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Sample records for dual-energy chest imaging

  1. a Single-Exposure Dual-Energy Computed Radiography Technique for Improved Nodule Detection and Classification in Chest Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Frank Edward

    The detection and classification of pulmonary nodules is of great interest in chest radiography. Nodules are often indicative of primary cancer, and their detection is particularly important in asymptomatic patients. The ability to classify nodules as calcified or non-calcified is important because calcification is a positive indicator that the nodule is benign. Dual-energy methods offer the potential to improve both the detection and classification of nodules by allowing the formation of material-selective images. Tissue-selective images can improve detection by virtue of the elimination of obscuring rib structure. Bone -selective images are essentially calcium images, allowing classification of the nodule. A dual-energy technique is introduced which uses a computed radiography system to acquire dual-energy chest radiographs in a single-exposure. All aspects of the dual-energy technique are described, with particular emphasis on scatter-correction, beam-hardening correction, and noise-reduction algorithms. The adaptive noise-reduction algorithm employed improves material-selective signal-to-noise ratio by up to a factor of seven with minimal sacrifice in selectivity. A clinical comparison study is described, undertaken to compare the dual-energy technique to conventional chest radiography for the tasks of nodule detection and classification. Observer performance data were collected using the Free Response Observer Characteristic (FROC) method and the bi-normal Alternative FROC (AFROC) performance model. Results of the comparison study, analyzed using two common multiple observer statistical models, showed that the dual-energy technique was superior to conventional chest radiography for detection of nodules at a statistically significant level (p < .05). Discussion of the comparison study emphasizes the unique combination of data collection and analysis techniques employed, as well as the limitations of comparison techniques in the larger context of technology

  2. Dual-energy imaging of the chest: Optimization of image acquisition techniques for the 'bone-only' image

    SciTech Connect

    Shkumat, N. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Richard, S.; Paul, N. S.; Yorkston, J.; Van Metter, R.

    2008-02-15

    Experiments were conducted to determine optimal acquisition techniques for bone image decompositions for a prototype dual-energy (DE) imaging system. Technique parameters included kVp pair (denoted [kVp{sup L}/kVp{sup H}]) and dose allocation (the proportion of dose in low- and high-energy projections), each optimized to provide maximum signal difference-to-noise ratio in DE images. Experiments involved a chest phantom representing an average patient size and containing simulated ribs and lung nodules. Low- and high-energy kVp were varied from 60-90 and 120-150 kVp, respectively. The optimal kVp pair was determined to be [60/130] kVp, with image quality showing a strong dependence on low-kVp selection. Optimal dose allocation was approximately 0.5--i.e., an equal dose imparted by the low- and high-energy projections. The results complement earlier studies of optimal DE soft-tissue image acquisition, with differences attributed to the specific imaging task. Together, the results help to guide the development and implementation of high-performance DE imaging systems, with applications including lung nodule detection and diagnosis, pneumothorax identification, and musculoskeletal imaging (e.g., discrimination of rib fractures from metastasis)

  3. Dual-energy imaging of the chest: optimization of image acquisition techniques for the 'bone-only' image.

    PubMed

    Shkumat, N A; Siewerdsen, J H; Richard, S; Paul, N S; Yorkston, J; Van Metter, R

    2008-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine optimal acquisition techniques for bone image decompositions for a prototype dual-energy (DE) imaging system. Technique parameters included kVp pair (denoted [kVp(L)/kVp(H)]) and dose allocation (the proportion of dose in low- and high-energy projections), each optimized to provide maximum signal difference-to-noise ratio in DE images. Experiments involved a chest phantom representing an average patient size and containing simulated ribs and lung nodules. Low- and high-energy kVp were varied from 60-90 and 120-150 kVp, respectively. The optimal kVp pair was determined to be [60/130] kVp, with image quality showing a strong dependence on low-kVp selection. Optimal dose allocation was approximately 0.5-i.e., an equal dose imparted by the low- and high-energy projections. The results complement earlier studies of optimal DE soft-tissue image acquisition, with differences attributed to the specific imaging task. Together, the results help to guide the development and implementation of high-performance DE imaging systems, with applications including lung nodule detection and diagnosis, pneumothorax identification, and musculoskeletal imaging (e.g., discrimination of rib fractures from metastasis).

  4. Development of a High-Performance Dual-Energy Chest Imaging System: Initial Investigation of Diagnostic Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, H.; Gang, G.J.; Shkumat, N. A.; Varon, C. A.; Yorkston, J.; Van Metter, R.; Paul, N. S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To assess the performance of a newly developed dual-energy (DE) chest radiography system in comparison to digital radiography (DR) in the detection and characterization of lung nodules. Materials and Methods An experimental prototype has been developed for high-performance DE chest imaging with total dose equivalent to a single posterior-anterior DR image. Low- and high-kVp projections were used to decompose DE soft-tissue and bone images. A cohort of 55 patients (31 male, 24 female, mean age 65.6 years) was drawn from an ongoing trial involving patients referred for percutaneous CT guided biopsy of suspicious lung nodules. DE and DR images were acquired of each patient prior to biopsy. Image quality was assessed by means of human observer tests involving 5 radiologists independently rating the detection and characterization of lung nodules on a 9-point scale. Results were analyzed in terms of the fraction of cases at or above a given rating, and statistical significance was evaluated from a Wilcoxon signed rank test. Performance was analyzed for all cases pooled as well as by stratification of nodule size, density, lung region, and chest thickness. Results The studies demonstrate a significant performance advantage for DE imaging compared to DR (p<0.001) in the detection and characterization of lung nodules. DE imaging improved the detection of both small and large nodules and exhibited the most significant improvement in regions of the upper lobes, where overlying anatomical noise (ribs and clavicles) are believed to reduce nodule conspicuity in DR. Conclusions DE imaging outperformed DR overall, particularly in the detection of small, solid nodules. DE imaging also performed better in regions dominated by anatomical noise such as the lung apices. The potential for improved nodule detection and characterization at radiation doses equivalent to DR is encouraging and could augment broader utilization of DE imaging. F studies will extend the

  5. Anatomical decomposition in dual energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and the early diagnosis of lung cancer has recently become more important. For early screening lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as a gold standard for early diagnosis of lung cancer [1]. The major advantage of CT is that it is not susceptible to the problem of misdiagnosis caused by anatomical overlapping while CT has extremely high radiation dose and cost compared to chest radiography. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced new modality for lung cancer screening with relatively low radiation dose compared to CT [2] and also showing high sensitivity and specificity to prevent anatomical overlapping occurred in chest radiography. Dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules as means of reducing the anatomical noise [3]. In this study, possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by simulation study and actual experiment using prototype CDT. Furthermore organ absorbed dose and effective dose were compared with single energy CDT. The Gate v6 (Geant4 application for tomographic emission), and TASMIP (Tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomial) code were used for simulation study and simulated cylinder shape phantom consisted of 4 inner beads which were filled with spine, rib, muscle and lung equivalent materials. The patient dose was estimated by PCXMC 1.5 Monte Carlo simulation tool [4]. The tomosynthesis scan was performed with a linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over 30 degree of angular range with 1.5° degree of angular interval. The proto type CDT system has same geometry with simulation study and composed of E7869X (Toshiba, Japan) x-ray tube and FDX3543RPW (Toshiba, Japan) detector. The result images showed that reconstructed with dual energy clearly visualize lung filed by removing unnecessary bony structure. Furthermore, dual energy CDT could enhance

  6. WE-E-18A-02: Enhancement of Lung Tumor Visibility by Dual-Energy X-Ray Imaging in An Anthropomorphic Chest Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Menten, MJ; Fast, MF; Nill, S; Oelfke, U

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intrafractional lung tumor motion during radiotherapy can be compensated for by tracking the tumor position using x-ray imaging and adapting the treatment in real-time. However, locating the tumor with an automated template-matching algorithm is often challenging if the tumor is obscured by ribs. This study investigates the feasibility of creating dual-energy (DE) images of the chest with increased tumor visibility on an Elekta XVI system. Methods: An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged at two different energies. Low-energy images were obtained at 80 kVp (0.8 mAs); high-energy images at 129 kVp (0.6 mAs, additional 1.26 mm tin filter). A Geant4 Monte-Carlo framework was developed allowing simulation of the x-ray tube, flat-panel detector and phantom in order to optimize the beam energies, filtration and the weighting factor used to subtract the individual images into a synthetic DE image. The weighting factor was selected to minimize the visibility of bones while maintaining a sufficient tumor visibility. We scored the bone visibility as the contrast of tumor (with bone) to tumor (without bone), and similarly of lung tissue (with bone) to lung tissue (without bone). Tumor visibility was quantified as the contrast between tumor and lung tissue (both without bone). Results: In the experimentally obtained DE image the bone visibility was reduced by 79.2% in tumor and by 96.8% in lung tissue while the overall tumor visibility only decreased by 69.5%. The Monte-Carlo simulation yielded similar results reducing the scores by 90.0%, 85.3% and only 71.9%, respectively. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of DE imaging to enhance lung tumor detectability. In the future, we hope to further refine the Monte-Carlo simulation to more accurately predict the weighting factors which would aid real-time implementation. Furthermore, we plan to use the Monte-Carlo framework to simulate DE images of actual lung tumors. The authors would like to thank Paul

  7. A feasibility study for anatomical noise reduction in dual-energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Kim, Y.-s.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Choi, S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Thus, early diagnosis is of considerable importance. For early screening of lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as the gold standard. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced modality for lung cancer screening with a relatively low radiation dose compared to CT. The dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules by means of reducing anatomical noise. In this study, the possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by both a simulation study and an experimental study using a CDT prototype. The Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) v6 and tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) codes were used for the simulation study to create simulated phantom shapes consisting of five inner cylinders filled with different densities of bone and airequivalent materials. Furthermore, the CDT prototype system and human phantom chest were used for the experimental study. CDT scan in both the simulation and experimental studies was performed with linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over a 30 degree angular range with a 1.5 degree angular interval. To obtain materialselective images, a projectionbased energy subtraction technique was applied to high and low energy images. The resultant simulation images showed that dual-energy reconstruction could achieve an approximately 32% higher contrast to noise ratio (CNR) in images and the difference in CNR value according to bone density was significant compared to single energy CDT. Additionally, image artifacts were effectively corrected in dual energy CDT simulation studies. Likewise the experimental study with dual energy produced clear images of lung fields and bone structure by removing unnecessary anatomical structures. Dual energy tomosynthesis is a new technique; therefore, there is little guidance regarding its

  8. Dynamic dual-energy chest radiography: a potential tool for lung tissue motion monitoring and kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L.; Wong, Jerry T.; Molloi, Sabee

    2011-02-01

    Dual-energy chest radiography has the potential to provide better diagnosis of lung disease by removing the bone signal from the image. Dynamic dual-energy radiography is now possible with the introduction of digital flat-panel detectors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using dynamic dual-energy chest radiography for functional lung imaging and tumor motion assessment. The dual-energy system used in this study can acquire up to 15 frames of dual-energy images per second. A swine animal model was mechanically ventilated and imaged using the dual-energy system. Sequences of soft-tissue images were obtained using dual-energy subtraction. Time subtracted soft-tissue images were shown to be able to provide information on regional ventilation. Motion tracking of a lung anatomic feature (a branch of pulmonary artery) was performed based on an image cross-correlation algorithm. The tracking precision was found to be better than 1 mm. An adaptive correlation model was established between the above tracked motion and an external surrogate signal (temperature within the tracheal tube). This model is used to predict lung feature motion using the continuous surrogate signal and low frame rate dual-energy images (0.1-3.0 frames per second). The average RMS error of the prediction was (1.1 ± 0.3) mm. The dynamic dual energy was shown to be potentially useful for lung functional imaging such as regional ventilation and kinetic studies. It can also be used for lung tumor motion assessment and prediction during radiation therapy.

  9. Dynamic dual-energy chest radiography: a potential tool for lung tissue motion monitoring and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L; Wong, Jerry T; Molloi, Sabee

    2011-02-21

    Dual-energy chest radiography has the potential to provide better diagnosis of lung disease by removing the bone signal from the image. Dynamic dual-energy radiography is now possible with the introduction of digital flat-panel detectors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using dynamic dual-energy chest radiography for functional lung imaging and tumor motion assessment. The dual-energy system used in this study can acquire up to 15 frames of dual-energy images per second. A swine animal model was mechanically ventilated and imaged using the dual-energy system. Sequences of soft-tissue images were obtained using dual-energy subtraction. Time subtracted soft-tissue images were shown to be able to provide information on regional ventilation. Motion tracking of a lung anatomic feature (a branch of pulmonary artery) was performed based on an image cross-correlation algorithm. The tracking precision was found to be better than 1 mm. An adaptive correlation model was established between the above tracked motion and an external surrogate signal (temperature within the tracheal tube). This model is used to predict lung feature motion using the continuous surrogate signal and low frame rate dual-energy images (0.1-3.0 frames per second). The average RMS error of the prediction was (1.1 ± 0.3) mm. The dynamic dual energy was shown to be potentially useful for lung functional imaging such as regional ventilation and kinetic studies. It can also be used for lung tumor motion assessment and prediction during radiation therapy.

  10. Dynamic dual-energy chest radiography: a potential tool for lung tissue motion monitoring and kinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L.; Wong, Jerry T.; Molloi, Sabee

    2011-01-01

    Dual-energy chest radiography has the potential to provide better diagnosis of lung disease by removing the bone signal from the image. Dynamic dual-energy radiography is now possible with the introduction of digital flat panel detectors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using dynamic dual-energy chest radiography for functional lung imaging and tumor motion assessment. The dual energy system used in this study can acquire up to 15 frame of dual-energy images per second. A swine animal model was mechanically ventilated and imaged using the dual-energy system. Sequences of soft-tissue images were obtained using dual-energy subtraction. Time subtracted soft-tissue images were shown to be able to provide information on regional ventilation. Motion tracking of a lung anatomic feature (a branch of pulmonary artery) was performed based on an image cross-correlation algorithm. The tracking precision was found to be better than 1 mm. An adaptive correlation model was established between the above tracked motion and an external surrogate signal (temperature within the tracheal tube). This model is used to predict lung feature motion using the continuous surrogate signal and low frame rate dual-energy images (0.1 to 3.0 frames /sec). The average RMS error of the prediction was (1.1 ± 0.3) mm. The dynamic dual-energy was shown to be potentially useful for lung functional imaging such as regional ventilation and kinetic studies. It can also be used for lung tumor motion assessment and prediction during radiation therapy. PMID:21285477

  11. Improvement of material decomposition and image quality in dual-energy radiography by reducing image noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Kim, Y.-s.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Choi, S.; Jo, B. D.; Jeon, P.-H.; Kim, H.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-08-01

    Although digital radiography has been widely used for screening human anatomical structures in clinical situations, it has several limitations due to anatomical overlapping. To resolve this problem, dual-energy imaging techniques, which provide a method for decomposing overlying anatomical structures, have been suggested as alternative imaging techniques. Previous studies have reported several dual-energy techniques, each resulting in different image qualities. In this study, we compared three dual-energy techniques: simple log subtraction (SLS), simple smoothing of a high-energy image (SSH), and anti-correlated noise reduction (ACNR) with respect to material thickness quantification and image quality. To evaluate dual-energy radiography, we conducted Monte Carlo simulation and experimental phantom studies. The Geant 4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) v 6.0 and tungsten anode spectral model using interpolation polynomials (TASMIP) codes were used for simulation studies and digital radiography, and human chest phantoms were used for experimental studies. The results of the simulation study showed improved image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and coefficient of variation (COV) values and bone thickness estimation accuracy by applying the ACNR and SSH methods. Furthermore, the chest phantom images showed better image quality with the SSH and ACNR methods compared to the SLS method. In particular, the bone texture characteristics were well-described by applying the SSH and ACNR methods. In conclusion, the SSH and ACNR methods improved the accuracy of material quantification and image quality in dual-energy radiography compared to SLS. Our results can contribute to better diagnostic capabilities of dual-energy images and accurate material quantification in various clinical situations.

  12. Dual-Energy Computed Tomography in Genitourinary Imaging.

    PubMed

    Mileto, Achille; Marin, Daniele

    2017-03-01

    Reignited by innovations in scanner engineering and software design, dual-energy computed tomography (CT) has come back into the clinical radiology arena in the last decade. Possibilities for noninvasive in vivo characterization of genitourinary disease, especially for renal stones and renal masses, have become the pinnacle offerings of dual-energy CT for body imaging in clinical practice. This article renders a state-of-the-art review on clinical applications of dual-energy CT in genitourinary imaging.

  13. Coronary calcium visualization using dual energy chest radiography with sliding organ registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Di; Nye, Katelyn; Zhou, Bo; Gilkeson, Robert C.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is the lead biomarker for atherosclerotic heart disease. We are developing a new technique to image CAC using ubiquitously ordered, low cost, low radiation dual energy (DE) chest radiography (using the two-shot GE Revolution XRd system). In this paper, we proposed a novel image processing method (CorCalDx) based on sliding organ registration to create a bone-image-like, coronary calcium image (CCI) that significantly reduces motion artifacts and improves CAC conspicuity. Experiments on images of a physical dynamic cardiac phantom showed that CorCalDx reduced 73% of the motion artifact area as compared to standard DE over a range of heart rates up to 90 bpm and varying x-ray radiation exposures. Residual motion artifact in the phantom CCI is greatly suppressed in gray level and area (0.88% of the heart area). In a Functional Measurement Test (FMT) with 20 clinical exams, image quality improvement of CorCalDx against standard DE (measured from -10 to +10) was significantly suggested (p<0.0001) by three radiologists for cardiac motion artifacts (7.2+/-2.1) and cardiac anatomy visibility (6.1+/-3.5). CorCalDx was always chosen best in every image tested. In preliminary assessments of 12 patients with 18 calcifications, 90% of motion artifact regions in standard DE results were removed in CorCalDx results, with 100% sensitivity of calcification detection, showing great potential of CorCalDx to improve CAC detection and grading in DE chest radiography.

  14. CsI-detector-based dual-exposure dual energy in chest radiography for lung nodule detection: results of an international multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Rühl, Ricarda; Wozniak, Magdalena M; Werk, Michael; Laurent, François; Mager, Georg; Montaudon, Michel; Pattermann, Andreas; Scherrer, Antoine; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2008-09-01

    To assess both sensitivity and specificity of digital chest radiography alone and in conjunction with dual-exposure dual-energy chest radiography for the detection and classification of pulmonary nodules. One hundred patients with a total of 149 lung nodules (3-45 mm; median, 11 mm) confirmed by CT were included in this study. Dual-exposure dual-energy chest radiographies of each patient were obtained using a CsI detector system. Experienced board-certified chest radiologists from four different medical centers in Europe reviewed standard chest radiographs alone and in conjunction with dual-energy images blinded and in random order. The reviewers rated the probability of presence, calcification and malignancy of all lung nodules on a five-point rating scale. Lesions detected were identified by applying a specific coordinate system to enable precise verification by the study leader. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. In addition to the 149 true-positive CT proven lesions, 236 false-positive lung nodules were described in digital chest radiographies in conjunction with dual-energy chest radiographies. The cumulative sensitivity of chest radiography in conjunction with dual energy was 43%, specificity was 55%. For digital radiography alone, sensitivity was 35% and specifity was 83%. For the dual energy system, positive predictive value was 58%, and negative predictive value was 66% compared to the digital radiography with a positive predictive value of 59% and a negative predictive value of 65%. Areas under the curve in a ROC analysis resulted in 0.631 (95% confidence interval =0.61 to 0.65) for radiography with dual energy and 0.602 (95% confidence interval =0.58 to 0.63) for digital radiography alone. This difference was not statistically significant. For the detection of lesion calcification or the determination of malignancy, ROC analysis also failed to show significant differences. CsI-based flat-panel dual-exposure dual-energy

  15. "How to" incorporate dual-energy imaging into a high volume abdominal imaging practice.

    PubMed

    Tamm, Eric P; Le, Ott; Liu, Xinming; Layman, Rick R; Cody, Dianna D; Bhosale, Priya R

    2017-03-01

    Dual-energy CT imaging has many potential uses in abdominal imaging. It also has unique requirements for protocol creation depending on the dual-energy scanning technique that is being utilized. It also generates several new types of images which can increase the complexity of image creation and image interpretation. The purpose of this article is to review, for rapid switching and dual-source dual-energy platforms, methods for creating dual-energy protocols, different approaches for efficiently creating dual-energy images, and an approach to navigating and using dual-energy images at the reading station all using the example of a pancreatic multiphasic protocol. It will also review the three most commonly used types of dual-energy images: "workhorse" 120kVp surrogate images (including blended polychromatic and 70 keV monochromatic), high contrast images (e.g., low energy monochromatic and iodine material decomposition images), and virtual unenhanced images. Recent developments, such as the ability to create automatically on the scanner the most common dual-energy images types, namely new "Mono+" images for the DSDECT (dual-source dual-energy CT) platform will also be addressed. Finally, an approach to image interpretation using automated "hanging protocols" will also be covered. Successful dual-energy implementation in a high volume practice requires careful attention to each of these steps of scanning, image creation, and image interpretation.

