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Sample records for dual permeability soil

  1. Uncertainty in dual permeability model parameters for structured soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Mohanty, B. P.; McGuire, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Successful application of dual permeability models (DPM) to predict contaminant transport is contingent upon measured or inversely estimated soil hydraulic and solute transport parameters. The difficulty in unique identification of parameters for the additional macropore- and matrix-macropore interface regions, and knowledge about requisite experimental data for DPM has not been resolved to date. Therefore, this study quantifies uncertainty in dual permeability model parameters of experimental soil columns with different macropore distributions (single macropore, and low- and high-density multiple macropores). Uncertainty evaluation is conducted using adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo (AMCMC) and conventional Metropolis-Hastings (MH) algorithms while assuming 10 out of 17 parameters to be uncertain or random. Results indicate that AMCMC resolves parameter correlations and exhibits fast convergence for all DPM parameters while MH displays large posterior correlations for various parameters. This study demonstrates that the choice of parameter sampling algorithms is paramount in obtaining unique DPM parameters when information on covariance structure is lacking, or else additional information on parameter correlations must be supplied to resolve the problem of equifinality of DPM parameters. This study also highlights the placement and significance of matrix-macropore interface in flow experiments of soil columns with different macropore densities. Histograms for certain soil hydraulic parameters display tri-modal characteristics implying that macropores are drained first followed by the interface region and then by pores of the matrix domain in drainage experiments. Results indicate that hydraulic properties and behavior of the matrix-macropore interface is not only a function of saturated hydraulic conductivity of the macroporematrix interface (Ksa) and macropore tortuosity (lf) but also of other parameters of the matrix and macropore domains.

  2. Transient and steady state expansions for water infiltration into dual permeability soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassabatere, Laurent; Di Prima, Simone; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Iovino, Massimo; Bagarello, Vincenzo

    2017-04-01

    In the vadose zone, preferential flow in strongly heterogeneous soils is more the rule than homogeneous flow in uniform soils. Consequently, research activity has recently focused on the investigation and the modeling of preferential flow in heterogeneous soils and the characterization of hydraulic properties of heterogeneous soils including dual permeability soils. Within this framework, some studies have investigated the quantification of water infiltration at the surface of dual-permeability soils (Lassabatere et al., 2014). These authors developed a new analytical model for water infiltration into dual-permeability soils. However, the proposed model is based on an implicit formulation quite tricky to compute. In this study, we proposed new explicit approximate expansions for transient and steady states for the model of Lassabatere et al. (2014). The proposed methodology to compute these approximations is based on the methodology proposed by Haverkamp et al. (1994) for modeling water infiltration at the surface of single permeability soils. The main point to overcome is related the fact, in dual-permeability soils, the two subdomains, namely the fracture and the matrix domains, may have contrasting time intervals for transient and steady states. More explicitly, quasi-steady state flow may be reached in advance in the fracture domain. Consequently, at a given time, there may be the concomitancy of steady state in the fracture domain and transient state in the matrix. This point is developed further with mathematical and practical consideration. Approximate expansions and related validity time intervals are clearly identified and discussed with regards to both numerically generated and experimental data. Haverkamp R, Ross PJ, Smettem KRJ, Parlange JY (1994) 3-Dimensional analysis of infiltration from the disc Infiltrometer .2. Physically-based infiltration equation. Water Resour Res 30:2931-2935. Lassabatere L, Yilmaz D, Peyrard X, et al (2014) New analytical

  3. A dual-permeability approach to preferential water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Gerke, Horst H.; Basile, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    The pore systems in most natural soils is dynamically changing due to alternating swelling and shrinkage processes, which induces changes in pore volume and pore size distribution including deformations in pore geometry. This is a serious difficulty for modeling flow and transport in dual permeability approaches, as it will also require that the geometrical deformation of both the soil matrix and the fracture porous systems be taken into account, as well as the dynamics of soil hydraulic properties in response to the domain deformations. This study follows up a previous work by the same authors extending the classical rigid (RGD) approach formerly proposed by Gerke and van Genuchten, to account for shrinking effects (SHR) in modeling water flow and solute transport in dual-permeability porous media. In this study we considered three SHR scenarios, assuming that aggregate shrinkage may change either: (i) the hydraulic properties of the two pore domains, (ii) their relative fractions, and (iii) both, hydraulic properties and fractions of the two domains. The objective was to compare simulation results obtained under the RGD and the SHR assumptions to illustrate the impact of matrix volume changes on water storage, water fluxes and solute concentrations during: 1) An infiltration process bringing an initially dry soil to saturation, 2) A drainage process starting from an initially saturated soil. For an infiltration process, the simulated wetting front and the solute concentration propagation velocity, as well as the water fluxes, water and solute exchange rates, for the three SHR scenarios significantly deviated from the RGD. By contrast, relatively similar water content profiles evolved under all scenarios during drying. Overall, compared to the RGD approach, the effect of changing the hydraulic properties and the weight of the two domains according to the shrinkage behavior of the soil aggregates induced a much more rapid response in terms of water fluxes and

  4. Estimating soil hydraulic properties from soil moisture time series by inversion of a dual-permeability model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Valle, Nicolas; Wutzler, Thomas; Meyer, Stefanie; Potthast, Karin; Michalzik, Beate

    2017-04-01

    Dual-permeability type models are widely used to simulate water fluxes and solute transport in structured soils. These models contain two spatially overlapping flow domains with different parameterizations or even entirely different conceptual descriptions of flow processes. They are usually able to capture preferential flow phenomena, but a large set of parameters is needed, which are very laborious to obtain or cannot be measured at all. Therefore, model inversions are often used to derive the necessary parameters. Although these require sufficient input data themselves, they can use measurements of state variables instead, which are often easier to obtain and can be monitored by automated measurement systems. In this work we show a method to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from high frequency soil moisture time series data gathered at two different measurement depths by inversion of a simple one dimensional dual-permeability model. The model uses an advection equation based on the kinematic wave theory to describe the flow in the fracture domain and a Richards equation for the flow in the matrix domain. The soil moisture time series data were measured in mesocosms during sprinkling experiments. The inversion consists of three consecutive steps: First, the parameters of the water retention function were assessed using vertical soil moisture profiles in hydraulic equilibrium. This was done using two different exponential retention functions and the Campbell function. Second, the soil sorptivity and diffusivity functions were estimated from Boltzmann-transformed soil moisture data, which allowed the calculation of the hydraulic conductivity function. Third, the parameters governing flow in the fracture domain were determined using the whole soil moisture time series. The resulting retention functions were within the range of values predicted by pedotransfer functions apart from very dry conditions, where all retention functions predicted lower matrix potentials

  5. Dual permeability modeling of tile drain management influences on hydrologic and nutrient transport characteristics in macroporous soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Steven K.; Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Park, Young-Jin; Hussain, Syed I.; Gottschall, Natalie; Edwards, Mark; Lapen, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Tile drainage management is considered a beneficial management practice (BMP) for reducing nutrient loads in surface water. In this study, 2-dimensional dual permeability models were developed to simulate flow and transport following liquid swine manure and rhodamine WT (strongly sorbing) tracer application on macroporous clay loam soils under controlled (CD) and free drainage (FD) tile management. Dominant flow and transport characteristics were successfully replicated, including higher and more continuous tile discharge and lower peak rhodamine WT concentrations in FD tile effluent; in relation to CD, where discharge was intermittent, peak rhodamine concentrations higher, and mass exchange from macropores into the soil matrix greater. Explicit representation of preferential flow was essential, as macropores transmitted >98% of surface infiltration, tile flow, and tile solute loads for both FD and CD. Incorporating an active 3rd type lower boundary condition that facilitated groundwater interaction was imperative for simulating CD, as the higher (relative to FD) water table enhanced water and soluble nutrient movement from the soil profile into deeper groundwater. Scenario analysis revealed that in conditions where slight upwards hydraulic gradients exist beneath tiles, groundwater upwelling can influence the concentration of surface derived solutes in tile effluent under FD conditions; whereas the higher and flatter CD water table can restrict groundwater upwelling. Results show that while CD can reduce tile discharge, it can also lead to an increase in surface-application derived nutrient concentrations in tile effluent and hence surface water receptors, and it can promote NO3 loading into groundwater. This study demonstrates dual permeability modeling as a tool for increasing the conceptual understanding of tile drainage BMPs.

  6. Estimation and upscaling of dual-permeability model parameters for the transport of E.coli D21g in soils with preferential flow

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dual-permeability models are increasingly used to quantify the transport of solutes and microorganisms in soils with preferential flow. An ability to accurately determine the model parameters and their variation with preferential pathway characteristics is crucial for predicting the transport of mi...

  7. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  8. Estimation and upscaling of dual-permeability model parameters for the transport of E. coli D21g in soils with preferential flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yusong; Bradford, Scott A; Šimůnek, Jiří

    2014-04-01

    Dual-permeability models are increasingly used to quantify the transport of solutes and microorganisms in soils with preferential flow. An ability to accurately determine the model parameters and their variation with preferential pathway characteristics is crucial for predicting the transport of microorganisms in the field. The dual-permeability model with optimized parameters was able to accurately describe the transport of E. coli D21g in columns with artificial macropores of different configurations and lengths at two ionic strength levels (1 and 20mM NaCl). Correlations between the model parameters and the structural geometry of the preferential flow path were subsequently investigated. Decreasing the macropore length produced a decrease in the apparent saturated hydraulic conductivity of the macropore domain and an increase in the mass transfer between the macropore and matrix domains. The mass transfer coefficient was also found to be dependent on the configuration of the preferential flow pathway. A linear superposition approach was used to estimate field-scale preferential transport behavior for hypothetical fields with different amounts and configurations of macropores. Upscaling procedures were numerically investigated to predict this field-scale transport behavior from column-scale parameters. The upscaling method provided a satisfactory prediction of the field results under the tested scenarios. This information will be useful in assessing the risks of microbial transport due to preferential flow.

  9. Soil permeability profiling using multiple geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Toru

    2014-05-01

    We propose a new method to estimate permeability of soils with multiple geophysical data based on rock physics. The method uses the unconsolidated sand model in rock physics to identify the soil type with seismic velocity and resistivity. The grain size representing each soil type thus derived and porosity estimated from resistivity by the modified Archie's law are input to the Kozeny-Carman equation for estimating permeability of the soil. The proposed method is applied to S-wave velocity and resistivity profiles obtained in well logging in saturated diluvial soils and acquired on an earthen levee to estimate soil permeability profiles. Comparison of estimated permeability with actual measurements by the in-situ permeability tests and laboratory tests shows that permeability can be estimated in accuracy less than one order of magnitude. This result indicates that the proposed method is promising for permeability profiling of soils using geophysical data.

  10. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  11. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media.

    PubMed

    Leij, Feike J; Bradford, Scott A

    2013-07-01

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the increased risks for disease caused by microorganisms and colloid-associated contaminants. This study presents a model for colloid transport in dual-permeability media that includes reversible and irreversible retention of colloids and first-order exchange between the aqueous phases of the two regions. The model may also be used to describe transport of other reactive solutes in dual-permeability media. Analytical solutions for colloid concentrations in aqueous and solid phases were obtained using Laplace transformation and matrix decomposition. The solutions proved convenient to assess the effect of model parameters on the colloid distribution. The analytical model was used to describe effluent concentrations for a bromide tracer and 3.2- or 1-μm-colloids that were observed after transport through a composite 10-cm long porous medium made up of a cylindrical lens or core of sand and a surrounding matrix with sand of a different grain size. The tracer data were described very well and realistic estimates were obtained for the pore-water velocity in the two flow domains. An accurate description was also achieved for most colloid breakthrough curves. Dispersivity and retention parameters were typically greater for the larger 3.2-μm-colloids while both reversible and irreversible retention rates tended to be higher for the finer sands than the coarser sand. The relatively small sample size and the complex flow pattern in the composite medium made it difficult to reach definitive conclusions regarding transport parameters for colloid transport.

  12. Scale Dependence of Soil Permeability to Air: Measurement Method and Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, K.; Sextro, R.G.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Wooley, J.D.; Owens, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1995-11-01

    This work investigates the dependence soil air-permeability on sampling scale in near-surface unsaturated soils. A new dual-probe dynamic pressure technique was developed to measure permeability in situ over different length scales and different spatial orientations in the soil. Soils at three sites were studied using the new technique. Each soil was found to have higher horizontal than vertical permeability. Significant scale dependence of permeability was also observed at each site. Permeability increased by a factor of 20 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 2 m in a sand soil vegetated with dry grass, and by a factor of 15 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 3.5 m in a sandy loam with mature Coast Live Oak trees (Quercus agrifolia). The results indicate that standard methods of permeability assessment can grossly underestimate advective transport of gas-phase contaminants through soils.

  13. Air sparging in low permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, M.C.

    1996-08-01

    Sparging technology is rapidly growing as a preferred, low cost remediation technique of choice at sites across the United States. The technology is considered to be commercially available and relatively mature. However, the maturity is based on the number of applications of the technology as opposed to the degree of understanding of the mechanisms governing the sparging process. Few well documented case studies exist on the long term operation of the technology. Sparging has generally been applied using modified monitoring well designs in uniform, coarse grained soils. The applicability of sparging for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media has not been significantly explored. Models for projecting the performance of sparging systems in either soils condition are generally simplistic but can be used to provide general insight into the effects of significant changes in soil and fluid properties. The most promising sparging approaches for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media are variations or enhancements to the core technology. Recirculatory sparging systems, sparging/biosparging trenches or curtains and heating or induced fracturing techniques appear to be the most promising technology variants for this type of soil. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Dual permeability FEM models for distributed fiber optic sensors development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-López, Juan Pablo; Bogaard, Thom

    2017-04-01

    Fiber optic cables are commonly known for being robust and reliable mediums for transferring information at the speed of light in glass. Billions of kilometers of cable have been installed around the world for internet connection and real time information sharing. Yet, fiber optic cable is not only a mean for information transfer but also a way to sense and measure physical properties of the medium in which is installed. For dike monitoring, it has been used in the past for detecting inner core and foundation temperature changes which allow to estimate water infiltration during high water events. The DOMINO research project, aims to develop a fiber optic based dike monitoring system which allows to directly sense and measure any pore pressure change inside the dike structure. For this purpose, questions like which location, how many sensors, which measuring frequency and which accuracy are required for the sensor development. All these questions may be initially answered with a finite element model which allows to estimate the effects of pore pressure change in different locations along the cross section while having a time dependent estimation of a stability factor. The sensor aims to monitor two main failure mechanisms at the same time; The piping erosion failure mechanism and the macro-stability failure mechanism. Both mechanisms are going to be modeled and assessed in detail with a finite element based dual permeability Darcy-Richards numerical solution. In that manner, it is possible to assess different sensing configurations with different loading scenarios (e.g. High water levels, rainfall events and initial soil moisture and permeability conditions). The results obtained for the different configurations are later evaluated based on an entropy based performance evaluation. The added value of this kind of modelling approach for the sensor development is that it allows to simultaneously model the piping erosion and macro-stability failure mechanisms in a time

  15. Permeability and Retentivity Curves In Mountain Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barontini, S.; Ranzi, R.

    The saturated conductivity, Ks, and the retentivity curves, for mountain non-mature soils have been determined after laboratory- and field-experiments carried out over about 146 soil samples in the Toce river basin (Val d'Ossola, Northern Italian Alps). Eightythree samples only have been used to measure the retentivity curves using 15 bar and 5 bar Richard's extractors. Coherently with other researches, traditional meth- ods used to derive Ks on the basis of in situ infiltration test with a single ring infiltrom- eter provided values grater than those calculated using a variable head permeameter in laboratory. So other simplified methods have been used to estimate Ks after field analysis: the traditional method based on the Darcy's law, modified in respect of soil saturation; a method based on an application of Green and Ampt infiltration model; and a method based on the Wooding's works. All these methods, in particular the Wooding (1968) solution, gave estimates of Ks closer to the laboratory ones and to the results of a finite elements numerical solution of the Richard's equation in a 3D domain with axial simmetry. As a result an updated legend for the existing surface soil saturated conductivity map for the of the Toce basin is proposed. Inhomogeneities in the vertical permeability profiles have been identified also.

  16. Long-term bioventing performance in low-permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.B.; Stanin, F.T.; Downey, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Short-term and long-term bioventing treatability testing has shown that in situ air injection and extraction is a practical method for sustaining increased oxygen levels and enhancing aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in low-permeability soils. At several test sites, initial physical parameter analysis of soils and air permeability tests indicated that impacted soils (fine sandy silts and clays) had low air permeabilities. Measurements of depleted soil-gas oxygen levels and increased soil-gas carbon dioxide levels indicated that the natural process of aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons was oxygen-limited. Initial treatability testing consisted of air permeability tests to measure the permeability of the soils to air and in situ respiration tests to measure the rates at which native microorganisms could biodegrade the contaminants when provided with sufficient oxygen. During the long-term treatment period, active air injection or extraction systems were operated for 1 year or longer. Soil gas was periodically monitored within the treatment zone to evaluate the success of the bioventing systems in increasing soil-gas oxygen levels in the low-permeability soils. Follow-up respiration tests and soil and soil-gas sampling were conducted to evaluate changes in respiration rates and contaminant concentrations with time.

  17. PREFERENTIAL RADON TRANSPORT THROUGH HIGHLY PERMEABLE CHANNELS IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses preferential radon transport through highly permeable channels in soils. Indoor radon levels (that can pose a serious health risk) can be dramatically increased by air that is drawn into buildings through pipe penetrations that connect to permeable channels in...

  18. PREFERENTIAL RADON TRANSPORT THROUGH HIGHLY PERMEABLE CHANNELS IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses preferential radon transport through highly permeable channels in soils. Indoor radon levels (that can pose a serious health risk) can be dramatically increased by air that is drawn into buildings through pipe penetrations that connect to permeable channels in...

  19. Correlation of Three Techniques for Determining Soil Permeability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winneberger, John T.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses problems of acquiring adequate results when measuring for soil permeability. Correlates three relatively simple techniques that could be helpful to the inexperienced technician dealing with septic tank practices. An appendix includes procedures for valid percolation tests. (MLB)

  20. Correlation of Three Techniques for Determining Soil Permeability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winneberger, John T.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses problems of acquiring adequate results when measuring for soil permeability. Correlates three relatively simple techniques that could be helpful to the inexperienced technician dealing with septic tank practices. An appendix includes procedures for valid percolation tests. (MLB)

  1. Influence of Relict Joints on Permeability of Residual Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Z. A.; Kassim, A.; Yunusa, G. H.

    2016-07-01

    Weathering process of granitic material results in the formation of relict joint in lateritic layer of the weathering profile. The number and arrangements of the relict joints affects the permeability of the residual soil which invariably affects water flow and suction distribution in the residual soil. Although the permeability of residual soil without a relict joint can be determined using standard permeability test, it is difficult to be measured when a relict joint is incorporated due to limitation of size and area of the standard equipment. Hence, modified permeability test equipment is introduced in this study. Two arrangement of the relict joint in the equipment were considered. In the first arrangement one relict joint with various spacing were tested while the orientation and spacing of the relict joint were tested using two relict joints in the second arrangement. The results obtained shows that the permeability of the residual soil due to one and two relict joint varies by two orders of magnitude. Therefore, the number and spacing of relict joints modified the permeability of residual soil.

  2. Dual Identity and Prejudice: The Moderating Role of Group Boundary Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Dang, Jianning; Zheng, Wenwen; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Past work suggested that dual identity was effective to reduce prejudice. This study extended research on dual identity and prejudice by identifying a boundary condition in this relationship, that is, group permeability. In Study 1, we replicated previous studies with Chinese individuals and found that inducing dual identity (emphasizing subgroup differences and a common nation identity), compared to the control condition, decreased the urban residents’ prejudice against rural-to-urban migrants. In Study 2, we manipulated the group boundary permeability using the Hukou system reform, and found that when the group boundary was permeable, dual identity was effective in reducing prejudice against rural-to-urban migrants. However, this effect vanished in the condition where the group boundary was impermeable. These results point to the importance of inducing dual identity under specific conditions for research on decreasing prejudice. Some practical implications of the findings for urbanization and immigration are discussed. PMID:28261130

  3. Dual Identity and Prejudice: The Moderating Role of Group Boundary Permeability.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Dang, Jianning; Zheng, Wenwen; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Past work suggested that dual identity was effective to reduce prejudice. This study extended research on dual identity and prejudice by identifying a boundary condition in this relationship, that is, group permeability. In Study 1, we replicated previous studies with Chinese individuals and found that inducing dual identity (emphasizing subgroup differences and a common nation identity), compared to the control condition, decreased the urban residents' prejudice against rural-to-urban migrants. In Study 2, we manipulated the group boundary permeability using the Hukou system reform, and found that when the group boundary was permeable, dual identity was effective in reducing prejudice against rural-to-urban migrants. However, this effect vanished in the condition where the group boundary was impermeable. These results point to the importance of inducing dual identity under specific conditions for research on decreasing prejudice. Some practical implications of the findings for urbanization and immigration are discussed.

  4. A multiple fractal model for estimating permeability of dual-porosity media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Liu, Richeng; Jiang, Yujing

    2016-09-01

    A multiple fractal model that considers the fractal properties of both porous matrices and fracture networks is proposed for the permeability of dual-porosity media embedded with randomly distributed fractures. In this model, the aperture distribution is verified to follow the fractal scaling law, and the porous matrix is assumed to comprise a bundle of tortuous capillaries that also follow the fractal scaling law. Analytical expressions for fractal aperture distribution, total flow rate, total equivalent permeability, and dimensionless permeability are established, where the dimensionless permeability is defined as the ratio of permeability of the porous matrices to that of the fracture networks. The dimensionless permeability is closely correlated to the structural parameters (i.e., α, θ, Dtf, Dtp, De, Dp, emax, λmax) of the dual-porosity media, and it is more sensitive to the fractal dimension for the size distribution of fracture aperture than to that for the size distribution of pore/capillary diameter. The maximum pore/capillary diameter has a greater impact on the dimensionless permeability than that of the maximum fracture aperture. The dimensionless permeability of fracture networks constructed by the fractal aperture distribution has close values with those of models with lognormal aperture distribution. The proposed multiple fractal model does not involve any empirical constants that do not have clear physical meanings, which could serve as a quick estimation method for assessing permeability of dual-porosity media.

  5. Thermal treatment of low permeability soils using electrical resistance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Udell, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The acceleration of recovery rates of second phase liquid contaminants from the subsurface during gas or water pumping operations is realized by increasing the soil and ground water temperature. Electrical heating with AC current is one method of increasing the soil and groundwater temperature and has particular applicability to low permeability soils. Several mechanisms have been identified that account for the enhanced removal of the contaminants during electrical heating. These are vaporization of liquid contaminants with low boiling points, temperature-enhanced evaporation rates of semi-volatile components, and removal of residual contaminants by the boiling of residual water. Field scale studies of electrical heating and fluid extraction show the effectiveness of this technique and its applicability to contaminants found both above and below the water table and within low permeability soils. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Measurement and simulation of subsurface tracer migration to tile drains in low permeability, macroporous soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Joshua M.; Callaghan, Michael V.; Cey, Edwin E.; Bentley, Larry R.

    2015-06-01

    Multiyear monitoring and simulation of a conservative tracer was used in this study to investigate preferential flow and macropore-matrix interactions in low permeability, macroporous soil. 2,6-Difluorobenzoic acid (DFBA) tracer was applied to a 20 × 20 m drip irrigated test plot situated over two tile drains. Tracer movement over the 2009 and 2010 field seasons was monitored using tile drain effluent, suction lysimeters, monitoring wells, and soil cores. Despite similar volumes of water application to the plot in each season, 10 times more water and 14 times more DFBA were captured by the drains in 2010 due to wetter regional hydrologic conditions. The importance of preferential flow along macropores was shown by rapid DFBA breakthrough to the tile (<47 h), and DFBA detections in sand units below the tile drains. Preferential flow resulted in less than 8% of the DFBA mass being captured by the tiles over both years. With much of the DFBA mass (75%) retained in the upper 0.25 m of the soil at the end of 2009, numerical simulations were used to quantify the migration of this in situ tracer during the subsequent 2010 field season. Dual permeability and dual porosity models produced similar matches to measured tile drain flows and concentrations, but solute leaching was captured more effectively by the dual permeability formulation. The simulations highlighted limitations in current descriptions for small-scale mass transfer between matrix and macropore domains, which do not consider time-dependent transfer coefficients or nonuniform distributions of solute mass within soil matrix blocks.

  7. [Effects of different planting modes on the soil permeability of sloping farmlands in purple soil area].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Xing; He, Bing-Hui; Mei, Xue-Mei; Liang, Yan-Ling; Xiong, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Taking bare land as the control, this paper studied the effects of different planting modes on the soil permeability of sloping farmlands in purple soil area. For the test six planting modes, the soil permeability was in the order of Eriobotrya japonica > Citrus limon > Vetiveria zizanioides hedgerows +corn >Leucaena leucocephala hedgerows + corn> Hemerocallis fulva > corn> bare land, and decreased with increasing depth. The eigenvalues of soil infiltration were in the order of initial infiltration rate> average infiltration rate> stable infiltration rate. The soil permeability had significant positive linear correlations with soil total porosity, non-capillary porosity, initial moisture content, water holding capacity, and organic matter content, and significant negative linear correlation with soil bulk density. The common empirical infiltration model could well fit the soil moisture infiltration processes under the six planting modes, while the Kostiakov equation could not.

  8. Air permeability and trapped-air content in two soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, D.A.; Rubin, J.

    1989-01-01

    To improve understanding of hysteretic air permeability relations, a need exists for data on the water content dependence of air permeability, matric pressure, and air trapping (especially for wetting-drying cycles). To obtain these data, a special instrument was designed. The instrument is a combination of a gas permeameter (for air permeability determination), a suction plate apparatus (for retentivity curve determination), and an air pycnometer (for trapped-air-volume determination). This design allowed values of air permeability, matric pressure, and air trapping to be codetermined, i.e., determined at the same values of water content using the same sample and the same inflow-outflow boundaries. Such data were obtained for two nonswelling soils. -from Authors

  9. Transverse Chemotactic Migration of Bacteria from High to Low Permeability Regions in a Dual Permeability Porous Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Olson, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Low permeability regions sandwiched between high permeability regions such as clay lenses are difficult to treat using conventional treatment methods. Trace concentrations of contaminants such as non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) remain trapped in these regions and over the time diffuse out into surrounding water thereby acting as a long term source of groundwater contamination. Bacterial chemotaxis (directed migration toward a contaminant source), may be helpful in enhancing bioremediation of such contaminated sites. This study is focused on simulating a two-dimensional dual-permeability groundwater contamination scenario using microfluidic devices and evaluating transverse chemotactic migration of bacteria from high to low permeability regions. A novel bi-layer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device was fabricated using photolithography and soft lithography techniques to simulate contamination of a dual- permeability region due to leakage from an underground storage tank into a low permeability region. This device consists of a porous channel through which a bacterial suspension (Escherchia Coli HCB33) is flown and another channel for injecting contaminant/chemo-attractant (DL-aspertic acid) into the porous channel. The pore arrangement in the porous channel contains a 2-D low permeability region surrounded by high permeability regions on both sides. Experiments were performed under chemotactic and non-chemotactic (replacing attractant with buffer solution in the non porous channel) conditions. Images were captured in transverse pore throats at cross-sections 4.9, 9.8, and 19.6 mm downstream from the attractant injection point and bacteria were enumerated in the middle of each pore throat. Bacterial chemotaxis was quantified in terms of the change in relative bacterial counts in each pore throat at cross-sections 9.8 and 19.6 mm with respect to counts at the cross-section at 4.9 mm. Under non-chemotactic conditions, relative bacterial count was observed

  10. An analytical model for cumulative infiltration into a dual-permeability media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrard, Xavier; Lassabatere, Laurent; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Simunek, Jiri

    2010-05-01

    Modeling of water infiltration into the vadose zone is important for better understanding of movement of water-transported contaminants. There is a great need to take into account the soil heterogeneity and, in particular, the presence of macropores or cracks that could generate preferential flow. Several mathematical models have been proposed to describe unsaturated flow through heterogeneous soils. The dual-permeability model assumes that flow is governed by Richards equation in both porous regions (matrix and fractures). Water can be exchanged between the two regions following a first-order rate law. A previous study showed that the influence of the hydraulic conductivity of the matrix/macropore interface had a little influence on cumulative infiltration at the soil surface. As a result, one could consider the surface infiltration for a specific case of no water exchange between the fracture and matrix regions (a case of zero interfacial hydraulic conductivity). In such a case, water infiltration can be considered to be the sum of the cumulative infiltrations into the matrix and the fractures. On the basis of analytical models for each sub domain (matrix and fractures), an analytical model is proposed for the entire dual-porosity system. A sensitivity analysis is performed to characterize the influence of several factors, such as the saturated hydraulic conductivity ratio, the water pressure scale parameter ratio, and the saturated volumetric water content scale ratio, on the total cumulative infiltration. Such an analysis greatly helps in quantifying the impact of macroporosity and fractures on water infiltration, which can be of great interest for hydrological models.

  11. Inverse modeling of rainfall infiltration with a dual permeability approach using different matrix-fracture coupling variants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöcher, Johanna; Kuraz, Michal

    2017-04-01

    In this contribution we propose implementations of the dual permeability model with different inter-domain exchange descriptions and metaheuristic optimization algorithms for parameter identification and mesh optimization. We compare variants of the coupling term with different numbers of parameters to test if a reduction of parameters is feasible. This can reduce parameter uncertainty in inverse modeling, but also allow for different conceptual models of the domain and matrix coupling. The different variants of the dual permeability model are implemented in the open-source objective library DRUtES written in FORTRAN 2003/2008 in 1D and 2D. For parameter identification we use adaptations of the particle swarm optimization (PSO) and Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO), which are population-based metaheuristics with different learning strategies. These are high-level stochastic-based search algorithms that don't require gradient information or a convex search space. Despite increasing computing power and parallel processing, an overly fine mesh is not feasible for parameter identification. This creates the need to find a mesh that optimizes both accuracy and simulation time. We use a bi-objective PSO algorithm to generate a Pareto front of optimal meshes to account for both objectives. The dual permeability model and the optimization algorithms were tested on virtual data and field TDR sensor readings. The TDR sensor readings showed a very steep increase during rapid rainfall events and a subsequent steep decrease. This was theorized to be an effect of artificial macroporous envelopes surrounding TDR sensors creating an anomalous region with distinct local soil hydraulic properties. One of our objectives is to test how well the dual permeability model can describe this infiltration behavior and what coupling term would be most suitable.

  12. Liquid Spills on Permeable Soil Surfaces: Experimental Confirmations

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Carver S.; Keller, Jason M.

    2005-09-29

    Predictive tools for assessing the quantity of a spill on a soil from the observed spreading area could contribute to improving remediation when it is necessary. On a permeable soil, the visible spill area only hints about the amount of liquid that might reside below the surface. An understanding of the physical phenomena involved with spill propagation on a soil surface is key to assessing the liquid amount possibly present beneath the surface. The objective of this study is an improved prediction capability for spill behavior.

  13. Inverse Calibration of the Dual-Permeability Model MACRO: Theoretical Analysis and Application to Microlysimeter Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulier, S.; Jarvis, N.

    2003-12-01

    Macropore flow is a key factor for determining chemical transport in unsaturated soils, but the description of the complex processes involved in macropore flow requires several parameters that cannot be easily measured. Inverse modeling procedures are increasingly used for model calibration, because they are objective and reproducible. But this is only true when the problem is well-posed: an ill-posed problem leads to parameter nonuniqueness, and thus contributes to poor model performance, like error and/or uncertainty in model predictions. Factors linked to nonuniqueness are most often related to sensitivity issues and/or correlation among two or several parameters. This study focused on the use of inverse techniques to estimate parameters controlling macropore flow, transport, and transformation processes in the dual porosity/dual-permeability model of water flow and solute transport MACRO. MACRO was used together with the inverse modeling package SUFI. The Bayesian (global) approach followed by SUFI is stable, converging, and robust. Moreover, the procedure also predicts a posterior uncertainty domain for the estimated parameters. A theoretical study was carried out to test the inverse modeling tool SUFI/MACRO. Generated "dummy" data set were used for this purpose, representing transient leaching experiment for tracers and reactive solutes in small soil columns (20 cm height). General issues related to inverse modeling such as internal correlation and sensitivity were investigated, with the help of response surface analysis, as well as the influence of the choice of the goal function used in the inverse procedure. Attention was also focused on the most appropriate experimental design necessary for a reliable parameter estimation. The procedure was then applied to real data, obtained from tracer leaching experiments carried out on microlysimeters. Based on calculated model efficiencies, MACRO/SUFI gave good predictions of water movement and tracer transport. This

  14. Dual-effect laser handpiece for modification of tissue permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen

    2011-03-01

    A new approach for improving the availability of topically applied drugs by reducing the permeability of dermis has been evaluated. The premise of this work is that photothermal vascular injury will reduce vascular uptake of drug in the dermis. The dermal distribution of two topically applied drugs, 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C, is calculated, considering molecular diffusion and vascular uptake according to a distributed model, in the presence and absence of vascular injury. Intradermal drug exposures obtained are compared to exposures known to be effective in killing tumor cells. Combining the reduction in dermal permeability with fractional photothermal epidermal ablation to increase epidermal permeability may allow higher drug concentrations to be achieved in the skin. A newly developed laser handpiece for implementing the technique is described.

  15. Modelling dual-permeability hydrological system and slope stability of the Rocca Pitigliana landslide using COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Wei; Bogaard, Thom; Bakker, Mark; Berti, Matteo

    2014-05-01

    The accuracy of using hydrological-slope stability models for rainfall-induced landslide forecasting relies on the identification of realistic landslide triggering mechanisms and the correct mathematical description of these mechanisms. The subsurface hydrological processes in a highly heterogeneous slope are controlled by complex geological conditions. Preferential flow through macropores, fractures and other local high-permeability zones can change the infiltration pattern, resulting in more rapid and deeper water movement. Preferential flow has significant impact on pore water pressure distribution and consequently on slope stability. Increasingly sophisticated theories and models have been developed to simulate preferential flow in various environmental systems. It is necessary to integrate methods of slope stability analysis with preferential flow models, such as dual-permeability models, to investigate the hydrological and soil mechanical response to precipitation in landslide areas. In this study, a systematic modeling approach is developed by using COMSOL Multiphysics to couple a single-permeability model and a dual-permeability model with a soil mechanical model for slope stability analysis. The dual-permeability model is composed of two Richards equations to describe coupled matrix and preferential flow, which can be used to quantify the influence of preferential flow on distribution and timing of pressure head in a slope. The hydrological models are coupled with a plane-strain elastic soil mechanics model and a local factor of safety method. The factor of safety is evaluated by applying the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion on the effective stress field. The method is applied to the Rocca Pitigliana landslide located roughly 50 km south of Bologna. The landslide material consists of weathered clay with a thickness of 2-4m overlying clay-shale bedrock. Three years of field data of pore pressure measurements provide a reliable description of the dynamic

  16. Dual permeability flow behavior for modeling horizontal well production in fractured-vuggy carbonate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian-Chun; Nie, Ren-Shi; Jia, Yong-Lu

    2012-09-01

    SummaryFractured-vuggy carbonate reservoirs are composed of by matrix, fracture, and vug systems. This paper is the first investigation into the dual permeability flow issue for horizontal well production in a fractured-vuggy carbonate reservoir. Considering dispersed vugs in carbonate reservoirs and treating media directly connected with horizontal wellbore as the matrix and fracture systems, a test analysis model of a horizontal well was created, and triple porosity and dual permeability flow behavior were modeled. Standard log-log type curves were drawn up by numerical simulation and flow behavior characteristics were thoroughly analyzed. Numerical simulations showed that type curves are dominated by external boundary conditions as well as the permeability ratio of the fracture system to the sum of fracture and matrix systems. The parameter κ is only relevant to the dual permeability model, and if κ is one, then the dual permeability model is equivalent to the single permeability model. There are seven main flow regimes with constant rate of horizontal well production and five flow regimes with constant wellbore pressure of horizontal well production; different flow regimes have different flow behavior characteristics. Early radial flow and linear flow regimes are typical characteristics of horizontal well production; duration of early radial flow regime is usually short because formation thickness is generally less than 100 m. Derivative curves are W-shaped, which is a reflection of inter-porosity flows between matrix, fracture, and vug systems. A distorted W-shape, which could be produced in certain situations, such as one involving an erroneously low time of inter-porosity flows, would handicap the recognition of a linear flow regime. A real case application was successfully implemented, and some useful reservoir parameters (e.g., permeability and inter-porosity flow factor) were obtained from well testing interpretation.

  17. Electroosmosis remediation of DNAPLS in low permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S V.

    1996-08-01

    Electroosmosis is the movement of water through a soil matrix induced by a direct current (DC) electric field. The technique has been used since the 1930s for dewatering and stabilizing fine-grained soils. More recently, electroosmosis has been considered as an in-situ method for soil remediation in which water is injected into the soil at the anode region to flush the contaminants to the cathode side for further treatment or disposal. The major advantage of electroosmosis is its inherent ability to move water uniformly through clayey, silty soils at 100 to 1000 times faster than attainable by hydraulic means, and with very low energy usage. Drawbacks of electroosmosis as a stand-alone technology include slow speed, reliance on solubilizing the contaminants into the groundwater for removal, potentially an unstable process for long term operation, and necessary additional treatment and disposal of the collected liquid. Possible remediation applications of electroosmosis for DNAPLs would be primarily in the removal of residual DNAPLs in the soil pores by electroosmotic flushing. The future of electroosmosis as a broad remedial method lies in how well it can be coupled with complementary technologies. Examples include combining electroosmosis with vacuum extraction, with surfactant usage to deal with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) through enhanced solubilization or mobilization, with permeability enhancing methods (hydrofracturing, pneumatic fracturing, etc.) to create recovery zones, and with in-situ degradation zones to eliminate aboveground treatment. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Temporal variations in air permeability and soil CO2 flux in volcanic ash soils (island of Vulcano, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarda, Marco; Prano, Vincenzo; Cappuzzo, Santo; Gurrieri, Sergio; Valenza, Mariano

    2017-08-01

    Air permeability is a major physical factor affecting the advective transport of a gas through the soil, and variations in this parameter can strongly influence the emission of endogenous gases from the soil to the atmosphere. In this paper, we illustrated a new and simple method for measuring in situ air permeability based on the measurement of air pressure inside a special probe inserted into the soil. The method was designed and developed primarily to study the relationship between air permeability and the soil CO2 flux in an active volcanic area. The method was used for continuous monitoring of the air permeability at two different locations on the island of Vulcano. At the same time, the values of the atmospheric pressure, temperature, rain, and volumetric water content of the soil were also acquired to investigate their effect on soil air permeability and soil CO2 flux. The results showed that during the monitoring period, soil air permeability exhibited minor variations at each site, while larger variations in the soil CO2 flux were recorded. The effect of soil air permeability on soil CO2 flux was negligible at both sites, whereas a strong dependence of soil CO2 flux on volumetric water content and on atmospheric pressure was found. Furthermore, the variation in air permeability recorded at both sites was much lower than that predicted using some well-known predictive models, showing that the relationship among different soil transport parameters is more complex in real field conditions than would be expected by semiempirical models.

  19. Unsaturated flow and solute transport through the Chalk: Tracer test and dual permeability modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Daele, Gerd F. A.; Barker, John A.; Connell, Luke D.; Atkinson, Tim C.; Darling, W. G.; Cooper, J. D.

    2007-08-01

    SummaryA tracer test was carried out in the unsaturated Chalk at the Fleam Dyke research site in Cambridgeshire, UK, to investigate the role of the Chalk fractures and matrix in unsaturated flow and solute transport. The experiment, under natural rainfall conditions, involved distributing deuterated water on a grass-covered lysimeter (a cube of volume 125 m 3) and on an adjacent 4 m × 4 m field plot. Tracer migration was monitored through regular core sampling and collection of lysimeter drainage water. The presence of occasional secondary peaks in sampling of the vertical tracer profile suggested the occurrence of fracture flow, allowing some tracer to bypass the Chalk matrix. However, in the 15 months following application, none of the tracer was detected in the lysimeter drainage at 5 m depth. Modelling of the tracer results was undertaken with the 1-D numerical transient dual permeability model MACRO 5.0, initially developed for macroporous soils. Modelling results showed that MACRO 5.0 could reliably simulate transient recharge through the Chalk. The simulations suggested that fracture flow is important at the site, but that it is only initiated at 1 m depth or deeper. The extent of fracture flow appeared to be highly variable in different layers of the profile, varying between 40% and 85% of the cumulative flux, mainly depending on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the matrix. Diffusion between the fractures and the matrix tended to equalize solute concentrations in both flow domains, although solute bypass through the fractures occurred in some Chalk strata. Besides diffusive exchange, the modelling stressed the importance of advective exchange of solutes. The results suggest that the Chalk aquifer at the Fleam Dyke site is only moderately vulnerable to pollution, even though for moderate rainfall conditions some bypass flow was possible.

  20. Liquid CO2 displacement of water in a dual-permeability pore network micromodel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Mart; Grate, Jay W; Wietsma, Thomas W; Warner, Marvin G

    2011-09-01

    Permeability contrasts exist in multilayer geological formations under consideration for carbon sequestration. To improve our understanding of heterogeneous pore-scale displacements, liquid CO(2) (LCO(2))-water displacement was evaluated in a pore network micromodel with two distinct permeability zones. Due to the low viscosity ratio (logM = -1.1), unstable displacement occurred at all injection rates over 2 orders of magnitude. LCO(2) displaced water only in the high permeability zone at low injection rates with the mechanism shifting from capillary fingering to viscous fingering with increasing flow rate. At high injection rates, LCO(2) displaced water in the low permeability zone with capillary fingering as the dominant mechanism. LCO(2) saturation (S(LCO2)) as a function of injection rate was quantified using fluorescent microscopy. In all experiments, more than 50% of LCO(2) resided in the active flowpaths, and this fraction increased as displacement transitioned from capillary to viscous fingering. A continuum-scale two-phase flow model with independently determined fluid and hydraulic parameters was used to predict S(LCO2) in the dual-permeability field. Agreement with the micromodel experiments was obtained for low injection rates. However, the numerical model does not account for the unstable viscous fingering processes observed experimentally at higher rates and hence overestimated S(LCO2).

  1. Liquid CO2 Displacement of Water in a Dual-Permeability Pore Network Micromodel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus; Grate, Jay W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Warner, Marvin G.

    2011-09-01

    Permeability contrasts exist in multilayer geological formations under consideration for carbon sequestration. To improve our understanding of heterogeneous pore-scale displacements, liquid CO2 (LCO2) - water displacement was evaluated in a pore network micromodel with two distinct permeability zones. Due to the low viscosity ratio (logM = -1.1), unstable displacement occurred at all injection rates over two orders of magnitude. LCO2 displaced water only in the high permeability zone at low injection rates with the mechanism shifting from capillary fingering to viscous fingering with increasing flow rate. At high injection rates, LCO2 displaced water in the low permeability zone with capillary fingering as the dominant mechanism. LCO2 saturation (SLCO2) as a function of injection rate was quantified using fluorescent microscopy. In all experiments, more than 50% of LCO2 resided in the active flowpaths, and this fraction increased as displacement transitioned from capillary to viscous fingering. A continuum-scale two-phase flow model with independently determined fluid and hydraulic parameters was used to predict SLCO2 in the dual-permeability field. Agreement with the micromodel experiments was obtained for low injection rates. However, the numerical model does not account for the unstable viscous fingering processes observed experimentally at higher rates and hence overestimated SLCO2.

  2. Wave propagation in double-porosity dual-permeability materials: Velocity and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. D.

    2017-08-01

    This study considers the propagation of harmonic plane waves in a double-porosity solid saturated by a viscous fluid. Two different porosities are supported with different permeabilities to facilitate the wave-induced fluid-flow in this composite material. The variation of the fluid content in the pores due to the wave-induced flow is expressed in terms of the dilatation of constituent particles in the porous aggregate. This fluid-flow can be considered through the constitutive relations with modified anelastic coefficients. The modified coefficients, being frequency dependent and complex, illustrate the dispersive and anelastic behaviour of double-porosity dual-permeability materials. Relevant equations of motion are solved to explain the propagation of three longitudinal waves and one transverse wave in double-porosity dual-permeability medium. A numerical example is considered to illustrate dispersion in velocity and attenuation of the four waves. Effect of wave-induced fluid-flow is analysed with changes in wave-inhomogeneity, pore-fluid viscosity and double-porosity structure.

  3. Construction of low permeability soil-bentonite barrier caps and liners for landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, T.; Williams, M.

    1995-12-31

    A low permeability soil barrier layer is the usual regulatory requirement for both caps and liner systems on modern municipal, industrial, and hazardous waste landfills. This soil layer is either used as the sole barrier or as the soil component of a composite liner system. This paper presents construction experience for blending on site soils with sodium bentonite to produce a thick, low permeability soil barrier layer. The paper begins with a description of the components and construction of the barrier layer and discusses how soil-bentonite barrier layers meet or exceed the regulatory performance criteria for both State and Federal agencies.

  4. Impact of chemical leaching on permeability and cadmium removal from fine-grained soils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhongbing; Zhang, Renduo; Huang, Shuang; Wang, Kang

    2017-06-21

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of chemical leaching on permeability and Cd removal from fine-grained polluted soils. Column leaching experiments were conducted using two types of soils (i.e., artificially Cd-polluted loam and historically polluted silty loam). Chemical agents of CaCl2, FeCl3, citric acid, EDTA, rhamnolipid, and deionized water were used to leach Cd from the soils. Results showed that organic agents reduced permeability of both soils, and FeCl3 reduced permeability of loam soil, compared with inorganic agents and deionized water. Entrapment and deposition of colloids generated from the organic agents and FeCl3 treatments reduced the soil permeability. The peak Cd effluence from the artificially polluted loam columns was retarded. For the artificially polluted soils treated with EDTA and the historically polluted soils with FeCl3, Cd precipitates were observed at the bottom after chemical leaching. When Cd was associated with large colloid particles, the reduction of soil permeability caused Cd accumulation in deeper soil. In addition, the slow process of disintegration of soil clay during chemical leaching might result in the retardation of peak Cd effluence. These results suggest the need for caution when using chemical-leaching agents for Cd removal in fine-grained soils.

  5. Correlation of soil radon and permeability with indoor radon potential in Ottawa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Falcomer, Renato; Bergman, Lauren; Wierdsma, Jessica; Ly, Jim

    2009-08-01

    Soil gas radon and soil gas permeability measurements were conducted at 32 sites across the five most populated communities in the city of Ottawa where indoor radon measurements were available for 167 houses. A soil radon index (SRI) determined from the soil radon concentration and the soil gas permeability was used to characterise radon availability from soil to air. This study demonstrated that the average SRI in a community area correlates with the indoor radon potential (the percentage of homes above 200 Bq m(-3)) in that community. Soil gas radon concentrations together with soil gas permeability measurements can be a useful tool for the prediction of the indoor radon potential in the development of a Canadian radon risk map.

  6. Surcharge preloading consolidation analysis of coastal road considering permeability of dredged soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Binbin; Si, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Due to the high plasticity index and low permeability of reclaimed ground composed of dredged soil, the reinforcement period is very long, which makes the merits of vacuum preloading, short reinforcement time, disappear. Surcharge preloading method becomes the most suitable and economic way. The equivalent permeability method is used to simulate the installation of the plastic vertical drain and the influence of different permeabilities, namely the interval space is calculated numerically.

  7. Potential performance of pillared inorgano- organo bentonite for soil mix technology permeable reactive barrier (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abunada, Z. M.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2013-12-01

    Modified bentonite has gained more interest for their effect in contaminant removal and environmental protection. This study is investigating the use of three different modified inorgano-organo bentonite (IOB) in soil mixing permeable reactive barrier. IOB were prepared using pillaring agents and quaternary ammonium cations (QAC) with different loading ratios. The permeabilities of compacted specimens containing IOB with two different soil types (sandy and gravelly soil) were measured for site contaminated groundwater, pure water and TEX compounds to study the potential of soil mix permeable reactive barrier (PRB). The soil permeability decreased by 1-2 order of magnitude once mixed with IOB. It also decreased by about 100 in case of TEX compound and site groundwater. The IOB was tested to remove Toluene, Ethyl-benzene, and o-Xylene (TEX) compound from model contaminated water in both batch and column test. Physical characteristics such as pore volume, porosity and specific structure in addition to level of surfactant loading were determined. Materials removal efficiency varied due to the surfactant loading, soil type and contaminant molecular weight. Sorption isotherm showed that the adsorbates preference increased in the order of T>E>X in all IOB types. Maximum TEX compound sorptive capacity varied also due to soil type with the highest was 86.89% 93.19% and 90.2% for T,E,X respectively on sandy soil. Key words: Inorgano-organo bentonite, permeability, reactive barrier, soil mix, sorption

  8. A mixed ionic and electronic conducting dual-phase membrane with high oxygen permeability.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Liang, Fangyi; Cao, Zhengwen; Steinbach, Frank; Feldhoff, Armin

    2015-04-13

    To combine good chemical stability and high oxygen permeability, a mixed ionic-electronic conducting (MIEC) 75 wt% Ce(0.85)Gd(0.1)Cu(0.05)O(2-δ)-25 wt% La(0.6)Ca(0.4)FeO(3-δ)(CGCO-LCF) dual-phase membrane based on a MIEC-MIEC composite has been developed. Copper doping into Ce(0.9)Gd(0.1)O(2-δ) (CGO) oxide enhances both ionic and electronic conductivity, which then leads to a change from ionic conduction to mixed conduction at elevated temperatures. For the first time we demonstrate that an intergranular film with 2-10 nm thickness containing Ce, Ca, Gd, La, and Fe has been formed between the CGCO grains in the CGCO-LCF one-pot dual-phase membrane. A high oxygen permeation flux of 0.70 mL min(-1) cm(-2) is obtained by the CGCO-LCF one-pot dual-phase membrane with 0.5 mm thickness at 950 °C using pure CO2 as the sweep gas, and the membrane shows excellent stability in the presence of CO2 even at lower temperatures (800 °C) during long-term operation.

  9. Linking soil permeability and soil aggregate stability with root development: a pots experiment (preliminary results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergani, Chiara; Graf, Frank; Gerber, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying and monitoring the contribution of vegetation to the stability of the slopes is a key issue for implementing effective soil bioengineering measures. This topic is being widely investigated both from the hydrological and mechanical point of view. Nevertheless, due to the high variability of the biological components, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of the role of plants in slope stabilization, especially if the different succession phases and the temporal development of vegetation is considered. Graf et al., 2014, found within the scope of aggregate stability investigations that the root length per soil volume of alder specimen grown for 20 weeks under laboratory conditions is comparable to the one of 20 years old vegetation in the field. This means that already relatively short time scales can provide meaningful information at least for the first stage of colonization of soil bioengineering measures, which is also the most critical. In the present study we analyzed the effect of root growth on two soil properties critical to evaluate the performance of vegetation in restoring and re-stabilizing slopes: permeability and soil aggregate stability. We set up a laboratory experiment in order to work under controlled conditions and limit as much as possible the natural variability. Alnus incana was selected as the study species as it is widely used in restoration projects in the Alps, also because of its capacity to fix nitrogen and its symbiosis with both ecto and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. After the first month of growth in germination pots, we planted one specimen each in big quasi cylindrical pots of 34 cm diameter and 35 cm height. The pots were filled with the soil fraction smaller than 10 mm coming from an oven dried moraine collected in a subalpine landslide area (Hexenrübi catchment, central Switzerland). The targeted dry unit weight was 16 kN/m3. The plants have been maintained at a daily temperature of 25°C and relative

  10. Measurements of soil permeability and pressure fields in EPA's soil-gas chamber. Report for May-August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, R.B.; Snoddy, R.; Brubaker, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses the measurement of soil permeability and pressure fields using EPA's soil-gas chamber, designed to study the production and transport of radon and other potential indoor air pollutants originating in soils. The chamber is instrumented to measure distributions of radon and pressure fields and also moisture distributions and their resulting influence on soil permeability. An analytic solution for advective flow in the soil-gas chamber is presented which includes the effects of moisture-dependent spatial variations of the permeability. Measurements of the pressure field are compared with model calculations. Relatively good agreement between the measurements and calculations is obtained, except near the water level where boundary conditions are not rigorously satisfied.

  11. Long-term monitoring of soil gas radon and permeability at two reference sites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Falcomer, Renato; Ly, Jim; Wierdsma, Jessica; Bergman, Lauren

    2008-01-01

    The long-term monitoring of soil radon variations was conducted at two reference sites in Ottawa. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a single soil radon survey could provide a representative soil radon characteristic of the site. Results showed that during the normal field survey period from June to September in Canada, a single field survey with multiple measurements of soil gas radon concentrations at a depth of 80 cm can characterise the soil radon level of a site within a deviation of +/-30%. Direct in situ soil permeability measurements exhibited, however, large variations even within an area of only 10 x 10 m(2). Considering such large variations and the weight of the equipment, soil permeability can be determined by direct measurements whenever possible or by other qualitative evaluation methods for sites that are hard to access with heavy equipment.

  12. The use of caesium iodide mini scintillation counters for dual isotope pulmonary capillary permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Hunter, D N; Lawrence, R; Morgan, C J; Evans, T W

    1990-12-01

    A commercially available system of caesium iodide crystal mini-detectors (Oakfield Instruments, Oxon, UK) was modified so that it was suitable for dual isotopic measurement of the plasma protein accumulation index (PPA)- a measure of pulmonary endothelial permeability. Using this modified system the mean PPA x 10(-3) min-1 +/- (S.E.M.) recorded in 11 normal subjects (22 lungs) was 0.18 (0.08) and in 6 patients (9 lungs) with the adult respiratory distress syndrome was 2.88 (0.63) (P less than 0.02). These values for PPA concur with those found by other groups using larger sodium iodide detectors. We conclude that with simple modification caesium iodide mini-detectors may be used successfully for the measurement of PPA in the intensive care setting.

  13. Propagation and attenuation of inhomogeneous waves in double-porosity dual-permeability materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    This study considers the propagation of harmonic plane waves in a double-porosity dual-permeability solid saturated with single viscous fluid. Christoffel system is obtained to explain the existence of three longitudinal waves and a transverse wave in the medium considered. Each wave is identified with a complex velocity, which is resolved for inhomogeneous propagation to calculate the phase velocity and attenuation of the wave. Pore-fluid pressures are expressed in terms of velocities of solid particles corresponding to the propagation of three longitudinal waves. Then, transfer rate of pore-fluid between two porosities induced by each longitudinal wave is calculated as a function of its complex velocity. Numerical example is solved to study the dispersion in phase velocity and attenuation for each of the four waves. Effects of pore-fluid viscosity, wave-inhomogeneity and composition of double porosity on inhomogeneous propagation are analysed graphically. Transfer rate of pore-fluid, induced by each of the three longitudinal waves, is calculated as a periodic waveform. Variations in the fluid-flow profile are exhibited for different values of pore-fluid viscosity, skeleton permeability, wave-frequency and wave-inhomogeneity.

  14. Propagation and attenuation of inhomogeneous waves in double-porosity dual-permeability materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. D.

    2016-11-01

    This study considers the propagation of harmonic plane waves in a double-porosity dual-permeability solid saturated with single viscous fluid. Christoffel system is obtained to explain the existence of three longitudinal waves and a transverse wave in the medium considered. Each wave is identified with a complex velocity, which is resolved for inhomogeneous propagation to calculate the phase velocity and attenuation of the wave. Pore-fluid pressures are expressed in terms of velocities of solid particles corresponding to the propagation of three longitudinal waves. Then, transfer rate of pore-fluid between two porosities induced by each longitudinal wave is calculated as a function of its complex velocity. Numerical example is solved to study the dispersion in phase velocity and attenuation for each of the four waves. Effects of pore-fluid viscosity, wave-inhomogeneity and composition of double porosity on inhomogeneous propagation are analysed graphically. Transfer rate of pore-fluid, induced by each of the three longitudinal waves, is calculated as a periodic waveform. Variations in the fluid-flow profile are exhibited for different values of pore-fluid viscosity, skeleton permeability, wave-frequency and wave-inhomogeneity.

  15. Information content of measurements from tracer microlysimeter experiments designed for parameter identification in dual-permeability models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsbo, Mats; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2006-06-01

    Parameters regulating the degree of preferential flow in the dual-permeability water flow and solute transport model MACRO are difficult or impossible to derive from direct measurements. The objectives were (i) to find an improved temporal measurement scheme for identification of these parameters using laboratory microlysimeter experiments and (ii) to evaluate the possibilities of parameter identification in the MACRO model. Artificial data from laboratory microlysimeter experiments consisting of high time-resolution 'measurements' of percolation rate, effluent concentration and resident concentrations at six depths were used with PIMLI (parameter identification method using the localisation of information). The data contained enough information to successfully reduce the uncertainty in the parameter governing mass exchange between pore domains, the saturated micropore hydraulic conductivity and the dispersivity for two hypothetical soils representing one typical clay and one loam. Parameters governing water flow in the macropores were shown to be sensitive in a screening analysis with the Morris method and the uncertainty in these parameters was also reduced by PIMLI. However, some of these parameters did not converge towards their true values probably because of parameter interdependence. In all cases, 'measurements' with large information content were found early in the experiments where less than 0.2 pore volumes of water had passed through the column. For successful identification of parameters determining the degree of preferential flow, efforts should be made to perform high time-resolution measurements during the first irrigations following solute application.

