notably inhibited only in the PE dogs, in which the vaccination program triggered tumor regression significantly sooner than in control dogs (NT). The CD4(+) subpopulation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and canine HSP70 (caHSP70)-specific IFN-γ-secreting lymphocytes were significantly increased during tumor regression in the PE dogs as compared to control dogs, demonstrating that specific tolerance to caHSP70 has been overcome. In contrast, no benefit of the therapeutic strategy (T) could be noticed and the (PT) strategy only led to partial control of tumor growth. In summary, antitumor prophylactic activity was demonstrated using the chHSP70 DNA vaccine including a boost via electroporation. Our data stressed the importance of DNA electroporation as a booster to get the full benefit of DNA vaccination but also of cancer immunotherapy initiation as early as possible. Xenogeneic chHSP70 DNA vaccination including an electroporation boost is a potential vaccine to HSP70-expressing tumors, although further research is still required to better understand true

  3. A DNA vaccine targeting the receptor-binding domain of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, David F; Rosenberg, Talia; Zaharatos, Jerry; Franco, David; Ho, David D

    2009-06-02

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogen with increasing severity for which host antibody responses provide protection from disease. DNA vaccination has several advantages compared to traditional vaccine methods, however no study has examined this platform against C. difficile toxins. A synthetic gene was created encoding the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of C. difficile toxin A, optimized for expression in human cells. Gene expression was examined in vitro. Mice were inoculated and then challenged with parenteral toxin A. Vaccination provided high titer antibodies and protected mice from death. This represents the first report of DNA vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies to C. difficile toxin A.

  4. Growth and performance of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., following administration of a rhabdovirus DNA vaccine alone or concurrently with an oil-adjuvanted, polyvalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Skinner, L A; Schulte, P M; LaPatra, S E; Balfry, S K; McKinley, R S

    2008-09-01

    This research demonstrates for the first time an absence of growth-related side effects in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., following the injection of a DNA vaccine alone or concurrently with a commercially available, polyvalent, oil-adjuvanted vaccine. Using weight and specific growth rate measurements, individually tagged Atlantic salmon were monitored for 2028 degree days (dd) post-vaccination. During this time, DNA-vaccinated fish did not differ in weight, length, condition factor or specific growth rate compared to unvaccinated control fish. While differences in weight were observed between unvaccinated control and concurrently vaccinated fish, there were no significant differences in weight, length, condition factor or specific growth rate between concurrently vaccinated fish and adjuvant-vaccinated fish, suggesting that only adjuvant vaccination affected growth. To further determine if concurrent injection of a DNA vaccine and a polyvalent, oil-adjuvanted vaccine had a physiological impact on the Atlantic salmon, swimming performance tests were performed at 106 dd post-vaccination with U(crit,1), U(crit,2), the U(crit) recovery ratio (RR) and the normalized RR being similar to values obtained from unvaccinated control fish. In summary, this study shows that concurrent injection of a DNA vaccine and a polyvalent, oil-adjuvanted vaccine does not negatively influence the growth or swimming performance of Atlantic salmon compared to adjuvant vaccination alone.

  5. A novel non-integrative single-cycle chimeric HIV lentivector DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Maha; Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Manoylov, Iliyan; Malogolovkin, Alexander; Mompelat, Dimitri; Ishimwe, Honorine; Smaoune, Amel; Ouzrout, Bilel; Gagnon, Jean; Chebloune, Yahia

    2015-05-05

    Novel HIV vaccine vectors and strategies are needed to control HIV/AIDS epidemic in humans and eradicate the infection. DNA vaccines alone failed to induce immune responses robust enough to control HIV-1. Development of lentivirus-based DNA vaccines deficient for integration and with a limited replication capacity is an innovative and promising approach. This type of vaccine mimics the early stages of virus infection/replication like the live-attenuated viruses but lacks the inconvenient integration and persistence associated with disease. We developed a novel lentivector DNA vaccine "CAL-SHIV-IN(-)" that undergoes a single round of replication in the absence of integration resulting in augmented expression of vaccine antigens in vivo. Vaccine gene expression is under control of the LTRs of a naturally attenuated lentivirus, Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) the natural goat lentivirus. The safety of this vaccine prototype was increased by the removal of the integrase coding sequences from the pol gene. We examined the functional properties of this lentivector DNA in cell culture and the immunogenicity in mouse models. Viral proteins were expressed in transfected cells, assembled into viral particles that were able to transduce once target permissive cells. Unlike the parental replication-competent SHIV-KU2 that was detected in DNA samples from any of the serial passage infected cells, CAL-SHIV-IN(-) DNA was detected only in target cells of the first round of infection, hence demonstrating the single cycle replication of the vaccine. A single dose DNA immunization of humanized NOD/SCID/β2 mice showed a substantial increase of IFN-γ-ELISPOT in splenocytes compared to the former replication and integration defective Δ4SHIV-KU2 DNA vaccine.

  6. Comprehensive gene expression profiling following DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Nichols, Krista M.; Winton, James R.; Kurath, Gael; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler, Paul; Hansen, John D.; Herwig, Russell P.; Park, Linda K.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine based on the glycoprotein gene of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus induces a non-specific anti-viral immune response and long-term specific immunity against IHNV. This study characterized gene expression responses associated with the early anti-viral response. Homozygous rainbow trout were injected intra-muscularly (I.M.) with vector DNA or the IHNV DNA vaccine. Gene expression in muscle tissue (I.M. site) was evaluated using a 16,008 feature salmon cDNA microarray. Eighty different genes were significantly modulated in the vector DNA group while 910 genes were modulated in the IHNV DNA vaccinate group relative to control group. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to examine expression of selected immune genes at the I.M. site and in other secondary tissues. In the localized response (I.M. site), the magnitudes of gene expression changes were much greater in the vaccinate group relative to the vector DNA group for the majority of genes analyzed. At secondary systemic sites (e.g. gill, kidney and spleen), type I IFN-related genes were up-regulated in only the IHNV DNA vaccinated group. The results presented here suggest that the IHNV DNA vaccine induces up-regulation of the type I IFN system across multiple tissues, which is the functional basis of early anti-viral immunity.

  7. Protective immunity of grass carp immunized with DNA vaccine against Aeromonas hydrophila by using carbon nanotubes as a carrier molecule.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Gong, Yu-Xin; Liu, Guang-Lu; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2016-08-01

    To reduce the economic losses caused by diseases in aquaculture industry, more efficient and economic prophylactic measures should be urgently investigated. In this research, the effects of a novel functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) applied as a delivery vehicle for DNA vaccine administration in juvenile grass carp against Aeromonas hydrophila were studied. Our results showed that SWCNTs loaded with DNA vaccine induced a better protection to juvenile grass carp against A. hydrophila. Moreover, SWCNTs conjugated with DNA vaccine provided significantly protective immunity compared with free DNA vaccine. Thereby, SWCNTs may be considered as a potential efficient DNA vaccine carrier to enhance the immunological activity.

  8. DNA Vaccination in the Skin Using Microneedles Improves Protection Against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Min; Kim, Yeu-Chun; O, Eunju; Compans, Richard W; Prausnitz, Mark R; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA vaccination in the skin using microneedles improves protective immunity compared to conventional intramuscular (IM) injection of a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding the influenza hemagglutinin (HA). In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrated the expression of a reporter gene delivered to the skin using a solid microneedle patch coated with plasmid DNA. Vaccination at a low dose (3 µg HA DNA) using microneedles generated significantly stronger humoral immune responses and better protective responses post-challenge compared to IM vaccination at either low or high (10 µg HA DNA) dose. Vaccination using microneedles at a high (10 µg) dose further generated improved post-challenge protection, as measured by survival, recall antibody-secreting cell responses in spleen and bone marrow, and interferon (IFN)-γ cytokine T-cell responses. This study demonstrates that DNA vaccination in the skin using microneedles induces higher humoral and cellular immune responses as well as improves protective immunity compared to conventional IM injection of HA DNA vaccine. PMID:22508490

  9. Functional evaluation of malaria Pfs25 DNA vaccine by in vivo electroporation in olive baboons.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nyakundi, Ruth; Kariuki, Thomas; Ozwara, Hastings; Nyamongo, Onkoba; Mlambo, Godfree; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2013-06-28

    Plasmodium falciparum Pfs25 antigen, expressed on the surface of zygotes and ookinetes, is one of the leading targets for the development of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV). Our laboratory has been evaluating DNA plasmid based Pfs25 vaccine in mice and non-human primates. Previously, we established that in vivo electroporation (EP) delivery is an effective method to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine encoding Pfs25 in mice. In order to optimize the in vivo EP procedure and test for its efficacy in more clinically relevant larger animal models, we employed in vivo EP to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy of Pfs25 encoding DNA vaccine in nonhuman primates (olive baboons, Papio anubis). The results showed that at a dose of 2.5mg DNA vaccine, antibody responses were significantly enhanced with EP as compared to without EP resulting in effective transmission blocking efficiency. Similar immunogenicity enhancing effect of EP was also observed with lower doses (0.5mg and 1mg) of DNA plasmids. Further, final boosting with a single dose of recombinant Pfs25 protein resulted in dramatically enhanced antibody titers and significantly increased functional transmission blocking efficiency. Our study suggests priming with DNA vaccine via EP along with protein boost regimen as an effective method to elicit potent immunogenicity of malaria DNA vaccines in nonhuman primates and provides the basis for further evaluation in human volunteers.

  10. An active DNA vaccine against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) with a different mode of action than fish rhabdovirus DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, A; Chaves-Pozo, E; de Las Heras, A I; Saint-Jean, S Rodríguez; Pérez-Prieto, S; Tafalla, C

    2010-04-26

    Although there are some commercial vaccines available against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), the disease still continues to be a major problem for aquaculture development worldwide. In the current work, we constructed a DNA vaccine against IPNV (pIPNV-PP) by cloning the long open reading frame of the polyprotein encoded by the viral RNA segment A. In vitro, the vaccine is properly translated giving the functional IPNV polyprotein since preVP2, VP2 and VP3 proteins were detected because of the VP4-protease cleavage. EPC cells transfected with the vaccine plasmid expressed the viral proteins and induced the expression of type I interferon (IFN)-induced Mx genes. Furthermore, IPNV synthesized proteins seemed to assemble in virus-like particles as evidenced by electron microscopy. In vivo, rainbow trout specimens were intramuscularly injected with the vaccine and expression of immune-relevant genes, the presence of neutralizing antibodies and effect on viral load was determined. The pIPNV-PP vaccine was expressed at the injection site and up-regulated MHC Ialpha, MHC IIalpha, type-I interferon (IFN), Mx, CD4 and CD8alpha gene expression in the muscle, head kidney or spleen, although to a much lower extent than the up-regulations observed in response to an effective DNA vaccine against viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). However, the IPNV vaccine was also very effective in terms of acquired immunity since it elicited neutralizing antibodies (in 6 out of 8 trout fingerlings) and decreased 665-fold the viral load after IPNV infection. The effectiveness of this new IPNV DNA vaccine and its possible mechanism of action are discussed and compared to other viral vaccines.

  11. Can VHS Virus Bypass the Protective Immunity Induced by DNA Vaccination in Rainbow Trout?

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus to serum neutralization, suggesting that the passaging did not promote the selection of virus populations able to bypass the neutralization by serum antibodies. Also, in the in vivo approach, where virus was passaged several times in vaccinated fish, no increased virulence nor increased persistence in vaccinated fish was observed in comparison with the parental virus. However, some of the vaccinated fish did get infected and could transmit the infection to naïve cohabitant fish. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine induced a robust protection, but also that the immunity was non-sterile. It is consequently important not to consider vaccinated fish as virus free in veterinary terms. PMID:27054895

  12. Evaluation in macaques of HIV-1 DNA vaccines containing primate CpG motifs and fowlpoxvirus vaccines co-expressing IFNgamma or IL-12.

    PubMed

    Dale, C Jane; De Rose, Robert; Wilson, Kim M; Croom, Hayley A; Thomson, Scott; Coupar, Barbara E H; Ramsay, Alistair; Purcell, Damian F J; Ffrench, Rosemary; Law, Matthew; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David A; Ramshaw, Ian A; Boyle, David B; Kent, Stephen J

    2004-11-25

    Induction of HIV-specific T-cell responses by vaccines may facilitate efficient control of HIV. Plasmid DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpoxvirus (rFPV) vaccines are promising HIV-1 vaccine candidates, although either vaccine alone may be insufficient to protect against HIV-1. A consecutive immunisation strategy involving priming with DNA and boosting with rFPV vaccines encoding multiple common HIV-1 antigens was further evaluated in 30 macaques. The DNA vaccine vector included CpG immunostimulatory molecules, and rFPV vaccines were compared with rFPV vaccines co-expressing the pro-T cell cytokines IFNgamma or IL-12. Vaccines expressed multiple HIV-1 genes, mutated to remove active sites of the HIV proteins. The vaccines were well tolerated, and a significant enhancement of DNA-vaccine primed HIV-1 specific T lymphocyte responses was observed following rFPV boosting. Co-expression of IFNgamma or IL-12 by the rFPV vaccines did not further enhance immune responses. Non-sterilising protection from a non-pathogenic HIV-1 challenge was observed. This study provides evidence of a safe, optimised, strategy for the generation of T-cell mediated immunity to HIV-1.

  13. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of mycobacterial DNA vaccines incorporating plasmid-encoded cytokines against Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Young, Sarah L; Slobbe, Lynn J; Peacey, Matthew; Gilbert, Sarah C; Buddle, Bryce M; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Buchan, Glenn S

    2010-08-01

    DNA-based vaccines, alone or in combination with other sub-unit vaccination regimes, represent an alternative to live mycobacterial vaccines for protective immunization against tuberculosis. Here, we have used a murine immunization or Mycobacterium bovis aerosol challenge model to assess the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of mycobacterial DNA vaccines. Mice that received immunization with DNA constructs encoding M. bovis antigen 85A (Ag85-A) and arget(ESAT-6) produced measurable interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses to CD4(+) T-cell epitope-peptide recall antigens in vitro. The magnitude of these responses was enhanced by co-delivery of a construct encoding murine cytokines (macrophage inhibitory protein (MIP)-1 alpha or interleukin(IL)-7), although they did not the match responses observed in mice that received Bacille Calmette-Guerin(BCG) immunisation. In contrast, DNA priming followed by boosting with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccine (expressing M. tuberculosis Ag85-A) invoked higher IFN-gamma levels, with the most immunogenic regime of Ag85 or ESAT or IL-7 prime followed by MVA boost being of commensurate immunogenicity to BCG. Despite this, neither DNA alone nor DNA-prime or MVA boost regimes conferred measurable protection against aerosol challenge with virulent M. bovis. These data highlight both the promise and the shortcomings of new generation subunit tuberculosis vaccines, with particular emphasis on their potential as vaccines against M. bovis.

  14. DNA vaccination for prostate cancer, from preclinical to clinical trials - where we stand?

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sarfraz; Sweeney, Paul; Sullivan, Gerald C; Tangney, Mark

    2012-10-09

    Development of various vaccines for prostate cancer (PCa) is becoming an active research area. PCa vaccines are perceived to have less toxicity compared with the available cytotoxic agents. While various immune-based strategies can elicit anti-tumour responses, DNA vaccines present increased efficacy, inducing both humoural and cellular immunity. This immune activation has been proven effective in animal models and initial clinical trials are encouraging. However, to validate the role of DNA vaccination in currently available PCa management paradigms, strong clinical evidence is still lacking. This article provides an overview of the basic principles of DNA vaccines and aims to provide a summary of preclinical and clinical trials outlining the benefits of this immunotherapy in the management of PCa.

  15. DNA Vaccine for West Nile Virus Infection in Fish Crows (Corvus ossifragus)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    SUBJECT TERMS west Nile virus, vaccine, efficacy , crows 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 5 19a...crows, Emerging Infectious Diseases • Vol. 9, No. 9, September 2003 1079 RESEARCH Table 1. Effect of route of administration of a DNA West Nile virus...zoologic parks indicate the need to develop an effective avian vaccine for WNV. To break the transmis- sion cycle, the vaccine must be able to

  16. Gold nanocluster-based vaccines for dual-delivery of antigens and immunostimulatory oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yu; Zhang, Yan; Ju, Enguo; Ren, Hui; Ren, Jinsong

    2015-07-01

    We here report a facile one-pot synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) via the peptide biomineralization method, which can elicit specific immunological responses. The as-prepared peptide-protected AuNCs (peptide-AuNCs) display strong red fluorescence, and more importantly, as compared to the peptide alone, the immune stimulatory ability of the resulting peptide-AuNCs can not only be retained, but can also be efficaciously enhanced. Moreover, through a dual-delivery of antigen peptides and cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), the as-prepared peptide-AuNC-CpG conjugates can also act as smart self-vaccines to assist in the generation of high immunostimulatory activity, and be applied as a probe for intracellular imaging. Both in vitro and in vivo studies provide strong evidence that the AuNC-based vaccines may be utilized as safe and efficient immunostimulatory agents that are able to prevent and/or treat a variety of ailments.We here report a facile one-pot synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) via the peptide biomineralization method, which can elicit specific immunological responses. The as-prepared peptide-protected AuNCs (peptide-AuNCs) display strong red fluorescence, and more importantly, as compared to the peptide alone, the immune stimulatory ability of the resulting peptide-AuNCs can not only be retained, but can also be efficaciously enhanced. Moreover, through a dual-delivery of antigen peptides and cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), the as-prepared peptide-AuNC-CpG conjugates can also act as smart self-vaccines to assist in the generation of high immunostimulatory activity, and be applied as a probe for intracellular imaging. Both in vitro and in vivo studies provide strong evidence that the AuNC-based vaccines may be utilized as safe and efficient immunostimulatory agents that are able to prevent and/or treat a variety of ailments. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  17. Dual infection of chickens with pox and infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) confirmed with specific pox and ILT DNA dot-blot hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Fatunmbi, O O; Reed, W M; Schwartz, D L; Tripathy, D N

    1995-01-01

    Dual infection with fowl pox (FP) and infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) was diagnosed as the cause of acute mortality in a flock of three age groups of Hy-Line leghorn layers. The affected chickens had not been previously vaccinated against either FP or ILT. The diagnosis was confirmed by virus isolation, histopathology, and the use of specific pox and ILT genomic DNA probes in a dot-blot hybridization assay. FP and ILT vaccinations were recommended to control mortality. The use of FP- and ILT-specific DNA dot-blot hybridization may be used as a routine diagnostic tool to differentiate between the two diseases, especially in atypical cases of either infection or to confirm the existence of the two diseases as a mixed infection in a flock of chickens.

  18. Preparation, characterization, and in ovo vaccination of dextran-spermine nanoparticle DNA vaccine coexpressing the fusion and hemagglutinin genes against Newcastle disease.

    PubMed

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Seyed Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Webster, Thomas J; Ideris, Aini

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines have emerged as effective subunit vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. In this study, a DNA vaccine, namely plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F, was applied in ovo against Newcastle disease (ND). Vaccination was carried out using the DNA vaccine alone or as a mixture of the pDNA and dextran-spermine (D-SPM), a nanoparticle used for pDNA delivery. The results showed that in ovo vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone induced high levels of antibody titer (P<0.05) in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens at 3 and 4 weeks postvaccination compared to 2 weeks postvaccination. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer was not significantly different between groups injected with 40 μg pDNA + 64 μg D-SPM and 40 μg pDNA at 4 weeks postvaccination (P>0.05). Higher antibody titer was observed in the group immunized with 40 μg pDNA/egg at 4 weeks postvaccination. The findings also showed that vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone was able to confer protection against Newcastle disease virus strain NDIBS002 in two out of seven SPF chickens. Although the chickens produced antibody titers 3 weeks after in ovo vaccination, it was not sufficient to provide complete protection to the chickens from lethal viral challenge. In addition, vaccination with pDNA/D-SPM complex did not induce high antibody titer when compared with naked pDNA. Therefore, it was concluded that DNA vaccination with plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F can be suitable for in ovo application against ND, whereas D-SPM is not recommended for in ovo gene delivery.

  19. Distribution and expression in vitro and in vivo of DNA vaccine against lymphocystis disease virus in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fengrong; Sun, Xiuqin; Liu, Hongzhan; Wu, Xingan; Zhong, Nan; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Guodong

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocystis disease, caused by the lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV), is a significant worldwide problem in fish industry causing substantial economic losses. In this study, we aimed to develop the DNA vaccine against LCDV, using DNA vaccination technology. We evaluated plasmid pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3 kb as a DNA vaccine candidate. The plasmid DNA was transiently expressed after liposome transfection into the eukaryotic COS 7 cell line. The distribution and expression of the DNA vaccine (pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3kb) were also analyzed in tissues of the vaccinated Japanese flounder by PCR, RT-PCR and fluorescent microscopy. Results from PCR analysis indicated that the vaccine-containing plasmids were distributed in injected muscle, the muscle opposite the injection site, the hind intestine, gill, spleen, head, kidney and liver, 6 and 25 days after vaccination. The vaccine plasmids disappeared 100 d post-vaccination. Fluorescent microscopy revealed green fluorescence in the injected muscle, the muscle opposite the injection site, the hind intestine, gill, spleen, head, kidney and liver of fish 48 h post-vaccination, green fluorescence did not appear in the control treated tissue. Green fluorescence became weak at 60 days post-vaccination. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the mcp gene was expressed in all tested tissues of vaccinated fish 6-50 days post-vaccination. These results demonstrate that the antigen encoded by the DNA vaccine is distributed and expressed in all of the tissues analyzed in the vaccinated fish. The antigen would therefore potentially initiate a specific immune response. the plasmid DNA was injected into Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) intramuscularly and antibodies against LCDV were evaluated. The results indicate that the plasmid encoded DNA vaccine could induce an immune response to LCDV and would therefore offer immune protection against LCD. Further studies are required for the development and application of this promising DNA vaccine.

  20. Use of DNA and recombinant canarypox viral (ALVAC) vectors for equine herpes virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Minke, J M; Fischer, L; Baudu, Ph; Guigal, P M; Sindle, T; Mumford, J A; Audonnet, J C

    2006-05-15

    In this study, experimental canarypox virus (ALVAC) and plasmid DNA recombinant vaccines expressing the gB, gC and gD glycoproteins of EHV-1 were assessed for their ability to protect conventional ponies against a respiratory challenge with EHV-1. In addition, potential means of enhancing serological responses in horses to ALVAC and DNA vaccination were explored. These included co-administration of the antigen with conventional adjuvants, complexation with DMRIE-DOPE and co-expression of the antigen along with equine GM-CSF. Groups of EHV primed ponies were vaccinated twice intra-muscularly with one dose of the appropriate test vaccine at an interval of 5 weeks. Two to 3 weeks after the second vaccination, ponies were infected intra-nasally with the virulent Ab4 strain of EHV-1 after which they were observed clinically and sampled for virological investigations. The results demonstrated that DNA and ALVAC vaccination markedly reduced virus excretion after challenge in terms of duration and magnitude, but failed to protect against cell-associated viremia. Noteworthy was the almost complete absence of virus excretion in the group of ponies vaccinated with ALVAC-EHV in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant or DNA plasmid formulated with aluminium phosphate. The administration of the DNA vaccine in the presence of GM-CSF and formulated in DMRIE-DOPE and of the ALVAC vaccine in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant significantly improved virus neutralising antibody responses to EHV-1. These findings indicate that DNA and ALVAC vaccination is a promising approach for the immunological control of EHV-1 infection, but that more research is needed to identify the immunodominant protective antigens of EHV-1 and their interaction with the equine immune system.

  1. Development of avian influenza virus H5 DNA vaccine and MDP-1 gene of Mycobacterium bovis as genetic adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that DNA vaccines can induce protective immunity, which demonstrated the high potential of DNA vaccines as an alternative to inactivated vaccines. Vaccines are frequently formulated with adjuvants to improve their release, delivery and presentation to the host immune system. Methods The H5 gene of H5N1 virus (A/Ck/Malaysia/5858/04) was cloned separately into pcDNA3.1 + vector. The immunogenicity of the cloned H5 DNA vaccine was tested on SPF chickens using two different approaches. First approach was using H5 DNA vaccine (pcDNA3.1/H5) and the second was using H5 DNA vaccine in addition to the pcDNA3.1/MDP1 vaccine. Ten days old chickens inoculated three times with two weeks intervals. The spleen and muscle samples from chickens immunized with H5 (pcDNA3.1/H5) and H5 + MDP1 (pcDNA3.1/H5 + pcDNA3.1/MDP1) vaccines were collected after sacrificing the chickens and successfully expressed H5 and MDP1 RNA transcripts. The sera of immunized chickens were collected prior to first immunization and every week after immunization; and analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. Results Results of competitive ELISA showed successful antibody responses two weeks post immunization. The HI test showed an increased in antibody titers during the course of experiment in group immunized with H5 and H5 + MDP1 vaccines. The result showed that the constructed DNA vaccines were able to produce detectable antibody titer in which the group immunized with H5 + MDP1 vaccine produced higher antibody comparing to H5 vaccine alone. Conclusions This study shows for the first time the usefulness of MDP1 as a genetic adjuvant for H5 DNA vaccine. PMID:20497569

  2. Production and purification of plasmid DNA vaccines: is there scope for further innovation?

    PubMed

    Xenopoulos, Alex; Pattnaik, Priyabrata

    2014-12-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA (pDNA) has vastly increased over the past decade in response to significant advances that have been made in its application for gene therapy and vaccine development. Plasmid DNA-based vaccines are experiencing a resurgence due to success with prime-boost immunization strategies. The challenge has always been poor productivity and delivery of pDNA. Plasmid DNA-based vaccines have traditionally required milligram scale of GMP-grade product for vaccination due to the relatively low efficacy and duration of gene expression. However, efforts to increase pDNA vaccine effectiveness are evolving in genetic manipulations of bacterial host, improvements in product recovery and innovative delivery methods. This review summarizes recent advances in large-scale pDNA vaccine manufacturing, ranging from upstream processing, downstream processing and formulation, as such information is usually not available to the scientific community. The article will highlight technology gaps and offer insight on further scope of innovation.

  3. CD4+ T cell–independent DNA vaccination against opportunistic infections

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingquan; Ramsay, Alistair J.; Robichaux, Myles B.; Norris, Karen A.; Kliment, Corrine; Crowe, Christopher; Rapaka, Rekha R.; Steele, Chad; McAllister, Florencia; Shellito, Judd E.; Marrero, Luis; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Zhong, Qiu; Kolls, Jay K.

    2005-01-01

    Depletion or dysfunction of CD4+ T lymphocytes profoundly perturbs host defenses and impairs immunogenicity of vaccines. Here, we show that plasmid DNA vaccination with a cassette encoding antigen (OVA) and a second cassette encoding full-length CD40 ligand (CD40L), a molecule expressed on activated CD4+ T lymphocytes and critical for T cell helper function, can elicit significant titers of antigen-specific immunoglobulins in serum and Tc1 CD8+ T cell responses in CD4-deficient mice. To investigate whether this approach leads to CD4+ T cell–independent vaccine protection against a prototypic AIDS-defining infection, Pneumocystis (PC) pneumonia, we used serum from mice vaccinated with PC-pulsed, CD40L-modifed DCs to immunoprecipitate PC antigens. Kexin, a PC antigen identified by this approach, was used in a similar DNA vaccine strategy with or without CD40L. CD4-deficient mice receiving DNA vaccines encoding Kexin and CD40L showed significantly higher anti-PC IgG titers as well as opsonic killing of PC compared with those vaccinated with Kexin alone. Moreover, CD4-depleted, Kexin-vaccinated mice showed a 3-log greater protection in a PC challenge model. Adoptive transfer of CD19+ cells or IgG to SCID mice conferred protection against PC challenge, indicating a role of humoral immunity in the protection. The results of these studies show promise for CD4-independent vaccination against HIV-related or other opportunistic pathogens. PMID:16308571

  4. Construction of Eimeria tenella multi-epitope DNA vaccines and their protective efficacies against experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Huang, Xinmei; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-08-15

    The search for effective vaccines against chicken coccidiosis remains a challenge because of the complex organisms with multiple life cycle stages of Eimeria. Combination of T-cell epitopes from different stages of Eimeria life cycle could be an optimal strategy to overcome the antigen complexity of the parasite. In this study, 4 fragments with concentrated T-cell epitopes from the sporozoite antigen SO7 and the merozoite antigen MZ5-7 of Eimeria tenella were cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 in different forms, with or without chicken cytokines IL-2 or IFN-γ genes as genetic adjuvants, to construct multistage, multi-epitope DNA vaccines against Eimeria tenella. Transcription and expression of the multi-epitope DNA vaccines in vivo were detected by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot. On the basis of survival rate, lesion score, body weight gain, oocyst decrease ratio and the anti-coccidial index (ACI), Animal experiments were carried out to evaluate the protective efficacy against Eimeria tenella. Results showed the constructed DNA vaccines were transcribed and translated successfully in vivo. Animal experiment showed that the multi-epitopes DNA vaccines were more effective to stimulate immune response than single fragment. Compared with the DNA vaccines composed with less T-cell epitopes, DNA vaccine pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2 containing 4 fragments with concentrated T-epitopes provided the highest ACI of 180.39. DNA vaccines composed of antigens from two developmental stages were more effective than the single-stage ones. Especially DNA vaccine pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2 provided the most effective protection with the ACI of 180.39. Furthermore, cytokines IL-2 or IFN-γ could improve the efficacy of the multi-epitope DNA vaccines significantly. Overall, pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2-IFN-γ provided the most effective protection with the ACI of 189.92. The multi-epitope DNA vaccines revealed in this study provide new candidates for Eimeria vaccine development.

  5. DNA is an efficient booster of dendritic cell-based vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinyao; Valentin, Antonio; Beach, Rachel Kelly; Alicea, Candido; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N

    2015-01-01

    DC-based therapeutic vaccines as a promising strategy against chronic infections and cancer have been validated in several clinical trials. However, DC-based vaccines are complex and require many in vitro manipulations, which makes this a personalized and expensive therapeutic approach. In contrast, DNA-based vaccines have many practical advantages including simplicity, low cost of manufacturing and potent immunogenicity already proven in non-human primates and humans. In this study, we explored whether DC-based vaccines can be simplified by the addition of plasmid DNA as prime or boost to achieve robust CD8-mediated immune responses. We compared the cellular immunity induced in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice by DC vaccines, loaded either with peptides or optimized SIV Env DNA, and plasmid DNA-based vaccines delivered by electroporation (EP). We found that mature DC loaded with peptides (P-mDC) induced the highest CD8+ T cell responses in both strains of mice, but those responses were significantly higher in the C57BL/6 model. A heterologous prime-boost strategy (P-DC prime-DNA boost) induced CD8+ T cell responses similar to those obtained by the P-DC vaccine. Importantly, this strategy elicited robust polyfunctional T cells as well as highest antigen-specific central memory CD8+ T cells in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting long-term memory responses. These results indicate that a DC-based vaccine in combination with DNA in a heterologous DC prime-DNA boost strategy has potential as a repeatedly administered vaccine. PMID:26125100

  6. A rapid and potent DNA vaccination strategy defined by in vivo monitoring of antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Bins, Adriaan D; Jorritsma, Annelies; Wolkers, Monika C; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C; Schumacher, Ton N M; Haanen, John B A G

    2005-08-01

    Induction of immunity after DNA vaccination is generally considered a slow process. Here we show that DNA delivery to the skin results in a highly transient pulse of antigen expression. Based on this information, we developed a new rapid and potent intradermal DNA vaccination method. By short-interval intradermal DNA delivery, robust T-cell responses, of a magnitude sufficient to reject established subcutaneous tumors, are generated within 12 d. Moreover, this vaccination strategy confers protecting humoral immunity against influenza A infection within 2 weeks after the start of vaccination. The strength and speed of this newly developed strategy will be beneficial in situations in which immunity is required in the shortest possible time.

  7. Multiple factors affect immunogenicity of DNA plasmid HIV vaccines in human clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xia; Morgan, Cecilia; Yu, Xuesong; DeRosa, Stephen; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Kublin, James; Corey, Larry; Keefer, Michael C

    2015-05-11

    Plasmid DNA vaccines have been licensed for use in domesticated animals because of their excellent immunogenicity, but none have yet been licensed for use in humans. Here we report a retrospective analysis of 1218 healthy human volunteers enrolled in 10 phase I clinical trials in which DNA plasmids encoding HIV antigens were administered. Elicited T-cell immune responses were quantified by validated intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) stimulated with HIV peptide pools. HIV-specific binding and neutralizing antibody activities were also analyzed using validated assays. Results showed that, in the absence of adjuvants and boosting with alternative vaccines, DNA vaccines elicited CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses in an average of 13.3% (95% CI: 9.8-17.8%) and 37.7% (95% CI: 31.9-43.8%) of vaccine recipients, respectively. Three vaccinations (vs. 2) improved the proportion of subjects with antigen-specific CD8+ responses (p=0.02), as did increased DNA dosage (p=0.007). Furthermore, female gender and participants having a lower body mass index were independently associated with higher CD4+ T-cell response rate (p=0.001 and p=0.008, respectively). These vaccines elicited minimal neutralizing and binding antibody responses. These findings of the immunogenicity of HIV DNA vaccines in humans can provide guidance for future clinical trials.

  8. Molecular adjuvants for malaria DNA vaccines based on the modulation of host-cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Leitner, Wolfgang W; Duncan, Elizabeth H; Savranskaya, Tatyana; Angov, Evelina

    2009-09-18

    Malaria represents a major global health problem but despite extensive efforts, no effective vaccine is available. Various vaccine candidates have been developed that provide protection in animal models, such as a gene gun-delivered DNA vaccine encoding the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium berghei. A common shortcoming of most malaria vaccines is the requirement for multiple immunizations leaving room for improvement even for established vaccine candidates such as the CSP-DNA vaccine. In this study, we explored whether regulating apoptosis in DNA vaccine transfected host cells could accelerate the onset of protective immunity and provide significant protection after a single immunization. A pro-apoptotic gene (Bax) was used as a molecular adjuvant in an attempt to mimic the immunostimulatory apoptosis triggered by viral or virus-derived vaccines, while anti-apoptotic genes such as Bcl-XL may increase the life span of transfected cells thus prolonging antigen production. Surprisingly, co-delivery of either Bax or Bcl-XL greatly reduced CSP-DNA vaccine efficacy after a single immunization. Co-delivery of Bax for three immunizations still had a detrimental effect on protective immunity, while repeated co-delivery of Bcl-XL had no negative impact. The fine characterization of humoral and cellular immune response modulated by these two molecular adjuvants revealed a previously unknown effect, i.e., a shift in the Th-profile. These results demonstrate that pro- or anti-apoptotic molecules should not be used as molecular adjuvants without careful evaluation of the resulting immune response. This finding represents yet another example that strategies to enhance vaccine efficacy developed for other model systems such as viral diseases cannot easily be applied to any vaccine.

  9. Removing residual DNA from Vero-cell culture-derived human rabies vaccine by using nuclease.

    PubMed

    Li, Si-Ming; Bai, Fu-Liang; Xu, Wen-Juan; Yang, Yong-Bi; An, Ying; Li, Tian-He; Yu, Yin-Hang; Li, De-Shan; Wang, Wen-Fei

    2014-09-01

    The clearance of host cell DNA is a critical indicator for Vero-cell culture-derived rabies vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the clearance of DNA in Vero-cell culture-derived rabies vaccine by purification process utilizing ultrafiltration, nuclease digestion, and gel filtration chromatography. The results showed that the bioprocess of using nuclease decreased residual DNA. Dot-blot hybridization analysis showed that the residual host cell DNA was <100 pg/ml in the final product. The residual nuclease in rabies vaccine was less than 0.1 ng/ml protein. The residual nuclease could not paly the biologically active role of digestion of DNA. Experiments of stability showed that the freeze-drying rabies virus vaccine was stable and titers were >5.0 IU/ml. Immunogenicity test and protection experiments indicated mice were greatly induced generation of neutralizing antibodies and invoked protective effects immunized with intraperitoneal injections of the rabies vaccine. These results demonstrated that the residual DNA was removed from virus particles and nuclease was removed by gel filtration chromatography. The date indicated that technology was an efficient method to produce rabies vaccine for human use by using nuclease.

  10. Immune-Enhancing Effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana Pollen Polysaccharides on DNA Vaccine Expressing Bordetella avium ompA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fujie; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Zhenhong; Yu, Cuilian; Liu, Liping; Yang, Shifa; Li, Bing; Wei, Kai; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella avium is the causative agent of bordetellosis, which remains to be the cause of severe losses in the turkey industry. Given the lack of vaccines that can provide good protection, developing a novel vaccine against B. avium infection is crucial. In this study, we constructed a eukaryotic expression plasmid, which expressed the outer membrane protein A (ompA) of B. avium, to prepare a B. avium recombinant ompA-DNA vaccine. Three concentrations (low, middle, and high) of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides (TPPPS), a known immunomodulator, were used as adjuvants, and their immune conditioning effects on the developed DNA vaccine were examined. The pure ompA-DNA vaccine, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine, and the empty plasmid served as the controls. The chickens in each group were separately inoculated with these vaccines three times at 1, 7, and 14 days old. Dynamic changes in antibody production, cytokine secretion, and lymphocyte count were then determined from 7 to 49 days after the first inoculation. Protective rates of the vaccines were also determined after the third inoculation. Results showed that the pure DNA vaccine obviously induced the production of antibodies, the secretion of cytokines, and the increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood, as well as provided a protective rate of 50% to the B. avium-challenged chickens. The chickens inoculated with the TPPPS adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine and Freund’s adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine demonstrated higher levels of immune responses than those inoculated with pure ompA-DNA vaccine, whereas only the ompA-DNA vaccine with 200 mg/mL TPPPS completely protected the chickens against B. avium infection. These findings indicate that the B. avium ompA-DNA vaccine combined with TPPPS is a potentially effective B. avium vaccine. PMID:26870023

  11. A pilot study comparing the development of EIAV Env-specific antibodies induced by DNA/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccines and an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    Data from successful attenuated lentiviral vaccine studies indicate that fully mature Env-specific antibodies characterized by high titer, high avidity, and the predominant recognition of conformational epitopes are associated with protective efficacy. Although vaccination with a DNA prime/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccine boost strategy has been found to be effective in some trials with non-human primate/simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models, it remains unclear whether this vaccination strategy could elicit mature equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Env-specific antibodies, thus protecting vaccinated horses against EIAV infection. Therefore, in this pilot study we vaccinated horses using a strategy based on DNA prime/recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV)-vectored vaccines encoding EIAV env and gag genes, and observed the development of Env-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and p26-specific antibodies. Vaccination with DNA induced low titer, low avidity, and the predominant recognition of linear epitopes by Env-specific antibodies, which was enhanced by boosting vaccinations with rTTV vaccines. However, the maturation levels of Env-specific antibodies induced by the DNA/rTTV vaccines were significantly lower than those induced by the attenuated vaccine EIAV(FDDV). Additionally, DNA/rTTV vaccines did not elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent EIAV strain, all of the vaccinees and control horses died from EIAV disease. These data indicate that the regimen of DNA prime/rTTV vaccine boost did not induce mature Env-specific antibodies, which might have contributed to immune protection failure.

  12. Alphavirus vectors: applications for DNA vaccine production and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, K

    2000-01-01

    Replication-deficient alphavirus vectors have been developed for efficient high-level transgene expression. The broad host range of alphaviruses has allowed infection of a wide variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cultures. Particularly, G protein-coupled receptors have been expressed at high levels and subjected to binding and functional studies. Expression in suspension cultures has greatly facilitated production of large quantities of recombinant proteins for structural studies. Injection of recombinant alphavirus vectors into rodent brain resulted in local reporter gene expression. Highly neuron-specific expression was obtained in hippocampal slice cultures in vivo. Additionally, preliminary studies in animal models suggest that alphavirus vectors can be attractive candidates for gene therapy applications. Traditionally alphavirus vectors, either attenuated strains or replication-deficient particles, have been used to elicit efficient immune responses in animals. Recently, the application of alphaviruses has been extended to naked nucleic acids. Injection of DNA as well as RNA vectors has demonstrated efficient antigen production. In many cases, protection against lethal challenges has been obtained after immunization with alphavirus particles or nucleic acid vectors. Alphavirus vectors can therefore be considered as potentially promising vectors for vaccine production.

  13. Design and Construction of Shrimp Antiviral DNA Vaccines Expressing Long and Short Hairpins for Protection by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aparna; Pathakota, Gireesh-Babu; Annam, Pavan-Kumar

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines present the aquaculture industry with an effective and economically viable method of controlling viral pathogens that drastically affect productivity. Since specific immune response is rudimentary in invertebrates, the presence of RNA interference (RNAi) pathway in shrimps provides a promising new approach to vaccination. Plasmid DNA vaccines that express short or long double stranded RNA in vivo have shown protection against viral diseases. The design, construction and considerations for preparing such vaccines are discussed.

  14. Development of enhanced antibody response toward dual delivery of nano-adjuvant adsorbed human Enterovirus-71 vaccine encapsulated carrier

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohamed I; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Hussein, Mohd Z; Elkhidir, Isam M; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a new approach for enhancing immunity toward mucosal vaccines. HEV71 killed vaccine that is formulated with nanosize calcium phosphate adjuvant and encapsulated onto chitosan and alginate delivery carriers was examined for eliciting antibody responses in serum and saliva collected at weeks 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 for viral-specific IgA & IgG levels and viral neutralizing antibody titers. The antibody responses induced in rabbits by the different formulations delivered by a single (buccal) route were compared to those of dual immunization (intradermal / mucosal) and un-immunized control. Chitosan-loaded vaccine adjuvant induced elevated IgA antibody, while Alginate-adjuvant irreversible bonding sequestered the vaccine and markedly reduced immunogenicity. The induced mucosal and parenteral antibody profiles appeared in an inverse manner of enhanced mucosal IgA antibody accompanied by lower systemic IgG following a single oral immunization route. The combined intradermal and oral dual-immunized group developed an elevated salivary IgA, systemic IgG, and virus neutralizing response. A reduced salivary neutralizing antibody titer was observed and attributed to the continual secretion exchanges in saliva. Designing a successful mucosal delivery formulation needs to take into account the vaccine delivery site, dosage, adjuvant and carrier particle size, charge, and the reversibility of component interactions. The dual immunization seems superior and is a important approach for modulating the antibody response and boosting mucosal protection against HEV71 and similar pathogens based on their transmission mode, tissue tropism and shedding sites. Finally, the study has highlighted the significant role of dual immunization for simultaneous inducing and modulating the systemic and mucosal immune responses to EV71. PMID:26186664

  15. A novel peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine of human telomerase reverse transcriptase induces a potent cytotoxic T-cell response in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hong; Hao, Jia; Wu, Chao; Shi, Yun; Zhao, Xiao-yan; Fang, Dian-chun . E-mail: fandianchun@hotmail.com

    2007-06-15

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is highly expressed in over 85% of human cancers, which makes it a broadly applicable molecular target for cancer therapy. Several groups have demonstrated that hTERT can efficiently evoke specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses for malignant tumors. In the present study, we developed a novel virus-like particulate peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine (PNDV) of hTERT, which was composed of a low-affinity epitope variant with encoding full-length gene in the same virus-size particulate. We verified the formation of PNDV by DNA retarding assay, DNase I protection assay and transmission electron microscopy, and confirmed its immunogenicity and transfection activities in mammalian cells. Furthermore, in vivo immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice generated efficient IFN-{gamma} secretion and hTERT-specific CTLs which are known to cause selective cell death of telomerase positive gastrointestinal cancer cells. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on collocating a low-affinity epitope variant with a full-length hTERT gene for anti-cancer vaccine design. This novel strategy for vaccine design not only enables enhanced immunity to a universal tumor antigen, but also has the potential to generate CTLs effective in telomerase-positive tumor cells of diverse tissue origins. Therefore, our findings bear significant implications for immunotherapy of human cancers.

  16. A cytomegalovirus DNA vaccine induces antibodies that block viral entry into fibroblasts and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    McVoy, Michael A; Lee, Ronzo; Saccoccio, Frances M; Hartikka, Jukka; Smith, Larry R; Mahajan, Rohit; Wang, Jian Ben; Cui, Xiaohong; Adler, Stuart P

    2015-12-16

    A vaccine to prevent congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections is a national priority. Investigational vaccines have targeted the viral glycoprotein B (gB) as an inducer of neutralizing antibodies and phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) as an inducer of cytotoxic T cells. Antibodies to gB neutralize CMV entry into all cell types but their potency is low compared to antibodies that block epithelial cell entry through targeting the pentameric complex (gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131). Hence, more potent overall neutralizing responses may result from a vaccine that combines gB with pentameric complex-derived antigens. To assess the ability of pentameric complex subunits to generate epithelial entry neutralizing antibodies, DNA vaccines encoding UL128, UL130, and/or UL131 were formulated with Vaxfectin(®), an adjuvant that enhances antibody responses to DNA vaccines. Mice were immunized with individual DNA vaccines or with pair-wise or trivalent combinations. Only the UL130 vaccine induced epithelial entry neutralizing antibodies and no synergy was observed from bi- or trivalent combinations. In rabbits the UL130 vaccine again induced epithelial entry neutralizing antibodies while UL128 or UL131 vaccines did not. To evaluate compatibility of the UL130 vaccine with DNA vaccines encoding gB or pp65, mono-, bi-, or trivalent combinations were evaluated. Fibroblast and epithelial entry neutralizing titers did not differ between rabbits immunized with gB alone vs. gB/UL130, gB/pp65, or gB/UL130/pp65 combinations, indicating a lack of antagonism from coadministration of DNA vaccines. Importantly, gB-induced epithelial entry neutralizing titers were substantially higher than activities induced by UL130, and both fibroblast and epithelial entry neutralizing titers induced by gB alone as well as gB/pp65 or gB/UL130/pp65 combinations were comparable to those observed in sera from humans with naturally-acquired CMV infections. These findings support further development of Vaxfectin

  17. Transcriptome Profiles Associated to VHSV Infection or DNA Vaccination in Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, Patricia; Dios, Sonia; Boltaña, Sebastián; Coll, Julio; Estepa, Amparo; Mackenzie, Simon; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding the viral G glycoprotein show the most successful protection capability against fish rhabdoviruses. Nowadays, the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective response remain still poorly understood. With the aim of shedding light on the protection conferred by the DNA vaccines based in the G glycoprotein of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) we have used a specific microarray highly enriched in antiviral sequences to carry out the transcriptomic study associated to VHSV DNA vaccination/infection. The differential gene expression pattern in response to empty plasmid (pMCV1.4) and DNA vaccine (pMCV1.4-G860) intramuscular administration with regard to non-stimulated turbot was analyzed in head kidney at 8, 24 and 72 hours post-vaccination. Moreover, the effect of VHSV infection one month after immunization was also analyzed in vaccinated and non-vaccinated fish at the same time points. Genes implicated in the Toll-like receptor signalling pathway, IFN inducible/regulatory proteins, numerous sequences implicated in apoptosis and cytotoxic pathways, MHC class I antigens, as well as complement and coagulation cascades among others were analyzed in the different experimental groups. Fish receiving the pMCV1.4-G860 vaccine showed transcriptomic patterns very different to the ones observed in pMCV1.4-injected turbot after 72 h. On the other hand, VHSV challenge in vaccinated and non-vaccinated turbot induced a highly different response at the transcriptome level, indicating a very relevant role of the acquired immunity in vaccinated fish able to alter the typical innate immune response profile observed in non-vaccinated individuals. This exhaustive transcriptome study will serve as a complete overview for a better understanding of the crosstalk between the innate and adaptive immune response in fish after viral infection/vaccination. Moreover, it provides interesting clues about molecules with a potential

  18. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Pushko, Peter

    2014-11-15

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. - Highlights: • The iDNA{sup ®} platform combines advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. • Yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine was launched from iDNA plasmid in vitro and in vivo. • Safety of iDNA-generated 17D virus was confirmed in AG129 mice. • BALB/c mice seroconverted after a single-dose vaccination with iDNA. • YF virus-neutralizing response was elicited in iDNA-vaccinated mice.