  16. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Menten, Martin J. Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  17. Simulated and experimental technique optimization of dual-energy radiography: abdominal imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabol, John M.; Wheeldon, Samuel J.; Jabri, Kadri N.

    2006-03-01

    With growing clinical acceptance of dual-energy chest radiography, there is increased interest in the application of dual-energy techniques to other clinical areas. This paper describes the creation and experimental validation of a poly-energetic signal-propagation model for technique optimization of new dual-energy clinical applications. The model is verified using phantom experiments simulating typical abdominal radiographic applications such as Intravenous Urography (IVU) and the detection of pelvic and sacral bone lesions or kidney stones in the presence of bowel gas. The model is composed of a spectral signal propagation component and an image-processing component. The spectral propagation component accepts detector specifications, X-ray spectra, phantom and imaging geometry as inputs, and outputs the detected signal and estimated noise. The image-processing module performs dual-energy logarithmic subtraction and returns figures-of-merit such as contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), which are evaluated in conjunction with Monte Carlo calculations of dose. Phantoms assembled from acrylic, aluminum, and iodinated contrast-agent filled tubes were imaged using a range of kVp's and dose levels. Simulated and experimental results were compared by dose, clinical suitability, and system limitations in order to yield technique recommendations that optimize one or more figures-of-merit. The model accurately describes phantom images obtained in a low scatter environment. For the visualization of iodinated vessels in the abdomen and the detection of pelvic bone lesions, both simulated and experimental results indicate that dual-energy techniques recommended by the model yield significant improvements in CNR without significant increases in patient dose as compared to conventional techniques. For example the CNR of iodinated vessels can be doubled using two-thirds of the dose of a standard exam. Alternatively, in addition to a standard dose image, the clinician can

  18. Dual Energy Method for Breast Imaging: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Koukou, V; Martini, N; Michail, C; Sotiropoulou, P; Fountzoula, C; Kalyvas, N; Kandarakis, I; Nikiforidis, G; Fountos, G

    2015-01-01

    Dual energy methods can suppress the contrast between adipose and glandular tissues in the breast and therefore enhance the visibility of calcifications. In this study, a dual energy method based on analytical modeling was developed for the detection of minimum microcalcification thickness. To this aim, a modified radiographic X-ray unit was considered, in order to overcome the limited kVp range of mammographic units used in previous DE studies, combined with a high resolution CMOS sensor (pixel size of 22.5 μm) for improved resolution. Various filter materials were examined based on their K-absorption edge. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was used to simulate microcalcifications. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR tc ) of the subtracted images was calculated for both monoenergetic and polyenergetic X-ray beams. The optimum monoenergetic pair was 23/58 keV for the low and high energy, respectively, resulting in a minimum detectable microcalcification thickness of 100 μm. In the polyenergetic X-ray study, the optimal spectral combination was 40/70 kVp filtered with 100 μm cadmium and 1000 μm copper, respectively. In this case, the minimum detectable microcalcification thickness was 150 μm. The proposed dual energy method provides improved microcalcification detectability in breast imaging with mean glandular dose values within acceptable levels.

  19. Comparison of dual and single exposure techniques in dual-energy chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Ho, J T; Kruger, R A; Sorenson, J A

    1989-01-01

    Conventional chest radiography is the most effective tool for lung cancer detection and diagnosis; nevertheless, a high percentage of lung cancer tumors are missed because of the overlap of lung nodule image contrast with bone image contrast in a chest radiograph. Two different energy subtraction strategies, dual exposure and single exposure techniques, were studied for decomposing a radiograph into bone-free and soft tissue-free images to address this problem. For comparing the efficiency of these two techniques in lung nodule detection, the performances of the techniques were evaluated on the basis of residual tissue contrast, energy separation, and signal-to-noise ratio. The evaluation was based on both computer simulation and experimental verification. The dual exposure technique was found to be better than the single exposure technique because of its higher signal-to-noise ratio and greater residual tissue contrast. However, x-ray tube loading and patient motion are problems.

  20. Dictionary-based image denoising for dual energy computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechlem, Korbinian; Allner, Sebastian; Mei, Kai; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional computed tomography (CT), dual energy CT allows for improved material decomposition by conducting measurements at two distinct energy spectra. Since radiation exposure is a major concern in clinical CT, there is a need for tools to reduce the noise level in images while preserving diagnostic information. One way to achieve this goal is the application of image-based denoising algorithms after an analytical reconstruction has been performed. We have developed a modified dictionary denoising algorithm for dual energy CT aimed at exploiting the high spatial correlation between between images obtained from different energy spectra. Both the low-and high energy image are partitioned into small patches which are subsequently normalized. Combined patches with improved signal-to-noise ratio are formed by a weighted addition of corresponding normalized patches from both images. Assuming that corresponding low-and high energy image patches are related by a linear transformation, the signal in both patches is added coherently while noise is neglected. Conventional dictionary denoising is then performed on the combined patches. Compared to conventional dictionary denoising and bilateral filtering, our algorithm achieved superior performance in terms of qualitative and quantitative image quality measures. We demonstrate, in simulation studies, that this approach can produce 2d-histograms of the high- and low-energy reconstruction which are characterized by significantly improved material features and separation. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches that attempt denoising without simultaneously using both energy signals, superior similarity to the ground truth can be found with our proposed algorithm.

  1. Imaging of nanoparticles with dual-energy computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ducote, J L; Alivov, Y; Molloi, S

    2011-01-01

    A simulation study was performed to determine the feasibility and performance of imaging nanoparticles as contrast agents in dual energy computed tomography. An analytical simulation model was used to model the relevant signal to noise ratio (SNR) in dual energy imaging for the specific case of a three material patient phantom consisting of water, calcium hydroxyapatite and contrast agent. Elemental gold and iodine were both considered as contrast agents. Simulations were performed for a range of monenergetic (20 - 150 keV) and polyenergetic (20-150 kVp) beam spectra. A reference configuration was defined with beam energies of 80 kVp and 140 kVp to match current clinical practice. The effect of adding a silver filter to the high energy beam was also studied. A figure of merit (FOM) which normalized the dual energy SNR to the square root of patient integral dose, was calculated for all cases. The units of the FOM were keV−1/2. A simple Rose model of detectability was used to estimate the minimum concentration of either elements needed to be detected (SNR>5). For monoenergetic beams, the peak FOM of gold was 6.4 × 10−6 keV−1/2while the peak FOM of iodine was 3.1 × 10−6 keV−1/2, a factor of approximately 2 greater for gold. For polyenergetic spectra, at the reference energies of 80 kVp and 140 kVp, the FOM for gold and iodine was 1.65 × 10−6 keV−1/2 and 5.0 × 10−7 keV−1/2, respectively, a factor of approximately 3.3 greater. Also at these energies, the minimum detectable concentration of gold was estimated to be 58.5 mg/mL while iodine was estimated to be 117.5 mg/mL. The results suggest that the imaging of a gold nanoparticle contrast agent is well suited to current conditions used in clinical imaging. The addition of a silver filter of 800 μm further increased the image quality of the gold signal by approximately 50% for the same absorbed dose to the patient. PMID:21386141

  2. Imaging of nanoparticles with dual-energy computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ducote, J L; Alivov, Y; Molloi, S

    2011-04-07

    A simulation study was performed to determine the feasibility and performance of imaging nanoparticles as contrast agents in dual-energy computed tomography. An analytical simulation model was used to model the relevant signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in dual-energy imaging for the specific case of a three-material patient phantom consisting of water, calcium hydroxyapatite and contrast agent. Elemental gold and iodine were both considered as contrast agents. Simulations were performed for a range of monoenergetic (20-150 keV) and polyenergetic (20-150 kVp) beam spectra. A reference configuration was defined with beam energies of 80 and 140 kVp to match current clinical practice. The effect of adding a silver filter to the high-energy beam was also studied. A figure of merit (FOM), which normalized the dual-energy SNR to the square root of the patient integral dose, was calculated for all cases. The units of the FOM were keV(-1/2). A simple Rose model of detectability was used to estimate the minimum concentration of either elements needed to be detected (SNR > 5). For monoenergetic beams, the peak FOM of gold was 6.4 × 10(-6) keV(-1/2), while the peak FOM of iodine was 3.1 × 10(-6) keV(-1/2), a factor of approximately 2 greater for gold. For polyenergetic spectra, at the reference energies of 80 and 140 kVp, the FOM for gold and iodine was 1.65 × 10(-6) and 5.0 × 10(-7) keV(-1/2), respectively, a factor of approximately 3.3 greater. Also at these energies, the minimum detectable concentration of gold was estimated to be 58.5 mg mL(-1), while iodine was estimated to be 117.5 mg mL(-1). The results suggest that the imaging of a gold nanoparticle contrast agent is well suited to current conditions used in clinical imaging. The addition of a silver filter of 800 µm further increased the image quality of the gold signal by approximately 50% for the same absorbed dose to the patient.

  3. Improved computerized detection of lung nodules in chest radiographs by means of 'virtual dual-energy' radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Suzuki, K.; MacMahon, H.

    2011-03-01

    Major challenges in current computer-aided detection (CADe) of nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) are to detect nodules that overlap with ribs and to reduce the frequent false positives (FPs) caused by ribs. Our purpose was to develop a CADe scheme with improved sensitivity and specificity by use of "virtual dual-energy" (VDE) CXRs where ribs are suppressed with a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN). To reduce rib-induced FPs and detect nodules overlapping with ribs, we incorporated VDE technology in our CADe scheme. VDE technology suppressed ribs in CXR while maintaining soft-tissue opacity by use of an MTANN that had been trained with real DE imaging. Our scheme detected nodule candidates on VDE images by use of a morphologic filtering technique. Sixty-four morphologic and gray-level-based features were extracted from each candidate from both original and VDE CXRs. A nonlinear support vector classifier was employed for classification of the nodule candidates. A publicly available database containing 126 nodules in 126 CXRs was used for testing of our CADe scheme. Twenty nine percent (36/126) of the nodules were rated "extremely subtle" or "very subtle" by a radiologist. With the original scheme, a sensitivity of 76.2 (96/126) with 5 (630/126) FPs per image was achieved. By use of VDE images, more nodules overlapping with ribs were detected and the sensitivity was improved substantially to 84.1% (106/126) at the same FP rate in a leave-one-out cross-validation test, whereas the literature shows that other CADe schemes achieved sensitivities of 66.0% and 72.0% at the same FP rate.

  4. Multi-Institutional Evaluation of Digital Tomosynthesis, Dual-Energy Radiography, and Conventional Chest Radiography for the Detection and Management of Pulmonary Nodules.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, James T; McAdams, H Page; Sabol, John M; Chakraborty, Dev P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Reddy, Gautham P; Vikgren, Jenny; Båth, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a multi-institutional, multireader study to compare the performance of digital tomosynthesis, dual-energy (DE) imaging, and conventional chest radiography for pulmonary nodule detection and management. Materials and Methods In this binational, institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant prospective study, 158 subjects (43 subjects with normal findings) were enrolled at four institutions. Informed consent was obtained prior to enrollment. Subjects underwent chest computed tomography (CT) and imaging with conventional chest radiography (posteroanterior and lateral), DE imaging, and tomosynthesis with a flat-panel imaging device. Three experienced thoracic radiologists identified true locations of nodules (n = 516, 3-20-mm diameters) with CT and recommended case management by using Fleischner Society guidelines. Five other radiologists marked nodules and indicated case management by using images from conventional chest radiography, conventional chest radiography plus DE imaging, tomosynthesis, and tomosynthesis plus DE imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy were measured by using the free-response receiver operating characteristic method and the receiver operating characteristic method for nodule detection and case management, respectively. Results were further analyzed according to nodule diameter categories (3-4 mm, >4 mm to 6 mm, >6 mm to 8 mm, and >8 mm to 20 mm). Results Maximum lesion localization fraction was higher for tomosynthesis than for conventional chest radiography in all nodule size categories (3.55-fold for all nodules, P < .001; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.96, 4.15). Case-level sensitivity was higher with tomosynthesis than with conventional chest radiography for all nodules (1.49-fold, P < .001; 95% CI: 1.25, 1.73). Case management decisions showed better overall accuracy with tomosynthesis than with conventional chest radiography, as given by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve

  5. Lung imaging in rodents using dual energy micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Guo, X.; Clark, D.; Johnston, S. M.; Marshall, C.; Piantadosi, C.

    2012-03-01

    Dual energy CT imaging is expected to play a major role in the diagnostic arena as it provides material decomposition on an elemental basis. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of dual energy micro-CT for the estimation of vascular, tissue, and air fractions in rodent lungs using a post-reconstruction three-material decomposition method. We have tested our method using both simulations and experimental work. Using simulations, we have estimated the accuracy limits of the decomposition for realistic micro-CT noise levels. Next, we performed experiments involving ex vivo lung imaging in which intact lungs were carefully removed from the thorax, were injected with an iodine-based contrast agent and inflated with air at different volume levels. Finally, we performed in vivo imaging studies in (n=5) C57BL/6 mice using fast prospective respiratory gating in endinspiration and end-expiration for three different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Prior to imaging, mice were injected with a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. The mean accuracy values were for Air (95.5%), Blood (96%), and Tissue (92.4%). The absolute accuracy in determining all fraction materials was 94.6%. The minimum difference that we could detect in material fractions was 15%. As expected, an increase in PEEP levels for the living mouse resulted in statistically significant increases in air fractions at end-expiration, but no significant changes in end-inspiration. Our method has applicability in preclinical pulmonary studies where various physiological changes can occur as a result of genetic changes, lung disease, or drug effects.

  6. The impact of cardiac gating on the detection of coronary calcifications in dual-energy chest radiography: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabol, John M.; Liu, Ray; Saunders, Rowland; Markley, Jonathan; Moreno, Nery; Seamans, John; Wiese, Scott; Jabri, Kadri; Gilkeson, Robert C.

    2006-03-01

    The detection of coronary calcifications with CT is generally accepted as a useful method for predicting early onset of coronary artery disease. Film-screen X-ray and fluoroscopy have also been shown to have high predictive value for coronary disease diagnosis, but have minimal sensitivity. Recently, flat-panel detectors capable of dual-energy techniques have enabled the separation of soft-tissue and bone from images. Clinical studies report substantially improved sensitivity for the detection of coronary calcifications using these techniques. However, heart motion causes minor artefacts from misregistration of both calcified and soft-tissue structures, resulting in inconsistent detection of calcifications. This research examines whether cardiac gating improves the reliability of calcification detection. Single-energy, gated, and non-gated dual-energy imaging techniques are examined in a dynamic phantom model. A gating system was developed to synchronize two dual-energy exposures to a specified phase of the cardiac cycle. The performance and repeatability of the gating system was validated with the use of a cyclical phantom. An anthropomorphic phantom was developed to simulate both cardiac and soft-tissue motion, and generate ECG-like output signals. The anthropomorphic phantom and motion artefact accuracy was verified by comparison with clinical images of patients with calcifications. The ability of observers to detect calcifications in non-gated, and gated techniques was compared through the use of an ROC experiment. Gating visibly reduces the effect of motion artifacts in the dual-energy images. Without gating, motion artefacts cause greater variability in calcification detection. Comparison of the average area-under-the-curve of the ROC curves show that gating significantly increases the accuracy of calcification detection. The effects of motion and gating on DE cardiac calcification detection have been demonstrated and characterized in a phantom model that

  7. Dual energy subtraction method for breast calcification imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukou, Vaia; Martini, Niki; Fountos, George; Michail, Christos; Sotiropoulou, Panagiota; Bakas, Athanasios; Kalyvas, Nektarios; Kandarakis, Ioannis; Speller, Robert; Nikiforidis, George

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to present an experimental dual energy (DE) method for the visualization of microcalcifications (μCs). A modified radiographic X-ray tube combined with a high resolution complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) X-ray detector was used. A 40/70 kV spectral combination was filtered with 100 μm cadmium (Cd) and 1000 μm copper (Cu) for the low/high-energy combination. Homogenous and inhomogeneous breast phantoms and two calcification phantoms were constructed with various calcification thicknesses, ranging from 16 to 152 μm . Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated from the DE subtracted images for various entrance surface doses. A calcification thickness of 152 μm was visible, with mean glandular doses (MGD) in the acceptable levels (below 3 mGy). Additional post-processing on the DE images of the inhomogeneous breast phantom resulted in a minimum visible calcification thickness of 93 μm (MGD=1.62 mGy). The proposed DE method could potentially improve calcification visibility in DE breast calcification imaging.

  8. SU-D-BRA-06: Dual-Energy Chest CT: The Effects of Virtual Monochromatic Reconstructions On Texture Analysis Features

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, J; Duran, C; Stingo, F; Wei, W; Rao, A; Zhang, L; Court, L; Erasmus, J; Godoy, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of virtual monochromatic reconstructions on several commonly used texture analysis features in DECT of the chest. Further, to assess the effect of monochromatic energy levels on the ability of these textural features to identify tissue types. Methods: 20 consecutive patients underwent chest CTs for evaluation of lung nodules using Siemens Somatom Definition Flash DECT. Virtual monochromatic images were constructed at 10keV intervals from 40–190keV. For each patient, an ROI delineated the lesion under investigation, and cylindrical ROI’s were placed within 5 different healthy tissues (blood, fat, muscle, lung, and liver). Several histogram- and Grey Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM)-based texture features were then evaluated in each ROI at each energy level. As a means of validation, these feature values were then used in a random forest classifier to attempt to identify the tissue types present within each ROI. Their predictive accuracy at each energy level was recorded. Results: All textural features changed considerably with virtual monochromatic energy, particularly below 70keV. Most features exhibited a global minimum or maximum around 80keV, and while feature values changed with energy above this, patient ranking was generally unaffected. As expected, blood demonstrated the lowest inter-patient variability, for all features, while lung lesions (encompassing many different pathologies) exhibited the highest. The accuracy of these features in identifying tissues (76% accuracy) was highest at 80keV, but no clear relationship between energy and classification accuracy was found. Two common misclassifications (blood vs liver and muscle vs fat) accounted for the majority (24 of the 28) errors observed. Conclusion: All textural features were highly dependent on virtual monochromatic energy level, especially below 80keV, and were more stable above this energy. However, in a random forest model, these commonly used features were

  9. TU-D-BRB-01: Dual-Energy CT: Techniques in Acquisition and Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Pelc, N

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT technology is becoming increasingly available to the medical imaging community. In addition, several models of CT simulators sold for use in radiation therapy departments now feature dual-energy technology. The images provided by dual-energy CT scanners add new information to the radiation treatment planning process; multiple spectral components can be used to separate and identify material composition as well as generate virtual monoenergetic images. In turn, this information could be used to investigate pathologic processes, separate the properties of contrast agents from soft tissues, assess tissue response to therapy, and other applications of therapeutic interest. Additionally, the decomposition of materials in images could directly integrate with and impact the accuracy of dose calculation algorithms. This symposium will explore methods of generating dual-energy CT images, spectral and image analysis algorithms, current and future applications of interest in oncologic imaging, and unique considerations when using dualenergy CT images in the radiation treatment planning process.

  10. TU-D-BRB-02: Dual-Energy CT: Applications in Oncologic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, U

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT technology is becoming increasingly available to the medical imaging community. In addition, several models of CT simulators sold for use in radiation therapy departments now feature dual-energy technology. The images provided by dual-energy CT scanners add new information to the radiation treatment planning process; multiple spectral components can be used to separate and identify material composition as well as generate virtual monoenergetic images. In turn, this information could be used to investigate pathologic processes, separate the properties of contrast agents from soft tissues, assess tissue response to therapy, and other applications of therapeutic interest. Additionally, the decomposition of materials in images could directly integrate with and impact the accuracy of dose calculation algorithms. This symposium will explore methods of generating dual-energy CT images, spectral and image analysis algorithms, current and future applications of interest in oncologic imaging, and unique considerations when using dualenergy CT images in the radiation treatment planning process.

  11. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan©600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the

  12. Clinical applications of dual-energy CT in head and neck imaging.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Mayich, Michael; Daftari-Besheli, Laleh; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-03-01

    Dual-energy CT provides insights into the material properties of the tissues and can differentiate between tissues that have similar attenuation on conventional, single energy CT imaging. It has several useful and promising applications in head and neck imaging that an otolaryngologist could use to deliver improved clinical care. These applications include metal artifact reduction, atherosclerotic plaque and tumor characterization, detection of parathyroid lesions, and delineation of paranasal sinus ventilation. Dual-energy CT can potentially improve image quality, reduce radiation dose, and provide specific diagnostic information for certain head and neck lesions. This article reviews some current and potential otolaryngology applications of dual-energy CT.