  16. Monitoring Performance of a Dual Wall Permeable Reactive Barrier for Treating Perchlorate and TCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowman, C. E.; Hashimoto, Y.; Warner, S.; Bennett, P.; Gandhi, D.; Szerdy, F.; Neville, S.; Fennessy, C.; Scow, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    AMEC Geomatrix, through collaboration with Aerojet General Corporation and the University of California, Davis (UCD), has performed work leading to the installation of a dual wall permeable reactive barrier (PRB) system capable of treating perchlorate and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon compounds (CAHs), including trichloroethylene (TCE), at Aerojet's Area 40 site in Sacramento, California. This unique system consisted of an upgradient zero-valent iron (ZVI) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) that is intended to not only degrade CAHs, but also, provide hydrogen generated from the ZVI corrosion process, to a downgradient bio-effective PRB (carbohydrate solution circulated through a gravel-packed trench) for destroying perchlorate. The subsurface was characterized during a site investigation, and numerous logistical and site-specific challenges of installation were addressed. The site-specific challenges included installation of a passive remediation system in a remote location with no access to electricity. The selected remediation system was keyed into the undulating bedrock 20 to 25 feet below the ground surface without the use of shoring. Under a collaborative effort, UCD provided initial bench testing. AMEC Geomatrix designed and installed the dual wall system consisting of two approximately parallel 50-foot long by 2-foot thick by 25-foot deep PRB segments which are separated by about 8 feet perpendicular to the approximate direction of groundwater flow. AMEC Geomatrix performed the installation of performance monitoring network, which consisted of 21 wells, and monitored these points for a 6-month period. Monitoring and sampling techniques were designed to measure water levels and water quality parameters in the subsurface during sampling events, to better assess the hydrologic and chemical processes. The monitoring results indicate that the upgradient ZVI PRB effectively treats groundwater with TCE concentrations approaching 60 mg/L, and in addition, may

  17. Estimation of soil air permeability components at a laboratory-scale pilot.

    PubMed

    Boudouch, Otmane; Esrael, Daoud; Kacem, Mariem; Benadda, Belkacem

    2012-01-01

    Soil air permeability is a key parameter in the design of soil vapour extraction. The purpose of this study is to verify the applicability of different analytical solutions, developed to determine soil characteristics in field conditions, to estimate soil air permeability in a small-scale pilot, since field testing may be expensive. A laboratory tridirectional pilot and a unidirectional column were designed in order to achieve the objectives of this work. Use of a steady-state unconfined analytical solution was found to be an appropriate method to determine soil air permeability components for the pilot conditions. Using pressure data collected under open, steady-state conditions, the average values of radial and vertical permeability were found to be, respectively, 9.97 x 10(-7) and 8.74 x 10(-7) cm2. The use of semi-confined analytical solutions may not be suitable to estimate soil parameters since a significant difference was observed between simulated and observed vacuums. Air permeability was underestimated when transient solutions were used, in comparison with methods based on steady-state solutions. The air radial and vertical permeability was found to be, respectively, 7.06 x 10(-7) and 4.93 x 10(-7) cm2, in the open scenario, and 2.30 x 10(-7) and 1.51 x 10(-7) cm2 in the semi-confined scenario. However, a good estimate of soil porosity was achieved using the two transient methods. The average values were predicted to be 0.482, in the open scenario, and 0.451 in the semi-confined scenario, which was in good agreement with the real value.

  18. Effects of the hydraulic conductivity of the matrix/macropore interface on cumulative infiltrations into dual-permeability media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassabatere, L.; Peyrard, X.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Simunek, J.

    2009-12-01

    Modeling of water infiltration into the vadose zone is important for better understanding of movement of water-transported contaminants. There is a great need to take into account the soil heterogeneity and, in particular, the presence of macropores or cracks that could generate preferential flow. Several mathematical models have been proposed to describe unsaturated flow through heterogeneous soils. The dual-permeability model (referred to as the 2K model) assumes that flow is governed by Richards equation in both porous regions (matrix and macropores). Water can be exchanged between the two regions following a first-order rate law. Although several studies have dealt with such modeling, no study has evaluated the influence of the hydraulic conductivity of the matrix/macropore interface on water cumulative infiltration. And this is the focus of this study. An analytical scaling method reveals the role of the following main parameters for given boundary and initial conditions: the saturated hydraulic conductivity ratio (R_Ks), the water pressure scale parameter ratio (R_hg), the saturated volumetric water content ratio (R_θs), and the shape parameters of the water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions. The last essential parameter is related to the interfacial hydraulic conductivity (Ka) between the macropore and matrix regions. The scaled 2K flow equations were solved using HYDRUS-1D 4.09 for the specific case of water infiltrating into an initially uniform soil profile and a zero pressure head at the soil surface. A sensitivity of water infiltration was studied for different sets of scale parameters (R_Ks, R_hg, R_θs, and shape parameters) and the scaled interfacial conductivity (Ka). Numerical results illustrate two extreme behaviors. When the interfacial conductivity is zero (i.e., no water exchange), water infiltrates separately into matrix and macropore regions, producing a much deeper moisture front in the macropore domain. In the opposite case

  19. Permeable Environmental Leaching Capsules (PELCAPs) for in situ evaluation of contaminant immobilization in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Brian Patrick; Brooks, Scott C

    2005-01-01

    We encapsulated radioisotope-spiked soil within a water-permeable polyacrylamide matrix cast in a small cylindrical geometry ({approx}5 cm{sup 3}) to measure the persistence of immobilized soil contaminants. As a proof-of-principle, soils contained within these permeable environmental leaching capsules (PELCAPs) were labeled with either {sup 85}Sr or {sup 134}Cs and were leached in both laboratory tests and continuously in situ with ground and streamwaters at two field sites on the Oak Ridge reservation. Groups of PELCAPs were retrieved, assayed nondestructively for radioisotopes via {gamma} spectroscopy, and then replaced in ground and surface water repeatedly over a 6-month period. PELCAPs that contained no soil readily and quantitatively leached either {sup 85}Sr or {sup 134}Cs into laboratory extractants or ground or surface water with effective diffusion coefficients (D{sub eff}) of (1.14 {+-} 0.06) and (4.8 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. PELCAPs containing untreated soil readily leached >90% of {sup 85}Sr but <1% of {sup 134}Cs during field leaching at both sites, whereas thermally treated soils quantitatively retained both isotopes under all conditions. Permeable polymer encapsulation methods, such as PELCAPs, offer the potential capability to conveniently test large numbers of soils and soil treatments for contaminant release and uptake under actual field environmental conditions.

  20. ABSTRACT: Upscaling Fracture Properties in Support of Dual-permeability Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rishi Parashar; Donald M. Reeves

    2008-09-15

    Rainier Mesa (RM) is a tuffaceous, high-elevation plateau on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that has been subjected to numerous nuclear tests between 1957 and 1992. Unlike other tests on the NTS located within or just above the saturated zone, tests at the RM T-tunnel complex were conducted within a variably saturated sequence of bedded and non-welded vitric and zeolitized tuff units, located approximately 500 m above the regional groundwater flow system. The low permeability and high porosity of the underlying zeolitized tuff units suggest the downward transport of radionuclides released from these tests are minimal through the tuff matrix. However, numerous faults observed to discharge water into tunnel drifts may serve as preferential pathways for radionuclide migration. Data collected from tunnel drifts indicate that faulting within the zeolitized tuff units is sparse with fractal clustering, and that connectivity between adjacent fault clusters is often weak to non-existent. The sparse fault density at RM, in conjunction with the extreme variability in the spatial distribution of faults, poses challenges not readily addressed by existing upscaling methods that upscale fracture properties as equivalent grid tensors. The unique fault statistics at RM has led to the development of a fracture continuum method designed to faithfully preserve flow and transport properties of the sparse fault networks. This method is based on selective mapping and upscaling of fault hydraulic and transport properties onto a continuum grid in support of dual-permeability simulations. Comparisons of global flow and random walk particle breakthrough between two-dimensional discrete fracture network and fracture continuum simulations demonstrate the utility of this method.

  1. Plastic Films for Soil Fumigation: Permeability and Emissions Reduction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil fumigation is being increasingly regulated to protect human and environmental health. Current California regulations are based on field data and, in effect, assume that use of a standard polyethylene tarp does not reliably reduce emissions. Plastic tarps used to cover the soil surface during so...

  2. Microwave Permittivity and Permeability Measurements on Lunar Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmatz, M.; Steinfeld, D.; Begley, S. B.; Winterhalter, D.; Allen, C.

    2011-03-01

    There has been speculation that the excellent microwave absorption of lunar soil came from the nanophase iron content. This room temperature study suggests that nanophase iron does not play a major heating role.

  3. Landslides and the interplay of infiltration, soil permeability and bedrock exfiltration on steep slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Brönnimann, Cornelia; Stähli, Manfred; Seibert, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Shallow landslides pose substantial risks to people and infrastructure in mountain areas. Their occurrence is influenced by soil and bedrock characteristics and triggered by precipitation-induced pore water dynamics. The bedrock may drain or contribute to groundwater in the overlying soil depending on permeability, degree of fracturing, saturation and hydraulic head. Here, we present a case study from Central Switzerland designed to illuminate a situation where such interactions are decisive and investigate runoff formation processes at hillslopes prone to slide. The bedrock in the study area represents a succession of fissured conglomerate-sandstone and weathered marlstone layers, overlaid by a gleysol. Evidence of a temporally confined aquifer in bedrock fractures was gathered from a severe storm event in August 2005. First, a geological model of the investigated slope derived from electrical resistivity tomography surveys, borehole data, and bedrock outcrops formed the basis for test site instrumentation. Second, the soil moisture and the groundwater response to 32 storm events were monitored in different soil and bedrock layers. Although the subsoil horizons are not particularly permeable, a fast and substantial rise of hydraulic heads in the bedrock was observed, suggesting that rapid percolation through bedrock fractures caused the immediate increase of pore water pressures. The data document how pore water pressure builds up in fractured bedrock below a low-permeable soil during storms, which may trigger shallow landslides. Third, sprinkling experiments were conducted on subplots with variable rainfall intensities and different dye tracers to identify preferential infiltration, percolation and storm runoff formation at the hillslope. Brilliant blue dye stained the entire organic topsoil, vertical soil fractures, and macropores. Lateral drainage in the subsoil or at the soil-bedrock interface was not observed; drainage was limited to the organic topsoil. In

  4. CORRELATION OF FLORIDA SOIL-GAS PERMEABILITIES WITH GRAIN SIZE, MOISTURE, AND POROSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a new correlation or predicting gas permeabilities of undisturbed or recompacted soils from their average grain diameter (d), moisture saturation factor (m), and porosity (p). he correlation exhibits a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of only 1.27 between m...

  5. CORRELATION OF FLORIDA SOIL-GAS PERMEABILITIES WITH GRAIN SIZE, MOISTURE, AND POROSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a new correlation or predicting gas permeabilities of undisturbed or recompacted soils from their average grain diameter (d), moisture saturation factor (m), and porosity (p). he correlation exhibits a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of only 1.27 between m...

  6. Intestinal permeability in Hymenolepis nana as reflected by non invasive lactulose/mannitol dual permeability test and its impaction on nutritional parameters of patients.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mahmoud A; Hegazi, Mai A

    2007-12-01

    Assessment of Hymenolepis nana infection among 102 children and adults of both sexes (5-16 years) residing 2 Welfare Institutes (Giza and Cairo) showed a prevalence of 22.33%. The effect of H. nana on intestinal permeability and on nutritional parameters of patients was studied. A total of 46 subjects were divided into 2 groups: GI (20 H. nana patients) and GII (26 parasite-free control). Both groups were subjected to lactulose/mannitol dual permeability test, anthropometric study, estimation of vitamin B12 and folate levels in plasma and estimation of haemoglobin (HB)%, RBCs and WBCs counts and haematocrite value (HCT%) for anaemia. The H. nana patients showed significant higher percent (P = 0.04) of altered intestinal permeability versus controls denoting intestinal leakage, significant means lower levels of vitamin B12 (P = 0.01) and folate (P < 0.04) in blood plasma versus control denoting liability to vitamin B12 & folate deficiencies. Means value of HB%, RBC & WBC counts and HCT% showed generalized decrease but without significant difference in H. nana patients and control denoting anaemia liability. The percent of stunting (HAZ < or =2) and of wasting (WAZ < or =2) were higher among H. nana patients versus controls but without significant difference (P = 0.19 & P = 0.47 respectively).

  7. The influence of meteorological parameters on soil radon levels in permeable glacial sediments.

    PubMed

    Sundal, Aud Venke; Valen, Vidar; Soldal, Oddmund; Strand, Terje

    2008-01-25

    The influence of meteorological parameters on soil radon concentrations in a permeable ice-marginal deposit in Kinsarvik, Norway, was investigated based on continuous measurements of soil radon concentrations, temperature, precipitation, wind speed, wind direction, air pressure and soil moisture content over a period of 10 months. The results show that the soil radon concentrations exhibit distinct seasonal and diurnal variations that predominantly are caused by changes in air temperature. Air flows between areas of different elevation occur in the ice-marginal deposit due to temperature differences between soil air and atmospheric air, and instantaneous changes in air flow direction were recorded when the atmospheric air temperature reached the average annual air temperature. Air pressure was found to be the second most important parameter influencing soil radon concentrations, while no apparent effect of precipitation, wind speed, wind direction or soil moisture was observed. Seasonal variations in indoor and soil radon levels were also investigated in a glaciofluvial deposit located 40 km southwest of Kinsarvik, and the close correlation between the seasonal variation patterns observed in the two areas suggests that the results of the Kinsarvik study also might be applicable to other areas of highly permeable building grounds where differences in terrain elevation exist.

  8. Microwave Permittivity and Permeability Measurement on Lunar Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin; Steinfeld, David; Begley, Shelley B.; Winterhalter, Daniel; Allen, Carlton

    2011-01-01

    There has been interest in finding ways to process the lunar regolith since the early analyses of lunar samples returned from the Apollo moon missions. This fact has led to proposals for using microwaves to perform in-situ processing of the lunar soil to support future colonization of the moon. More recently, there has been speculation that the excellent microwave absorption of lunar soil came from the nanophase iron content in the regolith. The motivation for the present study was to begin obtaining a more fundamental understanding of the dielectric and magnetic properties of the regolith at microwave frequencies. A major objective of this study was to obtain information that would help answer the question about whether nanophase iron plays a major role in heating lunar soils. These new measurements over a wide frequency range can also determine the magnitude of the dielectric and magnetic absorption and if there are any resonant features that could be used to enhance processing of the regolith in the future. In addition, these microwave measurements would be useful in confirming that new simulants being developed, particularly those containing nanophase iron, would have the correct composition to simulate the lunar regolith. The results of this study suggest that nanophase iron does not play a major role in heating lunar regolith.

  9. Washing of Pb contaminated soil using [S,S] ethylenediamine disuccinate and horizontal permeable barriers.

    PubMed

    Finzgar, N; Kos, B; Lestan, D

    2004-11-01

    The feasibility of in situ washing of soil contaminated with Pb (6.83 mmol kg(-1)) using biodegradable chelator, [S,S] stereoisomere of ethylenediamine disuccinate ([S,S]-EDDS) and horizontal permeable barriers was examined in soil columns. After 4-cycles of 10 mmol kg(-1) soil [S,S]-EDDS applications, followed by irrigation, 24.7% of total initial Pb was washed from the contaminated soil and accumulated into the barrier. Sequential extractions indicated that washing removed most of the Pb from the organic soil fraction. Barriers were positioned 20 cm deep in the soil and consisted of a 2 cm layer of nutrient enriched vermiculite. Barriers reduced leaching of Pb in the first cycle of [S,S]-EDDS addition by more than 500-times compared to columns with no barrier. After four cycles of chelator addition, a total of 0.24% of the initial Pb was leached from the columns with barriers. Four cycles of in situ soil washing in soil columns were less effective than simulated ex situ soil washing with 40 mmol kg(-1) [S,S]-EDDS, where 51.0% of the Pb was removed after 48-h extraction. Ex situ soil washing with 10 mmol kg(-1) [S,S]-EDDS was equally effective as the first cycle of in situ soil washing (15.5% and 14.5% of removed Pb, respectively).

  10. Micaceous Soil Strength And Permeability Improvement Induced By Microbacteria From Vegetable Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, R. C.; Roslan, R.; Baharuddin, I. N. Z.; Hanafiah, M. I. M.

    2016-11-01

    Green technology method using vegetable waste are introduced in this paper for improvement of phyllite residual soil from UNITEN, Campus. Residual soil from phyllite are known as micaceous soils and it give problem in managing the stability of the slope especially in wet and extensively dry seasons. Micaceous soil are collected using tube sampler technique and mixed with liquid contain microorganism from fermented vegetable waste name as vege-grout to form remolded sample. The remolded sample are classify as 15.0%, 17.5%, 20.00% and 22.5% based on different incremental percentages of vege-grout. The curing time for the sample are 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days before the tests were conducted. Observation of the effect of treatment shows 20.0% of liquid contain Bacillus pasteurii and Bacillus Subtilis with 21 days curing time is the optimum value in strengthening the soil and improve the permeability.

  11. Modeling reactive transport of reclaimed water through large soil columns with different low-permeability layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haizhu; Mao, Xiaomin; Barry, D. A.; Liu, Chengcheng; Li, Pengxiang

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of different proportions of silt-loam/bentonite mixtures overlying a vadose zone in controlling solute leaching to groundwater was quantified. Laboratory experiments were carried out using three large soil columns, each packed with 200-cm-thick riverbed soil covered by a 2-cm-thick bentonite/silt-loam mixture as the low-permeability layer (with bentonite mass accounting for 12, 16 and 19 % of the total mass of the mixture). Reclaimed water containing ammonium (NH4 +), nitrate (NO3 -), organic matter (OM), various types of phosphorus and other inorganic salts was applied as inflow. A one-dimensional mobile-immobile multi-species reactive transport model was used to predict the preferential flow and transport of typical pollutants through the soil columns. The simulated results show that the model is able to predict the solute transport in such conditions. Increasing the amount of bentonite in the low-permeability layer improves the removal of NH4 + and total phosphorous (TP) because of the longer contact time and increased adsorption capacity. The removal of NH4 + and OM is mainly attributed to adsorption and biodegradation. The increase of TP and NO3 - concentration mainly results from discharge and nitrification in riverbed soils, respectively. This study underscores the role of low-permeability layers as barriers in groundwater protection. Neglect of fingers or preferential flow may cause underestimation of pollution risk.

  12. Heavy metal uptake and leaching from polluted soil using permeable barrier in DTPA-assisted phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shulan; Shen, Zhiping; Duo, Lian

    2015-04-01

    Application of sewage sludge (SS) in agriculture is an alternative technique of disposing this waste. But unreasonable application of SS leads to excessive accumulation of heavy metals in soils. A column experiment was conducted to test the availability of heavy metals to Lolium perenne grown in SS-treated soils following diethylene triamine penta acetic acid (DTPA) application at rates of 0, 10 and 20 mmol kg(-1) soil. In order to prevent metal leaching in DTPA-assisted phytoextraction process, a horizontal permeable barrier was placed below the treated soil, and its effectiveness was also assessed. Results showed that DTPA addition significantly increased metal uptake by L. perenne shoots and metal leaching. Permeable barriers increased metal concentrations in plant shoots and effectively decreased metal leaching from the treated soil. Heavy metals in SS-treated soils could be gradually removed by harvesting L. perenne many times in 1 year and adding low dosage of DTPA days before each harvest.

  13. Permeability and Viability of Baylisascaris procyonis Eggs in Southern Texas Soils.

    PubMed

    Ogdee, Jacob L; Henke, Scott E; Wester, David B; Fedynich, Alan M

    2016-12-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis is a nematode whose definitive host is the raccoon ( Procyon lotor ). Adult parasites are not particularly pathogenic to raccoons; however, larvae in intermediate hosts can cause visceral, ocular, and neural larva migrans. Humans serve as dead-end hosts, and pathological responses are similar to those found in infected intermediate hosts. Infected raccoons expose intermediate hosts through their feces, which can contain millions of B. procyonis eggs. Our objective was to determine how the quantity and viability of B. procyonis eggs in soil changed over time within different soil texture, moisture, and sun exposure. To examine egg survival and movement through soil we placed 100 B. procyonis eggs on 100 squares in 48 boxes representing a full factorial treatment of soil texture, moisture, and sun level. We monitored egg percolation and survival for 2 yr, removing (at 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 mo) 5 squares from each box and counting the number of viable eggs at each depth in the soil column. Dry soils were mainly impermeable; even after 2 yr, >60% of B. procyonis eggs remained on the surface of all soil textures. Wet soils were more permeable than dry soils, but even in wet sandy soils where the greatest egg movement occurred, it required 1 yr before 60% of eggs transitioned from the soil surface to the next soil depth. For all soil textures, moistures, sun exposures, and depths, >92% of B. procyonis eggs remained viable after 2 yr in the southern Texas environment. Therefore, high exposure risk exists for potential hosts because B. procyonis eggs remain viable on or near the soil surface for at least 2 yr.

  14. Reducing compaction effort and incorporating air permeability in Proctor testing for design of urban green spaces on cohesive soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is well established that compaction negatively affects agronomic productivity, that air permeability is a sensitive measure of the degree of soil compaction and therefore a good indicator of soil productivity impairment from compaction. Cohesive soils in urban settings are often heavily compacted...

  15. Modeling relative permeability of water in soil: Application of effective-medium approximation and percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Sahimi, Muhammad; Daigle, Hugh

    2016-07-01

    Accurate prediction of the relative permeability to water under partially saturated condition has broad applications and has been studied intensively since the 1940s by petroleum, chemical, and civil engineers, as well as hydrologists and soil scientists. Many models have been developed for this purpose, ranging from those that represent the pore space as a bundle of capillary tubes, to those that utilize complex networks of interconnected pore bodies and pore throats with various cross-section shapes. In this paper, we propose an approach based on the effective-medium approximation (EMA) and percolation theory in order to predict the water relative permeability. The approach is general and applicable to any type of porous media. We use the method to compute the water relative permeability in porous media whose pore-size distribution follows a power law. The EMA is invoked to predict the relative permeability from the fully saturated pore space to some intermediate water saturation that represents a crossover from the EMA to what we refer to as the "critical region." In the critical region below the crossover water saturation Swx, but still above the critical water saturation Swc (the residual saturation or the percolation threshold of the water phase), the universal power law predicted by percolation theory is used to compute the relative permeability. To evaluate the accuracy of the approach, data for 21 sets of undisturbed laboratory samples were selected from the UNSODA database. For 14 cases, the predicted relative permeabilities are in good agreement with the data. For the remaining seven samples, however, the theory underestimates the relative permeabilities. Some plausible sources of the discrepancy are discussed.

  16. Induced phytoextraction/soil washing of lead using biodegradable chelate and permeable barriers.

    PubMed

    Kos, Bostjan; Lestan, Domen

    2003-02-01

    Chelate-induced remediation has been proposed as an effective tool for the extraction of lead (Pb) from contaminated soils by plants. However, side-effects, mainly mobilization and leaching of Pb, raise environmental concerns. Biodegradable, synthetic organic chelate ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS), and commonly used ethylenedimanetetraacetic acid (EDTA) were used for induced phytoextraction with a test plant Brassica rapa and in situ washing of soil contaminated with 1350 mg/kg of Pb. Horizontal permeable barriers were placed 20 cm deep in soil columns and tested for their ability to prevent leaching of Pb. The reactive materials in the barriers were nutrient enriched vermiculite, peat or agricultural hydrogel, and apatite. EDTA and EDDS addition increased Pb concentrations in the test plant by 158 and 89 times compared to the control, to 817 and 464 mg/kg, respectively. In EDTA treatments, approximately 25% or more of total initial soil Pb was leached in single cycle of chelate addition. In EDDS treatments, 20% of the initial Pb was leached from columns with no barrier, while barriers with vermiculite or hydrogel and apatite decreased leaching by more than 60 times, to 0.35%. 11.6% of total initial Pb was washed from the soil above the barrier with vermiculite and apatite, where almost all leached Pb was accumulated. Results indicate that use of biodegradable chelate EDDS and permeable barriers may lead to environmentally safe induced Pb phytoextraction and in situ washing of Pb.

  17. Estimation of water saturated permeability of soils, using 3D soil tomographic images and pore-level transport phenomena modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorski, Krzysztof; Sławiński, Cezary; Barna, Gyöngyi

    2014-05-01

    There are some important macroscopic properties of the soil porous media such as: saturated permeability and water retention characteristics. These soil characteristics are very important as they determine soil transport processes and are commonly used as a parameters of general models of soil transport processes used extensively for scientific developments and engineering practise. These characteristics are usually measured or estimated using some statistical or phenomenological modelling, i.e. pedotransfer functions. On the physical basis, saturated soil permeability arises from physical transport processes occurring at the pore level. Current progress in modelling techniques, computational methods and X-ray micro-tomographic technology gives opportunity to use direct methods of physical modelling for pore level transport processes. Physically valid description of transport processes at micro-scale based on Navier-Stokes type modelling approach gives chance to recover macroscopic porous medium characteristics from micro-flow modelling. Water microflow transport processes occurring at the pore level are dependent on the microstructure of porous body and interactions between the fluid and the medium. In case of soils, i.e. the medium there exist relatively big pores in which water can move easily but also finer pores are present in which water transport processes are dominated by strong interactions between the medium and the fluid - full physical description of these phenomena is a challenge. Ten samples of different soils were scanned using X-ray computational microtomograph. The diameter of samples was 5 mm. The voxel resolution of CT scan was 2.5 µm. Resulting 3D soil samples images were used for reconstruction of the pore space for further modelling. 3D image threshholding was made to determine the soil grain surface. This surface was triangulated and used for computational mesh construction for the pore space. Numerical modelling of water flow through the

  18. Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Optimization, Clare Water Supply Superfund Site, Permeable Reactive Barrier and Soil Remedy Areas, Clare, Michigan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report contains a review of the long-term groundwater monitoring network for the Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) and Soil Remedy Areas at the Clare Water Supply Superfund Site in Clare, Michigan.

  19. Classification of soils based on double ring measured permeability in Zarrineh-Roud Delta, western Azarbayejan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Alipour, S

    2007-08-01

    A physical method of soil classification based on soil permeability as a preliminary quick way prior to slow and expensive chemical conventional method was conducted in regional scale using 40 test stations. Double ring method used for permeability measurements in the area. The results clearly differentiated development of various soil types and quality in the area under investigation. The results clearly indicate the physical method of double ring measurement permeability is able to identify various soil types in regional scale and the later chemical methods could be used in local scale for detailed classification. NaCl content of soils was reflected by the amount of infiltration rate. Permeability ranged as high, medium and low, corresponded with loamy sand, loamy and clay soils respectively. Permeability in the vicinity of the higher water flows was high due to leaching of NaCl in the soil. NaCl is considered to be the main factor of impermeability reduction in the area associated with clay and soil textures.

  20. Fracture and healing in magmas: a dual role on permeability evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamur, Anthony; Lavallée, Yan; Wall, Richard; Ashworth, James; Kendrick, Jackie; Wadsworth, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    The development of a permeable network in silicic volcanic conduits controls outgassing and plays a major role on the subsequent eruptive behaviour. Efficient outgassing, at higher permeabilities, is achieved through the coalescence of pores and fractures. Whilst the relationship between permeability and increasing connected porosity is now relatively well constrained, the effects of fractures have, on the other hand, rarely been investigated. Here, we present the results of an experimental study focusing on the impacts of tensile fracturing and healing on permeability. Permeability measurements have been performed on over 60 disk-shaped samples (26 mm diameter, 13 mm thickness) with connected porosities ranging from 2 to 45%. Our results for unfractured samples display the same porosity-permeability trend as previous studies and permeabilities span from 10-15 at low porosities to over 5x10-12 m2 at higher porosities. These samples were then broken via Brazilian tests and the resultant permeability of the rocks were then measured across the fracture zone. Whilst high porosity samples reached permeabilities of about 5x10-10 m2 (2 orders of magnitude higher than intact samples), low porosity samples, on the other hand, reached permeabilities around 5x10-12 m2 (more than 3 orders of magnitude above intact samples). Our results show that fracturing favours the development of a permeable network that adheres to a different permeability-porosity relationship than previously presented, and that this effect is emphasized in magmas with low connected porosities. The effect of fracture healing by diffusion on permeability has been investigated through a series of experiments on borosilicate standard glass (NIST 717a). These experiments were conducted at 560oC (viscosity of 1010.33 Pa.s) on pairs of columns pressed and held in contact at constant load for times varying between 0.5s and 15000 s before being pulled apart at a strain rate of 10-3s-1. Using Maxwell's theory of

  1. Quantitative comparison of the water permeable zone among four types of dental adhesives used with a dual-cured composite.

    PubMed

    Chang, Juhea; Platt, Jeffrey A; Yi, Keewook; Cochran, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    This study compared silver penetration in the adhesive interface among four versions of adhesives from the same manufacturer: OptiBond FL, OptiBond Solo Plus, OptiBond Solo Plus Dual Cure, and OptiBond Solo Plus Self-Etch, when coupled with dual-cured composite, CoreRestore 2 (Kerr). Twenty flat dentin surfaces were prepared using one of the adhesives and bonded with the composite, following the manufacturer's instructions. The surfaces were sectioned into 2-mm slabs and immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate for 24 hours. Each specimen was exposed to a photodeveloping solution for eight hours and examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The water permeable area occupied by the silver nitrate tracer was determined, and the relative weight of silver was analyzed by wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS). The OptiBond FL group had a significantly lower silver content than the other groups (p < 0.0001). Each group demonstrated different patterns of silver deposition within the adhesive layer and within various features of artifactual fracture from dehydration stress of the SEM. This may be indicative of weak links in the bonded interfaces. Simplified-step adhesives showed increased permeability, which can lead to disruption of coupling with composites.

  2. Hydraulic fracturing to enhance the remediation of DNAPL in low permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, L.; Slack, B.

    1996-08-01

    Meager rates of fluid flow are a major obstacle to in situ remediation of low permeability soils. This paper describes methods designed to avoid that obstacle by creating fractures and filling them with sand to increase well discharge and change paths of fluid flow in soil. Gently dipping fractures 10 m in maximum dimension and 1 to 2 cm thick can be created in some contaminated soils at depths of a few in or greater. Hydraulic fractures can also be used to create electrically conductive layers or to deliver granules of chemically or biologically active compounds that will degrade contaminants in place. Benefits of applying hydraulic fractures to DNAPL recovery include rates of fluid recovery, enhancing upward gradients to improve hydrodynamic stabilization, forming flat-lying reactive curtains to intersect compounds moving downward, or improving the performance of electrokinetics intended to recover compounds dissolved in water. 30 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Controlling Solute Transport Processes in Soils by using Dual-Porosity Characteristics of Natural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Y.; Higashi, N.

    2009-12-01

    Soils are notorious for their heterogeneity, and macropores conduct solutions by bypassing the surrounding soils, sometimes wasting the applied fertilizer or remediation chemicals. It would be beneficial in agriculture or environmental engineering fields if solute transport in soils were controlled with relatively simple techniques. In this study, the solute transport process was controlled using dual-characteristics of the soil pore system. Specifically convection and dispersion were controlled by changing the structure-dependent flow regime. Soil samples with/without artificial small macropores (diameter = 1mm) and undisturbed soil samples were prepared, and solute transport experiments were conducted, in which a variety of breakthrough curves (BTC) was obtained by changing flow rate (from 1 to 0.1 of saturated conductivity) and saturation (saturation to -3kPa). The results for the artificial macropore system showed that completely different BTCs were obtained with small suction differences, namely saturation and -3kPa. At saturation, the BTC showed a bi-modal distribution typical for soils with macropores. At a slightly unsaturated condition of -3kPa, however, the BTC showed a normal distribution quite similar to that of a repacked soil column. The results for undisturbed soil showed that the BTC gradually transitioned from a bi-modal to normal distribution, with the suction changing from saturation to only -3kPa. These results suggest that effective use of fertilizer or remediation chemicals are possible with a relatively simple and inexpensive technique, even when macropore networks are present.

  4. Hot air injection for removal of dense, non-aqueous-phase liquid contaminants from low-permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.C.

    1996-08-01

    The performance of soil vapor extraction systems for the recovery of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds is potentially enhanced by the injection of heated air to increase soil temperatures. The soil temperature increase is expected to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) performance by increasing target compound vapor pressures and by increasing soil permeability through drying. The vapor pressure increase due to temperature rise relieves the vapor pressure limit on the feasibility of soil vapor extraction. However, the system still requires an air flow through the soil system to deliver heat and to recover mobilized contaminants. Although the soil permeability can be increased through drying, very low permeability soils and low permeability soils adjacent to high permeability air flow pathways will be treated slowly, if at all. AR thermal enhancement methods face this limitation. Heated air injection offers advantages relative to other thermal techniques, including low capital and operation costs. Heated air injection is at a disadvantage relative to other thermal techniques due to the low heat capacity of air. To be effective, heated air injection requires that higher air flows be established than for steam injection or radio frequency heating. Heated air injection is not economically feasible for the stratified soil system developed as a standard test for this document. This is due to the inability to restrict heated air flow to the clay stratum when a low-resistance air flow pathway is available in the adjoining sand. However, the technology should be especially attractive, both technically and economically, for low-volatile contaminant recovery from relatively homogeneous soil formations. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. [Effects of rhizosphere soil permeability on water and nutrient uptake by maize].

    PubMed

    Niu, Wen-quan; Guo, Chao

    2010-11-01

    Aimed to better understand the significance of soil microenvironment in crop growth, a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of rhizosphere soil permeability on the water and nutrient uptake by maize. Under three irrigation levels (600, 400, and 200 ml per pot), three treatments of soil aeration (no tube aeration as the control, tube aeration every two days, and tube aeration every four days) were installed, and the physiological indices of maize were measured. Under the same irrigation levels, soil aeration increased the plant height, leaf area, chlorophyll contents, promoted nutrient adsorption and increased root vitality markedly. At elongation stage, treatment tube aeration every four days had the highest root vitality (8.24 mg x g(-1) x h(-1)) under the irrigation level 600 ml per pot, being significantly higher (66.7%) than that (4.94 mg x g(-1) x h(-1)) of the control. Soil aeration had no significant effects on the transpiration rate of maize, indicating that rhizosphere soil aeration could raise water and nutrient use efficiency, and improve maize growth.

  6. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF GEOMETRICAL SHAPE FACTORS FOR SHORT CYLINDRICAL PROBES USED TO MEASURE SOIL PERMEABILITY TO AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeability of soil has become recognized as an important parameter in determining the rate of transport and entry of radon from the soil into indoor environments. This parameter is usually measured in the field by inserting a cylindrical tube with a short porous section into th...

  7. LEAK AND GAS PERMEABILITY TESTING DURING SOIL-GAS SAMPLING AT HAL'S CHEVRON LUST SITE IN GREEN RIVER, UTAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of gas permeability and leak testing during active soil-gas sampling at Hal’s Chevron LUST Site in Green River, Utah are presented. This study was conducted to support development of a passive soil-gas sampling method. Gas mixtures containing helium and methane were...

  8. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF GEOMETRICAL SHAPE FACTORS FOR SHORT CYLINDRICAL PROBES USED TO MEASURE SOIL PERMEABILITY TO AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeability of soil has become recognized as an important parameter in determining the rate of transport and entry of radon from the soil into indoor environments. This parameter is usually measured in the field by inserting a cylindrical tube with a short porous section into th...

  9. LEAK AND GAS PERMEABILITY TESTING DURING SOIL-GAS SAMPLING AT HAL'S CHEVRON LUST SITE IN GREEN RIVER, UTAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of gas permeability and leak testing during active soil-gas sampling at Hal’s Chevron LUST Site in Green River, Utah are presented. This study was conducted to support development of a passive soil-gas sampling method. Gas mixtures containing helium and methane were...

  10. Processes affecting soil and groundwater contamination by DNAPL in low-permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    This paper is one of a set of focus papers intended to document the current knowledge relevant to the contamination and remediation of soils and ground water by dense, nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). The emphasis is on low permeability media such as fractured clay and till and unconsolidated, stratified formations. Basic concepts pertaining to immiscible-fluid mixtures are described and used to discuss such aspects as DNAPL transport, dissolved-phase transport, and equilibrium mass distributions. Several implications for remediation are presented. 27 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Soil features and indoor radon concentration prediction: radon in soil gas, pedology, permeability and 226Ra content.

    PubMed

    Lara, E; Rocha, Z; Santos, T O; Rios, F J; Oliveira, A H

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at relating some physicochemical features of soils and their use as a tool for prediction of indoor radon concentrations of the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte (RMBH), Minas Gerais, Brazil. The measurements of soil gas radon concentrations were performed by using an AlphaGUARD monitor. The (226)Ra content analysis was performed by gamma spectrometry (high pure germanium) and permeabilities were performed by using the RADON-JOK permeameter. The GEORP indicator and soil radon index (RI) were also calculated. Approximately 53 % of the Perferric Red Latosols measurement site could be classified as 'high risk' (Swedish criteria). The Litholic Neosols presented the lowest radon concentration mean in soil gas. The Perferric Red Latosols presented significantly high radon concentration mean in soil gas (60.6 ± 8.7 kBq m(-3)), high indoor radon concentration, high RI, (226)Ra content and GEORP. The preliminary results may indicate an influence of iron formations present very close to the Perferric Red Latosols in the retention of uranium minerals. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The Influence of Selected Liquid and Soil Properties on the Propagation of Spills over Flat Permeable Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jason M.; Simmons, Carver S.

    2005-02-15

    In an effort to determine spill characteristics, information about a spill's spatial distribution with time is being studied. For permeable surfaces, spill phenomenology is controlled by liquid and soil properties, the most relevant of which are presented in this report. The pertinent liquid and soil properties were tabulated for ten liquids and four soils. The liquids represented an array of organic compounds, some of which are or are soon to be documented in the liquid spectra library by the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The soils were chosen based on ongoing surface spectra work and to represent a range of relevant soil properties. The effect of the liquid and soil properties on spill phenomenology were explored using a spill model that couples overland flow described by gravity currents with the Green-Ampt infiltration model. From the simulations, liquid viscosity was found to be a controlling liquid property in determining the amount of time a spill remains on the surface, with the surface vanish time decreasing as viscosity decreased. This was attributed to decreasing viscosity increasing both the hydraulic conductivity of the soil and allowing for the spill to more quickly spread out onto an unsaturated soil surface. Soil permeability also controlled vanish times with the vanish times increasing as permeability decreased, corresponding to finer textured materials. Maximum spill area was found to be largely controlled by liquid viscosity on coarse, highly permeable soils. On the less permeable soils maximum spill area began to be controlled by the steady-area spill height due to the restricting of infiltration to the extent that the spill is then able to reach its steady-area spill height. Simulations performed with and without the inclusion of capillarity in the Green-Ampt infiltration model displayed the importance of capillarity in describing infiltration rate in fine textured soils. In coarse textured

  13. Remediation of DNAPLs in Low Permeability Soils. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    Dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) compounds like trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) are prevalent at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), other government, and industrial sites. Their widespread presence in low permeability media (LPM) poses severe challenges for assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective remediation technologies. Most remedial methods that involve fluid flow perform poorly in LPM. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of remediation methods such as vapor extraction, free-product recovery, soil flushing, steam stripping, bioremediation, bioventing, and air sparging in LPM by enhancing formation permeability through the creation of fractures filled with high-permeability materials, such as sand. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of other remediation methods such as oxidation, reductive dechlorination, and bioaugmentation by enhancing delivery of reactive agents to the subsurface. Hydraulic fractures are typically created using a 2-in. steel casing and a drive point pushed into the subsurface by a pneumatic hammer. Hydraulic fracturing has been widely used for more than 50 years to stimulate the yield of wells recovering oil from rock at great depth and has recently been shown to stimulate the yield of wells recovering contaminated liquids and vapors from LPM at shallow depths. Hydraulic fracturing is an enabling technology for improving the performance of some remedial methods and is a key element in the implementation of other methods. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

  14. One-dimensional model for biogeochemical interactions and permeability reduction in soils during leachate permeation.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Naresh; Islam, Jahangir

    2008-02-19

    This paper uses the findings from a column study to develop a reactive model for exploring the interactions occurring in leachate-contaminated soils. The changes occurring in the concentrations of acetic acid, sulphate, suspended and attached biomass, Fe(II), Mn(II), calcium, carbonate ions, and pH in the column are assessed. The mathematical model considers geochemical equilibrium, kinetic biodegradation, precipitation-dissolution reactions, bacterial and substrate transport, and permeability reduction arising from bacterial growth and gas production. A two-step sequential operator splitting method is used to solve the coupled transport and biogeochemical reaction equations. The model gives satisfactory fits to experimental data and the simulations show that the transport of metals in soil is controlled by multiple competing biotic and abiotic reactions. These findings suggest that bioaccumulation and gas formation, compared to chemical precipitation, have a larger influence on hydraulic conductivity reduction.

  15. Characterization of RADON-222 Entry Into a Basement Structure Surrounded by Low Permeability Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Dann Carlton

    1992-01-01

    An experimental facility has been developed to monitor the entry rate and concentration of ^ {222}Rn in two basement type structures surrounded by soil having a permeability on the order of 10^{-12} m^2 . A data acquisition system recorded environmental conditions outside and inside the structures, including basement air exchange rates, every 15 min. Indoor ^{222}Rn concentrations ranged from 400 to 1400 Bq m^{-3}. The observed ^{222}Rn entry rate is highly variable and has two primary components; a constant input rate caused by diffusion of ^ {222}Rn through the concrete walls and floor, and a variable rate that depends upon indoor-soil pressure differentials of only a few pascals. Pressure differentials are dependent upon wind speed and wind direction. Stack effect was not significant. During a two week period, with relatively calm winds, diffusion through the concrete walls and floor plus the floor-wall joint accounted for more than 80% of the total ^{222} Rn entry.

  16. [Controlling effects of dual mulching on soil moisture in an apple orchard].

    PubMed

    Tian, Fei; Xie, Yong-Sheng; Suo, Gai-Di; Ding, Ya-Dong

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the controlling effects of dual mulching on soil moisture in an apple orchard on the Weibei rainfed highland, soil moisture in the 0-600 cm soil profile of the apple orchard was measured under four mulching treatments (plastic film plus straw, plastic film and straw mulches, as well as a non-mulching control) , and meanwhile the apple yield and branch growth increment were analyzed statistically. Results showed that the dual mulching treatment had the best effect on soil moisture conservation, and the soil water storage in such a soil profile was 6.7% higher than the control treatment. Long-term dual mulching could effectively alleviate soil desiccation occurring in deep soil layer in the region, and the monthly averaged soil water storage in stable layer (240-600 cm) was 64.22 mm higher than that of the control treatment. Both plastic film plus straw and plastic film mulches were able to reduce the temporal fluctuation of soil moisture in shallow soil (0-60 cm) and enhance the temporal stability of soil moisture in the layer. Compared with the single mulching treatments, the dual mulching treatment could effectively decrease the vertical variation of soil moisture in the profile and improve the stability of the vertical soil moisture distribution. The apple yield under the dual mulching treatment was evidently increased by 48.2%, as compared with the control treatment. All the analyses showed that dual mulching had more advantages in controlling soil moisture and improving apple yield than single mulching.

  17. Radon concentration in soil gas and its correlations with pedologies, permeabilities and 226Ra content in the soil of the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte - RMBH, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, E.; Rocha, Z.; Palmieri, H. E. L.; Santos, T. O.; Rios, F. J.; Oliveira, A. H.

    2015-11-01

    The radon concentration in soil gas is directly dependent on the geological characteristics of the area, such as lithology, pedology and on geochemicals, physicals and mineralogicals parameters of the soil. This paper looks for correlations between radon concentrations in soil gas and its soil permeability, 238U, 232Th and 226Ra contents in the soil groups classified by pedologies of Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte (RMBH), Minas Gerais, Brazil. The soil gas radon concentrations were determined by using an AlphaGUARD® monitor at about 150 measurement points. In soil samples of the same measurement points, the concentrations of 226Ra were determined by gamma spectrometry (HPGe), and 238U and 232Th by ICP-MS. The soil permeabilities were determined by using the RADON-JOK® permeameter. The mean concentrations of radon in soil gas ranged from 13.6±3.0 kBq m-3 for Litholic Neosols until 60.6±8.7 kBq m-3 for Perferric Red Latosols. The mean of 226Ra activity concentrations presented variation of 12.4±2.5 Bq kg-1 for Litholic Neosols until 50.3±13 Bq kg-1 for Perferric Red Latosols. Approximately 40% of the soils presented high permeability. The areas of different pedologies were classified by Soil Radon Index (SRI), determined by the soil gas radon concentration and permeability. Approximately 53% of the Perferric Red Latosols measurement site could be classified as "High Risk" (Swedish criteria). The preliminary results may indicate an influence of iron formations present very close to the Perferric Red Latosols in the retention of uranium minerals, and hence an increase in the concentration of radon and radium, whereas the series are in equilibrium in the environment.

  18. A novel dual-flow bioreactor simulates increased fluorescein permeability in epithelial tissue barriers.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Serena; Sbrana, Tommaso; La Marca, Margherita; Di Patria, Valentina; Martinucci, Valentina; Tirella, Annalisa; Domenici, Claudio; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2014-09-01

    Permeability studies across epithelial barriers are of primary importance in drug delivery as well as in toxicology. However, traditional in vitro models do not adequately mimic the dynamic environment of physiological barriers. Here, we describe a novel two-chamber modular bioreactor for dynamic in vitro studies of epithelial cells. The fluid dynamic environment of the bioreactor was characterized using computational fluid dynamic models and measurements of pressure gradients for different combinations of flow rates in the apical and basal chambers. Cell culture experiments were then performed with fully differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model of the intestinal epithelium, comparing the effect of media flow applied in the bioreactor with traditional static transwells. The flow increases barrier integrity and tight junction expression of Caco-2 cells with respect to the static controls. Fluorescein permeability increased threefold in the dynamic system, indicating that the stimulus induced by flow increases transport across the barrier, closely mimicking the in vivo situation. The results are of interest for studying the influence of mechanical stimuli on cells, and underline the importance of developing more physiologically relevant in vitro tissue models. The bioreactor can be used to study drug delivery, chemical, or nanomaterial toxicity and to engineer barrier tissues.

  19. Biological permeable reactive barriers coupled with electrokinetic soil flushing for the treatment of diesel-polluted clay soil.

    PubMed

    Mena, Esperanza; Ruiz, Clara; Villaseñor, José; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Cañizares, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Removal of diesel from spiked kaolin has been studied in the laboratory using coupled electrokinetic soil flushing (EKSF) and bioremediation through an innovative biological permeable reactive barriers (Bio-PRBs) positioned between electrode wells. The results show that this technology is efficient in the removal of pollutants and allows the soil to maintain the appropriate conditions for microorganism growth in terms of pH, temperature, and nutrients. At the same time, EKSF was demonstrated to be a very interesting technology for transporting pollutants, microorganisms and nutrients, although results indicate that careful management is necessary to avoid the depletion of nutrients, which are effectively transported by electro-migration. After two weeks of operation, 30% of pollutants are removed and energy consumption is under 70 kWh m(-3). Main fluxes (electroosmosis and evaporation) and changes in the most relevant parameters (nutrients, diesel, microorganisms, surfactants, moisture conductivity and pH) during treatment and in a complete post-study analysis are studied to give a comprehensive description of the most relevant processes occurring in the soil (pollutant transport and biodegradation).

  20. Changes in pulmonary microvascular permeability accompanying re-expansion oedema: evidence from dual isotope scintigraphy.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P D; Keegan, J; Davies, S W; Bailey, J; Rudd, R M

    1990-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism of pulmonary oedema following rapid re-expansion of a collapsed lung is poorly understood. It has been suggested that the period of collapse or subsequent reinflation produces an increase in pulmonary microvascular permeability. To investigate this, the pulmonary accumulation of the plasma protein transferrin was measured by radiolabelling it in vivo with indium-113m. Plasma protein accumulation was calculated after correcting the accumulation of transferrin for changes in intrathoracic blood distribution by simultaneously monitoring technetium-99m labelled red blood cells. Functional images of plasma protein accumulation were constructed for the lung fields on a pixel by pixel basis. Investigations were performed on 14 subjects after drainage of a pleural effusion (n = 9) or evacuation of a pneumothorax (n = 5), and on 11 control subjects. Plasma protein accumulation was greater over the regions of lung re-expansion (-0.1-9.6, mean 2.9 x 10(-3)/min) than over the corresponding region of the contralateral lung (-1.2-0.8, mean 0.01 x 10(-3)/min; p less than 0.001). Patients who had undergone re-expansion procedures also had significantly greater plasma protein accumulation than normal controls. Nine of the 14 patients in the re-expansion group had clearly identifiable areas of increased plasma protein accumulation that corresponded to the part of the lung that had been re-expanded; no regional abnormalities were recorded in the control group. These results suggest that the reinflated lung displays abnormal microvascular permeability. Images PMID:2392790

  1. Functional test of FOOTPRINT pedotransfer functions for the dual-permeability model MACRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeys, J.; Jarvis, N. J.; Stenemo, F.; Hollis, J. M.; Dubus, I. G.; Larsbo, M.; Brown, C. D.; Bromilow, R.; Coquet, Y.; Vachier, P.

    2009-04-01

    Our ability to assess and predict pollution risks for surface waters and groundwater across larger areas (e.g. catchment and regional scales) relies on our capacity to estimate soil physical and hydrological properties and crop characteristics that are generally required as model parameters. ‘Pedotransfer' functions (PTF) can be used to estimate model parameters from more easily available soil survey data. The EU-FP6 European project FOOTPRINT (www.eu-footprint.org) has supported the development of a full set of PTF's to completely parameterise the pesticide fate model MACRO from only easily available site and soil data for a range of European agronomic, climatic and pedological scenarios The work presented here aimed at assessing the performance of the parameterisation procedures developed in the FOOTPRINT project for MACRO, from a functional point of view. We present a comparison of measured and simulated tracer leaching in medium- to long-term (2 months to 2 years) experiments driven by natural-transient rainfall conditions on 41 lysimeters, representing 15 soil types, located in Sweden, UK and France. For each experiment, the only information used to parameterize the model was a soil profile description, in which each horizon is characterized by its thickness, FAO master horizon type, texture class, organic carbon content and bulk density and knowledge of the tillage (till, no-till, harrowed) and cropping practices (crop type, and sowing dates). The average depth of the lysimeters was 1 meter, each profile containing an average of 4.6 horizons. The soil properties covered a large range of textures (1 to 78% clay), organic matter contents (0 to 29%) and bulk densities (550 to 1870 kg.m-3). Simulations were first conducted without any calibration of parameters. In a second step, we conducted simulations where two crop parameters were optimized (root depth and root water uptake efficiency), in order to estimate the impact of errors in the simulated water balance

  2. An evolving dual porosity model for the study of rainfall infiltration processes in fractured porous swelling soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeandro, Annalisa; Simeone, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    In the last two decades a lot of models have been developed in order to simulate infiltration processes and preferential flow in the vadose zone. Some like dual-porosity/permeability or multi-porosity/permeability models are based on interacting regions (microporous matrix and macropores or fractures) with different hydraulic properties. This kind of models can be used to describe preferential water flow in unsaturated structured porous media. Most of existing models don't take in to account of shrinking-swelling dynamics of clayey soils that cause the closure of fractures and hold water flow. The presence of shrinking effect due to the presence of clay is the main cause of cracks formation in soils, which increases infiltration rate and reduces run-off. Moreover, during infiltration, the porous structure of clayey soils changes with moisture: as a consequence of soil swelling cracks close and there is a reduction in infiltration water flow. To describe this kind of phenomena, an "evolving" dual-porosity model has been pointed out, in which fractures behave like pipes subjected to progressive narrowing due to water content increase in the swelling matrix. Water transfer from fractures to matrix has been modelled by a modified Richards equations with an interaction term depending on effective saturation gradient, while water diffusion process in matrix has been estimated in terms of adsorption phenomena related to head pressure gradient in soil. The model has been used to simulate infiltration processes in a loamy soils characterized by shrinking cracks, for different values of rainfall intensity. In the model it has been considered also the presence of a layer of high permeability that create a capillary barrier effect at the interface between the two kind of soils. The application of the model has shown that, for intense precipitations, the water flowing in the fracture reaches significant depth (over 1,5 meters) in few minutes. Instead in the case of weak rains

  3. Investigation of Stabilised Batu Pahat Soft Soil Pertaining on its CBR and Permeability Properties for Road Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Idrus, M. M.; Singh, J. S. M.; Musbah, A. L. A.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization by adding materials such as cement, lime and bitumen is one of the effective methods for improving the geotechnical properties of soils [11] Nano-particle is one of the newest additives and many studies about using nano-particle in soil improvement has been done but it was given less attention when soft clay soils stabilization is concerned. To evaluate the strength characteristics of stabilized Batu Pahat soft clay, laboratory investigation on early strength gained by the stabilized soil must be conducted to formulate a suitable and economical mix design [10]. To achieve such purpose, the study examined the effect of NanoClay on the California Bearing Ratio and the Permeability of soft clay. The results gained shows that the Nano-Clay is able to increase the strength of the soft clay [9]. The California Bearing Ratio of the soil is increase significantly where the results for the highest percentage of admixture is 14.4% while the permeability of the soil decreases significantly with increasing Nano-Clay whereby the results of the highest percentage of admixture is 2.0187x10-11 m/s. After doing this research, it is proven that Nano-clay can contribute towards better soil stabilization and enhance the quality of soil as subgrade and foundation at large.

  4. Colloid Mobilization in a Fractured Soil during Dry-Wet Cycles: Role of Drying Duration and Flow Path Permeability.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2015-08-04

    In subsurface soils, colloids are mobilized by infiltrating rainwater, but the source of colloids and the process by which colloids are generated between rainfalls are not clear. We examined the effect of drying duration and the spatial variation of soil permeability on the mobilization of in situ colloids in intact soil cores (fractured and heavily weathered saprolite) during dry-wet cycles. Measuring water flux at multiple sampling ports at the core base, we found that water drained through flow paths of different permeability. The duration of antecedent drying cycles affected the amount of mobilized colloids, particularly in high-flux ports that received water from soil regions with a large number of macro- and mesopores. In these ports, the amount of mobilized colloids increased with increased drying duration up to 2.5 days. For drying durations greater than 2.5 days, the amount of mobilized colloids decreased. In contrast, increasing drying duration had a limited effect on colloid mobilization in low-flux ports, which presumably received water from soil regions with fewer macro- and mesopores. On the basis of these results, we attribute this dependence of colloid mobilization upon drying duration to colloid generation from dry pore walls and distribution of colloids in flow paths, which appear to be sensitive to the moisture content of soil after drying and flow path permeability. The results are useful for improving the understanding of colloid mobilization during fluctuating weather conditions.

  5. Gas Diffusivity And Air Permeability In Sandy Soils: Effect Of Particle Size, Compaction And Sample Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2007-12-01

    The transport and fate of gases in soils is mainly governed by gas diffusion and advection. The gas diffusivity (Dp/D0) is the transport parameter for the gas diffusion due to gas concentration gradient, while the air permeability (ka) is the transport parameter for advective gas transport due to soil-air pressure gradient. Hence, those gas transport parameters play a crucial role in simulating transport of gaseous contaminants such as volatile organic chemicals and in quantifying emission and exchange of greenhouse gases from/at the soil- atmosphere interface. In this study, we measured Dp/D0 and ka for total of six sandy soils and examined the effects of soil physical properties such as particle size, soil compaction, and sample scale on the gas transport parameters. Toyoura sand (0.106-0.50 mm) and Narita sands with three different particle size fractions (0.106-0.25, 0.25- 0.425, 0.425-0.85 mm) were used as experimental materials for the measurements of Dp/D0 and ka. The sand materials were repacked with given bulk densities into small-scale cores of 100 cm3 (for all materials) and large-scale cores of 2120 cm3 (only for Toyoura sand) at given water contents. In addition to the measurements, Dp/D0 and ka of Oso Flaco fine sand and Oakley sand from literature were also analyzed in this study. For all sand materials, we observed the threshold soil-air content (ɛth) below which Dp/D0 and ka are negligible, and measured Dp/D0 and ka increased linearly with increasing air-filled porosity (ɛ) from ɛth to soil total porosity (Φ). At high ɛ, sand materials with larger average particle diameter (APD) gave higher Dp/D0 and ka than those with smaller APD sands at a given ɛ due to the existence of rapid air flow through the highly continuous large pores. At low ɛ near the ɛth however, the measured Dp/D0 for large APD sands were lower than those for small APD sands. The measurements for Narita sand fractions with different bulk densities indicated that soil

  6. Influences of spatial scale and soil permeability on relationships between land cover and baseflow stream nutrient concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Little Miami River (LMR) basin, dominated by agriculture, contains two geologically-distinct regions; a glaciated northern till plain with soils three times more permeable than a southern, pre-Wisconsinan drift plain. The influences of two landscape measures, percent row crop...

