Science.gov

Sample records for dual receptor mechanisms

  1. Blocking NMDA receptors delays death in rats with acute liver failure by dual protective mechanisms in kidney and brain.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Omar; González-Usano, Alba; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gimenez-Garzó, Carla; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ruiz-Sauri, Amparo; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Duszczyk, Malgorzata; Malek, Michal; Lazarewicz, Jerzy W; Carratalá, Arturo; Urios, Amparo; Miguel, Alfonso; Torregrosa, Isidro; Carda, Carmen; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is unsatisfactory and mortality remains unacceptably high. Blocking NMDA receptors delays or prevents death of rats with ALF. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Clarifying these mechanisms will help to design more efficient treatments to increase patient's survival. The aim of this work was to shed light on the mechanisms by which blocking NMDA receptors delays rat's death in ALF. ALF was induced by galactosamine injection. NMDA receptors were blocked by continuous MK-801 administration. Edema and cerebral blood flow were assessed by magnetic resonance. The time course of ammonia levels in brain, muscle, blood, and urine; of glutamine, lactate, and water content in brain; of glomerular filtration rate and kidney damage; and of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and intracranial pressure was assessed. ALF reduces kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as reflected by reduced inulin clearance. GFR reduction is due to both reduced renal perfusion and kidney tubular damage as reflected by increased Kim-1 in urine and histological analysis. Blocking NMDA receptors delays kidney damage, allowing transient increased GFR and ammonia elimination which delays hyperammonemia and associated changes in brain. Blocking NMDA receptors does not prevent cerebral edema or blood-brain barrier permeability but reduces or prevents changes in cerebral blood flow and brain lactate. The data show that dual protective effects of MK-801 in kidney and brain delay cerebral alterations, HE, intracranial pressure increase and death. NMDA receptors antagonists may increase survival of patients with ALF by providing additional time for liver transplantation or regeneration.

  2. A Dual-Sensing Receptor Confers Robust Cellular Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Schramke, Hannah; Tostevin, Filipe; Heermann, Ralf; Gerland, Ulrich; Jung, Kirsten

    2016-06-28

    Cells have evolved diverse mechanisms that maintain intracellular homeostasis in fluctuating environments. In bacteria, control is often exerted by bifunctional receptors acting as both kinase and phosphatase to regulate gene expression, a design known to provide robustness against noise. Yet how such antagonistic enzymatic activities are balanced as a function of environmental change remains poorly understood. We find that the bifunctional receptor that regulates K(+) uptake in Escherichia coli is a dual sensor, which modulates its autokinase and phosphatase activities in response to both extracellular and intracellular K(+) concentration. Using mathematical modeling, we show that dual sensing is a superior strategy for ensuring homeostasis when both the supply of and demand for a limiting resource fluctuate. By engineering standards, this molecular control system displays a strikingly high degree of functional integration, providing a reference for the vast numbers of receptors for which the sensing strategy remains elusive. PMID:27320909

  3. Control of gravitropic orientation. II. Dual receptor model for gravitropism.

    PubMed

    LaMotte, Clifford E; Pickard, Barbara G

    2004-01-01

    Gravitropism of vascular plants has been assumed to require a single gravity receptor mechanism. However, based on the evidence in Part I of this study, we propose that maize roots require two. The first mechanism is without a directional effect and, by itself, cannot give rise to tropism. Its role is quantitative facilitation of the second mechanism, which is directional like the gravitational force itself and provides the impetus for tropic curvature. How closely coupled the two mechanisms may be is, as yet, unclear. The evidence for dual receptors supports a general model for roots. When readiness for gravifacilitation, or gravifacilitation itself, is constitutive, orthogravitropic curvature can go to completion. If not constitutively enabled, gravifacilitation can be weak in the absence of light and water deficit or strong in the presence of light and water deficit. In either case, it can decay and permit roots to assume reproducible non-vertical orientations (plagiogravitropic or plagiotropic orientations) without using non-vertical setpoints. In this way roots are deployed in a large volume of soil. Gravitropic behaviours in shoots are more diverse than in roots, utilising oblique and horizontal as well as vertical setpoints. As a guide to future experiments, we assess how constitutive v. non-constitutive modes of gravifacilitation might contribute to behaviours based on each kind of setpoint. PMID:15895503

  4. Control of gravitropic orientation. II. Dual receptor model for gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMotte, Clifford E.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    2004-01-01

    Gravitropism of vascular plants has been assumed to require a single gravity receptor mechanism. However, based on the evidence in Part I of this study, we propose that maize roots require two. The first mechanism is without a directional effect and, by itself, cannot give rise to tropism. Its role is quantitative facilitation of the second mechanism, which is directional like the gravitational force itself and provides the impetus for tropic curvature. How closely coupled the two mechanisms may be is, as yet, unclear. The evidence for dual receptors supports a general model for roots. When readiness for gravifacilitation, or gravifacilitation itself, is constitutive, orthogravitropic curvature can go to completion. If not constitutively enabled, gravifacilitation can be weak in the absence of light and water deficit or strong in the presence of light and water deficit. In either case, it can decay and permit roots to assume reproducible non-vertical orientations (plagiogravitropic or plagiotropic orientations) without using non-vertical setpoints. In this way roots are deployed in a large volume of soil. Gravitropic behaviours in shoots are more diverse than in roots, utilising oblique and horizontal as well as vertical setpoints. As a guide to future experiments, we assess how constitutive v. non-constitutive modes of gravifacilitation might contribute to behaviours based on each kind of setpoint.

  5. Progesterone Receptor Signaling Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sandra L; Hartig, Sean M; Edwards, Dean P

    2016-09-25

    Progesterone receptor (PR) is a master regulator in female reproductive tissues that controls developmental processes and proliferation and differentiation during the reproductive cycle and pregnancy. PR also plays a role in progression of endocrine-dependent breast cancer. As a member of the nuclear receptor family of ligand-dependent transcription factors, the main action of PR is to regulate networks of target gene expression in response to binding its cognate steroid hormone, progesterone. This paper summarizes recent advances in understanding the structure-function properties of the receptor protein and the tissue/cell-type-specific PR signaling pathways that contribute to the biological actions of progesterone in the normal breast and in breast cancer. PMID:27380738

  6. Dual-Color Luciferase Complementation for Chemokine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors may share common ligands, setting up potential competition for ligand binding, and association of activated receptors with downstream signaling molecules such as β-arrestin. Determining the "winner" of competition for shared effector molecules is essential for understanding integrated functions of chemokine receptor signaling in normal physiology, disease, and response to therapy. We describe a dual-color click beetle luciferase complementation assay for cell-based analysis of interactions of two different chemokine receptors, CXCR4 and ACKR3, with the intracellular scaffolding protein β-arrestin 2. This assay provides real-time quantification of receptor activation and signaling in response to chemokine CXCL12. More broadly, this general imaging strategy can be applied to quantify interactions of any set of two proteins that interact with a common binding partner.

  7. Molecular characterization of a dual endothelin-1/Angiotensin II receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Opazo, N.; Hirayama, K.; Akimoto, K.; Herrera, V. L.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The molecular recognition theory (MRT) provides a conceptual framework that could explain the evolution of intermolecular and intramolecular interaction of peptides and proteins. As such, it predicts that binding sites of peptide hormones, and its receptor binding sites were originally encoded by and evolved from complementary strands of genomic DNA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On the basis of principles underlying the MRT, we screened a rat brain complementary DNA library using an AngII followed by an endothelin-1 (ET-1) antisense oligonucleotide probe, expecting to isolate potential cognate receptors. RESULTS: An identical cDNA clone was isolated independently from both the AngII and ET-1 oligonucleotide screenings. Structural analysis revealed a receptor polypeptide containing a single predicted transmembrane region with distinct ET-1 and AngII putative binding domains. Functional analysis demonstrated ET-1- and AngII-specific binding as well as ET-1- and AngII-induced coupling to a Ca2+ mobilizing transduction system. Amino acid substitutions within the predicted ET-1 binding domain obliterate ET-1 binding while preserving AngII binding, thus defining the structural determinants of ET-1 binding within the dual ET-1/AngII receptor, as well as corroborating the dual nature of the receptor. CONCLUSIONS: Elucidation of the dual ET-1/AngII receptor provides further molecular genetic evidence in support of the molecular recognition theory and identifies for the first time a molecular link between the ET-1 and AngII hormonal systems that could underlie observed similar physiological responses elicited by ET-1 and AngII in different organ systems. The prominent expression of the ET-1/AngII receptor mRNA in brain and heart tissues suggests an important role in cardiovascular function in normal and pathophysiological states. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:9508787

  8. The development of FRET-based dual receptor optical biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Juntao

    The focus of the research presented in this dissertation is the development of a new FRET-based dual receptor sensing method for detecting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The new detection method presented in this dissertation imitates the way HIV infects cells. It utilizes the two receptor-binding event and integrates a chemical transducer system with two unique protein receptors, CD4 and mAb (HIV-1 gp120 monoclonal antibody), which both bind to gp120. The chemical transduction system is based on the distance-dependant principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The work presented in this dissertation attempts to demonstrate the feasibility of this new sensing method both in solution and on an optical fiber. Appropriate FRET pairs which have high energy transfer efficiency as well as good conjugation properties with receptors were selected and optimized. The two receptors, CD4 and mAb which specifically bind to gp120, were conjugated to one of the optimized FRET fluorophore pairs, AMCA-NHS (succinimidyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetic acid) and FITC (fluorescein isothiocyanate), respectively. For the solution test, the viral protein gp120, which is the featured protein on the surface of HIV-1, was detected by the mixed solution of the two FRET pair tagged receptors. A spectrofluorometer was used to detect the fluorescent change between AMCA-NHS and FITC peak intensities when the receptors bind to the gp120. Specific binding and non-specific binding gp120 were used to test the selectivity of this method. The results of the solution test indicated that FRET-conjugated receptors can efficiently distinguish the presence of specific and non-specific binding gp120 and proved the feasibility of the FRET-based dual receptor method in detecting the presence of gp120 with a limit of detection of 5ng/ml (0.5nM) in solution. For the optical fiber test, two FRET-conjugated receptors were immobilized onto an optical fiber silica core tip to detect the

  9. Dual Higgs Mechanism for Quarks in Hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, H.; Sasaki, S.; Toki, H.; Ichie, H.

    We study nonperturbative features of QCD using the dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory, where the color confinement is realized through the dual Higgs mechanism brought by QCD-monopole condensation. The linear confinement potential appears in the QCD-monopole condensed vacuum. We study the infrared screening effect to the confinement potential by the light-quark pair creation, and derive a compact formula for the screened quark potential. We study the dynamical chiral-symmetry breaking (DχSB) in the DGL theory by solving the Schwinger-Dyson equation. QCD-monopole condensation plays an essential role to DχSB. The QCD phase transition at finite temperature is studied using the effective potential formalism in the DGL theory. We find the reduction of QCD-monopole condensation and the string tension at high temperatures. The surface tension is calculated using the effective potential at the critical temperature T_c. The DGL theory predicts a large mass reduction of glueballs near T_c. We apply the DGL theory to the quark-gluon-plasma (QGP) physics in the ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We propose a new scenario of the QGP formation via the annihilation of color-electric flux tubes based on the attractive force between them.

  10. Molecular modeling, quantum polarized ligand docking and structure-based 3D-QSAR analysis of the imidazole series as dual AT1 and ETA receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Khuraijam Dhanachandra; Muthusamy, Karthikeyan

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Both endothelin ETA receptor antagonists and angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonists lower blood pressure in hypertensive patients. A dual AT1 and ETA receptor antagonist may be more efficacious antihypertensive drug. In this study we identified the mode and mechanism of binding of imidazole series of compounds as dual AT1 and ETA receptor antagonists. Methods: Molecular modeling approach combining quantum-polarized ligand docking (QPLD), MM/GBSA free-energy calculation and 3D-QSAR analysis was used to evaluate 24 compounds as dual AT1 and ETA receptor antagonists and to reveal their binding modes and structural basis of the inhibitory activity. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening and docking studies were performed to identify more potent dual antagonists. Results: 3D-QSAR models of the imidazole compounds were developed from the conformer generated by QPLD, and the resulting models showed a good correlation between the predicted and experimental activity. The visualization of the 3D-QSAR model in the context of the compounds under study revealed the details of the structure-activity relationship: substitution of methoxymethyl and cyclooctanone might increase the activity against AT1 receptor, while substitution of cyclohexone and trimethylpyrrolidinone was important for the activity against ETA receptor; addition of a trimethylpyrrolidinone to compound 9 significantly reduced its activity against AT1 receptor but significantly increased its activity against ETA receptor, which was likely due to the larger size and higher intensities of the H-bond donor and acceptor regions in the active site of ETA receptor. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening followed by subsequent Glide SP, XP, QPLD and MM/GBSA calculation identified 5 potential lead compounds that might act as dual AT1 and ETA receptor antagonists. Conclusion: This study may provide some insights into the development of novel potent dual ETA and AT1 receptor antagonists. As a result, five compounds are

  11. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  12. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Karsten; Xu, Yong; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Kovach, Amanda; Tham, Fook S.; Cutler, Sean R.; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-11-11

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of prolactin and its receptor.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Charles L

    2012-08-01

    Prolactin and the prolactin receptors are members of a family of hormone/receptor pairs which include GH, erythropoietin, and other ligand/receptor pairs. The mechanisms of these ligand/receptor pairs have broad similarities, including general structures, ligand/receptor stoichiometries, and activation of several common signaling pathways. But significant variations in the structural and mechanistic details are present among these hormones and their type 1 receptors. The prolactin receptor is particularly interesting because it can be activated by three sequence-diverse human hormones: prolactin, GH, and placental lactogen. This system offers a unique opportunity to compare the detailed molecular mechanisms of these related hormone/receptor pairs. This review critically evaluates selected literature that informs these mechanisms, compares the mechanisms of the three lactogenic hormones, compares the mechanism with those of other class 1 ligand/receptor pairs, and identifies information that will be required to resolve mechanistic ambiguities. The literature describes distinct mechanistic differences between the three lactogenic hormones and their interaction with the prolactin receptor and describes more significant differences between the mechanisms by which other related ligands interact with and activate their receptors.

  14. The duration of sleep promoting efficacy by dual orexin receptor antagonists is dependent upon receptor occupancy threshold

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drugs targeting insomnia ideally promote sleep throughout the night, maintain normal sleep architecture, and are devoid of residual effects associated with morning sedation. These features of an ideal compound are not only dependent upon pharmacokinetics, receptor binding kinetics, potency and pharmacodynamic activity, but also upon a compound’s mechanism of action. Results Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) block the arousal-promoting activity of orexin peptides and, as demonstrated in the current work, exhibit an efficacy signal window dependent upon oscillating levels of endogenous orexin neuropeptide. Sleep efficacy of structurally diverse DORAs in rat and dog was achieved at plasma exposures corresponding to orexin 2 receptor (OX2R) occupancies in the range of 65 to 80%. In rats, the time course of OX2R occupancy was dependent upon receptor binding kinetics and was tightly correlated with the timing of active wake reduction. In rhesus monkeys, direct comparison of DORA-22 with GABA-A modulators at similar sleep-inducing doses revealed that diazepam produced next-day residual sleep and both diazepam and eszopiclone induced next-day cognitive deficits. In stark contrast, DORA-22 did not produce residual effects. Furthermore, DORA-22 evoked only minimal changes in quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) activity during the normal resting phase in contrast to GABA-A modulators which induced substantial qEEG changes. Conclusion The higher levels of receptor occupancy necessary for DORA efficacy require a plasma concentration profile sufficient to maintain sleep for the duration of the resting period. DORAs, with a half-life exceeding 8 h in humans, are expected to fulfill this requirement as exposures drop to sub-threshold receptor occupancy levels prior to the wake period, potentially avoiding next-day residual effects at therapeutic doses. PMID:23981345

  15. Infrared abelian dominance and dual Higgs mechanisms in MA gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, H.; Amemiya, K.; Ichie, H.

    We study infrared abelian dominance and the dual Higgs mechanism in the maximally abelian (MA) gauge using the lattice QCD Monte Carlo simulation. In the MA gauge, the off-diagonal gluon phase tends to be random, and the off-diagonal gluon Aμ± acquires the effective mass as Moff ≅ 1.2 GeV. From the monopole current in the MA gauge, we extract the dual gluon field Bμ and estimate the dual gluon mass as mB ≅ 0.5 GeV. The QCD-monopole structure is also investigated in terms of off-diagonal gluons. From the lattice QCD in the MA gauge, the dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory can be constructed as a realistic infrared effective theory based on QCD

  16. Dual-specific Phosphatase-6 (Dusp6) and ERK Mediate AMPA Receptor-induced Oligodendrocyte Death*

    PubMed Central

    Domercq, Maria; Alberdi, Elena; Sánchez-Gómez, Maria Victoria; Ariz, Usue; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, are highly vulnerable to glutamate excitotoxicity, a mechanism involved in tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Thus, understanding oligodendrocyte death at the molecular level is important to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat the disease. Here, using microarray analysis and quantitative PCR, we observed that dual-specific phosphatase-6 (Dusp6), an extracellular regulated kinase-specific phosphatase, is up-regulated in oligodendrocyte cultures as well as in optic nerves after AMPA receptor activation. In turn, Dusp6 is overexpressed in optic nerves from multiple sclerosis patients before the appearance of evident damage in this structure. We further analyzed the role of Dusp6 and ERK signaling in excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and observed that AMPA receptor activation induces a rapid increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Blocking Dusp6 expression, which enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation, significantly diminished AMPA receptor-induced oligodendrocyte death. In contrast, MAPK/ERK pathway inhibition with UO126 significantly potentiates excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and increases cytochrome c release, mitochondrial depolarization, and mitochondrial calcium overload produced by AMPA receptor stimulation. Upstream analysis demonstrated that MAPK/ERK signaling alters AMPA receptor properties. Indeed, Dusp6 overexpression as well as incubation with UO126 produced an increase in AMPA receptor-induced inward currents and cytosolic calcium overload. Together, these data suggest that levels of phosphorylated ERK, controlled by Dusp6 phosphatase, regulate glutamate receptor permeability and oligodendroglial excitotoxicity. Therefore, targeting Dusp6 may be a useful strategy to prevent oligodendrocyte death in multiple sclerosis and other diseases involving CNS white matter. PMID:21300799

  17. Directed Molecular Evolution of an Engineered Gammaretroviral Envelope Protein with Dual Receptor Use Shows Stable Maintenance of Both Receptor Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Friis, Kristina Pagh; Iturrioz, Xavier; Thomsen, Jonas; Alvear-Perez, Rodrigo; Bahrami, Shervin; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have previously reported the construction of a murine leukemia virus-based replication-competent gammaretrovirus (SL3-AP) capable of utilizing the human G protein-coupled receptor APJ (hAPJ) as its entry receptor and its natural receptor, the murine Xpr1 receptor, with equal affinities. The apelin receptor has previously been shown to function as a coreceptor for HIV-1, and thus, adaptation of the viral vector to this receptor is of significant interest. Here, we report the molecular evolution of the SL3-AP envelope protein when the virus is cultured in cells harboring either the Xpr1 or the hAPJ receptor. Interestingly, the dual receptor affinity is maintained even after 10 passages in these cells. At the same time, the chimeric viral envelope protein evolves in a distinct pattern in the apelin cassette when passaged on D17 cells expressing hAPJ in three separate molecular evolution studies. This pattern reflects selection for reduced ligand-receptor interaction and is compatible with a model in which SL3-AP has evolved not to activate hAPJ receptor internalization. IMPORTANCE Few successful examples of engineered retargeting of a retroviral vector exist. The engineered SL3-AP envelope is capable of utilizing either the murine Xpr1 or the human APJ receptor for entry. In addition, SL3-AP is the first example of an engineered retrovirus retaining its dual tropism after several rounds of passaging on cells expressing only one of its receptors. We demonstrate that the virus evolves toward reduced ligand-receptor affinity, which sheds new light on virus adaptation. We provide indirect evidence that such reduced affinity leads to reduced receptor internalization and propose a novel model in which too rapid receptor internalization may decrease virus entry. PMID:26608314

  18. Dual pathways of internalization of the cholecystokinin receptor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Receptor molecules play a major role in the desensitization of agonist- stimulated cellular responses. For G protein-coupled receptors, rapid desensitization occurs via receptor phosphorylation, sequestration, and internalization, yet the cellular compartments in which these events occur and their interrelationships are unclear. In this work, we focus on the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor, which has been well characterized with respect to phosphorylation. We have used novel fluorescent and electron-dense CCK receptor ligands and an antibody to probe receptor localization in a CCK receptor-bearing CHO cell line. In the unstimulated state, receptors were diffusely distributed over the plasmalemma. Agonist occupation stimulated endocytosis via both clathrin-dependent and independent pathways. The former was predominant, leading to endosomal and lysosomal compartments, as well as recycling to the plasmalemma. The clathrin-independent processes led to a smooth vesicular compartment adjacent to the plasmalemma resembling caveolae, which did not transport ligand deeper within the cell. Potassium depletion largely eliminated clathrin-dependent endocytosis, while not interfering with agonist-stimulated receptor movement into subplasmalemmal smooth vesicle compartments. These cellular endocytic events can be related to the established cycle of CCK receptor phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which we have previously described (Klueppelberg, U. G., L. K. Gates, F. S. Gorelick, and L. J. Miller. 1991. J. Biol. Chem. 266:2403-2408; Lutz, M. P., D. I. Pinon, L. K. Gates, S. Shenolikar, and L. J. Miller. 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268:12136-12142). The rapid onset and peak of receptor phosphorylation after agonist occupation correlates best with a plasmalemmal localization, while stimulated receptor phosphatase activity correlates best with receptor residence in intracellular compartments. We postulate that the smooth vesicular compartment adjacent to the plasmalemma functions for

  19. Behavioral analyses of GHB: receptor mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lawrence P; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    GHB is used therapeutically and recreationally, although the precise mechanism of action responsible for its different behavioral effects is not entirely clear. The purpose of this review is to summarize how behavioral procedures, especially drug discrimination procedures, have been used to study the mechanism of action of GHB. More specifically, we will review several different drug discrimination procedures and discuss how they have been used to qualitatively and quantitatively study different components of the complex mechanism of action of GHB. A growing number of studies have provided evidence that the behavioral effects of GHB are mediated predominantly by GABAB receptors. However, there is also evidence that the mechanisms mediating the effects of GHB and the prototypical GABAB receptor agonist baclofen are not identical, and that other mechanisms such as GHB receptors and subtypes of GABAA and GABAB receptors might contribute to the effects of GHB. These findings are consistent with the different behavioral profile, abuse liability, and therapeutic indications of GHB and baclofen. A better understanding of the similarities and differences between GHB and baclofen, as well as the pharmacological mechanisms of action underlying the recreational and therapeutic effects of GHB, could lead to more effective medications with fewer adverse effects.

  20. Action mechanisms of Liver X Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gabbi, Chiara; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • LXRα and LXRβ are ligand-activated nuclear receptors. • They share oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, RXR. • LXRs regulate lipid and glucose metabolism, CNS and immune functions, and water transport. - Abstract: The two Liver X Receptors, LXRα and LXRβ, are nuclear receptors belonging to the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. They share more than 78% homology in amino acid sequence, a common profile of oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, Retinoid X Receptor. LXRs play crucial roles in several metabolic pathways: lipid metabolism, in particular in preventing cellular cholesterol accumulation; glucose homeostasis; inflammation; central nervous system functions and water transport. As with all nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of LXR is the result of an orchestration of numerous cellular factors including ligand bioavailability, presence of corepressors and coactivators and cellular context i.e., what other pathways are activated in the cell at the time the receptor recognizes its ligand. In this mini-review we summarize the factors regulating the transcriptional activity and the mechanisms of action of these two receptors.

  1. Structure-guided development of dual β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Dietmar; Stanek, Markus; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Aiming to discover dual-acting β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor ligands, a structure-guided approach for the evolution of GPCR agonists that address multiple targets was elaborated. Starting from GPCR crystal structures, we describe the design, synthesis and biological investigation of a defined set of compounds leading to the identification of the benzoxazinone (R)-3, which shows agonist properties at the adrenergic β2 receptor and substantial G protein-promoted activation at the D2 receptor. This directed approach yielded molecular probes with tuned dual activity. The congener desOH-3 devoid of the benzylic hydroxyl function was shown to be a β2 adrenergic antagonist/D2 receptor agonist with Ki values in the low nanomolar range. The compounds may serve as a promising starting point for the investigation and treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:27132867

  2. Mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity of DYRK1A.

    PubMed

    Walte, Agnes; Rüben, Katharina; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Preisinger, Christian; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Hilz, Nikolaus; Bracher, Franz; Becker, Walter

    2013-09-01

    The function of many protein kinases is controlled by the phosphorylation of a critical tyrosine residue in the activation loop. Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs) autophosphorylate on this tyrosine residue but phosphorylate substrates on aliphatic amino acids. This study addresses the mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity in DYRK1A and related kinases. Tyrosine autophosphorylation of DYRK1A occurred rapidly during in vitro translation and did not depend on the non-catalytic domains or other proteins. Expression in bacteria as well as in mammalian cells revealed that tyrosine kinase activity of DYRK1A is not restricted to the co-translational autophosphorylation in the activation loop. Moreover, mature DYRK1A was still capable of tyrosine autophosphorylation. Point mutants of DYRK1A and DYRK2 lacking the activation loop tyrosine showed enhanced tyrosine kinase activity. A series of structurally diverse DYRK1A inhibitors was used to pharmacologically distinguish different conformational states of the catalytic domain that are hypothesized to account for the dual specificity kinase activity. All tested compounds inhibited substrate phosphorylation with higher potency than autophosphorylation but none of the tested inhibitors differentially inhibited threonine and tyrosine kinase activity. Finally, the related cyclin-dependent kinase-like kinases (CLKs), which lack the activation loop tyrosine, autophosphorylated on tyrosine both in vitro and in living cells. We propose a model of DYRK autoactivation in which tyrosine autophosphorylation in the activation loop stabilizes a conformation of the catalytic domain with enhanced serine/threonine kinase activity without disabling tyrosine phosphorylation. The mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity probably applies to related serine/threonine kinases that depend on tyrosine autophosphorylation for maturation. PMID:23809146

  3. Dual mechanism of action of the atypical tetracycline chelocardin.

    PubMed

    Stepanek, Jennifer J; Lukežič, Tadeja; Teichert, Ines; Petković, Hrvoje; Bandow, Julia E

    2016-06-01

    Classical tetracyclines targeting the protein biosynthesis machinery are commonly applied in human and veterinary medicine. The development and spread of resistance seriously compromise the successful treatment of bacterial infections. The atypical tetracycline chelocardin holds promise as it retains activity against tetracycline-resistant strains. It has been suggested that chelocardin targets the bacterial membrane, thus differing in mode of action from that of classical tetracyclines. We investigated the mechanism of action of chelocardin using global proteome analysis. The proteome profiles after sublethal chelocardin stress were compared to a reference compendium containing antibiotic response profiles of Bacillus subtilis. This approach revealed a concentration-dependent dual mechanism of action. At low concentrations, like classical tetracyclines, chelocardin induces the proteomic signature for peptidyl transferase inhibition demonstrating that protein biosynthesis inhibition is the dominant physiological challenge. At higher concentrations B. subtilis mainly responds to membrane stress indicating that at clinically relevant concentrations the membrane is the main antibiotic target of chelocardin. Studying the effects on the membrane in more detail, we found that chelocardin causes membrane depolarization but does not lead to formation of large pores. We conclude that at growth inhibiting doses chelocardin not only targets protein biosynthesis but also corrupts the integrity of the bacterial membrane. This dual mechanism of action might prove beneficial in slowing the development of new resistance mechanisms against this atypical tetracycline. PMID:26969785

  4. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  5. Dynamic dual-tracer MRI-guided fluorescence tomography to quantify receptor density in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Gunn, Jason R.; Deharvengt, Sophie J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    The up-regulation of cell surface receptors has become a central focus in personalized cancer treatment; however, because of the complex nature of contrast agent pharmacokinetics in tumor tissue, methods to quantify receptor binding in vivo remain elusive. Here, we present a dual-tracer optical technique for noninvasive estimation of specific receptor binding in cancer. A multispectral MRI-coupled fluorescence molecular tomography system was used to image the uptake kinetics of two fluorescent tracers injected simultaneously, one tracer targeted to the receptor of interest and the other tracer a nontargeted reference. These dynamic tracer data were then fit to a dual-tracer compartmental model to estimate the density of receptors available for binding in the tissue. Applying this approach to mice with deep-seated gliomas that overexpress the EGF receptor produced an estimate of available receptor density of 2.3 ± 0.5 nM (n = 5), consistent with values estimated in comparative invasive imaging and ex vivo studies. PMID:23671066

  6. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Stéphane; Noble, Florence; Marie, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors (OR) are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization, and post-endocytic fate of the receptor. PMID:25566076

  7. Dual FRET assay for detecting receptor protein interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Krusiński, Tomasz; Ozyhar, Andrzej; Dobryszycki, Piotr

    2010-05-01

    We present here a new assay that is based on the idea of the molecular beacon. This assay makes it possible to investigate two proteins interacting with DNA at two binding sites that are close to each other. The effectiveness of the test depends on the exclusive binding of three DNA fragments in the presence of two proteins, and the monitoring of the process depends upon observing the quenching of two independent fluorescence donors. As a model we used the components of the heterodimeric ecdysteroid receptor proteins ultraspiracle (Usp) and ecdysone receptor (EcR) from Drosophila melanogaster and a response element from the promoter of the hsp27 gene. The response element consists of two binding sites (half-sites) for the DNA binding domains (DBDs). We have shown that protein-protein interactions mediate cooperative binding of the ecdysteroid receptor DBDs to a hsp27(pal) response element. The analysis of the microscopic dissociation constants obtained with the DMB led to the conclusion that there was increased affinity of UspDBD to the 5' half-site in the presence of EcRDBD when the 3' half-site was occupied, and increased affinity of EcRDBD to the 3' half-site when the 5' half-site was occupied.

  8. Assembly of AMPA receptors: mechanisms and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Quan; Salussolia, Catherine L; Wollmuth, Lonnie P

    2015-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) play a critical role in excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission. The number and subunit composition of AMPARs at synapses determines the dynamics of fast glutamatergic signalling. Functional AMPARs on the cell surface are tetramers. Thus tetrameric assembly of AMPARs represents a promising target for modulating AMPAR-mediated signalling in health and disease. Multiple structural domains within the receptor influence AMPAR assembly. In a proposed model for AMPAR assembly, the amino-terminal domain underlies the formation of a dimer pool. The transmembrane domain facilitates the formation and enhances the stability of the tetramer. The ligand-binding domain influences assembly through a process referred to as ‘domain swapping’. We propose that this core AMPAR assembly process could be regulated by neuronal signals and speculate on possible mechanisms for such regulation. PMID:25556786

  9. Design and Synthesis of Norendoxifen Analogues with Dual Aromatase Inhibitory and Estrogen Receptor Modulatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Liu, Jinzhong; Skaar, Todd C.; Flockhart, David A.; Cushman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Both selective estrogen receptor modulators and aromatase inhibitors are widely used for the treatment of breast cancer. Compounds with both aromatase inhibitory and estrogen receptor modulatory activities could have special advantages for treatment of breast cancer. Our previous efforts led to the discovery of norendoxifen as the first compound with dual aromatase inhibitory and estrogen receptor binding activities. To optimize its efficacy and aromatase selectivity versus other cytochrome P450 enzymes, a series of structurally related norendoxifen analogues were designed and synthesized. The most potent compound, 4'-hydroxynorendoxifen (10), displayed elevated inhibitory potency against aromatase and enhanced affinity for estrogen receptors when compared to norendoxifen. The selectivity of 10 for aromatase versus other cytochrome P450 enzymes was also superior to norendoxifen. 4'-Hydroxynorendoxifen is therefore an interesting lead for further development to obtain new anticancer agents of potential value for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25751283

  10. Dual mechanisms governing reward-driven perceptual learning

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongho; Ling, Sam; Watanabe, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we explore how reward signals shape perceptual learning in animals and humans. Perceptual learning is the well-established phenomenon by which extensive practice elicits selective improvement in one’s perceptual discrimination of basic visual features, such as oriented lines or moving stimuli. While perceptual learning has long been thought to rely on ‘top-down’ processes, such as attention and decision-making, a wave of recent findings suggests that these higher-level processes are, in fact, not necessary.  Rather, these recent findings indicate that reward signals alone, in the absence of the contribution of higher-level cognitive processes, are sufficient to drive the benefits of perceptual learning. Here, we will review the literature tying reward signals to perceptual learning. Based on these findings, we propose dual underlying mechanisms that give rise to perceptual learning: one mechanism that operates ‘automatically’ and is tied directly to reward signals, and another mechanism that involves more ‘top-down’, goal-directed computations. PMID:26539293

  11. The Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonist Almorexant Induces Sleep and Decreases Orexin-Induced Locomotion by Blocking Orexin 2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Géraldine M.; Dürst, Thomas; Bürki, Hugo; Imobersteg, Stefan; Abramowski, Dorothee; Schuepbach, Edi; Hoyer, Daniel; Fendt, Markus; Gee, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Orexin peptides activate orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R), regulate locomotion and sleep-wake. The dual OX1R/OX2R antagonist almorexant reduces activity and promotes sleep in multiple species, including man. The relative contributions of the two receptors in locomotion and sleep/wake regulation were investigated in mice. Design: Mice lacking orexin receptors were used to determine the contribution of OX1R and OX2R to orexin A-induced locomotion and to almorexant-induced sleep. Setting: N/A. Patients or Participants: C57BL/6J mice and OX1R+/+, OX1R-/-, OX2R+/+, OX2R-/- and OX1R-/-/OX2R-/- mice. Interventions: Intracerebroventricular orexin A; oral dosing of almorexant. Measurements and Results: Almorexant attenuated orexin A-induced locomotion. As in other species, almorexant dose-dependently increased rapid eye movement sleep (REM) and nonREM sleep in mice. Almorexant and orexin A were ineffective in OX1R-/-/OX2R-/- mice. Both orexin A-induced locomotion and sleep induction by almorexant were absent in OX2R-/- mice. Interestingly, almorexant did not induce cataplexy in wild-type mice under conditions where cataplexy was seen in mice lacking orexins and in OX1R-/-/OX2R-/- mice. Almorexant dissociates very slowly from OX2R as measured functionally and in radioligand binding. Under non equilibrium conditions in vitro, almorexant was a dual antagonist whereas at equilibrium, almorexant became OX2R selective. Conclusions: In vivo, almorexant specifically inhibits the actions of orexin A. The two known orexin receptors mediate sleep induction by almorexant and orexin A-induced locomotion. However, OX2R activation mediates locomotion induction by orexin A and antagonism of OX2R is sufficient to promote sleep in mice. Citation: Mang GM; Dürst T; Bürki H; Imobersteg S; Abramowski D; Schuepbach E; Hoyer D; Fendt M; Gee CE. The dual orexin receptor antagonist almorexant induces sleep and decreases orexin-induced locomotion by blocking orexin

  12. Dual pH-Mediated Mechanized Hollow Zirconia Nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Wang, MingDong; Gong, GuangCai; Feng, Jing; Wang, Ting; Ding, ChenDi; Zhou, BaoJing; Jiang, Wei; Fu, JiaJun

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate for the first time how to assemble mechanized hollow zirconia nanospheres (MHzNs), consisting of hollow mesoporous zirconia nanospheres (HMZNs) as nanoscaffolds and supramolecular switches anchored on the exterior surface of HMZNs. The remarkable advantage of substitution of HMZNs for conventional mesoporous silica nanoscaffolds is that HMZNs can suffer the hot alkaline reaction environment, which provides a novel strategy for functionalization and thus achieve dual pH-mediated controlled release functions by simple and practicable assembly procedure. Under neutral solution, cucurbituril[7] (CB[7]) macrocycles complexed with propanone bis(2-aminoethyl)ketal (PBAEK) to form [2]pseudorotaxanes as supramolecular switches, blocking the pore orifices and preventing the undesirable leakage of cargoes. When solution pH was adjusted to alkaline range, CB[7] macrocycles, acting as caps, disassociated from PBAEK stalks and opened the switches due to the dramatic decrease of ion-dipole interactions. While under acidic conditions, PBAEK stalks were broken on account of the cleavage of ketal groups, resulting in the collapse of supramolecular switches and subsequent release of encapsulated cargoes. MHzNs owning dual pH-mediated controlled release characteristic are expected to apply in many fields. In this work, the feasibility of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded MHzNs as targeted drug delivery systems was evaluated. In vitro cellular studies demonstrate that DOX-loaded MHzNs can be easily taken up by SMMC-7721 cells, can rapidly release DOX intracellularly, and can enhance cytotoxicity against tumor cells, proving their potential for chemotherapy. PMID:27523904

  13. Pharmacophore modeling of dual angiotensin II and endothelin A receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wei-Zhe; Lü, Wei; Zhou, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Zhan-Li

    2009-09-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore models were generated for AT1 and ET(A) receptors based on highly selective AT1 and ET(A) antagonists using the program Catalyst/HipHop. Both the best pharmacophore model for selective AT1 antagonists (Hypo-AT(1)-7) and ETA antagonists (Hypo-ET(A)-1) were obtained through a careful validation process. All five features contained in Hypo-AT(1)-7 and Hypo-ET(A)-1 (hydrogen-bond acceptor (A), hydrophobic aliphatic (Z), negative ionizable (N), ring aromatic (R), and hydrophobic aromatic (Y)) seem to be essential for antagonists in terms of binding activity. Dual AT1 and ET(A) receptor antagonists (DARAs) can map to both Hypo-AT(1)-7 and Hypo-ET(A)-1, separately. Comparison of Hypo-AT(1)-7 and Hypo-ET(A)-1, not only AT1 and ET(A) antagonist pharmacophore models consist of essential features necessary for compounds to be highly active and selective toward their corresponding receptor, but also have something in common. The results in this study will act as a valuable tool for designing and researching structural relationship of novel dual AT1 and ET(A) receptor antagonists. PMID:20055175

  14. Pharmacophore modeling of dual angiotensin II and endothelin A receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wei-Zhe; Lü, Wei; Zhou, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Zhan-Li

    2009-09-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore models were generated for AT1 and ET(A) receptors based on highly selective AT1 and ET(A) antagonists using the program Catalyst/HipHop. Both the best pharmacophore model for selective AT1 antagonists (Hypo-AT(1)-7) and ETA antagonists (Hypo-ET(A)-1) were obtained through a careful validation process. All five features contained in Hypo-AT(1)-7 and Hypo-ET(A)-1 (hydrogen-bond acceptor (A), hydrophobic aliphatic (Z), negative ionizable (N), ring aromatic (R), and hydrophobic aromatic (Y)) seem to be essential for antagonists in terms of binding activity. Dual AT1 and ET(A) receptor antagonists (DARAs) can map to both Hypo-AT(1)-7 and Hypo-ET(A)-1, separately. Comparison of Hypo-AT(1)-7 and Hypo-ET(A)-1, not only AT1 and ET(A) antagonist pharmacophore models consist of essential features necessary for compounds to be highly active and selective toward their corresponding receptor, but also have something in common. The results in this study will act as a valuable tool for designing and researching structural relationship of novel dual AT1 and ET(A) receptor antagonists.

  15. [Receptors involved in the mechanism of action of topical prostaglandines].

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Alina Mihaela

    2009-01-01

    Hypotensive effect to prostaglandins analogs (latanoprost, travoprost, tafluprost) means to increase uveoscleral outflow by action to FP receptors who generated extracellular matrix changes and intermuscular spaces changes. Syntetic prostamides analogs (bimatoprost) have a particulary action with a receptors most and intensive studied. The bimatoprost effect is the consequences to preferated stimulations on the specific receptors who have action only the tissue with prostaglandins activity is important to specify what the bimatoprost have dual effect: to uveoscleral outflow and classic outflow by increase hidraulic conductivity.

  16. [Receptors involved in the mechanism of action of topical prostaglandines].

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Alina Mihaela

    2009-01-01

    Hypotensive effect to prostaglandins analogs (latanoprost, travoprost, tafluprost) means to increase uveoscleral outflow by action to FP receptors who generated extracellular matrix changes and intermuscular spaces changes. Syntetic prostamides analogs (bimatoprost) have a particulary action with a receptors most and intensive studied. The bimatoprost effect is the consequences to preferated stimulations on the specific receptors who have action only the tissue with prostaglandins activity is important to specify what the bimatoprost have dual effect: to uveoscleral outflow and classic outflow by increase hidraulic conductivity. PMID:19697832

  17. Pharmacology of macitentan, an orally active tissue-targeting dual endothelin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Iglarz, Marc; Binkert, Christoph; Morrison, Keith; Fischli, Walter; Gatfield, John; Treiber, Alexander; Weller, Thomas; Bolli, Martin H; Boss, Christoph; Buchmann, Stephan; Capeleto, Bruno; Hess, Patrick; Qiu, Changbin; Clozel, Martine

    2008-12-01

    Macitentan, also called Actelion-1 or ACT-064992 [N-[5-(4-bromophenyl)-6-(2-(5-bromopyrimidin-2-yloxy)ethoxy)-pyrimidin-4-yl]-N'-propylaminosulfonamide], is a new dual ET(A)/ET(B) endothelin (ET) receptor antagonist designed for tissue targeting. Selection of macitentan was based on inhibitory potency on both ET receptors and optimization of physicochemical properties to achieve high affinity for lipophilic milieu. In vivo, macitentan is metabolized into a major and pharmacologically active metabolite, ACT-132577. Macitentan and its metabolite antagonized the specific binding of ET-1 on membranes of cells overexpressing ET(A) and ET(B) receptors and blunted ET-1-induced calcium mobilization in various natural cell lines, with inhibitory constants within the nanomolar range. In functional assays, macitentan and ACT-132577 inhibited ET-1-induced contractions in isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta (ET(A) receptors) and sarafotoxin S6c-induced contractions in isolated rat trachea (ET(B) receptors). In rats with pulmonary hypertension, macitentan prevented both the increase of pulmonary pressure and the right ventricle hypertrophy, and it markedly improved survival. In diabetic rats, chronic administration of macitentan decreased blood pressure and proteinuria and prevented end-organ damage (renal vascular hypertrophy and structural injury). In conclusion, macitentan, by its tissue-targeting properties and dual antagonism of ET receptors, protects against end-organ damage in diabetes and improves survival in pulmonary hypertensive rats. This profile makes macitentan a new agent to treat cardiovascular disorders associated with chronic tissue ET system activation.

  18. A Dual Receptor and Reporter for Multi-Modal Cell Surface Engineering.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Westcott, Nathan; Dutta, Debjit; Pulsipher, Abigail; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Chen, Jean; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2015-10-16

    The rapid development of new small molecule drugs, nanomaterials, and genetic tools to modulate cellular function through cell surface manipulation has revolutionized the diagnosis, study, and treatment of disorders in human health. Since the cell membrane is a selective gateway barrier that serves as the first line of defense/offense and communication to its environment, new approaches that molecularly engineer or tailor cell membrane surfaces would allow for a new era in therapeutic design, therapeutic delivery, complex coculture tissue construction, and in situ imaging probe tracking technologies. In order to develop the next generation of multimodal therapies, cell behavior studies, and biotechnologies that focus on cell membrane biology, new tools that intersect the fields of chemistry, biology, and engineering are required. Herein, we develop a liposome fusion and delivery strategy to present a novel dual receptor and reporter system at cell surfaces without the use of molecular biology or metabolic biosynthesis. The cell surface receptor is based on bio-orthogonal functional groups that can conjugate a range of ligands while simultaneously reporting the conjugation through the emission of fluorescence. We demonstrate this dual receptor and reporter system by conjugating and tracking various cell surface ligands for temporal control of cell fluorescent signaling, cell-cell interaction, and tissue assembly construction.

  19. Dual ligand/receptor interactions activate urothelial defenses against uropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Mémet, Sylvie; Saban, Ricardo; Kong, Xiangpeng; Aprikian, Pavel; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2015-11-09

    During urinary tract infection (UTI), the second most common bacterial infection, dynamic interactions take place between uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and host urothelial cells. While significant strides have been made in the identification of the virulence factors of UPEC, our understanding of how the urothelial cells mobilize innate defenses against the invading UPEC remains rudimentary. Here we show that mouse urothelium responds to the adhesion of type 1-fimbriated UPEC by rapidly activating the canonical NF-κB selectively in terminally differentiated, superficial (umbrella) cells. This activation depends on a dual ligand/receptor system, one between FimH adhesin and uroplakin Ia and another between lipopolysaccharide and Toll-like receptor 4. When activated, all the nuclei (up to 11) of a multinucleated umbrella cell are affected, leading to significant amplification of proinflammatory signals. Intermediate and basal cells of the urothelium undergo NF-κB activation only if the umbrella cells are detached or if the UPEC persistently express type 1-fimbriae. Inhibition of NF-κB prevents the urothelium from clearing the intracellular bacterial communities, leading to prolonged bladder colonization by UPEC. Based on these data, we propose a model of dual ligand/receptor system in innate urothelial defenses against UPEC.

  20. Novel dual endothelin receptor antagonist macitentan reverses severe pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Kunita-Takanezawa, Mutsumi; Abe, Kohtaro; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Kuwabara, Yukimitsu; Hirano, Katsuya; Oka, Masahiko; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    The efficacy of endothelin (ET) receptor antagonist bosentan in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains limited, partly because its higher doses for potential blockade of ET receptors have never been tested due to liver dysfunction. We hypothesized that rigorous blockade of ET receptors using the novel dual ET receptor antagonist macitentan would be effective in treating severe PAH without major side effects in a preclinical model appropriately representing the human disorder. In normal rats, 30 mg·kg·d of macitentan completely abolished big ET-1-induced increases in right ventricle (RV) systolic pressure. Adult male rats were injected with SU5416, a vascular endothelial growth factor blocker, and exposed to hypoxia for 3 weeks and then to normoxia for an additional 5 weeks (total 8 weeks). In intrapulmonary arterial rings isolated from rats with severe PAH, macitentan concentration dependently inhibited ET-1-induced contraction. Long-term treatment with macitentan (30 mg·kg·d, from week 3 to 8) reversed the high RV systolic pressure with preserved cardiac output. Development of RV hypertrophy, luminal occlusive lesions and medial wall thickening were also significantly improved without increasing serum levels of liver enzymes by macitentan. In conclusion, efficacious blockade of ET receptors with macitentan would reverse severe PAH without major adverse effects.

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Opioid Receptor-Dependent Signaling and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been targeted for the treatment of pain and related disorders for thousands of years, and remain the most widely used analgesics in the clinic. Mu (μ), kappa (κ), and delta (δ) opioid receptors represent the originally classified receptor subtypes, with opioid receptor like-1 (ORL1) being the least characterized. All four receptors are G-protein coupled, and activate inhibitory G-proteins. These receptors form homo- and hetereodimeric complexes, signal to kinase cascades, and scaffold a variety of proteins. In this review, we discuss classical mechanisms and developments in understanding opioid tolerance, opioid receptor signaling, and highlight advances in opioid molecular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, and human genetics. We put into context how opioid receptor signaling leads to the modulation of behavior with the potential for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we conclude that there is a continued need for more translational work on opioid receptors in vivo. PMID:22020140

  2. Biaryls as potent, tunable dual neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists and serotonin transporter inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Andrew P; Tora, George O; Han, Ying; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Bertekap, Robert; Krause, Rudolph; Davis, Carl D; Hu, Joanna; Morgan, Daniel; Taylor, Sarah J; Krause, Kelly; Li, Yu-Wen; Mattson, Gail; Cunningham, Melissa A; Taber, Matthew T; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bronson, Joanne J; Gillman, Kevin W; Macor, John E

    2015-08-01

    Depression is a serious illness that affects millions of patients. Current treatments are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists have recently been shown to potentiate the antidepressant effects of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in a number of animal models. Herein we describe the optimization of a biaryl chemotype to provide a series of potent dual NK1R antagonists/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors. Through the choice of appropriate substituents, the SERT/NK1R ratio could be tuned to afford a range of target selectivity profiles. This effort culminated in the identification of an analog that demonstrated oral bioavailability, favorable brain uptake, and efficacy in the gerbil foot tap model. Ex vivo occupancy studies with compound 58 demonstrated the ability to maintain NK1 receptor saturation (>88% occupancy) while titrating the desired level of SERT occupancy (11-84%) via dose selection. PMID:26048800

  3. Suvorexant: efficacy and safety profile of a dual orexin receptor antagonist in treating insomnia.

    PubMed

    Owen, R T

    2016-01-01

    Suvorexant is a hypnotic representing the first-in-class of a new group of agents known as dual orexin receptor antagonists. They target cerebral orexin receptors which, when activated, contribute to arousal and wakefulness. Suvorexant was shown to decrease sleep onset times and increase sleep duration, whether assessed objectively by polysomnography or subjectively by sleep diaries in primary insomnia patients. Overall tolerability was good, with somnolence being the commonest adverse event (≤ 7% in 3-month studies). No strong signals for rebound or withdrawal were seen after 1-12 months of treatment and few adverse events suggestive of residual psychomotor or cognitive events have been recorded. Further studies are required in patients with insomnia comorbid with depression and head-to-head studies with established hypnotics such as zolpidem and eszopiclone. Studies augmenting the small number of patients evaluating the initial recommended dose (10 mg) would also be prudent. PMID:26937493

  4. Accounting for pharmacokinetic differences in dual-tracer receptor density imaging.

    PubMed

    Tichauer, K M; Diop, M; Elliott, J T; Samkoe, K S; Hasan, T; St Lawrence, K; Pogue, B W

    2014-05-21

    Dual-tracer molecular imaging is a powerful approach to quantify receptor expression in a wide range of tissues by using an untargeted tracer to account for any nonspecific uptake of a molecular-targeted tracer. This approach has previously required the pharmacokinetics of the receptor-targeted and untargeted tracers to be identical, requiring careful selection of an ideal untargeted tracer for any given targeted tracer. In this study, methodology capable of correcting for tracer differences in arterial input functions, as well as binding-independent delivery and retention, is derived and evaluated in a mouse U251 glioma xenograft model using an Affibody tracer targeted to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell membrane receptor overexpressed in many cancers. Simulations demonstrated that blood, and to a lesser extent vascular-permeability, pharmacokinetic differences between targeted and untargeted tracers could be quantified by deconvolving the uptakes of the two tracers in a region of interest devoid of targeted tracer binding, and therefore corrected for, by convolving the uptake of the untargeted tracer in all regions of interest by the product of the deconvolution. Using fluorescently labeled, EGFR-targeted and untargeted Affibodies (known to have different blood clearance rates), the average tumor concentration of EGFR in four mice was estimated using dual-tracer kinetic modeling to be 3.9 ± 2.4 nM compared to an expected concentration of 2.0 ± 0.4 nM. However, with deconvolution correction a more equivalent EGFR concentration of 2.0 ± 0.4 nM was measured. PMID:24743262

  5. Accounting for pharmacokinetic differences in dual-tracer receptor density imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, K. M.; Diop, M.; Elliott, J. T.; Samkoe, K. S.; Hasan, T.; St. Lawrence, K.; Pogue, B. W.

    2014-05-01

    Dual-tracer molecular imaging is a powerful approach to quantify receptor expression in a wide range of tissues by using an untargeted tracer to account for any nonspecific uptake of a molecular-targeted tracer. This approach has previously required the pharmacokinetics of the receptor-targeted and untargeted tracers to be identical, requiring careful selection of an ideal untargeted tracer for any given targeted tracer. In this study, methodology capable of correcting for tracer differences in arterial input functions, as well as binding-independent delivery and retention, is derived and evaluated in a mouse U251 glioma xenograft model using an Affibody tracer targeted to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell membrane receptor overexpressed in many cancers. Simulations demonstrated that blood, and to a lesser extent vascular-permeability, pharmacokinetic differences between targeted and untargeted tracers could be quantified by deconvolving the uptakes of the two tracers in a region of interest devoid of targeted tracer binding, and therefore corrected for, by convolving the uptake of the untargeted tracer in all regions of interest by the product of the deconvolution. Using fluorescently labeled, EGFR-targeted and untargeted Affibodies (known to have different blood clearance rates), the average tumor concentration of EGFR in four mice was estimated using dual-tracer kinetic modeling to be 3.9 ± 2.4 nM compared to an expected concentration of 2.0 ± 0.4 nM. However, with deconvolution correction a more equivalent EGFR concentration of 2.0 ± 0.4 nM was measured.

  6. Receptor Recognition Mechanisms of Coronaviruses: a Decade of Structural Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Receptor recognition by viruses is the first and essential step of viral infections of host cells. It is an important determinant of viral host range and cross-species infection and a primary target for antiviral intervention. Coronaviruses recognize a variety of host receptors, infect many hosts, and are health threats to humans and animals. The receptor-binding S1 subunit of coronavirus spike proteins contains two distinctive domains, the N-terminal domain (S1-NTD) and the C-terminal domain (S1-CTD), both of which can function as receptor-binding domains (RBDs). S1-NTDs and S1-CTDs from three major coronavirus genera recognize at least four protein receptors and three sugar receptors and demonstrate a complex receptor recognition pattern. For example, highly similar coronavirus S1-CTDs within the same genus can recognize different receptors, whereas very different coronavirus S1-CTDs from different genera can recognize the same receptor. Moreover, coronavirus S1-NTDs can recognize either protein or sugar receptors. Structural studies in the past decade have elucidated many of the puzzles associated with coronavirus-receptor interactions. This article reviews the latest knowledge on the receptor recognition mechanisms of coronaviruses and discusses how coronaviruses have evolved their complex receptor recognition pattern. It also summarizes important principles that govern receptor recognition by viruses in general. PMID:25428871

  7. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-01-01

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades. PMID:27117478

  8. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-01-01

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades. PMID:27117478

  9. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-04-27

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades.

  10. In Vivo Quantification of Tumor Receptor Binding Potential with Dual-Reporter Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Hextrum, Shannon K.; Yang, Harold H.; Klubben, W. Spencer; Gunn, Jason R.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Receptor availability represents a key component of current cancer management. However, no approaches have been adopted to do this clinically, and the current standard of care is invasive tissue biopsy. A dual-reporter methodology capable of quantifying available receptor binding potential of tumors in vivo within a clinically relevant time scale is presented. Procedures To test the methodology, a fluorescence imaging-based adaptation was validated against ex vivo and in vitro measures of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) binding potential in four tumor lines in mice, each line expected to express a different level of EGFR. Results A strong correlation was observed between in vivo and ex vivo measures of binding potential for all tumor lines (r=0.99, p<0.01, slope=1.80±0.48, and intercept=−0.58±0.84) and between in vivo and in vitro for the three lines expressing the least amount of EGFR (r=0.99, p<0.01, slope=0.64±0.32, and intercept=0.47±0.51). Conclusions By providing a fast and robust measure of receptor density in tumors, the presented methodology has powerful implications for improving choices in cancer intervention, evaluation, and monitoring, and can be scaled to the clinic with an imaging modality like SPECT. PMID:22203241

  11. Dual-tracer receptor concentration imaging using tracers with different tissue delivery kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Diop, Mamadou; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hasan, Tayyaba; St. Lawrence, Keith; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    Simultaneous dynamic fluorescent imaging of a suitable untargeted tracer in conjunction with any molecular targeted fluorescent agent has been shown to be a powerful approach for quantifying cancer-specific cell surface receptors in vivo in the presence of non-specific uptake and tracer delivery variability. The identification of a "suitable" untargeted tracer (i.e., one having equivalent plasma and tissue delivery pharmacokinetics to the targeted tracer) for every targeted tracer, however, may not always be feasible or could require extensive testing. This work presents a "deconvolution" approach capable of correcting for plasma and tissue-delivery pharmacokinetic differences between tracers by quantifying dynamic differences in targeted and untargeted tracer uptake in a receptor-free tissue (one devoid of targeted molecular species) and correcting uptake in all other tissues accordingly. This deconvolution correction approach is evaluated in theoretical models and explored in an in vivo mouse xenograft model of human glioma. In the animal experiments, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR: a receptor known to be overexpressed in the investigated glioma cell line) was targeted using a fluorescent tracer with very different plasma pharmacokinetics than a second untargeted fluorescent tracer. Without correcting for these differences, the dual-tracer approach yielded substantially higher estimations of EGFR concentration in all tissues than expected; however, deconvolution correction was able to produce estimates that matched ex vivo validation.

  12. Dual CD44 and folate receptor-targeted nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Young; Termsarasab, Ubonvan; Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Song Yi; Ko, Seung-Hak; Shim, Jae-Seong; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2016-08-28

    Dual CD44 and folate receptor targetable nanoparticles (NPs) based on hyaluronic acid-ceramide-folic acid (HACE-FA) were fabricated for improving tumor targetability. HACE-FA was synthesized via esterification between the carboxylic group of FA and hydroxyl group of HA. Doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded HACE-FA NPs, with a mean diameter of 120-130nm, narrow size distribution, and negative zeta potential, were prepared. The drug release from HACE-FA NPs were significantly increased in acidic pH (pH5.5) compared with physiological pH (7.4) (p<0.05). The cellular accumulation of the drug in HACE-FA NPs group was higher than that of HACE NPs group in SKOV-3 cells (human ovarian cancer cells; CD44 and folate receptor (FR)-positive cells). Dual targetability of HACE-FA NPs, compared to HACE NPs, was also verified in the SKOV-3 tumor-xenografted mouse model by near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. Twenty-four hours after injection, HACE-FA NPs were accumulated mainly in tumor regions and their fluorescence intensity was 4.82-fold higher than that of HACE NPs (p<0.05). These findings suggest successful application of HACE-FA NPs for the accurate delivery of anticancer drugs to ovarian cancer. PMID:27320169

  13. Glycosylated SV2 and Gangliosides as Dual Receptors for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype F

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Zhuji; Chen, Chen; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Baldwin, Michael R.

    2010-02-22

    Botulinum neurotoxin causes rapid flaccid paralysis through the inhibition of acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction. The seven BoNT serotypes (A-G) have been proposed to bind motor neurons via ganglioside-protein dual receptors. To date, the structure-function properties of BoNT/F host receptor interactions have not been resolved. Here, we report the crystal structures of the receptor binding domains (HCR) of BoNT/A and BoNT/F and the characterization of the dual receptors for BoNT/F. The overall polypeptide fold of HCR/A is essentially identical to the receptor binding domain of the BoNT/A holotoxin, and the structure of HCR/F is very similar to that of HCR/A, except for two regions implicated in neuronal binding. Solid phase array analysis identified two HCR/F binding glycans: ganglioside GD1a and oligosaccharides containing an N-acetyllactosamine core. Using affinity chromatography, HCR/F bound native synaptic vesicle glycoproteins as part of a protein complex. Deglycosylation of glycoproteins using {alpha}(1-3,4)-fucosidase, endo-{beta}-galactosidase, and PNGase F disrupted the interaction with HCR/F, while the binding of HCR/B to its cognate receptor, synaptotagmin I, was unaffected. These data indicate that the HCR/F binds synaptic vesicle glycoproteins through the keratan sulfate moiety of SV2. The interaction of HCR/F with gangliosides was also investigated. HCR/F bound specifically to gangliosides that contain {alpha}2,3-linked sialic acid on the terminal galactose of a neutral saccharide core (binding order GT1b = GD1a GM3; no binding to GD1b and GM1a). Mutations within the putative ganglioside binding pocket of HCR/F decreased binding to gangliosides, synaptic vesicle protein complexes, and primary rat hippocampal neurons. Thus, BoNT/F neuronal discrimination involves the recognition of ganglioside and protein (glycosylated SV2) carbohydrate moieties, providing a structural basis for the high affinity and specificity of BoNT/F for neurons.

  14. Retinal Neuroprotective Effects of Flibanserin, an FDA-Approved Dual Serotonin Receptor Agonist-Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Ryals, Renee C.; Ku, Cristy A.; Fischer, Cody M.; Patel, Rachel C.; Datta, Shreya; Yang, Paul; Wen, Yuquan; Hen, René; Pennesi, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the neuroprotective effects of flibanserin (formerly BIMT-17), a dual 5-HT1A agonist and 5-HT2A antagonist, in a light-induced retinopathy model. Methods Albino BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with either vehicle or increasing doses of flibanserin ranging from 0.75 to 15 mg/kg flibanserin. To assess 5-HT1A-mediated effects, BALB/c mice were injected with 10 mg/kg WAY 100635, a 5-HT1A antagonist, prior to 6 mg/kg flibanserin and 5-HT1A knockout mice were injected with 6 mg/kg flibanserin. Injections were administered once immediately prior to light exposure or over the course of five days. Light exposure lasted for one hour at an intensity of 10,000 lux. Retinal structure was assessed using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and retinal function was assessed using electroretinography. To investigate the mechanisms of flibanserin-mediated neuroprotection, gene expression, measured by RT-qPCR, was assessed following five days of daily 15 mg/kg flibanserin injections. Results A five-day treatment regimen of 3 to 15 mg/kg of flibanserin significantly preserved outer retinal structure and function in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, a single-day treatment regimen of 6 to 15 mg/kg of flibanserin still provided significant protection. The action of flibanserin was hindered by the 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY 100635, and was not effective in 5-HT1A knockout mice. Creb, c-Jun, c-Fos, Bcl-2, Cast1, Nqo1, Sod1, and Cat were significantly increased in flibanserin-injected mice versus vehicle-injected mice. Conclusions Intraperitoneal delivery of flibanserin in a light-induced retinopathy mouse model provides retinal neuroprotection. Mechanistic data suggests that this effect is mediated through 5-HT1A receptors and that flibanserin augments the expression of genes capable of reducing mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Since flibanserin is already FDA-approved for other indications, the potential to repurpose this drug for

  15. Endosome acidification and receptor trafficking: bafilomycin A1 slows receptor externalization by a mechanism involving the receptor's internalization motif.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L S; Dunn, K W; Pytowski, B; McGraw, T E

    1993-01-01

    To examine the relationship between endosome acidification and receptor trafficking, transferrin receptor trafficking was characterized in Chinese hamster ovary cells in which endosome acidification was blocked by treatment with the specific inhibitor of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, bafilomycin A1. Elevating endosome pH slowed the receptor externalization rate to approximately one-half of control but did not affect receptor internalization kinetics. The slowed receptor externalization required the receptor's cytoplasmic domain and was largely eliminated by substitutions replacing either of two aromatic amino acids within the receptor's cytoplasmic YTRF internalization motif. These results confirm, using a specific inhibitor of the vacuolar proton pump, that proper endosome acidification is necessary to maintain rapid recycling of intracellular receptors back to the plasma membrane. Moreover, receptor return to the plasma membrane is slowed in the absence of proper endosome acidification by a signal-dependent mechanism involving the receptor's cytoplasmic tyrosine-containing internalization motif. These results, in conjunction with results from other studies, suggest that the mechanism for clustering receptors in plasma membrane clathrin-coated pits may be an example of a more general mechanism that determines the dynamic distribution of membrane proteins among various compartments with luminal acidification playing a crucial role in this process. Images PMID:8167408

  16. Dual-color dual-focus line-scanning FCS for quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand interactions in living specimens

    PubMed Central

    Dörlich, René M.; Chen, Qing; Niklas Hedde, Per; Schuster, Vittoria; Hippler, Marc; Wesslowski, Janine; Davidson, Gary; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Cellular communication in multi-cellular organisms is mediated to a large extent by a multitude of cell-surface receptors that bind specific ligands. An in-depth understanding of cell signaling networks requires quantitative information on ligand-receptor interactions within living systems. In principle, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) based methods can provide such data, but live-cell applications have proven extremely challenging. Here, we have developed an integrated dual-color dual-focus line-scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2c2f lsFCS) technique that greatly facilitates live-cell and tissue experiments. Absolute ligand and receptor concentrations and their diffusion coefficients within the cell membrane can be quantified without the need to perform additional calibration experiments. We also determine the concentration of ligands diffusing in the medium outside the cell within the same experiment by using a raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) based analysis. We have applied this robust technique to study the interactions of two Wnt antagonists, Dickkopf1 and Dickkopf2 (Dkk1/2), to their cognate receptor, low-density-lipoprotein-receptor related protein 6 (LRP6), in the plasma membrane of living HEK293T cells. We obtained significantly lower affinities than previously reported using in vitro studies, underscoring the need to measure such data on living cells or tissues. PMID:25951521

  17. Mechanisms of neurosteroid interactions with GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Akk, Gustav; Covey, Douglas F.; Evers, Alex S.; Steinbach, Joe Henry; Zorumski, Charles F.; Mennerick, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Neuroactive steroids have some of their most potent actions by augmenting the function of GABAA receptors. Endogenous steroid actions on GABAA receptors may underlie important effects on mood and behavior. Exogenous neuroactive steroids have potential as anesthetics, anticonvulsants, and neuroprotectants. We have taken multiple approaches to understand more completely the interaction of neuroactive steroids with GABAA receptors. We have developed many novel steroid analogues in this effort. Recent work has resulted in synthesis of new enantiomer analogue pairs, novel ligands that probe various properties of the steroid pharmacophore, fluorescent neuroactive steroid analogues, and photoaffinity labels. Using these tools, combined with receptor binding and electrophysiological assays, we have begun to untangle the complexity of steroid actions at this important class of ligand-gated ion channel. PMID:17524487

  18. Mechanism of the estrogen receptor interaction with 4-hydroxytamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Sasson, S; Notides, A C

    1988-04-01

    The binding mechanism of the estrogen receptor with 4-[3H]hydroxytamoxifen was investigated. The equilibrium binding analysis with 4-[3H]hydroxytamoxifen indicated a positive cooperative interaction: the Scatchard plot was convex and the Hill coefficient was 1.4-1.5. This binding appears similar to the positively cooperative interaction of the estrogen receptor with [3H]estradiol. However, a competitive binding assay with a saturating concentration of [3H] estradiol and variable concentrations of 4-hydroxytamoxifen produced nonparallel displacement curves indicating that the binding mechanism of the receptor with these two ligands is different. The competitive binding assay with [3H]estradiol and 4-hydroxytamoxifen at constant molar ratios demonstrated that the receptor's affinity for estradiol was reduced and the receptor preferentially bound 4-hydroxytamoxifen. These data suggest that 4-hydroxytamoxifen interacts with the receptor differently than estradiol; it antagonizes the binding of estradiol when these two ligands are simultaneously present.

  19. Mechanism of the estrogen receptor interaction with 4-hydroxytamoxifen

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, S.; Notides, A.C.

    1988-04-01

    The binding mechanism of the estrogen receptor with 4-(/sup 3/H)hydroxytamoxifen was investigated. The equilibrium binding analysis with 4-(/sup 3/H)hydroxytamoxifen indicated a positive cooperative interaction: the Scatchard plot was convex and the Hill coefficient was 1.4-1.5. This binding appears similar to the positively cooperative interaction of the estrogen receptor with (/sup 3/H)estradiol. However, a competitive binding assay with a saturating concentration of (/sup 3/H) estradiol and variable concentrations of 4-hydroxytamoxifen produced nonparallel displacement curves indicating that the binding mechanism of the receptor with these two ligands is different. The competitive binding assay with (/sup 3/H)estradiol and 4-hydroxytamoxifen at constant molar ratios demonstrated that the receptor's affinity for estradiol was reduced and the receptor preferentially bound 4-hydroxytamoxifen. These data suggest that 4-hydroxytamoxifen interacts with the receptor differently than estradiol; it antagonizes the binding of estradiol when these two ligands are simultaneously present.

  20. Mechanical Properties of a Superalloy Disk with a Dual Grain Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Gabb, Timothy; Kantzos, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical properties from an advanced, nickel-base superalloy disk, with a dual grain structure consisting of a fine grain bore and coarse grain rim, were evaluated. The dual grain structure was produced using NASA's low cost Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment (DMHT) process. The results showed the DMHT disk to have a high strength, fatigue resistant bore comparable to a subsolvus (fine grain) heat treated disk, and a creep resistant rim comparable to a supersolvus (coarse grain) heat treated disk. Additional work on subsolvus solutioning before or after the DMHT conversion appears to be a viable avenue for further improvement in disk properties.

  1. Interaction of the dual targeting peptide of Thr-tRNA synthetase with the chloroplastic receptor Toc34 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Weihua; Spånning, Erika; Glaser, Elzbieta; Mäler, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Organellar proteins synthesized in the cytosol are usually selective for only one destination in a cell but some proteins are localized in more than one compartment, for example in both mitochondria and chloroplasts. The mechanism of dual targeting of proteins to mitochondria and chloroplasts is yet poorly understood. Previously, we observed that the dual targeting peptide of threonyl-tRNA synthetase in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtThrRS-dTP) interacts with the mitochondrial receptor AtTom20 mainly through its N-terminal part. Here we report on the interaction of AtThrRS-dTP with the chloroplastic receptor AtToc34, presenting for the first time the mode of interactions of a dual targeting peptide with both Tom20 and Toc34. By NMR spectroscopy we investigated changes in 15N HSQC spectra of AtThrRS-dTP as a function of AtToc34 concentration. Line broadening shows that the interaction with AtToc34 involves residues along the entire sequence, which is not the case for AtTom20. The N-terminal φχχφφ motif, which plays an important role in AtTom20 recognition, shows no specificity for AtToc34. These results are supported by import competition studies into both mitochondria and chloroplasts, in which the effect of peptides corresponding to different segments of AtThrRS-dTP on in vitro import of organelle specific proteins was examined. This demonstrates that the N-terminal A2-Y29 segment of AtThrRS-dTP is essential for import into both organelles, while the C-terminal L30-P60 part is important for chloroplastic import efficiency. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the recognition of the dual targeting peptide of AtThr-tRNA synthetase is different for the mitochondrial and chloroplastic receptors. PMID:26101739

  2. Mechanism for ordered receptor binding by human prolactin.

    PubMed

    Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Canfield, Jeffrey M; Brooks, Charles L

    2004-11-01

    Prolactin, a lactogenic hormone, binds to two prolactin receptors sequentially, the first receptor binding at site 1 of the hormone followed by the second receptor binding at site 2. We have investigated the mechanism by which human prolactin (hPRL) binds the extracellular domain of the human prolactin receptor (hPRLbp) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. We have covalently coupled hPRL to the SPR chip surface via coupling chemistries that reside in and block either site 1 or site 2. Equilibrium binding experiments using saturating hPRLbp concentrations show that site 2 receptor binding is dependent on site 1 receptor occupancy. In contrast, site 1 binding is independent of site 2 occupancy. Thus, sites 1 and 2 are functionally coupled, site 1 binding inducing the functional organization of site 2. Site 2 of hPRL does not have a measurable binding affinity prior to hPRLbp binding at site 1. After site 1 receptor binding, site 2 affinity is increased to values approaching that of site 1. Corruption of either site 1 or site 2 by mutagenesis is consistent with a functional coupling of sites 1 and 2. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments indicate that receptor binding at site 1 induces a conformation change in the hormone. These data support an "induced-fit" model for prolactin receptor binding where binding of the first receptor to hPRL induces a conformation change in the hormone creating the second receptor-binding site.