  13. Targeted Silver Nanoparticles for Dual-Energy Breast X-Ray Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    FOR TEMPORAL SUBTRACTION AND DUAL-ENERGY X-RAY IMAGING, Roshan Karunamuni, Ajlan Al Zaki, Anatoliy V. Popov, E. James Delikatny, Sara Gavenonis, Andrew...imaging Roshan Karunamuni1, Ajlan Al Zaki2, Anatoliy V. Popov1, E. James Delikatny1, Sara Gavenonis1, Andrew Tsourkas2, Andrew D. A. Maidment1...Carton AK, Ullberg C, Lindman K, Acciavati R, Francke T, Maidmenet ADA. Optimization of a dual- energy contrast-enhanced technique for a photon

  14. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Molloi, S; Li, B; Yin, F; Chen, H

    2014-06-15

    The quantification accuracy of dual-energy imaging is influenced by the fundamentals of x-ray physics, system geometry, data acquisition hardware/protocol, system calibration, and image processing technique. This symposium will provide updates on the following advanced application areas: Mammography. Volumetric breast density techniques based on standard mammograms require estimation of breast thickness, which is difficult to accurately measure. By comparison, calculation of breast density using dual energy mammography does not require measurement of breast thickness. Dual energy mammography has been implemented using both energy integrating flat panel detectors in conjunction with beam energy switching and energy resolved photon counting detectors. These techniques have been optimized using simulation studies and validated using physical phantoms and postmortem breasts. Chemical decomposition was used as the gold standard for volumetric breast density measurement in postmortem breasts. Breast density measurements have also been compared with results from four-category BI-RADS density rankings, standard image thresholding and Fuzzy k-mean clustering techniques. These studies indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure volumetric breast density. Cardiovascular CT. The predicative accuracy of risk models for recurrent stroke and cardiac arrest depends heavily on accurate differentiation of thrombus or calcium from iodine in left atrial appendage or coronary arteries. The amount of energy separation is constrained by image noise; therefore, optimal kVp, beam filtration, and balanced flux are essential for the quantification accuracy of iodine and calcium. The basis materials are combined linearly to generate monochromatic energy images, where CT# accuracy and CNR are energy dependent. With optimal monochromatic energy, the mean iodine concentration for the thrombus, circulatory stasis, and control groups are significantly different. Risk

  15. A Flexible Method for Multi-Material Decomposition of Dual-Energy CT Images.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Paulo R S; Lamb, Peter; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dual-energy computed-tomographic (CT) systems to determine the concentration of constituent materials in a mixture, known as material decomposition, is the basis for many of dual-energy CT's clinical applications. However, the complex composition of tissues and organs in the human body poses a challenge for many material decomposition methods, which assume the presence of only two, or at most three, materials in the mixture. We developed a flexible, model-based method that extends dual-energy CT's core material decomposition capability to handle more complex situations, in which it is necessary to disambiguate among and quantify the concentration of a larger number of materials. The proposed method, named multi-material decomposition (MMD), was used to develop two image analysis algorithms. The first was virtual unenhancement (VUE), which digitally removes the effect of contrast agents from contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT exams. VUE has the ability to reduce patient dose and improve clinical workflow, and can be used in a number of clinical applications such as CT urography and CT angiography. The second algorithm developed was liver-fat quantification (LFQ), which accurately quantifies the fat concentration in the liver from dual-energy CT exams. LFQ can form the basis of a clinical application targeting the diagnosis and treatment of fatty liver disease. Using image data collected from a cohort consisting of 50 patients and from phantoms, the application of MMD to VUE and LFQ yielded quantitatively accurate results when compared against gold standards. Furthermore, consistent results were obtained across all phases of imaging (contrast-free and contrast-enhanced). This is of particular importance since most clinical protocols for abdominal imaging with CT call for multi-phase imaging. We conclude that MMD can successfully form the basis of a number of dual-energy CT image analysis algorithms, and has the potential to improve the clinical utility

  16. A computation method of dual-energy x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xuanqin; Tang, Shaojie; Hong, Wei

    2006-03-01

    Dual-energy X-ray imaging is an important method of medical imaging, capable of not only obtaining spatial information of imaging object but also disclosing its chemical components, and has many applications in clinic. The current computation methods of dual-energy imaging are still based on the model of mono-energy spectrum imaging with some linear calibration, while they are incapable to reflect correctly the physical characteristics of dual-energy imaging and obstruct deeper research in this field. The article presents a new medical X-ray imaging model in accordance with physics of imaging and its corresponding computational method. The computation process includes two steps: first, to compute two attenuation parameters that have clear physical meaning: equivalent electron density and attenuation parameter of photoemission; then to compute the components of high- and low-density mass through a group of simple equation with two variables. Experiments showed that such method has quite a satisfactory precision in theory, that is, the solutions of parameters under different exposure voltages and thickness of tissue for several main tissues of human body are much low in deviations, whose quotient of standard deviation divided by mean are mostly under 0.1%, and at most 0.32%. The method provides not only a new computational way for dual-energy X-ray imaging, but also a feasible analysis for its nature. In addition, the method can be used to linearly rectify data of dual-energy CT and analyze the chemical component of reconstructed object by means of parameters clear in physics.

  17. SU-E-J-256: Dual Energy Planar Image Based Localization in the Absence of On-Board CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Sadagopan, R; Yang, J; Li, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a tool enabling soft tissue based image guidance using dual energy radiographs for cases when on-board CT is not available. Method: Dual energy planar radiographs can be applied to image guidance for targeting lung lesions because the bone based alignment only may not be sufficient as the lesions move. We acquired images of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom at 120 and 60 KVp respectively. Using a weighted logarithmic subtraction of these dual energy images, a soft tissue enhanced and a bone enhanced image were generated and they could be used for the image guidance purpose. Similar processing was also applied to a dual energy image set acquired for a patient undergoing a proton therapy. Results: The soft tissue enhanced images suppressed bones (ribs and scapula) overlying on lung, thus enabling a better visualization of soft tissue and lesion, while the bone enhanced image suppressed the soft tissue. These enhanced effects were visually apparent without further processing for display enhancements, such as using histogram or edge enhancement technique. Conclusions: The phantom image processing was encouraging. The initial test on the patient image set showed that other post processing might still be able to add value in visualizing soft tissues in addition to the dual energy soft tissue enhancement. More evaluations are needed to determine the potential benefit of this technique in the clinic.

  18. Optimization of a flat-panel based real time dual-energy system for cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Ducote, Justin L; Xu, Tong; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-06-01

    A simulation study was conducted to evaluate the effects of high-energy beam filtration, dual-gain operation and noise reduction on dual-energy images using a digital flat-panel detector. High-energy beam filtration increases image contrast through greater beam separation and tends to reduce total radiation exposure and dose per image pair. It is also possible to reduce dual-energy image noise by acquiring low and high-energy images at two different detector gains. In addition, dual-energy noise reduction algorithms can further reduce image noise. The cumulative effect of these techniques applied in series was investigated in this study. The contrast from a small thickness of calcium was simulated over a step phantom of tissue equivalent material with a CsI phosphor as the image detector. The dual-energy contrast-to-noise ratio was calculated using values of energy absorption and energy variance. A figure-of-merit (FOM) was calculated from dual-energy contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and patient effective dose estimated from values of entrance exposure. Filter atomic numbers in the range of 1-100 were considered with thicknesses ranging from 0-2500 mg/cm2. The simulation examined combinations of the above techniques which maximized the FOM. The application of a filter increased image contrast by as much as 45%. Near maximal increases were seen for filter atomic numbers in the range of 40-60 and 85-100 with masses above 750 mg/cm2. Increasing filter thickness beyond 1000 mg/cm2 increased tube loading without further significant contrast enhancement. No additional FOM improvements were seen with dual gain before or after the application of any noise reduction algorithm. Narrow beam experiments were carried out to verify predictions. The measured FOM increased by more than a factor of 3.5 for a silver filter thickness of 800 microm, equal energy weighting and application of a noise clipping algorithm. The main limitation of dynamic high-energy filtration is increased

  19. Optimization of a flat-panel based real time dual-energy system for cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ducote, Justin L.; Xu Tong; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-06-15

    A simulation study was conducted to evaluate the effects of high-energy beam filtration, dual-gain operation and noise reduction on dual-energy images using a digital flat-panel detector. High-energy beam filtration increases image contrast through greater beam separation and tends to reduce total radiation exposure and dose per image pair. It is also possible to reduce dual-energy image noise by acquiring low and high-energy images at two different detector gains. In addition, dual-energy noise reduction algorithms can further reduce image noise. The cumulative effect of these techniques applied in series was investigated in this study. The contrast from a small thickness of calcium was simulated over a step phantom of tissue equivalent material with a CsI phosphor as the image detector. The dual-energy contrast-to-noise ratio was calculated using values of energy absorption and energy variance. A figure-of-merit (FOM) was calculated from dual-energy contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and patient effective dose estimated from values of entrance exposure. Filter atomic numbers in the range of 1-100 were considered with thicknesses ranging from 0-2500 mg/cm{sup 2}. The simulation examined combinations of the above techniques which maximized the FOM. The application of a filter increased image contrast by as much as 45%. Near maximal increases were seen for filter atomic numbers in the range of 40-60 and 85-100 with masses above 750 mg/cm{sup 2}. Increasing filter thickness beyond 1000 mg/cm{sup 2} increased tube loading without further significant contrast enhancement. No additional FOM improvements were seen with dual gain before or after the application of any noise reduction algorithm. Narrow beam experiments were carried out to verify predictions. The measured FOM increased by more than a factor of 3.5 for a silver filter thickness of 800 {mu}m, equal energy weighting and application of a noise clipping algorithm. The main limitation of dynamic high-energy filtration

  20. Line Integral Alternating Minimization Algorithm for Dual-Energy X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaqi; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Politte, David G; Evans, Joshua D; Han, Dong; Whiting, Bruce R; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new algorithm, called line integral alternating minimization (LIAM), for dual-energy X-ray CT image reconstruction. Instead of obtaining component images by minimizing the discrepancy between the data and the mean estimates, LIAM allows for a tunable discrepancy between the basis material projections and the basis sinograms. A parameter is introduced that controls the size of this discrepancy, and with this parameter the new algorithm can continuously go from a two-step approach to the joint estimation approach. LIAM alternates between iteratively updating the line integrals of the component images and reconstruction of the component images using an image iterative deblurring algorithm. An edge-preserving penalty function can be incorporated in the iterative deblurring step to decrease the roughness in component images. Images from both simulated and experimentally acquired sinograms from a clinical scanner were reconstructed by LIAM while varying the regularization parameters to identify good choices. The results from the dual-energy alternating minimization algorithm applied to the same data were used for comparison. Using a small fraction of the computation time of dual-energy alternating minimization, LIAM achieves better accuracy of the component images in the presence of Poisson noise for simulated data reconstruction and achieves the same level of accuracy for real data reconstruction.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of noise reduction strategies in dual-energy imaging.

    PubMed

    Warp, Richard J; Dobbins, James T

    2003-02-01

    In this paper we describe a quantitative evaluation of the performance of three dual-energy noise reduction algorithms: Kalender's correlated noise reduction (KCNR), noise clipping (NOC), and edge-predictive adaptive smoothing (EPAS). These algorithms were compared to a simple smoothing filter approach, using the variance and noise power spectrum measurements of the residual noise in dual-energy images acquired with an a-Si TFT flat-panel x-ray detector. An estimate of the true noise was made through a new method with subpixel accuracy by subtracting an individual image from an ensemble average image. The results indicate that in the lung regions of the tissue image, all three algorithms reduced the noise by similar percentages at high spatial frequencies (KCNR=88%, NOC=88%, EPAS=84%, NOC/KCNR=88%) and somewhat less at low spatial frequencies (KCNR=45%, NOC=54%, EPAS=52%, NOC/KCNR=55%). At low frequencies, the presence of edge artifacts from KCNR made the performance worse, thus NOC or NOC combined with KCNR performed best. At high frequencies, KCNR performed best in the bone image, yet NOC performed best in the tissue image. Noise reduction strategies in dual-energy imaging can be effective and should focus on blending various algorithms depending on anatomical locations.

  2. Capabilities of dual-energy x-ray imaging in medicine and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikov, Volodymyr D.; Grinyov, Borys V.; Opolonin, Oleksandr D.; Galkin, Serhiy M.; Lysetska, Olena K.; Voronkin, Yevheniy F.; Kostioukevitch, Serhiy A.

    2012-10-01

    The dual-energy computer tomography compared with its traditional single-energy variant ensures substantially higher contrast sensitivity. The evaluation of the signal ratio from high-energy and low-energy detectors has been carried out using a simplified model of the dual-energy detector array and accounting for the X-ray tube spectrum. We proposed to use of a dual-energy receiving-detecting circuit with a detector pair ZnSe/CsI or ZnSe/CdWO that allows efficient distinction between muscular and bone tissues, which supports our earlier theoretical assumptions that this method could be successfully used for separate detection of materials differing in their effective atomic number Zeff and local density (e.g., calcium contents in bone densitometry), so as can be turn to account for new generation instruments. A possibility of dual energy tomography use for osteoporosis diagnostics was considered. Direct image reconstruction of biological objects has been carried out, demonstrating details of bones with different density. The density of the bone depends on the calcium content, which is not more than 20 % for the narrow part and about 18,5 % in the broad part. This results obtained were in good agreement with the results of the independent chemical analysis.

  3. Dual energy imaging using a clinical on-board imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoggarth, M. A.; Luce, J.; Syeda, F.; Bray, T. S.; Block, A.; Nagda, S.; Roeske, J. C.

    2013-06-01

    Dual energy (DE) imaging consists of obtaining kilovoltage (kV) x-ray images at two different diagnostic energies and performing a weighted subtraction of these images. A third image is then produced that highlights soft tissue. DE imaging has been used by radiologists to aid in the detection of lung malignancies. However, it has not been used clinically in radiotherapy. The goal of this study is to assess the feasibility of performing DE imaging using a commercial on-board imaging system. Both a simple and an anthropomorphic phantom were constructed for this analysis. Planar kV images of the phantoms were obtained using varied imaging energies and mAs. Software was written to perform DE subtraction using empirically determined weighting factors. Tumor detectability was assessed quantitatively using the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR). Overall DE subtraction suppressed high density objects in both phantoms. The optimal imaging technique, providing the largest SDNR with a dose less than our reference technique was 140 kVp, 1.0 mAs and 60 kVp, 3.2 mAs. Based on this analysis, DE subtraction imaging is feasible using a commercial on-board imaging system and may improve the visualization of tumors in lung cancer patients undergoing image-guided radiotherapy.

  4. Dual energy imaging using a clinical on-board imaging system.

    PubMed

    Hoggarth, M A; Luce, J; Syeda, F; Bray, T S; Block, A; Nagda, S; Roeske, J C

    2013-06-21

    Dual energy (DE) imaging consists of obtaining kilovoltage (kV) x-ray images at two different diagnostic energies and performing a weighted subtraction of these images. A third image is then produced that highlights soft tissue. DE imaging has been used by radiologists to aid in the detection of lung malignancies. However, it has not been used clinically in radiotherapy. The goal of this study is to assess the feasibility of performing DE imaging using a commercial on-board imaging system. Both a simple and an anthropomorphic phantom were constructed for this analysis. Planar kV images of the phantoms were obtained using varied imaging energies and mAs. Software was written to perform DE subtraction using empirically determined weighting factors. Tumor detectability was assessed quantitatively using the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR). Overall DE subtraction suppressed high density objects in both phantoms. The optimal imaging technique, providing the largest SDNR with a dose less than our reference technique was 140 kVp, 1.0 mAs and 60 kVp, 3.2 mAs. Based on this analysis, DE subtraction imaging is feasible using a commercial on-board imaging system and may improve the visualization of tumors in lung cancer patients undergoing image-guided radiotherapy.

  5. Dual-energy x-ray image decomposition by independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yifeng; Jiang, Dazong; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Dengfu; Lin, Gang

    2001-09-01

    The spatial distributions of bone and soft tissue in human body are separated by independent component analysis (ICA) of dual-energy x-ray images. It is because of the dual energy imaging modelí-s conformity to the ICA model that we can apply this method: (1) the absorption in body is mainly caused by photoelectric absorption and Compton scattering; (2) they take place simultaneously but are mutually independent; and (3) for monochromatic x-ray sources the total attenuation is achieved by linear combination of these two absorption. Compared with the conventional method, the proposed one needs no priori information about the accurate x-ray energy magnitude for imaging, while the results of the separation agree well with the conventional one.

  6. On two-parameter models of photon cross sections: application to dual-energy CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Jeffrey F; Li, Sicong; Devic, Slobodan; Whiting, Bruce R; Lerma, Fritz A

    2006-11-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the theoretically achievable accuracy in estimating photon cross sections at low energies (20-1000 keV) from idealized dual-energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. Cross-section estimation from dual-energy measurements requires a model that can accurately represent photon cross sections of any biological material as a function of energy by specifying only two characteristic parameters of the underlying material, e.g., effective atomic number and density. This paper evaluates the accuracy of two commonly used two-parameter cross-section models for postprocessing idealized measurements derived from dual-energy CT images. The parametric fit model (PFM) accounts for electron-binding effects and photoelectric absorption by power functions in atomic number and energy and scattering by the Klein-Nishina cross section. The basis-vector model (BVM) assumes that attenuation coefficients of any biological substance can be approximated by a linear combination of mass attenuation coefficients of two dissimilar basis substances. Both PFM and BVM were fit to a modern cross-section library for a range of elements and mixtures representative of naturally occurring biological materials (Z = 2-20). The PFM model, in conjunction with the effective atomic number approximation, yields estimated the total linear cross-section estimates with mean absolute and maximum error ranges of 0.6%-2.2% and 1%-6%, respectively. The corresponding error ranges for BVM estimates were 0.02%-0.15% and 0.1%-0.5%. However, for photoelectric absorption frequency, the PFM absolute mean and maximum errors were 10.8%-22.4% and 29%-50%, compared with corresponding BVM errors of 0.4%-11.3% and 0.5%-17.0%, respectively. Both models were found to exhibit similar sensitivities to image-intensity measurement uncertainties. Of the two models, BVM is the most promising approach for realizing dual-energy CT cross-section measurement.

  7. Dual-energy micro-CT imaging for differentiation of iodine- and gold-based nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Johnston, S. M.; Qi, Y.; Ghaghada, K.; Johnson, G. A.

    2011-03-01

    Spectral CT imaging is expected to play a major role in the diagnostic arena as it provides material decomposition on an elemental basis. One fascinating possibility is the ability to discriminate multiple contrast agents targeting different biological sites. We investigate the feasibility of dual energy micro-CT for discrimination of iodine (I) and gold (Au) contrast agents when simultaneously present in the body. Simulations and experiments were performed to measure the CT enhancement for I and Au over a range of voltages from 40-to-150 kVp using a dual source micro-CT system. The selected voltages for dual energy micro-CT imaging of Au and I were 40 kVp and 80 kVp. On a massconcentration basis, the relative average enhancement of Au to I was 2.75 at 40 kVp and 1.58 at 80 kVp. We have demonstrated the method in a preclinical model of colon cancer to differentiate vascular architecture and extravasation. The concentration maps of Au and I allow quantitative measure of the bio-distribution of both agents. In conclusion, dual energy micro-CT can be used to discriminate probes containing I and Au with immediate impact in pre-clinical research.

  8. Preliminary research on dual-energy X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hua-Jie; Wang, Sheng-Hao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Pei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has been widely applied to measure the bone mineral density (BMD) and soft-tissue composition of the human body. However, the use of DEXA is greatly limited for low-Z materials such as soft tissues due to their weak absorption, while X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) shows significantly improved contrast in comparison with the conventional standard absorption-based X-ray imaging for soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a novel X-ray phase-contrast method to measure the area density of low-Z materials, including a single-energy method and a dual-energy method. The single-energy method is for the area density calculation of one low-Z material, while the dual-energy method aims to calculate the area densities of two low-Z materials simultaneously. Comparing the experimental and simulation results with the theoretical ones, the new method proves to have the potential to replace DEXA in area density measurement. The new method sets the prerequisites for a future precise and low-dose area density calculation method for low-Z materials. Supported by Major State Basic Research Development Program (2012CB825800), Science Fund for Creative Research Groups (11321503) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11179004, 10979055, 11205189, 11205157)

  9. Design of a contrast-enhanced dual-energy tomosynthesis system for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörnig, M. D.; Bätz, L.; Mertelmeier, T.