  19. Efficacy of Leishmania donovani ribosomal P1 gene as DNA vaccine in experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Masih, Shet; Arora, Sunil K; Vasishta, Rakesh K

    2011-09-01

    The acidic ribosomal proteins of the protozoan parasites have been described as prominent antigens during human disease. We present here data showing the molecular cloning and protective efficacy of P1 gene of Leishmania donovani as DNA vaccine. The PCR amplified complete ORF cloned in either pQE or pVAX vector was used either as peptide or DNA vaccine against experimentally induced visceral leishmaniasis in hamsters. The recombinant protein rLdP1 was given along with Freund's adjuvant and the plasmid DNA vaccine, pVAX-P1 was used alone either as single dose or double dose (prime and boost) in different groups of hamsters which were subsequently challenged with a virulent dose of 1×10(7) L. donovani (MHOM/IN/DD8/1968 strain) promastigotes by intra-cardiac route. While the recombinant protein rLdP1 or DNA vaccine pVAX-P1 in single dose format were not found to be protective, DNA vaccine in a prime-boost mode was able to induce protection with reduced mortality, a significant (75.68%) decrease in splenic parasite burden and increased expression of Th1 type cytokines in immunized hamsters. Histopathology of livers and spleens from these animals showed formation of mature granulomas with compact arrangement of lymphocytes and histiocytes, indicating its protective potential as vaccine candidate.

  20. Introduction of translation stop condons into the viral glycoprotein gene in a fish DNA vaccine eliminates induction of protective immunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, Kyle A.; Conway, Carla M.; Kurath, Gael

    2006-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was mutated to introduce two stop codons to prevent glycoprotein translation while maintaining the plasmid DNA integrity and RNA transcription ability. The mutated plasmid vaccine, denoted pIHNw-G2stop, when injected intramuscularly into fish at high doses, lacked detectable glycoprotein expression in the injection site muscle, and did not provide protection against lethal virus challenge 7 days post-vaccination. These results suggest that the G-protein itself is required to stimulate the early protective antiviral response observed after vaccination with the nonmutated parental DNA vaccine.

  1. Introduction of translation stop codons into the viral glycoprotein gene in a fish DNA vaccine eliminates induction of protective immunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.M.; Kurath, G.

    2006-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was mutated to introduce two stop codons to prevent glycoprotein translation while maintaining the plasmid DNA integrity and RNA transcription ability. The mutated plasmid vaccine, denoted pIHNw-G2stop, when injected intramuscularly into fish at high doses, lacked detectable glycoprotein expression in the injection site muscle, and did not provide protection against lethal virus challenge 7 days post-vaccination. These results suggest that the G-protein itself is required to stimulate the early protective antiviral response observed after vaccination with the nonmutated parental DNA vaccine. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  2. Effective pulmonary delivery of an aerosolized plasmid DNA vaccine via surface acoustic wave nebulization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary-delivered gene therapy promises to mitigate vaccine safety issues and reduce the need for needles and skilled personnel to use them. While plasmid DNA (pDNA) offers a rapid route to vaccine production without side effects or reliance on cold chain storage, its delivery to the lung has proved challenging. Conventional methods, including jet and ultrasonic nebulizers, fail to deliver large biomolecules like pDNA intact due to the shear and cavitational stresses present during nebulization. Methods In vitro structural analysis followed by in vivo protein expression studies served in assessing the integrity of the pDNA subjected to surface acoustic wave (SAW) nebulisation. In vivo immunization trials were then carried out in rats using SAW nebulized pDNA (influenza A, human hemagglutinin H1N1) condensate delivered via intratracheal instillation. Finally, in vivo pulmonary vaccinations using pDNA for influenza was nebulized and delivered via a respirator to sheep. Results The SAW nebulizer was effective at generating pDNA aerosols with sizes optimal for deep lung delivery. Successful gene expression was observed in mouse lung epithelial cells, when SAW-nebulized pDNA was delivered to male Swiss mice via intratracheal instillation. Effective systemic and mucosal antibody responses were found in rats via post-nebulized, condensed fluid instillation. Significantly, we demonstrated the suitability of the SAW nebulizer to administer unprotected pDNA encoding an influenza A virus surface glycoprotein to respirated sheep via aerosolized inhalation. Conclusion Given the difficulty of inducing functional antibody responses for DNA vaccination in large animals, we report here the first instance of successful aerosolized inhalation delivery of a pDNA vaccine in a large animal model relevant to human lung development, structure, physiology, and disease, using a novel, low-power (<1 W) surface acoustic wave (SAW) hand-held nebulizer to produce droplets of pDNA

  3. Advances in host and vector development for the production of plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Juergen; Lara, Alvaro R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in DNA vaccine research provide a new momentum for this rather young and potentially disruptive technology. Gene-based vaccines are capable of eliciting protective immunity in humans to persistent intracellular pathogens, such as HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, for which the conventional vaccine technologies have failed so far. The recent identification and characterization of genes coding for tumor antigens has stimulated the development of DNA-based antigen-specific cancer vaccines. Although most academic researchers consider the production of reasonable amounts of plasmid DNA (pDNA) for immunological studies relatively easy to solve, problems often arise during this first phase of production. In this chapter we review the current state of the art of pDNA production at small (shake flasks) and mid-scales (lab-scale bioreactor fermentations) and address new trends in vector design and strain engineering. We will guide the reader through the different stages of process design starting from choosing the most appropriate plasmid backbone, choosing the right Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain for production, and cultivation media and scale-up issues. In addition, we will address some points concerning the safety and potency of the produced plasmids, with special focus on producing antibiotic resistance-free plasmids. The main goal of this chapter is to make immunologists aware of the fact that production of the pDNA vaccine has to be performed with as much as attention and care as the rest of their research.

  4. Enhanced neutralising antibody response to bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) induced by DNA vaccination in calves.

    PubMed

    R El-Attar, Laila M; Thomas, Carole; Luke, Jeremy; A Williams, James; Brownlie, Joe

    2015-07-31

    DNA vaccination is effective in inducing potent immunity in mice; however it appears to be less so in large animals. Increasing the dose of DNA plasmid to activate innate immunity has been shown to improve DNA vaccine adaptive immunity. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a critical cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA pattern receptor required for innate immune activation in response to viral infection. RIG-I recognise viral RNA and trigger antiviral response, resulting in type I interferon (IFN) and inflammatory cytokine production. In an attempt to enhance the antibody response induced by BVDV DNA in cattle, we expressed BVDV truncated E2 (E2t) and NS3 codon optimised antigens from antibiotic free-plasmid vectors expressing a RIG-I agonist and designated either NTC E2t(co) and NTC NS3(co). To evaluate vaccine efficacy, groups of five BVDV-free calves were intramuscularly injected three times with NTC E2t(co) and NTC NS3(co) vaccine plasmids individually or in combination. Animals vaccinated with our (previously published) conventional DNA vaccines pSecTag/E2 and pTriExNS3 and plasmids expressing RIG-I agonist only presented both the positive and mock-vaccine groups. Our results showed that vaccines coexpressing E2t with a RIG-I agonist induced significantly higher E2 antigen specific antibody response (p<0.05). Additionally, E2t augmented the immune response to NS3 when the two vaccines were delivered in combination. Despite the lack of complete protection, on challenge day 4/5 calves vaccinated with NTC E2t(co) alone or NTC E2t(co) plus NTC NS3(co) had neutralising antibody titres exceeding 1/240 compared to 1/5 in the mock vaccine control group. Based on our results we conclude that co-expression of a RIG-I agonist with viral antigen could enhance DNA vaccine potency in cattle.

  5. The attenuation of cockroach allergy by DNA vaccine encoding cockroach allergen Bla g 2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Yuan, Jingdong; Zhou, Yixuan; Yang, Jun; James, Alan W; Nair, Usha; Shu, Xiji; Liu, Wei; Kanangat, Siva; Yoo, Tai June

    2012-01-01

    Bla g 2 is one of the most potent cockroach allergens. No effective treatment or vaccination strategies are yet available. We evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of Bla g 2 DNA vaccination in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. C57/BL6 mice were given Bla g 2 DNA vaccine prior to sensitization with recombinant Bla g 2 (rBla g 2) antigens, followed by nebulized rBla g 2 challenge. Bla g 2 vaccine could express at both transcriptional and translational levels in mammalian cells. Moreover, Bla g 2 vaccine significantly reduced the total inflammatory cell infiltrate and eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and markedly decreased allergen-induced inflammatory infiltrates in the lungs and Bla g 2-specific IgE in serum upon challenge with rBla g 2. Importantly, Bla g 2 vaccine could induce the production of antigen-specific IFN-γ and downregulated Th2 pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13. Thus, DNA vaccination showed protective efficacy against a clinically relevant allergen, Bla g 2.

  6. Canine distemper virus DNA vaccination of mink can overcome interference by maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Nielsen, Line; Aasted, Bent; Pertoldi, Cino; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2015-03-10

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is highly contagious and can cause severe disease against which conventional live vaccines are ineffective in the presence of maternal antibodies. Vaccination in the presences of maternal antibodies was challenged by vaccination of 5 days old and 3 weeks old mink kits with CDV DNA vaccines. Virus neutralising (VN) antibody responses were induced in mink kits vaccinated with a plasmid encoding the haemaglutinin protein (H) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-H) or a combination of the H, fusion (F) and nucleoprotein (N) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-HFN). These DNA vaccinated kits were protected against virulent experimental infection with field strains of CDV. The pCDV-H was more efficient in inducing protective immunity in the presence of maternal antibodies compared to the pCDV-HFN. The results show that DNA vaccination with the pCDV-H or pCDV-HFN (n=4) only given once at 5 days of age induces virus specific immune response in neonatal mink and protection against virulent CDV exposure later in life.

  7. The Murine Intravaginal HSV-2 Challenge Model for Investigation of DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Marshak, Joshua O.; Dong, Lichun; Koelle, David M.

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines have been licensed in veterinary medicine and have promise for humans. This format is relatively immunogenic in mice and guinea pigs, the two principle HSV-2 animal models, permitting rapid assessment of vectors, antigens, adjuvants, and delivery systems. Limitations include the relatively poor immunogenicity of naked DNA in humans and the profound differences in HSV-2 pathogenesis between host species. Herein, we detail lessons learned over the last few years investigating candidate DNA vaccines in the progesterone-primed female mouse vaginal model of HSV-2 infection as a guide to investigators in the field. PMID:24671693

  8. Codon-optimized filovirus DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular electroporation protect cynomolgus macaques from lethal Ebola and Marburg virus challenges.

    PubMed

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Badger, Catherine V; Bounds, Callie E; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Kwilas, Steven A; Vu, Hong A; Warfield, Kelly L; Hooper, Jay W; Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation with DNA plasmids expressing codon-optimized glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) or Marburg virus (MARV) or a combination of codon-optimized GP DNA vaccines for EBOV, MARV, Sudan virus and Ravn virus. When measured by ELISA, the individual vaccines elicited slightly higher IgG responses to EBOV or MARV than did the combination vaccines. No significant differences in immune responses of macaques given the individual or combination vaccines were measured by pseudovirion neutralization or IFN-γ ELISpot assays. Both the MARV and mixed vaccines were able to protect macaques from lethal MARV challenge (5/6 vs. 6/6). In contrast, a greater proportion of macaques vaccinated with the EBOV vaccine survived lethal EBOV challenge in comparison to those that received the mixed vaccine (5/6 vs. 1/6). EBOV challenge survivors had significantly higher pre-challenge neutralizing antibody titers than those that succumbed.

  9. Rapid DNA vaccination against Burkholderia pseudomallei flagellin by tattoo or intranasal application.

    PubMed

    Lankelma, Jacqueline M; Wagemakers, Alex; Birnie, Emma; Haak, Bastiaan W; Trentelman, Jos J A; Weehuizen, Tassili A F; Ersöz, Jasmin; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Hovius, Joppe W; Wiersinga, W Joost; Bins, Adriaan D

    2017-03-21

    Melioidosis is a severe infectious disease with a high mortality that is endemic in South-East Asia and Northern Australia. The causative pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei, is listed as potential bioterror weapon due to its high virulence and potential for easy dissemination. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine for prevention of melioidosis. Here, we explore the use of rapid plasmid DNA vaccination against B. pseudomallei flagellin for protection against respiratory challenge. We tested three flagellin DNA vaccines with different subcellular targeting designs. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated via skin tattoo on day 0, 3 and 6 before intranasal challenge with B. pseudomallei on day 21. Next, the most effective construct was used as single vaccination on day 0 by tattoo or intranasal formulation. Mice were sacrificed 72 hours post-challenge to assess bacterial loads, cytokine responses, inflammation and microscopic lesions. A construct encoding a cellular secretion signal resulted in the most effective protection against melioidosis via tattooing, with a 10-fold reduction in bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs compared to the empty vector. Strikingly, a single intranasal administration of the same vaccine resulted in >1000-fold lower bacterial loads and increased survival. Pro-inflammatory cytokine responses were significantly diminished and strong reductions in markers for distant organ damage were observed. A rapid vaccination scheme using flagellin DNA tattoo provides significant protection against intranasal challenge with B. pseudomallei, markedly improved by a single administration via airway mucosa. Hence intranasal vaccination with flagellin-encoding DNA may be applicable when acute mass vaccination is indicated and warrants further testing.

  10. Distinct immune responses of recombinant plasmid DNA replicon vaccines expressing two types of antigens with or without signal sequences.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Li, Na; Wang, Wen-Bin; Wang, Shuang; Ma, Yao; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2010-11-03

    Here, DNA replicon vaccines encoding the Hc domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (AHc) or the receptor binding domain of anthrax protective antigen (PA4) with or without signal sequences were evaluated in mice. Strong antibody and protective responses were elicited only from AHc DNA vaccines with an Ig κ signal sequence or tissue plasminogen activator signal sequence. Meanwhile, there were no differences in total antibody responses or isotypes, lymphocyte proliferative responses, cytokine profiles and protective immune responses with the PA4 DNA vaccines with or without a signal sequence. Therefore, use of targeting sequences in designing DNA replicon vaccines depends on the specific antigen.

  11. Testing the Efficacy of a Multi-Component DNA-Prime/DNA-Boost Vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio-Burgos, José E.; Ochoa-García, Laucel; Zepeda-Escobar, José Antonio; Gupta, Shivali; Dhiman, Monisha; Martínez, José Simón; de Oca-Jiménez, Roberto Montes; Arreola, Margarita Val; Barbabosa-Pliego, Alberto; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan C.; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2011-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas Disease, is a major vector borne health problem in Latin America and an emerging infectious disease in the United States. Methods We tested the efficacy of a multi-component DNA-prime/DNA-boost vaccine (TcVac1) against experimental T. cruzi infection in a canine model. Dogs were immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids and cytokine adjuvants, and two weeks after the last immunization, challenged with T. cruzi trypomastigotes. We measured antibody responses by ELISA and haemagglutination assay, parasitemia and infectivity to triatomines by xenodiagnosis, and performed electrocardiography and histology to assess myocardial damage and tissue pathology. Results Vaccination with TcVac1 elicited parasite-and antigen-specific IgM and IgG (IgG2>IgG1) responses. Upon challenge infection, TcVac1-vaccinated dogs, as compared to non-vaccinated controls dogs, responded to T. cruzi with a rapid expansion of antibody response, moderately enhanced CD8+ T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, and suppression of phagocytes’ activity evidenced by decreased myeloperoxidase and nitrite levels. Subsequently, vaccinated dogs controlled the acute parasitemia by day 37 pi (44 dpi in non-vaccinated dogs), and exhibited a moderate decline in infectivity to triatomines. TcVac1-immunized dogs did not control the myocardial parasite burden and electrocardiographic and histopatholgic cardiac alterations that are the hallmarks of acute Chagas disease. During the chronic stage, TcVac1-vaccinated dogs exhibited a moderate decline in cardiac alterations determined by EKG and anatomo-/histo-pathological analysis while chronically-infected/non-vaccinated dogs continued to exhibit severe EKG alterations. Conclusions Overall, these results demonstrated that TcVac1 provided a partial resistance to T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease, and provide an impetus to improve the vaccination strategy against Chagas disease. PMID:21625470

  12. Recent advances in design of immunogenic and effective naked DNA vaccines against cancer.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, Daniela; Iurescia, Sandra; Rinaldi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    A variety of clinical trials for vaccines against cancer have provided evidence that DNA vaccines are well tolerated and have an excellent safety profile. DNA vaccines require much improvement to make them sufficiently effective against cancer in the clinic. Nowadays, it is clear that an increased antigen expression correlates with improved immunogenicity and it is critical to vaccine performance in large animals and humans. Similarly, additional strategies are required to activate effective immunity against poorly immunogenic tumour antigens. This review discusses very recent scientific references focused on the development of sophisticated DNA vaccines against cancer. We report a selection of novel and relevant patents employed to improve their immunogenicity through several strategies such as the use of tissue-specific transcriptional elements, nuclear localisation signalling, codon-optimisation and by targeting antigenic proteins to secretory pathway. Recent patents validating portions or splice variants of tumour antigens as candidates for cancer DNA vaccines with improved specificity, such as mesothelin and hTERT, are also discussed. Lastly, we review novel patents on the use of genetic immunomodulators, such as "universal" T helper epitopes derived from tetanus toxin, E. coli heat labile enterotoxin and vegetable proteins, as well as cytokines, chemokines or costimulatory molecules such as IL-6, IL-15, IL- 21 to amplify immunity against cancer.

  13. Pilot study of p62 DNA vaccine in dogs with mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Gabai, Vladimir; Venanzi, Franco M; Bagashova, Elena; Rud, Oksana; Mariotti, Francesca; Vullo, Cecilia; Catone, Giuseppe; Sherman, Michael Y; Concetti, Antonio; Chursov, Andrey; Latanova, Anastasia; Shcherbinina, Vita; Shifrin, Victor; Shneider, Alexander

    2014-12-30

    Our previous data demonstrated profound anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of p62 (sqstm1) DNA vaccine in rodents with various types of transplantable tumors. Testing anti-cancer medicine in dogs as an intermediary step of translational research program provides two major benefits. First, clinical data collected in target animals is required for FDA/USDA approval as a veterinary anti-cancer drug or vaccine. It is noteworthy that the veterinary community is in need of novel medicine for the prevention and treatment of canine and feline cancers. The second more important benefit of testing anti-cancer vaccines in dogs is that spontaneous tumors in dogs may provide invaluable information for human trials. Here, we evaluated the effect(s) of p62 DNA vaccine on mammary tumors of dogs. We found that p62 DNA vaccine administered i.m. decreased or stabilized growth of locally advanced lesions in absence of its overall toxic effects. The observed antitumor activity was associated with lymphocyte infiltration and tumor encapsulation via fibrotic reaction. This data justifies both human clinical trials and veterinary application of p62 DNA vaccine.

  14. A DNA vaccine targeting angiomotin inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, Lars; Ambrosino, Elena; Birot, Olivier; Tullus, Carl; Veitonmäki, Niina; Levchenko, Tetyana; Carlson, Lena-Maria; Musiani, Piero; Iezzi, Manuela; Curcio, Claudia; Forni, Guido; Cavallo, Federica; Kiessling, Rolf

    2006-06-01

    Endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors have shown promise in preclinical trials, but clinical use has been hindered by low half-life in circulation and high production costs. Here, we describe a strategy that targets the angiostatin receptor angiomotin (Amot) by DNA vaccination. The vaccination procedure generated antibodies that detected Amot on the endothelial cell surface. Purified Ig bound to the endothelial cell membrane and inhibited endothelial cell migration. In vivo, DNA vaccination blocked angiogenesis in the matrigel plug assay and prevented growth of transplanted tumors for up to 150 days. We further demonstrate that a combination of DNA vaccines encoding Amot and the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human EGF receptor 2 (Her-2)/neu oncogene inhibited breast cancer progression and impaired tumor vascularization in Her-2/neu transgenic mice. No toxicity or impairment of normal blood vessels could be detected. This work shows that DNA vaccination targeting Amot may be used to mimic the effect of angiostatin. cancer vaccines | neoplasia | neovascularization | breast cancer | angiostatin

  15. DNA Vaccination Partially Protects Muskellunge against Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV-IVb).

    PubMed

    Millard, Elena V; Bourke, Ashley M; LaPatra, Scott E; Brenden, Travis O; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Faisal, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    A DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein (G) gene of the North American viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVb was developed to evaluate the immune response of fish following vaccination and evaluate its efficacy in protecting a susceptible species, the Muskellunge Esox masquinongy, against VHSV-IVb challenge. Seven weeks (539 degree-days) following vaccination with 10 μg of either pVHSivb-G or a control plasmid, Muskellunge were challenged by immersion with 10(5) plaque-forming units (pfu)/mL of VHSV-IVb. Fish vaccinated with pVHSivb-G had a relative percent survival (RPS) of 45%. Vaccinated fish also had significantly lower mean viral titers in tissues (4.2 × 10(2) pfu/g) and viral prevalence (4%) than fish receiving the plasmid control vaccine (3.3 × 10(5) pfu/g; 82%). Neutralizing antibodies were detected 28 d (308 degree-days) postchallenge (11 weeks postvaccination) in 100% of Muskellunge vaccinated with pVHSivb-G compared with only 12% of plasmid-control-vaccinated Muskellunge, suggesting robust induction of a secondary, adaptive immune response. In addition, pVHSivb-G-vaccinated Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss challenged 7 d (100 degree-days) postvaccination with the heterologous novirhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), experienced an RPS of 61%, compared to control fish, suggesting induction of an early and transient nonspecific antiviral immune response. This study provides an important starting point for VHSV-IVb vaccine development and useful information about the antiviral immune response elicited by DNA vaccination in a nondomesticated fish species. Received May 1, 2016; accepted September 1, 2016.

  16. A DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug CY190602 with significantly enhanced anticancer potency

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuan; Ding, Hongyu; Li, Xiaoxi; Pallasch, Christian P; Hong, Liya; Guo, Dianwu; Chen, Yi; Wang, Difei; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yajie; Hemann, Michael T; Jiang, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic drugs constitute a major treatment modality for human cancers; however, cancer cells' intrinsic DNA repair capability often increases the threshold of lethality and renders these drugs ineffective. The emerging roles of HDACs in DNA repair provide new opportunities for improving traditional genotoxic drugs. Here, we report the development and characterization of CY190602, a novel bendamustine-derived drug with significantly enhanced anticancer potency. We show that CY190602's enhanced potency can be attributed to its newly gained ability to inhibit HDACs. Using this novel DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug as a tool, we further explored HDAC's role in DNA repair. We found that HDAC activities are essential for the expression of several genes involved in DNA synthesis and repair, including TYMS, Tip60, CBP, EP300, and MSL1. Importantly, CY190602, the first-in-class example of such DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs, exhibited significantly enhanced anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide rationales for incorporating HDAC inhibitory moieties into genotoxic drugs, so as to overcome the repair capacity of cancer cells. Systematic development of similar DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs may represent a novel opportunity for improving cancer therapy. PMID:25759362

  17. A DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug CY190602 with significantly enhanced anticancer potency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Ding, Hongyu; Li, Xiaoxi; Pallasch, Christian P; Hong, Liya; Guo, Dianwu; Chen, Yi; Wang, Difei; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yajie; Hemann, Michael T; Jiang, Hai

    2015-03-09

    Genotoxic drugs constitute a major treatment modality for human cancers; however, cancer cells' intrinsic DNA repair capability often increases the threshold of lethality and renders these drugs ineffective. The emerging roles of HDACs in DNA repair provide new opportunities for improving traditional genotoxic drugs. Here, we report the development and characterization of CY190602, a novel bendamustine-derived drug with significantly enhanced anticancer potency. We show that CY190602's enhanced potency can be attributed to its newly gained ability to inhibit HDACs. Using this novel DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug as a tool, we further explored HDAC's role in DNA repair. We found that HDAC activities are essential for the expression of several genes involved in DNA synthesis and repair, including TYMS, Tip60, CBP, EP300, and MSL1. Importantly, CY190602, the first-in-class example of such DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs, exhibited significantly enhanced anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide rationales for incorporating HDAC inhibitory moieties into genotoxic drugs, so as to overcome the repair capacity of cancer cells. Systematic development of similar DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs may represent a novel opportunity for improving cancer therapy.

  18. Improved immunogenicity of Newcastle disease virus inactivated vaccine following DNA vaccination using Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and fusion protein genes.

    PubMed

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Ideris, Aini

    2016-03-01

    The present study describes the development of DNA vaccines using the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) genes from AF2240 Newcastle disease virus strain, namely pIRES/HN, pIRES/F and pIRES-F/HN. Transient expression analysis of the constructs in Vero cells revealed the successful expression of gene inserts in vitro. Moreover, in vivo experiments showed that single vaccination with the constructed plasmid DNA (pDNA) followed by a boost with inactivated vaccine induced a significant difference in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody levels (p < 0.05) elicited by either pIRES/F, pIRES/F+ pIRES/HN or pIRES-F/HN at one week after the booster in specific pathogen free chickens when compared with the inactivated vaccine alone. Taken together, these results indicated that recombinant pDNA could be used to increase the efficacy of the inactivated vaccine immunization procedure.

  19. B lymphocytes as direct antigen-presenting cells for anti-tumor DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Colluru, Viswa Teja; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of remarkable preclinical efficacy, DNA vaccination has demonstrated low immunogenicity in humans. While efforts have focused on increasing cross-presentation of DNA-encoded antigens, efforts to increase DNA vaccine immunogenicity by targeting direct presentation have remained mostly unexplored. In these studies, we compared the ability of different APCs to present antigen to T cells after simple co-culture with plasmid DNA. We found that human primary peripheral B lymphocytes, and not monocytes or in vitro derived dendritic cells (DCs), were able to efficiently encode antigen mRNA and expand cognate tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo. Similarly, murine B lymphocytes co-cultured with plasmid DNA, and not DCs, were able to prime antigen-specific T cells in vivo. Moreover, B lymphocyte-mediated presentation of plasmid antigen led to greater Th1-biased immunity and was sufficient to elicit an anti-tumor effect in vivo. Surprisingly, increasing plasmid presentation by B cells, and not cross presentation of peptides by DCs, further augmented traditional plasmid vaccination. Together, these data suggest that targeting plasmid DNA to B lymphocytes, for example through transfer of ex vivo plasmidloaded B cells, may be novel means to achieve greater T cell immunity from DNA vaccines. PMID:27661128

  20. Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLG) microparticles modify the immune response to DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Helson, Rebecca; Olszewska, Wieslawa; Singh, Manmohan; Megede, Jan Zur; Melero, Jose A; O'Hagan, Derek; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2008-02-06

    Priming with the major surface glycoprotein G of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) expressed by recombinant vaccinia leads to strong Th2 responses and lung eosinophilia during viral challenge. We now show that DNA vaccination in BALB/c mice with plasmids encoding G attenuated RSV replication but also enhanced disease with lung eosinophilia and increased IL-4/5 production. However, formulating the DNA with PLG microparticles reduced the severity of disease during RSV challenge without significantly lessening protection against viral replication. PLG formulation greatly reduced lung eosinophilia and prevented the induction of IL-4 and IL-5 during challenge, accompanied by a less marked CD4+ T cell response and a restoration of the CD8+ T cell recruitment seen during infection of non-vaccinated animals. After RSV challenge, lung eosinophilia was enhanced and prolonged in mice vaccinated with DNA encoding a secreted form of G; this effect was virtually prevented by PLG formulation. Therefore, PLG microparticulate formulation modifies the pattern of immune responses induced by DNA vaccination boosts CD8+ T cell priming and attenuates Th2 responses. We speculate that PLG microparticles affect antigen uptake and processing, thereby influencing the outcome of DNA vaccination.

  1. Design of immunogenic and effective multi-epitope DNA vaccines for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Il; Celis, Esteban

    2012-03-01

    Plasmid DNA vaccination is an attractive way to elicit T cell responses against infectious agents and tumor cells. DNA constructs can be designed to contain multiple T cell epitopes to generate a diverse immune response to incorporate numerous antigens and to reduce limitations due to MHC restriction into a single entity. We have prepared cDNA plasmid constructs containing several mouse T cell epitopes connected by either furin-sensitive or furin-resistant linkers and studied the effects of a cationic cell-penetrating sequence from HIV-tat. Significant CD8 T cell responses were obtained with multi-epitope DNA vaccines followed by in vivo electroporation regardless of the type of linker used and whether the construct had the HIV-tat sequence. The magnitude of immune responses was very similar to all CD8 T cell epitopes contained within each vaccine construct, indicating the absence of immunodominance. Incorporating a T helper epitope into the constructs increased the T cell responses. Prophylactic and therapeutic antitumor responses against B16 melanoma were obtained using a construct containing epitopes from melanosomal proteins, indicating that this vaccination was successful in generating responses to self-antigens that potentially may be subjected to immune tolerance. These findings are useful for designing DNA vaccines for a multitude of diseases where T lymphocytes play a protective or therapeutic role.

  2. Nucleic acid (DNA) immunization as a platform for dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kevin R; Raviprakash, Kanakatte

    2015-12-10

    Since the early 1990s, DNA immunization has been used as a platform for developing a tetravalent dengue vaccine in response to the high priority need for protecting military personnel deployed to dengue endemic regions of the world. Several approaches have been explored ranging from naked DNA immunization to the use of live virus vectors to deliver the targeted genes for expression. Pre-clinical animal studies were largely successful in generating anti-dengue cellular and humoral immune responses that were protective either completely or partially against challenge with live dengue virus. However, Phase 1 clinical evaluation of a prototype monovalent dengue 1 DNA vaccine expressing prM and E genes revealed anti-dengue T cell IFNγ responses, but poor neutralizing antibody responses. These less than optimal results are thought to be due to poor uptake and expression of the DNA vaccine plasmids. Because DNA immunization as a vaccine platform has the advantages of ease of manufacture, flexible genetic manipulation and enhanced stability, efforts continue to improve the immunogenicity of these vaccines using a variety of methods.

  3. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  4. DNA vaccine elicits an efficient antitumor response by targeting the mutant Kras in a transgenic mouse lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Weng, T-Y; Yen, M-C; Huang, C-T; Hung, J-J; Chen, Y-L; Chen, W-C; Wang, C-Y; Chang, J-Y; Lai, M-D

    2014-10-01

    Mutant Kras (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) is observed in more than 20% of non-small-cell lung cancers; however, no effective Kras target therapy is available at present. The Kras DNA vaccine may represent as a novel immunotherapeutic agent in lung cancer. In this study, we investigated the antitumor efficacy of the Kras DNA vaccine in a genetically engineered inducible mouse lung tumor model driven by Kras(G12D). Lung tumors were induced by doxycycline, and the therapeutic effects of Kras DNA vaccine were evaluated with delivery of Kras(G12D) plasmids. Mutant Kras(G12D) DNA vaccine significantly decreased the tumor nodules. A dominant-negative mutant Kras(G12D)N17, devoid of oncogenic activity, achieved similar therapeutic effects. The T-helper 1 immune response was enhanced in mice treated with Kras DNA vaccine. Splenocytes from mice receiving Kras DNA vaccine presented an antigen-specific response by treatment with peptides of Kras but not Hras or OVA. The number of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells increased after Kras vaccination. In contrast, Kras DNA vaccine was not effective in the lung tumor in transgenic mice, which was induced by mutant L858R epidermal growth factor receptor. Overall, these results indicate that Kras DNA vaccine produces an effective antitumor response in transgenic mice, and may be useful in treating lung cancer-carrying Ras mutation.

  5. Attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium delivery of a novel DNA vaccine induces immune responses and provides protection against duck enteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueyan; Liu, Qing; Xiao, Kangpeng; Li, Pei; Liu, Qiong; Zhao, Xinxin; Kong, Qingke

    2016-04-15

    DNA vaccines are widely used to prevent and treat infectious diseases, cancer and autoimmune diseases; however, their relatively low immunogenicity is an obstacle to their use. In this study, we constructed a novel and universal DNA vaccine vector (pSS898) that can be used to build DNA vaccines against duck enteritis virus (DEV) and other viruses that require DNA vaccines to provide protection. This vaccine vector has many advantages, including innate immunogenicity, efficient nuclear trafficking and resistance to attack from nucleases. UL24 and tgB from DEV were chosen as the antigens, and the heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) from Escherichia coli and the IL-2 gene (DuIL-2) from duck were used as adjuvants for the construction of DNA vaccine plasmids. Ducklings that were orally immunized with S739 (Salmonella Typhimurium Δasd-66 Δcrp-24 Δcya-25) and harboring these DEV DNA vaccines produced strong mucosal and systemic immune responses, and they resisted an otherwise lethal DEV challenge. More importantly, S739 (UL24-LTB) provided 90% protection after a priming-boost immunization. This study shows that our novel and universal DNA vaccine vector can be used efficiently in practical applications and may provide a promising method of orally inoculating ducks with a DEV DNA vaccine delivered by attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium for prevention of DVE.

  6. Progress in recombinant DNA-derived vaccines for Lassa virus and filoviruses.

    PubMed

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2011-12-01

    Developing vaccines for highly pathogenic viruses such as those causing Lassa, Ebola, and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers is a daunting task due to both scientific and logistical constraints. Scientific hurdles to overcome include poorly defined relationships between pathogenicity and protective immune responses, genetic diversity of viruses, and safety in a target population that includes a large number of individuals with compromised immune systems. Logistical obstacles include the requirement for biosafety level-4 containment to study the authentic viruses, the poor public health infrastructure of the endemic disease areas, and the cost of developing these vaccines for use in non-lucrative markets. Recombinant DNA-based vaccine approaches offer promise of overcoming some of these issues. In this review, we consider the status of various recombinant DNA candidate vaccines against Lassa virus and filoviruses which have been tested in animals.

  7. DNA vaccination of American robins (Turdus migratorius) against West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, A Marm; Dupuis, Alan P; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Kramer, Laura D

    2010-05-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has caused at least 1150 cases of encephalitis, 100 deaths, and an estimated 30,000-80,000 illnesses in 6 of the last 7 years. Recent evidence from several regions has implicated American robins (Turdus migratorius) as an important host for feeding by Culex mosquitoes, and, when integrated with their host competence for WNV, demonstrates that they are a key WNV amplification host. We evaluated the efficacy of a DNA plasmid vaccine at reducing the viremia and infectiousness of hatch-year American robins. We found that a single dose of vaccine injected intramuscularly resulted in more than a 400-fold (10(2.6)) decrease in average viremia. Although sample sizes were small, these results suggest that vaccinated robins exhibit viremias that are likely to be mostly noninfectious to biting Culex mosquitoes. More broadly, if an orally effective formulation of this vaccine could be developed, new control strategies based on wildlife vaccination may be possible.

  8. Using recombinant DNA technology for the development of live-attenuated dengue vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiang-Chi; Butler, Michael; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2012-07-15

    Dramatic increases in dengue (DEN) incidence and disease severity have been reported, in great part due to the geographic expansion of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. One result is the expanded co-circulation of all dengue 1-4 serotype viruses (DENV) in urban areas worldwide, especially in South and South-East Asia, and South America. DEN disease severity ranges from asymptomatic infections to febrile dengue fevers (DF) to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). There is an urgent need for a safe and effective tetravalent DEN vaccine. Several live attenuated, tetravalent DEN vaccine candidates have been generated by recombinant DNA technology; these candidates are capable of providing immunity to all four DENV serotypes. In this paper we review (a) recombinant live-attenuated DEN vaccine candidates in terms of deletion, antigen chimerization, and the introduction of adaptive mutations; (b) strategies for improving tetravalent vaccine attenuation; and (c) live-attenuated DENV vaccine development.

  9. Characterization of GD2 peptide mimotope DNA vaccines effective against spontaneous neuroblastoma metastases.

    PubMed

    Fest, Stefan; Huebener, Nicole; Weixler, Silke; Bleeke, Matthias; Zeng, Yan; Strandsby, Anne; Volkmer-Engert, Rudolf; Landgraf, Christiane; Gaedicke, Gerhard; Riemer, Angelika B; Michalsky, Elke; Jaeger, Ines S; Preissner, Robert; Förster-Wald, Elisabeth; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Lode, Holger N

    2006-11-01

    Disialoganglioside GD2 is an established target for immunotherapy in neuroblastoma. We tested the hypothesis that active immunization against the glycolipid GD2 using DNA vaccines encoding for cyclic GD2-mimicking decapeptides (i.e., GD2 mimotopes) is effective against neuroblastoma. For this purpose, two GD2 peptide mimotopes (MA and MD) were selected based on docking experiments to anti-GD2 antibody ch14.18 (binding free energy: -41.23 kJ/mol for MA and -48.06 kJ/mol for MD) and Biacore analysis (K(d) = 12.3 x 10(-5) mol/L for MA and 5.3 x 10(-5) mol/L for MD), showing a higher affinity of MD over MA. These sequences were selected for DNA vaccine design based on pSecTag2-A (pSA) also including a T-cell helper epitope. GD2 mimicry was shown following transfection of CHO-1 cells with pSA-MA and pSA-MD DNA vaccines, with twice-higher signal intensity for cells expressing MD over MA. Finally, these DNA vaccines were tested for induction of tumor protective immunity in a syngeneic neuroblastoma model following oral DNA vaccine delivery with attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (SL 7207). Only mice receiving the DNA vaccines revealed a reduction of spontaneous liver metastases. The highest anti-GD2 humoral immune response and natural killer cell activation was observed in mice immunized with the pSA-MD, a finding consistent with superior calculated binding free energy, dissociation constant, and GD2 mimicry potential for GD2 mimotope MD over MA. In summary, we show that DNA immunization with pSA-MD may provide a useful strategy for active immunization against neuroblastoma.

  10. Smallpox DNA Vaccine Delivered by Novel Skin Electroporation Device Protects Mice Against Intranasal Poxvirus Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-27

    10.1016/j.vaccine.2006.11.017mmunosuppressed, pregnant, breastfeeding , or have history f cardiac disease), and (2) because this vaccine results in...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The original document contains color images . 14. ABSTRACT Previously, we demonstrated that an experimental smallpox DNA...a Nikon E600 fluorescence microscope. Images were aken using a SPOT camera (Diagnostic Instruments, NC). For some experiments, cells were stained

  11. Construction and Nonclinical Testing of a Puumala Virus Synthetic M Gene-Based DNA Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-12

    nogenicity in hamsters, and the results indicated that there was no antibody response, even after five vaccinations delivered by gene gun (data not...infective doses [ID50]) (data not shown). In an earlier study , it was determined that the ANDV M gene-based DNA vaccine failed to elicit a de...data indicated that improve- ments in the quality of the immune response, i.e., the neutralizing antibody response, were needed. Synthetic, mammalian

  12. Targeted DNA vaccines for enhanced induction of idiotype-specific B and T cells

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksen, Agnete B.; Sandlie, Inger; Bogen, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Background: Idiotypes (Id) are antigenic determinants localized in variable (V) regions of Ig. Id-specific T and B cells (antibodies) play a role in immunotherapy of Id+ tumors. However, vaccine strategies that enhance Id-specific responses are needed. Methods: Id+ single-chain fragment variable (scFv) from multiple myelomas and B cell lymphomas were prepared in a fusion format that bivalently target surface molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APC). APC-specific targeting units were either scFv from APC-specific mAb (anti-MHC II, anti-CD40) or chemokines (MIP-1α, RANTES). Homodimeric Id-vaccines were injected intramuscularly or intradermally as plasmids in mice, combined with electroporation. Results: (i) Transfected cells secreted plasmid-encoded Id+ fusion proteins to extracellular fluid followed by binding of vaccine molecules to APC. (ii) Targeted vaccine molecules increased Id-specific B and T cell responses. (iii) Bivalency and xenogeneic sequences both contributed to enhanced responses. (iv) Targeted Id DNA vaccines induced tumor resistance against challenges with Id+ tumors. (v) Human MIP-1α targeting units enhanced Id-specific responses in mice, due to a cross reaction with murine chemokine receptors. Thus, targeted vaccines designed for humans can be quality tested in mice. (vi) Human Id+ scFv from four multiple myeloma patients were inserted into the vaccine format and were successfully tested in mice. (vii) Human MIP-1α vaccine proteins enhanced human T cell responses in vitro. (viii) A hypothetical model for how the APC-targeted vaccine molecules enhance Id-specific T and B cells is presented. Conclusion: Targeted DNA Id-vaccines show promising results in preclinical studies, paving the way for testing in patients. PMID:23115759

  13. Evaluation of a novel non-penetrating electrode for use in DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Donate, Amy; Coppola, Domenico; Cruz, Yolmari; Heller, Richard

    2011-04-29

    Current progress in the development of vaccines has decreased the incidence of fatal and non-fatal infections and increased longevity. However, new technologies need to be developed to combat an emerging generation of infectious diseases. DNA vaccination has been demonstrated to have great potential for use with a wide variety of diseases. Alone, this technology does not generate a significant immune response for vaccination, but combined with delivery by electroporation (EP), can enhance plasmid expression and immunity. Most EP systems, while effective, can be invasive and painful making them less desirable for use in vaccination. Our lab recently developed a non-invasive electrode known as the multi-electrode array (MEA), which lies flat on the surface of the skin without penetrating the tissue. In this study we evaluated the MEA for its use in DNA vaccination using Hepatitis B virus as the infectious model. We utilized the guinea pig model because their skin is similar in thickness and morphology to humans. The plasmid encoding Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was delivered intradermally with the MEA to guinea pig skin. The results show increased protein expression resulting from plasmid delivery using the MEA as compared to injection alone. Within 48 hours of treatment, there was an influx of cellular infiltrate in experimental groups. Humoral responses were also increased significantly in both duration and intensity as compared to injection only groups. While this electrode requires further study, our results suggest that the MEA has potential for use in electrically mediated intradermal DNA vaccination.

  14. Recent advance in immunotherapies for Alzheimer disease: with special reference to DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Okura, Yoshio; Matsumoto, Yoh

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. Based on the amyloid cascade hypothesis, several immunotherapies for AD have been developed as curative treatment. In 1999, Schenk et al. reported for the first time that amyloid beta (Abeta) deposits in AD model mice could be reduced by active vaccination with Abeta peptide. Although clinical trials with the Abeta peptide were halted due to the development of meningoencephalitis in some treated patients, the vaccine therapy was judged to be effective on the basis of clinical and pathological analyses. Passive immunization using humanized anti-Abeta monoclonal antibodies is also under clinical trials; however they have some problems to be solved. As other strategies, DNA vaccines have been developed as immunotherapies for AD, which is simple, easily modified and can be administered without adjuvant. DNA vaccines were developed by several groups including our laboratory, which induced Abeta reduction in AD model mice without side effects. DNA vaccination may be open up new avenue of vaccine therapies for AD in the near future.

  15. Dual functions of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™ at the intermediate dose in protection against rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs vaccinated with a human rotavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangning; Wen, Ke; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Bui, Tammy; Jones, Dorothy; Pelzer, Kevin; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine dose effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (LA) ™ strain on rotavirus-specific antibody and B cell responses in gnotobiotic pigs vaccinated with an oral attenuated human rotavirus (AttHRV). Methods Pigs were inoculated with AttHRV vaccine in conjunction with high dose LA (14 doses, total 2.2×109 colony forming units [CFU]), intermediate dose LA (9 doses, total 3.2×106 CFU), low dose LA (5 doses, total 2.1×106 CFU) or without LA feeding. Protection against rotavirus shedding and diarrhea was assessed upon challenge with a virulent HRV. Rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibodies in serum and rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells (ASC) and memory B cells in ileum, spleen and blood of the pigs were measured and compared among treatment groups. Results The intermediate dose LA (MidLA), but not high or low dose LA, significantly reduced rotavirus diarrhea (MidLA only group) and significantly improved the protection conferred by AttHRV vaccine (MidLA+AttHRV group). Associated with the increased protection, MidLA significantly enhanced rotavirus-specific antibody, ASC and memory B cell responses to AttHRV vaccine. High or low dose LA did not enhance virus-specific antibody and ASC responses, hence did not improve the vaccine efficacy. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of dose selection and indicate that certain specific lactobacilli strains at the appropriate dose have the dual function of reducing rotavirus diarrhea and enhancing the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. PMID:24126832

  16. A dual-strain feline calicivirus vaccine stimulates broader cross-neutralization antibodies than a single-strain vaccine and lessens clinical signs in vaccinated cats when challenged with a homologous feline calicivirus strain associated with virulent systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengjin; Hess, Jennifer; Gill, Michael; Hustead, David

    2010-02-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) causes an array of clinical disease in cats. Traditionally this disease has been associated with respiratory disease, limping, or chronic stomatitis. Within the last 10 years, virulent systemic feline calicivirus (VS-FCV) has been recognized which causes additional clinical signs and has a higher fatality rate. A dual-strain FCV vaccine containing a strain of FCV associated with traditional respiratory disease and a VS-FCV strain stimulates serum cross-neutralization antibodies when tested against field strains from Europe and VS-FCV strains from USA. Following challenge with a homologous VS-FCV strain, vaccinated cats had significantly reduced clinical signs.