  3. HIV-1 Env gp120 Structural Determinants for Peptide Triazole Dual Receptor Site Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Tuzer, Ferit; Madani, Navid; Kamanna, Kantharaju; Zentner, Isaac; LaLonde, Judith; Holmes, Andrew; Upton, Elizabeth; Rajagopal, Srivats; McFadden, Karyn; Contarino, Mark; Sodroski, Joseph; Chaiken, Irwin

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in HIV therapy, viral resistance and side-effects with current drug regimens require targeting new components of the virus. Dual antagonist peptide triazoles (PT) are a novel class of HIV-1 inhibitors that specifically target the gp120 component of the viral spike and inhibit its interaction with both of its cell surface protein ligands, namely the initial receptor CD4 and the co-receptor (CCR5/CXCR4), thus preventing viral entry. Following an initial survey of 19 gp120 alanine mutants by ELISA, we screened 11 mutants for their importance in binding to, and inhibition by the PT KR21 using surface plasmon resonance. Key mutants were purified and tested for their effects on the peptide’s affinity and its ability to inhibit binding of CD4 and the co-receptor surrogate mAb 17b. Effects of the mutations on KR21 viral neutralization were measured by single-round cell infection assays. Two mutations, D474A and T257A, caused large-scale loss of KR21 binding, as well as losses in both CD4/17b and viral inhibition by KR21. A set of other Ala mutants revealed more moderate losses in direct binding affinity and inhibition sensitivity to KR21. The cluster of sensitive residues defines a PT functional epitope. This site is in a conserved region of gp120 that overlaps the CD4 binding site and is distant from the co-receptor/17b binding site, suggesting an allosteric mode of inhibition for the latter. The arrangement and sequence conservation of the residues in the functional epitope explain the breadth of antiviral activity, and improve the potential for rational inhibitor development. PMID:23011758

  4. Dual Topology of the Melanocortin-2 Receptor Accessory Protein Is Stable

    PubMed Central

    Maben, Zachary J.; Malik, Sundeep; Jiang, Liyi H.; Hinkle, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Melanocortin 2 receptor accessory protein (MRAP) facilitates trafficking of melanocortin 2 (MC2) receptors and is essential for ACTH binding and signaling. MRAP is a single transmembrane domain protein that forms antiparallel homodimers. These studies ask when MRAP first acquires this dual topology, whether MRAP architecture is static or stable, and whether the accessory protein undergoes rapid turnover. To answer these questions, we developed an approach that capitalizes on the specificity of bacterial biotin ligase, which adds biotin to lysine in a short acceptor peptide sequence; the distinct mobility of MRAP protomers of opposite orientations based on their N-linked glycosylation; and the ease of identifying biotin-labeled proteins. We inserted biotin ligase acceptor peptides at the N- or C-terminal ends of MRAP and expressed the modified proteins in mammalian cells together with either cytoplasmic or endoplasmic reticulum-targeted biotin ligase. MRAP assumed dual topology early in biosynthesis in both CHO and OS3 adrenal cells. Once established, MRAP orientation was stable. Despite its conformational stability, MRAP displayed a half-life of under 2 h in CHO cells. The amount of MRAP was increased by the proteasome inhibitor MG132 and MRAP underwent ubiquitylation on lysine and other amino acids. Nonetheless, when protein synthesis was blocked with cycloheximide, MRAP was rapidly degraded even when MG132 was included and all lysines were replaced by arginines, implicating non-proteasomal degradation pathways. The results show that although MRAP does not change orientations during trafficking, its synthesis and degradation are dynamically regulated. PMID:27486435

  5. Dual Topology of the Melanocortin-2 Receptor Accessory Protein Is Stable.

    PubMed

    Maben, Zachary J; Malik, Sundeep; Jiang, Liyi H; Hinkle, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    Melanocortin 2 receptor accessory protein (MRAP) facilitates trafficking of melanocortin 2 (MC2) receptors and is essential for ACTH binding and signaling. MRAP is a single transmembrane domain protein that forms antiparallel homodimers. These studies ask when MRAP first acquires this dual topology, whether MRAP architecture is static or stable, and whether the accessory protein undergoes rapid turnover. To answer these questions, we developed an approach that capitalizes on the specificity of bacterial biotin ligase, which adds biotin to lysine in a short acceptor peptide sequence; the distinct mobility of MRAP protomers of opposite orientations based on their N-linked glycosylation; and the ease of identifying biotin-labeled proteins. We inserted biotin ligase acceptor peptides at the N- or C-terminal ends of MRAP and expressed the modified proteins in mammalian cells together with either cytoplasmic or endoplasmic reticulum-targeted biotin ligase. MRAP assumed dual topology early in biosynthesis in both CHO and OS3 adrenal cells. Once established, MRAP orientation was stable. Despite its conformational stability, MRAP displayed a half-life of under 2 h in CHO cells. The amount of MRAP was increased by the proteasome inhibitor MG132 and MRAP underwent ubiquitylation on lysine and other amino acids. Nonetheless, when protein synthesis was blocked with cycloheximide, MRAP was rapidly degraded even when MG132 was included and all lysines were replaced by arginines, implicating non-proteasomal degradation pathways. The results show that although MRAP does not change orientations during trafficking, its synthesis and degradation are dynamically regulated.

  6. Dual disease resistance mediated by the immune receptor Cf-2 in tomato requires a common virulence target of a fungus and a nematode

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Torres, Jose L.; Wilbers, Ruud H. P.; Gawronski, Piotr; Boshoven, Jordi C.; Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Cordewener, Jan H. G.; America, Antoine H. P.; Overmars, Hein A.; Van ‘t Klooster, John W.; Baranowski, Lukasz; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Ilyas, Muhammad; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Schots, Arjen; de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska; Smant, Geert

    2012-01-01

    Plants lack the seemingly unlimited receptor diversity of a somatic adaptive immune system as found in vertebrates and rely on only a relatively small set of innate immune receptors to resist a myriad of pathogens. Here, we show that disease-resistant tomato plants use an efficient mechanism to leverage the limited nonself recognition capacity of their innate immune system. We found that the extracellular plant immune receptor protein Cf-2 of the red currant tomato (Solanum pimpinellifolium) has acquired dual resistance specificity by sensing perturbations in a common virulence target of two independently evolved effectors of a fungus and a nematode. The Cf-2 protein, originally identified as a monospecific immune receptor for the leaf mold fungus Cladosporium fulvum, also mediates disease resistance to the root parasitic nematode Globodera rostochiensis pathotype Ro1-Mierenbos. The Cf-2–mediated dual resistance is triggered by effector-induced perturbations of the apoplastic Rcr3pim protein of S. pimpinellifolium. Binding of the venom allergen-like effector protein Gr-VAP1 of G. rostochiensis to Rcr3pim perturbs the active site of this papain-like cysteine protease. In the absence of the Cf-2 receptor, Rcr3pim increases the susceptibility of tomato plants to G. rostochiensis, thus showing its role as a virulence target of these nematodes. Furthermore, both nematode infection and transient expression of Gr-VAP1 in tomato plants harboring Cf-2 and Rcr3pim trigger a defense-related programmed cell death in plant cells. Our data demonstrate that monitoring host proteins targeted by multiple pathogens broadens the spectrum of disease resistances mediated by single plant immune receptors. PMID:22675118

  7. Targeting group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors for the treatment of psychosis associated with Alzheimer's disease: selective activation of mGlu2 receptors amplifies beta-amyloid toxicity in cultured neurons, whereas dual activation of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors is neuroprotective.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Molinaro, Gemma; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Giuffrida, Maria Laura; Riozzi, Barbara; Traficante, Anna; Bruno, Valeria; Cannella, Milena; Merlo, Sara; Wang, Xushan; Heinz, Beverly A; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Britton, Thomas C; Drago, Filippo; Sortino, Maria Angela; Copani, Agata; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2011-03-01

    Dual orthosteric agonists of metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) and mGlu3 receptors are being developed as novel antipsychotic agents devoid of the adverse effects of conventional antipsychotics. Therefore, these drugs could be helpful for the treatment of psychotic symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In experimental animals, the antipsychotic activity of mGlu2/3 receptor agonists is largely mediated by the activation of mGlu2 receptors and is mimicked by selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of mGlu2 receptors. We investigated the distinct influence of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors in mixed and pure neuronal cultures exposed to synthetic β-amyloid protein (Aβ) to model neurodegeneration occurring in AD. The mGlu2 receptor PAM, N-4'-cyano-biphenyl-3-yl)-N-(3-pyridinylmethyl)-ethanesulfonamide hydrochloride (LY566332), devoid of toxicity per se, amplified Aβ-induced neurodegeneration, and this effect was prevented by the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(9-xanthylmethyl)-2-(2'-carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (LY341495). LY566332 potentiated Aβ toxicity regardless of the presence of glial mGlu3 receptors, but it was inactive when neurons lacked mGlu2 receptors. The dual mGlu2/3 receptor agonist, (-)-2-oxa-4-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]exhane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268), was neuroprotective in mixed cultures via a paracrine mechanism mediated by transforming growth factor-β1. LY379268 lost its protective activity in neurons grown with astrocytes lacking mGlu3 receptors, indicating that protection against Aβ neurotoxicity was mediated entirely by glial mGlu3 receptors. The selective noncompetitive mGlu3 receptor antagonist, (3S)-1-(5-bromopyrimidin-2-yl)-N-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)pyrrolidin-3-amine methanesulfonate hydrate (LY2389575), amplified Aβ toxicity on its own, and, interestingly, unmasked a neurotoxic activity of LY379268, which probably was mediated by the activation of mGlu2 receptors. These data indicate that selective potentiation of

  8. Design, Syntheses, and Biological Evaluation of 14-Heteroaromatic Substituted Naltrexone Derivatives: Pharmacological Profile Switch from Mu Opioid Receptor Selectivity to Mu/Kappa Opioid Receptor Dual Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yunyun; Zaidi, Saheem A.; Elbegdorj, Orgil; Aschenbach, Lindsey C. K.; Li, Guo; Stevens, David L.; Scoggins, Krista L.; Dewey, William L.; Selley, Dana E.; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Based on a mu opioid receptor (MOR) homology model and the “isosterism” concept, three generations of 14-heteroaromatically substituted naltrexone derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as potential MOR selective ligands. The first generation ligands appeared to be MOR selective, whereas the second and the third generation ones showed MOR/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) dual selectivity. Docking of ligands 2 (MOR selective) and 10 (MOR/KOR dual selective) to the three opioid receptor crystal structures revealed a non-conserved residue facilitated “hydrogen bonding network” that could be responsible for their distinctive selectivity profiles. The MOR/KOR dual selective ligand 10 showed no agonism and acted as a potent antagonist in the tail flick assay. It also produced less severe opioid withdrawal symptoms than naloxone in morphine dependent mice. In conclusion, ligand 10 may serve as a novel lead compound to develop MOR/KOR dual selective ligands, which might possess unique therapeutic value for opioid addiction treatment. PMID:24144240

  9. A dual physiological character for sexual function: the role of serotonergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Motofei, Ion G

    2008-03-01

    Anatomically, sexual reflexes are mixed (somatic-autonomic) circuits, represented by emission (sympathetic centre and somatic afferents), expulsion (parasympathetic centre and somatic efferents) and erection (parasympathetic centre and somatic afferents). Physiologically, ejaculation has a dual autonomic mediation, consisting of two distinct and opposite autonomic centres (emission and expulsion), both with a positive contribution to the respective function. Experimentally, serotonin (5HT) has two distinct, opposite and positive effects on sexual function, with 5HT-(1A) agonists decreasing intravaginal ejaculatory latency and erection, and 5HT-(2C) agonists increasing both erection and ejaculatory latency. In this review I assume that 5HT modulates sexual reflexes, establishing a functional connection between the involved somatic and autonomic structures. The 5HT-(1A) receptors are assumed to make the connection between somatic pathways and sympathetic centres while the 5HT-(2C) receptors could establish the connection between somatic pathways and parasympathetic centres. Further studies will develop the cerebral sexual duality, explaining the implication of psychological factors in sexual function and the role of sexuality in psychosocial behaviour. PMID:17922864

  10. Structural mechanism for signal transduction in RXR nuclear receptor heterodimers

    PubMed Central

    Kojetin, Douglas J.; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Hughes, Travis S.; Srinivasan, Sathish; Nwachukwu, Jerome C.; Cavett, Valerie; Nowak, Jason; Chalmers, Michael J.; Marciano, David P.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Shulman, Andrew I.; Rance, Mark; Griffin, Patrick R.; Bruning, John B.; Nettles, Kendall W.

    2015-01-01

    A subset of nuclear receptors (NRs) function as obligate heterodimers with retinoid X receptor (RXR), allowing integration of ligand-dependent signals across the dimer interface via an unknown structural mechanism. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, x-ray crystallography and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry, here we show an allosteric mechanism through which RXR co-operates with a permissive dimer partner, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, while rendered generally unresponsive by a non-permissive dimer partner, thyroid hormone (TR) receptor. Amino acid residues that mediate this allosteric mechanism comprise an evolutionarily conserved network discovered by statistical coupling analysis (SCA). This SCA network acts as a signalling rheostat to integrate signals between dimer partners, ligands and coregulator-binding sites, thereby affecting signal transmission in RXR heterodimers. These findings define rules guiding how NRs integrate two ligand-dependent signalling pathways into RXR heterodimer-specific responses. PMID:26289479

  11. Dual GPCR and GAG mimicry by the M3 chemokine decoy receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2008-09-23

    Viruses have evolved a myriad of evasion strategies focused on undermining chemokine-mediated immune surveillance, exemplified by the mouse {gamma}-herpesvirus 68 M3 decoy receptor. Crystal structures of M3 in complex with C chemokine ligand 1/lymphotactin and CC chemokine ligand 2/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 reveal that invariant chemokine features associated with G protein-coupled receptor binding are primarily recognized by the decoy C-terminal domain, whereas the N-terminal domain (NTD) reconfigures to engage divergent basic residue clusters on the surface of chemokines. Favorable electrostatic forces dramatically enhance the association kinetics of chemokine binding by M3, with a primary role ascribed to acidic NTD regions that effectively mimic glycosaminoglycan interactions. Thus, M3 employs two distinct mechanisms of chemical imitation to potently sequester chemokines, thereby inhibiting chemokine receptor binding events as well as the formation of chemotactic gradients necessary for directed leukocyte trafficking.

  12. Structure and ligand-binding mechanism of the human OX1 and OX2 orexin receptors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Babaoglu, Kerim; Brautigam, Chad A; Clark, Lindsay; Shao, Zhenhua; Scheuermann, Thomas H; Harrell, Charles M; Gotter, Anthony L; Roecker, Anthony J; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J; Coleman, Paul J; Rosenbaum, Daniel M

    2016-04-01

    The orexin (also known as hypocretin) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate sleep and other behavioral functions in mammals, and are therapeutic targets for sleep and wake disorders. The human receptors hOX1R and hOX2R, which are 64% identical in sequence, have overlapping but distinct physiological functions and potential therapeutic profiles. We determined structures of hOX1R bound to the OX1R-selective antagonist SB-674042 and the dual antagonist suvorexant at 2.8-Å and 2.75-Å resolution, respectively, and used molecular modeling to illuminate mechanisms of antagonist subtype selectivity between hOX1R and hOX2R. The hOX1R structures also reveal a conserved amphipathic α-helix, in the extracellular N-terminal region, that interacts with orexin-A and is essential for high-potency neuropeptide activation at both receptors. The orexin-receptor crystal structures are valuable tools for the design and development of selective orexin-receptor antagonists and agonists. PMID:26950369

  13. The growth hormone receptor: mechanism of activation and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Andrew J; Waters, Michael J

    2010-09-01

    Growth hormone is widely used clinically to promote growth and anabolism and for other purposes. Its actions are mediated via the growth hormone receptor, both directly by tyrosine kinase activation and indirectly by induction of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Insensitivity to growth hormone (Laron syndrome) can result from mutations in the growth hormone receptor and can be treated with IGF-1. This treatment is, however, not fully effective owing to the loss of the direct actions of growth hormone and altered availability of exogenous IGF-1. Excessive activation of the growth hormone receptor by circulating growth hormone results in gigantism and acromegaly, whereas cell transformation and cancer can occur in response to autocrine activation of the receptor. Advances in understanding the mechanism of receptor activation have led to a model in which the growth hormone receptor exists as a constitutive dimer. Binding of the hormone realigns the subunits by rotation and closer apposition, resulting in juxtaposition of the catalytic domains of the associated tyrosine-protein kinase JAK2 below the cell membrane. This change results in activation of JAK2 by transphosphorylation, then phosphorylation of receptor tyrosines in the cytoplasmic domain, which enables binding of adaptor proteins, as well as direct phosphorylation of target proteins. This model is discussed in the light of salient information from closely related class 1 cytokine receptors, such as the erythropoietin, prolactin and thrombopoietin receptors. PMID:20664532

  14. A Dual Role for P2X7 Receptor during Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Junior, E.S.; Morandini, A.C.; Almeida-da-Silva, C.L.C.; Franco, E.J.; Potempa, J.; Nguyen, K.A.; Oliveira, A.C.; Zamboni, D.S.; Ojcius, D.M.; Scharfstein, J.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a role for purinergic signaling in the activation of multiprotein intracellular complexes called inflammasomes, which control the release of potent inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL) -1β and -18. Porphyromonas gingivalis is intimately associated with periodontitis and is currently considered one of the pathogens that can subvert the immune system by limiting the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. We recently showed that P. gingivalis can dampen eATP-induced IL-1β secretion by means of its fimbriae in a purinergic P2X7 receptor–dependent manner. Here, we further explore the role of this purinergic receptor during eATP-induced IL-1β processing and secretion by P. gingivalis–infected macrophages. We found that NLRP3 was necessary for eATP-induced IL-1β secretion as well as for caspase 1 activation irrespective of P. gingivalis fimbriae. Additionally, although the secretion of IL-1β from P. gingivalis–infected macrophages was dependent on NLRP3, its adaptor protein ASC, or caspase 1, the cleavage of intracellular pro-IL-1β to the mature form was found to occur independently of NLRP3, its adaptor protein ASC, or caspase 1. Our in vitro findings revealed that P2X7 receptor has a dual role, being critical not only for eATP-induced IL-1β secretion but also for intracellular pro-IL-1β processing. These results were relevant in vivo since P2X7 receptor expression was upregulated in a P. gingivalis oral infection model, and reduced IFN-γ and IL-17 were detected in draining lymph node cells from P2rx7-/- mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that P2X7 receptor and NLRP3 transcription were modulated in human chronic periodontitis. Overall, we conclude that the P2X7 receptor has a role in periodontal immunopathogenesis and suggest that targeting of the P2X7/NLRP3 pathway should be considered in future therapeutic interventions in periodontitis. PMID:26152185

  15. Effects of Strain Rates on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanism of DP780 Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengci; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Kuang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of DP780 dual phase steel were measured by quasi-static and high-speed tensile tests at strain rates between 0.001 and 1000 s-1 at room temperature. The deformation and fracture mechanisms were analyzed by observation of the tensile fracture and microstructure near the fracture. Dynamic factor and feret ratio quantitative methods were applied to study the effect of strain rate on the microstructure and properties of DP780 steel. The constitutive relation was described by a modified Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong model. The results showed that the strain rate sensitivity of yield strength is bigger than that of ultimate tensile strength; as strain rate increased, the formation of microcracks and voids at the ferrite/martensite interface can be alleviated; the strain rate effect is unevenly distributed in the plastic deformation region. Moreover, both models can effectively describe the experimental results, while the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is more accurate because the strain-hardening rate of this model is independent of strain rate.

  16. Dual role of dopamine D(2)-like receptors in the mediation of conditioned and unconditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Marcus Lira; de Oliveira, Amanda Ribeiro; Muthuraju, Sangu; Colombo, Ana Caroline; Saito, Viviane Mitsuko; Talbot, Teddy

    2015-11-14

    A reduction of dopamine release or D2 receptor blockade in the terminal fields of the mesolimbic system, particularly the amygdala, clearly reduces conditioned fear. Similar D2 receptor antagonism in the neural substrates of fear in the midbrain tectum attenuates the processing of unconditioned aversive information. However, the implications of the interplay between opposing actions of dopamine in the rostral and caudal segments of the dopaminergic system are still unclear. Previous studies from this laboratory have reported the effects of dopaminergic drugs on behavior in rats in the elevated plus maze, auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) recorded from the midbrain tectum, fear-potentiated startle, and conditioned freezing. These findings led to an interesting framework on the functional roles of dopamine in both anxiety and fear states. Dopamine D2 receptor inhibition in the terminal fields of the mesolimbic dopamine system generally causes anxiolytic-like effects, whereas the activity of midbrain substrates of unconditioned fear are enhanced by D2 receptor antagonists, suggesting that D2 receptor-mediated mechanisms play opposing roles in fear/anxiety processes, depending on the brain region under study. Dopamine appears to mediate conditioned fear by acting at rostral levels of the brain and regulate unconditioned fear at the midbrain level, likely by reducing the sensorimotor gating of aversive events.

  17. 8-THP-DHI analogs as potent Type I dual TIE-2/VEGF-R2 receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hudkins, Robert L; Zulli, Allison L; Underiner, Ted L; Angeles, Thelma S; Aimone, Lisa D; Meyer, Sheryl L; Pauletti, Daniel; Chang, Hong; Fedorov, Elena V; Almo, Steven C; Fedorov, Alexander A; Ruggeri, Bruce A

    2010-06-01

    A novel series of 8-(2-tetrahydropyranyl)-12,13-dihydroindazolo[5,4-a]pyrrolo[3,4-c]carbazoles (THP-DHI) was synthesized and evaluated as dual TIE-2 and VEGF-R2 receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Development of the structure-activity relationships (SAR) with the support of X-ray crystallography led to identification of 7f and 7g as potent, selective dual TIE-2/VEGF-R2 inhibitors with excellent cellular potency and acceptable pharmacokinetic properties. Compounds 7f and 7g were orally active in tumor models with no observed toxicity.

  18. A dual receptor crosstalk model of G-protein-coupled signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Patrick; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Dinh, Tuan; Rebres, Robert A; Roach, Tamara I; Jordan, Michael I; Arkin, Adam P

    2008-09-26

    Macrophage cells that are stimulated by two different ligands that bind to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) usually respond as if the stimulus effects are additive, but for a minority of ligand combinations the response is synergistic. The G-protein-coupled receptor system integrates signaling cues from the environment to actuate cell morphology, gene expression, ion homeostasis, and other physiological states. We analyze the effects of the two signaling molecules complement factors 5a (C5a) and uridine diphosphate (UDP) on the intracellular second messenger calcium to elucidate the principles that govern the processing of multiple signals by GPCRs. We have developed a formal hypothesis, in the form of a kinetic model, for the mechanism of action of this GPCR signal transduction system using data obtained from RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Bayesian statistical methods are employed to represent uncertainty in both data and model parameters and formally tie the model to experimental data. When the model is also used as a tool in the design of experiments, it predicts a synergistic region in the calcium peak height dose response that results when cells are simultaneously stimulated by C5a and UDP. An analysis of the model reveals a potential mechanism for crosstalk between the Galphai-coupled C5a receptor and the Galphaq-coupled UDP receptor signaling systems that results in synergistic calcium release.

  19. Discovery of Dual ETA/ETB Receptor Antagonists from Traditional Chinese Herbs through in Silico and in Vitro Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing; Zhang, Yuxin; Liu, Qing; Ai, Zhixin; Zhang, Yanling; Xiang, Yuhong; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2016-01-01

    Endothelin-1 receptors (ETAR and ETBR) act as a pivotal regulator in the biological effects of ET-1 and represent a potential drug target for the treatment of multiple cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the study is to discover dual ETA/ETB receptor antagonists from traditional Chinese herbs. Ligand- and structure-based virtual screening was performed to screen an in-house database of traditional Chinese herbs, followed by a series of in vitro bioassay evaluation. Aristolochic acid A (AAA) was first confirmed to be a dual ETA/ETB receptor antagonist based intracellular calcium influx assay and impedance-based assay. Dose-response curves showed that AAA can block both ETAR and ETBR with IC50 of 7.91 and 7.40 μM, respectively. Target specificity and cytotoxicity bioassay proved that AAA is a selective dual ETA/ETB receptor antagonist and has no significant cytotoxicity on HEK293/ETAR and HEK293/ETBR cells within 24 h. It is a feasible and effective approach to discover bioactive compounds from traditional Chinese herbs using in silico screening combined with in vitro bioassay evaluation. The structural characteristic of AAA for its activity was especially interpreted, which could provide valuable reference for the further structural modification of AAA. PMID:26999111

  20. Discovery of Dual ETA/ETB Receptor Antagonists from Traditional Chinese Herbs through in Silico and in Vitro Screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing; Zhang, Yuxin; Liu, Qing; Ai, Zhixin; Zhang, Yanling; Xiang, Yuhong; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2016-03-16

    Endothelin-1 receptors (ETAR and ETBR) act as a pivotal regulator in the biological effects of ET-1 and represent a potential drug target for the treatment of multiple cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the study is to discover dual ETA/ETB receptor antagonists from traditional Chinese herbs. Ligand- and structure-based virtual screening was performed to screen an in-house database of traditional Chinese herbs, followed by a series of in vitro bioassay evaluation. Aristolochic acid A (AAA) was first confirmed to be a dual ETA/ETB receptor antagonist based intracellular calcium influx assay and impedance-based assay. Dose-response curves showed that AAA can block both ETAR and ETBR with IC50 of 7.91 and 7.40 μM, respectively. Target specificity and cytotoxicity bioassay proved that AAA is a selective dual ETA/ETB receptor antagonist and has no significant cytotoxicity on HEK293/ETAR and HEK293/ETBR cells within 24 h. It is a feasible and effective approach to discover bioactive compounds from traditional Chinese herbs using in silico screening combined with in vitro bioassay evaluation. The structural characteristic of AAA for its activity was especially interpreted, which could provide valuable reference for the further structural modification of AAA.

  1. [Steroid receptors and mechanism of action of sex steroids].

    PubMed

    Guiochon-Mantel, A; Milgrom, E

    1999-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors define a large family of proteins. Recently, a new estradiol receptor has been identified. This discovery suggests the existence of a previously unrecognized pathway of estrogen signalling. Moreover, it implies important pharmacological consequences. Receptors activation induces the modulation of transcription of specific genes. Proteins involved in this effect have been identified: coactivators, corepressors and cointegrators. Their mechanism of action have been characterized. They modify histone acetylation of the corresponding promotor. Sex steroid receptors are located in the nucleus. This nuclear localization is in fact a dynamic situation, resulting from a continuous shuttling of the receptor between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Non genomic effects of steroids have also been described. PMID:10542957

  2. Antivascular therapy for multidrug-resistant ovarian tumors by macitentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Jin; Kim, Jang Seong; Kim, Seung Wook; Yun, Seok Joong; He, Junqin; Brantley, Emily; Fan, Dominic; Strickner, Panja; Lehembre, François; Regenass, Urs; Fidler, Isaiah J

    2012-02-01

    Endothelin receptors (ETRs) are often overexpressed in ovarian tumors, which can be resistant to conventional therapies. Thus, we investigated whether blockage of the ETR pathways using the dual ETR antagonist macitentan combined with taxol or cisplatinum can produce therapy for orthotopically growing multidrug-resistant (MDR) human ovarian carcinoma. In several studies, nude mice were injected in the peritoneal cavity with HeyA8-MDR human ovarian cancer cells. Ten days later, mice were randomized to receive vehicle (saline), macitentan (oral, daily), taxol (intraperitoneal, weekly), cisplatinum (intraperitoneal, weekly), macitentan plus taxol, or macitentan plus cisplatinum. Moribund mice were killed, and tumors were collected, weighed, and prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. The HeyA8-MDR tumors did not respond to taxol, cisplatinum, or macitentan administered as single agents. In contrast, combination therapy with macitentan and taxol or macitentan and cisplatinum significantly decreased the tumor incidence and weight and significantly increased the survival of mice and their general condition. Multiple immunohistochemical analyses revealed that treatment with macitentan and macitentan plus taxol or cisplatinum inhibited the phosphorylation of ETRs, decreased the levels of pVEGFR2, pAkt, and pMAPK in tumor cells after 2 weeks of treatment and induced a first wave of apoptosis in tumor-associated endothelial cells followed by apoptosis in surrounding tumor cells. Our study shows that ovarian cancer cells, which express the endothelin axis and are multidrug resistant, are exquisitely sensitive to treatment with a dual ET antagonist and can be resensitized to both taxol and cisplatinum. This combined therapy led to a significant reduction in tumor weight.

  3. Dynamic Regulation of the GABAA Receptor Function by Redox Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Daniel J; González, Andrea N Beltrán

    2016-09-01

    Oxidizing and reducing agents, which are currently involved in cell metabolism and signaling pathways, can regulate fast inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by GABA receptors in the nervous system. A number of in vitro studies have shown that diverse redox compounds, including redox metabolites and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, modulate phasic and tonic responses mediated by neuronal GABAA receptors through both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. We review experimental data showing that many redox agents, which are normally present in neurons and glia or are endogenously generated in these cells under physiologic states or during oxidative stress (e.g., hydrogen peroxide, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, nitric oxide, ascorbic acid, and glutathione), induce potentiating or inhibiting actions on different native and recombinant GABAA receptor subtypes. Based on these results, it is thought that redox signaling might represent a homeostatic mechanism that regulates the function of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in physiologic and pathologic conditions.

  4. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-11-28

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as their terminal electron acceptor for metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce components requisite for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates both diffusion- and conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found the literature. Our simulation results showed that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct measurements and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that cyclic and squarewave voltammetry are currently not good tools to determine the specific percentage of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms used by biofilms. The developed model will be a critical tool in designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  5. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Kuprat, Andrew; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms. PMID:24113651

  6. Dosage-dependent regulation of cell proliferation and adhesion through dual β2-adrenergic receptor/cAMP signals.

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, Ariana; Saulière, Aude; Finana, Frédéric; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Lüthy, Isabel; Galés, Céline

    2014-03-01

    The role of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) remains controversial in normal and tumor breast. Herein we explore the cAMP signaling involved in β-AR-dependent control of proliferation and adhesion of nontumor human breast cell line MCF-10A. Low concentrations of a β-agonist, isoproterenol (ISO), promote cell adhesion (87.5% cells remaining adherent to the plastic dishes following specific detachment vs. 35.0% in control, P<0.001), while increasing concentrations further engages an additional 36% inhibition of Erk1/2 phosphorylation (p-Erk1/2)-dependent cell proliferation (P<0.01). Isoproterenol dose response on cell adhesion was fitted to a 2-site curve (EC50(1): 16.5±11.5 fM, EC50(2): 4.08±3.09 nM), while ISO significantly inhibited p-Erk1/2 according to a 1-site model (EC50: 0.25±0.13 nM). Using β-AR-selective agonist/antagonists and cAMP analogs/inhibitors, we identified a dosage-dependent signaling in which low ISO concentrations target a β2-AR population localized in raft microdomains and stimulate a Gs/cAMP/Epac/adhesion-signaling module, while higher concentrations engage a concomitant activation of another β2-AR population outside rafts and inhibit the proliferation by a Gs/cAMP/PKA-dependent signaling module. Our data provide a new molecular basis for the dose-dependent switch of β-AR signaling. This study also sheds light on a new cAMP pathway core mechanism with a single receptor triggering dual cAMP signaling controlled by PKA or Epac but with different cellular outputs.

  7. Mechanism of regulation of receptor histidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Hedda U; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Hornig, Nora; Hulko, Michael; Martin, Jörg; Schultz, Joachim E; Zeth, Kornelius; Lupas, Andrei N; Coles, Murray

    2012-01-11

    Bacterial transmembrane receptors regulate an intracellular catalytic output in response to extracellular sensory input. To investigate the conformational changes that relay the regulatory signal, we have studied the HAMP domain, a ubiquitous intracellular module connecting input to output domains. HAMP forms a parallel, dimeric, four-helical coiled coil, and rational substitutions in our model domain (Af1503 HAMP) induce a transition in its interhelical packing, characterized by axial rotation of all four helices (the gearbox signaling model). We now illustrate how these conformational changes are propagated to a downstream domain by fusing Af1503 HAMP variants to the DHp domain of EnvZ, a bacterial histidine kinase. Structures of wild-type and mutant constructs are correlated with ligand response in vivo, clearly associating them with distinct signaling states. We propose that altered recognition of the catalytic domain by DHp, rather than a shift in position of the phospho-accepting histidine, forms the basis for regulation of kinase activity.

  8. Dual effect of trimebutine on contractility of the guinea pig ileum via the opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, K; Sano, I; Nakayama, S; Matsuyama, S; Takeda, K; Yoshihara, C; Tanaka, C

    1991-12-01

    Preparations of longitudinal muscle attached to myenteric plexus from guinea pig ileum were used to observe the effect of trimebutine on intestinal motility. Electrical stimulation at 0.2 Hz and 5 Hz produced contraction mediated by the release of acetylcholine in the preparations. The response to low-frequency stimulation (0.2 Hz) was inhibited by trimebutine (10(-8)-10(-5) mol/L), and the response to high-frequency stimulation (5 Hz) was enhanced by the drug at low concentrations (10(-8)-10(-7) mol/L) and inhibited by high concentrations (10(-6)-10(-5) mol/L). This enhancement was mimicked by [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin, and was antagonized by naloxone but not by MR2266. Enhancement by trimebutine was inhibited by yohimbine. Trimebutine (greater than or equal to 10(-8) mol/L) inhibited stimulation (5 Hz)-evoked release of norepinephrine, and the trimebutine effect was antagonized by naloxone but not by MR2266. Low concentrations of trimebutine inhibit norepinephrine release via the mu-opioid receptor and enhance intestinal motility by preventing the adrenergic inhibition of acetylcholine release. Inhibition by trimebutine was antagonized either by naloxone or MR2266. High concentrations of trimebutine may inhibit acetylcholine release via the mu- and kappa-opioid receptors, after which the intestinal motility is inhibited. Trimebutine at further high concentrations (greater than 10(-5) mol/L) contracted single smooth muscle cells from the circular muscle layers but not from the longitudinal muscle layers. The usual dose of trimebutine may exert dual effect on the intestinal motility indirectly through cholinergic and adrenergic neurons without direct effect on the smooth muscle. PMID:1659547

  9. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of macitentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist, in humans.

    PubMed

    Bruderer, Shirin; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Seiberling, Michael; Wank, Janine; Sidharta, Patricia N; Treiber, Alexander; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2012-09-01

    Macitentan is a tissue-targeting, dual endothelin receptor antagonist, currently under phase 3 investigation in pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this study the disposition and metabolism of macitentan were investigated following administration of a single oral 10 mg dose of (14)C-macitentan to six healthy male subjects. The total radioactivity in matrices was determined using liquid scintillation counting. The proposed structure of metabolites was based on mass spectrometry characteristics and, when available, confirmed by comparison with reference compounds. Mean (± SD) cumulative recovery of radioactivity from faeces and urine was 73.6% (± 6.2%) of the administered radioactive dose, with 49.7% (± 3.9%) cumulative recovery from urine, and 23.9% (± 4.8%) from faeces. In plasma, in addition to parent macitentan, ACT-132577, a pharmacologically active metabolite elicited by oxidative depropylation and the carboxylic acid metabolite ACT-373898 were identified. In urine, four entities were identified, with the hydrolysis product of ACT-373898 as the most abundant one. In faeces, five entities were identified, with the hydrolysis product of macitentan and ACT-132577 as the most abundant one. Concentrations of total radioactivity in whole blood were lower compared to plasma, which indicates that macitentan and its metabolites poorly bind to or penetrate into erythrocytes.

  10. Target duality in N= 8 superconformal mechanics and the coupling of dual pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, Marcelo; Lechtenfeld, Olaf

    2013-07-15

    We couple dual pairs of N= 8 superconformal mechanics with conical targets of dimension d and 8−d. The superconformal coupling generates an oscillator-type potential on each of the two target factors, with a frequency depending on the respective dual coordinates. In the case of the inhomogeneous (3,8,5) model, which entails a monopole background, it is necessary to add an extra supermultiplet of constants for half of the supersymmetry. The N= 4 analog, joining an inhomogeneous (1,4,3) with a (3,4,1) multiplet, is also analyzed in detail.

  11. Mechanism of Positive Allosteric Modulators Acting on AMPA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jin,R.; Clark, S.; Weeks, A.; Dudman, J.; Gouaux, E.; Partin, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels involved in the modulation of synaptic strength are the AMPA, kainate, and NMDA glutamate receptors. Small molecules that potentiate AMPA receptor currents relieve cognitive deficits caused by neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and show promise in the treatment of depression. Previously, there has been limited understanding of the molecular mechanism of action for AMPA receptor potentiators. Here we present cocrystal structures of the glutamate receptor GluR2 S1S2 ligand-binding domain in complex with aniracetam [1-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-2-pyrrolidinone] or CX614 (pyrrolidino-1, 3-oxazino benzo-1, 4-dioxan-10-one), two AMPA receptor potentiators that preferentially slow AMPA receptor deactivation. Both potentiators bind within the dimer interface of the nondesensitized receptor at a common site located on the twofold axis of molecular symmetry. Importantly, the potentiator binding site is adjacent to the 'hinge' in the ligand-binding core 'clamshell' that undergoes conformational rearrangement after glutamate binding. Using rapid solution exchange, patch-clamp electrophysiology experiments, we show that point mutations of residues that interact with potentiators in the cocrystal disrupt potentiator function. We suggest that the potentiators slow deactivation by stabilizing the clamshell in its closed-cleft, glutamate-bound conformation.

  12. END-PLATE ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR: STRUCTURE, MECHANISM, PHARMACOLOGY, AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The synapse is a localized neurohumoral contact between a neuron and an effector cell and may be considered the quantum of fast intercellular communication. Analogously, the postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor may be considered the quantum of fast chemical to electrical transduction. Our understanding of postsynaptic receptors began to develop about a hundred years ago with the demonstration that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve released acetylcholine and slowed the heart beat. During the past 50 years, advances in understanding postsynaptic receptors increased at a rapid pace, owing largely to studies of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the motor endplate. The endplate AChR belongs to a large superfamily of neurotransmitter receptors, called Cys-loop receptors, and has served as an exemplar receptor for probing fundamental structures and mechanisms that underlie fast synaptic transmission in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recent studies provide an increasingly detailed picture of the structure of the AChR and the symphony of molecular motions that underpin its remarkably fast and efficient chemoelectrical transduction. PMID:22811427

  13. Dual human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 blockade for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of trastuzumab into clinical practice changed the natural course of HER2-positive breast cancer. Currently, treatment with trastuzumab represents the standard of care for HER2-positive breast cancer and this treatment has been approved in the adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and metastatic settings. Besides trastuzumab, two other anti-HER2 agents—lapatinib and pertuzumab—have been approved for the treatment of HER2-positive advanced breast cancer. Strong biologic data support the concept of dual HER2 blockade, with different anti-HER2 agents demonstrating complementary mechanisms of action. Several neoadjuvant and metastatic studies performed in HER2-positive breast cancer using dual HER2 blockade have been proven to outperform anti-HER2 monotherapies. These dual combinations of agents represent a promising therapeutic strategy that is now reaching clinical practice. In this review we describe the results of studies utilizing dual blockade in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:23377763

  14. A numerical framework for the mechanical analysis of dual-layer stents in intracranial aneurysm treatment.

    PubMed

    Alherz, Ali I; Tanweer, Omar; Flamini, Vittoria

    2016-08-16

    Dual-layer stents and multi-layer stents represent a new paradigm in endovascular interventions. Multi-layer stents match different stent designs in order to offer auxiliary functions. For example, dual-layer stents used in the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms, like the FRED(TM) (MicroVention, CA) stent, combine a densely braided inner metallic mesh with a loosely braided outer mesh. The inner layer is designed to divert blood flow, whereas the outer one ensures microvessels branching out of the main artery remain patent. In this work, the implemented finite element (FE) analysis identifies the key aspects of dual-stent mechanics. In particular, dual-layer stents used in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms require the ability to conform to very narrow passages in their closed configuration, while at the same time they have to provide support and stability once deployed. This study developed a numerical framework for the analysis of dual-layer stents for endovascular intracranial aneurysm treatment. Our results were validated against analytical methods. For the designs considered, we observed that foreshortening was in average 37.5%±2.5%, and that doubling the number of wires in the outer stent increased bending moment by 23%, while halving the number of wires of the inner stent reduced von Mises stress by 2.3%. This framework can be extended to the design optimization of multi-layer stents used in other endovascular treatments.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a biodegradable elastomer featuring a dual crosslinking mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Richard T.; Thevenot, Paul; Gyawali, Dipendra; Chiao, Jung-Chih; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    The need for advanced materials in emerging technologies such as tissue engineering has prompted increased research to produce novel biodegradable polymers elastic in nature and mechanically compliant with the host tissue. We have developed a soft biodegradable elastomeric platform biomaterial created from citric acid, maleic anhydride, and 1,8-octanediol, poly(octamethylene maleate (anhydride) citrate) (POMaC), which is able to closely mimic the mechanical properties of a wide range of soft biological tissues. POMaC features a dual crosslinking mechanism, which allows for the option of the crosslinking POMaC using UV irradiation and/or polycondensation to fit the needs of the intended application. The material properties, degradation profiles, and functionalities of POMaC thermoset networks can all be tuned through the monomer ratios and the dual crosslinking mechanism. POMaC polymers displayed an initial modulus between 0.03 and 1.54 MPa, and elongation at break between 48% and 534% strain. In vitro and in vivo evaluation using cell culture and subcutaneous implantation, respectively, confirmed cell and tissue biocompatibility. POMaC biodegradable polymers can also be combined with MEMS technology to fabricate soft and elastic 3D microchanneled scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. The introduction of POMaC will expand the choices of available biodegradable polymeric elastomers. The dual crosslinking mechanism for biodegradable elastomer design should contribute to biomaterials science. PMID:22162975

  16. Beyond the cell surface: new mechanisms of receptor function.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2010-05-21

    The text book view of cell surface receptors depicts them at the top of a vertical chain of command that starts with ligand binding and proceeds in a lineal fashion towards the cell nucleus. Although pedagogically useful, this view is incomplete and recent findings suggest that the extracellular domain of cell surface receptors can be a transmitter as much as a receiver in intercellular communication. GFRalpha1 is a GPI-anchored receptor for GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor), a neuronal growth factor with widespread functions in the developing and adult nervous system. GFRalpha1 partners with transmembrane proteins, such as the receptor tyrosine kinase RET or the cell adhesion molecule NCAM, for intracellular transmission of the GDNF signal. In addition to this canonical role, GFRalpha1 can also engage in horizontal interactions and thereby modify the function of other cell surface components. GFRalpha1 can also function as a ligand-induced adhesion cell molecule, mediating homophilic cell-cell interactions in response to GDNF. Finally, GFRalpha1 can also be released from the cell surface and act at a distance as a soluble factor together with its ligand. This plethora of unconventional mechanisms is likely to be a feature common to several other receptors and considerably expands our view of cell surface receptor function. PMID:20494105

  17. Nuclear receptor corepressor complexes in cancer: mechanism, function and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Madeline M; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) and silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) function as corepressors for diverse transcription factors including nuclear receptors such as estrogen receptors and androgen receptors. Deregulated functions of NCoR and SMRT have been observed in many types of cancers and leukemias. NCoR and SMRT directly bind to transcription factors and nucleate the formation of stable complexes that include histone deacetylase 3, transducin b-like protein 1/TBL1-related protein 1, and G-protein pathway suppressor 2. These NCoR/SMRT-interacting proteins also show deregulated functions in cancers. In this review, we summarize the literature on the mechanism, regulation, and function of the core components of NCoR/SMRT complexes in the context of their involvement in cancers and leukemias. While the current studies support the view that the corepressors are promising targets for cancer treatment, elucidation of the mechanisms of corepressors involved in individual types of cancers is likely required for effective therapy. PMID:25374920

  18. An ultrasensitive sorting mechanism for EGF Receptor Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Hannah; Vacheva, Ivayla; Hoeller, Daniela; Dikic, Ivan; Eils, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Background The Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) receptor has been shown to internalize via clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) in a ligand concentration dependent manner. From a modeling point of view, this resembles an ultrasensitive response, which is the ability of signaling networks to suppress a response for low input values and to increase to a pre-defined level for inputs exceeding a certain threshold. Several mechanisms to generate this behaviour have been described theoretically, the underlying assumptions of which, however, have not been experimentally demonstrated for the EGF receptor internalization network. Results Here, we present a mathematical model of receptor sorting into alternative pathways that explains the EGF-concentration dependent response of CIE. The described mechanism involves a saturation effect of the dominant clathrin-dependent endocytosis pathway and implies distinct steady-states into which the system is forced for low vs high EGF stimulations. The model is minimal since no experimentally unjustified reactions or parameter assumptions are imposed. We demonstrate the robustness of the sorting effect for large parameter variations and give an analytic derivation for alternative steady-states that are reached. Further, we describe extensibility of the model to more than two pathways which might play a role in contexts other than receptor internalization. Conclusion Our main result is that a scenario where different endocytosis routes consume the same form of receptor corroborates the observation of a clear-cut, stimulus dependent sorting. This is especially important since a receptor modification discriminating between the pathways has not been found experimentally. The model is not restricted to EGF receptor internalization and might account for ultrasensitivity in other cellular contexts. PMID:18394191

  19. Bilingualism modulates dual mechanisms of cognitive control: Evidence from ERPs.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julia; Yudes, Carolina; Gómez-Ariza, Carlos J; Bajo, M Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Recent behavioral findings with the AX-Continous Performance Task (AX-CPT; Morales et al., 2013) show that bilinguals only outperform monolinguals under conditions that require the highest adjustment between monitoring (proactive) and inhibitory (reactive) control, which supports the idea that bilingualism modulates the coordination of different control mechanisms. In an ERP experiment we aimed to further investigate the role that bilingualism plays in the dynamic combination of proactive and reactive control in the AX-CPT. Our results strongly indicate that bilingualism facilitates an effective adjustment between both components of cognitive control. First, we replicated previous behavioral results. Second, ERP components indicated that bilingualism influences the conflict monitoring, response inhibition and error monitoring components of control (as indexed by the N2 and P3a elicited by the probe and the error-related negativity following incorrect responses, respectively). Thus, bilinguals exerted higher reactive control than monolinguals but only when they needed to overcome the competing cue-information. These findings join others in suggesting that a better understanding of the cognitive benefits of bilingualism may require consideration of a multi-component perspective. PMID:25448864

  20. Bilingualism modulates dual mechanisms of cognitive control: Evidence from ERPs.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julia; Yudes, Carolina; Gómez-Ariza, Carlos J; Bajo, M Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Recent behavioral findings with the AX-Continous Performance Task (AX-CPT; Morales et al., 2013) show that bilinguals only outperform monolinguals under conditions that require the highest adjustment between monitoring (proactive) and inhibitory (reactive) control, which supports the idea that bilingualism modulates the coordination of different control mechanisms. In an ERP experiment we aimed to further investigate the role that bilingualism plays in the dynamic combination of proactive and reactive control in the AX-CPT. Our results strongly indicate that bilingualism facilitates an effective adjustment between both components of cognitive control. First, we replicated previous behavioral results. Second, ERP components indicated that bilingualism influences the conflict monitoring, response inhibition and error monitoring components of control (as indexed by the N2 and P3a elicited by the probe and the error-related negativity following incorrect responses, respectively). Thus, bilinguals exerted higher reactive control than monolinguals but only when they needed to overcome the competing cue-information. These findings join others in suggesting that a better understanding of the cognitive benefits of bilingualism may require consideration of a multi-component perspective.

  1. Dual efficacy of delta opioid receptor-selective ligands for ethanol drinking and anxiety.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Richard M; Brissett, Daniela I; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2010-10-01

    Alcoholism and anxiety disorders have a huge impact on society and afflict 17.6 million and 40 million people in the United States, respectively. A strong comorbidity exists between alcoholism and anxiety disorders. Indeed, alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety is a primary contributing factor for relapse, and anxiolytics are a common adjuvant therapy prescribed for treatment-seeking alcoholics. It is thought that the use of alcohol to self-medicate and relieve anxiety contributes to the development of addiction. Treatment for anxiety disorders and alcoholism exist but are not universally effective. The delta opioid receptor (DOR) plays a role in both alcohol consumption and anxiety, making it a very interesting clinical target. Two pharmacologically distinct DORs have been described: DOR1 and DOR2. We find here that the relative specificity of DOR agonists for DOR1 or DOR2 can greatly affect the effects they exert on ethanol consumption and anxiety. The DOR1 agonist 2-methyl-4aα-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3,4,4a,5,12,12aα-octahydro-quinolino[2,3,30g]isoquinoline (TAN-67), although not effective in decreasing anxiety-like behavior in naive mice, has anxiolytic-like properties in ethanol-withdrawn mice. In contrast, a less subtype-selective agonist, (+)-4-[(αR)-α-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80), while also reducing anxiety-like behavior, increases ethanol consumption. In addition, we found that the conical anxiolytic diazepam [DZ; 7-chloro-1-methyl-5-phenyl-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one] is a less effective anxiolytic in ethanol-withdrawn mice than in naive mice. Together, our findings suggest that selective DOR agonists can decrease anxiety-like behavior and are more effective than diazepam at reducing ethanol consumption. We believe the dual efficacy of DOR1 agonists makes these receptors an interesting therapeutic target for treatment-seeking alcoholics.

  2. Dual mode of glucagon receptor internalization: role of PKCα, GRKs and β-arrestins.

    PubMed

    Krilov, Lada; Nguyen, Amy; Miyazaki, Teruo; Unson, Cecilia G; Williams, Russell; Lee, Norman H; Ceryak, Susan; Bouscarel, Bernard

    2011-12-10

    Glucagon levels are elevated in diabetes and some liver diseases. Increased glucagon secretion leads to abnormal stimulation of glucagon receptors (GRs) and consequent elevated glucose production in the liver. Blocking glucagon receptor signaling has been proposed as a potential treatment option for diabetes and other conditions associated with hyperglycemia. Elucidating mechanisms of GR desensitization and downregulation may help identify new drug targets besides GR itself. The present study explores the mechanisms of GR internalization and the role of PKCα, GPCR kinases (GRKs) and β-arrestins therein. We have reported previously that PKCα mediates GR phosphorylation and desensitization. While the PKC agonist, PMA, did not affect GR internalization when tested alone, it increased glucagon-mediated GR internalization by 25-40% in GR-expressing HEK-293 cells (HEK-GR cells). In both primary hepatocytes and HEK-GR cells, glucagon treatment recruited PKCα to the plasma membrane where it colocalized with GR. We also observed that overexpression of GRK2, GRK3, or GRK5 enhanced GR internalization. In addition, we found that GR utilizes both clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis in HEK-GR cells. Glucagon triggered translocation of both β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 from the cytosol to the perimembrane region, and overexpression of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 increased GR internalization. Furthermore, both β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 colocalized with GR and with Cav-1, suggesting the possible involvement of these arrestins in GR internalization.

  3. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between almorexant, a dual orexin receptor antagonist, and desipramine.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Hans G; Hay, Justin L; Hoever, Petra; Alessi, Federica; te Beek, Erik T; van Gerven, Joop M A; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2014-08-01

    Almorexant is a dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA) with sleep-enabling effects in humans. Insomnia is often associated with mental health problems, including depression. Hence, potential interactions with antidepressants deserve attention. Desipramine was selected as a model drug because it is mainly metabolized by CYP2D6, which is inhibited by almorexant in vitro. A single-center, randomized, placebo-controlled, two-way crossover study in 20 healthy male subjects was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between almorexant and desipramine. Almorexant 200mg or matching placebo (double-blind) was administered orally once daily in the morning for 10 days, and a single oral dose of 50mg desipramine (open-label) was administered on Day 5. Almorexant increased the exposure to desipramine 3.7-fold, suggesting that almorexant is a moderate inhibitor of desipramine metabolism through inhibition of CYP2D6. Conversely, desipramine showed no relevant effects on the pharmacokinetics of almorexant. Pharmacodynamic evaluations indicated that almorexant alone reduced visuomotor coordination, postural stability, and alertness, and slightly increased calmness. Desipramine induced a reduction in subjective alertness and an increase in pupil/iris ratio. Despite the increase in exposure to desipramine, almorexant and desipramine in combination showed the same pharmacodynamic profile as almorexant alone, except for prolonging reduced alertness and preventing the miotic effect of almorexant. Co-administration also prolonged the mydriatic effect of desipramine. Overall, repeated administration of almorexant alone or with single-dose desipramine was well tolerated. The lack of a relevant interaction with antidepressants, if confirmed for other DORAs, would be a key feature for a safer class of hypnotics. PMID:24880753

  4. Mechanical design and force calibration of dual-axis micromechanical probe for friction force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuzawa, Kenji; Terada, Satoshi; Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Amakawa, Hiroaki; Zhang, Hedong; Mitsuya, Yasunaga

    2007-02-01

    A dual-axis micromechanical probe that combines a double cantilever and torsion beams is presented. This probe can reduce the mechanical cross-talk between the lateral and vertical force detections. In addition, dual-axis forces can be detected by measuring the dual-axis displacement of the probe end using the optical lever-based method used in conventional friction force microscopes (FFMs). In this paper, the mechanical design of the probe, the details of the fabrication method, FFM performance, and calibration of the friction force are discussed. The mechanical design and the microfabrication method for probes that can provide a force resolution of the order of 1 nN without mechanical cross-talk are presented. Calibration of the lateral force signal is possible by using the relationship between the lateral force and the piezodisplacement at the onset of the probe scanning. The micromechanical probe enables simultaneous and independent detection of atomic and friction forces. This leads to accurate investigation of nanotribological phenomena and visualization of the distribution of the friction properties, which helps the identification of the material properties.

  5. Mechanisms of acetylcholine receptor loss in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Drachman, D B; Adams, R N; Stanley, E F; Pestronk, A

    1980-01-01

    The fundamental abnormality affecting the neuromuscular junctions of myasthenic patients is a reduction of available AChRs, due to an autoimmune attack directed against the receptors. Antibodies to AChR are present in most patients, and there is evidence that they have a predominant pathogenic role in the disease, aided by complement. The mechanism of antibody action involves acceleration of the rate of degradation of AChRs, attributable to cross-linking of the receptors. In addition, antibodies may block AChRs, and may participate in producing destructive changes, perhaps in conjunction with complement. The possibility that cell-mediated mechanisms may play a role in the autoimmune responses of some myasthenic patients remains to be explored. Although the target of the autoimmune attack in myasthenic patients is probably always the acetylcholine receptors, it is not yet clear which of these immune mechanisms are most important. It is likely that the relative role of each mechanism varies from patient to patient. One of the goals of future research will be to identify the relative importance of each of these mechanisms in the individual patient, and to tailor specific immunotherapeutic measures to the abnormalities found. PMID:6249894

  6. Modification of Glutamate Receptor Channels: Molecular Mechanisms and Functional Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, Hanns

    Of the many possible mechanisms for modulating the efficiency of ion channels, the phosphorylation of receptor channel proteins may be the primary one. Changes in the set of molecular subunits of which the channels are composed are also important, especially for long-term regulation. In the central nervous system synaptic plasticity may be altered by modulating the ligand-activated neuronal ion channels involved in synaptic transmission; among them are channels gated directly by glutamate, the regulation of which we are only beginning to understand. This paper focuses on modulation of these channels [α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleprionic acid (AMPA), kainate, and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) types] by phosphorylation and changes in subunit composition. AMPA- and kainate-activated receptors are modulated by adenosine 3, 5-monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinase A (PKA) coupled via D1 dopamine receptors. An increase in the intracellular concentration of cAMP and protein kinase A potentiates kainate-activated currents in α-motoneurons of the spinal cord by increasing the affinity of the ligand (glutamate) for the phosphorylated receptor protein (GluR6 and 7). The rapid desensitization of AMPA-evoked currents normally observed in horizontal cells of the retina is completely blocked by increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP. The effects of changes in subunit composition were examined in rat hippocampal neurons. The subunit composition of the NMDA receptor determines the kinetic properties of synaptic currents and can be regulated by the type of innervating neuron. Similar changes also occur during development. An important determinant here is the activity of the system. Dynamic regulation of excitatory receptors by both mechanisms may well be associated with some forms of learning and memory in the mammalian brain.

  7. Signaling mechanism of the netrin-1 receptor DCC in axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Finci, L; Zhang, Y.; Meijers, R; Wang, J-H

    2015-01-01

    DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer) is a single-pass transmembrane protein that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. It was originally identified as a prognostic tumor marker and then subsequently found to be a receptor for netrin-1. DCC plays a key role in axon guidance and also in a number of other important cellular processes. This review describes the current progress of the structural biology of DCC with an emphasis on how DCC is involved in the dual functionality of netrin-1 as a chemo-attractant as well as a repellent in axon guidance, referred to as bi-functionality. A perspective about other DCC ligands and the signaling mechanism of the cytoplasmic tail of DCC is also recapitulated. PMID:25881791

  8. Macitentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist, in combination with temozolomide leads to glioblastoma regression and long-term survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Jin; Lee, Ho Jeong; Kim, Mark Seungwook; Choi, Hyun Jin; He, Junqin; Wu, Qiuyu; Aldape, Kenneth; Weinberg, Jeffrey S.; Alfred Yung, W. K.; Conrad, Charles A.; Langley, Robert R.; Lehembre, François; Regenass, Urs; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of the study was to determine whether astrocytes and brain endothelial cells protect glioma cells from temozolomide (TMZ) through an endothelin-dependent signaling mechanism and to examine the therapeutic efficacy of the dual endothelin receptor antagonist, macitentan, in orthotopic models of human glioblastoma. Experimental Design We evaluated several endothelin receptor antagonists for their ability to inhibit astrocyte- and brain endothelial cell-induced protection of glioma cells from TMZ in chemoprotection assays. We compared survival in nude mice bearing orthotopically implanted LN-229 glioblastomas or TMZ-resistant (LN-229Res and D54Res) glioblastomas that were treated with macitentan, TMZ, or both. Tumor burden was monitored weekly with bioluminescence imaging. The effect of therapy on cell division, apoptosis, tumor-associated vasculature, and pathways associated with cell survival was assessed by immunofluorescent microscopy. Results Only dual endothelin receptor antagonism abolished astrocyte- and brain endothelial cell-mediated protection of glioma cells from TMZ. In five independent survival studies, including TMZ-resistant glioblastomas, 46 of 48 (96%) mice treated with macitentan plus TMZ had no evidence of disease (P<0.0001), whereas all mice in other groups died. In another analysis, macitentan plus TMZ therapy was stopped in 16 mice after other groups had died. Only 3 of 16 mice eventually developed recurrent disease, 2 of which responded to additional cycles of macitentan plus TMZ. Macitentan downregulated proteins associated with cell division and survival in glioma cells and associated endothelial cells, which enhanced their sensitivity to TMZ. Conclusions Macitentan plus TMZ are well tolerated, produce durable responses, and warrant clinical evaluation in glioblastoma patients. PMID:26106074

  9. Mechanisms of Activation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Monomers or Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play essential roles in cellular processes, including metabolism, cell-cycle control, survival, proliferation, motility and differentiation. RTKs are all synthesized as single-pass transmembrane proteins and bind polypeptide ligands, mainly growth factors. It has long been thought that all RTKs, except for the insulin receptor (IR) family, are activated by ligand-induced dimerization of the receptors. An increasing number of diverse studies, however, indicate that RTKs, previously thought to exist as monomers, are present as pre-formed, yet inactive, dimers prior to ligand binding. The non-covalently associated dimeric structures are reminiscent of those of the IR family, which has a disulfide-linked dimeric structure. Furthermore, recent progress in structural studies has provided insight into the underpinnings of conformational changes during the activation of RTKs. In this review, I discuss two mutually exclusive models for the mechanisms of activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, the neurotrophin receptor and IR families, based on these new insights. PMID:24758840

  10. Structure and Assembly Mechanism for Heteromeric Kainate Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Janesh; Schuck, Peter; Mayer, Mark L.

    2012-10-25

    Native glutamate receptor ion channels are tetrameric assemblies containing two or more different subunits. NMDA receptors are obligate heteromers formed by coassembly of two or three divergent gene families. While some AMPA and kainate receptors can form functional homomeric ion channels, the KA1 and KA2 subunits are obligate heteromers which function only in combination with GluR57. The mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor assembly involve an initial step in which the amino terminal domains (ATD) assemble as dimers. Here, we establish by sedimentation velocity that the ATDs of GluR6 and KA2 coassemble as a heterodimer of K{sub d} 11 nM, 32,000-fold lower than the K{sub d} for homodimer formation by KA2; we solve crystal structures for the GluR6/KA2 ATD heterodimer and heterotetramer assemblies. Using these structures as a guide, we perform a mutant cycle analysis to probe the energetics of assembly and show that high-affinity ATD interactions are required for biosynthesis of functional heteromeric receptors.

  11. Analysis method and principle of dual-mode electro-mechanical variable transmission program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongcai; Yan, Qingdong; Xiang, Changle; Wang, Weida

    2012-05-01

    Automotive industry, as an important pillar of the national economy, has been rapidly developing in recent years. But proplems such as energy comsumption and environmental pollution are posed at the same time. Electro-mechanical variable transmission system is considered one of avilable workarounds. It is brought forward a kind of design methods of dual-mode electro-mechanical variable transmission system rotational speed characteristics and dual-mode drive diagrams. With the motor operating behavior of running in four quadrants and the speed characteristics of the simple internal and external meshing single planetary gear train, four kinds of dual-mode electro-mechanical transmission system scheme are designed. And the velocity, torque and power characteristics of one of the programs are analyzed. The magnitude of the electric split-flow power is an important factor which influences the system performance, so in the parameters matching design, it needs to reduce the power needs under the first mode of the motor. The motor, output rotational speed range and the position of the mode switching point have relationships with the characteristics design of the planetary gear set. The analysis method is to provide a reference for hybrid vehicles' design. As the involved rotational speed and torque relationships are the natural contact of every part of transmission system, a theory basis of system program and performance analysis is provided.

  12. A novel oral dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist (KBP-042) exerts antiobesity and antidiabetic effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Kim V; Feigh, Michael; Hjuler, Sara T; Gydesen, Sofie; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten A; Henriksen, Kim

    2014-07-01

    The present study investigated a novel oral dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist (DACRA), KBP-042, in head-to-head comparison with salmon calcitonin (sCT) with regard to in vitro receptor pharmacology, ex vivo pancreatic islet studies, and in vivo proof of concept studies in diet-induced obese (DIO) and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. In vitro, KBP-042 demonstrated superior binding affinity and activation of amylin and calcitonin receptors, and ex vivo, KBP-042 exerted inhibitory action on stimulated insulin and glucagon release from isolated islets. In vivo, KBP-042 induced a superior and pronounced reduction in food intake in conjunction with a sustained pair-fed corrected weight loss in DIO rats. Concomitantly, KBP-042 improved glucose homeostasis and reduced hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia in conjunction with enhanced insulin sensitivity. In ZDF rats, KBP-042 induced a superior attenuation of diabetic hyperglycemia and alleviated impaired glucose and insulin tolerance. Concomitantly, KBP-042 preserved insulinotropic and induced glucagonostatic action, ultimately preserving pancreatic insulin and glucagon content. In conclusion, oral KBP-042 is a novel DACRA, which exerts antiobesity and antidiabetic efficacy by dual modulation of insulin sensitivity and directly decelerating stress on the pancreatic α- and β-cells. These results could provide the basis for oral KBP-042 as a novel therapeutic agent in type 2 diabetes. PMID:24801386

  13. E6-associated protein (E6-AP) is a dual function coactivator of steroid hormone receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Sivapriya; Nawaz, Zafar

    2008-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors (SHR) belong to a large family of ligand-activated transcription factors that perform their biological functions by enhancing the transcription of specific target genes. The transactivation functions of SHRs are regulated by a specialized group of proteins called coactivators. The SHR coactivators represent a growing class of proteins with various enzymatic activities that serve to modify the chromatin to facilitate the transcription of SHR target genes. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway enzymes have also been added to the growing list of enzymatic activities that are recruited to the SHR target gene promoters during transcription. One such ubiquitin-proteasome pathway enzyme to be identified and characterized as a SHR coactivator was E6-associated protein (E6-AP). E6-AP is a hect (homologous to E6-associated protein carboxy-terminal domain) domain containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that possesses two independent separable functions; a coactivation function and an ubiquitin-protein ligase activity. Being a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, it is postulated that E6-AP may orchestrate the dynamics of steroid hormone receptor-mediated transcription by regulating the degradation of the transcriptional complexes. E6-AP has also been shown to be involved in the regulation of various aspects of reproduction such as prostate and mammary gland development. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that E6-AP expression is down-regulated in breast and prostate tumors and that the expression of E6-AP is inversely associated with that of estrogen and androgen receptors. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the structures, molecular mechanisms, spatiotemporal expression patterns and biological functions of E6-AP. PMID:18432313

  14. Glycine receptor mechanism illuminated by electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Lü, Wei; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) mediates inhibitory synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and brainstem and is linked to neurological disorders including autism and hyperekplexia. Understanding of molecular mechanisms and pharmacology of GlyRs has been hindered by a dearth of high-resolution structures. Here we report electron cryo-microscopy structures of the α1 GlyR with strychnine, glycine, or glycine/ivermectin. Strychnine arrests the receptor in an antagonist-bound, closed ion channel state, glycine stabilizes the receptor in an agonist-bound open channel state, and the glycine/ivermectin complex adopts a potentially desensitized or partially open state. Relative to the glycine-bound state, strychnine expands the agonist-binding pocket via outward movement of the C loop, promotes rearrangement of the extracellular and transmembrane domain ‘wrist’ interface, and leads to rotation of the transmembrane domain toward the pore axis, occluding the ion conduction pathway. These structures illuminate GlyR mechanism and define a rubric to interpret structures of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:26344198

  15. Achieving diverse and monoallelic olfactory receptor selection through dual-objective optimization design.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Hang; Sannerud, Jens; Xing, Jianhua

    2016-05-24

    Multiple-objective optimization is common in biological systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, each sensory neuron stochastically expresses only one out of up to thousands of olfactory receptor (OR) gene alleles; at the organism level, the types of expressed ORs need to be maximized. Existing models focus only on monoallele activation, and cannot explain recent observations in mutants, especially the reduced global diversity of expressed ORs in G9a/GLP knockouts. In this work we integrated existing information on OR expression, and constructed a comprehensive model that has all its components based on physical interactions. Analyzing the model reveals an evolutionarily optimized three-layer regulation mechanism, which includes zonal segregation, epigenetic barrier crossing coupled to a negative feedback loop that mechanistically differs from previous theoretical proposals, and a previously unidentified enhancer competition step. This model not only recapitulates monoallelic OR expression, but also elucidates how the olfactory system maximizes and maintains the diversity of OR expression, and has multiple predictions validated by existing experimental results. Through making an analogy to a physical system with thermally activated barrier crossing and comparative reverse engineering analyses, the study reveals that the olfactory receptor selection system is optimally designed, and particularly underscores cooperativity and synergy as a general design principle for multiobjective optimization in biology.

  16. Achieving diverse and monoallelic olfactory receptor selection through dual-objective optimization design.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Hang; Sannerud, Jens; Xing, Jianhua

    2016-05-24

    Multiple-objective optimization is common in biological systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, each sensory neuron stochastically expresses only one out of up to thousands of olfactory receptor (OR) gene alleles; at the organism level, the types of expressed ORs need to be maximized. Existing models focus only on monoallele activation, and cannot explain recent observations in mutants, especially the reduced global diversity of expressed ORs in G9a/GLP knockouts. In this work we integrated existing information on OR expression, and constructed a comprehensive model that has all its components based on physical interactions. Analyzing the model reveals an evolutionarily optimized three-layer regulation mechanism, which includes zonal segregation, epigenetic barrier crossing coupled to a negative feedback loop that mechanistically differs from previous theoretical proposals, and a previously unidentified enhancer competition step. This model not only recapitulates monoallelic OR expression, but also elucidates how the olfactory system maximizes and maintains the diversity of OR expression, and has multiple predictions validated by existing experimental results. Through making an analogy to a physical system with thermally activated barrier crossing and comparative reverse engineering analyses, the study reveals that the olfactory receptor selection system is optimally designed, and particularly underscores cooperativity and synergy as a general design principle for multiobjective optimization in biology. PMID:27162367

  17. Mechanisms of NOD-like receptor-associated inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Haitao; Miao, Edward A; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2013-09-19

    A major function of a subfamily of NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing, or NOD-like receptor) proteins is in inflammasome activation, which has been implicated in a multitude of disease models and human diseases. This work will highlight key progress in understanding the mechanisms that activate the best-studied NLRs (NLRP3, NLRC4, NAIP, and NLRP1) and in uncovering inflammasome NLRs. PMID:24054327

  18. Mechanisms of oestrogen receptor (ER) gene regulation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancers are driven by a transcription factor called oestrogen receptor (ER). Understanding the mechanisms of ER activity in breast cancer has been a major research interest and recent genomic advances have revealed extraordinary insights into how ER mediates gene transcription and what occurs during endocrine resistance. This review discusses our current understanding on ER activity, with an emphasis on several evolving, but important areas of ER biology. PMID:26884552

  19. Mechanisms and physiological impact of the dual localization of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins.

    PubMed

    Petrungaro, Carmelina; Riemer, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells developed diverse mechanisms to guide proteins to more than one destination within the cell. Recently, the proteome of the IMS (intermembrane space) of mitochondria of yeast cells was identified showing that approximately 20% of all soluble IMS proteins are dually localized to the IMS, as well as to other cellular compartments. Half of these dually localized proteins are important for oxidative stress defence and the other half are involved in energy homoeostasis. In the present review, we discuss the mechanisms leading to the dual localization of IMS proteins and the implications for mitochondrial function.

  20. Charge transport model in nanodielectric composites based on quantum tunneling mechanism and dual-level traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guochang; Chen, George; Li, Shengtao

    2016-08-01

    Charge transport properties in nanodielectrics present different tendencies for different loading concentrations. The exact mechanisms that are responsible for charge transport in nanodielectrics are not detailed, especially for high loading concentration. A charge transport model in nanodielectrics has been proposed based on quantum tunneling mechanism and dual-level traps. In the model, the thermally assisted hopping (TAH) process for the shallow traps and the tunnelling process for the deep traps are considered. For different loading concentrations, the dominant charge transport mechanisms are different. The quantum tunneling mechanism plays a major role in determining the charge conduction in nanodielectrics with high loading concentrations. While for low loading concentrations, the thermal hopping mechanism will dominate the charge conduction process. The model can explain the observed conductivity property in nanodielectrics with different loading concentrations.

  1. Effect of friction and clearance on kinematics and contact mechanics of dual mobility hip implant.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongchang; Chai, Wei; Wang, Ling; Wang, Manyi; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    The dual mobility hip implant has been introduced recently and increasingly used in total hip replacement to maintain the stability and reduce the risk of post-surgery dislocation. However, the kinematics and contact mechanisms of dual mobility hip implants have not been investigated in detail in the literature. Therefore, finite element method was adopted in this study to investigate dynamics and contact mechanics of a typical metal-on-polymer dual mobility hip implant under different friction coefficient ratios between the inner and the outer articulations and clearances/interferences between the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene liner and the metal back shell. A critical ratio of friction coefficients between the two pairs of contact interfaces was found to mainly determine the rotating surfaces. Furthermore, an initial clearance between the liner and the back shell facilitated the rotation of the liner while an initial interference prevented such a motion at the outer articulating interface. In addition, the contact area and the sliding distance at the outer articulating surface were markedly greater than those at the inner cup-head interface, potentially leading to extensive wear at the outer surface of the liner.