  7. Influences of spatial scale and soil permeability on relationships between land cover and baseflow stream nutrient concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Little Miami River (LMR) basin, dominated by agriculture, contains two geologically-distinct regions; a glaciated northern till plain with soils three times more permeable than a southern, pre-Wisconsinan drift plain. The influences of two landscape measures, percent row crop...

  8. Characterization of tillage effects on soil permeability using different measures of macroporosity derived from tension infiltrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, G.; Schwen, A.; Scholl, P.; Kammerer, G.; Buchan, G.; Kaul, H.-P.; Loiskandl, W.

    2010-05-01

    Soil macroporosity is a highly dynamic property influenced by environmental factors, such as raindrop impact, wetting-drying and freezing-thawing cycles, soil biota and plant roots, as well as agricultural management measures. Macroporosity represents an important indicator of soil physical quality, particularly in relation to the site specific water transmission properties, and can be used as a sensitive measure to assess soil structural degradation. Its quantification is also required for the parameterization of dual porosity models that are frequently used in environmental impact studies on erosion and solute (pesticide, nitrate) leaching. The importance of soil macroporosity for the water transport properties of the soil and its complexity due to high spatio-temporal heterogeneity make its quantitative assessment still a challenging task. Tension infiltrometers have been shown to be adequate measurement devices to obtain data in the near-saturated range of water flow where structural (macro)pores are dominating the transport process. Different methods have been used to derive water transmission characteristics from tension infiltrometer measurements. Moret and Arrúe (2007) differentiated between using a minimum equivalent capillary pore radius and a flow weighted mean pore radius to obtain representative macropore flow properties from tension infiltrometer data. Beside direct approaches based on Wooding's equation, also inverse methods have been applied to obtain soil hydraulic properties (Šimůnek et al. 1998). Using a dual porosity model in the inverse procedure allows estimating parameters in the dynamic near-saturated range by numerical optimization to the infiltration measurements, while fixing parameters in the more stable textural range of small pores using e.g. pressure plate data or even pedotransfer functions. The present work presents a comparison of quantitative measures of soil macroporosity derived from tension infiltrometer data by different

  9. Lab and Pore-Scale Study of Low Permeable Soils Diffusional Tortuosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekhov, V.; Pozdniakov, S. P.; Denisova, L.

    2016-12-01

    Diffusion plays important role in contaminant spreading in low permeable units. The effective diffusion coefficient of saturated porous medium depends on this coefficient in water, porosity and structural parameter of porous space - tortuosity. Theoretical models of relationship between porosity and diffusional tortuosity are usually derived for conceptual granular models of medium filled by solid particles of simple geometry. These models usually do not represent soils with complex microstructure. The empirical models, like as Archie's law, based on the experimental electrical conductivity data are mostly useful for practical applications. Such models contain empirical parameters that should be defined experimentally for given soil type. In this work, we compared tortuosity values obtained in lab-scale diffusional experiments and pore scale diffusion simulation for the studied soil microstructure and exanimated relationship between tortuosity and porosity. Samples for the study were taken from borehole cores of low-permeable silt-clay formation. Using the samples of 50 cm3 we performed lab scale diffusional experiments and estimated the lab-scale tortuosity. Next using these samples we studied the microstructure with X-ray microtomograph. Shooting performed on undisturbed microsamples of size 1,53 mm with a resolution ×300 (10243 vox). After binarization of each obtained 3-D structure, its spatial correlation analysis was performed. This analysis showed that the spatial correlation scale of the indicator variogram is considerably smaller than microsample length. Then there was the numerical simulation of the Laplace equation with binary coefficients for each microsamples. The total number of simulations at the finite-difference grid of 1753 cells was 3500. As a result the effective diffusion coefficient, tortuosity and porosity values were obtained for all studied microsamples. The results were analyzed in the form of graph of tortuosity versus porosity. The 6

  10. A framework for assessing risk reduction due to DNAPL mass removal from low permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Freeze, R.A.; McWhorter, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    Many emerging remediation technologies are designed to remove contaminant mass from source zones at DNAPL sites in response to regulatory requirements. There is often concern in the regulated community as to whether mass removal actually reduces risk, or whether the small risk reductions achieved warrant the large costs incurred. This paper sets out a framework for quantifying the degree to which risk is reduced as mass is removed from shallow, saturated, low-permeability, dual-porosity, DNAPL source zones. Risk is defined in terms of meeting an alternate concentration level (ACL) at a compliance well in an aquifer underlying the source zone. The ACL is back-calculated from a carcinogenic health-risk characterization at a downstream water-supply well. Source-zone mass-removal efficiencies are heavily dependent on the distribution of mass between media (fractures, matrix) and phases (dissolved, sorbed, free product). Due to the uncertainties in currently-available technology performance data, the scope of the paper is limited to developing a framework for generic technologies rather than making risk-reduction calculations for specific technologies. Despite the qualitative nature of the exercise, results imply that very high mass-removal efficiencies are required to achieve significant long-term risk reduction with technology, applications of finite duration. 17 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Emissions from soil fumigation in two raised bed production systems tarped with low permeability films.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ruijun; Gao, Suduan; Thomas, John E; Dickson, Donald W; Ajwa, Husein; Wang, Dong

    2013-10-01

    Raised beds are used to produce some high-value annual fruit and vegetable crops such as strawberry in California (CA) and tomato in Florida (FL), USA. Pre-plant soil fumigation is an important tool to control soil-borne pests in the raised beds. However, fumigant emissions have detrimental environmental consequences. Field trials were conducted to evaluate emissions of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin (CP) in two different production systems with raised beds covered by different tarps. In the CA trial, InLine (60.8% 1,3-D and 33.3% CP) was drip-applied at 340 kg ha(-1) to 5 cm deep in the beds (30 cm high and 107 cm wide) tarped with polyethylene (PE) or virtually impermeable film (VIF). In the FL trial, carbonated Telone C35 (63.4% 1,3-D and 34.7% CP) was shank-applied at 151 kg ha(-1) to 20 cm deep in the beds (22 cm high and 76 cm wide) tarped with totally impermeable film (TIF). Emissions from tarped beds relative to furrows were contrary between the two trials. For the CA trial, the emission was 47% of applied 1,3-D and 27% of applied CP from PE tarped beds and 31% of applied 1,3-D and 15% of applied CP from VIF tarped beds, while that from uncovered furrows was<0.4% for both chemicals in both fields. In the FL trial, only 0.1% 1,3-D was emitted from the TIF tarped beds, but 27% was measured from the uncovered furrows. Factors contributing to the differences in emissions were chiefly raised-bed configuration, tarp permeability, fumigant application method, soil properties, soil water content, and fumigant carbonation. The results indicate that strategies for emission reduction must consider the differences in agronomic production systems. Modifying raised bed configuration and fumigant application technique in coarse textured soils with TIF tarping can maximize fumigation efficiency and emission reduction.

  12. Post-fire Changes in Air Permeability and Hydraulic Conductivity of Soils Following 2003 Aspen Fire in Sabino Canyon, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chief, K.; Ferre, T. P.; Nijssen, B.

    2006-12-01

    As part of a project to study the hydrologic effects of fire on the Sabino Canyon Watershed, the Soil Corer Air Permeameter (SCAP) was developed to rapidly measure in-situ air permeability (k_a) of unburned and burned desert soils while providing a standard soil sample for additional laboratory analysis. Twenty-two unburned and burned plots were selected in woodland-chaparral and coniferous zones with low and high slopes, and low, medium, and high fuel loads or burn severities. Air permeability was measured on a 25-point square grid on each 100 m2 plot (n=445). Hydraulic conductivity (Ksat), water permeability (k_w), soil physical properties, and hydrophobicity measurements were made on extracted soil samples in the laboratory. There was a slight decrease in the median k_a from 95 to 80 μm2 for the woodland- chaparral zone as a result of the wildfire. There was a greater decrease for the coniferous zone where the median decreased from 152 to 110 μm2 following the fire. The k_w of woodland-chaparral soils increased from 192 to 425 μm2; but the median k_w decreased for the coniferous zone from 862 to 444 μm2 after the fire. In addition, hydrophobic measurements show that there was a significant increase in hydrophobicity for post-fire woodland-chaparral soils but not for coniferous soils. The log k_a and log Ksat measurements were highly correlated for the unburned woodland-chaparral soils, but this correlation decreased for burned woodland-chaparral soils. The unburned coniferous data set had the least k_a and Ksat correlation, but was reasonable for burned coniferous soils. The decrease in correlation may be due to increases of hydrophobicity, uneven wetting and preferential flow in Ksat measurements, or extremely rocky terrain. However, the overall, log k_a-log Ksat correlation for all unburned and burned soils including previous measurements on agricultural and alluvial soils follow the trend of the Iversen et al. (2001) log k_a-log Ksat correlation.

  13. A standardized approach for estimating the permeability of plastic films to soil fumigants under various field and environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Papiernik, Sharon K; Yates, Scott R; Chellemi, Daniel O

    2011-01-01

    Minimizing atmospheric emissions of soil fumigants is critical for protecting human and environmental health. Covering the soil surface with a plastic tarp is a common approach to restrict fumigant emissions. The mass transfer of the fumigant vapors through the tarp is often the rate-limiting factor in fumigant emissions. An approach for standardizing measurements of film permeability is proposed that is based on determining the resistance (R) of films to diffusion of fumigants. Using this approach, values were determined for more than 200 film-chemical combinations under a range of temperature, relative humidity, and film handling conditions. Resistance to diffusion was specific for each fumigant/film combination, with the largest range of values observed for the fumigant chloropicrin. For each fumigant, decreased with increasing temperature. Changes in film permeability due to increases in temperature or field installation were generally less than a factor of five. For one film, values determined under conditions of very high relative humidity (approximately 100%) were at least 100 times lower than when humidity was very low (approximately 2%). This approach simplifies the selection of appropriate films for soil fumigation by providing rapid, reproducible, and precise measurements of their permeability to specific fumigants and application conditions. by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  14. In situ construction of low permeable barrier in soil to prevent pollutant migration by applying weak electric field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Li; Wan, Chunli

    2017-05-15

    In order to prevent vertical migration of pollutant in soil matrix, this study firstly proposed to construct an in situ low permeable barrier (LPB) through synchronously transporting calcium and carbonate. After LPB construction, the soil permeability was declined tenfold. Exchangeable calcium (37.3%) and calcium bonding to carbonate (41.7%) respectively alleviated flocculation of microaggregates and cementation of marcoaggregates. Accordingly, smaller particles (<1 mm) aggregated into bigger ones (>2 mm) after electrokinetic remediation. The other soil characters like pH, moisture, and bacterial communities were well preserved after remediation. In addition, the pollutant prevention was divided into two phases as unsaturated phase and saturated phase. In unsaturated phase, phenol, F(-), Cd(2+), and Ni(2+) in filtrate were all lower than 0.1 mg, and Cr2O4(2-)-Cr discharged from LPB was 1/5.1 than that from initial soil. In saturated phase, LPB prevented 4.3-12.1 fold pollutant than initial soil. Taken together, proposed method could effectively prevent vertical migration of pollutants, indicating significant values for saving soil remediation cost or avoiding contamination of underground water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermophysical effects of water driven copper nanoparticles on MHD axisymmetric permeable shrinking sheet: Dual-nature study.

    PubMed

    Ul Haq, Rizwan; Rajotia, D; Noor, N F M

    2016-03-01

    The present study is dedicated to analyze the dual-nature solutions of the axisymmetric flow of a magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) nanofluid over a permeable shrinking sheet. In those phenomena where the fluid flow is due to the shrinking surface, some reverse behaviors of the flow arise because of vorticity effects. Despite of heat transfer analysis, the main purpose of the present study is to attain the solutions of the complex nature problem that appear in reverse flow phenomena. Thermophysical properties of both base fluid (water) and nanoparticles (copper) are also taken into account. By means of similarity transformation, partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations and then solved via the Runge-Kutta method. These results are divided separately into two cases: the first one is the unidirectional shrinking along the surface (m = 1) and the other one is for axisymmetric shrinking phenomena (m = 2) . To enhance the thermal conductivity of base fluid, nanoparticle volume fractions (0≤φ ≤ 0.2)) are incorporated within the base fluid. The numerical investigation explores the condition of existence, non-existence and the duality of similarity solution depends upon the range of suction parameter (S) and Hartmann number (M). The reduced skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are plotted to analyze the fluid flow and heat transfer at the surface of the shrinking sheet. Streamlines and isotherms are also plotted against the engineering control parameters to analyze the flow behavior and heat transfer within the whole domain. Throughout this analysis it is found that both nanoparticle volume fraction and Hartmann number are increasing functions of both skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number.

  16. The mechanisms of arsenic removal from soil by electrokinetic process coupled with iron permeable reaction barrier.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ching; Chiang, Tzu-Shing

    2007-04-01

    An innovative remediation system of electrokinetic process coupled with permeable reaction barrier (PRB) was proposed for arsenic removal in soil matrix. Batch tests with PRB media of Fe(0) and FeOOH under potential gradient of 2 V cm(-1) for 5d duration were conducted to evaluate the removal mechanisms of arsenic. Arsenic enhancement of 1.6-2.2 times was achieved when a PRB system was installed in an electrokinetic system. A best performance was found in system with FeOOH layer located in the middle of elctrokinetic cell. This was largely because of higher surface area of FeOOH and the moving of HAsO(4)(2-) to the anode side by electromigration effect was inhibited by the electroosmosis flow. The surface characteristics of PRB media, which were qualified by SEM coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), were clearly confirmed that arsenic was found on the passive layer surface. Results indicated that the removal of As in EK/PRB systems was much more contributed by surface adsorption/precipitation on PRB media than by EK process. Furthermore among the electrical removal mechanisms, electromigration was predominant than electrosmotic flow. Surface adsorption and precipitation were respectively the principal removal mechanism under acid environment, e.g. near anode side, and under basic environment, e.g. near cathode side. The results reported in the present work will be beneficial to optimizing design of batch EK/PRB system and enlarging to the field scale system.

  17. Petroleum mass removal from low permeability sediment using air sparging/soil vapor extraction: impact of continuous or pulsed operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtland, Brian C.; Aelion, C. Marjorie

    2000-02-01

    Air sparging and soil vapor extraction (AS/SVE) are innovative remediation techniques that utilize volatilization and microbial degradation to remediate petroleum spills from soils and groundwater. This in situ study investigated the use of AS/SVE to remediate a gasoline spill from a leaking underground storage tank (UST) in the low permeability, clayey soil of the Appalachian Piedmont. The objectives of this study were to evaluate AS/SVE in low permeability soils by quantifying petroleum mass removal rates, monitoring vadose zone contaminant levels, and comparing the mass extraction rates of continuous AS/SVE to 8 and 24 h pulsed operation. The objectives were met by collecting AS/SVE exhaust gas samples and vadose zone air from multi-depth soil vapor probes. Samples were analyzed for O 2, CO 2, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), and total combustible hydrocarbon (TCH) concentrations using portable hand meters and gas chromatography. Continuous AS/SVE was effective in removing 608 kg of petroleum hydrocarbons from low permeability soil in 44 days (14.3 kg day -1). Mass removal rates ranged from 2.6 times higher to 5.1 times lower than other AS/SVE studies performed in sandy sediments. BTEX levels in the vadose zone were reduced from about 5 ppm to 1 ppm. Ten pulsed AS/SVE tests removed 78 kg in 23 days and the mean mass removal rate (17.6 kg day -1) was significantly higher than the last 15 days of continuous extraction. Pulsed operation may be preferable to continuous operation because of increased mass removal and decreased energy consumption.

  18. Evaluation of air permeability in layered unsaturated materials.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Christine; Kosson, David S

    2007-03-20

    Field estimation of air permeability is important in the design and operation of soil-vapor extraction systems. Previous models have examined airflow in homogenous soils, incorporating leakage through a low-permeability cap either as a correction to the airflow equation or as a boundary condition. The dual leakage model solution developed here improves upon the previous efforts by adding a leaky lower boundary condition, allowing for the examination of airflow in heterogeneous layered soils. The dual leakage model is applied to the evaluation of pump tests at a pilot soil-vapor extraction system at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. A thick, low-permeability, stiff clay layer divides the stratigraphy at the site into two units for evaluation. A modified version of the previous model, using the water table as the impermeable lower boundary, is used to evaluate the permeability of the low-permeability stiff clay layer (3.2 x 10(-10) cm(2)) and permeable sand (7.2 x 10(-7) cm(2)) beneath it. The stiff clay permeability estimate is used in the evaluation of the shallow unit. Permeability estimates of the shallow sand (3.8 x 10(-7) cm(2)) and kaolin cap (1.5 x 10(-9)cm(2)) were obtained with the dual leakage model. The shallow unit was evaluated using the previous model for comparison. The effects of anisotropy were investigated with a series of model simulations based on the shallow unit solution. The anisotropy sensitivity analysis suggests that increased anisotropy ratio or decreased axial permeability has a significant impact on the velocity profile at the lower boundary, especially at high values of the anisotropy ratio. This result may increase estimates of SVE removal rates for contaminants located at the interface of the lower boundary, typical of chlorinated solvent contamination.

  19. Effects of triethyl phosphate and nitrate on electrokinetically enhanced biodegradation of diesel in low permeability soils.

    PubMed

    Lee, G T; Ro, H M; Lee, S M

    2007-08-01

    Bench-scale experiments for electrokinetically enhanced bioremediation of diesel in low permeability soils were conducted. An electrokinetic reactor (ER) was filled with kaolin that was artificially contaminated with diesel at a level of 2500 mg kg(-1). A constant voltage gradient of 1.0 V cm(-1) was applied. In phosphorus transport experiments, KH2PO4 was not distributed homogeneously along the ER, and most of the transported phosphorus was converted to water-insoluble aluminum phosphate after 12 days of electrokinetic (EK) operation. However, the advancing P front of triethyl phosphate (TEP) progressed with time and resulted in uniform P distribution. The treatments employed in the electrokinetically enhanced bioremediation of diesel were control (no addition of nitrogen and phosphorus), NP (KNO3+ KH2PO4), NT (KNO3+ TEP), UP (urea+ KH2PO4), and UT (urea+TEP). Analysis of effluent collected during the first 12 days of EK operation showed that diesel was not removed from the kaolin. After nutrient delivery, using the EK operation, the ER was transferred into an incubator for the biodegradation process. After 60 days of biodegradation, the concentrations of diesel in the kaolin for the NP, NT, UP, UT, and control treatments were 1356, 1002, 1658, 1612, and 2003 mg kg(-1), respectively. The ratio of biodegraded diesel concentration to initial concentration (2465 mg kg(-1)) in NP, NT, UP, UT, and control were 45.0%, 59.4%, 32.7%, 34.6%, and 18.7%, respectively. This result showed that TEP, treated along with NO3-, was most effective for the biodegradation of diesel. TEP was delivered more efficiently to the target zones and with less phosphorus loss than KH2PO4. However, this facilitated phosphorus delivery was effective in biodegrading diesel under anaerobic conditions only when electron acceptors, such as NO3-, were present.

  20. Dual-temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI protocol for blood-brain barrier permeability measurement in enhancing multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Jelescu, I O; Leppert, I R; Narayanan, S; Araújo, D; Arnold, D L; Pike, G B

    2011-06-01

    To design a more accurate and reproducible technique for the measurement of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in gadolinium-enhancing multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. Four MS patients were scanned using a new dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol based on an uninterrupted two-part acquisition consisting of an initial part at high temporal and low spatial resolutions and a second part at low temporal and high spatial resolutions. The method preserves both the high spatial resolution needed for the often small size of lesions and the high temporal resolution required during the first minute after injection to sufficiently sample the first-pass bolus. Simulations compared the performance of this new protocol with the conventional one at low temporal and high spatial resolutions throughout. The BBB permeability estimates changed by up to 33% between the two protocols. The new protocol led to simulated error on K(trans) of 7%-10%, versus 7%-30% with the conventional protocol, and was more robust with respect to offsets between acquisition and injection start times, differences in shape of the first-pass peak, and permeability values. The dual-temporal resolution protocol produces improved BBB permeability estimates and provides a more complete view of active inflammatory MS lesion pathology. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Dynamics of soil gas radon concentration in a highly permeable soil based on a long-term high temporal resolution observation series.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Katalin Zsuzsanna; Jordan, Gyozo; Horváth, Ákos; Szabó, Csaba

    2013-10-01

    This paper studies the temporal variation of soil gas radon activity concentration in a highly permeable (k = 2.0E-11 m(2)) sandy-gravelly soil in order to understand if temporal variation of soil gas radon activity concentration can affect geogenic radon potential determination. Geogenic radon potential provides information about the potential risk from radon. Its calculation takes into account the equilibrium, saturated at infinite depth, soil gas radon activity concentration (c∞). This concentration may vary at annual time scale due to the environmental conditions. A long-term (yearly) and high temporal resolution (15 min) observation, applied in this study, reveal various temporal features such as long-term trend, seasonality, daily periodicity and sudden events in soil gas radon time series. Results show seasonal and daily periodical variation of the measured soil gas radon activity concentration (csoilRn) in a highly permeable sandy-gravelly soil with definite seasons without obvious long transitional periods. The winter (from October 2010 to April 2011) is characterized by 2.5 times higher average soil gas radon activity concentration (median is 7.0 kBq m(-3)) than the summer (August, September 2010 and May, June, July 2011) (median is 2.8 kBq m(-3)). Daily periodicity, which is much less than the seasonal one, controls the soil gas radon activity concentration mainly in the summer season. Average (AM) value of csoilRn is higher at night than in the daytime with about 18% and 3.8% in summer and in winter, respectively. As a conclusion, in case of single csoilRn measurement on a highly permeable (k ≥ 2.0E-11 m(2)) soil, similar to our test site, csoilRn should be corrected according to the seasons for calculating the equilibrium activity concentration c∞ value. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Screening model for volatile pollutants in dual porosity soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantush, Mohamed M.; Govindaraju, Rao. S.; Mariño, Miguel A.; Zhang, Zhonglong

    2002-03-01

    This paper develops mass fraction models for transport and fate of agricultural pollutants in structured two-region soils. Mass fraction index models, based on a semi-infinite domain solution, are derived that describe leaching at depth, vapor losses through soil surface, absorption, and degradation in the dynamic- and stagnant-water soil regions. The models predict that leaching is the result of the combined effect of the upward vapor-phase transport relative to downward advection, residence time relative to half-life, dispersion, and lateral diffusive mass transfer. Simulations show that leached fraction of volatile compounds does not always decrease monotonically with increased residence time relative to the pollutant half-life, as a result of complex interactions among the different physical and biochemical processes. The results show that leaching, volatilization, and degradation losses can be affected significantly by lateral diffusive mass transfer into immobile-water regions and advection relative to dispersion (i.e. Peclet number) in the mobile-water regions. It is shown that solute diffusion into the immobile phase and subsequent biochemical decay reduces leaching and vapor losses through soil surface. Potential use of the modified leaching index for the screening of selected pesticides is illustrated for different soil textures and infiltration rates. The analysis may be useful to the management of pesticides and the design of landfills.

  3. Developing a dual assimilation approach for thermal infrared and passive microwave soil moisture retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, Christopher Ryan

    Soil moisture plays a vital role in the partitioning of sensible and latent heat fluxes in the surface energy budget and the lack of a dense spatial and temporal network of ground-based observations provides a challenge to the initialization of the true soil moisture state in numerical weather prediction simulations. The retrieval of soil moisture using observations from both satellite-based thermal-infrared (TIR) and passive microwave (PM) sensors has been developed (Anderson et al., 2007; Hain et al., 2009; Jackson, 1993; Njoku et al., 2003). The ability of the TIR and microwave observations to diagnose soil moisture conditions within different layers of the soil profile provides an opportunity to use each in a synergistic data assimilation approach towards the goal of diagnosing the true soil moisture state from surface to root-zone. TIR and PM retrievals of soil moisture are compared to soil moisture estimates provided by a retrospective Land Information System (LIS) simulation using the NOAH LSM during the time period of 2003--2008. The TIR-based soil moisture product is provided by a retrieval of soil moisture associated with surface flux estimates from the Atmosphere-Land-Exchange-Inversion (ALEXI) model (Anderson et al., 1997; Mecikalski et al., 1999; Hain et al., 2009). The PM soil moisture retrieval is provided by the Vrijie Universiteit Amsterdam (VUA)-NASA surface soil moisture product. The VUA retrieval is based on the findings of Owe et al. (2001; 2008) using the Land Surface Parameter model (LPRM), which uses one dual polarized channel (6.925 or 10.65 GHz) for a dual-retrieval of surface soil moisture and vegetation water content. In addition, retrievals of ALEXI (TIR) and AMSR-E (PM) soil moisture are assimilated within the Land Information System using the NOAH LSM. A series of data assimilation experiments is completed with the following configuration: (a) no assimilation, (b) only ALEXI soil moisture, (c) only AMSR-E soil moisture, and (d) ALEXI

  4. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    Controlled ground-based passive microwave radiometric measurements on soil moisture were conducted to determine the effects of terrain surface roughness and vegetation on microwave emission. Theoretical predictions were compared with the experimental results and with some recent airborne radiometric measurements. The relationship of soil moisture to the permittivity for the soil was obtained in the laboratory. A dual frequency radiometer, 1.41356 GHz and 10.69 GHz, took measurements at angles between 0 and 50 degrees from an altitude of about fifty feet. Distinct surface roughnesses were studied. With the roughness undisturbed, oats were later planted and vegetated and bare field measurements were compared. The 1.4 GHz radiometer was less affected than the 10.6 GHz radiometer, which under vegetated conditions was incapable of detecting soil moisture. The bare surface theoretical model was inadequate, although the vegetation model appeared to be valid. Moisture parameters to correlate apparent temperature with soil moisture were compared.

  5. Monitoring water stable isotope composition in soils using gas-permeable tubing and infrared laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothfuss, Youri; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    The water stable isotopologues 1H2H16O and 1H218O are powerful tracers of processes occurring in nature. Their slightly different masses as compared to the most abundant water isotopologue (1H216O) affect their thermodynamic (e.g. during chemical equilibrium reactions or physical phase transitions with equilibration) and kinetic (liquid and vapor phases transport processes and chemical reactions without equilibration) properties. This results in measurable differences of the isotopic composition of water within or between the different terrestrial ecosystem compartments (i.e. sub-soil, soil, surface waters, plant, and atmosphere). These differences can help addressing a number of issues, among them water balance closure and flux partitioning from the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum at the field to regional scales. In soils particularly, the isotopic composition of water (δ2H and δ18O) provides qualitative information about whether water has only infiltrated or already been re-evaporated since the last rainfall event or about the location of the evaporation front. From water stable isotope composition profiles measured in soils, it is also possible, under certain hypotheses, to derive quantitative information such as soil evaporation flux and the identification of root water uptake depths. In addition, water stable isotopologues have been well implemented into physically based Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer models (e.g. SiSPAT-Isotope; Soil-Litter iso; TOUGHREACT) and have demonstrated their potential. However, the main disadvantage of the isotope methodology is that, contrary to other soil state variables that can be monitored over long time periods, δ2H and δ18O are typically analyzed following destructive sampling. Here, we present a non-destructive method for monitoring soil liquid water δ2H and δ18O over a wide range of water availability conditions and temperatures by sampling and measuring water vapor equilibrated with soil water using gas-permeable

  6. A method for characterizing desiccation-induced consolidation and permeability loss of organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Chelsea L.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2015-01-01

    A new method was developed to measure soil consolidation by capillary suction in organic soils. This method differs from previous methods of measuring soil consolidation in that no external load is utilized and only the forces generated via capillary suction consolidate the soil matrix. This limits the degree of consolidation that can occur, but gives a more realistic ecological perspective on the response of organic soils to desiccation in the field. This new method combines the principles behind a traditional triaxial cell (for measurements of volume change), a pressure plate apparatus, (to facilitate drainage by capillary suction), and the permeameter, (to measure saturated hydraulic conductivity) and allows for simultaneous desaturation of the soil while monitoring desiccation-induced volume change in the soil. This method also enables detection of historic limit of dryness. The historic limit of dryness is a novel concept that is unique to soils that have never experienced drying since their formation. It is fundamentally equivalent to the precompression stress of externally loaded soils. This method is particularly important for forecasting structural and hydrologic changes that may occur in soils that were formed in very wet regimes (e.g., wet meadows at the foot of persistent snowpacks and permafrost peats) as they respond to a changing climate.

  7. Quantification of colloidal and aqueous element transfer in soils: The dual-phase mass balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, Carleton R.; Thompson, Aaron; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2015-01-01

    Mass balance models have become standard tools for characterizing element gains and losses and volumetric change during weathering and soil development. However, they rely on the assumption of complete immobility for an index element such as Ti or Zr. Here we describe a dual-phase mass balance model that eliminates the need for an assumption of immobility and in the process quantifies the contribution of aqueous versus colloidal element transfer. In the model, the high field strength elements Ti and Zr are assumed to be mobile only as suspended solids (colloids) and can therefore be used to distinguish elemental redistribution via colloids from redistribution via dissolved aqueous solutes. Calculations are based upon element concentrations in soil, parent material, and colloids dispersed from soil in the laboratory. We illustrate the utility of this model using a catena in South Africa. Traditional mass balance models systematically distort elemental gains and losses and changes in soil volume in this catena due to significant redistribution of Zr-bearing colloids. Applying the dual-phase model accounts for this colloidal redistribution and we find that the process accounts for a substantial portion of the major element (e.g., Al, Fe and Si) loss from eluvial soil. In addition, we find that in illuvial soils along this catena, gains of colloidal material significantly offset aqueous elemental loss. In other settings, processes such as accumulation of exogenous dust can mimic the geochemical effects of colloid redistribution and we suggest strategies for distinguishing between the two. The movement of clays and colloidal material is a major process in weathering and pedogenesis; the mass balance model presented here is a tool for quantifying effects of that process over time scales of soil development.

  8. Minimize emissions and improve efficacy with low permeability tarp and deep injection in soil fumigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil fumigation targets high pest control efficiency and low environmental impact. Earlier field data show that most fumigated treatments provided 100% kill for plant parasitic nematodes in the soil above 3 ft depth, but not below due to insufficient fumigant delivery. A fumigation trial was conduct...

  9. Minimize emission and improve efficacy with low permeability tarp in soil fumigation for perennials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California is a major productive region for tree fruits, tree nuts and grapes. Orchards and open-field nurseries of these crops rely on soil fumigation to control soil-borne pests or replanting diseases in order to establish vigorous, productive, and marketable trees....

  10. Film Permeability Determination Using Static Permeability Cells

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The permeability of tarps to soil fumigant pesticides varies depending on the active ingredient chemical: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methyl bromide, chloropicrin, or other. The diffusion rate can be represented by the mass transfer coefficient (MTC).

  11. Effect of dissolved oxygen manipulation on diffusive emissions from NAPL-impacted low permeability soil layers.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Lisa M; Dahlen, Paul R; Johnson, Paul C

    2014-05-06

    Aquifer physical model experiments were performed to investigate if diffusive emissions from nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL)-impacted low-permeability layers into groundwater moving through adjacent NAPL-free high-permeability layers can be reduced by creating an aerobic biotreatment zone at the interface between the two, and if over time that leads to reduced emissions after treatment ceases. Experiments were performed in two 1.2-m long × 1.2-m high × 5.4 cm wide stainless steel tanks; each with a high-permeability sand layer overlying a low-permeability crushed granite layer containing a NAPL mixture of indane and benzene. Each tank was water-saturated with horizontal flow primarily through the sand layer. The influent water was initially deoxygenated and the emissions and concentration distributions were allowed to reach near-steady conditions. The influent dissolved oxygen (DO) level was increased stepwise to 6.5-8.5 mg/L and 17-20 mg/L, and then decreased back to deoxygenated conditions. Each condition was maintained for at least 45 days. Relative to the near-steady benzene emission at the initial deoxygenated condition, the emission was reduced by about 70% when the DO was 6.5-8.5 mg/L, 90% when the DO was 17-20 mg/L, and ultimately 60% when returning to low DO conditions. While the reductions were substantial during treatment, longer-term reductions after 120 d of elevated DO treatment, relative to an untreated condition predicted by theory, were low: 29% and 6% in Tank 1 and Tank 2, respectively. Results show a 1-2 month lag between the end of DO delivery and rebound to the final near-steady emissions level. This observation has implications for post-treatment performance monitoring sampling at field sites.

  12. The dual role of soil crusts in desertification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.; Thompson, S. E.; Chen, L.; Svoray, T.; Sela, S.; Katul, G. G.

    2015-10-01

    Vegetation cover in dry regions is a key variable in determining desertification. Soils exposed to rainfall by desertification can form physical crusts that reduce infiltration, exacerbating water stress on the remaining vegetation. Paradoxically, field studies show that crust removal is associated with plant mortality in desert systems, while artificial biological crusts can improve plant regeneration. Here it is shown how physical crusts can act as either drivers of or buffers against desertification depending on their environmental context. The behavior of crusts is first explored using a simplified theory for water movement on a uniform, partly vegetated slope subject to stationary hydrologic conditions. Numerical model runs supplemented with field data from a semiarid Long-Term Ecological Research site are then applied to represent more realistic environmental conditions. When vegetation cover is significant, crusts can drive desertification, but this process is potentially self-limiting. For low vegetation cover, crusts mitigate against desertification by providing water subsidy to plant communities through a runoff-runon mechanism.

  13. Study on 3D surfactant assisted electrokinetic remediation of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene in low permeability soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, W.; Ye, S.; Wu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Electrickinetic(EK) is a promising remediation technology because of its capability to remediate soils with low permeability. It has been used for heavy metals and organic pollutant(OPs) contaminated soils. As the most OPs are poor solubility and strong sorption capacity, combined EK technology is usually used, for example, EK combined with surfactants. Numerous combined EK tests are done in one-dimension(1D) column, however, it is proved that there is a big gap between 1D tests and field application. The objectives of this study are to investigate the remediation efficiency and EK behavior of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene(1,2,4-TCB) contaminated clay enhanced by surfactants in a three-dimension reactor with 28cm length×15cm width×16cm height. 1,2,4-TCB was one of the main contaminants at a field site in Nanjing, China, where the polluted soils are clay. Soil filled in EK cell was divided into six layers in depth, and each layer was divided into six parts in length and three parts in width. There were 108 specimens in total which realized 3D monitoring the effects of EK. Triton X-100(Exp1) and Tween80(Exp2) dissolved in NaCO3/NaHCO3 buffer respectively, were used as the anode purging solution. The distributions of soil pH and water content showed that the buffer was sufficient to neutralize H+ produced at anode and the direction of electroosmotic flow(EOF) remained constant. Exp2 generated a higher EOF than Exp1, but remediation efficiencies were not satisfactory so far. The concentration of 1,2,4-TCB in soil reached a peak and nadir in the normalized distances of 0.75 and 0.9 from cathode after 5 days, respectively. The 1,2,4-TCB concentration in the peak was almost twice as much as the initial concentration. It suggested that 1,2,4-TCB was desorbed from soil by surfactants and was transported from anode to cathode by EOF, which proved the capability of EK with surfactants to move 1,2,4-TCB in clay. The concentration of 1,2,4-TCB in the normalized distances of 0

  14. Fumigation efficacy and emission reduction using low-permeability film in orchard soil fumigation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Suduan; Sosnoskie, Lynn M; Cabrera, Jose Alfonso; Qin, Ruijun; Hanson, Bradley D; Gerik, James S; Wang, Dong; Browne, Greg T; Thomas, John E

    2016-02-01

    Many orchards use fumigation to control soilborne pests prior to replanting. Controlling emissions is mandatory to reduce air pollution in California. This research evaluated the effects of plastic film type [polyethylene (PE) or totally impermeable film (TIF)], application rate of Telone C35 [full (610 kg ha(-1) ), 2/3 or 1/3 rates] and carbonation at 207 kPa on fumigant transport (emission and in soil) and efficacy. While increasing fumigant concentrations under the tarp, TIF reduced emissions >95% (∼2% and <1% of total applied 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin respectively) relative to bare soil, compared with ∼30% reduction by PE. All fumigation treatments, regardless of film type, provided good nematode control above 100 cm soil depth; however, nematode survival was high at deeper depths. Weed emergence was mostly affected by tarping and fumigant rate, with no effects from the carbonation. TIF can effectively reduce fumigant emissions. Carbonation under the studied conditions did not improve fumigant dispersion and pest control. The 2/3 rate with TIF controlled nematodes as effectively as the full rate in bare soil or under the PE film to 100 cm soil depth. However, control of nematodes in deeper soil remains a challenge for perennial crops. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Numerical investigation of the effects of porosity and tortuosity on soil permeability using coupled three-dimensional discrete-element method and lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, Bahman; Pak, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Permeability of porous materials is an important characteristic which is extensively used in various engineering disciplines. There are a number of issues that influence the permeability coefficient among which the porosity, size of particles, pore shape, tortuosity, and particle size distribution are of great importance. In this paper a C++ GPU code based on three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been developed and used for investigating the effects of the above mentioned factors on the permeability coefficient of granular materials. Multirelaxation time collision scheme of the LBM equations is used in the simulator, which is capable of modeling the exact position of the fluid-solid interface leading to viscosity-independent permeabilities and better computational stability due to separation of the relaxations of various kinetic models. GPU-CPU parallel processing has been employed to reduce the computational time associated with three-dimensional simulations. Soil samples have been prepared using the discrete element method. The obtained results have demonstrated the importance of employing the concept of effective porosity instead of total porosity in permeability relationships. The results also show that a threshold porosity exists below which the connectivity of the pores vanishes and the permeability of the soils reduces drastically.

  16. Numerical investigation of the effects of porosity and tortuosity on soil permeability using coupled three-dimensional discrete-element method and lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Bahman; Pak, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Permeability of porous materials is an important characteristic which is extensively used in various engineering disciplines. There are a number of issues that influence the permeability coefficient among which the porosity, size of particles, pore shape, tortuosity, and particle size distribution are of great importance. In this paper a C++ GPU code based on three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been developed and used for investigating the effects of the above mentioned factors on the permeability coefficient of granular materials. Multirelaxation time collision scheme of the LBM equations is used in the simulator, which is capable of modeling the exact position of the fluid-solid interface leading to viscosity-independent permeabilities and better computational stability due to separation of the relaxations of various kinetic models. GPU-CPU parallel processing has been employed to reduce the computational time associated with three-dimensional simulations. Soil samples have been prepared using the discrete element method. The obtained results have demonstrated the importance of employing the concept of effective porosity instead of total porosity in permeability relationships. The results also show that a threshold porosity exists below which the connectivity of the pores vanishes and the permeability of the soils reduces drastically.

  17. Influences of spatial scale and soil permeability on relationships between land cover and baseflow stream nutrient concentrations.

    PubMed

    Daniel, F Bernard; Griffith, Michael B; Troyer, Michael E

    2010-02-01

    The Little Miami River (LMR) basin, dominated by agriculture, contains two geologically-distinct regions; a glaciated northern till plain with soils three times more permeable than a southern, pre-Wisconsinan drift plain. The influences of two landscape measures, percent row crop cover (%RCC, computed at three spatial scales), and soil permeability (PERM), on baseflow nutrient concentrations were modeled using linear regressions. Quarterly water samples collected for four years were analyzed for nitrate-N (NN), Kjeldahl-N (KN), total-N (TN), and total-P (TP). In till plain streams (n = 17), NN concentrations were 8.5-times greater than drift plain streams (n = 18), but KN and TP were 20-40% lower at comparable %RCC. These differences resulted in TN/TP molar ratios >80 in till plain streams, but <6 in drift plain streams. For till plain steams regression models based on %RCC accounted for 79% of the variance in NN concentrations but only 27% in drift plain streams. However, regressions on %RCC accounted for 68-75% of the KN and TP concentration variance in the drift plain streams but essentially none in the till plain. Catchment PERM influenced the regional NN/KN ratios which were 10-fold higher in the drift plain streams. For both till and drift streams the catchment scale %RCC gave the best predictions of NN, a water soluble anion, but the smaller spatial scales produced better models for insoluble nutrient species (e.g., KN and TP). Published literature on Ohio streams indicates that these inter-regional differences in nutrient ratios have potential implications for aquatic biota in the receiving streams.

  18. The influence of forest regrowth on soil permeability in the humid tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Sibylle; Zimmermann, Beate; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2010-05-01

    The humid tropics are subject to change in land use: on the one hand ongoing deforestation claims more area for agriculture and pastures, on the other hand reforestation efforts emerge. These changes in land use affect soil hydrological properties. Various studies have shown that a shift from primary forest to pasture leads to a rapid decrease in soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) through animal treading, implicitly enhancing the occurrence of overland flow. Recent information about the reverse process, the possible recovery of soil hydraulic properties during forest regrowth, suggests a slow recovery of Ks. To further explore this possibility with the help of a space-for-time substitution approach we surveyed Ks in the Panama Canal Zone. In a completely randomised sampling design we sampled several plots of four different land use classes: Pasture, secondary forest of two age classes (5-8 years and 12-15 years after pasture abandonment), and old-growth forest. Undisturbed soil cores were taken from the depths 0-6 and 6-12 cm and then subjected to the constant-head method. We also surveyed bulk density, soil organic carbon, soil texture and vegetation parameters (eg. basal area, diameter at breast height) to help interpret the observed Ks data. Our results support the notion of a slow recovery as they exhibit an increase in Ks after more than 10 years, if only for the depth of 0-6 cm. Other studies suggest that the decrease of Ks after deforestation is limited to a distinct shallow soil layer, thus the observed recovery effect in the upper layer is in logical accordance with these findings. We will use the ancillary information to elucidate the main determinants of Ks recovery. Quantification of the hydrological relevance of these findings is especially important as land use effects are obviously limited to only the upper soil layer. To evaluate the hydrological relevance we will compare the Ks measurements with prevailing rainfall intensities and data of

  19. Geotechnical behaviour of low-permeability soils in surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation.

    PubMed

    López-Vizcaíno, Rubén; Navarro, Vicente; Alonso, Juan; Yustres, Ángel; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Sáez, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Electrokinetic processes provide the basis of a range of very interesting techniques for the remediation of polluted soils. These techniques consist of the application of a current field in the soil that develops different transport mechanisms capable of mobilizing several types of pollutants. However, the use of these techniques could generate nondesirable effects related to the geomechanical behavior of the soil, reducing the effectiveness of the processes. In the case of the remediation of polluted soils with plasticity index higher than 35, an excessive shrinkage can be observed in remediation test. For this reason, the continued evaporation that takes place in the sample top can lead to the development of cracks, distorting the electrokinetic transport regime, and consequently, the development of the operation. On the other hand, when analyzing silty soils, in the surroundings of injection surfactant wells, high seepages can be generated that give rise to the development of piping processes. In this article methods are described to allow a reduction, or to even eliminate, both problems.

  20. The effect of the geometry of the micro pores on the effective permeability of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachkov, Igor N.; Marinova, Olga; Turygina, Victoria F.; Turygin, Evgeniy E.

    2016-06-01

    The problem of the setting the penetration of the soil occurs while solving a huge variety of practical problems. They are: the forecasting of the substance's migration in the dumps, pollution of the underground water in the mining areas, filtration of an oil in the soil, an optimization of the processes of reclamation and irrigation, evaluation of oil well production rate and some other. It was the method of variation formulation of the transport equations for finding the spatial distribution of pressure in conjunction with extreme functionality. The results allow to predict a wide range of ecological processes.

  1. Emissions from soil fumigation in two raised bed production systems tarped with low permeability films

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Raised beds are used to produce some high-value annual fruit and vegetable crops such as strawberry in California (CA) and tomato in Florida (FL), USA. Fumigation is an important tool to control soil-borne pests in the raised beds before planting. However, fumigant emissions have detrimental environ...

  2. Fumigation efficacy and emission reduction using low-permeability film in orchard soil fumigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: Many orchards in California, USA, apply fumigants to soil before replanting to reduce the impact of pest pressure or replanting disease on new tree establishment. Emission control of alternative fumigants to methyl bromide is mandatory in air quality (ozone) non-attainment areas. This s...

  3. Compact, Lightweight Dual- Frequency Microstrip Antenna Feed for Future Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Salinity Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Wilson, William J.; Njoku, Eni; Hunter, Don; Dinardo, Steve; Kona, Keerti S.; Manteghi, Majid; Gies, Dennis; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2004-01-01

    The development of a compact, lightweight, dual frequency antenna feed for future soil moisture and sea surface salinity (SSS) missions is described. The design is based on the microstrip stacked-patch array (MSPA) to be used to feed a large lightweight deployable rotating mesh antenna for spaceborne L-band (approx. 1 GHz) passive and active sensing systems. The design features will also enable applications to airborne sensors operating on small aircrafts. This paper describes the design of stacked patch elements, 16-element array configuration and power-divider beam forming network The test results from the fabrication of stacked patches and power divider were also described.

  4. Functional test of pedotransfer functions to predict water flow and solute transport with the dual-permeability model MACRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeys, J.; Larsbo, M.; Bergström, L.; Brown, C. D.; Coquet, Y.; Jarvis, N. J.

    2012-02-01

    Estimating pesticide leaching risks at the regional scale requires the ability to completely parameterise a pesticide fate model using only survey data, such as soil and land-use maps. Such parameterisation usually rely on a set of lookup tables and (pedo)transfer functions, relating elementary soil and site properties to model parameters. The aim of this paper is to describe and test a complete set of parameter estimation algorithms developed for the pesticide fate model MACRO, which accounts for preferential flow in soil macropores. We used tracer monitoring data from 16 lysimeter studies, carried out in three European countries, to evaluate the ability of MACRO and this "blind parameterisation" scheme to reproduce measured solute leaching at the base of each lysimeter. We focused on the prediction of early tracer breakthrough due to preferential flow, because this is critical for pesticide leaching. We then calibrated a selected number of parameters in order to assess to what extent the prediction of water and solute leaching could be improved. Our results show that water flow was generally reasonably well predicted (median model efficiency, ME, of 0.42). Although the general pattern of solute leaching was reproduced well by the model, the overall model efficiency was low (median ME = -0.26) due to errors in the timing and magnitude of some peaks. Preferential solute leaching at early pore volumes was also systematically underestimated. Nonetheless, the ranking of soils according to solute loads at early pore volumes was reasonably well estimated (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, between 0.54 and 0.72). Moreover, we also found that ignoring macropore flow leads to a significant deterioration in the ability of the model to reproduce the observed leaching pattern, and especially the early breakthrough in some soils. Finally, the calibration procedure showed that improving the estimation of solute transport parameters is probably more important than the

  5. Functional test of pedotransfer functions to predict water flow and solute transport with the dual-permeability model MACRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeys, J.; Larsbo, M.; Bergström, L.; Brown, C. D.; Coquet, Y.; Jarvis, N. J.

    2012-07-01

    Estimating pesticide leaching risks at the regional scale requires the ability to completely parameterise a pesticide fate model using only survey data, such as soil and land-use maps. Such parameterisations usually rely on a set of lookup tables and (pedo)transfer functions, relating elementary soil and site properties to model parameters. The aim of this paper is to describe and test a complete set of parameter estimation algorithms developed for the pesticide fate model MACRO, which accounts for preferential flow in soil macropores. We used tracer monitoring data from 16 lysimeter studies, carried out in three European countries, to evaluate the ability of MACRO and this "blind parameterisation" scheme to reproduce measured solute leaching at the base of each lysimeter. We focused on the prediction of early tracer breakthrough due to preferential flow, because this is critical for pesticide leaching. We then calibrated a selected number of parameters in order to assess to what extent the prediction of water and solute leaching could be improved. Our results show that water flow was generally reasonably well predicted (median model efficiency, ME, of 0.42). Although the general pattern of solute leaching was reproduced well by the model, the overall model efficiency was low (median ME = -0.26) due to errors in the timing and magnitude of some peaks. Preferential solute leaching at early pore volumes was also systematically underestimated. Nonetheless, the ranking of soils according to solute loads at early pore volumes was reasonably well estimated (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, between 0.54 and 0.72). Moreover, we also found that ignoring macropore flow leads to a significant deterioration in the ability of the model to reproduce the observed leaching pattern, and especially the early breakthrough in some soils. Finally, the calibration procedure showed that improving the estimation of solute transport parameters is probably more important than the

  6. Freundlich and dual Langmuir isotherm models for predicting 137Cs binding on Savannah River Site soils.

    PubMed

    Goto, Momoko; Rosson, Robert; Wampler, J Marion; Elliott, W Crawford; Serkiz, Steven; Kahn, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Distribution of 137Cs and stable cesium between aqueous solution and near-surface soil samples from five locations at the Savannah River Site was measured in order to develop a predictive model for 137Cs uptake by the soils. Sorption of 137Cs in these soils appears to be mostly by hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite. Batch sorption studies with 4 d for equilibration were conducted at three cesium concentrations and at two backing electrolyte (NaNO3) concentrations. The soil-solution mixtures were pH-adjusted to evaluate the effects of pH on cesium sorption. Sorbed cesium was related to the equilibrium aqueous cesium concentrations by a Freundlich isotherm model. Model fits on logarithmic scales have a common slope of 0.60 +/- 0.03 for acidic mixtures and 0.69 +/- 0.04 for neutralized mixtures but have unique intercepts that are influenced by backing electrolyte concentration and pH. An ion-exchange model is proposed that pertains to all five soils and relates the Freundlich isotherms to the cation exchange capacity of soil and the aqueous concentrations of cesium, sodium, and a third ionic species that was hydrogen in the acidic mixtures and potassium in the neutralized mixtures. Model fits are consistent with Kd values in the entire range of 5-2,300 L kg(-1) determined for the five soil types. As an alternate model, dual Langmuir isotherms were fitted to the data. The results suggest cesium sorption by (1) relatively few interlayer-wedge sites, highly selective for cesium, and (2) much more abundant but less selective sites on internal and external planar surfaces.

  7. Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Full Range of Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2010-09-28

    Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to capillary forces only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified with six datasets from the literature. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but under-estimate the conductivity while the extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

  8. Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Conditions from Oven-Dry to Full Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2011-11-04

    Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to the capillary force only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which the water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified measurements. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but underestimate the conductivity. The extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

  9. Dual Modulation of the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore and Redox Signaling Synergistically Promotes Cardiomyocyte Differentiation From Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Woo; Park, Jin‐Sung; Heo, Hye Jin; Park, Sang‐Wook; Song, Sukhyun; Kim, Injune; Han, Yong‐Mahn; Yamashita, Jun K.; Youm, Jae Boum; Han, Jin; Koh, Gou Young

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiomyocytes that differentiate from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) provide a crucial cellular resource for cardiac regeneration. The mechanisms of mitochondrial metabolic and redox regulation for efficient cardiomyocyte differentiation are, however, still poorly understood. Here, we show that inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) by Cyclosporin A (CsA) promotes cardiomyocyte differentiation from PSCs. Methods and Results We induced cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse and human PSCs and examined the effect of CsA on the differentiation process. The cardiomyogenic effect of CsA mainly resulted from mPTP inhibition rather than from calcineurin inhibition. The mPTP inhibitor NIM811, which does not have an inhibitory effect on calcineurin, promoted cardiomyocyte differentiation as much as CsA did, but calcineurin inhibitor FK506 only slightly increased cardiomyocyte differentiation. CsA‐treated cells showed an increase in mitochondrial calcium, mitochondrial membrane potential, oxygen consumption rate, ATP level, and expression of genes related to mitochondrial function. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism reduced the cardiomyogenic effect of CsA while antioxidant treatment augmented the cardiomyogenic effect of CsA. Conclusions Our data show that mPTP inhibition by CsA alters mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and redox signaling, which leads to differentiation of functional cardiomyocytes from PSCs. PMID:24627421

  10. Pore pressure propagation in a permeable thin-layer coal seam based on a dual porosity model: A case of risk prediction of water inrush in coalmines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Gao, F.; Yang, J. W.; Zhou, G. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Thin-layer coal seams, a type of filling coal rock body, are considered aquifer systems made up of dual porosity medium with immediate floor. A numerical simulation for the pore pressure propagation along a thin-layer coal seam was carried out for the case of the Zhaogezhuang coalmine in China. By valuing the permeability (Kf ) of the thin-layer coal seam, pore pressure variation with time was simulated and compared to the analytical solutions of a dual porosity model (DPM). The main conclusions were drawn as follow: (1) Seepage in the thin-layer coal seam was predominant in the whole process, and the distance of seepage was lengthened and the pore pressure decreased with increased Kf , (2) A series of simulated hydraulic graphs demonstrated that the pore pressure characteristics of peak-occurring and time-lag effects agreed with the analytical solutions of DPM; (3) By adjusting the parameters of DPM, two results of analytical solutions and numerical solutions fit well, particularly in the thin-layer coal seam, (4) The power law relationship between the peak-values and lag time of pore pressure were derived statistically under consideration of the Kf parameter in the range of 10-8 to 10-10 m2/pa-s orders, and it was reasonable that the Kf of the thin-layer coal seam was in the range of 10-8 m2/pa-s orders. The results were significantly helpful in decision-making for mining water prevention and prediction in practice.

  11. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass

  12. Nature based solutions to mitigate soil sealing in urban areas: Results from a 4-year study comparing permeable, porous, and impermeable pavements.

    PubMed

    Fini, A; Frangi, P; Mori, J; Donzelli, D; Ferrini, F

    2017-07-01

    Soil sealing is one of the most pervasive forms of soil degradation that follows urbanization and, despite innovative pavements (i.e. pervious) are being installed in urban areas to mitigate it, there is little research on the effects of pervious pavements on soil water and carbon cycle and on the physiology of urban trees. The aim of this 4-year experiment was to assess the effects of three pavements, differing in permeability to water and gases, on some soil physical parameters, and on growth and physiology of newly planted Celtis australis and Fraxinus ornus. Treatments were: 1) impermeable pavement (asphalt on concrete sub-base); 2) permeable pavement (pavers on crushed rock sub-base); 3) porous design (porous pavement on crushed rock sub-base); 4) control (unpaved soil, kept free of weed by chemical control). Soil (temperature, moisture, oxygen content and CO2 efflux) and plant (above- and below-ground growth, leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, water relations) parameters were measured. All types of pavements altered the water cycle compared to unpaved soil plots, but this disturbance was less intense in porous pavements than in other soil cover types. Porous pavements allowed both higher infiltration and evaporation of water than both pavers and asphalt. Reduction of evaporative cooling from soil paved with permeable and impermeable pavements contributed to significant soil warming: at 20cm depth, soils under concrete pavers and asphalt were 4 and 5°C warmer than soil covered by porous pavements and unpaved soils, respectively. Thus, enhancing evaporation from paved soil by the use of porous pavements may contribute to mitigating urban heat islands. CO2 greatly accumulated under impermeable and permeable pavements, but not under porous pavements, which showed CO2 efflux rates similar to control. Soil oxygen slightly decreased only beneath asphalt. Growth of newly planted C. australis and F. ornus was little affected by pavement type. Tree

  13. Dual-function growth medium and structural soil for use as porous pavement.

    PubMed

    Sloan, John J; Hegemann, Mary Ann; George, Steve A

    2008-01-01

    Permeable grass-covered surfaces can reduce the quantity of storm water runoff and filter out potentially harmful chemicals. The objective of this study was to develop permeable structural soils that sustained healthy turf growth and filtered heavy metals from contaminated pavement runoff. The basic soil medium was a 50:50 mixture (v/v) of expanded shale (ExSh) and quartz sand (QS). The ExSh component consisted of (i) large-diameter particles (3-6 mm), (ii) small-diameter particles (1-3 mm), or (iii) a 50:50 mixture (v/v) of the two. The basic blends were mixed with 0, 10, and 20% sphagnum peat moss (v/v) and 0, 10, and 20% natural zeolites (v/v) and placed in 15-cm-diameter pots in a greenhouse. Bermudagrass plugs were planted in each pot. The addition of sphagnum peat moss to the basic ExSh/QS blend increased bermudagrass growth and improved plant response to added fertilizer. Zeolites had no significant effect on plant growth in the absence of sphagnum peat moss. Growing mediums that contained 10 to 20% sphagnum peat moss and 10 to 20% zeolites consistently produced more bermudagrass biomass than the unamended ExSh/QS mixture. Changing the ratio of small- to large-diameter ExSh in the basic medium did not affect bermudagrass yield. Very low amounts of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn were recovered in leachate after the addition of 10 mg metal per pot, suggesting that most heavy metals (>99%) were retained in the growing mediums. Zeolites reduced the amount of Cd and Pb in leachate water, but not Cu or Zn.