  17. Specific detection of Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA using dual labeled gold nanoparticle based electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Thiruppathiraja, Chinnasamy; Kamatchiammal, Senthilkumar; Adaikkappan, Periyakaruppan; Santhosh, Devakirubakaran Jayakar; Alagar, Muthukaruppan

    2011-10-01

    The present study was aimed at the development and evaluation of a DNA electrochemical biosensor for Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA detection in a clinical specimen using a signal amplifier as dual-labeled AuNPs. The DNA electrochemical biosensors were fabricated using a sandwich detection strategy involving two kinds of DNA probes specific to Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA. The probes of enzyme ALP and the detector probe both conjugated on the AuNPs and subsequently hybridized with target DNA immobilized in a SAM/ITO electrode followed by characterization with CV, EIS, and DPV analysis using the electroactive species para-nitrophenol generated by ALP through hydrolysis of para-nitrophenol phosphate. The effect of enhanced sensitivity was obtained due to the AuNPs carrying numerous ALPs per hybridization and a detection limit of 1.25 ng/ml genomic DNA was determined under optimized conditions. The dual-labeled AuNP-facilitated electrochemical sensor was also evaluated by clinical sputum samples, showing a higher sensitivity and specificity and the outcome was in agreement with the PCR analysis. In conclusion, the developed electrochemical sensor demonstrated unique sensitivity and specificity for both genomic DNA and sputum samples and can be employed as a regular diagnostics tool for Mycobacterium sp. monitoring in clinical samples.

  18. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with DNA and MVA vaccines, expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag virus-like particles, is highly immunogenic in mice

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, Nicola; Chege, Gerald; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to make affordable vaccines suitable for the regions most affected by HIV-1, we have constructed stable vaccines that express an HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag immunogen (BCG-GagM, MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM). Mosaic immunogens have been designed to address the tremendous diversity of this virus. Here we have shown that GagM buds from cells infected and transfected with MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM respectively and forms virus-like particles. Previously we showed that a BCG-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost generated strong cellular immune responses in mice. In this study immune responses to the DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM vaccines were evaluated in homologous and heterologous prime-boost vaccinations. The DNA homologous prime boost vaccination elicited predominantly CD8+ T cells while the homologous MVA vaccination induced predominantly CD4+ T cells. A heterologous DNA-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost induced strong, more balanced Gag CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses and that were predominantly of an effector memory phenotype. The immunogenicity of the mosaic Gag (GagM) was compared to a naturally occurring subtype C Gag (GagN) using a DNA homologous vaccination regimen. DNA-GagN expresses a natural Gag with a sequence that was closest to the consensus sequence of subtype C viruses sampled in South Africa. DNA-GagM homologous vaccination induced cumulative HIV-1 Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT responses that were 6.5-fold higher than those induced by the DNA-GagN vaccination. Similarly, DNA-GagM vaccination generated 7-fold higher levels of cytokine-positive CD8+ T cells than DNA-GagN, indicating that this subtype C mosaic Gag elicits far more potent immune responses than a consensus-type Gag. Cells transfected and infected with DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM respectively, expressed high levels of GagM and produced budding virus-like particles. Our data indicates that a heterologous prime boost regimen using DNA and MVA vaccines expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag is highly immunogenic in mice and

  19. Evaluation of a prototype dengue-1 DNA vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Charmagne G; Tjaden, Jeffrey; Burgess, Timothy; Danko, Janine R; Tamminga, Cindy; Simmons, Monika; Wu, Shuenn-Jue; Sun, Peifang; Kochel, Tadeusz; Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Hayes, Curtis G; Porter, Kevin R

    2011-01-29

    Candidate dengue DNA vaccine constructs for each dengue serotype were developed by incorporating pre-membrane and envelope genes into a plasmid vector. A Phase 1 clinical trial was performed using the dengue virus serotype-1 (DENV-1) vaccine construct (D1ME(100)). The study was an open-label, dose-escalation, safety and immunogenicity trial involving 22 healthy flavivirus-naïve adults assigned to one of two groups. Each group received three intramuscular injections (0, 1, and 5 months) of either a high dose (5.0mg, n=12) or a low dose (1.0mg, n=10) DNA vaccine using the needle-free Biojector(®) 2000. The most commonly reported solicited signs and symptoms were local mild pain or tenderness (10/22, 45%), local mild swelling (6/22, 27%), muscle pain (6/22, 27%) and fatigue (6/22, 27%). Five subjects (41.6%) in the high dose group and none in the low dose group developed detectable anti-dengue neutralizing antibodies. T-cell IFN gamma responses were detected in 50% (4/8) and 83.3% (10/12) of subjects in the low and high dose groups, respectively. The safety profile of the DENV-1 DNA vaccine is acceptable at both doses administered in the study. These results demonstrate a favorable reactogenicity and safety profile of the first in human evaluation of a DENV-1 DNA vaccine.

  20. DNA electroporation of multi-agent vaccines conferring protection against select agent challenge: TriGrid delivery system.

    PubMed

    Keane-Myers, Andrea M; Bell, Matt; Hannaman, Drew; Albrecht, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Effective multi-agent/multivalent vaccines that confer protection against more than one disease are highly desirable to the patient and to health-care professionals. Electroporation of DNA vaccines, whereby tissues injected with DNA are subjected to localized electrical currents, is an ideal platform technology that achieves protective immune responses to multivalent vaccination. Here, we describe an electroporation-based immunization technique capable of administering a cocktail of DNA vaccinations in vivo. Immune response measurements, including protection from pathogen challenge and induction of antigen-specific antibody responses and cell-mediated immune responses, are also discussed.

  1. Immunogenicity of Candidate MERS-CoV DNA Vaccines Based on the Spike Protein

    PubMed Central

    Al-amri, Sawsan S.; Abbas, Ayman T.; Siddiq, Loai A.; Alghamdi, Abrar; Sanki, Mohammad A.; Al-Muhanna, Muhanna K.; Alhabbab, Rowa Y.; Azhar, Esam I.; Li, Xuguang; Hashem, Anwar M.

    2017-01-01

    MERS-coronavirus is a novel zoonotic pathogen which spread rapidly to >25 countries since 2012. Its apparent endemicity and the wide spread of its reservoir host (dromedary camels) in the Arabian Peninsula highlight the ongoing public health threat of this virus. Therefore, development of effective prophylactic vaccine needs to be urgently explored given that there are no approved prophylactics or therapeutics for humans or animals to date. Different vaccine candidates have been investigated but serious safety concerns remain over protein or full-length spike (S) protein-based vaccines. Here, we investigated the immunogenicity of naked DNA vaccines expressing different fragments of MERS-CoV S protein in mice. We found that plasmids expressing full-length (pS) or S1-subunit (pS1) could induce significant levels of S1-specific antibodies (Abs) but with distinct IgG isotype patterns. Specifically, pS1 immunization elicited a balanced Th1/Th2 response and generally higher levels of all IgG isotypes compared to pS vaccination. Interestingly, only mice immunized with pS1 demonstrated significant S1-specific cellular immune response. Importantly, both constructs induced cross-neutralizing Abs against multiple strains of human and camel origins. These results indicate that vaccines expressing S1-subunit of the MERS-CoV S protein could represent a potential vaccine candidate without the possible safety concerns associated with full-length protein-based vaccines. PMID:28332568

  2. Directed Molecular Evolution Improves the Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of a Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus DNA Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    VEEV IA/B challenge. Our results indicate that it is pos- sible to improve the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of alphavirus DNA vaccines using... alphaviruses that ause periodic epizootics in the Americas [1]. These New World lphaviruses cause diseases in humans characterized by fever, eadache...equine encephalitis virus, VEE, alphavirus , DNA vaccine, envelope glycoproteins, directed molecular evolution, efficacy, immunogenicity, laboratory

  3. The Influences of Glycosylation on the Antigenicity, Immunogenicity, and Protective Efficacy of Ebola Virus GP DNA Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-22

    Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Influences of Glycosylation on Antigenicity, Immunogenicity, and Protective Efficacy of Ebola Virus GP DNA Vaccines ...carbohydrates. We measured the influences of GP glycosylation on antigenicity, immu- nogenicity, and protection by testing DNA vaccines comprised of GP...may protect against filovirus infection (6, 39). Con- sistent with this, B-cell-deficient mice vaccinated with EBOV-like particles were not protected

  4. The immune response induced by DNA vaccine expressing nfa1 gene against Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-12-01

    The pathogenic free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in experimental animals and in humans. The nfa1 gene that was cloned from N. fowleri is located on pseudopodia, especially amoebic food cups and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri. In this study, we constructed and characterized retroviral vector and lentiviral vector systems for nfa1 DNA vaccination in mice. We constructed the retroviral vector (pQCXIN) and the lentiviral vector (pCDH) cloned with the egfp-nfa1 gene. The expression of nfa1 gene in Chinese hamster ovary cell and human primary nasal epithelial cell transfected with the pQCXIN/egfp-nfa1 vector or pCDH/egfp-nfa1 vector was observed by fluorescent microscopy and Western blotting analysis. Our viral vector systems effectively delivered the nfa1 gene to the target cells and expressed the Nfa1 protein within the target cells. To evaluate immune responses of nfa1-vaccinated mice, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of each retro- or lentiviral vector expressing nfa1 gene. DNA vaccination using viral vectors expressing nfa1 significantly stimulated the production of Nfa1-specific IgG subclass, as well as IgG levels. In particular, both levels of IgG2a (Th1) and IgG1 (Th2) were significantly increased in mice vaccinated with viral vectors. These results show the nfa1-vaccination induce efficiently Th1 type, as well as Th2 type immune responses. This is the first report to construct viral vector systems and to evaluate immune responses as DNA vaccination in N. fowleri infection. Furthermore, these results suggest that nfal vaccination may be an effective method for treatment of N. fowleri infection.

  5. Protective immunity to H7N9 influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S; Walters, Jewell N; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2014-05-19

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses' ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases.

  6. Identification of upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain and characterization of novel DNA vaccine candidates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (EST's) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC formerly RD-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  7. Dendritic Cell Targeting Effectively Boosts T Cell Responses Elicited by an HIV Multiepitope DNA Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Apostólico, Juliana de Souza; Lunardelli, Victória Alves Santos; Yamamoto, Marcio Massao; Souza, Higo Fernando Santos; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Boscardin, Silvia Beatriz; Rosa, Daniela Santoro

    2017-01-01

    Despite several efforts in the last decades, an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine is still not available. Different approaches have been evaluated, such as recombinant proteins, viral vectors, DNA vaccines, and, most recently, dendritic cell (DC) targeting. This strategy is based on DC features that place them as central for induction of immunity. Targeting is accomplished by the use of chimeric monoclonal antibodies directed to DC surface receptors fused to the antigen of interest. In this work, we targeted eight promiscuous HIV-derived CD4(+) T cell epitopes (HIVBr8) to the DEC205(+) DCs by fusing the multiepitope immunogen to the heavy chain of αDEC205 (αDECHIVBr8), in the presence of the TLR3 agonist poly (I:C). In addition, we tested a DNA vaccine encoding the same epitopes using homologous or heterologous prime-boost regimens. Our results showed that mice immunized with αDECHIVBr8 presented higher CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses when compared to mice that received the DNA vaccine (pVAXHIVBr8). In addition, pVAXHIVBr8 priming followed by αDECHIVBr8 boosting induced higher polyfunctional proliferative and cytokine-producing T cell responses to HIV-1 peptides than homologous DNA immunization or heterologous αDEC prime/DNA boost. Based on these results, we conclude that homologous prime-boost and heterologous boosting immunization strategies targeting CD4(+) epitopes to DCs are effective to improve HIV-specific cellular immune responses when compared to standalone DNA immunization. Moreover, our results indicate that antigen targeting to DC is an efficient strategy to boost immunity against a multiepitope immunogen, especially in the context of DNA vaccination.

  8. Dendritic Cell Targeting Effectively Boosts T Cell Responses Elicited by an HIV Multiepitope DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Apostólico, Juliana de Souza; Lunardelli, Victória Alves Santos; Yamamoto, Marcio Massao; Souza, Higo Fernando Santos; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Boscardin, Silvia Beatriz; Rosa, Daniela Santoro

    2017-01-01

    Despite several efforts in the last decades, an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine is still not available. Different approaches have been evaluated, such as recombinant proteins, viral vectors, DNA vaccines, and, most recently, dendritic cell (DC) targeting. This strategy is based on DC features that place them as central for induction of immunity. Targeting is accomplished by the use of chimeric monoclonal antibodies directed to DC surface receptors fused to the antigen of interest. In this work, we targeted eight promiscuous HIV-derived CD4+ T cell epitopes (HIVBr8) to the DEC205+ DCs by fusing the multiepitope immunogen to the heavy chain of αDEC205 (αDECHIVBr8), in the presence of the TLR3 agonist poly (I:C). In addition, we tested a DNA vaccine encoding the same epitopes using homologous or heterologous prime-boost regimens. Our results showed that mice immunized with αDECHIVBr8 presented higher CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses when compared to mice that received the DNA vaccine (pVAXHIVBr8). In addition, pVAXHIVBr8 priming followed by αDECHIVBr8 boosting induced higher polyfunctional proliferative and cytokine-producing T cell responses to HIV-1 peptides than homologous DNA immunization or heterologous αDEC prime/DNA boost. Based on these results, we conclude that homologous prime-boost and heterologous boosting immunization strategies targeting CD4+ epitopes to DCs are effective to improve HIV-specific cellular immune responses when compared to standalone DNA immunization. Moreover, our results indicate that antigen targeting to DC is an efficient strategy to boost immunity against a multiepitope immunogen, especially in the context of DNA vaccination. PMID:28223987

  9. PAMAM-Lys, a Novel Vaccine Delivery Vector, Enhances the Protective Effects of the SjC23 DNA Vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoting; Dai, Yang; Zhao, Song; Tang, Jianxia; Li, Hongjun; Xing, Yuntian; Qu, Guoli; Li, Xinsong; Dai, Jianrong; Zhu, Yinchang; Zhang, Xueguang

    2014-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis japonica remains a major public-health concern in China. Praziquantel-based chemotherapy effectively reduces both infections and intensity; however, it can not prevent re-infection. Furthermore, there is an increasing concern about praziquantel resistance following long-term repeated use of the drug in endemic areas. Therefore, development of a schistosomiasis vaccine, as a strategy to prevent and control schistosomiasis japonica, has been given high priority. The present study was conducted to develop PAMAM dendrimers as a novel vaccine delivery vector for a schistosomiasis japonica DNA vaccine and evaluate its ability to enhance protective effects against Schistosoma japonicum infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Lysine was used to modify 4.0G PAMAM, and the modified product PAMAM-Lys was synthesized. PAMAM-Lys showed both high transfection and low cytotocity for gene delivery in vitro. DNA vaccines combined with PAMAM-Lys produced higher level of protection compare with naked DNA vaccines against S. japonicum infection in a mouse model. Futhermore,antibodies from mice immunized with PAMAM-Lys combined DNA vaccines were significantly higher than those of mice immunized with the naked DNA vaccines. The PAMAM-Lys vector elicited a predominantly IgG2a antibody response and a tremendously increase in the production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. Conclusion/Significance Lysine-modified PAMAM-Lys is an excellent vector. PAMAM-Lys may enhance the immunoreactivity of DNA vaccine and increase the protective effect of the SjC23 DNA vaccine against S. japonicum infection. PMID:24497955

  10. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  11. C3d enhanced DNA vaccination induced humoral immune response to glycoprotein C of pseudorabies virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Tiezhu; Fan Huiying; Tan Yadi; Xiao Shaobo; Ling Jieyu; Chen Huanchun; Guo Aizhen . E-mail: aizhen@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2006-09-08

    Murine C3d were utilized to enhance immunogenicity of pseudorabies virus (PrV) gC DNA vaccination. Three copies of C3d and four copies of CR2-binding domain M28{sub 4} were fused, respectively, to truncated gC gene encoding soluble glycoprotein C (sgC) in pcDNA3.1. BALB/c mice were, respectively, immunized with recombinant plasmids, blank vector, and inactivated vaccine. The antibody ELISA titer for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA was 49-fold more than that for sgC DNA, and the neutralizing antibody obtained 8-fold rise. Protection of mice from death after lethal PrV (316 LD{sub 5}) challenge was augmented from 25% to 100%. Furthermore, C3d fusion increased Th2-biased immune response by inducing IL-4 production. The IL-4 level for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA immunization approached that for the inactivated vaccine. Compared to C3d, M28 enhanced sgC DNA immunogenicity to a lesser extent. In conclusion, we demonstrated that murine C3d fusion significantly enhanced gC DNA immunity by directing Th1-biased to a balanced and more effective Th1/Th2 response.

  12. DNA Vaccines: MHC II-Targeted Vaccine Protein Produced by Transfected Muscle Fibres Induces a Local Inflammatory Cell Infiltrate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Løvås, Tom-Ole; Gundersen, Kristian; Bogen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with naked DNA holds great promise but immunogenicity needs to be improved. DNA constructs encoding bivalent proteins that bind antigen-presenting cells (APC) for delivery of antigen have been shown to enhance T and B cell responses and protection in tumour challenge experiments. However, the mechanism for the increased potency remains to be determined. Here we have constructed DNA vaccines that express the fluorescent protein mCherry, a strategy which allowed tracking of vaccine proteins. Transfected muscle fibres in mice were visualized, and their relationship to infiltrating mononuclear cells could be determined. Interestingly, muscle fibers that produced MHC class II-specific dimeric vaccine proteins with mCherry were for weeks surrounded by a localized intense cellular infiltrate composed of CD45+, MHC class II+ and CD11b+ cells. Increasing numbers of eosinophils were observed among the infiltrating cells from day 7 after immunization. The local infiltrate surrounding mCherry+ muscle fibers was dependent on the MHC II-specificity of the vaccine proteins since the control, a non-targeted vaccine protein, failed to induce similar infiltrates. Chemokines measured on day 3 in immunized muscle indicate both a DNA effect and an electroporation effect. No influence of targeting was observed. These results contribute to our understanding for why targeted DNA vaccines have an improved immunogenicity. PMID:25299691

  13. DNA vaccines: MHC II-targeted vaccine protein produced by transfected muscle fibres induces a local inflammatory cell infiltrate in mice.

    PubMed

    Løvås, Tom-Ole; Bruusgaard, Jo C; Øynebråten, Inger; Gundersen, Kristian; Bogen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with naked DNA holds great promise but immunogenicity needs to be improved. DNA constructs encoding bivalent proteins that bind antigen-presenting cells (APC) for delivery of antigen have been shown to enhance T and B cell responses and protection in tumour challenge experiments. However, the mechanism for the increased potency remains to be determined. Here we have constructed DNA vaccines that express the fluorescent protein mCherry, a strategy which allowed tracking of vaccine proteins. Transfected muscle fibres in mice were visualized, and their relationship to infiltrating mononuclear cells could be determined. Interestingly, muscle fibers that produced MHC class II-specific dimeric vaccine proteins with mCherry were for weeks surrounded by a localized intense cellular infiltrate composed of CD45+, MHC class II+ and CD11b+ cells. Increasing numbers of eosinophils were observed among the infiltrating cells from day 7 after immunization. The local infiltrate surrounding mCherry+ muscle fibers was dependent on the MHC II-specificity of the vaccine proteins since the control, a non-targeted vaccine protein, failed to induce similar infiltrates. Chemokines measured on day 3 in immunized muscle indicate both a DNA effect and an electroporation effect. No influence of targeting was observed. These results contribute to our understanding for why targeted DNA vaccines have an improved immunogenicity.

  14. IFN-γ increases efficiency of DNA vaccine in protecting ducks against infection

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jian-Er; Huang, Li-Na; Qin, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Wen-Yi; Qu, Di

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To detect the effects of DNA vaccines in combination with duck IFN-γ gene on the protection of ducks against duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infection. METHODS: DuIFN-γ cDNA was cloned and expressed in COS-7 cells, and the antiviral activity of DuIFN-γ was detected and neutralized by specific antibodies. Ducks were vaccinated with DHBpreS/S DNA alone or co-immunized with plasmid expressing DuIFN-γ. DuIFN-γ mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from immunized ducks was detected by semi-quantitative competitive RT-PCR. Anti-DHBpreS was titrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). DHBV DNA in sera and liver was detected by Southern blot hybridization, after ducks were challenged with high doses of DHBV. RESULTS: DuIFN-γ expressed by COS-7 was able to protect duck fibroblasts against vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection in a dose-dependent fashion, and anti-DuIFN-γ antibodies neutralized the antiviral effects. DuIFN-γ in the supernatant also inhibited the release of DHBV DNA from LMH-D2 cells. When ducks were co-immunized with DNA vaccine expressing DHBpreS/S and DuIFN-γ gene as an adjuvant, the level of DuIFN-γ mRNA in PBMCs was higher than that in ducks vaccinated with DHBpreS/S DNA alone. However, the titer of anti-DHBpreS elicited by DHBpreS/S DNA alone was higher than that co-immunized with DuIFN-γ gene and DHBpreS/S DNA. After being challenged with DHBV at high doses, the load of DHBV in sera dropped faster, and the amount of total DNA and cccDNA in the liver decreased more significantly in the group of ducks co-immunized with DuIFN-γ gene and DHBpreS/S DNA than in other groups. CONCLUSION: DHBV preS/S DNA vaccine can protect ducks against DHBV infection, DuIFN-γ gene as an immune adjuvant enhances its efficacy. PMID:16124047

  15. DNA vaccines encoding altered peptide ligands for SSX2 enhance epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heath A; Rekoske, Brian T; McNeel, Douglas G

    2014-03-26

    Plasmid DNA serves as a simple and easily modifiable form of antigen delivery for vaccines. The USDA approval of DNA vaccines for several non-human diseases underscores the potential of this type of antigen delivery method as a cost-effective approach for the treatment or prevention of human diseases, including cancer. However, while DNA vaccines have demonstrated safety and immunological effect in early phase clinical trials, they have not consistently elicited robust anti-tumor responses. Hence many recent efforts have sought to increase the immunological efficacy of DNA vaccines, and we have specifically evaluated several target antigens encoded by DNA vaccine as treatments for human prostate cancer. In particular, we have focused on SSX2 as one potential target antigen, given its frequent expression in metastatic prostate cancer. We have previously identified two peptides, p41-49 and p103-111, as HLA-A2-restricted SSX2-specific epitopes. In the present study we sought to determine whether the efficacy of a DNA vaccine could be enhanced by an altered peptide ligand (APL) strategy wherein modifications were made to anchor residues of these epitopes to enhance or ablate their binding to HLA-A2. A DNA vaccine encoding APL modified to increase epitope binding elicited robust peptide-specific CD8+ T cells producing Th1 cytokines specific for each epitope. Ablation of one epitope in a DNA vaccine did not enhance immune responses to the other epitope. These results demonstrate that APL encoded by a DNA vaccine can be used to elicit increased numbers of antigen-specific T cells specific for multiple epitopes simultaneously, and suggest this could be a general approach to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines encoding tumor antigens.

  16. Fish DNA vaccine against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: efficacy of various routes of immunization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, Serge; Kurath, Gael; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    The DNA vaccine, pIHNVw-G, contains the gene for the glycoprotein (G) of the rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a major pathogen of salmon and trout. The relative efficacy of various routes of immunisation with pIHNVw-G was evaluated using 1.8 g rainbow trout fry vaccinated via intramuscular injection, scarification of the skin, intraperitoneal injection, intrabuccal administration, cutaneous particle bombardment using a gene gun, or immersion in water containing DNA vaccine-coated beads. Twenty-seven days after vaccination neutralising antibody titres were determined, and 2 days later groups of vaccinated and control unvaccinated fish were subjected to an IHNV immersion challenge. Results of the virus challenge showed that the intramuscular injection and the gene gun immunisation induced protective immunity in fry, while intraperitoneal injection provided partial protection. Neutralising antibodies were not detected in sera of vaccinated fish regardless of the route of immunisation used, suggesting that cell mediated immunity may be at least partially responsible for the observed protection.

  17. Plasmid DNA Initiates Replication of Yellow Fever Vaccine In Vitro and Elicits Virus-Specific Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Pushko, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20µg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. PMID:25129436

  18. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S; Pushko, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF.

  19. Immunogenicity of RSV F DNA Vaccine in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe acute lower respiratory tract disease leading to numerous hospitalizations and deaths among the infant and elderly populations worldwide. There is no vaccine or a less effective drug available against RSV infections. Natural RSV infection stimulates the Th1 immune response and activates the production of neutralizing antibodies, while earlier vaccine trials that used UV-inactivated RSV exacerbated the disease due to the activation of the allergic Th2 response. With a focus on Th1 immunity, we developed a DNA vaccine containing the native RSV fusion (RSV F) protein and studied its immune response in BALB/c mice. High levels of RSV specific antibodies were induced during subsequent immunizations. The serum antibodies were able to neutralize RSV in vitro. The RSV inhibition by sera was also shown by immunofluorescence analyses. Antibody response of the RSV F DNA vaccine showed a strong Th1 response. Also, sera from RSV F immunized and RSV infected mice reduced the RSV infection by 50% and 80%, respectively. Our data evidently showed that the RSV F DNA vaccine activated the Th1 biased immune response and led to the production of neutralizing antibodies, which is the desired immune response required for protection from RSV infections. PMID:27688769

  20. Development of a suicidal DNA vaccine for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV).

    PubMed

    Alonso, Marta; Chiou, Peter P; Leong, Jo-Ann

    2011-03-01

    We developed a suicidal DNA vaccine (pIRF1A-G-pMT-M) for salmonid fish susceptible to Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV). The suicidal vaccine consists of two operons: i) an inducible fish promoter, the interferon regulatory factor 1A promoter (pIRF1A), driving the expression of the IHNV viral glycoprotein (G) gene that induces protection, and ii) a ZnCl(2) inducible fish promoter, the metallothionein promoter (pMT), driving the expression of the IHNV matrix (M) protein that induces apoptosis. The vaccine induces an immune response to the G protein and then induces the cell to undergo apoptosis to eliminate the DNA vaccine-containing cell. Also developed is another suicidal construct (pCMV-luc-pMT-M) for monitoring the persistence of luciferase (luc) expression after induction of apoptosis. In this study, we evaluated the inducibility of the MT promoter with ZnCl(2) and the capacity of cells transfected with the suicidal vector pCMV-luc-pMT-M to undergo apoptosis after ZnCl(2) addition. We also demonstrated the protective immunity elicited by the suicidal DNA vaccine pIRF1A-G-pMT-M, the survival of fish after treatment with ZnCl(2), and the elimination of the suicidal vector in fish after ZnCl(2) treatment.

  1. Superior protection conferred by inactivated whole virus vaccine over subunit and DNA vaccines against salmonid alphavirus infection in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2012-06-06

    Salmonid alphavirus 3 (SAV-3) is an emerging pathogen in Norwegian salmon farming and causes severe annual losses. We studied the immunogenicity and protective ability of subunit and DNA vaccines based on E1 and E2 spike proteins of salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV-3), and compared these to an experimental inactivated, whole virus (IWV) vaccine in Atlantic salmon. The antigens were delivered as water-in-oil emulsions for the subunit and inactivated vaccines and non-formulated for the DNA vaccines. The IWV and the E2 subunit prime-boost groups had circulating neutralizing antibodies at challenge, correlating with high protection against lethal challenge and 3-log(10) reduction of virus titer in heart for the IWV group. Prime-boost with E1 subunit vaccine also conferred significant protection against mortality, but did not correlate with neutralizing antibody levels. Protection against pathology in internal organs was only seen for the IWV group. Prime-boost with E1 and E2 DNA vaccines showed marginal protection in terms of reduction of viral replication in target organs and protection against mortality was not different from controls. The IWV group showed significant upregulation of IFNγ and IL2 mRNA expression at 4 weeks post challenge possibly indicating that other mechanisms in addition to antibody responses play a role in mediating protection against infection. This is the first report comparing the immunogenicity and protection against mortality for IWV vaccines and spike protein subunit and DNA vaccines against salmonid alphavirus infection in Atlantic salmon. The IWV vaccine has superior immunogenicity over sub-unit and DNA vaccines.

  2. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Minkyoung; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-07-15

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. - Highlights: • Combined RSV FFG VLP vaccine is effective in inducing F specific responses. • FFG VLP vaccine confers RSV neutralizing activity and viral control in cotton rats. • Cotton rats with RSV FFG VLP vaccination do not show vaccine-enhanced disease. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP vaccine induce F specific antibody secreting cell responses. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP do not induce lung cellular infiltrates and Th2 cytokine.

  3. Recombinant DNA technology for melanoma immunotherapy: anti-Id DNA vaccines targeting high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen.

    PubMed

    Barucca, A; Capitani, M; Cesca, M; Tomassoni, D; Kazmi, U; Concetti, F; Vincenzetti, L; Concetti, A; Venanzi, F M

    2014-11-01

    Anti-idiotypic MK2-23 monoclonal antibody (anti-Id MK2-23 mAb), which mimics the high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA), has been used to implement active immunotherapy against melanoma. However, due to safety and standardization issues, this approach never entered extensive clinical trials. In the present study, we investigated the usage of DNA vaccines as an alternative to MK2-23 mAb immunization. MK2-23 DNA plasmids coding for single chain (scFv) MK2-23 antibody were constructed via the insertion of variable heavy (V H) and light (V L) chains of MK2-23 into the pVAC-1mcs plasmids. Two alternative MK2-23 plasmids format V H/V L, and V L/V H were assembled. We demonstrate that both polypeptides expressed by scFv plasmids in vitro retained the ability to mimic HMW-MAA antigen, and to elicit specific anti-HMW-MAA humoral and cellular immunoresponses in immunized mice. Notably, MK2-23 scFv DNA vaccines impaired the onset and growth of transplantable B16 melanoma cells not engineered to express HMW-MAA. This pilot study suggests that optimized MK2-23 scFv DNA vaccines could potentially provide a safer and cost-effective alternative to anti-Id antibody immunization, for melanoma immunotherapy.

  4. Expression of tak1 and tram induces synergistic pro-inflammatory signalling and adjuvants DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Karen Colbjørn; Spencer, Alexandra J; Goodman, Anna L; Gilchrist, Ashley; Furze, Julie; Rollier, Christine S; Kiss-Toth, Endre; Gilbert, Sarah C; Bregu, Migena; Soilleux, Elizabeth J; Hill, Adrian V S; Wyllie, David H

    2009-09-18

    Improving vaccine immunogenicity remains a major challenge in the fight against developing country diseases like malaria and AIDS. We describe a novel strategy to identify new DNA vaccine adjuvants. We have screened components of the Toll-like receptor signalling pathways for their ability to activate pro-inflammatory target genes in transient transfection assays and assessed in vivo adjuvant activity by expressing the activators from the DNA backbone of vaccines. We find that a robust increase in the immune response necessitates co-expression of two activators. Accordingly, the combination of tak1 and tram elicits synergistic reporter activation in transient transfection assays. In a mouse model this combination, but not the individual molecules, induced approximately twofold increases in CD8+ T-cell immune responses. These results indicate that optimal immunogenicity may require activation of distinct innate immune signalling pathways. Thus this strategy offers a novel route to the discovery of a new generation of adjuvants.

  5. Efficacy of an autophagy-targeted DNA vaccine against avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhenkai; Huang, Jianfei; Lei, Xiaoya; Yan, Yiming; Lu, Piaopiao; Zhang, Huanmin; Lin, Wencheng; Chen, Weiguo; Ma, Jingyun; Xie, Qingmei

    2017-02-01

    Infection with the avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can lead to neoplastic disease in chickens, inflicting significant economic losses to the poultry industry. Recent reports have identified inhibitory effects of ALV-J on autophagy, a process involving in innate and adaptive immunity. Inspired by this connection between autophagy and immunity, we developed a novel DNA vaccine against ALV-J which includes co-administration of rapamycin to stimulate autophagy. To measure the efficacy of the developed prototype vaccine, five experimental groups of seven-day-old chickens was immunized three times at three-week intervals respectively with vector, pVAX1-gp85, pVAX1-gp85-LC3, pVAX1-gp85+rapamycin and pVAX1-gp85-LC3+rapamycin through electroporation. We then tested their antibody titers, cytokine levels and cellular immune responses. The immunoprotective efficacy of the prototype vaccines against the challenge of the ALV-J GD1109 strain was also examined. The results showed that the combination of pVAX1-gp85-LC3 and rapamycin was able to induce the highest antibody titers, and enhance interleukin(IL)-2, IL-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ expression, and the chickens immunized with the combination of pVAX1-gp85-LC3 and rapamycin showed the highest percentage of CD3+CD8+T lymphocytes. Based on our results, we suggest that stimulating autophagy can improve the efficacy of DNA vaccines and that our DNA vaccine shows the potential of being a candidate vaccine against ALV-J. This study provides a novel strategy for developing vaccines against ALV-J.

  6. Evaluation of attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis-mediated inhibin recombinant DNA vaccine in rats.

    PubMed

    Hui, F M; Meng, C L; Guo, N N; Yang, L G; Shi, F X; Mao, D G

    2014-08-07

    DNA vaccination has been studied intensively as a potential vaccine technology. We evaluated the effect of an attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis-mediated inhibin DNA vaccine in rats. First, 15 rats were treated with different doses of an inhibin vaccine to evaluate vaccine safety. Next, 30 rats were divided into 3 groups and injected intramuscularly with the inhibin vaccine two (T1) or three times (T2) or with control bacteria (Con) at 4-week intervals. The inhibin antibody levels increased [positive/negative well (P/N) value: T1 vs Con = 2.39 ± 0.01 vs 1.08 ± 0.1; T2 vs Con = 2.36 ± 0.1 vs 1.08 ± 0.1, P < 0.05] at week 2 and were maintained at a high level in T1 and T2 until week 8, although a small decrease in T2 was observed at week 10. Rats in the T1 group showed more corpora lutea compared with the Con group (10.50 ± 0.87 vs 7.4 ± 0.51, P < 0.05). Estradiol (0.439 ± 0.052 vs 0.719 ± 0.063 ng/mL, P < 0.05) and progesterone (1.315 ± 0.2 vs 0.737 ± 0.11 ng/mL, P < 0.05) levels differed significantly at metestrus after week 10 between rats in the T1 and Con groups. However, there were no significant differences in body, ovary, uterus weights, or pathological signs in the ovaries after immunization, indicating that this vaccine is safe. In conclusion, the attenuated S. choleraesuis-mediated inhibin vaccine may be an alternative to naked inhibin plasmids for stimulating ovarian follicular development to increase the ovulation rate in rats.

  7. Effectiveness of DNA-recombinant anti-hepatitis B vaccines in blood donors: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kupek, Emil; de Souza, Denise ER; Petry, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Background Although various studies have demonstrated efficacy of DNA-recombinant anti-hepatitis B vaccines, their effectiveness in health care settings has not been researched adequately. This gap is particularly visible for blood donors, a group of significant importance in the reduction of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis B. Methods This is a double cohort study of 1411 repeat blood donors during the period 1998–2002, involving a vaccinated and an unvaccinated cohort, with matching of the two in terms of sex, age and residence. Average follow-up was 3.17 person-years. The outcome measure was infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), defined by testing positive on serologic markers HBsAg or anti-HBC. All blood donors were from the blood bank in Joaçaba, federal state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Results The cohorts did not differ significantly regarding sex, age and marital status but the vaccinated cohort had higher mean number of blood donations and higher proportion of those residing in the county capital Joaçaba. Hepatitis B incidences per 1000 person-years were zero among vaccinated and 2,33 among non-vaccinated, resulting in 100% vaccine effectiveness with 95% confidence interval from 30,1% to 100%. The number of vaccinated persons necessary to avoid one HBV infection in blood donors was estimated at 429 with 95% confidence interval from 217 to 21422. Conclusion The results showed very high effectiveness of DNA-recombinant anti-HBV vaccines in blood donors. Its considerable variation in this study is likely due to the limited follow-up and the influence of confounding factors normally balanced out in efficacy clinical trials. PMID:17986330

  8. Nanogram quantities of a DNA vaccine protect rainbow trout fry against heterologous strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a rhabdovirus affecting trout and salmon, was investigated. The minimal dose of vaccine required, the protection against heterologous strains, and the titers of neutralizing antibodies produced were used to evaluate the potential of the vaccine as a control pharmaceutical. Results indicated that a single dose of as little as 1–10 ng of vaccine protected rainbow trout fry against waterborne challenge by IHNV. An optimal dose of 100 ng per fish was selected to assure strong protection under various conditions. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish vaccinated with concentrations of DNA ranging from 5 to 0.01 μg. Furthermore, the DNA vaccine protected fish against a broad range of viral strains from different geographic locations, including isolates from France and Japan, suggesting that the vaccine could be used worldwide. A single dose of this DNA vaccine induced protection in fish at a lower dose than is usually reported in mammalian DNA vaccine studies.

  9. Characterization of immune responses induced by inactivated, live attenuated and DNA vaccines against Japanese encephalitis virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieqiong; Chen, Hui; Wu, Na; Fan, Dongying; Liang, Guodong; Gao, Na; An, Jing

    2013-08-28

    Vaccination is the most effective countermeasure for protecting individuals from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection. There are two types of JEV vaccines currently used in China: the Vero cell-derived inactivated vaccine and the live attenuated vaccine. In this study, we characterized the immune response and protective efficacy induced in mice by the inactivated vaccine, live attenuated vaccine and the DNA vaccine candidate pCAG-JME, which expresses JEV prM-E proteins. We found that the live attenuated vaccine conferred 100% protection and resulted in the generation of high levels of specific anti-JEV antibodies and cytokines. The pCAG-JME vaccine induced protective immunity as well as the live attenuated vaccine. Unexpectedly, immunization with the inactivated vaccine only induced a limited immune response and partial protection, which may be due to the decreased activity of dendritic cells and the expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells observed in these mice. Altogether, our results suggest that the live attenuated vaccine is more effective in providing protection against JEV infection than the inactivated vaccine and that pCAG-JME will be a potential JEV vaccine candidate.

  10. DNA vaccines against infectious agents: recent strategies for enhancing immune responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been widespread efforts to develop plasmid DNA vaccines against animal and human pathogens, and for use as therapies in the treatment of cancers, autoimmune diseases, and allergies. The impetus for this research activity was based on early promising results in laboratory animals that sho...

  11. Gene-gun DNA vaccination aggravates respiratory syncytial virus-induced pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Bartholdy, Christina; Olszewska, Wieslawa; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2004-10-01

    A CD8+ T-cell memory response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was generated by using a DNA vaccine construct encoding the dominant Kd-restricted epitope from the viral transcription anti-terminator protein M2 (M2(82-90)), linked covalently to human beta2-microglobulin (beta2m). Cutaneous gene-gun immunization of BALB/c mice with this construct induced an antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell memory. After intranasal RSV challenge, accelerated CD8+ T-cell responses were observed in pulmonary lymph nodes and virus clearance from the lungs was enhanced. The construct induced weaker CD8+ T-cell responses than those elicited with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the complete RSV M2 protein, but stronger than those induced by a similar DNA construct without the beta2m gene. DNA vaccination led to enhanced pulmonary disease after RSV challenge, with increased weight loss and cell recruitment to the lung. Depletion of CD8+ T cells reduced, but did not abolish, enhancement of disease. Mice vaccinated with a construct encoding a class I-restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus epitope and beta2m suffered more severe weight loss after RSV infection than unvaccinated RSV-infected mice, although RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses were not induced. Thus, in addition to specific CD8+ T cell-mediated immunopathology, gene-gun DNA vaccination causes non-specific enhancement of RSV disease without affecting virus clearance.

  12. GITRL as a genetic adjuvant enhances enterovirus 71 VP1 DNA vaccine immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Tang, Xinyi; Yin, Kai; Tian, Jie; Rui, Ke; Ma, Jie; Mao, Chaoming; Chen, Jianguo; Lu, Liwei; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Shengjun

    2015-05-01

    VP1 protein is the immunodominant capsid protein of enterovirus 71 (EV71) which is responsible for large outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease. It has been reported that glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR) and its ligand (GITRL) are involved in modulating both innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, a DNA vaccine vector encoding EV71 VP1 gene and mGITRL gene (pIRES/VP1/mGITRL) was constructed. And female Balb/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with the DNA vaccine. Compared with the groups immunized with pIRES, pIRES/VP1, pIRES/mGITRL and PBS, the inoculation of pIRES/VP1/mGITRL induced a higher levels of EV71 VP1-specific antibody and specific antibody-forming cells. However, significantly higher levels of CD4(+)Th1, Th2 and CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)T cells were found in the pIRES/VP1/mGITRL group compared with control groups. Our results demonstrate that a novel DNA vaccine, expressing VP1 and mGITRL, could effectively elicit both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against EV71 VP1 in mice. Thus, the mGITRL may be used as molecular adjuvant for EV71 DNA vaccine.

  13. Mycobacterium bovis DNA Detection in Colostrum as a Potential Indicator of Vaccination Effectiveness against Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara E.; Gordiano-Hidalgo, María Alejandra; López-Rincón, Gonzálo; Bojorquez-Narváez, Luis; Padilla-Ramírez, Francisco Javier; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a problem on many dairy farms in Mexico, as well as a public health risk. We previously found a high frequency of Mycobacterium bovis DNA in colostrum from dairy cows using a nested PCR to detect mpb70. Since there are no reliable in vivo tests to determine the effectiveness of booster Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination against bTB, in this work we monitored M. bovis DNA in colostrum by using this nested PCR. In order to decrease the risk of adverse reactions in animals likely containing viable M. bovis, a single application of BCG and a subunit vaccine (EEP-1) formulated with M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and a copolymer as the adjuvant was performed in tuberculin skin test-negative cattle (TST−), while TST reactor animals (TST+) received EEP-1 only. Booster immunization using EEP-1 was applied to both groups, 2 months after primary vaccination to whole herds and 12 months later to lactating cows. Colostrum samples were collected from 6 farms where the cows were vaccinated over a 12-month period postvaccination and, for comparison, from one control farm where the cows were not vaccinated with comparable bTB prevalence. We observed an inverse relationship between the frequency of M. bovis DNA detection and time postvaccination at the first (P < 0.001) and second (P < 0.0001) 6-month periods. Additionally, the concentration of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was higher in mpb70 PCR-positive colostrum samples (P = 0.0003). These results suggest that M. bovis DNA frequency in colostrum could be a potentially useful biomarker for bTB vaccine efficacy on commercial dairy farms. PMID:23425597

  14. Mycobacterium bovis DNA detection in colostrum as a potential indicator of vaccination effectiveness against bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara E; Gordiano-Hidalgo, María Alejandra; López-Rincón, Gonzálo; Bojorquez-Narváez, Luis; Padilla-Ramírez, Francisco Javier; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro

    2013-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a problem on many dairy farms in Mexico, as well as a public health risk. We previously found a high frequency of Mycobacterium bovis DNA in colostrum from dairy cows using a nested PCR to detect mpb70. Since there are no reliable in vivo tests to determine the effectiveness of booster Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination against bTB, in this work we monitored M. bovis DNA in colostrum by using this nested PCR. In order to decrease the risk of adverse reactions in animals likely containing viable M. bovis, a single application of BCG and a subunit vaccine (EEP-1) formulated with M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and a copolymer as the adjuvant was performed in tuberculin skin test-negative cattle (TST(-)), while TST reactor animals (TST(+)) received EEP-1 only. Booster immunization using EEP-1 was applied to both groups, 2 months after primary vaccination to whole herds and 12 months later to lactating cows. Colostrum samples were collected from 6 farms where the cows were vaccinated over a 12-month period postvaccination and, for comparison, from one control farm where the cows were not vaccinated with comparable bTB prevalence. We observed an inverse relationship between the frequency of M. bovis DNA detection and time postvaccination at the first (P < 0.001) and second (P < 0.0001) 6-month periods. Additionally, the concentration of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was higher in mpb70 PCR-positive colostrum samples (P = 0.0003). These results suggest that M. bovis DNA frequency in colostrum could be a potentially useful biomarker for bTB vaccine efficacy on commercial dairy farms.