  2. Dual and pan-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) co-agonism: the bezafibrate lessons.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Motro, Michael; Fisman, Enrique Z

    2005-01-01

    There are three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) subtypes which are commonly designated PPAR alpha, PPAR gamma and PPAR beta/delta. PPAR alpha activation increases high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol synthesis, stimulates "reverse" cholesterol transport and reduces triglycerides. PPAR gamma activation results in insulin sensitization and antidiabetic action. Until recently, the biological role of PPAR beta/delta remained unclear. However, treatment of obese animals by specific PPAR delta agonists results in normalization of metabolic parameters and reduction of adiposity. Combined treatments with PPAR gamma and alpha agonists may potentially improve insulin resistance and alleviate atherogenic dyslipidemia, whereas PPAR delta properties may prevent the development of overweight which typically accompanies "pure" PPAR gamma ligands. The new generation of dual-action PPARs--the glitazars, which target PPAR-gamma and PPAR-alpha (like muraglitazar and tesaglitazar) are on deck in late-stage clinical trials and may be effective in reducing cardiovascular risk, but their long-term clinical effects are still unknown. A number of glitazars have presented problems at a late stage of clinical trials because of serious side-effects (including ragaglitazar and farglitazar). The old and well known lipid-lowering fibric acid derivative bezafibrate is the first clinically tested pan--(alpha, beta/delta, gamma) PPAR activator. It is the only pan-PPAR activator with more than a quarter of a century of therapeutic experience with a good safety profile. Therefore, bezafibrate could be considered (indeed, as a "post hoc" understanding) as an "archetype" of a clinically tested pan-PPAR ligand. Bezafibrate leads to considerable raising of HDL cholesterol and reduces triglycerides, improves insulin sensitivity and reduces blood glucose level, significantly lowering the incidence of cardiovascular events and new diabetes in patients with features of metabolic

  3. Quantification of cell surface receptor expression in live tissue culture media using a dual-tracer stain and rinse approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Sinha, Lagnojita; Singh, Aparna; Yang, Cynthia; Xiang, Jialing; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    Immunofluorescence staining is a robust way to visualize the distribution of targeted biomolecules invasively in in fixed tissues and tissue culture. Despite the fact that these methods has been a well-established method in fixed tissue imaging for over 70 years, quantification of receptor concentration still simply assumes that the signal from the targeted fluorescent marker after incubation and sufficient rinsing is directly proportional to the concentration of targeted biomolecules, thus neglecting the experimental inconsistencies in incubation and rinsing procedures and assuming no, nonspecific binding of the fluorescent markers. This work presents the first imaging approach capable of quantifying the concentration of cell surface receptor on cancer cells grown in vitro based on compartment modeling in a nondestructive way. The approach utilizes a dual-tracer protocol where any non-specific retention or variability in incubation and rinsing of a receptor-targeted imaging agent is corrected by simultaneously imaging the retention of a chemically similar, "untargeted" imaging agent. Various different compartment models were used to analyze the data in order to find the optimal procedure for extracting estimates of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) concentration (a receptor overexpressed in many cancers and a key target for emerging molecular therapies) in tissue cultures with varying concentrations of human glioma cells (U251). Preliminary results demonstrated a need to model nonspecific binding of both the targeted and untargeted imaging agents used. The approach could be used to carry out the first repeated measures of cell surface receptor dynamics during 3D tumor mass development, in addition to the receptor response to therapies.

  4. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  5. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B. Alex; Jetten, Anton M.; Austin, Christopher, P.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR. PMID:23562765

  6. The Biochemistry, Ultrastructure, and Subunit Assembly Mechanism of AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-Rs) are tetrameric ligand-gated ion channels that play crucial roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Our knowledge about the ultrastructure and subunit assembly mechanisms of intact AMPA-Rs was very limited. However, the new studies using single particle EM and X-ray crystallography are revealing important insights. For example, the tetrameric crystal structure of the GluA2cryst construct provided the atomic view of the intact receptor. In addition, the single particle EM structures of the subunit assembly intermediates revealed the conformational requirement for the dimer-to-tetramer transition during the maturation of AMPA-Rs. These new data in the field provide new models and interpretations. In the brain, the native AMPA-R complexes contain auxiliary subunits that influence subunit assembly, gating, and trafficking of the AMPA-Rs. Understanding the mechanisms of the auxiliary subunits will become increasingly important to precisely describe the function of AMPA-Rs in the brain. The AMPA-R proteomics studies continuously reveal a previously unexpected degree of molecular heterogeneity of the complex. Because the AMPA-Rs are important drug targets for treating various neurological and psychiatric diseases, it is likely that these new native complexes will require detailed mechanistic analysis in the future. The current ultrastructural data on the receptors and the receptor-expressing stable cell lines that were developed during the course of these studies are useful resources for high throughput drug screening and further drug designing. Moreover, we are getting closer to understanding the precise mechanisms of AMPA-R-mediated synaptic plasticity. PMID:21080238

  7. Differences in Gene Regulation by Dual Ligands of Nuclear Receptors Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) and Pregnane X Receptor (PXR) in HepG2 Cells Stably Expressing CAR/PXR.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Tanuma, Nobuaki; Yazawa, Saki; Zhao, Shuai; Inaba, Miki; Nakamura, Satoshi; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Inouye, Yoshio

    2016-08-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulate various genes involved in xenobiotics and drug metabolism. In many cases, CAR/PXR share ligands termed dual ligands of CAR/PXR. It is difficult to investigate the effect of CAR/PXR dual ligands in cell lines because CAR and PXR expression is scarcely detected in cultured cell lines. Here, we established a tetracycline-inducible human CAR and stably human PXR-overexpressing HepG2 cell line (HepTR/hCAR/hPXR) to examine CAR/PXR dual ligands. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP3A4, and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase, which are target genes of CAR/PXR, by dual ligands of CAR/PXR in two transfectants. Activation of CAR and PXR in cells treated with a high dose of CITCO [6-(4-chlorophenyl)-imidazo(2,1-b)thiazole-5-carbaldehyde] or cotreated with rifampicin and tetracycline resulted in synergistic enhancement of CYP3A4, but not CYP2B6, CYP2C9, or UGT1A1, mRNA expression in HepTR/hCAR/hPXR cells. In contrast, this synergistic effect was not observed in HepTR/hCAR cells. These observations were also demonstrated in human primary hepatocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that dual ligands of CAR/PXR show distinct gene regulation patterns by cross-talk between CAR and PXR. Furthermore, the two newly established cell lines are useful tools to investigate dual ligands of CAR/PXR.

  8. Discovery of disubstituted piperidines and homopiperidines as potent dual NK1 receptor antagonists-serotonin reuptake transporter inhibitors for the treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong-Jin; He, Huan; Bertekap, Robert; Westphal, Ryan; Lelas, Snjezana; Newton, Amy; Wallace, Tanya; Taber, Matthew; Davis, Carl; Macor, John E; Bronson, Joanne

    2013-04-15

    This report describes the synthesis, structure-activity relationships and activity of piperidine, homopiperidine, and azocane derivatives combining NK1 receptor (NK1R) antagonism and serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) inhibition. Our studies culminated in the discovery of piperidine 2 and homopiperidine 8 as potent dual NK1R antagonists-SERT inhibitors. Compound 2 demonstrated significant activity in the gerbil forced swimming test, suggesting that dual NK1R antagonists-SERT inhibitors may be useful in treating depression disorders. PMID:23477943

  9. Dual-layered-coated mechanically-durable superomniphobic surfaces with anti-smudge properties.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Palanikkumaran; Bhushan, Bharat; Yun, Kyungsung; Kondo, Hirofumi

    2013-11-01

    Bio-inspired surfaces that exhibit high contact angle and low contact angle hysteresis for various liquids and demonstrate mechanical durability and anti-smudge properties are of interest for various applications. The fabrication of such surfaces has often involved complex or expensive processes, required techniques that may not be suitable for various substrates and particles, may require surface post-treatment, or may lack durability. Dual layered coatings of roughness-induced superomniphobic surfaces that demonstrate good mechanical durability were fabricated on glass substrates using hydrophobic SiO2 nanoparticles and low surface energy fluorobinders using dip coating and spray coating techniques. The particle-to-binder ratio was optimized for contact angles of interest. The mechanical durability of these coatings was examined under mechanical rubbing action. The anti-smudge properties were examined by wiping an artificially contaminated coating using oil-impregnated microfiber cloth.

  10. Evidence for a nucleus accumbens CCK2 receptor regulation of rat ventral pallidal GABA levels: a dual probe microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, L; O'Connor, W T; Glennon, J; Tomasini, M C; Bebe, B W; Tanganelli, S; Antonelli, T

    2000-12-22

    We employed dual probe microdialysis in the nucleus accumbens and ipsilateral ventral pallidum of the halothane anaesthetized rat to investigate the effect of intra-accumbens perfusion with the sulphated octapeptide cholecystokinin (CCK-8S, 10-1000 nM, 60 min) alone and in the presence of the selective CCK1 and CCK2 receptor antagonists L-364,718 (10 and 100 nM) and PD134308 (10 nM), tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1000 nM) and the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline (1000 nM), on dialysate GABA levels in the ventral pallidum. Intra-accumbens perfusion with the 100 and 1000 nM concentration of CCK-8S was associated with a significant decrease (-16+/-3% and -23+/-3% vs basal, respectively) in ventral pallidum GABA levels. The CCK-8S (1000 nM) induced decrease in ventral pallidal dialysate GABA levels was abolished when PD134308, TTX and bicuculline, but not L-364,718, were included into the perfusion medium of the accumbens probe. The data indicate that nucleus accumbens CCK-8S exerts a CCK2 receptor mediated inhibition of ventral pallidal GABA levels. Furthermore, the TTX and bicuculline sensitivity of this effect suggests that this is possibly mediated via CCK2 receptors probably located on local GABA interneurons.

  11. Piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid Derivatives as Dual Antagonists of NMDA and GluK1-Containing Kainate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Mark W.; Costa, Blaise M.; Dlaboga, Daniel; Culley, Georgia; Hulse, Richard; Scholefield, Caroline L.; Atlason, Palmi; Fang, Guangyu; Eaves, Richard; Morley, Richard; Mayo-Martin, Maria B.; Amici, Mascia; Bortolotto, Zuner A.; Donaldson, Lucy; Collingridge, Graham L.; Molnár, Elek; Monaghan, Daniel T.; Jane, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists bind to the GluN2 subunit, of which there are four types (GluN2A-D). We report that some N1-substituted derivatives of cis-piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid display improved relative affinity for GluN2C and GluN2D versus GluN2A and GluN2B. These derivatives also display subtype-selectivity among the more distantly related kainate receptor family. Compounds 18i and (−)-4 were the most potent kainate receptor antagonists and 18i was selective for GluK1 versus GluK2, GluK3 and AMPA receptors. Modeling studies revealed structural features required for activity at GluK1 subunits and suggested that S674 was vital for antagonist activity. Consistent with this hypothesis, replacing the equivalent residue in GluK3 (alanine) with a serine imparts 18i antagonist activity. Antagonists with dual GluN2D and GluK1 antagonist activity may have beneficial effects in various neurological disorders. Consistent with this idea, antagonist 18i (30 mg/Kg i.p.) showed antinociceptive effects in an animal model of mild nerve injury. PMID:22111545

  12. Reading in a deep orthography: neuromagnetic evidence for dual-mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Tony W; Leuthold, Arthur C; Moran, John E; Pardo, Patricia J; Lewis, Scott M; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2007-06-01

    Despite substantial efforts to connect cognitive-linguistic models with appropriate anatomical correlates, the question of which cognitive model best accounts for the neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging evidence remains open. The two most popular models are grounded in conceptually different bases and thus make quasi-distinct predictions in regard to the patterns of activation that should be observed in imaging investigations of linguistic processing. Dual-mechanism models propose that high-frequency regular and irregular words are processed through a lexicon-based word code, which facilitates their processing and pronunciation latencies relative to pseudowords. In contrast, single-mechanism models suggest the same behavioral effects can be explained through semantic mediation without the existence of a lexicon. In most previous studies, words and pronounceable pseudowords were presented in lexical-decision or word reading paradigms, and hemodynamic techniques were utilized to distinguish involved anatomical areas. The results typically indicated that both word classes activated largely congruent tissues, with a magnitude advantage for pseudowords in most or all activated regions. However, since the dual-mechanism model predicts both word types utilize the entire linguistic network, but that certain operations are merely obligatorily involved, these results do not sharply refute nor clearly support the model's main tenets. In the current study, we approach the dual- versus single-mechanism question differently by focusing on the temporal dynamics of MEG imaged neuronal activity, during performance of an oddball version of continuous lexical-decision, to determine whether the onset latency of any cortical language region shows effects of word class that are indicative of preferential versus obligatory processing pathways. The most remarkable aspect of our results indicated that both words and pseudowords initially activate the left posterior fusiform

  13. Reading in a Deep Orthography: Neuromagnetic Evidence for Dual-Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Tony W.; Leuthold, Arthur C.; Moran, John E.; Pardo, Patricia J.; Lewis, Scott M.; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    2009-01-01

    Despite substantial efforts to connect cognitive-linguistic models with appropriate anatomical correlates, the question of which cognitive model best accounts for the neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging evidence remains open. The two most popular models are grounded in conceptually different bases and thus make quasi-distinct predictions in regard to the patterns of activation that should be observed in imaging investigations of linguistic processing. Dual-mechanism models propose that high-frequency regular and irregular words are processed through a lexicon-based word code, which facilitates their processing and pronunciation latencies relative to pseudowords. In contrast, single-mechanism models suggest the same behavioral effects can be explained through semantic mediation without the existence of a lexicon. In most previous studies, words and pronounceable pseudowords were presented in lexical-decision or word reading paradigms, and hemodynamic techniques were utilized to distinguish involved anatomical areas. The results typically indicated that both word classes activated largely congruent tissues, with a magnitude advantage for pseudowords in most or all activated regions. However, since the dual-mechanism model predicts both word types utilize the entire linguistic network, but that certain operations are merely obligatorily involved, these results do not sharply refute nor clearly support the model’s main tenets. In the current study, we approach the dual- versus single mechanism question differently by focusing on the temporal dynamics of MEG imaged neuronal activity, during performance of an oddball version of continuous lexical-decision, to determine whether the onset latency of any cortical language region shows effects of word class that are indicative of preferential versus obligatory processing pathways. The most remarkable aspect of our results indicated that both words and pseudowords initially activate the left posterior fusiform

  14. Mechanical Coupling Error Suppression Technology for an Improved Decoupled Dual-Mass Micro-Gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xingjun; Deng, Yunpeng; Hu, Di

    2016-04-08

    This paper presents technology for the suppression of the mechanical coupling errors for an improved decoupled dual-mass micro-gyroscope (DDMG). The improved micro-gyroscope structure decreases the moment arm of the drive decoupled torque, which benefits the suppression of the non-ideal decoupled error. Quadrature correction electrodes are added to eliminate the residual quadrature error. The structure principle and the quadrature error suppression means of the DDMG are described in detail. ANSYS software is used to simulate the micro-gyroscope structure to verify the mechanical coupling error suppression effect. Compared with the former structure, simulation results demonstrate that the rotational displacements of the sense frame in the improved structure are substantially suppressed in the drive mode. The improved DDMG structure chip is fabricated by the deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) process. The feedback control circuits with quadrature control loops are designed to suppress the residual mechanical coupling error. Finally, the system performance of the DDMG prototype is tested. Compared with the former DDMG, the quadrature error in the improved dual-mass micro-gyroscope is decreased 9.66-fold, and the offset error is decreased 6.36-fold. Compared with the open loop sense, the feedback control circuits with quadrature control loop decrease the bias drift by 20.59-fold and the scale factor non-linearity by 2.81-fold in the ±400°/s range.

  15. Mechanical Coupling Error Suppression Technology for an Improved Decoupled Dual-Mass Micro-Gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xingjun; Deng, Yunpeng; Hu, Di

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents technology for the suppression of the mechanical coupling errors for an improved decoupled dual-mass micro-gyroscope (DDMG). The improved micro-gyroscope structure decreases the moment arm of the drive decoupled torque, which benefits the suppression of the non-ideal decoupled error. Quadrature correction electrodes are added to eliminate the residual quadrature error. The structure principle and the quadrature error suppression means of the DDMG are described in detail. ANSYS software is used to simulate the micro-gyroscope structure to verify the mechanical coupling error suppression effect. Compared with the former structure, simulation results demonstrate that the rotational displacements of the sense frame in the improved structure are substantially suppressed in the drive mode. The improved DDMG structure chip is fabricated by the deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) process. The feedback control circuits with quadrature control loops are designed to suppress the residual mechanical coupling error. Finally, the system performance of the DDMG prototype is tested. Compared with the former DDMG, the quadrature error in the improved dual-mass micro-gyroscope is decreased 9.66-fold, and the offset error is decreased 6.36-fold. Compared with the open loop sense, the feedback control circuits with quadrature control loop decrease the bias drift by 20.59-fold and the scale factor non-linearity by 2.81-fold in the ±400°/s range. PMID:27070616

  16. Mechanical Coupling Error Suppression Technology for an Improved Decoupled Dual-Mass Micro-Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xingjun; Deng, Yunpeng; Hu, Di

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents technology for the suppression of the mechanical coupling errors for an improved decoupled dual-mass micro-gyroscope (DDMG). The improved micro-gyroscope structure decreases the moment arm of the drive decoupled torque, which benefits the suppression of the non-ideal decoupled error. Quadrature correction electrodes are added to eliminate the residual quadrature error. The structure principle and the quadrature error suppression means of the DDMG are described in detail. ANSYS software is used to simulate the micro-gyroscope structure to verify the mechanical coupling error suppression effect. Compared with the former structure, simulation results demonstrate that the rotational displacements of the sense frame in the improved structure are substantially suppressed in the drive mode. The improved DDMG structure chip is fabricated by the deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) process. The feedback control circuits with quadrature control loops are designed to suppress the residual mechanical coupling error. Finally, the system performance of the DDMG prototype is tested. Compared with the former DDMG, the quadrature error in the improved dual-mass micro-gyroscope is decreased 9.66-fold, and the offset error is decreased 6.36-fold. Compared with the open loop sense, the feedback control circuits with quadrature control loop decrease the bias drift by 20.59-fold and the scale factor non-linearity by 2.81-fold in the ±400°/s range. PMID:27070616

  17. A dual analysis for recycled particulate composites: linking micro- and macro-mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, Antonio F.; Rodrigues, Paulo C.M.; Santos, Dagoberto B.; Faria, Ana C.A

    2003-06-15

    The large amount of disposable bottles produced nowadays makes imperative the search for alternative procedures for recycling them since they are not biodegradable. This paper takes into consideration the thermomechanical recycling of post-consumed plastic bottles, especially the ones made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and their use as composite materials for engineering applications. As changes on the composite's microstructure can have an influence on macroscopic behavior, a new type of analysis is needed. To be able to evaluate the composite performance, a dual analysis procedure was developed. It consists of a micro-mechanical analysis where the microstructure is observed by optical microscopy, and variations in morphology are related to composite overall mechanical behavior. The macro-mechanical analysis is performed by ASTM D 3039/3039 M tensile tests. By doing this, the composite effective moduli can be determined. The new composite seems to be encouraging, i.e., an HDPE/PET composite with 40:60 ratio, in weight, experiments a stiffness recovery from the third to the fourth recycle. Moreover, the dual analysis was able to capture this variation.

  18. Qualification of a High Accuracy Dual-Axis Antenna Deployment and Trimming Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gossant, Alain; Morichon, Francois

    2010-01-01

    The Antenna Deployment and Trimming Mechanism Mark 2 (ADTM Mk2) has been developed to answer today's need for a generic antenna deployment and high accuracy pointing mechanism, allowing RF sensing applications and easier dual deployments configurations. This paper presents the design and evolution from its predecessor, the experience of the design team from kick off to qualification and batch manufacture, as well as some lessons learned from ramping up "mass-production" capabilities while implementing customer driven changes. Astrium has manufactured and flown ADTM units for the past 20 years, from an initial deployment-only mechanism developed for the Orion program to today's Eurostar E3000 ADTM family. The Antenna ADTM Mk2 is an evolution of the original ADTM Mk1. Although it uses Mk1 building blocks to minimize risks associated with the development of a new product, it incorporates major evolutions and is the new baseline for Astrium latest generation of Eurostar E3000 telecom satellites.

  19. Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 Is a Dual Regulator of Cardiac Transcription Factor Function*

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Erin L.; Benham, Ashley; Soibam, Benjamin; Stashi, Erin; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Entman, Mark L.; Schwartz, Robert J.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the potential role of steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2) as a co-regulator in the transcription of critical molecules modulating cardiac function and metabolism in normal and stressed hearts. The present study seeks to extend the previous information by demonstrating SRC-2 fulfills this role by serving as a critical coactivator for the transcription and activity of critical transcription factors known to control cardiac growth and metabolism as well as in their downstream signaling. This knowledge broadens our understanding of the mechanism by which SRC-2 acts in normal and stressed hearts and allows further investigation of the transcriptional modifications mediating different types and degrees of cardiac stress. Moreover, the genetic manipulation of SRC-2 in this study is specific for the heart and thereby eliminating potential indirect effects of SRC-2 deletion in other organs. We have shown that SRC-2 is critical to transcriptional control modulated by MEF2, GATA-4, and Tbx5, thereby enhancing gene expression associated with cardiac growth. Additionally, we describe SRC-2 as a novel regulator of PPARα expression, thus controlling critical steps in metabolic gene expression. We conclude that through regulation of cardiac transcription factor expression and activity, SRC-2 is a critical transcriptional regulator of genes important for cardiac growth, structure, and metabolism, three of the main pathways altered during the cardiac stress response. PMID:24811170

  20. Steroid receptor coactivator-2 is a dual regulator of cardiac transcription factor function.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Erin L; Benham, Ashley; Soibam, Benjamin; Stashi, Erin; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Entman, Mark L; Schwartz, Robert J; O'Malley, Bert W

    2014-06-20

    We have previously demonstrated the potential role of steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2) as a co-regulator in the transcription of critical molecules modulating cardiac function and metabolism in normal and stressed hearts. The present study seeks to extend the previous information by demonstrating SRC-2 fulfills this role by serving as a critical coactivator for the transcription and activity of critical transcription factors known to control cardiac growth and metabolism as well as in their downstream signaling. This knowledge broadens our understanding of the mechanism by which SRC-2 acts in normal and stressed hearts and allows further investigation of the transcriptional modifications mediating different types and degrees of cardiac stress. Moreover, the genetic manipulation of SRC-2 in this study is specific for the heart and thereby eliminating potential indirect effects of SRC-2 deletion in other organs. We have shown that SRC-2 is critical to transcriptional control modulated by MEF2, GATA-4, and Tbx5, thereby enhancing gene expression associated with cardiac growth. Additionally, we describe SRC-2 as a novel regulator of PPARα expression, thus controlling critical steps in metabolic gene expression. We conclude that through regulation of cardiac transcription factor expression and activity, SRC-2 is a critical transcriptional regulator of genes important for cardiac growth, structure, and metabolism, three of the main pathways altered during the cardiac stress response. PMID:24811170

  1. Dual Control of Dopamine Synthesis and Release by Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Dopamine D2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Anzalone, Andrea; Lizardi-Ortiz, José E.; Ramos, Maria; De Mei, Claudia; Hopf, F. Woodward; Iaccarino, Ciro; Halbout, Briac; Jacobsen, Jacob; Kinoshita, Chisato; Welter, Marc; Caron, Marc G.; Bonci, Antonello; Sulzer, David

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunctions of dopaminergic homeostasis leading to either low or high dopamine (DA) levels are causally linked to Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and addiction. Major sites of DA synthesis are the mesencephalic neurons originating in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area; these structures send major projections to the dorsal striatum (DSt) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc), respectively. DA finely tunes its own synthesis and release by activating DA D2 receptors (D2R). To date, this critical D2R-dependent function was thought to be solely due to activation of D2Rs on dopaminergic neurons (D2 autoreceptors); instead, using site-specific D2R knock-out mice, we uncover that D2 heteroreceptors located on non-DAergic medium spiny neurons participate in the control of DA levels. This D2 heteroreceptor-mediated mechanism is more efficient in the DSt than in NAcc, indicating that D2R signaling differentially regulates mesolimbic- versus nigrostriatal-mediated functions. This study reveals previously unappreciated control of DA signaling, shedding new light on region-specific regulation of DA-mediated effects. PMID:22745501

  2. Lysine Specific Demethylase 1 has Dual Functions as a Major Regulator of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Changmeng; He, Housheng Hansen; Gao, Shuai; Chen, Sen; Yu, Ziyang; Gao, Yanfei; Chen, Shaoyong; Chen, Mei Wei; Zhang, Jesse; Ahmed, Musaddeque; Wang, Yang; Metzger, Eric; Schüle, Roland; Liu, X. Shirley; Brown, Myles; Balk, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine Specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1, KDM1A) functions as a transcriptional corepressor through demethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4), but has coactivator function on some genes through unclear mechanisms. We show that LSD1, interacting with CoREST, associates with and coactivates androgen receptor (AR) on a large fraction of androgen-stimulated genes. A subset of these AR/LSD1-associated enhancer sites have histone 3 threonine 6 phosphorylation (H3T6ph), and these sites are further enriched for androgen-stimulated genes. Significantly, despite its coactivator activity, LSD1 still mediates H3K4me2 demethylation at these androgen-stimulated enhancers. FOXA1 is also associated with LSD1 at AR regulated enhancer sites, and a FOXA1 interaction with LSD1 enhances binding of both proteins at these sites. These findings show LSD1 functions broadly as a regulator of AR function, that it maintains a transcriptional repression function at AR-regulated enhancers through H3K4 demethylation, and has a distinct AR-linked coactivator function mediated by demethylation of other substrates. PMID:25482560

  3. Dual Receptor Recognizing Cell Penetrating Peptide for Selective Targeting, Efficient Intratumoral Diffusion and Synthesized Anti-Glioma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yayuan; Mei, Ling; Xu, Chaoqun; Yu, Qianwen; Shi, Kairong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) were widely used for drug delivery to tumor. However, the nonselective in vivo penetration greatly limited the application of CPPs-mediated drug delivery systems. And the treatment of malignant tumors is usually followed by poor prognosis and relapse due to the existence of extravascular core regions of tumor. Thus it is important to endue selective targeting and stronger intratumoral diffusion abilities to CPPs. In this study, an RGD reverse sequence dGR was conjugated to a CPP octa-arginine to form a CendR (R/KXXR/K) motif contained tandem peptide R8-dGR (RRRRRRRRdGR) which could bind to both integrin αvβ3 and neuropilin-1 receptors. The dual receptor recognizing peptide R8-dGR displayed increased cellular uptake and efficient penetration ability into glioma spheroids in vitro. The following in vivo studies indicated the active targeting and intratumoral diffusion capabilities of R8-dGR modified liposomes. When paclitaxel was loaded in the liposomes, PTX-R8-dGR-Lip induced the strongest anti-proliferation effect on both tumor cells and cancer stem cells, and inhibited the formation of vasculogenic mimicry channels in vitro. Finally, the R8-dGR liposomal drug delivery system prolonged the medium survival time of intracranial C6 bearing mice by 2.1-fold compared to the untreated group, and achieved an exhaustive anti-glioma therapy including anti-tumor cells, anti-vasculogenic mimicry and anti-brain cancer stem cells. To sum up, all the results demonstrated that R8-dGR was an ideal dual receptor recognizing CPP with selective glioma targeting and efficient intratumoral diffusion, which could be further used to equip drug delivery system for effective glioma therapy. PMID:26877777

  4. Freud-2/CC2D1B mediates dual repression of the serotonin-1A receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Hadjighassem, Mahmoud R; Galaraga, Kimberly; Albert, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor functions as a pre-synaptic autoreceptor in serotonin neurons that regulates their activity, and is also widely expressed on non-serotonergic neurons as a post-synaptic heteroreceptor to mediate serotonin action. The 5-HT1A receptor gene is strongly repressed by a dual repressor element (DRE), which is recognized by two proteins: Freud-1/CC2D1A and another unknown protein. Here we identify mouse Freud-2/CC2D1B as the second repressor of the 5-HT1A-DRE. Freud-2 shares 50% amino acid identity with Freud-1, and contains conserved structural domains. Mouse Freud-2 bound specifically to the rat 5-HT1A-DRE adjacent to, and partially overlapping, the Freud-1 binding site. By supershift assay using nuclear extracts from L6 myoblasts, Freud-2-DRE complexes were distinguished from Freud-1-DRE complexes. Freud-2 mRNA and protein were detected throughout mouse brain and peripheral tissues. Freud-2 repressed 5-HT1A promoter-reporter constructs in a DRE-dependent manner in non-neuronal (L6) or 5-HT1A-expressing neuronal (NG108-15, RN46A) cell models. In NG108-15 cells, knockdown of Freud-2 using a specific short-interfering RNA reduced endogenous Freud-2 protein levels and decreased Freud-2 bound to the 5-HT1A-DRE as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, but increased 5-HT1A promoter activity and 5-HT1A protein levels. Taken together, these data show that Freud-2 is the second component that, with Freud-1, mediates dual repression of the 5-HT1A receptor gene at the DRE.

  5. Molecular and Physiological Mechanisms of Membrane Receptor Systems Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Severin, E.S.; Savvateeva, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular physiology is a new interdisciplinary field of knowledge that looks into how complicated biological systems function. The living cell is a relatively simple, but at the same time very sophisticated biological system. After the sequencing of the human genome, molecular physiology has endeavored to investigate the systems of cellular interactions at a completely new level based on knowledge of the spatial organization and functions of receptors, their ligands, and protein-protein interactions. In recent years, the achievements in molecular physiology have centered on the study of sensor reception mechanisms and intercellular data transfer, as well as the immune system physiology, amongst other processes. PMID:22649671

  6. Mechanism of dimerization of the human melanocortin 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zanna, Paola T.; Sanchez-Laorden, Berta L.; Perez-Oliva, Ana B.; Turpin, Maria C.; Herraiz, Cecilia; Jimenez-Cervantes, Celia; Garcia-Borron, Jose C.

    2008-04-04

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a dimeric G protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes, where it regulates the amount and type of melanins produced and determines the tanning response to ultraviolet radiation. We have studied the mechanisms of MC1R dimerization. Normal dimerization of a deleted mutant lacking the seventh transmembrane fragment and the C-terminal cytosolic extension excluded coiled-coil interactions as the basis of dimerization. Conversely, the electrophoretic pattern of wild type receptor and several Cys {yields} Ala mutants showed that four disulfide bonds are established between the monomers. Disruption of any of these bonds abolished MC1R function, but only the one involving Cys35 was essential for traffic to the plasma membrane. A quadruple Cys35-267-273-275Ala mutant migrating as a monomer in SDS-PAGE in the absence of reducing agents was able to dimerize with WT, suggesting that in addition to disulfide bond formation, dimerization involves non-covalent interactions, likely of domain swap type.

  7. Unidirectional, dual-comb lasing under multiple pulse formation mechanisms in a passively mode-locked fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya; Zhao, Xin; Hu, Guoqing; Li, Cui; Zhao, Bofeng; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-09-19

    Dual-comb lasers simultaneously generating asynchronous ultrashort pulses could be an intriguing alternative to the current dual-laser comb source. When generated through a common light path, the low common-mode noises and good coherence between the pulse trains could be realized. Here we demonstrate the completely common-path, unidirectional dual-comb lasing using a carbon nanotube saturable absorber with additional pulse narrowing and broadening mechanisms. The interactions between multiple soliton formation mechanisms result in bifurcation into unusual two-pulse states with pulses of four-fold bandwidth difference and tens-of-Hz repetition rate difference. Coherence between the pulses is verified by the asynchronous cross-sampling and dual-comb spectroscopy measurements. PMID:27661880

  8. Dual melanocortin-4 receptor and GLP-1 receptor agonism amplifies metabolic benefits in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Finan, Brian; Fischer, Katrin; Tom, Robby Zachariah; Legutko, Beata; Sehrer, Laura; Heine, Daniela; Grassl, Niklas; Meyer, Carola W; Henderson, Bart; Hofmann, Susanna M; Tschöp, Matthias H; Van der Ploeg, Lex HT; Müller, Timo D

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of simultaneous agonism at the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) and the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) for the treatment of obesity and diabetes in rodents. Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were chronically treated with either the long-acting GLP-1R agonist liraglutide, the MC4R agonist RM-493 or a combination of RM-493 and liraglutide. Co-treatment of DIO mice with RM-493 and liraglutide improves body weight loss and enhances glycemic control and cholesterol metabolism beyond what can be achieved with either mono-therapy. The superior metabolic efficacy of this combination therapy is attributed to the anorectic and glycemic actions of both drugs, along with the ability of RM-493 to increase energy expenditure. Interestingly, compared to mice treated with liraglutide alone, hypothalamic Glp-1r expression was higher in mice treated with the combination therapy after both acute and chronic treatment. Further, RM-493 enhanced hypothalamic Mc4r expression. Hence, co-dosing with MC4R and GLP-1R agonists increases expression of each receptor, indicative of minimized receptor desensitization. Together, these findings suggest potential opportunities for employing combination treatments that comprise parallel MC4R and GLP-1R agonism for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. PMID:25652173

  9. Retinoic acid receptors: from molecular mechanisms to cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    di Masi, Alessandra; Leboffe, Loris; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Pagano, Francesca; Cicconi, Laura; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Nervi, Clara

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive metabolite of retinol or vitamin A, induces a spectrum of pleiotropic effects in cell growth and differentiation that are relevant for embryonic development and adult physiology. The RA activity is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily, namely RARα, RARβ and RARγ, which belong to the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. RARs form heterodimers with members of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamily and act as ligand-regulated transcription factors through binding specific RA response elements (RAREs) located in target genes promoters. RARs also have non-genomic effects and activate kinase signaling pathways, which fine-tune the transcription of the RA target genes. The disruption of RA signaling pathways is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of hematological and non-hematological malignancies, including leukemias, skin cancer, head/neck cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Of note, RA and its derivatives (retinoids) are employed as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents because of their differentiation, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects. In humans, retinoids reverse premalignant epithelial lesions, induce the differentiation of myeloid normal and leukemic cells, and prevent lung, liver, and breast cancer. Here, we provide an overview of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate the RA and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, mechanisms through which deregulation of RA signaling pathways ultimately impact on cancer are examined. Finally, the therapeutic effects of retinoids are reported. PMID:25543955

  10. Synthesis and characterization of a dual kappa-delta opioid receptor agonist analgesic blocking cocaine reward behavior.

    PubMed

    Váradi, András; Marrone, Gina F; Eans, Shainnel O; Ganno, Michelle L; Subrath, Joan J; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Hunkele, Amanda; Pasternak, Gavril W; McLaughlin, Jay P; Majumdar, Susruta

    2015-11-18

    3-Iodobenzoyl naltrexamine (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic belonging to the pharmacologically diverse 6β-amidoepoxymorphinan group of opioids. We present the synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of five analogs of IBNtxA. The scaffold of IBNtxA was modified by removing the 14-hydroxy group, incorporating a 7,8 double bond and various N-17 alkyl substituents. The structural modifications resulted in analogs with picomolar affinities for opioid receptors. The lead compound (MP1104) was found to exhibit approximately 15-fold greater antinociceptive potency (ED50 = 0.33 mg/kg) compared with morphine, mediated through the activation of kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. Despite its kappa agonism, this lead derivative did not cause place aversion or preference in mice in a place-conditioning assay, even at doses 3 times the analgesic ED50. However, pretreatment with the lead compound prevented the reward behavior associated with cocaine in a conditioned place preference assay. Together, these results suggest the promise of dual acting kappa- and delta-opioid receptor agonists as analgesics and treatments for cocaine addiction.

  11. Design and synthesis of 3,5-disubstituted benzamide analogues of DNK333 as dual NK1/NK2 receptor probes.

    PubMed

    Swarna, Venkat Manoj; Undem, Bradley J; Korlipara, Vijaya L

    2007-02-15

    N-[(R,R)-(E)-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)-3-(2-oxoazepan-3-yl)carbamoyl]allyl-N-methyl-3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzamide (DNK333, 1b) has been reported to be a potent and balanced dual neurokinin (tachykinin) receptor antagonist. A recent clinical trial using DNK333 has shown that it blocks the NKA-induced bronchoconstriction in patients with asthma. A series of six analogues 3-8 derived from modification of 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzamide moiety of DNK333 has been synthesized to serve as the dual NK(1)/NK(2) receptor probes. The 3,5-dinitro substituted benzamide compound 3 was found to possess potent and balanced dual NK(1)/NK(2) receptor antagonist activities (pK(b)=8.4 for the NK(1) receptors, pK(b)=7.87 for the NK(2) receptors) in the functional assay using guinea pig trachea. Furthermore, SAR analysis suggests that steric, electronic, and lipophilic characteristics of substituents in the benzamide region of DNK333 have a crucial effect on both the NK(1) and NK(2) receptor antagonist activities.

  12. Design and Functional Validation of a Mechanism for Dual-Spinning CubeSats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Eric; Dave, Pratik; Kingsbury, Ryan; Marinan, Anne; Wise, Evan; Pong, Chris; Prinkey, Meghan; Cahoy, Kerri; Miller, David W.; Sklair, Devon

    2014-01-01

    The mission of the Micro-sized Microwave Atmospheric Satellite (MicroMAS) is to collect useful atmospheric images using a miniature passive microwave radiometer payload hosted on a low-cost CubeSat platform. In order to collect this data, the microwave radiometer payload must rotate to scan the ground-track perpendicular to the satellite's direction of travel. A custom motor assembly was developed to facilitate the rotation of the payload while allowing the spacecraft bus to remained fixed in the local-vertical, local-horizontal (LVLH) frame for increased pointing accuracy. This paper describes the mechanism used to enable this dual-spinning operation for CubeSats, and the lessons learned during the design, fabrication, integration, and testing phases of the mechanism's development lifecycle.

  13. Investigation of spectroscopy and the dual energy transfer mechanisms of Sm3+-doped telluroborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Do, Phan; Tuyen, Vu Phi; Quang, Vu Xuan; Hung, Le Xuan; Thanh, Luong Duy; Ngoc, Tran; Van Tam, Ngo; Huy, Bui The

    2016-05-01

    The absorption, luminescence, Raman spectra and lifetimes of Sm-doped alkali telluroborate glasses (TB glasses) TB:Sm3+ have been investigated. The dual energy transfers including energy transfer between Sm3+ - Sm3+ pairs and Sm3+ - non-bridging oxygen (NBO) intrinsic defects were investigated. The concentration quenching of luminescence intensity was explained by the non-radiative energy transfer between the Sm3+ ions through the cross-relaxation mechanism. The decay curves are single exponentials with low concentrations (lower 0.10 mol%) and become non-exponentials at higher concentrations. The non-exponential decay curves are fitted to the Inokuti and Hirayama model to give the energy transfer parameters between Sm3+ ions. The dominant interaction mechanism for energy transfer process is dipole-dipole interaction. The energy transfer induced Sm3+ photoluminescence enhancement in tellurite glass was experimentally studied and confirmed.

  14. Peripheral Receptor Mechanisms Underlying Orofacial Muscle Pain and Hyperalgesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloman, Jami L.

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders (TMD) are severely debilitating and affect approximately 12% of the population. Identifying peripheral nociceptive mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia, a prominent feature of persistent muscle pain, could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. This study provides evidence of functional interactions between ligand-gated channels, P2X3 and TRPV1/TRPA1, in trigeminal sensory neurons, and proposes that these interactions underlie the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. In the masseter muscle, direct P2X3 activation, via the selective agonist αβmeATP, induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, or the TRPA1 antagonist, AP18. P2X3 was co-expressed with both TRPV1 and TRPA1 in masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Moreover, in a subpopulation of P2X3 /TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca2+ transients were significantly potentiated following P2X3 activation. Inhibition of Ca2+-dependent kinases, PKC and CaMKII, prevented P2X3-mechanical hyperalgesia whereas blockade of Ca2+-independent PKA did not. Finally, activation of P2X3 induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 minutes, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Similar data were obtained regarding another nonselective cation channel, the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Our data propose P2X3 and NMDARs interact with TRPV1 in a facilitatory manner, which could contribute to the peripheral sensitization underlying masseter hyperalgesia. This study offers novel mechanisms by which individual pro-nociceptive ligand

  15. Structural insights into the dual-targeting mechanism of Nutlin-3

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jae-Sun; Ha, Ji-Hyang; He, Fahu; Muto, Yutaka; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Yoon, Ho Sup; Kang, Sunghyun; Park, Sung Goo; Park, Byoung Chul; Choi, Sang-Un; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Universal binding of Nutlin-3 with diverse anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nutlin-3 binds to the BH3 peptide-binding grooves of Bcl-2 family proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A conserved Bcl-X{sub L} binding mechanism of the Nutlin-3 and BH3-mimetic compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A molecular basis for the transcription-independent apoptosis by Nutlin-3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural insights into the dual-targeting mechanism of Nutlin-3. -- Abstract: Multi-targeting therapy is an emerging strategy of drug discovery to improve therapeutic efficacy, safety and resistance profiles. In this study, we monitored the binding of a potent MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3 with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins using NMR spectroscopy. Our results showed the universal binding of Nutlin-3 with diverse anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. Taken together with the binding data for Nutlin-3 analogs, the structural model of the Bcl-X{sub L}/Nutlin-3 complex showed that the binding mode of Nutlin-3 resembles that of the Bcl-X{sub L}/Bcl-2 inhibitors, suggesting the molecular mechanism of transcription-independent mitochondrial apoptosis by Nutlin-3. Finally, our structural comparison provides structural insights into the dual-targeting mechanism of how Nutlin-3 can bind to two different target proteins, MDM2 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in a similar manner.

  16. A fluoride-sensing receptor based on 2,2'-bis(indolyl)methane by dual-function of colorimetry and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Shao, Shi Jun; Guo, Yong

    2015-10-01

    A compound based on 2,2'-bis(indolyl)methane containing nitro group was studied as a new anion receptor. It could recognize selectively F(-) by an increasing fluorescence signal and a visible color change from colorless to blue. The introduction of nitro group induced the spectral dual-function related to the deprotonation of N-H protons. PMID:25978021

  17. Discovery of substituted lactams as novel dual orexin receptor antagonists. Synthesis, preliminary structure-activity relationship studies and efforts towards improved metabolic stability and pharmacokinetic properties. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Sifferlen, Thierry; Boller, Amandine; Chardonneau, Audrey; Cottreel, Emmanuelle; Hoecker, Johannes; Aissaoui, Hamed; Williams, Jodi T; Brotschi, Christine; Heidmann, Bibia; Siegrist, Romain; Gatfield, John; Treiber, Alexander; Brisbare-Roch, Catherine; Jenck, Francois; Boss, Christoph

    2014-02-15

    Starting from a thiazolidin-4-one HTS hit, a novel series of substituted lactams was identified and developed as dual orexin receptor antagonists. In this Letter, we describe our initial efforts towards the improvement of potency and metabolic stability. These investigations delivered optimized lead compounds with CNS drug-like properties suitable for further optimization. PMID:24447850

  18. Hybrids from 4-anilinoquinazoline and hydroxamic acid as dual inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fan-Wei; Wu, Ting-Ting; Ren, Zi-Wei; Xue, Jia-Yu; Shi, Lei

    2015-11-15

    A series of hybrids derived from 4-anilinoquinazoline and hydroxamic acid were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as dual inhibitors of vascular endothelia growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) tyrosine kinase and histone deacetylase (HDAC). Most of these compounds exhibited potent HDAC inhibition and moderate VEGFR-2 inhibition. Among them, compound 6l exhibited the most potent inhibitory activities against VEGFR-2 (IC50=84 nM) and HDAC (IC50=2.8 nM). It also showed the most potent antiproliferative ability against MCF-7, a human breast cancer line, with IC50 of 1.2 μM. Docking simulation supported the initial pharmacophoric hypothesis and suggested a common mode of interaction of compound 6l at the active binding sites of VEGFR-2 and HDAC. PMID:26475519

  19. Multi-functionalized hyaluronic acid nanogels crosslinked with carbon dots as dual receptor-mediated targeting tumor theranostics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu; Han, Yu; Pei, Mingliang; Zhao, Xubo; Tian, Kun; Zhou, Tingting; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based theranostic nanogels were designed for the tumor diagnosis and chemotherapy, by crosslinking the folate-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) modified hyaluronic acid (FA-PEG-HA) with carbon dots (CDs) for the first time. Due to the extraordinary fluorescence property of the integrated CDs, the theranostic nanogels could be used for the real-time and noninvasive location tracking to cancer cells. HA could load Doxorubicin (DOX) via electrostatic interaction with a drug-loading capacity (DLC) of 32.5%. The nanogels possessed an ideal release of DOX in the weak acid environment, while it was restrained in the neutral media, demonstrating the pH-responsive controlled release behavior. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake results clearly illustrated that most DOX was released and accumulated in the cell nuclei and killed the cancer cells efficaciously, due to their dual receptor-mediated targeting characteristics. PMID:27516286

  20. Microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior of a high strength dual-phase steel under monotonic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, E.V.; Bouvier, S.; Bacroix, B.

    2015-02-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructures of a high-strength dual-phase steel DP800 have been examined after moderate plastic deformations in simple shear and uniaxial tension. Special attention has been paid to the effect of the intergranular hard phase (martensite) on the microstructure evolution in the near-grain boundary regions. Quantitative parameters of dislocation patterning have been determined and compared with the similar characteristics of previously examined single-phase steels. The dislocation patterning in the interiors of the ferrite grains in DP800 steel is found to be similar to that already observed in the single-phase IF (Interstitial Free) steel whereas the martensite-affected zones present a delay in patterning and display very high gradients of continuous (gradual) disorientations associated with local internal stresses. The above stresses are shown to control the work-hardening of dual-phase materials at moderate strains for monotonic loading and are assumed to influence their microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior under strain-path changes. - Highlights: • The microstructure evolution has been studied by TEM in a DP800 steel. • It is influenced by both martensite and dislocations in the initial state. • The DP800 steel presents a high work-hardening rate due to internal stresses.

  1. The mechanical design of a high-power, dual frequency, millimeter-wave antenna feed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, N.

    1984-03-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design and fabrication of a high power, dual-frequency, millimeter-wave feed system. The feed system consists of a 35 GHz circularly polarized monopulse subsystem and a 95 GHz circularly polarized feed. The 35 GHz feed is designed to handle 5.0 kW average and 50 kW peak power and the 95 GHz 1.2 kW average and 12 kW peak power. A Frequency Selective Surface (FSS) is incorporated to provide dual frequency capability. Each feed is liquid cooled to provide suitable cooling during high power operation. The two feeds and FSS assembly are mounted in a supporting space frame to provide an optically integral assembly ready to be mounted at the vertex of a reflector. The paper addresses three main areas: the general feed design, which includes the manufacturing processes, flange considerations and waveguide cooling; the FSS fabrication; and beam alignment for both the primary and secondary field.

  2. Ammonium carbamates as highly active transdermal permeation enhancers with a dual mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Novotný, Michal; Klimentová, Jana; Janůšová, Barbora; Palát, Karel; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2011-03-10

    Transdermal permeation enhancers are compounds that temporarily increase drug flux through the skin by interacting with constituents of the stratum corneum. Transkarbam 12 (T12) is a highly active, broad-spectrum, biodegradable enhancer with low toxicity and low dermal irritation. We show here that T12 acts by a dual mechanism of action. The first part of this activity is associated with its ammonium carbamate polar head as shown by its pH-dependent effects on the permeation of two model drugs. Once this ammonium carbamate penetrates into the stratum corneum intercellular lipids, it rapidly decomposes releasing two molecules of protonated dodecyl 6-aminohexanoate (DDEAC) and carbon dioxide. This was observed by thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy. This step of T12 action influences drug permeation through lipidic pathways, not through the aqueous pores (polar pathway) as shown by its effects on various model drugs and electrical impedance. Consequently, protonated DDEAC released in the stratum corneum is also an active enhancer. It broadens the scope of T12 action since it is also able to increase permeation of hydrophilic drugs that prefer the pore pathway. Thus, this dual effect of T12 is likely responsible for its favorable properties, which make it a good candidate for prospective clinical use.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Norwitz, E R; Jeong, K H; Chin, W W

    1999-01-01

    GnRH plays a critical role in regulating mammalian reproductive development and function. At the level of the anterior pituitary, GnRH binds to the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) on the cell surface of pituitary gonadotropes. Here, it activates intracellular signal transduction pathways to effect both the synthesis and intermittent release of the gonadotropins LH and FSH. These hormones then enter the systemic circulation to regulate gonadal function, including steroid hormone synthesis and gametogenesis. The response of pituitary gonadotropes to GnRH correlates directly with the concentration of GnRHR on the cell surface, which is mediated, at least in part, at the level of gene expression. A number of endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors are known to regulate GnRHR gene expression. This article reviews in detail the role of the GnRHR in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the factors mediating expression of this gene. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate transcription of the GnRHR gene will further our knowledge about the role of this receptor in mammalian reproductive physiology in health and disease.

  4. The receptor kinase CERK1 has dual functions in symbiosis and immunity signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Dong, Wentao; Sun, Jongho; Feng, Feng; Deng, Yiwen; He, Zuhua; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Wang, Ertao

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of symbiotic interactions between mycorrhizal fungi, rhizobial bacteria and their legume hosts involves a common symbiosis signalling pathway. This signalling pathway is activated by Nod factors produced by rhizobia and these are recognised by the Nod factor receptors NFR1/LYK3 and NFR5/NFP. Mycorrhizal fungi produce lipochitooligosaccharides (LCOs) similar to Nod factors, as well as short-chain chitin oligomers (CO4/5), implying commonalities in signalling during mycorrhizal and rhizobial associations. Here we show that NFR1/LYK3, but not NFR5/NFP, is required for the establishment of the mycorrhizal interaction in legumes. NFR1/LYK3 is necessary for the recognition of mycorrhizal fungi and the activation of the symbiosis signalling pathway leading to induction of calcium oscillations and gene expression. Chitin oligosaccharides also act as microbe associated molecular patterns that promote plant immunity via similar LysM receptor-like kinases. CERK1 in rice has the highest homology to NFR1 and we show that this gene is also necessary for the establishment of the mycorrhizal interaction as well as for resistance to the rice blast fungus. Our results demonstrate that NFR1/LYK3/OsCERK1 represents a common receptor for chitooligosaccharide-based signals produced by mycorrhizal fungi, rhizobial bacteria (in legumes) and fungal pathogens. It would appear that mycorrhizal recognition has been conserved in multiple receptors across plant species, but additional diversification in certain plant species has defined other signals that this class of receptors can perceive.

  5. Mechanism of Oligonucleotide Uptake by Cells: Involvement of Specific receptors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakubov, Leonid A.; Deeva, Elena A.; Zarytova, Valentina F.; Ivanova, Eugenia M.; Ryte, Antonina S.; Yurchenko, Lyudmila V.; Vlassov, Valentin V.

    1989-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of oligonucleotides and their alkylating derivatives with mammalian cells. In experiments with L929 mouse fibroblast and Krebs 2 ascites carcinoma cells, it was found that cellular uptake of oligodeoxynucleotide derivatives is achieved by an endocytosis mechanism. Uptake is considerably more efficient at low oligomer concentration (< 1 μ M), because at this concentration a significant percentage of the total oligomer pool is absorbed on the cell surface and internalized by a more efficient absorptive endocytosis process. Two modified proteins were detected in mouse fibroblasts that were treated with the alkylating oligonucleotide derivatives. The binding of the oligomers to the proteins is inhibited by other oligodeoxynucleotides, single- and double-stranded DNA, and RNA. The polyanions heparin and chondroitin sulfates A and B do not inhibit binding. These observations suggest the involvement of specific receptor proteins in binding of oligomers to mammalian cells.

  6. MOLECULAR TARGETS AND MECHANISMS FOR ETHANOL ACTION IN GLYCINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Daya I.; Trudell, James R.; Crawford, Daniel K.; Alkana, Ronald L.; Davies, Daryl L.

    2010-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are recognized as the primary mediators of neuronal inhibition in the spinal cord, brain stem and higher brain regions known to be sensitive to ethanol. Building evidence supports the notion that ethanol acting on GlyRs causes at least a subset of its behavioral effects and may be involved in modulating ethanol intake. For over two decades, GlyRs have been studied at the molecular level as targets for ethanol action. Despite the advances in understanding the effects of ethanol in vivo and in vitro, the precise molecular sites and mechanisms of action for ethanol in ligand-gated ion channels in general, and in GlyRs specifically, are just now starting to become understood. The present review focuses on advances in our knowledge produced by using molecular biology, pressure antagonism, electrophysiology and molecular modeling strategies over the last two decades to probe, identify and model the initial molecular sites and mechanisms of ethanol action in GlyRs. The molecular targets on the GlyR are covered on a global perspective, which includes the intracellular, transmembrane and extracellular domains. The latter has received increasing attention in recent years. Recent molecular models of the sites of ethanol action in GlyRs and their implications to our understanding of possible mechanism of ethanol action and novel targets for drug development in GlyRs are discussed. PMID:20399807

  7. Dual effects of nicotine on dopamine neurons mediated by different nicotinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Schilström, Björn; Rawal, Nina; Mameli-Engvall, Monica; Nomikos, George G; Svensson, Torgny H

    2003-03-01

    Burst firing of dopaminergic neurons has been found to represent a particularly effective means of increasing dopamine release in terminal areas as well as activating immediate early genes in dopaminoceptive cells. Spontaneous burst firing is largely controlled by the level of activation of NMDA receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) as a consequence of glutamate released from afferents arising mainly in the prefrontal cortex. Nicotine has been found to effectively increase burst firing of dopaminergic cells. This effect of nicotine may be due to an alpha 7 nicotinic receptor-mediated presynaptic facilitation of glutamate release in the VTA. By the use of in-vivo single-cell recordings and immunohistochemistry we here evaluated the role of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors in nicotine-induced burst firing of dopamine cells in the VTA and the subsequent activation of immediate early genes in dopaminoceptive target areas. Nicotine (0.5 mg/kg s.c.) was found to increase firing rate and burst firing of dopaminergic neurons. In the presence of methyllycaconitine (MLA, 6.0 mg/kg i.p.) nicotine only increased firing rate. Moreover, in the presence of dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DH beta E, 1.0 mg/kg i.p.), an antagonist at non-alpha 7 nicotinic receptors, nicotine produced an increase in burst firing without increasing the firing rate. Nicotine also increased Fos-like immunoreactivity in dopamine target areas, an effect that was antagonized with MLA but not with DH beta E. Our data suggest that nicotine's augmenting effect on burst firing is, indeed, due to stimulation of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors whereas other nicotinic receptors seem to induce an increase in firing frequency.

  8. A new mechanism for growth hormone receptor activation of JAK2, and implications for related cytokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Michael J; Brooks, Andrew J; Chhabra, Yash

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone receptor was the first cytokine receptor to be cloned and crystallized, and provides a valuable exemplar for activation of its cognate kinase, JAK2. We review progress in understanding its activation mechanism, in particular the molecular movements made by this constitutively dimerized receptor in response to ligand binding, and how these lead to a separation of JAK-binding Box1 motifs. Such a separation leads to removal of the pseudokinase inhibitory domain from the kinase domain of a partner JAK2 bound to the receptor, and vice versa, leading to apposition of the kinase domains and transactivation. This may be a general mechanism for class I cytokine receptor action. PMID:25101218

  9. Enhancing the Mechanical Properties and Formability of Low Carbon Steel with Dual-Phase Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, M.; Hashemi, R.; Sadeghi, E.; Fazaeli, A.; Ghazanfari, A.; Lashini, H.

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, a special heat treatment cycle (step quenching) was used to produce a dual-phase (DP) microstructure in low carbon steel. By producing this DP microstructure, the mechanical properties of the investigated steel such as yield stress, tensile strength, and Vickers hardness were increased 14, 55, and 38%, respectively. In order to investigate the effect of heat treatment on formability of the steel, Nakazima forming test was applied and subsequently finite element base modeling was used to predict the outcome on forming limit diagrams. The results show that the DP microstructure also has a positive effect on formability. The results of finite element simulations are in a good agreement with those obtained by the experimental test.

  10. Mechanism-guided library design and dual genetic selection of synthetic OFF riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Norihito; Abe, Koichi; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2009-09-21

    After the recent discovery of bacterial riboswitches, synthetic riboswitches have been engineered by using natural and artificial RNA aptamers. In contrast to natural riboswitches, the majority of synthetic riboswitches in bacteria reported to date are ON switches that activate gene expression in response to the aptamer ligand. In this study, we adopted a mechanism-guided approach to design libraries predisposed to contain OFF riboswitches that respond to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The first library design exploited a pseudo-Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence located near the 3'-end of the TPP aptamer, which would be less accessible to the ribosome when the aptamer is bound to TPP. In the second library, an SD sequence was strategically placed in the aptamer's P1 stem, which is stabilized upon ligand binding. OFF riboswitches were obtained by dual genetic selection of these libraries. The results underscore the importance of effective library design to achieve desired riboswitch functions. PMID:19658147

  11. Dual Endothelin Receptor Blockade Abrogates Right Ventricular Remodeling and Biventricular Fibrosis in Isolated Elevated Right Ventricular Afterload

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Eva Amalie; Sun, Mei; Honjo, Osami; Hjortdal, Vibeke E.; Redington, Andrew N.; Friedberg, Mark K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension is usually fatal due to right ventricular failure and is frequently associated with co-existing left ventricular dysfunction. Endothelin-1 is a powerful pro-fibrotic mediator and vasoconstrictor that is elevated in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Endothelin receptor blockers are commonly used as pulmonary vasodilators, however their effect on biventricular injury, remodeling and function, despite elevated isolated right ventricular afterload is unknown. Methods Elevated right ventricular afterload was induced by progressive pulmonary artery banding. Seven rabbits underwent pulmonary artery banding without macitentan; 13 received pulmonary artery banding + macitentan; and 5 did not undergo inflation of the pulmonary artery band (sham-operated controls). Results: Right and left ventricular collagen content was increased with pulmonary artery banding compared to sham-operated controls and ameliorated by macitentan. Right ventricular fibrosis signaling (connective tissue growth factor and endothelin-1 protein levels); extra-cellular matrix remodeling (matrix-metalloproteinases 2 and 9), apoptosis and apoptosis-related peptides (caspases 3 and 8) were increased with pulmonary artery banding compared with sham-operated controls and decreased with macitentan. Conclusion Isolated right ventricular afterload causes biventricular fibrosis, right ventricular apoptosis and extra cellular matrix remodeling, mediated by up-regulation of endothelin-1 and connective tissue growth factor signaling. These pathological changes are ameliorated by dual endothelin receptor blockade despite persistent elevated right ventricular afterload. PMID:26765263

  12. The potential for macitentan, a new dual endothelin receptor antagonist, in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Steriade, Alexandru; Seferian, Andrei; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Jutant, Etienne-Marie; Parent, Florence; Sitbon, Olivier; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Montani, David

    2014-04-11

    In recent years in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) represent a well-established class of therapeutic agents with clear beneficial effects. Macitentan (Opsumit(®)), a dual ERA optimized for efficacy and safety, is the newest drug in the class. Macitentan presents a number of key beneficial characteristics, including increased in vivo preclinical efficacy versus existing ERAs, resulting from sustained receptor binding and physicochemical properties that allow enhanced tissue penetration. The clinical pharmacokinetics studies also indicated a low predilection of macitentan for drug-drug interactions. In the SERAPHIN trial, a phase III long-term study of PAH, macitentan significantly reduced morbidity and mortality by 45% versus placebo, providing sustained long-term improvements in exercise capacity. No association was found between changes in exercise capacity and long-term clinical outcomes, but improved cardiopulmonary hemodynamics were recorded in macitentan-treated patients irrespective of baseline background PAH therapy or World Health Organization functional class. Based on these favorable data, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the 10 mg/day dose in late 2013 and the same process has recently been concluded by the European Medicines Agency.

  13. Strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of two Dual Phase steels in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, E.; Singh, N. K.; Forni, D.; Singha, M. K.; Gupta, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the strain rate sensitivity of Dual Phase steel 1200 (DP1200) and Dual Phase steel 1400 (DP1400) under uni-axial tensile loads in the strain rate range from 0.001 s-1 to 600 s-1. These materials are advanced high strength steels (AHSS) having high strength, high capacity to dissipate crash energy and high formability. Flat sheet specimens of the materials having gauge length 10 mm, width 4 mm and thickness 2 mm (DP1200) and 1.25 mm (DP1400), are tested at room temperature (20∘C) on electromechanical universal testing machine to obtain their stress-strain relation under quasi-static condition (0.001 s-1), and on Hydro-Pneumatic machine and modified Hopkinson bar to study their mechanical behavior at medium (3 s-1, and 18 s-1) and high strain rates (200 s-1, 400 s-1, and 600 s-1) respectively. Tests under quasi-static condition are performed at high temperature (200∘C) also, and found that tensile flow stress is a increasing function of temperature. The stress-strain data has been analysed to determine the material parameters of the Cowper-Symonds and the Johnson-Cook models. A simple modification of the Johnson-Cook model has been proposed in order to obtain a better fit of tests at high temperatures. Finally, the fractographs of the broken specimens are taken by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fracture mechanism of these advanced high strength steels at different strain rates.

  14. Structural Insights into Neonatal Fc Receptor-based Recycling Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Oganesyan, Vaheh; Damschroder, Melissa M.; Cook, Kimberly E.; Li, Qing; Gao, Changshou; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F.

    2014-01-01

    We report the three-dimensional structure of human neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) bound concurrently to its two known ligands. More particularly, we solved the crystal structure of the complex between human FcRn, wild-type human serum albumin (HSA), and a human Fc engineered for improved pharmacokinetics properties (Fc-YTE). The crystal structure of human FcRn bound to wild-type HSA alone is also presented. HSA domain III exhibits an extensive interface of contact with FcRn, whereas domain I plays a lesser role. A molecular explanation for the HSA recycling mechanism is provided with the identification of FcRn His161 as the only potential direct contributor to the corresponding pH-dependent process. At last, this study also allows an accurate structural definition of residues considered for decades as important to the human IgG/FcRn interaction and reveals Fc His310 as a significant contributor to pH-dependent binding. Finally, we explain various structural mechanisms by which several Fc mutations (including YTE) result in increased human IgG binding to FcRn. Our study provides an unprecedented relevant understanding of the molecular basis of human Fc interaction with human FcRn. PMID:24469444

  15. Influence of Martensite Mechanical Properties on Failure Mode and Ductility of Dual Phase Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the effects of the mechanical properties of the martensite phase on the failure mode and ductility of dual phase (DP) steels are investigated using a micromechanics-based finite element method. Actual microstructures of DP sheet steels obtained from scanning electron microscopy are used as representative volume element (RVE) in two-dimensional plane-stress finite element calculations. Failure is predicted as plastic strain localization in the RVE during deformation. The mechanical properties of the ferrite and martensite phases in a commercial DP 980 steel are obtained based on the in-situ X-ray diffraction measurements of a uniaxial tensile test. Computations are then conducted on the RVE in order to investigate the influence of the martensite mechanical properties and volume fraction on the macroscopic behavior and failure mode of DP steels. The computations show that, as the strength and volume fraction of the martensite phase increase, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of DP steels increases but the UTS strain and failure strain decrease. These results agree well with the general experimental observations on DP steels. Additionally, shear dominant failure modes usually develop for DP steels with lower martensite strengths, whereas split failure modes typically develop for DP steels with higher martensite strengths.

  16. A smart pinless ejection mechanism using dual-resonance excitation Langevin piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Jen; Fu, Kuo-Chieh; Wang, Chun-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated a smart pinless ejection mechanism comprising two dual-resonance excitation Langevin piezoelectric transducers (DRELPTs) for keeping the injection parts intact and protecting their top and bottom surfaces from scarring during plastic injection molding. The dimensions of each DRELPT were determined using longitudinal vibration models, and an optimization method was used to set the frequency ratio of the first to the second longitudinal mode to 1:2. This concept enables the driving of DRELPT in its two longitudinal modes consistent with the ejection direction in resonant-type smooth impact drive mechanisms. During the ejection process, DRELPT provides an ejection force, which is applied on the sidewalls of the injection parts to protect their top and bottom surfaces from scarring. Considering individual differences in the resonance frequencies of DRELPTs, a resonance frequency tracking circuit based on a phase-locked loop was designed to keep DRELPT actuating in resonance. The ejection velocity of the injection part was estimated using the kinetic models derived from the dynamic behavior of the mold cavity and injection parameters. A characteristic number S was defined to evaluate the average velocity of the injection part during ejection. Proof-of-concept experimental results of the pinless ejection mechanism are presented. The ejection time, that is, the time from triggering the composite wave to the full departure of the injection part from the mold cavity, was 72 ms.

  17. Regulatory mechanisms that modulate signalling by G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, S K; Grady, E F; Bunnett, N W

    1997-01-01

    The large and functionally diverse group of G-protein-coupled receptors includes receptors for many different signalling molecules, including peptide and non-peptide hormones and neuro-transmitters, chemokines, prostanoids and proteinases. Their principal function is to transmit information about the extracellular environment to the interior of the cell by interacting with the heterotrimeric G-proteins, and they thereby participate in many aspects of regulation. Cellular responses to agonists of these receptors are usually rapidly attenuated. Mechanisms of signal attenuation include removal of agonists from the extracellular fluid, receptor desensitization, endocytosis and down-regulation. Agonists are removed by dilution, uptake by transporters and enzymic degradation. Receptor desensitization is mediated by receptor phosphorylation by G-protein receptor kinases and second-messenger kinases, interaction of phosphorylated receptors with arrestins and receptor uncoupling from G-proteins. Agonist-induced receptor endocytosis also contributes to desensitization by depleting the cell surface of high-affinity receptors, and recycling of internalized receptors contributes to resensitization of cellular responses. Receptor down-regulation is a form of desensitization that occurs during continuous, long-term exposure of cells to receptor agonists. Down-regulation, which may occur during the development of drug tolerance, is characterized by depletion of the cellular receptor content, and is probably mediated by alterations in the rates of receptor degradation and synthesis. These regulatory mechanisms are important, as they govern the ability of cells to respond to agonists. A greater understanding of the mechanisms that modulate signalling may lead to the development of new therapies and may help to explain the mechanism of drug tolerance. PMID:9078236

  18. Unidirectional, dual-comb lasing under multiple pulse formation mechanisms in a passively mode-locked fiber ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Zhao, Xin; Hu, Guoqing; Li, Cui; Zhao, Bofeng; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Dual-comb lasers from which asynchronous ultrashort pulses can be simultaneously generated have recently become an interesting research subject. They could be an intriguing alternative to the current dual-laser optical-frequency-comb source with highly sophisticated electronic control systems. If generated through a common light path traveled by all pulses, the common-mode noises between the spectral lines of different pulse trains could be significantly reduced. Therefore, coherent dual-comb generation from a completely common-path, unidirectional lasing cavity would be an interesting territory to explore. In this paper, we demonstrate such a dual-comb lasing scheme based on a nanomaterial saturable absorber with additional pulse narrowing and broadening mechanisms concurrently introduced into a mode-locked fiber laser. The interactions between multiple soliton formation mechanisms result in unusual bifurcation into two-pulse states with quite different characteristics. Simultaneous oscillation of pulses with four-fold difference in pulsewidths and tens of Hz repetition rate difference is observed. The coherence between these spectral-overlapped, picosecond and femtosecond pulses is further verified by the corresponding asynchronous cross-sampling and dual-comb spectroscopy measurements.