  14. In vitro studies of ferric carboxymaltose on placental permeability using the dual perfusion model of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Malek, Antoine

    2010-01-01

    An in vitro perfusion model of human placenta was used to study the transplacental passage of iron applied in the form of the drug compound ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) which had been radio-labelled with 59Fe. In four placental perfusion experiments, two simulated circuits for the maternal and fetal sides of the placenta were set up with two experimental phases each lasting 3 h. FCM was added to the maternal circuit at the beginning of each phase to a final iron concentration of 11 mM, which is at least 10 times higher than the maximal predicted level in blood after an administration of 200 mg iron as FCM. The effects of adding transferrin at a physiological concentration of 1.67 mg/ ml were also tested. The concentration profiles of 59Fe showed a 10% decrease within the first 30 min of perfusion on the maternal side. Thereafter the radioactivity levels remained unchanged. The addition of transferrin had no effect on the tissue uptake of 59Fe-FCM. No transferred iron radioactivity could be detected in the fetal circuit. Despite a loss of approximately 10% of the radio-labelled iron observed on the maternal side, only 0.5-2% of the radioactivity was detected in the placental tissue after perfusion. No free iron could be detected at the end of perfusion on the maternal side using ultrafiltration or acid precipitation methods. In addition, the production of transferrin receptor remained unchanged, with similar concentrations in placental tissue before and after perfusion. No effects of FCM on placental viability were observed in terms of energy metabolism (glucose consumption and lactate production), hormone release or placental permeability (assessed by the transfer rates of creatinine and antipyrine). However, two additional observations were made: firstly, a significant reduction in the rate of cell death compared to control conditions was observed in the presence of FCM; secondly, the integrity of the fetal capillary system was improved on the fetal side of the

  15. Impact of varying soil structure on transport processes in different diagnostic horizons of three soil types.

    PubMed

    Kodesová, Radka; Vignozzi, Nadia; Rohosková, Marcela; Hájková, Tereza; Kocárek, Martin; Pagliai, Marcello; Kozák, Josef; Simůnek, Jirka

    2009-02-16

    When soil structure varies in different soil types and the horizons of these soil types, it has a significant impact on water flow and contaminant transport in soils. This paper focuses on the effect of soil structure variations on the transport of pesticides in the soil above the water table. Transport of a pesticide (chlorotoluron) initially applied on soil columns taken from various horizons of three different soil types (Haplic Luvisol, Greyic Phaeozem and Haplic Cambisol) was studied using two scenarios of ponding infiltration. The highest infiltration rate and pesticide mobility were observed for the Bt(1) horizon of Haplic Luvisol that exhibited a well-developed prismatic structure. The lowest infiltration rate was measured for the Bw horizon of Haplic Cambisol, which had a poorly developed soil structure and a low fraction of large capillary pores and gravitational pores. Water infiltration rates were reduced during the experiments by a soil structure breakdown, swelling of clay and/or air entrapped in soil samples. The largest soil structure breakdown and infiltration decrease was observed for the Ap horizon of Haplic Luvisol due to the low aggregate stability of the initially well-aggregated soil. Single-porosity and dual-permeability (with matrix and macropore domains) flow models in HYDRUS-1D were used to estimate soil hydraulic parameters via numerical inversion using data from the first infiltration experiment. A fraction of the macropore domain in the dual-permeability model was estimated using the micro-morphological images. Final soil hydraulic parameters determined using the single-porosity and dual-permeability models were subsequently used to optimize solute transport parameters. To improve numerical inversion results, the two-site sorption model was also applied. Although structural changes observed during the experiment affected water flow and solute transport, the dual-permeability model together with the two-site sorption model proved to be

  16. Regional and Local Control of Arsenic Concentrations in Shallow Aquifers by the Permeability of Surface Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geen, A.; Aziz, Z.; Goodbred, S. L.; Zheng, Y.; Horneman, A.; Dhar, R.; Weinman, B.; Cheng, Z.; Stute, M.; Hoque, M. A.; Seddique, A. A.; Ahmed, K. M.

    2004-12-01

    One of the bewildering aspects of the current arsenic crisis in Bangladesh and other South Asian countries is the extreme degree of spatial variability of groundwater As concentrations. This presentation focuses on the origin of this variability in the top 20 meters of shallow aquifers by combining surface geophysical measurements (EM31) with groundwater and sediment properties obtained by modifying a local hand-drilling method in three contrasting areas of Bangladesh: (1) Birganj, in northwestern Bangladesh, where groundwater As concentrations rarely exceed 50 ug/L, (2) Araihazar, a central portion of the country where shallow groundwater As concentrations are highly variable, and (3) Lakshmipur, where essentially all shallow wells are elevated in As. Comparison with a series of auger cores collected in Araihazar indicates that the EM31 signal combines contributions related to the ionic strength of soil water as well as the proportion of fine-grained sediment. The combined set of observations shows a rather consistent relation between the conductivity of surface soils measured by induction and shallow groundwater As. In Birganj, EM31 conductivities rarely exceed 10 mS/m and can be below the detection limit of the instrument (~0.1 mS/m) over distances of 100s of meters. In Araihazar, areas with EM31 conductivities ranging form 10-15 mS/m are intermixed with regions with EM31 readings of 20-30 mS/m. The lower and higher EM31 conductivity ranges are generally associated with low and elevated As concentrations, respectively. In contrast, EM31 readings in the portion of Lakshmipur that was surveyed are consistently high and range from 30-50 mS/m. Overall, therefore, it appears that high groundwater As concentrations are typically associated with aquifers capped by fine-grained sediment whereas low groundwater As concentrations prevail in aquifers overlain by sandy deposits. This association, combined with gradual downstream fining of surface deposits of the Ganges

  17. Experimental observations and modeling of ponding and overland flow in flat, permeable soil fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appels, Willemijn; Bogaart, Patrick; van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    In flat well-drained agricultural terrain, overland flow is a relatively rare phenomenon, yet still a potentially important driver of sediment and nutrient transport. Under these conditions, periods of intense rainfall, shallow groundwater dynamics and local combinations of meso- and microtopography control whether water in ponds will become connected to streams and ditches. Combining overland flow measurements at agricultural fields with a new modeling approach, we explored: (i) what rainfall conditions relate to overland flow and (ii) how does flow route connectivity develop for various types of runoff generation and meso/microtopography? For this purpose, we assessed overland flow at two field sites in flat, lowland catchments in the sandy part of the Netherlands and developed a dynamic model (FAST-runoff) to simulate redistribution of water over a heterogeneous surface with infiltration and soil water storage. Experimentally, it appeared that most overland flow occurred as saturation excess runoff during long wet periods, though infiltration excess runoff generation may have played a role during snowmelt periods that generated small amounts of runoff. For both fields, the contributing area during the saturation excess events was large and flow paths long, irrespective of the profoundly different microtopographies. We explored this behaviour with our FAST-Runoff model and found that under saturation excess conditions, mesotopographic features, such as natural depressions or those caused by tillage, gain importance at the expense of the spatial organization of microtopography. The surface topographies of our experimental fields were equal in terms of standard topographic analytical measures such as Curvature, Convergence Index, and Topographic Wetness Index. However, the fields could be distinguished when analysed with a quantitative indicator of flow for hydrological connectivity. Also, the fields had different dynamics related to the runoff generating mechanism

  18. A New approach for evaluate a sandy soil infiltration to calculate the permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechergui, M. Mohamed; Latifa Dhaouadi, Ms

    2016-04-01

    10 sites were chosen in the four ha field of Research Regional Center of Oasis Agriculture in Deguache (Tozeur). The soil is homogeneous to the depth of 120 cm; with a sandy texture (60% big sand, 20% small sand 13% silt and 7% clay); with a mean bulk density equal to 1.43g/cm3 and with field capacity and welting point equal respectively to 11.9 and 6 %. The time duration for each infiltration essay lasted between 352 and 554 minutes. The number of observation points for each infiltration curve varies between 31 and 40. The shape of the infiltration curves observed in all sites is in part similar to what observed in literature (high increase with time of cumulative infiltration for a short time and then a linear increase of this parameter to a time varying between 122 to 197 minutes depending on the site) and then something special a slowdown in the cumulative infiltration to the end of the essay. The (F(t) / t 1/2 versus t 1/2) plotted curves showed two distinguished parts: A linear relation to the time varying between 122 and 197 minutes confirming the validity of Philips model and a second part showed a slowdown in the slope to a time varying between 231 and 347 minutes depending on the site and then drop down to the end of the essay. This is may be due to the rearrangement of particles after a long time of infiltration which led to a decrease in hydraulic conductivity. To improve the calculation of the saturated hydraulic conductivity, we choose only the part that is validated by Philips model, the linear part. The number of omitted points in the cumulative infiltration varies between 11 and 22 points. By this method, the saturated hydraulic conductivity varies between 1 and 3.72 m/day with a mean equal to 2.35. However the previous technique used gave a mean value equal to 2.07. The new method is accurate and gives better results of K and sorbtivity.

  19. Physiologic upper limits of pore size of different blood capillary types and another perspective on the dual pore theory of microvascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Much of our current understanding of microvascular permeability is based on the findings of classic experimental studies of blood capillary permeability to various-sized lipid-insoluble endogenous and non-endogenous macromolecules. According to the classic small pore theory of microvascular permeability, which was formulated on the basis of the findings of studies on the transcapillary flow rates of various-sized systemically or regionally perfused endogenous macromolecules, transcapillary exchange across the capillary wall takes place through a single population of small pores that are approximately 6 nm in diameter; whereas, according to the dual pore theory of microvascular permeability, which was formulated on the basis of the findings of studies on the accumulation of various-sized systemically or regionally perfused non-endogenous macromolecules in the locoregional tissue lymphatic drainages, transcapillary exchange across the capillary wall also takes place through a separate population of large pores, or capillary leaks, that are between 24 and 60 nm in diameter. The classification of blood capillary types on the basis of differences in the physiologic upper limits of pore size to transvascular flow highlights the differences in the transcapillary exchange routes for the transvascular transport of endogenous and non-endogenous macromolecules across the capillary walls of different blood capillary types. Methods The findings and published data of studies on capillary wall ultrastructure and capillary microvascular permeability to lipid-insoluble endogenous and non-endogenous molecules from the 1950s to date were reviewed. In this study, the blood capillary types in different tissues and organs were classified on the basis of the physiologic upper limits of pore size to the transvascular flow of lipid-insoluble molecules. Blood capillaries were classified as non-sinusoidal or sinusoidal on the basis of capillary wall basement membrane layer

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyls in contaminated soil samples evaluated by GC-ECD with dual-column and GC-HRMS.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Giuliana; Novario, Giuseppe; Bochicchio, Dominga; Anzilotta, Giuseppe; Palma, Achille; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2008-08-01

    We present and compare results obtained from the analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) of a limited number of contaminated soil samples collected in three areas of Basilicata region (south of Italy). The levels of PCBs were evaluated by using two analytical methods: (i) parallel dual-column gas-chromatography with dual electron capture detectors (GC-ECD) and (ii) gas-chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) via electron impact ionization (EI) in the multiple ion monitoring mode (MIM, two ions per compound). Two extraction methods prior to sample cleanup were also examined: microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE). The MAE was the extraction procedure adopted using acetone/n-hexane (1:1, v/v) as it is mainly characterized by higher sample throughput and allowed reduced consumption of organic solvents. While extraction and analysis of spiked soil samples showed the applicability of both methods, systematic differences between the results were obtained for the sum of PCBs as a result of some non-detected congeners by GC-ECD compared with GC-HRMS. Indeed, high resolution MS using EI mode (electron energy 40eV) with a resolving power of 10,000 provides additional information about the contamination pattern. The GC-ECD screening of 11 soil samples led to just one sample non-compliant to as it was close to the guide value for soils fixed by the Italian legislation (i.e., 60ppb for private or urban soil). Using GC-HRMS, the amount of all PCBs found ranged from 5.4 to 127ppb with five soil samples non-compliant to the guide value. The number of identified congeners ranged from 1 to 9 and 9 to 18 using dual-column GC-ECD and GC-HRMS, respectively.

  1. Numerical simulation of freshwater/seawater interaction in a dual-permeability karst system with conduits: the development of discrete-continuum VDFST-CFP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zexuan; Hu, Bill

    2016-04-01

    Dual-permeability karst aquifers of porous media and conduit networks with significant different hydrological characteristics are widely distributed in the world. Discrete-continuum numerical models, such as MODFLOW-CFP and CFPv2, have been verified as appropriate approaches to simulate groundwater flow and solute transport in numerical modeling of karst hydrogeology. On the other hand, seawater intrusion associated with fresh groundwater resources contamination has been observed and investigated in numbers of coastal aquifers, especially under conditions of sea level rise. Density-dependent numerical models including SEAWAT are able to quantitatively evaluate the seawater/freshwater interaction processes. A numerical model of variable-density flow and solute transport - conduit flow process (VDFST-CFP) is developed to provide a better description of seawater intrusion and submarine groundwater discharge in a coastal karst aquifer with conduits. The coupling discrete-continuum VDFST-CFP model applies Darcy-Weisbach equation to simulate non-laminar groundwater flow in the conduit system in which is conceptualized and discretized as pipes, while Darcy equation is still used in continuum porous media. Density-dependent groundwater flow and solute transport equations with appropriate density terms in both conduit and porous media systems are derived and numerically solved using standard finite difference method with an implicit iteration procedure. Synthetic horizontal and vertical benchmarks are created to validate the newly developed VDFST-CFP model by comparing with other numerical models such as variable density SEAWAT, couplings of constant density groundwater flow and solute transport MODFLOW/MT3DMS and discrete-continuum CFPv2/UMT3D models. VDFST-CFP model improves the simulation of density dependent seawater/freshwater mixing processes and exchanges between conduit and matrix. Continuum numerical models greatly overestimated the flow rate under turbulent flow

  2. Compact, Lightweight Dual-Frequency Microstrip Antenna Feed for Future Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Salinity Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon; Wilson, William J.; Njoku, Eni; Dinardo, Steve; Hunter, Don; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Kona, Keerti S.; Manteghi, Majid

    2006-01-01

    The development of a compact, lightweight, dual-frequency antenna feed for future soil moisture and sea surface salinity (SSS) missions is described. The design is based on the microstrip stacked-patch array (MSPA) to be used to feed a large lightweight deployable rotating mesh antenna for spaceborne L-band (approx.1 GHz) passive and active sensing systems. The design features will also enable applications to airborne soil moisture and salinity remote sensing sensors operating on small aircrafts. This paper describes the design of stacked patch elements and 16-element array configuration. The results from the return loss, antenna pattern measurements and sky tests are also described.

  3. A dual-low-frequency radar for sub-canopy and deep soil-moisture measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, D.; Rodriguez, E.; Moghadamm, M.; Hoffman, J.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of deep and sub-canopy soil moisture are critical in understanding the global water and carbon energy cycle, but are not presently available on a synoptic basis. In this paper, we discuss a proposed spaceborne dual-frequency (UHF and VHF) radar that can provide global & these key measurements. This system is polarimetric and the low transmit frequencies chosen for their penetration abilities necessitate a large antenna that has an aperture of approximately 30m by 11m at VHF, and 30m by 3m at UHF. We describe the mission concept, overall system design and performance characteristics, and discuss ongoing tasks to prototype key system components, and verify the retrieval algorithms. We are also developing a tower-based prototype radar system. This system will, through field observations, demonstrate the scientific effectiveness of the measurement concept and provide critical data for algorithm development. We provide details of the ground experimentation including issues unique to operating at the low-frequencies chosen for these systems.

  4. Crustal permeability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, Tom; Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Permeability is the primary control on fluid flow in the Earth’s crust and is key to a surprisingly wide range of geological processes, because it controls the advection of heat and solutes and the generation of anomalous pore pressures.  The practical importance of permeability – and the potential for large, dynamic changes in permeability – is highlighted by ongoing issues associated with hydraulic fracturing for hydrocarbon production (“fracking”), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration.  Although there are thousands of research papers on crustal permeability, this is the first book-length treatment.  This book bridges the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic perspective of permeability as a static material property and the perspective of other Earth scientists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. 

  5. A standardized approach for estimating the permeability of plastic films to soil fumigants under various field and environmental conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Minimizing atmospheric emissions of soil fumigants is critical for protecting human and environmental health. Covering the soil surface with a plastic tarp is a common approach to restrict fumigant emissions. The mass transfer of the fumigant vapors through the tarp is often the rate-limiting factor...

  6. Investigation of Soil Permeability and Hydrological Properties of Flood Plain Deposits of the Rio Grande in EL Paso TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schacht, D.; Jin, L.; Doser, D. I.

    2013-12-01

    The various soil types within the flood plains of Rio Grande in El Paso 's Lower Valley have long been utilized by local farmers. These soils are typically more conducive to farming than the more recent (Pliocene) sandy soils outside of the flood plain region. This project will explore the various properties of these soils types such as their grain size, depths, extent, and hydrological conductivity utilizing various geophysical and geochemical methods. The study site is located in El Paso 's Lower Valley and is situated in an actively farmed area. Soil maps from the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) and variations in vegetation growth will help delineate locations of soil types in the study area. The information that will be collected will produce baseline data to help track expected seasonal variations in the soil's moisture content and in the depth of the local water table. This project represents a collaboration between El Paso Community College's and the University of Texas at El Paso's Departments of Geological Sciences as a means for students majoring in Geological Sciences at El Paso Community College to gain hands on experience in researching geological issues through partnerships with their future institution and faculty.

  7. The Effectiveness of Communication Forms Used by the Soil Conservation Service and Soil and Water Conservation Districts: A Dual Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Sylvia Jean

    This study investigated the effectiveness of communication modes used by the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) and Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCD) of Clinton, Highland, and Warren countries in southwest Ohio. The evaluation was based on the recorded perceptions of SCS and SWCD personnel and farmers from each of the study countries. Two…

  8. Enhancing Bioremediation of Oil-contaminated Soils by Controlling Nutrient Transport using Dual Characteristics of Soil Pore Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Y.; Suetsugu, A.; Matsumoto, Y.; Fujihara, A.; Suyama, K.; Miyamoto, T.

    2012-12-01

    Soil structure is heterogeneous with cracks or macropores allowing bypass flow, which may lead to applied chemicals avoiding interaction with soil particles or the contaminated area. We investigated the bioremediation efficiency of oil-contaminated soils by applying suction at the bottom of soil columns during bioremediation. Unsaturated flow conditions were investigated so as to avoid bypass flow and achieve sufficient dispersion of chemicals in the soil column. The boundary conditions at the bottom of the soil columns were 0 kPa and -3 kPa, and were applied to a volcanic ash soil with and without macropores. Unsaturated flow was achieved with -3 kPa and an injection rate of 1/10 of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The resultant biological activities of the effluent increased dramatically in the unsaturated flow with macropores condition. Unsaturated conditions prevented bypass flow and allowed dispersion of the injected nutrients. Unsaturated flow achieved 60-80% of saturation, which enhanced biological activity in the soil column. Remediation results were better for unsaturated conditions because of higher biological activity. Moreover, unsaturated flow with macropores achieved uniform remediation efficiency from upper through lower positions in the column. Finally, taking the applied solution volume into consideration, unsaturated flow with -3 kPa achieved 10 times higher efficiency when compared with conventional saturated flow application. These results suggest that effective use of nutrients or remediation chemicals is possible by avoiding bypass flow and enhancing biological activity using relatively simple and inexpensive techniques.

  9. A dual-porous, biophysical void structure model of soil for the understanding of the conditions causing nitrous oxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, G. Peter; Maurizio Laudone, G.; Whalle, W. Richard; Bird, Nigel; Gregory, Andrew; Cardenas, Laura; Misselbrook, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Nitrous oxide is the fourth most important greenhouse gas. It is 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide, and two-thirds of anthropogenic nitrous oxide is emitted by agricultural land. This presentation will begin with a brief overview of the laboratory measurements of nitrous oxide emission from carefully characterised soils, presented in more detail by Cardenas et al.. The measurements were made in a twelve-chamber, gas chromatographic apparatus at North Wyke Research (formerly IGER). The presentation will then continue with a description of a void network model of sufficient accuracy and authenticity that it can be used to explain and predict the nitrous oxide production, and the modelling of the biological, chemical and physical processes for the production of nitrous oxide within the constructed network. Finally, conclusions will be drawn from a comparison of the model results with experiment. The void network model Nitrous oxide is produced by microbial activity located in ‘hotspots' within the microstructure of soil, and nutrients and gases flow or diffuse to and from these hotspots through the water or gas-filled macro-porosity. It is clear, therefore, that a network model to describe and explain nitrous oxide production must encompass the full size range of pore space active within the process, which covers 6 orders of magnitude, and must make realistic suppositions about the positional relationship of the hotspots relative to the soil macro-porosity. Previous experimental (Tsakiroglou, C. D. et al, European J.Soil Sci., 2008) and theoretical approaches to the modelling of soil void structure cannot generally meet these two requirements. We have therefore built on the success of the previous uni-porous model of soil (Matthews, G. P. et al, Wat.Resour.Res, 2010), and the concept of a critical percolation path, to develop a dual porous model (Laudone, G. M. et al, European J.Soil Sci., 2010) with the following features: • A porous unit cell, with

  10. CAPSTONE REPORT ON THE APPLICATION, MONITORING, AND PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR GROUND-WATER REMEDIATION: VOL. 2 LONG-TERM MONITORING OF PRBS: SOIL AND GROUND WATER SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses soil and ground-water sampling methods and procedures used to evaluate the long-term performance of permeable reactive barriers (PRBS) at two sites, Elizabeth City, NC, and the Denver Federal Center near Lakewood, CO. Both PRBs were installed in 1996 and hav...

  11. CAPSTONE REPORT ON THE APPLICATION, MONITORING, AND PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR GROUND-WATER REMEDIATION: VOL. 2 LONG-TERM MONITORING OF PRBS: SOIL AND GROUND WATER SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses soil and ground-water sampling methods and procedures used to evaluate the long-term performance of permeable reactive barriers (PRBS) at two sites, Elizabeth City, NC, and the Denver Federal Center near Lakewood, CO. Both PRBs were installed in 1996 and hav...

  12. Dual, differential isotope labeling shows the preferential movement of labile plant constituents into mineral-bonded soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Haddix, Michelle L; Paul, Eldor A; Cotrufo, M Francesca

    2016-06-01

    The formation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) are major concerns in the context of global change for carbon sequestration and soil health. It is presently believed that lignin is not selectively preserved in soil and that chemically labile compounds bonding to minerals comprise a large fraction of the SOM. Labile plant inputs have been suggested to be the main precursor of the mineral-bonded SOM. Litter decomposition and SOM formation are expected to have temperature sensitivity varying with the lability of plant inputs. We tested this framework using dual (13) C and (15) N differentially labeled plant material to distinguish the metabolic and structural components within a single plant material. Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) seedlings were grown in an enriched (13) C and (15) N environment and then prior to harvest, removed from the enriched environment and allowed to incorporate natural abundance (13) C-CO2 and (15) N fertilizer into the metabolic plant components. This enabled us to achieve a greater than one atom % difference in (13) C between the metabolic and structural components within the plant litter. This differentially labeled litter was incubated in soil at 15 and 35 °C, for 386 days with CO2 measured throughout the incubation. After 14, 28, 147, and 386 days of incubation, the soil was subsequently fractionated. There was no difference in temperature sensitivity of the metabolic and structural components with regard to how much was respired or in the amount of litter biomass stabilized. Only the metabolic litter component was found in the sand, silt, or clay fraction while the structural component was exclusively found in the light fraction. These results support the stabilization framework that labile plant components are the main precursor of mineral-associated organic matter.

  13. Dual solutions of stagnation point flow and heat transfer of Maxwell fluid over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet in the presence of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusoh, Rahimah; Nazar, Roslinda

    2017-08-01

    Numerical investigation for stagnation point flow and heat transfer of Maxwell fluid over a stretching/shrinking sheet in the presence of nanoparticles has been performed. A similarity transformation has been used to transform the governing partial differential equations to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the built in bvp4c function in Matlab. Graphical results are plotted for the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number for various values of the emerging parameters. Final conclusion has been drawn on the basis of both numerical and graphical results. Dual solutions exist and the first solution is found to be stable.

  14. Dual solutions of magnetohydrodynamic stagnation point flow and heat transfer of viscoelastic nanofluid over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusoh, R.; Nazar, R.; Pop, I.

    2017-09-01

    The present study is intended to encompass the stagnation point flow and heat transfer of viscoelastic nanofluid with the presence of thermal radiation. The viscous incompressible electrically conducting and Jeffrey fluid model is taken into account. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to ordinary differential equations by using the appropriate similarity variables. The resulting differential equations are solved numerically using the built in bvp4c function in Matlab. Dual solutions are discovered for a certain range of the governing parameters. Numerical results for the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction coefficients and the local Nusselt number are elucidated through tables and graphs.

  15. Dual-frequency surface-based Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) for the quantitative study of soil-water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klenk, Patrick; Jaumann, Stefan; Keicher, Viktoria; Roth, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution surface-based GPR measurements allow studying the evolution of the capillary fringe in very dynamic hydraulic regimes. We use a dual-frequency surface-based multichannel GPR system to investigate imbibition, drainage, and infiltration in a complicated but known subsurface structure. These hydraulic dynamics are induced by varying the ground water table through pumping water into and out of an observation well or by infiltration with a sprinkler system. The precision of our GPR measurements permits to place close scrutiny on the underlying hydraulic processes. Here, we specifically focus on an experiment featuring high-resolution monitoring of two artificially induced infiltration events into two different kinds of sands at our test site by an eight channel, dual-frequency GPR system measuring at center frequencies of 200 and 600 MHz. During these infiltration events, which lasted for several hours each, 2D-common offset data were acquired along the 20 m center axis of our test site at a time resolution of approximately one radargram per minute. The subsequent relaxation of the system has been monitored by repeated status measurements for about three months. In this presentation, we (i) show the efficacy of our dual-frequency multichannel setup for quantitative studies of both the highly dynamic infiltration phase and the increasingly small variations during subsequent months of relaxation, (ii) assess the currently attainable precision with our commercial GPR instruments, and (iii) discuss the use of observed differences in the GPR response of the different materials for estimating soil hydraulic properties from these datasets.

  16. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L. |; Lowe, K.S.; Murdoch, L.D. |; Slack, W.W.; Houk, T.C.

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies.

  17. Phase 1 remediation of jet fuel contaminated soil and groundwater at JFK International Airport using dual phase extraction and bioventing

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.; Bianco, P. Rizzo, M.; Pressly, N.; Frumer, B.

    1995-12-31

    Soil and groundwater contaminated with jet fuel at Terminal One of the JFK International Airport in New York have been remediated using dual phase extraction (DPE) and bioventing. Two areas were remediated using 51 DPE wells and 20 air sparging/air injection wells. The total area remediated by the DPE wells is estimated to be 4.8 acres. Groundwater was extracted to recover nonaqueous phase and aqueous phase jet fuel from the shallow aquifer and treated above ground by the following processes; oil/water separation, iron-oxidation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, air stripping and liquid-phase granular activated carbon (LPGAC) adsorption. The extracted vapors were treated by vapor-phase granular activated carbon (VPGAC) adsorption in one area, and catalytic oxidation and VPGAC adsorption in another area. After 6 months of remediation, approximately 5,490 lbs. of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were removed by soil vapor extraction (SVE), 109,650 lbs. of petroleum hydrocarbons were removed from the extracted groundwater, and 60,550 lbs. of petroleum hydrocarbons were biologically oxidized by subsurface microorganisms. Of these three mechanisms, the rate of petroleum hydrocarbon removal was the highest for biological oxidation in one area and by groundwater extraction in another area.

  18. Dual assimilation of satellite soil moisture to improve flood prediction in ungauged catchments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper explores the use of active and passive satellite soil moisture products for improving stream flow prediction within 4 large (>5,000km2) semi-arid catchments. We use the probability distributed model (PDM) under a data-scarce scenario and aim at correcting two key controlling factors in th...

  19. THEORETICAL DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR TRANSPORT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN DUAL-POROSITY SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the behavior of volatile organic compounds in soils or sediments is necessary for managing their use and designing appropriate remedial systems to eliminate potential threats to the environment, particularly the air and groundwater resources. In this effort, based on c...

  20. THEORETICAL DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR TRANSPORT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN DUAL-POROSITY SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the behavior of volatile organic compounds in soils or sediments is necessary for managing their use and designing appropriate remedial systems to eliminate potential threats to the environment, particularly the air and groundwater resources. In this effort, based on c...

  1. Rapidly progressing dual infection with Aspergillus and Rhizopus: when soil inhabitants become deadly invaders.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Milind; Rapose, Alwyn

    2016-12-08

    We present a case report of a 61-year-old patient with acute pulmonary and cerebral infections with Aspergillus and Rhizopus. The only risk factor for invasive fungal disease was high-dose corticosteroids used to treat her chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. She had rapid progression and succumbed to her infections within 2 weeks of diagnosis in spite of aggressive antifungal therapy and surgery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of rapidly fatal dual infection with Aspergillus and Rhizopus Our case highlights the role of high-dose corticosteroids as a risk factor for invasive fungal disease in patients without traditional risk factors like haematological malignancies, solid organ transplantation or uncontrolled diabetes.

  2. Dual-sugar tests of small intestinal permeability are poor predictors of bacterial infections and mortality in cirrhosis: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Anika; Reuken, Philipp A; Stengel, Sven; Stallmach, Andreas; Bruns, Tony

    2016-03-21

    To prospectively analyze the impact of increased intestinal permeability (IP) on mortality and the occurrence of infections in patients with cirrhosis. IP was quantified using the lactulose/mannitol (L/M) test in 46 hospitalized patients with cirrhosis (25 Child-Pugh A/B, 21 Child-Pugh C) and in 16 healthy controls. Markers of inflammation [LPS-binding protein, Interleukin-6 (IL-6)] and enterocyte death [intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (I-FABP)] were determined in serum using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Patients were followed for one year and assessed for survival, liver transplantation, the necessity of hospitalization and the occurrence of bacterial infections. The primary endpoint of the study was defined as differences in survival between patients with pathological and without pathological lactulose/mannitol test. Thirty-nine (85%) patients with cirrhosis had a pathologically increased IP index (L/M ratio > 0.07) compared to 4 (25%) healthy controls (P < 0.0001). The IP index correlated with the Child-Pugh score (r = 0.484, P = 0.001) and with serum IL-6 (r = 0.342, P = 0.02). Within one year, nineteen (41%) patients developed a total of 33 episodes of hospitalization with bacterial or fungal infections. Although patients who developed spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) (n = 7) had a higher IP index than patients who did not (0.27 vs 0.14, P = 0.018), the baseline IP index did not predict time to infection, infection-free survival or overall survival, neither when assessed as linear variable, as tertiles, nor dichotomized using an established cut-off. In contrast, model for end-stage liver disease score, Child-Pugh score, the presence of ascites, serum IL-6 and I-FABP were univariate predictors of infection-free survival. Although increased IP is a frequent phenomenon in advanced cirrhosis and may predispose to SBP, it failed to predict infection-free and overall survival in this prospective cohort study.

  3. Dual-sugar tests of small intestinal permeability are poor predictors of bacterial infections and mortality in cirrhosis: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Anika; Reuken, Philipp A; Stengel, Sven; Stallmach, Andreas; Bruns, Tony

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively analyze the impact of increased intestinal permeability (IP) on mortality and the occurrence of infections in patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: IP was quantified using the lactulose/mannitol (L/M) test in 46 hospitalized patients with cirrhosis (25 Child-Pugh A/B, 21 Child-Pugh C) and in 16 healthy controls. Markers of inflammation [LPS-binding protein, Interleukin-6 (IL-6)] and enterocyte death [intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (I-FABP)] were determined in serum using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Patients were followed for one year and assessed for survival, liver transplantation, the necessity of hospitalization and the occurrence of bacterial infections. The primary endpoint of the study was defined as differences in survival between patients with pathological and without pathological lactulose/mannitol test. RESULTS: Thirty-nine (85%) patients with cirrhosis had a pathologically increased IP index (L/M ratio > 0.07) compared to 4 (25%) healthy controls (P < 0.0001). The IP index correlated with the Child-Pugh score (r = 0.484, P = 0.001) and with serum IL-6 (r = 0.342, P = 0.02). Within one year, nineteen (41%) patients developed a total of 33 episodes of hospitalization with bacterial or fungal infections. Although patients who developed spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) (n = 7) had a higher IP index than patients who did not (0.27 vs 0.14, P = 0.018), the baseline IP index did not predict time to infection, infection-free survival or overall survival, neither when assessed as linear variable, as tertiles, nor dichotomized using an established cut-off. In contrast, model for end-stage liver disease score, Child-Pugh score, the presence of ascites, serum IL-6 and I-FABP were univariate predictors of infection-free survival. CONCLUSION: Although increased IP is a frequent phenomenon in advanced cirrhosis and may predispose to SBP, it failed to predict infection-free and overall survival in this prospective cohort study

  4. Potential dual use of biochar for wastewater treatment and soil amelioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, Bernd; Werner, Steffen; Alfes, Karsten; Lübken, Manfred

    2013-04-01

    Irrigating crops with wastewater from open drainage channels is a common practice in urban agricultural production in many dry regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America. While the wastewater-borne nutrients reduce the need for inputs of mineral fertilizers or manures and thus reduce production costs, wastewater-borne pathogens and contaminants pose a health risk for the producers and consumers of the crops. Furthermore, the input of nutrients with the irrigation water may greatly exceed crop requirements and thus lead to unproductive leaching losses of nutrients. It is generally acknowledged that biochar additions can increase the soil's sorption and retention capacity for nutrients and water. However, positive effects on crop production are generally only observed, if this is combined with mineral fertilizers or manures due to the low nutrient content of biochars. Biochar possibly also has a high potential for use in water purification, replacing the coal-based activated carbon as a sorbent for contaminants and pathogens. It was therefore hypothesized that biochar can be used for pathogen removal from wastewater while at the same time being loaded with nutrients and contaminants. If contaminants are of minor concern the "loaded" biochar can be used as a soil amendment, providing not only long-term sorption capacity but also nutrients. Experiments were conducted with pyrochar from Miscanthus, rice husks and wood chips, which strongly differed in elemental composition, MIR-DRIFT spectra, surface charge properties and sorption potential for DOC and phosphate. When used as top filter layer in a sand column system, the biochars effectively reduced E. coli concentrations from raw wastewater by up to 2 log units. While biochars from rice husks and Miscanthus accumulated N substantially, wood chip biochar showed no N retention. On the other hand, P accumulation was most pronounced for wood chip biochar. Ongoing incubation experiments with the "loaded" and fresh biochar in

  5. Competition for phosphorus: differential uptake from dual-isotope-labeled soil interspaces between shrub and grass

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, M.M.; Eissenstat, D.M.; Richards, J.H.; Allen, M.F.

    1985-07-26

    Two species of Agropyron grass differed strikingly in their capacity to compete for phosphate in soil interspaces shared with a common competitor, the sagebrush Artemisia tridentata. Of the total phosphorus-32 and -33 absorbed by Artemisia, 86% was from the interspace shared with Agropyron spicatum and only 14% from that shared with Agropyron desertorum. Actively absorbing mycorrhizal roots of Agropyron and Artemisia were present in both interspaces, where competition for the labeled phosphate occurred. The results have important implications about the way in which plants compete for resources below ground in both natural plant communities and agricultural intercropping systems.

  6. Dual-low frequency radar for soil moisture under vegetation at at-depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Moller, D.

    2002-01-01

    To address a key science research topic for the global water and energy cycle, namely measuring soil moisture under substantial vegetation canopies and to useful depths, we have developed a concept for a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system operating simultaneously at UHF and VHF frequencies. We are currently prototyping key technology items that enable this concept under the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). This presentation describes the technological challenges and innovations we are addressing to enable the implementation of this instrument and its integration into a future Earth-orbiting mission.

  7. Dual State/Rainfall Correction via Soil Moisture Assimilation for Improved Hydrologic Prediction - A Synthetic Study Using the VIC Model in the Arkansas-Red River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Y.; Crow, W. T.; Nijssen, B.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate streamflow prediction based on hydrologic models requires accurate antecedent soil moisture conditions as well as realistic rainfall estimates. If soil moisture measurements are available, they presumably contain information about both. With the growing availability of satellite-based precipitation and soil moisture products, data assimilation techniques have been used to enhance both antecedent soil moisture states and rainfall to achieve more accurate streamflow prediction. One such approach is a dual state/rainfall correction framework, which assimilates soil moisture measurements into both hydrologic model states and rainfall estimates simultaneously to enhance pre-storm soil moisture conditions and within-storm rainfall totals.To date such approaches have only been applied to deterministic hydrologic prediction within relatively small (< 10,000 km2) hydrologic basins. In this study, we conducted a synthetic experiment in the 500,000 km2 Arkansas-Red River basin in the central United States, in which we applied such a dual system to a semi-distributed hydrologic model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, at a sub-daily time step for multiple years at 1/8 degree resolution. We considered a VIC model realization as synthetic "truth" and added noise to the simulated true state to create synthetic soil moisture measurements. We then used a separate VIC realization, based on modified forcings and model states, as the "open-loop" results (i.e., baseline model run prior to any assimilation) into which the synthetic soil moisture measurements were assimilated. For the state correction part in the dual system, the synthetic measurements were assimilated into the open-loop states using an ensemble Kalman filtering (EnKF) approach, resulting in an ensemble of updated antecedent states. Separately, the soil moisture data was also assimilated into a simple water balance model using EnKF to obtain an ensemble of corrected rainfall estimates. The

  8. A dual stable-isotope approach to analyse the linkages between tree water fluxes and soil water pools in a Mediterranean mountain catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Pilar; Cayuela, Carles; Sánchez-Costa, Elisenda; Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme

    2017-04-01

    This work uses a dual isotope-based approach (18O, 2H) to examine the mixing of water in the soil and the linkages between tree water fluxes and soil water pools in a Mediterranean mountain catchment (Vallcebre Research Catchments, NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E). Since May 2015, water-isotopes have been monitored in rainfall, throughfall and stemflow below a Scots pine stand and in stream water at the Can Vila (0.56 km2) catchment outlet. Moreover, fortnightly (From May to December 2015) soil samples (10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 cm), xylem samples (3 Scots pines) and mobile soil water samples in low-suction lysimeters (20, 50 and 100 cm) and in a piezometer (150-300 cm deep) were collected at the same stand. Water from soil and xylem samples was extracted by cryogenic vacuum distillation and isotope analyses were obtained by infrared spectroscopy. All this information has been combined with continuous measurement of meteorological, soil moisture and water potential, piezometric levels and hydrological variables at the stand and catchment scales. Stable isotopes ratios of bound soil water fell below the local meteoric water line (LMWL), with more evaporative enrichment in the shallow horizons. On the contrary, mobile soil water (low suction lysimeters) and groundwater fell along the LMWL, well mixed with stream water. The differences observed between these two water pools remained similar during the whole study period. Stable isotopes ratios indicate that Scots pine trees use shallow bound soil water during the whole study period. No marked changes in depth of water uptake were observed, presumably due to the availability of water in the shallow horizons, even during the summer months.

  9. Dual-chamber measurements of δ13C of soil-respired CO2 partitioned using a field-based three end-member model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanito, F.; McAllister, J.; Smith, P.; Robinson, D.

    2012-04-01

    Reliably estimating the heterotrophic component of RS is crucial for the characterisation of an ecosystem's net C balance. However, the contribution of 'historical' soil C (SOM) to total soil respiration (RS) in forest remains still uncertain. One of the contributing factors of this uncertainty is the difficulty to reliably measure and partition key carbon-cycle processes. Isotopic methods, such as natural variations in carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of soil respiration, are more frequently being applied, and show promise in separating heterotrophic and autotrophic contributions to RS. In this study we report the partitioning of soil-surface CO2 effluxes, measured in forests in Italy and in Germany, using a new field-based δ13C method and a three end-member mixing model. Soil-surface CO2 flux was partitioned into components derived from root, litter/humus and SOM sources, and compared this with the conventional partitioning into autotrophic and heterotrophic components (two end-member mixing model). In addition, we used a novel dual-chamber technique to ensure that measurements of δ13CRs were subjected to minimal artefacts during measurement. Our results provide new information about the contributions of belowground components to the CO2 flux at the soil surface, and show an alternative approach to the partitioning of RS components using their 13C signatures.

  10. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the incre...

  11. EFFECT OF AQUEOUS PHASE PROPERTIES ON CLAY PARTICLE ZETA POTENTIAL AND ELECTRO-OSMOTIC PERMEABILITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRO-KINETIC SOIL REMEDIATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aqueous phase properties (pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration) on clay particle zeta potential and packed-bed electro-osmotic permeability was quantified. Although pH strongly altered the zeta potential of a Georgia kaolinite, it did not signi...

  12. EFFECT OF AQUEOUS PHASE PROPERTIES ON CLAY PARTICLE ZETA POTENTIAL AND ELECTRO-OSMOTIC PERMEABILITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRO-KINETIC SOIL REMEDIATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aqueous phase properties (pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration) on clay particle zeta potential and packed-bed electro-osmotic permeability was quantified. Although pH strongly altered the zeta potential of a Georgia kaolinite, it did not signi...

  13. Pneumatic fracturing of low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    Schuring, J.R.

    1996-08-01

    Pneumatic fracturing of soils to enhance the removal and treatment of dense nonaqueous phase liquids is described. The process involves gas injection at a pressure exceeding the natural stresses and at a flow rate exceeding the permeability of the formation. The paper outlines geologic considerations, advantages and disadvantages, general technology considerations, low permeability media considerations, commercial availability, efficiency, and costs. Five case histories of remediation using pneumatic fracturing are briefly summarized. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. An ensemble Kalman filter dual assimilation of thermal infrared and microwave satellite observations of soil moisture into the Noah land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, Christopher R.; Crow, Wade T.; Anderson, Martha C.; Mecikalski, John R.

    2012-11-01

    Studies that have assimilated remotely sensed soil moisture (SM) into land surface models (LSMs) have generally focused on retrievals from microwave (MW) sensors. However, retrievals from thermal infrared (TIR) sensors have also been shown to add unique information, especially where MW sensors are not able to provide accurate retrievals (due to, e.g., dense vegetation). In this study, we examine the assimilation of a TIR product based on surface evaporative flux estimates from the Atmosphere Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) model and the MW-based VU Amsterdam NASA surface SM product generated with the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM). A set of data assimilation experiments using an ensemble Kalman filter are performed over the contiguous United States to assess the impact of assimilating ALEXI and LPRM SM retrievals in isolation and together in a dual-assimilation case. The relative skill of each assimilation case is assessed through a data denial approach where a LSM is forced with an inferior precipitation data set. The ability of each assimilation case to correct for precipitation errors is quantified by comparing with a simulation forced with a higher-quality precipitation data set. All three assimilation cases (ALEXI, LPRM, and Dual assimilation) show relative improvements versus the open loop (i.e., reduced RMSD) for surface and root zone SM. In the surface zone, the dual assimilation case provides the largest improvements, followed by the LPRM case. However, the ALEXI case performs best in the root zone. Results from the data denial experiment are supported by comparisons between assimilation results and ground-based SM observations from the Soil Climate Analysis Network.

  15. Soils

    Treesearch

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  16. Soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil is a diverse natural material characterized by solid, liquid, and gas phases that impart unique chemical, physical, and biological properties. Soil provides many key functions, including supporting plant growth and providing environmental remediation. Monitoring key soil properties and processe...

  17. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  18. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  19. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  20. New dual in-growth core isotopic technique to assess the root litter carbon input to the soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The root-derived carbon (C) input to the soil, whose quantification is often neglected because of methodological difficulties, is considered a crucial C flux for soil C dynamics and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) studies. In the present study, we compared two independent methods to quantify this C...

  1. Modeling multidomain hydraulic properties of shrink-swell soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Ryan D.; Abou Najm, Majdi R.; Rupp, David E.; Selker, John S.

    2016-10-01

    Shrink-swell soils crack and become compacted as they dry, changing properties such as bulk density and hydraulic conductivity. Multidomain models divide soil into independent realms that allow soil cracks to be incorporated into classical flow and transport models. Incongruously, most applications of multidomain models assume that the porosity distributions, bulk density, and effective saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil are constant. This study builds on a recently derived soil shrinkage model to develop a new multidomain, dual-permeability model that can accurately predict variations in soil hydraulic properties due to dynamic changes in crack size and connectivity. The model only requires estimates of soil gravimetric water content and a minimal set of parameters, all of which can be determined using laboratory and/or field measurements. We apply the model to eight clayey soils, and demonstrate its ability to quantify variations in volumetric water content (as can be determined during measurement of a soil water characteristic curve) and transient saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks (as can be measured using infiltration tests). The proposed model is able to capture observed variations in Ks of one to more than two orders of magnitude. In contrast, other dual-permeability models assume that Ks is constant, resulting in the potential for large error when predicting water movement through shrink-swell soils. Overall, the multidomain model presented here successfully quantifies fluctuations in the hydraulic properties of shrink-swell soil matrices, and are suitable for use in physical flow and transport models based on Darcy's Law, the Richards Equation, and the advection-dispersion equation.

  2. Does Miscanthus cultivation on organic soils compensate for carbon loss from peat oxidation? A dual label study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Cédric; Leifeld, Jens; Müller, Moritz; Schulin, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural use of organic soils requires drainage and thereby changes conditions in these soils from anoxic to oxic. As a consequence, organic carbon that had been accumulated over millennia is rapidly mineralized, so that these soils are converted from a CO2 sink to a source. The peat mineralization rate depends mainly on drainage depth, but also on crop type. Various studies show that Miscanthus, a C4 bioenergy plant, shows potential for carbon sequestration in mineral soils because of its high productivity, its dense root system, absence of tillage and high preharvest litterfall. If Miscanthus cropping would have a similar effect in organic soils, peat consumption and thus CO2 emissions might be reduced. For our study we compared two adjacent fields, on which organic soil is cultivated with Miscanthus (since 20 years) and perennial grass (since 6 years). Both sites are located in the Bernese Seeland, the largest former peatland area of Switzerland. To determine wether Miscanthus-derived carbon accumulated in the organic soil, we compared the stable carbon isotopic signatures of the experimental soil with those of an organic soil without any C4-plant cultivation history. To analyze the effect of C4-C accumulation on peat degradability we compared the CO2 emissions by incubating 90 soil samples of the two fields for more than one year. Additionally, we analysed the isotopic CO2 composition (13C, 14C) during the first 25 days of incubation after trapping the emitted CO2 in NaOH and precipitating it as BaCO3. The ∂13C values of the soil imply, that the highest share of C4-C of around 30% is situated at a depth of 10-20 cm. Corn that used to be cultivated on the grassland field before 2009 still accounts for 8% of SOC. O/C and H/C ratios of the peat samples indicate a stronger microbial imprint of organic matter under Miscanthus cultivation. The amount of CO2 emitted was not affected by the cultivation type. On average 57% of the CO2 was C4 derived in the

  3. Mitigating methane emissions and air intrusion in heterogeneous landfills with a high permeability layer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yoojin; Imhoff, Paul T; Augenstein, Don; Yazdani, Ramin

    2011-05-01

    Spatially variable refuse gas permeability and landfill gas (LFG) generation rate, cracking of the soil cover, and reduced refuse gas permeability because of liquid addition can all affect CH(4) collection efficiency when intermediate landfill covers are installed. A new gas collection system that includes a near-surface high permeability layer beneath the landfill cover was evaluated for enhancing capture of LFG and mitigating CH(4) emissions. Simulations of gas transport in two-dimensional domains demonstrated that the permeable layer reduces CH(4) emissions up to a factor of 2 for particular spatially variable gas permeability fields. When individual macrocracks formed in the cover soil and the permeable layer was absent, CH(4) emissions increased to as much as 24% of the total CH(4) generated, double the emissions when the permeable layer was installed. CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil was also much more uniform when the permeable layer was present: local percentages of CH(4) oxidized varied between 94% and 100% across the soil cover with the permeable layer, but ranged from 10% to 100% without this layer for some test cases. However, the permeable layer had a minor effect on CH(4) emissions and CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil when the ratio of the gas permeability of the cover soil to the mean refuse gas permeability ≤ 0.05. The modeling approach employed in this study may be used to assess the utility of other LFG collection systems and management practices.

  4. Selection of Streptomyces against soil borne fungal pathogens by a standardized dual culture assay and evaluation of their effects on seed germination and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Kunova, Andrea; Bonaldi, Maria; Saracchi, Marco; Pizzatti, Cristina; Chen, Xiaoyulong; Cortesi, Paolo

    2016-11-09

    In the search for new natural resources for crop protection, streptomycetes are gaining interest in agriculture as plant growth promoting bacteria and/or biological control agents. Because of their peculiar life cycle, in which the production of secondary metabolites is synchronized with the development of aerial hyphae and sporulation, the commonly used methods to screen for bacterial antagonists need to be adapted. The dual culture assay was standardized in terms of inoculation timing of Streptomyces antagonist and pathogen, and growth rate of different fungal pathogens. In case of fast-growing fungi, inoculation of the antagonist 2 or 3 days prior to the pathogen resulted in significantly stronger inhibition of mycelium growth. One hundred and thirty Streptomyces strains were evaluated against six destructive soil borne pathogens. The activity of strains varied from broad-spectrum to highly specific inhibition of individual pathogens. All strains inhibited at least one tested pathogen. Three strains, which combined the largest broad-spectrum with the highest inhibition activity, were selected for further characterization with four vegetable species. All of them were able to colonize seed surface of all tested vegetable crops. They mostly improved radicle and hypocotyl growth in vitro, although no statistically significant enhancement of biomass weight was observed in vivo. Occasionally, transient negative effects on germination and plant growth were observed. The adapted dual culture assay allowed us to compare the inhibition of individual Streptomyces strains against six fungal soil borne pathogens. The best selected strains were able to colonize the four vegetable crops and have a potential to be developed into biocontrol products. Although they occasionally negatively influenced plant growth, these effects did not persist during the further development. Additional in vivo studies are needed to confirm their potential as biological control or plant growth

  5. Wave-induced pore pressure and effective stresses in a porous seabed with variable permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, D.S.; Seymour, B.R.

    1996-12-31

    An evaluation of wave-induced soil response is particularly useful for geotechnical and coastal engineers involved in the design of foundations for offshore structures. To simplify the mathematical procedure, most theories available for the wave/seabed interaction problem have assumed a porous seabed with uniform permeability, despite strong evidence of variable permeability. This paper proposes an analytical solution for the wave induced soil response in a porous seabed with variable permeability. Verification is available through reduction to the simple case of uniform permeability. The numerical results indicate that the effect of variable soil permeability on pore pressure and effective stresses is significant.

  6. Anisotropy of permeability in faulted porous sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, N. J. C.; Healy, D.; Taylor, C. W.

    2014-06-01

    Studies of fault rock permeabilities advance the understanding of fluid migration patterns around faults and contribute to predictions of fault stability. In this study a new model is proposed combining brittle deformation structures formed during faulting, with fluid flow through pores. It assesses the impact of faulting on the permeability anisotropy of porous sandstone, hypothesising that the formation of fault related micro-scale deformation structures will alter the host rock porosity organisation and create new permeability pathways. Core plugs and thin sections were sampled around a normal fault and oriented with respect to the fault plane. Anisotropy of permeability was determined in three orientations to the fault plane at ambient and confining pressures. Results show that permeabilities measured parallel to fault dip were up to 10 times higher than along fault strike permeability. Analysis of corresponding thin sections shows elongate pores oriented at a low angle to the maximum principal palaeo-stress (σ1) and parallel to fault dip, indicating that permeability anisotropy is produced by grain scale deformation mechanisms associated with faulting. Using a soil mechanics 'void cell model' this study shows how elongate pores could be produced in faulted porous sandstone by compaction and reorganisation of grains through shearing and cataclasis.

  7. Extreme Rainfall Impacts in Fractured Permeable Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    of recharge: under low rainfall intensities recharge is slow (lags of > 100 days) and through the matrix; under moderate intensities recharge is via the matrix and partially saturated fractures (lags of 10s of days) and, if sustained, can lead to flooding (as in 2000/1); under high intensity rainfall fractures transmit rainfall preferentially, leading to a large, rapid (<1 day) water table response. Given the expectation that extreme rainfall events are likely to become more frequent and intense, our main focus is the preferential recharge mechanism, which has the potential to cause rapid flooding. By examining rainfall-water table response patterns, we demonstrate how the combined intensity-duration characteristics of rainfall events can be used to predict when preferential recharge is likely to occur. A 2D physically based, dual permeability Richards' equation model of the Chalk, which fully couples the unsaturated/saturated zones was developed and conditioned on field observations. This was used in a sensitivity study of water table response to a wide range of rainfall conditions, such as might be expected under future climate scenarios. The model also demonstrated the importance of the soil and weathered chalk layers on matrix and fracture flow response to rainfall infiltration.

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil and surface marine sediment near Jubany Station (Antarctica). Role of permafrost as a low-permeability barrier.

    PubMed

    Curtosi, Antonio; Pelletier, Emilien; Vodopivez, Cristian L; Mac Cormack, Walter P

    2007-09-20

    Although Antarctica is still considered as one of the most pristine areas of the world, the growing tourist and fisheries activities as well as scientific operations and their related logistic support are responsible for an increasing level of pollutants in this fragile environment. Soils and coastal sediments are significantly affected near scientific stations particularly by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this work sediment and soil were sampled in two consecutive summer Antarctic expeditions at Potter Cove and peninsula, in the vicinity of Jubany Station (South Shetland Islands). Two- and 3-ring PAHs (methylnaphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene and anthracene) were the main compounds found in most sites, although total PAH concentrations showed relatively low levels compared with other human-impacted areas in Antarctica. Pattern distribution of PAHs observed in samples suggested that low-temperature combustion processes such as diesel motor combustion and open-field garbage burning are the main sources of these compounds. An increase in PAH concentrations was observed from surface to depth into the active soil layer except for a unique sampling site where a fuel spill had been recently reported and where an inverted PAH concentration gradient was observed. The highest level was detected in the upper layer of permafrost followed by a sharp decrease in depth, showing this layer is acting as a barrier for downward PAH migration. When PAH levels in soil from both sampling programs were compared a significant decrease (p<0.01) was observed in summer 2005 (range at 75-cm depth: 12+/-1-153+/-22 ng/g) compared to summer 2004 (range at 75-cm depth: 162+/-15-1182+/-113 ng/g) whereas concentrations in surface sediment collected nearby the station PAHs increased drastically in 2005 (range: 36+/-3-1908+/-114 ng/g) compared to 2004 (range: 28+/-3-312+/-24 ng/g). Precipitation regime and water run off suggest that an important wash out of soil-PAHs occurred during

  9. Comparing dynamic recording of infiltration by X-Ray tomography to the results of a dual porosity model for structured soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissy, Anne-Sophie; Sammartino, Stephane; Di Pietro, Liliana; Lecompte, François; Ruy, Stephane

    2017-04-01

    With climate change, preferential flow phenomenon in soil could be predominant in Mediterranean zone. Understanding this phenomenon becomes a fundamental issue for preserving the water resource in quantity (drinking water) and quality (pesticide content). Non-invasive imaging technics, as X-ray tomography, allow studying water infiltration in laboratory with time-lapse imaging to visualize preferential flow path in soil columns (Sammartino et al. 2012). The modeling of water flow with a dual porosity model (matrix and macropores) integrates these fast flow phenomena (Ilhem 2014). These models, however needs more explicit links with the soil structure. The comparison of experimental results of infiltration (dynamics images and mass data) and modeling could improve our comprehension of preferential flow phenomenon and allow a better integration of the functional macroporosity (i.e. which drains water infiltration during a rain event) in such mass transfer models (Sammartino et al. 2015). Soil columns (Ø 12 cm - hauteur 13 cm, clay-loamy & medium sandy loam) have been sampled in the field to preserve their structure (field plowed or not). Several rains have been simulated in the laboratory and the last one was performed in an X-ray medical scanner (Siemens Somatom® 128 slices) at the CIRE platform (INRA, Centre - Val de Loire). Total and functional macro porosities were identified from time lapse tridimensional images. Water dynamics in the porosities was characterized from the identification and analysis of voxels filled by water. With an image resolution of 350μm only water in the largest macropores can be identified. The modeling of these experiments was carried out via the VirtualSoil platform (UMR Emmah, Avignon; www6.inra.fr/vsoil) using a water flow model coupling Darcy-Richards and KDW equations (Di Pietro et al., 2003). The simulated water flux drained by macropores is similar to the experimental hydrograph obtained for rainfalls on soils close to the

  10. A synergistic approach for soil moisture estimation using modified Dubois model with dual-polarized SAR and optical satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanabalan, P.; Vidhya, R.