    2012-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a three-dimensional X-ray imaging modality that has the potential to decrease the superimposition effect of breast structural noise, thereby increasing lesion conspicuity. To further improve breast cancer detection, our work has been devoted to develop a prototype for contrast-enhanced dual-energy tomosynthesis (CEDET). CEDET involves the injection of an iodinated contrast agent and measures the relative increase in uptake of contrast in the suspected breast cancer lesion. Either temporal or dual-energy subtraction techniques may be used to implement CEDET. Both 2D contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography and 3D tomosynthesis can be applied. Here we present the design of a prototype CEDET system based on the Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration and employing two additional high-energy filters in addition to the standard Rh filter, the latter being used for the low-energy acquisitions. A quality factor of squared signal-difference-to-noise-ratio of iodine per pixel area and average glandular dose as a function of breast thickness is used to optimize the filter material, the filter thickness, and the tube voltage. The average glandular dose can be calculated from the entrance surface air kerma using computed conversion coefficients DgN for the used X-ray spectra. We also present the results of DQE measurements of the amorphous selenium detector involved. Finally, results of phantom tests for tomosynthesis acquisition and first clinical data in the 2D mode will be shown.

  10. Combining 3D optical imaging and dual energy absorptiometry to measure three compositional components.

    PubMed

    Malkov, Serghei; Shepherd, John

    2014-02-17

    We report on the design of the technique combining 3D optical imaging and dual-energy absorptiometry body scanning to estimate local body area compositions of three compartments. Dual-energy attenuation and body shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional tissue thicknesses: water, lipid, and protein. We designed phantoms with tissue-like properties as our reference standards for calibration purposes. The calibration was created by fitting phantom values using non-linear regression of quadratic and truncated polynomials. Dual-energy measurements were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms using a bone densitometer unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the biological compositional compartments. The components for the solid phantom were tested and their high energy/low energy attenuation ratios are in good correspondent to water, lipid, and protein for the densitometer x-ray region. The three-dimensional body shape was reconstructed from the depth maps generated by Microsoft Kinect for Windows. We used open-source Point Cloud Library and freeware software to produce dense point clouds. Accuracy and precision of compositional and thickness measures were calculated. The error contributions due to two modalities were estimated. The preliminary phantom composition and shape measurements are found to demonstrate the feasibility of the method proposed.

  11. Combining 3D optical imaging and dual energy absorptiometry to measure three compositional components

    PubMed Central

    Malkov, Serghei; Shepherd, John

    2014-01-01

    We report on the design of the technique combining 3D optical imaging and dual-energy absorptiometry body scanning to estimate local body area compositions of three compartments. Dual-energy attenuation and body shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional tissue thicknesses: water, lipid, and protein. We designed phantoms with tissue-like properties as our reference standards for calibration purposes. The calibration was created by fitting phantom values using non-linear regression of quadratic and truncated polynomials. Dual-energy measurements were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms using a bone densitometer unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the biological compositional compartments. The components for the solid phantom were tested and their high energy/low energy attenuation ratios are in good correspondent to water, lipid, and protein for the densitometer x-ray region. The three-dimensional body shape was reconstructed from the depth maps generated by Microsoft Kinect for Windows. We used open-source Point Cloud Library and freeware software to produce dense point clouds. Accuracy and precision of compositional and thickness measures were calculated. The error contributions due to two modalities were estimated. The preliminary phantom composition and shape measurements are found to demonstrate the feasibility of the method proposed. PMID:25083118

  12. Combining 3D optical imaging and dual energy absorptiometry to measure three compositional components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Serghei; Shepherd, John

    2014-02-01

    We report on the design of the technique combining 3D optical imaging and dual-energy absorptiometry body scanning to estimate local body area compositions of three compartments. Dual-energy attenuation and body shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional tissue thicknesses: water, lipid, and protein. We designed phantoms with tissue-like properties as our reference standards for calibration purposes. The calibration was created by fitting phantom values using non-linear regression of quadratic and truncated polynomials. Dual-energy measurements were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms using a bone densitometer unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the biological compositional compartments. The components for the solid phantom were tested and their high energy/low energy attenuation ratios are in good correspondent to water, lipid, and protein for the densitometer x-ray region. The three-dimensional body shape was reconstructed from the depth maps generated by Microsoft Kinect for Windows. We used open-source Point Cloud Library and freeware software to produce dense point clouds. Accuracy and precision of compositional and thickness measures were calculated. The error contributions due to two modalities were estimated. The preliminary phantom composition and shape measurements are found to demonstrate the feasibility of the method proposed.

  13. Feasibility of real time dual-energy imaging based on a flat panel detector for coronary artery calcium quantification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L; Wong, Jerry T; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-06-01

    The feasibility of a real-time dual-energy imaging technique with dynamic filtration using a flat panel detector for quantifying coronary arterial calcium was evaluated. In this technique, the x-ray beam was switched at 15 Hz between 60 kVp and 120 kVp with the 120 kVp beam having an additional 0.8 mm silver filter. The performance of the dynamic filtration technique was compared with a static filtration technique (4 mm Al+0.2 mm Cu for both beams). The ability to quantify calcium mass was evaluated using calcified arterial vessel phantoms with 20-230 mg of hydroxylapatite. The vessel phantoms were imaged over a Lucite phantom and then an anthropomorphic chest phantom. The total thickness of Lucite phantom ranges from 13.5-26.5 cm to simulate patient thickness of 16-32 cm. The calcium mass was measured using a densitometric technique. The effective dose to patient was estimated from the measured entrance exposure. The effects of patient thickness on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), effective dose, and the precision of calcium mass quantification (i.e., the frame to frame variability) were studied. The effects of misregistration artifacts were also measured by shifting the vessel phantoms manually between low- and high-energy images. The results show that, with the same detector signal level, the dynamic filtration technique produced 70% higher calcium contrast-to-noise ratio with only 4% increase in patient dose as compared to the static filtration technique. At the same time, x-ray tube loading increased by 30% with dynamic filtration. The minimum detectability of calcium with anatomical background was measured to be 34 mg of hydroxyapatite. The precision in calcium mass measurement, determined from 16 repeated dual-energy images, ranges from 13 mg to 41 mg when the patient thickness increased from 16 to 32 cm. The CNR was found to decrease with the patient thickness linearly at a rate of (-7%/cm). The anatomic background produced measurement root-mean-square (RMS

  14. Feasibility of real time dual-energy imaging based on a flat panel detector for coronary artery calcium quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Tong; Ducote, Justin L.; Wong, Jerry T.; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-06-15

    The feasibility of a real-time dual-energy imaging technique with dynamic filtration using a flat panel detector for quantifying coronary arterial calcium was evaluated. In this technique, the x-ray beam was switched at 15 Hz between 60 kVp and 120 kVp with the 120 kVp beam having an additional 0.8 mm silver filter. The performance of the dynamic filtration technique was compared with a static filtration technique (4 mm Al+0.2 mm Cu for both beams). The ability to quantify calcium mass was evaluated using calcified arterial vessel phantoms with 20-230 mg of hydroxylapatite. The vessel phantoms were imaged over a Lucite phantom and then an anthropomorphic chest phantom. The total thickness of Lucite phantom ranges from 13.5-26.5 cm to simulate patient thickness of 16-32 cm. The calcium mass was measured using a densitometric technique. The effective dose to patient was estimated from the measured entrance exposure. The effects of patient thickness on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), effective dose, and the precision of calcium mass quantification (i.e., the frame to frame variability) were studied. The effects of misregistration artifacts were also measured by shifting the vessel phantoms manually between low- and high-energy images. The results show that, with the same detector signal level, the dynamic filtration technique produced 70% higher calcium contrast-to-noise ratio with only 4% increase in patient dose as compared to the static filtration technique. At the same time, x-ray tube loading increased by 30% with dynamic filtration. The minimum detectability of calcium with anatomical background was measured to be 34 mg of hydroxyapatite. The precision in calcium mass measurement, determined from 16 repeated dual-energy images, ranges from 13 mg to 41 mg when the patient thickness increased from 16 to 32 cm. The CNR was found to decrease with the patient thickness linearly at a rate of (-7%/cm). The anatomic background produced measurement root-mean-square (RMS

  15. Motion correction for improving the accuracy of dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Jed D.; Yin, Zhye; Xiong, Guanglei; Mittal, Priya; Dunham, Simon; Elmore, Kimberly; Edic, Peter M.; Min, James K.

    2016-03-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death globally [1]. Modern cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is highly effective at identifying and assessing coronary blockages associated with CAD. The diagnostic value of this anatomical information can be substantially increased in combination with a non-invasive, low-dose, correlative, quantitative measure of blood supply to the myocardium. While CT perfusion has shown promise of providing such indications of ischemia, artifacts due to motion, beam hardening, and other factors confound clinical findings and can limit quantitative accuracy. In this paper, we investigate the impact of applying a novel motion correction algorithm to correct for motion in the myocardium. This motion compensation algorithm (originally designed to correct for the motion of the coronary arteries in order to improve CCTA images) has been shown to provide substantial improvements in both overall image quality and diagnostic accuracy of CCTA. We have adapted this technique for application beyond the coronary arteries and present an assessment of its impact on image quality and quantitative accuracy within the context of dual-energy CT perfusion imaging. We conclude that motion correction is a promising technique that can help foster the routine clinical use of dual-energy CT perfusion. When combined, the anatomical information of CCTA and the hemodynamic information from dual-energy CT perfusion should facilitate better clinical decisions about which patients would benefit from treatments such as stent placement, drug therapy, or surgery and help other patients avoid the risks and costs associated with unnecessary, invasive, diagnostic coronary angiography procedures.

  16. Systematic bias in basis material decomposition applied to quantitative dual-energy x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Gingold, E L; Hasegawa, B H

    1992-01-01

    Basis material decomposition represents dual-energy x-ray attenuation measurements in terms of the attenuation coefficients or thickness of two standard materials which, when combined, produce attenuation equivalent to the object being measured. In tomographic imaging, the reconstructed attenuation coefficient is calculated in terms of the attenuation coefficients of the basis materials, while in projection imaging, the thicknesses of two materials can be specified in terms of the basis materials. This analysis shows that basis material decomposition is exact in a dual-monoenergetic system, but for broad spectra, x-ray beam hardening introduces a bias into quantitative measurements. The error is small enough that it can be ignored when dual-energy imaging is used primarily to enhance the contrast of one material over another. The magnitude of the error in quantitative measurements depends on the details of the specific application including the energy of the x-ray beam, and the composition and thickness of the materials included in the object. The magnitude of the error for dual-energy bone densitometry has been analyzed using a first-order propagation of error analysis and the calculations verified by computer simulation. This analysis shows that the magnitude of the systematic error can be as high as 3% for 1 g/cm2 of bone mineral when aluminum and acrylic basis materials are used for the calibration. This systematic error is eliminated when the basis materials are the same as the materials that are being quantified (i.e., bone mineral and water).

  17. Quantitative imaging of chemical composition using dual-energy, dual-source CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Primak, Andrew N.; Yu, Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Morin, Richard L.

    2008-03-01

    Dual-energy x-ray material decomposition has been proposed as a noninvasive quantitative imaging technique for more than 20 years. In this paper, we summarize previously developed dual-energy material decomposition methods and propose a simple yet accurate method for quantitatively measuring chemical composition in vivo. In order to take advantage of the newly developed dual-source CT, the proposed method is based upon post reconstruction (image space) data. Different from other post reconstruction methods, this method is designed to directly measure element composition (mass fraction) in a tissue by a simple table lookup procedure. The method has been tested in phantom studies and also applied to a clinical case. The results showed that this method is capable of accurately measuring elemental concentrations, such as iron in tissue, under low noise imaging conditions. The advantage of this method lies in its simplicity and fast processing times. We believe that this method can be applied clinically to measure the mass fraction of any chemical element in a two-material object, such as to quantify the iron overload in the liver (hemochromatosis). Further investigations on de-noising techniques, as well as clinical validation, are merited.

  18. Sequential dual-energy subtraction technique with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD): primary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Matsui, Takeshi; Hayashi, Norio; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-07-01

    A sequential dual-energy subtraction technique for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was developed. Here, we report on a computerized method for creating sequential soft-tissue images and the accuracy of tracking targets on the images obtained, in comparison to conventional fluoroscopic images. Two sets of sequential chest images during respiration of a normal subject were obtained with X-rays of different energy separately with a flat-panel detector (FPD). Sequential soft-tissue images were created from the two sets of sequential images consisting of real-time images and reference template images, respectively. The creation of sequential soft-tissue images consisted of three steps: one-to-one image correspondence of the two sequential images, image registration, and image subtraction in each frame. Motion tracking of lung vessels was then performed by the template-matching technique. For evaluation of the accuracy of motion tracking on the sequential soft-tissue images, the results were compared with those on the original sequential images. Sequential soft-tissue images provided more accurate tracking than the original images (P < 0.01). There was no significant error throughout all frames in the soft-tissue images, whereas the rib shadow introduced a tracking error in the original images. The maximum errors were 4.1 +/- 0.3 mm in the sequential soft-tissue images and 28.1 +/- 20.0 mm in the original images. In conclusion, sequential soft-tissue images were helpful for tracking of a target affected by respiratory motion. Dual-energy subtraction has the potential to improve the accuracy of IGRT without implanted markers.

  19. Recent Advances in Cardiac Computed Tomography: Dual Energy, Spectral and Molecular CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Danad, Ibrahim; Fayad, Zahi A.; Willemink, Martin J.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool and it is impossible to imagine current clinical practice without CT imaging. Due to its widespread availability, ease of clinical application, superb sensitivity for detection of CAD, and non-invasive nature, CT has become a valuable tool within the armamentarium of the cardiologist. In the last few years, numerous technological advances in CT have occurred—including dual energy CT (DECT), spectral CT and CT-based molecular imaging. By harnessing the advances in technology, cardiac CT has advanced beyond the mere evaluation of coronary stenosis to an imaging modality tool that permits accurate plaque characterization, assessment of myocardial perfusion and even probing of molecular processes that are involved in coronary atherosclerosis. Novel innovations in CT contrast agents and pre-clinical spectral CT devices have paved the way for CT-based molecular imaging. PMID:26068288

  20. Optimization of dual-energy imaging systems using generalized NEQ and imaging task.

    PubMed

    Richard, S; Siewerdsen, J H

    2007-01-01

    Dual-energy (DE) imaging is a promising advanced application of flat-panel detectors (FPDs) with a potential host of applications ranging from thoracic and cardiac imaging to interventional procedures. The performance of FPD-based DE imaging systems is investigated in this work by incorporating the noise-power spectrum associated with overlying anatomical structures ("anatomical noise" modeled according to a 1/f characteristic) into descriptions of noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) to yield the generalized NEQ (GNEQ). Signal and noise propagation in the DE imaging chain is modeled by cascaded systems analysis. A Fourier-based description of the imaging task is integrated with the GNEQ to yield a detectability index used as an objective function for optimizing DE image reconstruction, allocation of dose between low- and high-energy images, and selection of low- and high-kVp. Optimal reconstruction and acquisition parameters were found to depend on dose; for example, optimal kVp varied from [60/150] kVp at typical radiographic dose levels (approximately 0.5 mGy entrance surface dose, ESD) but increased to [90/150] kVp at high dose (ESD approximately 5.0 mGy). At very low dose (ESD approximately 0.05 mGy), detectability index indicates an optimal low-energy technique of 60 kVp but was largely insensitive to the choice of high-kVp in the range 120-150 kVp. Similarly, optimal dose allocation, defined as the ratio of low-energy ESD and the total ESD, varied from 0.2 to 0.4 over the range ESD=(0.05-5.0) mGy. Furthermore, two applications of the theoretical framework were explored: (i) the increase in detectability for DE imaging compared to conventional radiography; and (ii) the performance of single-shot vs double-shot DE imaging, wherein the latter is found to have a DQE approximately twice that of the former. Experimental and theoretical analysis of GNEQ and task-based detectability index provides a fundamental understanding of the factors governing DE imaging performance

  1. Dual-Energy Technique at Low Tube Voltages for Small Animal Imaging*

    PubMed Central

    CHO, Seungryong; SIDKY, Emil Y; BIAN, Junguo; PAN, Xiaochuan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of dual-energy method for image contrast enhancement in small animal studies using a low kV X-ray radiographic system. A robust method for X-ray spectrum estimation from transmission measurements, based on expectation-maximization (EM) method, is applied to an X-ray specimen radiographic system for dual energy imaging of a mouse. From transmission measurements of two known attenuators at two different X-ray tube voltages, the X-ray energy spectra are reconstructed using the EM-based method. From the spectra information thus obtained, the transmission data for bone and soft tissue in terms of various thicknesses are generated. Two polynomial functions of transmission data are then sought for to fit the inverted thicknesses of bone and soft-tissue. Scatters in cone-beam projection data acquired at two X-ray energies were corrected. From the scatter-corrected data, a bone thickness map is separated from a soft-tissue thickness map by use of the polynomial functions. PMID:20589233

  2. Dose and image quality measurements for contrast-enhanced dual energy mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduko, J. M.; Homolka, P.; Jones, V.; Whitwam, D.

    2015-03-01

    The results of patient dose surveys of two contrast-enhanced dual energy mammography systems are presented, showing mean glandular doses for both low and high energy components of the exposures. For one system the distribution of doses is of an unusual pattern, very different from that normally measured in patient dose surveys. The contribution of the high energy component of the exposure to the total is shown to be about 20% of that of the low energy component for this system. It is about 33% for the other system, for which the distribution of doses is similar to previously published surveys . A phantom containing disks with a range of different iodine content was used, with tissue-equivalent materials, to investigate the properties of one dual energy system. The iodine signal difference to noise ratio is suggested as a measure of image quality. It was found to remain practically constant as phantom thickness was varied, and increased only slowly (with a power relationship) as air kerma increased. Other measurements showed good reproducibility of the iodine signal difference, and that it was proportional to iodine concentration in the phantom. The iodine signal difference was found to be practically the same for a wide range of phantom thickness and glandularity.

  3. Estimates of the image quality and the radiation dose for head and abdomen phantom image acquisition by using dual-energy CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Hong; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Soo

    2012-04-01

    Using dual-energy computed tomography (CT) scans, we obtained images from a raw data set by using low- and high-energy scans (usually 80 and 140 kV, respectively). Generally, the head and the abdomen examinations were performed using single-energy (120 kV) scanning with a routine exposure protocol, and the images were used for diagnostic interpretation. The dual-energy CT scans can also be used for diagnosis by using the linearly-mixed method with low- and high-energy images. In the current study, we evaluated mixed images in dual-energy and single-energy scans for image quality and radiation dose. The CT scan protocol for single energy was adopted from IEC protocols, and the recommended dose from the EC. The dual-energy scan protocol was based on the Siemens dual-energy CT scan protocol. The CT scan protocols were extended further in the mA range for both scans to estimate the image quality corresponding to these dose alternations. The results demonstrate that the Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) value of a dual-energy mixed image is higher than that of a single-energy image in similar dose regions for both the head and the abdomen phantoms. We observed that the dual-energy images could reduce the dose compared to single-energy images. In the abdomen phantom study, the CNR of dual-energy images was even higher than that of single-energy images with half the radiation dose of the single-energy scan. Therefore, the dual-energy CT scan can accomplish a remarkable dose reduction while preserving image quality for head and abdomen imaging.

  4. Dual-energy subtraction imaging utilizing indium as a contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Le Duc, G.; Zhong, Z.; Warkentien, L.; Laster, B.; Thomlinson, W.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of our current work is to establish the minimum detection, of indium contrast agent using dual-energy subtraction imaging above and below indium K-edge. Experiments were performed on the X12 and X17B2 beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source using the same method but with two different set-ups. Experiments were first carried out on InCl{sub 3} solutions, then on V79 Chinese hamster cells and on BALB/c mice excised tumors, labeled with indium. For each experiment, several layers of Lucite were placed in front of the phantom to ensure a 43 mm thickness, dose to that of a mammography examination. Results were the same on X12 and X17B2. As expected, indium-free materials disappeared on subtracted images (water, steel reference and screw). Indium samples were easily distinguishable for the following concentrations: 10-5-2-1 mg/cm{sup 2}. Smaller concentrations were not clearly distinguishable and we were unable to see cell samples and tumors. To conclude, the lowest concentration we can image is around 1 mg/cm{sup 2}. These results agree with theoretical results. Such results also suggest that indium concentration in both cells and tumors is lower than 0.5 mg/cm{sup 2}. Since the current detection is dose to optimum, we conclude that dual energy subtraction imaging using indium to label tumors cells and tumors is not possible unless the indium uptake is increased by more than an order of magnitude.