  19. Dual signal transduction pathways activated by TSH receptors in rat primary tanycyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Bolborea, Matei; Helfer, Gisela; Ebling, Francis J P; Barrett, Perry

    2015-06-01

    Tanycytes play multiple roles in hypothalamic functions, including sensing peripheral nutrients and metabolic hormones, regulating neurosecretion and mediating seasonal cycles of reproduction and metabolic physiology. This last function reflects the expression of TSH receptors in tanycytes, which detect photoperiod-regulated changes in TSH secretion from the neighbouring pars tuberalis. The present overall aim was to determine the signal transduction pathway by which TSH signals in tanycytes. Expression of the TSH receptor in tanycytes of 10-day-old Sprague Dawley rats was observed by in situ hybridisation. Primary ependymal cell cultures prepared from 10-day-old rats were found by immunohistochemistry to express vimentin but not GFAP and by PCR to express mRNA for Dio2, Gpr50, Darpp-32 and Tsh receptors that are characteristic of tanycytes. Treatment of primary tanycyte/ependymal cultures with TSH (100  IU/l) increased cAMP as assessed by ELISA and induced a cAMP-independent increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 as assessed by western blot analysis. Furthermore, TSH (100  IU/l) stimulated a 2.17-fold increase in Dio2 mRNA expression. We conclude that TSH signal transduction in cultured tanycytes signals via Gαs to increase cAMP and via an alternative G protein to increase phosphorylation of ERK1/2. PMID:25878058

  20. Dual targeting of retinoid X receptor and histone deacetylase with DW22 as a novel antitumor approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihui; Chen, Guoliang; Chen, Kang; Ren, Yong; Li, Huahuan; Jiang, Xiaorui; Jia, Lina; Fu, Shiyuan; Li, Yi; Liu, Xinwei; Wang, Shuang; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Chunfu

    2015-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) and Histone deacetylase (HDAC) are considered important targets for cancer therapy due to their crucial roles in genetic or epigenetic regulations of cancer development and progression. Here, we evaluated the potential of dual targeting of RXR and HDAC using DW22 as a novel therapeutic approach to cancer treatment. We found that the co-expression of RXR-α and HDAC1 was frequently appeared in lung cancer and breast cancer tissues and cell lines. RXR was activated by DW22 in RXRα and HDAC1 overexpressed A549 and MDA-MB-435 cell lines. Meanwhile, DW22 inhibited the activity of HDAC by decreasing its expression in A549 and MDA-MB-435 cell lines, but not in RXRα and HDAC1 deficient cell lines. Moreover, DW22 suppressed cell growth, induced cell differentiation, prompted cell apoptosis and arrested cell cycle in A549, MDA-MB-435 or HL60 cell lines. Treatment human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) with DW22 suppressed migration, invasion and tube formation through decreasing VEGF expression. The up-regulation of Ac-H3 and p21, and down-regulation of VEGF caused by DW22 was markedly attenuated by silencing of HDAC1. Furthermore, knockdown of RXRα by siRNA completely blocked DW22-induced cell differentiation, but partially attenuated DW22-caused inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell apoptosis, and suppression of cell migration, invasion and tube formation. Moreover, intravenous administration of DW22 significantly retarded tumor growth of A549 and MDA-MB-435 xenograft mice models, and induced no substantial weight loss and gross toxicity. In addition, DW22 also reduced cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and induced cell apoptosis in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrates that dual targeting of RXR and HDAC using DW22 possesses pleiotropic antitumor activities both in vitro and in vivo, providing a novel therapeutic approach for cancer treatment. PMID:25762635

  1. Dual targeting of retinoid X receptor and histone deacetylase with DW22 as a novel antitumor approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihui; Chen, Guoliang; Chen, Kang; Ren, Yong; Li, Huahuan; Jiang, Xiaorui; Jia, Lina; Fu, Shiyuan; Li, Yi; Liu, Xinwei; Wang, Shuang; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Chunfu

    2015-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) and Histone deacetylase (HDAC) are considered important targets for cancer therapy due to their crucial roles in genetic or epigenetic regulations of cancer development and progression. Here, we evaluated the potential of dual targeting of RXR and HDAC using DW22 as a novel therapeutic approach to cancer treatment. We found that the co-expression of RXR-α and HDAC1 was frequently appeared in lung cancer and breast cancer tissues and cell lines. RXR was activated by DW22 in RXRα and HDAC1 overexpressed A549 and MDA-MB-435 cell lines. Meanwhile, DW22 inhibited the activity of HDAC by decreasing its expression in A549 and MDA-MB-435 cell lines, but not in RXRα and HDAC1 deficient cell lines. Moreover, DW22 suppressed cell growth, induced cell differentiation, prompted cell apoptosis and arrested cell cycle in A549, MDA-MB-435 or HL60 cell lines. Treatment human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) with DW22 suppressed migration, invasion and tube formation through decreasing VEGF expression. The up-regulation of Ac-H3 and p21, and down-regulation of VEGF caused by DW22 was markedly attenuated by silencing of HDAC1. Furthermore, knockdown of RXRα by siRNA completely blocked DW22-induced cell differentiation, but partially attenuated DW22-caused inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell apoptosis, and suppression of cell migration, invasion and tube formation. Moreover, intravenous administration of DW22 significantly retarded tumor growth of A549 and MDA-MB-435 xenograft mice models, and induced no substantial weight loss and gross toxicity. In addition, DW22 also reduced cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and induced cell apoptosis in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrates that dual targeting of RXR and HDAC using DW22 possesses pleiotropic antitumor activities both in vitro and in vivo, providing a novel therapeutic approach for cancer treatment. PMID:25762635

  2. A light-controlled switch after dual targeting of proliferating tumor cells via the membrane receptor EGFR and the nuclear protein Ki-67

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sijia; Hüttmann, Gereon; Scholzen, Thomas; Zhang, Zhenxi; Vogel, Alfred; Hasan, Tayyaba; Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin

    2016-01-01

    Using nanotechnology for optical manipulation of molecular processes in cells with high spatial and temporal precision promises new therapeutic options. Especially tumor therapy may profit as it requires a combination of both selectivity and an effective cell killing mechanism. Here we show a dual targeting approach for selective and efficient light-controlled killing of cells which are positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Ki-67. Liposomes with the covalently linked EGFR antibody Erbitux enabled selective uptake of FITC-labeled Ki-67 antibody TuBB-9 in EGFR-positive cells pre-loaded with the photoactive dye BPD. After irradiation at 690 nm, BPD disrupted the endosomal membranes and delivered the antibodies to the nucleoli of the cells. The second irradiation at 490 nm activated the FITC-labeled TuBB-9, which caused inactivation of the Ki-67 protein and subsequent cell death via apoptosis. Efficient cell killing was possible at nanomolar concentrations of TuBB-9 due to the effective transport by immune liposomes and the high efficacy of the Ki-67 light-inactivation. Delivery of the liposomal constructs and cell destruction correlated well with the EGFR expression pattern of different cell lines (HeLa, OVCAR-5, MCF-7, and human fibroblasts), demonstrating an excellent selectivity. PMID:27246531

  3. Dual mechanisms of DNA sequencing based on tunnelling between nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2013-03-01

    The DNA sequencing approach based on the combination of nanopores and electron tunnelling has seen considerable advances in recent years, and particularly carbon nanomaterials have emerged as promising candidates to replace metal electrodes. Carrying out extensive first-principles calculations, we here show that two distinct DNA sequencing mechanisms can be achieved with different configurations of a single-type nitrogen-doped capped carbon nanotube (CNT) that has significantly enhanced transmission and chemical sensitivity over its pristine counterpart. With a small CNT-CNT gap size that induces face-on nucleobase configurations, we obtain a typical conductance ordering where the largest signal is induced from guanine due to its highest occupied molecular orbital energetic position higher than those of other bases. On the other hand, for a large CNT-CNT gap size that accommodates edge-on nucleobase configurations, we extract a completely different conductance ordering in which thymine results in the largest signal. We find that the latter novel nucleobase sensing mechanism originates from the nature of chemical connectivity between nitrogen-doped CNT caps and nucleobase functional groups that include the thymine methyl group. This work thus demonstrates the feasibility of a tunnelling-based dual-mode approach toward whole genome sequencing applications, detection of DNA base modifications, and single-molecule sensing in general.

  4. Atg19 Mediates a Dual Interaction Cargo Sorting Mechanism in Selective Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiung-Ying

    2007-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic membrane-trafficking mechanism conserved in all eukaryotic cells. In addition to the nonselective transport of bulk cytosol, autophagy is responsible for efficient delivery of the vacuolar enzyme Ape1 precursor (prApe1) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting the presence of a prApe1 sorting machinery. Sequential interactions between Atg19-Atg11 and Atg19-Atg8 pairs are thought responsible for targeting prApe1 to the vesicle formation site, the preautophagosomal structure (PAS), and loading it into transport vesicles, respectively. However, the different patterns of prApe1 transport defect seen in the atg11Δ and atg19Δ strains seem to be incompatible with this model. Here we report that prApe1 could not be targeted to the PAS and failed to be delivered into the vacuole in atg8Δ atg11Δ double knockout cells regardless of the nutrient conditions. We postulate that Atg19 mediates a dual interaction prApe1-sorting mechanism through independent, instead of sequential, interactions with Atg11 and Atg8. In addition, to efficiently deliver prApe1 to the vacuole, a proper interaction between Atg11 and Atg9 is indispensable. We speculate that Atg11 may elicit a cargo-loading signal and induce Atg9 shuttling to a specific PAS site, where Atg9 relays the signal and recruits other Atg proteins to induce vesicle formation. PMID:17192412

  5. Investigating enhanced mechanical properties in dual-phase Fe-Ga-Tb alloys

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Chongzheng; Wang, Hui; Wu, Yuye; Liu, Jinghua; Jiang, Chengbao

    2016-01-01

    Dual-phase (Fe83Ga17)100−xTbx alloys with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 were synthesized by arc melting and homogenization treatment. The microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties were systematically investigated. The chemical composition of the body centered cubic matrix is Fe83Ga17. The monoclinic second phase was composed of meltable precipitates with approximate composition Fe57Ga33Tb10. The nano-hardness of matrix and precipitates were 2.55 ± 0.17 GPa and 6.81 ± 1.03 GPa, respectively. Both the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and fracture strain (ε) of the alloys were improved by the precipitates for x ≤ 0.2 alloys, but the strain decreases significantly at higher values of x. As potential structural-functional materials, the best mechanical properties obtained were a UTS of 595 ± 10 MPa and an ε of 3.5 ± 0.1%, four-fold and seven-fold improvements compared with the un-doped alloy. The mechanism for these anomalous changes of mechanical properties was attributed to the dispersed precipitates and semi-coherent interfaces, which serve as strong obstacles to dislocation motion and reduce the stress concentration at the grain boundaries. A sizeable improvement of magnetostriction induced by the precipitates in the range 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2 was discovered and an optimal value of 150 ± 5 ppm is found, over three times higher than that of the un-doped alloy. PMID:27694839

  6. Investigating enhanced mechanical properties in dual-phase Fe-Ga-Tb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chongzheng; Wang, Hui; Wu, Yuye; Liu, Jinghua; Jiang, Chengbao

    2016-10-01

    Dual-phase (Fe83Ga17)100‑xTbx alloys with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 were synthesized by arc melting and homogenization treatment. The microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties were systematically investigated. The chemical composition of the body centered cubic matrix is Fe83Ga17. The monoclinic second phase was composed of meltable precipitates with approximate composition Fe57Ga33Tb10. The nano-hardness of matrix and precipitates were 2.55 ± 0.17 GPa and 6.81 ± 1.03 GPa, respectively. Both the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and fracture strain (ε) of the alloys were improved by the precipitates for x ≤ 0.2 alloys, but the strain decreases significantly at higher values of x. As potential structural-functional materials, the best mechanical properties obtained were a UTS of 595 ± 10 MPa and an ε of 3.5 ± 0.1%, four-fold and seven-fold improvements compared with the un-doped alloy. The mechanism for these anomalous changes of mechanical properties was attributed to the dispersed precipitates and semi-coherent interfaces, which serve as strong obstacles to dislocation motion and reduce the stress concentration at the grain boundaries. A sizeable improvement of magnetostriction induced by the precipitates in the range 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2 was discovered and an optimal value of 150 ± 5 ppm is found, over three times higher than that of the un-doped alloy.

  7. Architecture and conformational switch mechanism of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Rouslan G; Leitner, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raunser, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction is initiated by the release of calcium (Ca(2+)) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum into the cytoplasm of myocytes through ryanodine receptors (RyRs). RyRs are homotetrameric channels with a molecular mass of more than 2.2 megadaltons that are regulated by several factors, including ions, small molecules and proteins. Numerous mutations in RyRs have been associated with human diseases. The molecular mechanism underlying the complex regulation of RyRs is poorly understood. Using electron cryomicroscopy, here we determine the architecture of rabbit RyR1 at a resolution of 6.1 Å. We show that the cytoplasmic moiety of RyR1 contains two large α-solenoid domains and several smaller domains, with folds suggestive of participation in protein-protein interactions. The transmembrane domain represents a chimaera of voltage-gated sodium and pH-activated ion channels. We identify the calcium-binding EF-hand domain and show that it functions as a conformational switch allosterically gating the channel. PMID:25470059

  8. Alternative mechanisms of receptor editing in autoreactive B cells.

    PubMed

    Kalinina, Olga; Doyle-Cooper, Colleen M; Miksanek, Jennifer; Meng, Wenzhao; Prak, Eline Luning; Weigert, Martin G

    2011-04-26

    Pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies expressed in systemic lupus erythematosis bind DNA mainly through electrostatic interactions between the positively charged Arg residues of the antibody complementarity determining region (CDR) and the negatively charged phosphate groups of DNA. The importance of Arg in CDR3 for DNA binding has been shown in mice with transgenes coding for anti-DNA V(H) regions; there is also a close correlation between arginines in CDR3 of antibodies and DNA binding. Codons for Arg can readily be formed by V(D)J rearrangement; thereby, antibodies that bind DNA are part of the preimmune repertoire. Anti-DNAs in healthy mice are regulated by receptor editing, a mechanism that replaces κ light (L) chains compatible with DNA binding with κ L chains that harbor aspartic residues. This negatively charged amino acid is thought to neutralize Arg sites in the V(H). Editing by replacement is allowed at the κ locus, because the rearranged VJ is nested between unrearranged Vs and Js. However, neither λ nor heavy (H) chain loci are organized so as to allow such second rearrangements. In this study, we analyze regulation of anti-DNA H chains in mice that lack the κ locus, κ-/κ- mice. These mice show that the endogenous preimmune repertoire does indeed include a high frequency of antibodies with Arg in their CDR3s (putative anti-DNAs) and they are associated mainly with the editor L chain λx. The editing mechanisms in the case of λ-expressing B cells include L chain allelic inclusion and V(H) replacement.

  9. A mechanism for Src kinase-dependent signaling by non-catalytic receptors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental issue in cell biology is how signals are transmitted across membranes. A variety of transmembrane receptors, including multichain immune recognition receptors, lack catalytic activity and require Src family kinases (SFKs) for signal transduction. However, many receptors only bind and activate SFKs after ligand-induced receptor dimerization. This presents a conundrum: How do SFKs sense the dimerization of receptors to which they are not already bound? Most proposals to resolve this enigma invoke additional players, such as lipid rafts or receptor conformational changes. Here we used simple thermodynamics to show that SFK activation is a natural outcome of clustering of receptors with SFK phosphorylation sites, provided that there is phosphorylation-dependent receptor-SFK association and an SFK bound to one receptor can phosphorylate the second receptor or its associated SFK in a dimer. A simple system of receptor, SFK and an unregulated protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) can account for ligand-induced changes in phosphorylation observed in cells. We suggest that a core signaling system comprising a receptor with SFK phosphorylation sites, an SFK and an unregulated PTP provides a robust mechanism for transmembrane signal transduction. Other events that regulate signaling in specific cases may have evolved for fine-tuning of this basic mechanism. PMID:18444664

  10. Dual Targeting of the Chemokine Receptors CXCR4 and ACKR3 with Novel Engineered Chemokines*

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Melinda S.; Salanga, Catherina L.; Chowdry, Arnab B.; Comerford, Iain; McColl, Shaun R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 and its G protein-coupled receptors CXCR4 and ACKR3 are implicated in cancer and inflammatory and autoimmune disorders and are targets of numerous antagonist discovery efforts. Here, we describe a series of novel, high affinity CXCL12-based modulators of CXCR4 and ACKR3 generated by selection of N-terminal CXCL12 phage libraries on live cells expressing the receptors. Twelve of 13 characterized CXCL12 variants are full CXCR4 antagonists, and four have Kd values <5 nm. The new variants also showed high affinity for ACKR3. The variant with the highest affinity for CXCR4, LGGG-CXCL12, showed efficacy in a murine model for multiple sclerosis, demonstrating translational potential. Molecular modeling was used to elucidate the structural basis of binding and antagonism of selected variants and to guide future designs. Together, this work represents an important step toward the development of therapeutics targeting CXCR4 and ACKR3. PMID:26216880

  11. Dual and tetraelectrode QCMs using imprinted polymers as receptors for ions and neutral analytes.

    PubMed

    Latif, Usman; Mujahid, Adnan; Afzal, Adeel; Sikorski, Renatus; Lieberzeit, Peter A; Dickert, Franz L

    2011-06-01

    Polymers as coating materials were combined with quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) to design sensor devices for the detection of both ionic and neutral analytes in liquid phase. The design and geometry of dual and tetraelectrode QCMs have been optimized to reduce electric field interferences. An unusual Sauerbrey effect was observed while exposing potassium salt solution to 10- and 20-MHz QCMs, i.e. increase in the frequency shifts by a factor of seven, which is attributed to electro-acoustic phenomena. Non-functionalized sol-gel materials were synthesized by templating with hydrophobic salt such as tetraethyl ammonium picrate. Imprinting with these ions of low charge density leads to sensitive layers, and UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to check re-inclusion of this analyte. In the next strategy, functionalized polyurethane for potassium ions and sol-gel materials with aminopropyl group as ligand were generated to tune selectivity and sensitivity towards Ni(2+) and Cu(2+). Methacrylic acid polymers were optimized for the detection of atrazine by hydrogen bonding; double molecular imprinted polyurethane approach was followed for pyrene recognition. Finally, these imprinted polymers were combined with tetraelectrode QCM to develop sensor platform.

  12. Dual and tetraelectrode QCMs using imprinted polymers as receptors for ions and neutral analytes.

    PubMed

    Latif, Usman; Mujahid, Adnan; Afzal, Adeel; Sikorski, Renatus; Lieberzeit, Peter A; Dickert, Franz L

    2011-06-01

    Polymers as coating materials were combined with quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) to design sensor devices for the detection of both ionic and neutral analytes in liquid phase. The design and geometry of dual and tetraelectrode QCMs have been optimized to reduce electric field interferences. An unusual Sauerbrey effect was observed while exposing potassium salt solution to 10- and 20-MHz QCMs, i.e. increase in the frequency shifts by a factor of seven, which is attributed to electro-acoustic phenomena. Non-functionalized sol-gel materials were synthesized by templating with hydrophobic salt such as tetraethyl ammonium picrate. Imprinting with these ions of low charge density leads to sensitive layers, and UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to check re-inclusion of this analyte. In the next strategy, functionalized polyurethane for potassium ions and sol-gel materials with aminopropyl group as ligand were generated to tune selectivity and sensitivity towards Ni(2+) and Cu(2+). Methacrylic acid polymers were optimized for the detection of atrazine by hydrogen bonding; double molecular imprinted polyurethane approach was followed for pyrene recognition. Finally, these imprinted polymers were combined with tetraelectrode QCM to develop sensor platform. PMID:21461862

  13. Dual regulation of mu opioid receptors in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells by morphine and interleukin-1β: evidence for opioid-immune crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Shekher; Davis, Randall L; DeSilva, Udaya; Stevens, Craig W

    2010-10-01

    Treatment of SK-N-SH cells with morphine and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) produced dual regulation of the mRNA for the human mu opioid receptor (MOR) protein. Morphine produced a decrease in the MOR mRNA while IL-1β increased it, as assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. These data were consistent with immunocytochemical studies of treated and untreated cells. Morphine-mediated down-regulation of MOR was blocked by naltrexone and IL-1β-induced up-regulation of MOR was blocked by interleukin-1 receptor type 1 antagonist. Immune-opioid crosstalk was examined by IL-1β and morphine co-treatment. These data are the first to show dual regulation of MOR in neuroblastoma cells.

  14. A dual physiological character for cerebral mechanisms of sexuality and cognition: common somatic peripheral afferents.

    PubMed

    Motofei, Ion G

    2011-11-01

    The dual theory of sexuality is a work in progress that tries to put together all the significant physiological aspects described on this subject, the most recent published article discussing about the hormonal and pheromonal neuromodulation of somatic peripheral afferents. But sexuality and cognition shares common somatic peripheral afferents, so that a good understanding of sexual mechanisms supposes also a good knowledge of the essential psychological mechanisms/neuromodulators. Current psychological approaches could be limited to two general tendencies. Some authors consider that cerebral neuronal connexions generate a unitary network substrate that - increasing in its complexity - becomes compatible with our complex mental function. Others suggest that such a complex cerebral function correspond actually to a system based on subsystems, represented by distinct neuronal units (not necessarily complexes) that interact each other. Starting from basic somatic/sexual neurophysiological elements and general accepted psychological aspects, the discussion gave sense to the last point of view, namely that genesis of a new function is the result of cooperation between distinct structural and functional units. Contrary to the classical concepts, this paper sows the fact that mental perception corresponds actually (in term of touch/tangibility) to the internal representation of an external object while sensations realize an internal representation of the external characteristics of environmental object. As a conclusion, sexuality and cognition are two distinct autonomic/dual functions, interrelated at both cerebral and peripheral level. Peripheral interference implies intervention of some specific (mental and sexual) neuromodulators, making external information act as internal mental or internal sexual stimuli. Central cerebral interferences are also clinically and pharmacologically documented, specific neuromodulators being taken into account. Supplementary studies would

  15. A dual physiological character for cerebral mechanisms of sexuality and cognition: common somatic peripheral afferents.

    PubMed

    Motofei, Ion G

    2011-11-01

    The dual theory of sexuality is a work in progress that tries to put together all the significant physiological aspects described on this subject, the most recent published article discussing about the hormonal and pheromonal neuromodulation of somatic peripheral afferents. But sexuality and cognition shares common somatic peripheral afferents, so that a good understanding of sexual mechanisms supposes also a good knowledge of the essential psychological mechanisms/neuromodulators. Current psychological approaches could be limited to two general tendencies. Some authors consider that cerebral neuronal connexions generate a unitary network substrate that - increasing in its complexity - becomes compatible with our complex mental function. Others suggest that such a complex cerebral function correspond actually to a system based on subsystems, represented by distinct neuronal units (not necessarily complexes) that interact each other. Starting from basic somatic/sexual neurophysiological elements and general accepted psychological aspects, the discussion gave sense to the last point of view, namely that genesis of a new function is the result of cooperation between distinct structural and functional units. Contrary to the classical concepts, this paper sows the fact that mental perception corresponds actually (in term of touch/tangibility) to the internal representation of an external object while sensations realize an internal representation of the external characteristics of environmental object. As a conclusion, sexuality and cognition are two distinct autonomic/dual functions, interrelated at both cerebral and peripheral level. Peripheral interference implies intervention of some specific (mental and sexual) neuromodulators, making external information act as internal mental or internal sexual stimuli. Central cerebral interferences are also clinically and pharmacologically documented, specific neuromodulators being taken into account. Supplementary studies would

  16. Sugar and pH dual-responsive mesoporous silica nanocontainers based on competitive binding mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, M. Deniz; Xue, Min; Ambrogio, Michael W.; Buyukcakir, Onur; Wu, Yilei; Frasconi, Marco; Chen, Xinqi; Nassar, Majed S.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2014-12-01

    A sugar and pH dual-responsive controlled release system, which is highly specific towards molecular stimuli, has been developed based on the binding between catechol and boronic acid on a platform of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). By grafting phenylboronic acid stalks onto the silica surface, catechol-containing β-cyclodextrins can be attached to the orifices of the MSNs' nanopores through formation of boronate esters which block access to the nanopores. These esters are stable enough to prevent cargo molecules from escaping. The boronate esters disassociate in the presence of sugars, enabling the molecule-specific controlled-release feature of this hybrid system. The rate of release has been found to be tunable by varying both the structures and the concentrations of sugars, as a result of the competitive binding nature associated with the mechanism of its operation. Acidification also induces the release of cargo molecules. Further investigations show that the presence of both a low pH and sugar molecules provides cooperative effects which together control the rate of release.A sugar and pH dual-responsive controlled release system, which is highly specific towards molecular stimuli, has been developed based on the binding between catechol and boronic acid on a platform of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). By grafting phenylboronic acid stalks onto the silica surface, catechol-containing β-cyclodextrins can be attached to the orifices of the MSNs' nanopores through formation of boronate esters which block access to the nanopores. These esters are stable enough to prevent cargo molecules from escaping. The boronate esters disassociate in the presence of sugars, enabling the molecule-specific controlled-release feature of this hybrid system. The rate of release has been found to be tunable by varying both the structures and the concentrations of sugars, as a result of the competitive binding nature associated with the mechanism of its operation

  17. The metabolism of the dual endothelin receptor antagonist macitentan in rat and dog.

    PubMed

    Treiber, Alexander; Miraval, Tommaso; Bolli, Martin H; Funel, Jacques-Alexis; Segrestaa, Jerome; Seeland, Swen

    2016-01-01

    1. The metabolism of the endothelin receptor antagonist macitentan has been characterized in bile duct-cannulated rats and dogs. 2. In both species, macitentan was metabolized along five primary pathways, i.e. conjugation with glucose (M9), oxidative depropylation (M6), aliphatic hydroxylation (M7), oxidative cleavage of the ethylene glycol linker (M4) and hydrolysis of the sulfamide moiety (M3). Most of the primary metabolites underwent subsequent biotransformation including conjugation with glucuronic acid or glucose, hydrolysis of the sulfamide group or secondary oxidation of the ethylene glycol moiety. 3. Though there were species differences in their relative importance, all metabolic pathways were present in rat and dog. The depropylated M6 was the only metabolite present in plasma of both species. 4. Metabolism was a prerequisite for macitentan excretion as relevant amounts of parent drug were neither detected in bile nor urine. Biliary excretion was the major elimination pathway, while renal elimination was of little importance.

  18. Dual elimination of the glucagon and GLP-1 receptors in mice reveals plasticity in the incretin axis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Safina; Lamont, Benjamin J; Charron, Maureen J; Drucker, Daniel J

    2011-05-01

    Disordered glucagon secretion contributes to the symptoms of diabetes, and reduced glucagon action is known to improve glucose homeostasis. In mice, genetic deletion of the glucagon receptor (Gcgr) results in increased levels of the insulinotropic hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which may contribute to the alterations in glucose homeostasis observed in Gcgr-/- mice. Here, we assessed the contribution of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling to the phenotype of Gcgr-/- mice by generating Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- mice. Although insulin sensitivity was similar in all genotypes, fasting glucose was increased in Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- mice. Elimination of the Glp1r normalized gastric emptying and impaired intraperitoneal glucose tolerance in Gcgr-/- mice. Unexpectedly, deletion of Glp1r in Gcgr-/- mice did not alter the improved oral glucose tolerance and increased insulin secretion characteristic of that genotype. Although Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- islets exhibited increased sensitivity to the incretin glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), mice lacking both Glp1r and the GIP receptor (Gipr) maintained preservation of the enteroinsular axis following reduction of Gcgr signaling. Moreover, Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- islets expressed increased levels of the cholecystokinin A receptor (Cckar) and G protein-coupled receptor 119 (Gpr119) mRNA transcripts, and Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- mice exhibited increased sensitivity to exogenous CCK and the GPR119 agonist AR231453. Our data reveal extensive functional plasticity in the enteroinsular axis via induction of compensatory mechanisms that control nutrient-dependent regulation of insulin secretion. PMID:21540554

  19. Agonist induced constitutive receptor activation as a novel regulatory mechanism. Mu receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Sadée, W; Wang, Z

    1995-01-01

    We propose the hypothesis that certain G protein coupled receptors can become constitutively activated during agonist stimulation so that the receptor remains active even after the agonist is removed. This new paradigm of receptor regulation may account for some long term effects of neurotransmitters and hormones. We have tested the hypothesis that constitutive mu receptor activation represents a crucial step driving narcotic tolerance and dependence. Our results indeed support the conversion of mu to a constitutively active state, mu*, observed in neuroblastoma SK-N-SH and SH-SY5Y tissue culture, in U293 cells transfected with the mu receptor gene, and in vivo. Constitutive mu activation may result from receptor phosphorylation to yield mu*, and further, in vivo studies indicate that formation of mu* could account for narcotic tolerance and dependence.

  20. First experimental investigation of dual-reciprocating drilling in planetary regoliths: Proposition of penetration mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouache, Thibault P.; Gao, Yang; Coste, Pierre; Gourinat, Yves

    2011-10-01

    The search for life in the solar system requires sub-surface exploration capabilities of extra-terrestrial bodies like the Moon and Mars. To do so different techniques are being developed: from the classical rotary drilling techniques widely used on Earth to more original techniques like ultrasonic drilling. Dual-reciprocating drilling (DRD) is a bio-mimetic drilling principle inspired by the manner wood-wasps drill into wood to lay its eggs. It was proposed as an efficient extra-terrestrial drilling technique requiring low over-head force. To deepen the understanding of this novel drilling technique, DRD has been tested for the first time in planetary regolith simulants. These experiments are reported here. To do so a new test bench was built and is presented. The soil forces on the drill bit are analysed and the final depth reached by the DRD system is compared to the final depth reached by static penetration. The experiments have shown very high levels of slippage (defined here specifically for DRD). The observations of the surface deformations and the importance of slippage lead to the proposal of DRD penetration mechanics in regoliths. Finally a re-evaluation of previous DRD experiments conducted on low compressive strength rocks also show the high levels of slippage during DRD.

  1. Dual mechanisms of ion uptake in relation to vacuolation in corn roots.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Laties, G G

    1966-05-01

    Absorption isotherms for chloride and rubidium ions have been determined through a wide concentration range for nonvacuolate root tips, and for vacuolate subapical sections of corn root. In the range 0 to 0.5 mm, chloride absorption is hyperbolic with concentration in both tips and proximal sections. At high concentrations, 1 to 50 mm, a second multiple-hyperbolic isotherm for chloride is noted in vacuolate tissue, while the isotherm for nonvacuolate tips rises exponentially. A linear to exponentially rising isotherm is taken to signify diffusive permeation.The same distinction between tip and subapical tissue characterizes Rb absorption. Rb uptake is indifferent to the nature of the counterion at all concentrations in the tip, while the counterion exerts a predictable influence on Rb absorption in proximal tissue. The effect of a poorly absorbable anion on Rb uptake is greater in the high concentration range. Evidence is presented for the metabolic nature of ion transport into nonvacuolate root tips. Verification is offered that ion uptake is mediated by dual mechanisms, and the thesis is developed that the high-affinity (low K(s)) system mediates ion passage through the plasma membrane while the low-affinity (high K(s)) system implements transport through the tonoplast.

  2. Crystal structures and enzyme mechanisms of a dual fucose mutarotase/ribose pyranase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Kim, Min-Sung; Suh, Hye-Young; Ku, Bonsu; Song, Young-Lan; Ko, Sunggeon; Lee, Weontae; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2009-08-01

    Escherichia coli FucU (Fucose Unknown) is a dual fucose mutarotase and ribose pyranase, which shares 44% sequence identity with its human counterpart. Herein, we report the structures of E. coli FucU and mouse FucU bound to L-fucose and delineate the catalytic mechanisms underlying the interconversion between stereoisomers of fucose and ribose. E. coli FucU forms a decameric toroid with each active site formed by two adjacent subunits. While one subunit provides most of the fucose-interacting residues including a catalytic tyrosine residue, the other subunit provides a catalytic His-Asp dyad. This active-site feature is critical not only for the mutarotase activity toward L-fucose but also for the pyranase activity toward D-ribose. Structural and biochemical analyses pointed that mouse FucU assembles into four different oligomeric forms, among which the smallest homodimeric form is most abundant and would be the predominant species under physiological conditions. This homodimer has two fucose-binding sites that are devoid of the His-Asp dyad and catalytically inactive, indicating that the mutarotase and the pyranase activities appear dispensable in vertebrates. The defective assembly of the mouse FucU homodimer into the decameric form is due to an insertion of two residues at the N-terminal extreme, which is a common aspect of all the known vertebrate FucU proteins. Therefore, vertebrate FucU appears to serve for as yet unknown function through the quaternary structural alteration.

  3. Dual strain mechanisms in a lead-free morphotropic phase boundary ferroelectric.

    PubMed

    Walker, Julian; Simons, Hugh; Alikin, Denis O; Turygin, Anton P; Shur, Vladimir Y; Kholkin, Andrei L; Ursic, Hana; Bencan, Andreja; Malic, Barbara; Nagarajan, Valanoor; Rojac, Tadej

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical properties such as d33 and strain are significantly enhanced at morphotropic phase boundaries (MPBs) between two or more different crystal structures. Many actuators, sensors and MEMS devices are therefore systems with MPBs, usually between polar phases in lead (Pb)-based ferroelectric ceramics. In the search for Pb-free alternatives, systems with MPBs between polar and non-polar phases have recently been theorized as having great promise. While such an MPB was identified in rare-earth (RE) modified bismuth ferrite (BFO) thin films, synthesis challenges have prevented its realization in ceramics. Overcoming these, we demonstrate a comparable electromechanical response to Pb-based materials at the polar-to-non-polar MPB in Sm modified BFO. This arises from 'dual' strain mechanisms: ferroelectric/ferroelastic switching and a previously unreported electric-field induced transition of an anti-polar intermediate phase. We show that intermediate phases play an important role in the macroscopic strain response, and may have potential to enhance electromechanical properties at polar-to-non-polar MPBs.

  4. Dual mechanism of protection by live attenuated Bordetella pertussis BPZE1 against Bordetella bronchiseptica in mice.

    PubMed

    Kammoun, Hana; Feunou, Pascal Feunou; Foligne, Benoit; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Raze, Dominique; Mielcarek, Nathalie; Locht, Camille

    2012-08-31

    Bordetella bronchiseptica, a gram-negative bacterium, causes chronic respiratory tract infections in a wide variety of mammalian hosts, including man, and no human vaccine is currently available. Acellular pertussis vaccines protect poorly against B. bronchiseptica, although they contain cross-reactive antigens. We have recently developed Bordetella pertussis BPZE1, a novel, live attenuated pertussis vaccine, currently completing phase I clinical trials in humans, and found that it protects against both B. pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis in mice. Here, we show that a single nasal administration of BPZE1 protects mice against lethal infection with B. bronchiseptica. After challenge, the vaccinated animals displayed markedly reduced lung inflammation and tissue damage, decreased neutrophil infiltration and increased levels of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells in the lungs compared to non-immunized mice. Depletion of these cells abolished BPZE1-induced protection, indicating that BPZE1 protects against lethal inflammation through the recruitment of regulatory T cells. In addition, the B. bronchiseptica load was significantly decreased in the vaccinated animals. Using passive transfer experiments, protection was found to be essentially cell mediated, and BPZE1-induced Th1 and Th17 T cells recognize whole B. bronchiseptica extracts, although the participation of antibodies in protection cannot be discounted. Thus, a single administration of BPZE1 can confer protection against B. bronchiseptica in mice by a dual mechanism.

  5. Benzodiazepine receptor ligand influences on acquisition: suggestion of an endogenous modulatory mechanism mediated by benzodiazepine receptors.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, I; Pereira, M E; Medina, J H

    1990-07-01

    In rats, pretraining ip administration of the central benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, flumazenil (5.0 mg/kg), or of the inverse agonist, n-butyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (BCCB) (0.2 or 0.5 mg/kg), facilitated retention of a step-down inhibitory avoidance task; the central agonists, clonazepam and diazepam (0.4 or 1.0 mg/kg), had an opposite effect, and the peripheral agonist, 4'-chlordiazepam (1.25 or 6.25 mg/kg), was without effect. Pre- but not post-training flumazenil (2.0 mg/kg) blocked the effect of BCCB (0.5 mg/kg), clonazepam (1.0 mg/kg), or diazepam (1.0 mg/kg) given also pretraining. The post-training administration of all of these drugs had no effect on retention of the avoidance task. Flumazenil (5.0 mg/kg) and BCCB (0.5 mg/kg), given before training, enhanced retention test performance of habituation to a buzzer but not of habituation to an open field. In the three tasks studied, none of the drugs used had any appreciable effect on training session parameters. These results suggest that there is an endogenous mechanism mediated by benzodiazepine agonists, sensitive to inverse agonists, that normally down-regulates acquisition of certain behaviors; this mechanism becomes activated only when the tasks involve or occur with a certain degree of stress or anxiety (i.e., inhibitory avoidance or habituation to the buzzer) and not in less stressful or anxiogenic tasks (i.e., habituation to an open field).

  6. Conformational Changes in the GM-CSF Receptor Suggest a Molecular Mechanism for Affinity Conversion and Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Sophie E; Hercus, Timothy R; Nero, Tracy L; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J; Dhagat, Urmi; Taing, Houng; Gorman, Michael A; King-Scott, Jack; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    The GM-CSF, IL-3, and IL-5 receptors constitute the βc family, playing important roles in inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Typical of heterodimeric type I cytokine receptors, signaling requires recruitment of the shared subunit to the initial cytokine:α subunit binary complex through an affinity conversion mechanism. This critical process is poorly understood due to the paucity of crystal structures of both binary and ternary receptor complexes for the same cytokine. We have now solved the structure of the binary GM-CSF:GMRα complex at 2.8-Å resolution and compared it with the structure of the ternary complex, revealing distinct conformational changes. Guided by these differences we performed mutational and functional studies that, importantly, show GMRα interactions playing a major role in receptor signaling while βc interactions control high-affinity binding. These results support the notion that conformational changes underlie the mechanism of GM-CSF receptor activation and also suggest how related type I cytokine receptors signal. PMID:27396825

  7. [Probable mechanism of recognition of cholinergic ligands by acetylcholine receptors].

    PubMed

    Demushkin, V P; Kotelevtsev, Iu V; Pliashkevich, Iu G; Khramtsov, N V

    1982-01-01

    Dryding's models were used for the conformational analysis of compounds affecting muscarin-specific acetylcholine receptor and nicotin-specific acetylcholine receptor. Ammonium group and ether oxygen (3.6 A apart from the ammonium group) specifically oriented to each other were shown to be necessary structural elements to reveal muscarin-type cholinergic activity. Ammonium group along with carbonyl oxygen or its substituent (5 A distance) are the necessary structural units providing nicotin-type cholinergic activity. The presence of two hydrophobic substituents (one in the ammonium area and the other neighbouring the second active grouping) is the additional factor. The developed principles were justified by the use of a series of synthetic samples. The compounds were obtained likely favouring affinitive modification of acetylcholine receptor (dissociation constants of acetylcholine receptor complexes equalling to 10(-4)--10(-7) M-1). PMID:7070378

  8. Dual mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor upregulation by hypoxia in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    von Marschall, Z; Cramer, T; Hocker, M; Finkenzeller, G; Wiedenmann, B; Rosewicz, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in regulation of tumour associated angiogenesis. In the current study we analysed expression of VEGF and its receptors in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and investigated the molecular mechanisms of VEGF regulation by hypoxia.
METHODS—VEGF, kinase domain region (KDR)/fetal liver kinase 1 (flk-1), and flt-1 expression were examined by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation in 15 human HCC tissues. Expression of VEGF and regulation by hypoxia were assessed in three human HCC cell lines using a quantitative competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and a series of 5' deletion reporter gene constructs of the human VEGF promoter in transient transfection assays.
RESULTS—We observed over expression of VEGF mRNA and protein in HCC compared with cirrhosis or normal liver. Expression of VEGF in tumour cells was strongly increased in areas directly adjacent to necrotic/hypoxic regions. Both VEGF receptors were detected in vascular endothelia of HCC while only KDR/flk-1 receptors were detected in endothelial cells of cirrhotic livers. Expression of VEGF was observed in all human HCC cell lines examined. Hypoxia (1% oxygen) resulted in profound upregulation of VEGF mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, hypoxia treatment resulted in a doubling of VEGF mRNA stability. Deletion analysis of the human VEGF 5' flanking region −2018 and +50 demonstrated induction of VEGF promoter activity under hypoxic conditions which was significantly decreased following deletion of the region −1286 and −789 suggesting a substantial contribution of the −975 putative hypoxia inducible factor 1 binding site to hypoxia mediated transcriptional activation of the VEGF gene.
CONCLUSION—These data suggest hypoxia as a central stimulus of angiogenesis in human HCC through upregulation of VEGF gene expression by at least two distinct molecular mechanisms: activation of

  9. Immunolocalization of steroid hormone receptors in normal and tumour cells: mechanisms of their cellular traffic.

    PubMed

    Perrot-Applanat, M; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Milgrom, E

    1992-01-01

    Experimental conditions are described for the detection of steroid receptors in tissue sections or cells at the light microscope level. Current knowledge about the ultrastructural distribution of these receptors is summarized; the mechanisms of their nuclear localization are described. Karyophilic signals involved in nuclear translocation are characterized by means of in vitro mutagenesis of steroid receptor cDNAs. Studies analysing the subcellular distribution of various transfected receptor mutants in energy depleted cells together with fusion experiments provide evidence for nucleoplasmic shuttling of progesterone receptors. We conclude that the "nuclear" location of the wild type progesterone receptor reflects a dynamic equilibrium between active nuclear import and outward diffusion. We also describe the use of immunocytochemistry in pathology, especially for the detection of steroid receptors in hormone dependent tumours. PMID:1423330

  10. The dual role of scavenger receptor class A in development of diabetes in autoimmune NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Mami; Yasuda, Hisafumi; Hara, Kenta; Takahashi, Kazuma; Nagata, Masao; Yokono, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Human type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results from the autoreactive destruction of pancreatic β cells by T cells. Antigen presenting cells including dendritic cells and macrophages are required to activate and suppress antigen-specific T cells. It has been suggested that antigen uptake from live cells by dendritic cells via scavenger receptor class A (SR-A) may be important. However, the role of SR-A in autoimmune disease is unknown. In this study, SR-A-/- nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice showed significant attenuation of insulitis, lower levels of insulin autoantibodies, and suppression of diabetes development compared with NOD mice. We also found that diabetes progression in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with low-dose polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) was significantly accelerated compared with that in disease-resistant NOD mice treated with low-dose poly(I:C). In addition, injection of high-dose poly(I: C) to mimic an acute RNA virus infection significantly accelerated diabetes development in young SR-A-/- NOD mice compared with untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. Pathogenic cells including CD4+CD25+ activated T cells were increased more in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with poly(I:C) than in untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggested that viral infection might accelerate diabetes development even in diabetes-resistant subjects. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that diabetes progression was suppressed in SR-A-/- NOD mice and that acceleration of diabetes development could be induced in young mice by poly(I:C) treatment even in SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggest that SR-A on antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells may play an unfavorable role in the steady state and a protective role in a mild infection. Our findings imply that SR-A may be an important target for improving therapeutic strategies for type 1 diabetes. PMID:25343451

  11. Molecular mechanism for opioid dichotomy: bidirectional effect of μ-opioid receptors on P2X₃ receptor currents in rat sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Chizhmakov, Igor; Kulyk, Vyacheslav; Khasabova, Iryna; Khasabov, Sergey; Simone, Donald; Bakalkin, Georgy; Gordienko, Dmitri; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-06-01

    Here, we describe a molecular switch associated with opioid receptors-linked signalling cascades that provides a dual opioid control over P2X3 purinoceptor in sensory neurones. Leu-enkephalin inhibited P2X3-mediated currents with IC50 ~10 nM in ~25% of small nociceptive rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones. In contrast, in neurones pretreated with pertussis toxin leu-enkephalin produced stable and significant increase of P2X3 currents. All effects of opioid were abolished by selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), nonselective inhibitor naloxone, and by PLC inhibitor U73122. Thus, we discovered a dual link between purinoceptors and μ-opioid receptors: the latter exert both inhibitory (pertussis toxin-sensitive) and stimulatory (pertussis toxin-insensitive) actions on P2X3 receptors through phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent pathways. This dual opioid control of P2X3 receptors may provide a molecular explanation for dichotomy of opioid therapy. Pharmacological control of this newly identified facilitation/inhibition switch may open new perspectives for the adequate medical use of opioids, the most powerful pain-killing agents known today.

  12. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN PROGESTERONE RECEPTOR REGULATION OF UTERINE FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K.; Jeong, J.; Tsai, M.-J.; Tsai, S.; Lydon, J. P.; DeMayo, F. J.

    2007-01-01

    The ovarian steroid hormone progesterone is a major regulator of uterine function. The actions of this hormone is mediated through its cognate receptor, the progesterone receptor, Pgr. Ablation of the Pgr has shown that this receptor is critical for all female reproductive functions including the ability of the uterus to support and maintain the development of the implanting mouse embryo. High density DNA microarray analysis has identified direct and indirect targets of Pgr action. One of the targets of Pgr action is a member of the Hedgehog morphogen Indian hedgehog, Ihh. Ihh and members of the Hh signaling cascade show a coordinate expression pattern in the mouse uterus during the preimplantation period of pregnancy. The expression of Ihh and its receptor Patched-1, Ptc1, as well as, down stream targets of Ihh-Ptch1 signaling, such as the orphan nuclear receptor COUP-TF II show that this morphogen pathway mediates communication between the uterine epithelial and stromal compartments. The members of the Ihh signaling axis may function to coordinate the proliferation, vascularization and differentiation of the uterine stroma during pregnancy. This analysis demonstrates that progesterone regulates uterine function in the mouse by coordinating the signals from the uterine epithelium to stroma in the preimplantation mouse uterus. PMID:17067792

  13. Dual ACE-inhibition and angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonism with curcumin attenuate maladaptive cardiac repair and improve ventricular systolic function after myocardial infarctionin rat heart.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xue-Fen; Zhang, Li-Hui; Bai, Feng; Wang, Ning-Ping; Ijaz Shah, Ahmed; Garner, Ron; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has been shown to improve cardiac function by reducing degradation of extracellular matrix and inhibiting synthesis of collagen after ischemia. This study tested the hypothesis that attenuation of maladaptive cardiac repair with curcumin is associated with a dual ACE-inhibition and angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonism after myocardial infarction. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 45min ischemia followed by 7 and 42 days of reperfusion, respectively. Curcumin was fed orally at a dose of 150mg/kg/day only during reperfusion. Relative to the control animals, dietary treatment with curcumin significantly reduced levels of ACE and AT1 receptor protein as determined by Western blot assay, coincident with less locally-expressed ACE and AT1 receptor in myocardium and coronary vessels as identified by immunohistochemistry. Along with this inhibition, curcumin significantly increased protein level of AT2 receptor and its expression compared with the control. As evidenced by less collagen deposition in fibrotic myocardium, curcumin also reduced the extent of collagen-rich scar and increased mass of viable myocardium detected by Masson׳s trichrome staining. Echocardiography showed that the wall thickness of the infarcted anterior septum in the curcumin group was significantly greater than that in the control group. Cardiac contractile function was improved in the curcumin treated animals as measured by fraction shortening and ejection fraction. In cultured cardiac muscle cells, curcumin inhibited oxidant-induced AT1 receptor expression and promoted cell survival. These results suggest that curcumin attenuates maladaptive cardiac repair and enhances cardiac function, primarily mediated by a dual ACE-inhibition and AT1 receptor antagonism after myocardial infarction.

  14. Effect of cyclosporine and rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of macitentan, a tissue-targeting dual endothelin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Bruderer, Shirin; Aänismaa, Päivi; Homery, Marie-Claude; Häusler, Stephanie; Landskroner, Kyle; Sidharta, Patricia N; Treiber, Alexander; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2012-03-01

    Macitentan is a dual endothelin receptor antagonist under phase 3 investigation in pulmonary arterial hypertension. We investigated the effect of cyclosporine (Cs) and rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of macitentan and its metabolites ACT-132577 and ACT-373898 in healthy male subjects. In addition, in vitro studies were performed to investigate interactions between macitentan and its active metabolite ACT-132577 with human organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs). The clinical study (AC-055-111) was conducted as a two-part, one-sequence, crossover study. Ten subjects in each part received multiple-dose macitentan followed by multiple-dose co-administration of Cs (part A) or rifampin (part B). In the presence of Cs, steady-state area under the plasma concentration-time profiles during a dose interval (AUC(τ)) for macitentan and ACT-373898 increased 10% and 7%, respectively, and decreased 3% for ACT-132577. Steady-state AUC(τ) of macitentan and ACT-373898 in the presence of rifampin decreased 79% and 64%, respectively. For ACT-132577, no relevant difference in AUC(τ) between the two treatments was observed. Macitentan co-administered with Cs or rifampin was well tolerated. The complementary in vitro studies demonstrated no marked differences in uptake rates of macitentan and ACT-132577 between the wild-type and OATP over-expressing cells over the concentration range tested. Concomitant treatment with Cs did not have any clinically relevant effect on the exposure to macitentan or its metabolites, at steady-state. Concomitant treatment with rifampin reduced significantly the exposure to macitentan and its metabolite ACT-373898 at steady-state but did not affect the exposure to the active metabolite ACT-132577 to a clinically relevant extent.

  15. Design of donecopride, a dual serotonin subtype 4 receptor agonist/acetylcholinesterase inhibitor with potential interest for Alzheimer's disease treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lecoutey, Cédric; Hedou, Damien; Freret, Thomas; Giannoni, Patrizia; Gaven, Florence; Since, Marc; Bouet, Valentine; Ballandonne, Céline; Corvaisier, Sophie; Malzert Fréon, Aurélie; Mignani, Serge; Cresteil, Thierry; Boulouard, Michel; Claeysen, Sylvie; Rochais, Christophe; Dallemagne, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    RS67333 is a partial serotonin subtype 4 receptor (5-HT4R) agonist that has been widely studied for its procognitive effect. More recently, it has been shown that its ability to promote the nonamyloidogenic cleavage of the precursor of the neurotoxic amyloid-β peptide leads to the secretion of the neurotrophic protein sAPPα. This effect has generated great interest in RS67333 as a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We show herein that RS67333 is also a submicromolar acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor and therefore, could contribute, through this effect, to the restoration of the cholinergic neurotransmission that becomes altered in AD. We planned to pharmacomodulate RS67333 to enhance its AChE inhibitory activity to take advantage of this pleiotropic pharmacological profile in the design of a novel multitarget-directed ligand that is able to exert not only a symptomatic but also, a disease-modifying effect against AD. These efforts allowed us to select donecopride as a valuable dual (h)5-HT4R partial agonist (Ki = 10.4 nM; 48.3% of control agonist response)/(h)AChEI (IC50 = 16 nM) that further promotes sAPPα release (EC50 = 11.3 nM). Donecopride, as a druggable lead, was assessed for its in vivo procognitive effects (0.1, 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg) with an improvement of memory performances observed at 0.3 and 1 mg/kg on the object recognition test. On the basis of these in vitro and in vivo activities, donecopride seems to be a promising drug candidate for AD treatment. PMID:25157130

  16. Effects of ONO-6950, a novel dual cysteinyl leukotriene 1 and 2 receptors antagonist, in a guinea pig model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Yonetomi, Yasuo; Sekioka, Tomohiko; Kadode, Michiaki; Kitamine, Tetsuya; Kamiya, Akihiro; inoue, Atsuto; Nakao, Takafumi; Nomura, Hiroaki; Murata, Masayuki; Nakao, Shintaro; Nambu, Fumio; Fujita, Manabu; Nakade, Shinji; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2015-10-15

    We assessed in this study the anti-asthmatic effects of ONO-6950, a novel cysteinyl leukotriene 1 (CysLT1) and 2 (CysLT2) receptors dual antagonist, in normal and S-hexyl glutathione (S-hexyl GSH)-treated guinea pigs, and compared these effects to those of montelukast, a CysLT1 selective receptor antagonist. Treatment with S-hexyl GSH reduced animals LTC4 metabolism, allowing practical evaluation of CysLT2 receptor-mediated airway response. ONO-6950 antagonized intracellular calcium signaling via human and guinea pig CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptors with IC50 values of 1.7 and 25 nM, respectively (human receptors) and 6.3 and 8.2 nM, respectively (guinea pig receptors). In normal guinea pigs, both ONO-6950 (1 or 0.3 mg/kg, p.o.) and the CysLT1 receptor antagonist montelukast (0.3 or 0.1 mg/kg, p.o.) fully attenuated CysLT1-mediated bronchoconstriction and airway vascular hyperpermeability induced by LTD4. On the other hand, in S-hexyl GSH-treated guinea pigs ONO-6950 at 3 mg/kg, p.o. or more almost completely inhibited bronchoconstriction and airway vascular hyperpermeability elicited by LTC4, while montelukast showed only partial or negligible inhibition of these airway responses. In ovalbumin sensitized guinea pigs, treatment with S-hexyl GSH on top of pyrilamine and indomethacin rendered antigen-induced bronchoconstriction sensitive to both CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptor antagonists. ONO-6950 strongly inhibited this asthmatic response to the level attained by combination therapy with montelukast and BayCysLT2RA, a selective CysLT2 receptor antagonist. These results clearly demonstrate that ONO-6950 is an orally active dual CysLT1/LT2 receptor antagonist that may provide a novel therapeutic option for patients with asthma. PMID:26318198

  17. Effects of ONO-6950, a novel dual cysteinyl leukotriene 1 and 2 receptors antagonist, in a guinea pig model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Yonetomi, Yasuo; Sekioka, Tomohiko; Kadode, Michiaki; Kitamine, Tetsuya; Kamiya, Akihiro; inoue, Atsuto; Nakao, Takafumi; Nomura, Hiroaki; Murata, Masayuki; Nakao, Shintaro; Nambu, Fumio; Fujita, Manabu; Nakade, Shinji; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2015-10-15

    We assessed in this study the anti-asthmatic effects of ONO-6950, a novel cysteinyl leukotriene 1 (CysLT1) and 2 (CysLT2) receptors dual antagonist, in normal and S-hexyl glutathione (S-hexyl GSH)-treated guinea pigs, and compared these effects to those of montelukast, a CysLT1 selective receptor antagonist. Treatment with S-hexyl GSH reduced animals LTC4 metabolism, allowing practical evaluation of CysLT2 receptor-mediated airway response. ONO-6950 antagonized intracellular calcium signaling via human and guinea pig CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptors with IC50 values of 1.7 and 25 nM, respectively (human receptors) and 6.3 and 8.2 nM, respectively (guinea pig receptors). In normal guinea pigs, both ONO-6950 (1 or 0.3 mg/kg, p.o.) and the CysLT1 receptor antagonist montelukast (0.3 or 0.1 mg/kg, p.o.) fully attenuated CysLT1-mediated bronchoconstriction and airway vascular hyperpermeability induced by LTD4. On the other hand, in S-hexyl GSH-treated guinea pigs ONO-6950 at 3 mg/kg, p.o. or more almost completely inhibited bronchoconstriction and airway vascular hyperpermeability elicited by LTC4, while montelukast showed only partial or negligible inhibition of these airway responses. In ovalbumin sensitized guinea pigs, treatment with S-hexyl GSH on top of pyrilamine and indomethacin rendered antigen-induced bronchoconstriction sensitive to both CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptor antagonists. ONO-6950 strongly inhibited this asthmatic response to the level attained by combination therapy with montelukast and BayCysLT2RA, a selective CysLT2 receptor antagonist. These results clearly demonstrate that ONO-6950 is an orally active dual CysLT1/LT2 receptor antagonist that may provide a novel therapeutic option for patients with asthma.

  18. Fasiglifam (TAK-875) has dual potentiating mechanisms via Gαq-GPR40/FFAR1 signaling branches on glucose-dependent insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Kensuke; Yabuki, Chiori; Maruyama, Minoru; Abiru, Akiko; Komatsu, Hidetoshi; Negoro, Nobuyuki; Tsujihata, Yoshiyuki; Takeuchi, Koji; Habata, Yugo; Mori, Masaaki

    2016-06-01

    Fasiglifam (TAK-875) is a free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1)/G-protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) agonist that improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes with minimum risk of hypoglycemia. Fasiglifam potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells glucose dependently, although the precise mechanism underlying the glucose dependency still remains unknown. Here, we investigated key cross-talk between the GSIS pathway and FFAR1 signaling, and Ca(2+) dynamics using mouse insulinoma MIN6 cells. We demonstrated that the glucose-dependent insulinotropic effect of fasiglifam required membrane depolarization and that fasiglifam induced a glucose-dependent increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and amplification of Ca(2+) oscillations. This differed from the sulfonylurea glimepiride that induced changes in Ca(2+) dynamics glucose independently. Stimulation with cell-permeable analogs of IP3 or diacylglycerol (DAG), downstream second messengers of Gαq-FFAR1, augmented GSIS similar to fasiglifam, indicating their individual roles in the potentiation of GSIS pathway. Intriguingly, the IP3 analog triggered similar Ca(2+) dynamics to fasiglifam, whereas the DAG analog had no effect. Despite the lack of an effect on Ca(2+) dynamics, the DAG analog elicited synergistic effects on insulin secretion with Ca(2+) influx evoked by an L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel opener that mimics glucose-dependent Ca(2+) dynamics. These results indicate that the Gαq signaling activated by fasiglifam enhances GSIS pathway via dual potentiating mechanisms in which IP3 amplifies glucose-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and DAG/protein kinase C (PKC) augments downstream secretory mechanisms independent of Ca(2+) oscillations. PMID:27433346

  19. Dual mechanical behaviour of hydrogen in stressed silicon nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Volpi, F. Braccini, M.; Pasturel, A.; Devos, A.; Raymond, G.; Morin, P.

    2014-07-28

    In the present article, we report a study on the mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms and pores in silicon nitride (SiN) films. A simple three-phase model is proposed to relate the physical properties (stiffness, film stress, mass density, etc.) of hydrogenated nanoporous SiN thin films to the volume fractions of hydrogen and pores. This model is then applied to experimental data extracted from films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, where hydrogen content, stress, and mass densities range widely from 11% to 30%, −2.8 to 1.5 GPa, and 2.0 to 2.8 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Starting from the conventional plotting of film's Young's modulus against film porosity, we first propose to correct the conventional calculation of porosity volume fraction with the hydrogen content, thus taking into account both hydrogen mass and concentration. The weight of this hydrogen-correction is found to evolve linearly with hydrogen concentration in tensile films (in accordance with a simple “mass correction” of the film density calculation), but a clear discontinuity is observed toward compressive stresses. Then, the effective volume occupied by hydrogen atoms is calculated taking account of the bond type (N-H or Si-H bonds), thus allowing a precise extraction of the hydrogen volume fraction. These calculations applied to tensile films show that both volume fractions of hydrogen and porosity are similar in magnitude and randomly distributed against Young's modulus. However, the expected linear dependence of the Young's modulus is clearly observed when both volume fractions are added. Finally, we show that the stiffer behaviour of compressive films cannot be only explained on the basis of this (hydrogen + porosity) volume fraction. Indeed this stiffness difference relies on a dual mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms against the film stress state: while they participate to the stiffness in compressive films, hydrogen atoms

  20. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF RECEPTOR KINASE ACTION IN BRASSINOSTEROID SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development and require an active BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1) and BRI1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (BAK1) for hormone perception and signal transduction. To examine early events in BR signaling, we used co-immunoprecipita...

  1. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor constitutive activation: from molecular mechanisms to pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Petrel, Christophe; Clauser, Eric

    2009-04-29

    Mutations activating the angiotensin II AT(1) receptor are important to identify and characterize because they give access to the activation mechanisms of this G protein coupled receptor and help to characterize the signaling pathways and the potential pathophysiology of this receptor. The different constitutively activated mutations of the AT(1) receptor are mostly localized in transmembrane domains (TM) and their characterization demonstrated that release of intramolecular constraints and movements among these TM are a necessary step for receptor activation. These mutations constitutively activate Gq linked signaling pathways, receptor internalization and maybe the G protein-independent signaling pathways. Expression of such mutations in mice is linked to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, but such natural mutations have not been identified in human pathology. PMID:19061936

  2. Possible mechanisms and function of nuclear trafficking of the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Rovida, Elisabetta; Dello Sbarba, Persio

    2014-10-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) have long being studied with respect to the "canonical" signaling. This includes ligand-induced activation of a receptor tyrosine kinase at the cell surface that leads to receptor dimerization, followed by its phosphorylation in the intracellular domain and activation. The activated receptor then recruits cytoplasmic signaling molecules including other kinases. Activation of the downstream signaling cascade frequently leads to changes in gene expression following nuclear translocation of downstream targets. However, RTK themselves may localize within the nucleus, as either full-length molecules or cleaved fragments, with or without their ligands. Significant differences in this mechanism have been reported depending on the individual RTK, cellular context or disease. Accumulating evidences indicate that the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) may localize within the nucleus. To date, however, little is known about the mechanism of CSF-1R nuclear shuttling, as well as the functional role of nuclear CSF-1R.

  3. ERBB receptors: from oncogene discovery to basic science to mechanism-based cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Carlos L; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2014-03-17

    ERBB receptors were linked to human cancer pathogenesis approximately three decades ago. Biomedical investigators have since developed substantial understanding of the biology underlying the dependence of cancers on aberrant ERBB receptor signaling. An array of cancer-associated genetic alterations in ERBB receptors has also been identified. These findings have led to the discovery and development of mechanism-based therapies targeting ERBB receptors that have improved outcome for many cancer patients. In this Perspective, we discuss current paradigms of targeting ERBB receptors with cancer therapeutics and our understanding of mechanisms of action and resistance to these drugs. As current strategies still have limitations, we also discuss challenges and opportunities that lie ahead as basic scientists and clinical investigators work toward more breakthroughs.

  4. Receptor mechanisms of antipsychotic drug action in bipolar disorder - focus on asenapine.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Gavin P

    2011-12-01

    The atypical antipsychotic drugs are considered a first-line treatment for mania in bipolar disorder with many having a proven superiority to the classical mood stabilisers. This review addresses the pharmacological mechanisms underlying this therapeutic efficacy, as well as those mechanisms considered responsible for the adverse effects of antipsychotic drugs, with a particular focus on the recently introduced asenapine. The high efficacy in bipolar mania of haloperidol, a relatively selective dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist, indicates that the one common receptor mechanism underlying antipsychotic effects on mania is antagonism at the D2 receptor. Serotonin receptors are implicated in antidepressant response, and relief of depressed mood in mixed states is likely to involve drug effects at one, or more likely several interacting, serotonin receptors. Asenapine shows a unique breadth of action at these sites, with potential effects at clinical doses at 5HT1A, 1B, 2A, 2C, 6 and 7 receptors. Antagonism at alpha2 adrenoceptors may also be involved. Adverse effects include those classically associated with dopamine D2 receptor blockade, the extrapyramidal side effects (EPS), and which are relatively diminished in the atypical (in comparison with the conventional) antipsychotics. A variety of protective mechanisms against EPS associated with different drugs include low D2 affinity, D2 partial agonism, high 5-HT2A and 2C antagonism. Similar effects at the D2 and 5-HT2C receptors may underlie the low propensity for hyperprolactinaemia of the atypicals, although the strong prolactin-elevating effect of risperidone reflects its relatively high blood/brain concentration ratio, a consequence of it being a substrate for the p-glycoprotein pump. Weight gain is a further concern of antipsychotic treatment of bipolar disorder which is particularly severe with olanzapine. Histamine H1, alpha1 adrenergic and particularly 5-HT2C receptors are implicated in this effect

  5. Dura-evoked neck muscle activity involves purinergic and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dongyuan; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-12-16

    We have previously demonstrated that noxious stimulation of craniofacial tissues including the frontal dura reflexly evokes significant increases in neck muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether purinergic receptor mechanisms may be involved in these EMG effects, and whether N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor processes modulate the purinergic mechanisms. Application of the P2X1, P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (but not vehicle) to the dural surface evoked a significant (P<0.05) increase in ipsilateral neck EMG activity that could be suppressed by dural or intrathecal application of the selective P2X1, P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonist 2',3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) ATP (TNP-ATP) but not by vehicle; the intrathecal application of 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, an NMDA receptor antagonist, also significantly reduced the neck EMG activity evoked by dural application of α,β-methylene ATP. These data suggest that purinergic receptor mechanisms contribute to the increased neck activity that can be reflexly evoked by noxious stimulation of the frontal dura, and that NMDA as well as purinergic receptor mechanisms in the medulla may modulate these purinergic-related effects. PMID:26559728

  6. Radiation and Dual Checkpoint Blockade Activates Non-Redundant Immune Mechanisms in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Christina Twyman-Saint; Rech, Andrew J.; Maity, Amit; Rengan, Ramesh; Pauken, Kristen E.; Stelekati, Erietta; Benci, Joseph L.; Xu, Bihui; Dada, Hannah; Odorizzi, Pamela M.; Herati, Ramin S.; Mansfield, Kathleen D.; Patsch, Dana; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Ishwaran, Hemant; Mick, Rosemarie; Pryma, Daniel A.; Xu, Xiaowei; Feldman, Michael D.; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Wherry, E. John; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Minn, Andy J.

    2015-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors1 result in impressive clinical responses2–5 but optimal results will require combination with each other6 and other therapies. This raises fundamental questions about mechanisms of non-redundancy and resistance. Here, we report major tumor regressions in a subset of patients with metastatic melanoma treated with an anti-CTLA4 antibody (anti-CTLA4) and radiation (RT) and reproduced this effect in mouse models. Although combined treatment improved responses in irradiated and unirradiated tumors, resistance was common. Unbiased analyses of mice revealed that resistance was due to upregulation of PD-L1 on melanoma cells and associated with T cell exhaustion. Accordingly, optimal response in melanoma and other cancer types requires RT, anti-CTLA4, and anti-PD-L1/PD-1. Anti-CTLA4 predominantly inhibits T regulatory cells (Tregs) to increase the CD8 T cell to Treg (CD8/Treg) ratio. RT enhances the diversity of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of intratumoral T cells. Together, anti-CTLA4 promotes expansion of T cells, while RT shapes the TCR repertoire of the expanded peripheral clones. Addition of PD-L1 blockade reverses T cell exhaustion to mitigate depression in the CD8/Treg ratio and further encourages oligo-clonal T cell expansion. Similar to results from mice, patients on our clinical trial with melanoma showing high PD-L1 did not respond to RT + anti-CTLA4, demonstrated persistent T cell exhaustion, and rapidly progressed. Thus, PD-L1 on melanoma cells allows tumors to escape anti-CTLA4-based therapy, and the combination of RT, anti-CTLA4, and anti-PD-L1 promotes response and immunity through distinct mechanisms. PMID:25754329

  7. Dual motor responses elicited by ethanol in the posterior VTA: Consequences of the blockade of μ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Martí-Prats, Lucía; Orrico, Alejandro; Polache, Ana; Granero, Luis

    2015-09-01

    A recent hypothesis, based on electrophysiological and behavioural findings, suggests that ethanol simultaneously exerts opposed effects on the activity of dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) through two parallel mechanisms, one promoting and the other reducing the GABA release onto VTA DA neurons. In this sense, the activating effects are mediated by salsolinol, a metabolite of ethanol, acting on the μ-opioid receptors (MORs) located in VTA GABA neurons. The inhibitory effects are, however, triggered by the non-metabolized fraction of ethanol which would cause the GABAA receptors-mediated inhibition of VTA DA neurons. Since both trends tend to offset each other, only the use of appropriate pharmacological tools allows analysis of this phenomenon in depth. Herein, we present new behavioural findings supporting this hypothesis. Motor activity was evaluated in rats after intra-VTA administration of ethanol 35 nmol, an apparently ineffective dose, 24 h after the irreversible blockade of MORs in the VTA with β-FNA. Our results showed that this pre-treatment turned the initially ineffective ethanol dose into a depressant one, confirming that the activating effect of ethanol can be selectively suppressed without affecting the depressant effects mediated by the non-biotransformed fraction of ethanol.

  8. The mechanisms of HAMP-mediated signaling in transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Hedda U; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Mondéjar, Laura García; Hulko, Michael; Hantke, Klaus; Martin, Jörg; Schultz, Joachim E; Zeth, Kornelius; Lupas, Andrei N; Coles, Murray

    2011-03-01

    HAMP domains mediate signal transduction in over 7500 enzyme-coupled receptors represented in all kingdoms of life. The HAMP domain of the putative archaeal receptor Af1503 has a parallel, dimeric, four-helical coiled coil structure, but with unusual core packing, related to canonical packing by concerted axial rotation of the helices. This has led to the gearbox model for signal transduction, whereby the alternate packing modes correspond to signaling states. Here we present structures of a series of Af1503 HAMP variants. We show that substitution of a conserved small side chain within the domain core (A291) for larger residues induces a gradual transition in packing mode, involving both changes in helix rotation and bundle shape, which are most prominent at the C-terminal, output end of the domain. These are correlated with activity and ligand response in vitro and in vivo by incorporating Af1503 HAMP into mycobacterial adenylyl cyclase assay systems.

  9. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1R) is activated by adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 µs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1R activation. PMID:27460867

  10. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Saita, Y; Koizumi, T; Yazawa, H; Morita, T; Takenaka, T; Honda, K

    1997-06-01

    1. Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). 2. [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. 3. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. 4. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. 5. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. 6. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  11. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Yuji; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Yazawa, Hidenori; Morita, Takashi; Takenaka, Toichi; Honda, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  12. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Araldi, D; Bogen, O; Levine, J D

    2016-06-01

    We propose that the extracellular matrix (ECM) signals CD44, a hyaluronan receptor, to increase the responsiveness to mechanical stimulation in the rat hind paw. We report that intradermal injection of hyaluronidase induces mechanical hyperalgesia, that is inhibited by co-administration of a CD44 receptor antagonist, A5G27. The intradermal injection of low (LMWH) but not high (HMWH) molecular weight hyaluronan also induces mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect that was attenuated by pretreatment with HMWH or A5G27. Pretreatment with HMWH also attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by hyaluronidase. Similarly, intradermal injection of A6, a CD44 receptor agonist, produced hyperalgesia that was inhibited by HMWH and A5G27. Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and Src, but not protein kinase C (PKC), significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by both A6 and LMWH. Finally, to determine if CD44 receptor signaling is involved in a preclinical model of inflammatory pain, we evaluated the effect of A5G27 and HMWH on the mechanical hyperalgesia associated with the inflammation induced by carrageenan. Both A5G27 and HMWH attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, while LMWH acts at its cognate receptor, CD44, to induce mechanical hyperalgesia, HMWH acts at the same receptor as an antagonist. That the local administration of HMWH or A5G27 inhibits carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia supports the suggestion that carrageenan produces changes in the ECM that contributes to inflammatory pain. These studies define a clinically relevant role for signaling by the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, in increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. PMID:26996509

  13. Receptors, Ion Channels, and Signaling Mechanisms Underlying Microglial Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Christian; Attwell, David

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the innate immune cells of the CNS, play a pivotal role in brain injury and disease. Microglia are extremely motile; their highly ramified processes constantly survey the brain parenchyma, and they respond promptly to brain damage with targeted process movement toward the injury site. Microglia play a key role in brain development and function by pruning synapses during development, phagocytosing apoptotic newborn neurons, and regulating neuronal activity by direct microglia-neuron or indirect microglia-astrocyte-neuron interactions, which all depend on their process motility. This review highlights recent discoveries about microglial dynamics, focusing on the receptors, ion channels, and signaling pathways involved. PMID:25855789

  14. Identification of the transmitter and receptor mechanisms responsible for REM sleep paralysis.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Patricia L; Peever, John H

    2012-07-18

    During REM sleep the CNS is intensely active, but the skeletal motor system is paradoxically forced into a state of muscle paralysis. The mechanisms that trigger REM sleep paralysis are a matter of intense debate. Two competing theories argue that it is caused by either active inhibition or reduced excitation of somatic motoneuron activity. Here, we identify the transmitter and receptor mechanisms that function to silence skeletal muscles during REM sleep. We used behavioral, electrophysiological, receptor pharmacology and neuroanatomical approaches to determine how trigeminal motoneurons and masseter muscles are switched off during REM sleep in rats. We show that a powerful GABA and glycine drive triggers REM paralysis by switching off motoneuron activity. This drive inhibits motoneurons by targeting both metabotropic GABA(B) and ionotropic GABA(A)/glycine receptors. REM paralysis is only reversed when motoneurons are cut off from GABA(B), GABA(A) and glycine receptor-mediated inhibition. Neither metabotropic nor ionotropic receptor mechanisms alone are sufficient for generating REM paralysis. These results demonstrate that multiple receptor mechanisms trigger REM sleep paralysis. Breakdown in normal REM inhibition may underlie common sleep motor pathologies such as REM sleep behavior disorder.

  15. Identification of the transmitter and receptor mechanisms responsible for REM sleep paralysis.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Patricia L; Peever, John H

    2012-07-18

    During REM sleep the CNS is intensely active, but the skeletal motor system is paradoxically forced into a state of muscle paralysis. The mechanisms that trigger REM sleep paralysis are a matter of intense debate. Two competing theories argue that it is caused by either active inhibition or reduced excitation of somatic motoneuron activity. Here, we identify the transmitter and receptor mechanisms that function to silence skeletal muscles during REM sleep. We used behavioral, electrophysiological, receptor pharmacology and neuroanatomical approaches to determine how trigeminal motoneurons and masseter muscles are switched off during REM sleep in rats. We show that a powerful GABA and glycine drive triggers REM paralysis by switching off motoneuron activity. This drive inhibits motoneurons by targeting both metabotropic GABA(B) and ionotropic GABA(A)/glycine receptors. REM paralysis is only reversed when motoneurons are cut off from GABA(B), GABA(A) and glycine receptor-mediated inhibition. Neither metabotropic nor ionotropic receptor mechanisms alone are sufficient for generating REM paralysis. These results demonstrate that multiple receptor mechanisms trigger REM sleep paralysis. Breakdown in normal REM inhibition may underlie common sleep motor pathologies such as REM sleep behavior disorder. PMID:22815493

  16. Discovery of dual orexin receptor antagonists with rat sleep efficacy enabled by expansion of the acetonitrile-assisted/diphosgene-mediated 2,4-dichloropyrimidine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roecker, Anthony J; Mercer, Swati P; Harrell, C Meacham; Garson, Susan L; Fox, Steven V; Gotter, Anthony L; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Cabalu, Tamara D; Cui, Donghui; Lemaire, Wei; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J; Coleman, Paul J

    2014-05-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that dual orexin receptor antagonists (OX1R and OX2R antagonists or DORAs) represent a novel treatment option for insomnia patients. Previously we have disclosed several compounds in the diazepane amide DORA series with excellent potency and both preclinical and clinical sleep efficacy. Additional SAR studies in this series were enabled by the expansion of the acetonitrile-assisted, diphosgene-mediated 2,4-dichloropyrimidine synthesis to novel substrates providing an array of Western heterocycles. These heterocycles were utilized to synthesize analogs in short order with high levels of potency on orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors as well as in vivo sleep efficacy in the rat.