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses about an estimation of soil moisture in agricultural region using SAR data with the use of HH and HV polarization. In this study the semi empirical approach derived by Dubois et al (1) was modified to work using (σdegHH) and σ°VV) so that soil moisture can be obtained for the larger area extent. The optical remote sensing is helps to monitor changes in vegetation biomass and canopy cover surface reflectance by using NDVI and LAI from which the site suitability from different land use/land cover are identified. The second use involves retrieve the backscattering coefficient valuesσ°) derived from SAR for soil moisture studies. In SAR techniques, the relative surface roughness can be directly estimate using surface roughness derivation empirical algorithms. The mid incidence angle is used to overcome the incidence angle effect and it worked successfully to this study. The modified Dubois Model (MDM) in combination with The Topp's et al (2) model is used to retrieve soil moisture. These two models have equations (HH, VV) and two independent variables i.e. root mean square height (s) and dielectric constant (epsilon). The linear regression analysis is performed and the surface roughness derived from SAR is well correlated with ground surface roughness having the value of (r2 = 0.69). By using the dielectric constant (epsilon) the modified Dubois model in combination with Topp's model are performed and the soil moisture is derived from SAR having value of (r2 = 0.60). Thus, the derived model is having good scope for soil moisture monitoring with present availability of SAR datasets.

  11. GC-ECD analysis of S-metolachlor (Dual Gold) in cotton plant and soil in trial field.

    PubMed

    Cao, Pengying; Liu, Fengmao; Wang, Suli; Wang, Yuhong; Han, Lijun

    2008-08-01

    The analytical method of S-metolachlor residue and its degradation in cotton and soil in trial field were investigated. S-metolachlor EC (96% w/w) was applied as pre-emergence at dosages of 1,500 and 2,250 ml ha(-1) 3 days after sowing of the cottonseeds in the field. The soil and the plant samples were collected at different intervals and the residues of S-metolachlor were analyzed by GC-ECD. The results showed that the degradation of S-metolachlor in cotton leaves in Beijing and Nanjing coincides with C = 0.1113e(-0.1050t) and C = 0.1177e(-0.1580t), respectively; the half-lives were about 6.6 and 4.4 days. The degradation of S-metolachlor in soil in Beijing and Nanjing coincides with C = 1.0621e(-0.0475) (t), and C = 0.9212e(-0.0548) (t), respectively; the half-lives were about 14.6 and 12.6 days,. At harvest time, the S-metolachlor in cotton seeds and soil samples were detected by GC-ECD and confirmed by GC/MS. The results showed that the residues in cottonseeds were lower than the USA EPA's maximum residue limit of 0.1 mg kg(-1) in cottonseed. It could be considered as safe to human beings and environment.

  12. Scaling preferential flow processes in agricultural soils affected by tillage and trafficking at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipović, Vilim; Coquet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    There is an accumulation of experimental evidences that agricultural soils, at least the top horizons affected by tillage practices, are not homogeneous and present a structure that is strongly dependent on farming practices like tillage and trafficking. Soil tillage and trafficking can create compacted zones in the soil with hydraulic properties and porosity which are different from those of the non-compacted zones. This spatial variability can strongly influence transport processes and initiate preferential flow. Two or three dimensional models can be used to account for spatial variability created by agricultural practices, but such models need a detailed assessment of spatial heterogeneity which can be rather impractical to provide. This logically raises the question whether and how one dimensional model may be designed and used to account for the within-field spatial variability in soil structure created by agricultural practices. Preferential flow (dual-permeability) modelling performed with HYDRUS-1D will be confronted to classical modelling based on the Richards and convection-dispersion equations using HYDRUS-2D taking into account the various soil heterogeneities created by agricultural practices. Our goal is to derive one set of equivalent 1D soil hydraulic parameters from 2D simulations which accounts for soil heterogeneities created by agricultural operations. A field experiment was carried out in two phases: infiltration and redistribution on a plot by uniform sprinkle irrigation with water or bromide solution. Prior to the field experiment the soil structure of the tilled layer was determined along the face of a large trench perpendicular to the tillage direction (0.7 m depth and 3.1 m wide). Thirty TDR probes and tensiometers were installed in different soil structural zones (Δ compacted soil and Γ macroporous soil) which ensured soil water monitoring throughout the experiment. A map of bromide was constructed from small core samples (4 cm diam

  13. Permeability of Dentine

    PubMed Central

    Ghazali, Farid Bin Che

    2003-01-01

    This is an update on the present integrated knowledge regarding dentine permeability that assumed a role in dentine sensitivity and contribute clinically to the effective bonding properties of restorative dental materials. This paper will attempt to refer to in vivo and in vitro studies of dentine permeability and the various interrelated factors governing it. PMID:23365497

  14. Permeability of dentine.

    PubMed

    Ghazali, Farid Bin Che

    2003-01-01

    This is an update on the present integrated knowledge regarding dentine permeability that assumed a role in dentine sensitivity and contribute clinically to the effective bonding properties of restorative dental materials. This paper will attempt to refer to in vivo and in vitro studies of dentine permeability and the various interrelated factors governing it.

  15. Gas transport in highly permeable, dry porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levintal, Elad; Dragila, Maria I.; Kamai, Tamir; Weisbrod, Noam

    2017-04-01

    Gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is far more efficient via advective than diffusive mechanisms. Whereas advection requires media permeability be sufficiently high and an advecting driving mechanism, diffusion transport occurs in all permeabilities. Traditionally, diffusion models generally have focused only on low permeability media (sand particles and smaller, k < 10-5 cm2). Here we establish the validity of these models to quantify diffusive transport in higher permeability media when climatic conditions do not favor advection. A permeability cutoff is quantified, such that above it traditional diffusion models become inaccurate. Results are based on experiments using large columns filled with different homogeneous spherical particles, conducted inside a climate-controlled laboratory especially designed for quantifying soil-gas diffusivity under isothermal and windless conditions. The results indicate that traditional diffusion models are accurate for permeability values below 2.7×10-3 cm2. Above this threshold, gas transport could not be explained by diffusion alone. Our measurements indicate that for permeability values above this threshold gas flux is higher than can be explained by diffusion, even under stable environmental conditions where advection is not expected. The findings of this research can contribute to better understanding of gas transport in high-permeability porous media such as: aggregated soils, snowpacks and mines stockpiles.

  16. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, T.; Smith, L.; Moosdorf, N.; Hartmann, J.; Durr, H.H.; Manning, A.H.; Van Beek, L. P. H.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Permeability, the ease of fluid flow through porous rocks and soils, is a fundamental but often poorly quantified component in the analysis of regional-scale water fluxes. Permeability is difficult to quantify because it varies over more than 13 orders of magnitude and is heterogeneous and dependent on flow direction. Indeed, at the regional scale, maps of permeability only exist for soil to depths of 1-2 m. Here we use an extensive compilation of results from hydrogeologic models to show that regional-scale (>5 km) permeability of consolidated and unconsolidated geologic units below soil horizons (hydrolithologies) can be characterized in a statistically meaningful way. The representative permeabilities of these hydrolithologies are used to map the distribution of near-surface (on the order of 100 m depth) permeability globally and over North America. The distribution of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent. The near-surface mean permeability is of the order of ???5 ?? 10-14 m2. The results provide the first global picture of near-surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and modeling the influence of climate-surface-subsurface interactions on global climate change. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, Tom; Smith, Leslie; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Durr, Hans H.; Manning, Andrew H.; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Permeability, the ease of fluid flow through porous rocks and soils, is a fundamental but often poorly quantified component in the analysis of regional-scale water fluxes. Permeability is difficult to quantify because it varies over more than 13 orders of magnitude and is heterogeneous and dependent on flow direction. Indeed, at the regional scale, maps of permeability only exist for soil to depths of 1-2 m. Here we use an extensive compilation of results from hydrogeologic models to show that regional-scale (>5 km) permeability of consolidated and unconsolidated geologic units below soil horizons (hydrolithologies) can be characterized in a statistically meaningful way. The representative permeabilities of these hydrolithologies are used to map the distribution of near-surface (on the order of 100 m depth) permeability globally and over North America. The distribution of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent. The near-surface mean permeability is of the order of -5 x 10-14 m2. The results provide the first global picture of near-surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and modeling the influence of climate-surface-subsurface interactions on global climate change.

  18. Soils

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Norbert V. DeByle

    1985-01-01

    Edaphic and climatic characteristics of a site quite well define the quality of that site for plant growth. The importance of soil characteristics to the growth and well-being of aspen in the West is apparent from observations by many authors, from inferences resulting from work with other trees and agricultural crops, and from detailed study of aspen soils and site...

  19. Dual Assimilation of Microwave and Thermal-Infrared Satellite Observations of Soil Moisture into NLDAS for Improved Drought Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, C.; Crow, W. T.; Anderson, M. C.; Zhan, X.; Wardlow, B.; Svoboda, M. D.; Mecikalski, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Our research group is currently developing an operational data assimilation (DA) system for the optimal assimilation of thermal infrared (TIR) and microwave (MV) soil moisture (SM) and insertion of near real-time green vegetation fraction (GVF) into the Noah land-surface model component of the National Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). NLDAS produces the hydrologic products (e.g. soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and runoff) used by NCEP for operational drought monitoring, but these products are sensitive to model input errors in soil texture (affecting infiltration rates) and prescribed precipitation rates. Periodic updates of SM state variables in LSMs achieved by assimilating diagnostic moisture information retrieved using satellite remote sensing have been shown to compensate for model errors and result in improved hydrologic output. The work proposed here will build on a project currently funded under the Climate Test Bed Program entitled "A GOES Thermal-Based Drought Early Warning Index for NIDIS", which is developing an operational TIR SM index (Evaporative Stress Index; ESI) based on maps of the ratio of actual to potential ET (fPET) generated with the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) surface energy balance algorithm. The research team has demonstrated that diagnostic information about SM and evapotranspiration (ET) from MW and TIR remote sensing can significantly reduce SM drifts in LSMs such as Noah. The two different SM retrievals have been shown to be quite complementary: TIR provides relatively high spatial (down to 100 m) and low temporal resolution (due to cloud cover) retrievals over a wide range of GVF, while MW provides relatively low spatial (25 to 60 km) and high temporal resolution (can retrieve through cloud cover), but only over areas with low GVF. Furthermore, MW retrievals are sensitive to SM only in the first few centimeters of the soil profile, while TIR provides information about SM conditions integrated over the full root

  20. Permeability of porour rhyolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K.; Rust, A.; Wright, H.; Roberge, J.

    2003-04-01

    The development of permeability in bubble-bearing magmas determines the efficiency of volatile escape during their ascent through volcanic conduits, which, in turn, controls their explosive potential. As permeability requires bubble connectivity, relationships between permeability and porosity in silicic magmas must be controlled by the formation, growth, deformation and coalescence of their constituent bubbles. Although permeability data on porous volcanic pyroclasts are limited, the database can be greatly extended by including data for ceramic and metallic foams1. Several studies indicate that a single number does not adequately describe the permeability of a foam because inertial effects, which predominate at high flow rates, cause deviations from Darcy's law. These studies suggest that permeability is best modeled using the Forschheimer equation to determine both the Darcy permeability (k1) and the non-Darcian (k2) permeability. Importantly, at the high porosities of ceramic foams (75-95%), both k1 and k2 are strongly dependent on pore size and geometry, suggesting that measurement of these parameters provides important information on foam structure. We determined both the connected porosity (by He-pycnometry) and the permeability (k1 and k2) of rhyolitic samples having a wide range in porosity (22-85%) and vesicle textures. In general, these data support previous observations of a power law relationship between connected porosity and Darcy permeability2. In detail, variations in k1 increase at higher porosities. Similarly, k2 generally increases in both mean and standard deviation with increasing porosity. Measurements made on three mutually perpendicular cores from individual pumice clasts suggest that some of the variability can be explained by anisotropy in the vesicle structure. By comparison with ceramic foams, we suggest that the remaining variability results from differences either in average vesicle size or, more likely, in the size of apertures

  1. Development of a Digital Aquifer Permeability Map for the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Researchers at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Western Ecology Division have been developing hydrologic landscape maps for selected U.S. states in an effort to create a method to identify the intrinsic watershed attributes of landscapes in regions with little data. Each hydrologic landscape unit is assigned a categorical value from five key indices of macro-scale hydrologic behavior, including annual climate, climate seasonality, aquifer permeability, terrain, and soil permeability. The aquifer permeability index requires creation of a from-scratch dataset for each state. The permeability index for the Pacific Southwest (California, Nevada, and Arizona) expands and modifies the permeability index for the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington, and Idaho), which preceded it. The permeability index was created by assigning geologic map units to one of 18 categories with presumed similar values of permeability to create a hydrolithologic map. The hydrolithologies were then further categorized into permeability index classifications of high, low, unknown and surface water. Unconsolidated, carbonate, volcanic, and undifferentiated units are classified more conservatively to better address uncertainty in source data. High vs. low permeability classifications are assigned qualitatively but follow a threshold guideline of 8.5x10-2 m/day hydraulic conductivity. Estimates of permeability from surface lithology is the current best practice for broad-sca

  2. Development of a Digital Aquifer Permeability Map for the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Researchers at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Western Ecology Division have been developing hydrologic landscape maps for selected U.S. states in an effort to create a method to identify the intrinsic watershed attributes of landscapes in regions with little data. Each hydrologic landscape unit is assigned a categorical value from five key indices of macro-scale hydrologic behavior, including annual climate, climate seasonality, aquifer permeability, terrain, and soil permeability. The aquifer permeability index requires creation of a from-scratch dataset for each state. The permeability index for the Pacific Southwest (California, Nevada, and Arizona) expands and modifies the permeability index for the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington, and Idaho), which preceded it. The permeability index was created by assigning geologic map units to one of 18 categories with presumed similar values of permeability to create a hydrolithologic map. The hydrolithologies were then further categorized into permeability index classifications of high, low, unknown and surface water. Unconsolidated, carbonate, volcanic, and undifferentiated units are classified more conservatively to better address uncertainty in source data. High vs. low permeability classifications are assigned qualitatively but follow a threshold guideline of 8.5x10-2 m/day hydraulic conductivity. Estimates of permeability from surface lithology is the current best practice for broad-sca

  3. In-situ permeability measurements with the Cone Permeameter{trademark} measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-30

    The permeability of soil to fluid flow defines the magnitude of soil gas and groundwater flow under imposed pressure gradients. Pressure gradients exist due to natural effects such as hydraulic gradients (in the case of groundwater) and barometrically imposed gradients (in the case of soil gas). Unnatural gradients are imposed by soil vapor extraction air sparging, active venting, pump-and-treat, and other remediation processes requiring the active movement of fluids through the soil. The design of these processes requires knowledge of the flow characteristics of the soil. The most variable of the soil's flow characteristics is its permeability, which can vary by several orders of magnitude in a given geologic and hydrologic setting. Knowledge of soil gas permeability is needed to design soil vapor extraction systems and predict the general movement of gas in soil. Saturated hydraulic conductivity, or the soil's permeability to liquid flow, is required to predict movement of groundwater in saturated soils. The variability of permeability is illustrated by the range of values for different media in a table. It is not uncommon for permeabilities to vary by several orders of magnitude at a given site.

  4. Permeability of edible coatings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Khatkar, B S; Garg, M K; Wilson, L A

    2010-01-01

    The permeabilities of water vapour, O2 and CO2 were determined for 18 coating formulations. Water vapour transmission rate ranged from 98.8 g/m(2).day (6% beeswax) to 758.0 g/m(2).day (1.5% carboxymethyl cellulose with glycerol). O2 permeability at 14 ± 1°C and 55 ± 5% RH ranged from 1.50 to 7.95 cm(3)cm cm(-2)s(-1)Pa(-1), with CO2 permeability 2 to 6 times as high. Permeability to noncondensable gases (O2 and CO2) was higher for hydrophobic (peanut oil followed by beeswax) coatings as compared to hydrophilic (whey protein concentrate and carboxymethyl cellulose).

  5. Permeability of displaced fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Christian; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido

    2017-04-01

    Flow along fractures or in fissured systems becomes increasingly important in the context of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), shale gas recovery or nuclear waste deposit. Commonly, the permeability of fractures is approximated using the Hagen-Poiseuille solution of Navier Stokes equation. Furthermore, the flow in fractures is assumed to be laminar flow between two parallel plates and the cubic law for calculating the velocity field is applied. It is a well-known fact, that fracture flow is strongly influenced by the fracture surface roughness and the shear displacement along the fracture plane. Therefore, a numerical approach was developed which calculates the flow pattern within a fracture-matrix system. The flow in the fracture is described by a free fluid flow and the flow in the matrix is assumed to be laminar and therefore validates Darcy's law. The presented approach can be applied for artificially generated fractures or real fractures measured by surface scanning. Artificial fracture surfaces are generated using the power spectral density of the surface height random process with a spectral exponent to define roughness. For calculating the permeability of such fracture-matrix systems the mean fracture aperture, the shear displacement and the surface roughness are considered by use of a 3D numerical simulator. By use of this approach correlation between shear displacement and mean aperture, shear displacement and permeability, as well as surface roughness and permeability can be obtained. Furthermore, the intrinsic measured permeability presents a combination of matrix and fracture permeability. The presented approach allows the separation and quantification of the absolute magnitudes of the matrix and the fracture permeability and the permeability of displaced fractures can be calculated. The numerical approach which is a 3D numerical simulation of the fracture-matrix system can be applied for artificial as well as real systems.

  6. Seismic waves increase permeability.

    PubMed

    Elkhoury, Jean E; Brodsky, Emily E; Agnew, Duncan C

    2006-06-29

    Earthquakes have been observed to affect hydrological systems in a variety of ways--water well levels can change dramatically, streams can become fuller and spring discharges can increase at the time of earthquakes. Distant earthquakes may even increase the permeability in faults. Most of these hydrological observations can be explained by some form of permeability increase. Here we use the response of water well levels to solid Earth tides to measure permeability over a 20-year period. At the time of each of seven earthquakes in Southern California, we observe transient changes of up to 24 degrees in the phase of the water level response to the dilatational volumetric strain of the semidiurnal tidal components of wells at the Piñon Flat Observatory in Southern California. After the earthquakes, the phase gradually returns to the background value at a rate of less than 0.1 degrees per day. We use a model of axisymmetric flow driven by an imposed head oscillation through a single, laterally extensive, confined, homogeneous and isotropic aquifer to relate the phase response to aquifer properties. We interpret the changes in phase response as due to changes in permeability. At the time of the earthquakes, the permeability at the site increases by a factor as high as three. The permeability increase depends roughly linearly on the amplitude of seismic-wave peak ground velocity in the range of 0.21-2.1 cm s(-1). Such permeability increases are of interest to hydrologists and oil reservoir engineers as they affect fluid flow and might determine long-term evolution of hydrological and oil-bearing systems. They may also be interesting to seismologists, as the resulting pore pressure changes can affect earthquakes by changing normal stresses on faults.

  7. Permeable pavement study (Edison)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types have on nutrient concentrations present in stormwater runoff are limited. In 2009, the U.S. EPA constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, New Jersey, that incorporated permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). Each permeable pavement type has four, 54.9-m2, lined sections that direct all infiltrate into 5.7-m3 tanks enabling complete volume collection and sampling. This paper highlights the results from a 12-month period when samples were collected from 13 rainfall/runoff events and analyzed for nitrogen species, orthophosphate, and organic carbon. Differences in infiltrate concentrations among the three permeable pavement types were assessed and compared with concentrations in rainwater samples and impervious asphalt runoff samples, which were collected as controls. Contrary to expectations based on the literature, the PA infiltrate had significantly larger total nitrogen (TN) concentrations than runoff and infiltrate from the other two permeable pavement types, indicating that nitrogen leached from materials in the PA strata. There was no significant difference in TN concentration between runoff and infiltrate from either PICP or PC, but TN in runoff was significantly larger than in the rainwater, suggesting meaningful inter-event dry de

  8. Permeability of microcracked fiber-reinforced containment barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1995-11-01

    Cement-based containment barriers for waste landfills are at risk of cracking, thereby reducing effectiveness. Improved resistance to formation of permeable cracks will enhance the performance of cementitous hydraulic barriers exposed to excessive drying or to wet-dry cycles. Addition of fiber reinforcement was investigated as a potential means of improving crack resistance. Grout and soil cements with and without polypropylene fibers were subjected to different curing and exposure conditions and tested for initial and final permeability. Permeabilities under saturated flow conditions were compared to determine whether fibers could control permeable microcracking of subsurface containment barriers. Fibrillated polypropylene fibers reduced the relative change in permeability for grout and soil cement cured in water and subjected to wet-dry cycles, but did not show significant benefit for materials cured in soil and allowed to dry. Addition of monofilament fibers to barrier materials caused an increase in post-cracking permeability compared with unreinforced materials. This was attributed to increased flow paths created at failed fiber/matrix interfaces.

  9. Model-based Permeability Estimation of Shaly Sands Using Seismic Velocity and Resistivity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.

    2016-12-01

    Permeability is an indispensable parameter for hydraulic characterization of soils and rocks in many applications. Permeability of soils and rocks is usually obtained with the in-situ permeability test in a borehole and/or laboratory permeability test of soil/rock core samples obtained in the borehole. Many boreholes are necessary for building a hydraulic model of a large soil/rock mass. It is, however, often difficult to drill many boreholes due to time and cost constraints. For such a case, geophysical methods can be effectively utilized for profiling permeability of a large soil/rock mass if geophysical properties such as seismic velocity and resistivity can be used for estimating permeability. We, therefore, propose an effective method for estimating permeability of shaly sands by applying a rock physics model to seismic velocity and resistivity data. Because consolidated shaly sand is a key rock for aquifers and oil/gas reservoirs, and unconsolidated shaly sand is very common soils whose hydraulic properties are often important for safety evaluation of river embankments and designing countermeasure of its liquefaction. The method first estimates the grain size distribution of the shaly sand by applying a shaly sand model to seismic velocity and resistivity data obtained with seismic and resistivity measurements. The grain size of the soil/rock thus obtained and porosity estimated from resistivity data by applying the Glover's equation are then input to the Kozeny-Carman equation for estimating permeability of the shaly sand. The proposed method is applied to P- and S-wave velocities and resistivity data measured in the laboratory, well logging and surface seismic and electric surveys for shaly sands. Comparison of estimated permeability with actual measurements reveals that permeability can be estimated in accuracy less than one order of magnitude and the method can be used for profiling permeability of a large shaly sand using geophysical data measured on it.

  10. Update to Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavements including interlocking concrete permeable pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. The permeable pavements are limited to parking spaces while adjacent driving lanes are impermeable and drain to the permeable surfaces. The parking lot is instrumented for continuous monitoring with thermistors and water content reflectometers that measure moisture as infiltrate passes through the storage gallery beneath the permeable pavements into the underlying native soil. Each permeable surface of the parking lot has four lined sections that capture infiltrate in tanks for water quality analyses; these tanks are capable of holding volumes up to 4.1 m3, which represents up to 38 mm (1.5 in.) for direct rainfall on the porous pavement and runoff from adjacent driving lanes that drain into the permeable surface.Previous technical releases concerning the demonstration site focused on monitoring techniques, observed chloride and nutrient concentrations, surface hydrology, and infiltration and evaporation rates. This presentation summarizes these past findings and addresses current water quality efforts including pH, solids analysis, total organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand. Stormwater runoff continues to be a major cause of water pollution in

  11. Evaluation of the permeability of agricultural films to various fumigants.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yaorong; Kamel, Alaa; Stafford, Charles; Nguyen, Thuy; Chism, William J; Dawson, Jeffrey; Smith, Charles W

    2011-11-15

    A variety of agricultural films are commercially available for managing emissions and enhancing pest control during soil fumigation. These films are manufactured using different materials and processes which can ultimately result in different permeability to fumigants. A systematic laboratory study of the permeability of the agricultural films to nine fumigants was conducted to evaluate the performance of commonly used film products, including polyethylene, metalized, and high-barrier films. The permeability, as expressed by mass transfer coefficient (cm/h), of 27 different films from 13 manufacturers ranged from below 1 × 10(-4) cm/h to above 10 cm/h at 25 °C under ambient relative humidity test conditions. The wide range in permeability of commercially available films demonstrates the need to use films which are appropriate for the fumigation application. The effects of environmental factors, such as temperature and humidity, on the film permeability were also investigated. It was found that high relative humidity could drastically increase the permeability of the high-barrier films. The permeability of some high-barrier films was increased by 2-3 orders of magnitude when the films were tested at high relative humidity. Increasing the temperature from 25 to 40 °C increased the permeability for some high-barrier films up to 10 times more than the permeability at 25 °C, although the effect was minimal for several of these films. Analysis of the distribution of the permeability of the films under ambient humidity conditions to nine fumigants indicated that the 27 films largely followed the material type, although the permeability varied considerably among the films of similar material.

  12. EPA Permeable Surface Research - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  13. EPA Permeable Surface Research - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  14. Liquid-permeable electrode

    DOEpatents

    Folser, George R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

  15. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  16. Use of Interface Treatment to Reduce Emissions from Residuals in Lower Permeability Zones to Groundwater flowing Through More Permeable Zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P.; Cavanagh, B.; Clifton, L.; Daniels, E.; Dahlen, P.

    2013-12-01

    Many soil and groundwater remediation technologies rely on fluid flow for contaminant extraction or reactant delivery (e.g., soil vapor extraction, pump and treat, in situ chemical oxidation, air sparging, enhanced bioremediation). Given that most unconsolidated and consolidated settings have permeability contrasts, the outcome is often preferential treatment of more permeable zones and ineffective treatment of the lower permeability zones. When this happens, post-treatment contaminant emissions from low permeability zone residuals can cause unacceptable long-term impacts to groundwater in the transmissive zones. As complete remediation of the impacted lower permeability zones may not be practicable with conventional technologies, one might explore options that lead to reduction of the contaminant emissions to acceptable levels, rather than full remediation of the lower permeability layers. This could be accomplished either by creating a sustained emission reaction/attenuation zone at the high-low permeability interface, or by creating a clean soil zone extending sufficiently far into the lower permeability layer to cause the necessary reduction in contaminant concentration gradient and diffusive emission. These options are explored in proof-of-concept laboratory-scale physical model experiments. The physical models are prepared with two layers of contrasting permeability and either dissolved matrix storage or nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in the lower permeability layer. A dissolved oxidant is then delivered to the interface via flow across the higher permeability layer and changes in contaminant emissions from the low permeability zone are monitored before, during, and after oxidant delivery. The use of three oxidants (dissolved oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and sodium persulfate) for treatment of emissions from petroleum hydrocarbon residuals is examined.

  17. A tale of two solutes: Dual-domain flow and the role of the mass transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, M. V.; Bishop, J. M.; Cey, E. E.; Bentley, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    During remediation of natural porous media it is often observed that concentrations of contaminants exhibit long tail-off periods and a concentration rebound following the end of pumping. This phenomenon has often been modeled using a dual-domain approach, which includes a preferential flow domain, such as macropores or fractures, and a less mobile domain, such as the soil or rock matrix. In this model, preferential flow paths provide the majority of the advective mass transport and the less mobile domain contains the majority of storage. A pilot-scale remediation experiment was conducted on salt-affected soil associated with the accidental release of oilfield brine prior to the early 1970's. This salt contamination has deeply impregnated the soil matrix. Preferential flow pathways are present as root hole macropores in shallow soils and fractures in glacial till at depth. Understanding the solute transport processes between the matrix domain and the preferential flow domain is key to optimizing the remediation process. Tile drains were installed to collect saline leachate from shallow soils (0 to 2 m). In addition to the salt flushing experiment, a conservative organic tracer, 2,6-difluorobenzoic acid (DFBA), was applied to the soil surface. In the tile drain effluent, salt and tracer concentrations show differing behavior. Tracer concentrations tend to increase during increased flow events, indicating increased flushing. In contrast, salinity concentrations tend to decrease during increased flow events, indicating dilution of salt by low-salinity rain or irrigation water. Within the soil column, tracer pore water concentrations are decreasing rapidly with time, while salinity levels remain elevated. This is attributed to a lower rate of macropore transport of salt, as a result of the salt having diffused into the soil matrix, while the tracer has not. Thus the tracer is more readily transported through macropores and fractures. The two conservative tracers

  18. The Interfacial-Area-Based Relative Permeability Function

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Khaleel, Raziuddin

    2009-09-25

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the services of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide technical support for the Remediation Decision Support (RDS) activity within the Soil & Groundwater Remediation Project. A portion of the support provided in FY2009, was to extend the soil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using an alternative approach. This alternative approach incorporates the Brooks and Corey (1964), van Genuchten (1980), and a modified van Genuchten water-retention models into the interfacial-area-based relative permeability model presented by Embid (1997). The general performance of the incorporated models is shown using typical hydraulic parameters. The relative permeability models for the wetting phase were further examined using data from literature. Results indicate that the interfacial-area-based model can describe the relative permeability of the wetting phase reasonably well.

  19. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  20. Measuring Clogging with Pressure Transducers in Permeable Pavement Strips

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two issues that have a negative affect on the long term hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems are surface clogging and clogging at the interface with the underlying soil. Surface clogging limits infiltration capacity and results in bypass if runoff rate exceeds in...

  1. Measuring Clogging with Pressure Transducers in Permeable Pavement Strips

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two issues that have a negative affect on the long term hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems are surface clogging and clogging at the interface with the underlying soil. Surface clogging limits infiltration capacity and results in bypass if runoff rate exceeds in...

  2. GROUNDWATER AND SOIL REMEDIATION USING ELECTRICAL FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enhancements of contaminants removal and degradation in low permeability soils by electrical fields are achieved by the processes of electrical heating, electrokinetics, and electrochemical reactions. Electrical heating increases soil temperature resulting in the increase of cont...

  3. GROUNDWATER AND SOIL REMEDIATION USING ELECTRICAL FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enhancements of contaminants removal and degradation in low permeability soils by electrical fields are achieved by the processes of electrical heating, electrokinetics, and electrochemical reactions. Electrical heating increases soil temperature resulting in the increase of cont...

  4. Modeling the Impact of Cracking in Low Permeability Layers in a Groundwater Contamination Source Zone on Dissolved Contaminant Fate and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, K. W.; Goltz, M. N.; Huang, J.; Demond, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs), which are chemicals and chemical mixtures that are heavier than and only slightly soluble in water, are a significant source of groundwater contamination. Even with the removal or destruction of most DNAPL mass, small amounts of remaining DNAPL can dissolve into flowing groundwater and continue as a contamination source for decades. One category of DNAPLs is the chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). CAHs, such as trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride, are found to contaminate groundwater at numerous DoD and industrial sites. DNAPLs move through soils and groundwater leaving behind residual separate phase contamination as well as pools sitting atop low permeability layers. Recently developed models are based on the assumption that dissolved CAHs diffuse slowly from pooled DNAPL into the low permeability layers. Subsequently, when the DNAPL pools and residual DNAPL are depleted, perhaps as a result of a remediation effort, the dissolved CAHs in these low permeability layers still remain to serve as long-term sources of contamination, due to so-called "back diffusion." These recently developed models assume that transport in the low permeability zones is strictly diffusive; however field observations suggest that more DNAPL and/or dissolved CAH is stored in the low permeability zones than can be explained on the basis of diffusion alone. One explanation for these field observations is that there is enhanced transport of dissolved CAHs and/or DNAPL into the low permeability layers due to cracking. Cracks may allow for advective flow of water contaminated with dissolved CAHs into the layer as well as possible movement of pure phase DNAPL into the layer. In this study, a multiphase numerical flow and transport model is employed in a dual domain (high and low permeability layers) to investigate the impact of cracking on DNAPL and CAH movement. Using literature values, the crack geometry and spacing was varied to model

  5. Use of a Dual-Structure Constitutive Model for Predicting the Long-Term Behavior of an Expansive Clay Buffer in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    DOE PAGES

    Vilarrasa, Víctor; Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; ...

    2015-12-31

    Expansive soils are suitable as backfill and buffer materials in engineered barrier systems to isolate heat-generating nuclear waste in deep geological formations. The canisters containing nuclear waste would be placed in tunnels excavated at a depth of several hundred meters. The expansive soil should provide enough swelling capacity to support the tunnel walls, thereby reducing the impact of the excavation-damaged zone on the long-term mechanical and flow-barrier performance. In addition to their swelling capacity, expansive soils are characterized by accumulating irreversible strain on suction cycles and by effects of microstructural swelling on water permeability that for backfill or buffer materialsmore » can significantly delay the time it takes to reach full saturation. In order to simulate these characteristics of expansive soils, a dual-structure constitutive model that includes two porosity levels is necessary. The authors present the formulation of a dual-structure model and describe its implementation into a coupled fluid flow and geomechanical numerical simulator. The authors use the Barcelona Basic Model (BBM), which is an elastoplastic constitutive model for unsaturated soils, to model the macrostructure, and it is assumed that the strains of the microstructure, which are volumetric and elastic, induce plastic strain to the macrostructure. The authors tested and demonstrated the capabilities of the implemented dual-structure model by modeling and reproducing observed behavior in two laboratory tests of expansive clay. As observed in the experiments, the simulations yielded nonreversible strain accumulation with suction cycles and a decreasing swelling capacity with increasing confining stress. Finally, the authors modeled, for the first time using a dual-structure model, the long-term (100,000 years) performance of a generic heat-generating nuclear waste repository with waste emplacement in horizontal tunnels backfilled with expansive clay and

  6. Use of a Dual-Structure Constitutive Model for Predicting the Long-Term Behavior of an Expansive Clay Buffer in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Vilarrasa, Víctor; Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Birkholzer, Jens

    2015-12-31

    Expansive soils are suitable as backfill and buffer materials in engineered barrier systems to isolate heat-generating nuclear waste in deep geological formations. The canisters containing nuclear waste would be placed in tunnels excavated at a depth of several hundred meters. The expansive soil should provide enough swelling capacity to support the tunnel walls, thereby reducing the impact of the excavation-damaged zone on the long-term mechanical and flow-barrier performance. In addition to their swelling capacity, expansive soils are characterized by accumulating irreversible strain on suction cycles and by effects of microstructural swelling on water permeability that for backfill or buffer materials can significantly delay the time it takes to reach full saturation. In order to simulate these characteristics of expansive soils, a dual-structure constitutive model that includes two porosity levels is necessary. The authors present the formulation of a dual-structure model and describe its implementation into a coupled fluid flow and geomechanical numerical simulator. The authors use the Barcelona Basic Model (BBM), which is an elastoplastic constitutive model for unsaturated soils, to model the macrostructure, and it is assumed that the strains of the microstructure, which are volumetric and elastic, induce plastic strain to the macrostructure. The authors tested and demonstrated the capabilities of the implemented dual-structure model by modeling and reproducing observed behavior in two laboratory tests of expansive clay. As observed in the experiments, the simulations yielded nonreversible strain accumulation with suction cycles and a decreasing swelling capacity with increasing confining stress. Finally, the authors modeled, for the first time using a dual-structure model, the long-term (100,000 years) performance of a generic heat-generating nuclear waste repository with waste emplacement in horizontal tunnels backfilled with expansive clay and hosted in a

  7. Rocks of low permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 17th International Congress of the IAH (International Association of Hydrogeologists) will meet in Tucson, Ariz., January 7-10, 1985. The deadline for abstracts is March 1, 1984, and final papers are due October 15, 1984.The topic of the congress will be “Hydrogeology of Rocks of Low Permeability,” and speakers will include W. Back, J. F. Bredehoeft, G. de Marsily, J. E. Gale, P. Fritz, L. W. Gelhar, G. E. Grisak, C. W. Kreitler, M. R. Llamas, T. N. Narasimhan, I. Neretnieks, and E. P. Weeks. The congress will conclude with a panel discussion moderated by S. P. Neuman. Panelists include S. N. Davis, G. de Marsily, R. A. Freeze, P. A. Witherspoon, and I. Neretnieks.

  8. Placental Permeability of Lead

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Stanley J.

    1974-01-01

    The detection of lead in fetal tissues by chemical analysis has long been accepted as prima facie evidence for the permeability of the placenta to this nonessential trace metal. However, only a few investigations, all on lower mammalian species, have contributed any direct experimental data bearing on this physiological process. Recent radioactive tracer and radioautographic studies on rodents have shown that lead crosses the placental membranes rapidly and in significant amounts even at relatively low maternal blood levels. While it is not possible to extrapolate directly the results of these experiments to humans because of differences in placental structure and other factors, the results do serve as a warning of the possible hazard to the human embryo and fetus of even low levels of lead in the maternal system. PMID:4857497

  9. Predicting soil-water and soil-air transport properties and their effects on soil-vapor extraction efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, T.G.; Moldrup, P.; Yamaguchi, Toshiko; Schjoenning, P.; Hansen, J.A.

    1999-06-30

    Accurate prediction of water and air transport parameters in variably saturated soil is necessary for modeling of soil-vapor extraction (SVE) at soil sites contaminated with volatile organic chemicals (VOCs). An expression for predicting saturated water permeability (k{sub 1,s}) in undisturbed soils from the soil total porosity and the field capacity soil-water content was developed by fitting a tortuous-tube fluid flow model to measured water permeability and gas diffusivity data. The new k{sub 1,s} expression gave accurate predictions when tested against independent k{sub 1,s} data. The k{sub 1,s} expression was implemented in the Campbell relative water permeability model to yield a predictive model for water permeability in variably saturated, undisturbed soil. The water permeability model, together with recently developed predictive equations for gas permeability and gas diffusivity, was used in a two-dimensional numerical SVE model that also included nonequilibrium mass transfer of VOC from a separate phase (nonaqueous phase liquid [NAPL]) to the air phase. SVE calculations showed that gas permeability is likely the most important factor controlling VOC migration and vapor extraction efficiency. Water permeability and gas diffusivity effects became significant at water contents near and above field capacity. The NAPL-air mass transfer coefficient also had large impacts on simulated vapor extraction efficiency. The calculations suggest that realistic SVE models need to include predictive expressions for both convective, diffusive, and phase-partitioning processes in natural, undisturbed soils.

  10. Regulation of intestinal permeability: The role of proteases

    PubMed Central

    Van Spaendonk, Hanne; Ceuleers, Hannah; Witters, Leonie; Patteet, Eveline; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; De Meester, Ingrid; De Man, Joris G; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal barrier is - with approximately 400 m2 - the human body’s largest surface separating the external environment from the internal milieu. This barrier serves a dual function: permitting the absorption of nutrients, water and electrolytes on the one hand, while limiting host contact with noxious luminal antigens on the other hand. To maintain this selective barrier, junction protein complexes seal the intercellular space between adjacent epithelial cells and regulate the paracellular transport. Increased intestinal permeability is associated with and suggested as a player in the pathophysiology of various gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gastrointestinal tract is exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous proteases, both in the lumen and in the mucosa. There is increasing evidence to suggest that a dysregulation of the protease/antiprotease balance in the gut contributes to epithelial damage and increased permeability. Excessive proteolysis leads to direct cleavage of intercellular junction proteins, or to opening of the junction proteins via activation of protease activated receptors. In addition, proteases regulate the activity and availability of cytokines and growth factors, which are also known modulators of intestinal permeability. This review aims at outlining the mechanisms by which proteases alter the intestinal permeability. More knowledge on the role of proteases in mucosal homeostasis and gastrointestinal barrier function will definitely contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets for permeability-related diseases. PMID:28405139

  11. Permeable Boundaries in Organizational Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazy, James K.; Tivnan, Brian F.; Schwandt, David R.

    The nature of the organizational boundary is investigated in the context of organizational learning. Boundary permeability is defined and hypotheses relating it to performance are tested computationally using data from 5,500 artificial organizations. We find that matching boundary permeability to the environment predicts both agent and organization survival.

  12. Hybrid green permeable pave with hexagonal modular pavement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, M. A.; Abustan, I.; Hamzah, M. O.

    2013-06-01

    Modular permeable pavements are alternatives to the traditional impervious asphalt and concrete pavements. Pervious pore spaces in the surface allow for water to infiltrate into the pavement during rainfall events. As of their ability to allow water to quickly infiltrate through the surface, modular permeable pavements allow for reductions in runoff quantity and peak runoff rates. Even in areas where the underlying soil is not ideal for modular permeable pavements, the installation of under drains has still been shown to reflect these reductions. Modular permeable pavements have been regarded as an effective tool in helping with stormwater control. It also affects the water quality of stormwater runoff. Places using modular permeable pavement has been shown to cause a significant decrease in several heavy metal concentrations as well as suspended solids. Removal rates are dependent upon the material used for the pavers and sub-base material, as well as the surface void space. Most heavy metals are captured in the top layers of the void space fill media. Permeable pavements are now considered an effective BMP for reducing stormwater runoff volume and peak flow. This study examines the extent to which such combined pavement systems are capable of handling load from the vehicles. Experimental investigation were undertaken to quantify the compressive characteristics of the modular. Results shows impressive results of achieving high safety factor for daily life vehicles.

  13. Analytical solution for vacuum preloading considering the nonlinear distribution of horizontal permeability within the smear zone

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jie; He, Xiang; Ye, Hanming

    2015-01-01

    The vacuum preloading is an effective method which is widely used in ground treatment. In consolidation analysis, the soil around prefabricated vertical drain (PVD) is traditionally divided into smear zone and undisturbed zone, both with constant permeability. In reality, the permeability of soil changes continuously within the smear zone. In this study, the horizontal permeability coefficient of soil within the smear zone is described by an exponential function of radial distance. A solution for vacuum preloading consolidation considers the nonlinear distribution of horizontal permeability within the smear zone is presented and compared with previous analytical results as well as a numerical solution, the results show that the presented solution correlates well with the numerical solution, and is more precise than previous analytical solution. PMID:26447973

  14. Analytical solution for vacuum preloading considering the nonlinear distribution of horizontal permeability within the smear zone.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jie; He, Xiang; Ye, Hanming

    2015-01-01

    The vacuum preloading is an effective method which is widely used in ground treatment. In consolidation analysis, the soil around prefabricated vertical drain (PVD) is traditionally divided into smear zone and undisturbed zone, both with constant permeability. In reality, the permeability of soil changes continuously within the smear zone. In this study, the horizontal permeability coefficient of soil within the smear zone is described by an exponential function of radial distance. A solution for vacuum preloading consolidation considers the nonlinear distribution of horizontal permeability within the smear zone is presented and compared with previous analytical results as well as a numerical solution, the results show that the presented solution correlates well with the numerical solution, and is more precise than previous analytical solution.

  15. Permeable membrane experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Thomas J.; Cao, Tuan Q.; Kliss, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Permeable Membrane Experiment is to gather flight data on three areas of membrane performance that are influenced by the presence of gravity. These areas are: (1) Liquid/gas phase separation, (2) gas bubble interference with diffusion through porous membranes and (3) wetting characteristics of hydrophilic membrane surfaces. These data are important in understaning the behavior of membrane/liquid/gas interfaces where surface tension forces predominate. The data will be compared with 1-g data already obtained and with predicted micrograviity behavior. The data will be used to develop designs for phase separation and plant nutrient delivery systems and will be available to the life support community for use in developing technologies which employ membranes. A conceptual design has been developed to conduct three membrane experiments, in sequence, aboard a single Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) carrier to be carried in the Shuttle Orbiter payload bay. One experiment is conducted for each of the three membrane performance areas under study. These experiments are discussed in this paper.

  16. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Ahlers, M; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  17. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  18. Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M.; Cantrell, K.J.; Phillips, S.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods.

  19. Effects of elevated CO2 on soil organic matter turnover and plant nitrogen uptake: First results from a dual labeling mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, Lucia Muriel; Weber, Enrico; Schrumpf, Marion; Zaehle, Sönke

    2017-04-01

    The response of plant growth to elevated concentrations of CO2 (eCO2) is often constrained by plant nitrogen (N) uptake. To overcome potential N limitation, plants may invest photosynthetically fixed carbon (C) into N acquiring strategies, including fine root biomass, root exudation, or C allocation to mycorrhizal fungi. In turn, these strategies may affect the decomposition of soil organic matter, leading to uncertainties in net effects of eCO2 on C storage. To gain more insight into these plant-soil C-N-interactions, we combined C and N stable isotope labeling in a mesocosm experiment. Saplings of Fagus sylvatica L. were exposed to a 13CO2 enriched atmosphere at near ambient (380 ppm) or elevated (550 ppm) CO2 concentrations for four months of the vegetation period in 2016. Aboveground and belowground net CO2 fluxes were measured separately and the 13C label enabled partitioning of total soil CO2 efflux into old, soil derived and new, plant-derived C. We used ingrowth cores to assess effects of eCO2on belowground C allocation and plant N uptake in more detail and in particular we evaluated the relative importance of ectomycorrhizal associations. In the soil of each sapling, ingrowth cores with different mesh sizes allowed fine roots or only mycorrhizal hyphae to penetrate. In one type of ingrowth core each, we incorporated fine root litter that was enriched in 15N. Additionally, total N uptake was estimated by using 15N enriched saplings and unlabeled control plants. We found that eCO2 increased aboveground net CO2 exchange rates by 19% and total soil respiration by 11%. The eCO2 effect for GPP and also for NPP was positive (+23% and +11%, respectively). By combining gaseous C fluxes with data on new and old C stocks in bulk soil and plants through destructive harvesting in late autumn 2016, we will be able to infer net effects of eCO2 on the fate of C in these mesocosms. Biomass allocation patterns can reveal physiological responses to high C availability under

  20. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  1. Comparison of three techniques to measure unsaturated-zone air permeability at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mira Stone; Tillman, Fred D.; Choi, Jee-Won; Smith, James A.

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare three techniques to measure the air permeability of the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and to examine the effects of moisture content and soil heterogeneity on air permeability. Air permeability was measured in three ways: laboratory experiments on intact soil cores, field-scale air pump tests and calibration of air permeability to air pressures measured in the field under natural air pressure conditions using a numerical airflow model. The results obtained from these three methods were compared and found to be similar. Laboratory experiments performed on intact cores measured air permeability values on the order of 10 -14 to 10 -9 m 2. Low-permeability cores were found between land surface and a depth of 0.6 m. The soil core data were divided into two layers with composite vertical permeability values of 1.3×10 -13 m 2 from land surface to a 0.6-m depth and 3.8×10 -10 m 2 for the lower layer. Analyses of the field-scale pump tests were performed for two scenarios: one in which the entire unsaturated zone was open to the atmosphere and one assuming a cap of low permeability extending 0.6 m below land surface. The vertical air permeability values obtained for the open scenario ranged from 1.2×10 -9 to 1.5×10 -9 m 2, and ranged from 3.6×10 -9 to 6.8×10 -9 m 2 in the lower layer, assuming an upper cap permeability of 6.0×10 -14 m 2. The results from the open scenario are much higher than expected and the possible reasons for this ambiguity are discussed. The results from the capped scenario matched closely with those from the other methods and indicated that it is important to have background information on the study site to correctly analyze the pump test data. The optimized fit of the natural subsurface air pressure was achieved with an intrinsic permeability value of 3.3×10 -14 m 2. When the data were refitted to the model assuming two distinct layers of the unsaturated zone, the optimized fit was achieved

  2. Permeability of cork to gases.

    PubMed

    Faria, David P; Fonseca, Ana L; Pereira, Helen; Teodoro, Orlando M N D

    2011-04-27

    The permeability of gases through uncompressed cork was investigated. More than 100 samples were assessed from different plank qualities to provide a picture of the permeability distribution. A novel technique based on a mass spectrometer leak detector was used to directly measure the helium flow through the central area of small disks 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick. The permeability for nitrogen, oxygen, and other gases was measured by the pressure rise technique. Boiled and nonboiled cork samples from different sections were evaluated. An asymmetric frequency distribution ranging 3 orders of magnitude (roughly from 1 to 1000 μmol/(cm·atm·day)) for selected samples without macroscopic defects was found, having a peak below 100 μmol/(cm·atm·day). Correlation was found between density and permeability: higher density samples tend to show lower permeability. However, boiled cork showed a mean lower permeability despite having a lower density. The transport mechanism of gases through cork was also examined. Calculations suggest that gases permeate uncompressed cork mainly through small channels between cells under a molecular flow regime. The diameter of such channels was estimated to be in the range of 100 nm, in agreement with the plasmodesmata size in the cork cell walls.

  3. Permeability theory and Palace Athena.

    PubMed

    Stamps, Arthur E

    2013-06-01

    Permeability theory suggests that safety in environments depends on how far and how easily one can perceive or move through environments. Parts of environments that limit perception or retard locomotion elicit impressions of being enclosed, so properties of environments that influence perceived enclosure are important in permeability theory. One prediction of permeability theory is that the more permeable the boundary, the less enclosed the region within that boundary will seem to be. Another prediction is that boundary depth will have little influence on perceived enclosure. These predictions were tested in the venue of Greek temples. 30 participants were tested (14 men, 16 women; M age = 40 yr.), who rated perceived enclosure for 18 stimuli. The stimuli were constructed using a virtual scene from the Tholos in Delphi with the positions of the columns forming the boundaries. The boundaries were designed to have different levels of permeability and depth. Data were analyzed in terms of effect sizes and focused comparisons. Results indicated that perceived enclosure was most strongly influenced by the visual permeability of the boundary, while depth of boundary had a much smaller effect on perceived enclosure.

  4. Predicting relative permeability from water retention: A direct approach based on fractal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Abdullah; Tyner, John S.; Perfect, Edmund

    2009-04-01

    Commonly, a soil's relative permeability curve is predicted from its measured water retention curve by fitting equations that share parameters between the two curves (e.g., Brooks/Corey-Mualem and van Genuchten-Mualem). We present a new approach to predict relative permeability by direct application of measured soil water retention data without any fitting procedures. The new relative permeability model, derived from a probabilistic fractal approach, appears in series form as a function of suction and the incremental change in water content. This discrete approach describes the drained pore space and permeability at different suctions incorporating the effects of both pore size distribution and connectivity among water-filled pores. We compared the new model performance predicting relative permeability to that of the van Genuchten-Mualem (VG-M) model for 35 paired data sets from the Unsaturated Soil hydraulic Database (UNSODA) and five other previously published data sets. At the 5% level of significance, the new method predicts relative permeabilities from the UNSODA database significantly better (mean logarithmic root-mean-square error, LRMSE = 0.813) than the VG-M model (LRMSE = 1.555). Each prediction of relative permeability from the five other previously published data sets was also significantly better.

  5. From Multi-Porosity to Multiple-Scale Permeability Models of Natural Fractured Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Dreuzy, J. R.; Davy, P.; Meheust, Y.; Bour, O.

    2014-12-01

    Classical dual-porosity models and homogenization approaches fail to represent the permeability scaling, the high flow channeling and the broad variability observed in natural fractured media. More critically, most modeling frameworks cannot restitute simultaneously the permeability increase with scale and the persistence of channeling. In fact, channeling enhances the impact of bottlenecks, reduces permeability, and increases permeability variability with scale. It is the case of percolation theory but also of more advanced large-range correlated theories including power-law scaling of some of the fracture properties including their length or their mutual distances. More generally, we show with extensive numerical studies on 3D Discrete Fracture Networks (DFNs) that hydraulic behaviors come from a number of local and global fracture characteristics. The concept of effective properties like effective permeability itself appears quite weak and should be replaced by new modeling frameworks. We propose three alternative approaches combining the specificies of fracture flow and transport of DFNs and the simplicity of continuum approaches: 1- Discrete dual porosity media for high flow localization in a subset of the fracture network. 2- Structured Interacting Continua for highly organized diffusive processes in poorly connected fracture structures. 3- Multiple-scale permeability models for hierarchically structured fractured media with 3D concurrent fracture percolating networks. These different approaches can be combined and specified with a limited number of parameters. They are also efficient in representing the potentially large hydraulic impact of minor modification of the fracture network geometry and local connectivity.

  6. A study of the relationship between permeability distributions and small scale sedimentary features in a fluvial formation

    SciTech Connect

    Gotkowitz, M.

    1993-10-01

    This study focuses on styles of small-scale heterogeneity found in fluvial sand and soil bodies. Over 1,700 in situ measurements of air permeability were taken in an outcrop-based study which joins observations of sedimentary features with their associated permeability distributions. The relationship between sedimentology and hydrologic parameters provides a geologic framework to assess geostatistical hypotheses. The soils in the study area are found to have a significantly lower permeability than the channel sand deposits. The soil deposits showed a significant lack of observable small scale sedimentary structures, which is reflected in the experimental variograms. The permeability distribution in these study sites appears to be adequately represented by a continuous gaussian random field model. The presence of calcium carbonate nodules in the soils is related to the permeability distribution. Correlation lengths in the channel sands perpendicular to stratigraphy are significantly shorter than those observed parallel to stratigraphy. A sedimentological, bounding surfaces model is evaluated with regard to permeability distributions. In deposits of little sedimentary structure, the mean and variance may adequately characterize the permeability distribution. Where significant sedimentary structure exists, the bounding surfaces model can be used to determine the scales of variability present in the permeability distribution and may also be used to infer an appropriate choice of random field model.

  7. Permeability of stylolite-bearing chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, I.; Nykjaer, O.; Priisholm, S. ); Springer, N.

    1994-11-01

    Permeabilities were measured on core plugs from stylolite-bearing chalk of the Gorm field in the Danish North Sea. Air and liquid permeabilities were measured in directions parallel to and perpendicular to the stylolite surface. Permeability was measured with sleeve pressure equal to in-situ reservoir stress. Permeabilities of plugs with stylolites but without stylolite-associated fractures were equal in the two directions. The permeability is equal to the matrix permeability of non-stylolite-bearing chalk. In contrast, when fractures were associated with the stylolites, permeability was enhanced. The enhancement was most significant in the horizontal direction parallel to the stylolites.

  8. Pyrotechnic deflagration velocity and permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Begeal, D R; Stanton, P L

    1982-01-01

    Particle size, porosity, and permeability of the reactive material have long been considered to be important factors in propellant burning rates and the deflagration-to-detonation transition in explosives. It is reasonable to assume that these same parameters will also affect the deflagration velocity of pyrotechnics. This report describes an experimental program that addresses the permeability of porous solids (particulate beds), in terms of particle size and porosity, and the relationship between permeability and the behavior of pyrotechnics and explosives. The experimental techniques used to acquire permeability data and to characterize the pyrotechnic burning are discussed. Preliminary data have been obtained on the burning characteristics of titanium hydride/potassium perchlorate (THKP) and boron/calcium chromate (BCCR). With THKP, the velocity of a pressure wave (from hot product gases) in the unburned region shows unsteady behavior which is related to the initial porosity or permeability. Simultaneous measurements with pressure gauges and ion gauges reveal that the pressure wave precedes the burn front. Steady burning of BCCR was observed with pressure gauge diagnostics and with a microwave interferometry technique.

  9. Platelets can enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Nathalie; Paré, Alexandre; Farndale, Richard W; Schumacher, H Ralph; Nigrovic, Peter A; Lacroix, Steve; Boilard, Eric

    2012-08-09

    Platelets survey blood vessels, searching for endothelial damage and preventing loss of vascular integrity. However, there are circumstances where vascular permeability increases, suggesting that platelets sometimes fail to fulfill their expected function. Human inflammatory arthritis is associated with tissue edema attributed to enhanced permeability of the synovial microvasculature. Murine studies have suggested that such vascular leak facilitates entry of autoantibodies and may thereby promote joint inflammation. Whereas platelets typically help to promote microvascular integrity, we examined the role of platelets in synovial vascular permeability in murine experimental arthritis. Using an in vivo model of autoimmune arthritis, we confirmed the presence of endothelial gaps in inflamed synovium. Surprisingly, permeability in the inflamed joints was abrogated if the platelets were absent. This effect was mediated by platelet serotonin accumulated via the serotonin transporter and could be antagonized using serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. As opposed to the conventional role of platelets to microvascular leakage, this demonstration that platelets are capable of amplifying and maintaining permeability adds to the rapidly growing list of unexpected functions for platelets.

  10. Capstone Report on the Application, Monitoring, and Performance of Permeable Reactive Barriers for Ground-Water Remediation: Volume 2: Long-Term Monitoring of PRBs: Soil and Ground Water Sampling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Volume 2 Long-Term Monitoring of PRBs: Soil and Ground Water Sampling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d...PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) United States Environmental Protection...Agency 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM( S ) 11. SPONSOR

  11. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  12. Turbulent drag reduction by permeable coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; Abderrahaman-Elena, Nabil

    2015-11-01

    We present an assessment of permeable coatings as a form of passive drag reduction, proposing a simplified model to quantify the effect of the coating thickness and permeability. To reduce skin friction, the porous layer must be preferentially permeable in the streamwise direction, so that a slip effect is produced. For small permeability, the controlling parameter is the difference between streamwise and spanwise permeability lengths, scaled in viscous units, √{Kx+}-√{Kz+}. In this regime, the reduction in drag is proportional to that difference. However, the proportional performance eventually breaks down for larger permeabilities. A degradation mechanism is investigated, common to other obstructed surfaces in general and permeable substrates in particular, which depends critically on the geometric mean of the streamwise and wall-normal permeabilities, √{Kx+ Ky+}. For a streamwise-to-cross-plane permeability ratio of order Kx+/Ky+ = Kx+/Kz+ 10 -100, the model predicts a maximum drag reduction of order 15-25%.

  13. Characterizing Low Molecular Weight Organic Matter in Arctic Polygonal Tundra Soils to Identify Biogeochemical Hotspots Using a Dual-Separation, High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, M.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Iversen, C. M.; Hettich, R.