  5. WE-D-BRF-05: Quantitative Dual-Energy CT Imaging for Proton Stopping Power Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, D; Williamson, J; Siebers, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To extend the two-parameter separable basis-vector model (BVM) to estimation of proton stopping power from dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging. Methods: BVM assumes that the photon cross sections of any unknown material can be represented as a linear combination of the corresponding quantities for two bracketing basis materials. We show that both the electron density (ρe) and mean excitation energy (Iex) can be modeled by BVM, enabling stopping power to be estimated from the Bethe-Bloch equation. We have implemented an idealized post-processing dual energy imaging (pDECT) simulation consisting of monogenetic 45 keV and 80 keV scanning beams with polystyrene-water and water-CaCl2 solution basis pairs for soft tissues and bony tissues, respectively. The coefficients of 24 standard ICRU tissue compositions were estimated by pDECT. The corresponding ρe, Iex, and stopping power tables were evaluated via BVM and compared to tabulated ICRU 44 reference values. Results: BVM-based pDECT was found to estimate ρe and Iex with average and maximum errors of 0.5% and 2%, respectively, for the 24 tissues. Proton stopping power values at 175 MeV, show average/maximum errors of 0.8%/1.4%. For adipose, muscle and bone, these errors result range prediction accuracies less than 1%. Conclusion: A new two-parameter separable DECT model (BVM) for estimating proton stopping power was developed. Compared to competing parametric fit DECT models, BVM has the comparable prediction accuracy without necessitating iterative solution of nonlinear equations or a sample-dependent empirical relationship between effective atomic number and Iex. Based on the proton BVM, an efficient iterative statistical DECT reconstruction model is under development.

  6. TU-F-18A-02: Iterative Image-Domain Decomposition for Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, T; Dong, X; Petrongolo, M; Zhu, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its material decomposition capability. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical value. Existing de-noising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. We propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. It includes the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. Performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan 600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Results are compared to those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a de-noising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation but with an edge-preserving regularization term. Results: On the Catphan phantom, our method retains the same spatial resolution as the CT images before decomposition while reducing the noise standard deviation of decomposed images by over 98%. The other methods either degrade spatial resolution or achieve less low-contrast detectability. Also, our method yields lower electron density measurement error than direct matrix inversion and reduces error variation by over 97%. On the head phantom, it reduces the noise standard deviation of decomposed images by over 97% without blurring the sinus structures. Conclusion: We propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for DECT. The method combines noise suppression and material decomposition into an iterative

  7. Feasibility Study of Dual Energy Radiographic Imaging for Target Localization in Radiotherapy for Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Jie; Zhu, Xianfeng; Dong, Yang; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xuemin; Wang, Gang; Hu, Xin-Hua; Feng, Yuanming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dual-energy (DE) radiographic imaging improves tissue discrimination by separating soft from hard tissues in the acquired images. This study was to establish a mathematic model of DE imaging based on intrinsic properties of tissues and quantitatively evaluate the feasibility of applying the DE imaging technique to tumor localization in radiotherapy. Methods We investigated the dependence of DE image quality on the radiological equivalent path length (EPL) of tissues with two phantoms using a stereoscopic x-ray imaging unit. 10 lung cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy each with gold markers implanted in the tumor were enrolled in the study approved by the hospital's Ethics Committee. The displacements of the centroids of the delineated gross tumor volumes (GTVs) in the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) and in the bone-canceled DE image were compared with the averaged displacements of the centroids of gold markers to evaluate the feasibility of using DE imaging for tumor localization. Results The results of the phantom study indicated that the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was linearly dependent on the difference of EPL and a mathematical model was established. The objects and backgrounds corresponding to ΔEPL less than 0.08 are visually indistinguishable in the bone-canceled DE image. The analysis of patient data showed that the tumor contrast in the bone-canceled images was improved significantly as compared with that in the original radiographic images and the accuracy of tumor localization using the DE imaging technique was comparable with that of using fiducial makers. Conclusion It is feasible to apply the technique for tumor localization in radiotherapy. PMID:25268643

  8. NEQ and task in dual-energy imaging: from cascaded systems analysis to human observer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Samuel; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Tward, Daniel J.

    2008-03-01

    The relationship between theoretical descriptions of imaging performance (Fourier-based cascaded systems analysis) and the performance of real human observers was investigated for various detection and discrimination tasks. Dual-energy (DE) imaging provided a useful basis for investigating this relationship, because it presents a host of acquisition and processing parameters that can significantly affect signal and noise transfer characteristics and, correspondingly, human observer performance. The detectability index was computed theoretically using: 1) cascaded systems analysis of the modulation transfer function (MTF), and noise-power spectrum (NPS) for DE imaging; 2) a Fourier description of imaging task; and 3.) integration of MTF, NPS, and task function according to various observer models, including Fisher-Hotelling and non-prewhitening with and without an eye filter and internal noise. Three idealized tasks were considered: sphere detection, shape discrimination (sphere vs. disk), and texture discrimination (uniform vs. textured disk). Using images of phantoms acquired on a prototype DE imaging system, human observer performance was assessed in multiple-alternative forced choice (MAFC) tests, giving an estimate of area under the ROC curve (A Ζ). The degree to which the theoretical detectability index correlated with human observer performance was investigated, and results agreed well over a broad range of imaging conditions, depending on the choice of observer model. Results demonstrated that optimal DE image acquisition and decomposition parameters depend significantly on the imaging task. These studies provide important initial validation that the detectability index derived theoretically by Fourier-based cascaded systems analysis correlates well with actual human observer performance and represents a meaningful metric for system optimization.

  9. Dual energy CT: How well can pseudo-monochromatic imaging reduce metal artifacts?

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchenbecker, Stefan Faby, Sebastian; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc; Lell, Michael

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Dual Energy CT (DECT) provides so-called monoenergetic images based on a linear combination of the original polychromatic images. At certain patient-specific energy levels, corresponding to certain patient- and slice-dependent linear combination weights, e.g., E = 160 keV corresponds to α = 1.57, a significant reduction of metal artifacts may be observed. The authors aimed at analyzing the method for its artifact reduction capabilities to identify its limitations. The results are compared with raw data-based processing. Methods: Clinical DECT uses a simplified version of monochromatic imaging by linearly combining the low and the high kV images and by assigning an energy to that linear combination. Those pseudo-monochromatic images can be used by radiologists to obtain images with reduced metal artifacts. The authors analyzed the underlying physics and carried out a series expansion of the polychromatic attenuation equations. The resulting nonlinear terms are responsible for the artifacts, but they are not linearly related between the low and the high kV scan: A linear combination of both images cannot eliminate the nonlinearities, it can only reduce their impact. Scattered radiation yields additional noncanceling nonlinearities. This method is compared to raw data-based artifact correction methods. To quantify the artifact reduction potential of pseudo-monochromatic images, they simulated the FORBILD abdomen phantom with metal implants, and they assessed patient data sets of a clinical dual source CT system (100, 140 kV Sn) containing artifacts induced by a highly concentrated contrast agent bolus and by metal. In each case, they manually selected an optimal α and compared it to a raw data-based material decomposition in case of simulation, to raw data-based material decomposition of inconsistent rays in case of the patient data set containing contrast agent, and to the frequency split normalized metal artifact reduction in case of the metal

  10. Pathologic stratification of operable lung adenocarcinoma using radiomics features extracted from dual energy CT images

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Yun; Sohn, Insuk; Kim, Hye Seung; Son, Ji Ye; Kwon, O Jung; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Shim, Young Mog

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of surrogate biomarkers as predictors of histopathologic tumor grade and aggressiveness using radiomics data from dual-energy computed tomography (DECT), with the ultimate goal of accomplishing stratification of early-stage lung adenocarcinoma for optimal treatment. Results Pathologic grade was divided into grades 1, 2, and 3. Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed i-uniformity and 97.5th percentile CT attenuation value as independent significant factors to stratify grade 2 or 3 from grade 1. The AUC value calculated from leave-one-out cross-validation procedure for discriminating grades 1, 2, and 3 was 0.9307 (95% CI: 0.8514–1), 0.8610 (95% CI: 0.7547–0.9672), and 0.8394 (95% CI: 0.7045–0.9743), respectively. Materials and Methods A total of 80 patients with 91 clinically and radiologically suspected stage I or II lung adenocarcinoma were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent DECT and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, followed by surgery. Quantitative CT and PET imaging characteristics were evaluated using a radiomics approach. Significant features for a tumor aggressiveness prediction model were extracted and used to calculate diagnostic performance for predicting all pathologic grades. Conclusions Quantitative radiomics values from DECT imaging metrics can help predict pathologic aggressiveness of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27880938

  11. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, S.; Lechtman, E.; Lai, P.; Keller, B. M.; Karotki, A.; Beachey, D. J.; Pignol, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 × \\text{ICF} formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  12. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, S; Lechtman, E; Lai, P; Keller, B M; Karotki, A; Beachey, D J; Pignol, J P

    2014-09-21

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 [Formula: see text] formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  13. Penalized weighted least-squares image reconstruction for dual energy X-ray transmission tomography.

    PubMed

    Sukovic, P; Clinthorne, N H

    2000-11-01

    We present a dual-energy (DE) transmission computed tomography (CT) reconstruction method. It is statistically motivated and features nonnegativity constraints in the density domain. A penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) objective function has been chosen to handle the non-Poisson noise added by amorphous silicon (aSi:H) detectors. A Gauss-Seidel algorithm has been used to minimize the objective function. The behavior of the method in terms of bias/standard deviation tradeoff has been compared to that of a DE method that is based on filtered back projection (FBP). The advantages of the DE PWLS method are largest for high noise and/or low flux cases. Qualitative results suggest this as well. Also, the reconstructed images of an object with opaque regions are presented. Possible applications of the method are: attenuation correction for positron emission tomography (PET) images, various quantitative computed tomography (QCT) methods such as bone mineral densitometry (BMD), and the removal of metal streak artifacts.

  14. Image-processing technique for suppressing ribs in chest radiographs by means of massive training artificial neural network (MTANN).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji; Abe, Hiroyuki; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio

    2006-04-01

    When lung nodules overlap with ribs or clavicles in chest radiographs, it can be difficult for radiologists as well as computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) schemes to detect these nodules. In this paper, we developed an image-processing technique for suppressing the contrast of ribs and clavicles in chest radiographs by means of a multiresolution massive training artificial neural network (MTANN). An MTANN is a highly nonlinear filter that can be trained by use of input chest radiographs and the corresponding "teaching" images. We employed "bone" images obtained by use of a dual-energy subtraction technique as the teaching images. For effective suppression of ribs having various spatial frequencies, we developed a multiresolution MTANN consisting of multiresolution decomposition/composition techniques and three MTANNs for three different-resolution images. After training with input chest radiographs and the corresponding dual-energy bone images, the multiresolution MTANN was able to provide "bone-image-like" images which were similar to the teaching bone images. By subtracting the bone-image-like images from the corresponding chest radiographs, we were able to produce "soft-tissue-image-like" images where ribs and clavicles were substantially suppressed. We used a validation test database consisting of 118 chest radiographs with pulmonary nodules and an independent test database consisting of 136 digitized screen-film chest radiographs with 136 solitary pulmonary nodules collected from 14 medical institutions in this study. When our technique was applied to nontraining chest radiographs, ribs and clavicles in the chest radiographs were suppressed substantially, while the visibility of nodules and lung vessels was maintained. Thus, our image-processing technique for rib suppression by means of a multiresolution MTANN would be potentially useful for radiologists as well as for CAD schemes in detection of lung nodules on chest radiographs.

  15. Dual-energy micro-CT imaging of pulmonary airway obstruction: correlation with micro-SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Befera, N.; Clark, D.; Qi, Y.; Johnson, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    To match recent clinical dual energy (DE) CT studies focusing on the lung, similar developments for DE micro-CT of the rodent lung are required. Our group has been actively engaged in designing pulmonary gating techniques for micro- CT, and has also introduced the first DE micro-CT imaging method of the rodent lung. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DE micro-CT imaging for the evaluation of airway obstruction in mice, and to compare the method with micro single photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA). The results suggest that the induced pulmonary airway obstruction causes either atelectasis, or air-trapping similar to asthma or chronic bronchitis. Atelectasis could only be detected at early time points in DE micro-CT images, and is associated with a large increase in blood fraction and decrease in air fraction. Air trapping had an opposite effect with larger air fraction and decreased blood fraction shown by DE micro-CT. The decrease in perfusion to the hypoventilated lung (hypoxic vasoconstriction) is also seen in micro-SPECT. The proposed DE micro-CT technique for imaging localized airway obstruction performed well in our evaluation, and provides a higher resolution compared to micro-SPECT. Both DE micro-CT and micro-SPECT provide critical, quantitative lung biomarkers for image-based anatomical and functional information in the small animal. The methods are readily linked to clinical methods allowing direct comparison of preclinical and clinical results.

  16. Role of Dual Energy Computed Tomography Imaging in the Diagnosis of Gout

    PubMed Central

    Sehra, Shiv T; Anand, Suneesh; Stallings, Gary W.; Danve, Abhijeet

    2017-01-01

    Gout is a well-known inflammatory arthritis and affects four percent of the United States population. It results from the deposition of uric acid crystals in joints, tendons, bursae, and other surrounding tissues. Prevalence of gout has increased in the recent decade. Gout is usually seen in conjunction with other chronic comorbid conditions like cardiac disease, metabolic syndrome, and renal disease. The diagnosis of this inflammatory arthritis is confirmed by visualization of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals in the synovial fluid. Though synovial fluid aspiration is the standard of care, it is often deferred because of inaccessibility of small joints, patient assessment during intercritical period, or procedural inexperience in a primary care office. Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) is a relatively new imaging modality which shows great promise in the diagnosis of gout. It is a good noninvasive alternative to synovial fluid aspiration. DECT is increasingly useful in diagnosing cases of gout where synovial fluid fails to demonstrate monosodium urate crystals. In this article, we will review the mechanism, types, advantages, and disadvantages of DECT. PMID:28229032

  17. Role of Dual Energy Computed Tomography Imaging in the Diagnosis of Gout.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Divya; Sehra, Shiv T; Anand, Suneesh; Stallings, Gary W; Danve, Abhijeet

    2017-01-20

    Gout is a well-known inflammatory arthritis and affects four percent of the United States population. It results from the deposition of uric acid crystals in joints, tendons, bursae, and other surrounding tissues. Prevalence of gout has increased in the recent decade. Gout is usually seen in conjunction with other chronic comorbid conditions like cardiac disease, metabolic syndrome, and renal disease. The diagnosis of this inflammatory arthritis is confirmed by visualization of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals in the synovial fluid. Though synovial fluid aspiration is the standard of care, it is often deferred because of inaccessibility of small joints, patient assessment during intercritical period, or procedural inexperience in a primary care office. Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) is a relatively new imaging modality which shows great promise in the diagnosis of gout. It is a good noninvasive alternative to synovial fluid aspiration. DECT is increasingly useful in diagnosing cases of gout where synovial fluid fails to demonstrate monosodium urate crystals. In this article, we will review the mechanism, types, advantages, and disadvantages of DECT.

  18. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis: optimization of beam quality for dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert S

    2011-10-07

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis is a promising technique to obtain three-dimensional functional information from the breast with high resolution and speed. To optimize this new method, this study searched for the beam quality that maximized image quality in terms of mass detection performance. A digital tomosynthesis system was modeled using a fast ray-tracing algorithm, which created simulated projection images by tracking photons through a voxelized anatomical breast phantom containing iodinated lesions. The single-energy images were combined into dual-energy images through a weighted log subtraction process. The weighting factor was optimized to minimize anatomical noise, while the dose distribution was chosen to minimize quantum noise. The dual-energy images were analyzed for the signal difference to noise ratio (SdNR) of iodinated masses. The fast ray-tracing explored 523 776 dual-energy combinations to identify which yields optimum mass SdNR. The ray-tracing results were verified using a Monte Carlo model for a breast tomosynthesis system with a selenium-based flat-panel detector. The projection images from our voxelized breast phantom were obtained at a constant total glandular dose. The projections were combined using weighted log subtraction and reconstructed using commercial reconstruction software. The lesion SdNR was measured in the central reconstructed slice. The SdNR performance varied markedly across the kVp and filtration space. Ray-tracing results indicated that the mass SdNR was maximized with a high-energy tungsten beam at 49 kVp with 92.5 µm of copper filtration and a low-energy tungsten beam at 49 kVp with 95 µm of tin filtration. This result was consistent with Monte Carlo findings. This mammographic technique led to a mass SdNR of 0.92 ± 0.03 in the projections and 3.68 ± 0.19 in the reconstructed slices. These values were markedly higher than those for non-optimized techniques. Our findings indicate that dual-energy

  19. Cascaded systems analysis of noise reduction algorithms in dual-energy imaging.

    PubMed

    Richard, Samuel; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2008-02-01

    An important aspect of dual-energy (DE) x-ray image decomposition is the incorporation of noise reduction techniques to mitigate the amplification of quantum noise. This article extends cascaded systems analysis of imaging performance to DE imaging systems incorporating linear noise reduction algorithms. A general analytical formulation of linear DE decomposition is derived, with weighted log subtraction and several previously reported noise reduction algorithms emerging as special cases. The DE image noise-power spectrum (NPS) and modulation transfer function (MTF) demonstrate that noise reduction algorithms impart significant, nontrivial effects on the spatial-frequency-dependent transfer characteristics which do not cancel out of the noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ). Theoretical predictions were validated in comparison to the measured NPS and MTF. The resulting NEQ was integrated with spatial-frequency-dependent task functions to yield the detectability index, d', for evaluation of DE imaging performance using different decomposition algorithms. For a 3 mm lung nodule detection task, the detectability index varied from d' < 1 (i.e., nodule barely visible) in the absence of noise reduction to d' > 2.5 (i.e., nodule clearly visible) for "anti-correlated noise reduction" (ACNR) or "simple-smoothing of the high-energy image" (SSH) algorithms applied to soft-tissue or bone-only decompositions, respectively. Optimal dose allocation (A*, the fraction of total dose delivered in the low-energy projection) was also found to depend on the choice of noise reduction technique. At fixed total dose, multi-function optimization suggested a significant increase in optimal dose allocation from A* = 0.32 for conventional log subtraction to A* = 0.79 for ACNR and SSH in soft-tissue and bone-only decompositions, respectively. Cascaded systems analysis extended to the general formulation of DE image decomposition provided an objective means of investigating DE imaging performance across

  20. Exploring the relationship between SDNR and detectability in dual-energy breast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunamuni, Roshan; Kanamaluru, Swathiu; Lau, Kristen; Gavenonis, Sara; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2013-03-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) provides a technique to increase the contrast of radiographic imaging agents by suppressing soft-tissue signal variation. By reducing the effect of the soft-tissue anatomical noise, it is then possible to quantify the signal from an iodinated contrast agent. The combination of dual-energy and tomographic acquisitions allows for both the accurate quantification and localization of an iodinated lesion. Here, we present our findings demonstrating the relationship that exists between the signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) and reader detectability of iodinated lesions in a physical anthropomorphic phantom. The observer study was conducted using the ViewDEX software platform with a total of nine readers. The readers were asked to score each of the iodinated lesions on a scale from 1 (entire boundary and area are visible) to 5 (not visible). Both SDNR and lesion detectability were found to improve as the concentration of the iodine increases, and the thickness of the phantom decreases. Lesion detectability was better in the tomographic slice that best matches the focal plane of the imaged object. However, SDNR does not significantly change with focal plane. Our results demonstrated that observer lesion detectability correlated well with SDNR. Lesions whose SDNR fell below 1 were difficult to distinguish from the background and were in general not visible. Lesions that were rated entirely visible corresponded to those with SDNR values above 3. Lesions with intermediate SDNR values were visualized but not confidently from the surrounding background. These threshold SDNR values can be used to optimize the imaging parameters in CE-DBT.

  1. SU-C-18C-03: Dual-Energy X-Ray Fluoroscopy Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Virshup, G; Richmond, M; Mostafavi, H; Ganguly, A; Fu, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This work studies the clinical utility of dual energy (DE) subtraction fluoroscopy for fiducial-free tumor tracking in lung radiation therapy (RT). Improvement in tumor visualization and quantification of tumor shift within a breathing cycle were analyzed. Methods: Twenty subjects who were undergoing RT for lung cancer were recruited following institutional review board approval. The subjects had a range of tumor sizes, locations in the lungs, and body sizes. An x-ray imaging system was setup with the following components: (a) x-ray tube (Varian G-242, Varian Medical Systems (VMS), CA) (b) flat panel detector (4030CB, VMS, CA) and (c) x-ray generator (EPS 50RF, EMD, Canada). Firmware and software modifications were made to the generator to allow 10 x-ray pulse pairs with alternating low/high kV, 100 ms apart for ∼4s (one breathing cycle). Images were obtained at 4 angles: 0°, 45°, 90° and 135°. Weighted subtraction of a kV-pair image set was used to create a “bone-free” image of the lungs. The 2D tumor-shift in each subtracted image and the 3D shift during a breathing cycle was calculated using all views. Results: The subjects enrolled had the following statistics: average age 62.3±7.1 years, 5 female/15 male, 11 had tumors on the right and 9 on the left and the average tumor size was ∼31.4±10.8 mm. X-ray imaging conditions for the pulse pairs were: 70/120 kVp, 280/221 mA and 65/8 ms. For views where these parameters were insufficient 80/130 kVp, 280/221 mA and 60/12 ms was used. Tumor visibility improved for 0°, 45°, 90° and 135° in 100%, 55%, 75% and 80% of the cases respectively. Tumor shift during a breathing cycle was: 2.4±1.0 mm AP, 2.7±1.4 mm LR and 7.6±4.8 mm IS. Conclusion: DE subtraction fluoroscopy allowed improved visualization and quantification of movement of tumors in the lungs during a breathing cycle. This study was entirely funded by Varian Medical Systems.