  15. [Expression and immunity of multi-HIV B'/C subype genes in replicating DNA vaccines].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying-ying; Deng, Yao; Qi, Xiang-rong; Zhang, Xiang-min; Meng, Xin; Wang, Hui-juan; Tan, Wen-jie; Ruan, Li

    2010-05-01

    To understand the effect of various gene structures of HIV B'/C subtype on the gene expression and immunity in DNA vaccine, replicating DNA vector pSCK2 was used to construct seven DNA vaccines carrying one or more of HIV B'/C subtype genes: gagpol, gp160 and rtn (rev, tat and nef fusion gene). Immunofluorescence staining indicated that Gag, Gp160, Rev, Tat and Nef could be expressed from the seven DNA vaccines. Stronger expression was observed with the gene in single-gene expression plasmid or with the gene located at upper-IRES in double- or multi-gene expression plasmid. ELISA test showed that Gag induced higher antibody response, but the antibody titers stimulated by Gp160, Pol, or RTN were very low. Both Gag single-gene expression plasmid and Gag-RTN double-gene expression plasmid separately inoculating induced stronger antibody response against Gag than Gag-Gp160 double-gene expression plasmid and Gagpol-Gp160-RTN multi-gene expression plasmid or combined inoculation of Gag and Gp160 single-gene expression plasmids did. ELISPOT detection showed that all the seven DNA vaccines could stimulate cellular immune response against Gag, Pol, Gp160, Tat, and Nef, respectively. Gagpol or Gp160 single-gene expression plasmid separately inoculating stimulated the strongest cellular immune response. Tat and Nef expressed in all the plasmids induced similar immune response. These results indicated that HIV B'/C subtype genes gagpol, gp160 and rtn could be efficiently expressed in the replicating DNA vaccine vector, single-gene expression plasmid had the higher gene expression level and induced stronger immune response; combined immunization of Gagpol and Gp160 had dramatically lower immunity than Gagpol or Gp160 separated immunization did. Immunity of RTN had no difference between combined and separated immunizations. Therefore, in case of immunization with DNA vaccines containing different HIV genes, it is necessary to optimize the combined immunization procedure

  16. A Novel DNA-Based Vaccine Methodology for Aids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    A., Beck, T.W., Grant, R.F., Bischofberger, N., Benveniste, R.E., Black, R. 1995. Prevention of SIV infection in macaques by (R)-9-(2...enhancement of CTL. Gene gun-based DNA immunization of rhesus macaques resulted in further refinement of DNA delivery parameters based on the degree of...responses by gene gun-based DNA immunization. In addition, we initiated 2 challenge studies in the SIV macaque model to test the role of CTL and mucosal

  17. Protection of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus four days after specific or semi-specific DNA vaccination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPatra, S.E.; Corbeil, S.; Jones, G.R.; Shewmaker, W.D.; Lorenzen, N.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2001-01-01

    A DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was shown to provide significant protection as soon as 4 d after intramuscular vaccination in 2 g rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) held at 15??C. Nearly complete protection was also observed at later time points (7, 14, and 28 d) using a standardized waterborne challenge model. In a test of the specificity of this early protection, immunization of rainbow trout with a DNA vaccine against another fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, provided a significant level of cross-protection against IHNV challenge for a transient period of time, whereas a rabies virus DNA vaccine was not protective. This indication of distinct early and late protective mechanisms was not dependent on DNA vaccine doses from 0.1 to 2.5 ??g. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  18. Enhanced nasal mucosal delivery and immunogenicity of anti-caries DNA vaccine through incorporation of anionic liposomes in chitosan/DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liulin; Zhu, Junming; Li, Yuhong; Lu, Jie; Gao, Li; Xu, Huibi; Fan, Mingwen; Yang, Xiangliang

    2013-01-01

    The design of optimized nanoparticles offers a promising strategy to enable DNA vaccines to cross various physiological barriers for eliciting a specific and protective mucosal immunity via intranasal administration. Here, we reported a new designed nanoparticle system through incorporating anionic liposomes (AL) into chitosan/DNA (CS/DNA) complexes. With enhanced cellular uptake, the constructed AL/CS/DNA nanoparticles can deliver the anti-caries DNA vaccine pGJA-P/VAX into nasal mucosa. TEM results showed the AL/CS/DNA had a spherical structure. High DNA loading ability and effective DNA protection against nuclease were proved by gel electrophoresis. The surface charge of the AL/CS/DNA depended strongly on pH environment, enabling the intracellular release of loaded DNA via a pH-mediated manner. In comparison to the traditional CS/DNA system, our new design rendered a higher transfection efficiency and longer residence time of the AL/CS/DNA at nasal mucosal surface. These outstanding features enable the AL/CS/DNA to induce a significantly (p<0.01) higher level of secretory IgA (SIgA) than the CS/DNA in animal study, and a longer-term mucosal immunity. On the other hand, the AL/CS/DNA exhibited minimal cytotoxicity. These results suggest that the developed nanoparticles offer a potential platform for DNA vaccine packaging and delivery for more efficient elicitation of mucosal immunity.

  19. Enhanced non-inflammasome mediated immune responses by mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposomes for HIV DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chenmeng; Liu, Jiandong; Yang, Jun; Li, Yan; Weng, Jie; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA vaccine can induce cellular and humoral immunity. A safe and effective HIV DNA vaccine is urgent need to prevent the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The major drawback of DNA vaccines is the low immunogenicity, which is caused by the poor delivery to antigen presenting cells and insufficient antigen expression. Sparked by the capability of endosomal/lysosomal escape of the zwitterionic lipid distearoyl phosphoethanol-amine-polycarboxybetaine (DSPE-PCB), we attempted to develop a zwitterionic-based cationic liposome with enhanced immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. The mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposome (man-ZCL) was constructed as a DNA vaccine adjuvant for HIV vaccination. Man-ZCL could complex with DNA antigens to form a tight structure and protect them from nuclei enzyme degradation. Benefited from the capability of the specific mannose receptor mediated antigen processing cells targeting and enhanced endosomal/lysosomal escape, the man-ZCL lipoplexes were supposed to promote antigen presentation and the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In vitro and in vivo results revealed that man-ZCL lipoplexes showed enhanced anti-HIV immune responses and lower toxicity compared with CpG/DNA and Lipo2k/DNA, and triggered a Th1/Th2 mixed immunity. An antigen-depot effect was observed in the administration site, and this resulted in enhanced retention of DNA antigens in draining lymph nodes. Most importantly, the man-ZCL could assist to activate T cells through a non-inflammasome pathway. These findings suggested that the man-ZCL could be potentially applied as a safe and efficient DNA adjuvant for HIV vaccines.

  20. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  1. Construction and Nonclinical Testing of a Puumala Virus Synthetic M Gene-Based DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, R. L.; Josleyn, M. J.; Wahl-Jensen, V.; Schmaljohn, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) is a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Although PUUV-associated HFRS does not result in high case-fatality rates, the social and economic impact is considerable. There is no licensed vaccine or specific therapeutic to prevent or treat HFRS. Here we report the synthesis of a codon-optimized, full-length M segment open reading frame and its cloning into a DNA vaccine vector to produce the plasmid pWRG/PUU-M(s2). pWRG/PUU-M(s2) delivered by gene gun produced high-titer neutralizing antibodies in hamsters and nonhuman primates. Vaccination with pWRG/PUU-M(s2) protected hamsters against infection with PUUV but not against infection by related HFRS-associated hantaviruses. Unexpectedly, vaccination protected hamsters in a lethal disease model of Andes virus (ANDV) in the absence of ANDV cross-neutralizing antibodies. This is the first evidence that an experimental DNA vaccine for HFRS can provide protection in a hantavirus lethal disease model. PMID:23239797

  2. Tumor prevention in HPV8 transgenic mice by HPV8-E6 DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Awerkiew, Sabine; Hufbauer, Martin; Schädlich, Lysann; Gissmann, Lutz; Eming, Sabine; Pfister, Herbert

    2014-06-01

    The genus beta human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in individuals with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. Immunosuppressed transplant recipients are prone to harbor particularly high betapapillomavirus DNA loads, which may contribute to their highly increased risk of SCC. Tumor induction in HPV8 transgenic mice correlates with increased expression of viral oncogenes E6 and E2. In an attempt to prevent skin tumor development, we evaluated an HPV8-E6-DNA vaccine, which was able to stimulate a detectable HPV8-E6-specific cell-mediated immune response in 8/15 immunized mice. When skin of HPV8 transgenic mice was grafted onto non-transgenic littermates, the grafted HPV8 transgenic tissue was not rejected and papillomas started to grow within 14 days all over the transplant of 9/9 non-vaccinated and 7/15 not successfully vaccinated mice. In contrast, no papillomas developed in 6/8 successfully vaccinated mice. In the other two of these eight mice, a large ulcerative lesion developed within the initial papilloma growth or papilloma development was highly delayed. As the vaccine completely or partially prevented papilloma development without rejecting the transplanted HPV8 positive skin, the immune system appears to attack only keratinocytes with increased levels of E6 protein, which would give rise to papillomas.

  3. Modular multiantigen T cell epitope-enriched DNA vaccine against human leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Das, Shantanabha; Freier, Anja; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Das, Sushmita; Oswald, Detlef; Losch, Florian O; Selka, Melanie; Sacerdoti-Sierra, Nina; Schönian, Gabriele; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Seifert, Karin; Schroff, Matthias; Juhls, Christiane; Jaffe, Charles L; Roy, Syamal; Das, Pradeep; Louzir, Hechmi; Croft, Simon L; Modabber, Farrokh; Walden, Peter

    2014-04-30

    The leishmaniases are protozoal diseases that severely affect large populations in tropical and subtropical regions. There are only limited treatment options and preventative measures. Vaccines will be important for prevention, control and elimination of leishmaniasis, and could reduce the transmission and burden of disease in endemic populations. We report the development of a DNA vaccine against leishmaniasis that induced T cell-based immunity and is a candidate for clinical trials. The vaccine antigens were selected as conserved in various Leishmania species, different endemic regions, and over time. They were tested with T cells from individuals cured of leishmaniasis, and shown to be immunogenic and to induce CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in genetically diverse human populations of different endemic regions. The vaccine proved protective in a rodent model of infection. Thus, the immunogenicity of candidate vaccine antigens in human populations of endemic regions, as well as proof of principle for induction of specific immune responses and protection against Leishmania infection in mice, provides a viable strategy for T cell vaccine development.

  4. Chemokine Adjuvanted Electroporated-DNA Vaccine Induces Substantial Protection from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P; Weiner, D B

    2015-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P=0.0016) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared to only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where 6 of 9 animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P=0.0003). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  5. DNA Vaccine for West Nile Virus Infection in Fish Crows (Corvus ossifragus)

    PubMed Central

    Bunning, Michel; Ludwig, George V.; Ortman, Brian; Chang, Jeff; Speaker, Tully; Spielman, Andrew; McLean, Robert; Komar, Nicholas; Gates, Robert; McNamara, Tracey; Creekmore, Terry; Farley, Linda; Mitchell, Carl J.

    2003-01-01

    A DNA vaccine for West Nile virus (WNV) was evaluated to determine whether its use could protect fish crows (Corvus ossifragus) from fatal WNV infection. Captured adult crows were given 0.5 mg of the DNA vaccine either orally or by intramuscular (IM) inoculation; control crows were inoculated or orally exposed to a placebo. After 6 weeks, crows were challenged subcutaneously with 105 plaque-forming units of WNV (New York 1999 strain). None of the placebo inoculated–placebo challenged birds died. While none of the 9 IM vaccine–inoculated birds died, 5 of 10 placebo-inoculated and 4 of 8 orally vaccinated birds died within 15 days after challenge. Peak viremia titers in birds with fatal WNV infection were substantially higher than those in birds that survived infection. Although oral administration of a single DNA vaccine dose failed to elicit an immune response or protect crows from WNV infection, IM administration of a single dose prevented death and was associated with reduced viremia. PMID:14519243

  6. Designing and Development of a DNA Vaccine Based On Structural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Teimourpour, Roghayeh; Tajani, Amineh Sadat; Askari, Vahid Reza; Rostami, Sina; Meshkat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases responsible for high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Therefore, designing new and effective therapeutics is of great importance. The aim of the current study was to construct a DNA vaccine containing structural proteins of HCV and evaluation of its expression in a eukaryotic system. Methods: Structural proteins of HCV (core, E1, and E2) were isolated and amplified from JFH strain of HCV genotype 2a using PCR method. The PCR product was cloned into pCDNA3.1 (+) vector and finally were confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis and sequencing methods. The eukaryotic expression of the vector was confirmed by RT-PCR. Results: A recombinant vector containing 2241bp fragment of HCV structural genes was constructed. The desired plasmid was sequenced and corresponded to 100% identity with the submitted sequences in GenBank. RT-PCR results indicated that the recombinant plasmid could be expressed efficiently in the eukaryotic expression system. Conclusion: Successful cloning of structural viral genes in pCDNA3.1 (+) vector and their expression in the eukaryotic expression system facilitates the development of new DNA vaccines against HCV. A DNA vaccine encoding core-E1-E2 antigens was designed. The desired expression vector can be used for further attempts in the development of vaccines. PMID:27799971

  7. Chemokine-adjuvanted electroporated DNA vaccine induces substantial protection from simian immunodeficiency virus vaginal challenge.

    PubMed

    Kutzler, M A; Wise, M C; Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M A; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D G; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P A; Weiner, D B

    2016-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG responses in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P<0.01) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared with only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where six of nine animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P<0.001). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection.

  8. Duck enteritis virus glycoprotein D and B DNA vaccines induce immune responses and immunoprotection in Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Cao, Yongsheng; Cui, Lihong; Ma, Bo; Mu, Xiaoyu; Li, Yanwei; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Dan; Wei, Wei; Gao, Mingchun; Wang, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccine is a promising strategy for protection against virus infection. However, little is known on the efficacy of vaccination with two plasmids for expressing the glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) of duck enteritis virus (DEV) in inducing immune response and immunoprotection against virulent virus infection in Pekin ducks. In this study, two eukaryotic expressing plasmids of pcDNA3.1-gB and pcDNA3.1-gD were constructed. Following transfection, the gB and gD expressions in DF1 cells were detected. Groups of ducks were vaccinated with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, and boosted with the same vaccine on day 14 post primary vaccination. We found that intramuscular vaccinations with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, but not control plasmid, stimulated a high frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in Pekin ducks, particularly with both plasmids. Similarly, vaccination with these plasmids, particularly with both plasmids, promoted higher levels of neutralization antibodies against DEV in Pekin ducks. More importantly, vaccination with both plasmids significantly reduced the virulent DEV-induced mortality in Pekin ducks. Our data indicated that vaccination with plasmids for expressing both gB and gD induced potent cellular and humoral immunity against DEV in Pekin ducks. Therefore, this vaccination strategy may be used for the prevention of DEV infection in Pekin ducks.

  9. Chloroplast-derived vaccine antigens confer dual immunity against cholera and malaria by oral or injectable delivery

    PubMed Central

    Davoodi-Semiromi, Abdoreza; Schreiber, Melissa; Nallapali, Samson; Verma, Dheeraj; Singh, Nameirakpam D.; Banks, Robert K.; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Daniell, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cholera and malaria are major diseases causing high mortality. The only licensed cholera vaccine is expensive; immunity is lost in children within 3 years and adults are not fully protected. No vaccine is yet available for malaria. Therefore, in this study, the cholera toxin-B subunit (CTB) of Vibrio cholerae fused to malarial vaccine antigens apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) and merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1) was expressed in lettuce and tobacco chloroplasts. Southern blot analysis confirmed homoplasmy and stable integration of transgenes. CTB-AMA1 and CTB-MSP1 fusion proteins accumulated up to 13.17% and 10.11% (total soluble protein, TSP) in tobacco and up to 7.3% and 6.1% (TSP) in lettuce respectively. Nine groups of mice (n = 10/group) were immunized subcutaneously (SQV) or orally (ORV) with purified antigens or transplastomic tobacco leaves. Significant levels of antigen-specific antibody titres of immunized mice completely inhibited proliferation of the malarial parasite and cross-reacted with the native parasite proteins in immunoblots and immunofluorescence studies. Protection against cholera toxin challenge in both ORV (100%) and SQV (89%) mice correlated with CTB-specific titres of intestinal, serum IgA and IgG1 in ORV and only IgG1 in SQV mice, but no other immunoglobulin. Increasing numbers of interleukin-10+ T cell but not Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, suppression of interferon-γ and absence of interleukin-17 were observed in protected mice, suggesting that immunity is conferred via the Tr1/Th2 immune response. Dual immunity against two major infectious diseases provided by chloroplast-derived vaccine antigens for long-term (>300 days, 50% of mouse life span) offers a realistic platform for low cost vaccines and insight into mucosal and systemic immunity. PMID:20051036

  10. DNA Vaccines: Protective Immunizations by Parenteral, Mucosal, and Gene-Gun Inoculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynan, Ellen F.; Webster, Robert G.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Haynes, Joel R.; Santoro, Joseph C.; Robinson, Harriet L.

    1993-12-01

    Plasmid DNAs expressing influenza virus hemagglutinin glycoproteins have been tested for their ability to raise protective immunity against lethal influenza challenges of the same subtype. In trials using two inoculations of from 50 to 300 μg of purified DNA in saline, 67-95% of test mice and 25-63% of test chickens have been protected against a lethal influenza challenge. Parenteral routes of inoculation that achieved good protection included intramuscular and intravenous injections. Successful mucosal routes of vaccination included DNA drops administered to the nares or trachea. By far the most efficient DNA immunizations were achieved by using a gene gun to deliver DNA-coated gold beads to the epidermis. In mice, 95% protection was achieved by two immunizations with beads loaded with as little as 0.4 μg of DNA. The breadth of routes supporting successful DNA immunizations, coupled with the very small amounts of DNA required for gene-gun immunizations, highlight the potential of this remarkably simple technique for the development of subunit vaccines.

  11. Analysis of humoral immune response and cytokines in chickens vaccinated with Eimeria brunetti apical membrane antigen-1 (EbAMA1) DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hoan, Tran Duc; Thao, Doan Thi; Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the changes of cytokines, specific serum IgG and several parameters in chickens vaccinated with DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria brunetti apical membrane antigen-1 (EbAMA1) antigen. Two-week-old chickens were divided into five groups (four groups for experiment) randomly. Experimental groups of chickens were immunized with DNA vaccine while control group of chickens were injected with pVAX1 plasmid alone or TE buffer solution. All immunizations were boosted 2 weeks later. The EbAMA1 specific IgG antibody responses were measured at weeks 1-6 post-second immunizations and several parameters were also identified. The result showed that the antibody titers in chickens vaccinated with DNA vaccines were significantly different from those of the control groups 1 week after the second immunization and reached the maximum values 3 weeks post-second immunization. IFN-γ concentration was increased the highest level against EbAMA1 of all chickens vaccinated with vaccines up to 56-fold, follow by the specific IgG antibody levels were increased 10-17-fold compared with those of TE solution and plasmid (pVAX1) control chickens 1-6 weeks post-second immunization. In case of the levels of IL-10 and IL-17 was increased in experimental chickens with 4-5-fold. Even though it was statistically significant, TGF-β and IL-4 levels were higher in vaccinated than unvaccinated chickens. The results suggested that DNA vaccines encoding E. brunetti apical membrane antigen-1 (EbAMA1) could increase serum specific IgG antibody and cytokines concentration and could give protection against E. brunetti infection.

  12. The effects of HIV Tat DNA on regulating the immune response of HIV DNA vaccine in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV trans-activator protein (Tat) is the crucial factor to control HIV transcription, and is usually considered as an important immunogen for the design of HIV vaccine. Recent studies reported some special bio-activities of Tat protein on immunoregulation. However, to date, few studies have focused on exploring the effects of Tat expression plasmid (pTat) on regulating the immune responses induced by HIV DNA vaccines. In this study, our main objective is to investigate the immunoregulation mediated by pTat in mice. Methods Four gene-coding plasmids (pTat, pGag, pEnv and pPol) were constructed, and the gene expression was detected by western blot method. The effects of pTat on regulating the immune responses to antigens Gag, Env, Pol were assessed by enzyme-linked immunospot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The data was analysed by one-way analysis of variance. Results After two immunizations, mice vaccinated with antigen expressing plasmid (pGag, pEnv or pPol) plus pTat exhibited significantly stronger IFN-gamma response than that vaccinated with the corresponding antigen alone. Moreover, mice receiving two injections of antigen plus pTat exhibited the same strong IFN-gamma response as those receiving three injections of antigen alone did. Furthermore, addition of pTat not only induced a more balanced Th1 and Th2 response, but also broadened IgG subclass responses to antigens Gag and Pol. Conclusion pTat exhibited the appreciable effects on modulating immune responses to HIV antigens Gag, Env and Pol, providing us interesting clues on how to optimize HIV DNA vaccine. PMID:24073803

  13. Studies on the protective immunity of Schistosoma japonicum bivalent DNA vaccine encoding Sj23 and Sj14.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hu; You-En, Shi; Long-Jiang, Yu; Xiao-Hua, Zhu; Liu-Zhe, Li; Cash, Melanie; Lu, Zhu; Zhi, Liu; Deng-Xin, Song

    2007-04-01

    In order to explore the high performance bivalent DNA vaccine of Schistosoma japonicum, the fatty-acid-binding protein (Sj14) and the 23 kDa transmembrane protein (Sj23) two proteins were selected to construct the DNA-based vaccine. It was successful to construct a bivalent DNA vaccine using three strategies: the co-expression of two genes, a fusion gene expression and two kinds of plasmids in combination (cocktail vaccine). The bivalent DNA was proven to express well in vitro and in vivo by indirect immunofluorescence test (IIF) and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The protective immunity of bivalent DNA vaccine was higher than that of univalent DNA vaccine (p<0.05). There were four groups of bivalent vaccine whose protective immunity was higher than 50%. Granuloma diameter reduction rates were in the range of 18-39%. There was no significant impact on immunity protection exerted by the four factors including dosage, inoculated times, inoculated routes and challenge time after the last immunization in three levels (p>0.05).

  14. Genetic Immunization With In Vivo Dendritic Cell-targeting Liposomal DNA Vaccine Carrier Induces Long-lasting Antitumor Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Garu, Arup; Moku, Gopikrishna; Gulla, Suresh Kumar; Chaudhuri, Arabinda

    2016-01-01

    A major limiting factor retarding the clinical success of dendritic cell (DC)-based genetic immunizations (DNA vaccination) is the scarcity of biologically safe and effective carrier systems for targeting the antigen-encoded DNA vaccines to DCs under in vivo settings. Herein, we report on a potent, mannose receptor selective in vivo DC-targeting liposomes of a novel cationic amphiphile with mannose-mimicking shikimoyl head-group. Flow cytometric experiments with cells isolated from draining lymph nodes of mice s.c. immunized with lipoplexes of pGFP plasmid (model DNA vaccine) using anti-CD11c antibody-labeled magnetic beads revealed in vivo DC-targeting properties of the presently described liposomal DNA vaccine carrier. Importantly, s.c. immunizations of mice with electrostatic complex of the in vivo DC-targeting liposome and melanoma antigen-encoded DNA vaccine (p-CMV-MART1) induced long-lasting antimelanoma immune response (100 days post melanoma tumor challenge) with remarkable memory response (more than 6 months after the second tumor challenge). The presently described direct in vivo DC-targeting liposomal DNA vaccine carrier is expected to find future exploitations toward designing effective vaccines for various infectious diseases and cancers. PMID:26666450

  15. Use of Staby(®) technology for development and production of DNA vaccines free of antibiotic resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Reschner, Anca; Scohy, Sophie; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Daukandt, Marc; Jacques, Céline; Michel, Benjamin; Nauwynck, Hans; Xhonneux, Florence; Préat, Véronique; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Szpirer, Cédric

    2013-10-01

    The appearance of new viruses and the cost of developing certain vaccines require that new vaccination strategies now have to be developed. DNA vaccination seems to be a particularly promising method. For this application, plasmid DNA is injected into the subject (man or animal). This plasmid DNA encodes an antigen that will be expressed by the cells of the subject. In addition to the antigen, the plasmid also encodes a resistance to an antibiotic, which is used during the construction and production steps of the plasmid. However, regulatory agencies (FDA, USDA and EMA) recommend to avoid the use of antibiotics resistance genes. Delphi Genetics developed the Staby(®) technology to replace the antibiotic-resistance gene by a selection system that relies on two bacterial genes. These genes are small in size (approximately 200 to 300 bases each) and consequently encode two small proteins. They are naturally present in the genomes of bacteria and on plasmids. The technology is already used successfully for production of recombinant proteins to achieve higher yields and without the need of antibiotics. In the field of DNA vaccines, we have now the first data validating the innocuousness of this Staby(®) technology for eukaryotic cells and the feasibility of an industrial production of an antibiotic-free DNA vaccine. Moreover, as a proof of concept, mice have been successfully vaccinated with our antibiotic-free DNA vaccine against a deadly disease, pseudorabies (induced by Suid herpesvirus-1).

  16. Vaccines in pregnancy: The dual benefit for pregnant women and infants

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, H.; McMillan, M.; Andrews, R. M.; Macartney, K.; Edwards, K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Maternal immunization has the potential to reduce the burden of infectious diseases in the pregnant woman and her infant. Many countries now recommend immunization against influenza at any stage of pregnancy and against pertussis in the third trimester. Despite evidence of the safety and effectiveness of these vaccines when administered during pregnancy, uptake generally remains low for influenza and moderate for pertussis vaccine. Enhancing confidence in both immunization providers and pregnant women by increasing the evidence-base for the safety and effectiveness of vaccines during pregnancy, improving communication and access by incorporating immunization into standard models of antenatal care are likely to improve uptake. Developing a framework for implementation of vaccines for pregnant women which is cognizant of local and national cultural, epidemiological, behavioral and societal factors will enable a smooth transition and high uptake for new vaccines currently in development for pregnant women. PMID:26857450

  17. Mixing of M Segment DNA Vaccines to Hantaan Virus and Puumala Virus Reduces Their Immunogenicity in Hamsters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    with renal syndrome (HFRS). In merica, several other hantaviruses cause hantavirus pulmonary yndrome (HPS) [1]. There are currently no U.S. licensed vac...online 25 April 2008 eywords: a b s t r a c t To determine if DNA vaccines for two hantaviruses causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, Hantaan...twoantaviruses emorrhagic fever with renal syndrome NA vaccines hantaviruses could be detected. In contrast, if the DNAs were given as separate vaccinations to

  18. [DNA vaccines and recombinant antigens in prevention of Toxoplasma gondii infections--current status of the studies].

    PubMed

    Hiszczyńska-Sawicka, Elzbieta; Holec-Gasior, Lucyna; Kur, Józef

    2009-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis caused by an intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is still one of major medical and veterinary problems and there is still need for a vaccine for human toxoplasmosis. Despite years of research much remains to be done to develop effective vaccine. The article presents the current status of vaccine strategies against toxoplasmosis with focus on the most developed approaches using naked DNA and recombinant antigens.

  19. PD-1 or PD-L1 Blockade Restores Antitumor Efficacy Following SSX2 Epitope-Modified DNA Vaccine Immunization.

    PubMed

    Rekoske, Brian T; Smith, Heath A; Olson, Brian M; Maricque, Brett B; McNeel, Douglas G

    2015-08-01

    DNA vaccines have demonstrated antitumor efficacy in multiple preclinical models, but low immunogenicity has been observed in several human clinical trials. This has led to many approaches seeking to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. We previously reported that a DNA vaccine encoding the cancer-testis antigen SSX2, modified to encode altered epitopes with increased MHC class I affinity, elicited a greater frequency of cytolytic, multifunctional CD8(+) T cells in non-tumor-bearing mice. We sought to test whether this optimized vaccine resulted in increased antitumor activity in mice bearing an HLA-A2-expressing tumor engineered to express SSX2. We found that immunization of tumor-bearing mice with the optimized vaccine elicited a surprisingly inferior antitumor effect relative to the native vaccine. Both native and optimized vaccines led to increased expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells, but antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells from mice immunized with the optimized construct expressed higher PD-1. Splenocytes from immunized animals induced PD-L1 expression on tumor cells in vitro. Antitumor activity of the optimized vaccine could be increased when combined with antibodies blocking PD-1 or PD-L1, or by targeting a tumor line not expressing PD-L1. These findings suggest that vaccines aimed at eliciting effector CD8(+) T cells, and DNA vaccines in particular, might best be combined with PD-1 pathway inhibitors in clinical trials. This strategy may be particularly advantageous for vaccines targeting prostate cancer, a disease for which antitumor vaccines have demonstrated clinical benefit and yet PD-1 pathway inhibitors alone have shown little efficacy to date.

  20. Vaccination with plasmid DNA encoding KMPII, TRYP, LACK and GP63 does not protect dogs against Leishmania infantum experimental challenge.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí; Ojeda, Ana; López-Fuertes, Laura; Timón, Marcos; Altet, Laura; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Sánchez-Robert, Elisenda; Francino, Olga; Alberola, Jordi

    2007-11-14

    Vaccination of dogs, the domestic reservoir of Leishmania infantum, is the best method for controlling zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis. This strategy would reduce the incidence of disease in both the canine and, indirectly, the human population. Different vaccination approaches have been investigated against canine leishmaniasis (CaL) but to date there is only one licensed vaccine against this disease in dogs, in Brazil. DNA immunization is a promising method for inducing both humoral and cellular immune responses against this parasitic disease. Here, we report the results of a multiantigenic plasmid DNA vaccine encoding KMPII, TRYP, LACK and GP63 L. infantum antigens against experimentally induced CaL. Twelve dogs were randomly assigned to two groups receiving, at a 15 days interval, either four doses of plasmid DNA or similar injections of PBS. After vaccination, dogs were intravenously challenged with 5 x 10(7) promastigotes of L. infantum. The vaccine showed to be safe and well-tolerated. Neither cellular immune response nor antibodies directed against whole Leishmania antigen were detected after immunization in vaccinated dogs, although anti-LACK-specific antibodies were sporadically detected in two vaccinated dogs before challenge, thus suggesting that antigens were indeed expressed. A delay in the development of detectable specific immune response and parasite multiplication in vaccinated dogs was observed after challenge. Nevertheless, the multiantigenic Leishmania DNA vaccine was unable to induce protection against parasite dissemination or disease. This study emphasizes the need to strengthen DNA vaccines in order to obtain effective immune responses in models other than the murine.

  1. Bursal transcriptome of chickens protected by DNA vaccination versus those challenged with infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Chun; Kim, Bong-Suk; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) infection destroys the bursa of Fabricius, causing immunosuppression and rendering chickens susceptible to secondary bacterial or viral infections. IBDV large-segment-protein-expressing DNA has been shown to confer complete protection of chickens from infectious bursal disease (IBD). The purpose of the present study was to compare DNA-vaccinated chickens and unvaccinated chickens upon IBDV challenge by transcriptomic analysis of bursa regarding innate immunity, inflammation, immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport. One-day-old specific-pathogen-free chickens were vaccinated intramuscularly three times at weekly intervals with IBDV large-segment-protein-expressing DNA. Chickens were challenged orally with 8.2 × 10(2) times the egg infective dose (EID)50 of IBDV strain variant E (VE) one week after the last vaccination. Bursae collected at 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days post-challenge (dpc) were subjected to real-time RT-PCR quantification of bursal transcripts related to innate immunity, inflammation, immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport. The expression levels of granzyme K and CD8 in DNA-vaccinated chickens were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those in unvaccinated chickens upon IBDV challenge at 0.5 or 1 dpc. The expression levels of other genes involved in innate immunity, inflammation, immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport were not upregulated or downregulated in DNA-vaccinated chickens during IBDV challenge. Bursal transcripts related to innate immunity and inflammation, including TLR3, MDA5, IFN-α, IFN-β, IRF-1, IRF-10, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, iNOS, granzyme A, granzyme K and IL-10, were upregulated or significantly (p < 0.05) upregulated at 3 dpc and later in unvaccinated chickens challenged with IBDV. The expression levels of genes related to immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport, including CD4, CD8, IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-12(p40), IL-18, GM-CSF, GATA-3

  2. Magnetic Nanovectors for the Development of DNA Blood-Stage Malaria Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Al-Deen, Fatin M. Nawwab; Xiang, Sue D.; Ma, Charles; Wilson, Kirsty; Coppel, Ross L.; Selomulya, Cordelia; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    DNA vaccines offer cost, flexibility, and stability advantages, but administered alone have limited immunogenicity. Previously, we identified optimal configurations of magnetic vectors comprising superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), polyethylenimine (PEI), and hyaluronic acid (HA) to deliver malaria DNA encoding Plasmodium yoelii (Py) merozoite surface protein MSP119 (SPIONs/PEI/DNA + HA gene complex) to dendritic cells and transfect them with high efficiency in vitro. Herein, we evaluate their immunogenicity in vivo by administering these potential vaccine complexes into BALB/c mice. The complexes induced antibodies against PyMSP119, with higher responses induced intraperitoneally than intramuscularly, and antibody levels further enhanced by applying an external magnetic field. The predominant IgG subclasses induced were IgG2a followed by IgG1 and IgG2b. The complexes further elicited high levels of interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and moderate levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-17 antigen-specific splenocytes, indicating induction of T helper 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th17 cell mediated immunity. The ability of such DNA/nanoparticle complexes to induce cytophilic antibodies together with broad spectrum cellular immunity may benefit malaria vaccines. PMID:28336871

  3. Do uncertainty analyses reveal uncertainties? Using the introduction of DNA vaccines to aquaculture as a case.

    PubMed

    Gillund, Frøydis; Kjølberg, Kamilla A; von Krauss, Martin Krayer; Myhr, Anne I

    2008-12-15

    The Walker and Harremoës (W&H) uncertainty framework is a tool to systematically identify scientific uncertainty. We applied the W&H uncertainty framework to elicit scientists' judgements of potential sources of uncertainty associated with the use of DNA vaccination in aquaculture. DNA vaccination is considered a promising solution to combat pathological fish diseases. There is, however, lack of knowledge regarding its ecological and social implications. Our findings indicate that scientists are open and aware of a number of uncertainties associated with DNA vaccination e.g. with regard to immune response, degradation and distribution of the DNA plasmid after injection and environmental release, and consider most of these uncertainties to be adequately reduced through more research. We proceed to discuss our experience of using the W&H uncertainty framework. Some challenges related to the application of the framework were recognised. This was especially related to the respondents' unfamiliarity with the concepts used and their lack of experience in discussing qualitative aspects of uncertainties. As we see it, the W&H framework should be considered as a useful tool to stimulate reflection on uncertainty and an important first step in a more extensive process of including and properly dealing with uncertainties in science and policymaking.

  4. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  5. Construction and immune effect of Haemophilus parasuis DNA vaccine encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shulin; Zhang, Minmin; Ou, Jiwen; Liu, Huazhen; Tan, Chen; Liu, Jinlin; Chen, Huanchun; Bei, Weicheng

    2012-11-06

    Haemophilus parasuis, the causative agent of swine polyserositis, polyarthritis, and meningitis, is one of the most important bacterial diseases of pigs worldwide. The development of a vaccine against H. parasuis has been impeded due to the lack of induction of reliable cross-serotype protection. In this study the gapA gene that encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was shown to be present and highly conserved in various serotypes of H. parasuis and we constructed a novel DNA vaccine encoding GAPDH (pCgap) to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy against infection with H. parasuis MD0322 serovar 4 or SH0165 serovar 5 in mice. A significant antibody response against GAPDH was generated following pCgap intramuscular immunization; moreover, antibodies to the pCgap DNA vaccine were bactericidal, suggesting that it was expressed in vivo. The gapA transcript was detected in muscle, liver, spleen, and kidney of the mice seven days post-vaccination. The IgG subclass (IgG1 and IgG2a) analysis indicated that the DNA vaccine induced both Th1 and Th2 immune responses, but the IgG1 response was greater than the IgG2a response. Moreover, the groups vaccinated with the pCgap vaccine exhibited 83.3% and 50% protective efficacy against the H. parasuis MD0322 serovar 4 or SH0165 serovar 5 challenges, respectively. The pCgap DNA vaccine provided significantly greater protective efficacy compared to the negative control groups or blank control groups (P<0.05 for both). Taken together, these findings indicate that the pCgap DNA vaccine provides a novel strategy against infection of H. parasuis and offer insight concerning the underlying immune mechanisms of a bacterial DNA vaccine.

  6. DNA Virus Vectors for Vaccine Production in Plants: Spotlight on Geminiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hefferon, Kathleen L.

    2014-01-01

    Plants represent a safe, efficacious and inexpensive production platform by which to provide vaccines and other therapeutic proteins to the world’s poor. Plant virus expression vector technology has rapidly become one of the most popular methods to express pharmaceutical proteins in plants. This review discusses several of the state-of-the-art plant expression systems based upon geminiviruses that have been engineered for vaccine production. An overview of the advantages of these small, single-stranded DNA viruses is provided and comparisons are made with other virus expression systems. Advances in the design of several different geminivirus vectors are presented in this review, and examples of vaccines and other biologics generated from each are described. PMID:26344750

  7. Myostatin DNA vaccine increases skeletal muscle mass and endurance in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Yan, Zhen; Wan, Yi; Han, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi

    2007-09-01

    Myostatin is a transforming growth factor-beta family member that acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. In mice, genetic disruption of the myostatin gene leads to a marked increase in body weight and muscle mass. Similarly, pharmacological interference with myostatin in vivo in mdx knockout mice results in a functional improvement of the dystrophic phenotype. Consequently, myostatin is an important therapeutic target for treatment of diseases associated with muscle wasting. To construct a therapeutic DNA vaccine against myostatin, we coupled the foreign, immunodominant T-helper epitope of tetanus toxin to the N terminus of myostatin, and BALB/c mice were immunized with the recombinant vector. Sera from vaccinated mice showed the presence of specific antibodies against the recombinant protein. In addition, body weight, muscle mass, and grip endurance of vaccinated mice were significantly increased. Our study provides a novel, pharmacological strategy for treatment of diseases associated with muscle wasting.

  8. Dendritic cell targeted liposomes-protamine-DNA complexes mediated by synthetic mannosylated cholestrol as a potential carrier for DNA vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Chen, Simu; Jiang, Yuhong; Jiang, Jiayu; Zhang, Zhirong; Sun, Xun

    2013-07-01

    To construct mannosylated liposomes/protamine/DNA (LPD) carriers for DNA vaccine targeting to dendritic cells (DCs), a mannosylated cholesterol derivative (Man-C6-Chol) was synthesized via simple ester linkage and amide bonds. Then, the Man-C6-Chol was applied to LPD formulation as a synthetic ligand. The physicochemical properties of mannosylated LPD (Man-LPD) were first evaluated, including the size and zeta potential, morphology and the ability to protect DNA against DNase I degradation. Man-LPD showed a small size with a stable viral-like structure. In comparison to non-mannose liposomes/LPD (Man-free liposomes/LPD), mannosylated liposomes/LPD (Man-liposomes/Man-LPD) exhibited higher efficiency in both intracellular uptake (2.3-fold) and transfection (4.5-fold) in vitro. Subsequent MTT assays indicated that the LPD carriers had low toxicity on the tested cells. Afterwards, the investigation into the maturation activation on primary bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) showed that both Man-LPD and Man-free LPD induced remarkable up-regulation of CD80, CD86 and CD40 on BMDCs. Inspired by these studies, we can conclude that the synthetic mannosylated LPD targeting to DCs was a potential carrier for DNA vaccine.

  9. Neutralizing antibodies respond to a bivalent dengue DNA vaccine or/and a recombinant bivalent antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Weng, Yu-Wei; Huang, Hai-Long; Zhang, Jian-Ming; Yan, Yan-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    There is currently no effective vaccine to prevent dengue infection, despite the existence of multiple studies on potential methods of immunization. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of DNA and/or recombinant protein on levels of neutralizing antibodies. For this purpose, envelope domain IIIs of dengue serotypes 1 and 2 (DEN-1/2)were spliced by a linker (Gly‑Gly‑Ser‑Gly‑Ser)3 and cloned into the prokaryotic expression plasmid pET30a (+) and eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1 (+). The chimeric bivalent protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and one‑step purification by high‑performance liquid chromatography was conducted. Protein expression levels of the DNA plasmid were tested in BHK‑21 cells by indirect immunofluorescent assay. In order to explore a more effective immunization strategy and to develop neutralizing antibodies against the two serotypes, mice were inoculated with recombinant bivalent protein, the DNA vaccine, or the two given simultaneously. Presence of the specific antibodies was tested by ELISA and the presence of the neutralizing antibodies was determined by plaque reduction neutralization test. Results of the analysis indicated that the use of a combination of DNA and protein induced significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies against either DEN‑1 or DEN‑2 (1:64.0 and 1:76.1, respectively) compared with the DNA (1:24.7 and 1:26.9, DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively) or the recombinant protein (1:34.9 and 1:45.3 in DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively). The present study demonstrated that the combination of recombinant protein and DNA as an immunization strategy may be an effective method for the development of a vaccine to prevent dengue virus infection.

  10. Efficacy of an infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus DNA vaccine in Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye O. nerka salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; LaPatra, S.E.; Kurath, G.

    2005-01-01

    The level of protective immunity was determined for Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye/kokanee salmon (anadromous and landlocked) O. nerka following intramuscular vaccination with a DNA vaccine against the aquatic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). A DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of IHNV protected Chinook and sockeye/kokanee salmon against waterborne or injection challenge with IHNV, and relative percent survival (RPS) values of 23 to 86% were obtained under a variety of lethal challenge conditions. Although this is significant protection, it is less than RPS values obtained in previous studies with rainbow trout (O. mykiss). In addition to the variability in the severity of the challenge and inherent host susceptibility differences, it appears that use of a cross-genogroup challenge virus strain may lead to reduced efficacy of the DNA vaccine. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in both Chinook and sockeye that had been vaccinated with 1.0 and 0.1 ??g doses of the DNA vaccine, and vaccinated fish responded to viral challenges with higher antibody titers than mock-vaccinated control fish. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  11. The Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime-Rv0577 DNA boost vaccination induces a durable Th1 immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dongqing; Chen, Wei; Mi, Youjun; Gong, Xueli; Luo, Tao; Bao, Lang

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global health problem and effective vaccines are urgently needed. In this study, we used the combined DNA- and protein-based vaccines of immunodominant antigen Rv0577 to boost BCG and evaluated their immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. Our data suggest that the booster vaccine may substantially enhance the immunogenicity of BCG and strengthen both CD4+ T cell-mediated Th1 and CD8+ T cell-mediated cytolytic responses. Compared with the protein-based vaccine, the DNA-based vaccine can induce more durable Th1 immune response, characterized by high levels of antibody response, proliferation response, percentages of CD4+/CD8+ and cytokine secretion in antigen-stimulated splenocyte cultures. In conclusion, we for the first time, developed a protein- and plasmid DNA-based booster vaccine based on Rv0577. Our findings suggest that antigen Rv0577-based DNA vaccine is immunogenic and can efficiently boost BCG, which could be helpful in the design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB.

  12. Efficacy of an infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus DNA vaccine in Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye O. nerka salmon.

    PubMed

    Garver, Kyle A; LaPatra, Scott E; Kurath, Gael

    2005-04-06

    The level of protective immunity was determined for Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye/kokanee salmon (anadromous and landlocked) O. nerka following intramuscular vaccination with a DNA vaccine against the aquatic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). A DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of IHNV protected Chinook and sockeye/kokanee salmon against waterborne or injection challenge with IHNV, and relative percent survival (RPS) values of 23 to 86% were obtained under a variety of lethal challenge conditions. Although this is significant protection, it is less than RPS values obtained in previous studies with rainbow trout (O. mykiss). In addition to the variability in the severity of the challenge and inherent host susceptibility differences, it appears that use of a cross-genogroup challenge virus strain may lead to reduced efficacy of the DNA vaccine. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in both Chinook and sockeye that had been vaccinated with 1.0 and 0.1 pg doses of the DNA vaccine, and vaccinated fish responded to viral challenges with higher antibody titers than mock-vaccinated control fish.

  13. Construction of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) DNA vaccine and its protective efficiency on the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) challenged with Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyang; Zhu, Fan; Huang, Yucong; Ding, Yu; Jian, Jichang; Wu, Zaohe

    2017-01-01

    The main aims of this study were to construct glutathione peroxidase (GPx) DNA vaccine of Vibrio harveyi ZJ0603 and to investigate its immune protective efficiency as a vaccine candidate on the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) treated with V. harveyi. Base on the cloning of ZJ0603 GPx gene, a DNA vaccine, named as pcDNA-GPx, was constructed by inserting GPx gene into pcDNA3.1 (+) plasmid. Orange-spotted groupers were immunized with the pcDNA-GPx plasmid by injection intramuscularly. The relative percent of survival (RPS) of fish vaccinated with the DNA vaccine against pathogenic V. harveyi infection was 77.5%. The expression of DNA vaccine was analyzed in the tissues of orange-spotted grouper by PCR and RT-PCR. The results indicated that pcDNA-GPx distributed and expressed in the head kidney, liver, spleen, gill and injected muscle at 7 and 28 days after vaccination. Significant specific antibody responses were also detected in the vaccinated orange-spotted groupers by indirect ELISA method. In a conclusion, DNA vaccine pcDNA-GPx showed an effective immune protection to the orange-spotted grouper treated with V. harveyi. The GPx can be used as a candidate DNA vaccine for the control of vibriosis.

  14. Generation of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) Recombinants Expressing the Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus (ILTV) Glycoprotein gB or gD as Dual Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Spatz, Stephen; Zsak, Laszlo; Yu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by infection with infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), a member of the family Herpesviridae. The current commercial ILT vaccines are either unsafe or ineffective. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop safer and more efficacious vaccines. Newcastle disease (ND), caused by infection with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, is one of the most serious infectious diseases of poultry. The NDV LaSota strain, a naturally occurring low-virulence NDV strain, has been routinely used as a live vaccine throughout the world. This chapter describes the generation of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota vaccine strain-based recombinant viruses expressing glycoprotein B (gB) or glycoprotein D (gD) of ILTV as dual vaccines against ND and ILT using reverse genetics technology.

  15. Effects of menstrual cycle on gene transfection through mouse vagina for DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, T; Takashima, Y; Hirayama, S; Okada, H

    2008-08-06

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections mainly occur through the vaginal and rectal mucosal membranes. In the present study, to develop a DNA vaginal vaccine against viral and bacterial infections, the effects of the menstrual cycle on DNA transfection through the vaginal mucosa in female mice and transfection enhancement by electroporation, a chelating agent, cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) and nuclear localizing signals (NLS) were investigated. The transfection efficiencies of a marker plasmid DNA (pDNA), pCMV-Luc, on the vaginal mucosal membrane in mice at the stages of metestrus and diestrus were significantly higher than those at the stages of proestrus and estrus. The gene expression was markedly enhanced by electroporation and by pretreatment with the chelating agent. The highest level of expression was obtained by 2h pretreatment with 5% citric acid solution combined with electroporation with 15 pulses at 250 V/cm for 5 milliseconds (ms). Furthermore, a synergistic promoting effect on pDNA transfection was obtained by co-administration of CPP, the Tat peptide analog, and NLS, the NF-kappaB analog. These results indicate that effective DNA vaccination administered through the vaginal tract is possible by selecting the menstrual stage and overcoming the mucosal barrier using a combination of methods that promotes uptake.

  16. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Semliki forest virus replicon-based DNA vaccines encoding goatpox virus structural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Min; Jin Ningyi; Liu Qi; Huo Xiaowei; Li Yang; Hu Bo; Ma Haili; Zhu Zhanbo; Cong Yanzhao; Li Xiao; Jin Minglan; Zhu Guangze

    2009-08-15

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is an acute feverish and contagious disease in goats often associated with high morbidity and high mortality. To resolve potential safety risks and vaccination side effects of existing live attenuated goatpox vaccine (AV41), two Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicon-based bicistronic expression DNA vaccines (pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA) which encode GTPV structural proteins corresponding to the Vaccinia virus proteins A27, L1, A33, and B5, respectively, were constructed. Then, theirs ability to induce humoral and cellular response in mice and goats, and protect goats against virulent virus challenge were evaluated. The results showed that, vaccination with pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA in combination could elicit strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and goats, provide partial protection against viral challenge in goats, and reduce disease symptoms. Additionally, priming vaccination with the above-mentioned DNA vaccines could significantly reduce the goats' side reactions from boosting vaccinations with current live vaccine (AV41), which include skin lesions at the inoculation site and fevers. Data obtained in this study could not only facilitate improvement of the current goatpox vaccination strategy, but also provide valuable guidance to suitable candidates for evaluation and development of orthopoxvirus vaccines.