    2016-12-01

    Reliably modeling biogeochemical processes (e.g. decomposition, plant-microbial competition for nutrients) across spatial or temporal scales requires elucidating the chemical composition of low molecular weight (LMW) dissolved soil organic matter (DOM). Our understanding is limited, however, by the wide-ranging physicochemical properties and high fluxes of these compounds, posing major challenges in detection, isolation, and quantification. Here, we developed and evaluated a sensitive, non-targeted approach to characterize LMW DOM in the Arctic, a unique system that is warming at a rate twice that of the global average and may have significant feedbacks to global C and N cycles. Soil cores were collected from a continuous permafrost, polygonal tundra landscape near Barrow, Alaska (71° 16' N) and sectioned into 5 cm increments. Water and salt extracts from each section were filtered and injected onto C18 reversed-phase or zwitterionic-type hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ZIC-pHILIC) columns for separation. LMW DOM profiles were obtained using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), and unique features, known and unknown, were characterized by LC retention time, accurate mass (m/z), and molecular fragmentation pattern. Coupling two orthogonal chromatographic separations with HRMS enabled the characterization of hundreds of analytes in a single measurement providing enhanced, high-throughput coverage of LMW DOM from soil extracts. The complexity and relative/absolute intensities of LMW DOM features (e.g. organic acids, amino sugars, peptides) varied across polygon type (high- or low-centered), extract condition, and with depth, providing an information-rich, molecular signal of LMW DOM availability across scales. Comprehensively profiling this complex mixture of small molecules of both biotic and abiotic origin provides a chemical signature of biological function, allowing for more reliable predictions of how discrete, molecular-scale processes may control

  14. Clay swelling and formation permeability reductions induced by a nonionic surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, K.H.; Arias, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    A major concern with the use of surfactant flushing to mobilize nonaqueous phase liquids in aquifers is specific mineral-surfactant interactions that may effect significant permeability changes in the soil formation. Soils comprised of Ottawa sand mixed with small percentages of bentonite that had moderate initial hydraulic conductivity were investigated for loss of permeability upon flushing with solution containing a nonionic surfactant (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate). Columns containing 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5% had permeability reductions of 1, 5, 13, 44, 49, and 69%, respectively. The surfactant-clay interactions were further investigated as the cause of the permeability reductions. Some transport of clay through the column was apparent from a small amount of release measured. A permeability change was correlated with the colloid transport in the column with the highest clay concentration, although its effect was transient. Clay swelling was postulated as the primary mechanism for the permeability reductions. It was determined through X-ray diffraction that the surfactant was spreading the silica layer spacings of the clay from a hydration spacing of 15.23 {angstrom} to a surfactant-swelled spacing of 18.02 {angstrom}. A model was formulated to describe the reduced permeability by the increase in clay volume due to swelling measured by X-ray diffraction and was capable of describing the observed data well with an average error of approximately 10%.

  15. Solute Breakthrough During Recurrent Ponded Infiltration Into Heterogeneous Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotkova, M.; Snehota, M.; Cislerova, M.

    2009-12-01

    Water flow during recurrent ponded infiltration may be influenced by presence of entrapped air in heterogeneous soils. It is assumed that variations of the entrapped air volume cause changes of the water content and flow patterns, with consequences for the solute transport. The aim of this contribution is to investigate the effect of entrapped air on dispersion by means of experiments in laboratory. Two undisturbed samples of sandy loam soils were collected at the experimental sites in the Šumava Mountains and the Jizera Mountains (Czech Republic). Recurrent ponded infiltration, conducted on each soil sample consisted of two or more infiltration runs. The same level of ponding was maintained during each infiltration run at the top of the sample. Water drained freely through the perforated plate at the bottom of the sample. First infiltration run was done into naturally dry soil while subsequent runs were conducted into wetter soil. Suction pressure heads in three heights were continuously measured by tensiometers. Water contents were monitored by TDR probes also in three heights. Outflow fluxes were recorded continuously during the experiments as well as the weight of the sample. During each infiltration run the concentration pulse of potassium bromide solution was applied at the top of the soil core during steady state flow and breakthrough curve was acquired by electrochemical in-line analysis of bromide ions in the effluent. Soil hydraulic properties were obtained by fitting the measured flux, water content and pressure data by the dual permeability model. The dispersion coefficients were determined by fitting a one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation to each breakthrough curve. Differences in the shape of the breakthrough curves obtained for individual infiltration runs will be discussed on the poster. This research has been supported by GACR 103/08/1552.

  16. Solute breakthrough during recurrent ponded infiltration into heterogeneous soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotkova, Martina; Snehota, Michal; Dohnal, Michal; Cislerova, Milena

    2010-05-01

    Water flow during recurrent ponded infiltration may be influenced by presence of entrapped air in heterogeneous soils. It is assumed that variations of the entrapped air volume cause changes of the water content and flow patterns, with consequences for the solute transport. The aim of this contribution is to investigate the effect of entrapped air on dispersion by means of experiments in laboratory. Two undisturbed samples of sandy loam soils were collected at the experimental sites in the Šumava Mountains and the Jizera Mountains (Czech Republic). Packed sample of fine quartz sand was used as a reference. Recurrent ponded infiltration, conducted on each soil sample consisted of two or more infiltration runs. The same level of ponding was maintained during each infiltration run at the top of the sample. Water drained freely through the perforated plate at the bottom of the sample. First infiltration run was done into naturally dry soil while subsequent runs were conducted into wetter soil. Suction pressure heads in three heights were continuously measured by tensiometers. Water contents were monitored by TDR probes also in three heights. Outflow fluxes were recorded continuously during the experiments as well as the weight of the sample. During each infiltration run the concentration pulse of potassium bromide solution was applied at the top of the soil core during steady state flow and breakthrough curve was acquired by electrochemical in-line analysis of bromide ions in the effluent. Soil hydraulic properties were obtained by fitting the measured flux, water content and pressure data by the dual permeability model. The dispersion coefficients were determined by fitting a one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation to each breakthrough curve. Differences in the shape of the breakthrough curves obtained for individual infiltration runs will be discussed on the poster. This research has been supported by GACR 103/08/1552.

  17. Rigid gas permeable extended wear.

    PubMed

    Maehara, J R; Kastl, P R

    1994-04-01

    We have reviewed the pertinent literature on rigid gas permeable (RGP) extended wear contact lenses, and we discuss the benefits and adverse reactions of this contact lens modality, drawing conclusions from reviewed studies. We suggest parameters for success with these lenses and guidelines for the prevention of adverse reactions.

  18. PNEUMATIC PUMP TEST FOR DESIGN OF SOIL VACUUM EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ pneumatic pumping tests were performed to estimate the pneumatic permeability at a site containing soils contaminated with aviation gasoline. Determination of pneumatic permeability was necessary to evaluate soil-air discharge or pore volume exchange rates. Pressure propa...

  19. PNEUMATIC PUMP TEST FOR DESIGN OF SOIL VACUUM EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ pneumatic pumping tests were performed to estimate the pneumatic permeability at a site containing soils contaminated with aviation gasoline. Determination of pneumatic permeability was necessary to evaluate soil-air discharge or pore volume exchange rates. Pressure propa...

  20. High membrane permeability for melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be “secreted” from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  1. Oil permeability variations on lagoon sand beaches in the Patos-Guaíba system in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Elaine Baroni; Nicolodi, João Luiz

    2017-02-15

    Permeability is the ability of a sediment deposit to allow fluids to pass through it. It depends on the local types of sediments. When the fluid is oil, high permeability implies greater interaction with the site and more extensive damage, which makes recovery most difficult. Knowledge of permeability oscillations is necessary to understand oil behavior and improve cleanup techniques. The goal is to determine oil permeability variations on lagoon sand beaches. Oil permeability tests were performed at the beach face, using a Modified Phillip Dunne Permeameter and parameters were sampled. Permeability of lagoon beaches is driven by grain diameter and roundness, soil compaction, and depth of the water table. Factors that enhance permeability include: sand sorting, vertical distribution of sediments and gravel percentage. High permeability on lagoon beaches is related to polymodal distribution, to the sediment package, and to the system's low mobility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prediction of permeability of cement-admixed soft clay using resistivity and time-domain IP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latt, Khin M. M.; Giao, P. H.

    2017-02-01

    Permeability is one of the most important petrophysical parameters, which unfortunately is quite difficult to be tested and estimated, particularly for the fine-grained soils and mixed soils. Prediction of permeability based on geophysical measurements is currently one of the most challenging issues in petrophysics. There have been recently reported some empirical relationships between permeability, resistivity and spectral induced polarization (SIP) parameters for a porous medium. However, the disadvantage of this approach is the very scarcity of SIP data as most of practical measurements are time-domain IP. In this study, a detailed overview of permeability prediction models using resistivity and spectral IP data was made. More than that, an innovative approach using resistivity and time-domain IP measurements to predict permeability of cement-admixed Bangkok clay was proposed and successfully applied for tested samples based on measurements of resistivity and time-domain IP data. A good amount of geotechnical and geophysical tests was conducted to investigate the time-dependent development of strength, porosity, and permeability of cement-mixed Bangkok soft clay samples during a 28-day curing process. The permeability predicted by resistivity and chargeability model matched well with permeability measured by consolidation testing. In addition, a series of correlations between unconfined compressive strength, porosity and permeability as measured by geotechnical testing and resistivity and chargeability as measured by geophysical testing were found.

  3. Trench infiltration for managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, V.M.; Watt, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    Managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock is increasingly being utilized to enhance resources and maintain sustainable groundwater development practices. One such target is the Navajo Sandstone, an extensive regional aquifer located throughout the Colorado Plateau of the western United States. Spreading-basin and bank-filtration projects along the sandstone outcrop's western edge in southwestern Utah have recently been implemented to meet growth-related water demands. This paper reports on a new cost-effective surface-infiltration technique utilizing trenches for enhancing managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock. A 48-day infiltration trench experiment on outcropping Navajo Sandstone was conducted to evaluate this alternative surface-spreading artificial recharge method. Final infiltration rates through the bottom of the trench were about 0.5 m/day. These infiltration rates were an order of magnitude higher than rates from a previous surface-spreading experiment at the same site. The higher rates were likely caused by a combination of factors including the removal of lower permeability soil and surficial caliche deposits, access to open vertical sandstone fractures, a reduction in physical clogging associated with silt and biofilm layers, minimizing viscosity effects by maintaining isothermal conditions, minimizing chemical clogging caused by carbonate mineral precipitation associated with algal photosynthesis, and diminished gas clogging associated with trapped air and biogenic gases. This pilot study illustrates the viability of trench infiltration for enhancing surface spreading of managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock. ?? 2010.

  4. Experimental determination of permeability of Neapolitan Yellow Tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peluso, F.; Arienzo, I.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents and discusses the measurement of permeability of Neapolitan Yellow Tuff (NYT) samples obtained in the framework of a study concerning the phenomenon of bradyseism, i.e. the slow vertical movement of soil, in the Campi Flegrei caldera (Campania—Italy). Measurements have been performed under isothermal, non-isothermal and transient non-isothermal conditions using a specifically designed apparatus. Results of measurements of porosity of different samples are also reported. Experimental results in isothermal conditions show that the volume flux through the samples changes linearly with applied pressure. The values of permeability obtained turn out to be independent of the temperature and pressure gradients applied to the samples. This result is consistent with the fact that the permeability is a characteristic of the porous medium, and as such is not affected by temperature and pressure variation, at least in the range examined. The permeability values measured in our laboratories agree quite well with the ones measured in situ by the Agenzia Generale Italiana Petroli (AGIP) during a geothermal exploration of the Campi Flegrei area in 1980. An interesting, still unexplained phenomenon has been detected during transient phases when both pressure and temperature gradients were applied to the samples. The phenomenon consists in an enhancement of volume flux due to heat flux in the transient phase. The extra volume-flux disappears once the steady temperature gradient is reached.

  5. Control of the permeability of fractures in geothermal rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faoro, Igor

    This thesis comprises three journal articles that will be submitted for publication (Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth). Their respective titles are: "Undrained through Drained Evolution of Permeability in Dual Permeability Media" by Igor Faoro, Derek Elsworth and Chris Marone, "Evolution of Stiffness and Permeability in Fractures Subject to Thermally-and Mechanically-Activated Dissolution" by Igor Faoro, Derek Elsworth Chris Marone; "Linking permeability and mechanical damage for basalt from Mt. Etna volcano (Italy)" by Igor Faoro, Sergio Vinciguerra, Chris Marone and Derek Elsworth. Undrained through Drained Evolution of Permeability in Dual Permeability Media: temporary permeability changes of fractured aquifers subject to earthquakes have been observed and recorded worldwide, but their comprehension still remains a complex issue. In this study we report on flow-through fracture experiments on cracked westerly cores that reproduce, at laboratory scale, those (steps like) permeability changes that have been recorded when earthquakes occur. In particular our experiments show that under specific test boundary conditions, rapid increments of pore pressure induce transient variations of flow rate of the fracture whose peak magnitudes decrease as the variations of the effective stresses increase. We identify that the observed hydraulic behavior of the fracture is due to two principal mechanisms of origin; respectively mechanical (shortening of core) and poro-elastic (radial diffusion of the pore fluid into the matrix of the sample) whose interaction cause respectively an instantaneous opening and then a progressive closure of the fracture. Evolution of Stiffness and Permeability in Fractures Subject to Thermally-and Mechanically-Activated Dissolution: we report the results of radial flow-through experiments conducted on heated samples of Westerly granite. These experiments are performed to examine the influence of thermally and mechanically activated

  6. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  7. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  8. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  9. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  10. Drug permeability prediction using PMF method.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fancui; Xu, Weiren

    2013-03-01

    Drug permeability determines the oral availability of drugs via cellular membranes. Poor permeability makes a drug unsuitable for further development. The permeability may be estimated as the free energy change that the drug should overcome through crossing membrane. In this paper the drug permeability was simulated using molecular dynamics method and the potential energy profile was calculated with potential of mean force (PMF) method. The membrane was simulated using DPPC bilayer and three drugs with different permeability were tested. PMF studies on these three drugs show that doxorubicin (low permeability) should pass higher free energy barrier from water to DPPC bilayer center while ibuprofen (high permeability) has a lower energy barrier. Our calculation indicates that the simulation model we built is suitable to predict drug permeability.

  11. Review of Hydrogen Isotope Permeability Through Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, S. A.

    1983-08-15

    This report is the first part of a comprehensive summary of the literature on hydrogen isotope permeability through materials that do not readily form hydrides. While we mainly focus on pure metals with low permeabilities because of their importance to tritium containment, we also give data on higher-permeability materials such as iron, nickel, steels, and glasses.

  12. Vapor-liquid phase separator permeability results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1981-01-01

    Continued studies are described in the area of vapor-liquid phase separator work with emphasis on permeabilities of porous sintered plugs (stainless steel, nominal pore size 2 micrometer). The temperature dependence of the permeability has been evaluated in classical fluid using He-4 gas at atmospheric pressure and in He-2 on the basis of a modified, thermosmotic permeability of the normal fluid.

  13. Structure/Permeability Relationships Of Polyimide Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; Yamamoto, H.; Mi, Y.; Stern, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of permeabilities, by each of five gases, of membranes made of four different polyimides. Conducted to gain understanding of effects of molecular structures of membranes on permeabilities and to assess potential for exploitation of selective permeability in gas-separation processes. Gases used: H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4.

  14. Structure/Permeability Relationships Of Polyimide Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; Yamamoto, H.; Mi, Y.; Stern, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of permeabilities, by each of five gases, of membranes made of four different polyimides. Conducted to gain understanding of effects of molecular structures of membranes on permeabilities and to assess potential for exploitation of selective permeability in gas-separation processes. Gases used: H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4.

  15. Novel additives to retard permeable flow

    SciTech Connect

    Golombok, Michael; Crane, Carel; Ineke, Erik; Welling, Marco; Harris, Jon

    2008-09-15

    Low concentrations of surfactant and cosolute in water, can selectively retard permeable flow in high permeability rocks compared to low permeability ones. This represents a way forward for more efficient areal sweep efficiency when water flooding a reservoir during improved oil recovery. (author)

  16. Effects of heterogeneities on capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships.

    PubMed

    Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Hassanizadeh, S Majid; Celia, Michael A

    2002-06-01

    In theories of multiphase flow through porous media, capillary pressure-saturation and relative permeability-saturation curves are assumed to be intrinsic properties of the medium. Moreover, relative permeability is assumed to be a scalar property. However, numerous theoretical and experimental works have shown that these basic assumptions may not be valid. For example, relative permeability is known to be affected by the flow velocity (or pressure gradient) at which the measurements are carried out. In this article, it is suggested that the nonuniqueness of capillary pressure-relative permeability-saturation relationships is due to the presence of microheterogeneities within a laboratory sample. In order to investigate this hypothesis, a large number of "numerical experiments" are carried out. A numerical multiphase flow model is used to simulate the procedures that are commonly used in the laboratory for the measurement of capillary pressure and relative permeability curves. The dimensions of the simulation domain are similar to those of a typical laboratory sample (a few centimeters in each direction). Various combinations of boundary conditions and soil heterogeneity are simulated and average capillary pressure, saturation, and relative permeability for the "soil sample" are obtained. It is found that the irreducible water saturation is a function of the capillary number; the smaller the capillary number, the larger the irreducible water saturation. Both drainage and imbibition capillary pressure curves are found to be strongly affected by heterogeneities and boundary conditions. Relative permeability is also found to be affected by the boundary conditions; this is especially true about the nonaqueous phase permeability. Our results reveal that there is much need for laboratory experiments aimed at investigating the interplay of boundary conditions and microheterogeneities and their effect on capillary pressure and relative permeability.

  17. Permeability enhancement using explosive techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.F.; Schmidt, S.C.; Carter, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    In situ recovery methods for many of our hydrocarbon and mineral resources depend on the ability to create or enhance permeability in the resource bed to allow uniform and predictable flow. To meet this need, a new branch of geomechanics devoted to computer prediction of explosive rock breakage and permeability enhancement has developed. The computer is used to solve the nonlinear equations of compressible flow, with the explosive behavior and constitutive properties of the medium providing the initial/boundary conditions and material response. Once the resulting computational tool has been verified and calibrated with appropriate large-scale field tests, it can be used to develop and optimize commercially useful explosive techniques for in situ resource recovery.

  18. Nexal membrane permeability to anions

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The permeability of the septa of the earthworm in the median axon has been calculated for the anions fluorescein and its halogen derivatives. The values ranged from 5.4 X 10(-5) to 4 X 10(-6) cm/s. Previously, the septa had been shown to contain nexuses. By using freeze-fracture material, the surface area of nexus on the septal membranes was determined to be 4.5%, very similar to the percentage of nexus in the intercalated disk of mammalian myocardium. Plasma membrane permeability to these dyes was also calculated and shown to be much less than that of the septal membranes. In addition, an estimate of cytoplasmic binding for each dye was made, and most dyes showed little or no binding with the exception of aminofluorescein. PMID:702107

  19. THE GRADIENT OF VASCULAR PERMEABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Frederick; Rous, Peyton

    1931-01-01

    A mounting gradient of permeability exists along the capillaries of frog muscle. In chicken muscle on the other hand none has been demonstrated; but the close-knit vascularization is arranged in duplicate in such manner that the blood runs in opposite directions through the capillaries of nearly adjacent fibres. In a flight muscle of the pigeon there exists in addition to this artifice what appears to be a special collecting system of venous capillaries. In the mammalian diaphragm indications of such a system are also to be found, and a gradient of capillary permeability like that in the other skeletal muscles is probably present. These vascular conditions are briefly considered in terms of function. PMID:19869836

  20. Calculation of Permeability Change Due to Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Effects

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blair

    2000-06-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide a bounding estimate of how thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) behavior of rock in the region surrounding an emplacement drift in a Monitored Geologic Repository subsurface facility may affect the permeability of fractures in the rock mass forming the region. The bounding estimate will provide essential input to performance assessment analysis of the potential repository system. This calculation also supports the Near Field Environment Process Model Report (NFE PMR) and will contribute to Site Recommendation. The geologic unit being considered as a potential repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, Nevada lies within a fractured, densely welded ash-flow tuff located in the Topopah Spring Tuff member of the Paintbrush Group. Fractures form the primary conduits for fluid flow in the rock mass. Considerable analysis has been performed to characterize the thermal-hydrologic (TH) behavior of this rock unit (e.g., CRWMS M&O 2000a, pp. 83-87), and recently the dual permeability model (DKM) has proved to be an effective tool for predicting TH behavior (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The DKM uses fracture permeability as a primary input parameter, and it is well known that fracture permeability is strongly dependent on fracture deformation (Brown. 1995). Consequently, one major unknown is how deformation during heating and cooling periods may change fracture permeability. Opening of fractures increases their permeability, whereas closing reduces permeability. More importantly, shear displacement on fractures increases their permeability, and fractures undergoing shear are likely to conduct fluids. This calculation provides a bounding estimate of how heating and cooling in the rock surrounding an emplacement drift and the resulting mechanical deformation may affect the fracture permeability of the rock.

  1. Experimental Volcanology: Fragmentation and Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieler, O.

    2005-12-01

    An increasing number of scientists design new experiments to analyse processes that control the dynamics of explosive eruptions. There research is mostly coupled to numerical models and aims toward its controlling parameters. The fragmentation process, its threshold and the speed of the fragmentation wave as well as the energy consumed by the fragmentation are some hot spots of the experimental volcanology. Analysing the fragmentation behaviour of volcaniclastics as close to the natural system as possible, we found a number of physical constrains. Identifying the porosity as determining factor of the threshold, we realised that neither threshold nor the speed of the fragmentation process are solely controlled by the rock density. The later results of the shock tube type apparatus lead to the analysis of the specific surface area and permeability as direct links to textural features. Permeability analysis performed in a modified shock tube type apparatus, show two clear, distinct trends for dome rock and pyroclastic samples. The specific surface determined by Argon sorbtion (BET) as well as textural features of pumices from Campi Flegrei, Montserrat and Krakatoa (1883) give in contrary evidence of a more complex story. Large spherical, or ellipsoidal bubbles around fractured crystals prove that the high permeability of the pumice has partially developed after the fixing of the bubble size distribution. This puts up the question, if permeability measurements on pyroclastic samples reveal relevant numbers! The surface tension controlled 'self sealing' behaviour of surfaces from foaming obsidian hinders in situ measurements. Close textural investigations will have to clarify how the 'post process' samples deviate from the syneruptive conduit filling.

  2. Off-tarp emissions, distribution, and efficacy of carbonated fumigants in a low permeability film tarped field

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbonated fumigants have been shown to distribute quickly and uniformly in sandy soils and improve pest control efficacy for annual crops. Low permeability films, such as VaporSafe® (TIF), could further improve fumigant dispersion by effectively retaining the fumigant in soil; however, there is a c...

  3. Permeability evolution of shale during spontaneous imbibition

    DOE PAGES

    Chakraborty, N.; Karpyn, Z. T.; Liu, S.; ...

    2017-01-05

    Shales have small pore and throat sizes ranging from nano to micron scales, low porosity and limited permeability. The poor permeability and complex pore connectivity of shales pose technical challenges to (a) understanding flow and transport mechanisms in such systems and, (b) in predicting permeability changes under dynamic saturation conditions. This paper presents quantitative experimental evidence of the migration of water through a generic shale core plug using micro CT imaging. In addition, in-situ measurements of gas permeability were performed during counter-current spontaneous imbibition of water in nano-darcy permeability Marcellus and Haynesville core plugs. It was seen that water blocksmore » severely reduced the effective permeability of the core plugs, leading to losses of up to 99.5% of the initial permeability in experiments lasting 30 days. There was also evidence of clay swelling which further hindered gas flow. When results from this study were compared with similar counter-current gas permeability experiments reported in the literature, the initial (base) permeability of the rock was found to be a key factor in determining the time evolution of effective gas permeability during spontaneous imbibition. With time, a recovery of effective permeability was seen in the higher permeability rocks, while becoming progressively detrimental and irreversible in tighter rocks. Finally, these results suggest that matrix permeability of ultra-tight rocks is susceptible to water damage following hydraulic fracturing stimulation and, while shut-in/soaking time helps clearing-up fractures from resident fluid, its effect on the adjacent matrix permeability could be detrimental.« less

  4. The Membrane Permeability Outcome study.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Cavalli, Andrea; Manzoni, Celestina; Pontoriero, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Many observational studies have consistently shown that high-flux hemodialysis has positive effects on the survival and morbidity of uremic patients when compared with low-flux hemodialysis. However, the HEMO study, a randomized trial designed to evaluate the effect of membrane permeability on patient survival, showed only an 8% non-statistically significant reduction of mortality, albeit a secondary analysis suggested an advantage for high-flux membranes in certain patient subgroups. The prospective, randomized Membrane Permeability Outcome (MPO) study investigated the impact of membrane permeability on survival in incident hemodialysis patients who had low albumin (≤4 g/dl) and normal albumin ( >4 g/dl) as separate randomization groups. Patients with serum albumin ≤4 g/dl had significantly better survival rates in the high-flux group compared with the low-flux group (p = 0.032). Moreover, a post-hoc secondary analysis showed that high-flux membranes may significantly improve survival in diabetic patients. No difference was found in patients with normal albumin levels. Considering the increasing number of dialysis patients with low serum albumin levels and with diabetes, the relevance of the MPO study led to the publication of a position statement by the European Renal Best Practice Advisory Board. This board strongly recommended that high-flux hemodialysis should be used for high-risk patients and, with a lower degree of evidence, even also for low-risk subjects due to the substantial reduction in β(2)-microglobulin levels observed in the high-flux group.

  5. Structural determinants of glomerular permeability.

    PubMed

    Deen, W M; Lazzara, M J; Myers, B D

    2001-10-01

    Recent progress in relating the functional properties of the glomerular capillary wall to its unique structure is reviewed. The fenestrated endothelium, glomerular basement membrane (GBM), and epithelial filtration slits form a series arrangement in which the flow diverges as it enters the GBM from the fenestrae and converges again at the filtration slits. A hydrodynamic model that combines morphometric findings with water flow data in isolated GBM has predicted overall hydraulic permeabilities that are consistent with measurements in vivo. The resistance of the GBM to water flow, which accounts for roughly half that of the capillary wall, is strongly dependent on the extent to which the GBM surfaces are blocked by cells. The spatial frequency of filtration slits is predicted to be a very important determinant of the overall hydraulic permeability, in keeping with observations in several glomerular diseases in humans. Whereas the hydraulic resistances of the cell layers and GBM are additive, the overall sieving coefficient for a macromolecule (its concentration in Bowman's space divided by that in plasma) is the product of the sieving coefficients for the individual layers. Models for macromolecule filtration reveal that the individual sieving coefficients are influenced by one another and by the filtrate velocity, requiring great care in extrapolating in vitro observations to the living animal. The size selectivity of the glomerular capillary has been shown to be determined largely by the cellular layers, rather than the GBM. Controversial findings concerning glomerular charge selectivity are reviewed, and it is concluded that there is good evidence for a role of charge in restricting the transmural movement of albumin. Also discussed is an effect of albumin that has received little attention, namely, its tendency to increase the sieving coefficients of test macromolecules via steric interactions. Among the unresolved issues are the specific contributions of the

  6. Permeability of normal versus carious dentin.

    PubMed

    Pashley, E L; Talman, R; Horner, J A; Pashley, D H

    1991-10-01

    Although a number of reports have been published demonstrating that carious dentin is less permeable than normal dentin, these reports have been qualitative rather than quantitative. The purpose of this in vitro study was to apply a quantitative technique to the study of the permeability of carious human teeth before and after excavation, before and after removal of the smear layer and before and after preparation of a control cavity of similar size and depth in normal dentin subjected to the same measurements, for comparative purposes. Dentin permeability was measured as a hydraulic conductance. The permeability values measured at each step in the protocol were expressed as a percent of the maximum permeability of both cavities, permitting each tooth the serve as its own control. Carious lesions exhibited a slight degree of permeability (2.3 +/- 0.6% of controls) which remained unchanged after excavation of the lesions. Removal of the smear layer in the excavated carious lesions increased the permeability significantly to 6.9 +/- 3.2%. Preparation of a control cavity of the same area and depth increased the permeability slightly. Removal of its smear layer increased the permeability of the dentin 91%. These results confirm previous qualitative studies that carious dentin, even after excavation and removal of the smear layer has a very low permeability.

  7. Anisotropic hydraulic permeability in compressed articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    The extent to which articular cartilage hydraulic permeability is anisotropic is largely unknown, despite its importance for understanding mechanisms of joint lubrication, load bearing, transport phenomena, and mechanotransduction. We developed and applied new techniques for the direct measurement of hydraulic permeability within statically compressed adult bovine cartilage explant disks, dissected such that disk axes were perpendicular to the articular surface. Applied pressure gradients were kept small to minimize flow-induced matrix compaction, and fluid outflows were measured by observation of a meniscus in a glass capillary under a microscope. Explant disk geometry under radially unconfined axial compression was measured by direct microscopic observation. Pressure, flow, and geometry data were input to a finite element model where hydraulic permeabilities in the disk axial and radial directions were determined. At less than 10% static compression, near free-swelling conditions, hydraulic permeability was nearly isotropic, with values corresponding to those of previous studies. With increasing static compression, hydraulic permeability decreased, but the radially directed permeability decreased more dramatically than the axially directed permeability such that strong anisotropy (a 10-fold difference between axial and radial directions) in the hydraulic permeability tensor was evident for static compression of 20-40%. Results correspond well with predictions of a previous microstructurally-based model for effects of tissue mechanical deformations on glycosaminoglycan architecture and cartilage hydraulic permeability. Findings inform understanding of structure-function relationships in cartilage matrix, and suggest several biomechanical roles for compression-induced anisotropic hydraulic permeability in articular cartilage.

  8. Inter-laboratory validation of standardized method to determine permeability of plastic films

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To support regulations controlling soil fumigation, we are standardizing the laboratory method we developed to measure the permeability of plastic films to fumigant vapors. The method was validated using an inter-laboratory comparison with 7 participants. Each participant evaluated the mass transfer...

  9. Evaluation of Surface and Subsurface Processes in Permeable Pavement Infiltration Trenches

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems can be affected by clogging of the pavement surface and/or clogging at the interface where the subsurface storage layer meets the underlying soil. As infiltration and exfiltration are the primary functional mechanisms for ...

  10. Evaluation of Surface and Subsurface Processes in Permeable Pavement Infiltration Trenches

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems can be affected by clogging of the pavement surface and/or clogging at the interface where the subsurface storage layer meets the underlying soil. As infiltration and exfiltration are the primary functional mechanisms for ...

  11. Adaptive upscaling with the dual mesh method

    SciTech Connect

    Guerillot, D.; Verdiere, S.

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that upscaling should be calculated during the flow simulation instead of trying to enhance the a priori upscaling methods. Hence, counter-examples are given to motivate our approach, the so-called Dual Mesh Method. The main steps of this numerical algorithm are recalled. Applications illustrate the necessity to consider different average relative permeability values depending on the direction in space. Moreover, these values could be different for the same average saturation. This proves that an a priori upscaling cannot be the answer even in homogeneous cases because of the {open_quotes}dynamical heterogeneity{close_quotes} created by the saturation profile. Other examples show the efficiency of the Dual Mesh Method applied to heterogeneous medium and to an actual field case in South America.

  12. Intravesical oxybutynin affects bladder permeability.

    PubMed

    Ersay, A; Demirtas, O C

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the effects of intravesical application of oxybutynin chloride on bladder permeability we designed an animal model. Female Guinea pigs were given 3 different test solutions: phosphate buffered saline (PBS), 50% acetone and 1.27 x 10(-2) M oxybutynin chloride solution. Then 99mTc-DTPA 45 microCi in 2 ml normal saline was instilled into the bladder lumen in each animals and allowed to dwell for 30 minutes. At the end of exposure time, the net count data in each 1 ml serum sample were corrected for radioactive decay and converted to the total percentage of administered dose. 99mTc-DTPA absorption percentages of both acetone and oxybutynin groups were significantly higher than that of PBS group (mean 3.2 +/- 2.9% p < 0.001). Intravesical oxybutynin application increases bladder permeability 5 times compared with PBS administration. This observation can also explain how rapid absorption of oxybutynin through the bladder into the systemic circulation occurs.

  13. Steam-water relative permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N.

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  14. Brain permeability of inhaled corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Arya, Vikram; Issar, Manish; Wang, Yaning; Talton, James D; Hochhaus, Guenther

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the permeability of inhaled corticosteroids entering the brain is reduced and if P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporters are involved. Currently employed inhaled corticosteroids were given intravenously and intratracheally to rats at a dose of 100 microg kg-1. An ex-vivo receptor binding assay was used to monitor over 12 h the glucocorticoid receptor occupancy in the brain and a systemic reference organ (kidney). The involvement of P-gp in the brain permeability of triamcinolone acetonide was assessed in wild-type mice and mdr1a(-/-) knockout mice (mice lacking the gene for expressing P-gp). After both forms of administration, the average brain receptor occupancies were 20-56% of those of the reference organ, with the more lipophilic drugs showing a more pronounced receptor occupation. While the receptor occupancies in the liver of wild-type and mdr1a(-/-) mice were similar after administration of triamcinolone acetonide, brain receptor occupancies in mdr1a(-/-) mice were significantly greater (mdr1a(-/-): 47.6%, 40.2-55.0%, n=14; 2; wild-type: 11.5+/-33.0%, n=14; 3). Penetration into the brain for inhaled corticosteroids (especially those of lower lipophilicity) is reduced. Experiments in mdr1a(-/-) mice confirmed the involvement of P-gp transporters. Further studies are needed to assess whether potential drug interactions at the transporter level are of pharmacological significance.

  15. Modelling susceptibility of grassland soil to macropore flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Abdallah

    2015-06-01

    Investigating preferential flow, including macropore flow, is crucial to predicting and preventing point sources of contamination in soil, for example in the vicinity of pumping wells. With a view to advancing groundwater protection, this study aimed (i) to quantify the strength of macropore flow in four representative natural grassland soils on the Swiss plateau, and (ii) to define the parameters that significantly control macropore flow in grassland soil. For each soil type we selected three measurement points on which three successive irrigation experiments were carried out, resulting in a total of 36 irrigations. The strength of macropore flow, parameterized as the cumulated water volume flowing from macropores at a depth of 1 m in response to an irrigation of 60 mm h-1 intensity and 1 h duration, was simulated using the dual-permeability MACRO model. The model calibration was based on the key soil parameters and fine measurements of water content at different depths. Modelling results indicate high performance of macropore flow in all investigated soil types except in gleysols. The volume of water that flowed from macropores and was hence expected to reach groundwater varied between 81% and 94% in brown soils, 59% and 67% in para-brown soils, 43% and 56% in acid brown soils, and 22% and 35% in gleysols. These results show that spreading pesticides and herbicides in pumping well protection zones poses a high risk of contamination and must be strictly prohibited. We also found that organic carbon content was not correlated with the strength of macropore flow, probably due to its very weak variation in our study, while saturated water content showed a negative correlation with macropore flow. The correlation between saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and macropore flow was negative as well, but weak. Macropore flow appears to be controlled by the interaction between the bulk density of the uppermost topsoil layer (0-0.10 m) and the macroporosity of the soil

  16. Permeability reductions induced by sorption of surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Carl E.; Zynda, Gregory D.; Fountain, John C.

    Surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is an attractive alternative to traditional pump and treat methods for remediating aquifers contaminated with nonaqueous phase liquids. However, initial studies indicate that the application of surfactant can reduce aquifer permeability by more than an order of magnitude, limiting the efficiency of SEAR. A series of column experiments using mixtures of medium sand and montmorillonite clay demonstrate that existing permeability reduction models for biofouling and deep-bed filtration poorly predict surfactant induced permeability reductions. An alternative permeability reduction model is proposed which is based on the assumption that the sorbed surfactant effectively increases the volume fraction of the clay. The model is shown to reasonably predict observed permeability reductions, particularly for clay fractions less than 20%. A numerical simulation of surfactant transport that incorporates the effective clay fraction model demonstrates that induced permeability reductions significantly influence the transport of surfactant through an aquifer.

  17. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  18. Clogging in permeable concrete: A review.

    PubMed

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2017-05-15

    Permeable concrete (or "pervious concrete" in North America) is used to reduce local flooding in urban areas and is an important sustainable urban drainage system. However, permeable concrete exhibits reduction in permeability due to clogging by particulates, which severely limits service life. This paper reviews the clogging mechanism and current mitigating strategies in order to inform future research needs. The pore structure of permeable concrete and characteristics of flowing particulates influence clogging, which occurs when particles build-up and block connected porosity. Permeable concrete requires regular maintenance by vacuum sweeping and pressure washing, but the effectiveness and viability of these methods is questionable. The potential for clogging is related to the tortuosity of the connected porosity, with greater tortuosity resulting in increased potential for clogging. Research is required to develop permeable concrete that can be poured on-site, which produces a pore structure with significantly reduced tortuosity.

  19. Diffusion limited soil vapor extraction: Geologic and bed thickness controls

    SciTech Connect

    Beckett, G.D.; Benson, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) can remove volatile contaminants from the subsurface environment. In a heterogeneous geologic setting, SVE cleanup will progress rapidly through advective mass transfer in permeable sediments and primarily through slow diffusion in lower permeability soil. The contrast in rates of cleanup between high and low permeability soils is further increased by the associated soil moisture retention contrasts (i.e., capillarity) in the same soils. Low permeability soil generally has a higher soil suction capacity and moisture content than high permeability soil. This results in further diminishment of cleanup rate in fine-grained sediments in a heterogeneous environment. This paper investigates how contrasts in soil type and bed thickness affect the rate of SVE diffusive cleanup. The numerical model VENT3D is used to simulate three heterogeneous geologic settings with differing soil contrasts. Within each geologic setting, four simulations are performed with varying bed thicknesses in each, effectively changing the diffusive half-length of the fine-grained soils while maintaining the total bulk percentages of fine-to coarse-grained material. Under these conditions, the bulk flow parameters measured during SVE field testing would be constant for each of the four simulations within a single geologic domain while the cleanup times would not.

  20. Diffusion limited soil vapor extraction: Geologic and bed thickness controls

    SciTech Connect

    Beckett, G.D. ); Benson, D.A. )

    1996-01-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) can remove volatile contaminants from the subsurface environment. In a heterogeneous geologic setting, SVE cleanup will progress rapidly through advective mass transfer in permeable sediments and primarily through slow diffusion in lower permeability soil. The contrast in rates of cleanup between high and low permeability soils is further increased by the associated soil moisture retention contrasts (i.e., capillarity) in the same soils. Low permeability soil generally has a higher soil suction capacity and moisture content than high permeability soil. This results in further diminishment of cleanup rate in fine-grained sediments in a heterogeneous environment. This paper investigates how contrasts in soil type and bed thickness affect the rate of SVE diffusive cleanup. The numerical model VENT3D is used to simulate three heterogeneous geologic settings with differing soil contrasts. Within each geologic setting, four simulations are performed with varying bed thicknesses in each, effectively changing the diffusive half-length of the fine-grained soils while maintaining the total bulk percentages of fine-to coarse-grained material. Under these conditions, the bulk flow parameters measured during SVE field testing would be constant for each of the four simulations within a single geologic domain while the cleanup times would not.

  1. Modeling the Hydrologic Processes of a Permeable Pavement ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A permeable pavement system can capture stormwater to reduce runoff volume and flow rate, improve onsite groundwater recharge, and enhance pollutant controls within the site. A new unit process model for evaluating the hydrologic performance of a permeable pavement system has been developed in this study. The developed model can continuously simulate infiltration through the permeable pavement surface, exfiltration from the storage to the surrounding in situ soils, and clogging impacts on infiltration/exfiltration capacity at the pavement surface and the bottom of the subsurface storage unit. The exfiltration modeling component simulates vertical and horizontal exfiltration independently based on Darcy’s formula with the Green-Ampt approximation. The developed model can be arranged with physically-based modeling parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity, Manning’s friction flow parameters, saturated and field capacity volumetric water contents, porosity, density, etc. The developed model was calibrated using high-frequency observed data. The modeled water depths are well matched with the observed values (R2 = 0.90). The modeling results show that horizontal exfiltration through the side walls of the subsurface storage unit is a prevailing factor in determining the hydrologic performance of the system, especially where the storage unit is developed in a long, narrow shape; or with a high risk of bottom compaction and clogging. This paper presents unit

  2. A Study of Pore Geometry Effects on Anisotropy in Hydraulic Permeability Using the Lattice-Boltzmann Method

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Mark L.; Ward, Andy L.; Rector, David R.

    2006-09-01

    We hypothesize that anisotropy in soil properties arises from pore-scale heterogeneity caused by the alignment of aspherical soil particles. We developed a method to predict the permeability tensor from particle shape and packing structure. Digital geometry maps were created for the pore space in regular cubic and random packs of particles with various aspect ratios using a numerical packing algorithm. The lattice-Boltzmann method was used to simulate saturated flow through these packs, and the effect of particle shape and degree of alignment on the permeability tensor was characterized. Results show that the degree of anisotropy in permeability depends not only upon particle shape and alignment, but also on the three-dimensional structure of the pack. In random packs, more oblate particles and higher degrees of particle alignment lead to reduced permeability perpendicular to the direction of particle alignment compared to the direction parallel to particle alignment.

  3. Mixed region reactors for in situ treatment of DNAPL contaminated low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    West, O.R.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1996-08-01

    Fine-textured soils and sediments contaminated by dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) present a significant environmental restoration challenge. An emerging approach to rapid in situ treatment within low permeability media involves the use of soil mixing to create mixed region reactors wherein biological or physical/chemical treatment processes can be employed. In cohesive soils, mixing breaks up the original soil structure and produces soil aggregates or clods separated by interaggregate void spaces. These void spaces create preferential flow paths for more efficient extraction of contaminants from the soil matrix or more rapid diffusion of treatment agents into the soil aggregates. This enhancement technology has been most successfully used with vapor stripping. However, other technologies can also be coupled with soil mixing including chemical degradation, biodegradation and solidification. The application of this technology to DNAPL-contaminated low permeability media appears promising but requires further experiments and models that can simulate the movement of DNAPLs in mixed regions. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik BW; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  5. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy.

  6. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  7. Borosilicate films as permeability barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, J. R.; Steinmetz, C. E.; Hettinger, J. D.; Carroll, J. F.; Krchnavek, R.

    2009-03-01

    Borosilicate films have been deposited using rf-sputtering techniques from a composite target at room temperature onto polypropylene (PP), high density polyethylene(HDPE), low density polyethylene(LDPE), and polyethylene terephthalate (PETG) substrates. Films were found to be smooth, flexible, with excellent adhesion to the substrates. Repeated rolling the coated substrates on a radius of 0.5mm resulted in no discernable damage for films less than 200nm in thickness. Creasing the substrates did result in local damage. However excellent adhesion did not allow the fractured glass to come off the substrate. Heat generated during deposition only influenced the films grown on LDPE where the thermal expansion mismatch between the film and substrate induced strains caused fractures in thick films. Modifications to processing parameters allowed thick films to be grown without fractures. Permeability measurements of nitrogen resulted in significant improvements in comparison to uncoated substrates.

  8. Bio-mediated Permeability Reduction of Saturated Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proto, Clayton Joseph

    New, alternative in-situ ground improvement techniques are necessary to address increased performance demands and growing environmental concerns about traditional grouting methods. To date, the controlled use of microbiological processes has demonstrated promise in the ability of microbes to meet this need. A particular form of biological improvement is the utilization of biofilms, an organic accumulation of cells and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), in saturated soils. By adhering and accumulating on particle surfaces, biofilms can cause clogging of the pore volume and induce significant permeability reductions. The void-filling nature of biofilms allows for possible field applications to control groundwater, heal leaks, and prevent internal erosion in structures such as earth dams and levees. This study investigated the growth characteristics and robustness of biofilm-treated sands. Experimental results indicate that biofilms are capable of reducing permeability of saturated sands by 100-fold or more after only two to three weeks of nutrient treatment. These improvements can be maintained indefinitely with extended nutrient treatments, after which a gradual return to initial conditions is seen. During periods of nutrient treatment, permeability reductions were shown to remain stable in a variety of adverse conditions including two months of starvation, reverse flow, and fluctuating hydraulic gradients. However, further tests indicated that biofilm growth in this study was highly heterogeneous, with the majority of clogging occurring adjacent to the inlet face. The results of this study show strong potential for the use of biofilms to reduce permeability, but future studies are required to improve uniformity as the process is scaled to field applications.

  9. Impact of acid and oxidative modifications, single or dual, of sorghum starch on biodegradable films.

    PubMed

    Biduski, Bárbara; Silva, Francine Tavares da; Silva, Wyller Max da; Halal, Shanise Lisie de Mello El; Pinto, Vania Zanella; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acid and oxidation modifications on sorghum starch, as well as the effect of dual modification of starch on the physical, morphological, mechanical, and barrier properties of biodegradable films. The acid modification was performed with 3% lactic acid and the oxidation was performed with 1.5% active chlorine. For dual modification, the acid modification was performed first, followed by oxidation under the same conditions as above. Both films of the oxidized starches, single and dual, had increased stiffness, providing a higher tensile strength and lower elongation when compared to films based on native and single acid modified starches. However, the dual modification increased the water vapor permeability of the films without changing their solubility. The increase in sorghum starch concentration in the filmogenic solution increased the thickness, water vapor permeability, and elongation of the films. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Simulating sulfadimidine transport in surface runoff and soil at the microplot and field scale.

    PubMed

    Larsbo, Mats; Fenner, Kathrin; Stoob, Krispin; Burkhardt, Michael; Abbaspour, Karim; Stamm, Christian

    2008-01-01

    To prevent residues of veterinary medicinal products (VMPs) from contaminating surface waters and ground water, an environmental impact assessment is required before a new product is allowed on the market. Physically based simulation models are advocated for the calculation of predicted environmental concentrations at higher tiers of the assessment process. However, the validation status of potentially useful models is poor for VMP transport. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dual-permeability model MACRO for simulation of transport of sulfonamide antibiotics in surface runoff and soil. Special focus was on effects of solute application in liquid manure, which may alter the hydraulic properties at the soil surface. To this end we used data from a microplot runoff experiment and a field experiment, both conducted on the same clay loam soil prone to preferential flow. Results showed that the model could accurately simulate concentrations of sulfadimidine and the nonreactive tracer bromide in runoff and in soil from the microplot experiments. The use of posterior parameter distributions from calibrations using the microplot data resulted in poor simulations for the field data of total sulfadimidine losses. The poor results may be due to surface runoff being instantly transferred off the field in the model, whereas in reality re-infiltration may occur. The effects of the manure application were reflected in smaller total and micropore hydraulic conductivities compared with the application in aqueous solution. These effects could easily be accounted for in regulatory modeling.

  11. Comparison of three techniques to measure unsaturated-zone air permeability at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

    PubMed

    Olson, M S; Tillman, F D; Choi, J W; Smith, J A

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare three techniques to measure the air permeability of the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and to examine the effects of moisture content and soil heterogeneity on air permeability. Air permeability was measured in three ways: laboratory experiments on intact soil cores, field-scale air pump tests and calibration of air permeability to air pressures measured in the field under natural air pressure conditions using a numerical airflow model. The results obtained from these three methods were compared and found to be similar. Laboratory experiments performed on intact cores measured air permeability values on the order of 10(-14) to 10(-9) m2. Low-permeability cores were found between land surface and a depth of 0.6 m. The soil core data were divided into two layers with composite vertical permeability values of 1.3 x 10(-13) m2 from land surface to a 0.6-m depth and 3.8 x 10(-10) m2 for the lower layer. Analyses of the field-scale pump tests were performed for two scenarios: one in which the entire unsaturated zone was open to the atmosphere and one assuming a cap of low permeability extending 0.6 m below land surface. The vertical air permeability values obtained for the open scenario ranged from 1.2 x 10(-9) to 1.5 x 10(-9) m2, and ranged from 3.6 x 10(-9) to 6.8 x 10(-9) m2 in the lower layer, assuming an upper cap permeability of 6.0 x 10(-14) m2. The results from the open scenario are much higher than expected and the possible reasons for this ambiguity are discussed. The results from the capped scenario matched closely with those from the other methods and indicated that it is important to have background information on the study site to correctly analyze the pump test data. The optimized fit of the natural subsurface air pressure was achieved with an intrinsic permeability value of 3.3 x 10(-14) m2. When the data were refitted to the model assuming two distinct layers of the unsaturated zone, the optimized fit

  12. Multiscale modelling of dual-porosity porous media; a computational pore-scale study for flow and solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Enno T.; Raoof, Amir; van Genuchten, Martinus Th.

    2017-07-01

    Many environmental and agricultural applications involve the transport of water and dissolved constituents through aggregated soil profiles, or porous media that are structured, fractured or macroporous in other ways. During the past several decades, various process-based macroscopic models have been used to simulate contaminant transport in such media. Many of these models consider advective-dispersive transport through relatively large inter-aggregate pore domains, while exchange with the smaller intra-aggregate pores is assumed to be controlled by diffusion. Exchange of solute between the two domains is often represented using a first-order mass transfer coefficient, which is commonly obtained by fitting to observed data. This study aims to understand and quantify the solute exchange term by applying a dual-porosity pore-scale network model to relatively large domains, and analysing the pore-scale results in terms of the classical dual-porosity (mobile-immobile) transport formulation. We examined the effects of key parameters (notably aggregate porosity and aggregate permeability) on the main dual-porosity model parameters, i.e., the mobile water fraction (ϕm) and the mass transfer coefficient (α). Results were obtained for a wide range of aggregate porosities (between 0.082 and 0.700). The effect of aggregate permeability was explored by varying pore throat sizes within the aggregates. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained with the pore-scale network model at several locations along the domain were analysed using analytical solutions of the dual-porosity model to obtain estimates of ϕm and α. An increase in aggregate porosity was found to decrease ϕm and increase α, leading to considerable tailing in the BTCs. Changes in the aggregate pore throat size affected the relative flow velocity between the intra- and inter-aggregate domains. Higher flow velocities within the aggregates caused a change in the transport regime from diffusion dominated to more

  13. Modeling soil moisture processes and recharge under a melting snowpack

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Recharge into granitic bedrock under a melting snowpack is being investigated as part of a study designed to understand hydrologic processes involving snow at Yosemite National Park in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Snowpack measurements, accompanied by water content and matric potential measurements of the soil under the snowpack, allowed for estimates of infiltration into the soil during snowmelt and percolation into the bedrock. During portions of the snowmelt period, infiltration rates into the soil exceeded the permeability of the bedrock and caused ponding to be sustained at the soil-bedrock interface. During a 5-d period with little measured snowmelt, drainage of the ponded water into the underlying fractured granitic bedrock was estimated to be 1.6 cm d?1, which is used as an estimate of bedrock permeability. The numerical simulator TOUGH2 was used to reproduce the field data and evaluate the potential for vertical flow into the fractured bedrock or lateral flow at the bedrock-soil interface. During most of the snowmelt season, the snowmelt rates were near or below the bedrock permeability. The field data and model results support the notion that snowmelt on the shallow soil overlying low permeability bedrock becomes direct infiltration unless the snowmelt rate greatly exceeds the bedrock permeability. Late in the season, melt rates are double that of the bedrock permeability (although only for a few days) and may tend to move laterally at the soil-bedrock interface downgradient and contribute directly to streamflow. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  14. A new coal-permeability model: Internal swelling stress and fracture-matrix interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a new coal-permeability model for uniaxial strain and constant confining stress conditions. The model is unique in that it explicitly considers fracture-matrix interaction during coal deformation processes and is based on a newly proposed internal-swelling stress concept. This concept is used to account for the impact of matrix swelling (or shrinkage) on fracture-aperture changes resulting from partial separation of matrix blocks by fractures that do not completely cut through the whole matrix. The proposed permeability model is evaluated with data from three Valencia Canyon coalbed wells in the San Juan Basin, where increased permeability has been observed during CH{sub 4} gas production, as well as with published data from laboratory tests. Model results are generally in good agreement with observed permeability changes. The importance of fracture-matrix interaction in determining coal permeability, demonstrated in this work using relatively simple stress conditions, underscores the need for a dual-continuum (fracture and matrix) mechanical approach to rigorously capture coal-deformation processes under complex stress conditions, as well as the coupled flow and transport processes in coal seams.

  15. Gas permeability of biochar-amended clay: potential alternative landfill final cover material.

    PubMed

    Wong, James Tsz Fung; Chen, Zhongkui; Ng, Charles Wang Wai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2016-04-01

    Compacted biochar-amended clay (BAC) has been proposed as an alternative landfill final cover material in this study. Biochar has long been proposed to promote crop growth, mitigate odor emission, and promote methane oxidation in field soils. However, previous studies showed that soil-gas permeability was increased upon biochar application, which will promote landfill gas emission. The objective of the present study is to investigate the possibility of using compacted BAC as an alternative material in landfill final cover by evaluating its gas permeability. BAC samples were prepared by mixing 425-μm-sieved peanut shell biochar with kaolin clay in different ratios (0, 5, 10, and 15 %, w/w) and compacting at different degrees of compactions (DOC) (80, 85, and 90 %) with an optimum water content of 35 %. The gas permeability of the BACs was measured by flexible wall gas permeameter and the microstructure of the BACs was analyzed by SEM with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that the effects of biochar content on BAC gas permeability is highly dependent on the DOC. At high DOC (90 %), the gas permeability of BAC decreases with increasing biochar content due to the combined effect of the clay aggregation and the inhibition of biochar in the gas flow. However, at low DOC (80 %), biochar incorporation has no effects on gas permeability because it no longer acts as a filling material to the retard gas flow. The results from the present study imply that compacted BAC can be used as an alternative final cover material with decreased gas permeability when compared with clay.

  16. A method of determination of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S.V.; Trofimov, V.A.

    2007-11-15

    A method is proposed for determining permeability of coals under conditions of steady-state deformation and stationary filtration mode by employing a reference core made of gas-non-sorbing material with a known permeability. The approach has been developed to assess the time of transition to the stable filtration.

  17. Influence of fiber packing structure on permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Zhong; Berdichevsky, Alexander L.

    1993-01-01

    The study on the permeability of an aligned fiber bundle is the key building block in modeling the permeability of advanced woven and braided preforms. Available results on the permeability of fiber bundles in the literature show that a substantial difference exists between numerical and analytical calculations on idealized fiber packing structures, such as square and hexagonal packing, and experimental measurements on practical fiber bundles. The present study focuses on the variation of the permeability of a fiber bundle under practical process conditions. Fiber bundles are considered as containing openings and fiber clusters within the bundle. Numerical simulations on the influence of various openings on the permeability were conducted. Idealized packing structures are used, but with introduced openings distributed in different patterns. Both longitudinal and transverse flow are considered. The results show that openings within the fiber bundle have substantial effect on the permeability. In the longitudinal flow case, the openings become the dominant flow path. In the transverse flow case, the fiber clusters reduce the gap sizes among fibers. Therefore the permeability is greatly influenced by these openings and clusters, respectively. In addition to the porosity or fiber volume fraction, which is commonly used in the permeability expression, another fiber bundle status parameter, the ultimate fiber volume fraction, is introduced to capture the disturbance within a fiber bundle.

  18. Crustal permeability: Introduction to the special issue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Gleeson, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The topic of crustal permeability is of broad interest in light of the controlling effect of permeability on diverse geologic processes and also timely in light of the practical challenges associated with emerging technologies such as hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production (‘fracking’), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration. This special issue of Geofluids is also motivated by the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic concept of permeability as a static material property that exerts control on fluid flow and the perspective of economic geologists, geophysicists, and crustal petrologists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. Issues associated with fracking, enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration have already begun to promote a constructive dialog between the static and dynamic views of permeability, and here we have made a conscious effort to include both viewpoints. This special issue also focuses on the quantification of permeability, encompassing both direct measurement of permeability in the uppermost crust and inferential permeability estimates, mainly for the deeper crust.

  19. Pressure sensitivity of low permeability sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilmer, N.H.; Morrow, N.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed core analysis has been carried out on 32 tight sandstones with permeabilities ranging over four orders of magnitude (0.0002 to 4.8 mD at 5000 psi confining pressure). Relationships between gas permeability and net confining pressure were measured for cycles of loading and unloading. For some samples, permeabilities were measured both along and across bedding planes. Large variations in stress sensitivity of permeability were observed from one sample to another. The ratio of permeability at a nominal confining pressure of 500 psi to that at 5000 psi was used to define a stress sensitivity ratio. For a given sample, confining pressure vs permeability followed a linear log-log relationship, the slope of which provided an index of pressure sensitivity. This index, as obtained for first unloading data, was used in testing relationships between stress sensitivity and other measured rock properties. Pressure sensitivity tended to increase with increase in carbonate content and depth, and with decrease in porosity, permeability and sodium feldspar. However, scatter in these relationships increased as permeability decreased. Tests for correlations between pressure sensitivity and various linear combinations of variables are reported. Details of pore structure related to diagenetic changes appears to be of much greater significance to pressure sensitivity than mineral composition. ?? 1987.