  17. Desensitization of GABAergic receptors as a mechanism of zolpidem-induced somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R

    2011-08-01

    Sleepwalking is a frequently reported side effect of zolpidem which is a short-acting hypnotic drug potentiating activity of GABA(A) receptors. Paradoxically, the most commonly used medications for somnambulism are benzodiazepines, especially clonazepam, which also potentiate activity of GABA(A) receptors. It is proposed that zolpidem-induced sleepwalking can be explained by the desensitization of GABAergic receptors located on serotonergic neurons. According to the proposed model, the delay between desensitization of GABA receptors and a compensatory decrease in serotonin release constitutes the time window for parasomnias. The occurrence of sleepwalking depends on individual differences in receptor desensitization, autoregulation of serotonin release and drug pharmacokinetics. The proposed mechanism of interaction between GABAergic and serotonergic systems can be also relevant for zolpidem abuse and zolpidem-induced hallucinations. It is therefore suggested that special care should be taken when zolpidem is used in patients taking at the same time selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. PMID:21565448

  18. Desensitization of GABAergic receptors as a mechanism of zolpidem-induced somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R

    2011-08-01

    Sleepwalking is a frequently reported side effect of zolpidem which is a short-acting hypnotic drug potentiating activity of GABA(A) receptors. Paradoxically, the most commonly used medications for somnambulism are benzodiazepines, especially clonazepam, which also potentiate activity of GABA(A) receptors. It is proposed that zolpidem-induced sleepwalking can be explained by the desensitization of GABAergic receptors located on serotonergic neurons. According to the proposed model, the delay between desensitization of GABA receptors and a compensatory decrease in serotonin release constitutes the time window for parasomnias. The occurrence of sleepwalking depends on individual differences in receptor desensitization, autoregulation of serotonin release and drug pharmacokinetics. The proposed mechanism of interaction between GABAergic and serotonergic systems can be also relevant for zolpidem abuse and zolpidem-induced hallucinations. It is therefore suggested that special care should be taken when zolpidem is used in patients taking at the same time selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  19. Influence of Thermal Aging on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Dual Phase Precipitation Hardened Powder Metallurgy Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Increasing demand for high strength powder metallurgy (PM) steels has resulted in the development of dual phase PM steels. In this work, the effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels of varying ferrite-martensite content were examined. Quantitative analyses of the inherent porosity and phase fractions were conducted on the steels and no significant differences were noted with respect to aging temperature. Tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation to fracture all increased with increasing aging temperature reaching maxima at 538°C in most cases. Increased strength and decreased ductility were observed in steels of higher martensite content. Nanoindentation of the individual microconstituents was employed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the strengthening contributions. Both the ferrite and martensite hardness values increased with aging temperature and exhibited similar maxima to the bulk tensile properties. Due to the complex non-uniform stresses and strains associated with conventional nanoindentation, micropillar compression has become an attractive method to probe local mechanical behavior while limiting strain gradients and contributions from surrounding features. In this study, micropillars of ferrite and martensite were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels. Compression testing was conducted using a nanoindenter equipped with a flat punch indenter. The stress-strain curves of the individual microconstituents were calculated from the load-displacement curves less the extraneous displacements of the system. Using a rule of mixtures approach in conjunction with porosity corrections, the mechanical properties of ferrite and martensite were combined for comparison to tensile tests of the bulk material, and reasonable agreement was found for the ultimate tensile

  20. First selective dual inhibitors of tau phosphorylation and Beta-amyloid aggregation, two major pathogenic mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Marica; Schmitt, Christian; Miralinaghi, Parisa; Catto, Marco; Hartmann, Rolf W; Carotti, Angelo; Engel, Matthias

    2014-12-17

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple factors account for the accumulation of neurocellular changes, which may begin several years before symptoms appear. The most important pathogenic brain changes that are contributing to the development of AD are the formation of the cytotoxic β-amyloid aggregates and of the neurofibrillary tangles, which originate from amyloid-β peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau protein, respectively. New therapeutic agents that target both major pathogenic mechanisms may be particularly efficient. In this study, we introduce bis(hydroxyphenyl)-substituted thiophenes as a novel class of selective, dual inhibitors of the tau kinase Dyrk1A and of the amyloid-β aggregation. PMID:25247807

  1. Statistical Mechanics Model for the Interaction between the Neurotransmitter γ-Aminobutyric acid and GABAA Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Sufi; Saxena, Nina C.; Conrad, Kevin A.; Hussain, Arif

    2004-07-01

    Interactions between the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABAA receptor ion channels play an important role in the central nervous system. A statistical mechanics model is proposed for the interaction between GABA and GABAA receptors. The model provides good fits to the electrophysiology data as well as an estimation of receptor activation energies, and predicts the temperature dependence consistent with measurements. In addition, the model provides insights into single channel conductance measurements. This model is also applicable to other ligand-gated ion channels with similar pentameric structures.

  2. Discovery of a Series of Imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines with Dual Activity at Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Filzen, Gary F.; Flynn, Declan; Bigge, Christopher F.; Chen, Jing; Davis, Jo Ann; Dudley, Danette A.; Edmunds, Jeremy J.; Esmaeil, Nadia; Geyer, Andrew; Heemstra, Ronald J.; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F.; Ostroski, Robert; Ellis, Teresa; Schaum, Robert P.; Stoner, Chad

    2013-03-07

    Mining of an in-house collection of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to identify compounds with activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) revealed a new series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines 2 possessing activity at these two receptors. Early availability of the crystal structure of the lead compound 2a bound to the ligand binding domain of human PPAR{gamma} confirmed the mode of interaction of this scaffold to the nuclear receptor and assisted in the optimization of PPAR{gamma} activity. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-(5-(2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-2-ethyl-5-isobutyl-7-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (2l) was identified as a potent angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (IC{sub 50} = 1.6 nM) with partial PPAR{gamma} agonism (EC{sub 50} = 212 nM, 31% max) and oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of 2l was demonstrated in animal models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (ZDF rat). In the SHR, 2l was highly efficacious in lowering blood pressure, while robust lowering of glucose and triglycerides was observed in the male ZDF rat.

  3. Dual-targeted nanocarrier based on cell surface receptor and intracellular mRNA: an effective strategy for cancer cell imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei; Yang, Huijun; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Yanhua; Li, Na; Tang, Bo

    2013-07-16

    Developing efficient methods for targeting cancer cells and encapsulating drugs coupled with activated release holds enormous potential for cancer cell imaging and therapy. Herein, a novel dual-targeted nanocarrier was developed on the basis of gold nanoparticles modified with a dense shell of synthetic oligonucleotides. The folic acid functionalized single-stranded DNA was designed to target the folate receptor on the cancer cell surface, and the molecular beacon was employed as drug carrier for activated release associated with intracellular tumor mRNA. Intracellular experiments indicated that the dual-targeted nanocarrier could be preferentially internalized into cancer cells due to the folate receptor targeting and release Doxorubicin (Dox) selectively in cancer cells because of the activated release with intracellular mRNA. The nanocarrier could reduce the dosage and greatly improve the therapeutic effect of drugs in cancer cells. Moreover, the nanocarrier can identify the changes of the express level of tumor mRNA and release Dox in a controlled manner in cancer cells, which would be beneficial for cancer therapy.

  4. Synergistic inhibition with a dual epidermal growth factor receptor/HER-2/neu tyrosine kinase inhibitor and a disintegrin and metalloprotease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Witters, Lois; Scherle, Peggy; Friedman, Steven; Fridman, Jordan; Caulder, Eian; Newton, Robert; Lipton, Allan

    2008-09-01

    The ErbB family of receptors is overexpressed in numerous human tumors. Overexpression correlates with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. Use of ErbB-specific antibodies to the receptors (Herceptin or Erbitux) or ErbB-specific small-molecule inhibitors of the receptor tyrosine kinase activity (Iressa or Tarceva) has shown clinical efficacy in several solid tumors. An alternative method of affecting ErbB-initiated tumor growth and survival is to block sheddase activity. Sheddase activity is responsible for cleavage of multiple ErbB ligands and receptors, a necessary step in availability of the soluble, active form of the ligand and a constitutively activated ligand-independent receptor. This sheddase activity is attributed to the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of proteins. ADAM 10 is the main sheddase of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and HER-2/neu cleavage, whereas ADAM17 is required for cleavage of additional EGF receptor (EGFR) ligands (transforming growth factor-alpha, amphiregulin, heregulin, heparin binding EGF-like ligand). This study has shown that addition of INCB3619, a potent inhibitor of ADAM10 and ADAM17, reduces in vitro HER-2/neu and amphiregulin shedding, confirming that it interferes with both HER-2/neu and EGFR ligand cleavage. Combining INCB3619 with a lapatinib-like dual inhibitor of EGFR and HER-2/neu kinases resulted in synergistic growth inhibition in MCF-7 and HER-2/neu-transfected MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Combining the INCB7839 second-generation sheddase inhibitor with lapatinib prevented the growth of HER-2/neu-positive BT474-SC1 human breast cancer xenografts in vivo. These results suggest that there may be an additional clinical benefit of combining agents that target the ErbB pathways at multiple points.

  5. Ombuin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside from Gynostemma pentaphyllum is a dual agonistic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and δ/β

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, Mastura Abd; Hoang, Minh-Hien; Jia, Yaoyao; Lee, Ji Hae; Jun, Hee Jin; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Hak Ju; Lee, Chul; Lee, Myung Koo; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► Ombuin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside is a dual ligand for PPARα and δ/β. ► Ombuin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside reduces cellular lipid levels in multiple cell types. ► Cells stimulated with ombuine up-regulated target genes in cholesterol efflux. ► Cells stimulated with ombuine regulated target fatty acid β-oxidation and synthesis. ► Ombuin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside could ameliorate hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. -- Abstract: We demonstrated that ombuin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (ombuine), a flavonoid from Gynostemma pentaphyllum, is a dual agonist for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) α and δ/β. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses, and reporter gene assays, we showed that ombuine bound directly to PPARα and δ/β but not to PPARγ or liver X receptors (LXRs). Cultured HepG2 hepatocytes stimulated with ombuine significantly reduced intracellular concentrations of triglyceride and cholesterol and downregulated the expression of lipogenic genes, including sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), with activation of PPARα and δ/β. Activation of LXRs by ombuine was confirmed by reporter gene assays, however, SPR and cell-based FRET assays showed no direct binding of ombuine to either of the LXRs suggesting LXR activation by ombuine may be operated via PPARα stimulation. Ombuine-stimulated macrophages showed significantly induced transcription of ATP binding cassette cholesterol transporter A1 (ABCA1) and G1 (ABCG1), the key genes in reverse cholesterol transport, which led to reduced cellular cholesterol concentrations. These results suggest that ombuine is a dual PPAR ligand for PPARα and δ/β with the ability to decrease lipid concentrations by reducing lipogenic gene expression in hepatocytes and inducing genes involved in cholesterol efflux in macrophages.

  6. Mechanisms of alcohol liver damage: aldehydes, scavenger receptors, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Duryee, Michael J; Willis, Monte S; Freeman, Thomas L; Kuszynski, Charles A; Tuma, Dean J; Klassen, Lynell W; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2004-09-01

    While most of the investigations into the causative events in the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) have been focused on multiple factors, increasing interest has centered around the possible role of immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis and perpetuation of ALD. This is because many of the clinical features of ALD suggest that immune effector mechanisms may be contributing to liver tissue damage, as evidenced by the detection of circulating autoantibodies, and the presence of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphoid cells in the livers of patients with ALD. One mechanism that has been associated with the development of autoimmune responses is the modification (haptenation or adduction) of liver proteins with aldehydes or other products of oxidative stress. This is because it has been shown that these adducted proteins can induce specific immune responses, to the adduct, the adduct plus protein (conformational antigens), as well as the unmodified parts of the protein. More importantly, it is possible to demonstrate that adducted self-proteins can induce reactivity to the normal self-protein and thereby induce autoimmune responses. Therefore, it is the purpose of this manuscript to outline the mechanism(s) by which these modified self proteins can induce autoimmune reactivity, and thus play a role in the development and/or progression of ALD.

  7. Metabolism of a 14C/3H-labeled GABAA receptor partial agonist in rat, dog and human liver microsomes: evaluation of a dual-radiolabel strategy.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Christopher L; Langer, Connie S

    2007-03-12

    The metabolism of 2-{[2-(3-fluoropyrid-2-yl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl]methyl}-1-propyl-5-cyano-1H-benzimidazole (1), a potent subtype-selective GABA(A) receptor partial agonist, was investigated in rat, dog and human liver microsomes. Due to its significant metabolic cleavage at C(8) observed in preliminary biotransformation studies with non-radiolabeled 1, both [(14)C]1 and [(3)H]1 were synthesized with respective radioisotopes placed on either side of C(8) to determine if all microsomal metabolites formed after C(8)N-dealkylation of 1 (or its core-intact metabolites) could be detected and quantified adequately. Both radiolabeled forms of 1, used separately in mono-radiolabel studies in cross-species microsomes and concomitantly in dual-radiolabel studies in rat microsomes, permitted the detection and quantification of all metabolites of 1, and a combination of radioactive and mass spectral data allowed structural elucidation of its Phase I metabolites. As expected, the sum of (14)C-only metabolites equaled that of (3)H-only metabolites in all incubations. In-line radiometric analysis worked extremely well (and was very reproducible) for quantifying either (14)C- or (3)H-compounds within separate incubations when using mono-radiolabeled 1. However, although the in-line radiodetector provided a comprehensive qualitative metabolic profile using dual-radiolabled 1, its inability to exclude completely (14)C- from (3)H-generated counts caused a degree of ambiguity pertaining to metabolite quantification. Thus, off-line liquid scintillation counting of collected dual-radiolabeled incubation LC-fractions was employed to quantify both (14)C- and (3)H-metabolites simultaneously, while in-line radiodetection was only used for qualitative analyses accompanying MS and MS/MS experiments. These studies demonstrated the analytical feasibility of using a dual-radiolabel approach for subsequent in vivo ADME studies with 1. PMID:17150324

  8. Organophosphorus Pesticides Decrease M2 Muscarinic Receptor Function in Guinea Pig Airway Nerves via Indirect Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Proskocil, Becky J.; Bruun, Donald A.; Thompson, Charles M.; Fryer, Allison D.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies link organophosphorus pesticide (OP) exposures to asthma, and we have shown that the OPs chlorpyrifos, diazinon and parathion cause airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs 24 hr after a single subcutaneous injection. OP-induced airway hyperreactivity involves M2 muscarinic receptor dysfunction on airway nerves independent of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, but how OPs inhibit neuronal M2 receptors in airways is not known. In the central nervous system, OPs interact directly with neurons to alter muscarinic receptor function or expression; therefore, in this study we tested whether the OP parathion or its oxon metabolite, paraoxon, might decrease M2 receptor function on peripheral neurons via similar direct mechanisms. Methodology/Principal Findings Intravenous administration of paraoxon, but not parathion, caused acute frequency-dependent potentiation of vagally-induced bronchoconstriction and increased electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contractions in isolated trachea independent of AChE inhibition. However, paraoxon had no effect on vagally-induced bradycardia in intact guinea pigs or EFS-induced contractions in isolated ileum, suggesting mechanisms other than pharmacologic antagonism of M2 receptors. Paraoxon did not alter M2 receptor expression in cultured cells at the mRNA or protein level as determined by quantitative RT-PCR and radio-ligand binding assays, respectively. Additionally, a biotin-labeled fluorophosphonate, which was used as a probe to identify molecular targets phosphorylated by OPs, did not phosphorylate proteins in guinea pig cardiac membranes that were recognized by M2 receptor antibodies. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that neither direct pharmacologic antagonism nor downregulated expression of M2 receptors contributes to OP inhibition of M2 function in airway nerves, adding to the growing evidence of non-cholinergic mechanisms of OP neurotoxicity. PMID:20479945

  9. Mechanism-based common reactivity pattern (COREPA) modelling of aryl hydrocarbon receptor binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    Petkov, P.I.; Rowlands, J.C.; Budinsky, R.; Zhao, B.; Denison, M.S.; Mekenyan, O.

    2011-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a ligand-activated transcription factor responsive to both natural and synthetic environmental compounds, with the most potent agonist being 2,3,7,8-tetrachlotrodibenzo-p-dioxin. The aim of this work was to develop a categorical COmmon REactivity PAttern (COREPA)-based structure–activity relationship model for predicting aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands within different binding ranges. The COREPA analysis suggested two different binding mechanisms called dioxin- and biphenyl-like, respectively. The dioxin-like model predicts a mechanism that requires a favourable interaction with a receptor nucleophilic site in the central part of the ligand and with electrophilic sites at both sides of the principal molecular axis, whereas the biphenyl-like model predicted a stacking-type interaction with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor allowing electron charge transfer from the receptor to the ligand. The current model was also adjusted to predict agonistic/antagonistic properties of chemicals. The mechanism of antagonistic properties was related to the possibility that these chemicals have a localized negative charge at the molecule's axis and ultimately bind with the receptor surface through the electron-donating properties of electron-rich groups. The categorization of chemicals as agonists/antagonists was found to correlate with their gene expression. The highest increase in gene expression was elicited by strong agonists, followed by weak agonists producing lower increases in gene expression, whereas all antagonists (and non-aryl hydrocarbon receptor binders) were found to have no effect on gene expression. However, this relationship was found to be quantitative for the chemicals populating the areas with extreme gene expression values only, leaving a wide fuzzy area where the quantitative relationship was unclear. The total concordance of the derived aryl hydrocarbon receptor binding categorical structure–activity relationship model was

  10. Molecular Mechanism of Action of Triazolobenzodiazepinone Agonists of the Type 1 Cholecystokinin Receptor. Possible Cooperativity across the Receptor Homodimeric Complex.

    PubMed

    Desai, Aditya J; Lam, Polo C H; Orry, Andrew; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Miller, Laurence J

    2015-12-24

    The type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R) has multiple physiologic roles relating to nutrient homeostasis, including mediation of postcibal satiety. This effect has been central in efforts to develop agonists of this receptor as part of a program to manage and/or prevent obesity. While a number of small molecule CCK1R agonists have been developed, none have yet been approved for clinical use, based on inadequate efficacy, side effects, or the potential for toxicity. Understanding the molecular details of docking and mechanism of action of these ligands can be helpful in the rational refinement and enhancement of small molecule drug candidates. In the current work, we have defined the mechanism of binding and activity of two triazolobenzodiazepinones, CE-326597 and PF-04756956, which are reported to be full agonist ligands. To achieve this, we utilized receptor binding with a series of allosteric and orthosteric radioligands at structurally related CCK1R and CCK2R, as well as chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs exchanging residues in the allosteric pocket, and assessment of biological activity. These triazolobenzodiazepinones docked within the intramembranous small molecule allosteric ligand pocket, with higher affinity binding to CCK2R than CCK1R, yet with biological activity exclusive to or greatly enhanced at CCK1R. These ligands exhibited cooperativity with benzodiazepine binding across the CCK1R homodimeric complex, resulting in their ability to inhibit only a fraction of the saturable binding of a benzodiazepine radioligand, unlike other small molecule antagonists and agonists of this receptor. This may contribute to the understanding of the unique short duration and reversible gallbladder contraction observed in vivo upon administration of these drugs.

  11. Receptor mechanisms and dose-response models for the effects of dioxins.

    PubMed Central

    Lucier, G W; Portier, C J; Gallo, M A

    1993-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that receptor-mediated events impact one or more stages responsible for tumor development in experimental animals and humans. Although many chemicals and endogenous hormones require receptor interactions as a necessary event in their carcinogenic activity, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and its structural analogs are the most visible examples of receptor-mediated carcinogens. TCDD, or dioxin as it is frequently called, interacts with the Ah receptor (AhR), which functions in a manner analogous to receptors for steroids. TCDD produces a wide spectrum of biochemical and toxic responses in in vitro and in vivo systems, and the Ah receptor is generally considered necessary for most if not all of these responses. Risk assessments for dioxin made by the United States and other countries throughout the world have been based on its carcinogenecity in experimental animals. Recently, epidemiology studies have indicated that TCDD is a human carcinogen at high doses. Because TCDD appears to be acting like a potent and persistent hormone agonist, it appears reasonable to incorporate mechanistic information on receptor-mediated events in risk assessments for TCDD. This information may be obtained from steroid receptor action and from molecular data on the Ah receptor. In this paper, we evaluate the scientific foundation on which mechanistic models for estimating dioxin's risks should be based. These models need to recognize the mechanisms possible for the diversity of biological responses that are initiated by a single receptor interacting with a single ligand. The U.S. EPA is currently reevaluating dioxin's risks by examining the possibility of developing biologically based models.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images p36-a Figure 1. p42-a p42-b p42-c PMID:8390353

  12. The mechansims by which solute nitrogen affects phase transformations and mechanical properties of automotive dual-phase sheet steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Tyson W.

    Dual-phase steels have seen increased use in automotive applications in recent years, in order to meet the goals of weight reduction and occupant safety. Variations in nitrogen content that may be encountered in steel sourced from a basic oxygen furnace process compared to an electric arc furnace process require that dual-phase steel producers understand the ways that nitrogen affects processing and properties. In the current work, the distribution of nitrogen was investigated in a dual-phase steel with a base chemistry of 0.1 C, 2.0 Mn, 0.2 Cr, 0.2 Mo (wt pct) across a range of nitrogen contents (30-159 ppm) with Al (0.2 and 0.08 wt pct), and Ti (0.02 wt pct) additions used for precipitation control of nitrogen amounts. The distribution of nitrogen amongst trapping sites, including precipitates, grain boundaries, dislocations, and interstitial sites (away from other types of defects) was determined from a combination of electrolytic dissolution, internal friction, and three-dimensional atom probe tomography experiments. Various mechanisms by which different amounts and locations of nitrogen affect phase transformations and mechanical properties were identified from quantitative metallography, dilatometric measurement of phase transformations, tensile testing, and nanoindentation hardness testing. Results indicate nitrogen that is not precipitated with Ti or Al (free nitrogen) partitions to austenite (and thus martensite) during typical intercritical annealing treatments, and is mostly contained in Cottrell atmospheres in martensite. Due to the austenite stabilizing effect of nitrogen, the presence of free nitrogen during intercritical annealing leads to a higher austenite fraction in certain conditions. Thus, the presence of free nitrogen in a dual-phase microstructure will lead to an increase in tensile and yield strengths from both an increase in martensite fraction, and an increase in martensite hardness due to solid solution strengthening. Despite the presence

  13. GM-CSF and phorbol esters modulate GM-CSF receptor expression by independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, M F; Arduino, C; Avanzi, G C; Bussolino, F; Pegoraro, L

    1991-07-01

    Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (0.1 nM) down-modulates its receptor in IL-3/GM-CSF dependent M-07e cells, in KG-1 cells and normal granulocytes, whereas phorbol esters 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (2 nM) down-modulates the GM-CSF receptor in M-07e cells and granulocytes but not in KG-1 cells. As data analysis shows by nonlinear regression, the decreased binding ability depends on a reduction of the binding sites with no significant change of their dissociation constant. To gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the GM-CSF receptor regulation, we investigated the role of protein kinase C (PKC). GM-CSF, unlike TPA, was unable to activate PKC in all the cells studied. Moreover, unlike TPA, GM-CSF was still able to down-modulate its receptor in cells where PKC was inhibited by 1-(5-isoquinolonesulphonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7) and staurosporine or in cells where PKC was exhausted by prolonged incubation with 1 microM TPA. Finally, the receptor re-expression rate was accelerated by protein kinases inhibitors. These results, taken together, indicate the presence of a PKC-dependent and -independent down-modulation mechanism and a negative role of the endogeneous protein kinases in GM-CSF receptor re-expression.

  14. Quiver matrix mechanics for IIB string theory II: generic dual tori, fractional matrix membrane and SL(2,Z) duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jian; Wu, Yong-Shi

    2005-02-01

    With the deconstruction technique, the geometric information of a torus can be encoded in a sequence of orbifolds. By studying the matrix theory on these orbifolds as quiver mechanics, we present a formulation that (de)constructs the torus of generic shape on which matrix theory is "compactified". The continuum limit of the quiver mechanics gives rise to a (1 + 2)-dimensional SYM. A hidden (fourth) dimension, that was introduced before in the matrix theory literature to argue for the electric-magnetic duality, can be easily identified in our formalism. We construct membrane wrapping states rigorously in terms of Dunford calculus in the context of matrix regularization. Unwanted degeneracy in the spectrum of the wrapping states is eliminated by using SL(2,Z) symmetry and the relations to the FD-string bound states. The dual IIB circle emerges in the continuum limit, constituting a critical evidence for IIB/M duality.

  15. Dynamic gas slippage: a unique dual-mechanism approach to the flow of gas in tight formations

    SciTech Connect

    Ertekin, T.; King, G.R.; Schwerer, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical formulation, applicable to both numeric simulation and transient well analysis, describing the flow of gas in very tight porous media has been developed. Unique to this formulation is the dual- mechanism transport of gas. In this formulation, gas is assumed to be traveling under the influence of 2 fields: a concentration field and a pressure field. Transport through the concentration field is a Knudsen flow process and is modeled with Fick's Law of diffusion. Transport through the pressure field is a laminar process and is modeled with Darcy's Law (inertial-turbulent effects are ignored). The combination of these 2 flow mechanisms rigorously yields a composition, pressure, and saturation dependent slippage factor. 21 references.

  16. Tachykinins and Their Receptors: Contributions to Physiological Control and the Mechanisms of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, Martin S.; von Mentzer, Bengt; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2014-01-01

    The tachykinins, exemplified by substance P, are one of the most intensively studied neuropeptide families. They comprise a series of structurally related peptides that derive from alternate processing of three Tac genes and are expressed throughout the nervous and immune systems. Tachykinins interact with three neurokinin G protein-coupled receptors. The signaling, trafficking, and regulation of neurokinin receptors have also been topics of intense study. Tachykinins participate in important physiological processes in the nervous, immune, gastrointestinal, respiratory, urogenital, and dermal systems, including inflammation, nociception, smooth muscle contractility, epithelial secretion, and proliferation. They contribute to multiple diseases processes, including acute and chronic inflammation and pain, fibrosis, affective and addictive disorders, functional disorders of the intestine and urinary bladder, infection, and cancer. Neurokinin receptor antagonists are selective, potent, and show efficacy in models of disease. In clinical trials there is a singular success: neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists to treat nausea and vomiting. New information about the involvement of tachykinins in infection, fibrosis, and pruritus justifies further trials. A deeper understanding of disease mechanisms is required for the development of more predictive experimental models, and for the design and interpretation of clinical trials. Knowledge of neurokinin receptor structure, and the development of targeting strategies to disrupt disease-relevant subcellular signaling of neurokinin receptors, may refine the next generation of neurokinin receptor antagonists. PMID:24382888

  17. Development and Acceptance Testing of the Dual Wheel Mechanism for the Tunable Filter Imager Cryogenic Instrument on the JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckie, Martin; Ahmad, Zakir

    2010-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will carry four scientific instruments, one of which is the Tunable Filter Imager (TFI), which is an instrument within the Fine Guidance Sensor. The Dual Wheel (DW) mechanism is being designed, built and tested by COM DEV Ltd. under contract from the Canadian Space Agency. The DW mechanism includes a pupil wheel (PW) holding seven coronagraphic masks and two calibration elements and a filter wheel (FW) holding nine blocking filters. The DW mechanism must operate at both room temperature and at 35K. Successful operation at 35K comprises positioning each optical element with the required repeatability, for several thousand occasions over the five year mission. The paper discusses the results of testing geared motors and bearings at the cryogenic temperature. In particular bearing retainer design and PGM-HT material, the effects of temperature gradients across bearings and the problems associated with cooling mechanisms down to cryogenic temperatures. The results of additional bearing tests are described that were employed to investigate an abnormally high initial torque experienced at cryogenic temperatures. The findings of these tests, was that the bearing retainer and the ball/race system could be adversely affected by the large temperature change from room temperature to cryogenic temperature and also the temperature gradient across the bearing. The DW mechanism is now performing successfully at both room temperature and at cryogenic temperature. The life testing of the mechanism is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2010.

  18. Design of integrated readout circuit with enhanced capacitance mechanism for dual-band infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tai-Ping; Lu, Yi-Chuan; Shieh, Hsiu-Li; Shiu, Shiuan-Shuo; Liu, Yi-Ting; Tang, Shiang-Feng; Lin, Wen-Jen

    2011-10-01

    This study proposes a solution for an excessive dark current by a sharing capacitor, which avoids output signal distortion due to integration voltage saturation. Integration capacitance can be changed by adding a switch in the pixel circuit, which will increase the capacitance by two times the original. This circuit also provides output functions of either single-band or dual-band by switching to different sensor. This integrated readout circuit design adopts the TSMC 0.35um 2P4M CMOS 5V process, run on a 5V power supply and operated at a 3MHz clock rate. The dual-band pixel circuit uses an interlace structure, the pixel circuit areas of the two wavelengths are both 30um x 30um. The mid-wave and long-wave sensor currents are from 1nA to 2nA and 6nA to 8nA, respectively, and output swing is 2.8V.

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 11 (TLR11) Interacts with Flagellin and Profilin through Disparate Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hatai, Hirotsugu; Lepelley, Alice; Zeng, Wangyong; Hayden, Matthew S; Ghosh, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate immune receptors that sense a variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by interacting with them and subsequently initiating signal transduction cascades that elicit immune responses. TLR11 has been shown to interact with two known protein PAMPs: Salmonella and E. coli flagellin FliC and Toxoplasma gondii profilin-like protein. Given the highly divergent biology of these pathogens recognized by TLR11, it is unclear whether common mechanisms are used to recognize these distinct protein PAMPs. Here we show that TLR11 interacts with these two PAMPs using different receptor domains. Furthermore, TLR11 binding to flagellin and profilin exhibits differential dependency on pH and receptor ectodomain cleavage. PMID:26859749

  20. Computational study of the molecular mechanisms of caffeine action: Caffeine complexes with adenosine receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poltev, V. I.; Rodríguez, E.; Grokhlina, T. I.; Deriabina, A.; Gonzalez, E.

    To understand the molecular basis of the principal biological action of the caffeine (CAF), the molecular mechanics calculations of possible complexes between CAF and the fragments of human A1 adenosine receptor were performed. The fragments were selected after considerations of the CAF molecular structure and its possible interactions, as well as after an analysis of the extensive bibliography on the structure, biological role, site-directed mutagenesis, and the modeling of the adenosine receptors. The minimum energy configurations of these complexes were obtained using two different computer programs with different force fields. The most favorable configurations correspond to the formation of two hydrogen bonds between the CAF molecule and hydrophilic amino acid residues of the fragments of transmembrane domains of the receptor. These configurations are supposed to contribute to CAF blocking of the adenosine receptors. They will be used later for the construction of model CAF complexes with two transmembrane domains simultaneously.

  1. Impaired wake-promoting mechanisms in ghrelin receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Matthew; Pellinen, Jacob; Kapás, Levente; Szentirmai, Éva

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin receptors are expressed by key components of the arousal system. Exogenous ghrelin induces behavioral activation, promotes wakefulness and stimulates eating. We hypothesized that ghrelin-sensitive mechanisms play a role in the arousal system. To test this, we investigated the responsiveness of ghrelin receptor knockout (KO) mice to two natural wake-promoting stimuli. Additionally, we assessed the integrity of their homeostatic sleep-promoting system using sleep deprivation. There was no significant difference in the spontaneous sleep-wake activity between ghrelin receptor KO and wild-type (WT) mice. WT mice mounted robust arousal responses to a novel environment and food deprivation. Wakefulness increased for 6 h after cage change accompanied by increases in body temperature and locomotor activity. Ghrelin receptor KO mice completely lacked the wake and body temperature responses to new environment. When subjected to 48 h food deprivation, WT mice showed marked increases in their waking time during the dark periods of both days. Ghrelin receptor KO mice failed to mount an arousal response on the first night and wake increases were attenuated on the second day. The responsiveness to sleep deprivation did not differ between the two genotypes. These results indicate that the ghrelin-receptive mechanisms play an essential role in the function of the arousal system but not in homeostatic sleep-promoting mechanisms.

  2. Vitamin A Transport Mechanism of the Multitransmembrane Cell-Surface Receptor STRA6

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Riki; Zhong, Ming; Kassai, Miki; Ter-Stepanian, Mariam; Sun, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A has biological functions as diverse as sensing light for vision, regulating stem cell differentiation, maintaining epithelial integrity, promoting immune competency, regulating learning and memory, and acting as a key developmental morphogen. Vitamin A derivatives have also been used in treating human diseases. If vitamin A is considered a drug that everyone needs to take to survive, evolution has come up with a natural drug delivery system that combines sustained release with precise and controlled delivery to the cells or tissues that depend on it. This “drug delivery system” is mediated by plasma retinol binding protein (RBP), the principle and specific vitamin A carrier protein in the blood, and STRA6, the cell-surface receptor for RBP that mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. The mechanism by which the RBP receptor absorbs vitamin A from the blood is distinct from other known cellular uptake mechanisms. This review summarizes recent progress in elucidating the fundamental molecular mechanism mediated by the RBP receptor and multiple newly discovered catalytic activities of this receptor, and compares this transport system with retinoid transport independent of RBP/STRA6. How to target this new type of transmembrane receptor using small molecules in treating diseases is also discussed. PMID:26343735

  3. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptors: Molecular mechanisms of activation and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Nader

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis-associated eye diseases are among the most common cause of blindness in the United States and worldwide. Recent advances in the development of angiogenesis-based therapies for treatment of angiogenesis-associated diseases have provided new hope in a wide variety of human diseases ranging from eye diseases to cancer. One group of growth factor receptors critically implicated in angiogenesis is vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR), a subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 are closely related receptor tyrosine kinases and have both common and specific ligands. VEGFR-1 is a kinase-impaired RTK and its kinase activity is suppressed by a single amino acid substitution in its kinase domain and by its carboxyl terminus. VEGFR-2 is highly active kinase, stimulates a variety of signaling pathways and broad biological responses in endothelial cells. The mechanisms that govern VEGFR-2 activation, its ability to recruit signaling proteins and to undergo downregulation are highly regulated by phosphorylation activation loop tyrosines and its carboxyl terminus. Despite their differential potentials to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation and kinase activation, both VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 are required for normal embryonic development and pathological angiogenesis. VEGFR-1 regulates angiogenesis by mechanisms that involve ligand trapping, receptor homodimerization and heterodimerization. This review highlights recent insights into the mechanism of activation of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, and focuses on the signaling pathways employed by VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 that regulate angiogenesis and their therapeutic potentials in angiogenesis-associated diseases. PMID:16713597

  4. Quantification of the binding potential of cell-surface receptors in fresh excised specimens via dual-probe modeling of SERS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Lagnojita; Wang, Yu; Yang, Cynthia; Khan, Altaz; Brankov, Jovan G; Liu, Jonathan T C; Tichauer, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    The complete removal of cancerous tissue is a central aim of surgical oncology, but is difficult to achieve in certain cases, especially when the removal of surrounding normal tissues must be minimized. Therefore, when post-operative pathology identifies residual tumor at the surgical margins, re-excision surgeries are often necessary. An intraoperative approach for tumor-margin assessment, insensitive to nonspecific sources of molecular probe accumulation and contrast, is presented employing kinetic-modeling analysis of dual-probe staining using surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles (SERS NPs). Human glioma (U251) and epidermoid (A431) tumors were implanted subcutaneously in six athymic mice. Fresh resected tissues were stained with an equimolar mixture of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted and untargeted SERS NPs. The binding potential (BP; proportional to receptor concentration) of EGFR - a cell-surface receptor associated with cancer - was estimated from kinetic modeling of targeted and untargeted NP concentrations in response to serial rinsing. EGFR BPs in healthy, U251, and A431 tissues were 0.06 ± 0.14, 1.13 ± 0.40, and 2.23 ± 0.86, respectively, which agree with flow-cytometry measurements and published reports. The ability of this approach to quantify the BP of cell-surface biomarkers in fresh tissues opens up an accurate new approach to analyze tumor margins intraoperatively.

  5. A dual model of entertainment-based and community-based mechanisms to explore continued participation in online entertainment communities.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun; Hou, Jinghui; Ma, Xiao; Cai, Shuqin

    2013-05-01

    Online entertainment communities have exploded in popularity and drawn attention from researchers. However, few studies have investigated what leads people to remain active in such communities at the postadoption stage. We proposed and tested a dual model of entertainment-based and community-based mechanisms to examine the factors that affect individuals' continued participation in online entertainment communities. Survival analysis was employed on a longitudinal dataset of 2,302 users collected over 2 years from an online game community. Our results were highly consistent with the theoretical model. Specifically, under the entertainment-based mechanism, our findings showed that the intensities of initial use and frequent use were positive predictors of players' activity lifespan. Under the community-based mechanism, the results demonstrated that the number of guilds a player was affiliated with and the average number of days of being a guild member positively predict players' lifespan in the game. Overall, our study suggests that the entertainment-based mechanism and community-based mechanism are two key drivers that determinate individuals' continued participation in online entertainment communities.

  6. Understanding the deposition mechanism of pulsed laser deposited B-C films using dual-targets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song; He, Zhiqiang; Wang, Chuanbin; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Lianmeng; Ji, Xiaoli; Lu, Wenzhong

    2014-04-21

    Boron carbide thin films with stoichiometry (boron-carbon atomic ratio) range of 0.1 ∼ 8.9 were fabricated via pulsed laser deposition by using boron-carbon dual-targets. However, this experimental data on stoichiometry were smaller than the computer simulation values. The discrepancy was investigated by studies on composition and microstructure of the thin films and targets by scanning electron microscopy, excitation laser Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicate that the boron liquid droplets were formed by phase explosion after laser irradiation on boron sector. Part of the boron droplets would be lost via ejection in the direction of laser beam, which is tilted 45° to the surface of substrate.

  7. A dual function of V0-ATPase a1 provides an endolysosomal degradation mechanism in Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, W. Ryan; Wang, Dong; Haberman, Adam S.

    2010-01-01

    The vesicular adenosine triphosphatase (v-ATPase) is a proton pump that acidifies intracellular compartments. In addition, mutations in components of the membrane-bound v-ATPase V0 sector cause acidification-independent defects in yeast, worm, fly, zebrafish, and mouse. In this study, we present a dual function for the neuron-specific V0 subunit a1 orthologue v100 in Drosophila melanogaster. A v100 mutant that selectively disrupts proton translocation rescues a previously characterized synaptic vesicle fusion defect and vesicle fusion with early endosomes. Correspondingly, V100 selectively interacts with syntaxins on the respective target membranes, and neither synaptic vesicles nor early endosomes require v100 for their acidification. In contrast, V100 is required for acidification once endosomes mature into degradative compartments. As a consequence of the complete loss of this neuronal degradation mechanism, photoreceptors undergo slow neurodegeneration, whereas selective rescue of the acidification-independent function accelerates cell death by increasing accumulations in degradation-incompetent compartments. We propose that V100 exerts a temporally integrated dual function that increases neuronal degradative capacity. PMID:20513768

  8. Endocrine disrupting chemicals targeting estrogen receptor signaling: Identification and mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Many endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) adversely impact estrogen signaling by interacting with two estrogen receptors (ERs): ERα and ERβ. Though the receptors have similar ligand binding and DNA binding domains, ERα and ERβ have some unique properties in terms of ligand selectivity and target gene regulation. EDCs that target ER signaling can modify genomic and non-genomic ER activity through direct interactions with ERs, indirectly through transcription factors like the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), or through modulation of metabolic enzymes that are critical for normal estrogen synthesis and metabolism. Many EDCs act through multiple mechanisms as exemplified by chemicals that bind both AhR and ER, such as 3-methylcholanthrene. Other EDCs that target ER signaling include phytoestrogens, bisphenolics, and organochlorine pesticides and many alter normal ER signaling through multiple mechanisms. EDCs can also display tissue-selective ER agonist and antagonist activities similar to selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) designed for pharmaceutical use. Thus, biological effects of EDCs need to be carefully interpreted because EDCs can act through complex tissue-selective modulation of ERs and other signaling pathways in vivo. Current requirements by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency require some in vitro and cell-based assays to identify EDCs that target ER signaling through direct and metabolic mechanisms. Additional assays may be useful screens for identifying EDCs that act through alternative mechanisms prior to further in vivo study. PMID:21053929

  9. MECHANISMS OF ZN-INDUCED SIGNAL INITIATION THROUGH THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    MECHANISMS OF Zn-INDUCED SIGNAL INITIATION THROUGH THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR)
    James M. Samet*, Lee M. Graves? and Weidong Wu?. *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and ?Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North C...

  10. Open tubular columns containing the immobilized ligand binding domain of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and γ for dual agonists characterization by frontal affinity chromatography with MS detection

    PubMed Central

    Temporini, C.; Pochetti, G.; Fracchiolla, G.; Piemontese, L.; Montanari, R.; Moaddel, R.; Laghezza, A.; Altieri, F.; Cervoni, L.; Ubiali, D.; Prada, E.; Loiodice, F.; Massolini, G.; Calleri, E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily. In the last years novel PPARs ligands have been identified and these include PPARα/γ dual agonists. To rapidly identify novel PPARs dual ligands, a robust binding assay amenable to high-throughput screening towards PPAR isoforms would be desirable. In this work we describe a parallel assay based on the principles of Frontal Affinity Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (FAC-MS) that can be used to characterize dual agonists. For this purpose the ligand binding domain of PPARα receptor was immobilized onto the surface of open tubular capillaries to create new PPAR-alpha-OT columns to be used in parallel with PPAR-gamma-OT columns. The two biochromatographic systems were used in both ranking and Kd experiments towards new ureidofibrate-like dual agonists for subtype selectivity ratio determination. In order to validate the system, the Kd values determined by frontal analysis chromatography were compared to the affinity constants obtained by ITC experiments. The results of this study strongly demonstrate the specific nature of the interaction of the ligands with the two immobilized receptor subtypes. PMID:23466198

  11. Internalization mechanism of neuropeptide Y bound to its Y1 receptor investigated by high resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Noémie; Didier, Pascal; Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Bucher, Bernard; Mély, Yves

    2015-06-01

    The neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays numerous biological roles that are mediated by a family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Among the latter, the NPY Y1 subtype receptor undergoes a rapid desensitization following agonist exposure. This desensitization was suggested to result from a rapid clathrin-dependent internalization of Y1 and its recycling at the plasma membrane via sorting/early endosomes (SE/EE) and recycling endosomes (RE). Herein, to validate and quantitatively consolidate the mechanism of NPY internalization, we quantitatively investigated the NPY-induced internalization of the Y1 receptor by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), a super-resolution imaging technique that can resolve EE and SE, which are below the resolution limit of conventional optical microscopes. Using Cy5-labeled NPY, we could monitor with time the internalization and recycling of NPY on HEK293 cells stably expressing eGFP-labeled Y1 receptors. Furthermore, by discriminating the SE/EE from the larger RE by their sizes and monitoring these two populations as a function of time, we could firmly consolidate the kinetic model describing the internalization mechanism of the Y1 receptors as the basis for their rapid desensitization following agonist exposure.

  12. Dual Receptor-Targeted Theranostic Nanoparticles for Localized Delivery and Activation of Photodynamic Therapy Drug in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Suraj; Miller, Kayla; Zhu, Yun; McKinnon, Emilie; Novak, Thomas; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Targeting gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with two or more receptor binding peptides has been proposed to address intratumoral heterogeneity of glioblastomas that overexpress multiple cell surface receptors to ultimately improve therapeutic efficacy. AuNPs conjugated with peptides against both the epidermal growth factor and transferrin receptors and loaded with the photosensitizer phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4) have been designed and compared with monotargeted AuNPs for in vitro and in vivo studies. The (EGFpep+Tfpep)-AuNPs-Pc 4 with a particle size of ~41 nm improved both specificity and worked synergistically to decrease time of maximal accumulation in human glioma cells that overexpressed two cell surface receptors as compared to cells that overexpressed only one. Enhanced cellular association and increased cytotoxicity were achieved. In vivo studies show notable accumulation of these agents in the brain tumor regions. PMID:26198693

  13. Therapeutic potential of the dual peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α/γ agonist aleglitazar in attenuating TNF-α-mediated inflammation and insulin resistance in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Marika; Scoditti, Egeria; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata; Calabriso, Nadia; Wabitsch, Martin; Storelli, Carlo; Wright, Matthew; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation is a mechanistic link between obesity and its related sequelae, including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Dual ligands of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α and γ, combining in a single molecule the metabolic and inflammatory-regulatory properties of α and γ agonists, have been proposed as a promising therapeutic strategy to antagonize adipose tissue inflammation. Here we investigated the effects of the dual PPARα/γ agonist aleglitazar on human adipocytes challenged with inflammatory stimuli. Human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) adipocytes were treated with aleglitazar or - for comparison - the selective agonists for PPARα or γ fenofibrate or rosiglitazone, respectively, for 24h before stimulation with TNF-α. Aleglitazar, at concentrations as low as 10nmol/L, providing the half-maximal transcriptional activation of both PPARα and PPARγ, reduced the stimulated expression of several pro-inflammatory mediators including interleukin (IL)-6, the chemokine CXC-L10, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. Correspondingly, media from adipocytes treated with aleglitazar reduced monocyte migration, consistent with suppression of MCP-1 secretion. Under the same conditions, aleglitazar also reversed the TNF-α-mediated suppression of insulin-stimulated ser473 Akt phosphorylation and decreased the TNF-α-induced ser312 IRS1 phosphorylation, two major switches in insulin-mediated metabolic activities, restoring glucose uptake in insulin-resistant adipocytes. Such effects were similar to those obtainable with a combination of single PPARα and γ agonists. In conclusion, aleglitazar reduces inflammatory activation and dysfunction in insulin signaling in activated adipocytes, properties that may benefit diabetic and obese patients. The effect of aleglitazar was consistent with dual PPARα and γ agonism, but with no evidence of synergism. PMID:26976796

  14. Effects and mechanism of dual-frequency power ultrasound on the molecular weight distribution of corn gluten meal hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian; Ma, Haile; Wang, Bei; Yagoub, Abu El-Gasim A; Wang, Kai; He, Ronghai; Zhou, Cunshan

    2016-05-01

    The impact of dual-frequency power ultrasound (DPU) on the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of corn gluten meal (CGM) hydrolysates and its mechanism were investigated in the present study. The mechanism was studied from aspects of structural and nano-mechanical characteristics of the major protein fractions of CGM, viz. zein and glutelin. The results of molecular weight distribution indicated that DPU pretreatment of CGM was beneficial to the preparation of peptides with molecular weights of 200-1000Da. Moreover, FTIR spectral analysis and atomic force microscopy characterization showed that the DPU pretreatment changed the contents of secondary structure of proteins, decreased the particle height and surface roughness of glutelin, reduced the Young's modulus and stiffness of zein while increased its adhesion force. In conclusion, DPU pretreatment of proteins before proteolysis is an efficient alternative method to produce short-chain peptides because of its positive effects originating from acoustic cavitation on the molecular conformation, nano-structures and nano-mechanical properties of proteins as well.

  15. Effects and mechanism of dual-frequency power ultrasound on the molecular weight distribution of corn gluten meal hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian; Ma, Haile; Wang, Bei; Yagoub, Abu El-Gasim A; Wang, Kai; He, Ronghai; Zhou, Cunshan

    2016-05-01

    The impact of dual-frequency power ultrasound (DPU) on the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of corn gluten meal (CGM) hydrolysates and its mechanism were investigated in the present study. The mechanism was studied from aspects of structural and nano-mechanical characteristics of the major protein fractions of CGM, viz. zein and glutelin. The results of molecular weight distribution indicated that DPU pretreatment of CGM was beneficial to the preparation of peptides with molecular weights of 200-1000Da. Moreover, FTIR spectral analysis and atomic force microscopy characterization showed that the DPU pretreatment changed the contents of secondary structure of proteins, decreased the particle height and surface roughness of glutelin, reduced the Young's modulus and stiffness of zein while increased its adhesion force. In conclusion, DPU pretreatment of proteins before proteolysis is an efficient alternative method to produce short-chain peptides because of its positive effects originating from acoustic cavitation on the molecular conformation, nano-structures and nano-mechanical properties of proteins as well. PMID:26703201

  16. Examining the role of endogenous orexins in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis endocrine function using transient dual orexin receptor antagonism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Michel A; Sciarretta, Carla; Brisbare-Roch, Catherine; Strasser, Daniel S; Studer, Rolf; Jenck, Francois

    2013-04-01

    The orexin neuropeptide system regulates wakefulness and contributes to physiological and behavioral stress responses. Moreover, a role for orexins in modulating hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity has been proposed. Brain penetrating dual orexin receptor (OXR) antagonists such as almorexant decrease vigilance and have emerged as a novel therapeutic class for the treatment of insomnia. Almorexant was used here as a pharmacological tool to examine the role of endogenous orexin signaling in HPA axis endocrine function under natural conditions. After confirming the expression of prepro-orexin and OXR-1 and OXR-2 mRNA in hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands, the effects of systemic almorexant were investigated on peripheral HPA axis hormone release in the rat under baseline, stress and pharmacological challenge conditions. Almorexant did not alter basal or stress-induced corticosterone release despite affecting wake and sleep stages (detected by radiotelemetric electroencephalography/electromyography) during the stress exposure. Moreover, almorexant did not affect the release of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone at different time points along the diurnal rhythm, nor corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH)- and ACTH-stimulated neuroendocrine responses, measured in vivo under stress-free conditions. These results illustrate that dual OXR antagonists, despite modulating stress-induced wakefulness, do not interfere with endocrine HPA axis function in the rat. They converge to suggest that endogenous orexin signaling plays a minor role in stress hormone release under basal conditions and under challenge.

  17. The dual effect of CA1 NMDA receptor modulation on ACPA-induced amnesia in step-down passive avoidance learning task.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Amin-Yavari, Samaneh; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-04-01

    It is well documented that cannabinoids play an important role in certain hippocampal memory processes in rodents. On the other hand, N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate the synaptic plasticity related to learning and memory processes which take place in the hippocampus. Such insights prompted us to investigate the influence of dorsal hippocampal (CA1) NMDA receptor agents on amnesia induced by cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) in male mice. One-trial step-down passive avoidance and hole-board apparatuses were used to examine the memory retrieval and exploratory behaviors, respectively. Based on our findings, pre-training intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of ACPA (0.01mg/kg) decreased memory acquisition. Moreover, pre-training intra-CA1 infusion of NMDA (0.001, 0.0125, 0.025 and 0.2µg/mouse), d-AP7 (0.5 and 1µg/mouse) or AM251 (50ng/mouse) impaired the memory acquisition. Meanwhile, NMDA-treated animals at the doses of 0.0005, 0.05 and 0.1µg/mouse acquired memory formation. In addition, intra-CA1 microinjection of NMDA (0.0005) plus different doses of ACPA potentiated the ACPA response, while NMDA (0.1) plus the lower or the higher dose of ACPA potentiated or restored the ACPA response, respectively. Further investigation revealed that a subthreshold dose of d-AP7 could potentiate the memory acquisition impairment induced by ACPA. Moreover, the subthreshold dose of AM251 did not alter the ACPA response, while the effective dose of the drug restored the memory acquisition impairment induced by ACPA. According to these results, we concluded that activation of the NMDA receptors in the CA1 mediates a dual effect on ACPA-induced amnesia in step-down passive avoidance learning task.

  18. Nigral neurotensin receptor regulation of nigral glutamate and nigroventral thalamic GABA transmission: a dual-probe microdialysis study in intact conscious rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, L; Tomasini, M C; Fernandez, M; Bebe, B W; O'Connor, W T; Fuxe, K; Glennon, J C; Tanganelli, S; Antonelli, T

    2001-01-01

    Dual-probe microdialysis in the awake rat was employed to investigate the effects of intranigral perfusion with the tridecapeptide neurotensin on local dialysate glutamate and GABA levels in the substantia nigra pars reticulata and on dialysate GABA levels in the ventral thalamus. Intranigral neurotensin (10-300nM, 60min) dose-dependently increased (+29+/-3% and +46+/-3% vs basal for the 100 and 300nM concentrations, respectively) local dialysate glutamate levels, while the highest 300nM concentration of the peptide exerted a long-lasting and prolonged reduction in both local and ventral thalamic (-20+/-4% and -22+/-2%, respectively) GABA levels. Intranigral perfusion with the inactive neurotensin fragment neurotensin(1-7) (10-300nM, 60min) was without effect. Furthermore, the non-peptide neurotensin receptor antagonist SR 48692 (0.2mg/kg) and tetrodotoxin (1microM) fully counteracted the intranigral neurotensin (300nM)-induced increase in local glutamate. SR 48692 (0.2mg/kg) also counteracted the decreases in nigral and ventral thalamic GABA release induced by the peptide. In addition, intranigral perfusion with the dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist raclopride (1microM) fully antagonized the neurotensin (300nM)-induced decreases in nigral and ventral thalamic GABA levels. The ability of nigral neurotensin receptor activation to differently influence glutamate and GABA levels, whereby it increases nigral glutamate and decreases both nigral and ventral thalamic GABA levels, suggests the involvement of neurotensin receptor in the regulation of basal ganglia output at the level of the nigra.

  19. Incorporation of the purified epstein barr virus/C3d receptor (CR2) into liposomes and demonstration of its dual ligand binding functions

    SciTech Connect

    Mold, C.; Cooper, N.R.; Nemerow, G.R.

    1986-06-01

    The 145-kDA molecule that has been identified as the C3d receptor CR2 was isolated from lysates of Raji cells by affinity chromatography by using the monoclonal antibody (MoAb)HB-5. The purified protein was incorporated into /sup 14/C-phosphatidylcholine liposomes by deoxycholate dialysis followed by flotation on discontinuous sucrose gradients. Incorporation of the receptor was verified by testing the gradient fractions for CR2 by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Liposomes were shown to be unilamellar vesicles ranging in diameter from 25 to 100 nm by electron microscopy. The external orientation of CR2 in the membranes was demonstrated by immunoelectron microscopy. The functional activities of liposomes containing CR2 and liposomes without protein were compared. CR2 liposomes bound to EC3d, but not to E, and this binding was inhibited by the anti-CR2 MoAb OKB7 and by a MoAb specific for C3d. Control liposomes failed to bind to either E or EC3D. The ability of CR2 to function as a receptor for Epstein Barr virus (EBV) was tested in two ways. First, CR2 liposomes bound to B95-8, a cell line expressing EBV membrane antigens, but not to B95-8 cells treated with the viral DNA polymerase inhibitor phosphonoformic acid. Second, liposomes containing CR2 were shown by ultracentrifugal analyses to bind directly to purified EBV, and this binding was also inhibited by OKB7. Control liposomes did not bind to B95-8 cells or to EBV. These findings show that CR2 purified from detergent extracts of Raji cells can be reconstituted into lipid membranes with maintenance of its dual functions as a receptor for C3d and EBV.

  20. Dual action of isoflurane on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated currents through recombinant alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L)-GABA(A)-receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Neumahr, S; Hapfelmeier, G; Scheller, M; Schneck, H; Franke, C; Kochs, E

    2000-05-01

    Isoflurane (ISO) increased the agonist-induced chloride flux through the gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA(A)R). This may reflect an anesthetic-induced increase in the apparent agonist affinity. A dual effect of anesthetics was postulated for both the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and the GABA(A)R. We tested the hypothesis that, in addition to a blocking effect, ISO increases gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated currents through recombinant GABA(A)R channels. HEK293 cells were transfected with rat cDNA for alpha(1),beta(2),gamma(2L) subunits. Currents elicited by 1 mM or 0. 01 mM GABA, respectively, alone, or with increasing concentrations of ISO, were recorded by using standard patch clamp techniques. ISO reduced the peak current elicited by 1 mM GABA. Currents induced by 0.01 mM GABA were potentiated by small ISO (twofold at 0.5 mM ISO) and inhibited by larger concentrations. Withdrawal of ISO and GABA induced rebound currents, suggesting an open-channel block by ISO. These currents increased with increasing concentrations of ISO. At large concentrations of ISO, the inhibitory effect predominated and was caused by, at least partly, an open-channel block. At small concentrations of ISO, potentiation of the GABA-gated currents was more prominent. This dual action of ISO indicates different binding sites at the GABA(A)R. The balance between potentiation and block depends on the concentrations of both ISO and GABA.

  1. Unifying electrostatic mechanism for metal cations in receptors and cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Previously, an electrostatic mechanism was proposed for receptor-ligand action and for cell signaling by phosphate and sulfate. The hypothesis is further elaborated by application to metal ions, mainly calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, and copper, in receptors and cell signaling. Evidence is provided for involvement of electrostatics in various reaction modes in biosystems. Calcium plays an important role electrochemically in neurotransmission. In some cases, electron transfer and redox processes are also involved. Electrostatics are known to participate in plant biochemistry. Mechanistically, the electrostatic field may act as a conduit for electrons and radicals and in involvement with energetics.

  2. Structures of pattern recognition receptors reveal molecular mechanisms of autoinhibition, ligand recognition and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Jin, Tengchuan; Ravilious, Geoffrey; Xiao, T Sam

    2014-02-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are essential sentinels for pathogens or tissue damage and integral components of the innate immune system. Recent structural studies have provided unprecedented insights into the molecular mechanisms of ligand recognition and signal transduction by several PRR families at distinct subcellular compartments. Here we highlight some of the recent discoveries and summarize the common themes that are emerging from these exciting studies. Better mechanistic understanding of the structure and function of the PRRs will improve future prospects of therapeutic targeting of these important innate immune receptors.

  3. Mechanism of HSV infection through soluble adapter-mediated virus bridging to the EGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Kenji; Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi; Tahara, Hideaki; Kuwano, Michihiko; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2011-04-25

    Herpes simplex virus entry into cells requires the binding of envelope glycoprotein D (gD) to an entry receptor. Depending on the cell, entry occurs by different mechanisms, including fusion at the cell surface or endocytosis. Here we examined the entry mechanism through a non-HSV receptor mediated by a soluble bi-specific adapter protein composed of recognition elements for gD and the EGF receptor (EGFR). Virus entered into endosomes using either EGF or an EGFR-specific single chain antibody (scFv) for receptor recognition. Infection was less efficient with the EGF adapter which could be attributed to its weaker binding to a viral gD. Infection mediated by the scFv adapter was pH sensitive, indicating that gD-EGFR bridging alone was insufficient for capsid release from endosomes. We also show that the scFv adapter enhanced infection of EGFR-expressing tumor tissue in vivo. Our results indicate that adapters may retarget HSV infection without drastically changing the entry mechanism.

  4. Multi-scale invertigation of the relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties in dual phase steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan

    Dual phase steel alloys belong to the first generation of advanced high strength steels that are widely used in the automotive industry to form body structure and closure panels of vehicles. A deeper understanding of the microstructural features, such as phase orientation and morphology are needed in order to establish their effect on the mechanical performance and to design a material with optimized attributes. In this work, our goal is to establish what kind of relationship exist between the mechanical properties and the microstructural representation of dual phase steels obtained from experimental observations. Microstructure in different specimens are characterized with advanced experimental techniques as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction pattern, scanning probe microscopy, and nanoindentation. Nanoindentation, Vickers hardness and tensile testing are conducted to reveal a multi-scale mechanical performance on original material and also specimens under a variety combinations of temperatures, cooling rates, and rolling conditions. To quantify the single phase properties in each sample, an inverse method is adopted using experimental nanoindentation load-depth curves to obtain tensile stress-strain curves for each phase, and the inverse results were verified with the true stress-strain curves from tensile tests. This work also provides the insight on spatial phase distribution of different phases through a 2-point correlation statistical methodology and relate to material strength and formability. The microstructure information is correlated with the results of mechanical tests. The broken surfaces from tensile testing are analyzed to discover the fracture mechanism in relation to martensite morphology and distribuion. Viscoplastic self-consistent fast Fourier Transformation simulations is also used to compute efficiently the local and the homogenized viscoplastic response of the

  5. Mechanism of Secondary Hardening in Rapid Tempering of Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Dulal Chandra; Nayak, Sashank S.; Biro, Elliot; Gerlich, Adrian P.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Dual-phase steel with ferrite-martensite-bainite microstructure exhibited secondary hardening in the subcritical heat affected zone during fiber laser welding. Rapid isothermal tempering conducted in a Gleeble simulator also indicated occurrence of secondary hardening at 773 K (500 °C), as confirmed by plotting the tempered hardness against the Holloman-Jaffe parameter. Isothermally tempered specimens were characterized by analytic transmission electron microscopy and high-angle annular dark-field imaging. The cementite (Fe3C) and TiC located in the bainite phase of DP steel decomposed upon rapid tempering to form needle-shaped Mo2C (aspect ratio ranging from 10 to 25) and plate-shaped M4C3 carbides giving rise to secondary hardening. Precipitation of these thermodynamically stable and coherent carbides promoted the hardening phenomenon. However, complex carbides were only seen in the tempered bainite and were not detected in the tempered martensite. The martensite phase decomposed into ferrite and spherical Fe3C, and interlath-retained austenite decomposed into ferrite and elongated carbide.

  6. CD44 Antibody Inhibition of Macrophage Phagocytosis Targets Fcγ Receptor- and Complement Receptor 3-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Amash, Alaa; Wang, Lin; Wang, Yawen; Bhakta, Varsha; Fairn, Gregory D; Hou, Ming; Peng, Jun; Sheffield, William P; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-04-15

    Targeting CD44, a major leukocyte adhesion molecule, using specific Abs has been shown beneficial in several models of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The mechanisms contributing to the anti-inflammatory effects of CD44 Abs, however, remain poorly understood. Phagocytosis is a key component of immune system function and can play a pivotal role in autoimmune states where CD44 Abs have shown to be effective. In this study, we show that the well-known anti-inflammatory CD44 Ab IM7 can inhibit murine macrophage phagocytosis of RBCs. We assessed three selected macrophage phagocytic receptor systems: Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), complement receptor 3 (CR3), and dectin-1. Treatment of macrophages with IM7 resulted in significant inhibition of FcγR-mediated phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized RBCs. The inhibition of FcγR-mediated phagocytosis was at an early stage in the phagocytic process involving both inhibition of the binding of the target RBC to the macrophages and postbinding events. This CD44 Ab also inhibited CR3-mediated phagocytosis of C3bi-opsonized RBCs, but it did not affect the phagocytosis of zymosan particles, known to be mediated by the C-type lectin dectin-1. Other CD44 Abs known to have less broad anti-inflammatory activity, including KM114, KM81, and KM201, did not inhibit FcγR-mediated phagocytosis of RBCs. Taken together, these findings demonstrate selective inhibition of FcγR and CR3-mediated phagocytosis by IM7 and suggest that this broadly anti-inflammatory CD44 Ab inhibits these selected macrophage phagocytic pathways. The understanding of the immune-regulatory effects of CD44 Abs is important in the development and optimization of therapeutic strategies for the potential treatment of autoimmune conditions.

  7. CD44 Antibody Inhibition of Macrophage Phagocytosis Targets Fcγ Receptor- and Complement Receptor 3-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Amash, Alaa; Wang, Lin; Wang, Yawen; Bhakta, Varsha; Fairn, Gregory D; Hou, Ming; Peng, Jun; Sheffield, William P; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-04-15

    Targeting CD44, a major leukocyte adhesion molecule, using specific Abs has been shown beneficial in several models of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The mechanisms contributing to the anti-inflammatory effects of CD44 Abs, however, remain poorly understood. Phagocytosis is a key component of immune system function and can play a pivotal role in autoimmune states where CD44 Abs have shown to be effective. In this study, we show that the well-known anti-inflammatory CD44 Ab IM7 can inhibit murine macrophage phagocytosis of RBCs. We assessed three selected macrophage phagocytic receptor systems: Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), complement receptor 3 (CR3), and dectin-1. Treatment of macrophages with IM7 resulted in significant inhibition of FcγR-mediated phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized RBCs. The inhibition of FcγR-mediated phagocytosis was at an early stage in the phagocytic process involving both inhibition of the binding of the target RBC to the macrophages and postbinding events. This CD44 Ab also inhibited CR3-mediated phagocytosis of C3bi-opsonized RBCs, but it did not affect the phagocytosis of zymosan particles, known to be mediated by the C-type lectin dectin-1. Other CD44 Abs known to have less broad anti-inflammatory activity, including KM114, KM81, and KM201, did not inhibit FcγR-mediated phagocytosis of RBCs. Taken together, these findings demonstrate selective inhibition of FcγR and CR3-mediated phagocytosis by IM7 and suggest that this broadly anti-inflammatory CD44 Ab inhibits these selected macrophage phagocytic pathways. The understanding of the immune-regulatory effects of CD44 Abs is important in the development and optimization of therapeutic strategies for the potential treatment of autoimmune conditions. PMID:26944929

  8. Transmembrane chemokines act as receptors in a novel mechanism termed inverse signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hattermann, Kirsten; Gebhardt, Henrike; Krossa, Sebastian; Ludwig, Andreas; Lucius, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane chemokines CX3CL1/fractalkine and CXCL16 are widely expressed in different types of tumors, often without an appropriate expression of their classical receptors. We observed that receptor-negative cancer cells could be stimulated by the soluble chemokines. Searching for alternative receptors we detected that all cells expressing or transfected with transmembrane chemokine ligands bound the soluble chemokines with high affinity and responded by phosphorylation of intracellular kinases, enhanced proliferation and anti-apoptosis. This activity requires the intracellular domain and apparently the dimerization of the transmembrane chemokine ligand. Thus, shed soluble chemokines can generate auto- or paracrine signals by binding and activating their transmembrane forms. We term this novel mechanism “inverse signaling”. We suppose that inverse signaling is an autocrine feedback and fine-tuning system in the communication between cells that in tumors supports stabilization and proliferation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10820.001 PMID:26796342

  9. On the central mechanism underlying ghrelin's chronic pro-obesity effects in rats: new insights from studies exploiting a potent ghrelin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Salomé, N; Hansson, C; Taube, M; Gustafsson-Ericson, L; Egecioglu, E; Karlsson-Lindahl, L; Fehrentz, J A; Martinez, J; Perrissoud, D; Dickson, S L

    2009-09-01

    In the present study, we explore the central nervous system mechanism underlying the chronic central effects of ghrelin with respect to increasing body weight and body fat. Specifically, using a recently developed ghrelin receptor antagonist, GHS-R1A (JMV2959), we investigate the role of GHS-R1A in mediating the effects of ghrelin on energy balance and on hypothalamic gene expression. As expected, in adult male rats, chronic central treatment with ghrelin for 14 days, when compared to vehicle-treated control rats, resulted in an increased body weight, lean mass and fat mass (assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry), dissected white fat pad weight, cumulative food intake, food efficiency, respiratory exchange ratio and a decrease of energy expenditure. Co-administration of the ghrelin receptor antagonist JMV2959 suppressed/blocked the majority of these effects, with the notable exception of ghrelin-induced food intake and food efficiency. The hypothesis emerging from these data, namely that GHS-R1A mediates the chronic effects of ghrelin on fat accumulation, at least partly independent of food intake, is discussed in light of the accompanying data regarding the hypothalamic genes coding for peptides and receptors involved in energy balance regulation, which were found to have altered expression in these studies.

  10. Dual silencing of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor in colorectal cancer cells is associated with decreased proliferation and enhanced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kaulfuss, Silke; Burfeind, Peter; Gaedcke, Jochen; Scharf, Jens-Gerd

    2009-04-01

    Overexpression and activation of tyrosine kinase receptors are common features of colorectal cancer. Using the human colorectal cancer cell lines DLD-1 and Caco-2, we evaluated the role of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptor (IGF-IR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cellular functions of these cells. We used the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology to specifically down-regulate IGF-IR and EGFR expression. Knockdown of IGF-IR and EGFR resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation of DLD-1 and Caco-2 cells. An increased rate of apoptosis was associated with siRNA-mediated silencing of IGF-IR and EGFR as assessed by activation of caspase-3/caspase-7. The combined knockdown of both EGFR and IGF-IR decreased cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis more effectively than did silencing of either receptor alone. Comparable effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis were observed after single and combinational treatment of cells by the IGF-IR tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 and/or the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. Combined IGF-IR and EGFR silencing by either siRNAs or tyrosine kinase inhibitors diminished the phosphorylation of downstream signaling pathways AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 more effectively than did the single receptor knockdown. Single IGF-IR knockdown inhibited IGF-I-dependent phosphorylation of AKT but had no effect on IGF-I- or EGF-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, indicating a role of EGFR in ligand-dependent ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The present data show that inhibition of the IGF-IR transduction cascade augments the antipoliferative and proapoptotic effects of EGFR inhibition in colorectal cancer cells. A clinical application of combination therapy targeting both EGFR and IGF-IR could be a promising therapeutic strategy.

  11. Involvement of histaminergic receptor mechanisms in the stimulation of NT-3 synthesis in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jurič, Damijana M; Mele, Tina; Carman-Kržan, Marija

    2011-06-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) is produced by astrocytes, in addition to neurons, and monoamine neurotransmitters play a role in controlling NT-3 synthesis. The impact of histamine (HA) on the regulation of NT-3 synthesis in cultured astrocytes has not been studied. We evaluated the involvement of histamine receptors and intracellular mechanisms in the regulation of NT-3 production by HA. Real-time PCR was performed to examine the expression of all known histamine receptor subtypes in cultured rat cortical astrocytes. Pharmacological tools, selective for the H₁, H₂ and H₃ receptors and intracellular systems, were utilized to confirm functional properties of HA receptors in histaminergic up-regulation of astrocytic NT-3 synthesis. HA potently and transiently elevated NT-3 expression and protein levels by more than twofold. In addition to H₁ and H₂ receptors, cultured astrocytes also express H₃ receptors, which activate G(i/o) proteins to inhibit adenylyl cyclase and modulate MAP kinase activity. Histaminergic stimulation was partly inhibited by selective H₁, H₂, and H₃ antagonists whereas selective H₁, H₂, and H₃ agonists or mediators of the intracellular histaminergic pathways increased NT-3 levels. Inhibitors of PKA, PKC, and CaMK II significantly reduced the HA-induced increase in NT-3 cellular levels whereas the MAP kinase cascade inhibitor completely blocked the stimulatory action of HA and all selective agonists. In conclusion, the synthesis of astrocytic NT-3 stimulated by HA is a receptor-mediated process, which is fine-tuned via subtle modulation of parallel histaminergic H₁, H₂, and H₃ pathways that converge at the level of MAP kinase activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'.

  12. Design and synthesis of benzoxazole containing indole analogs as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ/δ dual agonists.

    PubMed

    Gim, Hyo Jin; Cheon, Ye-Jin; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Jeon, Raok

    2011-05-15

    A series of benzoxazole or benzothiazole containing indole analogs, 6-alkoxyindole-2-carboxylic acids and 5-alkoxy-3-indolylacetic acids, were synthesized as novel candidates of PPARγ/δ dual agonists and their ligand activities for PPAR subtypes (α, γ, and δ) were investigated. In transient transactivation assay, several compounds activated PPARγ and δ with little activity of PPARα. Putative binding mode of the compounds 1a and 2a in the active site of PPARγ was similar with that of rosiglitazone and the molecular modeling provides molecular insight to the observed activity.