  2. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  3. Dual energy scanning beam X-radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Randolph Frank

    Dual energy X-radiography is a method first developed in the mid-1970's by which one uses the information contained in the energy spectrum of the transmitted X-ray flux through an object. With this information one can distinguish the types of materials present in a radiograph and thus allow a computer to subtract them from the image enhancing the contrast of the remaining materials. Using this method, one can see details, which would have been hidden by overlying structures of other materials such as seen in radiographs of parts, made up of mixtures of metals and composites. There is also great interest in this technique for medical imaging of the chest where images of the organs are significantly improved by subtracting the bones. However, even with the enhanced capabilities realized with this technique, the majority of X-radiography systems only measures the bulk transmitted X-ray intensity and ignores the information contained in the energy spectrum. This is due to the added expense, time requirements, and registration problems incurred using standard radiographic methods to obtain dual energy radiographs. This dissertation describes a novel method which overcomes these problems and allows one to perform inexpensive, near real time, single shot dual energy X-radiography. The work of this thesis resulted in US patent #5,742,660.

  4. Dual-energy cardiac imaging: an image quality and dose comparison for a flat-panel detector and x-ray image intensifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducote, Justin L.; Xu, Tong; Molloi, Sabee

    2007-01-01

    This study presents a comparison of dual-energy imaging with an x-ray image intensifier and flat-panel detector for cardiac imaging. It also investigates if the wide dynamic range of the flat-panel detector can improve dual-energy image quality while reducing patient dose. Experimental contrast-to-noise (CNR) measurements were carried out in addition to simulation studies. Patient entrance exposure and system tube loading were also recorded. The studied contrast objects were calcium and iodine. System performance was quantified with a figure-of-merit (FOM) defined as the image CNR2 over patient entrance exposure. The range of thickness studied was from 10 to 30 cm of Lucite (PMMA). Detector dose was initially set to 140 nGy (16 µR)/frame. The high-energy 120 kVp beam was filtered by an additional 0.8 mm silver filter. Keeping the same filament current, the kVp for the low-energy beam was adjusted as a function of thickness until 140 nGy was achieved. System performance was found to be similar for both systems, with the x-ray image intensifier performing better at lower thicknesses and the flat-panel detector performing better at higher thicknesses. This requirement of fixed detector entrance exposure was then relaxed and the kVp for the low-energy beam was allowed to vary while the mAs of the x-ray tube remained fixed to study changes in dual-energy image quality, patient dose and FOM with the flat-panel detector. It was found that as the kVp for the low-energy beam was reduced, system performance would rise until reaching a maximum while simultaneously lowering patient exposure. Suggested recommendations for optimal dual-energy imaging implementation are also provided.

  5. Dual-energy cardiac imaging: an image quality and dose comparison for a flat-panel detector and x-ray image intensifier.

    PubMed

    Ducote, Justin L; Xu, Tong; Molloi, Sabee

    2007-01-07

    This study presents a comparison of dual-energy imaging with an x-ray image intensifier and flat-panel detector for cardiac imaging. It also investigates if the wide dynamic range of the flat-panel detector can improve dual-energy image quality while reducing patient dose. Experimental contrast-to-noise (CNR) measurements were carried out in addition to simulation studies. Patient entrance exposure and system tube loading were also recorded. The studied contrast objects were calcium and iodine. System performance was quantified with a figure-of-merit (FOM) defined as the image CNR(2) over patient entrance exposure. The range of thickness studied was from 10 to 30 cm of Lucite (PMMA). Detector dose was initially set to 140 nGy (16 microR)/frame. The high-energy 120 kVp beam was filtered by an additional 0.8 mm silver filter. Keeping the same filament current, the kVp for the low-energy beam was adjusted as a function of thickness until 140 nGy was achieved. System performance was found to be similar for both systems, with the x-ray image intensifier performing better at lower thicknesses and the flat-panel detector performing better at higher thicknesses. This requirement of fixed detector entrance exposure was then relaxed and the kVp for the low-energy beam was allowed to vary while the mAs of the x-ray tube remained fixed to study changes in dual-energy image quality, patient dose and FOM with the flat-panel detector. It was found that as the kVp for the low-energy beam was reduced, system performance would rise until reaching a maximum while simultaneously lowering patient exposure. Suggested recommendations for optimal dual-energy imaging implementation are also provided.

  6. Application of dual-energy spectral CT imaging in differential diagnosis of bladder cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Anliang; Liu, Ailian; Liu, Jinghong; Tian, Shifeng; Wang, Heqing; Liu, Yijun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the clinical value of dual-energy spectral CT imaging in the differential diagnosis between bladder cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We retrospectively analyzed images of 118 patients who received pelvic dual-energy spectral CT imaging. These patients were later confirmed to have bladder cancer in 61 patients and BPH in 57 patients. CT values of the 2 lesion types from 40 to 140 keV were measured from the monochromatic spectral CT image to generate spectral HU curves. The slope of the spectral curve and the lesion effective atomic number were calculated. The measured parameters were analyzed with independent-sample Mann-Whitney U test. There was a statistically significant difference in CT value between the 2 groups from 40 to 90 keV, with the biggest difference at 40 keV (median and interquartile range: 83.3 HU and 22.9 HU vs 60.6 HU and 16.7 HU, Z = 5.932, P < 0.001). The slope of the spectral HU curve for bladder cancer was markedly higher than that of BPH (median and interquartile range: 0.48 and 0.23 vs 0.26 and 0.22, Z = 5.162, P < 0.001); the difference in effective atomic number (median and interquartile range: 7.99 and 0.21 vs 7.80 and 0.20, Z = 5.233, P < 0.001) was also statistically significant. Dual-energy spectral CT imaging provides high sensitivity and specificity for differentiating bladder cancer from benign prostate hyperplasia. PMID:28033269

  7. Prospective Evaluation of Dual-Energy Imaging in Patients Undergoing Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Initial Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sherertz, Tracy; Hoggarth, Mark; Luce, Jason; Block, Alec M.; Nagda, Suneel; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: A prospective feasibility study was conducted to investigate the utility of dual-energy (DE) imaging compared to conventional x-ray imaging for patients undergoing kV-based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved feasibility study enrolled patients with lung cancer undergoing IGRT and was initiated in September 2011. During daily setup, 2 sequential respiration-gated x-ray images were obtained using an on-board imager. Imaging was composed of 1 standard x-ray image at 120 kVp (1 mAs) and a second image obtained at 60 kVp (4 mAs). Weighted logarithmic subtraction of the 2 images was performed offline to create a soft tissue-selective DE image. Conventional and DE images were evaluated by measuring relative contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and also by comparing spatial localization, using both approaches. Imaging dose was assessed using a calibrated ion chamber. Results: To date, 10 patients with stage IA to IIIA lung cancer were enrolled and 57 DE images were analyzed. DE subtraction resulted in complete suppression of overlying bone in all 57 DE images, with an average improvement in relative contrast of 4.7 ± 3.3 over that of 120 kVp x-ray images (P<.0002). The improvement in relative contrast with DE imaging was seen for both smaller (gross tumor volume [GTV] ≤5 cc) and larger tumors (GTV >5 cc), with average relative contrast improvement ratios of 3.4 ± 4.1 and 5.4 ± 3.6, respectively. Moreover, the GTV was reliably localized in 95% of the DE images versus 74% of the single energy (SE images, (P=.004). Mean skin dose per DE image set was 0.44 ± 0.03 mGy versus 0.43 ± 0.03 mGy, using conventional kV imaging parameters. Conclusions: Initial results of this feasibility study suggest that DE thoracic imaging may enhance tumor localization in lung cancer patients receiving kV-based IGRT without increasing imaging dose.

  8. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Garcia, Luis Isaac; Pérez Azorin, José Fernando; Almansa, Julio F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ({ρ\\text{e}} ) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for {ρ\\text{e}} and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating {ρ\\text{e}} and Z eff using dual-energy CT images.

  9. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Luis Isaac Ramos; Azorin, José Fernando Pérez; Almansa, Julio F

    2016-01-07

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ([Formula: see text]) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for [Formula: see text] and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating [Formula: see text] and Z eff using dual-energy CT images.

  10. Evaluation of image quality of coronary artery plaque with rapid kVp-switching dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yasutoshi; Kitao, Shinichiro; Watanabe, Tomomi; Kishimoto, Junichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated the virtual monochromatic imaging (VMI) energy levels that maximize image quality of each coronary plaque component in dual-energy computed tomography angiography in 495 coronary segments (45 for each energy level). Maximal signal-to-noise ratios were different for plaque, lumen, fat, and surrounding tissue (p<0.05). Maximal contrast-to-noise ratios were observed at 70keV for calcified plaque (CP), non-calcified plaque (NCP), and fat in comparison with the lumen (p<0.05), and 70keV and 120keV for NCP in comparison with fat (p=0.144). VMI demonstrated maximal image quality at different energy levels for each component of coronary artery plaque.

  11. Direct visualization of regions with lowered bone mineral density in dual-energy CT images of vertebrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesarg, Stefan; Erdt, Marius; Kafchitsas, Konstantinos; Khan, M. Fawad

    2011-03-01

    Dual-energy CT allows for a better material differentiation than conventional CT. For the purpose of osteoporosis diagnosis, a detection of regions with lowered bone mineral density (BMD) is of high clinical interest. Based on an existing biophysical model of the trabecular bone in vertebrae a new method for directly highlighting those low density regions in the image data has been developed. For this, we combine image data acquired at 80 kV and 140 kV with information about the BMD range in different vertebrae and derive a method for computing a color enhanced image which clearly indicates low density regions. An evaluation of our method which compares it with a quantitative method for BMD assessment shows a very good correspondence between both methods. The strength of our method lies in its simplicity and speed.

  12. Image processing of digital chest ionograms.

    PubMed

    Yarwood, J R; Moores, B M

    1988-10-01

    A number of image-processing techniques have been applied to a digital ionographic chest image in order to evaluate their possible effects on this type of image. In order to quantify any effect, a simulated lesion was superimposed on the image at a variety of locations representing different types of structural detail. Visualization of these lesions was evaluated by a number of observers both pre- and post-processing operations. The operations employed included grey-scale transformations, histogram operations, edge-enhancement and smoothing functions. The resulting effects of these operations on the visualization of the simulated lesions are discussed.

  13. Pitfalls and variants in pediatric chest imaging.

    PubMed

    García Asensio, D; Fernández Martín, M

    2016-05-01

    Most pitfalls in the interpretation of pediatric chest imaging are closely related with the technique used and the characteristics of pediatric patients. To obtain a quality image that will enable the correct diagnosis, it is very important to use an appropriate technique. It is important to know how technical factors influence the image and to be aware of the possible artifacts that can result from poor patient cooperation. Moreover, radiologists need to be familiar with the normal anatomy in children, with the classic radiologic findings, and with the anatomic and developmental variants to avoid misinterpreting normal findings as pathological.

  14. Technical Note: Relation between dual-energy subtraction of CT images for electron density calibration and virtual monochromatic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: For accurate tissue inhomogeneity correction in radiotherapy treatment planning, the author previously proposed a simple conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide ρ{sub e} range. The purpose of the present study was to reveal the relation between the ΔHU image for ρ{sub e} calibration and a virtually monochromatic CT image by performing numerical analyses based on the basis material decomposition in dual-energy CT. Methods: The author determined the weighting factor, α{sub 0}, of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion through numerical analyses of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report-46 human body tissues using their attenuation coefficients and given ρ{sub e} values. Another weighting factor, α(E), for synthesizing a virtual monochromatic CT image from high- and low-kV CT images, was also calculated in the energy range of 0.03 < E < 5 MeV, assuming that cortical bone and water were the basis materials. The mass attenuation coefficients for these materials were obtained using the XCOM photon cross sections database. The effective x-ray energies used to calculate the attenuation were chosen to imitate a dual-source CT scanner operated at 80–140 and 100–140 kV/Sn. Results: The determined α{sub 0} values were 0.455 for 80–140 kV/Sn and 0.743 for 100–140 kV/Sn. These values coincided almost perfectly with the respective maximal points of the calculated α(E) curves located at approximately 1 MeV, in which the photon-matter interaction in human body tissues is exclusively the incoherent (Compton) scattering. Conclusions: The ΔHU image could be regarded substantially as a CT image acquired with monoenergetic 1-MeV photons, which provides a linear relationship between CT numbers and electron densities.

  15. Linear modeling of single-shot dual-energy x-ray imaging using a sandwich detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, S. H.; Yun, S.; Youn, H.; Jeon, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    For single-shot dual-energy (DE) imaging, a sandwich detector typically consists of a thin front detector and a thick rear detector. Therefore, the spatial-resolution characteristics of the two detectors are different, and as a result, weighted subtraction of the corresponding two images gives rise to edge-enhancement characteristics in the resulting DE images. This is a unique characteristic of single-shot DE imaging compared to the conventional dual-shot DE imaging which uses the same detector to acquire low- and high-energy images. Using a linear-systems theory, in this paper, we show that the modulation-transfer function (MTF) of a sandwich detector is a weighted average of contributions from each MTF characteristic of two detector layers forming the sandwich detector. The MTF results obtained using the developed model are validated with those measured directly from single-shot DE images for an edge-knife phantom. Weighting larger than at least 0.5 in DE reconstruction gives an enhancement in DE MTF at mid and high spatial frequencies compared to the MTFs obtained from each detector layer. The behavior of the linear model as a function of weighting factor used for DE reconstruction is discussed in comparisons with numerical simulations.

  16. Exploring silver as a contrast agent for contrast-enhanced dual-energy X-ray breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tsourkas, A; Maidment, A D A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Through prior monoenergetic modelling, we have identified silver as a potential alternative to iodine in dual-energy (DE) X-ray breast imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of silver and iodine contrast agents in a commercially available DE imaging system through a quantitative analysis of signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR). Methods: A polyenergetic simulation algorithm was developed to model the signal intensity and noise. The model identified the influence of various technique parameters on SDNR. The model was also used to identify the optimal imaging techniques for silver and iodine, so that the two contrast materials could be objectively compared. Results: The major influences on the SDNR were the low-energy dose fraction and breast thickness. An increase in the value of either of these parameters resulted in a decrease in SDNR. The SDNR for silver was on average 43% higher than that for iodine when imaged at their respective optimal conditions, and 40% higher when both were imaged at the optimal conditions for iodine. Conclusion: A silver contrast agent should provide benefit over iodine, even when translated to the clinic without modification of imaging system or protocol. If the system were slightly modified to reflect the lower k-edge of silver, the difference in SDNR between the two materials would be increased. Advances in knowledge: These data are the first to demonstrate the suitability of silver as a contrast material in a clinical contrast-enhanced DE image acquisition system. PMID:24998157

  17. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hidetake; Muraishi, Hiroshi; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Yasuo; Satoh, Hitoshi; Abe, Shinji

    2015-07-01

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize an acute-stage cerebral infarction by using dual-energy Computed tomography (DECT) to obtain virtual monochromatic images of this phantom. Virtual monochromatic images were created by using DECT voltages from 40 to 100 keV in steps of 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV in steps of 1 keV, under three conditions of the tube voltage with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images at voltages between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created images. Therefore, the optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  18. Dual energy x-ray imaging and scoring of coronary calcium: physics-based digital phantom and clinical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bo; Wen, Di; Nye, Katelyn; Gilkeson, Robert C.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) as assessed with CT calcium score is the best biomarker of coronary artery disease. Dual energy x-ray provides an inexpensive, low radiation-dose alternative. A two shot system (GE Revolution-XRd) is used, raw images are processed with a custom algorithm, and a coronary calcium image (DECCI) is created, similar to the bone image, but optimized for CAC visualization, not lung visualization. In this report, we developed a physicsbased, digital-phantom containing heart, lung, CAC, spine, ribs, pulmonary artery, and adipose elements, examined effects on DECCI, suggested physics-inspired algorithms to improve CAC contrast, and evaluated the correlation between CT calcium scores and a proposed DE calcium score. In simulation experiment, Beam hardening from increasing adipose thickness (2cm to 8cm) reduced Cg by 19% and 27% in 120kVp and 60kVp images, but only reduced Cg by <7% in DECCI. If a pulmonary artery moves or pulsates with blood filling between exposures, it can give rise to a significantly confounding PA signal in DECCI similar in amplitude to CAC. Observations suggest modifications to DECCI processing, which can further improve CAC contrast by a factor of 2 in clinical exams. The DE score had the best correlation with "CT mass score" among three commonly used CT scores. Results suggest that DE x-ray is a promising tool for imaging and scoring CAC, and there still remains opportunity for further DECCI processing improvements.

  19. Xenon-Enhanced Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Gocho, Kyoko; Ishida, Fumiaki; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Shiraga, Nobuyuki; Homma, Sakae

    2017-01-01

    Background Little has been reported on the feasibility of xenon-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography (Xe-DECT) in the visual and quantitative analysis of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE). Objectives We compared CPFE with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as correlation with parameters of pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods Studied in 3 groups were 25 patients with CPFE, 25 with IPF without emphysema (IPF alone), 30 with COPD. Xe-DECT of the patients’ entire thorax was taken from apex to base after a patient’s single deep inspiration of 35% stable nonradioactive xenon. The differences in several parameters of PFTs and percentage of areas enhanced by xenon between 3 groups were compared and analyzed retrospectively. Results The percentage of areas enhanced by xenon in both lungs were calculated as CPFE/IPF alone/COPD = 72.2 ± 15.1% / 82.2 ± 14.7% /45.2 ± 23.2%, respectively. In the entire patients, the percentage of areas enhanced by xenon showed significantly a positive correlation with FEV1/FVC (R = 0.558, P < 0.0001) and %FEV1, (R = 0.528, P < 0.0001) and a negative correlation with %RV (R = -0.594, P < 0.0001) and RV/TLC (R = -0.579, P < 0.0001). The percentage of areas enhanced by xenon in patients with CPFE showed significantly a negative correlation with RV/TLC (R = -0.529, P = 0.007). Xenon enhancement of CPFE indicated 3 different patterns such as upper predominant, diffuse, and multifocal defect. The percentage of areas enhanced by xenon in upper predominant defect pattern was significantly higher than that in diffuse defect and multifocal defect pattern among these 3 different patterns in CPFE. Conclusion The percentage of areas enhanced by xenon demonstrated strong correlations with obstructive ventilation impairment. Therefore, we conclude that Xe-DECT may be useful for distinguishing emphysema lesion from fibrotic lesion in CPFE. PMID:28107411

  20. Newer imaging methods in chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Wandtke, J C

    1990-01-01

    In recent years the application of computers to chest radiography has resulted in a wide variety of innovative research. Major research efforts have resulted in the development of new types of x-ray detectors, such as storage phosphor technology, for use with computers. Storage phosphor imaging is one of the most promising new techniques, and almost 100 systems have been installed worldwide. Radiologists are quickly evaluating the image quality provided by this new detector system, which has the potential to improve image quality. It has wide latitude and is coupled with a computer to perform image processing. Another promising technology, originally studied in the form of scan equalization radiography, is now commercially available in the form of advanced multiple-beam equalization radiography. This film technique uses computers to modulate the x-ray exposure to take maximum advantage of the imaging capabilities of radiographic film. Digital solid-state detectors have been studied in conjunction with computerized image enhancement systems. These currently show improvement in nodule detection and quantification of the calcium content of a lesion. Application of large image intensifiers to a digital image system is being studied, but there are currently limitations on spatial resolution.