  17. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Semliki forest virus replicon-based DNA vaccines encoding goatpox virus structural proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Jin, Ningyi; Liu, Qi; Huo, Xiaowei; Li, Yang; Hu, Bo; Ma, Haili; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cong, Yanzhao; Li, Xiao; Jin, Minglan; Zhu, Guangze

    2009-08-15

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is an acute feverish and contagious disease in goats often associated with high morbidity and high mortality. To resolve potential safety risks and vaccination side effects of existing live attenuated goatpox vaccine (AV41), two Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicon-based bicistronic expression DNA vaccines (pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA) which encode GTPV structural proteins corresponding to the Vaccinia virus proteins A27, L1, A33, and B5, respectively, were constructed. Then, theirs ability to induce humoral and cellular response in mice and goats, and protect goats against virulent virus challenge were evaluated. The results showed that, vaccination with pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA in combination could elicit strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and goats, provide partial protection against viral challenge in goats, and reduce disease symptoms. Additionally, priming vaccination with the above-mentioned DNA vaccines could significantly reduce the goats' side reactions from boosting vaccinations with current live vaccine (AV41), which include skin lesions at the inoculation site and fevers. Data obtained in this study could not only facilitate improvement of the current goatpox vaccination strategy, but also provide valuable guidance to suitable candidates for evaluation and development of orthopoxvirus vaccines.

  18. Effects of DDA, CpG-ODN, and plasmid-encoded chicken IFN-γ on protective immunity by a DNA vaccine against IBDV in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Ha Jung; Sung, Haan Woo

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the adjuvant effects of dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), and chicken interferon-γ (ChIFN-γ) on a DNA vaccine (pcDNA-VP243) against the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). A plasmid encoding chicken IFN-ã was constructed. Twice at 2-week intervals, two-week-old chickens were injected intramuscularly and intraperitoneally with either a DNA vaccine alone or a DNA vaccine together with the respective adjuvants. On week 2 after the second immunization, the chickens were orally challenged with the highly virulent IBDV. The groups that received the DNA vaccines plus either DDA or CpG-ODN showed significantly lower survival rates than the group that received the DNA vaccine alone. However, the survival rates for the DNA vaccine alone and for the DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-γ were similar. The chickens had no detectable antibodies to the IBDV before the challenge but all the surviving chickens in all groups except for the normal control group showed the induction of antibodies to the IBDV at day 10 after the challenge. As judged by the lymphocyte proliferation assays using the a WST-8 solution performed on the peripheral blood and splenic lymphocytes, the stimulation indices (SI) of the peripheral blood lymphocytes in all groups except for the normal control group were similar immediately before the challenge. At 10 days post-challenge, the SI for DNA vaccine plus either CpG-ODN or ChIFN-γ was similar to that of the DNA vaccine control group. For splenic lymphocytes, the SI in the DNA vaccine plus CpG-ODN and DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-γ groups were higher than for the DNA vaccine control. These results suggest that DDA actually compromises the protection against the IBDV by DNA vaccine, and CpG-ODN and IFN-γ had no significant effect. PMID:17106228

  19. Protective immunity induced by a DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria tenella rhomboid against homologous challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingli; Zheng, Jun; Li, Jianhua; Gong, Pengtao; Zhang, Xichen

    2013-01-01

    Rhomboid protein in Apicomplexa was associated with the process of host cell invasion. To evaluate the potential of the protein in eliciting protective immunity against challenge, a DNA vaccine pVAX1-Rho encoding Eimeria tenella rhomboid was constructed. Recombinant protein was expressed in Hela cells and verified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting analysis. In vivo experiments, 1-week-old chickens were randomly divided into three groups. Experimental group of chickens were immunized with DNA vaccines while control group of chickens were injected with pVAX1 plasmid alone or sterile water. Two weeks following the booster dose, all chickens were inoculated orally with 5 × 10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. tenella. The host immunity and protective efficacy of this vaccine against E. tenella challenge in broilers were evaluated. Results showed that specific antibody, the levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte cells were significantly increased in the pVAX1-Rho group. Challenge experiments demonstrated that pVAX1-Rho vaccination could reduce oocyst excretion, decrease cecal lesion, increase bodyweight gains and provide chickens with oocysts decrease ratio around 75.8 %. These results suggest that the pVAX1-Rho was able to induce humoral and cellular responses and generate protective immunity against E. tenella infection.

  20. Protection of tree shrews by pVAX-PS DNA vaccine against HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng-Juan; Hu, Zhen-Lin; Dai, Jian-Xin; Chen, Rui-Wen; Shi, Ke; Lin, Yi; Sun, Shu-Han

    2003-07-01

    The immunological protection of pVAX-PS, a DNA vaccine, was assessed in the tree shrews model. pVAX-PS was constructed by inserting the gene encoding the middle (pre-S2 plus S) envelope protein of HBV into a plasmid vector pVAX1. Tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinenesis) were experimentally infected with human HBV by inoculation with human serum positive for HBV markers. DNA vaccination-induced seroconversion and antibody to HBV surface antigen (anti-HBs) were analyzed by ELISA, and protective effects elicited by pVAX-PS vaccination against subsequent HBV challenge were evaluated by detection of HBV seromarkers and observation of hepatic lesions in HBV-infected tree shrews. The results shown that anti-HBs were detectable in serum at week 2 after pVAX-PS vaccination and peaked at week 4, and immunization with pVAX-PS decreased the positive conversion rate of HBV seromarkers and relieved hepatic lesions in tree shrews challenged with HBV. These results indicated that pVAX-PS immunization could induce remarkable humoral immune response and prevent the experimental tree shrews from infection of HBV.

  1. Local gene expression and immune responses of vaginal DNA vaccination using a needle-free injector.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Takanori; Takashima, Yuuki; Tamura, Toshiaki; Tsuchiya, Miki; Shibata, Yasunori; Udagawa, Haruhide; Okada, Hiroaki

    2010-08-30

    The vaginal mucosa is the most common site of initiation of virus infections that are transmitted through heterosexual intercourse, including HIV and papillomavirus. Thus, in order to prevent or treat these infections, strong vaginal immunity is required as the first line of defense. In this study, to establish a less invasive, safe, convenient and effective immunization method, we examined the local (skin and vagina) gene transfection efficiency of a non-needle jet injector for daily insulin injection. In the skin experiment, the needle-free injector resulted in a marked increase in marker gene expression, compared to the conventional needle-syringe injection. In addition, intradermal DNA vaccination using the needle-free injector dramatically induced IFN-gamma and antibody systemic responses in mice. Furthermore, we investigated the applicability of the needle-free injector as a vaginal vaccination tool in rabbits. Vaginal gene expression using the needle-free injector was significantly greater than that using needle-syringe injection. Moreover, intravaginal vaccination by the needle-free injector promoted vaginal IgA secretion and IFN-gamma mRNA expression in the blood lymphocytes, to a degree significantly higher than that by needle-syringe injection. In conclusion, local vaginal DNA vaccination using a needle-free jet injector is a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of mucosal infectious diseases.

  2. Dual-degradable disulfide-containing PEI-Pluronic/DNA polyplexes: transfection efficiency and balancing protection and DNA release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lifen; Chen, Zhenzhen; Li, Yanfeng

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric gene-delivery vectors to achieve lack of toxicity and a balance between protection and DNA release remains a formidable challenge. Incorporating intracellular environment-responsive degradable bonds is an appreciable step toward developing safer transfection agents. In this study, novel, dual-degradable polycation copolymers (Pluronic-diacrylate [PA]-polyethyleneimine [PEI]-SS) were synthesized through the addition of low molecular weight (800 Da) PEI cross-linked with SS (PEI-SS) to PA. Three PA-PEI-SS copolymers (PA-PEI-SS1, 2, and 3) with different PEI-SS to Pluronic molar ratios were investigated and found to strongly condense plasmid DNA into positively charged nanoparticles with an average particle size of approximately 200 nm and to possess higher stability against DNase I digestion and sodium heparin. Disulfide and ester bonds of the copolymers were susceptible to intracellular redox conditions. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the PA-PEI-SS copolymers had significantly lower cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency in both BGC-823 and 293T cell lines than the controls of degradable PEI-SS and nondegradable 25 kDa PEI. Transfection activity was influenced by the PEI-SS content in the polymers and PA-PEI-SS1 showed the highest efficiency of the three copolymers. These studies suggest that these dual-degradable copolymers could be used as potential biocompatible gene delivery carriers.

  3. DNA Vaccination of American Robins (Turdus migratorius) Against West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Alan P.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Kramer, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract West Nile virus (WNV) has caused at least 1150 cases of encephalitis, 100 deaths, and an estimated 30,000–80,000 illnesses in 6 of the last 7 years. Recent evidence from several regions has implicated American robins (Turdus migratorius) as an important host for feeding by Culex mosquitoes, and, when integrated with their host competence for WNV, demonstrates that they are a key WNV amplification host. We evaluated the efficacy of a DNA plasmid vaccine at reducing the viremia and infectiousness of hatch-year American robins. We found that a single dose of vaccine injected intramuscularly resulted in more than a 400-fold (102.6) decrease in average viremia. Although sample sizes were small, these results suggest that vaccinated robins exhibit viremias that are likely to be mostly noninfectious to biting Culex mosquitoes. More broadly, if an orally effective formulation of this vaccine could be developed, new control strategies based on wildlife vaccination may be possible. PMID:19874192

  4. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette; Fischer, William; Wallstrom, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  5. Enhancing the Immunogenicity of a Dengue-2 DNA Vaccine With Adjuvants and Anti-FCyRI Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    antibody responses to the vaccine given IM were enhanced slightly by combining it with TT. However, the ELISA and neutralizing antibody levels were...aluminum phosphate, tetanus toxoid and DNA vaccine linked with anti-FcγR antibody . 3. Analyze antibody response by indirect ELISA and plaque reduction...FcγR antibody to the DEN-1 DNA. 3. Analyze antibody response by indirect ELISA and plaque reduction neutralization tests. Perform ELISPOT

  6. [A kinetic study of gamma interferon production in herpes simplex virus-1 DNA prime-protein boost regimen comparing to DNA or subunit vaccination].

    PubMed

    Arefian, Ehsan; Bamdad, Taravat; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Akhood, Mohamad Reza; Parsania, Masaoud; Ghaemi, Amir

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of the world's population is infected with Herpes simplex virus (HSV). Although antiviral therapy can reduce the incidence of reactivation and asymptomatic viral shedding, and limit morbidity and mortality from active disease, it cannot cure infection. Therefore, the development of an effective vaccine is an important global health priority. In this study, the induction of IFN-gamma production was compared by different herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) vaccines. Glycoprotein D (gD1) as a major immunogenic HSV1 glycoprotein was chosen to our study. Balb/c mice were administered with DNA vaccine encoding gD1, subunit glycoprotein vaccine including insect cells infected by a gD1 recombinant Baculovirus, prime DNA vaccine boosted by subunit glycoprotein vaccine, inactivated KOS strain as a positive control, PcDNA3 plasmid and Sf9 cells as a negative control. Evaluation tests showed kinetics of IFN-gamma mRNA at 8, 16 and 32 hours after restimulation sharply decreased whereas, IFN-gamma protein is significantly increased. Our results revealed that at 14 days after immunization IFN-gamma secretion of stimulated cells in all of the vaccinate groups dramatically raised rather than secreted IFN-gamma levels in mice that were analyzed at 7 days after vaccination. In comparison to other groups; Prime-Boost immunization dramatically caused vigorous and prompt IFN-gamma production at 7 days after immunization and 8 hours after restimulation.

  7. The degree of apoptosis as an immunostimulant for a DNA vaccine against HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yoshitsugu; Jounai, Nao; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Nakazawa, Masatoshi; Okuda, Kentaro; Watabe, Setsuko; Xin, Ke-Qin; Okuda, Kenji

    2007-01-05

    To regulate the expression of the apoptotic gene, we constructed bicistronic DNA vaccines that encode for HIV env and caspase-3 mutant (casp 3m) that are expressed via the encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) or cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-dependent translations. While IRES-casp 3m induced weak apoptosis and caused little reduction in antigen expression, CMV-casp 3m elicited strong apoptosis and led to a marked decrease in the antigen expression. Therefore, IRES-casp 3m augmented HIV-specific immune responses, and IRES-casp 3m induced significant protection against the vaccinia-HIV chimeric virus. These results suggest that the appropriate level of apoptosis is important for DNA vaccine development.

  8. Alum adjuvanted rabies DNA vaccine confers 80% protection against lethal 50 LD50 rabies challenge virus standard strain.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rajni; Kaur, Manpreet; Saxena, Ankur; Prasad, Rajendra; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2017-03-03

    Rabies is a serious concern world-wide. Despite availability of rabies vaccines for long; their efficacy, safety, availability and cost effectiveness has been a tremendous issue. This calls for improvement of rabies vaccination strategies. DNA vaccination has immense potential in this regard. The DNA vaccine pgp.LAMP-1 conferred 60% protection to BALB/c mice against 20 LD50 rabies challenge virus standard (CVS) strain challenge. Upon supplementation with Emulsigen-D, the vaccine formulation conferred complete protection against lethal challenge. To assess the feasibility of this vaccine formulation for human use, it was tested along with other FDA approved adjuvants, namely, Alum, Immuvac, Montanide ISA720 VG. Enhanced immune response correlated with high IgG antibody titer, Th2 biased response with a high level of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNAs) and IgG1/IgG2a ratio >1, observed upon alum supplementation of the rabies DNA vaccine. The total IgG antibody titer was 2IU/ml and total RVNA titer was observed to be 4IU/ml which is eight times higher than the minimum protective titer recommended by WHO. Furthermore, it conferred 80% protection against challenge with 50 LD50 of the rabies CVS strain, conducted in compliance with the potency test for rabies recommended by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA. Previously, we have established pre-clinical safety of this vaccine as per the guidelines of Schedule Y, FDA as well as The European Agency for evaluation of Medicinal Products. The vaccine showed no observable toxicity at the site of injection as well as at systemic level in Wistar rats when administered with 10X recommended dose. Therefore, supplementation of rabies DNA vaccine, pgp.LAMP-1 with alum would lead to development of a non-toxic, efficacious, stable and affordable vaccine that can be used to combat high numbers of fatal rabies infections tormenting developing countries.

  9. Dietary Flavones as Dual Inhibitors of DNA Methyltransferases and Histone Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Rajnee; Datt, Manish; Liu, Xiaoqi; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of DNA and histone proteins are mutually involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone methyltransferases (HMTs). DNMTs methylate cytosine residues within gene promoters, whereas HMTs catalyze the transfer of methyl groups to lysine and arginine residues of histone proteins, thus causing chromatin condensation and transcriptional repression, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of cancer. The potential reversibility of epigenetic alterations has encouraged the development of dual pharmacologic inhibitors of DNA and histone methylation as anticancer therapeutics. Dietary flavones can affect epigenetic modifications that accumulate over time and have shown anticancer properties, which are undefined. Through DNA binding and in silico protein-ligand docking studies with plant flavones viz. Apigenin, Chrysin and Luteolin, the effect of flavones on DNA and histone methylation was assessed. Spectroscopic analysis of flavones with calf-thymus DNA revealed intercalation as the dominant binding mode, with specific binding to a GC-rich sequence in the DNA duplex. A virtual screening approach using a model of the catalytic site of DNMT and EZH2 demonstrated that plant flavones are tethered at both ends inside the catalytic pocket of DNMT and EZH2 by means of hydrogen bonding. Epigenetic studies performed with flavones exhibited a decrease in DNMT enzyme activity and a reversal of the hypermethylation of cytosine bases in the DNA and prevented cytosine methylation in the GC-rich promoter sequence incubated with the M.SssI enzyme. Furthermore, a marked decrease in HMT activity and a decrease in EZH2 protein expression and trimethylation of H3K27 were noted in histones isolated from cancer cells treated with plant flavones. Our results suggest that dietary flavones can alter DNMT and HMT activities and the methylation of DNA and histone proteins that regulate epigenetic modifications, thus

  10. A DNA Vaccine Formulated with Chemical Adjuvant Provides Partial Protection against Bovine Herpes Virus Infection in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocchi, Valeria; Soria, Ivana; Langellotti, Cecilia Ana; Gnazzo, Victoria; Gammella, Mariela; Moore, Dadin P.; Zamorano, Patricia I.

    2017-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1) is the causative agent of bovine infectious rhinotracheitis, an important disease worldwide. Although conventional BoHV-1 vaccines, including those based on the use of modified live virus and also inactivated vaccines, are currently used in many countries, they have several disadvantages. DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive approach since they have the potential to induce both humoral and cellular immune response; nevertheless, it is largely known that potency of naked DNA vaccines is limited. We demonstrated previously, in the murine model, that the use of adjuvants in combination with a DNA vaccine against BoHV-1 is immunologically beneficial. In this study, we evaluate the immune response and protection against challenge elicited in bovines, by a DNA vaccine carrying the sequence of secreted version of glycoprotein D (gD) of BoHV-1 formulated with chemical adjuvants. Bovines were vaccinated with formulations containing the sequence of gD alone or in combination with adjuvants ESSAI 903110 or Montanide™ 1113101PR. After prime vaccination and two boosters, animals were challenged with infectious BoHV-1. Formulations containing adjuvants Montanide™ 1113101PR and ESSAI 903110 were both, capable of increasing humoral immune response against the virus and diminishing clinical symptoms. Nevertheless, only formulations containing adjuvant Montanide™ 1113101PR was capable of improving cellular immune response and diminishing viral excretion. To our knowledge, it is the first time that a BoHV-1 DNA vaccine is combined with adjuvants and tested in cattle. These results could be useful to design a vaccine for the control of bovine rhinotracheitis. PMID:28179907

  11. A DNA Vaccine Formulated with Chemical Adjuvant Provides Partial Protection against Bovine Herpes Virus Infection in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Quattrocchi, Valeria; Soria, Ivana; Langellotti, Cecilia Ana; Gnazzo, Victoria; Gammella, Mariela; Moore, Dadin P; Zamorano, Patricia I

    2017-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1) is the causative agent of bovine infectious rhinotracheitis, an important disease worldwide. Although conventional BoHV-1 vaccines, including those based on the use of modified live virus and also inactivated vaccines, are currently used in many countries, they have several disadvantages. DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive approach since they have the potential to induce both humoral and cellular immune response; nevertheless, it is largely known that potency of naked DNA vaccines is limited. We demonstrated previously, in the murine model, that the use of adjuvants in combination with a DNA vaccine against BoHV-1 is immunologically beneficial. In this study, we evaluate the immune response and protection against challenge elicited in bovines, by a DNA vaccine carrying the sequence of secreted version of glycoprotein D (gD) of BoHV-1 formulated with chemical adjuvants. Bovines were vaccinated with formulations containing the sequence of gD alone or in combination with adjuvants ESSAI 903110 or Montanide™ 1113101PR. After prime vaccination and two boosters, animals were challenged with infectious BoHV-1. Formulations containing adjuvants Montanide™ 1113101PR and ESSAI 903110 were both, capable of increasing humoral immune response against the virus and diminishing clinical symptoms. Nevertheless, only formulations containing adjuvant Montanide™ 1113101PR was capable of improving cellular immune response and diminishing viral excretion. To our knowledge, it is the first time that a BoHV-1 DNA vaccine is combined with adjuvants and tested in cattle. These results could be useful to design a vaccine for the control of bovine rhinotracheitis.

  12. Immunization of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) with an auxotrophic Edwardsiella tarda mutant harboring the VHSV DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hyuk; Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Ki Hong

    2012-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to find more powerful promoter for DNA vaccines in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and to evaluate the availability of the auxotrophic Edwardsiella tarda mutant (Δalr Δasd E. tarda) as a delivery vehicle for DNA vaccine against VHSV in olive flounder. The marine medaka (Oryzias dancena) β-actin promoter was clearly stronger than cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter when the vectors were transfected to Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells or injected into the muscle of olive flounder, suggesting that marine medaka β-actin promoter would be more appropriate promoter for DNA vaccines in olive flounder than CMV promoter. Olive flounder immunized with the Δalr Δasd E. tarda harboring viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) DNA vaccine vector driven by the marine medaka β-actin promoter showed significantly higher serum neutralization titer and higher survival rates against challenge with VHSV than fish immunized with the bacteria carrying VHSV DNA vaccine vector driven by CMV promoter. These results indicate that auxotrophic E. tarda mutant harboring marine medaka β-actin promoter-driven DNA vaccine vectors would be a potential system for prophylactics of infectious diseases in olive flounder.

  13. Hepatitis B DNA vaccine-polycation nano-complexes enhancing immune response by percutaneous administration with microneedle.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dongfeng; Liang, Wenqing; Xing, Shuxing; Gao, Zhixiang; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Zhili; Gao, Shen

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous immune method is becoming an attractive alternative for DNA vaccine as a lot of antigen presenting cells are existed in the viable epidermis. However, due to the barrier function of stratum corneum, it would be hard for DNA vaccine to reach the viable epidermis of the skin. In order to deliver the DNA vaccine successfully cross the stratum corneum, pentagram silicon microneedle array was prepared in this study, and fluorescently labeled nanoparticle was taken as the model to observe the situation inside the skin processed by microneedle. Via microneedle nanoparticles could enter the skin through the micro-channel (diameter about 20-30 µm) and its amount is greatly larger than that enter though the hair follicle of intact skin. A new type of gene vector Pluronic P123-modified polyethyleneimine (P123-PEI) was synthesized by high molecular weight polyethylenimine and Pluronic P123 with the molar ratio of 1 : 1 to take the advantage of P123-PEI as low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency. Mice were immunized percutaneously with Hepatitis B DNA vaccine/P123-PEI nano-complexes by microneedle. The humoral and cellular immunity generated in percutaneously immunized mice through microneedle array by Hepatitis B DNA vaccine/P123-PEI nano-complex was significantly higher than that of DNA vaccine intramuscular administration.

  14. Arg-Gingipain A DNA Vaccine Induces Protective Immunity against Infection by Porphyromonas gingivalis in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Hideo; Ishihara, Kazuyuki; Okuda, Katsuji

    2001-01-01

    Arginine-specific cysteine proteinases (RgpA and RgpB) produced by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis are suspected virulence factors and are involved in interrupting host defense mechanisms as well as in penetrating and destroying periodontal connective tissues. To induce a protective immune response against P. gingivalis, we constructed an rgpA DNA vaccine. BALB/c mice were immunized intradermally by Gene Gun with plasmid DNA carrying rgpA. Antibody responses against P. gingivalis were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The rgpA DNA vaccine induced high levels of serum antibodies against P. gingivalis. Sera from the rgpA DNA vaccine-immunized mice diminished the proteolytic activity of RgpA and RgpB and inhibited the binding of P. gingivalis to a type I collagen sponge. Moreover, the sera effectively reduced the hemagglutination of P. gingivalis, indicating that the hemagglutinin activity of the organism is associated with RgpA. We found with a murine abscess model that mice immunized with the rgpA DNA vaccine were resistant to an invasive P. gingivalis W50 challenge. These results suggest that the rgpA DNA vaccine induced specific antibodies against the enzyme and that this vaccine could confer protective immunity against P. gingivalis infection. PMID:11292699

  15. Poor immune responses of newborn rhesus macaques to measles virus DNA vaccines expressing the hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Polack, Fernando P; Lydy, Shari L; Lee, Sok-Hyong; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J; Adams, Robert J; Robinson, Harriet L; Griffin, Diane E

    2013-02-01

    A vaccine that would protect young infants against measles could facilitate elimination efforts and decrease morbidity and mortality in developing countries. However, immaturity of the immune system is an important obstacle to the development of such a vaccine. In this study, DNA vaccines expressing the measles virus (MeV) hemagglutinin (H) protein or H and fusion (F) proteins, previously shown to protect juvenile macaques, were used to immunize groups of 4 newborn rhesus macaques. Monkeys were inoculated intradermally with 200 μg of each DNA at birth and at 10 months of age. As controls, 2 newborn macaques were similarly vaccinated with DNA encoding the influenza virus H5, and 4 received one dose of the current live attenuated MeV vaccine (LAV) intramuscularly. All monkeys were monitored for development of MeV-specific neutralizing and binding IgG antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. These responses were poor compared to the responses induced by LAV. At 18 months of age, all monkeys were challenged intratracheally with a wild-type strain of MeV. Monkeys that received the DNA vaccine encoding H and F, but not H alone, were primed for an MeV-specific CD8(+) CTL response but not for production of antibody. LAV-vaccinated monkeys were protected from rash and viremia, while DNA-vaccinated monkeys developed rashes, similar to control monkeys, but had 10-fold lower levels of viremia. We conclude that vaccination of infant macaques with DNA encoding MeV H and F provided only partial protection from MeV infection.

  16. Delivery of DNA HIV-1 Vaccine to the Liver Induces High and Long-lasting Humoral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Raska, Milan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Novak, Jan; Hel, Zdenek; Bozja, Jadranka; Compans, Richard W.; Yang, Chinglai; Mestecky, Jiri

    2008-01-01

    The quality of immune responses induced by DNA vaccination depends on the site of DNA administration, the expression, and the properties of the encoded antigen. In the present study we demonstrate that intravenous hydrodynamic HIV-1 envelope DNA injection resulted in high levels of expression of HIV-1 envelope antigen in the liver. When compared to the administration of DNA by i.n., i.d., i.m., and i.splenic routes, hydrodynamic vaccination induced, upon DNA boosting, 40 times increase of HIV-1 envelope-specific antibodies over the preimmune levels. Hydrodynamic vaccination with 1 μg DNA induced higher humoral responses than 100 μg DNA given intramuscularly in the prime – boost regimen. High levels of envelope-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were induced in genital tract secretions after two doses of DNA followed by intranasal boosting with recombinant HIV-1 gp120 protein. Furthermore, two doses of 100 μg DNA generated interferon-gamma production in ~ 4.3 ± 1.7 % of CD8+ splenocytes after in vitro stimulation with HIV-1 envelope peptides. These results demonstrate that DNA vaccines targeted to tissues with high proteosynthetic activity, such as the liver, results in enhanced immune responses. PMID:18304708

  17. Rifapentine, Moxifloxacin, or DNA Vaccine Improves Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nuermberger, Eric; Tyagi, Sandeep; Williams, Kathy N.; Rosenthal, Ian; Bishai, William R.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Priorities for developing improved regimens for treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection include (1) developing shorter and/or more intermittently administered regimens that are easier to supervise and (2) developing and evaluating regimens that are active against multidrug-resistant organisms. Objectives and Methods: By using a previously validated murine model that involves immunizing mice with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin to augment host immunity before infection with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we evaluated new treatment regimens including rifapentine and moxifloxacin, and assessed the potential of the Mycobacterium leprae heat shock protein-65 DNA vaccine to augment the activity of moxifloxacin. Measurements: Quantitative spleen colony-forming unit counts, and the proportion of mice with culture-positive relapse after treatment, were determined. Main Results: Three-month, once-weekly regimens of rifapentine combined with either isoniazid or moxifloxacin were as active as daily isoniazid for 6–9 mo. Six-month daily combinations of moxifloxacin with pyrazinamide, ethionamide, or ethambutol were more active than pyrazinamide plus ethambutol, a regimen recommended for latent TB infection after exposure to multidrug-resistant TB. The combination of moxifloxacin with the experimental nitroimidazopyran PA-824 was especially active. Finally, the heat shock protein-65 DNA vaccine had no effect on colony-forming unit counts when given alone, but augmented the bactericidal activity of moxifloxacin. Conclusions: Together, these findings suggest that rifapentine, moxifloxacin, and, perhaps, therapeutic DNA vaccination have the potential to improve on the current treatment of latent TB infection. PMID:16151038

  18. On the efficacy of malaria DNA vaccination with magnetic gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Nawwab Al-Deen, Fatin; Ma, Charles; Xiang, Sue D; Selomulya, Cordelia; Plebanski, Magdalena; Coppel, Ross L

    2013-05-28

    We investigated the efficacy and types of immune responses from plasmid malaria DNA vaccine encoding VR1020-PyMSP119 condensed on the surface of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated SPIONs. In vivo mouse studies were done firstly to determine the optimum magnetic vector composition, and then to observe immune responses elicited when magnetic vectors were introduced via different administration routes. Higher serum antibody titers against PyMSP119 were observed with intraperitoneal and intramuscular injections than subcutaneous and intradermal injections. Robust IgG2a and IgG1 responses were observed for intraperitoneal administration, which could be due to the physiology of peritoneum as a major reservoir of macrophages and dendritic cells. Heterologous DNA prime followed by single protein boost vaccination regime also enhanced IgG2a, IgG1, and IgG2b responses, indicating the induction of appropriate memory immunity that can be elicited by protein on recall. These outcomes support the possibility to design superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based DNA vaccines to optimally evoke desired antibody responses, useful for a variety of diseases including malaria.

  19. Adjuvant effect of polysaccharide from fruits of Physalis alkekengi L. in DNA vaccine against systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huimin; Han, Shuying; Zhao, Danyang; Wang, Guiyun

    2014-08-30

    Adjuvant effect mediated by polysaccharide (PPSB) isolated from the fruits of Physalis alkekengi L. in DNA vaccine was evaluated in mice. Recombinant plasmid containing epitope C (LKVIRK) from heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) of Candida albicans (C. albican) was used as DNA vaccine (pD-HSP90C). The results indicated that PPSB significantly enhanced specific antibody titers IgG, IgG1, IgG2b, and concentration of IL-2 and IL-4 in sera of mice immunized with pD-HSP90C (p<0.05). More importantly, it was found that the mice immunized with pD-HSP90C/PPSB not only had fewer CFU (colony forming unites) in the kidneys than mice immunized with pD-HSP90C, but also a statistically significant higher survival rate over PBS-injected group (p<0.05) when the immunized mice were challenged with living C. albican cells. However, no statistically significant difference in survival rate was observed between pD-HSP90C-immunized group and PBS-injected group. Therefore, PPSB can be considered as a promising adjuvant eliciting both Th1 and Th2 responses to enhance the efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  20. Preparation and efficacy of Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Wei; Shi, Ci; Guo, Chen; Dai, Chunxiao; Chen, Qian; Jin, Zheng; Zhao, Yan; Cui, Hongyu; Wang, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Optimal preparation conditions of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) F gene deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles (pFNDV-CS-NPs) were determined. The pFNDV-CS-NPs were prepared according to a complex coacervation method. The pFNDV-CS-NPs were produced with good morphology, high stability, a mean diameter of 199.5 nm, encapsulation efficiency of 98.37% ± 0.87%, loading capacity of 36.12% ± 0.19%, and a zeta potential of +12.11 mV. The in vitro release assay showed that the plasmid DNA was sustainably released from the pFNDV-CS-NPs, up to 82.9% ± 2.9% of the total amount. Cell transfection test indicated that the vaccine expressed the F gene in cells and maintained good bioactivity. Additionally, the safety of mucosal immunity delivery system of the pFNDV-CS-NPs was also tested in vitro by cell cytotoxicity and in vivo by safety test in chickens. In vivo immunization showed that better immune responses of specific pathogen-free chickens immunized with the pFNDV-CS-NPs were induced, and prolonged release of the plasmid DNA was achieved compared to the chickens immunized with the control plasmid. This study lays the foundation for the further development of mucosal vaccines and drugs encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles.

  1. Immunostimulant patches containing Escherichia coli LT enhance immune responses to DNA- and recombinant protein-based Alzheimer's disease vaccines.

    PubMed

    Davtyan, Hayk; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Hovakimyan, Armine; Petrushina, Irina; Yu, Jianmei; Flyer, David; Madsen, Peter Juul; Pedersen, Lars Ostergaard; Cribbs, David H; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-03-15

    Immunotherapeutic approaches to treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) using vaccination strategies must overcome the obstacle of achieving adequate responses to vaccination in the elderly. Here we demonstrate for the first time that application of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin adjuvant-laden immunostimulatory patches (LT-IS) dramatically enhances the onset and magnitude of immune responses to DNA- and protein-based vaccines for Alzheimer's disease following intradermal immunization via gene gun and conventional needles, respectively. Our studies suggest that the immune activation mediated by LT-IS offers improved potency for generating AD-specific vaccination responses that should be investigated as an adjuvant in the clinical arena.

  2. Protective immunity and lack of histopathological damage two years after DNA vaccination against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Corbeil, Serge; Elliott, Diane G.; Anderson, Eric D.; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine pIHNw-G encodes the glycoprotein of the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Vaccine performance in rainbow trout was measured 3, 6, 13, 24, and 25 months after vaccination. At three months all fish vaccinated with 0.1 μg pIHNw-G had detectable neutralizing antibody (NAb) and they were completely protected from lethal IHNV challenge with a relative percent survival (RPS) of 100% compared to control fish. Viral challenges at 6, 13, 24, and 25 months post-vaccination showed protection with RPS values of 47–69%, while NAb seroprevalence declined to undetectable levels. Passive transfer experiments with sera from fish after two years post-vaccination were inconsistent but significant protection was observed in some cases. The long-term duration of protection observed here defined a third temporal phase in the immune response to IHNV DNA vaccination, characterized by reduced but significant levels of protection, and decline or absence of detectable NAb titers. Examination of multiple tissues showed an absence of detectable long-term histopathological damage due to DNA vaccination.

  3. Characterization of guinea pig T cell responses elicited after EP-assisted delivery of DNA vaccines to the skin

    PubMed Central

    Schultheis, Katherine; Schaefer, Hubert; Yung, Bryan S.; Oh, Janet; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Humeau, Laurent; Broderick, Kate E.

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an ideal target tissue for vaccine delivery for a number of reasons. It is highly accessible, and most importantly, enriched in professional antigen presenting cells. Possessing strong similarities to human skin physiology and displaying a defined epidermis, the guinea pig is an appropriate model to study epidermal delivery of vaccine. However, whilst we have characterized the humoral responses in the guinea pig associated with skin vaccine protocols we have yet to investigate the T cell responses. In response to this inadequacy, we developed an IFN-γ ELISpot assay to characterize the cellular immune response in the peripheral blood of guinea pigs. Using a nucleoprotein (NP) influenza pDNA vaccination regimen, we characterized host T cell responses. After delivery of the DNA vaccine to the guinea pig epidermis we detected robust and rapid T cell responses. The levels of IFN-γ spot-forming units averaged approximately 5000 per million cells after two immunizations. These responses were broad in that multiple regions across the NP antigen elicited a T cell response. Interestingly, we identified a number of NP immunodominant T cell epitopes to be conserved across an outbred guinea pig population, a phenomenon which was also observed after immunization with a RSV DNA vaccine. We believe this data enhances our understanding of the cellular immune response elicited to a vaccine in guinea pigs, and globally, will advance the use of this model for vaccine development, especially those targeting skin as a delivery site. PMID:27894716

  4. Characterization of guinea pig T cell responses elicited after EP-assisted delivery of DNA vaccines to the skin.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Katherine; Schaefer, Hubert; Yung, Bryan S; Oh, Janet; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Humeau, Laurent; Broderick, Kate E; Smith, Trevor R F

    2017-01-03

    The skin is an ideal target tissue for vaccine delivery for a number of reasons. It is highly accessible, and most importantly, enriched in professional antigen presenting cells. Possessing strong similarities to human skin physiology and displaying a defined epidermis, the guinea pig is an appropriate model to study epidermal delivery of vaccine. However, whilst we have characterized the humoral responses in the guinea pig associated with skin vaccine protocols we have yet to investigate the T cell responses. In response to this inadequacy, we developed an IFN-γ ELISpot assay to characterize the cellular immune response in the peripheral blood of guinea pigs. Using a nucleoprotein (NP) influenza pDNA vaccination regimen, we characterized host T cell responses. After delivery of the DNA vaccine to the guinea pig epidermis we detected robust and rapid T cell responses. The levels of IFN-γ spot-forming units averaged approximately 5000 per million cells after two immunizations. These responses were broad in that multiple regions across the NP antigen elicited a T cell response. Interestingly, we identified a number of NP immunodominant T cell epitopes to be conserved across an outbred guinea pig population, a phenomenon which was also observed after immunization with a RSV DNA vaccine. We believe this data enhances our understanding of the cellular immune response elicited to a vaccine in guinea pigs, and globally, will advance the use of this model for vaccine development, especially those targeting skin as a delivery site.

  5. Suppression of breast tumor growth by DNA vaccination against phosphatase of regenerating liver 3.

    PubMed

    Lv, J; Liu, C; Huang, H; Meng, L; Jiang, B; Cao, Y; Zhou, Z; She, T; Qu, L; Wei Song, S; Shou, C

    2013-08-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL)-3 is highly expressed in multiple cancers and has important roles in cancer development. Some small-molecule inhibitors and antibodies targeting PRL-3 have been recently reported to inhibit tumor growth effectively. To determine whether PRL-3-targeted DNA vaccination can induce immune response to prevent or inhibit the tumor growth, we established mouse D2F2 breast cancer cells expressing PRL-3 (D2F2/PRL-3) and control cells (D2F2/NC) with lentivirus, and constructed pVAX1-Igκ-PRL-3 plasmid (named as K-P3) as DNA vaccine to immunize BALB/c mice. We found that the K-P3 vaccine delivered by gene gun significantly prevented the growth of D2F2/PRL-3 compared with pVAX1-vector (P<0.01), but not of D2F2/NC, and improved the survival of D2F2/PRL-3-innoculated mice. Both PRL-3-targeted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and T-helper type 1 cell immune response (production of high levels of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α) were found to be involved in the preventive effect. Furthermore, PRL-3-targeted DNA immunization inhibited tumor growth of D2F2/PRL-3 cells in mice. We also evaluated the potential of immunization with PRL-3 protein, but no significant therapeutic or preventive effect was obtained on tumor growth. To enhance the immunity of PRL-3, we incorporated different molecular adjuvants, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat-shock protein, CTL antigen 4 and M. tuberculosis T-cell stimulatory epitope (MT), into K-P3 vaccine for expressing the fusion proteins. We found that these adjuvant molecules did not significantly improve the antitumor activity of PRL-3 vaccine, but enhanced the production of PRL-3 antibodies in immunized mice. Summarily, our findings demonstrate that PRL-3-targeted DNA vaccine can generate significantly preventive and therapeutic effects on the growth of breast cancer expressing PRL-3 through the induction of cellular immune responses to PRL-3.

  6. Immunogenicity of a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding 42kDa fragment of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Inayat Hussain; Kaushal, Deep C; Chandra, Deepak; Kaushal, Nuzhat A

    2016-10-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the second major human malaria parasite that inflicts debilitating morbidity and consequent economic impact in South-East Asian countries. The relapsing nature of P. vivax along with the emergence of drug-resistant P. vivax strains has emphasized the urgent need for a vaccine. However, the development of an effective vivax vaccine is seriously hampered due to the diversity and variation in parasite antigens and non-availability of suitable animal models. DNA based vaccines represent an alternative approach in inducing immunity to multiple targets from different stages of malaria parasite. DNA prime-boosting strategies induce both antibody mediated and cell-mediated immune responses that are the major mechanisms of protection against malaria parasites. We have earlier studied the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the soluble and refolded forms of recombinant 42kDa fragment of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 (PvMSP-142) using P. cynomolgi rhesus monkey model. In the present study, we have constructed a recombinant DNA vaccine encoding 42kDa fragment of P. vivax MSP-1 and studied the immunogenicity of PvMSP-142 DNA vaccine construct in mice. The 42kDa gene fragment of PvMSP-1 was PCR amplified using gene specific primers and subcloned into pcDNA 3.1 (+) eukaryotic expression vector. In vitro expression of PvMSP-142 plasmid construct was checked by transfection in COS-1 cell line. Indirect immunofluorescence of transfected COS-1 cells probed with monoclonal antibodies against PvMSP-142 exhibited positive fluorescence. Immunization of BALB/c mice with PvMSP-142-pcDNA vaccine construct revealed the immunogenicity of recombinant vaccine plasmid that can be enhanced by prime boosting with recombinant protein corresponding to the DNA vaccine as evidenced by significant elevation of antibody and the cytokines responses.

  7. Induction of protective immunity against Eimeria tenella, Eimeria necatrix, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria acervulina infections using multivalent epitope DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Ren, Zhe; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-06-04

    Avian coccidiosis is mostly caused by mixed infection of several Eimeria species under natural conditions and immunity to avian coccidiosis is largely dependent on T-cell immune response. In this study, 14 T-cell epitope fragments from eight antigens of Eimeria tenella (E. tenella), Eimeria necatrix (E. necatrix), Eimeria maxima (E. maxima) and Eimeria acervulina (E. acervulina) were ligated with pVAX1 producing 14 monovalent DNA vaccines, respectively. Protective immunity of the monovalent DNA vaccines was assessed by in vivo challenge experiments and then four most protective fragments of each species were chosen to construct multivalent epitope DNA vaccines with or without chicken IL-2 as genetic adjuvant. Protective efficacies of the epitope DNA vaccines on chickens against E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. maxima and E. acervulina were evaluated. The results showed that the constructed multivalent epitope DNA vaccines significantly increased body weight gain, alleviated enteric lesions and reduced oocyst output of the infected birds. Especially, the multivalent epitope DNA vaccines of pVAX1-NA4-1-TA4-1-LDH-2-EMCDPK-1 and pVAX1-NA4-1-TA4-1-LDH-2-EMCDPK-1-IL-2 not only significantly increased body weight gain, alleviated enteric lesions and reduced oocyst output of the infected birds, but also resulted in anti-coccidial index (ACI) more than 170 against E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. maxima and E. acervulina, which indicated they could induce protective immunity against E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. maxima and E. acervulina. Our findings suggest the constructed multivalent epitope DNA vaccines are the potential candidate multivalent vaccines against mixed infection of Eimeria.

  8. Dual polarisation interferometry characterisation of DNA immobilisation and hybridisation detection on a silanised support.

    PubMed

    Lillis, B; Manning, M; Berney, H; Hurley, E; Mathewson, A; Sheehan, M M

    2006-02-15

    Dual polarisation interferometry is an analytical technique that allows the simultaneous determination of thickness, density and mass of a biological layer on a sensing waveguide surface in real time. We evaluated, for the first time, the ability of this technique to characterise the covalent immobilisation of single stranded probe DNA and the selective detection of target DNA hybridisation on a silanised support. Two immobilisation strategies have been evaluated: direct attachment of the probe molecule and a more complex chemistry employing a 1,2 homobifunctional crosslinker molecule. With this technique we demonstrate it was possible to determine probe orientation and measure probe coverage at different stages of the immobilisation process in real time and in a single experiment. In addition, by measuring simultaneously changes in thickness and density of the probe layer upon hybridisation of target DNA, it was possible to directly elucidate the impact that probe mobility had on hybridisation efficiency. Direct covalent attachment of an amine modified 19 mer resulted in a thickness change of 0.68 nm that was consistent with multipoint attachment of the probe molecule to the surface. Blocking with BSA formed a dense layer of protein molecules that absorbed between the probe molecules on the surface. The observed hybridisation efficiency to target DNA was approximately 35%. No further significant reorientation of the probe molecule occurred upon hybridisation. The initial thickness of the probe layer upon attachment to the crosslinker molecule was 0.5 nm. Significant reorientation of the probe molecule surface normal occurred upon hybridisation to target DNA. This indicated that the probe molecule had greater mobility to hybridise to target DNA. The observed hybridisation efficiency for target DNA was approximately 85%. The results show that a probe molecule attached to the surface via a crosslinker group is better able to hybridise to target DNA due to its greater

  9. Codon-optimized filovirus DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular electroporation protect cynomolgus macaques from lethal Ebola and Marburg virus challenges

    PubMed Central

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Badger, Catherine V; Bounds, Callie E; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Kwilas, Steven A; Vu, Hong A; Warfield, Kelly L; Hooper, Jay W; Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation with DNA plasmids expressing codon-optimized glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) or Marburg virus (MARV) or a combination of codon-optimized GP DNA vaccines for EBOV, MARV, Sudan virus and Ravn virus. When measured by ELISA, the individual vaccines elicited slightly higher IgG responses to EBOV or MARV than did the combination vaccines. No significant differences in immune responses of macaques given the individual or combination vaccines were measured by pseudovirion neutralization or IFN-γ ELISpot assays. Both the MARV and mixed vaccines were able to protect macaques from lethal MARV challenge (5/6 vs. 6/6). In contrast, a greater proportion of macaques vaccinated with the EBOV vaccine survived lethal EBOV challenge in comparison to those that received the mixed vaccine (5/6 vs. 1/6). EBOV challenge survivors had significantly higher pre-challenge neutralizing antibody titers than those that succumbed. PMID:25996997

  10. Protective effect of DNA vaccine encoding pseudomonas exotoxin A and PcrV against acute pulmonary P. aeruginosa Infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mingzi; Yao, Jing; Feng, Ganzhu

    2014-01-01

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been a long-standing challenge for clinical therapy because of complex pathogenesis and resistance to antibiotics, thus attaching importance to explore effective vaccines for prevention and treatment. In the present study, we constructed a novel DNA vaccine by inserting mutated gene toxAm encoding Pseudomonas Exotoxin A and gene pcrV encoding tip protein of the type III secretion system into respective sites of a eukaryotic plasmid pIRES, named pIRES-toxAm-pcrV, and next evaluated the efficacy of the vaccine in murine acute Pseudomonas pneumonia models. Compared to DNA vaccines encoding single antigen, mice vaccinated with pIRES-toxAm-pcrV elicited higher levels of antigen-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), enhanced splenic cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigens, additionally PAO1 challenge in mice airway resulted in reduced bacteria burden and milder pathologic changes in lungs. Besides, it was observed that immunogenicity and protection could be promoted by the CpG ODN 1826 adjuvant. Taken together, it's revealed that recombinant DNA vaccine pIRES-toxAm-pcrV was a potential candidate for immunotherapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and the CpG ODN 1826 a potent stimulatory adjuvant for DNA vaccination.

  11. Influenza nucleoprotein DNA vaccination by a skin targeted, dry coated, densely packed microprojection array (Nanopatch) induces potent antibody and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Germain J P; Zhang, Jin; Ng, Hwee-Ing; Haigh, Oscar L; Yukiko, Sally R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-09-10

    DNA vaccines have many advantages such as thermostability and the ease and rapidity of manufacture; for example, in an influenza pandemic situation where rapid production of vaccine is essential. However, immunogenicity of DNA vaccines was shown to be poor in humans unless large doses of DNA are used. If a highly efficacious DNA vaccine delivery system could be identified, then DNA vaccines have the potential to displace protein vaccines. In this study, we show in a C57BL/6 mouse model, that the Nanopatch, a microprojection array of high density (>21,000 projections/cm(2)), could be used to deliver influenza nucleoprotein DNA vaccine to skin, to generate enhanced antigen specific antibody and CD8(+) T cell responses compared to the conventional intramuscular (IM) delivery by the needle and syringe. Antigen specific antibody was measured using ELISA assays of mice vaccinated with a DNA plasmid containing the nucleoprotein gene of influenza type A/WSN/33 (H1N1). Antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses were measured ex-vivo in splenocytes of mice using IFN-γ ELISPOT assays. These results and our previous antibody and CD4(+) T cell results using the Nanopatch delivered HSV DNA vaccine indicate that the Nanopatch is an effective delivery system of general utility that could potentially be used in humans to increase the potency of the DNA vaccines.