  13. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P; Brennan, Sarah C; Mun, Hee-chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D; Colecraft, Henry M; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R

    2016-01-01

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca2+ homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca2+ and PO43- ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca2+ ions stabilize the active state, PO43- ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13662.001 PMID:27434672

  14. Possible Mechanisms for Functional Antagonistic Effect of Ferula assafoetida on Muscarinic Receptors in Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kiyanmehr, Majid; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Hashemzehi, Milad

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of histamine (H1) receptors inhibitory and/or β-adrenoceptors stimulatory mechanisms in the relaxant property of Ferula assa-foetida. (F. asafoetida) was examined in the present study. Methods We evaluated the effect of three concentrations of F. asafoetida extract (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/mL), a muscarinic receptors antagonist, and saline on methacholine concentration-response curve in tracheal smooth muscles incubated with β-adrenergic and histamine (H1) (group 1), and only β-adrenergic (group 2) receptors antagonists. Results EC50 values in the presence of atropine, extract (5 and 10 mg/mL) and maximum responses to methacholine due to the 10 mg/mL extract in both groups and 5 mg/mL extract in group 1 were higher than saline (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0477, and P = 0.0008 in group 1 and P < 0.0001, P = 0.0438, and P = 0.0107 in group 2 for atropine, 5 and 10 mg/mL extract, respectively). Values of concentration ratio minus one (CR-1), in the presence of extracts were lower than atropine in both groups (P = 0.0339 for high extract concentration in group 1 and P < 0.0001 for other extract concentrations in both groups). Conclusion Histamine (H1) receptor blockade affects muscarinic receptors inhibitory property of F. asafoetida in tracheal smooth muscle PMID:27540324

  15. X-ray structure, symmetry and mechanism of an AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevsky, Alexander I.; Rosconi, Michael P.; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-02-02

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate most excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and function by opening a transmembrane ion channel upon binding of glutamate. Despite their crucial role in neurobiology, the architecture and atomic structure of an intact ionotropic glutamate receptor are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the {alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)-sensitive, homotetrameric, rat GluA2 receptor at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution in complex with a competitive antagonist. The receptor harbours an overall axis of two-fold symmetry with the extracellular domains organized as pairs of local dimers and with the ion channel domain exhibiting four-fold symmetry. A symmetry mismatch between the extracellular and ion channel domains is mediated by two pairs of conformationally distinct subunits, A/C and B/D. Therefore, the stereochemical manner in which the A/C subunits are coupled to the ion channel gate is different from the B/D subunits. Guided by the GluA2 structure and site-directed cysteine mutagenesis, we suggest that GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors have a similar architecture, with subunits arranged in a 1-2-1-2 pattern. We exploit the GluA2 structure to develop mechanisms of ion channel activation, desensitization and inhibition by non-competitive antagonists and pore blockers.

  16. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P; Brennan, Sarah C; Mun, Hee-Chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D; Colecraft, Henry M; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R

    2016-01-01

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca(2+) ions stabilize the active state, PO4(3-) ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits. PMID:27434672

  17. Mechanisms of Biased β-Arrestin-Mediated Signaling Downstream from the Cannabinoid 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Peraza, Francheska; Ahn, Kwang H.; Nogueras-Ortiz, Carlos; Mungrue, Imran N.; Mackie, Ken; Kendall, Debra A.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors results in multiple waves of signaling that are mediated by heterotrimeric G proteins and the scaffolding proteins β-arrestin 1/2. Ligands can elicit full or subsets of cellular responses, a concept defined as ligand bias or functional selectivity. However, our current understanding of β-arrestin-mediated signaling is still very limited. Here we provide a comprehensive view of β-arrestin-mediated signaling from the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R). By using a signaling biased receptor, we define the cascades, specific receptor kinases, and molecular mechanism underlying β-arrestin-mediated signaling: We identify the interaction kinetics of CB1R and β-arrestin 1 during their endocytic trafficking as directly proportional to its efficacy. Finally, we demonstrate that signaling results in the control of genes clustered around prosurvival and proapoptotic functions among others. Together, these studies constitute a comprehensive description of β-arrestin-mediated signaling from CB1Rs and suggest modulation of receptor endocytic trafficking as a therapeutic approach to control β-arrestin-mediated signaling. PMID:27009233

  18. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Karsten; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Xu, Yong; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Park, Sang-Youl; Weiner, Joshua J; Fujii, Hiroaki; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Kovach, Amanda; Li, Jun; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang; Peterson, Francis C; Jensen, Davin R; Yong, Eu-Leong; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved β-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling.

  19. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  20. Histamine enhances inhibitory avoidance memory consolidation through a H2 receptor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Weber C; Bonini, Juliana S; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2006-07-01

    Several evidences suggest that brain histamine is involved in memory consolidation but the actual contribution of the hippocampal histaminergic system to this process remains controversial. Here, we show that when infused into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus immediately after training in an inhibitory avoidance task, but not later, histamine induced a dose-dependent promnesic effect without altering locomotor activity, exploratory behavior, anxiety state or retrieval of the avoidance response. The facilitatory effect of intra-CA1 histamine was mimicked by the histamine N-methyltransferase inhibitor SKF-91844 as well as by the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit and it was blocked completely by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine. Conversely, the promnesic action of histamine was unaffected by the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine, the H3 receptor antagonist, thioperamide, and the NMDAr polyamine-binding site antagonist ifenprodil. By themselves, ranitidine, pyrilamine, thioperamide, and ifenprodil did not affect IA memory consolidation. Our data indicate that, when given into CA1, histamine enhances memory consolidation through a mechanism that involves activation of H2 receptors; however, endogenous CA1 histamine does not seem to participate in the consolidation of IA memory at least at the post-training times analyzed.

  1. Synthesis of alkylsulfonyl and substituted benzenesulfonyl curcumin mimics as dual antagonist of L-type Ca(2+) channel and endothelin A/B2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Park, Chong-Bin; Ahn, Chan Mug; Oh, Sangtae; Kwon, Daeho; Cho, Won-Chul; Shin, Woon-Seob; Cui, Yuan; Um, Ye Sol; Park, Byong-Gon; Lee, Seokjoon

    2015-10-15

    We synthesized a library of curcumin mimics with diverse alkylsulfonyl and substituted benzenesulfonyl modifications through a simple addition reaction of important intermediate, 1-(3-Amino-phenyl)-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-propenone (10), with various sulfonyl chloride reactants and then tested their vasodilatation effect on depolarization (50 mM K(+))- and endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced basilar artery contraction. Generally, curcumin mimics with aromatic sulfonyl groups showed stronger vasodilation effect than alkyl sulfonylated curcumin mimics. Among the tested compounds, six curcumin mimics (11g, 11h, 11i, 11j, 11l, and 11s) in a depolarization-induced vasoconstriction and seven compounds (11g, 11h, 11i, 11j, 11l, 11p, and 11s) in an ET-1-induced vasoconstriction showed strong vasodilation effect. Based on their biological properties, synthetic curcumin mimics can act as dual antagonist scaffold of L-type Ca(2+) channel and endothelin A/B2 receptor in vascular smooth muscle cells. In particular, compounds 11g and 11s are promising novel drug candidates to treat hypertension related to the overexpression of L-type Ca(2+) channels and ET peptides/receptors-mediated cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Electrolocation and electrocommunication in pulse gymnotids: signal carriers, pre-receptor mechanisms and the electrosensory mosaic.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Angel A; Castelló, María E; Aguilera, Pedro; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar

    2002-01-01

    Constraints introduced by signal carriers, pre-receptor mechanisms and receptor transduction are fundamental for shaping the signals used by the brain to build up perceptual images. This review analyses some of these constraints in the electrosensory system of pulse Gymnotids. First, it describes the characteristics and differences of electrolocation and electrocommunication carriers. Second, it analyses the role of electrogenic and non-electrogenic tissues of the fish body in the generation and conditioning of these carriers. Two pre-receptor mechanisms are discussed: (a) the funneling of currents to the perioral region and (b) a Mexican-hat profile involved in edge detection. Finally, some characteristics of the electroreceptor structure and the sensory mosaic are examined. We conclude that there is an electrosensory fovea at the perioral region where a large density and variety of receptors is stimulated by self- and conspecific-generated currents funneled there by non electrogenic tissues. Differences in carrier waveform may be used to distinguish between reafferent and communication signals.

  3. Redox mechanism as alternative to ligand binding for receptor activation delivering disregulated cellular signals.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, I; Pu, M Y; Nishizaki, A; Rosila, I; Ma, L; Katano, Y; Ohkusu, K; Rahman, S M; Isobe, K; Hamaguchi, M

    1994-02-01

    Cross-linking with specific ligand is a general requirement for ordered activation of cell surface receptors. In this study we demonstrated a novel pathway for disregulated receptor activation through a redox mechanism. Treatment of murine thymocytes or spleen cells with thiol-reactive HgCl2, a known inducer of autoimmune proliferative lymphocyte disorders in rodents, was found to induce tyrosine phosphorylation of several cellular proteins, which was up to 100 times as extensive as that triggered by stimulation with antireceptor antibody or mitogen. Through the cross-linkage by thiol-reactive bivalent mercury, transmembrane CD4, CD3, and CD45 and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Thy-1 were aggregated together on thymocytes or T lymphocytes. Along with the aggregation of Thy-1 and CD4, nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase p56lck was aggregated and activated. These events were linked to extensive protein tyrosine phosphorylation, which was visualized as a well localized spot beneath the membrane. Under appropriate conditions, this novel pathway of multiple receptor aggregation delivered a disregulated signal into T lymphocytes, which cross-talked to the antireceptor antibody-induced signal, for prolonged cell proliferation and IL-2 production. These results suggest a novel mechanism of disregulation of the ligand-dependent receptor function.

  4. A feedback mechanism controlling SCRAMBLED receptor accumulation and cell-type pattern in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Schiefelbein, John

    2008-12-23

    Cellular pattern formation in the root epidermis of Arabidopsis occurs in a position-dependent manner, generating root-hair (H) cells contacting two underlying cortical cells and nonhair (N) cells contacting one cortical cell. SCRAMBLED (SCM), a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK), mediates this process through its effect on a downstream transcription factor regulatory network. After perception of a positional cue, the SCM signaling pathway is proposed to preferentially repress WEREWOLF (WER) transcription factor expression in H cells and thereby bias the outcome of mutual lateral inhibition acting between H and N cells. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this preferential SCM signaling is unknown. Here, we analyze the distribution of the SCM receptor and the biological effect of altering its accumulation pattern. We find that SCM expression and accumulation in the epidermal cell layer is necessary and sufficient to direct the cell-type pattern. Further, SCM preferentially accumulates in H cells, and this accumulation pattern is dependent on the downstream transcription factors. Thus, SCM participates in an autoregulatory feedback loop, enabling cells engaged in SCM signaling to maintain high levels of SCM receptor, which provides a simple mechanism for reinforcing a bias in receptor-mediated signaling to ensure robust pattern formation.

  5. mGlu2 metabotropic glutamate receptors restrain inflammatory pain and mediate the analgesic activity of dual mGlu2/mGlu3 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Zammataro, Magda; Chiechio, Santina; Montana, Michael C; Traficante, Anna; Copani, Agata; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Gereau, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) couple to the inhibitory G-protein Gi. The group II mGluRs include two subtypes, mGlu2 and mGlu3, and their pharmacological activation produces analgesic effects in inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. However, the specific contribution of each one of the two subtypes has not been clarified due to the lack of selective orthosteric ligands that can discriminate between mGlu2 and mGlu3 subtypes.In this study we used mGlu2 or mGlu3 knock-out mice to dissect the specific role for these two receptors in the endogenous control of inflammatory pain and their specific contribution to the analgesic activity of mixed mGlu2/3 receptor agonists.Our results showed that mGlu2⁻(/)⁻ mice display a significantly greater pain response compared to their wild type littermates. Interestingly the increased pain sensitivity in mGlu2⁻(/)⁻ mice occurred only in the second phase of the formalin test. No differences were observed in the first phase. In contrast, mGlu3⁻(/)⁻ mice did not significantly differ from their wild type littermates in either phase of the formalin test.When systemically injected, a single administration of the mGlu2/3 agonist, LY379268 (3 mg/kg, ip), showed a significant reduction of both phases in wild-type mice and in mGlu3⁻(/)⁻ but not in mGlu2⁻(/)⁻ mice. However tolerance to the analgesic effect of LY379268 (3 mg/kg, ip) in mGlu3⁻(/)⁻ mice developed following 5 consecutive days of injection.Taken together, these results demonstrate that: (i) mGlu2 receptors play a predominant role over mGlu3 receptors in the control of inflammatory pain in mice; (ii) the analgesic activity of mixed mGlu2/3 agonists is entirely mediated by the activation of the mGlu2 subtype and (iii) the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of mGlu2/3 agonists develops despite the lack of mGlu3 receptors. PMID:21235748

  6. The dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/delta agonist GFT505 exerts anti-diabetic effects in db/db mice without peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-associated adverse cardiac effects.

    PubMed

    Hanf, Rémy; Millatt, Lesley J; Cariou, Bertrand; Noel, Benoit; Rigou, Géraldine; Delataille, Philippe; Daix, Valérie; Hum, Dean W; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    We report here the efficacy and safety of GFT505, a novel liver-targeted peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/delta (PPARα/δ) agonist, in the db/db mouse model of diabetes. Mice were treated with vehicle, GFT505, PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone or dual-PPARα/γ agonist aleglitazar for up to 8 weeks. All compounds comparably reduced fasting glycaemia and HbA1c and improved insulin sensitivity. The glucose-lowering effect of GFT505 was associated with decreased hepatic gluconeogenesis, correlating with reduced expression of gluconeogenic genes. In contrast with the PPARγ-activating drugs, treatment with GFT505 did not affect heart weight and did not increase plasma adiponectin concentrations. This absence of cardiac effects of GFT505 was confirmed after 12 months of administration in cynomolgus monkeys, by the absence of echocardiographic and histological findings. Moreover, long-term GFT505 administration to monkeys induced no change in haematological parameters or in bone marrow differential cell counts. Compared to PPARγ-activating drugs, the dual-PPARα/δ agonist GFT505 therefore shows an improved benefit/risk ratio, treating multiple features of type 2 diabetes without inducing the cardiac side-effects associated with PPARγ activation.

  7. The anterior cingulate cortex may enhance inhibition of lateral prefrontal cortex via m2 cholinergic receptors at dual synaptic sites.

    PubMed

    Medalla, Maria; Barbas, Helen

    2012-10-31

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (DLPFC) share robust excitatory connections. However, during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, when cortical activity is dominated by acetylcholine, the ACC is activated but DLPFC is suppressed. Using pathway tracing and electron microscopy in nonhuman primates (Macaca mulatta), we tested the hypothesis that the opposite states may reflect specific modulation by acetylcholine through strategic synaptic localization of muscarinic m2 receptors, which inhibit neurotransmitter release presynaptically, but are thought to be excitatory postsynaptically. In the ACC pathway to DLPFC (area 32 to area 9), m2 receptors predominated in ACC axon terminals and in more than half of the targeted dendrites of presumed inhibitory neurons, suggesting inhibitory cholinergic influence. In contrast, in a pathway linking the DLPFC area 46 to DLPFC area 9, postsynaptic m2 receptors predominated in targeted spines of presumed excitatory neurons, consistent with their mutual activation in working memory. These novel findings suggest that presynaptic and postsynaptic specificity of m2 cholinergic receptors may help explain the differential engagement of ACC and DLPFC areas in REM sleep for memory consolidation and synergism in awake states for cognitive control.

  8. Effects of the antitumor drug OSI-906, a dual inhibitor of IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor, on the glycemic control, β-cell functions, and β-cell proliferation in male mice.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Jun; Okuyama, Tomoko; Yoshida, Eiko; Shimizu, Mari; Horigome, Yuka; Tuno, Takayuki; Hayasaka, Moe; Abe, Shiori; Fuse, Masahiro; Togashi, Yu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    The IGF-1 receptor has become a therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. The efficacy of OSI-906 (linstinib), a dual inhibitor of IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor, for solid cancers has been examined in clinical trials. The effects of OSI-906, however, on the blood glucose levels and pancreatic β-cell functions have not yet been reported. We investigated the impact of OSI-906 on glycemic control, insulin secretion, β-cell mass, and β-cell proliferation in male mice. Oral administration of OSI-906 worsened glucose tolerance in a dose-dependent manner in the wild-type mice. OSI-906 at a dose equivalent to the clinical daily dose (7.5 mg/kg) transiently evoked glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. Insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2-deficient mice and mice with diet-induced obesity, both models of peripheral insulin resistance, exhibited more severe glucose intolerance after OSI-906 administration than glucokinase-haploinsufficient mice, a model of impaired insulin secretion. Phloridzin improved the hyperglycemia induced by OSI-906 in mice. In vitro, OSI-906 showed no effect on insulin secretion from isolated islets. After daily administration of OSI-906 for a week to mice, the β-cell mass and β-cell proliferation rate were significantly increased. The insulin signals in the β-cells were apparently unaffected in those mice. Taken together, the results suggest that OSI-906 could exacerbate diabetes, especially in patients with insulin resistance. On the other hand, the results suggest that the β-cell mass may expand in response to chemotherapy with this drug. PMID:24712877

  9. Effects of the antitumor drug OSI-906, a dual inhibitor of IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor, on the glycemic control, β-cell functions, and β-cell proliferation in male mice.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Jun; Okuyama, Tomoko; Yoshida, Eiko; Shimizu, Mari; Horigome, Yuka; Tuno, Takayuki; Hayasaka, Moe; Abe, Shiori; Fuse, Masahiro; Togashi, Yu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    The IGF-1 receptor has become a therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. The efficacy of OSI-906 (linstinib), a dual inhibitor of IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor, for solid cancers has been examined in clinical trials. The effects of OSI-906, however, on the blood glucose levels and pancreatic β-cell functions have not yet been reported. We investigated the impact of OSI-906 on glycemic control, insulin secretion, β-cell mass, and β-cell proliferation in male mice. Oral administration of OSI-906 worsened glucose tolerance in a dose-dependent manner in the wild-type mice. OSI-906 at a dose equivalent to the clinical daily dose (7.5 mg/kg) transiently evoked glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. Insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2-deficient mice and mice with diet-induced obesity, both models of peripheral insulin resistance, exhibited more severe glucose intolerance after OSI-906 administration than glucokinase-haploinsufficient mice, a model of impaired insulin secretion. Phloridzin improved the hyperglycemia induced by OSI-906 in mice. In vitro, OSI-906 showed no effect on insulin secretion from isolated islets. After daily administration of OSI-906 for a week to mice, the β-cell mass and β-cell proliferation rate were significantly increased. The insulin signals in the β-cells were apparently unaffected in those mice. Taken together, the results suggest that OSI-906 could exacerbate diabetes, especially in patients with insulin resistance. On the other hand, the results suggest that the β-cell mass may expand in response to chemotherapy with this drug.

  10. Mechanisms of insulin resistance in human obesity: evidence for receptor and postreceptor defects.

    PubMed Central

    Kolterman, O G; Insel, J; Saekow, M; Olefsky, J M

    1980-01-01

    To assess the mechanisms of the insulin resistance in human obesity, we have determined, using a modification of the euglycemic glucose clamp technique, the shape of the in vivo insulin-glucose disposal dose-response curves in 7 control and 13 obese human subjects. Each subject had at least three euglycemic studies performed at insulin infusion rates of 15, 40, 120, 240, or 1,200 mU/M2/min. The glucose disposal rate was decreased in all obese subjects compared with controls (101 +/- 16 vs. 186 +/- 16 mg/M2/min) during the 40 mU/M2/min insulin infusion. The mean dose-response curve for the obese subjects was displaced to the right, i.e., the half-maximally effective insulin concentration was 270 +/- 27 microU/ml for the obese compared with 130 +/- 10 microU/ml for controls. In nine of the obese subjects, the dose-response curves were shifted to the right, and maximal glucose disposal rates (at a maximally effective insulin concentration) were markedly decreased, indicating both a receptor and a postreceptor defect. On the other hand, four obese patients had right-shifted dose-response curves but reached normal maximal glucose disposal rates, consistent with decreased insulin receptors as the only abnormality. When the individual data were analyzed, it was found that the lease hyperinsulinemic, least insulin-resistant patients displayed only the receptor defect, whereas those with the greatest hyperinsulinemia exhibited the largest post-receptor defect, suggesting a continuous spectrum of defects as one advances from mild to severe insulin resistance. When insulin's ability to suppress hepatic glucose output was assessed, hyperinsulinemia produced total suppresssion in all subjects. The dose-response curve for the obese subjects was shifted to the right, indicating a defect in insulin receptors. Insulin binding to isolated adipocytes obtained from the obese subjects was decreased, and a highly significant inverse linear relationship was demonstrated between insulin

  11. Active Joint Mechanism Driven by Multiple Actuators Made of Flexible Bags: A Proposal of Dual Structural Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Inou, Norio

    2013-01-01

    An actuator is required to change its speed and force depending on the situation. Using multiple actuators for one driving axis is one of the possible solutions; however, there is an associated problem of output power matching. This study proposes a new active joint mechanism using multiple actuators. Because the actuator is made of a flexible bag, it does not interfere with other actuators when it is depressurized. The proposed joint achieved coordinated motion of multiple actuators. This report also discusses a new actuator which has dual cylindrical structure. The cylinders are composed of flexible bags with different diameters. The joint torque is estimated based on the following factors: empirical formula for the flexible actuator torque, geometric relationship between the joint and the actuator, and the principle of virtual work. The prototype joint mechanism achieves coordinated motion of multiple actuators for one axis. With this motion, small inner actuator contributes high speed motion, whereas large outer actuator generates high torque. The performance of the prototype joint is examined by speed and torque measurements. The joint showed about 30% efficiency at 2.0 Nm load torque under 0.15 MPa air input. PMID:24385868

  12. Dual Mechanism Conceptual Model for Cr Isotope Fractionation during Reduction by Zerovalent Iron under Saturated Flow Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H; Amos, Richard T; Blowes, David W; Ptacek, Carol J

    2015-05-01

    Chromium isotope analysis is rapidly becoming a valuable complementary tool for tracking Cr(VI) treatment in groundwater. Evaluation of various treatment materials has demonstrated that the degree of isotope fractionation is a function of the reaction mechanism, where reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) induces the largest fractionation. However, it has also been observed that uniform flow conditions can contribute complexity to isotope measurements. Here, laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to assess Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by zerovalent iron under both static and saturated flow conditions. Isotope measurements were accompanied by traditional aqueous geochemical measurements (pH, Eh, concentrations) and solid-phase analysis by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Increasing δ(53)Cr values were associated with decreasing Cr(VI) concentrations, which indicates reduction; solid-phase analysis showed an accumulation of Cr(III) on the iron. Reactive transport modeling implemented a dual mechanism approach to simulate the fractionation observed in the experiments. The faster heterogeneous reaction pathway was associated with minimal fractionation (ε=-0.2‰), while the slower homogeneous pathway exhibited a greater degree of fractionation (ε=-0.9‰ for the batch experiment, and ε=-1.5‰ for the column experiment). PMID:25839086

  13. Dynamic gas slippage: A unique dual-mechanism approach to the flow of gas in tight formations

    SciTech Connect

    Ertekin; King, G.R.; Schwerer, F.C.

    1983-10-01

    A mathematical formulation, applicable to both numerical simulation and transient well analysis, describing the flow of gas in very tight (k < 0.1 md) porous media has been developed. Unique to this formulation is the dual-mechanism transport of gas. In this formulation gas is assumed to be traveling under the influence of two fields: a concentration field and a pressure field. Transport through the concentration field is a Knudsen flow process and is modeled with Fick's Law of diffusion. Transport through the pressure field is a laminar process and is modeled with Darcy's law (inertial-turbulent effects are ignored). The combination of these two flow mechanisms rigorously yields a composition, pressure and saturation dependent slippage factor. The pressure dependence arises from treating the gas as a real gas. The dynamic slippage derived from this formulation is found to be most applicable in reservoirs with permeabilities less than or equal to 0.01 md. The results from this study indicate that in reservoirs of this type, differences between recoveries after ten years of production using the dynamic slip described in this paper and constant slip approaches were as great as 10% depending on the initial gas saturation. If an economic production rate is considered, differences as great as 30 can be expected.

  14. Dynamic gas slippage: A unique dual-mechanism approach to the flow of gas in tight formations

    SciTech Connect

    Ertekin, T.; King, G.R.; Schwerer, F.C.

    1986-02-01

    A mathematical formulation, applicable to both numerical simulation and transient well analysis that describes the flow of gas in very tight porous media and includes a dual-mechanism transport of gas is developed. Gas is assumed to be traveling under the influence of a concentration field and a pressure field. Transport through the concentration field is a Knudsen flow process and is modeled with Fick's law of diffusion. Transport through the pressure field is a laminar process and is modeled with Darcy's law (inertial/turbulent effects are ignored). The combination of these two flow mechanisms rigorously yields a composition-, pressure-, and saturation-dependent slippage factor. The pressure dependence arises from treating the gas as a real gas. The derived dynamic slippage is most applicable in reservoirs with permeabilities less than or equal to0.01 md. The results indicate that in reservoirs of this type, differences between recoveries after 10 years of production with the dynamic-slip and constant-slip approaches were as great as 10%, depending on the initial gas saturation. If an economic production rate is considered, differences as great as 30% can be expected.

  15. Advanced lung ventilation system (ALVS) with linear respiratory mechanics assumption for waveform optimization of dual-controlled ventilation.

    PubMed

    Montecchia, F; Guerrisi, M; Canichella, A

    2007-03-01

    The present paper describes the functional features of an advanced lung ventilation system (ALVS) properly designed for the optimization of conventional dual-controlled ventilation (DCV), i.e. with pressure-controlled ventilation with ensured tidal or minute volume. Considering the particular clinical conditions of patients treated with controlled ventilation the analysis and synthesis of ALVS control have been performed assuming a linear respiratory mechanics. Moreover, new airways pressure waveforms with more physiological shape can be tested on simulators of respiratory system in order to evaluate their clinical application. This is obtained through the implementation of a compensation procedure making the desired airways pressure waveform independent on patient airways resistance and lung compliance variations along with a complete real-time monitoring of respiratory system parameters leading the ventilator setting. The experimental results obtained with a lung simulator agree with the theoretical ones and show that ALVS performance is useful for the research activity aiming at the improvement of both diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic outcome relative to mechanical ventilation treatments.

  16. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism.

  17. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  18. Nanoscale imaging and mechanical analysis of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2014-02-18

    Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells is an important mechanism in the immune therapy of cancers. Traditional research about macrophage phagocytosis was based on optical microscopy, which cannot reveal detailed information because of the 200-nm-resolution limit. Quantitatively investigating the macrophage phagocytosis at micro- and nanoscale levels is still scarce. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers an excellent analytical instrument for quantitatively investigating the biological processes at single-cell and single-molecule levels under native conditions. In this work, we combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy to visualize and quantify the detailed changes in cell morphology and mechanical properties during the process of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells. Lymphoma cells were discernible by fluorescence staining. Then, the dynamic process of phagocytosis was observed by time-lapse optical microscopy. Next, AFM was applied to investigate the detailed cellular behaviors during macrophage phagocytosis under the guidance of fluorescence recognition. AFM imaging revealed the distinct features in cellular ultramicrostructures for the different steps of macrophage phagocytosis. AFM cell mechanical property measurements indicated that the binding of cancer cells to macrophages could make macrophages become stiffer. The experimental results provide novel insights in understanding the Fc-receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-induced calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Van der Linden, Ilse; Van Kolen, Kristof; Verhoeven, Kim F C; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing calcium signal transduction of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells were investigated. Calcium signaling strictly depended on intracellular calcium sources, and this is the first study to establish a prominent contribution of the three major G-protein families to CRF receptor-mediated calcium signaling. Overexpression of Galpha(q/11) and Galpha(16) led to leftward shifts of the agonist concentration-response curves. Blockade of Galpha(q/11) proteins by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology partially reduced agonist-mediated calcium responses in CRF(1)- and CRF(2(a))-expressing HEK293 cells, thereby proving a contribution of the G(q) protein family. A small but significant inhibition of calcium signaling was recorded by pharmacological inhibition of G(i/o) proteins with pertussis toxin treatment. This effect was mediated by direct binding of Gbetagamma subunits to phospholipase C. G(i/o) inhibition also elevated cAMP responses in CRF receptor-overexpressing HEK293 cells and in Y79 retinoblastoma cells endogenously expressing human CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) receptors, thereby demonstrating natural coupling of G(i) proteins to both CRF receptors. The strongest reduction of CRF receptor-mediated calcium mobilization was noted when blocking the G(s) signaling protein either by cholera toxin or by siRNA. It is noteworthy that simultaneous inhibition of two G-proteins shed light on the additive effects of G(s) and G(q) on the calcium signaling and, hence, that they act in parallel. On the other hand, G(i) coupling required prior G(s) activation. PMID:19098121

  20. Anaerobic reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene: how can dual Carbon-Chlorine isotopic measurements help elucidating the underlying reaction mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badin, Alice; Buttet, Géraldine; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Chlorinated ethenes (CEs) such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) are common persistent groundwater contaminants. Among clean-up strategies applied to sites affected by such pollution, bioremediation has been considered with a growing interest as it represents a cost-effective, environmental friendly approach. This technique however sometimes leads to an incomplete and slow biodegradation of CEs resulting in an accumulation of toxic metabolites. Understanding the reaction mechanisms underlying anaerobic reductive dechlorination would thus help assessing PCE biodegradation in polluted sites. Stable isotope analysis can provide insight into reaction mechanisms. For chlorinated hydrocarbons, carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) isotope data (δ13C and δ37Cl) tend to show a linear correlation with a slope (m ≡ ɛC/ɛCl) characteristic of the reaction mechanism [1]. This study hence aims at exploring the potential of a dual C-Cl isotope approach in the determination of the reaction mechanisms involved in PCE reductive dechlorination. C and Cl isotope fractionation were investigated during anaerobic PCE dechlorination by two bacterial consortia containing members of the Sulfurospirillum genus. The specificity in these consortia resides in the fact that they each conduct PCE reductive dechlorination catalysed by one different reductive dehalogenase, i.e. PceADCE which yields trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), and PceATCE which yields TCE only. The bulk C isotope enrichment factors were -3.6±0.3 o for PceATCE and -0.7±0.1o for PceADCE. The bulk Cl isotope enrichment factors were -1.3±0.2 o for PceATCE and -0.9±0.1 o for PceADCE. When applying the dual isotope approach, two m values of 2.7±0.1 and 0.7±0.2 were obtained for the reductive dehalogenases PceATCE and PceADCE, respectively. These results suggest that PCE can be degraded according to two different mechanisms. Furthermore, despite their highly similar protein sequences, each reductive dehalogenase seems

  1. Mechanisms of Host Receptor Adaptation by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kailang; Peng, Guiqing; Wilken, Matthew; Geraghty, Robert J.; Li, Fang

    2012-12-10

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) from palm civets has twice evolved the capacity to infect humans by gaining binding affinity for human receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Numerous mutations have been identified in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of different SARS-CoV strains isolated from humans or civets. Why these mutations were naturally selected or how SARS-CoV evolved to adapt to different host receptors has been poorly understood, presenting evolutionary and epidemic conundrums. In this study, we investigated the impact of these mutations on receptor recognition, an important determinant of SARS-CoV infection and pathogenesis. Using a combination of biochemical, functional, and crystallographic approaches, we elucidated the molecular and structural mechanisms of each of these naturally selected RBD mutations. These mutations either strengthen favorable interactions or reduce unfavorable interactions with two virus-binding hot spots on ACE2, and by doing so, they enhance viral interactions with either human (hACE2) or civet (cACE2) ACE2. Therefore, these mutations were viral adaptations to either hACE2 or cACE2. To corroborate the above analysis, we designed and characterized two optimized RBDs. The human-optimized RBD contains all of the hACE2-adapted residues (Phe-442, Phe-472, Asn-479, Asp-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for hACE2 but relative low affinity for cACE2. The civet-optimized RBD contains all of the cACE2-adapted residues (Tyr-442, Pro-472, Arg-479, Gly-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for cACE2 and also substantial affinity for hACE2. These results not only illustrate the detailed mechanisms of host receptor adaptation by SARS-CoV but also provide a molecular and structural basis for tracking future SARS-CoV evolution in animals.

  2. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Hosomi, Naohisa; Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke; Deguchi, Kazushi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Griendling, Kathy K.; Nishiyama, Akira

    2011-10-15

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: {yields} Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. {yields} Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. {yields} Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. {yields} Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  3. Dual mechanisms regulate ecosystem stability under decade-long warming and hay harvest

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zheng; Xu, Xia; Souza, Lara; Wilcox, Kevin; Jiang, Lifen; Liang, Junyi; Xia, Jianyang; García-Palacios, Pablo; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-01-01

    Past global change studies have identified changes in species diversity as a major mechanism regulating temporal stability of production, measured as the ratio of the mean to the standard deviation of community biomass. However, the dominant plant functional group can also strongly determine the temporal stability. Here, in a grassland ecosystem subject to 15 years of experimental warming and hay harvest, we reveal that warming increases while hay harvest decreases temporal stability. This corresponds with the biomass of the dominant C4 functional group being higher under warming and lower under hay harvest. As a secondary mechanism, biodiversity also explains part of the variation in temporal stability of production. Structural equation modelling further shows that warming and hay harvest regulate temporal stability through influencing both temporal mean and variation of production. Our findings demonstrate the joint roles that dominant plant functional group and biodiversity play in regulating the temporal stability of an ecosystem under global change. PMID:27302085

  4. Dual mechanisms regulate ecosystem stability under decade-long warming and hay harvest.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zheng; Xu, Xia; Souza, Lara; Wilcox, Kevin; Jiang, Lifen; Liang, Junyi; Xia, Jianyang; García-Palacios, Pablo; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-01-01

    Past global change studies have identified changes in species diversity as a major mechanism regulating temporal stability of production, measured as the ratio of the mean to the standard deviation of community biomass. However, the dominant plant functional group can also strongly determine the temporal stability. Here, in a grassland ecosystem subject to 15 years of experimental warming and hay harvest, we reveal that warming increases while hay harvest decreases temporal stability. This corresponds with the biomass of the dominant C4 functional group being higher under warming and lower under hay harvest. As a secondary mechanism, biodiversity also explains part of the variation in temporal stability of production. Structural equation modelling further shows that warming and hay harvest regulate temporal stability through influencing both temporal mean and variation of production. Our findings demonstrate the joint roles that dominant plant functional group and biodiversity play in regulating the temporal stability of an ecosystem under global change. PMID:27302085

  5. A mutarotation mechanism based on dual proton exchange in the amorphous D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, P; Paluch, M; Wlodarczyk, A; Hyra, M

    2014-03-14

    It is a well known fact that carbohydrates have unusual chemical and physical properties when they approach the glassy state during the cooling process. Differences between sugar aqueous solutions and their pure anhydrous states are caused mainly by the different intermolecular interactions related to the different hydrogen bond patterns. The mutarotation, a specific reaction in the saccharides, was recently investigated in the supercooled liquid and the glassy state of D-glucose. It was shown that the activation energy of this process in the supercooled liquid state is twice as low as for the same process in aqueous solution. In contrast, the activation energy in the glassy state is twice as high as in the aqueous solution. Herein, we present possible explanations for this phenomenon and propose a universal mechanism for the mutarotation process in the amorphous state of matter. In this work, for the first time, a double proton exchange mechanism in carbohydrates is proposed. PMID:24469017

  6. Dual mechanisms regulate ecosystem stability under decade-long warming and hay harvest.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zheng; Xu, Xia; Souza, Lara; Wilcox, Kevin; Jiang, Lifen; Liang, Junyi; Xia, Jianyang; García-Palacios, Pablo; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-06-15

    Past global change studies have identified changes in species diversity as a major mechanism regulating temporal stability of production, measured as the ratio of the mean to the standard deviation of community biomass. However, the dominant plant functional group can also strongly determine the temporal stability. Here, in a grassland ecosystem subject to 15 years of experimental warming and hay harvest, we reveal that warming increases while hay harvest decreases temporal stability. This corresponds with the biomass of the dominant C4 functional group being higher under warming and lower under hay harvest. As a secondary mechanism, biodiversity also explains part of the variation in temporal stability of production. Structural equation modelling further shows that warming and hay harvest regulate temporal stability through influencing both temporal mean and variation of production. Our findings demonstrate the joint roles that dominant plant functional group and biodiversity play in regulating the temporal stability of an ecosystem under global change.

  7. Catalytic control in the EGF Receptor and its connection to general kinase regulatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jura, Natalia; Zhang, Xuewu; Endres, Nicholas F.; Seeliger, Markus A.; Schindler, Thomas; Kuriyan, John

    2011-01-01

    Summary In contrast to the active conformations of protein kinases, which are essentially the same for all kinases, inactive kinase conformations are structurally diverse. Some inactive conformations are, however, observed repeatedly in different kinases, perhaps reflecting an important role in catalysis. In this review, we analyze one of these recurring conformations, first identified in CDK and Src kinases, which turned out to be central to understanding of how kinase domain of the EGF receptor is activated. This mechanism, which involves the stabilization of the active conformation of an α helix, has features in common with mechanisms operative in several other kinases. PMID:21474065

  8. Molecular mechanisms of viral inhibitors of RIG-I-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Daisy W.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of innate immune signaling pathways through cytosolic RIG-I like receptors (RLR) is a critical response that is antagonized by many viruses. A variety of RNA related pathogen associated molecular patterns have been identified and their role in RLR activation has been examined. Recent studies suggest that several virally encoded components that antagonize RLR signaling interact with and inhibit the interferon (IFN)-α/β activation pathway using both RNA-dependent and RNA-independent mechanisms. The structural basis for these RLR inhibitory mechanisms, as well as the multifunctional nature of viral RLR antagonists, is reviewed in the context of recent biochemical and structural studies. PMID:22325030

  9. A dual flow bioreactor with controlled mechanical stimulation for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Spitters, Tim W G M; Leijten, Jeroen C H; Deus, Filipe D; Costa, Ines B F; van Apeldoorn, Aart A; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Karperien, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    In cartilage, tissue engineering bioreactors can create a controlled environment to study chondrocyte behavior under mechanical stimulation or produce chondrogenic grafts of clinically relevant size. Here we present a novel bioreactor that combines mechanical stimulation with a two compartment system through which nutrients can be supplied solely by diffusion from opposite sides of a tissue-engineered construct. This design is based on the hypothesis that creating gradients of nutrients, growth factors, and growth factor antagonists can aid in the generation of zonal tissue-engineered cartilage. Computational modeling predicted that the design facilitates the creation of a biologically relevant glucose gradient. This was confirmed by quantitative glucose measurements in cartilage explants. In this system, it is not only possible to create gradients of nutrients, but also of anabolic or catabolic factors. Therefore, the bioreactor design allows control over nutrient supply and mechanical stimulation useful for in vitro generation of cartilage constructs that can be used for the resurfacing of articulated joints or as a model for studying osteoarthritis disease progression.

  10. Thermodynamic evidence for a dual transport mechanism in a POT peptide transporter.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joanne L; Mindell, Joseph A; Newstead, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Peptide transport plays an important role in cellular homeostasis as a key route for nitrogen acquisition in mammalian cells. PepT1 and PepT2, the mammalian proton coupled peptide transporters (POTs), function to assimilate and retain diet-derived peptides and play important roles in drug pharmacokinetics. A key characteristic of the POT family is the mechanism of peptide selectivity, with members able to recognise and transport >8000 different peptides. In this study, we present thermodynamic evidence that in the bacterial POT family transporter PepTSt, from Streptococcus thermophilus, at least two alternative transport mechanisms operate to move peptides into the cell. Whilst tri-peptides are transported with a proton:peptide stoichiometry of 3:1, di-peptides are co-transported with either 4 or 5 protons. This is the first thermodynamic study of proton:peptide stoichiometry in the POT family and reveals that secondary active transporters can evolve different coupling mechanisms to accommodate and transport chemically and physically diverse ligands across the membrane.

  11. Anticonvulsant effects of N-arachidonoyl-serotonin, a dual fatty acid amide hydrolase enzyme and transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel blocker, on experimental seizures: the roles of cannabinoid CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Luciano R; Medeiros, Daniel C; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P; Moraes, Marcio F; Moreira, Fabricio A

    2014-10-01

    Selective blockade of anandamide hydrolysis, through the inhibition of the FAAH enzyme, has anticonvulsant effects, which are mediated by CB1 receptors. Anandamide, however, also activates TRPV1 channels, generally with an opposite outcome on neuronal modulation. Thus, we suggested that the dual FAAH and TRPV1 blockade with N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT) would be efficacious in inhibiting pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice. We also investigated the contribution of CB1 activation and TRPV1 blockade to the overt effect of AA-5-HT. In the first experiment, injection of AA-5-HT (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) delayed the onset and reduced the duration of PTZ (60 mg)-induced seizures in mice. These effects were reversed by pre-treatment with the CB1 antagonist, AM251 (1.0-3.0 mg/kg). Finally, we observed that administration of the selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB366791 (0.1-1 mg/kg), did not entirely mimic AA-5-HT effects. In conclusion, AA-5-HT alleviates seizures in mice, an effect inhibited by CB1 antagonism, but not completely mimicked by TRPV1 blockage, indicating that the overall effect of AA-5-HT seems to depend mainly on CB1 receptors. This may represent a new strategy for the development of drugs against seizures, epilepsies and related syndromes.

  12. Mechanism of A2 adenosine receptor activation. I. Blockade of A2 adenosine receptors by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lohse, M.J.; Klotz, K.N.; Schwabe, U.

    1991-04-01

    It has previously been shown that covalent incorporation of the photoreactive adenosine derivative (R)-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxy-phenylisopropyladenosine ((R)-AHPIA) into the A1 adenosine receptor of intact fat cells leads to a persistent activation of this receptor, resulting in a reduction of cellular cAMP levels. In contrast, covalent incorporation of (R)-AHPIA into human platelet membranes, which contain only stimulatory A2 adenosine receptors, reduces adenylate cyclase stimulation via these receptors. This effect of (R)-AHPIA is specific for the A2 receptor and can be prevented by the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline. Binding studies indicate that up to 90% of A2 receptors can be blocked by photoincorporation of (R)-AHPIA. However, the remaining 10-20% of A2 receptors are sufficient to mediate an adenylate cyclase stimulation of up to 50% of the control value. Similarly, the activation via these 10-20% of receptors occurs with a half-life that is only 2 times longer than that in control membranes. This indicates the presence of a receptor reserve, with respect to both the extent and the rate of adenylate cyclase stimulation. These observations require a modification of the models of receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling.

  13. Ethanol Increases Mechanical Pain Sensitivity in Rats via Activation of GABAA Receptors in Medial Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Geng, Kai-Wen; He, Ting; Wang, Rui-Rui; Li, Chun-Li; Luo, Wen-Jun; Wu, Fang-Fang; Wang, Yan; Li, Zhen; Lu, Yun-Fei; Guan, Su-Min; Chen, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Ethanol is widely known for its ability to cause dramatic changes in emotion, social cognition, and behavior following systemic administration in humans. Human neuroimaging studies suggest that alcohol dependence and chronic pain may share common mechanisms through amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) interactions. However, whether acute administration of ethanol in the mPFC can modulate pain perception is unknown. Here we showed that bilateral microinjections of ethanol into the prelimbic and infralimbic areas of the mPFC lowered the bilateral mechanical pain threshold for 48 h without influencing thermal pain sensitivity in adult rats. However, bilateral microinjections of artificial cerebrospinal fluid into the mPFC or bilateral microinjections of ethanol into the dorsolateral PFC (also termed as motor cortex area 1 in Paxinos and Watson's atlas of The Rat Brain. Elsevier Academic Press, Amsterdam, 2005) failed to do so, suggesting regional selectivity of the effects of ethanol. Moreover, bilateral microinjections of ethanol did not change the expression of either pro-apoptotic (caspase-3 and Bax) or anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) proteins, suggesting that the dose was safe and validating the method used in the current study. To determine whether γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors are involved in mediating the ethanol effects, muscimol, a selective GABAA receptor agonist, or bicuculline, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist, was administered alone or co-administered with ethanol through the same route into the bilateral mPFC. The results showed that muscimol mimicked the effects of ethanol while bicuculline completely reversed the effects of ethanol and muscimol. In conclusion, ethanol increases mechanical pain sensitivity through activation of GABAA receptors in the mPFC of rats. PMID:27628528

  14. [The mechanism of beta-receptor desensitization in human myometrial culture cell].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Y; Oku, M; Fujii, E; Otsuki, T; Adachi, S; Morimoto, K

    1995-01-01

    Beta-adrenoceptor desensitization is considered to be primarily due to phosphorylation of receptors by protein kinase A (PKA) and beta-adrenaline receptor kinase (beta-ARK) and sequestration of receptors themselves. But in the human uterine muscle, the desensitization mechanism has been evaluated only as a phenomenon, and there are few studies on its mechanism. We evaluated cAMP production by beta-agonist and changes in the number of beta-receptors in cultured human myometrial cells. Uterine muscle cell were obtained from patients with benign disease before menopause and cultured. 1) At the confluent stage, dl-Isoproterenol Hydrochloride (ISP) was added under various conditions, and the intracellular cAMP concentration was determined by EIA. 2) After the addition of ISP (10(-6) M), plates were incubated at 37 degrees C, and beta-AR on the cell membrane surface (S beta-AR) and total beta-AR (T beta-AR) was measured in a binding assay with 125I-pindolol. The production of cAMP dose-dependently increased 30 minutes after the addition of ISP at 10(-6) M or higher, but rapidly decreased thereafter. T beta-AR was similar in the cells treated with ISP (10(-6) M) and the untreated cells. On the other hand, S beta-AR decreased by about 50% in the ISP treated cells. These result suggest the desensitization of beta-AR in human uterine muscle, and the involvement of the sequestration mechanism as its cause.

  15. Molecular mechanism of ligand recognition by NR3 subtype glutamate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Yongneng; Harrison, Chris B.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Schulten, Klaus; Mayer, Mark L.

    2008-10-27

    NR3 subtype glutamate receptors have a unique developmental expression profile, but are the least well-characterized members of the NMDA receptor gene family, which have key roles in synaptic plasticity and brain development. Using ligand binding assays, crystallographic analysis, and all atom MD simulations, we investigate mechanisms underlying the binding by NR3A and NR3B of glycine and D-serine, which are candidate neurotransmitters for NMDA receptors containing NR3 subunits. The ligand binding domains of both NR3 subunits adopt a similar extent of domain closure as found in the corresponding NR1 complexes, but have a unique loop 1 structure distinct from that in all other glutamate receptor ion channels. Within their ligand binding pockets, NR3A and NR3B have strikingly different hydrogen bonding networks and solvent structures from those found in NR1, and fail to undergo a conformational rearrangement observed in NR1 upon binding the partial agonist ACPC. MD simulations revealed numerous interdomain contacts, which stabilize the agonist-bound closed-cleft conformation, and a novel twisting motion for the loop 1 helix that is unique in NR3 subunits.

  16. Molecular mechanisms involving sigma receptor-mediated induction of MCP-1: implication for increased monocyte transmigration.

    PubMed

    Yao, Honghong; Yang, Yanjing; Kim, Kee Jun; Bethel-Brown, Crystal; Gong, Nan; Funa, Keiko; Gendelman, Howard E; Su, Tsung-Ping; Wang, John Q; Buch, Shilpa

    2010-06-10

    Cocaine abuse hastens the neurodegeneration often associated with advanced HIV-1 infection. The mechanisms, in part, revolve around the neuroinflammatory processes mediated by the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2). Understanding factors that modulate MCP-1 and, in turn, facilitate monocyte extravasation in the brain is thus of paramount importance. We now demonstrate that cocaine induces MCP-1 in rodent microglia through translocation of the sigma receptor to the lipid raft microdomains of the plasma membrane. Sequential activation of Src, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and phosphatidylinositol-3' kinase (PI3K)/Akt and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathways resulted in increased MCP-1 expression. Furthermore, conditioned media from cocaine-exposed microglia increased monocyte transmigration, and thus was blocked by antagonists for CCR2 or sigma receptor. These findings were corroborated by demonstrating increased monocyte transmigration in mice exposed to cocaine, which was attenuated by pretreatment of mice with the sigma receptor antagonist. Interestingly, cocaine-mediated transmigratory effects were not observed in CCR2 knockout mice. We conclude that cocaine-mediated induction of MCP-1 accelerates monocyte extravasation across the endothelium. Understanding the regulation of MCP-1 expression and functional changes by cocaine/sigma receptor system may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:20354174

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Retinoid Receptors in Diabetes-Induced Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jing; Guleria, Rakeshwar S.; Zhu, Sen; Baker, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients, is characterized by ventricular dysfunction, in the absence of coronary atherosclerosis and hypertension. There is no specific therapeutic strategy to effectively treat patients with DCM, due to a lack of a mechanistic understanding of the disease process. Retinoic acid, the active metabolite of vitamin A, is involved in a wide range of biological processes, through binding and activation of nuclear receptors: retinoic acid receptors (RAR) and retinoid X receptors (RXR). RAR/RXR-mediated signaling has been implicated in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. Recently, it has been reported that activation of RAR/RXR has an important role in preventing the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy, through improving cardiac insulin resistance, inhibition of intracellular oxidative stress, NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses and the renin-angiotensin system. Moreover, downregulated RAR/RXR signaling has been demonstrated in diabetic myocardium, suggesting that impaired RAR/RXR signaling may be a trigger to accelerate diabetes-induced development of DCM. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of retinoid receptors in the regulation of cardiac metabolism and remodeling under diabetic conditions is important in providing the impetus for generating novel therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced cardiac complications and heart failure. PMID:26237391

  18. Evaluation of Thermo-Mechanical Stability of COTS Dual-Axis MEMS Accelerometers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Teverovksy, Alexander; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems in MEMS is one of the fastest growing technologies in microelectronics, and is of great interest for military and aerospace applications. Accelerometers are the earliest and most developed representatives of MEMS. First demonstrated in 1979, micromachined accelerometers were used in automobile industry for air bag crash- sensing applications since 1990. In 1999, N4EMS accelerometers were used in NASA-JPL Mars Microprobe. The most developed accelerometers for airbag crash- sensing are rated for a full range of +/- 50 G. The range of sensitivity for accelerometers required for military or aerospace applications is much larger, varying from 20,000 G (to measure acceleration during gun and ballistic munition launches), and to 10(exp -6) G, when used as guidance sensors (to measure attitude and position of a spacecraft). The presence of moving parts on the surface of chip is specific to MEMS, and particularly, to accelerometers. This characteristic brings new reliability issues to micromachined accelerometers, including cyclic fatigue cracking of polysilicon cantilevers and springs, mechanical stresses that are caused by packaging and contamination in the internal cavity of the package. Studies of fatigue cracks initiation and growth in polysilicon showed that the fatigue damage may influence MEMS device performance, and the presence of water vapor significantly enhances crack initiation and growth. Environmentally induced failures, particularly, failures due to thermal cycling and mechanical shock are considered as one of major reliability concerns in MEMS. These environmental conditions are also critical for space applications of the parts. For example, the Mars pathfinder mission had experienced 80 mechanical shock events during the pyrotechnic separation processes.

  19. The involvement of dual mechanisms of photoinactivation of photosystem II in Capsicum annuum L. Plants.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Riichi; Terashima, Ichiro; Chow, Wah Soon

    2009-10-01

    For plants, light is an indispensable resource. However, it also causes a loss of photosynthetic activity associated with photoinactivation of photosystem II (PSII). In studies of the mechanism of this photoinactivation, there are two conflicting hypotheses at present. One is that excess energy received by leaves, being neither utilized by photosynthesis nor dissipated safely in non-photochemical quenching, causes the photoinactivation. The other involves a two-step mechanism in which excitation of Mn by photons is the primary cause. In the former hypothesis, photoinactivation of PSII should not occur in low light that provides little excess energy, but in the latter hypothesis it should. Therefore, we tested these two hypotheses in different irradiances. We used a system that can measure the fraction of functional PSII complexes under natural conditions and over a long period in intact leaves, which were attached to a plant treated with lincomycin taken up via the roots. The leaves were photoinactivated in low, medium or high light (30, 60 or 950 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) with white, blue, green or red light-emitting diode arrays. Our results showed that the extent of photoinactivation per photon exposure was higher in high light than in low light, consistent with the abundance of excess energy. However, photoinactivation did occur in low light with little excess energy, and blue light caused the greatest extent of photoinactivation followed by white, green and red light in this order, an order that can be predicted from the Mn absorbance spectrum. These results suggest that both mechanisms occur in the photoinactivation process.

  20. Dual mechanism of ion permeation through VDAC revealed with inorganic phosphate ions and phosphate metabolites.

    PubMed

    Krammer, Eva-Maria; Vu, Giang Thi; Homblé, Fabrice; Prévost, Martine

    2015-01-01

    In the exchange of metabolites and ions between the mitochondrion and the cytosol, the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is a key element, as it forms the major transport pathway for these compounds through the mitochondrial outer membrane. Numerous experimental studies have promoted the idea that VDAC acts as a regulator of essential mitochondrial functions. In this study, using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, free-energy calculations, and electrophysiological measurements, we investigated the transport of ions through VDAC, with a focus on phosphate ions and metabolites. We showed that selectivity of VDAC towards small anions including monovalent phosphates arises from short-lived interactions with positively charged residues scattered throughout the pore. In dramatic contrast, permeation of divalent phosphate ions and phosphate metabolites (AMP and ATP) involves binding sites along a specific translocation pathway. This permeation mechanism offers an explanation for the decrease in VDAC conductance measured in the presence of ATP or AMP at physiological salt concentration. The binding sites occur at similar locations for the divalent phosphate ions, AMP and ATP, and contain identical basic residues. ATP features a marked affinity for a central region of the pore lined by two lysines and one arginine of the N-terminal helix. This cluster of residues together with a few other basic amino acids forms a "charged brush" which facilitates the passage of the anionic metabolites through the pore. All of this reveals that VDAC controls the transport of the inorganic phosphates and phosphate metabolites studied here through two different mechanisms.

  1. A dual E3 mechanism for Rub1 ligation to Cdc53

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Daniel C.; Monda, Julie K.; Grace, Christy R. R.; Duda, David M.; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Kurz, Thimo; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary In ubiquitin-like protein (UBL) cascades, a thioester-linked E2~UBL complex typically interacts with an E3 enzyme for UBL transfer to the target. Here we demonstrate a variant mechanism, whereby the E2 Ubc12 functions with two E3s, Hrt1 and Dcn1, for ligation of the UBL Rub1 to Cdc53’s WHB subdomain. Hrt1 functions like a conventional RING E3, with its N-terminus recruiting Cdc53 and C-terminal RING activating Ubc12~Rub1. Dcn1’s “potentiating neddylation” domain (Dcn1P) acts as an additional E3, reducing nonspecific Hrt1-mediated Ubc12~Rub1 discharge and directing Ubc12’s active site to Cdc53. Crystal structures of Dcn1P-Cdc53WHB and Ubc12 allow modeling of a catalytic complex, supported by mutational data. We propose that Dcn1’s interactions with both Cdc53 and Ubc12 would restrict the otherwise flexible Hrt1 RING-bound Ubc12~Rub1 to a catalytically competent orientation. Our data reveal mechanisms by which two E3s function synergistically to promote UBL transfer from one E2 to a target. PMID:20832729

  2. Dual mechanisms of green tea extract (EGCG)-induced cell survival in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin Ho; Han, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Eun Ju; Seo, Jin Young; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Kyu Han; Youn, Jai Il; Eun, Hee Chul

    2003-10-01

    Beneficial effects attributed to green tea, such as its anticancer and antioxidant properties, may be mediated by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). In this study, the effects of EGCG on cell proliferation and UV-induced apoptosis were investigated in normal epidermal keratinocytes. When topically applied to aged human skin, EGCG stimulated the proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes, which increased the epidermal thickness. In addition, this topical application also inhibited the UV-induced apoptosis of epidermal keratinocytes. EGCG was found to increase the phosphorylation of Bad protein at the Ser112 and Ser136. Moreover, EGCG-induced Erk phosphorylation was found to be critical for the phosphorylation of Ser112 in Bad protein, and the EGCG-induced activation of the Akt pathway was found to be involved in the phosphorylation of Ser136. Furthermore, EGCG increased Bcl-2 expression but decreased Bax expression, causing an increase in the Bcl-2-to-Bax ratio. In addition, we demonstrate the differential growth inhibitory effects of EGCG on cancer cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that EGCG promotes keratinocyte survival and inhibits the UV-induced apoptosis via two mechanisms: by phosphorylating Ser112 and Ser136 of Bad protein through Erk and Akt pathways, respectively, and by increasing the Bcl-2-to-Bax ratio. Moreover, these two proposed mechanisms of EGCG-induced cell proliferation may differ kinetically to promote keratinocyte survival.

  3. Role of Orexin-1 Receptor Mechanisms on Compulsive Food Consumption in a Model of Binge Eating in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Laura; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Cifani, Carlo; Costantini, Vivian J A; Massagrande, Mario; Montanari, Dino; Martinelli, Prisca; Antolini, Marinella; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Massi, Maurizio; Merlo-Pich, Emilio; Di Fabio, Romano; Corsi, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Orexins (OX) and their receptors (OXR) modulate feeding, arousal, stress, and drug abuse. Neural systems that motivate and reinforce drug abuse may also underlie compulsive food seeking and intake. Therefore, the effects of GSK1059865 (5-bromo-N-[(2S,5S)-1-(3-fluoro-2-methoxybenzoyl)-5-methylpiperidin-2-yl]methyl-pyridin-2-amine), a selective OX1R antagonist, JNJ-10397049 (N-(2,4-dibromophenyl)-N′-[(4S,5S)-2,2-dimethyl-4-phenyl-1,3-dioxan-5-yl]urea), a selective OX2R antagonist, and SB-649868 (N-[((2S)-1-{[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl]carbonyl}-2-piperidinyl)methyl]-1-benzofuran-4-carboxamide), a dual OX1/OX2R antagonist were evaluated in a binge eating (BE) model in female rats. BE of highly palatable food (HPF) was evoked by three cycles of food restriction followed by stress, elicited by exposing rats to HPF, but preventing them from having access to it for 15 min. Pharmacokinetic assessments of all compounds were obtained under the same experimental conditions used for the behavioral experiments. Topiramate was used as the reference compound as it selectively blocks BE in rats and humans. Dose-related thresholds for sleep-inducing effects of the OXR antagonists were measured using polysomnography in parallel experiments. SB-649868 and GSK1059865, but not JNJ-10397049, selectively reduced BE for HPF without affecting standard food pellet intake, at doses that did not induce sleep. These results indicate, for the first time, a major role of OX1R mechanisms in BE, suggesting that selective antagonism at OX1R could represent a novel pharmacological treatment for BE and possibly other eating disorders with a compulsive component. PMID:22569505

  4. Role of orexin-1 receptor mechanisms on compulsive food consumption in a model of binge eating in female rats.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Laura; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Cifani, Carlo; Costantini, Vivian J A; Massagrande, Mario; Montanari, Dino; Martinelli, Prisca; Antolini, Marinella; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Massi, Maurizio; Merlo-Pich, Emilio; Di Fabio, Romano; Corsi, Mauro

    2012-08-01

    Orexins (OX) and their receptors (OXR) modulate feeding, arousal, stress, and drug abuse. Neural systems that motivate and reinforce drug abuse may also underlie compulsive food seeking and intake. Therefore, the effects of GSK1059865 (5-bromo-N-[(2S,5S)-1-(3-fluoro-2-methoxybenzoyl)-5-methylpiperidin-2-yl]methyl-pyridin-2-amine), a selective OX(1)R antagonist, JNJ-10397049 (N-(2,4-dibromophenyl)-N'-[(4S,5S)-2,2-dimethyl-4-phenyl-1,3-dioxan-5-yl]urea), a selective OX(2)R antagonist, and SB-649868 (N-[((2S)-1-{[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl]carbonyl}-2-piperidinyl)methyl]-1-benzofuran-4-carboxamide), a dual OX(1)/OX(2)R antagonist were evaluated in a binge eating (BE) model in female rats. BE of highly palatable food (HPF) was evoked by three cycles of food restriction followed by stress, elicited by exposing rats to HPF, but preventing them from having access to it for 15 min. Pharmacokinetic assessments of all compounds were obtained under the same experimental conditions used for the behavioral experiments. Topiramate was used as the reference compound as it selectively blocks BE in rats and humans. Dose-related thresholds for sleep-inducing effects of the OXR antagonists were measured using polysomnography in parallel experiments. SB-649868 and GSK1059865, but not JNJ-10397049, selectively reduced BE for HPF without affecting standard food pellet intake, at doses that did not induce sleep. These results indicate, for the first time, a major role of OX(1)R mechanisms in BE, suggesting that selective antagonism at OX(1)R could represent a novel pharmacological treatment for BE and possibly other eating disorders with a compulsive component.

  5. Mechanisms of action of the 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Stewart J; Rapoport, Alan M; Sheftell, Fred D

    2002-07-01

    Recent studies of the pathophysiology of migraine provide evidence that the headache phase is associated with multiple physiologic actions. These actions include the release of vasoactive neuropeptides by the trigeminovascular system, vasodilation of intracranial extracerebral vessels, and increased nociceptive neurotransmission within the central trigeminocervical complex. The 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists, collectively known as triptans, are a major advance in the treatment of migraine. The beneficial effects of the triptans in patients with migraine are related to their multiple mechanisms of action at sites implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. These mechanisms are mediated by 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors and include vasoconstriction of painfully dilated cerebral blood vessels, inhibition of the release of vasoactive neuropeptides by trigeminal nerves, and inhibition of nociceptive neurotransmission. The high affinity of the triptans for 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors and their favorable pharmacologic properties contribute to the beneficial effects of these drugs, including rapid onset of action, effective relief of headache and associated symptoms, and low incidence of adverse effects. PMID:12117355

  6. Loss of the membrane anchor of the target receptor is a mechanism of bioinsecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Darboux, Isabelle; Pauchet, Yannick; Castella, Claude; Silva-Filha, Maria Helena; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina; Charles, Jean-François; Pauron, David

    2002-04-30

    The mosquitocidal activity of Bacillus sphaericus is because of a binary toxin (Bin), which binds to Culex pipiens maltase 1 (Cpm1), an alpha-glucosidase present in the midgut of Culex pipiens larvae. In this work, we studied the molecular basis of the resistance to Bin developed by a strain (GEO) of C. pipiens. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization experiments showed that Cpm1 was undetectable in the midgut of GEO larvae, although the gene was correctly transcribed. The sequence of the cpm1(GEO) cDNA differs from the sequence we previously reported for a susceptible strain (cpm1(IP)) by seven mutations: six missense mutations and a mutation leading to the premature termination of translation. When produced in insect cells, Cpm1(IP) was attached to the membrane by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). In contrast, the premature termination of translation of Cpm1(GEO) resulted in the targeting of the protein to the extracellular compartment because of truncation of the GPI-anchoring site. The interaction between Bin and Cpm1(GEO) and the enzyme activity of the receptor were not affected. Thus, Bin is not toxic to GEO larvae because it cannot interact with the midgut cell membrane, even though its receptor site is unaffected. This mechanism contrasts with other known resistance mechanisms in which point mutations decrease the affinity of binding between the receptor and the toxin. PMID:11983886

  7. Dual Raman-Brillouin microscope for chemical and mechanical characterization and imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a unique confocal microscope capable of measuring the Raman and Brillouin spectra simultaneously from a single spatial location. Raman and Brillouin scattering offer complementary information about a material's chemical and mechanical structure, respectively, and concurrent monitoring of both of these spectra would set a new standard for material characterization. We achieve this by applying recent innovations in Brillouin spectroscopy that reduce the necessary acquisition times to durations comparable to conventional Raman spectroscopy while attaining a high level of spectral accuracy. To demonstrate the potential of the system, we apply this system for imaging melanoma, arteriosclerotic plaque, embryonic development, bones and biomaterials. The developed instrument has the potential for very diverse analytical applications in basic biomedical science and biomedical diagnostics and imaging.

  8. Hydraulic actuator mechanism to control aircraft spoiler movements through dual input commands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irick, S. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An aircraft flight spoiler control mechanism is described. The invention enables the conventional, primary spoiler control system to retain its operational characteristics while accommodating a secondary input controlled by a conventional computer system to supplement the settings made by the primary input. This is achieved by interposing springs between the primary input and the spoiler control unit. The springs are selected to have a stiffness intermediate to the greater force applied by the primary control linkage and the lesser resistance offered by the spoiler control unit. Thus, operation of the primary input causes the control unit to yield before the springs, yet, operation of the secondary input, acting directly on the control unit, causes the springs to yield and absorb adjustments before they are transmitted into the primary control system.

  9. Dual Raman-Brillouin Microscope for Chemical and Mechanical Characterization and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Traverso, Andrew J; Thompson, Jonathan V; Steelman, Zachary A; Meng, Zhaokai; Scully, Marlan O; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-08-01

    We present a unique confocal microscope capable of measuring the Raman and Brillouin spectra simultaneously from a single spatial location. Raman and Brillouin scattering offer complementary information about a material's chemical and mechanical structure, respectively, and concurrent monitoring of both of these spectra would set a new standard for material characterization. We achieve this by applying recent innovations in Brillouin spectroscopy that reduce the necessary acquisition times to durations comparable to conventional Raman spectroscopy while attaining a high level of spectral accuracy. To demonstrate the potential of the system, we map the Raman and Brillouin spectra of a molded poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel sample in cyclohexane to create two-dimensional images with high contrast at microscale resolutions. This powerful tool has the potential for very diverse analytical applications in basic science, industry, and medicine.

  10. Research of the disbalance mechanism of dual collector lateral bipolar magnetotransistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, R. D.; Polomoshnov, S. A.; Kozlov, A. V.; Krasukov, A. J.

    2008-03-01

    The experimental research initial disbalance potential collectors from the scheme of inclusion two-collector lateral bipolar magnetotransistor (BMT) NPN-type, generated in a well is lead. By means of device-technological modelling the mechanism of occurrence initial disbalance is investigated and the way of its reduction initial disbalance is certain at maintenance of preservation of high sensitivity. The choice of the operating mode bipolar magnetotransistor is based on the distributions of the emitter injected electron currents in two symmetrical base electrodes - two contacts to the base-well, in two contacts to a substrate, in two collectors. The mode of magnetotransistor based on the influence of a magnetic field. Reduction of initial disbalance allows to increase relative size of a output valid signal ΔU= UC1(B) - UC2(B) - UC1(0) + UC2(0).

  11. Dual Mechanism of Ion Permeation through VDAC Revealed with Inorganic Phosphate Ions and Phosphate Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Krammer, Eva-Maria; Vu, Giang Thi; Homblé, Fabrice; Prévost, Martine

    2015-01-01

    In the exchange of metabolites and ions between the mitochondrion and the cytosol, the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is a key element, as it forms the major transport pathway for these compounds through the mitochondrial outer membrane. Numerous experimental studies have promoted the idea that VDAC acts as a regulator of essential mitochondrial functions. In this study, using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, free-energy calculations, and electrophysiological measurements, we investigated the transport of ions through VDAC, with a focus on phosphate ions and metabolites. We showed that selectivity of VDAC towards small anions including monovalent phosphates arises from short-lived interactions with positively charged residues scattered throughout the pore. In dramatic contrast, permeation of divalent phosphate ions and phosphate metabolites (AMP and ATP) involves binding sites along a specific translocation pathway. This permeation mechanism offers an explanation for the decrease in VDAC conductance measured in the presence of ATP or AMP at physiological salt concentration. The binding sites occur at similar locations for the divalent phosphate ions, AMP and ATP, and contain identical basic residues. ATP features a marked affinity for a central region of the pore lined by two lysines and one arginine of the N-terminal helix. This cluster of residues together with a few other basic amino acids forms a “charged brush” which facilitates the passage of the anionic metabolites through the pore. All of this reveals that VDAC controls the transport of the inorganic phosphates and phosphate metabolites studied here through two different mechanisms. PMID:25860993

  12. Caffeine stimulates locomotor activity in the mammalian spinal cord via adenosine A1 receptor-dopamine D1 receptor interaction and PKA-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, JeanMarie; Santana-Almansa, Alexandra; Matos-Vergara, Nikol; Marrero-Cordero, Luis René; Cabezas-Bou, Ernesto; Díaz-Ríos, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine is a potent psychostimulant that can have significant and widely variable effects on the activity of multiple neuronal pathways. The most pronounced caffeine-induced behavioral effect seen in rodents is to increase locomotor activity which has been linked to a dose-dependent inhibition of A1 and A(2A) receptors. The effects of caffeine at the level of the lumbar spinal central pattern generator (CPG) network for hindlimb locomotion are lacking. We assessed the effects of caffeine to the locomotor function of the spinal CPG network via extracellular ventral root recordings using the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord preparation. Addition of caffeine and of an A1 receptor antagonist significantly decreased the cycle period accelerating the ongoing locomotor rhythm, while decreasing burst duration reversibly in most preparations suggesting the role of A1 receptors as the primary target of caffeine. Caffeine and an A1 receptor antagonist failed to stimulate ongoing locomotor activity in the absence of dopamine or in the presence of a D1 receptor antagonist supporting A1/D1 receptor-dependent mechanism of action. The use of caffeine or an A1 receptor blocker failed to stimulate an ongoing locomotor rhythm in the presence of a blocker of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) supporting the need of this intracellular pathway for the modulatory effects of caffeine to occur. These results support a stimulant effect of caffeine on the lumbar spinal network controlling hindlimb locomotion through the inhibition of A1 receptors and subsequent activation of D1 receptors via a PKA-dependent intracellular mechanism.

  13. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, James C; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states.

  14. Noncanonical Myo9b-RhoGAP Accelerates RhoA GTP Hydrolysis by a Dual-Arginine-Finger Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fengshuang; Kong, Ruirui; Ren, Jinqi; Zhu, Li; Lou, Jizhong; Wu, Jane Y; Feng, Wei

    2016-07-31

    The GTP hydrolysis activities of Rho GTPases are stimulated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), which contain a RhoGAP domain equipped with a characteristic arginine finger and an auxiliary asparagine for catalysis. However, the auxiliary asparagine is missing in the RhoGAP domain of Myo9b (Myo9b-RhoGAP), a unique motorized RhoGAP that specifically targets RhoA for controlling cell motility. Here, we determined the structure of Myo9b-RhoGAP in complex with GDP-bound RhoA and magnesium fluoride. Unexpectedly, Myo9b-RhoGAP contains two arginine fingers at its catalytic site. The first arginine finger resembles the one within the canonical RhoGAP domains and inserts into the nucleotide-binding pocket of RhoA, whereas the second arginine finger anchors the Switch I loop of RhoA and interacts with the nucleotide, stabilizing the transition state of GTP hydrolysis and compensating for the lack of the asparagine. Mutating either of the two arginine fingers impaired the catalytic activity of Myo9b-RhoGAP and affected the Myo9b-mediated cell migration. Our data indicate that Myo9b-RhoGAP accelerates RhoA GTP hydrolysis by a previously unknown dual-arginine-finger mechanism, which may be shared by other noncanonical RhoGAP domains lacking the auxiliary asparagine. PMID:27363609

  15. Production of an antimicrobial peptide AN5-1 in Escherichia coli and its dual mechanisms against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tonghui; Huang, Yibing; Chen, Yuxin

    2015-05-01

    AN5-1 (YSKSLPLSVLNP) is an antimicrobial peptide isolated from the fermentation broth of Paenibacillus alvei strain AN5 (J Ind Microb Biotechnol 2013; 40: 571-9). In this study, we report the application of ubiquitin fusion technology to the expression and purification of AN5-1. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and measurement of hemolytic activity (MHC) were measured to confirm the biological activities of the expressed AN5-1. Bacterial cell membrane permeabilization was investigated to show the interaction between the AN5-1 and the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Furthermore, intracellular activities of the AN5-1 were determined by genomic DNA interaction assays. The results revealed AN5-1 damaging bacterial membranes and binding to bacterial genomic DNA to inhibit cellular functions, suggesting that it has multiple intracellular targets in bacteria. The application of ubiquitin fusion technology may be an excellent approach for industrial production to the expression and purification of antimicrobial peptide. Furthermore, AN5-1 was demonstrated as an antimicrobial peptide with great potentials, as bacterial resistance to AN5-1 would be not expected, due to the dual mechanisms of AN5-1 against bacteria.