  1. Dual-energy X-ray micro-CT imaging of hybrid Ni/Al open-cell foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fíla, T.; Kumpová, I.; Koudelka, P.; Zlámal, P.; Vavřík, D.; Jiroušek, O.; Jung, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we employ dual-energy X-ray microfocus tomography (DECT) measurement to develop high-resolution finite element (FE) models that can be used for the numerical assessment of the deformation behaviour of hybrid Ni/Al foam subjected to both quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading. Cubic samples of hybrid Ni/Al open-cell foam with an edge length of [15]mm were investigated by the DECT measurement. The material was prepared using AlSi7Mg0.3 aluminium foam with a mean pore size of [0.85]mm, coated with nanocrystalline nickel (crystallite size of approx. [50]nm) to form a surface layer with a theoretical thickness of [0.075]mm. CT imaging was carried out using state-of-the-art DSCT/DECT X-ray scanner developed at Centre of Excellence Telč. The device consists of a modular orthogonal assembly of two tube-detector imaging pairs, with an independent geometry setting and shared rotational stage mounted on a complex 16-axis CNC positioning system to enable unprecedented measurement variability for highly-detailed tomographical measurements. A sample of the metal foam was simultaneously irradiated using an XWT-240-SE reflection type X-ray tube and an XWT-160-TCHR transmission type X-ray tube. An enhanced dual-source sampling strategy was used for data acquisition. X-ray images were taken using XRD1622 large area GOS scintillator flat panel detectors with an active area of [410 × 410]mm and resolution [2048 × 2048]pixels. Tomographic scanning was performed in 1,200 projections with a 0.3 degree angular step to improve the accuracy of the generated models due to the very complex microstructure and high attenuation of the investigated material. Reconstructed data was processed using a dual-energy algorithm, and was used for the development of a 3D model and voxel model of the foam. The selected parameters of the models were compared with nominal parameters of the actual foam and showed good correlation.

  2. Dual-energy CT with virtual monochromatic images and metal artifact reduction software for reducing metallic dental artifacts.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jihoon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Yi Kyung; Kim, Ha Youn; Park, Gyeong Min

    2017-01-01

    Background Metallic dental prostheses may degrade image quality on head and neck computed tomography (CT). However, there is little information available on the use of dual-energy CT (DECT) and metal artifact reduction software (MARS) in the head and neck regions to reduce metallic dental artifacts. Purpose To assess the usefulness of DECT with virtual monochromatic imaging and MARS to reduce metallic dental artifacts. Material and Methods DECT was performed using fast kilovoltage (kV)-switching between 80-kV and 140-kV in 20 patients with metallic dental prostheses. CT data were reconstructed with and without MARS, and with synthesized monochromatic energy in the range of 40-140-kiloelectron volt (keV). For quantitative analysis, the artifact index of the tongue, buccal, and parotid areas was calculated for each scan. For qualitative analysis, two radiologists evaluated 70-keV and 100-keV images with and without MARS for tongue, buccal, parotid areas, and metallic denture. The locations and characteristics of the MARS-related artifacts, if any, were also recorded. Results DECT with MARS markedly reduced metallic dental artifacts and improved image quality in the buccal area ( P < 0.001) and the tongue ( P < 0.001), but not in the parotid area. The margin and internal architecture of the metallic dentures were more clearly delineated with MARS ( P < 0.001) and in the higher-energy images than in the lower-energy images ( P = 0.042). MARS-related artifacts most commonly occurred in the deep center of the neck. Conclusion DECT with MARS can reduce metallic dental artifacts and improve delineation of the metallic prosthesis and periprosthetic region.

  3. Combined iterative reconstruction and image-domain decomposition for dual energy CT using total-variation regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is being increasingly used for its capability of material decomposition and energy-selective imaging. A generic problem of DECT, however, is that the decomposition process is unstable in the sense that the relative magnitude of decomposed signals is reduced due to signal cancellation while the image noise is accumulating from the two CT images of independent scans. Direct image decomposition, therefore, leads to severe degradation of signal-to-noise ratio on the resultant images. Existing noise suppression techniques are typically implemented in DECT with the procedures of reconstruction and decomposition performed independently, which do not explore the statistical properties of decomposed images during the reconstruction for noise reduction. In this work, the authors propose an iterative approach that combines the reconstruction and the signal decomposition procedures to minimize the DECT image noise without noticeable loss of resolution. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which balances the data fidelity and total variation of decomposed images in one framework, and the decomposition step is carried out iteratively together with reconstruction. The noise in the CT images from the proposed algorithm becomes well correlated even though the noise of the raw projections is independent on the two CT scans. Due to this feature, the proposed algorithm avoids noise accumulation during the decomposition process. The authors evaluate the method performance on noise suppression and spatial resolution using phantom studies and compare the algorithm with conventional denoising approaches as well as combined iterative reconstruction methods with different forms of regularization. Results: On the Catphan©600 phantom, the proposed method outperforms the existing denoising methods on preserving spatial resolution at the same level of noise suppression, i.e., a reduction of noise standard deviation by one

  4. Technical Note: Improved CT number stability across patient size using dual-energy CT virtual monoenergetic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, Gregory; Grimes, Joshua; Fletcher, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia; Halaweish, Ahmed

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, over a wide range of phantom sizes, CT number stability achieved using two techniques for generating dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) virtual monoenergetic images. Methods: Water phantoms ranging in lateral diameter from 15 to 50 cm and containing a CT number test object were scanned on a DSCT scanner using both single-energy (SE) and dual-energy (DE) techniques. The SE tube potentials were 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, and 150 kV; the DE tube potential pairs were 80/140, 70/150Sn, 80/150Sn, 90/150Sn, and 100/150Sn kV (Sn denotes that the 150 kV beam was filtered with a 0.6 mm tin filter). Virtual monoenergetic images at energies ranging from 40 to 140 keV were produced from the DECT data using two algorithms, monoenergetic (mono) and monoenergetic plus (mono+). Particularly in large phantoms, water CT number errors and/or artifacts were observed; thus, datasets with water CT numbers outside ±10 HU or with noticeable artifacts were excluded from the study. CT numbers were measured to determine CT number stability across all phantom sizes. Results: Data exclusions were generally limited to cases when a SE or DE technique with a tube potential of less than 90 kV was used to scan a phantom larger than 30 cm. The 90/150Sn DE technique provided the most accurate water background over the large range of phantom sizes evaluated. Mono and mono+ provided equally improved CT number stability as a function of phantom size compared to SE; the average deviation in CT number was only 1.4% using 40 keV and 1.8% using 70 keV, while SE had an average deviation of 11.8%. Conclusions: The authors’ report demonstrates, across all phantom sizes, the improvement in CT number stability achieved with mono and mono+ relative to SE.

  5. Tomography of atomic number and density of materials using dual-energy imaging and the Alvarez and Macovski attenuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paziresh, M.; Kingston, A. M.; Latham, S. J.; Fullagar, W. K.; Myers, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography and the Alvarez and Macovski [Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] transmitted intensity (AMTI) model were used in this study to estimate the maps of density (ρ) and atomic number (Z) of mineralogical samples. In this method, the attenuation coefficients are represented [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] in the form of the two most important interactions of X-rays with atoms that is, photoelectric absorption (PE) and Compton scattering (CS). This enables material discrimination as PE and CS are, respectively, dependent on the atomic number (Z) and density (ρ) of materials [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)]. Dual-energy imaging is able to identify sample materials even if the materials have similar attenuation coefficients at single-energy spectrum. We use the full model rather than applying one of several applied simplified forms [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976); Siddiqui et al., SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition (Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2004); Derzhi, U.S. patent application 13/527,660 (2012); Heismann et al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 2073-2079 (2003); Park and Kim, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 59, 2709 (2011); Abudurexiti et al., Radiol. Phys. Technol. 3, 127-135 (2010); and Kaewkhao et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 109, 1260-1265 (2008)]. This paper describes the tomographic reconstruction of ρ and Z maps of mineralogical samples using the AMTI model. The full model requires precise knowledge of the X-ray energy spectra and calibration of PE and CS constants and exponents of atomic number and energy that were estimated based on fits to simulations and calibration measurements. The estimated ρ and Z images of the samples used in this paper yield average relative errors of 2.62% and 1.19% and maximum relative errors of 2.64% and 7.85%, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the method accounts for the beam hardening effect in density (ρ) and

  6. Gold silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN): an imaging probe for breast cancer screening with dual-energy mammography or computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naha, Pratap C.; Lau, Kristen C.; Hsu, Jessica C.; Hajfathalian, Maryam; Mian, Shaameen; Chhour, Peter; Uppuluri, Lahari; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Cormode, David P.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. DEM and computed tomography (CT) phantom imaging showed that GSAN produced robust contrast that was comparable to silver alone. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation and DNA damage results revealed that the formulations with 30% or higher gold content are cytocompatible to Hep G2 and J774A.1 cells. In vivo imaging was performed in mice with and without breast tumors. The results showed that GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast and accumulated in tumors. Furthermore, both in vivo imaging and ex vivo analysis indicated the excretion of GSAN via both urine and feces. In summary, GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast, and has potential for both blood pool imaging and for breast cancer screening.Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various

  7. A linear, separable two-parameter model for dual energy CT imaging of proton stopping power computation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dong; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and robustness of a simple, linear, separable, two-parameter model (basis vector model, BVM) in mapping proton stopping powers via dual energy computed tomography (DECT) imaging. Methods: The BVM assumes that photon cross sections (attenuation coefficients) of unknown materials are linear combinations of the corresponding radiological quantities of dissimilar basis substances (i.e., polystyrene, CaCl2 aqueous solution, and water). The authors have extended this approach to the estimation of electron density and mean excitation energy, which are required parameters for computing proton stopping powers via the Bethe–Bloch equation. The authors compared the stopping power estimation accuracy of the BVM with that of a nonlinear, nonseparable photon cross section Torikoshi parametric fit model (VCU tPFM) as implemented by the authors and by Yang et al. [“Theoretical variance analysis of single- and dual-energy computed tomography methods for calculating proton stopping power ratios of biological tissues,” Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 1343–1362 (2010)]. Using an idealized monoenergetic DECT imaging model, proton ranges estimated by the BVM, VCU tPFM, and Yang tPFM were compared to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) published reference values. The robustness of the stopping power prediction accuracy of tissue composition variations was assessed for both of the BVM and VCU tPFM. The sensitivity of accuracy to CT image uncertainty was also evaluated. Results: Based on the authors’ idealized, error-free DECT imaging model, the root-mean-square error of BVM proton stopping power estimation for 175 MeV protons relative to ICRU reference values for 34 ICRU standard tissues is 0.20%, compared to 0.23% and 0.68% for the Yang and VCU tPFM models, respectively. The range estimation errors were less than 1 mm for the BVM and Yang tPFM models, respectively. The BVM estimation accuracy is not dependent on tissue type

  8. A linear, separable two-parameter model for dual energy CT imaging of proton stopping power computation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dong Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and robustness of a simple, linear, separable, two-parameter model (basis vector model, BVM) in mapping proton stopping powers via dual energy computed tomography (DECT) imaging. Methods: The BVM assumes that photon cross sections (attenuation coefficients) of unknown materials are linear combinations of the corresponding radiological quantities of dissimilar basis substances (i.e., polystyrene, CaCl{sub 2} aqueous solution, and water). The authors have extended this approach to the estimation of electron density and mean excitation energy, which are required parameters for computing proton stopping powers via the Bethe–Bloch equation. The authors compared the stopping power estimation accuracy of the BVM with that of a nonlinear, nonseparable photon cross section Torikoshi parametric fit model (VCU tPFM) as implemented by the authors and by Yang et al. [“Theoretical variance analysis of single- and dual-energy computed tomography methods for calculating proton stopping power ratios of biological tissues,” Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 1343–1362 (2010)]. Using an idealized monoenergetic DECT imaging model, proton ranges estimated by the BVM, VCU tPFM, and Yang tPFM were compared to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) published reference values. The robustness of the stopping power prediction accuracy of tissue composition variations was assessed for both of the BVM and VCU tPFM. The sensitivity of accuracy to CT image uncertainty was also evaluated. Results: Based on the authors’ idealized, error-free DECT imaging model, the root-mean-square error of BVM proton stopping power estimation for 175 MeV protons relative to ICRU reference values for 34 ICRU standard tissues is 0.20%, compared to 0.23% and 0.68% for the Yang and VCU tPFM models, respectively. The range estimation errors were less than 1 mm for the BVM and Yang tPFM models, respectively. The BVM estimation accuracy is not dependent on

  9. Quality assessment of digital X-ray chest images using an anthropomorphic chest phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodovatov, A. V.; Kamishanskaya, I. G.; Drozdov, A. A.; Bernhardsson, C.

    2017-02-01

    The current study is focused on determining the optimal tube voltage for the conventional X-ray digital chest screening examinations, using a visual grading analysis method. Chest images of an anthropomorphic phantom were acquired in posterior-anterior projection on four digital X-ray units with different detector types. X-ray images obtained with an anthropomorphic phantom were accepted by the radiologists as corresponding to a normal human anatomy, hence allowing using phantoms in image quality trials without limitations.

  10. Quality Improvement of Dual-Energy Lung Perfusion Image by Reduction of Low-Energy X-Ray Spectrum: An Evaluation on Clinical Images

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tatsuya; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Masaki; Ohashi, Kazuya; Suzuki, Kazushi; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The effects of the reduction of low-energy X-ray spectrum on lung perfusion images created by dual-energy CT have not been well evaluated. The aim of this study is to investigate the reliability of lung perfusion blood volume (PBV) images created by dual-energy CT (DECT) equipped with or without a tin filter, focusing on its accuracy adjacent to high-attenuation areas. Material/Methods Among 176 patients who underwent DECT for suspicion of pulmonary embolism, 38 patients (mean age, 64; range, 16 to 83 years) without apparent evidence of pulmonary embolism were evaluated in this study. They underwent DECT at 100/140 kVp with a tin filter on 140 kVp tube (Group A; n=18) or at 80/140 kVp without the filter (Group B; n=20). On the lung PBV images, the degrees of artifacts – pulmonary enhancement defect (PED) and pseudo-enhancement in the trachea (PTE) adjacent to the vena cava were evaluated using a four-point scale (0=minimal to 3=prominent). Results The mean degrees of artifact in Group A were significantly lower than those in Group B (0.8 vs. 1.9; P<0.0001 for PED, respectively, and 1.1 vs. 2.2; P<0.0001 for TPE, respectively). The mean CTDIvols were 4.90±1.14 and 12.98±3.15 mGy (P<0.0001) for Group A and Group B, respectively. Conclusions The quality and accuracy of dual-energy lung perfusion image will be improved by using the tin filter technique. PMID:27994698

  11. Using edge-preserving algorithm with non-local mean for significantly improved image-domain material decomposition in dual-energy CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Tianye; Xing, Lei; Xie, Yaoqin; Xiong, Guanglei; Elmore, Kimberly; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Luyao; Min, James K.

    2016-02-01

    Increased noise is a general concern for dual-energy material decomposition. Here, we develop an image-domain material decomposition algorithm for dual-energy CT (DECT) by incorporating an edge-preserving filter into the Local HighlY constrained backPRojection reconstruction (HYPR-LR) framework. With effective use of the non-local mean, the proposed algorithm, which is referred to as HYPR-NLM, reduces the noise in dual-energy decomposition while preserving the accuracy of quantitative measurement and spatial resolution of the material-specific dual-energy images. We demonstrate the noise reduction and resolution preservation of the algorithm with an iodine concentrate numerical phantom by comparing the HYPR-NLM algorithm to the direct matrix inversion, HYPR-LR and iterative image-domain material decomposition (Iter-DECT). We also show the superior performance of the HYPR-NLM over the existing methods by using two sets of cardiac perfusing imaging data. The DECT material decomposition comparison study shows that all four algorithms yield acceptable quantitative measurements of iodine concentrate. Direct matrix inversion yields the highest noise level, followed by HYPR-LR and Iter-DECT. HYPR-NLM in an iterative formulation significantly reduces image noise and the image noise is comparable to or even lower than that generated using Iter-DECT. For the HYPR-NLM method, there are marginal edge effects in the difference image, suggesting the high-frequency details are well preserved. In addition, when the search window size increases from 11× 11 to 19× 19 , there are no significant changes or marginal edge effects in the HYPR-NLM difference images. The reference drawn from the comparison study includes: (1) HYPR-NLM significantly reduces the DECT material decomposition noise while preserving quantitative measurements and high-frequency edge information, and (2) HYPR-NLM is robust with respect to parameter selection.

  12. The effect of amorphous selenium detector thickness on dual-energy digital breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yue-Houng Zhao, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Contrast enhanced (CE) imaging techniques for both planar digital mammography (DM) and three-dimensional (3D) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) applications requires x-ray photon energies higher than the k-edge of iodine (33.2 keV). As a result, x-ray tube potentials much higher (>40 kVp) than those typical for screening mammography must be utilized. Amorphous selenium (a-Se) based direct conversion flat-panel imagers (FPI) have been widely used in DM and DBT imaging systems. The a-Se layer is typically 200 μm thick with quantum detective efficiency (QDE) >87% for x-ray energies below 26 keV. However, QDE decreases substantially above this energy. To improve the object detectability of either CE-DM or CE-DBT, it may be advantageous to increase the thickness (d{sub Se}) of the a-Se layer. Increasing the d{sub Se} will improve the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at the higher energies used in CE imaging. However, because most DBT systems are designed with partially isocentric geometries, where the gantry moves about a stationary detector, the oblique entry of x-rays will introduce additional blur to the system. The present investigation quantifies the effect of a-Se thickness on imaging performance for both CE-DM and CE-DBT, discussing the effects of improving photon absorption and blurring from oblique entry of x-rays. Methods: In this paper, a cascaded linear system model (CLSM) was used to investigate the effect of d{sub Se} on the imaging performance (i.e., MTF, NPS, and DQE) of FPI in CE-DM and CE-DBT. The results from the model are used to calculate the ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio, d′, which is used as a figure-of-merit to determine the total effect of increasing d{sub Se} for CE-DM and CE-DBT. Results: The results of the CLSM show that increasing d{sub Se} causes a substantial increase in QDE at the high energies used in CE-DM. However, at the oblique projection angles used in DBT, the increased length of penetration through a

  13. A novel numerical method to eliminate thickness effect in dual energy X-ray imaging used in baggage inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazoochi, Alireza; Rahmani, Faezeh; Abbasi Davani, Freydoun; Ghaderi, Ruhollah

    2014-11-01

    One of the methods for material inspection is the dual-energy X-ray technique. Although this method can be more useful in material distinguishing, but signal's intensities are still dependent on the thicknesses of materials in front of the detector, so the material identification results may be affected. In this paper, the new technique using Composite Simpson numerical method has been introduced for eliminating this conflicting effect which stems from material's thickness in the image. This method has been evaluated for some materials such as aluminum and plastic. Calculations have been performed using MCNP4C code to obtain the received X-ray intensity to the detectors. MATLAB software has been also used for the calculations of removing the effect of thickness and optimizing the system performance. Results have shown good performance in identifying materials independent of their thicknesses. The standard deviation of the R parameter, a common parameter for identification, has been improved from 0.613 to 0.0557 for aluminum and from 0.3043 to 0.0288 for plastic, respectively. This method provides an approximation for the X-ray attenuation at two X-ray energies instead of two energy spectra which greatly improves the material identification.

  14. Relative dose in dual energy fast-kVp switching and conventional kVp imaging: spatial frequency dependent noise characteristics and low contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Chandra, Naveen; Hsieh, Jiang

    2011-03-01

    Dual energy computed tomography offers unique diagnostic value by enabling access to material density, effective atomic number, and energy specific spectral characteristics, which remained indeterminate with conventional kVp imaging. Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) is one of the dual energy methods based on fast kVp switching between two x-ray spectra, 80 kVp and 140 kVp nominal, in adjacent projections. The purpose of this study was to compare relative dose between GSI monochromatic and conventional kVp imaging for equivalent image noise characteristics. A spatialfrequency domain noise power spectrum (NPS) was used as a more complete noise descriptor for the comparison of the two image types. Uniform 20cm water phantom images from GSI and conventional 120 kVp scans were used for NPS calculation. In addition, a low contrast imaging study of the two image types with equivalent noise characteristics was conducted for contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) and low contrast detectability (LCD) in the Catphan600® phantom. From three GSI presets ranging from medium to low dose, we observed that conventional 120kVp scan requires ~ 7% - 18% increase in dose to match the noise characteristics in optimal noise GSI monochromatic image; and that the 65 keV monochromatic image CNR for a 0.5% contrast object is 22% higher compared to corresponding 120 kVp scan. Optimal use of the two energy spectra within GSI results in reduced noise and improved CNR in the monochromatic images, indicating the potential for use of this image type in routine clinical applications.

  15. Arterial cross-section measurements from dual energy transvenous coronary angiography images

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.; Schulze, C.

    1994-05-01

    The synchrotron based coronary angiography project at the National Synchrotron Light Source obtains images of coronary arteries using the digital subtraction technique after a distal venous injection of an iodine contrast agent. It allows two areal mass densities to be calculated from these images; one of the iodine and one of the water. Analysis procedures have been developed to arrive at these areal mass densities with corrections to the values being made for detector cross-talk and beam harmonics. From the iodine mass density distribution the relative arterial cross-section area is determined by a line integration across the arterial feature. Results will be given for an iodine tube phantom showing that the relative area of a feature whose lateral dimensions are smaller than the detector pixel resolution can be determined to a few percent. Also, results will be shown from a human image, showing the relative area of the right coronary artery mapped through a region of a previous stenosis subsequently treated by balloon angioplasty. Finally, limitation of the technique and plans to validate and improve the analysis will be discussed.