  12. Skewing the T-cell repertoire by combined DNA vaccination, host conditioning, and adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, Annelies; Bins, Adriaan D; Schumacher, Ton N M; Haanen, John B A G

    2008-04-01

    Approaches for T-cell-based immunotherapy that have shown substantial effects in clinical trials are generally based on the adoptive transfer of high numbers of antigen-specific cells, and the success of these approaches is thought to rely on the high magnitude of the tumor-specific T-cell responses that are induced. In this study, we aimed to develop strategies that also yield a T-cell repertoire that is highly skewed toward tumor recognition but do not rely on ex vivo generation of tumor-specific T cells. To this end, the tumor-specific T-cell repertoire was first expanded by DNA vaccination and then infused into irradiated recipients. Subsequent vaccination of the recipient mice with the same antigen resulted in peak CD8(+) T-cell responses of approximately 50%. These high T-cell responses required the presence of antigen-experienced tumor-specific T cells within the graft because only mice that received cells of previously vaccinated donor mice developed effective responses. Tumor-bearing mice treated with this combined therapy showed a significant delay in tumor outgrowth, compared with mice treated by irradiation or vaccination alone. Furthermore, this antitumor effect was accompanied by an increased accumulation of activated and antigen-specific T cells within the tumor. In summary, the combination of DNA vaccination with host conditioning and adoptive transfer generates a marked, but transient, skewing of the T-cell repertoire toward tumor recognition. This strategy does not require ex vivo expansion of cells to generate effective antitumor immunity and may therefore easily be translated to clinical application.

  13. DNA Vaccines against Dengue Virus Type 2 Based on Truncate Envelope Protein or Its Domain III

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Adriana S.; Yamamura, Anna M. Y.; Freire, Marcos S.; Trindade, Gisela F.; Bonaldo, Myrna; Galler, Ricardo; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2011-01-01

    Two DNA vaccines were constructed encoding the ectodomain (domains I, II and III) of the DENV2 envelope protein (pE1D2) or only its domain III (pE2D2), fused to the human tissue plasminogen activator signal peptide (t-PA). The expression and secretion of recombinant proteins was confirmed in vitro in BHK cells transfected with the two plasmids, detected by immunofluorescence or immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled gene products, using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against DENV2. Besides, results reveal that the ectodomain of the E protein can be efficiently expressed in vivo, in a mammalian system, without the prM protein that is hypothesized to act as a chaperonin during dengue infection. Balb/c mice were immunized with the DNA vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of DENV2. All pE1D2-vaccinated mice survived challenge, while 45% of animals immunized with the pE2D2 died after infection. Furthermore, only 10% of pE1D2-immunized mice presented some clinical signs of infection after challenge, whereas most of animals inoculated with the pE2D2 showed effects of the disease with high morbidity degrees. Levels of neutralizing antibodies were significantly higher in pE1D2-vaccinated mice than in pE2D2-immunized animals, also suggesting that the pE1D2 vaccine was more protective than the pE2D2. PMID:21779317

  14. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as novel carrier for oral DNA vaccines in Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Nana; Xu, Kun; Li, Xinyi; Liu, Yuwan; Bai, Yichun; Zhang, Xiaohan; Han, Baoquan; Chen, Zhilong; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-12-01

    Oral delivery of DNA vaccines represents a promising vaccinating method for fish. Recombinant yeast has been proved to be a safe carrier for delivering antigen proteins and DNAs to some species in vivo. However, whether recombinant yeast can be used to deliver functional DNAs for vaccination to fish is still unknown. In this study, red crucian carp (Carassius auratus) was orally administrated with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae harboring CMV-EGFP expression cassette. On day 5 post the first vaccination, EGFP expression in the hindgut was detected under fluorescence microscope. To further study whether the delivered gene could induce specific immune responses, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) was used as immunogen, and oral administrations were conducted with recombinant S. cerevisiae harboring pCMV-OVA mammalian gene expression cassette as gene delivery or pADH1-OVA yeast gene expression cassette as protein delivery. Each administration was performed with three different doses, and the OVA-specific serum antibody was detected in all the experimental groups by western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ELISA assay also revealed that pCMV-OVA group with lower dose (pCMV-OVA-L) and pADH1-OVA group with moderate dose (pADH1-OVA-M) triggered relatively stronger antibody response than the other two doses. Moreover, the antibody level induced by pCMV-OVA-L group was significantly higher than pADH1-OVA-M group at the same serum dilutions. All the results suggested that recombinant yeast can be used as a potential carrier for oral DNA vaccines and would help to develop more practical strategies to control infectious diseases in aquaculture.

  15. Evaluation of protective effect of multi-epitope DNA vaccine encoding six antigen segments of Toxoplasma gondii in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Shi, Lin; Cheng, Yan-bin; Fan, Gui-xiang; Ren, Hui-xun; Yuan, Yu-kang

    2009-07-01

    To investigate the vaccine potential of multi-epitope vaccines against toxoplasmosis, a multi-epitope DNA vaccine, eukaryotic plasmid pcDNA3.1/T-ME expressing six antigen segments (SAG1(238-256), SAG1(281-320), GRA1(170-193), GRA4(331-345), GRA4(229-245), and GRA2(171-185)) of Toxoplasma gondii was constructed. We investigated the efficacy of pcDNA3.1/T-ME with or without co-administration of a CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) as an adjuvant to protect mice (BALB/c and C57BL/6) against toxoplasmosis. High survival rates were observed in mice immunized with pcDNA3.1/T-ME when challenged with T. gondii RH strain. Lymphocyte proliferation assays, cytokine, and antibody determinations show that mice immunized with pcDNA3.1/T-ME produced stronger humoral and Th1-type cellular immune responses compared to untreated mice or those immunized with empty plasmids. However, co-immunization with CpG-ODN resulted in impaired immune responses. Our data demonstrates that multi-epitope DNA vaccination is a potential strategy for the control of toxoplasmosis and paves the way for further investigations into producing a multi-epitope anti-T. gondii DNA vaccine.

  16. Pentavalent replicon vaccines against botulinum neurotoxins and tetanus toxin using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus replicon vectors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, YunZhou; Liu, Si; Ma, Yao; Gong, Zheng-Wei; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxin (CNT) family includes botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), serotypes A, B, E, and F of which can cause human botulism, and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT), which is the causative agent of tetanus. This suggests that the greatest need is for a multivalent or multiagent vaccine that provides protection against all 5 agents. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of generating several pentavalent replicon vaccines that protected mice against BoNTs and TeNT. First, we evaluated the potency of individual replicon DNA or particle vaccine against TeNT, which induced strong antibody and protective responses in BALB/c mice following 2 or 3 immunizations. Then, the individual replicon TeNT vaccines were combined with tetravalent BoNTs vaccines to prepare 4 types of pentavalent replicon vaccines. These replicon DNA or particle pentavalent vaccines could simultaneously and effectively induce antibody responses and protect effects against the 5 agents. Finally, a solid-phase assay showed that the sera of pentavalent replicon formulations-immunized mice inhibited the binding of THc to the ganglioside GT1b as the sera of individual replicon DNA or particle-immunized mice. These results indicated these pentavalent replicon vaccines could protect against the 4 BoNT serotypes and effectively neutralize and protect the TeNT. Therefore, our studies demonstrate the utility of combining replicon DNA or particle vaccines into multi-agent formulations as potent pentavalent vaccines for eliciting protective responses against BoNTs and TeNT. PMID:25424795

  17. Analysis of the Vaccine Potential of Plasmid DNA Encoding Nine Mycolactone Polyketide Synthase Domains in Mycobacterium ulcerans Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roupie, Virginie; Pidot, Sacha J.; Einarsdottir, Tobba; Van Den Poel, Christophe; Jurion, Fabienne; Stinear, Timothy P.; Huygen, Kris

    2014-01-01

    There is no effective vaccine against Buruli ulcer. In experimental footpad infection of C57BL/6 mice with M. ulcerans, a prime-boost vaccination protocol using plasmid DNA encoding mycolyltransferase Ag85A of M. ulcerans and a homologous protein boost has shown significant, albeit transient protection, comparable to the one induced by M. bovis BCG. The mycolactone toxin is an obvious candidate for a vaccine, but by virtue of its chemical structure, this toxin is not immunogenic in itself. However, antibodies against some of the polyketide synthase domains involved in mycolactone synthesis, were found in Buruli ulcer patients and healthy controls from the same endemic region, suggesting that these domains are indeed immunogenic. Here we have analyzed the vaccine potential of nine polyketide synthase domains using a DNA prime/protein boost strategy. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated against the following domains: acyl carrier protein 1, 2, and 3, acyltransferase (acetate) 1 and 2, acyltransferase (propionate), enoylreductase, ketoreductase A, and ketosynthase load module. As positive controls, mice were vaccinated with DNA encoding Ag85A or with M. bovis BCG. Strongest antigen specific antibodies could be detected in response to acyltransferase (propionate) and enoylreductase. Antigen-specific Th1 type cytokine responses (IL-2 or IFN-γ) were induced by vaccination against all antigens, and were strongest against acyltransferase (propionate). Finally, vaccination against acyltransferase (propionate) and enoylreductase conferred some protection against challenge with virulent M. ulcerans 1615. However, protection was weaker than the one conferred by vaccination with Ag85A or M. bovis BCG. Combinations of these polyketide synthase domains with the vaccine targeting Ag85A, of which the latter is involved in the integrity of the cell wall of the pathogen, and/or with live attenuated M. bovis BCG or mycolactone negative M. ulcerans may eventually lead to the development of an

  18. Safety of administering the canine melanoma DNA vaccine (Oncept) to cats with malignant melanoma - a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sarbu, Luminita; Kitchell, Barbara E; Bergman, Philip J

    2017-02-01

    Objectives A xenogeneic human tyrosinase DNA vaccine was developed for treatment of dogs with oral malignant melanoma (Oncept; Merial). No studies have evaluated the safety or efficacy of this vaccine in cats. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of the canine melanoma vaccine in cats diagnosed with melanoma. Methods Medical records were reviewed from cats diagnosed with malignant melanoma and treated with the canine melanoma DNA vaccine (Oncept). Data regarding signalment, melanoma location, treatments received, vaccine adverse effects and cause of death were collected. Results A total of 114 melanoma vaccines were administered to 24 cats. Seven cats (11.4%) had clinical adverse effects from a total of 13 vaccines classified as grade 1 or 2 based on the Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group's common terminology criteria for adverse events v1.1. These included pain on vaccine administration, brief muscle fasciculation, transient inappetence, depression, nausea and mild increase in pigmentation at the injection site. Nineteen cats were deceased at study close. The most common cause of death was melanoma (14 cats). Hematological and biochemical changes were observed in six cats, five of which had concurrent disease or treatments that likely caused or greatly contributed to the laboratory abnormalities found. Therefore, these adverse events were considered unlikely to be caused by the melanoma vaccine. One cat had transient grade 1 hypoalbuminemia, which was possibly caused by the vaccination but not thoroughly evaluated. Conclusions and relevance The canine melanoma DNA vaccine can be safely administered to cats, with minimal risk of adverse effects.

  19. Safety Profile of the Merck Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Clade B gag DNA Plasmid Vaccine With and Without Adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Erin K; Brown, Elizabeth L; Leavitt, Randi Y; Mogg, Robin; Mehrotra, Devan V; Evans, Robert K; DiNubile, Mark J; Robertson, Michael N

    2014-03-01

    The immunogenicity results from 3 phase I trials of the Merck DNA human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine have previously been reported. Because preventive DNA vaccine strategies continue to be leveraged for diverse infections, the safety and tolerability results from these studies can inform the field moving forward, particularly regarding adverse reactions and adjuvants. No serious vaccine-related adverse events were reported during the 3-dose priming phase. Pain at the injection site was more common with adjuvanted formulations than with the phosphate-buffered saline diluent alone. Febrile reactions were usually low grade. Although the AlPO4 or CRL1005 adjuvants used in these studies did not significantly enhance the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine, adverse events were numerically more common with adjuvanted formulations than without adjuvants.

  20. The swine CD81 enhances E2-based DNA vaccination against classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenliang; Mao, Li; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Xia; Yang, Leilei; Zhang, Wenwen; Jiang, Jieyuan

    2015-07-09

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and economically important viral disease that affects the pig industry worldwide. The glycoprotein E2 of CSFV can induce neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity, and is widely used for novel vaccine development. The objective of this study was to explore whether a tetraspanin molecule CD81 could improve the immune responses of an E2-based DNA vaccine. Plasmids pVAX-CD81, pVAX-E2 and pVAX-CD81-E2 were constructed and the expression of target proteins was confirmed in BHK-21 cells by indirect immunofluorescence assay. BALB/c mice were divided into 5 groups and immunized with different plasmids (pVAX-E2, pVAX-CD81-E2, pVAX-E2+pVAX-CD81, pVAX-CD81 and PBS) three times with two weeks interval. The results showed that the introduction of CD81 promoted higher humoral and cellular immune responses than E2 expression alone (P<0.05). In addition, immunization with pVAX-CD81-E2 induced stronger immune responses than pVAX-E2+pVAX-CD81. Furthermore, four groups of pigs were immunized with pVAX-E2, pVAX-CD81-E2, pVAX-CD81 and PBS, respectively. Humoral and cellular immune responses detection showed similar results with those in mice. Compared to pVAX-E2, pVAX-CD81-E2 induced higher titers of neutralizing antibodies after viral challenge and conferred stronger protection. These results confirmed the capacity of swine CD81 enhancing the humoral and cellular responses with an adjuvant effect on CSFV DNA vaccine. This is the first report demonstrating the adjuvant effect of CD81 to enhance the DNA vaccination for swine pathogen.

  1. DNA vaccine with discontinuous T-cell epitope insertions into HSP65 scaffold as a potential means to improve immunogenicity of multi-epitope Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Manli; Li, Min; Yue, Yan; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    DNA-based vaccine is a promising candidate for immunization and induction of a T-cell-focused protective immune response against infectious pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). To induce multi-functional T response against multi-TB antigens, a multi-epitope DNA vaccine and a 'protein backbone grafting' design method is adopted to graft five discontinuous T-cell epitopes into HSP65 scaffold protein of M. tb for enhancement of epitope processing and immune presentation. A DNA plasmid with five T-cell epitopes derived from ESAT-6, Ag85B, MTB10.4, PPE25 and PE19 proteins of H37Rv strain of M. tb genetically inserted into HSP65 backbone was constructed and designated as pPES. After confirmation of its in vitro expression efficiency, pPES DNA was i.m. injected into C57BL/6 mice with four doses of 50 µg DNA followed by mycobacterial challenge 4 weeks after the final immunization. It was found that pPES DNA injection maintained the ability of HSP65 backbone to induce specific serum IgG. ELISPOT assay demonstrated that pPES epitope-scaffold construct was significantly more potent to induce IFN-γ(+) T response to five T-cell epitope proteins than other DNA constructs (with epitopes alone or with epitope series connected to HSP65), especially in multi-functional-CD4(+) T response. It also enhanced granzyme B(+) CTL and IL-2(+) CD8(+) T response. Furthermore, significantly improved protection against Mycobacterium bovis BCG challenge was achieved by pPES injection compared to other DNA constructs. Taken together, HSP65 scaffold grafting strategy for multi-epitope DNA vaccine represents a successful example of rational protein backbone engineering design and could prove useful in TB vaccine design.

  2. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; de Lourdes Muñoz, María; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G.; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P.; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-01-01

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples. PMID:24776933

  3. A DNA microarray-based assay to detect dual infection with two dengue virus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; Muñoz, María de Lourdes; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-04-25

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples.

  4. Oral Vaccination with Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium-Delivered TsPmy DNA Vaccine Elicits Protective Immunity against Trichinella spiralis in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiaohuan; Bi, Kuo; Sun, Ximeng; Yang, Jing; Gu, Yuan; Huang, Jingjing; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2016-01-01

    Background Our previous studies showed that Trichinella spiralis paramyosin (TsPmy) is an immunomodulatory protein that inhibits complement C1q and C8/C9 to evade host complement attack. Vaccination with recombinant TsPmy protein induced protective immunity against T. spiralis larval challenge. Due to the difficulty in producing TsPmy as a soluble recombinant protein, we prepared a DNA vaccine as an alternative approach in order to elicit a robust immunity against Trichinella infection. Methods and Findings The full-length TsPmy coding DNA was cloned into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAX1, and the recombinant pVAX1/TsPmy was transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain SL7207. Oral vaccination of mice with this attenuated Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine elicited a significant mucosal sIgA response in the intestine and a systemic IgG antibody response with IgG2a as the predominant subclass. Cytokine analysis also showed a significant increase in the Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 (IL-4, 5, 6, 10) responses in lymphocytes from the spleen and MLNs of immunized mice upon stimulation with TsPmy protein. The expression of the homing receptors CCR9/CCR10 on antibody secreting B cells may be related to the translocation of IgA-secreted B cells to local intestinal mucosa. The mice immunized with Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine produced a significant 44.8% reduction in adult worm and a 46.6% reduction in muscle larvae after challenge with T. spiralis larvae. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that oral vaccination with TsPmy DNA delivered by live attenuated S. typhimurium elicited a significant local IgA response and a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response that elicited a significant protection against T. spiralis infection in mice. PMID:27589591

  5. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Kaur, Tejinder; Joshi, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The current study was designed to examine the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on gp63 and Hsp70 against murine visceral leishmaniasis. Inbred BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously twice at an interval of three weeks with pcDNA3.1(+) encoding T cell epitopes of gp63 and Hsp70 individually and in combination. Animals were challenged intracardially with 107 promastigotes of Leishmania donovani 10 days post immunization and sacrificed 1, 2 and 3 months post challenge. The immunized animals revealed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in splenic and hepatic parasite burden as compared to the infected controls. Maximum reduction in parasite load (P < 0.05) was observed in animals treated with a combination of pcDNA/gp63 and pcDNA/Hsp70. These animals also showed heightened DTH response, increased IgG2a, elevated Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and reduced IgG1 and IL-10 levels. Thus, mice immunized with the cocktail vaccine exhibited significantly greater protection in comparison to those immunized with individual antigens. PMID:27533939

  6. Induction of broad cytotoxic T cells by protective DNA vaccination against Marburg and Ebola.

    PubMed

    Shedlock, Devon J; Aviles, Jenna; Talbott, Kendra T; Wong, Gary; Wu, Stephan J; Villarreal, Daniel O; Myles, Devin Jf; Croyle, Maria A; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2013-07-01

    Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers have been described as the most virulent viral diseases known to man due to associative lethality rates of up to 90%. Death can occur within days to weeks of exposure and there is currently no licensed vaccine or therapeutic. Recent evidence suggests an important role for antiviral T cells in conferring protection, but little detailed analysis of this response as driven by a protective vaccine has been reported. We developed a synthetic polyvalent-filovirus DNA vaccine against Marburg marburgvirus (MARV), Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV), and Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV). Preclinical efficacy studies were performed in guinea pigs and mice using rodent-adapted viruses, whereas murine T-cell responses were extensively analyzed using a novel modified assay described herein. Vaccination was highly potent, elicited robust neutralizing antibodies, and completely protected against MARV and ZEBOV challenge. Comprehensive T-cell analysis revealed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of great magnitude, epitopic breadth, and Th1-type marker expression. This model provides an important preclinical tool for studying protective immune correlates that could be applied to existing platforms. Data herein support further evaluation of this enhanced gene-based approach in nonhuman primate studies for in depth analyses of T-cell epitopes in understanding protective efficacy.

  7. Enhanced Immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA Vaccine Delivered with Electroporation via Combined Intramuscular and Intradermal Routes

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Paul F.; Fiserova, Anezka; Klein, Katja; Cope, Alethea; Rogers, Paul; Swales, Julie; Seaman, Michael S.; Combadiere, Behazine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is accepted that an effective prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine is likely to have the greatest impact on viral transmission rates. As previous reports have implicated DNA-priming, protein boost regimens to be efficient activators of humoral responses, we sought to optimize this regimen to further augment vaccine immunogenicity. Here we evaluated single versus concurrent intradermal (i.d.) and intramuscular (i.m.) vaccinations as a DNA-priming strategy for their abilities to elicit humoral and cellular responses against a model HIV-1 vaccine antigen, CN54-gp140. To further augment vaccine-elicited T and B cell responses, we enhanced cellular transfection with electroporation and then boosted the DNA-primed responses with homologous protein delivered subcutaneously (s.c.), intranasally (i.n.), i.m., or transcutaneously (t.c.). In mice, the concurrent priming regimen resulted in significantly elevated gamma interferon T cell responses and high-avidity antigen-specific IgG B cell responses, a hallmark of B cell maturation. Protein boosting of the concurrent DNA strategy further enhanced IgG concentrations but had little impact on T cell reactivity. Interestingly protein boosting by the subcutaneous route increased antibody avidity to a greater extent than protein boosting by either the i.m., i.n., or t.c. route, suggesting that this route may be preferential for driving B cell maturation. Using an alternative and larger animal model, the rabbit, we found the concurrent DNA-priming strategy followed by s.c. protein boosting to again be capable of eliciting high-avidity humoral responses and to also be able to neutralize HIV-1 pseudoviruses from diverse clades (clades A, B, and C). Taken together, we show that concurrent multiple-route DNA vaccinations induce strong cellular immunity, in addition to potent and high-avidity humoral immune responses. IMPORTANCE The route of vaccination has profound effects on prevailing immune responses. Due to the insufficient

  8. DNA shuffling: induced molecular breeding to produce new generation long-lasting vaccines.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Sergio H

    2002-11-01

    The paradigm for classic vaccines has been to mimic natural infection, and their success relies mostly on the induction of neutralizing antibodies followed by long-lasting immunity. The outcome of aggressive chronic infections such as HIV and HCV, the reappearance of fastidious diseases such as tuberculosis and the progression of cancer growth suggest that natural immune responses are definitely insufficient in many cases. A new paradigm is needed to design and develop a new high-efficiency generation of vaccines ideally able to surpass the capabilities of natural immune responses. In vitro evolution is a new, important laboratory method to evolve molecules with desired properties, which appears as an appealing alternative to achieve this goal. In its battle against disease, the vertebrate immune system triggers a series of well-known molecular events in order to produce protective neutralizing antibodies. This natural in vivo response shares remarkable similarities with the in vitro technique known as molecular breeding or "DNA shuffling." This method exploits the recombination between genes to dramatically accelerate the rate at which genes can be evolved under selection pressure in the laboratory, producing optimized high-efficiency mutant proteins. Since new generation vaccines are aimed to overcome natural selection and environmental pressures to fully inactivate rapidly developing pathogen variants, they could be engineered, developed and selected through the application of directed DNA shuffling procedures. This review highlights the potential of the procedure in the complex context of natural immune responses and the equilibrium and interaction existing in nature between hosts and pathogens.

  9. Identification and assembly of V genes as idiotype-specific DNA fusion vaccines in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sahota, Surinder S; Townsend, Mark; Stevenson, Freda K

    2005-01-01

    Tumor-specific markers are important in identifying and tracking malignant cells. In this regard, functionally rearranged immunoglobulin variable (V) region genes in B-cell tumors fulfill and extend these criteria. V genes provide signature motifs in tumor cells and can delineate critical features of the clonal history of the cell of origin. They also define a tumor-specific antigen, which can be targeted for immunotherapy. Our focus has been on using novel DNA fusion vaccines to induce antitumor immunity. Here, we describe in detail the methods for identifying tumor-derived V genes at the nucleotide level in the malignant plasma cells of multiple myeloma. We further present the methodology for assembly of tumor V genes as single-chain variable region fragments (scFv), fused in frame with an immunopotentiating nontoxic bacterial sequence, Fragment C (FrC) of tetanus toxin. These scFv.FrC DNA vaccines provide protection in myeloma models and are currently in clinical trials. The vaccines are patient specific and can be rapidly assembled for clinical use.

  10. Novel synthetic plasmid and Doggybone™ DNA vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and provide protection from lethal influenza challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Patel, Ami; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hensley, Scott E; Ragwan, Edwin; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Rothwell, Paul J; Extance, Jonathan P; Caproni, Lisa J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines (NAVs) are a promising alternative to conventional influenza vaccines with the potential to increase influenza vaccine availability due to their simplicity in design and rapid speed of production. NAVs can also target multiple influenza antigens and control flu variants. Traditionally NAVs have been DNA plasmids however, we are continuing to explore new methods that may enhance vaccine efficacy. Recently new focus has been on RNA cassettes as NAVs. RNA vaccines combine conceptual advantages in that they focus on delivery of only the coding cassette. However, RNA vaccines have a short half-life and cause interferon-induced fevers. Here we describe a new NAV approach where we study delivery of a linear DNA cassette [Doggybone™ linear closed DNA [(dbDNA™)] produced by an enzymatic process that yields an antigen expression cassette comprising a promoter, DNA antigen, poly A tail, and telomeric ends. This focused approach has many of the advantages of plasmid DNA as well as a minimal cassette size similar to RNA strategies. For this study, we characterized the specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and determined the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers induced by dbDNA™ and compared the responses with those of an optimized plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine encoding the same H1N1 influenza A/PR/8/34 HA gene. Immunizations with the constructs resulted in similar humoral and cellular immune responses. Both constructs induced high-titer HI antibodies and fully protected animals from lethal viral challenge. The data obtained from this study provides important validation for further development of novel vector approaches. PMID:26091432

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Juan, Long; Xiao, Zhao; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Current clinically available treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fail to cure the disease or unsatisfactorily halt disease progression. To overcome these limitations, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters may offer new promising strategies. Because type II collagen (CII) as a critical autoantigen in RA and native chicken type II collagen (nCCII) has been used to effectively treat RA, we previously developed a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding CCII (pcDNA-CCOL2A1) with efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard", methotrexate(MTX). Here, we systemically evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal Wistar rats. Group 1 received only a single intramuscular injection into the hind leg with pcDNA-CCOL2A1 at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg on day 0; Group 2 was injected with normal saline (NS) as a negative control. All rats were monitored daily for any systemic adverse events, reactions at the injection site, and changes in body weights. Plasma and tissues from all experimental rats were collected on day 14 for routine examinations of hematology and biochemistry parameters, anti-CII IgG antibody reactivity, and histopathology. Our results indicated clearly that at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine was safe and well-tolerated. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths occurred in the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 group compared with the NS group. Furthermore, no major alterations were observed in hematology, biochemistry, and histopathology, even at the maximum dose. In particularly, no anti-CII IgG antibodies were detected in vaccinated normal rats at 14 d after vaccination; this was relevant because we previously demonstrated that the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine, when administered at the therapeutic dosage of 300 μg/kg alone, did not induce anti-CII IgG antibody production and significantly reduced levels of anti-CII IgG antibodies in the plasma of rats with established collagen-induced arthritis

  12. IgA response and protection following nasal vaccination of chickens with Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine nanoencapsulated with Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Rong, Guangyu; Hao, Yan; Yu, Lu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Ren, Zhiyu; Li, Zejun

    2016-05-01

    Newcastle disease caused by ND virus (NDV) is a highly contagious disease of birds. Vaccine for effective protection of poultry animals from NDV infection is urgently needed. Mucosal immunity plays a very important role in the antiviral immune response. In this study, a NDV F gene-containing DNA vaccine encapsulated in Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles (pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs) with an average diameter of 500 nm were prepared to assess the mucosal immune response. These nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity and did not destroy the bioactivity of plasmid DNA, which could be expressed in vitro. The plasmid DNA was sustainably released after an initial burst release. In vivo immunization showed that the intranasal immunization of chickens with pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs induced high titers of serum antibody, significantly promoted lymphocyte proliferation and induced higher expression levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles could serve as an efficient and safe delivery carrier for NDV DNA vaccine to induce mucosal immunity. This study has provided promising results for the further development of mucosal vaccines encapsulated in inorganic nanoparticles.

  13. IgA response and protection following nasal vaccination of chickens with Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine nanoencapsulated with Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Rong, Guangyu; Hao, Yan; Yu, Lu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Ren, Zhiyu; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease caused by ND virus (NDV) is a highly contagious disease of birds. Vaccine for effective protection of poultry animals from NDV infection is urgently needed. Mucosal immunity plays a very important role in the antiviral immune response. In this study, a NDV F gene-containing DNA vaccine encapsulated in Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles (pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs) with an average diameter of 500 nm were prepared to assess the mucosal immune response. These nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity and did not destroy the bioactivity of plasmid DNA, which could be expressed in vitro. The plasmid DNA was sustainably released after an initial burst release. In vivo immunization showed that the intranasal immunization of chickens with pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs induced high titers of serum antibody, significantly promoted lymphocyte proliferation and induced higher expression levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles could serve as an efficient and safe delivery carrier for NDV DNA vaccine to induce mucosal immunity. This study has provided promising results for the further development of mucosal vaccines encapsulated in inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27170532

  14. Cholera toxin B subunit acts as a potent systemic adjuvant for HIV-1 DNA vaccination intramuscularly in mice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jue; Liu, Ying; Hsi, Jenny; Wang, Hongzhi; Tao, Ran; Shao, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was investigated as a classical mucosal adjuvant that can increase vaccine immunogenicity. In this study, we found out the in vitro efficacy of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) in activating mice bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) through Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. In vitro RNA and transcriptional level profiling arrays revealed that CTB guides high levels of Th1 and Th2 type cytokines, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines. Based on the robustness of these profiling results, we examined the induction of HIV Env-specific immunity by CTB co-inoculated with HIV Env DNA vaccine intramuscularly in vivo. CTB enhanced HIV-Env specific cellular immune responses in Env-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT, compared with DNA vaccine alone. Moreover, CTB induced high levels of Env specific humoral response and promoted antibody maturation after the third round of vaccination. This combination immunization strategy induced a Th2-type bias response which is indicative of a high ratio of IgG1/IgG2a. This study reports that CTB as a classical mucosal adjuvant could enhance HIV-1 DNA-based vaccine immunogenicity intramuscularly; therefore, these findings suggest that CTB could serve as an effective candidate adjuvant for DNA vaccination.

  15. Long-Term Reduction of High Blood Pressure by Angiotensin II DNA Vaccine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Nakagami, Futoshi; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Kyutoku, Mariko; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kurinami, Hitomi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-07-01

    Recent research on vaccination has extended its scope from infectious diseases to chronic diseases, including Alzheimer disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. The aim of this study was to design DNA vaccines for high blood pressure and eventually develop human vaccine therapy to treat hypertension. Plasmid vector encoding hepatitis B core-angiotensin II (Ang II) fusion protein was injected into spontaneously hypertensive rats using needleless injection system. Anti-Ang II antibody was successfully produced in hepatitis B core-Ang II group, and antibody response against Ang II was sustained for at least 6 months. Systolic blood pressure was consistently lower in hepatitis B core-Ang II group after immunization, whereas blood pressure reduction was continued for at least 6 months. Perivascular fibrosis in heart tissue was also significantly decreased in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. Survival rate was significantly improved in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. This study demonstrated that Ang II DNA vaccine to spontaneously hypertensive rats significantly lowered high blood pressure for at least 6 months. In addition, Ang II DNA vaccines induced an adequate humoral immune response while avoiding the activation of self-reactive T cells, assessed by ELISPOT assay. Future development of DNA vaccine to treat hypertension may provide a new therapeutic option to treat hypertension.

  16. Label-free and dual-amplified detection of protein via small molecule-ligand linked DNA and a cooperative DNA machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Jing; Wu, Yushu; Jiang, Wei

    2015-10-15

    Sensitive detection of protein is essential for both molecular diagnostics and biomedical research. Here, taking folate receptor as the model analyte, we developed a label-free and dual-amplified strategy via small molecular-ligand linked DNA and a cooperative DNA machine which could perform primary amplification and mediate secondary amplification simultaneously. Firstly, the specific binding of folate receptor to the small-molecule folate which linked to a trigger DNA could protect the trigger DNA from exonuclease I digestion, translating folate receptor detection into trigger DNA detection. Subsequently, trigger DNA initiated the DNA machine through hybridizing with the hairpin of the DNA machine, resulting in hairpin conformational change and stem open. The open stem further hybridized with a primer which initiated circular strand-displacement polymerization reaction; meanwhile the rolling circle amplification templates which were initially blocked in the DNA machine were liberated to mediate rolling circle amplification. In such a working model, the DNA machine achieved cooperatively controlling circular strand-displacement polymerization reaction and rolling circle amplification, realizing dual-amplification. Finally, the rolling circle amplification process synthesized a long repeated G-quadruplex sequence, which strongly interacted with N-methyl mesoporphyrin IX, bringing label-free fluorescence signal. This strategy could detect folate receptor as low as 0.23 pM. A recovery over 90% was obtained when folate receptor was detected in spiked human serum, demonstrating the feasibility of this detection strategy in biological samples.

  17. Safety and Immunogenicity Study of Multiclade HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Alone or as Boost following a Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Vaccine in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Susan; Than, Soe; Adams, Elizabeth M.; Graham, Barney S.; Koup, Richard A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Smith, Carol; Dally, Len; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Bergin, Philip J.; Hayes, Peter; Ho, Martin; Loughran, Kelley; Komaroff, Wendy; Stevens, Gwynneth; Thomson, Helen; Boaz, Mark J.; Cox, Josephine H.; Schmidt, Claudia; Gilmour, Jill; Nabel, Gary J.; Fast, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I study of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vector expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol from subtype B and Env from subtypes A, B and C, given alone or as boost following a DNA plasmid vaccine expressing the same HIV-1 proteins plus Nef, in 114 healthy HIV-uninfected African adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were randomized to 4 groups receiving the rAd5 vaccine intramuscularly at dosage levels of 1×1010 or 1×1011 particle units (PU) either alone or as boost following 3 injections of the DNA vaccine given at 4 mg/dose intramuscularly by needle-free injection using Biojector® 2000. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for 12 months. Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Overall, 62% and 86% of vaccine recipients in the rAd5 alone and DNA prime - rAd5 boost groups, respectively, responded to the HIV-1 proteins by an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISPOT. The frequency of immune responses was independent of rAd5 dosage levels. The highest frequency of responses after rAd5 alone was detected at 6 weeks; after DNA prime - rAd5 boost, at 6 months (end of study). At baseline, neutralizing antibodies against Ad5 were present in 81% of volunteers; the distribution was similar across the 4 groups. Pre-existing immunity to Ad5 did not appear to have a significant impact on reactogenicity or immune response rates to HIV antigens by IFN-γ ELISPOT. Binding antibodies against Env were detected in up to 100% recipients of DNA prime - rAd5 boost. One volunteer acquired HIV infection after the study ended, two years after receipt of rAd5 alone. Conclusions/Significance The HIV-1 rAd5 vaccine, either alone or as a boost following HIV-1 DNA vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic in African adults. DNA priming increased the frequency and magnitude of cellular and humoral immune responses, but there was no effect of rAd5 dosage on immunogenicity endpoints. Trial

  18. A polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine induces heterologous immunity and protects pigs against pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bragstad, Karoline; Vinner, Lasse; Hansen, Mette Sif; Nielsen, Jens; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2013-04-26

    The composition of current influenza protein vaccines has to be reconsidered every season to match the circulating influenza viruses, continuously changing antigenicity. Thus, influenza vaccines inducing a broad cross-reactive immune response would be a great advantage for protection against both seasonal and emerging influenza viruses. We have developed an alternative influenza vaccine based on DNA expressing selected influenza proteins of pandemic and seasonal origin. In the current study, we investigated the protection of a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine approach in pigs. We immunised pigs intradermally with a combination of influenza DNA vaccine components based on the pandemic 1918 H1N1 (M and NP genes), pandemic 2009 H1N1pdm09 (HA and NA genes) and seasonal 2005 H3N2 genes (HA and NA genes) and investigated the protection against infection with virus both homologous and heterologous to the DNA vaccine components. We found that pigs challenged with a virus homologous to the HA and NA DNA vaccine components were well protected from infection. In addition, heterologous challenge virus was cleared rapidly compared to the unvaccinated control pigs. Immunisation by electroporation induced HI antibodies >40 HAU/ml seven days after second vaccination. Heterologous virus challenge as long as ten weeks after last immunisation was able to trigger a vaccine antibody HI response 26 times higher than in the control pigs. The H3N2 DNA vaccine HA and NA genes also triggered an effective vaccine response with protective antibody titres towards heterologous H3N2 virus. The described influenza DNA vaccine is able to induce broadly protective immune responses even in a larger animal, like the pig, against both heterologous and homologous virus challenges despite relatively low HI titres after vaccination. The ability of this DNA vaccine to limit virus shedding may have an impact on virus spread among pigs which could possibly extend to humans as well, thereby diminishing the

  19. Construction and identification of Complex DNA vaccine of hepatitis B and Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qing-Kuan; Xiao, Ting; Li, Jin; Yin, Kun; Jia, Feng-Ju; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Gui-Hua; Cui, Yong; Liu, Gong-Zhen; Sun, Hui; Jiang, Hong-Tao; Yan, Ge; Huang, Bing-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To construct and identify multi-gene recombinant expression vector pcDNA3-HBsAg-p30-ROP2. Method: Primers were designed according to the gene sequences of restriction enzyme cutting site of recombinant pcDNA3-p30-ROP2 and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The target fragment of HBsAg was amplified and cloned to expression vector pcDNA3-p30-ROP2 by restriction enzyme digestion and ligation. The recombinant expression vector pcDNA3-HBsAg-p30-ROP2 was identified by PCR detection, followed by enzyme restriction and sequencing. Results: The target fragment of HBsAg was successfully amplified, and the multi-gene eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3-HBsAg-p30-ROP2 was established. PCR detection and restriction enzyme digestion showed that the length of the target fragment was consistent with the theoretical value. The recombinant expression vector contained the complete sequences of p30-ROP2 compound gene and HBsAg. Conclusion: Multi-gene recombinant expression vector pcDNA3-HBsAg-p30-ROP2 was successfully established. The constructed expression vector could be used to develop multi-gene nucleic acid vaccines. PMID:26309572

  20. Enhanced potency of plasmid DNA microparticle human immunodeficiency virus vaccines in rhesus macaques by using a priming-boosting regimen with recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Otten, Gillis R; Schaefer, Mary; Doe, Barbara; Liu, Hong; Srivastava, Indresh; Megede, Jan zur; Kazzaz, Jina; Lian, Ying; Singh, Manmohan; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Montefiori, David; Lewis, Mark; Driver, David A; Dubensky, Thomas; Polo, John M; Donnelly, John; O'Hagan, Derek T; Barnett, Susan; Ulmer, Jeffrey B

    2005-07-01

    DNA vaccines have been used widely in experimental primate models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but their effectiveness has been limited. In this study, we evaluated three technologies for increasing the potency of DNA vaccines in rhesus macaques. These included DNA encoding Sindbis virus RNA replicons (pSINCP), cationic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) microparticles for DNA delivery, and recombinant protein boosting. The DNA-based pSINCP replicon vaccines encoding HIV Gag and Env were approximately equal in potency to human cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-driven conventional DNA vaccines (pCMV). The PLG microparticle DNA delivery system was particularly effective at enhancing antibody responses induced by both pCMV and pSINCP vaccines and had less effect on T cells. Recombinant Gag and Env protein boosting elicited rapid and strong recall responses, in some cases to levels exceeding those seen after DNA or DNA/PLG priming. Of note, Env protein boosting induced serum-neutralizing antibodies and increased frequencies of gamma interferon-producing CD4 T cells severalfold. Thus, PLG microparticles are an effective means of delivering DNA vaccines in nonhuman primates, as demonstrated for two different types of DNA vaccines encoding two different antigens, and are compatible for use with DNA prime-protein boost regimens.

  1. Development of an ultrasound-responsive and mannose-modified gene carrier for DNA vaccine therapy.

    PubMed

    Un, Keita; Kawakami, Shigeru; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2010-10-01

    Development of a gene delivery system to transfer the gene of interest selectively and efficiently into targeted cells is essential for achievement of sufficient therapeutic effects by gene therapy. Here, we succeeded in developing the gene transfection method using ultrasound (US)-responsive and mannose-modified gene carriers, named Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes. Compared with the conventional lipofection method using mannose-modified carriers, this transfection method using Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes and US exposure enabled approximately 500-800-fold higher gene expressions in the antigen presenting cells (APCs) selectively in vivo. This enhanced gene expression was contributed by the improvement of delivering efficiency of nucleic acids to the targeted organs, and by the increase of introducing efficiency of nucleic acids into the cytoplasm followed by US exposure. Moreover, high anti-tumor effects were demonstrated by applying this method to DNA vaccine therapy using ovalbumin (OVA)-expressing plasmid DNA (pDNA). This US-responsive and cell-specific gene delivery system can be widely applied to medical treatments such as vaccine therapy and anti-inflammation therapy, which its targeted cells are APCs, and our findings may help in establishing innovative methods for in-vivo gene delivery to overcome the poor introducing efficiency of carriers into cytoplasm which the major obstacle associated with gene delivery by non-viral carriers.

  2. Transcription of immune genes upon challenge with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) in DNA vaccinated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Cuesta, A; Tafalla, C

    2009-01-07

    Even though DNA vaccination has proven as one of the most effective methods in controlling fish rhabdoviruses, the immune mechanisms responsible for protection are still unknown. Many studies have focused on studying which cytokines and immune genes are triggered in response to the vaccine at different times post-vaccination. However, to elucidate the mechanism(s) responsible for protection, to our understanding it is also of great relevance to study the immune response to the virus in fish that have been previously vaccinated and compare it to the effects that the virus might have on non-vaccinated fish. This type of study has never been performed to date in fish. Thus, in the current work, we vaccinated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with a DNA vaccine against viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), and 30 days post-vaccination we challenged the fish with a virulent VHSV. It was then, that we studied the immune response to the virus at very early times post-infection in fish, in order to compare the effects of VHSV on vaccinated or non-vaccinated trout. We studied the levels of expression of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ialpha and IIalpha genes, immunoglobulin M (IgM), CD8alpha, type I interferon (IFN), Mx, IFN-gamma and natural killer enhancing factor (NKEF) in head kidney, spleen and blood. When we compared the effect that VHSV had on vaccinated fish to the effect that the virus produced in fish vaccinated with the empty plasmid, the genes that were significantly up-regulated were IL-1beta and MHC IIalpha in the spleen at day 1 post-infection, MHC Ialpha in all organs at day 1 post-infection, and IFN and Mx in the spleen and blood at days 1 and 3 post-infection, respectively. Genes that correlate with an increased specific immune response were not significantly increased in response to VHSV in these vaccinated animals. The results suggest that DNA vaccination induces a memory state in fish that, on the

  3. Gene Gun Bombardment with DNA-Coated Golden Particles Enhanced the Protective Effect of a DNA Vaccine Based on Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase of Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yan; Zhao, Bin; Han, Yanhui; Zhang, Juan; Li, Xuezhen; Qiu, Chunhui; Wu, Xiujuan; Hong, Yang; Ai, Dezhou; Lin, Jiaojiao; Fu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by infection with Schistosoma species, remains an important parasitic zoonosis. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase of Schistosoma japonicum (SjTGR) plays an important role in the development of the parasite and for its survival. Here we present a recombinant plasmid DNA vaccine, pVAX1/SjTGR, to estimate its protection against S. japonicum in BALB/c mice. The DNA vaccine administrated by particle bombardment induced higher protection than by intramuscular injection. All animals vaccinated with pVAX1/SjTGR developed significant specific anti-SjTGR antibodies than control groups. Moreover, animals immunized by gene gun exhibited a splenocyte proliferative response, with an increase in IFN-γ and IL-4. The recombinant plasmid administrated by gene gun achieved a medium protective efficacy of 27.83–38.83% (P < 0.01) of worm reduction and 40.38–44.51% (P < 0.01) of liver egg count reduction. It suggests that different modes of administering a DNA vaccine can influence the protective efficacy induced by the vaccine. Interestingly, from the enzymatic activity results, we found that worms obtained from pVAX1/SjTGR-vaccinated animals expressed lower enzymatic activity than the control group and the antibodies weakened the enzymatic activity of SjTGR in vitro, too. It implies that the high-level antibodies may contribute to the protective effects. PMID:23509820

  4. Protective immune response in mice induced by a suicidal DNA vaccine encoding NTPase-II gene of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lina; Hu, Yue; Hua, Qianqian; Luo, Fangjun; Xie, Guizhen; Li, Xiangzhi; Lin, Jiaxin; Wan, Yujing; Ren, Shoufeng; Pan, Changwang; Tan, Feng

    2017-02-01

    DNA-based alphaviral RNA replicon vectors, also called suicidal DNA vectors, have been employed to alleviate biosafety concerns attribution to its ability to induce apoptotic cell death of the transfected cells. Toxoplasma gondii nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase-II (TgNTPase-II), which facilitates the parasite to salvage purines from the host cell for survival and replication, have been demonstrated to be a potential vaccine candidate for toxoplasmosis. Herein, we evaluated the immunogenic potential of a suicidal DNA vaccine encoding TgNTPase-II gene, pDREP-TgNTPase-II, delivered intramuscularly in combination with electroporation. Immunization of mice with pDREP-TgNTPase-II elicited specific humoral responses, with high IgG antibody titers and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response. The cellular immune response was associated with high level production of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-10 cytokines and low level IL-4 production as well as the increase of the percentage of CD8+ T cells, indicating that a Th1 predominant response was elicited. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with this suicidal DNA vaccine displayed partial protection against acute infection with the virulent RH strain as well as chronic infection with PRU cyst, which shows 77.7% and 71.4% reduction in brain cyst burden in comparison to PBS and pDREP-eGFP control group, respectively. Based on the cellular and antibody responses, the suicidal DNA vaccine elicited a Th1-predominant immune response against T. gondii challenge.