  20. Microorganism Removal in Permeable Pavement Parking Lots ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Three types of permeable pavements (pervious concrete, permeable interlocking concrete pavers, and porous asphalt) were monitored at the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, New Jersey for indicator organisms such as fecal coliform, enterococci, and E. coli. Results showed that porous asphalt had much lower concentration in monitored infiltrate compared to pervious concrete and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Concentrations of monitored organisms in infiltrate from porous asphalt were consistently below the bathing water quality standard. Fecal coliform and enterococci exceeded bathing water quality standards more than 72% and 34% of the time for permeable interlocking concrete pavers and pervious concrete, respectively. Purpose is to evaluate the performance of permeable pavement in removing indicator organisms from infiltrating stormwater runoff.

  1. Permeability measurement and control for epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsun-Hsu; Tsai, Cheng-Hung; Wong, Wei-Syuan; Chen, Yen-Ren; Chao, Hsien-Wen

    2017-08-01

    The coupling of the electric and magnetic fields leads to a strong interplay in materials' permittivity and permeability. Here, we proposed a specially designed cavity, called the mu cavity. The mu cavity, consisting of a mushroom structure inside a cylindrical resonator, is exclusively sensitive to permeability, but not to permittivity. It decouples materials' electromagnetic properties and allows an accurate measurement of the permeability. With the help of an epsilon cavity, these two cavities jointly determine the complex permeability and permittivity of the materials at microwave frequencies. Homemade epoxy-based composite materials were prepared and tested. Measurement and manipulation of the permeability and permittivity of the epoxy composites will be shown. The results will be compared with the effective medium theories.

  2. Pneumatic pumping test for soil vacuum extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.S.; DiGiulio, D.C.

    1992-08-01

    In-situ pneumatic pumping tests were performed to estimate the pneumatic permeability at a site containing soils contaminated with aviation gasoline. Determination of pneumatic permeability was necessary to evaluate soil-air discharge or pore volume exchange rates. Pressure propagation was measured in clustered vapor probes during the application of vacuum and positive pressure. An analytical solution for soil-air pressure distribution with a non-linear data fitting algorithm was adopted to obtain the pneumatic permeability from soil-air pressure distribution. Pneumatic pumping tests indicated substantially higher air discharge rates in the immediate vicinity of wells. The air discharge rate dissipated rapidly as distance from the wells increased. Application of increased vacuum or injection pressure resulted in substantially increased air flow in the immediate vicinity with small changes at a distance. This fact indicates that effective design should be based on air flow fields near wells, and the site specific design criteria should be determined with carefully conducted tests.

  3. Multi-process herbicide transport in structured soil columns: Experiments and model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhne, J. Maximilian; Köhne, Sigrid; Šimůnek, Jirka

    2006-05-01

    Model predictions of pesticide transport in structured soils are complicated by multiple processes acting concurrently. In this study, the hydraulic, physical, and chemical nonequilibrium (HNE, PNE, and CNE, respectively) processes governing herbicide transport under variably saturated flow conditions were studied. Bromide (Br -), isoproturon (IPU, 3-(4-isoprpylphenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) and terbuthylazine (TER, N2-tert-butyl-6-chloro- N4-ethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) were applied to two soil columns. An aggregated Ap soil column and a macroporous, aggregated Ah soil column were irrigated at a rate of 1 cm h - 1 for 3 h. Two more irrigations at the same rate and duration followed in weekly intervals. Nonlinear (Freundlich) equilibrium and two-site kinetic sorption parameters were determined for IPU and TER using batch experiments. The observed water flow and Br - transport were inversely simulated using mobile-immobile (MIM), dual-permeability (DPM), and combined triple-porosity (DP-MIM) numerical models implemented in HYDRUS-1D, with improving correspondence between empirical data and model results. Using the estimated HNE and PNE parameters together with batch-test derived equilibrium sorption parameters, the preferential breakthrough of the weakly adsorbed IPU in the Ah soil could be reasonably well predicted with the DPM approach, whereas leaching of the strongly adsorbed TER was predicted less well. The transport of IPU and TER through the aggregated Ap soil could be described consistently only when HNE, PNE, and CNE were simultaneously accounted for using the DPM. Inverse parameter estimation suggested that two-site kinetic sorption in inter-aggregate flow paths was reduced as compared to within aggregates, and that large values for the first-order degradation rate were an artifact caused by irreversible sorption. Overall, our results should be helpful to enhance the understanding and modeling of multi-process pesticide transport through structured soils

  4. Dual-energy perfusion-CT of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Klauss, M; Stiller, W; Pahn, G; Fritz, F; Kieser, M; Werner, J; Kauczor, H U; Grenacher, L

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dual-energy CT (DECT)-perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas for assessing the differences in perfusion, permeability and blood volume of healthy pancreatic tissue and histopathologically confirmed solid pancreatic carcinoma. 24 patients with histologically proven pancreatic carcinoma were examined prospectively with a 64-slice dual source CT using a dynamic sequence of 34 dual-energy (DE) acquisitions every 1.5s (80 ml of iodinated contrast material, 370 mg/ml, flow rate 5 ml/s). 80 kV(p), 140 kV(p), and weighted average (linearly blended M0.3) 120 kV(p)-equivalent dual-energy perfusion image data sets were evaluated with a body-perfusion CT tool (Body-PCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) for estimating perfusion, permeability, and blood volume values. Color-coded parameter maps were generated. In all 24 patients dual-energy CT-perfusion was. All carcinomas could be identified in the color-coded perfusion maps. Calculated perfusion, permeability and blood volume values were significantly lower in pancreatic carcinomas compared to healthy pancreatic tissue. Weighted average 120 kV(p)-equivalent perfusion-, permeability- and blood volume-values determined from DE image data were 0.27 ± 0.04 min(-1) vs. 0.91 ± 0.04 min(-1) (p<0.0001), 0.5 ± 0.07 *0.5 min(-1) vs. 0.67 ± 0.05 *0.5 min(-1) (p=0.06) and 0.49 ± 0.07 min(-1) vs. 1.28 ± 0.11 min(-1) (p<0.0001). Compared with 80 and 140 kV(p) the standard deviations of the kV(p)120 kV(p)-equivalent values were manifestly smaller. Dual-energy CT-perfusion of the pancreas is feasible. The use of DECT improves the accuracy of CT-perfusion of the pancreas by fully exploiting the advantages of enhanced iodine contrast at 80 kV(p) in combination with the noise reduction at 140 kV(p). Therefore using dual-energy perfusion data could improve the delineation of pancreatic carcinomas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling radon transport in dry, cracked soil

    SciTech Connect

    Holford, D.J. ); Schery, S.D.; Wilson, J.L.; Phillips, F.M. )

    1993-01-10

    A two-dimensional finite element code was used to investigate the effect of changes in surface air pressure on radon flux from soil with parallel, partially penetrating cracks. A sensitivity analysis investigates the effects of various crack dimensions, soil characteristics, and surface air pressure on radon flux from the soil surface to the atmosphere. Simulation results indicate that radon flux is most sensitive to soil properties; the diffusion coefficient is most important, followed by permeability and porosity. Radon flux is also sensitive to changes in barometric pressure, which cause variations in radon flux above and below the average diffusive flux. Sinusoidal variations in barometric pressure cause a net increase in the average radon flux from the soil, because increases in flux during periods of decreasing pressure are greater than the decreases in flux during periods of decreasing pressure of equal magnitude. Cracks were found to significantly increase radon flux from soils of low permeability. 33 refs. 19 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Plant actin controls membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Hohenberger, Petra; Eing, Christian; Straessner, Ralf; Durst, Steffen; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The biological effects of electric pulses with low rise time, high field strength, and durations in the nanosecond range (nsPEFs) have attracted considerable biotechnological and medical interest. However, the cellular mechanisms causing membrane permeabilization by nanosecond pulsed electric fields are still far from being understood. We investigated the role of actin filaments for membrane permeability in plant cells using cell lines where different degrees of actin bundling had been introduced by genetic engineering. We demonstrate that stabilization of actin increases the stability of the plasma membrane against electric permeabilization recorded by penetration of Trypan Blue into the cytoplasm. By use of a cell line expressing the actin bundling WLIM domain under control of an inducible promotor we can activate membrane stabilization by the glucocorticoid analog dexamethasone. By total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy we can visualize a subset of the cytoskeleton that is directly adjacent to the plasma membrane. We conclude that this submembrane cytoskeleton stabilizes the plasma membrane against permeabilization through electric pulses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Protozoon infections and intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Dagci, Hande; Ustun, Sebnem; Taner, Memduh S; Ersoz, Galip; Karacasu, Ferit; Budak, Seza

    2002-01-01

    Intestinal permeability (IP) studies using some macromolecules have been assumed to demonstrate the intactness of intestinal mucosa. The aim of the present study is to determine the changes in IP among patients with protozoan infections. Thirty nine patients with protozoan infections and ten healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Protozoa were diagnosed by Native-lugol, Richie and Trichrome staining of faeces. IP was evaluated by diethyl triamine penta acetic acid labeled with 99m Technetium (99mTc labeled DTPA) assay. The IP was found to have increased in patients with protozoan infections compared with control patients (7.20+/-5.52 vs. 4.47+/-0.65%, P=0.0017). The IP values were 9.91+/-10.05% in Giardia intestinalis group, 6.81+/-2.25% in Blastocystis hominis group, 5.78+/-2.84% in Entamoeba coli group. In comparison with the control group, the IP was significantly higher in G. intestinalis and B. hominis patients (P=0.0025, P=0.00037, respectively), but not in E. coli patients. In conclusion, the IP increases in patients with G. intestinalis and B. hominis but not with E. coli infection. This finding supports the view that IP increases during the course of protozoan infections which cause damage to the intestinal wall while non-pathogenic protozoan infections have no effect on IP. The increase in IP in patients with B. hominis brings forth the idea that B. hominis can be a pathogenic protozoan.

  8. Dual-fuel, dual-throat engine preliminary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    A propulsion system analysis of the dual fuel, dual throat engine for launch vehicle applications was conducted. Basic dual throat engine characterization data were obtained to allow vehicle optimization studies to be conducted. A preliminary baseline engine system was defined.

  9. Permeable Gas Flow Influences Magma Fragmentation Speed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, D.; Scheu, B.; Spieler, O.; Dingwell, D.

    2008-12-01

    Highly viscous magmas undergo fragmentation in order to produce the pyroclastic deposits that we observe, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. The overpressure required to initiate fragmentation depends on a number of physical parameters, such as the magma's vesicularity, permeability, tensile strength and textural properties. It is clear that these same parameters control also the speed at which a fragmentation front travels through magma when fragmentation occurs. Recent mathematical models of fragmentation processes consider most of these factors, but permeable gas flow has not yet been included in these models. However, it has been shown that permeable gas flow through a porous rock during a sudden decompression event increases the fragmentation threshold. Fragmentation experiments on natural samples from Bezymianny (Russia), Colima (Mexico), Krakatau (Indonesia) and Augustine (USA) volcanoes confirm these results and suggest in addition that high permeable flow rates may increase the speed of fragmentation. Permeability from the investigated samples ranges from as low as 5 x 10-14 to higher than 9 x 10- 12 m2 and open porosity ranges from 16 % to 48 %. Experiments were performed for each sample series at applied pressures up to 35 MPa. Our results indicate that the rate of increase of fragmentation speed is higher when the permeability is above 10-12 m2. We confirm that it is necessary to include the influence of permeable flow on fragmentation dynamics.

  10. Intestinal permeability, leaky gut, and intestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollander, D

    1999-10-01

    A major task of the intestine is to form a defensive barrier to prevent absorption of damaging substances from the external environment. This protective function of the intestinal mucosa is called permeability. Clinicians can use inert, nonmetabolized sugars such as mannitol, rhamnose, or lactulose to measure the permeability barrier or the degree of leakiness of the intestinal mucosa. Ample evidence indicates that permeability is increased in most patients with Crohn's disease and in 10% to 20% of their clinically healthy relatives. The abnormal leakiness of the mucosa in Crohn's patients and their relatives can be greatly amplified by aspirin preadministration. Permeability measurements in Crohn's patients reflect the activity, extent, and distribution of the disease and may allow us to predict the likelihood of recurrence after surgery or medically induced remission. Permeability is also increased in celiac disease and by trauma, burns, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The major determinant of the rate of intestinal permeability is the opening or closure of the tight junctions between enterocytes in the paracellular space. As we broaden our understanding of the mechanisms and agents that control the degree of leakiness of the tight junctions, we will be increasingly able to use permeability measurements to study the etiology and pathogenesis of various disorders and to design or monitor therapies for their management.

  11. Fluid permeability of deformable fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.R.; Bruhn, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The authors consider the problem of defining the fracture permeability tensor for each grid lock in a rock mass from maps of natural fractures. For this purpose they implement a statistical model of cracked rock due to M. Oda [1985], where the permeability tensor is related to the crack geometry via a volume average of the contribution from each crack in the population. In this model tectonic stress is implicitly coupled to fluid flow through an assumed relationship between crack aperture and normal stress across the crack. The authors have included the following enhancements to the basic model: (1) a realistic model of crack closure under stress has been added along with the provision to apply tectonic stresses to the fracture system in any orientation, the application of stress results in fracture closure and consequently a reduction in permeability; (2) the fracture permeability can be superimposed onto an arbitrary anisotropic matrix permeability; (3) the fracture surfaces are allowed to slide under the application of shear stress, causing fractures to dilate and result in a permeability increase. Through an example, the authors demonstrate that significant changes in permeability magnitudes and orientations are possible when tectonic stress is applied to a fracture system.

  12. Development of Cassette PAMPA for Permeability Screening.

    PubMed

    Oh, Mun Hwan; Lee, Hye Jin; Jo, Sang Hyun; Park, Bernie Byunghoon; Park, Sae-Bom; Kim, Eun-Yeong; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Jeon, Young Ho; Lee, Kiho

    2017-01-01

    The parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) is widely used in early-stage drug discovery to discriminate compounds by intestinal permeability. The purpose of the current study was to establish a cassette (n-in-1) PAMPA to enable permeability screening of lipophilic compounds. A double-sink PAMPA consisting of a pH gradient (i.e., pH 6.5 and 7.4 for the donor and receiver compartments, respectively) and a lipophilic sink (i.e., a surfactant in the receiver solution) was utilized with cassette incubation of 10 reference compounds. Sample analysis was conducted using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) with a triple quadrupole LC-MS/MS system. Correlation between PAMPA permeability and human intestinal absorption (HIA) of the reference compounds yielded two false negatives, namely propranolol (PPN) and verapamil (VER); these two compounds showed a substantially lower recovery (ca. 10%) than other reference compounds (>69%). This cassette PAMPA was repeated subsequently with polysorbate 80 added to the donor compartments, which resulted in a significant increase in both the recovery and the permeability of the false negatives. Accordingly, the permeability class of all reference compounds could be unambiguously differentiated using this cassette PAMPA. Also, a strong linear correlation (r=0.9845) was observed between the cassette and discrete permeability of all reference compounds.

  13. Correlation between gas permeability and pore structure of coal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yang, J.; Gao, F.; Li, Y.; Niu, H.; Gao, H.

    2012-04-01

    The sequestration of CO2 in unminable coal seams represents a promising option for CO2 geologic storage, because the injected CO2 may enhance coalbed methane recovery (CO2-ECBM), which could partly offset the costs of the storage process. The CO2-ECBM technology is based on the relative affinity of CO2 and CH4 to coals under given pressure and temperature conditions. The excess sorption capacity of coals for CO2 is generally higher than the sorption capacity for methane. The coal seams are characterized by a dual porosity structure including cleat and matrix pores. The cleats in the coal seams are considered as highways for gas and water flow, while the matrix is the storage location of gas by adsorption. The slow transport process of gas in coal matrix may constrain the efficiency of the displacement of CH4 by CO2 due to the compacted pore structure of the coal matrix. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the correlation between permeability of gas and pore structure in coal matrix is crucial for the CO2-ECBM processes. Yangquan coals originating from the Qingshui basin, which contains gas-rich coals in China, were selected for the tests in this study. Yangquan coals are classified as anthracite. In order to avoid the influence of coal cleats on fluid flow, small coal plugs (~6 mm in diameter, ~13 mm in length) were selected and fixed in the sample compartment by special glue. A test system for simultaneously measuring adsorption-porosity-permeability on the coal matrix blocks in its free state is constructed. The permeability of gas and porosity in coal plugs to He under different gas pressure and temperature conditions were simultaneously investigated. The permeability and excess sorption capacity of the coal plugs to He, N2, CH4 and CO2 were compared at a constant gas pressure and temperature. It is expected that gas break through a cleat-plug is much faster than that through a coal matrix-plug. Different sample plugs with the different pore structure results

  14. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  15. Runoff generation and flow paths on an inclined cultivated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumr, David; Strouhal, Luděk; Kavka, Petr

    2015-04-01

    with the highest tested precipitation intensities, surface runoff always formed due to saturation excess of the topsoil, irrespective of the topsoil properties and crops. The experiments were numerically modelled and analysed to understand the effect of temporal variability in the macropores and intra-aggregate voids ratio within the topsoil. We used a combination of physically based macroscopic models S1D and HYPO. In the S1D the dual permeability approach with two coupled Richards equations is used, the simultaneously operating HYPO code is based on a diffusion wave (Boussinesq eq.). Additional comparison of the experiments results with whole experimental catchment runoff regime (Nucice, Czech Republic) proves that lateral runoff through the shallow topsoil can easily cause a very quick increase of stream discharge. The research was performed within the framework of a postdoctoral project granted by Czech Science Foundation No. 13-20388P.

  16. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  17. Aluminum and temperature alteration of cell membrane permeability of Quercus rubra

    SciTech Connect

    Junping Chen; Sucoff, E.I.; Stadelmann, E.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Al toxicity is the major factor limiting plant growth in acid soils. This report extends research on Al-induced changes in membrane behavior of intact root cortex cells of Northern red oak (Quercus rubra). Membrane permeability was determined by the plasmometric method for individual intact cells at temperatures from 2 or 4 to 35 C. Al (0.37 millimolar) significantly increased membrane permeability to urea and monoethyl urea and decreased permeability to water. Al significantly altered the activation energy required to transport water (+ 32%), urea (+ 9%), and monoethyl urea ({minus}7%) across cell membranes. Above 9 C, Al increased the lipid partiality of the cell membranes; below 7 C, Al decreased it. Al narrowed by 6 C the temperature range over which plasmolysis occurred without membrane damage. These changes in membrane behavior are explainable if Al reduced membrane lipid fluidity and kink frequency and increases packing density and the occurrence of straight lipid chains.

  18. Self-dual gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2017-05-01

    Self-dual gravity is a diffeomorphism invariant theory in four dimensions that describes two propagating polarisations of the graviton and has a negative mass dimension coupling constant. Nevertheless, this theory is not only renormalisable but quantum finite, as we explain. We also collect various facts about self-dual gravity that are scattered across the literature.

  19. Dual Enrollment Academy Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Nicolas; Chavez, Guadalupe

    2009-01-01

    Dual Enrollment Engineering (DEEA) and Medical Science (DEMSA) Academies are two-year dual enrollment programs for high school students. Students explore engineering and medical careers through college coursework. Students prepare for higher education in engineering and medical fields while completing associate degrees in biology or engineering…

  20. Dual Enrollment Academy Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Nicolas; Chavez, Guadalupe

    2009-01-01

    Dual Enrollment Engineering (DEEA) and Medical Science (DEMSA) Academies are two-year dual enrollment programs for high school students. Students explore engineering and medical careers through college coursework. Students prepare for higher education in engineering and medical fields while completing associate degrees in biology or engineering…

  1. Dual Credit Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Noreen

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, legislation to improve access to dual-credit programs and to reduce disparities in access and completion--particularly for low income and underrepresented students--was enacted. The new law focused on expanding access to College in the High School but acknowledged issues in other dual-credit programs and reinforced the notion that cost…

  2. [Desiccation cracking of soil body: a review].

    PubMed

    Pei, Yin-Ge; Xu, Ze-Min; Zhang, Jia-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Desiccation cracking of soil body is a complex physical process, which can affect the strength, stability, and permeability of soil body, and involve in several disciplines such as soil science, agricultural science, engineering geology, and environmental science. This paper introduced the significances of the study on the desiccation cracking of soil body, reviewed the related theoretical and applied researches and the quantitative analysis of crack morphology, and discussed the deficiencies in the research fields, research contents, and research methods. The future research directions about the desiccation cracking of soil body were pointed out.

  3. Solvent-free synthesis and application of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO4] composite for dual separation and immobilization of stable and radioactive cesium in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Okuda, Tetsuji; Simion, Cristian; Lee, Byeong Kyu

    2015-10-30

    This study assessed the synthesis and application of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO-based composite material for use as a separation and immobilizing treatment of dry soil contaminated by stable ((133)Cs) and radioactive cesium species ((134)Cs and (137)Cs). After grinding with nano-Fe/CaO, nano-Fe/Ca/CaO, and nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO4], approximately 31, 25, and 22 wt% of magnetic fraction soil was separated. Their resultant (133)Cs immobilization values were about 78, 81, and 100%, respectively. When real radioactive cesium contaminated soil obtained from Fukushima was treated with nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO4], approximately 27.3 wt% of magnetic and 72.75% of non-magnetic soil fractions were separated. The highest amount of entrapped (134)Cs and (137)Cs was found in the lowest weight of the magnetically separated soil fraction (i.e., 80% in 27.3% of treated soil). Results show that (134)Cs and (137)Cs either in the magnetic or non-magnetic soil fractions was 100% immobilized. The morphology and mineral phases of the nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO4] treated soil were characterized using SEM-EDS, EPMA, and XRD analysis. The EPMA and XRD patterns indicate that the main fraction of enclosed/bound materials on treated soil included Ca/PO4 associated crystalline complexes. These results suggest that simple grinding treatment with nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO4] under dry conditions might be an extremely efficient separation and immobilization method for radioactive cesium contaminated soil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Permeable Reactive Zones for Groundwater Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will cover aspects of the application of permeable reactive zones to treat contaminated ground water. Specific field studies will be discussed covering both granular iron-based and organic carbon-based reactive barriers. Specific contaminants addressed include:...

  5. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  6. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR GROUND WATER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  7. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A.T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  8. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  9. Lunar electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Improved analytical techniques are applied to a large Apollo magnetometer data set to yield values of electroconductivity, temperature, magnetic permeability, and iron abundance. Average bulk electroconductivity of the moon is calculated to be .0007 mho/m; a rapid increase with depth to about .003 mho/m within 250 km is indicated. The temperature profile, obtained from the electroconductivity profile for olivine, indicates high lunar temperatures at relatively shallow depths. Magnetic permeability of the moon relative to its environment is calculated to be 1.008 plus or minus .005; a permeability relative to free space of 1.012 plus 0.011, minus 0.008 is obtained. Lunar iron abundances corresponding to this permeability value are 2.5 plus 2.3, minus 1.7 wt% free iron and 5.0-13.5 wt% total iron for a moon composed of a combination of free iron, olivine, and orthopyroxene.

  10. NASA In-step: Permeable Membrane Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Permeable Membrane Experiment are presented. An experiment overview is given. The Membrane Phase Separation Experiment, Membrane Diffusion Interference Experiment, and Membrane Wetting Experiment are described. Finally, summary and conclusions are discussed.

  11. The Edison Environmental Center Permeable Pavement Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    This a presentation for a Community Outreach Event called "Chemistry Works and Celebration of International Year of Chemistry." It will review the permeable pavement research project at the Edison Environmental center.

  12. The Edison Environmental Center Permeable Pavement Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    This a presentation for a Community Outreach Event called "Chemistry Works and Celebration of International Year of Chemistry." It will review the permeable pavement research project at the Edison Environmental center.

  13. Permeable Reactive Zones for Groundwater Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will cover aspects of the application of permeable reactive zones to treat contaminated ground water. Specific field studies will be discussed covering both granular iron-based and organic carbon-based reactive barriers. Specific contaminants addressed include:...

  14. Flexible Sandwich Diaphragms Are Less Permeable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalovic, John G.; Vassallo, Franklin A.

    1993-01-01

    Diaphragms for use in refrigerator compressors made as laminates of commercially available elastomers and metals. Diaphragms flexible, but less permeable by chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant fluids than diaphragms made of homogeneous mixtures of materials.

  15. Permeability of rayon based polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    Several types of anomalous rayon based phenolic behavior have been observed in post-fired nozzles and exit cones. Many of these events have been shown to be related to the development of internal gas pressure within the material. The development of internal gas pressure is a function of the amount of gas produced within the material and the rate at which that gas is allowed to escape. The latter property of the material is referred to as the material's permeability. The permeability of two dimensional carbonized rayon based phenolic composites is a function of material direction, temperature, and stress/strain state. Recently significant differences in the permeability of these materials has been uncovered which may explain their inconsistent performance. This paper summarizes what is known about the permeability of these materials to date and gives possible implications of these finding to the performance of these materials in an ablative environment.

  16. HP-41 Calculates Dykstra-Parsons permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Bixler, B.

    1983-07-01

    A new program for the HP-41 programmable calculator has been written which will calculate the often used Dykstra-Parsons permeability variation factor, V. No longer must numerous individual permeability values be plotted on log probability paper as a first step in determining V. Input is simply these same permeability values selected at equal spacing along the interval in question. For most core analysis this spacing will be 1 ft. This program is labeled ''KVAR'' (for permeability variation) and is listed here, along with its bar code for those with optical wands. It requires only nine registers for program storage (since it uses HP built-in statistical functions) and eight registers for data storage. Also, it can be stored on one track of the standard two-track magnetic card. Data entry is terminated by entering ''O''. Lastly, it will run with or without a printer.

  17. Subsurface Xenon Migration by Atmospheric Pumping Using an Implicit Non-Iterative Algorithm for a Locally 1D Dual-Porosity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, R.; Kalinowksi, M. B.

    2009-04-01

    An underground nuclear explosion injects radionuclids in the surrounding host rock creating an initial radionuclid distribution. In the case of fractured permeable media, cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can draw gaseous species upwards to the surface, establishing a ratcheting pump effect. The resulting advective transport is orders of magnitude more significant than transport by molecular diffusion. In the 1990s the US Department of Energy funded the socalled Non-Proliferation Experiment conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate this barometric pumping effect for verifying compliance with respect to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. A chemical explosive of approximately 1 kt TNT-equivalent has been detonated in a cavity located 390 m deep in the Rainier Mesa (Nevada Test Site) in which two tracer gases were emplaced. Within this experiment SF6 was first detected in soil gas samples taken near fault zones after 50 days and 3He after 325 days. For this paper a locally one-dimensional dual-porosity model for flow along the fracture and within the permeable matrix was used after Nilson and Lie (1990). Seepage of gases and diffusion of tracers between fracture and matrix are accounted. The advective flow along the fracture and within the matrix block is based on the FRAM filtering remedy and methodology of Chapman. The resulting system of equations is solved by an implicit non-iterative algorithm. Results on time of arrival and subsurface concentration levels for the CTBT-relevant xenons will be presented.

  18. Dentin permeability after toothbrushing with different toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Prati, C; Chersoni, S; Lucchese, A; Pashley, D H; Mongiorgi, R

    1999-08-01

    To evaluate the interaction of smear layer produced during brushing and dentifrice particles. Dentin disks were obtained from extracted human third molars. Dentin permeability was evaluated using a hydraulic pressure apparatus working at 1 psi of pressure. After preparation, each sample was connected to the hydraulic pressure apparatus to evaluate the permeability of dentin with the smear layer produced during specimen preparation. After 5 min of measurements dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel for 2 min, washed and gently dried with cotton to measure the permeability after smear layer removal. This was done to measure the maximum permeability of each specimen (expressed as 100%). Then a second smear layer was produced using a #400 carbide paper under water for 1 min. Dentin permeability of the smear layer covered dentin was then measured, and expressed as a percent of the maximum permeability of that specimen, permitting each specimen to serve as its own control. The three toothpastes used (Merfluan powder, Merfluan paste and Fluorigard) were applied on dentin surfaces using a small sponge to completely cover the dentin surface. After 5 s, each sample was connected to a mechanical device and brushed under water for 3 min with constant pressure of 250 gr using a Colgate medium toothbrush. After this treatment, each sample was gently washed with tap water, gently air dried for 3-5 s and connected with the pressure apparatus to remeasure the permeability after brushing. For SEM examination of dentin before and after treatment with toothpaste and brushing, each dentin and enamel sample was fixed in 2% buffered glutaraldehyde. Dentin permeability proved unaffected by dentifrice treatments. SEM observations demonstrated the presence of dentifrice particles on dentin surface and inside dentin tubules. Smear plugs produced during dentin brushing were not removed by dentifrices.

  19. Apical membrane permeability of MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Rivers, R L; McAteer, J A; Clendenon, J L; Connors, B A; Evan, A P; Williams, J C

    1996-07-01

    The osmotic water permeability (Pf) and permeability to nonelectrolytes were determined for the apical membrane of clonal strain Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) C12 cells cultured as cysts with the apical membrane facing the surrounding medium. Pf and solute permeabilities were calculated from the rate of volume change of cysts by digitizing images at 1-s intervals after instantaneous osmotic challenge. Image measurement was fully automated with the use of a program that separated the image of the cyst from the background by using adaptive intensity thresholding and shape analysis. Pf, calculated by curve fitting to the volume loss data, averaged 2.4 +/- 0.1 micron/s and was increased by addition of amphotericin B. The energy of activation for Pf was high (16.3 kcal/mol), and forskolin (50 microM) had no effect on Pf. Two populations of MDCK cysts were studied: those with two to three cells and those that appeared to be composed of only one cell. The Pf of multicell cysts was the same as single cell cysts, suggesting that paracellular water flow is not significant. Solute permeability was measured using paired osmotic challenges (sucrose and test solute) on the same cyst. Urea permeability was not different from zero, whereas the permeabilities of acetamide and formamide were consistent with their relative oil-water partition coefficients. Our data are similar to values from studies on the permeability properties of vesicles of water-tight epithelial apical membrane. The combination of the unique model of MDCK apical-out cysts and fully automated data analysis enabled determination of apical membrane permeability in intact epithelial cells with high precision.

  20. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  1. Radon generation and transport in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Soil-gas Rn, soil moisture, and soil temperature have been monitored for one year or more at five sites in Pennsylvania which have been characterized for soil bulk density, porosity, diffusivity and permeability. Radon-222 and {sup 222}Rn vary in an annual, approximately sinusoidal pattern having an amplitude of 2- to 10-fold at all five sites. Since Rn partitioning between gas and water is temperature sensitive, and because soil moisture and temperature change in annual cycles, much of the variability in {sup 222}Rn occurs in annual cycles. Therefore knowledge of regional and temporal soil moisture and temperature patterns allows estimates of {sup 222}Rn in soil gas. These estimates suggest Rn is least elevated by moisture in cold, arid soils, and temporal variability will be small in arid soils. In areas where the soil substrate has lower Rn, emanation coefficient, or bulk density than the soil, soil-gas Rn can diffuse into the substrate. Under extreme conditions the Rn concentration can have a gradient towards the rock. Soil cores were used to measure the fraction of Rn exhaling to the gas phase over a range of moisture tensions. The greatest exhaling fraction generally occurred at intermediate moisture tension. The low exhaling fraction in dry soil is attributed to lodging of recoiling Rn in adjacent soil grains. The low exhaling fraction in wet soil is attributed to waterinhibited diffusion. This core method provides reasonable estimates of the combined effects of emanation and diffusion on Rn in soils. Bulk diffusion coefficients and permeability coefficients generally decrease by nearly 1 and 2 orders of magnitude respectively from the eluvial to the illuvial horizons in typical soils.

  2. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition to the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.

  3. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    DOE PAGES

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; ...

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition tomore » the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.« less

  4. Caprock integrity susceptibility to permeable fracture creation

    DOE PAGES

    Frash, Luke; Carey, James William; Ickes, Timothy Lee; ...

    2017-07-14

    Caprock leakage is of crucial concern for environmentally and economically sustainable development of carbon dioxide sequestration and utilization operations. One potential leakage pathway is through fractures or faults that penetrate the caprock. In this study, we investigate the permeability induced by fracturing initially intact Marcellus shale outcrop specimens at stressed conditions using a triaxial direct-shear method. Measurements of induced permeability, fracture geometry, displacement, and applied stresses were all obtained at stressed conditions to investigate the coupled processes of fracturing and fluid flow as may occur in the subsurface. Fracture geometry was directly observed at stressed conditions using X-ray radiography video.more » Numerical simulation was performed to evaluate the stress distribution developed in the experiments. Our experiments show that permeability induced by fracturing is strongly dependent on the stresses at which the fractures are created, the magnitude of shearing displacement, and the duration of flow. The strongest permeability contrast was observed when comparing specimens fractured at low stress to others fractured at higher stress. Measureable fracture permeability decreased by up to 7 orders of magnitude over a corresponding triaxial confining stress range of 3.5 MPa to 30 MPa. These results show that increasing stress, depth, and time are all significant permeability inhibitors that may limit potential leakage through fractured caprock.« less

  5. Simulating perforation permeability damage and cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P; Lomov, I N; Glenn, L A

    2000-12-15

    Completion of cased and cemented wells by shaped charge perforation causes its own damage to the formation, potentially reducing well productivity. In practice it is found that underbalance conditions clean up the damaged zone to some extent, however, the mechanisms of these processes are poorly understood. Most hydrocodes typically used to simulate rock response to shaped charge penetration do not provide permeability estimates. Furthermore, the time scales for formation clean up are potentially much longer than the period of jet penetration. We have developed a simple, yet accurate model for the evolution of porosity and permeability which can easily be incorporated into existing hydrocodes using information from the history of each cell. In addition, we have developed a code that efficiently simulates fines migration during the post-shot surge period using initial conditions taken directly from hydrocode simulations of jet penetration. Results from a one-dimensional model simulation are in excellent agreement with measured permeability distributions. We also present two-dimensional numerical results which qualitatively reproduce experimentally obtained permeability maps for different values of underbalance. Although initial results have been promising, further comparison with experiment is essential to tune the coupling between the hydrocode and fines migration simulator. Currently the permeability model is most appropriate for high permeability sandstones (such as Berea), but with little effort, the model can be extended to other rock types, given sufficient experimental data.

  6. Creation of a dual-porosity and dual-depth micromodel for the study of multiphase flow in complex porous media.

    PubMed

    Yun, Wonjin; Ross, Cynthia M; Roman, Sophie; Kovscek, Anthony R

    2017-04-11

    Silicon-based microfluidic devices, so-called micromodels in this application, are particularly useful laboratory tools for the direct visualization of fluid flow revealing pore-scale mechanisms controlling flow and transport phenomena in natural porous media. Current microfluidic devices with uniform etched depths, however, are limited when representing complex geometries such as the multiple-scale pore sizes common in carbonate rocks. In this study, we successfully developed optimized sequential photolithography to etch micropores (1.5 to 21 μm width) less deeply than the depth of wider macropores (>21 μm width) to improve the structural realism of an existing single-depth micromodel with a carbonate-derived pore structure. Surface profilimetry illustrates the configuration of the dual-depth dual-porosity micromodel and is used to estimate the corresponding pore volume change for the dual-depth micromodel compared to the equivalent uniform- or single-depth model. The flow characteristics of the dual-depth dual-porosity micromodel were characterized using micro-particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV), relative permeability measurements, and pore-scale observations during imbibition and drainage processes. The μ-PIV technique provides insights into the fluid dynamics within microfluidic channels and relevant fluid velocities controlled predominantly by changes in etching depth. In addition, the reduction of end-point relative permeability for both oil and water in the new dual-depth dual-porosity micromodel compared to the equivalent single-depth micromodel implies more realistic capillary forces occurring in the new dual-depth micromodel. Throughout the imbibition and drainage experiments, the flow behaviors of single- and dual-depth micromodels are further differentiated using direct visualization of the trapped non-wetting phase and the preferential mobilization of the wetting phase in the dual-depth micromodel. The visual observations agree with the relative

  7. Frictional stability-permeability relationships for fractures in shales: Friction-Permeability Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yi; Elsworth, Derek; Wang, Chaoyi; Ishibashi, Takuya; Fitts, Jeffrey P.

    2017-01-01

    There is wide concern that fluid injection in the subsurface, such as for the stimulation of shale reservoirs or for geological CO2 sequestration (GCS), has the potential to induce seismicity that may change reservoir permeability due to fault slip. However, the impact of induced seismicity on fracture permeability evolution remains unclear due to the spectrum of modes of fault reactivation (e.g., stable versus unstable). As seismicity is controlled by the frictional response of fractures, we explore friction-stability-permeability relationships through the concurrent measurement of frictional and hydraulic properties of artificial fractures in Green River shale (GRS) and Opalinus shale (OPS). We observe that carbonate-rich GRS shows higher frictional strength but weak neutral frictional stability. The GRS fracture permeability declines during shearing while an increased sliding velocity reduces the rate of permeability decline. By comparison, the phyllosilicate-rich OPS has lower friction and strong stability while the fracture permeability is reduced due to the swelling behavior that dominates over the shearing induced permeability reduction. Hence, we conclude that the friction-stability-permeability relationship of a fracture is largely controlled by mineral composition and that shale mineral compositions with strong frictional stability may be particularly subject to permanent permeability reduction during fluid infiltration.

  8. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spatial and temporal variation in factors governing the radon source potential of soil

    SciTech Connect

    Sextro, R.G.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Turk, B.H.

    1988-10-01

    Soil is the predominant source of radon in most US homes, particularly for those homes with elevated indoor concentrations. Three factors help govern the indoor radon concentration, the radon production rate in the soil, the air permeability of the soil surrounding the building substructure, and the coupling between the soil and the building. In order to evaluate the spatial and temporal variability of the first two factors, soil permeabilities and soil gas radon concentrations have been measured at different locations and as a function of time. The spatial variability in permeability measurements at an individual homesite was seen to range from approximately a factor of ten to more than four orders of magnitude. Similarly, spatial variations in soil gas radon concentrations are less than a factor of two at some homesites to a factor of /approximately/200 at others. The temporal changes in permeability and soil gas radon at a given sampling location are somewhat smaller, yielding variations ranging from less than a factor of two to a factor of /approximately/90 in the case of permeability, and from less than a factor of three to a factor of /approximately/40 for soil gas radon concentrations. A method of combining measurements of soil gas radon and air permeability to provide a characteristic parameter -- the radon source potential -- has been developed and is briefly reviewed. Calculated indoor radon concentrations, based on measured values of radon source potential at a few sample homesites, correlate with the measured indoor radon concentrations. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Data Driven Policy Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberger, Eric; Witt, M. Allison; Blankenberger, Bob; Franklin, Doug

    2014-01-01

    The use of dual credit has been expanding rapidly. Dual credit is a college course taken by a high school student for which both college and high school credit is given. Previous studies provided limited quantitative evidence that dual credit/dual enrollment is directly connected to positive student outcomes. In this study, predictive statistics…

  11. Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Data Driven Policy Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberger, Eric; Witt, M. Allison; Blankenberger, Bob; Franklin, Doug

    2014-01-01

    The use of dual credit has been expanding rapidly. Dual credit is a college course taken by a high school student for which both college and high school credit is given. Previous studies provided limited quantitative evidence that dual credit/dual enrollment is directly connected to positive student outcomes. In this study, predictive statistics…

  12. Bifocal dual reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    A bifocal dual reflector antenna is similar to and has better scan capability than classical cassegrain reflector antenna. The method used in determining the reflector surfaces is a modification of a design method for the dielectric bifocal lens. The three dimensional dual reflector is obtained by first designing an exact (in geometrical optics sense) two-point corrected two dimensional reflector and then rotating it around its axis of symmetry. A point by point technique is used in computing the reflector surfaces. Computed radiation characteristics of the dual reflector are compared with those of a cassegrain reflector. The results confirm that the bifocal antenna has superior performance.

  13. Integration of Multi-Tension Permeametry and Photogrammetric Textural Segmentation for Estimating Directional Permeability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Acronyms CCD Charge Couple Device CPT Cone Penetrometer Technology DOD U.S. Department of Defense DOE U.S. Department of Energy EPA U.S...commonly used to estimate permeability include pneumatic and hydraulic slug tests with permeameters deployed by cone penetrometer and hollow-stem...an area approximately 2 mm x 3 mm through a sapphire window on a cone penetrometer probe. The soil at the window is illuminated using LEDs mounted

  14. Permeability reduction in granite under hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of impermeable fault seals between earthquake events is a feature of many models of earthquake generation, suggesting that earthquake recurrence may depend in part on the rate of permeability reduction of fault zone materials under hydrothermal conditions. In this study, permeability measurements were conducted on intact, fractured, and gouge-bearing Westerly granite at an effective pressure of 50 MPa and at temperatures from 150?? to 500??C, simulating conditions in the earthquake-generating portions of fault zones. Pore fluids were cycled back and forth under a 2 MPa pressure differential for periods of up to 40 days. Permeability of the granite decreased with time t, following the exponential relation k = c(10-rt). For intact samples run between 250?? and 500??C the time constant for permeability decrease r was proportional to temperature and ranged between 0.001 and 0.1 days-1 (i.e., between 0.4 and 40 decades year-1 loss of permeability). Values of r for the lower-temperature experiments differed little from the 250??C runs. In contrast, prefractured samples showed higher rates of permeability decrease at a given temperature. The surfaces of the fractured samples showed evidence of dissolution and mineral growth that increased in abundance with both temperature and time. The experimentally grown mineral assemblages varied with temperature and were consistent with a rock-dominated hydrothermal system. As such mineral deposits progressively seal the fractured samples, their rates of permeability decrease approach the rates for intact rocks at the same temperature. These results place constraints on models of precipitation sealing and suggest that fault rocks may seal at a rate consistent with earthquake recurrence intervals of typical fault zones.

  15. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, Aaran; Gerada, Chris; Brown, Neil; Clare, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels.

  16. Evaluating the relative air permeability of porous media from their water retention curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.; Tuli, A.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Accurate modeling of water and air flow in porous media requires the definition of the relevant hydraulic properties, namely, the water retention curve (WRC) and the relative hydraulic conductivity function (RHC), as well as the definition of the relative air permeability function (RAP). Capitalizing on the approach developed previously to represent the RHC, a new model allowing the prediction of RAP based on information resulting from the WRC is proposed. The power value ηa in the model is a decreasing exponential function of the coefficient of variation, ɛ, characterizing the pore size distribution of the porous medium, and derived from its WRC. The model was calibrated using data from 22 disturbed and undisturbed soil samples and was validated using data from eight soil types ranging from quartz sand to silty clay loam. The proposed model provided accurate prediction of the soil RAP and performed in some cases (sandy loam and silty clay loam soils) better than available alternative models.

  17. Assessment of a dye permeability assay for determination of inactivation rates of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, M B; Anguish, L J; Bowman, D D; Walker, M J; Ghiorse, W C

    1997-01-01

    The ability to determine inactivation rates of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in environmental samples is critical for assessing the public health hazard of this gastrointestinal parasite in watersheds. We compared a dye permeability assay, which tests the differential uptake of the fluorochromes 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and propidium iodide (PI) by the oocysts (A. T. Campbell, L. J. Robertson, and H. V. Smith, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:3488-3493, 1992), with an in vitro excystation assay, which tests their ability to excyst and, thus, their metabolic potential and potential for infectivity (J.B. Rose, H. Darbin, and C.P. Gerba, Water Sci. Technol. 20:271-276, 1988). Formaldehyde-fixed (killed) oocysts and untreated oocysts were permeabilized with sodium hypochlorite and subjected to both assays. The results of the dye permeability assays were the same, while the excystation assay showed that no excystation occurred in formaldehyde-fixed oocysts. This confirmed that oocyst wall permeability, rather than metabolic activity potential, was the basis of the dye permeability viability assessment. A previously developed protocol (L. J. Anguish and W. C. Ghiorse, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:724-733, 1997) for determining viability of oocysts in soil and sediment was used to examine further the use of oocyst permeability status as an indicator of oocyst viability in fecal material stored at 4 degrees C and in water at various temperatures. Most of the oocysts in fresh calf feces were found to be impermeable to the fluorochromes. They were also capable of excystation, as indicated by the in vitro excystation assay, and were infective, as indicated by a standard mouse infectivity assay. The dye permeability assay further showed that an increase in the intermediate population of oocysts permeable to DAPI but not to PI occurred over time. There was also a steady population of oocysts permeable to both dyes. Further experiments with purified oocysts suspended in

  18. Gastrointestinal permeability in patients with irritable bowel syndrome assessed using a four probe permeability solution

    PubMed Central

    Del Valle-Pinero, Arseima Y.; Van Deventer, Hendrick E.; Fourie, Nicolaas H.; Martino, Angela C.; Patel, Nayan S.; Remaley, Alan T.; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Abnormal gastrointestinal permeability has been linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The lactulose-to-mannitol ratio is traditionally used to assess small intestine permeability while sucralose and sucrose are used to assess colonic and gastric permeability respectively. We used a single 4-probe test solution to assess permeability throughout the gastrointestinal tract in IBS patients and healthy controls by measuring the recovery of the probes in urine after ingestion using a modified liquid chromatography mass spectrometry protocol. Methods Fasting participants (N = 59) drank a permeability test solution (100 ml: sucralose, sucrose, mannitol, and lactulose). Urine was collected over a 5-h period and kept frozen until analysis. Urinary sugar concentrations were measured using an liquid chromatography/triple quadruple mass spectrometer. Results Colonic permeability was significantly lower in IBS patients when compared to healthy controls (p = 0.011). Gastric and small intestinal permeability did not significantly differ between the groups. Conclusions The study demonstrates the clinical potential of this non-invasive method for assessing alterations in gastrointestinal permeability in patients with IBS. PMID:23328210

  19. Strain-dependent permeability of volcanic rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    We explore permeability evolution during deformation of volcanic materials using a suite of rocks with varying compositions and physical properties (such as porosity ϕ). 40 mm × 20 mm cylindrical samples were made from a range of extrusive rocks, including andesites from Colima, Mexico (ϕ˜0.08; 0.18; 0.21), Kumamoto, Japan (ϕ˜0.13), and Ruapehu, New Zealand (ϕ˜0.15), and basalt from Mt Etna, Italy (ϕ˜0.04). Gas permeability of each sample was measured before and after triaxial deformation using a steady-state benchtop permeameter. To study the strain-dependence of permeability in volcanic rocks, we deformed samples to 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12 % axial strain at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1. Further, the influence of failure mode - dilatant or compactant - on permeability was assessed by repeating experiments at different confining pressures. During triaxial deformation, porosity change of the samples was monitored by a servo-controlled pore fluid pump. Below an initial porosity of ˜0.18, and at low confining pressures (≤ 20 MPa), we observe a dilatant failure mode (shear fracture formation). With increasing axial strain, stress is accommodated by fault sliding and the generation of ash-sized gouge between the fracture planes. In higher-porosity samples, or at relatively higher confining pressures (≥ 60 MPa), we observe compactant deformation characterised by a monotonous decrease in porosity with increasing axial strain. The relative permeability k' is given by the change in permeability divided by the initial reference state. When behaviour is dilatant, k' tends to be positive: permeability increases with progressive deformation. However, results suggest that after a threshold amount of strain, k' can decrease. k' always is negative (permeability decreases during deformation) when compaction is the dominant behaviour. Our results show that - in the absence of a sealing or healing process - the efficiency of a fault to transmit fluids is correlated to

  20. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, NJ, that incorporated three different permeable pavement types in the parking lanes – permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). An impermeable liner installed 0.4 m below the driving surface in four 11.6-m by 4.74-m sections per each pavement type captures all infiltrating water and routes it to collection tanks that can contain events up to 38 mm. Each section has a design impervious area to permeable pavement area ratio of 0.66:1. Pressure transducers installed in the underdrain collection tanks measured water level for 24 months. Level was converted to volume using depth-to-volume ratios for individual collection tanks. Using a water balance approach, the measured infiltrate volume was compared to rainfall volume on an event-basis to determine the rainfall retained in the pavement strata and underlying aggregate. Evaporation since the previous event created additional storage in the pavement and aggregate layers. Events were divided into three groups based on antecedent dry period (ADP) and three, four-month categories of potential e

  1. Honeycomb Core Permeability Under Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Raman, V. V.; Venkat, Venki S.; Sankaran, Sankara N.

    1997-01-01

    A method for characterizing the air permeability of sandwich core materials as a function of applied shear stress was developed. The core material for the test specimens was either Hexcel HRP-3/16-8.0 and or DuPont Korex-1/8-4.5 and was nominally one-half inch thick and six inches square. The facesheets where made of Hercules' AS4/8552 graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) composites and were nominally 0.059-in. thick. Cytec's Metalbond 1515-3M epoxy film adhesive was used for co-curing the facesheets to the core. The permeability of the specimens during both static (tension) and dynamic (reversed and non-reversed) shear loads were measured. The permeability was measured as the rate of air flow through the core from a circular 1-in2 area of the core exposed to an air pressure of 10.0 psig. In both the static and dynamic testing, the Korex core experienced sudden increases in core permeability corresponding to a core catastrophic failure, while the URP core experienced a gradual increase in the permeability prior to core failure. The Korex core failed at lower loads than the HRP core both in the transverse and ribbon directions.

  2. Comparison of Steady State Method and Transient Methods for Water Permeability Measurement in Low Permeability Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulin, P. F.; Bretonnier, P.; Gland, N.

    2010-12-01

    Very low permeability geomaterials (order of nanoDarcy (10-21 m2)), such as clays rocks, are studied for many industrial applications such as production from unconventional reserves of oil and gas, CO2 geological storage and deep geological disposal of high-level long-lived nuclear wastes. For these last two applications, clay efficiency as barrier relies mainly on their very low permeability. Laboratory measurement of low permeability to water (below 10-19 m2) remains a technical challenge. Some authors argue that steady state methods are irrelevant due to the time required to stabilize water fluxes in such low permeability media. Most of the authors measuring low permeabilities use a transient technique called pulse decay. This study aims to compare objectively these different types of permeability tests performed on a single clay sample. For the steady state method, a high precision pump was used to impose a pressure gradient and to measure the small resulting water flow rate at steady state. We show that with a suitable set-up, the steady state method enables to measure a very low permeability of 8 10-22 m2 in a period of three days. For a comparable duration, the pulse decay test, most commonly used for such low permeability measurements, provides only an average estimate of the permeability. Permeability measurements by pulse decay require to perform simulations to interpret the pressure relaxation signals. Many uncertainties remain such as the determination of the reservoirs storage factor, micro leakage effect, or the determination of the initial pulse pressure. All these uncertainties have a very significant impact on the determination of sample permeability and specific storage. Opposite to the wide-spread idea that transient techniques are required to measure very low permeability, we show that direct steady state measurement of water permeability with suitable equipments can be much faster and more accurate than measurement by pulse decay, especially in

  3. Liquefaction mechanism for layered soils

    SciTech Connect

    Fiegel, G.L.; Kutter, B.L. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Results from four centrifuge model tests are presented. Three of the model tests involve layered soil deposits subject to base shaking; one model test involves a uniform soil deposit of sand subject to base shaking. The layered soil models consisted of fine sand overlain by a layer of relatively impermeable silica flour (silt). Pore-water pressures, accelerations, and settlements were measured during all four tests. Results from the model tests involving layered soils suggest that during liquefaction a water interlayer or very loose zone of soil may develop at the sand-silt interface due to the difference in permeabilities. In each layered model test, boils were observed on the surface of the silt layer. These boils were concentrated in the thinnest zones of the overlying silt layer and provided a vent for the excess pore-water pressure generated in the fine sand.

  4. Normal compression wave scattering by a permeable crack in a fluid-saturated poroelastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.

    2017-03-01

    A mathematical formulation is presented for the dynamic stress intensity factor (mode I) of a finite permeable crack subjected to a time-harmonic propagating longitudinal wave in an infinite poroelastic solid. In particular, the effect of the wave-induced fluid flow due to the presence of a liquid-saturated crack on the dynamic stress intensity factor is analyzed. Fourier sine and cosine integral transforms in conjunction with Helmholtz potential theory are used to formulate the mixed boundary-value problem as dual integral equations in the frequency domain. The dual integral equations are reduced to a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. It is found that the stress intensity factor monotonically decreases with increasing frequency, decreasing the fastest when the crack width and the slow wave wavelength are of the same order. The characteristic frequency at which the stress intensity factor decays the fastest shifts to higher frequency values when the crack width decreases.

  5. Quicklime-induced changes of soil properties: Implications for enhanced remediation of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminated soils via mechanical soil aeration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Dong, Binbin; He, Xiaosong; Shi, Yi; Xu, Mingyue; He, Xuwen; Du, Xiaoming; Li, Fasheng

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical soil aeration is used for soil remediation at sites contaminated by volatile organic compounds. However, the effectiveness of the method is limited by low soil temperature, high soil moisture, and high soil viscosity. Combined with mechanical soil aeration, quicklime has a practical application value related to reinforcement remediation and to its action in the remediation of soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds. In this study, the target pollutant was trichloroethylene, which is a volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon pollutant commonly found in contaminated soils. A restoration experiment was carried out, using a set of mechanical soil-aeration simulation tests, by adding quicklime (mass ratios of 3, 10, and 20%) to the contaminated soil. The results clearly indicate that quicklime changed the physical properties of the soil, which affected the environmental behaviour of trichloroethylene in the soil. The addition of CaO increased soil temperature and reduced soil moisture to improve the mass transfer of trichloroethylene. In addition, it improved the macroporous cumulative pore volume and average pore size, which increased soil permeability. As soil pH increased, the clay mineral content in the soils decreased, the cation exchange capacity and the redox potential decreased, and the removal of trichloroethylene from the soil was enhanced to a certain extent. After the addition of quicklime, the functional group COO of soil organic matter could interact with calcium ions, which increased soil polarity and promoted the removal of trichloroethylene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Soil bioventing demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.S.; Kampbell, D.H.; Wilson, J.T.; DiGiulio, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot scale demonstration project of a soil bioventing system, which utilizes the biodegradation in soil and physical removal of VOC by induced air flow, is in operation at the U.S. Coast Guard Aviation Field in Traverse City, Michigan. The system is being tested to determine its suitability for remediation of the vadose zone in conjunction with aquifer remediation at a site contaminated by an aviation gas spill. Several microcosm studies with soil obtained from the vertical profile of the contaminated site showed rapid microbial decompositions of hydrocarbon fumes with NPK nutrient and moisture addition. Basic removal kinetics data were obtained from these experiments. Field pneumatic pump tests for soil-air characterization have been conducted. The soil-air permeability and pressure distributions under the air injection/withdrawal systems were obtained. On the basis of information from the laboratory and field tests, a conceptual design at a field scale was made. The system will be implemented on the selected study site and the operation will start in fall, 1990. Additional soil core samplings and continuous monitoring of operation are planned.

  7. Permeability of Triaxially Compressed Sandstone: Influence of Deformation and Strain-rate on Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiland, J.

    - The influence of differential stress on the permeability of a Lower Permian sandstone was investigated. Rock cylinders of 50 mm in diameter and 100 mm length of a fine-grained (mean grain size 0.2 mm), low-porosity (6-9%) sandstone were used to study the relation between differential stress, rock deformation, rock failure and hydraulic properties, with a focus on the changes of hydraulic properties in the pre-failure and failure region of triaxial rock deformation. The experiments were conducted at confining pressures up to 20 MPa, and axial force was controlled by lateral strain with a rate ranging from 10-6 to 10-7 sec-1. While deforming the samples, permeability was determined by steady-state technique with a pressure gradient of 1 MPa over the specimen length and a fluid pressure level between 40 and 90% of the confining pressure. The results show that permeability of low-porosity sandstones under increasing triaxial stress firstly decreases due to compaction and starts to increase after the onset of dilatancy. This kind of permeability evolution is similar to that of crystalline rocks. A significant dependence of permeability evolution on strain rate was found. Comparison of permeability to volumetric strain demonstrates that the permeability increase after the onset of dilatancy is not sufficient to regain the initial permeability up to failure of the specimen. The initial permeability, which was determined in advance of the experiments, usually was regained in the post-failure region. After the onset of dilatancy, the permeability increase displays a linear dependence on volumetric strain.

  8. Mathematical models of skin permeability: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mitragotri, Samir; Anissimov, Yuri G; Bunge, Annette L; Frasch, H Frederick; Guy, Richard H; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Kasting, Gerald B; Lane, Majella E; Roberts, Michael S

    2011-10-10

    Mathematical models of skin permeability play an important role in various fields including prediction of transdermal drug delivery and assessment of dermal exposure to industrial chemicals. Extensive research has been performed over the last several decades to yield predictions of skin permeability to various molecules. These efforts include the development of empirical approaches such as quantitative structure-permeability relationships and porous pathway theories as well as the establishment of rigorous structure-based models. In addition to establishing the necessary mathematical framework to describe these models, efforts have also been dedicated to determining the key parameters that are required to use these models. This article provides an overview of various modeling approaches with respect to their advantages, limitations and future prospects.