  16. Concurrent Phosphorus Recovery and Energy Generation in Mediator-Less Dual Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells: Mechanisms and Influencing Factors.

    PubMed

    Almatouq, Abdullah; Babatunde, Akintunde O

    2016-03-29

    This study investigated the mechanism and key factors influencing concurrent phosphorus (P) recovery and energy generation in microbial fuel cells (MFC) during wastewater treatment. Using a mediator-less dual chamber microbial fuel cell operated for 120 days; P was shown to precipitate as struvite when ammonium and magnesium chloride solutions were added to the cathode chamber. Monitoring data for chemical oxygen demand (COD), pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and aeration flow rate showed that a maximum 38% P recovery was achieved; and this corresponds to 1.5 g/L, pH > 8, -550 ± 10 mV and 50 mL/min respectively, for COD, pH(cathode), ORP and cathode aeration flow rate. More importantly, COD and aeration flow rate were shown to be the key influencing factors for the P recovery and energy generation. Results further show that the maximum P recovery corresponds to 72 mW/m² power density. However, the energy generated at maximum P recovery was not the optimum; this shows that whilst P recovery and energy generation can be concurrently achieved in a microbial fuel cell, neither can be at the optimal value.

  17. Glutathione synthesis inhibitor butathione sulfoximine regulates ceruloplasmin by dual but opposite mechanism: Implication in hepatic iron overload.

    PubMed

    Tapryal, Nisha; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali; Mishra, Manoj Kumar; Das, Dola; Biswas, Sudipta; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K

    2010-06-01

    Glutathione (GSH) depletion is often detected in chronic pathological conditions like hepatitis C infection, alcohol consumption or xenobiotic assault with simultaneous reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and hepatic iron overload. However, relation between GSH depletion and regulators of iron homeostasis is not clear so far. To determine that hepatic HepG2 cells were treated with GSH synthesis inhibitor butathione sulfoximine (BSO) and a dual regulation of ceruloplasmin (Cp) that involves in hepatic iron release was detected unlike other iron homeostasis regulators. BSO treatment that caused marginal GSH deficiency increased Cp synthesis due to increased transcription mediated by activator protein (AP)-1-binding site. In higher GSH deficiency (> 40 %) with increased ROS generation, Cp expression was decreased due to promotion of Cp mRNA decay mediated by 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) as found by transfecting chimera of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene with Cp 3'UTR. RNA gel shift assay showed significant reduction in 3'UTR binding protein complex in similar condition. Decreased CAT expression and RNA-protein complex binding are reversed by pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine suggesting 3'UTR binding protein complex is redox-sensitive. This unique and opposite regulation of Cp provides a mechanism of hepatic iron-deposition during glutathione deficiency detected in chronic pathological conditions.

  18. Concurrent Phosphorus Recovery and Energy Generation in Mediator-Less Dual Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells: Mechanisms and Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Almatouq, Abdullah; Babatunde, Akintunde O.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism and key factors influencing concurrent phosphorus (P) recovery and energy generation in microbial fuel cells (MFC) during wastewater treatment. Using a mediator-less dual chamber microbial fuel cell operated for 120 days; P was shown to precipitate as struvite when ammonium and magnesium chloride solutions were added to the cathode chamber. Monitoring data for chemical oxygen demand (COD), pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and aeration flow rate showed that a maximum 38% P recovery was achieved; and this corresponds to 1.5 g/L, pH > 8, −550 ± 10 mV and 50 mL/min respectively, for COD, pHcathode, ORP and cathode aeration flow rate. More importantly, COD and aeration flow rate were shown to be the key influencing factors for the P recovery and energy generation. Results further show that the maximum P recovery corresponds to 72 mW/m2 power density. However, the energy generated at maximum P recovery was not the optimum; this shows that whilst P recovery and energy generation can be concurrently achieved in a microbial fuel cell, neither can be at the optimal value. PMID:27043584

  19. Formulating a Sulfonated Anti-Viral Dendrimer in a Vaginal Microbicidal Gel having Dual Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mumper, Russell J.; Bell, Michael A.; Worthen, David R.; Cone, Richard A.; Lewis, Gareth R.; Moench, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    SPL7013 is the sodium salt of a sulfonated dendrimer that has potent antiviral properties. VivaGel®, a topical gel containing 3% w/w SPL7013, has been shown to be safe and well-tolerated in human clinical studies. BufferGel® is a Carbopol®-based acidic buffering gel that enhances the natural protective action of the vagina to produce a broad-spectrum microbicidal environment. The positive attributes of both gels were combined into a combination vaginal microbicidal gel having dual mechanisms of action. A 3% w/w SPL7013 combination gel, pH 3.7, was developed and fully characterized, and was shown to have more than 2-fold greater acidic buffering capacity than BufferGel. Ultracentrifugation experiments demonstrated that SPL7013 was not sequestered or entropically trapped in the viscous gel, thereby confirming, along with viral challenge studies, that SPL7013 has sufficient mobility in the viscous gel to exert antiviral properties. PMID:19040181

  20. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, James C.; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F.; Damschroder, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD73 (ecto-5′-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states. PMID:26854859

  1. Linearly tunable emission colors obtained from a fluorescent-phosphorescent dual-emission compound by mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhu; Yang, Zhiyong; Mu, Yingxiao; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yi-Fan; Chi, Zhenguo; Lo, Chang-Cheng; Liu, Siwei; Lien, Alan; Xu, Jiarui

    2015-05-18

    Organic mechanoluminochromic materials are mechano/piezo-responsive and promising for applications in sensors, displays, and data storage devices. However, their switching range of emission is seriously impeded by only one kind of emission (either a fluorescent or phosphorescent peak) in the spectrum of single organic compounds. This study presents a design strategy for pure organic compounds with excellent room-temperature fluorescent-phosphorescent dual-emission (rFPDE) properties, which combines the effective factors of dipenylsulfone group, crystalline state, and heavy atom effect. Following the principle of color mixing, myriad emission colors with a wide range from orange to purple and across white zone in a straight line in the chromaticity diagram of the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) can be obtained by simply mechanical grinding the compound. The unique properties could be concentrated on a pure organic compound through this design strategy, which provides a new efficient channel for the discovery of efficient mechano-responsive organic materials. PMID:25851943

  2. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, James C; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states. PMID:26854859

  3. Structural mechanism of G protein activation by G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Kim, Hee Ryung; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a family of membrane receptors that regulate physiology and pathology of various organs. Consequently, about 40% of drugs in the market targets GPCRs. Heterotrimeric G proteins are composed of α, β, and γ subunits, and act as the key downstream signaling molecules of GPCRs. The structural mechanism of G protein activation by GPCRs has been of a great interest, and a number of biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed since the late 80's. These studies investigated the interface between GPCR and G proteins and the structural mechanism of GPCR-induced G protein activation. Recently, arrestins are also reported to be important molecular switches in GPCR-mediated signal transduction, and the physiological output of arrestin-mediated signal transduction is different from that of G protein-mediated signal transduction. Understanding the structural mechanism of the activation of G proteins and arrestins would provide fundamental information for the downstream signaling-selective GPCR-targeting drug development. This review will discuss the structural mechanism of GPCR-induced G protein activation by comparing previous biochemical and biophysical studies.

  4. Mechanisms regulating cell membrane localization of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Edgar B; Dediulia, Tatjana; Fernando, Joan; Bertran, Esther; Egea, Gustavo; Navarro, Estanislao; Fabregat, Isabel

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells with a mesenchymal phenotype show an asymmetric subcellular distribution of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which is required for cell migration and invasion. In this work we examine the mechanisms that regulate the intracellular trafficking of CXCR4 in HCC cells. Results indicate that HCC cells present CXCR4 at the cell surface, but most of this protein is in endomembranes colocalizing with markers of the Golgi apparatus and recycling endosomes. The presence of high protein levels of CXCR4 present at the cell surface correlates with a mesenchymal-like phenotype and a high autocrine activation of the Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway. CXCR4 traffics along the Golgi/exocyst/plasma membrane pathway and requires EXOC4 (Sec8) component of the exocyst complex. HCC cells use distinct mechanisms for the CXCR4 internalization such as dynamin-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Regardless of the endocytic mechanisms, colocalization of CXCR4 and Rab11 is observed, which could be involved not only in receptor recycling but also in its post-Golgi transport. In summary, this work highlights membrane trafficking pathways whose pharmacological targeting could subsequently result in the inactivation of one of the main guiding mechanisms used by metastatic cells to colonize secondary organs and tissues.

  5. Mechanisms regulating cell membrane localization of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Edgar B; Dediulia, Tatjana; Fernando, Joan; Bertran, Esther; Egea, Gustavo; Navarro, Estanislao; Fabregat, Isabel

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells with a mesenchymal phenotype show an asymmetric subcellular distribution of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which is required for cell migration and invasion. In this work we examine the mechanisms that regulate the intracellular trafficking of CXCR4 in HCC cells. Results indicate that HCC cells present CXCR4 at the cell surface, but most of this protein is in endomembranes colocalizing with markers of the Golgi apparatus and recycling endosomes. The presence of high protein levels of CXCR4 present at the cell surface correlates with a mesenchymal-like phenotype and a high autocrine activation of the Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway. CXCR4 traffics along the Golgi/exocyst/plasma membrane pathway and requires EXOC4 (Sec8) component of the exocyst complex. HCC cells use distinct mechanisms for the CXCR4 internalization such as dynamin-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Regardless of the endocytic mechanisms, colocalization of CXCR4 and Rab11 is observed, which could be involved not only in receptor recycling but also in its post-Golgi transport. In summary, this work highlights membrane trafficking pathways whose pharmacological targeting could subsequently result in the inactivation of one of the main guiding mechanisms used by metastatic cells to colonize secondary organs and tissues. PMID:25704914

  6. Vandetanib (ZD6474), a dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Alessandro; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Falasconi, Fabiano; De Feo, Gianfranco; Del Giudice, Antonia; Bryce, Jane; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Normanno, Nicola; Perrone, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Vandetanib is a novel, orally available inhibitor of different intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor growth, progression, and angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, and REarranged during Transfection tyrosine kinase activity. Phase I clinical trials have shown that vandetanib is well tolerated as a single agent at daily doses < or =300 mg. In the phase II setting, negative results were observed with vandetanib in small cell lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and multiple myeloma. In contrast, three randomized phase II studies showed that vandetanib prolonged the progression-free survival (PFS) time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a single agent when compared with gefitinib or when added to chemotherapy. Rash, diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue, and asymptomatic QTc prolongation were the most common adverse events. Antitumor activity was also observed in medullary thyroid cancer. Four randomized phase III clinical trials in NSCLC are exploring the efficacy of vandetanib in combination with docetaxel, the Zactima in cOmbination with Docetaxel In non-small cell lung Cancer (ZODIAC) trial, or with pemetrexed, the Zactima Efficacy with Alimta in Lung cancer (ZEAL) trial, or as a single agent, the Zactima Efficacy when Studied versus Tarceva (ZEST) and the Zactima Efficacy trial for NSCLC Patients with History of EGFR-TKI chemo-Resistance (ZEPHYR) trials. Based on a press release by the sponsor of these trials, the PFS time was longer with vandetanib in the ZODIAC and ZEAL trials; the ZEST trial was negative for its primary superiority analysis, but was successful according to a preplanned noninferiority analysis of PFS. Ongoing phase II and III clinical trials will better define the appropriate schedule, the optimal setting of evaluation, and the safety of long-term use of vandetanib.

  7. Vandetanib (ZD6474), a dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Alessandro; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Falasconi, Fabiano; De Feo, Gianfranco; Del Giudice, Antonia; Bryce, Jane; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Normanno, Nicola; Perrone, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Vandetanib is a novel, orally available inhibitor of different intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor growth, progression, and angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, and REarranged during Transfection tyrosine kinase activity. Phase I clinical trials have shown that vandetanib is well tolerated as a single agent at daily doses < or =300 mg. In the phase II setting, negative results were observed with vandetanib in small cell lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and multiple myeloma. In contrast, three randomized phase II studies showed that vandetanib prolonged the progression-free survival (PFS) time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a single agent when compared with gefitinib or when added to chemotherapy. Rash, diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue, and asymptomatic QTc prolongation were the most common adverse events. Antitumor activity was also observed in medullary thyroid cancer. Four randomized phase III clinical trials in NSCLC are exploring the efficacy of vandetanib in combination with docetaxel, the Zactima in cOmbination with Docetaxel In non-small cell lung Cancer (ZODIAC) trial, or with pemetrexed, the Zactima Efficacy with Alimta in Lung cancer (ZEAL) trial, or as a single agent, the Zactima Efficacy when Studied versus Tarceva (ZEST) and the Zactima Efficacy trial for NSCLC Patients with History of EGFR-TKI chemo-Resistance (ZEPHYR) trials. Based on a press release by the sponsor of these trials, the PFS time was longer with vandetanib in the ZODIAC and ZEAL trials; the ZEST trial was negative for its primary superiority analysis, but was successful according to a preplanned noninferiority analysis of PFS. Ongoing phase II and III clinical trials will better define the appropriate schedule, the optimal setting of evaluation, and the safety of long-term use of vandetanib. PMID:19349511

  8. Dual Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin-like Growth Factor Receptor I Reduces Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Galer, Chad E.; Corey, Christina L.; Wang, Zhuoying; Younes, Maher N.; Gomez-Rivera, Fernando; Jasser, Samar A.; Ludwig, Dale L.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Weber, Randal S.; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) is the second most common non-melanoma skin cancer. The majority of the ~250,000 cases occurring annually in the United States are small, non-aggressive, and cured by excision alone. However, a subset of these tumors which are defined by poorly differentiated histology, large tumor size, invasion of adjacent structures and/or regional metastases can prove resistant to treatment despite adjuvant radiotherapy and have increased risk of recurrence and nodal metastasis. Novel therapeutic approaches are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with aggressive CSCC. Experimental Design We analyzed the effect of targeted therapy on the growth and survival of CSCC cell lines using an anti-IGF-IR antibody, A12, alone or in combination with an anti-EGF-R antibody, cetuximab, both in vitro and in vivo in an athymic nude mouse model of CSCC. Results Treatment with A12 and cetuximab inhibited the signaling pathways of IGF-IR and EGFR and inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of SCC cell lines in vitro. Immunohistochemical staining revealed decreased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and microvessel density (MVD) as well as increased apoptosis within the treated tumor xenografts. In addition, the administration of A12, alone or in combination with cetuximab inhibited the growth of tumors by 51% and 92% respectively, and significantly enhanced survival in the nude mouse model of CSCC (p = 0.044 and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions These data suggest that dual treatment with monoclonal antibodies to the EGFR and IGF-IR may be therapeutically useful in the treatment of CSCC. PMID:20848439

  9. REVIEWMolecular mechanisms underlying physiological and receptor pleiotropic effects mediated by GLP-1R activation

    PubMed Central

    Pabreja, K; Mohd, M A; Koole, C; Wootten, D; Furness, S G B

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes in developed countries is increasing yearly with a significant negative impact on patient quality of life and an enormous burden on the healthcare system. Current biguanide and thiazolidinedione treatments for type 2 diabetes have a number of clinical limitations, the most serious long-term limitation being the eventual need for insulin replacement therapy (Table 1). Since 2007, drugs targeting the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor have been marketed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. These drugs have enjoyed a great deal of success even though our underlying understanding of the mechanisms for their pleiotropic effects remain poorly characterized even while major pharmaceutical companies actively pursue small molecule alternatives. Coupling of the GLP-1 receptor to more than one signalling pathway (pleiotropic signalling) can result in ligand-dependent signalling bias and for a peptide receptor such as the GLP-1 receptor this can be exaggerated with the use of small molecule agonists. Better consideration of receptor signalling pleiotropy will be necessary for future drug development. This is particularly important given the recent failure of taspoglutide, the report of increased risk of pancreatitis associated with GLP-1 mimetics and the observed clinical differences between liraglutide, exenatide and the newly developed long-acting exenatide long acting release, albiglutide and dulaglutide. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:23889512

  10. Turnover of acetylcholine receptors: Mechanisms of regulation. Final report, 1 August 1985-30 November 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Drachman, D.B.

    1990-12-31

    The synthesis, insertion and degradation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) of skeletal muscle cells as closely regulated both by the muscle cells and by the motor nerves that supply them. The goal of this project is to elucidate the mechanisms of regulation of the AChRs, both at the neuromuscular junctional and at extrajunctional regions. The results of our studies on junctional AChRs have shown that: Both stable and rapidly turned over (RTO) AChRs are present at normally innervated neuromuscular junctions` Synthesis and insertion of AChRs at neuromuscular junctions occurs rapidly, at a rate consistent with the rapid rate of turnover of RTOs. RTOs serve as precursors of stable AChRs. Acetylcholine receptors, RA5 Neuromuscular junctions, Motor nerves.

  11. Progesterone modulates the LPS-induced nitric oxide production by a progesterone-receptor independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Manuel Luis; Schander, Julieta Aylen; Bariani, María Victoria; Correa, Fernando; Franchi, Ana María

    2015-12-15

    Genital tract infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria induce miscarriage and are one of the most common complications of human pregnancy. LPS administration to 7-day pregnant mice induces embryo resorption after 24h, with nitric oxide playing a fundamental role in this process. We have previously shown that progesterone exerts protective effects on the embryo by modulating the inflammatory reaction triggered by LPS. Here we sought to investigate whether the in vivo administration of progesterone modulated the LPS-induced nitric oxide production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pregnant and non-pregnant mice. We found that progesterone downregulated LPS-induced nitric oxide production by a progesterone receptor-independent mechanism. Moreover, our results suggest a possible participation of glucocorticoid receptors in at least some of the anti-inflammatory effects of progesterone.

  12. Flunitrazepam rapidly reduces GABAA receptor subunit protein expression via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Price, Sally A; Bristow, David R

    1998-01-01

    Acute flunitrazepam (1 μM) exposure for 1 h reduced GABAA receptor α1 (22±4%, mean±s.e.mean) and β2/3 (21±4%) subunit protein levels in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. This rapid decrease in subunit proteins was completely prevented by bisindolymaleimide 1 (1 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but not by N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, 4.8 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinases A and G. These results suggest the existence of a benzodiazepine-induced mechanism to rapidly alter GABAA receptor protein expression, that appears to be dependent on protein kinase C activity. PMID:9723942

  13. [Action mechanisms of prolactin and its receptors on penile erection and ejaculation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-zhong; Xu, Ai-ming; Chen, Wei; Wang, Zeng-jun

    2015-12-01

    Prolactin is a polypeptide hormone which mainly acts on the reproductive system and plays an important role in penile erection and ejaculation. Prolactin receptors have a variety of short forms apart from the classic long form, which are widely expressed in male reproductive glands. High levels of prolactin can induce erectile dysfunction and results in secondary male infertility, which are mainly associated with the inhibition of dopaminergic activity, reduction of the testosterone level, and contraction of the cavernous smooth muscle. Moreover, low levels of prolactin can result in ejaculatory dysfunction. This article updates the views on the expressions of prolactin receptors in the male reproductive system, the effects of prolactin on penile erection and ejaculation, and its action mechanisms.

  14. Dual Pili Post-translational Modifications Synergize to Mediate Meningococcal Adherence to Platelet Activating Factor Receptor on Human Airway Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Benjamin L.; Power, Peter M.; Swords, W. Edward; Weiser, Jeffery N.; Apicella, Michael A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Pili of pathogenic Neisseria are major virulence factors associated with adhesion, twitching motility, auto-aggregation, and DNA transformation. Pili of N. meningitidis are subject to several different post-translational modifications. Among these pilin modifications, the presence of phosphorylcholine (ChoP) and a glycan on the pilin protein are phase-variable (subject to high frequency, reversible on/off switching of expression). In this study we report the location of two ChoP modifications on the C-terminus of N. meningitidis pilin. We show that the surface accessibility of ChoP on pili is affected by phase variable changes to the structure of the pilin-linked glycan. We identify for the first time that the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFr) is a key, early event receptor for meningococcal adherence to human bronchial epithelial cells and tissue, and that synergy between the pilin-linked glycan and ChoP post-translational modifications is required for pili to optimally engage PAFr to mediate adherence to human airway cells. PMID:23696740

  15. Kainate receptor pore‐forming and auxiliary subunits regulate channel block by a novel mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Patricia M. G. E.; Aurousseau, Mark R. P.; Musgaard, Maria; Biggin, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Kainate receptor heteromerization and auxiliary subunits, Neto1 and Neto2, attenuate polyamine ion‐channel block by facilitating blocker permeation.Relief of polyamine block in GluK2/GluK5 heteromers results from a key proline residue that produces architectural changes in the channel pore α‐helical region.Auxiliary subunits exert an additive effect to heteromerization, and thus relief of polyamine block is due to a different mechanism.Our findings have broad implications for work on polyamine block of other cation‐selective ion channels. Abstract Channel block and permeation by cytoplasmic polyamines is a common feature of many cation‐selective ion channels. Although the channel block mechanism has been studied extensively, polyamine permeation has been considered less significant as it occurs at extreme positive membrane potentials. Here, we show that kainate receptor (KAR) heteromerization and association with auxiliary proteins, Neto1 and Neto2, attenuate polyamine block by enhancing blocker permeation. Consequently, polyamine permeation and unblock occur at more negative and physiologically relevant membrane potentials. In GluK2/GluK5 heteromers, enhanced permeation is due to a single proline residue in GluK5 that alters the dynamics of the α‐helical region of the selectivity filter. The effect of auxiliary proteins is additive, and therefore the structural basis of polyamine permeation and unblock is through a different mechanism. As native receptors are thought to assemble as heteromers in complex with auxiliary proteins, our data identify an unappreciated impact of polyamine permeation in shaping the signalling properties of neuronal KARs and point to a structural mechanism that may be shared amongst other cation‐selective ion channels. PMID:26682513

  16. Dual strain mechanisms in a lead-free morphotropic phase boundary ferroelectric

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Julian; Simons, Hugh; Alikin, Denis O.; Turygin, Anton P.; Shur, Vladimir Y.; Kholkin, Andrei L.; Ursic, Hana; Bencan, Andreja; Malic, Barbara; Nagarajan, Valanoor; Rojac, Tadej

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical properties such as d33 and strain are significantly enhanced at morphotropic phase boundaries (MPBs) between two or more different crystal structures. Many actuators, sensors and MEMS devices are therefore systems with MPBs, usually between polar phases in lead (Pb)-based ferroelectric ceramics. In the search for Pb-free alternatives, systems with MPBs between polar and non-polar phases have recently been theorized as having great promise. While such an MPB was identified in rare-earth (RE) modified bismuth ferrite (BFO) thin films, synthesis challenges have prevented its realization in ceramics. Overcoming these, we demonstrate a comparable electromechanical response to Pb-based materials at the polar-to-non-polar MPB in Sm modified BFO. This arises from ‘dual’ strain mechanisms: ferroelectric/ferroelastic switching and a previously unreported electric-field induced transition of an anti-polar intermediate phase. We show that intermediate phases play an important role in the macroscopic strain response, and may have potential to enhance electromechanical properties at polar-to-non-polar MPBs. PMID:26791098

  17. β-adrenergic antagonists influence abdominal aorta contractility by mechanisms not involving β-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Hauzer, Willy; Bujok, Jolanta; Czerski, Albert; Rusiecka, Agnieszka; Pecka, Ewa; Gnus, Jan; Zawadzki, Wojciech; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR) are widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, where they considerably contribute to the control of its functions. β-blockers are commonly used in the treatment of disorders of the circulatory system. They act primarily by inhibiting cardiac β-receptors. However, there are also reports of pleiotropic action of β-blockers as well as of new compounds created to study β3 adrenergic receptors. The study aimed to investigate additional mechanisms of action of β-AR inhibitors in the rabbit abdominal aorta with emphasis on their action on α-adrenergic receptors and calcium influx. Responses to propranolol, betaxolol, metoprolol and SR59230A were evaluated in phenylephrine and PGF(2alpha) precontracted aortic rings. The effect of propranolol on the phenylephrine concentration-contraction curve was examined. Propranolol (≥ 10 μM) and SR59230A (≥ 0.1 μM) induced relaxations in phenylephrine-precontracted rings, while betaxolol and metoprolol had little effect. The β-AR inhibitors produced further contraction of tissues preincubated with PGF(2alpha), excluding SR59230A, which after initial contraction, elicited marked relaxation at a concentration above 1 ĕM. 100 μM of propranolol caused a significant rightward shift of the concentration-contraction curve to phenylephrine with no reduction in the maximum response. Incubation of aortic rings in phentolamine reduced the maximal contraction to propranolol; verapamil pretreatment by contrast enhanced contractile response. In conclusion, SR59230A and propranolol most probably act as α1-AR competitive antagonists in the presence of phenylephrine in rabbit abdominal aortic rings. After α-ARs blockade, propranolol exerts a weak relaxing activity connected with Ca2+ channel inactivation. SR59230A at a high concentration acts on the rabbit aorta by an additional mechanism needing further investigation.

  18. The discovery of N-[5-(4-bromophenyl)-6-[2-[(5-bromo-2-pyrimidinyl)oxy]ethoxy]-4-pyrimidinyl]-N'-propylsulfamide (Macitentan), an orally active, potent dual endothelin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Martin H; Boss, Christoph; Binkert, Christoph; Buchmann, Stephan; Bur, Daniel; Hess, Patrick; Iglarz, Marc; Meyer, Solange; Rein, Josiane; Rey, Markus; Treiber, Alexander; Clozel, Martine; Fischli, Walter; Weller, Thomas

    2012-09-13

    Starting from the structure of bosentan (1), we embarked on a medicinal chemistry program aiming at the identification of novel potent dual endothelin receptor antagonists with high oral efficacy. This led to the discovery of a novel series of alkyl sulfamide substituted pyrimidines. Among these, compound 17 (macitentan, ACT-064992) emerged as particularly interesting as it is a potent inhibitor of ET(A) with significant affinity for the ET(B) receptor and shows excellent pharmacokinetic properties and high in vivo efficacy in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Compound 17 successfully completed a long-term phase III clinical trial for pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:22862294

  19. The discovery of N-[5-(4-bromophenyl)-6-[2-[(5-bromo-2-pyrimidinyl)oxy]ethoxy]-4-pyrimidinyl]-N'-propylsulfamide (Macitentan), an orally active, potent dual endothelin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Martin H; Boss, Christoph; Binkert, Christoph; Buchmann, Stephan; Bur, Daniel; Hess, Patrick; Iglarz, Marc; Meyer, Solange; Rein, Josiane; Rey, Markus; Treiber, Alexander; Clozel, Martine; Fischli, Walter; Weller, Thomas

    2012-09-13

    Starting from the structure of bosentan (1), we embarked on a medicinal chemistry program aiming at the identification of novel potent dual endothelin receptor antagonists with high oral efficacy. This led to the discovery of a novel series of alkyl sulfamide substituted pyrimidines. Among these, compound 17 (macitentan, ACT-064992) emerged as particularly interesting as it is a potent inhibitor of ET(A) with significant affinity for the ET(B) receptor and shows excellent pharmacokinetic properties and high in vivo efficacy in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Compound 17 successfully completed a long-term phase III clinical trial for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  20. Novel 1,4-diarylpiperidine-4-methylureas as anti-hyperlipidemic agents: dual effectors on acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase and low-density lipoprotein receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shigehiro; Ban, Hitoshi; Kino, Kouichi; Ioriya, Katsuhisa; Muraoka, Masami

    2009-02-15

    A family of 1,4-diarylpiperidine-4-methylureas were designed and synthesized as novel dual effectors on ACAT and LDL receptor expression. We examined SAR of the synthesized compounds focusing on substitution at the three aromatic parts of the starting compound 1 and succeeded in identifying essential substituents for inhibition of ACAT and up-regulation of hepatic LDL receptor expression. Especially, we found that compound 12f, which can easily be prepared, has biological properties comparable to those of SMP-797, a promising ACAT inhibitor. In addition, the in vitro effects of 12f on lipid metabolism were substantially superior to those of a known ACAT inhibitor, Avasimibe. PMID:19167888

  1. Dual mechanisms of NF-kappaB inhibition in carnosol-treated endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, K.-C.; Chuang, J.-J.; Hsieh, C.-W.; Wung, B.-S.; Huang, G.-D.; Jian, T.-Y.; Sun, Y.-W.

    2010-05-15

    The increased adhesion of monocytes to injured endothelial layers is a critical early event in atherogenesis. Under inflammatory conditions, there is increased expression of specific cell adhesion molecules on activated vascular endothelial cells, which increases monocyte adhesion. In our current study, we demonstrate a putative mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effects of carnosol, a diterpene derived from the herb rosemary. Our results show that both carnosol and rosemary essential oils inhibit the adhesion of TNFalpha-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppress the expression of ICAM-1 at the transcriptional level. Moreover, carnosol was found to exert its inhibitory effects by blocking the degradation of the inhibitory protein IkappaBalpha in short term pretreatments but not in 12 h pretreatments. Our data show that carnosol reduces IKK-beta phosphorylation in pretreatments of less than 3 h. In TNFalpha-treated ECs, NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity was abolished by up to 12 h of carnosol pretreatment and this was blocked by Nrf-2 siRNA. The long-term inhibitory effects of carnosol thus appear to be mediated through its induction of Nrf-2-related genes. The inhibition of ICAM-1 expression and p65 translocation is reversed by HO-1 siRNA. Carnosol also upregulates the Nrf-2-related glutathione synthase gene and thereby increases the GSH levels after 9 h of exposure. Treating ECs with a GSH synthesis inhibitor, BSO, blocks the inhibitory effects of carnosol. In addition, carnosol increases p65 glutathionylation. Hence, our present findings indicate that carnosol suppresses TNFalpha-induced singling pathways through the inhibition of IKK-beta activity or the upregulation of HO-1 expression. The resulting GSH levels are dependent, however, on the length of the carnosol pretreatment period.

  2. Simultaneous Activation of Induced Heterodimerization between CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor and Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2) Reveals a Mechanism for Regulation of Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Coke, Christopher J; Scarlett, Kisha A; Chetram, Mahandranauth A; Jones, Kia J; Sandifer, Brittney J; Davis, Ahriea S; Marcus, Adam I; Hinton, Cimona V

    2016-05-01

    The G-protein-coupled chemokine receptor CXCR4 generates signals that lead to cell migration, cell proliferation, and other survival mechanisms that result in the metastatic spread of primary tumor cells to distal organs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that CXCR4 can form homodimers or can heterodimerize with other G-protein-coupled receptors to form receptor complexes that can amplify or decrease the signaling capacity of each individual receptor. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we found that CXCR4 can form an induced heterodimer with cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) in human breast and prostate cancer cells. Simultaneous, agonist-dependent activation of CXCR4 and CB2 resulted in reduced CXCR4-mediated expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and ultimately reduced cancer cell functions such as calcium mobilization and cellular chemotaxis. Given that treatment with cannabinoids has been shown to reduce invasiveness of cancer cells as well as CXCR4-mediated migration of immune cells, it is plausible that CXCR4 signaling can be silenced through a physical heterodimeric association with CB2, thereby inhibiting subsequent functions of CXCR4. Taken together, the data illustrate a mechanism by which the cannabinoid system can negatively modulate CXCR4 receptor function and perhaps tumor progression. PMID:26841863

  3. Dual role for Fcγ receptors in host defense and disease in Borrelia burgdorferi-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Belperron, Alexia A.; Liu, Nengyin; Booth, Carmen J.; Bockenstedt, Linda K.

    2014-01-01

    Arthritis in mice infected with the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, results from the influx of innate immune cells responding to the pathogen in the joint and is influenced in part by mouse genetics. Production of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells in vitro is largely mediated by Toll-like receptor (TLR) interaction with Borrelia lipoproteins, yet surprisingly mice deficient in TLR2 or the TLR signaling molecule MyD88 still develop arthritis comparable to that seen in wild type mice after B. burgdorferi infection. These findings suggest that other, MyD88-independent inflammatory pathways can contribute to arthritis expression. Clearance of B. burgdorferi is dependent on the production of specific antibody and phagocytosis of the organism. As Fc receptors (FcγR) are important for IgG-mediated clearance of immune complexes and opsonized particles by phagocytes, we examined the role that FcγR play in host defense and disease in B. burgdorferi-infected mice. B. burgdorferi-infected mice deficient in the Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcεRγ−/− mice) harbored ~10 fold more spirochetes than similarly infected wild type mice, and this was associated with a transient increase in arthritis severity. While the elevated pathogen burdens seen in B. burgdorferi-infected MyD88−/− mice were not affected by concomitant deficiency in FcγR, arthritis was reduced in FcεRγ−/−MyD88−/− mice in comparison to wild type or single knockout mice. Gene expression analysis from infected joints demonstrated that absence of both MyD88 and FcγR lowers mRNA levels of proteins involved in inflammation, including Cxcl1 (KC), Xcr1 (Gpr5), IL-1beta, and C reactive protein. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for FcγR-mediated immunity in limiting pathogen burden and arthritis in mice during the acute phase of B. burgdorferi infection, and further suggest that this pathway contributes to the arthritis that develops in B. burgdorferi

  4. Small-molecule ATP-competitive dual IGF-1R and insulin receptor inhibitors: structural insights, chemical diversity and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Jin, Meizhong; Wang, Jing; Buck, Elizabeth; Mulvihill, Mark J

    2012-03-01

    IGF-1R has been recognized as a major target in cancer drug discovery due to its strong implications in various stages of tumorigenesis based on accumulated preclinical data. Recent research on compensatory crosstalk between IGF-1R and insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathways suggests that targeting both IGF-1R and IR should result in a more therapeutically beneficial response, than targeting IGF-1R alone (e.g., IGF-1R-specific antibodies). These findings provided biological rationale and opened the door to the discovery of a variety of small-molecule dual IGF-1R and IR inhibitors. In this review we summarize the recent developments in this field, with a focus on binding modes and binding interactions of these inhibitors with IGF-1R and/or IR. Selectivity of these inhibitors has been discussed in this context as well. This is an important area to be discussed since one of the major challenges in kinase inhibitor drug discovery is to build an optimal selectivity profile based on biological rationale.

  5. Quantitative determination of MK-0767, a dual alpha/gamma peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist, in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Hengchang; Yan, Kerri; Xu, Xiaohui; Lo, Man-Wai

    2004-10-15

    5-[2,4-Dioxothiazolidin-5-yl)methyl]-2-methoxy-N-[[(4-trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]methyl]benzamide (I, MK-0767 or KRP-297, Fig. 1), is a dual alpha/gamma peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist. A LC-MS/MS method for the determination of I in human plasma has been successfully developed, validated and applied to clinical programs. The analyte and internal standard (II) are extracted from 0.05 mL plasma via solid phase extraction (SPE). HPLC is used for the separation of I and II from possible co-extracted endogenous and other compounds. Detection is by MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using a TurboIonSpray probe. The whole sample preparation is automated by using a Packard Multiprobe liquid handling system. The linear range is 4-2000 ng/mL in plasma. Recoveries were 71.1% and 69.4% for I and II, respectively. The method exhibited good linearity, reproducibility and sensitivity, selectivity and robustness when used for the analysis of clinical samples.

  6. Fracture mechanisms in dual phase steels based on the acicular ferrite + martensite/austenite microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poruks, Peter

    The fracture mechanisms of low carbon microalloyed plate steels based on the acicular ferrite + marten site/austenite microstructure (AF + M/A) are investigated. The final microstructure consists of a dispersed phase of submicron equi-axed martensite particles with a bainitic ferrite matrix. A series of plates with M/A volume fractions of 0.076--0.179 are studied. Brittle fracture is investigated by Instrumented Charpy impact testing of samples at -196°C and subsequent metallography. The M/A particles are identified as the crack nucleation sites and the cleavage fracture stress calculated to be 2400 MPa in a complete AF microstrucuture. This value is significantly larger than in steels that contain significant proportions of conventional bainite. Standard Charpy and Instrumented Charpy impact testing is conducted through a temperature range from -80 to + 22°C to study ductile fracture behaviour. The total absorbed energy is separated into energies of crack nucleation and of crack propagation. It is found that the energy of crack nucleation is weakly dependent on the volume fraction of M/A and completely independent of temperature over the range studied. The crack propagation energy varies significantly with both variables, decreasing with increased volume fraction of M/A and with decreasing temperature. The peak load in the instrumented Charpy data is used to calculate the dynamic fracture toughness, KId, which is found to be 105--120 MPa-m1/2. The void nucleation and void growth stages of ductile fracture are studied by metallographic examination of tensile bars. The sites of void nucleation are identified as inclusions and M/A particles. Voids nucleate at the M/A particles by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. A constant void nucleation strain of epsilon = 0.90 +/- 0.05 is measured for all of the samples independent of the volume fraction of M/A. A stress-based criterion is used to predict void nucleation and the interface strength is determined to be

  7. Dual-purpose linker for alpha helix stabilization and imaging agent conjugation to glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Navaratna, Tejas; Liao, Jianshan; Thurber, Greg M

    2015-02-18

    Peptides display many characteristics of efficient imaging agents such as rapid targeting, fast background clearance, and low non-specific cellular uptake. However, poor stability, low affinity, and loss of binding after labeling often preclude their use in vivo. Using glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) ligands exendin and GLP-1 as a model system, we designed a novel α-helix-stabilizing linker to simultaneously address these limitations. The stabilized and labeled peptides showed an increase in helicity, improved protease resistance, negligible loss or an improvement in binding affinity, and excellent in vivo targeting. The ease of incorporating azidohomoalanine in peptides and efficient reaction with the dialkyne linker enable this technique to potentially be used as a general method for labeling α helices. This strategy should be useful for imaging beta cells in diabetes research and in developing and testing other peptide targeting agents. PMID:25594741

  8. A common mechanism underlies stretch activation and receptor activation of TRPC6 channels

    PubMed Central

    Spassova, Maria A.; Hewavitharana, Thamara; Xu, Wen; Soboloff, Jonathan; Gill, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    The TRP family of ion channels transduce an extensive range of chemical and physical signals. TRPC6 is a receptor-activated nonselective cation channel expressed widely in vascular smooth muscle and other cell types. We report here that TRPC6 is also a sensor of mechanically and osmotically induced membrane stretch. Pressure-induced activation of TRPC6 was independent of phospholipase C. The stretch responses were blocked by the tarantula peptide, GsMTx-4, known to specifically inhibit mechanosensitive channels by modifying the external lipid-channel boundary. The GsMTx-4 peptide also blocked the activation of TRPC6 channels by either receptor-induced PLC activation or by direct application of diacylglycerol. The effects of the peptide on both stretch- and diacylglycerol-mediated TRPC6 activation indicate that the mechanical and chemical lipid sensing by the channel has a common molecular mechanism that may involve lateral-lipid tension. The mechanosensing properties of TRPC6 channels highly expressed in smooth muscle cells are likely to play a key role in regulating myogenic tone in vascular tissue. PMID:17056714

  9. Direct Role for Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Vascular Remodeling: Novel Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Jenny B.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2014-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a key regulator of blood pressure. MR-antagonist drugs are used to treat hypertension and heart failure, resulting in decreased mortality by mechanisms that are not completely understood. In addition to the kidney, MR is also expressed in the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of the vasculature, where it is activated by the hormone aldosterone and affects the expression of genes involved in vascular function at the cellular and systemic levels. Following vascular injury due to mechanical or physiological stresses, vessels undergo remodeling resulting in SMC hypertrophy, migration, and proliferation, as well as vessel fibrosis. Exuberant vascular remodeling is associated with poor outcomes in cardiovascular patients. This review compiles recent findings on the specific role of SMC-MR in the vascular remodeling process. The development and characterization of a SMC-specific MR-knockout mouse has demonstrated a direct role for SMC-MR in vascular remodeling. Additionally, several novel mechanisms contributing to SMC-MR-mediated vascular remodeling have been identified and are reviewed here, including Rho-kinase signaling, placental growth factor signaling through vascular endothelial growth factor type 1 receptor, and galectin signaling. PMID:24633842

  10. Allosteric mechanisms of G protein coupled receptor signaling: a structural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Tarjani M.; Kaya, Ali I.; Preininger, Anita M.; Hamm, Heidi E.; Iverson, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) use a complex series of intramolecular conformational changes to couple agonist binding to the binding and activation of cognate heterotrimeric G protein (Gαβγ). The mechanisms underlying this long-range activation have been identified using a variety of biochemical and structural approaches and have primarily used visual signal transduction via the GPCR rhodopsin and cognate heterotrimeric G protein transducin (Gt) as a model system. In this chapter, we will review the methods that have revealed allosteric signaling through rhodopsin and transducin. These methods can be applied to a variety of GPCR-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:22052489

  11. Estradiol decreases cortical reactive astrogliosis after brain injury by a mechanism involving cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    López Rodríguez, Ana Belén; Mateos Vicente, Beatriz; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Noé; Bellini, María José; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Bermudez-Silva, Francisco Javier; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Viveros, María-Paz

    2011-09-01

    The neuroactive steroid estradiol reduces reactive astroglia after brain injury by mechanisms similar to those involved in the regulation of reactive gliosis by endocannabinoids. In this study, we have explored whether cannabinoid receptors are involved in the effects of estradiol on reactive astroglia. To test this hypothesis, the effects of estradiol, the cannabinoid CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM251, and the cannabinoid CB2 antagonist/inverse agonist AM630 were assessed in the cerebral cortex of male rats after a stab wound brain injury. Estradiol reduced the number of vimentin immunoreactive astrocytes and the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive astrocytes in the proximity of the wound. The effect of estradiol was significantly inhibited by the administration of either CB1 or CB2 receptor antagonists. The effect of estradiol may be in part mediated by alterations in endocannabinoid signaling because the hormone increased in the injured cerebral cortex the messenger RNA levels of CB2 receptors and of some of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of endocannabinoids. These findings suggest that estradiol may decrease reactive astroglia in the injured brain by regulating the activity of the endocannabinoid system.

  12. Anti-infective mannose receptor immune mechanism in large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiangli; Li, Jiji; He, Jianyu; Liu, Wei; Jiang, Lihua; Ye, Yingying; Wu, Changwen

    2016-07-01

    Mannose receptor (MR) is a pattern recognition receptor (PRR) that plays a significant role in immunity responses. Its role has been described extensively in mammals, but very rarely in fish. Recently, with the rapid development of an aquaculture industry cultivating large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea), infectious diseases caused by viruses, bacteria and parasites are becoming more frequent and more severe, in particular bacterial infections caused by Vibrio anguillarum, resulting in great economical losses. Extensive use of antibiotics as conventional treatment has led to microenvironment imbalances, development of drug-resistant bacteria and deposition of drug residues, which cause environmental pollution and ultimately affect human health. The purpose of this pilot study was to detect the transcriptional levels of C-type mannose receptor genes MRC1 (4710-bp ORF; encoding 1437 aa; a signal peptide, a SMART RICIN domain, a SMART FN2 domain, eight SMART CLECT domain, and a transmembrane helix region) and MRC2 (3996-bp ORF; encoding 1484 aa; a SMART FN2 domain, eight SMART CLECT domains, and a transmembrane region) in the liver, kidney and spleen tissues of L. crocea challenged by V. anguillarum, to explore the effective domain and the molecular response mechanisms of MRC1 and MRC2, and, ultimately, to explore the possibility of developing a vaccine targeting V. anguillarum infections.

  13. Insulin-like factor regulates neural induction through an IGF1 receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Shuji; Oshima, Tomomi; Onuma, Yasuko; Ito, Yuzuru; Asashima, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signalling is required for normal embryonic growth and development. Previous reports indicated that the IGF/IGF1R/MAPK pathway contributes to neural induction and the IGF/IGF1R/PI3K/Akt pathway to eye development. Here, we report the isolation of insulin3 encoding a novel insulin-like ligand involved in neural induction. Insulin3 has a similar structure to pro-insulin and mature IGF ligands, but cannot activate the IGF1 receptor. However, similar to IGFs, Insulin3 induced the gene expression of an anterior neural marker, otx2, and enlarged anterior head structures by inhibiting Wnt signalling. Insulin3 are predominantly localised to the endoplasmic reticulum when otx2 is induced by insulin3. Insulin3 reduced extracellular Wnts and cell surface localised Lrp6. These results suggest that Insulin3 is a novel cell-autonomous inhibitor of Wnt signalling. This study provides the first evidence that an insulin-like factor regulates neural induction through an IGF1R-independent mechanism. PMID:26112133

  14. Investigation of Inhibition Mechanism of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 by Micro-second Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Yurtsever, Mine; Durdagi, Serdar

    2015-08-24

    Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) belongs to G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and plays an important role in treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since HIV uses CCR5 protein as a co-receptor. Recently, the crystal structure of CCR5-bound complex with an approved anti-retroviral drug (maroviroc) was resolved. During the crystallization procedure, amino acid residues (i.e., Cys224, Arg225, Asn226 and Glu227) at the third intra-cellular loop were replaced by the rubredoxin for stability reasons. In the current study, we aimed to understand the impact of the incorporated rubredoxin on the conformations of TM domains of the target protein. For this reason, rubredoxin was deleted from the crystal structure and the missing amino acids were engineered. The resultant structure was subjected to long (μs) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to shed light into the inhibitory mechanism. The derived model structure displayed a significant deviation in the cytoplasmic domain of TM5 and IC3 in the absence of rubredoxin. The principal component analyses (PCA) and MD trajectory analyses revealed important structural and dynamical differences at apo and holo forms of the CCR5.

  15. Investigation of Inhibition Mechanism of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 by Micro-second Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Yurtsever, Mine; Durdagi, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) belongs to G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and plays an important role in treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since HIV uses CCR5 protein as a co-receptor. Recently, the crystal structure of CCR5-bound complex with an approved anti-retroviral drug (maroviroc) was resolved. During the crystallization procedure, amino acid residues (i.e., Cys224, Arg225, Asn226 and Glu227) at the third intra-cellular loop were replaced by the rubredoxin for stability reasons. In the current study, we aimed to understand the impact of the incorporated rubredoxin on the conformations of TM domains of the target protein. For this reason, rubredoxin was deleted from the crystal structure and the missing amino acids were engineered. The resultant structure was subjected to long (μs) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to shed light into the inhibitory mechanism. The derived model structure displayed a significant deviation in the cytoplasmic domain of TM5 and IC3 in the absence of rubredoxin. The principal component analyses (PCA) and MD trajectory analyses revealed important structural and dynamical differences at apo and holo forms of the CCR5. PMID:26299310

  16. Anti-infective mannose receptor immune mechanism in large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiangli; Li, Jiji; He, Jianyu; Liu, Wei; Jiang, Lihua; Ye, Yingying; Wu, Changwen

    2016-07-01

    Mannose receptor (MR) is a pattern recognition receptor (PRR) that plays a significant role in immunity responses. Its role has been described extensively in mammals, but very rarely in fish. Recently, with the rapid development of an aquaculture industry cultivating large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea), infectious diseases caused by viruses, bacteria and parasites are becoming more frequent and more severe, in particular bacterial infections caused by Vibrio anguillarum, resulting in great economical losses. Extensive use of antibiotics as conventional treatment has led to microenvironment imbalances, development of drug-resistant bacteria and deposition of drug residues, which cause environmental pollution and ultimately affect human health. The purpose of this pilot study was to detect the transcriptional levels of C-type mannose receptor genes MRC1 (4710-bp ORF; encoding 1437 aa; a signal peptide, a SMART RICIN domain, a SMART FN2 domain, eight SMART CLECT domain, and a transmembrane helix region) and MRC2 (3996-bp ORF; encoding 1484 aa; a SMART FN2 domain, eight SMART CLECT domains, and a transmembrane region) in the liver, kidney and spleen tissues of L. crocea challenged by V. anguillarum, to explore the effective domain and the molecular response mechanisms of MRC1 and MRC2, and, ultimately, to explore the possibility of developing a vaccine targeting V. anguillarum infections. PMID:27071518

  17. [Myoanabolic steroids and selective androgen receptor modulators: mechanism of action and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Miklós

    2009-11-01

    Interest in anabolic steroids has been renewed in the last decade with the discovery of tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators exhibiting high myotropic and small androgenic activity. An explanation put forward by us in 1982 for the mechanism of the preferential myotropic effect of nandrolone (19-nortestosterone) exploits the fundamental difference between the 5alpha-reductase concentrations in skeletal muscle and androgenic target tissue. In androgenic tissue, testosterone is converted to the more potent 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone whereas nandrolone is converted to a less potent derivative. As 5alpha-reduction is negligible in skeletal muscle, this explains why nandrolone shows a greater myotropic to androgenic ratio when compared with testosterone. Anabolic steroids that do not undergo 5alpha-reduction exert myotropic-androgenic dissociation because their effect in androgenic tissues is not amplified by 5alpha-reduction. Tissue selectivity by receptor modulators may be achieved by inducing specific conformational changes of the androgen receptor that affect its interaction with transcriptional coregulators. Anabolic activity is mediated by the stimulation of ribosomal RNA synthesis therefore regulation of this synthesis by anabolic steroids would deserve detailed studies.

  18. Mechanics of the trachea and behaviour of its slowly adapting stretch receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Mortola, J P; Sant'Ambrogio, G

    1979-01-01

    1. The trachea is constructed by a series of U-shaped cartilaginous rings supporting a membranous posterior wall. We have studied separately the pressure-volume relationships of the two components. 2. The motion of the membranous posterior wall contributes most to the tracheal volume change caused by any given transmural pressure change; the cartilaginous rings provide a semi-rigid support to the posterior wall and have a far greater compliance with negative than positive transmural pressure. 3. The response of tracheal stretch receptors to transmural pressure can be explained by the mechanical coupling between cartilages and posterior wall. They respond both to positive and negative transmural pressure, they are active at zero transmural pressure and have a point of least activity with small negative transmural pressures. 4. The stress-strain relationship of the posterior wall has been studied in static and dynamic conditions in control situations and after removal of either the tunica fibrosa or the trachealis muscle. Each of these two components contributes to the stiffness of the posterior wall, with the trachealis muscle providing most of its viscosity. 5. The response of tracheal stretch receptors to transverse traction of the posterior membranous wall has been studied in both static and dynamic conditions before and after removal of the tunica fibrosa. The behaviour of these receptors reflects the visco-elastic properties of the trachealis muscle in which they have been localized. PMID:439039

  19. Distinct Signaling Mechanisms in Multiple Developmental Pathways by the SCRAMBLED Receptor of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Woo, Sooah; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    SCRAMBLED (SCM), a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is required for positional signaling in the root epidermis and for tissue/organ development in the shoot. To further understand SCM action, we generated a series of kinase domain variants and analyzed their ability to complement scm mutant defects. We found that the SCM kinase domain, but not kinase activity, is required for its role in root epidermal patterning, supporting the view that SCM is an atypical receptor kinase. We also describe a previously uncharacterized role for SCM in fruit dehiscence, because mature siliques from scm mutants fail to open properly. Interestingly, the kinase domain of SCM appears to be dispensable for this developmental process. Furthermore, we found that most of the SCM kinase domain mutations dramatically inhibit inflorescence development. Because this process is not affected in scm null mutants, it is likely that SCM acts redundantly to regulate inflorescence size. The importance of distinct kinase residues for these three developmental processes provides an explanation for the maintenance of the conserved kinase domain in the SCM protein, and it may generally explain its conservation in other atypical kinases. Furthermore, these results indicate that individual leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases may participate in multiple pathways using distinct signaling mechanisms to mediate diverse cellular communication events. PMID:25136062

  20. Luminal l-glutamate enhances duodenal mucosal defense mechanisms via multiple glutamate receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chikako; Mizumori, Misa; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Presence of taste receptor families in the gastrointestinal mucosa suggests a physiological basis for local and early detection of a meal. We hypothesized that luminal l-glutamate, which is the primary nutrient conferring fundamental umami or proteinaceous taste, influences mucosal defense mechanisms in rat duodenum. We perfused the duodenal mucosa of anesthetized rats with l-glutamate (0.1–10 mM). Intracellular pH (pHi) of the epithelial cells, blood flow, and mucus gel thickness (MGT) were simultaneously and continuously measured in vivo. Some rats were pretreated with indomethacin or capsaicin. Duodenal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) was measured with flow-through pH and CO2 electrodes. We tested the effects of agonists or antagonists for metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1 or 4 or calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) on defense factors. Luminal l-glutamate dose dependently increased pHi and MGT but had no effect on blood flow in the duodenum. l-glutamate (10 mM)-induced cellular alkalinization and mucus secretion were inhibited by pretreatment with indomethacin or capsaicin. l-glutamate effects on pHi and MGT were mimicked by mGluR4 agonists and inhibited by an mGluR4 antagonist. CaSR agonists acidified cells with increased MGT and DBS, unlike l-glutamate. Perfusion of l-glutamate with inosinate (inosine 5′-monophosphate, 0.1 mM) enhanced DBS only in combination, suggesting synergistic activation of the l-glutamate receptor, typical of taste receptor type 1. l-leucine or l-aspartate had similar effects on DBS without any effect on pHi and MGT. Preperfusion of l-glutamate prevented acid-induced cellular injury, suggesting that l-glutamate protects the mucosa by enhancing mucosal defenses. Luminal l-glutamate may activate multiple receptors and afferent nerves and locally enhance mucosal defenses to prevent subsequent injury attributable to acid exposure in the duodenum. PMID:19643955

  1. Dual action mechanisms of KK-3, a newly synthesized leu-enkephalin derivative, in the production of spinal analgesic effects.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Senda, T; Kaneto, H

    1990-04-01

    The action mechanism for the production of spinal analgesia of KK-3, tyrosyl-N-methyl-gamma-aminobutylyl-phenylalaninol, was examined by the tail pinch and tail flick methods. Intrathecal KK-3, 2.5, 5 and 10 nmol/mouse, dose-dependently produced an analgesic effect in both methods. In the tail pinch method, the analgesia was suppressed by 2 mg/kg but not by 1 mg/kg of naloxone; however, the analgesic effect was significantly antagonized by 1 and 2 mg/kg Mr2266, a kappa-antagonist. Meanwhile, both naloxone and Mr2266 failed to block the analgesic effect of KK-3 in the tail flick test. Intrathecal capsaicin, 0.3, 3 and 15 nmol/mouse, also produced a dose-dependent analgesic effect in the tail flick test, whereas no appreciable analgesia could be found in the tail pinch test. Neither naloxone nor Mr2266 blocked the analgesic effect of capsaicin. The results indicate that KK-3 may possess two separate pharmacological mechanisms for the production of analgesic effects on the spinal level: one is the depletion of substance P following its release from the spinal cord, and the other is the mediation through kappa-opioid receptors. PMID:2342228

  2. Molecular dynamics study-based mechanism of nefiracetam-induced NMDA receptor potentiation.

    PubMed

    Omotuyi, Olaposi I; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Plastic changes in the brain required for memory formation and long-term learning are dependent on N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor signaling. Nefiracetam reportedly boosts NMDA receptor functions as a basis for its nootropic properties. Previous studies suggest that nefiracetam potentiates the NMDA receptor activation, as a more potent co-agonist for glycine binding site than glycine, though the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, using BSP-SLIM method, a novel binding site within the core of spiral β-strands-1-5 of LBD-GLUN1 has been predicted in glycine-bound GLUN1 conformation in addition to the glycine pocket in Apo-GLUN1. Within the core of spiral β-strands-1-5 of LBD-GLUN1 pocket, all-atom molecular dynamics simulation revealed that nefiracetam disrupts Arg523-glycine-Asp732 interaction resulting in open GLUN1 conformation and ultimate diffusion of glycine out of the clamshell cleft. Open GLUN1 conformation coerces other intra-chain domains and proximal inter-chain domains to sample inactivate conformations resulting in closure of the transmembrane gate via a novel gauche trap on threonine 647 (chi-1 dihedral (χ1)=-45° instead of +45°). Docking of nefiracetam into the glycine pocket reversed the gauche trap and meditates partial opening of the TMD gate within a time-scale of 100ns as observed in glycine-only state. All these results suggest that nefiracetam can favorably complete with glycine for GLUN1-LBD in a two-step process, first by binding to a novel site of GLUN1-LBD-NMDA receptor followed by disruption of glycine-binding dynamics then replacing glycine in the GLUN1-LBD cleft. PMID:25659913

  3. A Common Molecular Motif Characterizes Extracellular Allosteric Enhancers of GPCR Aminergic Receptors and Suggests Enhancer Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Robert Root; Dillon, Patrick F

    2014-01-01

    Several classes of compounds that have no intrinsic activity on aminergic systems nonetheless enhance the potency of aminergic receptor ligands three-fold or more while significantly increasing their duration of activity, preventing tachyphylaxis and reversing fade. Enhancer compounds include ascorbic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, cortico-steroids, opioid peptides, opiates and opiate antagonists. This paper provides the first review of aminergic enhancement, demonstrating that all enhancers have a common, inobvious molecular motif and work through a common mechanism that is manifested by three common characteristics. First, aminergic enhancers bind directly to the amines they enhance, suggesting that the common structural motif is reflected in common binding targets. Second, one common target is the first extracellular loop of aminergic receptors. Third, at least some enhancers are antiphosphodiesterases. These observations suggest that aminergic enhancers act on the extracellular surface of aminergic receptors to keep the receptor in its high affinity state, trapping the ligand inside the receptor. Enhancer binding produces allosteric modifications of the receptor structure that interfere with phosphorylation of the receptor, thereby inhibiting down-regulation of the receptor. The mechanism explains how enhancers potentiate aminergic activity and increase duration of activity and makes testable predictions about additional compounds that should act as aminergic enhancers. PMID:25174918

  4. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in glucose homeostasis: the acute hyperglycemic and chronic insulin-sensitive effects of nicotine suggest dual opposing roles of the receptors in male mice.

    PubMed

    Vu, Christine U; Siddiqui, Jawed A; Wadensweiler, Paul; Gayen, Jiaur R; Avolio, Ennio; Bandyopadhyay, Gautam K; Biswas, Nilima; Chi, Nai-Wen; O'Connor, Daniel T; Mahata, Sushil K

    2014-10-01

    Cigarette smoking causes insulin resistance. However, nicotine induces anti-inflammation and improves glucose tolerance in insulin-resistant animal models. Here, we determined the effects of nicotine on glucose metabolism in insulin-sensitive C57BL/J6 mice. Acute nicotine administration (30 min) caused fasting hyperglycemia and lowered insulin sensitivity acutely, which depended on the activation of nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and correlated with increased catecholamine secretion, nitric oxide (NO) production, and glycogenolysis. Chlorisondamine, an inhibitor of nAChRs, reduced acute nicotine-induced hyperglycemia. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that the liver and muscle express predominantly β4 > α10 > α3 > α7 and β4 > α10 > β1 > α1 mRNA for nAChR subunits respectively, whereas the adrenal gland expresses β4 > α3 > α7 > α10 mRNA. Chronic nicotine treatment significantly suppressed expression of α3-nAChR (predominant peripheral α-subunit) in liver. Whereas acute nicotine treatment raised plasma norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (Epi) levels, chronic nicotine exposure raised only Epi. Acute nicotine treatment raised both basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). After chronic nicotine treatment, basal insulin level was elevated, but GSIS after acute saline or nicotine treatment was blunted. Chronic nicotine exposure caused an increased buildup of NO in plasma and liver, leading to decreased glycogen storage, along with a concomitant suppression of Pepck and G6Pase mRNA, thus preventing hyperglycemia. The insulin-sensitizing effect of chronic nicotine was independent of weight loss. Chronic nicotine treatment enhanced PI-3-kinase activities and increased Akt and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β phosphorylation in an nAChR-dependent manner coupled with decreased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. The latter effects caused suppression of Pepck and G6Pase gene expression. Thus, nicotine causes both

  5. Dual Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor α/δ Agonist GFT505 Improves Hepatic and Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity in Abdominally Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cariou, Bertrand; Hanf, Rémy; Lambert-Porcheron, Stéphanie; Zaïr, Yassine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Noël, Benoit; Flet, Laurent; Vidal, Hubert; Staels, Bart; Laville, Martine

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The development of new insulin sensitizers is an unmet need for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We investigated the effect of GFT505, a dual peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR)-α/δ agonist, on peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty-two abdominally obese insulin-resistant males (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance >3) were randomly assigned in a randomized crossover study to subsequent 8-week treatment periods with GFT505 (80 mg/day) or placebo, followed by a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic insulin clamp with a glucose tracer to calculate endogenous glucose production (EGP). The primary end point was the improvement in glucose infusion rate (GIR). Gene expression analysis was performed on skeletal muscle biopsy specimens. RESULTS GFT505 improved peripheral insulin sensitivity, with a 21% (P = 0.048) increase of the GIR at the second insulin infusion period. GFT505 also enhanced hepatic insulin sensitivity, with a 44% (P = 0.006) increase of insulin suppression of EGP at the first insulin infusion period. Insulin-suppressed plasma free fatty acid concentrations were significantly reduced on GFT505 treatment (0.21 ± 0.07 vs. 0.27 ± 0.11 mmol/L; P = 0.006). Neither PPARα nor PPARδ target genes were induced in skeletal muscle, suggesting a liver-targeted action of GFT505. GFT505 significantly reduced fasting plasma triglycerides (−21%; P = 0.003) and LDL cholesterol (−13%; P = 0.0006), as well as liver enzyme concentrations (γ-glutamyltranspeptidase: −30.4%, P = 0.003; alanine aminotransferase: −20.5%, P = 0.004). There was no safety concern or any indication of PPARγ activation with GFT505. CONCLUSIONS The dual PPARα/δ agonist GFT505 is a liver-targeted insulin-sensitizer that is a promising drug candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:23715754

  6. Estrogen receptor independent neurotoxic mechanism of bisphenol A, an environmental estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoot Mo; Seong, Min Jae; Lee, Jae Woong; Lee, Yong Kyung; Kim, Tae Myoung; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae Joong; Yun, Young Won; Kim, Tae Seong; Han, Soon Young

    2007-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been shown to cause developmental toxicity and carcinogenic effects. BPA may have physiological activity through estrogen receptor (ER) -α and -β, which are expressed in the central nervous system. We previously found that exposure of BPA to immature mice resulted in behavioral alternation, suggesting that overexposure of BPA could be neurotoxic. In this study, we further investigated the molecular neurotoxic mechanisms of BPA. BPA increased vulnerability (decrease of cell viability and differentiation, and increase of apoptotic cell death) of undifferentiated PC12 cells and cortical neuronal cells isolated from gestation 18 day rat embryos in a concentration-dependent manner (more than 50 µM). The ER antagonists, ICI 182,780, and tamoxifen, did not block these effects. The cell vulnerability against BPA was not significantly different in the PC12 cells overexpressing ER-α and ER-β compared with PC12 cells expressing vector alone. In addition, there was no difference observed between BPA and 17-β estradiol, a well-known agonist of ER receptor in the induction of neurotoxic responses. Further study of the mechanism showed that BPA significantly activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but inhibited anti-apoptotic nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. In addition, ERK-specific inhibitor, PD 98,059, reversed BPA-induced cell death and restored NF-κB activity. This study demonstrated that exposure to BPA can cause neuronal cell death which may eventually be related with behavioral alternation in vivo. However, this neurotoxic effect may not be directly mediated through an ER receptor, as an ERK/NF-κB pathway may be more closely involved in BPA-induced neuronal toxicity. PMID:17322771

  7. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S.

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  8. Studies on the mechanisms of action of picrotoxin, quercetin and pregnanolone at the GABAρ1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Goutman, Juan D; Calvo, Daniel J

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms of action of antagonists of the γ-aminobutyric acid C (GABAC) receptor picrotoxin, quercetin and pregnanolone were studied. Ionic currents (chloride), mediated through human homomeric GABAρ1 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, were recorded by two-electrode voltage clamp. Dose–response (D–R) curves and kinetic measurements of GABAρ1 currents were carried out in the presence or absence of antagonists. Use-dependent actions were also evaluated. Picrotoxin, quercetin and pregnanolone exerted noncompetitive actions. IC50 values measured at the EC50 for GABA (1 μM) were as follows: picrotoxin 0.6±0.1 μM (Hill coefficient n=1.0±0.2); quercetin 4.4±0.4 μM (n=1.5±0.2); pregnanolone 2.1±0.5 μM (n=0.8±0.1). These antagonists produced changes only in the slope of the linear current–voltage relationships, which was indicative of voltage-independent effects. The effect of picrotoxin on GABAρ1 currents was use-dependent, strongly relied on agonist concentration and showed a slow onset and offset. The mechanism was compatible with an allosteric inhibition and receptor activation was a prerequisite for antagonism. The effect of quercetin was use-independent, showed relatively fast onset and offset, and resulted in a slowed time course of the GABA-evoked currents. The effect of pregnanolone was use-independent, presented fast onset and a very slow washout, and did not affect current activation. All the antagonists accelerated the time course of deactivation of the GABAρ1 currents. PMID:14732759

  9. Permanent Suppression of Cortical Oscillations in Mice After Adolescent Exposure to Cannabinoids: Receptor Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Raver, Sylvina M.; Keller, Asaf

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana use in adolescence, but not adulthood, may permanently impair cognitive functioning and increase the risk of developing schizophrenia. Cortical oscillations are patterns of neural network activity implicated in cognitive processing, and are abnormal in patients with schizophrenia. We have recently reported that cortical oscillations are suppressed in adult mice that were treated, in adolescence but not adulthood, with the cannabinoids WIN55,212-2 (WIN) or Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). WIN and THC are cannabinoid types 1 and 2 receptor (CB1R & CB2R) agonists, and also have activity at non-cannabinoid receptor targets. However, as acute WIN and THC administration can suppress oscillations through CB1Rs, we hypothesize that a similar mechanism underlies the permanent suppression of oscillations by repeated cannabinoid exposure in adolescence. Here we test the prediction that cannabinoid exposure in adolescence permanently suppresses cortical oscillations by acting through CB1Rs, and that these suppressive effects can be antagonized by a CB1R antagonist. We treated adolescent mice with various cannabinoid compounds, and pharmacologically-evoked oscillations in vitro in adult mice. We find that WIN exposure for six days in early adolescence suppresses oscillations preferentially in adult medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) via CB1Rs, and that a similar CB1R mechanism accounts for the suppressive effects of long-term (20 day) adolescent THC in adult somatosensory cortex (SCx). Unexpectedly, we also find that CB2Rs may be involved in the suppression of oscillations in both mPFC and SCx by long-term adolescent cannabinoid exposure, and that non-cannabinoid receptors may also contribute to oscillation suppression in adult mPFC. These findings represent a novel attempt to antagonize the effects of adolescent cannabinoid exposure on neural network activity, and reveal the contribution of non-CB1R targets to the suppression of cortical oscillations. PMID:25036610

  10. Emerging Mechanisms of Resistance to Androgen Receptor Inhibitors in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Vivek K.

    2016-01-01

    Preface Over the past ten years, preclinical studies implicating sustained androgen receptor (AR) signaling as the primary driver of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) led to the development of novel agents targeting the AR pathway that are now in widespread clinical use. These drugs prolong survival of patients with late stage prostate cancer but are not curative. In this review, we highlight emerging mechanisms of acquired resistance to these contemporary therapies, which fall into the three broad categories of restored AR signaling, AR bypass signaling and complete AR independence. This diverse spectrum of resistance mechanisms presents new challenges for long term disease control, which may be addressable through early use of combination therapies guided by recent insights from genomic landscape studies of CRPC. PMID:26563462

  11. An electrostatic selection mechanism controls sequential kinase signaling downstream of the T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neel H; Wang, Qi; Yan, Qingrong; Karandur, Deepti; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Fallahee, Ian R; Russ, William P; Ranganathan, Rama; Weiss, Arthur; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of events that initiates T cell signaling is dictated by the specificities and order of activation of the tyrosine kinases that signal downstream of the T cell receptor. Using a platform that combines exhaustive point-mutagenesis of peptide substrates, bacterial surface-display, cell sorting, and deep sequencing, we have defined the specificities of the first two kinases in this pathway, Lck and ZAP-70, for the T cell receptor ζ chain and the scaffold proteins LAT and SLP-76. We find that ZAP-70 selects its substrates by utilizing an electrostatic mechanism that excludes substrates with positively-charged residues and favors LAT and SLP-76 phosphosites that are surrounded by negatively-charged residues. This mechanism prevents ZAP-70 from phosphorylating its own activation loop, thereby enforcing its strict dependence on Lck for activation. The sequence features in ZAP-70, LAT, and SLP-76 that underlie electrostatic selectivity likely contribute to the specific response of T cells to foreign antigens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20105.001 PMID:27700984

  12. Receptor Pre-Clustering and T cell Responses: Insights into Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Castro, Mario; van Santen, Hisse M; Férez, María; Alarcón, Balbino; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    T cell activation, initiated by T cell receptor (TCR) mediated recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I or II molecules (pMHC), shows exquisite specificity and sensitivity, even though the TCR-pMHC binding interaction is of low affinity. Recent experimental work suggests that TCR pre-clustering may be a mechanism via which T cells can achieve such high sensitivity. The unresolved stoichiometry of the TCR makes TCR-pMHC binding and TCR triggering, an open question. We formulate a mathematical model to characterize the pre-clustering of T cell receptors (TCRs) on the surface of T cells, motivated by the experimentally observed distribution of TCR clusters on the surface of naive and memory T cells. We extend a recently introduced stochastic criterion to compute the timescales of T cell responses, assuming that ligand-induced cross-linked TCR is the minimum signaling unit. We derive an approximate formula for the mean time to signal initiation. Our results show that pre-clustering reduces the mean activation time. However, additional mechanisms favoring the existence of clusters are required to explain the difference between naive and memory T cell responses. We discuss the biological implications of our results, and both the compatibility and complementarity of our approach with other existing mathematical models.