  5. Early life DNA vaccination with the H gene of Canine distemper virus induces robust protection against distemper.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Nielsen, Line; Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2009-08-20

    Young mink kits (n=8) were vaccinated with DNA plasmids encoding the viral haemagglutinin protein (H) of a vaccine strain of Canine distemper virus (CDV). Virus neutralising (VN) antibodies were induced after 2 immunisations and after the third immunisation all kits had high VN antibody titres. The VN antibody titres remained high for more than 4 months and the mink were protected against viraemia, lymphopenia, clinical disease and changes in the percentage of IFN-gamma producing peripheral blood leucocytes after challenge inoculation with a recent wild type strain of CDV. Essentially, these results demonstrate that early life DNA vaccination with the H gene of a CDV vaccine strain induced robust protective immunity against a recent wild type CDV.

  6. Leptospirosis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijun; Jin, Li; Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2007-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a serious infection disease caused by pathogenic strains of the Leptospira spirochetes, which affects not only humans but also animals. It has long been expected to find an effective vaccine to prevent leptospirosis through immunization of high risk humans or animals. Although some leptospirosis vaccines have been obtained, the vaccination is relatively unsuccessful in clinical application despite decades of research and millions of dollars spent. In this review, the recent advancements of recombinant outer membrane protein (OMP) vaccines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) vaccines, inactivated vaccines, attenuated vaccines and DNA vaccines against leptospirosis are reviewed. A comparison of these vaccines may lead to development of new potential methods to combat leptospirosis and facilitate the leptospirosis vaccine research. Moreover, a vaccine ontology database was built for the scientists working on the leptospirosis vaccines as a starting tool. PMID:18072968

  7. Assessment of the efficacy of two novel DNA vaccine formulations against highly pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Du, Luping; Pang, Fengjiao; Yu, Zhengyu; Xu, Xiangwei; Fan, Baochao; Huang, Kehe; He, Kongwang; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Since May 2006, a highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) has emerged and prevailed in mainland China, affecting over 2 million pigs. Commercial PRRSV killed and modified live vaccines cannot provide complete protection against HP-PRRSV due to genetic variation. Development of more effective vaccines against the emerging HP-PRRSV is urgently required. In our previous studies, two formulations of DNA vaccines (pcDNA3.1-PoIFN-λ1-SynORF5 and BPEI/PLGA-SynORF5) based on the HP-PRRSV were constructed and shown to induce enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immune response induced by these novel formulations in piglets. PcDNA3.1-PoIFN-λ1-SynORF5 and BPEI/PLGA-SynORF5 vaccines induced significantly enhanced GP5-specific antibody and PRRSV-specific neutralizing antibody in pigs compared with the pcDNA3.1-SynORF5 parental construct. Though IFN-γ levels and lymphocyte proliferation responses induced by the two DNA vaccine formulations were comparable to that induced by the pcDNA3.1-SynORF5 construct, each of the novel formulations provided efficient protection against challenge with HP-PRRSV. Non-severe clinical signs and rectal temperatures were observed in pigs immunized with BPEI/PLGA-SynORF5 compared with other groups. Thus, these novel DNA constructs may represent promising candidate vaccines against emerging HP-PRRSV. PMID:28157199

  8. A noninfectious simian/human immunodeficiency virus DNA vaccine that protects macaques against AIDS.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh K; Liu, Zhenqian; Sheffer, Darlene; Mackay, Glenn A; Smith, Marilyn; Dhillon, Sukhbir; Hegde, Ramakrishna; Jia, Fenglan; Adany, Istvan; Narayan, Opendra

    2005-03-01

    Simian/human immunodeficiency virus SHIV(KU2) replicates with extremely high titers in macaques. In order to determine whether the DNA of the viral genome could be used as a vaccine if the DNA were rendered noninfectious, we deleted the reverse transcriptase gene from SHIVKU2 and inserted this DNA (DeltartSHIVKU2) into a plasmid that was then used to test gene expression and immunogenicity. Transfection of Jurkat and human embryonic kidney epithelial (HEK 293) cells with the DNA resulted in production of all of the major viral proteins and their precursors and transient export of a large quantity of the Gag p27 into the supernatant fluid. As expected, no infectious virus was produced in these cultures. Four macaques were injected intradermally with 2 mg of the DNA at 0, 8, and 18 weeks. The animals developed neutralizing antibodies and low enzyme-linked immunospot assay (E-SPOT) titers against SHIVKU2. These four animals and two unvaccinated control animals were then challenged with heterologous SHIV89.6P administered into their rectums. The two control animals developed viral RNA titers exceeding 10(6) copies/ml of plasma, and these titers were accompanied by the loss of CD4+ T cells by 2 weeks after challenge. The two control animals died at weeks 8 and 16, respectively. All four of the immunized animals became infected with the challenge virus but developed lower titers of viral RNA in plasma than the control animals, and the titers decreased over time in three of the four macaques. The fourth animal remained viremic and died at week 47. Whereas the control animals failed to develop E-SPOT responses, all four of the immunized animals developed anamnestic E-SPOT responses after challenge. The animal that died developed the highest E-SPOT response and was the only one that produced neutralizing antibodies against the challenge virus. These results established that noninfectious DNA of pathogenic SHIV could be used as a vaccine to prevent AIDS, even though the

  9. Gene silencing by DNA methylation and dual inheritance in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Paulin, R P; Ho, T; Balzer, H J; Holliday, R

    1998-06-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells strain D422, which has one copy of the adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) gene, were permeabilized by electroporation and treated with 5-methyl deoxycytidine triphosphate. Cells with a silenced APRT gene were selected on 2, 6-diaminopurine. Colonies were isolated and shown to be reactivated to APRT+ by 5-aza-cytidine and by selection in medium containing adenine, aminopterin and thymidine. Genomic DNA was prepared from eight isolates of independent origin and subjected to bisulphite treatment. This deaminates cytosine to uracil in single-stranded DNA but does not deaminate 5-methyl cytosine. PCR, cloning and sequencing revealed the methylation pattern of CpG doublets in the promoter region of the APRT- gene, whereas the active APRT gene had nonmethylated DNA. CHO strain K1, which has two copies of the APRT+ gene, could also be silenced by the same procedure but at a lower frequency. The availability of the 5-methyl dCTP-induced silencing, 5-aza-CR and a standard mutagen, ethyl methane sulphonate, makes it possible to follow concomitantly the inheritance of active, mutant or silenced gene copies. This analysis demonstrates "dual inheritance" at the APRT locus in CHO cells.

  10. Immune responses to a DNA/protein vaccination strategy against Staphylococcus aureus induced mastitis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Talbot, Brian G; Diarra, Moussa S; Lacasse, Pierre

    2004-11-15

    The fibronectin binding protein (FnBP) and clumping factor A (ClfA) of Staphylococcus aureus are important proteins involved in the pathogenesis of staphylococcal bovine mastitis. These antigens were the targets of a DNA and protein vaccination strategy against S. aureus induced mastitis in dairy cows. The DNA vaccine comprised the bicistronic plasmid (pCI-D(1)D(3)-IRES-ClfA) that encoded the fusion of two sequences, (D1(21-34); D3(20-33)) from the fibronectin-binding motifs of FnBP and a fragment from ClfA (aa 221-550) of S. aureus 8325-4 separated by an Internal Ribosomal Entry Site (IRES) sequence. In addition, the vaccine contained the plasmid encoding the bovine granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulatory factor gene (pCI-bGM-CSF). Four, 7-month pregnant heifers were immunized twice with the DNA vaccine and boosted once with recombinant D(1)D(3) and ClfA proteins while four others were not immunized. The immunization induced lymphoproliferative responses and functional antibodies against D(1)D(3) and ClfA antigens. Three weeks after calving, three mammary quarters of each vaccinated and non-vaccinated cow were challenged with 900 CFU/each of S. aureus Newbould 305. The fourth quarter received saline only. Serum haptoglobin levels, cardiac rhythm and the body temperature of vaccinated cows during the 24-72 h post-challenge were lower than in non-vaccinated animals. At 21 days post-challenge, bacteria were present in 5 of the vaccinated and 11 of the control challenged quarters. The bacteria averaged 1.4 and 3.3 log(10) CFU/ml of milk from vaccinated and control cows respectively. In summary, DNA-protein vaccination against FnBP and ClfA of S. aureus caused both lymphoproliferative and humoral immune responses that provided partial protection of mammary gland from staphylococcal mastitis and better post-challenge conditions in vaccinated cows.

  11. Virus-Like Particle Secretion and Genotype-Dependent Immunogenicity of Dengue Virus Serotype 2 DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galula, Jedhan U.; Shen, Wen-Fan; Chuang, Shih-Te

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV), composed of four distinct serotypes, is the most important and rapidly emerging arthropod-borne pathogen and imposes substantial economic and public health burdens. We constructed candidate vaccines containing the DNA of five of the genotypes of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and evaluated the immunogenicity, the neutralizing (Nt) activity of the elicited antibodies, and the protective efficacy elicited in mice immunized with the vaccine candidates. We observed a significant correlation between the level of in vitro virus-like particle secretion, the elicited antibody response, and the protective efficacy of the vaccines containing the DNA of the different DENV genotypes in immunized mice. However, higher total IgG antibody levels did not always translate into higher Nt antibodies against homologous and heterologous viruses. We also found that, in contrast to previous reports, more than 50% of total IgG targeted ectodomain III (EDIII) of the E protein, and a substantial fraction of this population was interdomain highly neutralizing flavivirus subgroup-cross-reactive antibodies, such as monoclonal antibody 1B7-5. In addition, the lack of a critical epitope(s) in the Sylvatic genotype virus recognized by interdomain antibodies could be the major cause of the poor protection of mice vaccinated with the Asian 1 genotype vaccine (pVD2-Asian 1) from lethal challenge with virus of the Sylvatic genotype. In conclusion, although the pVD2-Asian 1 vaccine was immunogenic, elicited sufficient titers of Nt antibodies against all DENV-2 genotypes, and provided 100% protection against challenge with virus of the homologous Asian 1 genotype and virus of the heterologous Cosmopolitan genotype, it is critical to monitor the potential emergence of Sylvatic genotype viruses, since vaccine candidates under development may not protect vaccinated humans from these viruses. IMPORTANCE Five genotype-specific dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) DNA vaccine

  12. Evaluation of immune responses induced by rhoptry protein 5 and rhoptry protein 7 DNA vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Lu, G; Zhou, A; Han, Y; Guo, J; Zhou, H; Cong, H; He, S

    2016-04-01

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is widespread, and the organism can cause congenital infections in humans. The horizontal transmission of Toxoplasma is even more common than congenital. An effective vaccine strategy brings the prospect of improving Toxoplasma disease control. Rhoptry protein 5 (ROP5) and ROP7 are potential stimulators of humoral and cellular immune responses. In this study, we constructed a multi-antigenic DNA vaccine expressing ROP5 and ROP7 of T. gondii and compared the protective efficacy to single-gene vaccines and control groups. BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly three times. The levels of IgG antibodies and cytokines in mice immunized with the multi-antigenic DNA vaccine (pROP5/ROP7) were significantly higher than those in the control mice. Mice vaccinated with pROP5/ROP7 showed a longer survival time (16 days) than single-gene-immunized mice (11 and 12 days, respectively) or control mice (8 days) after a challenge with 1 × 10(4) tachyzoites of RH strain of T. gondii. Furthermore, after intragastric infection with 20 cysts of PRU strain of T. gondii, the number of brain cysts in mice immunized with pROP5/ROP7 was only 25% of the number in control mice. Our results showed that a DNA vaccine encoding ROP5 and ROP7 significantly enhanced protection against T. gondii challenge.

  13. A recombinant DNA vaccine protects mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor against lethal challenge with Usutu virus.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Cañas-Arranz, Rodrigo; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2016-04-19

    Usutu virus (USUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus whose circulation had been confined to Africa since it was first detected in 1959. However, in the last decade USUV has emerged in Europe causing episodes of avian mortality and sporadic severe neuroinvasive infections in humans. Remarkably, adult laboratory mice exhibit limited susceptibility to USUV infection, which has impaired the analysis of the immune responses, thus complicating the evaluation of virus-host interactions and of vaccine candidates against this pathogen. In this work, we showed that mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor (IFNAR (-/-) mice) were highly susceptible to USUV infection and provided a lethal challenge model for vaccine testing. To validate this infection model, a plasmid DNA vaccine candidate encoding the precursor of membrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of USUV was engineered. Transfection of cultured cells with this plasmid resulted in expression of USUV antigens and the assembly and secretion of small virus-like particles also known as recombinant subviral particles (RSPs). A single intramuscular immunization with this plasmid was sufficient to elicit a significant level of protection against challenge with USUV in IFNAR (-/-) mice. The characterization of the humoral response induced revealed that DNA vaccination primed anti-USUV antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies. Overall, these results probe the suitability of IFNAR (-/-) mice as an amenable small animal model for the study of USUV host virus interactions and vaccine testing, as well as the feasibility of DNA-based vaccine strategies for the control of this pathogen.

  14. A DNA Vaccine Encoding for TcSSP4 Induces Protection against Acute and Chronic Infection in Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Ramos-Ligonio, Angel; López-Monteón, Aracely; Salgado-Jiménez, Berenice; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; Rosales-Encina, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Immunization of mice with plasmids containing genes of Trypanosoma cruzi induces protective immunity in the murine model of Chagas disease. A cDNA clone that codes for an amastigote-specific surface protein (TcSSP4) was used as a candidate to develop a DNA vaccine. Mice were immunized with the recombinant protein rTcSSP4 and with cDNA for TcSSP4, and challenged with bloodstream trypomastigotes. Immunization with rTcSSP4 protein makes mice more susceptible to trypomastigote infection, with high mortality rates, whereas mice immunized with a eukaryotic expression plasmid containing the TcSSP4 cDNA were able to control the acute phase of infection. Heart tissue of gene-vaccinated animals did not show myocarditis and tissue damage at 365 days following infection, as compared with control animals. INF-γ was detected in sera of DNA vaccinated mice shortly after immunization, suggesting the development of a Th1 response. The TcSSP4 gene is a promising candidate for the development of an anti-T. cruzi DNA vaccine. PMID:22110377

  15. Universal real-time PCR assay for quantitation and size evaluation of residual cell DNA in human viral vaccines.

    PubMed

    André, Murielle; Reghin, Sylviane; Boussard, Estelle; Lempereur, Laurent; Maisonneuve, Stéphane

    2016-05-01

    Residual host cellular DNA (rcDNA) is one of the principal risk associated with continuous cell lines derived medicines such as viral vaccines. To assess rcDNA degradation, we suggest two quantitative real-time PCR assays designed to separately quantify target sequences shorter and longer than the 200 bp risk limit, the relative abundance of both targets reflecting the extent of rcDNA fragmentation. The conserved multicopy ribosomal 18S RNA gene was targeted to detect host cell templates from most mammalian cell substrates commonly used in the manufacture of human viral vaccines. The detection range of the method was assessed on purified DNA templates from different animal origins. The standard calibrator origin and structural conformation were shown crucial to achieve accurate quantification. Artificial mixtures of PCR products shorter and longer than 200 bp were used as a model to check the ability of the assay to estimate the fragment size distribution. The method was successfully applied to a panel of Vero cell derived vaccines and could be used as a universal method for determination of both content and size distribution of rcDNA in vaccines.

  16. A dual amplification fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of DNA methyltransferase activity based on strand displacement amplification and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wanling; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2016-03-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) plays a critical role in many biological processes and has been regarded as a predictive cancer biomarker and a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. Sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential for early cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. Here, we developed a dual amplification fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity based on strand displacement amplification (SDA) and DNAzyme amplification. A trifunctional double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) probe was designed including a methylation site for DNA MTase recognition, a complementary sequence of 8-17 DNAzyme for synthesizing DNAzyme, and a nicking site for nicking enzyme cleavage. Firstly, the trifunctional dsDNA probe was methylated by DNA MTase to form the methylated dsDNA. Subsequently, HpaII restriction endonuclease specifically cleaved the residue of unmethylated dsDNA. Next, under the action of polymerase and nicking enzyme, the methylared dsDNA initiated SDA, releasing numbers of 8-17 DNAzymes. Finally, the released 8-17 DNAzymes triggered DNAzyme amplification reaction to induce a significant fluorescence enhancement. This strategy could detect DNA MTase activity as low as 0.0082U/mL. Additionally, the strategy was successfully applied for evaluating the inhibitions of DNA MTase using two anticancer drugs, 5-azacytidine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The results indicate the proposed strategy has a potential application in early cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  17. Preclinical evaluation of multi antigenic HCV DNA vaccine for the prevention of Hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyojin; Jeong, Moonsup; Oh, Jooyeon; Cho, Youngran; Shen, Xuefei; Stone, John; Yan, Jian; Rothkopf, Zachary; Khan, Amir S; Cho, Byung Mun; Park, Young K; Weiner, David B; Son, Woo-Chan; Maslow, Joel N

    2017-03-07

    Direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is costly and does not protect from re-infection. For human and chimpanzees, recovery from acute HCV infection correlates with host CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. DNA plasmids targeting the HCV non-structural antigens NS3, NS4, and NS5, were previously reported to induce robust and sustained T cell responses in mice and primates. These plasmids were combined with a plasmid encoding cytokine IL-28B, together named as VGX-6150. The dose-dependent T cell response and safety of VGX-6150 administered intramuscularly and followed by electroporation was assessed in mice. Immune responses plateaued at 20 μg/dose with IL-28B demonstrating significant immunoadjuvant activity. Mice administered VGX-6150 at 40, 400, and 800 μg given either as a single injection or as 14 injections given bi-weekly over 26 weeks showed no vaccine related changes in any clinical parameter compared to placebo recipients. There was no evidence of VGX-6150 accumulation at the injection site or in any organ 1 month following the 14(th) vaccination. Based on these studies, the approximate lethal dose (ALD) exceeds 800 μg/dose and the NOAEL was 800 μg/dose in mouse. In conclusion, VGX-6150 appears safe and a promising preventive vaccine candidate for HCV infection.

  18. Epitope analysis and protection by a ROP19 DNA vaccine against Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Wang, Lin; Lu, Gang; Zhou, Aihua; Zhu, Meiyan; Li, Qihang; Wang, Zhilin; Arken, Miradel; Wang, Ao; He, Shenyi

    2016-01-01

    We used bioinformatics approaches to identify B-cell and T-cell epitopes on the ROP19 protein of Toxoplasma gondii. Then, we constructed plasmids with ROP19 (pEGFP-C1-ROP19) and injected them into BALB/c mice to test the immunoprotection induced by this vaccine candidate. The results showed that immunization with pEGFP-C1-ROP19 induced effective cellular and humoral immune responses in mice; specifically, high serum levels of T. gondii-specific IgG and increased interferon-gamma production by splenocytes. Furthermore, the mice vaccinated with pROP19 had significantly fewer brain cysts (583 ± 160) than the mice injected with phosphate-buffered saline (1350 ± 243) or with the control plasmid, pEGFP-C1 (1300 ± 167). Compared with PBS-treated mice, those immunized with pROP19 had only 43% of the number of brain cysts. These results suggest that the DNA vaccine encoding ROP19 induced a significant immune response and provided protection against a challenge with T. gondii strain PRU cysts. PMID:27055564

  19. Preclinical evaluation of multi antigenic HCV DNA vaccine for the prevention of Hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyojin; Jeong, Moonsup; Oh, Jooyeon; Cho, Youngran; Shen, Xuefei; Stone, John; Yan, Jian; Rothkopf, Zachary; Khan, Amir S.; Cho, Byung Mun; Park, Young K.; Weiner, David B.; Son, Woo-Chan; Maslow, Joel N.

    2017-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is costly and does not protect from re-infection. For human and chimpanzees, recovery from acute HCV infection correlates with host CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. DNA plasmids targeting the HCV non-structural antigens NS3, NS4, and NS5, were previously reported to induce robust and sustained T cell responses in mice and primates. These plasmids were combined with a plasmid encoding cytokine IL-28B, together named as VGX-6150. The dose-dependent T cell response and safety of VGX-6150 administered intramuscularly and followed by electroporation was assessed in mice. Immune responses plateaued at 20 μg/dose with IL-28B demonstrating significant immunoadjuvant activity. Mice administered VGX-6150 at 40, 400, and 800 μg given either as a single injection or as 14 injections given bi-weekly over 26 weeks showed no vaccine related changes in any clinical parameter compared to placebo recipients. There was no evidence of VGX-6150 accumulation at the injection site or in any organ 1 month following the 14th vaccination. Based on these studies, the approximate lethal dose (ALD) exceeds 800 μg/dose and the NOAEL was 800 μg/dose in mouse. In conclusion, VGX-6150 appears safe and a promising preventive vaccine candidate for HCV infection. PMID:28266565

  20. DNA vaccination for cervical cancer; a novel technology platform of RALA mediated gene delivery via polymeric microneedles.

    PubMed

    Ali, A A; McCrudden, C M; McCaffrey, J; McBride, J W; Cole, G; Dunne, N J; Robson, T; Kissenpfennig, A; Donnelly, R F; McCarthy, H O

    2016-12-12

    HPV subtypes (16, 18) are associated with the development of cervical cancer, with oncoproteins E6 and E7 responsible for pathogenesis. The goal of this study was to evaluate our 'smart system' technology platform for DNA vaccination against cervical cancer. The vaccination platform brings together two main components; a peptide RALA which condenses DNA into cationic nanoparticles (NPs), and a polymeric polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) microneedle (MN) patch for cutaneous delivery of the loaded NPs. RALA condensed E6/E7 DNA into NPs not exceeding 100nm in diameter, and afforded the DNA protection from degradation in PVP. Sera from mice vaccinated with MN/RALA-E6/E7 were richer in E6/E7-specific IgGs, displayed a greater T-cell-mediated TC-1 cytotoxicity and contained more IFN-γ than sera from mice that received NPs intramuscularly. More importantly, MN/RALA-E6/E7 delayed TC-1 tumor initiation in a prophylactic model, and slowed tumor growth in a therapeutic model of vaccination, and was more potent than intramuscular vaccination.

  1. The site of administration influences both the type and the magnitude of the immune response induced by DNA vaccine electroporation.

    PubMed

    Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Vanvarenberg, Kevin; De Beuckelaer, Ans; De Koker, Stefaan; Lambricht, Laure; Uyttenhove, Catherine; Reschner, Anca; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Grooten, Johan; Préat, Véronique

    2015-06-22

    We investigated the influence of the site of administration of DNA vaccine on the induced immune response. DNA vaccines were administered by electroporation at three different sites: tibial cranial muscle, abdominal skin and ear pinna. Aiming to draw general conclusions about DNA vaccine delivery, we successively used several plasmids encoding either luciferase and ovalbumin as models or gp160 and P1A as vaccines against HIV and P815 mastocytoma, respectively. Low levels and duration of luciferase transgene expression were observed after electroporation of the abdominal skin, partly explaining its lower immunogenic performance as compared to the other sites of administration. Analyses of OT-I CD8+ and OT-II CD4+ T cell responses highlighted the differential impact of the delivery site on the elicited immune response. Muscle electroporation induced the strongest humoral immune response and both muscle and ear pinna sites induced cellular immunity against gp160. Ear pinna delivery generated the highest level of CTL responses against P1A but electroporation of muscle and ear pinna were equally efficient in delaying P815 growth and improving mice survival. The present study demonstrated that the site of administration is a key factor to be tested in the development of DNA vaccine.

  2. Promoting effect of Antrodia camphorata as an immunomodulating adjuvant on the antitumor efficacy of HER-2/neu DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Hsin; Chang, Chia-Che; Lin, Chiu-Mei; Wang, Sin-Ting; Wu, Min-Tze; Li, Eric I C; Chang, Hsien-Chang; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2010-08-01

    It is well known that DNA vaccines induce protective humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in several animal models. Antrodia camphorata (AC) is a unique basidiomycete fungus of the Polyporaceae family that only grows on the aromatic tree Cinnamomum kanehirai Hayata (Lauraceae) endemic to Taiwan. Importantly, AC has been shown to be highly beneficial in the treatment and prevention of cancer. The goal of this study was to investigate whether AC is able to augment the antitumor immune properties of a HER-2/neu DNA vaccine in a mouse model in which p185neu is overexpressed in MBT-2 tumor cells. Compared with the mice that received the HER-2/neu DNA vaccine alone, co-treatment with AC suppressed tumor growth and extended the survival rate. This increase in the antitumor efficacy was attributed to the enhancement of the Th1-like cellular immune response by the HER-2/neu DNA vaccine-AC combination. Evidence for this came from the marked increase in the IFN-gamma mRNA expression in CD4+ T cells in the draining inguinal lymph nodes, an increase in the number of functional HER-2/neu-specific CTLs, and the increased tumor infiltration of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, depletion of which abolishes the antitumor effect of the HER-2/neu DNA vaccine-AC therapy. Our results further indicate that the treatment of mice with AC enhanced DC activation and production of Th1-activating cytokines (e.g. IL-12, and IFN-alpha) in the draining lymph nodes, which were sufficient to directly stimulate T cell proliferation and higher IFN-gamma production in response to ErbB2. Overall, these results clearly demonstrate that AC represents a promising immunomodulatory adjuvant that could enhance the therapeutic potency of HER-2/neu DNA vaccines in cancer therapy.

  3. Design and pre-clinical development of epitope-based DNA vaccines against B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Iurescia, Sandra; Fioretti, Daniela; Fazio, Vito Michele; Rinaldi, Monica

    2011-10-01

    Optimally designed cancer vaccines should combine the best tumor antigens with the most effective immunotherapy agents and delivery strategies to achieve positive clinical results. The unique immunoglobulin (Ig) idiotype on the surface of each B-cell lymphoma represents an ideal tumor-specific antigen for use as a cancer vaccine. It has been theorized that effective cancer vaccines can be developed using the minimum essential subset of T cell and B cell epitopes that comprise the 'immunome', the universe of neoplasm-derived peptides that interface with B and T cells of the host immune system. Idiotypic antigenic determinants of a B-cell lymphoma lie within the hypervariable regions and mainly within the complementarity-determining regions (CDR)s 3. Thus, the CDR3s are considered a "hot spot" of particular interest for construction of subunit vaccines. DNA vaccines, whose safety and tolerability are substantiated in completed and ongoing clinical trials, have emerged as a novel lymphoma vaccine formulation for antigen-specific immunotherapy. The molecular precision tools offered by gene-based vaccines allow to explore the use of CDR3 sequence as an anti-lymphoma vaccine.

  4. Immunogenicity and safety of xenogeneic vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 DNA vaccination in mice and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Denies, Sofie; Cicchelero, Laetitia; Polis, Ingeborgh; Sanders, Niek N.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is an attractive target in oncology due to its crucial role in angiogenesis. In this study a DNA vaccine coding for human VEGFR-2 was evaluated in healthy mice and dogs, administered by intradermal injection and electroporation. In mice, three doses and vaccination schedules were evaluated. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular IFN-gamma staining and a cytotoxicity assay and antibodies by ELISA. Safety was assessed by measuring regulatory T cells and myeloid derived suppressor cells and a wound healing assay. The vaccine was subsequently evaluated in dogs, which were vaccinated three times with 100μg. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular IFN-gamma staining and antibodies by a flow cytometric assay. In mice, maximal cellular responses were observed after two vaccinations with 5μg. Humoral responses continued to increase with higher dose and number of vaccinations. No abnormalities in the measured safety parameters were observed. The vaccine was also capable of eliciting a cellular and humoral immune response in dogs. No adverse effects were observed, but tolerability of the electroporation was poor. This study will facilitate the evaluation of the vaccine in tumor bearing animals, ranging from rodent models to dogs with spontaneous tumors. PMID:26871296

  5. Prime-boost bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination with lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines expressing antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 improves protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Jianguang; Li, Rui; Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Huang, Qi; Kong, Cong; Wang, Honghai

    2014-10-01

    To prevent the global spread of tuberculosis (TB), more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are urgently needed. As a result of the success of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in protecting children against miliary and meningeal TB, the majority of individuals will have been vaccinated with BCG; hence, boosting BCG-primed immunity will probably be a key component of future vaccine strategies. In this study, we compared the ability of DNA-, protein- and lentiviral vector-based vaccines that express the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost the effects of BCG in the context of immunity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that prime-boost BCG vaccination with a lentiviral vector expressing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 significantly enhanced immune responses, including T helper type 1 and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, compared with DNA- and protein-based vaccines. However, lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines greatly improved the protective efficacy of BCG against M. tuberculosis, as indicated by a lack of weight loss and significantly reduced bacterial loads and histological damage in the lung. Our study suggests that the use of lentiviral or DNA vaccines containing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost BCG is a good choice for the rational design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB.

  6. Detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 gene DNA possibly bound to particulate aluminum adjuvant in the HPV vaccine Gardasil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sin Hang

    2012-12-01

    Medical practitioners in nine countries submitted samples of Gardasil (Merck & Co.) to be tested for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA because they suspected that residual recombinant HPV DNA left in the vaccine might have been a contributing factor leading to some of the unexplained post-vaccination side effects. A total of 16 packages of Gardasil were received from Australia, Bulgaria, France, India, New Zealand, Poland, Russia, Spain and the United States. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using the MY09/MY11 degenerate primers for initial amplification and the GP5/GP6-based nested PCR primers for the second amplification were used to prepare the template for direct automated cycle DNA sequencing of a hypervariable segment of the HPV L1 gene which is used for manufacturing of the HPV L1 capsid protein by a DNA recombinant technology in vaccine production. Detection of HPV DNA and HPV genotyping of all positive samples were finally validated by BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) analysis of a 45-60 bases sequence of the computer-generated electropherogram. The results showed that all 16 Gardasil samples, each with a different lot number, contained fragments of HPV-11 DNA, or HPV-18 DNA, or a DNA fragment mixture from both genotypes. The detected HPV DNA was found to be firmly bound to the insoluble, proteinase-resistant fraction, presumably of amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate (AAHS) nanoparticles used as adjuvant. The clinical significance of these residual HPV DNA fragments bound to a particulate mineral-based adjuvant is uncertain after intramuscular injection, and requires further investigation for vaccination safety.

  7. Single-Step DNA Detection Assay Monitoring Dual-Color Light Scattering from Individual Metal Nanoparticle Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Efficiently detecting DNA sequences within a limited time is vital for disease screening and public health monitoring. This calls for a new method that combines high sensitivity, fast read-out time, and easy manipulation of the sample, avoiding the extensive steps of DNA amplification, purification, or grafting to a surface. Here, we introduce photon cross-correlation spectroscopy as a new method for specific DNA sensing with high sensitivity in a single-step homogeneous solution phase. Our approach is based on confocal dual-color illumination and detection of the scattering intensities from individual silver nanoparticles and gold nanorods. In the absence of the target DNA, the nanoparticles move independently and their respective scattering signals are uncorrelated. In the presence of the target DNA, the probe-functionalized gold and silver nanoparticles assemble via DNA hybridization with the target, giving rise to temporal coincidence between the signals scattered by each nanoparticle. The degree of coincidence accurately quantifies the amount of target DNA. To demonstrate the efficiency of our technique, we detect a specific DNA sequence of sesame, an allergenic food ingredient, for a range of concentration from 5 pM to 1.5 nM with a limit of detection of 1 pM. Our method is sensitive and specific enough to detect single nucleotide deletion and mismatch. With the dual-color scattering signals being much brighter than fluorescence-based analogs, the analysis is fast, quantitative, and simple to operate, making it valuable for biosensing applications. PMID:28261666

  8. Immune response of neonates elicited by somatic transgene vaccination with naked DNA.

    PubMed

    Bot, A; Antohi, S; Bona, C

    1997-05-01

    Neonates display lower immune responsiveness and higher susceptibility for high-dose tolerance. Quantitative as well as functional differences between the neonatal and adult lymphocytes or antigen presenting cells (APC) respectively, explain the particular immune responsiveness during the early stages of the postnatal development. Reduced numbers of lymphocytes and APCs as well as a modified responsiveness of T cells in neonates, are the main factors that account for the low threshold of tolerance in newborns. Taking into account these particularities, the design of effective vaccines for neonates poses significant difficulties. We hypothesized that a continuous exposure to low doses of antigens may avoid high-zone tolerance and may lead instead, to effective expansion of effector and memory cells. Indeed, inoculation of newborn mice with plasmids encoding nucleoprotein (NP) or hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus, led to the priming of specific cytotoxic (CTL), helper (Th) and B cells, rather than induction of unresponsiveness. Mice immunized as neonates with naked DNA and challenged later with lethal doses of influenza virus, displayed significant protection. Thus, DNA immunization may be a promising strategy for vaccination against serious infectious diseases of infants and children.

  9. Evaluating the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding Lassa virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Carreno, Maria P; Nelson, Michael S; Botten, Jason; Smith-Nixon, Kim; Buchmeier, Michael J; Whitton, J Lindsay

    2005-04-25

    Several viruses in the Arenavirus genus of the family Arenaviridae cause severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever. One such virus, Lassa virus (LV), is a frequent cause of disease in Africa, and survivors often are left with substantial neurological impairment. The feasibility of protective immunization against LV infection, and the associated disease, has been demonstrated in animal models, using recombinant vaccinia viruses to deliver Lassa proteins. Circumstantial evidence implicates cellular immunity in this Lassa-induced protection, but this has not been confirmed. Here, we describe DNA vaccines that encode LV proteins. A single inoculation of a plasmid encoding full-length Lassa nucleoprotein (LNP) can induce CD8(+) T cell responses in mice and can protect against challenge with two arenaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Pichinde virus (PV). A DNA minigene vaccine encoding a 9 amino acid sequence from LNP also induces CD8(+) T cells and protects against arenavirus challenge, thus confirming prior speculation that protective cellular immunity is induced by LV proteins.

  10. DNA Prime-Boost Vaccine Regimen To Increase Breadth, Magnitude, and Cytotoxicity of the Cellular Immune Responses to Subdominant Gag Epitopes of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xintao; Valentin, Antonio; Dayton, Frances; Kulkarni, Viraj; Alicea, Candido; Rosati, Margherita; Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Gautam, Rajeev; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Martin, Malcolm A.; Mullins, James I.

    2016-01-01

    HIV sequence diversity and the propensity of eliciting immunodominant responses targeting variable regions of the HIV proteome are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. An HIV-derived conserved element (CE) p24gag plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine is able to redirect immunodominant responses to otherwise subdominant and often more vulnerable viral targets. By homology to the HIV immunogen, seven CE were identified in SIV p27Gag. Analysis of 31 rhesus macaques vaccinated with full-length SIV gag pDNA showed inefficient induction (58% response rate) of cellular responses targeting these CE. In contrast, all 14 macaques immunized with SIV p27CE pDNA developed robust T cell responses recognizing CE. Vaccination with p27CE pDNA was also critical for the efficient induction and increased the frequency of Ag-specific T cells with cytotoxic potential (granzyme B+ CD107a+) targeting subdominant CE epitopes, compared with the responses elicited by the p57gag pDNA vaccine. Following p27CE pDNA priming, two booster regimens, gag pDNA or codelivery of p27CE+gag pDNA, significantly increased the levels of CE-specific T cells. However, the CE+gag pDNA booster vaccination elicited significantly broader CE epitope recognition, and thus, a more profound alteration of the immunodominance hierarchy. Vaccination with HIV molecules showed that CE+gag pDNA booster regimen further expanded the breadth of HIV CE responses. Hence, SIV/HIV vaccine regimens comprising CE pDNA prime and CE+gag pDNA booster vaccination significantly increased cytotoxic T cell responses to subdominant highly conserved Gag epitopes and maximized response breadth. PMID:27733554

  11. Prime-boost BCG vaccination with DNA vaccines based in β-defensin-2 and mycobacterial antigens ESAT6 or Ag85B improve protection in a tuberculosis experimental model.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Biragyn, Arya; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio; Bodogai, Monica; Martínez-Fierro, Margarita; Sada, Eduardo; Trujillo, Valentin; Enciso-Moreno, Antonio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2013-01-11

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that there are about 8 million new cases annually of active Tuberculosis (TB). Despite its irregular effectiveness (0-89%), the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) BCG is the only vaccine available worldwide for prevention of TB; thus, the design is important of novel and more efficient vaccination strategies. Considering that β-defensin-2 is an antimicrobial peptide that induces dendritic cell maturation through the TLR-4 receptor and that both ESAT-6 and Ag85B are immunodominant mycobacterial antigens and efficient activators of the protective immune response, we constructed two DNA vaccines by the fusion of the gene encoding β-defensin-2 and antigens ESAT6 (pDE) and 85B (pDA). After confirming efficient local antigen expression that induced high and stable Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in intramuscular (i.m.) vaccinated Balb/c mice, groups of mice were vaccinated with DNA vaccines in a prime-boost regimen with BCG and with BCG alone, and 2 months later were challenged with the mild virulence reference strain H37Rv and the highly virulent clinical isolate LAM 5186. The level of protection was evaluated by survival, lung bacilli burdens, and extension of tissue damage (pneumonia). Vaccination with both DNA vaccines showed similar protection to that of BCG. After the challenge with the highly virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, animals that were prime-boosted with BCG and then boosted with both DNA vaccines showed significant higher survival and less tissue damage than mice vaccinated only with BCG. These results suggest that improvement of BCG vaccination, such as the prime-boost DNA vaccine, represents a more efficient vaccination scheme against TB.

  12. Effect of Different Human Papillomavirus Serological and DNA Criteria on Vaccine Efficacy Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Gonzalez, Paula; Wacholder, Sholom; Ghosh, Arpita; Li, Yan; Lowy, Douglas R.; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Poncelet, Sylviane; Schussler, John; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Sherman, Mark E.; Sidawy, Mary; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Schiller, John T.; Schiffman, Mark; Wacholder, Sholom; Lowy, Douglas R.; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Sherman, Mark E.; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Porras, Carolina; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Gonzalez, Paula; Herrero, Rolando; Gonzalez, Paula; Herrero, Rolando; Ghosh, Arpita; Li, Yan; Poncelet, Sylviane; Schussler, John; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Sidawy, Mary; Self, Steve; Benavides, Adriana; Calzada, Luis Diego; Karron, Ruth; Nayar, Ritu; Roach, Nancy; Cain, Joanna; Davey, Diane; DeMets, David; Fuster, Francisco; Gershon, Ann; Holly, Elizabeth; Raventós, Henriette; Rida, Wasima; Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Suthers, Kristen; Lara, Silvia; Thomas, Sarah; Alfaro, Mario; Barrantes, Manuel; Concepción Bratti, M.; Cárdenas, Fernando; Cortés, Bernal; Espinoza, Albert; Estrada, Yenory; González, Paula; Guillén, Diego; Herrero, Roland; Jiménez, Silvia E.; Morales, Jorge; Villegas, Luis; Morera, Lidia Ana; Pérez, Elmer; Porras, Carolina; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Rivas, Libia; Freer, Enrique; Bonilla, José; García-Piñeres, Alfanso; Silva, Sandra; Atmella, Ivannia; Ramírez, Margarita; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Macklin, Nora; Schiffman, Mark; Schiller, John T.; Sherman, Mark; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Pinto, Ligia; Kemp, Troy; Eklund, Claire; Hutchinson, Martha; Sidawy, Mary; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Two trials of clinically approved human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, Females United to Unilaterally Reduce Endo/Ectocervical Disease (FUTURE I/II) and the Papilloma Trial Against Cancer in Young Adults (PATRICIA), reported a 22% difference in vaccine efficacy (VE) against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse in HPV-naïve subcohorts; however, serological testing methods and the HPV DNA criteria used to define HPV-unexposed women differed between the studies. We applied previously described methods to simulate these HPV-naïve subcohorts within the Costa Rica HPV16/18 Vaccine Trial and assessed how these criteria affect the estimation of VE. We applied 2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) thresholds for HPV16 and HPV18 seropositivity (8 and 7 ELISA units/mL, respectively, for PATRICIA; 54 and 65 ELISA units/mL, respectively, for FUTURE I/II (to approximate the competitive Luminex immunoassay)) and 2 criteria for HPV DNA positivity (12 oncogenic HPV types, plus HPV66 and 68/73 for PATRICIA; or plus HPV6 and 11 for FUTURE I/II). VE was computed in the 2 naïve subcohorts. Using the FUTURE I/II and PATRICIA criteria, VE estimates against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse, regardless of HPV type, were 69.0% (95% confidence interval: 40.3%, 84.9%) and 80.8% (95% confidence interval: 52.6%, 93.5%), respectively (P = 0.1). Although the application of FUTURE I/II criteria to our cohort resulted in the inclusion of more sexually experienced women, methodological differences did not fully explain the VE differences. PMID:25139208

  13. pH-sensitive carbonate apatite nanoparticles as DNA vaccine carriers enhance humoral and cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    He, Pan; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Tada, Seiichi; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Aida, Yoko

    2014-10-29

    To demonstrate the potential of pH-sensitive carbonate apatite (CO₃Ap) nanoparticles as DNA vaccine carriers to enhance vaccination efficacy, we examined the humoral and cellular immune responses of C57BL/6 mice immunized with the plasmid expression vector pCI-neo encoding the full-length soluble ovalbumin (OVA) (pCI-neo-sOVA), pCI-neo-sOVA/CO₃Ap complexes, or pCI-neo/CO₃Ap complexes as a control. Mice immunized with a low dose of pCI-neo-sOVA-loaded CO₃Ap (10 μg) produced ex vivo splenocyte proliferation after stimulation with CD8 T-cell but not CD4 T-cell epitopes and a delayed-type-hypersensitivity reaction more efficiently than mice in the other groups. Furthermore, mice receiving this immunization generated the same levels of OVA-specific antibodies and interferon (IFN)-γ secretion after CD8 T-cell and CD4 T-cell epitope challenges as those in mice treated with 100 μg of free pCI-neo-sOVA, whereas mice injected with a high dose of pCI-neo-sOVA-loaded CO₃Ap (100 μg) or with control plasmids produced negligible levels of OVA-specific antibodies or IFN-γ. Therefore, our results showed that 10 μg of pCI-neo-sOVA delivered by CO₃Ap strongly elicited humoral and cellular immune responses. This study is the first to demonstrate the promising potential of CO₃Ap nanoparticles for DNA vaccine delivery.

  14. A HIV-Tat/C4-binding protein chimera encoded by a DNA vaccine is highly immunogenic and contains acute EcoHIV infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tomusange, Khamis; Wijesundara, Danushka; Gummow, Jason; Garrod, Tamsin; Li, Yanrui; Gray, Lachlan; Churchill, Melissa; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Gowans, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines are cost-effective to manufacture on a global scale and Tat-based DNA vaccines have yielded protective outcomes in preclinical and clinical models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), highlighting the potential of such vaccines. However, Tat-based DNA vaccines have been poorly immunogenic, and despite the administration of multiple doses and/or the addition of adjuvants, these vaccines are not in general use. In this study, we improved Tat immunogenicity by fusing it with the oligomerisation domain of a chimeric C4-binding protein (C4b-p), termed IMX313, resulting in Tat heptamerisation and linked Tat to the leader sequence of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) to ensure that the bulk of heptamerised Tat is secreted. Mice vaccinated with secreted Tat fused to IMX313 (pVAX-sTat-IMX313) developed higher titres of Tat-specific serum IgG, mucosal sIgA and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, and showed superior control of EcoHIV infection, a surrogate murine HIV challenge model, compared with animals vaccinated with other test vaccines. Given the crucial contribution of Tat to HIV-1 pathogenesis and the precedent of Tat-based DNA vaccines in conferring some level of protection in animal models, we believe that the virologic control demonstrated with this novel multimerised Tat vaccine highlights the promise of this vaccine candidate for humans. PMID:27358023

  15. Persistent immune responses induced by a human immunodeficiency virus DNA vaccine delivered in association with electroporation in the skin of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Martinon, Frédéric; Kaldma, Katrin; Sikut, Rein; Culina, Slobodan; Romain, Gabrielle; Tuomela, Mari; Adojaan, Maarja; Männik, Andres; Toots, Urve; Kivisild, Toomas; Morin, Julie; Brochard, Patricia; Delache, Benoît; Tripiciano, Antonella; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Stanescu, Ioana; Le Grand, Roger; Ustav, Mart

    2009-11-01

    Strategies to improve vaccine efficacy are still required, especially in the case of chronic infections, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA vaccines have potential advantages over conventional vaccines; however, low immunological efficacy has been demonstrated in many experiments involving large animals and in clinical trials. To improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines, we have designed a plasmid vector exploiting the binding capacity of the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein and we have used electroporation (EP) to increase DNA uptake after intradermal inoculation. We demonstrated, in nonhuman primates (NHPs), efficient induction of anti-HIV immunity with an improved DNA vaccine vector encoding an artificial fusion protein, consisting of several proteins and selected epitopes from HIV-1. We show that a DNA vaccine delivery method combining intradermal injection and noninvasive EP dramatically increased expression of the vaccine antigen selectively in the epidermis, and our observations strongly suggest the involvement of Langerhans cells in the strength and quality of the anti-HIV immune response. Although the humoral responses to the vaccine were transient, the cellular responses were exceptionally robust and persisted, at high levels, more than 2 years after the last vaccine boost. The immune responses were characterized by the induction of significant proportions of T cells producing both interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 cytokines, in both subpopulations, CD4(+) and CD8(+). This strategy is an attractive approach for vaccination in humans because of its high efficacy and the possible use of newly developed devices for EP.

  16. [Serologic response to a DNA recombinant vaccine against hepatitis B in natives of the Peruvian Amazonian jungle].

    PubMed

    Colichón, A; Vildósola, H; Sjogren, M; Cantella, R; Rojas, C

    1990-01-01

    Large areas of the Amazon basin in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and in the nonoriental region of the peruvian jungle have been found to be hyperendemic to Hepatitis B with high prevalence of asymptomatic carriers (11 to 25%) and, in more selected areas, Hepatitis Delta has been also reported. In the present report, we have studied 108 volunteers from six different Jivaroes communities living in a hyperendemic Hepatitis B area. They received 2 doses of DNA recombinant yeast derivated HBV vaccine. All the selected persons were HBsAb negatives, but many (80%) had antibodies to HBc. Following immunization schedule, 80% responded with the formation of HBsAb; a better seroconversion was achieved in those negatives to anticore IgG compared with those having HBcAb. We obtained 90% of seroconversion in spite of the fact that our vaccination schedule was prolonged up to 10 months from the one recommended by the manufacturer. The vaccination schedule 0,4, 14 months, and the schedule 0,4 months, had 76 and 29% of seroconversion, respectively. We want to point out three observations: 1) It is quite possible that many of the Anti-core positives, that did not respond to vaccination were carriers of HBsAg undetectable by the conventional EIA test carried out; 2) The seroconversion rate in these natives was low (up to six months after the vaccination schedule); and 3) Many of the HBcAb were false positives and many of them were recently infected. We conclude: A) It is highly important to assess the anti-HBs hyperendemic areas before attempting vaccinations; B) All persons negative to anti-HBs should be vaccinated in spite to anticore antibodies; C) Areas with difficult access could be vaccinated even until 10 months without affecting good results, and D) DNA recombinant vaccine (ENGERIX B) was well tolerated. No side effects were observed.