  9. Tunable permeability of magnetic wires at microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panina, L. V.; Makhnovskiy, D. P.; Morchenko, A. T.; Kostishin, V. G.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the analysis into microwave magnetic properties of magnetic microwires and their composites in the context of applications in wireless sensors and tunable microwave materials. It is demonstrated that the intrinsic permeability of wires has a wide frequency dispersion with relatively large values in the GHz band. In the case of a specific magnetic anisotropy this results in a tunable microwave impedance which could be used for distributed wireless sensing networks in functional composites. The other range of applications is related with developing the artificial magnetic dielectrics with large and tunable permeability. The composites with magnetic wires with a circumferential anisotropy have the effective permeability which differs substantially from unity for a relatively low concentration (less than 10%). This can make it possible to design the wire media with a negative and tunable index of refraction utilising natural magnetic properties of wires.

  10. [Use of rigid gas permeable contact lenses].

    PubMed

    Habela, M

    1992-01-01

    By application of contact lenses destined for a extended wearing, for preservation of a normal structure and metabolism of the cornea a considerable permeability of the contact lens for oxygen is necessary (Dk/L 75-80). The actually most popular in the world soft contact lenses have no such parameters. The application of rigid lenses produced from materials of high permeability for oxygen enables the extended wearing without substantial disturbances of the corneal metabolism. The paper presents a new generation of fluoro-silicone acrylates used for the production of contact lenses permeable for oxygen. Discussed are the problems connected with the adjusting of these lenses, their tolerance and influence on the corneal metabolism.

  11. Artificial membrane assays to assess permeability.

    PubMed

    Faller, Bernard

    2008-11-01

    This paper reviews the development of artificial membrane assays in the last decade. Reasons why parallel artificial membrane assays (PAMPA) became widely used are discussed and the various PAMPA assays targeting gastro-intestinal absorption, blood brain barrier and skin penetration are presented. Improvements in the assay technology like the introduction of a paracellular component and the critical factors to get quality data are reviewed. The question how does PAMPA compare with Caco-2 monolayer permeability is being addressed. New dimensions in artificial membrane assays like octanol/water logP measurement, influence of excipients on solubility/permeability and binding constants measurements are introduced. Finally, similarity and differences between partition coefficients and permeability values are discussed.

  12. Permeability of Hollow Microspherical Membranes to Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, V. N.; Kazanin, I. V.; Pak, A. Yu.; Vereshchagin, A. S.; Lebiga, V. A.; Fomin, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the sorption characteristics of various hollow microspherical membranes to reveal particles most suitable for application in the membrane-sorption technologies of helium extraction from a natural gas. The permeability of the investigated sorbents to helium and their impermeability to air and methane are shown experimentally. The sorption-desorption dependences of the studied sorbents have been obtained, from which the parameters of their specific permeability to helium are calculated. It has been established that the physicochemical modification of the original particles exerts a great influence on the coefficient of the permeability of a sorbent to helium. Specially treated cenospheres have displayed high efficiency as membranes for selective extraction of helium.

  13. Reduction of diffusive contaminant emissions from a dissolved source in a lower permeability layer by sodium persulfate treatment.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Bridget A; Johnson, Paul C; Daniels, Eric J

    2014-12-16

    Residual contamination contained in lower permeability zones is difficult to remediate and can, through diffusive emissions to adjacent higher permeability zones, result in long-term impacts to groundwater. This work investigated the effectiveness of oxidant delivery for reducing diffusive emissions from lower permeability zones. The experiment was conducted in a 1.2 m tall × 1.2 m wide × 6 cm thick tank containing two soil layers having 3 orders of magnitude contrast in hydraulic conductivity. The lower permeability layer initially contained dissolved methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-xylenes (BTEX). The treatment involved delivery of 10% w/w nonactivated sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) solution to the high permeability layer for 14 days. The subsequent diffusion into the lower permeability layer and contaminant emission response were monitored for about 240 days. The S2O8(2-) diffused about 14 cm at 1% w/w into the lower permeability layer during the 14 day delivery and continued diffusing deeper into the layer as well as back toward the higher-lower permeability interface after delivery ceased. Over 209 days, the S2O8(2-) diffused 60 cm into the lower permeability layer, the BTEX mass and emission rate were reduced by 95-99%, and the MTBE emission rate was reduced by 63%. The overall treatment efficiency was about 60-110 g-S2O8(2-)delivered/g-hydrocarbon oxidized, with a significant fraction of the oxidant delivered likely lost by back-diffusion and not involved in hydrocarbon destruction.

  14. Negative permeability from random particle composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Shahid

    2017-04-01

    Artificial media, such as those composed of periodically-spaced wires for negative permittivity and split ring resonators for negative permeability have been extensively investigated for negative refractive index (NRI) applications (Smith et al., 2004; Pendry et al., 1999) [1,2]. This paper presents an alternative method for producing negative permeability: granular (or particulate) composites incorporating magnetic fillers. Artificial media, such as split-ring resonators, are designed to produce a magnetic resonance feature, which results in negative permeability over a narrow frequency range about the resonance frequency. The position of the feature is dependent upon the size of the inclusion. The material in this case is anisotropic, such that the feature is only observable when the materials are orientated in a specific direction relative to the applied field. A similar resonance can be generated in magnetic granular (particulate) materials: ferromagnetic resonance from the natural spin resonance of particles. Although the theoretical resonance profiles in granular composites shows the permeability dipping to negative values, this is rarely observed experimentally due to resonance damping effects. Results are presented for iron in spherical form and in flake form, dispersed in insulating host matrices. The two particle shapes show different permeability performance, with the magnetic flakes producing a negative contribution. This is attributed to the stronger coupling with the magnetic field resulting from the high aspect ratio of the flakes. The accompanying ferromagnetic resonance is strong enough to overcome the effects of damping and produce negative permeability. The size of random particle composites is not dictated by the wavelength of the applied field, so the materials are potentially much thinner than other, more traditional artificial composites at microwave frequencies.

  15. Development of an Improved Permeability Modification Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.W.; Elphnick, J.

    1999-03-09

    This report describes the development of an improved permeability modification simulator performed jointly by BDM Petroleum Technologies and Schlumberger Dowell under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the US Department of Energy. The improved simulator was developed by modifying NIPER's PC-GEL permeability modification simulator to include a radial model, a thermal energy equation, a wellbore simulator, and a fully implicit time-stepping option. The temperature-dependent gelation kinetics of a delayed gel system (DGS) is also included in the simulator.

  16. Rough and partially-cemented fracture permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, C. J.; Eichhubl, P.; Prodanovic, M.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical studies of mass transport in fractured rock, such as discrete fracture network models, use models to assign estimates of permeability to individual fractures. These fracture permeability models typically employ statistical moments of the fracture aperture distribution to estimate permeability. Although it is known that these fracture permeability models are in error, the quantification of this error is limited. We use a digital rock physics workflow to quantify this error in four fracture samples, a barren artificially-induced fracture in sandstone, a calcite-lined fracture sampled from outcrop, and two quartz-bridged fractures sampled from reservoir core. Each of the fracture samples is imaged using three-dimensional x-ray computed microtomography. The images are then processed, segmented and used in a lattice-Boltzmann-method-based flow simulation. We also vary the kinematic apertures of the barren and calcite-lined fractures through digital dilatation and closure in order to investigate sensitivity to the relative fracture roughness. We define the scalar error, F, between the actual permeability determined from simulation, kLB, and that predicted using the fracture permeability model of Zimmerman and Bodvarsson (1996), kZB, as, F±1=kZB/kLB. Although the pore space shape of the fractures appears quite different, the scalar error as a function of relative roughness is found to be similar for all fracture samples investigated, with a maximum of approximately 2. Considering two-dimensional cross-sections of fractures are more readily available than three-dimensional images we then plot the scalar error as a function of relative roughness and the number of observations measured from two-dimensional images (width of fracture analyzed). In general, the rougher the fracture, the greater the number of observations that are required to define the statistical moment inputs for the fracture permeability model. We use these results to approximate the width of the

  17. Immediate refitting with gas permeable lenses.

    PubMed

    Bennett, E S

    1983-03-01

    Handling long-term polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) lens wearers, especially those suffering severe corneal oxygen deprivation, has been a problem much relieved by the introduction of oxygen permeable rigid lenses. Previous methods including lens modifications, discontinuation of lens wear, and de-adaptation possessed limitations which could cause the patient to experience permanent corneal curvature and refractive changes. Immediately refitting these patients with gas permeable lenses has been a procedure which appears to have eliminated many of the previous problems and has achieved rapid approval from contact lens practitioners the past few years. This paper discusses how this procedure can be performed to the satisfaction of both the optometrist and the patient.

  18. Flexibility of hard gas permeable contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R W

    1988-11-01

    Gas permeable (GP) lenses can flex on some eyes producing unpredictable clinical results. A method of measuring the flexibility of hard GP materials has been developed and shown to be repeatable. Materials in the form of flats rather than lenses were used. Differences between materials were found and in general a linear relation was shown to exist between maximum flexing and quoted oxygen permeability (r = 0.78, p less than 0.05). It is recommended that flexibility be measured and reported in the data presented with all new GP polymers. The term "hard" rather than "rigid" in describing GP lenses is suggested.

  19. Simulating solute transport in a structured field soil: uncertainty in parameter identification and predictions.

    PubMed

    Larsbo, Mats; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Dual-permeability models have been developed to account for the significant effects of macropore flow on contaminant transport, but their use is hampered by difficulties in estimating the additional parameters required. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate data requirements for parameter identification for predictive modeling with the dual-permeability model MACRO. Two different approaches were compared: sequential uncertainty fitting (SUFI) and generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE). We investigated six parameters controlling macropore flow and pesticide sorption and degradation, applying MACRO to a comprehensive field data set of bromide andbentazone [3-isopropyl-1H-2,1,3-benzothiadiazin-4(3H)-one-2,2dioxide] transport in a structured soil. The GLUE analyses of parameter conditioning for different combinations of observations showed that both resident and flux concentrations were needed to obtain highly conditioned and unbiased parameters and that observations of tracer transport generally improved the conditioning of macropore flow parameters. The GLUE "behavioral" parameter sets covered wider parameter ranges than the SUFI posterior uncertainty domains. Nevertheless, estimation uncertainty ranges defined by the 5th and 95th percentiles were similar and many simulations randomly sampled from the SUFI posterior uncertainty domains had negative model efficiencies (minimum of -3.2). This is because parameter correlations are neglected in SUFI and the posterior uncertainty domains were not always determined correctly. For the same reasons, uncertainty ranges for predictions of bentazone losses through drainflow for good agricultural practice in southern Sweden were 27% larger for SUFI compared with GLUE. Although SUFI proved to be an efficient parameter estimation tool, GLUE seems better suited as a method of uncertainty estimation for predictions.

  20. The Delivery Of Dissolved Organic Carbon From Forest Soils To A Head Water Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Y.; Hornberger, G. M.; Kaplan, L.; Newbold, J. D.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    The temporal variation of the delivery of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a complex mixture of compounds, from hillslopes to the adjacent streams is determined by hydrological and biogeochemical processes that have not been completely quantified. In particular, processes involving differences in the fate and transport of the easily biodegradable fraction of dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and the more recalcitrant fraction of DOC are of ecological importance. We conducted leaching experiments on two vertically oriented in-situ soil cores with different lengths to explore the dynamics of behavior of BDOC and DOC on a forested hillslope at White Clay Creek in southeastern Pennsylvania. A dual-permeability model based on a one-dimensional Richards’ equation coupled with reactive convection-dispersion equations and a heat transport model to characterize the temperature pattern along the core was developed, and used to interpret the experimental data. We also collected storm DOC samples from the stream and from piezometers and wells along a hillslope transect. A two dimensional saturated-unsaturated finite element flow model coupled with a two-dimensional reactive transport model was developed to describe the soil and groundwater flow and the DOC and BDOC responses to precipitation events. Parameters for both the flow and transport models were selected using trial and error calibration first, and then refined using UCODE (USGS). The results show that the models can match the main features of the observed DOC and BDOC patterns under transient soil water flux conditions. Both the simulation and experimental results from this work suggest that the DOC flux declines with depth in the soil profile. DOC, and particularly BDOC, transported from soils to the stream is predominantly from the riparian zone.

  1. Simultaneous imaging of tumor oxygenation and microvascular permeability using Overhauser enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Shingo; Yasui, Hironobu; Batra, Sonny; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Bernardo, Marcelino; Munasinghe, Jeeva P.; Utsumi, Hideo; Choudhuri, Rajani; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2009-01-01

    Architectural and functional abnormalities of blood vessels are a common feature in tumors. A consequence of increased vascular permeability and concomitant aberrant blood flow is poor delivery of oxygen and drugs, which is associated with treatment resistance. In the present study, we describe a strategy to simultaneously visualize tissue oxygen concentration and microvascular permeability by using a hyperpolarized 1H-MRI, known as Overhauser enhanced MRI (OMRI), and an oxygen-sensitive contrast agent OX63. Substantial MRI signal enhancement was induced by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The DNP achieved up to a 7,000% increase in MRI signal at an OX63 concentration of 1.5 mM compared with that under thermal equilibrium state. The extent of hyperpolarization is influenced mainly by the local concentration of OX63 and inversely by the tissue oxygen level. By collecting dynamic OMRI images at different hyperpolarization levels, local oxygen concentration and microvascular permeability of OX63 can be simultaneously determined. Application of this modality to murine tumors revealed that tumor regions with high vascular permeability were spatio-temporally coincident with hypoxia. Quantitative analysis of image data from individual animals showed an inverse correlation between tumor vascular leakage and median oxygen concentration. Immunohistochemical analyses of tumor tissues obtained from the same animals after OMRI experiments demonstrated that lack of integrity in tumor blood vessels was associated with increased tumor microvascular permeability. This dual imaging technique may be useful for the longitudinal assessment of changes in tumor vascular function and oxygenation in response to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or antiangiogenic treatment. PMID:19815528

  2. Predicting the permeability of sediments entering subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Screaton, Elizabeth J.

    2015-07-01

    Using end-member permeabilities defined by a worldwide compilation of sediment permeabilities at convergent margins, we compare permeability predictions using a geometric mean and a two-component effective medium theory (EMT). Our implementation of EMT includes a threshold fraction of the high-permeability component that determines whether flow occurs dominantly in the high- or low-permeability component. We find that this threshold fraction in most cases is equal to the silt + sand-sized fraction of the sediment. This suggests that sediments undergoing primary consolidation tend to exhibit flow equally distributed between the high- and low-permeability components. We show that the EMT method predicts permeability better than the weighted geometric mean of the end-member values for clay fractions <0.6. This work provides insight into the microstructural controls on permeability in subducting sediments and valuable guidance for locations which lack site-specific permeability results but have available grain-size information.

  3. Permeability assessment of poorly water-soluble compounds under solubilizing conditions: the reciprocal permeability approach.

    PubMed

    Katneni, Kasiram; Charman, Susan A; Porter, Christopher J H

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a general method to assess the intestinal permeability of poorly water-soluble drugs where low-aqueous drug solubility requires conduct of experiments under solubilizing experimental conditions. The permeability (Papp) of diazepam (DIA) was assessed across excised rat jejunum in the absence (Pappcontrol) and presence (Pappuncorr) of polysorbate-80 (PS-80). The micellar association constant (Ka) of DIA, estimated via equilibrium solubility studies, was used to correct Pappuncorr data and obtain an estimate of the true permeability coefficient (Pappcorr). An alternate approach was also developed (the reciprocal permeability approach) to allow direct estimation of Pappcorr without the need for independent estimation of Ka. The approach was further examined experimentally using a range of model drugs. DIA Pappcorr values obtained using the Ka from equilibrium solubility studies deviated from Papp(control) values, especially at PS-80 concentrations above 0.1% w/v. In contrast, data obtained using the reciprocal permeability method were consistent with Pappcontrol across the PS-80 concentration range. Similar trends were observed with propranolol (PRO), antipyrine (ANT), naproxen (NAP), and cinnarizine (CIN). The reciprocal permeability approach therefore provides a simple and accurate method by which the permeability of poorly water-soluble compounds may be estimated under solubilizing conditions.

  4. Oil Recovery Enhancement from Fractured, Low Permeability Reservoirs. [Carbonated Water

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Poston, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    The results of the investigative efforts for this jointly funded DOE-State of Texas research project achieved during the 1990-1991 year may be summarized as follows: Geological Characterization - Detailed maps of the development and hierarchical nature the fracture system exhibited by Austin Chalk outcrops were prepared. The results of these efforts were directly applied to the development of production decline type curves applicable to a dual-fracture-matrix flow system. Analysis of production records obtained from Austin Chalk operators illustrated the utility of these type curves to determine relative fracture/matrix contributions and extent. Well-log response in Austin Chalk wells has been shown to be a reliable indicator of organic maturity. Shear-wave splitting concepts were used to estimate fracture orientations from Vertical Seismic Profile, VSP data. Several programs were written to facilitate analysis of the data. The results of these efforts indicated fractures could be detected with VSP seismic methods. Development of the EOR Imbibition Process - Laboratory displacement as well as Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI and Computed Tomography, CT imaging studies have shown the carbonated water-imbibition displacement process significantly accelerates and increases recovery from oil saturated, low permeability rocks. Field Tests - Two operators amenable to conducting a carbonated water flood test on an Austin Chalk well have been identified. Feasibility studies are presently underway.

  5. Oil recovery enhancement from fractured, low permeability reservoirs. [Carbonated Water

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    The results of the investigative efforts for this jointly funded DOE-State of Texas research project achieved during the 1990-1991 year may be summarized as follows: Geological Characterization - Detailed maps of the development and hierarchical nature the fracture system exhibited by Austin Chalk outcrops were prepared. The results of these efforts were directly applied to the development of production decline type curves applicable to a dual-fracture-matrix flow system. Analysis of production records obtained from Austin Chalk operators illustrated the utility of these type curves to determine relative fracture/matrix contributions and extent. Well-log response in Austin Chalk wells has been shown to be a reliable indicator of organic maturity. Shear-wave splitting concepts were used to estimate fracture orientations from Vertical Seismic Profile, VSP data. Several programs were written to facilitate analysis of the data. The results of these efforts indicated fractures could be detected with VSP seismic methods.Development of the EOR Imbibition Process - Laboratory displacement as well as Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI and Computed Tomography, CT imaging studies have shown the carbonated water-imbibition displacement process significantly accelerates and increases recovery from oil saturated, low permeability rocks.Field Tests - Two operators amenable to conducting a carbonated water flood test on an Austin Chalk well have been identified. Feasibility studies are presently underway.

  6. Experimental studies and model analysis of noble gas fractionation in low-permeability porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xin; Mack Kennedy, B.; Molins, Sergi; Kneafsey, Timothy; Evans, William C.

    2017-05-01

    Gas flow through the vadose zone from sources at depth involves fractionation effects that can obscure the nature of transport and even the identity of the source. Transport processes are particularly complex in low permeability media but as shown in this study, can be elucidated by measuring the atmospheric noble gases. A series of laboratory column experiments was conducted to evaluate the movement of noble gas from the atmosphere into soil in the presence of a net efflux of CO2, a process that leads to fractionation of the noble gases from their atmospheric abundance ratios. The column packings were designed to simulate natural sedimentary deposition by interlayering low permeability ceramic plates and high permeability beach sand. Gas samples were collected at different depths at CO2 fluxes high enough to cause extreme fractionation of the noble gases (4He/36Ar > 20 times the air ratio). The experimental noble gas fractionation-depth profiles were in good agreement with those predicted by the dusty gas (DG) model, demonstrating the applicability of the DG model across a broad spectrum of environmental conditions. A governing equation based on the dusty gas model was developed to specifically describe noble gas fractionation at each depth that is controlled by the binary diffusion coefficient, Knudsen diffusion coefficient and the ratio of total advection flux to total flux. Finally, the governing equation was used to derive the noble gas fractionation pattern and illustrate how it is influenced by soil CO2 flux, sedimentary sequence, thickness of each sedimentary layer and each layer's physical parameters. Three potential applications of noble gas fractionation are provided: evaluating soil attributes in the path of gas flow from a source at depth to the atmosphere, testing leakage through low permeability barriers used to isolate buried waste, and tracking biological methanogenesis and methane oxidation associated with hydrocarbon degradation.

  7. Study of the transport of cadusafos in two tropical undisturbed soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionisio Fernandez-Bayo, Jesus; Crevoisier, David; Saison, Carine; Geniez, Chantal; Huttel, Olivier; Samouelian, Anatja; Voltz, Marc

    2013-04-01

    The use of pesticides to control agriculture pests is a common practice on most tropical plantations whose vulnerability to pesticide pollution is very important due to the frequent heavy rains that wash pesticides from target areas. Tropical volcanic soils have been scarcely investigated in this sense and monitoring the dynamic of pesticide at column scale is of great interest for a better understanding at catchment scale and risk modelling. The objective was to study and model the transport of cadusafos (CDS) in two undisturbed soil columns from a nitisol and an andosol, representative of the major soils in agricultural areas of the FWI. Undisturbed soil columns from andosol (sandy-loam soil) and nitisol (clay soil) from Guadeloupe Island were spiked with 14C-CDS along with 10 g of granulate Rugby®. To each soil column, 10 rain events of different intensities (20 and 40 mm/h during 4 and 2 hours, respectively) were applied with 4-7 days delay between two subsequent rain events. For the nitisol columns, the cumulated rain was halved (by decreasing duration of each rain event) since these soils occur in drier areas of Guadeloupe and because the imposed rain intensities led to the accumulation of water at the surface of the column. At the end of the leaching experiment the extractable and non-extractable remaining pesticide residues were determined along the soil profile. The andosol presented a very high permeability attributed to the preferential flow expected in this type of soil with high macroporosity due to the allophane materials. The maximum concentration of CDS was attained during the first rainfall event while the cumulated infiltrated volume of water was much less than the pore volume of the column soil. The peak concentration levels of CDS were almost constant during the first 5 rain events and they decreased during the subsequent rain events, probably due to degradation and/or ageing processes of CDS. The nitisol showed lower permeability reflected in

  8. Clostridium difficile toxin A perturbs cytoskeletal structure and tight junction permeability of cultured human intestinal epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, G; Pothoulakis, C; LaMont, J T; Madara, J L

    1988-01-01

    Toxin A of Clostridium difficile causes severe inflammatory enterocolitis in man and animals that appears to be mediated in part by acute inflammatory cells that migrate into the toxin A-exposed mucosa. To determine the direct effects of toxin A on intestinal epithelial permeability and structure in the absence of other modulating factors, we used cultured monolayers of a human intestinal epithelial cell line (T84). A toxin A concentration of 7 x 10(-1) micrograms/ml (3 x 10(-9) M) nearly abolished monolayer transepithelial resistance within 6-8 h. This marked permeability defect occurred while the monolayers were still confluent. Dual sodium-mannitol flux studies localized the permeability defect to the intercellular tight junction. Cytotoxicity assays and morphological evaluation using Nomarski optics and electron microscopy failed to demonstrate any evidence of cell damage at the time the maximum resistance response was observed. Fluorescent staining for F actin, however, revealed a marked decrease in fluorescent intensity in toxin-treated monolayers versus controls. These data show that toxin A can directly affect the barrier function of this model intestinal epithelium and initially does so by selectively enhancing tight junction permeability. Furthermore, cytoskeletal structure is markedly altered over the same time course, although the integrity of individual cells is maintained. Because the cytoskeleton of intestinal epithelial cells is known to be capable of regulating tight junction permeability, we speculate that the above effects of toxin A on epithelial barrier function result from alterations of the cytoskeleton. Images PMID:3141478

  9. Clostridium difficile toxin A perturbs cytoskeletal structure and tight junction permeability of cultured human intestinal epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hecht, G; Pothoulakis, C; LaMont, J T; Madara, J L

    1988-11-01

    Toxin A of Clostridium difficile causes severe inflammatory enterocolitis in man and animals that appears to be mediated in part by acute inflammatory cells that migrate into the toxin A-exposed mucosa. To determine the direct effects of toxin A on intestinal epithelial permeability and structure in the absence of other modulating factors, we used cultured monolayers of a human intestinal epithelial cell line (T84). A toxin A concentration of 7 x 10(-1) micrograms/ml (3 x 10(-9) M) nearly abolished monolayer transepithelial resistance within 6-8 h. This marked permeability defect occurred while the monolayers were still confluent. Dual sodium-mannitol flux studies localized the permeability defect to the intercellular tight junction. Cytotoxicity assays and morphological evaluation using Nomarski optics and electron microscopy failed to demonstrate any evidence of cell damage at the time the maximum resistance response was observed. Fluorescent staining for F actin, however, revealed a marked decrease in fluorescent intensity in toxin-treated monolayers versus controls. These data show that toxin A can directly affect the barrier function of this model intestinal epithelium and initially does so by selectively enhancing tight junction permeability. Furthermore, cytoskeletal structure is markedly altered over the same time course, although the integrity of individual cells is maintained. Because the cytoskeleton of intestinal epithelial cells is known to be capable of regulating tight junction permeability, we speculate that the above effects of toxin A on epithelial barrier function result from alterations of the cytoskeleton.

  10. Ablation of MMP9 gene ameliorates paracellular permeability and fibrinogen-amyloid beta complex formation during hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Muradashvili, Nino; Tyagi, Reeta; Metreveli, Naira; Tyagi, Suresh C; Lominadze, David

    2014-09-01

    Increased blood level of homocysteine (Hcy), called hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) accompanies many cognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that HHcy-enhanced cerebrovascular permeability occurs via activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) and leads to an increased formation of fibrinogen-β-amyloid (Fg-Aβ) complex. Cerebrovascular permeability changes were assessed in C57BL/6J (wild type, WT), cystathionine-β-synthase heterozygote (Cbs+/-, a genetic model of HHcy), MMP9 gene knockout (Mmp9-/-), and Cbs and Mmp9 double knockout (Cbs+/-/Mmp9-/-) mice using a dual-tracer probing method. Expression of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) and Fg-Aβ complex formation was assessed in mouse brain cryosections by immunohistochemistry. Short-term memory of mice was assessed with a novel object recognition test. The cerebrovascular permeability in Cbs+/- mice was increased via mainly the paracellular transport pathway. VE-cadherin expression was the lowest and Fg-Aβ complex formation was the highest along with the diminished short-term memory in Cbs+/- mice. These effects of HHcy were ameliorated in Cbs+/-/Mmp9-/- mice. Thus, HHcy causes activation of MMP9 increasing cerebrovascular permeability by downregulation of VE-cadherin resulting in an enhanced formation of Fg-Aβ complex that can be associated with loss of memory. These data may lead to the identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention that can modulate HHcy-induced cerebrovascular permeability and resultant pathologies.

  11. Measurements, interpretation and climate change effects evaluation for pyroclastic bare soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, G.; Pagano, L.; Mercogliano, P.; Montesarchio, M.

    2012-12-01

    A physical model has been designed to achieve the following goals: to mark out the main features of the soil-atmosphere interaction; to quantify the water and energy fluxes through the soil surface during several years; to monitor the trends of the main variables regulating the hydraulic and thermal conditions. It is constituted by a soil volume (about 1mc) exposed to weather forcing; it is instrumented at four depths by sensors for measuring suction, water content and temperature. Therefore, a station allows knowing the meteo variables (rainfall, wind velocity and direction, air temperature, air pressure and relative humidity) and the two directly measurable components of the energy balance at the soil surface (net radiation and soil heat flux). Under the soil specimen, three shear beam load cells measure the soil weight and, hence, because the soil particles weight can be assumed as constant, the sample water storage. As first attempt, the soil surface is kept bare to avoid the complications led by overlapping processes induced by vegetation (interception, transpiration). Since May 2010, the soil involved in testing is pyroclastic material (silty sand) representative of air fall deposits covering a large part of Campania (South Italy) and erupted in the last 10,000 years by different volcanic centres (Phlegrean fields, Vesuvius). Because of their genesis, these soils show peculiar features: high porosity, low weight of soil unit volume, high water retention capacity; they cause an unusual hydraulic behaviour, halfway between coarse and fine soils in terms of saturated hydraulic permeability and mean slope of soil-water characteristic curve. In turn, these elements induce, among other things, that the currently adopted predictive approaches to estimate, for example, infiltration and evaporation processes are not directly suitable for these soils as the available parameters, even for grain sizes comparable to those of pyroclastic soils, fail to reproduce the

  12. Foam film permeability: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, R; Krastev, R; Zitha, Pacelli L J

    2008-02-28

    The mass transfer of gas through foam films is a prototype of various industrial and biological processes. The aim of this paper is to give a perspective and critical overview of studies carried out to date on the mass transfer of gas through foam films. Contemporary experimental data are summarized, and a comprehensive overview of the theoretical models used to explain the observed effects is given. A detailed description of the processes that occur when a gas molecule passes through each layer that forms a foam film is shown. The permeability of the film-building surfactant monolayers plays an important role for the whole permeability process. It can be successfully described by the models used to explain the permeability of surfactant monolayers on aqueous sub-phase. For this reason, the present paper briefly discusses the surfactant-induced resistance to mass transfer of gases through gas-liquid interface. One part of the paper discusses the experimental and theoretical aspects of the foam film permeability in a train of foam films in a matrix or a cylinder. This special case is important to explain the gas transfer in porous media or in foams. Finally, this paper will highlight the gaps and challenges and sketch possible directions for future research.

  13. Permeable pavement research – Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    These are the slides for the New York City Concrete Promotional Council Pervious Concrete Seminar presentation. The basis for the project, the monitoring design and some preliminary monitoring data from the permeable pavement parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center are pre...

  14. EVALUATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology represents a passive option for long-term treatment of ground-water contamination. PRBs are a potentially more cost-effective treatment option for a variety of dissolved contaminants, such as certain types of chlorinated solvents, ...

  15. Permeable pavement research – Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    These are the slides for the New York City Concrete Promotional Council Pervious Concrete Seminar presentation. The basis for the project, the monitoring design and some preliminary monitoring data from the permeable pavement parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center are pre...

  16. EVALUATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology represents a passive option for long-term treatment of ground-water contamination. PRBs are a potentially more cost-effective treatment option for a variety of dissolved contaminants, such as certain types of chlorinated solvents, ...

  17. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  18. Alterations in Intestinal Permeability After Thermal Injury,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    disaccharide with a The cause of the altered intestinal permeability in our molecular weight of 342, and mannitol, a monosaccharide patients who...and linear regression analyses were used as indicated. Differences •P<.01 vs controls and uninfected patients by analysis of were considered

  19. A permeable rotating-wheel solvent extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, D. R.; Nady, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    Column-type device reported employs circular permeable structures of wire mesh screen for extracting solvents from systems with low density differences and low interfacial tensions. Rotating screen wheels of structure fasten to shaft; stationary screen structures are supported by circular bands connected by radial metal arms.

  20. Prolactin and blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan M; Hamilton, W Ryan; Ramirez-Lee, Manuel A; Ali, Syed F; Gonzalez, Carmen

    2013-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) consists in part of a highly specialized set of cells which separates the brain from the vascular system. The BBB controls the entry and exit of substances from the brain tissue through tight junctions (TJs) between endothelial cells. It is known that the hormone prolactin (PRL) is able to regulate endothelial-dependent processes, like the balance between proliferation and apoptosis and the mammary epithelial permeability. However, the effects of PRL and the role it plays in the BBB permeability are still not well understood. A primary culture of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells was used as in vitro model of BBB. Cells were treated with PRL (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nM) for 24 hours. PRL significantly increased cellular proliferation at 10 and 100 nM, but did not modify basal apoptosis. These effects were dependent on the production of the mitogenic factor nitric oxide (NO). PRL significantly decreased the permeability and promoted an increase in trans-endothelial electrical resistance in a NO-independent way. PRL also increased the expression of the TJs proteins claudin-5 and occludin. The short form of the PRL receptor was detected in these cells but its expression was not modified by PRL. Together, these results suggest that PRL has the ability to increase cellular proliferation associated with a decrease on BBB permeability by increasing the expression of TJs proteins.

  1. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  2. Pump and treat in low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, D.M.

    1996-08-01

    Pump and Treat (P&T) is a commonly applied technology whose primary promise for the low permeability environments of interest to these technology reviews is almost certainly containment of the problem. Conventional P&T would be expected to offer little promise of complete restoration in such environments, unless very long time frames (decades or centuries) are considered. A variety of approaches have been proposed to enhance the efficiency of P&T; some appear to offer little promise in low or mixed permeability environments, while others may offer more promise (e.g. hydro- or pneumatic-fracturing, which are described elsewhere in this document, and application of vacuum to the extraction well(s), which is a proprietary technology whose promise is currently difficult to assess objectively). Understanding the potential advantages and means of optimizing these enhancement approaches requires more understanding of the basic processes limiting P&T performance in low or mixed permeability media. These efforts are probably also necessary to understand the advantages and means of optimizing many of the very different remedial technologies that may be applicable to low or mixed permeability environments. Finally, since a reasonably certain capability of P&T is containment (i.e. prevention of further migration of contaminants), P&T may generally be required as a sort of safety net around sites at which the alternative technologies are being tested or applied. 23 refs.

  3. Forest soils

    Treesearch

    Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Michael C. Amacher

    2009-01-01

    Productive soils are the foundation of sustainable forests throughout the United States. Forest soils are generally subjected to fewer disturbances than agricultural soils, particularly those that are tilled, so forest soils tend to have better preserved A-horizons than agricultural soils. Another major contrast between forest and agricultural soils is the addition of...

  4. FEASIBILITY OF ELECTROKINETIC SOIL REMEDIATION IN HORIZONTAL LASAGNA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated soil remediation technology called Lasagna has been developed that combines electrokinetics with treatment zones for use in low permeability soils where the rates of hydraulic and electrokinetic transport are too low to be useful for remediation of contaminants. The...

  5. FEASIBILITY OF ELECTROKINETIC SOIL REMEDIATION IN HORIZONTAL LASAGNA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated soil remediation technology called Lasagna has been developed that combines electrokinetics with treatment zones for use in low permeability soils where the rates of hydraulic and electrokinetic transport are too low to be useful for remediation of contaminants. The...

  6. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gasmore » causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design

  7. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gas causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design production

  8. Numerical modeling of shallow subsurface runoff on cultivated soil with temporary variable structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumr, David; Klípa, Vladimír; Dušek, Jaromír; Dostál, Tomáš

    2014-05-01

    Temporary variable properties of periodically cultivated soils are one of the crucial factors that must be taken into account to understand flow processes on agriculture catchments. Soil structure is a property that is often considered as a static rather than dynamic. This could be a reasonable assumption for compacted subsoil, but not for the plough layer. The man-made and natural processes such as an overuse of heavy machinery, tillage, plowing, harvest, quick vegetation and root growth, edaphon activity, raindrops kinetic energy, freezing, thawing etc. cause recurrent cycles of the topsoil loosening, compaction and surface sealing. Deformation of the structure causes reduction of volume and connectivity of inter-aggregate voids and eroded fine particles clog the macropores and preferential pathways, the infiltration capacity decreases. Originally connected large pores normally serve as a quick bypass for infiltrating water, therefore, based on the state of the topsoil structure one can expect different runoff mechanisms ranging from hypodermic to surface flow. The aim of the contribution is to examine the runoff dynamics along the inclined slope under different structural properties of the topsoil. We will present a numerical analysis of the effect of variable preferential domain ratio on subsurface runoff, the simulation results will be qualitatively compared to measured hydrographs at the catchment. We used a combination of physically based macroscopic models S1D and HYPO. In the S1D the dual permeability approach with two coupled Richards equations is used, the simultaneously operating HYPO code is based on a diffusion wave (Boussinesq eq.). The study is based on monitoring of water regime of the cultivated soils on experimental catchment Nucice (Central Bohemia, Czech Republic). The soil is classified as Cambisol, texture ranges from loam to clay loam classes. Soil is conservatively tilled till depth of approximately 17 cm, below that a compacted subsoil was

  9. Linking soil bacterial biodiversity and soil carbon stability.

    PubMed

    Mau, Rebecca L; Liu, Cindy M; Aziz, Maliha; Schwartz, Egbert; Dijkstra, Paul; Marks, Jane C; Price, Lance B; Keim, Paul; Hungate, Bruce A

    2015-06-01

    Native soil carbon (C) can be lost in response to fresh C inputs, a phenomenon observed for decades yet still not understood. Using dual-stable isotope probing, we show that changes in the diversity and composition of two functional bacterial groups occur with this 'priming' effect. A single-substrate pulse suppressed native soil C loss and reduced bacterial diversity, whereas repeated substrate pulses stimulated native soil C loss and increased diversity. Increased diversity after repeated C amendments contrasts with resource competition theory, and may be explained by increased predation as evidenced by a decrease in bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results suggest that biodiversity and composition of the soil microbial community change in concert with its functioning, with consequences for native soil C stability.

  10. Quantitative imaging of water transport in soil and roots using neutron radiography, D2O and a new numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is currently limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure the water fluxes in soil and plants. Our study aimed to develop a new non-destructive method to measure the local fluxes of water into roots of plants growing in soils. We injected deuterated water (D2O) near the roots of lupines growing in sandy soils, and we used neutron radiography to image the transport of D2O through the root system. The experiments were performed during day, when plants were transpiring, and at night, when transpiration was reduced. The radiographs showed that: 1) the radial transport of D2O from soil and roots depended similarly to diffusion and convection; and 2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To determine the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we simulated the D2O transport in soils and roots. A dual porosity model was used to describe the apoplastic and symplastic pathways of water across the root tissue. Other features such as the endodermis and the xylem were also included in the model. The D2O transport was modelled solving a convection-diffusion numerical model in soil and plants. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that at night the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modelling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For 24 day-old lupine grown in a sandy soil with uniform water content, our modelling results showed that root water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the roots near soil surface and it decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along root systems growing in soils. Future applications of this method include the characterization of varying root systems, the radial and axial hydraulic conductivity of different root

  11. DNA excision repair in permeable human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, W.K.; Bodell, W.J.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    U.v. irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts activated DNA repair, aspects of which were characterized in the cells after they were permeabilized. Incubation of intact cells for 20 min between irradiation and harvesting was necessary to obtain a maximum rate of reparative DNA synthesis. Cells harvested immediately after irradiation before repair was initiated displayed only a small stimulation of DNA synthesis, indicating that permeable cells have a reduced capacity to recognize pyrimidine dimers and activate repair. The distribution of sizes of DNA strands labeled during 10 min of reparative DNA synthesis resembled that of parental DNA. However, during a 60-min incubation of permeable cells at 37 degrees C, parental DNA and DNA labeled by reparative DNA synthesis were both cleaved to smaller sizes. Cleavage also occurred in unirradiated cells, indicating that endogenous nuclease was active during incubation. Repair patches synthesized in permeable cells displayed increased sensitivity to digestion by micrococcal nuclease. However, the change in sensitivity during a chase with unlabeled DNA precursors was small, suggesting that reassembly of nucleosome structure at sites of repair was impaired. To examine whether this deficiency was due to a preponderance of incomplete or unligated repair patches, 3H-labeled (repaired) DNA was purified, then digested with exonuclease III and nuclease S1 to probe for free 3' ends and single-stranded regions. About 85% of the (3H)DNA synthesized during a 10-min pulse resisted digestion, suggesting that a major fraction of the repair patches that were filled were also ligated. U.v. light-activated DNA synthesis in permeable cells, therefore, appears to represent the continuation of reparative gap-filling at sites of excision repair activated within intact cells. Gap-filling and ligation were comparatively efficient processes in permeable cells.

  12. Connexin Channel Permeability to Cytoplasmic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Andrew L.

    2007-01-01

    Connexin channels are known to be permeable to a variety of cytoplasmic molecules. The first observation of second messenger junctional permeability, made ∼30 years ago, sparked broad interest in gap junction channels as mediators of intercellular molecular signaling. Since then, much has been learned about the diversity of connexin channels with regard to isoform diversity, tissue and developmental distribution, modes of channel regulation, assembly and expression, biochemical modification and permeability, all of which appear to be dynamically regulated. This information has expanded the potential roles of connexin channels in development, physiology and disease, and made their elucidation much more complex - 30 years ago such an orchestra of junctional dynamics was unanticipated. Only recently, however, have investigators been able to directly address, in this more complex framework, the key issue: What specific biological molecules, second messengers and others, are able to permeate the various types of connexin channels, and how well? An important related issue, given the ever-growing list of connexin-related pathologies, is how these permeabilities are altered by disease-causing connexin mutations. Together, many studies show that a variety of cytoplasmic molecules can permeate the different types of connexin channels. A few studies reveal differences in permeation by different molecules through a particular type of connexin channel, and differences in permeation by a particular molecule through different types of connexin channels. This article describes and evaluates the various methods used to obtain these data, presents an annotated compilation of the results, and discusses the findings in the context of what can be inferred about mechanism of selectivity and potential relevance to signaling. The data strongly suggest that highly specific interactions take place between connexin pores and specific biological molecular permeants, and that those

  13. Ionic Permeability of Thin Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gutknecht, John; Tosteson, D. C.

    1970-01-01

    Ultrathin (black) lipid membranes were made from sheep red cell lipids dissolved in n-decane. The presence of aliphatic alcohols in the aqueous solutions bathing these membranes produced reversible changes in the ionic permeability, but not the osomotic permeability. Heptanol (8 mM), for example, caused the membrane resistance (Rm) to decrease from >108 to about 105 ohm-cm2 and caused a marked increase in the permeability to cations, especially potassium. In terms of ionic transference numbers, deduced from measurements of the membrane potential at zero current, Tcat/TCl increased from about 6 to 21 and TK/TNa increased from about 3 to 21. The addition of long-chain (C8ndash;C10) alcohols to the lipid solutions from which membranes were made produced similar effects on the ionic permeability. A plot of log Rm vs. log alcohol concentration was linear over the range of maximum change in Rm, and the slope was -3 to -5 for C2 through C7 alcohols, suggesting that a complex of several alcohol molecules is responsible for the increase in ionic permeability. Membrane permselectivity changed from cationic to anionic when thorium or ferric iron (10-4 M) was present in the aqueous phase or when a secondary amine (Amberlite LA-2) was added to the lipid solutions from which membranes were made. When membranes containing the secondary amine were exposed to heptanol, Rm became very low (103–104 ohm-cm2) and the membranes became perfectly anion-selective, developing chloride diffusion potentials up to 150 mv. PMID:5535355

  14. Permeability during densification of viscous droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Ed; Dobson, Katherine; Schauroth, Jenny; Heap, Michael; Farquharson, Jamie; Scheu, Bettina; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; von Aulock, Felix; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Fragmentation of magma can yield a transiently granular material, which can subsequently weld back to a fluid-continuum. This process results in dramatic changes in the porosity of the material, which impacts its fluid permeability. We collate published data for the porosity and permeability of volcanic and synthetic materials which have undergone this process to different amounts. By discriminating data for which good microstructural information are provided, we use simple scaling arguments to collapse the data in both the still-granular, high porosity region, and the fluid-continuum low porosity region, such that a universal description can be provided. This allows us to describe the microstructural meaning of permeability scaling, and to infer the controls on the position of this transition between dominantly granular (dispersion) and dominantly fluid-continuum materials. Fractures in coherent magmas are thought to be a primary degassing pathway in high viscosity systems. As a specific application, we consider transiently granular magma being transported through and deposited in these fractures. We finally present a physical model for the kinetics of porosity changes in arrays of viscous droplets and compare this with our experimental data. The combination of the physical model for the evolution of porosity with the scaling between porosity and permeability permits us to describe the evolution of permeability during densification. We anticipate that this will be a useful tool for predicting the longevity of degassing pathways in granular filled cracks, both in conduits and shallow lava domes, as well as during the sedimentation of exceptionally hot ignimbrites undergoing compaction and welding.

  15. Hydraulic Fracturing of Soils; A Literature Review.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    best case, or worst case. The study reported herein is an overview of one such test or technique, hydraulic fracturing , which is defined as the...formation of cracks, in soil by the application of hydraulic pressure greater than the minor principal stress at that point. Hydraulic fracturing , as a... hydraulic fracturing as a means for determination of lateral stresses, the technique can still be used for determining in situ total stress and permeability at a point in a cohesive soil.

  16. Dual-Mode Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J (Inventor); Dippold, Vance F (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-mode ramjet combustor used for operation over a wide flight Mach number range is described. Subsonic combustion mode is usable to lower flight Mach numbers than current dual-mode scramjets. High speed mode is characterized by supersonic combustion in a free-jet that traverses the subsonic combustion chamber to a variable nozzle throat. Although a variable combustor exit aperture is required, the need for fuel staging to accommodate the combustion process is eliminated. Local heating from shock-boundary-layer interactions on combustor walls is also eliminated.

  17. A multiscale model of distributed fracture and permeability in solids in all-round compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bellis, Maria Laura; Della Vecchia, Gabriele; Ortiz, Michael; Pandolfi, Anna

    2017-07-01

    We present a microstructural model of permeability in fractured solids, where the fractures are described in terms of recursive families of parallel, equidistant cohesive faults. Faults originate upon the attainment of tensile or shear strength in the undamaged material. Secondary faults may form in a hierarchical organization, creating a complex network of connected fractures that modify the permeability of the solid. The undamaged solid may possess initial porosity and permeability. The particular geometry of the superposed micro-faults lends itself to an explicit analytical quantification of the porosity and permeability of the damaged material. The model is the finite kinematics version of a recently proposed porous material model, applied with success to the simulation of laboratory tests and excavation problems [De Bellis, M. L., Della Vecchia, G., Ortiz, M., Pandolfi, A., 2016. A linearized porous brittle damage material model with distributed frictional-cohesive faults. Engineering Geology 215, 10-24. Cited By 0. 10.1016/j.enggeo.2016.10.010]. The extension adds over and above the linearized kinematics version for problems characterized by large deformations localized in narrow zones, while the remainder of the solid undergoes small deformations, as typically observed in soil and rock mechanics problems. The approach is particularly appealing as a means of modeling a wide scope of engineering problems, ranging from the prevention of water or gas outburst into underground mines, to the prediction of the integrity of reservoirs for CO2 sequestration or hazardous waste storage, to hydraulic fracturing processes.

  18. Dual approximations in optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, W. W.; Ianculescu, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    A dual approximation for the solution to an optimal control problem is analyzed. The differential equation is handled with a Lagrange multiplier while other constraints are treated explicitly. An algorithm for solving the dual problem is presented.

  19. A new quasi-steady method to measure gas permeability of weakly permeable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannot, Yves; Lasseux, Didier

    2012-01-01

    A new quasi-steady method for the determination of the apparent gas permeability of porous materials is presented in this paper along with the corresponding interpretative physical model derived from the unsteady flow equations. This method is mainly dedicated to the measurement of very low permeability of thin porous media, although thicker but more permeable samples may also be analyzed. The method relies on quasi-steady flow resulting from a (quasi) constant pressure maintained at the inlet face of the sample. Gas flow-rate, as low as 3 × 10-10 m3/s, is determined from the record of pressure increase in a reservoir connected to the outlet face of the sample. An estimate of the characteristic time, tc, to reach quasi-steady flow after imposing a constant pressure at the inlet is derived. It is validated by direct numerical simulations of the complete unsteady flow, clearly defining the required experimental duration for the method to apply. Experimental results obtained on rather permeable and thick rock samples are reported showing an excellent agreement of the measured permeability with that determined independently on the same sample whereas the experimental value of tc is also in very good agreement with the predicted one. The method is further employed on a composite material sheet allowing the identification of an apparent gas permeability of about 10-23 m2.

  20. Different application rate on the degradation of several important soil fumigants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low permeability tarp can effectively retain soil fumigant and increase concentration time exposure indices in soil. As a result, there is a potential to use reduced fumigant application rate that are efficacious to control soil pests. However, information on the effect of varying fumigant amount on...

  1. Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

  2. Photocontrolled Cargo Release from Dual Cross-Linked Polymer Particles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shereen; Cui, Jiwei; Fu, Qiang; Nam, Eunhyung; Ladewig, Katharina; Ren, Jing M; Wong, Edgar H H; Caruso, Frank; Blencowe, Anton; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-03-09

    Burst release of a payload from polymeric particles upon photoirradiation was engineered by altering the cross-linking density. This was achieved via a dual cross-linking concept whereby noncovalent cross-linking was provided by cyclodextrin host-guest interactions, and irreversible covalent cross-linking was mediated by continuous assembly of polymers (CAP). The dual cross-linked particles (DCPs) were efficiently infiltrated (∼80-93%) by the biomacromolecule dextran (molecular weight up to 500 kDa) to provide high loadings (70-75%). Upon short exposure (5 s) to UV light, the noncovalent cross-links were disrupted resulting in increased permeability and burst release of the cargo (50 mol % within 1 s) as visualized by time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. As sunlight contains UV light at low intensities, the particles can potentially be incorporated into systems used in agriculture, environmental control, and food packaging, whereby sunlight could control the release of nutrients and antimicrobial agents.

  3. Steam injection for in-situ remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    Sleep, B.

    1996-08-01

    The potential for remediation of dense, nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination by steam injection is investigated, including the advantages and disadvantages of the technology. The primary advantage is the significant enhancement of removal rates through steam distillation. The disadvantages are related to the lack of field experience with the technology and difficulties related to steam override and channeling in heterogeneous soils. The problems related to steam injection in low permeability fractured clay are examined, and removal times and costs are postulated for a hypothetical DNAPL contamination scenario. It is concluded that steam injection has significant potential for remediation of DNAPL in fractured clay soils, but there is significant uncertainty in predictions of the performance of steam injection in these soils. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Intestinal permeability study of minoxidil: assessment of minoxidil as a high permeability reference drug for biopharmaceutics classification.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Makoto; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Zur, Moran; Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-01-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate minoxidil as a high permeability reference drug for Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). The permeability of minoxidil was determined in in situ intestinal perfusion studies in rodents and permeability studies across Caco-2 cell monolayers. The permeability of minoxidil was compared with that of metoprolol, an FDA reference drug for BCS classification. In rat perfusion studies, the permeability of minoxidil was somewhat higher than that of metoprolol in the jejunum, while minoxidil showed lower permeability than metoprolol in the ileum. The permeability of minoxidil was independent of intestinal segment, while the permeability of metoprolol was region-dependent. Similarly, in mouse perfusion study, the jejunal permeability of minoxidil was 2.5-fold higher than that of metoprolol. Minoxidil and metoprolol showed similar permeability in Caco-2 study at apical pH of 6.5 and basolateral pH of 7.4. The permeability of minoxidil was independent of pH, while metoprolol showed pH-dependent transport in Caco-2 study. Minoxidil exhibited similar permeability in the absorptive direction (AP-BL) in comparison with secretory direction (BL-AP), while metoprolol had higher efflux ratio (ER > 2) at apical pH of 6.5 and basolateral pH of 7.4. No concentration-dependent transport was observed for either minoxidil or metoprolol transport in Caco-2 study. Verapamil did not alter the transport of either compounds across Caco-2 cell monolayers. The permeability of minoxidil was independent of both pH and intestinal segment in intestinal perfusion studies and Caco-2 studies. Caco-2 studies also showed no involvement of carrier mediated transport in the absorption process of minoxidil. These results suggest that minoxidil may be an acceptable reference drug for BCS high permeability classification. However, minoxidil exhibited higher jejunal permeability than metoprolol and thus to use minoxidil as a reference drug would raise the

  5. Generation and mobility of radon in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    This research generation and mobility of radon in soil evaluates the extent and nature of uranium and radium depletion and/or enrichment in soil horizons as a function of climate and other factors affecting soil character; evaluates the relation of radon emanation coefficient to soil type, soil properties, soil-forming factors, and radon levels in soil gas; and evaluate the relations of fragipans, soil moisture and soil permeability to radon concentration and radon flux in soil profiles. The approach has been to investigate in detail 13 soil profiles selected to represent distinct differences in parent material (limestone, sandstone, shale, granite), major soil groups (Alfisols, Ultisol, Inceptisol, Mollisol, Spodosol), and moisture regimes (well-drained to somewhat poorly drained with fragipan). The nine profiles investigated in the first 2 years are in Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Four profiles currently being sampled are in New York, Tennessee, Illinois and Pennsylvania. Samples from five profiles in Georgia have also been analyzed in less detail. A combination of pedologic, geochemical and radiometric methods have been applied to understanding radon at these sites (Table 2). An important feature of the project has been the collaboration of a geochemist, a soil scientist and a nuclear engineer as Co-PI's. 4 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic fracturing is a physical process that creates fractures in silty clay soil to enhance its permeability. The technology, developed by the Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) and the University of Cincinnati, creates sand-filled horizontal fractures up to 1 in. i...

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic fracturing is a physical process that creates fractures in silty clay soil to enhance its permeability. The technology, developed by the Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) and the University of Cincinnati, creates sand-filled horizontal fractures up to 1 in. i...

  8. Permeability-porosity relationships in sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1994-01-01

    In many consolidated sandstone and carbonate formations, plots of core data show that the logarithm of permeability (k) is often linearly proportional to porosity (??). The slope, intercept, and degree of scatter of these log(k)-?? trends vary from formation to formation, and these variations are attributed to differences in initial grain size and sorting, diagenetic history, and compaction history. In unconsolidated sands, better sorting systematically increases both permeability and porosity. In sands and sandstones, an increase in gravel and coarse grain size content causes k to increase even while decreasing ??. Diagenetic minerals in the pore space of sandstones, such as cement and some clay types, tend to decrease log(k) proportionately as ?? decreases. Models to predict permeability from porosity and other measurable rock parameters fall into three classes based on either grain, surface area, or pore dimension considerations. (Models that directly incorporate well log measurements but have no particular theoretical underpinnings from a fourth class.) Grain-based models show permeability proportional to the square of grain size times porosity raised to (roughly) the fifth power, with grain sorting as an additional parameter. Surface-area models show permeability proportional to the inverse square of pore surface area times porosity raised to (roughly) the fourth power; measures of surface area include irreducible water saturation and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pore-dimension models show permeability proportional to the square of a pore dimension times porosity raised to a power of (roughly) two and produce curves of constant pore size that transgress the linear data trends on a log(k)-?? plot. The pore dimension is obtained from mercury injection measurements and is interpreted as the pore opening size of some interconnected fraction of the pore system. The linear log(k)-?? data trends cut the curves of constant pore size from the pore-dimension models

  9. Dual Coding in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, John K.; Wildman, Terry M.

    The purpose of this study was to test the applicability of the dual coding hypothesis to children's recall performance. The hypothesis predicts that visual interference will have a small effect on the recall of visually presented words or pictures, but that acoustic interference will cause a decline in recall of visually presented words and…

  10. Dual beam optical interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A dual beam interferometer device is disclosed that enables moving an optics module in a direction, which changes the path lengths of two beams of light. The two beams reflect off a surface of an object and generate different speckle patterns detected by an element, such as a camera. The camera detects a characteristic of the surface.

  11. Exploring the scale-dependent permeability of fractured andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.

    2016-08-01

    Extension fractures in volcanic systems exist on all scales, from microscopic fractures to large fissures. They play a fundamental role in the movement of fluids and distribution of pore pressure, and therefore exert considerable influence over volcanic eruption recurrence. We present here laboratory permeability measurements for porous (porosity = 0.03-0.6) andesites before (i.e., intact) and after failure in tension (i.e., the samples host a throughgoing tensile fracture). The permeability of the intact andesites increases with increasing porosity, from 2 ×10-17 to 5 ×10-11 m2. Following fracture formation, the permeability of the samples (the equivalent permeability) falls within a narrow range, 2- 6 ×10-11 m2, regardless of their initial porosity. However, laboratory measurements on fractured samples likely overestimate the equivalent permeability due to the inherent scale-dependence of permeability. To explore this scale-dependence, we first determined the permeability of the tensile fractures using a two-dimensional model that considers flow in parallel layers. Our calculations highlight that tensile fractures in low-porosity samples are more permeable (as high as 3.5 ×10-9 m2) than those in high-porosity samples (as low as 4.1 ×10-10 m2), a difference that can be explained by an increase in fracture tortuosity with porosity. We then use our fracture permeability data to model the equivalent permeability of fractured rock (with different host rock permeabilities, from 10-17 to 10-11 m2) with increasing lengthscale. We highlight that our modelling approach can be used to estimate the equivalent permeability of numerous scenarios at andesitic stratovolcanoes in which the fracture density and width and host rock porosity or permeability are known. The model shows that the equivalent permeability of fractured andesite depends heavily on the initial host rock permeability and the scale of interest. At a given lengthscale, the equivalent permeability of

  12. Scanning electron microscopy and dentinal permeability analysis of smear layer.

    PubMed

    Prati, C; Mongiorgi, R; Pashley, D H; Riva di Sanseverino, L

    1991-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the surface morphology and the permeability of dentine after different acid treatments: polyacrylic acid, maleic acid, phosphoric acid and saline solution as control. Dentine permeability was expressed as hydraulic conductance. All the acid treatments removed the smear layer and increased the dentine permeability.

  13. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, oth