  13. Retinoic Acid and LTP Recruit Postsynaptic AMPA-Receptors Using Distinct SNARE-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Kristin L.; Zhang, Yingsha; Jurado, Sandra; Malenka, Robert C.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Chen, Lu

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Retinoic acid- (RA-) dependent homeostatic plasticity and NMDA-receptor-dependent LTP, a form of Hebbian plasticity, both enhance synaptic strength by increasing the abundance of postsynaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs). However, it is unclear whether the molecular mechanisms mediating AMPAR-trafficking during homeostatic and Hebbian plasticity differ, and unknown how RA-signaling impacts Hebbian plasticity. Here, we show that RA increases postsynaptic AMPAR-abundance by an activity-dependent mechanism that requires a unique SNARE-dependent fusion machinery different from that mediating LTP. Specifically, RA-induced AMPAR-trafficking did not involve complexin, which activates SNARE complexes containing syntaxin-1 or -3 but not complexes containing syntaxin-4, whereas LTP required complexin. Moreover, RA-induced AMPAR trafficking utilized the Q-SNARE syntaxin-4 whereas LTP utilized syntaxin-3; both additionally required the Q-SNARE SNAP-47 and the R-SNARE synatobrevin-2. Finally, acute RA treatment blocked subsequent LTP expression, probably by increasing AMPAR-trafficking. Thus, RA-induced homeostatic plasticity involves a novel, activity-dependent postsynaptic AMPAR-trafficking pathway mediated by a unique SNARE-dependent fusion machinery. PMID:25843403

  14. Receptor Pre-Clustering and T cell Responses: Insights into Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mario; van Santen, Hisse M.; Férez, María; Alarcón, Balbino; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    T cell activation, initiated by T cell receptor (TCR) mediated recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I or II molecules (pMHC), shows exquisite specificity and sensitivity, even though the TCR–pMHC binding interaction is of low affinity. Recent experimental work suggests that TCR pre-clustering may be a mechanism via which T cells can achieve such high sensitivity. The unresolved stoichiometry of the TCR makes TCR–pMHC binding and TCR triggering, an open question. We formulate a mathematical model to characterize the pre-clustering of T cell receptors (TCRs) on the surface of T cells, motivated by the experimentally observed distribution of TCR clusters on the surface of naive and memory T cells. We extend a recently introduced stochastic criterion to compute the timescales of T cell responses, assuming that ligand-induced cross-linked TCR is the minimum signaling unit. We derive an approximate formula for the mean time to signal initiation. Our results show that pre-clustering reduces the mean activation time. However, additional mechanisms favoring the existence of clusters are required to explain the difference between naive and memory T cell responses. We discuss the biological implications of our results, and both the compatibility and complementarity of our approach with other existing mathematical models. PMID:24817867

  15. Internalisation of the bleomycin molecules responsible for bleomycin toxicity: a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pron, G; Mahrour, N; Orlowski, S; Tounekti, O; Poddevin, B; Belehradek, J; Mir, L M

    1999-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) does not diffuse through the plasma membrane but nevertheless displays cytotoxic activity due to DNA break generation. The aim of the study was to describe the mechanism of BLM internalisation. We previously provided evidence for the existence of BLM-binding sites at the surface of DC-3F Chinese hamster fibroblasts, as well as of their involvement in BLM cytotoxicity on DC-3F cells and related BLM-resistant sublines. Here we report that A253 human cells and their BLM-resistant subline C-10E also possessed a membrane protein of ca. 250 kDa specifically binding BLM. Part of this C-10E cell resistance could be explained by a decrease in the number of BLM-binding sites exposed at the cell surface with respect to A253 cells. The comparison between A253 and DC-3F cells exposing a similar number of BLM-binding sites revealed that the faster the fluid phase endocytosis, the greater the cell sensitivity to BLM. Moreover, the experimental modification of endocytotic vesicle size showed that BLM cytotoxicity was directly correlated with the flux of plasma membrane area engulfed during endocytosis rather than with the fluid phase volume incorporated. Thus, BLM would be internalised by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism which would first require BLM binding to its membrane receptor and then the transfer of the complex into intracellular endocytotic vesicles, followed by BLM entry into the cytosol, probably from a nonacidic compartment.

  16. Pregnane X receptor activation and silencing promote steatosis of human hepatic cells by distinct lipogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bitter, Andreas; Rümmele, Petra; Klein, Kathrin; Kandel, Benjamin A; Rieger, Jessica K; Nüssler, Andreas K; Zanger, Ulrich M; Trauner, Michael; Schwab, Matthias; Burk, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    In addition to its well-characterized role in the regulation of drug metabolism and transport by xenobiotics, pregnane X receptor (PXR) critically impacts on lipid homeostasis. In mice, both ligand-dependent activation and knockout of PXR were previously shown to promote hepatic steatosis. To elucidate the respective pathways in human liver, we generated clones of human hepatoma HepG2 cells exhibiting different PXR protein levels, and analyzed effects of PXR activation and knockdown on steatosis and expression of lipogenic genes. Ligand-dependent activation as well as knockdown of PXR resulted in increased steatosis in HepG2 cells. Activation of PXR induced the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) 1-dependent lipogenic pathway via PXR-dependent induction of SREBP1a, which was confirmed in primary human hepatocytes. Inhibiting SREBP1 activity by blocking the cleavage-dependent maturation of SREBP1 protein impaired the induction of lipogenic SREBP1 target genes and triglyceride accumulation by PXR activation. On the other hand, PXR knockdown resulted in up-regulation of aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1B10, which enhanced the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC)-catalyzed reaction step of de novo lipogenesis. In a cohort of human liver samples histologically classified for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, AKR1B10, SREBP1a and SREBP1 lipogenic target genes proved to be up-regulated in steatohepatitis, while PXR protein was reduced. In summary, our data suggest that activation and knockdown of PXR in human hepatic cells promote de novo lipogenesis and steatosis by induction of the SREBP1 pathway and AKR1B10-mediated increase of ACC activity, respectively, thus providing mechanistic explanations for a putative dual role of PXR in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis. PMID:25182422

  17. Dual single-scission event analysis of constitutive transferrin receptor (TfR) endocytosis and ligand-triggered β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) or Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Marko; Pierre, Fabienne; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; Krasel, Cornelius; Merrifield, Christien J

    2014-10-01

    The dynamic relationship between constitutive and ligand-triggered clathrin-mediated endocytosis is only poorly characterized, and it remains controversial whether clathrin-coated pits specialize to internalize particular receptor cargo. Here we analyzed the ligand-triggered endocytosis of the model G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) at the level of individual endocytic events using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM)-based assay. Similar to the constitutive endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR), ligand- triggered endocytosis of β2AR occurs via quantized scission events hosted by clathrin spots and plaques of variable size and persistence. To address whether clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) specialize to internalize particular GPCRs, we adapted the TIRFM imaging assay to simultaneously quantify the internalization of TfR and the ligand- triggered endocytosis of the β2AR or MOR. Agonist-triggered β2AR or MOR endocytosis extended the maturation time of CCSs, as shown previously, but did not affect the rate of constitutive TfR endocytosis or loading of TfR into individual endocytic vesicles. Both the β2AR and the MOR receptors entered cells in the same vesicles as TfR, and the overall evidence for CCS specialization was weak. These data support a simple model in which different cargoes internalize through common CCSs.

  18. Dual single-scission event analysis of constitutive transferrin receptor (TfR) endocytosis and ligand-triggered β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) or Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Marko; Pierre, Fabienne; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; Krasel, Cornelius; Merrifield, Christien J.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic relationship between constitutive and ligand-triggered clathrin-mediated endocytosis is only poorly characterized, and it remains controversial whether clathrin-coated pits specialize to internalize particular receptor cargo. Here we analyzed the ligand-triggered endocytosis of the model G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) at the level of individual endocytic events using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM)–based assay. Similar to the constitutive endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR), ligand- triggered endocytosis of β2AR occurs via quantized scission events hosted by clathrin spots and plaques of variable size and persistence. To address whether clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) specialize to internalize particular GPCRs, we adapted the TIRFM imaging assay to simultaneously quantify the internalization of TfR and the ligand- triggered endocytosis of the β2AR or MOR. Agonist-triggered β2AR or MOR endocytosis extended the maturation time of CCSs, as shown previously, but did not affect the rate of constitutive TfR endocytosis or loading of TfR into individual endocytic vesicles. Both the β2AR and the MOR receptors entered cells in the same vesicles as TfR, and the overall evidence for CCS specialization was weak. These data support a simple model in which different cargoes internalize through common CCSs. PMID:25079691

  19. Dual Role of the Tyrosine Kinase Syk in Regulation of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aouar, Besma; Kovarova, Denisa; Letard, Sebastien; Font-Haro, Albert; Florentin, Jonathan; Weber, Jan; Durantel, David; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Trejbalova, Katerina; Hejnar, Jiri; Nunès, Jacques A.; Olive, Daniel; Dubreuil, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Crosslinking of regulatory immunoreceptors (RR), such as BDCA-2 (CD303) or ILT7 (CD85g), of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) efficiently suppresses production of type-I interferon (IFN)-α/β and other cytokines in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/9 ligands. This cytokine-inhibitory pathway is mediated by spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) associated with the ITAM-containing adapter of RR. Here we demonstrate by pharmacological targeting of Syk that in addition to the negative regulation of TLR7/9 signaling via RR, Syk also positively regulates the TLR7/9 pathway in human pDCs. Novel highly specific Syk inhibitor AB8779 suppressed IFN-α, TNF-α and IL-6 production induced by TLR7/9 agonists in primary pDCs and in the pDC cell line GEN2.2. Triggering of TLR9 or RR signaling induced a differential kinetics of phosphorylation at Y352 and Y525/526 of Syk and a differential sensitivity to AB8779. Consistent with the different roles of Syk in TLR7/9 and RR signaling, a concentration of AB8779 insufficient to block TLR7/9 signaling still released the block of IFN-α production triggered via the RR pathway, including that induced by hepatitis B and C viruses. Thus, pharmacological targeting of Syk partially restored the main pDC function—IFN-α production. Opposing roles of Syk in TLR7/9 and RR pathways may regulate the innate immune response to weaken inflammation reaction. PMID:27258042

  20. CD40 and B cell antigen receptor dual triggering of resting B lymphocytes turns on a partial germinal center phenotype

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Phenotypic alterations occur when resting human B lymphocytes become germinal center (GC) cells. These include the induction of surface CD38, CD95 (FAS/APO-1), and carboxy-peptidase-M (CPM), a recently described GC marker. However, the factors that govern the in vivo induction of these surface molecules on B cells remain unknown. Here, we purified resting (CD38-) human B lymphocytes from tonsils in an attempt to establish culture conditions resulting in the induction of these three GC markers. We show that interferon (IFN) alpha or IFN- gamma, as well as antibodies against the B cell antigen receptor (BCR), could induce CD38 on resting B lymphocytes, a phenomenon further enhanced by CD40 stimulation. Concomitantly, CD95 was upregulated by CD40 ligation and, to a lesser extent, by IFN-gamma. By contrast, CPM expression could be upregulated only through BCR triggering. This CPM induction was specifically enhanced by CD19 or CD40 ligation. CD40 + BCR stimulation of resting B cells with CD40 ligand-transfected fibroblastic cells in the presence of cross-linked anti-BCR monoclonal antibodies resulted in the coexpression of CD38, CD95, and CPM. As GC cells, these cells also expressed CD71, CD80 (B7.1), and CD86 (B7.2), but not CD24. However, CD10+ or CD44- B cells could not be detected in these culture conditions, suggesting that yet other signals are required for the induction of these GC markers. Consistent with a GC phenotype, CD40 + BCR-stimulated cells exhibited reduced viability when cultured for 20 h in the absence of stimulus. These results first demonstrate that cotriggering of resting B cells through BCR and CD40 induces both phenotypic and functional GC features. They also show that IFN and CD19 triggering of resting B cells specifically modulate the expression of GC markers. PMID:8551247

  1. Independent mechanisms for macrophage binding and macrophage phagocytosis of damaged erythrocytes. Evidence of receptor cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Sambrano, G R; Terpstra, V; Steinberg, D

    1997-12-01

    The binding and phagocytosis of oxidatively damaged red blood cells (OxRBCs) by mouse peritoneal macrophages can be inhibited by oxidatively modified LDL (OxLDL), implying some commonality at their receptor-binding domains. Studies from many different laboratories support the view that OxRBC binding is due to the disruption of plasma membrane phospholipid asymmetry and the subsequent exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer membrane leaflet. Presumably, oxidation of LDL creates a surface structure on it in some way homologous to the PS-rich domain on OxRBCs. Apoptotic cells in some instances are also recognized because of PS exposure on the outer leaflet of the membrane, and apoptotic cells are a common feature of atherosclerotic lesions. In the present studies, the mechanisms of binding and internalization of cells recognized by virtue of their membrane PS were studied using OxRBCs or vanadate-treated erythrocytes (VaRBCs) as models. Disruption of phospholipid asymmetry with vanadate produced cells that were bound by macrophages in the same divalent cation-dependent manner as OxRBCs. However, whereas OxRBCs were rapidly phagocytosed, VaRBCs were not. Stimulation of mouse macrophages with phorbol myristate acetate resulted in a concentration-dependent induction of phagocytosis of bound VaRBCs, an effect that could be prevented by the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine. Because phagocytosis of OxRBCs occurred unassisted, we speculated that there must be additional membrane changes induced by oxidation (over and above the disruption of phospholipid asymmetry) that contribute to phagocytosis of OxRBCs, possibly resulting in the ligation of a distinct receptor that does not necessarily contribute to adherence. This proposal is supported by the finding that ligation of macrophage Fc gamma receptors by the anti-Fc gamma RII/RIII antibody 2.4G2 triggers the phagocytosis of bound VaRBCs. Phagocytosis is also triggered by subthreshold opsonization of VaRBC, i

  2. Mechanical vibration inhibits osteoclast formation by reducing DC-STAMP receptor expression in osteoclast precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh N; Voglewede, Philip A; Liu, Dawei

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that physical inactivity leads to loss of muscle mass, but it also causes bone loss. Mechanistically, osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption have recently been shown to be regulated by vibration. However, the underlying mechanism behind the inhibition of osteoclast formation is yet unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether mechanical vibration of osteoclast precursor cells affects osteoclast formation by the involvement of fusion-related molecules such as dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) and P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). RAW264.7 (a murine osteoclastic-like cell line) cells were treated with 20ng/ml receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). For 3 consecutive days, the cells were subjected to 1h of mechanical vibration with 20μm displacement at a frequency of 4Hz and compared to the control cells that were treated under the same condition but without the vibration. After 5days of culture, osteoclast formation was determined. Gene expression of DC-STAMP and P2X7R by RAW264.7 cells was determined after 1h of mechanical vibration, while protein production of the DC-STAMP was determined after 6h of postincubation after vibration. As a result, mechanical vibration of RAW264.7 cells inhibited the formation of osteoclasts. Vibration down-regulated DC-STAMP gene expression by 1.6-fold in the presence of RANKL and by 1.4-fold in the absence of RANKL. Additionally, DC-STAMP protein production was also down-regulated by 1.4-fold in the presence of RANKL and by 1.2-fold in the absence of RANKL in RAW264.7 cells in response to mechanical vibration. However, vibration did not affect P2X7R gene expression. Mouse anti-DC-STAMP antibody inhibited osteoclast formation in the absence of vibration. Our results suggest that mechanical vibration of osteoclast precursor cells reduces DC-STAMP expression in osteoclast precursor cells leading to the inhibition of osteoclast formation.

  3. Picrotoxin inhibition mechanism of a gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor investigated by a laser-pulse photolysis technique.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Latha; Hess, George P

    2005-06-14

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptor, a major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptor, belongs to a family of membrane-bound proteins that regulate signal transmission between approximately 10(12) cells of the nervous system. It plays a major role in many neurological disorders, including epilepsy. It is the target of many pharmacological agents, including the convulsant picrotoxin. Here, we present the mechanism of inhibition by picrotoxin of the rat alpha1beta2gamma2L GABA(A) receptor investigated using rapid kinetic techniques in combination with whole-cell current recordings. The following new results were obtained by using transient kinetic techniques, the cell-flow method and the laser-pulse photolysis (LaPP) technique with a microsecond to millisecond time resolution. (i) The apparent dissociation constant of picrotoxin for the open-channel form of the receptor was approximately 5 times higher than that of the closed-channel form. (ii) Picrotoxin increased the channel-closing rate constant (k(cl)) approximately 4-fold, while the rate constant for channel opening (k(op)) remained essentially unaffected. (iii) The mechanism indicates that picrotoxin binds to an allosteric site of the receptor with higher affinity for the closed-channel form than for the open-channel form and thereby inhibits the receptor by decreasing 4-fold its channel-opening equilibrium constant [Phi(I)(-)(1) = k(op(I))/k(cl(I))]. (iv) The mechanism further indicates that compounds that bind with equal affinity to the picrotoxin-binding site on the open-channel form of the receptor and the closed-channel form will not affect the channel-opening equilibrium and can, therefore, displace picrotoxin and prevent inhibition of the GABA(A) receptor by picrotoxin. Such compounds may be therapeutically useful in counteracting the effects of compounds and diseases that unfavorably affect the channel-opening equilibrium of the receptor channel.

  4. Low concentrations of bisphenol a suppress thyroid hormone receptor transcription through a nongenomic mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo; Tang, Yuan; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Yuan, Ye; Zhao, Bao-Quan; Chao, Xi-Juan; Zhu, Ben-Zhan

    2012-02-15

    Bisphenol (BPA) is one of the highest-volume chemicals produced worldwide, and human exposure to BPA is thought to be ubiquitous. Various rodent and in vitro studies have shown that thyroid hormone (TH) function can be impaired by BPA. However, it is still unknown if low concentrations of BPA can suppress the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) transcription. The present study aims to investigate the possible suppressing effects of low concentrations of BPA on TR transcription and the involved mechanism(s) in CV-1 cells derived from cercopithecus aethiops monkey kidneys. Using gene reporter assays, BPA at concentrations as low as 10{sup −9} M suppresses TR or steroid receptor coactivator-1(SRC-1)-enhanced TR transcription, but not reducing TR/SRC-1 interaction in mammalian two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase pull-down studies. It has been further shown that both nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) and silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) are recruited to the TR-β1 by BPA in the presence of physiologic concentrations of T3 or T4. However, the overexpression of β3 integrin or c-Src significantly reduces BPA-induced recruitment of N-CoR/SMRT to TR or suppression of TR transcription. Furthermore, BPA inhibits the T3/T4-mediated interassociation of the β3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-β1 pathways by the co-immunoprecipitation. These results indicate that low concentrations of BPA suppress the TR transcription by disrupting physiologic concentrations of T3/T4-mediated β3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-β1 pathways, followed by recruiting N-CoR/SMRT to TR-β1, providing a novel insight regarding the TH disruption effects of low concentration BPA. -- Highlights: ► Environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA suppress TR transcription. ► BPA recruits the N-CoR/SMRT to TR under the physiologic concentrations of T3/T4. ► BPA disrupts T3/T4-mediated β3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-β1 pathways.

  5. Oxaliplatin elicits mechanical and cold allodynia in rodents via TRPA1 receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nassini, Romina; Gees, Maarten; Harrison, Selena; De Siena, Gaetano; Materazzi, Serena; Moretto, Nadia; Failli, Paola; Preti, Delia; Marchetti, Nicola; Cavazzini, Alberto; Mancini, Francesca; Pedretti, Pamela; Nilius, Bernd; Patacchini, Riccardo; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2011-07-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs cause neurotoxicity. In particular, oxaliplatin produces early-developing, painful, and cold-exacerbated paresthesias. However, the mechanism underlying these bothersome and dose-limiting adverse effects is unknown. We hypothesized that the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), a cation channel activated by oxidative stress and cold temperature, contributes to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity caused by oxaliplatin and cisplatin. Oxaliplatin and cisplatin evoked glutathione-sensitive relaxation, mediated by TRPA1 stimulation and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory nerve terminals in isolated guinea pig pulmonary arteries. No calcium response was observed in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons or in naïve Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to oxaliplatin or cisplatin. However, oxaliplatin, and with lower potency, cisplatin, evoked a glutathione-sensitive calcium response in CHO cells expressing mouse TRPA1. One single administration of oxaliplatin produced mechanical and cold hyperalgesia in rats, an effect selectively abated by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Oxaliplatin administration caused mechanical and cold allodynia in mice. Both responses were absent in TRPA1-deficient mice. Administration of cisplatin evoked mechanical allodynia, an effect that was reduced in TRPA1-deficient mice. TRPA1 is therefore required for oxaliplatin-evoked mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, and contributes to cisplatin-evoked mechanical allodynia. Channel activation is most likely caused by glutathione-sensitive molecules, including reactive oxygen species and their byproducts, which are generated after tissue exposure to platinum-based drugs from cells surrounding nociceptive nerve terminals.

  6. Influence of pharmacological manipulations of NMDA and cholinergic receptors on working versus reference memory in a dual component odor span task.

    PubMed

    MacQueen, David A; Dalrymple, Savannah R; Drobes, David J; Diamond, David M

    2016-06-01

    Developed as a tool to assess working memory capacity in rodents, the odor span task (OST) has significant potential to advance drug discovery in animal models of psychiatric disorders. Prior investigations indicate OST performance is impaired by systemic administration of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-r) antagonists and is sensitive to cholinergic manipulations. The present study sought to determine whether an impairment in OST performance can be produced by systemic administration of the competitive NMDA-r antagonist 3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP; 3, 10, 17 mg/kg i.p.) in a unique dual-component variant of the OST, and whether this impairment is ameliorated by nicotine (0.75 mg/kg i.p.). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to asymptotic level of performance on a 24-trial two-comparison incrementing nonmatching to sample OST. In addition, rats were administered a two-comparison olfactory reference memory (RM) task, which was integrated into the OST. The RM task provided an assessment of the effects of drug administration on global behavioral measures, long-term memory and motivation. Several measures of working memory (span, longest run, and accuracy) were dose dependently impaired by CPP without adversely affecting RM. Analysis of drug effects across trial blocks demonstrated a significant impairment of performance even at low memory loads, suggesting a CPP-induced deficit of olfactory short-term memory that is not load-dependent. Although nicotine did not ameliorate CPP-induced impairments in span or accuracy, it did block the impairment in longest run produced by the 10 mg/kg dose of CPP. Overall, our results indicate that performance in our 24 odor two-comparison OST is capacity dependent and that CPP impaired OST working, but not reference, memory. PMID:27194794

  7. Macitentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, does not affect cardiac repolarization in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lindegger, Nicolas; Sidharta, Patricia N; Reseski, Kathrin; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2014-10-01

    Macitentan is an orally active dual endothelin receptor antagonist, which demonstrated a reduction of the risk of morbidity/mortality events in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients. This double-blind, randomized, placebo- and positive-controlled, four-way crossover thorough QTc study was designed to investigate the effects of therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses of macitentan on cardiac repolarization in healthy male and female subjects. Each subject received the following treatments: moxifloxacin 400 mg, macitentan 10 mg, macitentan 30 mg, and placebo. Each treatment period lasted 9 days and was followed by at least 10 days of washout. The primary endpoint of this study was the baseline-adjusted, placebo-corrected QT interval corrected using the Fridericia method (ΔΔQTcF). Pharmacokinetic (PK), safety, and tolerability assessments were performed during each treatment. A total of 64 subjects were randomized. The upper bound of the 2-sided 90% confidence interval for ΔΔQTcF following macitentan was <10 ms at all time points and no correlation was observed between ΔΔQTcF and PK parameters. Findings in the analysis of the morphological patterns of the ECGs were randomly distributed across all treatments and did not indicate an association with macitentan. Macitentan was well tolerated in this study. Headache and nasopharyngitis were the most frequently reported adverse events. No effects on clinical laboratory and vital signs parameters were observed. In summary, repeated doses of macitentan 10 mg and 30 mg did not indicate any pro-arrhythmic potential.

  8. Macitentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, does not affect cardiac repolarization in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lindegger, Nicolas; Sidharta, Patricia N; Reseski, Kathrin; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2014-10-01

    Macitentan is an orally active dual endothelin receptor antagonist, which demonstrated a reduction of the risk of morbidity/mortality events in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients. This double-blind, randomized, placebo- and positive-controlled, four-way crossover thorough QTc study was designed to investigate the effects of therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses of macitentan on cardiac repolarization in healthy male and female subjects. Each subject received the following treatments: moxifloxacin 400 mg, macitentan 10 mg, macitentan 30 mg, and placebo. Each treatment period lasted 9 days and was followed by at least 10 days of washout. The primary endpoint of this study was the baseline-adjusted, placebo-corrected QT interval corrected using the Fridericia method (ΔΔQTcF). Pharmacokinetic (PK), safety, and tolerability assessments were performed during each treatment. A total of 64 subjects were randomized. The upper bound of the 2-sided 90% confidence interval for ΔΔQTcF following macitentan was <10 ms at all time points and no correlation was observed between ΔΔQTcF and PK parameters. Findings in the analysis of the morphological patterns of the ECGs were randomly distributed across all treatments and did not indicate an association with macitentan. Macitentan was well tolerated in this study. Headache and nasopharyngitis were the most frequently reported adverse events. No effects on clinical laboratory and vital signs parameters were observed. In summary, repeated doses of macitentan 10 mg and 30 mg did not indicate any pro-arrhythmic potential. PMID:24813561

  9. Structure-guided enzymology of the lipid A acyltransferase LpxM reveals a dual activity mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dovala, Dustin; Rath, Christopher M.; Hu, Qijun; Sawyer, William S.; Shia, Steven; Elling, Robert A.; Knapp, Mark S.; Metzger, Louis E.

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess a characteristic outer membrane, of which the lipid A constituent elicits a strong host immune response through the Toll-like receptor 4 complex, and acts as a component of the permeability barrier to prevent uptake of bactericidal compounds. Lipid A species comprise the bulk of the outer leaflet of the outer membrane and are produced through a multistep biosynthetic pathway conserved in most Gram-negative bacteria. The final steps in this pathway involve the secondary acylation of lipid A precursors. These are catalyzed by members of a superfamily of enzymes known as lysophospholipid acyltransferases (LPLATs), which are present in all domains of life and play important roles in diverse biological processes. To date, characterization of this clinically important class of enzymes has been limited by a lack of structural information and the availability of only low-throughput biochemical assays. In this work, we present the structure of the bacterial LPLAT protein LpxM, and we describe a high-throughput, label-free mass spectrometric assay to characterize acyltransferase enzymatic activity. Using our structure and assay, we identify an LPLAT thioesterase activity, and we provide experimental evidence to support an ordered-binding and “reset” mechanistic model for LpxM function. This work enables the interrogation of other bacterial acyltransferases’ structure–mechanism relationships, and the assay described herein provides a foundation for quantitatively characterizing the enzymology of any number of clinically relevant LPLAT proteins. PMID:27681620

  10. Interaction of NMDA receptor and pacemaking mechanisms in the midbrain dopaminergic neuron.

    PubMed

    Ha, Joon; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission has been found to play a role in addictive behavior and is altered in psychiatric disorders. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons display two functionally distinct modes of electrophysiological activity: low- and high-frequency firing. A puzzling feature of the DA neuron is the following combination of its responses: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation evokes high-frequency firing, whereas other tonic excitatory stimuli (α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR) activation or applied depolarization) block firing instead. We suggest a new computational model that reproduces this combination of responses and explains recent experimental data. Namely, somatic NMDAR stimulation evokes high-frequency firing and is more effective than distal dendritic stimulation. We further reduce the model to a single compartment and analyze the mechanism of the distinct high-frequency response to NMDAR activation vs. other stimuli. Standard nullcline analysis shows that the mechanism is based on a decrease in the amplitude of calcium oscillations. The analysis confirms that the nonlinear voltage dependence provided by the magnesium block of the NMDAR determine its capacity to elevate the firing frequency. We further predict that the moderate slope of the voltage dependence plays the central role in the frequency elevation. Additionally, we suggest a repolarizing current that sustains calcium-independent firing or firing in the absence of calcium-dependent repolarizing currents. We predict that the ether-a-go-go current (ERG), which has been observed in the DA neuron, is the best fit for this critical role. We show that a calcium-dependent and a calcium-independent oscillatory mechanisms form a structure of interlocked negative feedback loops in the DA neuron. The structure connects research of DA neuron firing with circadian biology and determines common minimal models for investigation of robustness of oscillations, which is

  11. Boldine enhances bile production in rats via osmotic and Farnesoid X receptor dependent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Cermanova, Jolana; Kadova, Zuzana; Zagorova, Marie; Hroch, Milos; Tomsik, Pavel; Nachtigal, Petr; Kudlackova, Zdenka; Pavek, Petr; Dubecka, Michaela; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek; Laho, Tomas; Micuda, Stanislav

    2015-05-15

    Boldine, the major alkaloid from the Chilean Boldo tree, is used in traditional medicine to support bile production, but evidence to support this function is controversial. We analyzed the choleretic potential of boldine, including its molecular background. The acute- and long-term effects of boldine were evaluated in rats either during intravenous infusion or after 28-day oral treatment. Infusion of boldine instantly increased the bile flow 1.4-fold in healthy rats as well as in animals with Mrp2 deficiency or ethinylestradiol induced cholestasis. This effect was not associated with a corresponding increase in bile acid or glutathione biliary excretion, indicating that the effect is not related to stimulation of either bile acid dependent or independent mechanisms of bile formation and points to the osmotic activity of boldine itself. We subsequently analyzed bile production under conditions of changing biliary excretion of boldine after bolus intravenous administration and found strong correlations between both parameters. HPLC analysis showed that bile concentrations of boldine above 10 μM were required for induction of choleresis. Importantly, long-term pretreatment, when the bile collection study was performed 24-h after the last administration of boldine, also accelerated bile formation despite undetectable levels of the compound in bile. The effect paralleled upregulation of the Bsep transporter and increased biliary clearance of its substrates, bile acids. We consequently confirmed the ability of boldine to stimulate the Bsep transcriptional regulator, FXR receptor. In conclusion, our study clarified the mechanisms and circumstances surrounding the choleretic activity of boldine. - Highlights: • Boldine may increase bile production by direct as well as indirect mechanisms. • Biliary concentrations of boldine above 10 μM directly stimulate bile production. • Long-term oral boldine administration increases bile acid (BA) biliary secretion. • Boldine

  12. Uterine Epithelial Estrogen Receptor-α Controls Decidualization via a Paracrine Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, S.; Laws, M. J.; Bagchi, I. C.

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormone-regulated differentiation of uterine stromal cells, known as decidualization, is essential for embryo implantation. The role of the estrogen receptor-α (ESR1) during this differentiation process is unclear. Development of conditional Esr1-null mice showed that deletion of this gene in both epithelial and stromal compartments of the uterus leads to a complete blockade of decidualization, indicating a critical role of ESR1 during this process. To further elucidate the cell type-specific function of ESR1 in the uterus, we created WEd/d mice in which Esr1 is ablated in uterine luminal and glandular epithelia but is retained in the stroma. Uteri of WEd/d mice failed to undergo decidualization, indicating that epithelial ESR1 contributes to stromal differentiation via a paracrine mechanism. We noted markedly reduced production of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in WEd/d uteri. Supplementation with LIF restored decidualization in WEd/d mice. Our study indicated that LIF acts synergistically with progesterone to induce the expression of Indian hedgehog (IHH) in uterine epithelium and its receptor patched homolog 1 in the stroma. IHH then induces the expression of chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II, a transcription factor that promotes stromal differentiation. To address the mechanism by which LIF induces IHH expression, we used mice lacking uterine epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, a well-known mediator of LIF signaling. Our study revealed that LIF-mediated induction of IHH occurs without the activation of epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 but uses an alternate pathway involving the activation of the ERK1/2 kinase. Collectively our results provide unique insights into the paracrine mechanisms by which ESR1 directs epithelial-stromal dialogue during pregnancy establishment. PMID:26241389

  13. Uterine Epithelial Estrogen Receptor-α Controls Decidualization via a Paracrine Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pawar, S; Laws, M J; Bagchi, I C; Bagchi, M K

    2015-09-01

    Steroid hormone-regulated differentiation of uterine stromal cells, known as decidualization, is essential for embryo implantation. The role of the estrogen receptor-α (ESR1) during this differentiation process is unclear. Development of conditional Esr1-null mice showed that deletion of this gene in both epithelial and stromal compartments of the uterus leads to a complete blockade of decidualization, indicating a critical role of ESR1 during this process. To further elucidate the cell type-specific function of ESR1 in the uterus, we created WE(d/d) mice in which Esr1 is ablated in uterine luminal and glandular epithelia but is retained in the stroma. Uteri of WE(d/d) mice failed to undergo decidualization, indicating that epithelial ESR1 contributes to stromal differentiation via a paracrine mechanism. We noted markedly reduced production of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in WE(d/d) uteri. Supplementation with LIF restored decidualization in WE(d/d) mice. Our study indicated that LIF acts synergistically with progesterone to induce the expression of Indian hedgehog (IHH) in uterine epithelium and its receptor patched homolog 1 in the stroma. IHH then induces the expression of chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II, a transcription factor that promotes stromal differentiation. To address the mechanism by which LIF induces IHH expression, we used mice lacking uterine epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, a well-known mediator of LIF signaling. Our study revealed that LIF-mediated induction of IHH occurs without the activation of epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 but uses an alternate pathway involving the activation of the ERK1/2 kinase. Collectively our results provide unique insights into the paracrine mechanisms by which ESR1 directs epithelial-stromal dialogue during pregnancy establishment. PMID:26241389

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor acutely enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 via NMDA receptor-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuo; Len, Guo-Wei; McAuliffe, Geoff; Ma, Chia; Tai, Jessica P; Xu, Fei; Black, Ira B

    2004-11-01

    Brain-derived growth factor (BDNF) acutely regulates synaptic transmission and modulates hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), cellular models of plasticity associated with learning and memory. Our previous studies revealed that BDNF rapidly increases phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B in the postsynaptic density (PSD), potentially linking receptor phosphorylation to synaptic plasticity. To further define molecular mechanisms governing BDNF actions, we examined tyrosine phosphorylation of GluR1, the most well-characterized subunit of AMPA receptors. Initially, we investigated synaptoneurosomes that contain intact pre- and postsynaptic elements. Incubation of synaptoneurosomes with BDNF for 5 min increased tyrosine phosphorylation of GluR1 in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal, 4-fold enhancement at 10 ng/ml BDNF. NGF had no effects, suggesting the specificity of BDNF actions. Subsequently, we found that BDNF elicited a maximal, 2.5-fold increase in GluR1 phosphorylation in the PSD at 250 ng/ml BDNF within 5 min, suggesting that BDNF enhances the phosphorylation through postsynaptic mechanisms. Activation of trkB receptors was critical as k252-a, an inhibitor of trk receptor tyrosine kinase, blocked the BDNF-activated GluR1 phosphorylation. In addition, AP-5 and MK 801, NMDA receptor antagonists, blocked BDNF enhancement of phosphorylation in synaptoneurosomes or PSDs. Conversely, NMDA, the specific receptor agonist, evoked respective 3.8- and 2-fold increases in phosphorylation in synaptoneurosomes and PSDs within 5 min, mimicking the effects of BDNF. These findings raise the possibility that BDNF modulates GluR1 activity via changes in NMDA receptor function. Moreover, incubation of synaptoneurosomes or PSDs with BDNF and ifenprodil, a specific NR2B antagonist, reproduced the results of AP-5 and MK-801. Finally, coexposure of synaptoneurosomes or PSDs to BDNF and NMDA was not additive, suggesting that

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Bitopic Ligand Engagement with the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Keov, Peter; López, Laura; Devine, Shane M.; Valant, Celine; Lane, J. Robert; Scammells, Peter J.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    TBPB and 77-LH-28-1 are selective agonists of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) that may gain their selectivity through a bitopic mechanism, interacting concomitantly with the orthosteric site and part of an allosteric site. The current study combined site-directed mutagenesis, analytical pharmacology,and molecular modeling to gain further insights into the structural basis underlying binding and signaling by these agonists. Mutations within the orthosteric binding site caused similar reductions in affinity and signaling efficacy for both selective and prototypical orthosteric ligands. In contrast, the mutation of residues within transmembrane helix (TM) 2 and the second extracellular loop (ECL2) discriminated between the different classes of ligand. In particular, ECL2 appears to be involved in the selective binding of bitopic ligands and in coordinating biased agonism between intracellular calcium mobilization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Molecular modeling of the interaction between TBPB and the M1 mAChR revealed a binding pose predicted to extend from the orthosteric site up toward a putative allosteric site bordered by TM2, TM3, and TM7, thus consistent with a bitopic mode of binding. Overall, these findings provide valuable structural and mechanistic insights into bitopic ligand actions and receptor activation and support a role for ECL2 in dictating the active states that can be adopted by a G protein-coupled receptor. This may enable greater selective ligand design and development for mAChRs and facilitate improved identification of bitopic ligands. PMID:25006252

  16. Allosteric modulators of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Mony, Laetitia; Kew, James N C; Gunthorpe, Martin J; Paoletti, Pierre

    2009-08-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are ion channels gated by glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). They are widespread in the CNS and are involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes including synaptic plasticity, chronic pain and psychosis. Aberrant NMDAR activity also plays an important role in the neuronal loss associated with ischaemic insults and major degenerative disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Agents that target and alter NMDAR function may, thus, have therapeutic benefit. Interestingly, NMDARs are endowed with multiple extracellular regulatory sites that recognize ions or small molecule ligands, some of which are likely to regulate receptor function in vivo. These allosteric sites, which differ from agonist-binding and channel-permeation sites, provide means to modulate, either positively or negatively, NMDAR activity. The present review focuses on allosteric modulation of NMDARs containing the NR2B subunit. Indeed, the NR2B subunit confers a particularly rich pharmacology with distinct recognition sites for exogenous and endogenous allosteric ligands. Moreover, NR2B-containing receptors, compared with other NMDAR subtypes, appear to contribute preferentially to pathological processes linked to overexcitation of glutamatergic pathways. The actions of extracellular H+, Mg2+, Zn2+, of polyamines and neurosteroids, and of the synthetic compounds ifenprodil and derivatives ('prodils') are presented. Particular emphasis is put upon the structural determinants and molecular mechanisms that underlie the effects exerted by these agents. A better understanding of how NR2B-containing NMDARs (and NMDARs in general) operate and how they can be modulated should help define new strategies to counteract the deleterious effects of dysregulated NMDAR activity.

  17. Dual isotope plots reflect transformation pathways of pesticides: Potential to assess pesticide fate and elucidate transformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Armin; Penning, Holger; Sorensen, Sebastian; Aamand, Jens; Elsner, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The degradation of pesticides in deeper soil layers and groundwater is of growing interest, because they have repeatedly been found in drinking water supply wells and may pose a risk to future water resources. Current assessment schemes face a common problem, however: natural degradation often cannot be reliably assessed by concentration measurements alone, since mass balances are difficult to establish and transformation cannot be distinguished from sorption or dilution. Even detection of metabolites may only give an incomplete picture. When several transformation pathways occur, some metabolites may be degraded or form bound residues so that the associated pathways may be missed. Our research shows that dual isotope plots derived from compound specific isotope analysis offer a novel approach to give additional, complementary insight into the natural degradation of pesticides. Detection of metabolites is not required, since the isotope fractionation can be fully observed in the pesticide itself. Specifically, different initial biotransformation reactions of the phenylurea herbicide isoproturon (3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) in pure culture experiments with bacterial and fungal strains showed strongly pathway-dependent isotope fractionation. When analyzing isotopic changes in different parts of the isoproturon molecule, hydroxylation of the isopropyl group by fungi was found to be associated with C and H isotope fractionation. In contrast, hydrolysis by Arthrobacter globiformis D47 caused strong C and N isotope fractionation, albeit in a different manner than abiotic hydrolysis so that isotope measurements can distinguish between both modes of transformation. Likewise, we observed highly pathway-dependent C and N isotope fractionation of atrazine (1-chloro-3-ethylamino-5-isopropylamino-2,4,6-triazine). Desalkylation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. strain NI86/21 resulted in enrichment of both 13-C and 15-N in atrazine, whereas hydrolysis to hydroxyatrazine

  18. Neutralization of plasminogen activator inhibitor I (PAI-1) by the synthetic antagonist PAI-749 via a dual mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Gardell, Stephen J; Krueger, Julie A; Antrilli, Thomas A; Elokdah, Hassan; Mayer, Scott; Orcutt, Steven J; Crandall, David L; Vlasuk, George P

    2007-10-01

    PAI-749 is a potent and selective synthetic antagonist of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) that preserved tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activities in the presence of PAI-1 (IC(50) values, 157 and 87 nM, respectively). The fluorescence (Fl) of fluorophore-tagged PAI-1 (PAI-NBD119) was quenched by PAI-749; the apparent K(d) (254 nM) was similar to the IC(50) (140 nM) for PAI-NBD119 inactivation. PAI-749 analogs displayed the same potency rank order for neutralizing PAI-1 activity and perturbing PAI-NBD119 Fl; hence, binding of PAI-749 to PAI-1 and inactivation of PAI-1 activity are tightly linked. Exposure of PAI-1 to PAI-749 for 5 min (sufficient for full inactivation) followed by PAI-749 sequestration with Tween 80 micelles yielded active PAI-1; thus, PAI-749 did not irreversibly inactivate PAI-1, a known metastable protein. Treatment of PAI-1 with a PAI-749 homolog (producing less assay interference) blocked the ability of PAI-1 to displace p-aminobenzamidine from the uPA active site. Consistent with this observation, PAI-749 abolished formation of the SDS-stable tPA/PAI-1 complex. PAI-749-mediated neutralization of PAI-1 was associated with induction of PAI-1 polymerization as assessed by native gel electrophoresis. PAI-749 did not turn PAI-1 into a substrate for tPA; however, PAI-749 promoted plasmin-mediated degradation of PAI-1. In conclusion, PAI-1 inactivation by PAI-749 using purified components can result from a dual mechanism of action. First, PAI-749 binds directly to PAI-1, blocks PAI-1 from accessing the active site of tPA, and abrogates formation of the SDS-stable tPA/PAI-1 complex. Second, binding of PAI-749 to PAI-1 renders PAI-1 vulnerable to plasmin-mediated proteolytic degradation. PMID:17622579

  19. Tomographic docking suggests the mechanism of auxin receptor TIR1 selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Uzunova, Veselina V.; Quareshy, Mussa

    2016-01-01

    We study the binding of plant hormone IAA on its receptor TIR1, introducing a novel computational method that we call tomographic docking and that accounts for interactions occurring along the depth of the binding pocket. Our results suggest that selectivity is related to constraints that potential ligands encounter on their way from the surface of the protein to their final position at the pocket bottom. Tomographic docking helps develop specific hypotheses about ligand binding, distinguishing binders from non-binders, and suggests that binding is a three-step mechanism, consisting of engagement with a niche in the back wall of the pocket, interaction with a molecular filter which allows or precludes further descent of ligands, and binding on the pocket base. Only molecules that are able to descend the pocket and bind at its base allow the co-receptor IAA7 to bind on the complex, thus behaving as active auxins. Analysing the interactions at different depths, our new method helps in identifying critical residues that constitute preferred future study targets and in the quest for safe and effective herbicides. Also, it has the potential to extend the utility of docking from ligand searches to the study of processes contributing to selectivity. PMID:27805904

  20. Major and Minor Receptor Group Human Rhinoviruses Penetrate from Endosomes by Different Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Daniela; Kronenberger, Peter; Prchla, Elisabeth; Blaas, Dieter; Fuchs, Renate

    1998-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and the low-density lipoprotein receptor are used for cell entry by major and minor receptor group human rhinoviruses (HRVs), respectively. Whereas minor-group viruses, exemplified by HRV2, transfer their genomic RNA to the cytoplasm through a pore in the endosomal membrane (E. Prchla, C. Plank, E. Wagner, D. Blaas, and R. Fuchs, J. Cell Biol. 131:111–123, 1995), the mechanism of in vivo uncoating of major-group HRVs has not been elucidated so far. Using free-flow electrophoresis, we performed a comparative analysis of cell entry by HRV2 and the major group rhinovirus HRV14. Here we demonstrate that this technique allows the separation of free viral particles from those associated with early endosomes, late endosomes, and plasma membranes. Upon free-flow electrophoretic separation of microsomes, HRV14 was recovered from endosomes under conditions which prevent uncoating, whereas the proportion of free viral particles increased with time under conditions which promote uncoating. The remaining virus eluted within numerous fractions corresponding to membraneous material, with no clear endosomal peaks being discernible. This suggests that uncoating of HRV14 results in lysis of the endosomal membrane and release of subviral 135S and 80S particles into the cytoplasm. PMID:9445036

  1. Subcellular localization and mechanisms of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of steroid receptor coactivator-1.

    PubMed

    Amazit, Larbi; Alj, Youssef; Tyagi, Rakesh Kumar; Chauchereau, Anne; Loosfelt, Hugues; Pichon, Christophe; Pantel, Jacques; Foulon-Guinchard, Emmanuelle; Leclerc, Philippe; Milgrom, Edwin; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne

    2003-08-22

    Steroid hormone receptors are ligand-stimulated transcription factors that modulate gene transcription by recruiting coregulators to gene promoters. Subcellular localization and dynamic movements of transcription factors have been shown to be one of the major means of regulating their transcriptional activity. In the present report we describe the subcellular localization and the dynamics of intracellular trafficking of steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1). After its synthesis in the cytoplasm, SRC-1 is imported into the nucleus, where it activates transcription and is subsequently exported back to the cytoplasm. In both the nucleus and cytoplasm, SRC-1 is localized in speckles. The characterization of SRC-1 nuclear localization sequence reveals that it is a classic bipartite signal localized in the N-terminal region of the protein, between amino acids 18 and 36. This sequence is highly conserved within the other members of the p160 family. Additionally, SRC-1 nuclear export is inhibited by leptomycin B. The region involved in its nuclear export is localized between amino acids 990 and 1038. It is an unusually large domain differing from the classic leucine-rich NES sequences. Thus SRC-1 nuclear export involves either an alternate type of NES or is dependent on the interaction of SRC-1 with a protein, which is exported through the crm1/exportin pathway. Overall, the intracellular trafficking of SRC-1 might be a mechanism to regulate the termination of hormone action, the interaction with other signaling pathways in the cytoplasm and its degradation. PMID:12791702

  2. Carbamylcholine and phorbol esters desensitize muscarinic receptors by different mechanisms in rat pancreatic acini.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, L M; Paquette, B; Larose, L; Morisset, J

    1990-01-01

    Pretreatment of rat pancreatic acini with phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), a protein kinase C (PK-C) activator, caused the desensitization of carbamylcholine (CBC)-induced amylase release in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The less potent phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) also provoked a desensitization, but the inactive 4-alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate had no effect. PMA or PDBu also significantly reduced subsequent amylase release induced by caerulein or secretin in contrast to CBC, which only reduced amylase release induced by CBC or secretin. Preincubation of acini with PMA did not lead to a decrease in PMA or A23187-stimulated amylase release. A 3 h resting period did not restore the desensitization induced by PMA or PDBu. Pretreatment with PMA did not cause changes in muscarinic receptor high- and low-affinity populations as observed with CBC pretreatment. The PK-C inhibitor H-7 completely prevented the desensitization induced by PDBu but not that induced by CBC. TMB-8, another PK-C inhibitor, also completely prevented the desensitization induced by PDBu but only partially that induced by CBC. These results suggest that phorbol esters can induce desensitization of muscarinic receptor-stimulated amylase release by a different mechanism than that involved in muscarinic agonist-induced desensitization.

  3. Odorant receptors can mediate axonal identity and gene choice via cAMP-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Grosmaitre, Xavier; Feinstein, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Odorant receptors (ORs) control several aspects of cell fate in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), including singular gene choice and axonal identity. The mechanisms of OR-induced axon guidance have been suggested to principally rely on G-protein signalling. Here, we report that for a subset of OSNs, deleting G proteins or altering their levels of signalling does not affect axonal identity. Signalling-deficient ORs or surrogate receptors that are unable to couple to Gs/Golf still provide axons with distinct identities and the anterior–posterior targeting of axons does not correlate with the levels of cAMP produced by genetic modifications. In addition, we refine the models of negative feedback by showing that ectopic ORs can be robustly expressed without suppressing endogenous gene choice. In conclusion, our results uncover a new feature of ORs, showing that they can instruct axonal identity and regulate olfactory map formation independent of canonical G-protein signalling and cAMP production. PMID:27466441

  4. Minding the Calcium Store: Ryanodine Receptor Activation as a Convergent Mechanism of PCB Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pessah, Isaac N.; Cherednichenko, Gennady; Lein, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic low level polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) exposures remain a significant public health concern since results from epidemiological studies indicate PCB burden is associated with immune system dysfunction, cardiovascular disease, and impairment of the developing nervous system. Of these various adverse health effects, developmental neurotoxicity has emerged as a particularly vulnerable endpoint in PCB toxicity. Arguably the most pervasive biological effects of PCBs could be mediated by their ability to alter the spatial and temporal fidelity of Ca2+ signals through one or more receptor mediated processes. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the structure and function of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in muscle and nerve cells and how PCBs and related non-coplanar structures alter these functions. The molecular and cellular mechanisms by which non-coplanar PCBs and related structures alter local and global Ca2+ signaling properties and the possible short and long-term consequences of these perturbations on neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration are reviewed. PMID:19931307

  5. Odorant receptors can mediate axonal identity and gene choice via cAMP-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Kiavash; Grosmaitre, Xavier; Feinstein, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Odorant receptors (ORs) control several aspects of cell fate in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), including singular gene choice and axonal identity. The mechanisms of OR-induced axon guidance have been suggested to principally rely on G-protein signalling. Here, we report that for a subset of OSNs, deleting G proteins or altering their levels of signalling does not affect axonal identity. Signalling-deficient ORs or surrogate receptors that are unable to couple to Gs/Golf still provide axons with distinct identities and the anterior-posterior targeting of axons does not correlate with the levels of cAMP produced by genetic modifications. In addition, we refine the models of negative feedback by showing that ectopic ORs can be robustly expressed without suppressing endogenous gene choice. In conclusion, our results uncover a new feature of ORs, showing that they can instruct axonal identity and regulate olfactory map formation independent of canonical G-protein signalling and cAMP production. PMID:27466441

  6. Progesterone stimulates respiration through a central nervous system steroid receptor-mediated mechanism in cat.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Gallman, E A; Cidlowski, J A

    1987-11-01

    We have examined the effect on respiration of the steroid hormone progesterone, administered either intravenously or directly into the medulla oblongata in anesthetized and paralyzed male and female cats. The carotid sinus and vagus nerves were cut, and end-tidal PCO2 and temperature were kept constant with servo-controllers. Phrenic nerve activity was used to quantitate central respiratory activity. Repeated doses of progesterone (from 0.1 to 2.0 micrograms/kg, cumulative) caused a sustained (greater than 45 min) facilitation of phrenic nerve activity in female and male cats; however, the response was much more variable in females. Progesterone injected into the region of nucleus tractus solitarii, a respiratory-related area in the medulla oblongata, also caused a prolonged stimulation of respiration. Progesterone administration at high concentration by both routes also caused a substantial hypotension. Identical i.v. doses of other classes of steroid hormones (17 beta-estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) did not elicit the same respiratory effect. Pretreatment with RU 486, a progesterone-receptor antagonist, blocked the facilitatory effect of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone acts centrally through a steroid receptor-mediated mechanism to facilitate respiration. PMID:3478727

  7. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein–coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet; Ariestanti, Donna M.; Aust, Gabriela; Bae, Byoung-il; Bista, Bigyan R.; Bridges, James P.; Duman, Joseph G.; Engel, Felix B.; Giera, Stefanie; Goffinet, André M.; Hall, Randy A.; Hamann, Jörg; Hartmann, Nicole; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Liu, Mingyao; Luo, Rong; Mogha, Amit; Monk, Kelly R.; Peeters, Miriam C.; Prömel, Simone; Ressl, Susanne; Schiöth, Helgi B.; Sigoillot, Séverine M.; Song, Helen; Talbot, William S.; Tall, Gregory G.; White, James P.; Wolfrum, Uwe; Xu, Lei; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein–coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix—a structural feature of all GPCRs—the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region. In addition, all aGPCRs but one (GPR123) contain a GPCR autoproteolysis–inducing (GAIN) domain that mediates autoproteolytic cleavage at the GPCR autoproteolysis site (GPS) motif to generate N- and a C-terminal fragments (NTF and CTF, respectively) during protein maturation. Subsequently, the NTF and CTF are associated non-covalently as a heterodimer at the plasma membrane. While the biological function of the GAIN domain–mediated autocleavage is not fully understood, mounting evidence suggests that the NTF and CTF possess distinct biological activities in addition to their function as a receptor unit. We discuss recent advances in understanding the biological functions, signaling mechanisms, and disease associations of the aGPCRs. PMID:25424900

  8. Mechanisms of anorexia-cachexia syndrome and rational for treatment with selective ghrelin receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Angela; Criscitiello, Carmen; Gelao, Lucia; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Locatelli, Marzia; Minchella, Ida; Di Leo, Maria; Liuzzi, Rita; Milani, Alessandra; Massaro, Mariangela; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cachexia is a multi-organ, multifactorial and often irreversible syndrome affecting many patients with cancer. Cancer cachexia is invariably associated with weight loss, mainly from loss of skeletal muscle and body fat, conditioning a reduced quality of life due to asthenia, anorexia, anaemia and fatigue. Treatment options for treating cancer cachexia are limited. The approach is multimodal and may include: treatment of secondary gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional treatments, drug, and non-drug treatments. Nutritional counselling and physical training may be beneficial in delaying or preventing the development of anorexia-cachexia. However, these interventions are limited in their effect, and no definitive pharmacological treatment is available to address the relevant components of the syndrome. Anamorelin is a first-in-class, orally active ghrelin receptor agonist that binds and stimulates the growth hormone secretagogue receptor centrally, thereby mimicking the appetite-enhancing and anabolic effects of ghrelin. It represents a new class of drug and an additional treatment option for this patient group, whose therapeutic options are currently limited. In this review we examine the mechanisms of anamorelin by which it contrasts catabolic states, its role in regulation of metabolism and energy homeostasis, the data of recent trials in the setting of cancer cachexia and its safety profile.

  9. The Activation Mechanism of Glycoprotein Hormone Receptors with Implications in the Cause and Therapy of Endocrine Diseases.

    PubMed

    Brüser, Antje; Schulz, Angela; Rothemund, Sven; Ricken, Albert; Calebiro, Davide; Kleinau, Gunnar; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Glycoprotein hormones (GPHs) are the main regulators of the pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-gonadal axes. Selective interaction between GPHs and their cognate G protein-coupled receptors ensure specificity in GPH signaling. The mechanisms of how these hormones activate glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs) or how mutations and autoantibodies can alter receptor function were unclear. Based on the hypothesis that GPHRs contain an internal agonist, we systematically screened peptide libraries derived from the ectodomain for agonistic activity on the receptors. We show that a peptide (p10) derived from a conserved sequence in the C-terminal part of the extracellular N terminus can activate all GPHRs in vitro and in GPHR-expressing tissues. Inactivating mutations in this conserved region or in p10 can inhibit activation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor by autoantibodies. Our data suggest an activation mechanism where, upon extracellular ligand binding, this intramolecular agonist isomerizes and induces structural changes in the 7-transmembrane helix domain, triggering G protein activation. This mechanism can explain the pathophysiology of activating autoantibodies and several mutations causing endocrine dysfunctions such as Graves disease and hypo- and hyperthyroidism. Our findings highlight an evolutionarily conserved activation mechanism of GPHRs and will further promote the development of specific ligands useful to treat Graves disease and other dysfunctions of GPHRs.

  10. Structure and Mechanism of Receptor Sharing by the IL-10R2 Common Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-il; Jones, Brandi C.; Logsdon, Naomi J.; Harris, Bethany D.; Deshpande, Ashlesha; Radaeva, Svetlana; Halloran, Brian A.; Gao, Bin; Walter, Mark R.

    2010-07-19

    IL-10R2 is a shared cell surface receptor required for the activation of five class 2 cytokines (IL-10, IL-22, IL-26, IL-28, and IL-29) that play critical roles in host defense. To define the molecular mechanisms that regulate its promiscuous binding, we have determined the crystal structure of the IL-10R2 ectodomain at 2.14 {angstrom} resolution. IL-10R2 residues required for binding were identified by alanine scanning and used to derive computational models of IL-10/IL-10R1/IL-10R2 and IL-22/IL-22R1/IL-10R2 ternary complexes. The models reveal a conserved binding epitope that is surrounded by two clefts that accommodate the structural and chemical diversity of the cytokines. These results provide a structural framework for interpreting IL-10R2 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with human disease.

  11. Mechanisms and concepts paving the way towards a complete transport cycle of plant vacuolar sorting receptors.

    PubMed

    De Marcos Lousa, Carine; Gershlick, David C; Denecke, Jurgen

    2012-05-01

    Delivery of proteins to the lytic vacuole in plants is a complex cascade of selective interactions that specifically excludes residents of the endoplasmic reticulum and secreted proteins. Vacuolar transport must be highly efficient to avoid mistargeting of hydrolytic enzymes to locations where they could be harmful. While plant vacuolar sorting signals have been well described for two decades, it is only during the last 5 years that a critical mass of data was gathered that begins to reveal how vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) may complete a full transport cycle. Yet, the field is far from reaching a consensus regarding the organelles that could be involved in vacuolar sorting, their potential biogenesis, and the ultimate recycling of membranes and protein machinery that maintain this pathway. This review will highlight the important landmarks in our understanding of VSR function and compare recent transport models that have been proposed so that an emerging picture of plant vacuolar sorting mechanisms can be drawn. PMID:22570446

  12. Dynamic fluctuations provide the basis of a conformational switch mechanism in apo cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Aykaç Fas, Burcu; Tutar, Yusuf; Haliloğlu, Türkan

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP) undergoes conformational changes with cAMP binding and allosterically promotes CRP to bind specifically to the DNA. In that, the structural and dynamic properties of apo CRP prior to cAMP binding are of interest for the comprehension of the activation mechanism. Here, the dynamics of apo CRP monomer/dimer and holo CRP dimer were studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Gaussian Network Model (GNM). The interplay of the inter-domain hinge with the cAMP and DNA binding domains are pre-disposed in the apo state as a conformational switch in the CRP's allosteric communication mechanism. The hinge at L134-D138 displaying intra- and inter-subunit coupled fluctuations with the cAMP and DNA binding domains leads to the emergence of stronger coupled fluctuations between the two domains and describes an on state. The flexible regions at K52-E58, P154/D155 and I175 maintain the dynamic coupling of the two domains. With a shift in the inter-domain hinge position towards the N terminus, nevertheless, the latter correlations between the domains loosen and become disordered; L134-D138 dynamically interacts only with the cAMP and DNA binding domains of its own subunit, and an off state is assumed. We present a mechanistic view on how the structural dynamic units are hierarchically built for the allosteric functional mechanism; from apo CRP monomer to apo-to-holo CRP dimers.

  13. Mechanisms for the Evolution of a Derived Function in the Ancestral Glucocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Sean Michael; Ortlund, Eric A.; Thornton, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the genetic, structural, and biophysical mechanisms that caused protein functions to evolve is a central goal of molecular evolutionary studies. Ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) offers an experimental approach to these questions. Here we use ASR to shed light on the earliest functions and evolution of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a steroid-activated transcription factor that plays a key role in the regulation of vertebrate physiology. Prior work showed that GR and its paralog, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), duplicated from a common ancestor roughly 450 million years ago; the ancestral functions were largely conserved in the MR lineage, but the functions of GRs—reduced sensitivity to all hormones and increased selectivity for glucocorticoids—are derived. Although the mechanisms for the evolution of glucocorticoid specificity have been identified, how reduced sensitivity evolved has not yet been studied. Here we report on the reconstruction of the deepest ancestor in the GR lineage (AncGR1) and demonstrate that GR's reduced sensitivity evolved before the acquisition of restricted hormone specificity, shortly after the GR–MR split. Using site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, and computational analyses of protein stability to recapitulate and determine the effects of historical mutations, we show that AncGR1's reduced ligand sensitivity evolved primarily due to three key substitutions. Two large-effect mutations weakened hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions within the ancestral protein, reducing its stability. The degenerative effect of these two mutations is extremely strong, but a third permissive substitution, which has no apparent effect on function in the ancestral background and is likely to have occurred first, buffered the effects of the destabilizing mutations. Taken together, our results highlight the potentially creative role of substitutions that partially degrade protein structure and function and

  14. Mechanisms for the Evolution of a Derived Function in the Ancestral Glucocorticoid Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Sean Michael; Ortlund, Eric A; Thornton, Joseph W.

    2012-03-16

    Understanding the genetic, structural, and biophysical mechanisms that caused protein functions to evolve is a central goal of molecular evolutionary studies. Ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) offers an experimental approach to these questions. Here we use ASR to shed light on the earliest functions and evolution of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a steroid-activated transcription factor that plays a key role in the regulation of vertebrate physiology. Prior work showed that GR and its paralog, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), duplicated from a common ancestor roughly 450 million years ago; the ancestral functions were largely conserved in the MR lineage, but the functions of GRs - reduced sensitivity to all hormones and increased selectivity for glucocorticoids - are derived. Although the mechanisms for the evolution of glucocorticoid specificity have been identified, how reduced sensitivity evolved has not yet been studied. Here we report on the reconstruction of the deepest ancestor in the GR lineage (AncGR1) and demonstrate that GR's reduced sensitivity evolved before the acquisition of restricted hormone specificity, shortly after the GR-MR split. Using site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, and computational analyses of protein stability to recapitulate and determine the effects of historical mutations, we show that AncGR1's reduced ligand sensitivity evolved primarily due to three key substitutions. Two large-effect mutations weakened hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions within the ancestral protein, reducing its stability. The degenerative effect of these two mutations is extremely strong, but a third permissive substitution, which has no apparent effect on function in the ancestral background and is likely to have occurred first, buffered the effects of the destabilizing mutations. Taken together, our results highlight the potentially creative role of substitutions that partially degrade protein structure and function and

  15. GABAB receptors modulate catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells by a mechanism involving cyclic AMP formation.

    PubMed Central

    Oset-Gasque, M. J.; Parramón, M.; González, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The function of gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors in modulation of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells and the possible mechanism involved in this action have been examined. 2. The GABAB agonists (-)-baclofen and 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid (3-APPA) were found to induce a dose-dependent increase of basal catecholamine secretion. The EC50s were 151 +/- 35 microM and 225 +/- 58 microM for baclofen and 3-APPA, respectively. This stimulatory effect was specific since it could be blocked by 0.5 mM of the specific GABAB antagonist CGP-35348. 3. In contrast, preincubation of chromaffin cells with the GABAB agonists was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the catecholamine secretion evoked by 10 microM nicotine and 200 microM muscimol. 4. The effects of GABAB agonists on both basal and evoked catecholamine secretion were found to be accompanied by parallel changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). GABAB agonists produced a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i which was partially blocked by CGP 35348, but they produced a strong inhibition of the [Ca2+]i increase induced by nicotine and muscimol. 5. The GABAB agonists also produced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular cyclic AMP levels, there being a direct correlation between both increase in catecholamine secretion and in intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The pretreatment of chromaffin cells with pertussis toxin doubled the catecholamine secretion and increased by four times the intracellular cyclic AMP levels evoked by GABAB agonists. 7. The possible involvement of adenylate cyclase in the mechanism of GABAA receptor modulation of catecholamine secretion is discussed. PMID:8306105

  16. Uncovering the dual role of RHAMM as an HA receptor and a regulator of CD44 expression in RHAMM-expressing mesenchymal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Mandana; Leith, Sean J.; Tolg, Cornelia; Elhayek, Sallie S.; Bahrami, S. Bahram; Collis, Lisa; Hamilton, Sara; McCarthy, James B.; Bissell, Mina J.; Turley, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of hyaluronan (HA) with mesenchymal progenitor cells impacts trafficking and fate after tissue colonization during wound repair and these events contribute to diseases such as cancer. How this interaction occurs is poorly understood. Using 10T½ cells as a mesenchymal progenitor model and fluorescent (F-HA) or gold-labeled HA (G-HA) polymers, we studied the role of two HA receptors, RHAMM and CD44, in HA binding and uptake in non-adherent and adherent mesenchymal progenitor (10T½) cells to mimic aspects of cell trafficking and tissue colonization. We show that fluorescent labeled HA (F-HA) binding/uptake was high in non-adherent cells but dropped over time as cells became increasingly adherent. Non-adherent cells displayed both CD44 and RHAMM but only function-blocking anti-RHAMM and not anti-CD44 antibodies significantly reduced F-HA binding/uptake. Adherent cells, which also expressed CD44 and RHAMM, primarily utilized CD44 to bind to F-HA since anti-CD44 but not anti-RHAMM antibodies blocked F-HA uptake. RHAMM overexpression in adherent 10T½ cells led to increased F-HA uptake but this increased binding remained CD44 dependent. Further studies showed that RHAMM-transfection increased CD44 mRNA and protein expression while blocking RHAMM function reduced expression. Collectively, these results suggest that cellular microenvironments in which these receptors function as HA binding proteins differ significantly, and that RHAMM plays at least two roles in F-HA binding by acting as an HA receptor in non-attached cells and by regulating CD44 expression and display in attached cells. Our findings demonstrate adhesion-dependent mechanisms governing HA binding/ uptake that may impact development of new mesenchymal cell-based therapies. PMID:26528478

  17. Phorbol diesters and transferrin modulate lymphoblastoid cell transferrin receptor expression by two different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Alcantara, O.; Phillips, J.L.; Boldt, D.H.

    1986-12-01

    Expression of transferrin receptors (TfR) by activated lymphocytes is necessary for lymphocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Regulation of TfR expression, therefore, is a mechanism by which the lymphocyte's proliferative potential may be directed and controlled. The authors studied mechanisms by which lymphoblastoid cells modulate TfR expression during treatment with phorbol diesters or iron transferrin (FeTf), agents which cause downregulation of cell surface TfR. Phorbol diester-induced TfR downregulation occurred rapidly, being detectable at 2 min and reaching maximal decreases of 50% by 15 min. It was inhibited by cold but not by agents that destabilize cytoskeletal elements. Furthermore, this downregulation was reversed rapidly by washing or by treatment with the membrane interactive agent, chlorpromazine. In contrast, FeTf-induced TfR downregulation occurred slowly. Decreased expression of TfR was detectable only after 15 min and maximal downregulation was achieved after 60 min. Although FeTf-induced downregulation also was inhibited by cold, it was inhibited in addition by a group of microtubule destabilizing agents (colchicine, vinblastine, podophyllotoxin) or cytochalasin B, a microfilament inhibitor. Furthermore, FeTf-induced downregulation was not reversed readily by washing or by treatment with chlorpromazine. Phorbol diesters cause TfR downregulation by a cytoskeleton-independent mechanism. These data indicate that TfR expression is regulated by two independent mechanisms in lymphoblastoid cells, and they provide the possibility that downregulation of TfR by different mechanisms may result in different effects in these cells.

  18. Goshajinkigan reduces bortezomib-induced mechanical allodynia in rats: Possible involvement of kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hitomi; Yamamoto, Shota; Ushio, Soichiro; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Egashira, Nobuaki

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of a Kampo medicine Goshajinkigan (GJG) on the bortezomib-induced mechanical allodynia in von Frey test in rats. The single administration of tramadol (10 mg/kg), GJG (1.0 g/kg) and its component processed Aconiti tuber (0.1 g/kg) significantly reversed the reduction in withdrawal threshold by bortezomib. These effects were abolished by the intrathecal injection of nor-binaltorphimine (10 μg/body), kappa opioid receptor antagonist. These findings suggest that kappa opioid receptor is involved in the effect of GJG on the bortezomib-induced mechanical allodynia.

  19. Crystal structure of PXY-TDIF complex reveals a conserved recognition mechanism among CLE peptide-receptor pairs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heqiao; Lin, Xiaoya; Han, Zhifu; Qu, Li-Jia; Chai, Jijie

    2016-01-01

    Plants can achieve amazing lifespans because of their continuous and repetitive formation of new organs by stem cells present within meristems. The balance between proliferation and differentiation of meristem cells is largely regulated by the CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) peptide hormones. One of the well-characterized CLE peptides, CLE41/TDIF (tracheary elements differentiation inhibitory factor), functions to suppress tracheary element differentiation and promote procambial cell proliferation, playing important roles in vascular development and wood formation. The recognition mechanisms of TDIF or other CLE peptides by their respective receptors, however, remain largely elusive. Here we report the crystal structure of TDIF in complex with its receptor PXY, a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK). Our structure reveals that TDIF mainly adopts an “Ω”-like conformation binding to the inner surface of the LRR domain of PXY. Interaction between TDIF and PXY is predominately mediated by the relatively conserved amino acids of TDIF. Structure-based sequence alignment showed that the TDIF-interacting motifs are also conserved among other known CLE receptors. Our data provide a structural template for understanding the recognition mechanism of CLE peptides by their receptors, offering an opportunity for the identification of receptors of other uncharacterized CLE peptides. PMID:27055373

  20. Mechanisms of signal transduction by ethylene: overlapping and non-overlapping signalling roles in a receptor family

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Samina N.; Wang, Xiaomin; Binder, Brad M.; Schaller, G. Eric

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene regulates growth and development as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Over the last few decades, key elements involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified through genetic approaches, these elements defining a pathway that extends from initial ethylene perception at the endoplasmic reticulum to changes in transcriptional regulation within the nucleus. Here, we present our current understanding of ethylene signal transduction, focusing on recent developments that support a model with overlapping and non-overlapping roles for members of the ethylene receptor family. We consider the evidence supporting this model for sub-functionalization within the receptor family, and then discuss mechanisms by which such a sub-functionalization may occur. To this end, we consider the importance of receptor interactions in modulating their signal output and how such interactions vary in the receptor family. In addition, we consider evidence indicating that ethylene signal output by the receptors involves both phosphorylation-dependent and phosphorylation-independent mechanisms. We conclude with a current model for signalling by the ethylene receptors placed within the overall context of ethylene signal transduction. PMID:23543258

  1. Preclinical characterization of WAY-211612: a dual 5-HT uptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor antagonist and potential novel antidepressant

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, CE; Lin, Q; Platt, B; Malberg, J; Hornby, G; Sullivan, KM; Smith, DL; Lock, T; Mitchell, PJ; Hatzenbuhler, NT; Evrard, DA; Harrison, BL; Magolda, R; Pangalos, MN; Schechter, LE; Rosenzweig-Lipson, S; Andree, TH

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose As a combination of 5-HT selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) with 5-HT1A receptor antagonism may yield a rapidly acting antidepressant, WAY-211612, a compound with both SSRI and 5-HT1A receptor antagonist activities, was evaluated in preclinical models. Experimental approach Occupancy studies confirmed the mechanism of action of WAY-211612, while its in vivo profile was characterized in microdialysis and behavioural models. Key results WAY-211612 inhibited 5-HT reuptake (Ki = 1.5 nmol·L−1; KB = 17.7 nmol·L−1) and exhibited full 5-HT1A receptor antagonist activity (Ki = 1.2 nmol·L−1; KB = 6.3 nmol·L−1; Imax 100% in adenyl cyclase assays; KB = 19.8 nmol·L−1; Imax 100% in GTPγS). WAY-211612 (3 and 30 mg·kg−1, po) occupied 5-HT reuptake sites in rat prefrontal cortex (56.6% and 73.6% respectively) and hippocampus (52.2% and 78.5%), and 5-HT1A receptors in the prefrontal cortex (6.7% and 44.7%), hippocampus (8.3% and 48.6%) and dorsal raphe (15% and 83%). Acute