  17. A Nonhuman Primate Scrub Typhus Model: Protective Immune Responses Induced by pKarp47 DNA Vaccination in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S.; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Richards, Allen L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi–specific, IFN-γ–producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine

  18. DNA vaccination with a gene encoding Toxoplasma gondii Rhoptry Protein 17 induces partial protective immunity against lethal challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Long; Wang, Yu-Jing; Pei, Yan-Jiang; Bai, Ji-Zhong; Yin, Li-Tian; Guo, Rui; Yin, Guo-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite that affects humans and various vertebrate livestock and causes serious economic losses. To develop an effective vaccine against T. gondii infection, we constructed a DNA vaccine encoding the T. gondii rhoptry protein 17 (TgROP17) and evaluated its immune protective efficacy against acute T. gondii infection in mice. The DNA vaccine (p3×Flag-CMV-14-ROP17) was intramuscularly injected to BALB/c mice and the immune responses of the vaccinated mice were determined. Compared to control mice treated with empty vector or PBS, mice immunized with the ROP17 vaccine showed a relatively high level of specific anti-T. gondii antibodies, and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response with predominance of IgG2a production. The immunized mice also displayed a specific lymphocyte proliferative response, a Th1-type cellular immune response with production of IFN-γ and interleukin-2, and increased number of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with the ROP17 DNA significantly prolonged the survival time (15.6 ± 5.4 days, P < 0.05) of mice after challenge infection with the virulent T. gondii RH strain (Type I), compared with the control groups which died within 8 days. Therefore, our data suggest that DNA vaccination with TgROP17 triggers significant humoral and cellular responses and induces effective protection in mice against acute T. gondii infection, indicating that TgROP17 is a promising vaccine candidate against acute toxoplasmosis. PMID:26842927

  19. Enhancement of immune response to a DNA vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ag85B by incorporation of an autophagy inducing system.

    PubMed

    Meerak, Jomkhwan; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason P; Palaga, Tanapat

    2013-01-21

    DNA vaccines are a promising new generation of vaccines that can elicit an immune response using DNA encoding the antigen of interest. The efficacy of these vaccines, however, still needs to be improved. In this study, we investigated the effect of autophagy on increasing the efficacy of a candidate DNA vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), a causative agent of tuberculosis. Low molecular weight chitosan was used to encapsulate plasmid DNA containing a gene encoding MTB Antigen 85B (Ag85B), a secreted fibronectin-binding protein. To induce autophagy upon DNA vaccination, the kinase defective mTOR (mTOR-KD) was transfected into cells, and autophagy was detected based on the presence of LC3II. To investigate whether autophagy enhances an immune response upon DNA vaccination, we coencapsualted the Ag85B-containing plasmid with a plasmid encoding mTOR-KD. Plasmids encapsulated by chitosan particles were used for primary subcutaneous immunization and for intranasal boost in mice. After the boost vaccination, sera from the mice were measured for humoral immune response. The DNA vaccine with the autophagy-inducing construct elicited significantly higher Ag85B-specific antibody levels than the control group treated with the Ag85B plasmid alone or with the Ag85B plasmid plus the wild type mTOR construct. Upon in vitro stimulation of splenocytes from mice immunized with recombinant Ag85B, the highest levels of secreted IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in mice immunized with the autophagy-inducing plasmid, while no differences in IL-4 levels were detected between the groups, suggesting that the DNA vaccine regimen with autophagy induction induced primarily a Th1 immune response. Furthermore, the enhanced proliferation of CD4+ T cells from mice receiving the autophagy-inducing vaccine was observed in vitro. Based on the evidence presented, we conclude that incorporating an autophagy-inducing element into a DNA vaccine may help to improve immune response.

  20. Antibiotic-free production of a herpes simplex virus 2 DNA vaccine in a high yield cGMP process

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jared; Rodriguez, Stephen; Finlayson, Neil; Williams, Jim; Carnes, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Two DNA vaccine plasmids encoding Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D, NTC8485-O2-gD2 and NTC8485-O2-UgD2tr, were produced at large scale under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) for use in a Phase I human clinical trial. These DNA vaccines incorporate the regulatory agency compliant, minimal, antibiotic-free (AF) NTC8485 mammalian expression vector. Plasmid yields of > 1 g/L were achieved using the HyperGRO™ fed-batch fermentation process, with successful scale up from 10 L process development scale to 320 L culture volume for cGMP production. The DNA vaccines were purified using a low residence time, high shear lysis process and AIRMIXTM technology, followed by chromatographic purification. This combination of optimized plasmid vector, high yield upstream production, and efficient downstream purification resulted in purified HSV-2 DNA vaccines with > 99% total supercoiled plasmid, ≤ 0.2% RNA, ≤ 0.1% host cell genomic DNA, and ≤ 0.1 endotoxin units per mg. PMID:23899469

  1. Immunogenicity, protective efficacy and safety of a recombinant DNA vaccine encoding truncated Plasmodium yoelii sporozoite asparagine-rich protein 1 (PySAP1).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Deng, Shu; Liang, Jiayuan; Cao, Yaming; Liu, Jun; Du, Feng; Shang, Hong; Cui, Liwang; Luo, Enjie

    2013-05-01

    Although great efforts have been undertaken for the development of malaria vaccines, no completely effective malaria vaccines are available yet. Despite being clinically silent, the pre-erythrocytic stage is considered an ideal target for the development of malaria vaccines. Sporozoite asparagine-rich protein 1 (SAP1) is a sporozoite-localized protein that regulates the expression of UIS (upregulated in infectious sporozoites) genes, which are essential for the infectivity of sporozoites. In this study, a recombinant DNA vaccine encoding a predicted antigenic determinant region of Plasmodium yoelii SAP1 (PySAP1) was constructed. Immunization of mice with this DNA vaccine construct resulted in significant elevation of cytokines such as IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10, and total IgG as compared with control groups immunized with either the empty DNA vector or saline. After challenge with sporozoites, the group receiving the DNA vaccine showed delayed development of parasitemia and prolonged survival time compared with the control group. The DNA vaccine provided partial protection against P. yoelii 17XL infection, with an overall protection rate of 20%. In addition, the DNA vaccine did not show integration into the host genome. Further studies of SAP1 are needed to test whether it can be used as subunit vaccine candidate.

  2. Robust vaccine-elicited cellular immune responses in breast milk following systemic simian immunodeficiency virus DNA prime and live virus vector boost vaccination of lactating rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Andrew B; Christian, Elizabeth C; Seaman, Michael S; Sircar, Piya; Carville, Angela; Gomez, Carmen E; Esteban, Mariano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Barouch, Dan H; Letvin, Norman L; Permar, Sallie R

    2010-12-01

    Breast milk transmission of HIV remains an important mode of infant HIV acquisition. Enhancement of mucosal HIV-specific immune responses in milk of HIV-infected mothers through vaccination may reduce milk virus load or protect against virus transmission in the infant gastrointestinal tract. However, the ability of HIV/SIV strategies to induce virus-specific immune responses in milk has not been studied. In this study, five uninfected, hormone-induced lactating, Mamu A*01(+) female rhesus monkey were systemically primed and boosted with rDNA and the attenuated poxvirus vector, NYVAC, containing the SIVmac239 gag-pol and envelope genes. The monkeys were boosted a second time with a recombinant Adenovirus serotype 5 vector containing matching immunogens. The vaccine-elicited immunodominant epitope-specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte response in milk was of similar or greater magnitude than that in blood and the vaginal tract but higher than that in the colon. Furthermore, the vaccine-elicited SIV Gag-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte polyfunctional cytokine responses were more robust in milk than in blood after each virus vector boost. Finally, SIV envelope-specific IgG responses were detected in milk of all monkeys after vaccination, whereas an SIV envelope-specific IgA response was only detected in one vaccinated monkey. Importantly, only limited and transient increases in the proportion of activated or CCR5-expressing CD4(+) T lymphocytes in milk occurred after vaccination. Therefore, systemic DNA prime and virus vector boost of lactating rhesus monkeys elicits potent virus-specific cellular and humoral immune responses in milk and may warrant further investigation as a strategy to impede breast milk transmission of HIV.

  3. Upstream processing of plasmid DNA for vaccine and gene therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Tejeda-Mansir, Armando; Montesinos, Rosa M

    2008-01-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA has increased vastly in response to rapid advances in its use in gene therapy and vaccines. These therapies are based on the same principle, i.e. the introduction of nucleic acids in human/non-human cells receptor to restore, cancel, enhance or introduce a biochemical function. Naked plasmid DNA as a vector has attracted a lot of interest since it offers several advantages over a viral vector, especially weak immunogenicity, better safety and easy to manufacture, but low transfection efficacy. Non-viral gene therapy may require considerable amounts (milligram scale) of pharmaceutical-grade pDNA per patient since the efficacy and duration of gene expression is presently relatively low. Reliance on fermentation, which generates large lysate volumes, for producing the needed quantities of pDNA is becoming more widespread. Through optimization of the biological system, growth environment and the growth mode, improvements can be achieved in biomass productivity, plasmid yield, plasmid quality and production costs. The information on large-scale plasmid production is scarce and usually not available to the scientific community. This review summarizes recent patents and patent applications relating to plasmid upstream processing manufacturing, ranging from plasmid design to growth strategies to produce plasmid-bearing E. coli.

  4. Two distinct DNA binding modes guide dual roles of a CRISPR-Cas protein complex.

    PubMed

    Blosser, Timothy R; Loeff, Luuk; Westra, Edze R; Vlot, Marnix; Künne, Tim; Sobota, Małgorzata; Dekker, Cees; Brouns, Stan J J; Joo, Chirlmin

    2015-04-02

    Small RNA-guided protein complexes play an essential role in CRISPR-mediated immunity in prokaryotes. While these complexes initiate interference by flagging cognate invader DNA for destruction, recent evidence has implicated their involvement in new CRISPR memory formation, called priming, against mutated invader sequences. The mechanism by which the target recognition complex mediates these disparate responses-interference and priming-remains poorly understood. Using single-molecule FRET, we visualize how bona fide and mutated targets are differentially probed by E. coli Cascade. We observe that the recognition of bona fide targets is an ordered process that is tightly controlled for high fidelity. Mutated targets are recognized with low fidelity, which is featured by short-lived and PAM- and seed-independent binding by any segment of the crRNA. These dual roles of Cascade in immunity with distinct fidelities underpin CRISPR-Cas robustness, allowing for efficient degradation of bona fide targets and priming of mutated DNA targets.

  5. Dual targeting of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV: target interactions of heteroaryl isothiazolones in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jijun; Thanassi, Jane A; Thoma, Christy L; Bradbury, Barton J; Deshpande, Milind; Pucci, Michael J

    2007-07-01

    Heteroaryl isothiazolones (HITZs) are antibacterial agents that display excellent in vitro activity against Staphylococcus aureus. We recently identified a series of these compounds that show potent bactericidal activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We report here the results of in vitro resistance studies that reveal potential underlying mechanisms of action. HITZs selected gyrA mutations exclusively in first-step mutants of wild-type S. aureus, indicating that in contrast to the case with most quinolones, DNA gyrase is the primary target. The compounds displayed low mutation frequencies (10(-9) to 10(-10)) at concentrations close to the MICs and maintained low MICs (< or =0.016 microg/ml) against mutants with single mutations in either gyrA or grlA (parC). These data suggested that HITZs possess significant inhibitory activities against target enzymes, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. This dual-target inhibition was supported by low 50% inhibitory concentrations against topoisomerase IV as measured in a decatenation activity assay and against DNA gyrase as measured in a supercoiling activity assay. Good antibacterial activities (< or =1 microg/ml) against staphylococcal gyrA grlA double mutants, as well as low frequencies (10(-9) to 10(-10)) of selection of still higher-level mutants, also suggested that HITZs remained active against mutant enzymes. We further demonstrated that HITZs exhibit good inhibition of both S. aureus mutant enzymes and thus continue to possess a novel dual-targeting mode of action against these mutant strains. In stepwise acquisition of mutations, HITZs selected quinolone resistance determining region mutations gyrA(Ser84Leu), grlA(Ser80Phe), grlA(Ala116Val), and gyrA(Glu88Lys) sequentially, suggesting that the corresponding amino acids are key amino acids involved in the binding of HITZs to topoisomerases. The overall profile of these compounds suggests the potential utility of HITZs in combating

  6. New Approaches to Attenuated Hepatitis a Vaccine Development: Cloning and Sequencing of Cell-Culture Adapted Viral cDNA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-13

    reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Hepatitis A Vaccine, Molecular Cloning and Hybridization, 06 13 Strain Differences...cells. Molecular cloning of p16 HM175 virus cDNA. cDNA clones were derived from p16 HM175 virus RNA by cloning cDNA-RNA hybrid molecules into the Pstl... molecular cloning . Clones derived from cDNA synthesized with oligo-dT_12 18 as primer were nearly always restricted to the 3’ terminus of the genome, while

  7. Immunomodulation of bivalent Newcastle disease DNA vaccine induced immune response by co-delivery of chicken IFN-γ and IL-4 genes.

    PubMed

    Sawant, P M; Verma, P C; Subudhi, P K; Chaturvedi, U; Singh, M; Kumar, Rajeev; Tiwari, A K

    2011-11-15

    The basic objective of this study was to enumerate whether co-administration of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and/or interleukin-4 (IL-4) gene along with a bivalent Newcastle disease (ND) DNA vaccine construct could modulate the immune response to the DNA vaccine in chickens. pVIVO2 vector carrying Haemaglutinin-Neuraminidase (HN) and Fusion (F) genes of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) at its two cloning sites was used as a DNA vaccine. The same vector was used to clone the chicken IFN-γ and IL-4 genes at the multiple cloning site-1 separately. In vitro expression of IFN-γ and IL-4 gene constructs was assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and that of HN and F genes by indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT) in addition to RT-PCR. The chickens were immunized thrice intramuscularly at 21, 36 and 46 days of age with the bivalent DNA vaccine alone, or in combination with IFN-γ/IL-4 or both cytokine gene constructs. The bivalent DNA vaccine led to increase in both NDV specific antibodies as assessed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and haemagglutination inhibition test (HI) and cell mediated immune (CMI) response as assessed by lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) employing MTT assay. Co-administration of the DNA vaccine with IL-4 gene resulted in highest IgY levels while IFN-γ produced highest CMI response. The DNA vaccine alone could afford only 10% protection against challenge infection by velogenic NDV. This protection was increased to 40% when IL-4 gene construct was co-administered with the DNA vaccine. Co-injection of IFN-γ as well as the combination of IFN-γ and IL-4 gene constructs with the DNA vaccine yielded 20% protection. Our study suggests that IL-4 may prove to be more appropriate as a genetic adjuvant than IFN-γ for ND DNA vaccine.

  8. Analysis of DNA-vaccinated fish reveals viral antigen in muscle, kidney, and thymus, and transient histopathologic changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.M.; Elliott, D.G.; Kurath, G.

    2005-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was used in a systematic study to analyze vaccine tissue distribution, persistence, expression patterns, and histopathologic effects. Vaccine plasmid pIHNw-G, containing the gene for the viral glycoprotein, was detected immediately after intramuscular injection in all tissues analyzed, including blood, but at later time points was found primarily in muscle tissue, where it persisted to 90 days. Glycoprotein expression was detected in muscle, kidney, and thymus tissues, with levels peaking at 14 days and becoming undetectable by 28 days. Histologic examination revealed no vaccine-specific pathologic changes at the standard effective dose of 0.1 ??g DNA per fish, but at a high dose of 50 ??g an increased inflammatory response was evident. Transient damage associated with needle injection was localized in muscle tissue, but by 90 days after vaccination no damage was detected in any tissue, indicating the vaccine to be safe and well tolerated. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005.

  9. Ag85A/ESAT-6 chimeric DNA vaccine induces an adverse response in tuberculosis-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Bai, Xuejuang; Zhang, Junxian; Song, Jingying; Yang, Yourong; Yu, Qi; Li, Ning; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-08-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) antigens encoded by the 6 kDa early secretory antigenic target (esat-6) and antigen 85A (ag85a) genes are known to exert protective effects against tuberculosis in animal models. In addition, these antigens represent vaccine components that were tested in early human clinical trials. In the present study, a chimeric DNA vaccine was constructed that contained two copies of the esat‑6 gene inserted into the ag85a gene from M. tb. BALB/c mice were treated with this chimeric vaccine following infection with either M. tb H37Rv or a clinical multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis isolate. Treatment of both groups of mice with the chimeric vaccine resulted in accelerated mortality. These findings are in contrast with previous results, which indicated that DNA vaccines expressing the individual antigens were either beneficial or at least not harmful. The results of the present study suggested that the ESAT-6 antigen is not suitable for inclusion in therapeutic vaccines.

  10. Induction of antigen-positive cell death by the expression of perforin, but not DTa, from a DNA vaccine enhances the immune response.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Tessa; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Garrod, Tamsin J; Yu, Wenbo; Miller, Darren; Major, Lee; Wesselingh, Steve; Suhrbier, Andreas; Gowans, Eric J

    2014-04-01

    The failure of traditional protein-based vaccines to prevent infection by viruses such as HIV or hepatitis C highlights the need for novel vaccine strategies. DNA vaccines have shown promise in small animal models, and are effective at generating anti-viral T cell-mediated immune responses; however, they have proved to be poorly immunogenic in clinical trials. We propose that the induction of necrosis will enhance the immune response to vaccine antigens encoded by DNA vaccines, as necrotic cells are known to release a range of intracellular factors that lead to dendritic cell (DC) activation and enhanced cross-presentation of antigen. Here we provide evidence that induction of cell death in DNA vaccine-targeted cells provides an adjuvant effect following intradermal vaccination of mice; however, this enhancement of the immune response is dependent on both the mechanism and timing of cell death after antigen expression. We report that a DNA vaccine encoding the cytolytic protein, perforin, resulted in DC activation, enhanced broad and multifunctional CD8 T-cell responses to the HIV-1 antigen GAG and reduced viral load following challenge with a chimeric virus, EcoHIV, compared with the canonical GAG DNA vaccine. This effect was not observed for a DNA vaccine encoding an apoptosis-inducing toxin, DTa, or when the level of perforin expression was increased to induce cell death sooner after vaccination. Thus, inducing lytic cell death following a threshold level of expression of a viral antigen can improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines, whereas apoptotic cell death has an inhibitory effect on the immune response.

  11. Comparison of different prime-boost regimes with DNA and recombinant Orf virus based vaccines expressing glycoprotein D of pseudorabies virus in pigs.

    PubMed

    van Rooij, E M A; Rijsewijk, F A M; Moonen-Leusen, H W; Bianchi, A T J; Rziha, H-J

    2010-02-17

    Both DNA and Orf virus (ORFV; Parapox virus) based vaccines have shown promise as alternatives for conventional vaccines in pigs against pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection causing Aujeszky's disease. In the present study we evaluated the efficacy of different prime-boost regimes in pigs in terms of immunogenicity and protection against challenge infection with PRV. The different prime-boost regimes consisted of the homologous prime-boost regimes (DNA followed by DNA or ORFV followed by ORFV) and the heterologous prime-boost regimes (DNA followed by ORFV and ORFV followed by DNA), all based on glycoprotein D (gD) of PRV. Moreover, we compared the efficacy of the different prime-boost regimes with the efficacy of a conventional modified live vaccine (MLV). The different prime-boost regimes resulted in different levels of immunity and protection against challenge infection. Most effective was the regime of priming with DNA vaccine followed by boosting with the ORFV based vaccine. This regime resulted in strong antibody responses, comparable to the antibody responses obtained after prime-boost vaccination with a conventional MLV vaccine. Also with regard to protection, the prime DNA-boost ORFV regime performed better than the other prime-boost regimes. This study demonstrates the potential of a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy against PRV based on a single antigen, and that in the natural host, the pig.

  12. DNA-based vaccination against hepatitis B virus using dissolving microneedle arrays adjuvanted by cationic liposomes and CpG ODN.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuqin; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Suohui; Xu, Bai; Gao, Yunhua; Hu, Yan; Hou, Jun; Bai, Bingke; Shen, Honghui; Mao, Panyong

    2016-09-01

    DNA vaccines are simple to produce and can generate strong cellular and humoral immune response, making them attractive vaccine candidates. However, a major shortcoming of DNA vaccines is their poor immunogenicity when administered intramuscularly. Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) via microneedles is a promising alternative delivery route to enhance the vaccination efficacy. A novel dissolving microneedle array (DMA)-based TCI system loaded with cationic liposomes encapsulated with hepatitis B DNA vaccine and adjuvant CpG ODN was developed and characterized. The pGFP expression in mouse skin using DMA was imaged over time. In vivo immunity tests in mice were performed to observe the capability of DMA to induce immune response after delivery of DNA. The results showed that pGFP could be delivered into skin by DMA and expressed in skin. Further, the amount of expressed GFP was likely to peak at day 4. The immunity tests showed that the DMA-based DNA vaccination could induce effective immune response. CpG ODN significantly improved the immune response and achieved the shift of immune type from predominate Th2 type to a balance Th1/Th2 type. The cationic liposomes could further improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. In conclusion, the novel DMA-based TCI system can effectively deliver hepatitis B DNA vaccine into skin, inducing effective immune response and change the immune type by adjuvant CpG ODN.

  13. Comparison of the immune responses in BALB/c mice following immunization with DNA-based and live attenuated vaccines delivered via different routes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ming-sheng; Deng, Shu-xuan; Li, Mei-li

    2013-02-18

    The objective of this study was to compare immune responses induced in BALB/c mice following immunization with pcDNA-GPV-VP2 DNA by gene gun bombardment (6 μg) or by intramuscular (im) injection (100 μg) with the responses to live attenuated vaccine by im injection (100 μl). pcDNA3.1 (+) and physiological saline were used as controls. Peripheral blood samples were collected at 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 49, 63, 77 and 105 d after immunization. T lymphocyte proliferation was analyzed by MTT assay and enumeration of CD4(+), and CD8(+) T cell populations in peripheral blood was performed by flow cytometric analysis. Indirect ELISA was used to detect IgG levels. Cellular and humoral responses were induced by pcDNA-GPV-VP2 DNA and live virus vaccines. No differences were observed in T cell proliferation and CD8(+) T cell responses induced by the genetic vaccine regardless of the route of delivery. However, CD4(+) T cell responses and humoral immunity were enhanced in following gene gun immunization compared with im injection of the genetic vaccine. Cellular and humoral immunity was enhanced in following gene gun delivery of the genetic vaccine compared with the live attenuated vaccine. In conclusion, the pcDNA-GPV-VP2 DNA vaccine induced enhanced cellular and humoral immunity compared with that induced by the live attenuated vaccine.

  14. The immunogenicity of viral haemorragic septicaemia rhabdovirus (VHSV) DNA vaccines can depend on plasmid regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Chico, V; Ortega-Villaizan, M; Falco, A; Tafalla, C; Perez, L; Coll, J M; Estepa, A

    2009-03-18

    A plasmid DNA encoding the viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV)-G glycoprotein under the control of 5' sequences (enhancer/promoter sequence plus both non-coding 1st exon and 1st intron sequences) from carp beta-actin gene (pAE6-G(VHSV)) was compared to the vaccine plasmid usually described the gene expression is regulated by the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early promoter (pMCV1.4-G(VHSV)). We observed that these two plasmids produced a markedly different profile in the level and time of expression of the encoded-antigen, and this may have a direct effect upon the intensity and suitability of the in vivo immune response. Thus, fish genetic immunisation assays were carried out to study the immune response of both plasmids. A significantly enhanced specific-antibody response against the viral glycoprotein was found in the fish immunised with pAE6-G(VHSV). However, the protective efficacy against VHSV challenge conferred by both plasmids was similar. Later analysis of the transcription profile of a set of representative immune-related genes in the DNA immunized fish suggested that depending on the plasmid-related regulatory sequences controlling its expression, the plasmid might activate distinct patterns of the immune system. All together, the results from this study mainly point out that the selection of a determinate encoded-antigen/vector combination for genetic immunisation is of extraordinary importance in designing optimised DNA vaccines that, when required for inducing protective immune response, could elicit responses biased to antigen-specific antibodies or cytotoxic T cells generation.

  15. Subtype C gp140 Vaccine Boosts Immune Responses Primed by the South African AIDS Vaccine Initiative DNA-C2 and MVA-C HIV Vaccines after More than a 2-Year Gap

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Kenneth H.; Elizaga, Marnie L.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Allen, Mary; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Sato, Alicia; Gu, Niya; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Tucker, Timothy; Barnett, Susan W.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Shen, Xiaoying; Downing, Katrina; Williamson, Carolyn; Pensiero, Michael; Corey, Lawrence; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2016-01-01

    A phase I safety and immunogenicity study investigated South African AIDS Vaccine Initiative (SAAVI) HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) DNA vaccine encoding Gag-RT-Tat-Nef and gp150, boosted with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing matched antigens. Following the finding of partial protective efficacy in the RV144 HIV vaccine efficacy trial, a protein boost with HIV-1 subtype C V2-deleted gp140 with MF59 was added to the regimen. A total of 48 participants (12 U.S. participants and 36 Republic of South Africa [RSA] participants) were randomized to receive 3 intramuscular (i.m.) doses of SAAVI DNA-C2 of 4 mg (months 0, 1, and 2) and 2 i.m. doses of SAAVI MVA-C of 1.45 × 109 PFU (months 4 and 5) (n = 40) or of a placebo (n = 8). Approximately 2 years after vaccination, 27 participants were rerandomized to receive gp140/MF59 at 100 μg or placebo, as 2 i.m. injections, 3 months apart. The vaccine regimen was safe and well tolerated. After the DNA-MVA regimen, CD4+ T-cell and CD8+ T-cell responses occurred in 74% and 32% of the participants, respectively. The protein boost increased CD4+ T-cell responses to 87% of the subjects. All participants developed tier 1 HIV-1C neutralizing antibody responses as well as durable Env binding antibodies that recognized linear V3 and C5 peptides. The HIV-1 subtype C DNA-MVA vaccine regimen showed promising cellular immunogenicity. Boosting with gp140/MF59 enhanced levels of binding and neutralizing antibodies as well as CD4+ T-cell responses to HIV-1 envelope. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00574600 and NCT01423825.) PMID:27098021

  16. Subtype C gp140 Vaccine Boosts Immune Responses Primed by the South African AIDS Vaccine Initiative DNA-C2 and MVA-C HIV Vaccines after More than a 2-Year Gap.

    PubMed

    Gray, Glenda E; Mayer, Kenneth H; Elizaga, Marnie L; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Allen, Mary; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David; De Rosa, Stephen C; Sato, Alicia; Gu, Niya; Tomaras, Georgia D; Tucker, Timothy; Barnett, Susan W; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N; Shen, Xiaoying; Downing, Katrina; Williamson, Carolyn; Pensiero, Michael; Corey, Lawrence; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2016-06-01

    A phase I safety and immunogenicity study investigated South African AIDS Vaccine Initiative (SAAVI) HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) DNA vaccine encoding Gag-RT-Tat-Nef and gp150, boosted with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing matched antigens. Following the finding of partial protective efficacy in the RV144 HIV vaccine efficacy trial, a protein boost with HIV-1 subtype C V2-deleted gp140 with MF59 was added to the regimen. A total of 48 participants (12 U.S. participants and 36 Republic of South Africa [RSA] participants) were randomized to receive 3 intramuscular (i.m.) doses of SAAVI DNA-C2 of 4 mg (months 0, 1, and 2) and 2 i.m. doses of SAAVI MVA-C of 1.45 × 10(9) PFU (months 4 and 5) (n = 40) or of a placebo (n = 8). Approximately 2 years after vaccination, 27 participants were rerandomized to receive gp140/MF59 at 100 μg or placebo, as 2 i.m. injections, 3 months apart. The vaccine regimen was safe and well tolerated. After the DNA-MVA regimen, CD4(+) T-cell and CD8(+) T-cell responses occurred in 74% and 32% of the participants, respectively. The protein boost increased CD4(+) T-cell responses to 87% of the subjects. All participants developed tier 1 HIV-1C neutralizing antibody responses as well as durable Env binding antibodies that recognized linear V3 and C5 peptides. The HIV-1 subtype C DNA-MVA vaccine regimen showed promising cellular immunogenicity. Boosting with gp140/MF59 enhanced levels of binding and neutralizing antibodies as well as CD4(+) T-cell responses to HIV-1 envelope. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00574600 and NCT01423825.).

  17. Vaccination with Bivalent DNA Vaccine of α1-Giardin and CWP2 Delivered by Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Reduces Trophozoites and Cysts in the Feces of Mice Infected with Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xian-Min; Zheng, Wen-Yu; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Shi, Wen-Yan; Li, Yao; Cui, Bai-Ji; Wang, Hui-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background Giardia lamblia is one of the most common infectious protozoans in human that may cause diarrhea in travelers. Searching for antigens that induced effectively protective immunity has become a key point in the development of vaccine against giardiasis. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice vaccinated with G. lamblia trophozozite-specific α1-giardin DNA vaccine delivered orally by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7027 elicited 74.2% trophozoite reduction, but only 28% reduction in cyst shedding compared with PBS buffer control. Oral vaccination with Salmonella-delivered cyst-specific CWP2 DNA produced 89% reduction in cysts shedding in feces of vaccinated mice. Significantly, the mice vaccinated with Salmonella-delivered bivalent α1-giardin and CWP2 DNA vaccines produced significant reduction in both trophozoite (79%) and cyst (93%) in feces of vaccinated mice. This parasite reduction is associated with the strong local mucosal IgA secretion and the IgG2a-dominant systemic immune responses in vaccinated mice. Conclusions The results demonstrate that bivalent vaccines targeting α1-giardin and CWP2 can protect mice against the colonization of Giardia trophozoite and block the transformation of cyst in host at the same time, and can be used to prevent Giardia infection and block the transmission of giardiasis. PMID:27332547

  18. Trout oral VP2 DNA vaccination mimics transcriptional responses occurring after infection with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV).

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Natalia A; Saint-Jean, Sylvia S Rodríguez; Perez-Prieto, Sara I; Coll, Julio M

    2012-12-01

    Time-course and organ transcriptional response profiles in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were studied after oral DNA-vaccination with the VP2 gene of the infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) encapsulated in alginates. The profiles were also compared with those obtained after infection with IPNV. A group of immune-related genes (stat1, ifn1, ifng, mx1, mx3, il8, il10, il11, il12b, tnf2, mhc1uda, igm and igt) previously selected from microarray analysis of successful oral vaccination of rainbow trout, were used for the RTqPCR analysis. The results showed that oral VP2-vaccination qualitatively mimicked both the time-course and organ (head kidney, spleen, intestine, pyloric ceca, and thymus) transcriptional profiles obtained after IPNV-infection. Highest transcriptional differential expression levels after oral vaccination were obtained in thymus, suggesting those might be important for subsequent protection against IPNV challenges. However, transcriptional differential expression levels of most of the genes mentioned above were lower in VP2-vaccinated than in IPNV-infected trout, except for ifn1 which were similar. Together all the results suggest that the oral-alginate VP2-vaccination procedure immunizes trout against IPNV in a similar way as IPNV-infection does while there is still room for additional improvements in the oral vaccination procedure. Some of the genes described here could be used as markers to further optimize the oral immunization method.

  19. A multiagent filovirus DNA vaccine delivered by intramuscular electroporation completely protects mice from ebola and Marburg virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Badger, Catherine V; Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccines expressing the codon-optimized envelope glycoprotein genes of Zaire ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus, and Marburg marburgvirus (Musoke and Ravn). Intramuscular or intradermal delivery of the vaccines in BALB/c mice was performed using the TriGrid™ electroporation device. Mice that received DNA vaccines against the individual viruses developed robust glycoprotein-specific antibody titers as determined by ELISA and survived lethal viral challenge with no display of clinical signs of infection. Survival curve analysis revealed there was a statistically significant increase in survival compared to the control groups for both the Ebola and Ravn virus challenges. These data suggest that further analysis of the immune responses generated in the mice and additional protection studies in nonhuman primates are warranted.

  20. DNA vaccines expressing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniela M; Miyaji, Eliane N; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Darrieux, Michelle; Arêas, Ana Paula M; Ho, Paulo L; Leite, Luciana C C

    2006-04-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is a promising candidate for the development of cost-effective vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the present study, BALB/c mice were immunized with DNA vaccine vectors expressing the N-terminal region of PspA. Animals immunized with a vector expressing secreted PspA developed higher levels of antibody than mice immunized with the vector expressing the antigen in the cytosol. However, both immunogens elicited similar levels of protection against intraperitoneal challenge. Furthermore, immunization with exactly the same fragment in the form of a recombinant protein, with aluminium hydroxide as an adjuvant, elicited even higher antibody levels, but this increased humoral response did not correlate with enhanced protection. These results show that DNA vaccines expressing PspA are able to elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein, even though total anti-PspA IgG response is considerably lower.

  1. KISS1 can be used as a novel target for developing a DNA immunocastration vaccine in ram lambs.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanguo; Liu, Guiqiong; Jiang, Xunping; Ijaz, Nabeel; Tesema, Birhanu; Xie, Guangyue

    2015-02-04

    KISS1 gene-encoding kisspeptins are critical for the onset of puberty and control of adult fertility. This study investigated whether KISS1 can be used as a novel target for immunocastration. Human KISS1 was fused with the HBsAg-S gene for constructing an antibiotic-free recombinant plasmid pKS-asd that coded for 31.168 kDa target fusion protein. Six male Hu sheep lambs were divided into two equal groups, treatment and control. The vaccine (1mg/ram lamb) prepared in saline solution was injected into lambs at weeks 0, 3 and 6 of the experiment, respectively. Vaccine efficacy was evaluated in terms of KISS1-specific IgG antibody response, serum testosterone levels, scrotal circumference, testicular weight, length and breadth, extent of testicular tissue damage, and sexual behaviour changes. The specific anti-KISS1 antibody titre in vaccinated animals was significantly higher than that in controls (p<0.05). In addition, vaccinated animals showed lower serum testosterone level, testicular weight and length and smaller scrotal circumference than those in controls (p<0.05). Spermatogenesis of seminiferous tubules in vaccinated animals was suppressed; sexual behaviours in vaccinated animals were significantly lower (p<0.05) than those in controls. In conclusion, the immunization against KISS1 in this DNA vaccine induced a strong antibody response and resulted in the suppression of gonadal function and sexual behaviour in animals, demonstrating that KISS1 can be used as a novel target for developing a DNA immunocastration vaccine.

  2. Evaluation of DNA encoding acidic ribosomal protein P2 of Cryptosporidium parvum as a potential vaccine candidate for cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro; Priest, Jeffrey W; Ehigiator, Humphrey N; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R

    2011-11-15

    The Cryptosporidium parvum acidic ribosomal protein P2 (CpP2) is an important immunodominant marker in C. parvum infection. In this study, the CpP2 antigen was evaluated as a vaccine candidate using a DNA vaccine model in adult C57BL/6 IL-12 knockout (KO) mice, which are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Our data show that subcutaneous immunization in the ear with DNA encoding CpP2 (CpP2-DNA) cloned into the pUMVC4b vector induced a significant anti-CpP2 IgG antibody response that was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Compared to control KO mice immunized with plasmid alone, CpP2-immunized mice demonstrated specific in vitro spleen cell proliferation as well as enhanced IFN-γ production to recombinant CpP2. Further, parasite loads in CpP2 DNA-immunized mice were compared to control mice challenged with C. parvum oocysts. Although a trend in reduction of infection was observed in the CpP2 DNA-immunized mice, differences between groups were not statistically significant. These results suggest that a DNA vaccine encoding the C. parvum P2 antigen is able to provide an effective means of eliciting humoral and cellular responses and has the potential to generate protective immunity against C. parvum infection but may require using alternative vectors or adjuvant to generate a more potent and balanced response.

  3. MPG-based nanoparticle: An efficient delivery system for enhancing the potency of DNA vaccine expressing HPV16E7.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Tayebeh; Bolhassani, Azam; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-06-22

    DNA vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 have not been successful in clinical trials, due to the lack of an appropriate delivery system. In this study, a peptide-based gene delivery system, MPG, which forms stable non-covalent nanoparticles with nucleic acids, was used for in vitro and in vivo delivery of HPV16 E7 DNA as a model antigen. The results demonstrated that at Nitrogen/Phosphate (N/P) ratio over 10:1, this peptide can effectively condense plasmid DNA into stable nanoparticles with an average size of 180-210nm and a positive surface charge. The transfection efficiency of MPG-based nanoparticles was shown to be comparable with Polyethyleneimine (PEI). The efficient protein expression detected by western blotting and flow cytometry supports the potential of MPG-based nanoparticles as a potent delivery system in DNA vaccine formulations. Immunization with MPG/E7DNA nanoparticles at an N/P ratio of 10:1 induced a stronger Th1 cellular immune response with a predominant interferon-γ (IFN-γ) profile than those induced by E7DNA alone in a murine tumor model. These findings suggest that MPG peptide as a novel gene delivery system could have promising applications in improving HPV therapeutic vaccines.

  4. Assessment of delivery parameters with the multi-electrode array for development of a DNA vaccine against Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Donate, Amy; Heller, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Gene electrotransfer (GET) enhances delivery of DNA vaccines by increasing both gene expression and immune responses. Our lab has developed the multi-electrode array (MEA) for DNA delivery to skin. The MEA was used at constant pulse duration (150 ms) and frequency (6.67 Hz). In this study, delivery parameters including applied voltage (5-45 V), amount of plasmid (100-300 μg), and number of treatments (2-3) were evaluated for delivery of a DNA vaccine. Mice were intradermally injected with plasmid expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen with or without GET and αPA serum titers measured. Within this experiment no significant differences were noted in antibody levels from varying dose or treatment number. However, significant differences were measured from applied voltages of 25 and 35 V. These voltages generated antibody levels between 20,000 and 25,000. Serum from animals vaccinated with these conditions also resulted in toxin neutralization in 40-60% of animals. Visual damage was noted at MEA conditions of 40 V. No damage was noted either visually or histologically from conditions of 35 V or below. These results reflect the importance of establishing appropriate electrical parameters and the potential for the MEA in non-invasive DNA vaccination against B. anthracis.

  5. Preclinical safety assessment of a DNA vaccine using particle-mediated epidermal delivery in domestic pig, minipig and mouse.

    PubMed

    Dincer, Zuhal; Jones, Stewart; Haworth, Richard

    2006-07-01

    DNA vaccination involves the direct injection of genes coding for specific antigenic proteins. One technique known as particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED) is a practical approach for epidermal delivery and provides a strong immune response. An important aspect of the preclinical safety assessment of DNA vaccines is the selection of a pharmacologically relevant animal model for the assessment of antigen expression, optimization of delivery and formulation of the plasmid. This paper describes a comparative study of domestic pig, minipig and mouse in regard to local tolerance and antigen expression of HIV immunotherapeutic using PMED. Pig/minipig is considered a good model for the safety assessment of DNA vaccines due to the similarity to human skin. Local reactions were evaluated at 10 min, 4, 24 and 48 h. Histology of administration sites revealed epidermal necrosis with associated dermal inflammation at 10 min and 4h, and subsequent regeneration with repair at 24 and 48 h. The degree and extent of these changes varied according to species. Domestic pig and minipig showed superficial epidermal necrosis and complete repair, while the mouse showed full-thickness epidermal necrosis and partial repair. Expression of HIV antigen was confirmed using immunohistochemistry in all three species at 4, 24 and 48 h. The results showed that PMED is an effective system for DNA vaccine delivery as demonstrated by the antigen expression seen as early as 4 h.

  6. Optimization of HIV-1 Envelope DNA Vaccine Candidates within Three Different Animal Models, Guinea Pigs, Rabbits and Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Borggren, Marie; Vinner, Lasse; Andresen, Betina Skovgaard; Grevstad, Berit; Repits, Johanna; Melchers, Mark; Elvang, Tara Laura; Sanders, Rogier W; Martinon, Frédéric; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Bowles, Emma Joanne; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Biswas, Priscilla; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Jansson, Marianne; Heyndrickx, Leo; Le Grand, Roger; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 DNA vaccines have many advantageous features. Evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates often starts in small animal models before macaque and human trials. Here, we selected and optimized DNA vaccine candidates through systematic testing in rabbits for the induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb). We compared three different animal models: guinea pigs, rabbits and cynomolgus macaques. Envelope genes from the prototype isolate HIV-1 Bx08 and two elite neutralizers were included. Codon-optimized genes, encoded secreted gp140 or membrane bound gp150, were modified for expression of stabilized soluble trimer gene products, and delivered individually or mixed. Specific IgG after repeated i.d. inoculations with electroporation confirmed in vivo expression and immunogenicity. Evaluations of rabbits and guinea pigs displayed similar results. The superior DNA construct in rabbits was a trivalent mix of non-modified codon-optimized gp140 envelope genes. Despite NAb responses with some potency and breadth in guinea pigs and rabbits, the DNA vaccinated macaques displayed less bNAb activity. It was concluded that a trivalent mix of non-modified gp140 genes from rationally selected clinical isolates was, in this study, the best option to induce high and broad NAb in the rabbit model, but this optimization does not directly translate into similar responses in cynomolgus macaques. PMID:26344115

  7. Effective DNA epitope chimeric vaccines for Alzheimer's disease using a toxin-derived carrier protein as a molecular adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Wang, Shuang; Bai, Jie-Ying; Zhao, Meng; Chen, Ao; Wang, Wen-Bin; Chang, Qing; Liu, Si; Qiu, Wei-Yi; Pang, Xiao-Bin; Xu, Qing; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-10-01

    Active amyloid-beta (Aβ) immunotherapy is under investigation to prevent or treat Alzheimer disease (AD). We describe here the immunological characterization and protective effect of DNA epitope chimeric vaccines using 6 copies of Aβ1-15 fused with PADRE or toxin-derived carriers. These naked 6Aβ15-T-Hc chimeric DNA vaccines were demonstrated to induce robust anti-Aβ antibodies that could recognize Aβ oligomers and inhibit Aβ oligomer-mediated neurotoxicity, result in the reduction of cerebral Aβ load and Aβ oligomers, and improve cognitive function in AD mice, but did not stimulate Aβ-specific T cell responses. Notably, toxin-derived carriers as molecular adjuvants were able to substantially promote immune responses, overcome Aβ-associated hypo-responsiveness, and elicit long-term Aβ-specific antibody response in 6Aβ15-T-Hc-immunized AD mice. These findings suggest that our 6Aβ15-T-Hc DNA chimeric vaccines can be used as a safe and effective strategy for AD immunotherapy, and toxin-derived carrier proteins are effective molecular adjuvants of DNA epitope vaccines for Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a tuberculosis DNA vaccine co-expressing pro-apoptotic caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Tatiana; Romano, Marta; Suin, Vanessa; Kalai, Michaël; Korf, Hannelie; De Baetselier, Patrick; Huygen, Kris

    2008-03-10

    DNA vaccination is a potent means for inducing strong cell-mediated immune responses and protective immunity against viral, bacterial and parasite pathogens in rodents. In an attempt to increase cross-presentation through apoptosis, the DNA-encoding caspase-2 prodomain followed by wild-type or catalytically inactive mutated caspase-3 was inserted into a plasmid encoding the 32 kDa mycolyl transferase (Ag85A) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Transient transfection showed that the mutated caspase induced slow apoptosis, normal protein expression and NF-kappaB activation while wild-type caspase induced rapid apoptosis, lower protein expression and no NF-kappaB activation. Ag85A specific antibody production was increased by co-expressing the mutated and decreased by co-expressing the wild-type caspase. Vaccination with pro-apoptotic plasmids triggered more Ag85A specific IFN-gamma producing spleen cells, and more efficient IL-2 and IFN-gamma producing memory cells in spleen and lungs after M. tuberculosis challenge. Compared to DNA-encoding secreted Ag85A, vaccination with DNA co-expressing wild-type caspase increased protection after infection with M. tuberculosis, while vaccination with plasmid co-expressing mutated caspase was not protective, possibly due to the stimulation of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-17A production.

  9. Enhancement of the immunogenicity of DNA replicon vaccine of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A by GM-CSF gene adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2011-03-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage clony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an attractive adjuvant for a DNA vaccine on account of its ability to recruit antigen-presenting cells to the site of antigen synthesis as well as stimulate the maturation of dendritic cells.This study evaluated the utility of GM-CSF as a plasmid DNA replicon vaccine adjuvants for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) in mouse model. In balb/c mice that received the plasmid DNA replicon vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) carrying the Hc gene of BoNT/A (AHc), both antibody and lymphoproliferative response specific to AHc were induced, the immunogenicity was enhanced by co-delivery or coexpress of the GM-CSF gene. In particular, when AHc and GM-CSF were coexpressed within the SFV based DNA vaccine, the anti-AHc antibody titers and survival rates of immunized mice after challenged with BoNT/A were significantly increased, and further enhanced by coimmunization with aluminum phosphate adjuvant.

  10. Quantitative expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection or DNA vaccination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Herwig, Russell P.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well-studied virus of salmonid fishes. A highly efficacious DNA vaccine has been developed against this virus and studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both an early and transient non-specific anti-viral phase as well as long-term specific protection. The mechanisms of the early anti-viral phase are not known, but previous studies noted changes in Mx gene expression, suggesting a role for type I interferon. This study used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR methodology to compare expression changes over time of a number of cytokine or cytokine-related genes in the spleen of rainbow trout following injection with poly I:C, live IHNV, the IHNV DNA vaccine or a control plasmid encoding the non-antigenic luciferase gene. The target genes included Mx-1, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus induced gene 8 (Vig-8), TNF-α1, TNF-α2, IL-1β1, IL-8, TGF-β1 and Hsp70. Poly I:C stimulation induced several genes but the strongest and significant response was observed in the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes. The live IHN virus induced a significant response in all genes examined except TGF-β1. The control plasmid construct and the IHNV DNA vaccine marginally induced a number of genes, but the main difference between these two groups was a statistically significant induction of the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes by the IHNV vaccine only. The gene expression profiles elicited by the live virus and the IHNV DNA vaccine differed in a number of aspects but this study confirms the clear role for a type I interferon-like response in early anti-viral defence.

  11. Chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Ei