  16. Estimation of liver iron concentration by dual energy CT images: influence of X-ray energy on sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Malvarosa, I; Massaroni, C; Liguori, C; Paul, J; Beomonte Zobel, B; Saccomandi, P; Vogl, T J; Silvestri, S; Schena, E

    2014-01-01

    In hemochromatosis an abnormal accumulation of iron is present in parenchymal organs and especially in liver. Among the several techniques employed to diagnose the iron overload, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) are the most promising non-invasive ones. MRI is largely used but shows limitation including an overestimation of iron and inability to quantify iron at very high concentrations. Therefore, some research groups are focusing on the estimation of iron concentration by CT images. Single X-ray CTs are not able to accurately perform this task in case of the presence of confounding factors (e.g., fat). A potential solution to overcome this concern is the employment of Dual-Energy CT (DECT). The aim of this work is to investigate influence of the kVp and mAs on CT number sensitivity to iron concentration. A phantom with test tubes filled with homogenized porcine liver at different iron concentrations, has been scanned with DECT at different mAs. The images have been analyzed using an ad-hoc developed algorithm which allows minimizing the influence of air bubbles present in the homogenized. Data show that the sensitivity is strongly influenced by kVp (its value almost halves from 80 kVp to 140 kVp; e.g. 0.41 g·μmol(-1) and 0.19 g·μmol(-1) at 80 kVp/120 mAs and 140 kVp/60 mAs respectively), on the other hand the influence of mAs value is negligible.

  17. Association of Coronary Aortic Calcium with Abdominal Aortic Calcium Detected on Lateral Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Spine Images

    PubMed Central

    Schousboe, John T.; Claflin, Diane; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The association of abdominal aortic calcium (AAC) on lateral spine bone densitometry with coronary artery calcium (CAC) has not been reported. We studied 33 men and 73 women who had CAC scored with electron beam computed tomography at the 8th visit of the Rancho Bernardo study and lateral spine dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) images fully evaluable for AAC done at the 9th study visit. The association between CAC level and AAC tertile was assessed by ordinal logistic regression. The odds ratio of having a higher level of CAC score for those in the top tertile of AAC score (24-point scale score ≥ 5) was 6.42 (95% C.I. 2.28 – 18.1) and on an 8-point scale (score ≥ 3) was 3.38 (95% C.I. 1.26 – 9.07), compared to those with AAC scores in the bottom tertiles, adjusted for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, total and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, smoking status, and diabetes. A 24-point AAC score of ≥ 5 had a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 70% to detect a high CAC score (≥ 400 units). An 8-point AAC score ≥ 3 had a sensitivity of 45% and a specificity of 78%. In conclusion, a high level of AAC on lateral spine DXA is strongly associated with coronary artery disease and may be commonly encountered since bone densitometry is indicated in all women age ≥ 65 and all men age ≥ 70. Its presence should be reported to the patient's physician to identify and manage modifiable risk factors. PMID:19616658

  18. Dual-Energy Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Radiation-Induced Vascular Changes in Primary Mouse Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Moding, Everett J.; Clark, Darin P.; Qi, Yi; Li, Yifan; Ma, Yan; Ghaghada, Ketan; Johnson, G. Allan; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on primary tumor vasculature using dual-energy (DE) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials: Primary sarcomas were generated with mutant Kras and p53. Unirradiated tumors were compared with tumors irradiated with 20 Gy. A liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was administered 1 day after treatment, and mice were imaged immediately after injection (day 1) and 3 days later (day 4) with DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated histologically by use of CD31 immunofluorescence and fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results: Radiation treatment significantly decreased tumor growth from day 1 to day 4 (P<.05). There was a positive correlation between CT measurement of tumor FBV on day 1 and extravasated iodine on day 4 with microvascular density (MVD) on day 4 (R{sup 2}=0.53) and dextran accumulation (R{sup 2}=0.63) on day 4, respectively. Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE micro-CT (0.070 vs 0.091, P<.05). Both dextran and liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased significantly after irradiation, with dextran fractional area increasing 5.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration increasing 4.0-fold. Conclusions: DE micro-CT is an effective tool for noninvasive assessment of vascular changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of radiation treatment.

  19. Dual-energy multidetector CT: how does it work, what can it tell us, and when can we use it in abdominopelvic imaging?

    PubMed

    Coursey, Courtney A; Nelson, Rendon C; Boll, Daniel T; Paulson, Erik K; Ho, Lisa M; Neville, Amy M; Marin, Daniele; Gupta, Rajan T; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2010-01-01

    Dual-energy CT provides information about how substances behave at different energies, the ability to generate virtual unenhanced datasets, and improved detection of iodine-containing substances on low-energy images. Knowing how a substance behaves at two different energies can provide information about tissue composition beyond that obtainable with single-energy techniques. The term K edge refers to the spike in attenuation that occurs at energy levels just greater than that of the K-shell binding because of the increased photoelectric absorption at these energy levels. K-edge values vary for each element, and they increase as the atomic number increases. The energy dependence of the photoelectric effect and the variability of K edges form the basis of dual-energy techniques, which may be used to detect substances such as iodine, calcium, and uric acid crystals. The closer the energy level used in imaging is to the K edge of a substance such as iodine, the more the substance attenuates. In the abdomen and pelvis, dual-energy CT may be used in the liver to increase conspicuity of hypervascular lesions; in the kidneys, to distinguish hyperattenuating cysts from enhancing renal masses and to characterize renal stone composition; in the adrenal glands, to characterize adrenal nodules; and in the pancreas, to differentiate between normal and abnormal parenchyma.

  20. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  1. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  2. Initial evaluation of virtual un-enhanced imaging derived from fast kVp-switching dual energy contrast enhanced CT for the abdomen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, M.; Mendonca, P.; Okerlund, D.; Lamb, P.; Kulkarni, N.; Pinho, D.; Sahani, D.; Bhotika, R.

    2011-03-01

    The feasibility and utility of creating virtual un-enhanced images from contrast enhanced data acquired using a fast switching dual energy CT acquisition, is explored. Utilizing projection based material decomposition data, monochromatic images are generated and a Multi-material decomposition technique is applied. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation is performed to assess the equivalence of Virtual Un-Enhanced (VUE) and True Un-enhanced (TUE) for multiple tissue types and different organs in the abdomen. Ten patient cases were analyzed where a TUE and a subsequent Contrast Enhanced (CE) acquisition were obtained using fast kVp-switching dual energy CT utilizing Gemstone Spectral Imaging. Quantitative measurements were made by placing multiple Regions of Interest on the different tissues and organs in both the TUE and the VUE images. The absolute Hounsfield Unit (HU) differences in the mean values between TUE & VUE were calculated as well as the differences of the standard deviations. Qualitative analysis was done by two radiologists for overall image quality, presence of residual contrast, appearance of pathology, appearance and contrast of normal tissues and organs in comparison to the TUE. There is a very strong correlation between the TUE and VUE images.

  3. Patient doses and image quality in digital chest radiology.

    PubMed

    Salát, D; Nikodemová, D

    2008-01-01

    Chest X-ray examination is one of the most frequently required procedures used in clinical practice. For studying the image quality of different X-ray digital systems and for the control of patient doses during chest radiological examinations, the standard anthropomorphic lung/chest phantom RSD 330 has been used and exposed in different digital modalities available in Slovakia. To compare different techniques of chest examination, a special software has been developed that enables researchers to compare digital imaging and communications in medicine header images from different digital modalities, using a special viewer. In this paper, this special software has been used for an anonymous correspondent audit for testing image quality evaluation by comparing various parameters of chest imaging, evaluated by 84 Slovak radiologists. The results of the comparison have shown that the majority of the participating radiologists felt that the highest image quality is reached with a flat panel, assessed by the entrance surface dose value, which is approximately 75% lower than the diagnostic reference level of chest examination given in the Slovak legislation. Besides the results of the audit, the possibilities of using the software for optimisation, education and training of medical students, radiological assistants, physicists and radiologists in the field of digital radiology will be described.

  4. Coccidioidomycosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows the affects of a fungal infection, coccidioidomycosis. In the middle of the left lung (seen on the ... defined borders. Other diseases that may explain these x-ray findings include lung abscesses, chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic ...

  5. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  6. SU-E-I-39: Combining Conventional Tomographic Imaging Strategy and Interior Tomography for Low Dose Dual-Energy CT (DECT)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q; Xing, L; Xiong, G; Elmore, K; Min, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) affords quantitative information of tissue density and provides a new dimension for disease diagnosis and treatment planning. The technique, however, increases the imaging dose because of the doubled scans, and thus hinders its widespread clinical applications. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel hybrid DECT image acquisition and reconstruction strategy, in which one of the energies is dealt by interior tomography while the other one is obtained using conventional tomography approach. Methods: In the proposed hybrid imaging strategy, the projection data of one of the energies (e.g., high-energy) were acquired and processed in an interior scanning model, whereas the other energy in the conventional tomographic approach. It known that, if the ROI is piecewise constant or polynomial, the interior ROI can be reconstructed with TV or HOT minimization. Here we extend the TV based interior reconstruction method into dual-energy situation. The ROI images so obtained were overlaid in the context of conventional CT of the companion energy. A material based composition in ROI was used in the proposed reconstruction framework. Results: In the simulation experiment with a diagnostic DECT geometry and energies, we were able to derive the densities of soft-tissues and bones in the ROI with high fidelity. In the experimental CBCT study, both kV and MV data were collected using the on-board kV and MV imaging system. The MV data were truncated only across the ROI. Using the interior tomography reconstruction above, we were able to obtain the ROI images as that obtained using un-truncated MV data with known tissue densities. Conclusion: The proposed DECT imaging strategy provides an effective way to extract tissue density information in the ROI and in the context of anatomical images of CT imaging, with much reduced imaging dose.

  7. Lung nodules detection in chest radiography: image components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tao; Mou, Xuanqin; Yang, Ying; Yan, Hao

    2009-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of different components of chest image on performances of both human observer and channelized Fisher-Hotelling model (CFH) in nodule detection task. Irrelevant and relevant components were separated from clinical chest radiography by employing Principal Component Analysis (PCA) methods. Human observer performance was evaluated in two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) on original clinical images and anatomical structure only images obtained by PCA methods. Channelized Fisher-Hotelling model with Laguerre-Gauss basis function was evaluated to predict human performance. We show that relevant component is the primary factor influencing on nodule detection in chest radiography. There is obvious difference of detectability between human observer and CFH model for nodule detection in images only containing anatomical structure. CFH model should be used more carefully.

  8. Role of Cross Sectional Imaging in Isolated Chest Wall Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Shantiranjan; Sharma, Barun K.; Prakash, Arjun; Dhingani, Dhabal D.; Bora, Karobi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Isolated chest wall tuberculosis though a rare entity, the incidence of it has been on rise among immunocompromised population making it an important challenging diagnosis for the physicians. Its clinical presentation may resemble pyogenic chest wall abscess or chest wall soft tissue tumour. Sometimes it is difficult to detect clinically or on plain radiograph. Aim The present study was conducted with an aim to evaluate the common sites and varying appearances of isolated chest wall tuberculosis. Materials and Methods A hospital based cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted in Assam Medical College and Hospital, a tertiary care centre in North East India. The study group comprise of 21 patients (n=15 male and n=6 females) with isolated chest wall tuberculosis without associated pulmonary or spinal involvement who were subjected to Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CT/MRI) of the thorax following initial Ultrasonogram (USG) evaluation of the local site. Pathological correlation was done from imaging guided sampling of the aspirate or surgery. Results Variable sites of involvement were seen in the chest wall in our patients (n=21), with chest wall abscess formation being the most common presentation and rib being the most common bony site affected in the thoracic cage. Bony sclerosis was noted in 11 patients (52.4%), periosteal reaction in 10 patients (47.6%) and sequestration in five patients (23.8%). CT/MRI not only localized the exact site and extent of the abscesses which facilitated guided aspirations, but also helped in detecting typical bony lesions thereby, differentiating from pyogenic osteomyelitis besides ruling out associated pulmonary or pleural involvement in such patients. Conclusion Cross-sectional imaging plays an important role by giving a wholesome picture of both soft tissue and bony pathology. It is important to have adequate understanding of the radiologic manifestations of the chest wall involvement and

  9. TU-F-18C-02: Increasing Amorphous Selenium Thickness in Direct Conversion Flat-Panel Imagers for Contrast-Enhanced Dual-Energy Breast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Scaduto, DA; Hu, Y-H; Zhao, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Contrast-enhanced (CE) breast imaging using iodinated contrast agents requires imaging with x-ray spectra at energies greater than those used in mammography. Optimizing amorphous selenium (a-Se) flat panel imagers (FPI) for this higher energy range may increase lesion conspicuity. Methods: We compare imaging performance of a conventional FPI with 200 μm a-Se conversion layer to a prototype FPI with 300 μm a-Se layer. Both detectors are evaluated in a Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system using low-energy (W/Rh 28 kVp) and high-energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) x-ray spectra. Detectability of iodinated lesions in dual-energy images is evaluated using an iodine contrast phantom. Effects of beam obliquity are investigated in projection and reconstructed images using different reconstruction methods. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio is used as a figure-of-merit to predict the optimal a-Se thickness for CE lesion detectability without compromising conventional full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and DBT performance. Results: Increasing a-Se thickness from 200 μm to 300 μm preserves imaging performance at typical mammographic energies (e.g. W/Rh 28 kVp), and improves the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for high energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) by 30%. While the more penetrating high-energy x-ray photons increase geometric blur due to beam obliquity in the FPI with thicker a-Se layer, the effect on lesion detectability in FBP reconstructions is negligible due to the reconstruction filters employed. Ideal observer SNR for CE objects shows improvements in in-plane detectability with increasing a-Se thicknesses, though small lesion detectability begins to degrade in oblique projections for a-Se thickness above 500 μm. Conclusion: Increasing a-Se thickness in direct conversion FPI from 200 μm to 300 μm improves lesion detectability in CE breast imaging with virtually no cost to conventional FFDM and DBT. This work was partially

  10. Tests of variable-band multilayers designed for investigating optimal signal-to-noise vs artifact signal ratios in Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography (DDSA) imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Boyers, D.; Ho, A.; Li, Q.; Piestrup, M.; Rice, M.; Tatchyn, R.

    1993-08-01

    In recent work, various design techniques were applied to investigate the feasibility of controlling the bandwidth and bandshape profiles of tungsten/boron-carbon (W/B{sub 4}C) and tungsten/silicon (W/Si) multilayers for optimizing their performance in synchrotron radiation based angiographical imaging systems at 33 keV. Varied parameters included alternative spacing geometries, material thickness ratios, and numbers of layer pairs. Planar optics with nominal design reflectivities of 30%--94% and bandwidths ranging from 0.6%--10% were designed at the Stanford Radiation Laboratory, fabricated by the Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company, and characterized on Beam Line 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, in this paper we report selected results of these tests and review the possible use of the multilayers for determining optimal signal to noise vs. artifact signal ratios in practical Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography systems.

  11. Functional MR Imaging in Chest Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Broncano, Jordi; Luna, Antonio; Sánchez-González, Javier; Alvarez-Kindelan, Antonio; Bhalla, Sanjeev

    2016-02-01

    With recent advances in MR imaging, its application in the thorax has been feasible. The performance of both morphologic and functional techniques in the evaluation of thoracic malignances has improved not only differentiation from benign etiologies but also treatment monitoring based on a multiparametric approach. Several MR imaging-derived parameters have been described as potential biomarkers linked with prognosis and survival. Therefore, an integral approach with a nonradiating and noninvasive technique could be an optimal alternative for evaluating those patients.

  12. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography.

    PubMed

    Travieso Aja, M M; Rodríguez Rodríguez, M; Alayón Hernández, S; Vega Benítez, V; Luzardo, O P

    2014-01-01

    The degree of vascularization in breast lesions is related to their malignancy. For this reason, functional diagnostic imaging techniques have become important in recent years. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography is a new, apparently promising technique in breast cancer that provides information about the degree of vascularization of the lesion in addition to the morphological information provided by conventional mammography. This article describes the state of the art for dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography. Based on 15 months' clinical experience, we illustrate this review with clinical cases that allow us to discuss the advantages and limitations of this technique.

  13. Automatic image hanging protocol for chest radiographs in PACS.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hui; Hao, Wei; Foos, David H; Cornelius, Craig W

    2006-04-01

    Chest radiography is one of the most widely used techniques in diagnostic imaging. It comprises at least one-third of all diagnostic radiographic procedures in hospitals. However, in the picture archive and communication system, images are often stored with the projection and orientation unknown or mislabeled, which causes inefficiency for radiologists' interpretation. To address this problem, an automatic hanging protocol for chest radiographs is presented. The method targets the most effective region in a chest radiograph, and extracts a set of size-, rotation-, and translation-invariant features from it. Then, a well-trained classifier is used to recognize the projection. The orientation of the radiograph is later identified by locating the neck, heart, and abdomen positions in the radiographs. Initial experiments are performed on the radiographs collected from daily routine chest exams in hospitals and show promising results. Using the presented protocol, 98.2% of all cases could be hung correctly on projection view (without protocol, 62%), and 96.1% had correct orientation (without protocol, 75%). A workflow study on the protocol also demonstrates a significant improvement in efficiency for image display.

  14. Performance of today’s dual energy CT and future multi energy CT in virtual non-contrast imaging and in iodine quantification: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Faby, Sebastian Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc; Simons, David; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Lell, Michael

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To study the performance of different dual energy computed tomography (DECT) techniques, which are available today, and future multi energy CT (MECT) employing novel photon counting detectors in an image-based material decomposition task. Methods: The material decomposition performance of different energy-resolved CT acquisition techniques is assessed and compared in a simulation study of virtual non-contrast imaging and iodine quantification. The material-specific images are obtained via a statistically optimal image-based material decomposition. A projection-based maximum likelihood approach was used for comparison with the authors’ image-based method. The different dedicated dual energy CT techniques are simulated employing realistic noise models and x-ray spectra. The authors compare dual source DECT with fast kV switching DECT and the dual layer sandwich detector DECT approach. Subsequent scanning and a subtraction method are studied as well. Further, the authors benchmark future MECT with novel photon counting detectors in a dedicated DECT application against the performance of today’s DECT using a realistic model. Additionally, possible dual source concepts employing photon counting detectors are studied. Results: The DECT comparison study shows that dual source DECT has the best performance, followed by the fast kV switching technique and the sandwich detector approach. Comparing DECT with future MECT, the authors found noticeable material image quality improvements for an ideal photon counting detector; however, a realistic detector model with multiple energy bins predicts a performance on the level of dual source DECT at 100 kV/Sn 140 kV. Employing photon counting detectors in dual source concepts can improve the performance again above the level of a single realistic photon counting detector and also above the level of dual source DECT. Conclusions: Substantial differences in the performance of today’s DECT approaches were found for the

  15. Dual-source dual-energy CT with additional tin filtration: Dose and image quality evaluation in phantoms and in-vivo

    PubMed Central

    Primak, Andrew N.; Giraldo, Juan Carlos Ramirez; Eusemann, Christian D.; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kantor, B.; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect on radiation dose and image quality of the use of additional spectral filtration for dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging using dual-source CT (DSCT). Materials and Methods A commercial DSCT scanner was modified by adding tin filtration to the high-kV tube, and radiation output and noise measured in water phantoms. Dose values for equivalent image noise were compared among DE-modes with and without tin filtration and single-energy (SE) mode. To evaluate DECT material discrimination, the material-specific DEratio for calcium and iodine were determined using images of anthropomorphic phantoms. Data were additionally acquired in 38 and 87 kg pigs, and noise for the linearly mixed and virtual non-contrast (VNC) images compared between DE-modes. Finally, abdominal DECT images from two patients of similar sizes undergoing clinically-indicated CT were compared. Results Adding tin filtration to the high-kV tube improved the DE contrast between iodine and calcium as much as 290%. Pig data showed that the tin filtration had no effect on noise in the DECT mixed images, but decreased noise by as much as 30% in the VNC images. Patient VNC-images acquired using 100/140 kV with added tin filtration had improved image quality compared to those generated with 80/140 kV without tin filtration. Conclusion Tin filtration of the high-kV tube of a DSCT scanner increases the ability of DECT to discriminate between calcium and iodine, without increasing dose relative to SECT. Furthermore, use of 100/140 kV tube potentials allows improved DECT imaging of large patients. PMID:20966323

  16. Prognostic impact of average iodine density assessed by dual-energy spectral imaging for predicting lung tumor recurrence after stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of average iodine density as assessed by dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) for lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). From March 2011 to August 2014, 93 medically inoperable patients with 74 primary lung cancers and 19 lung metastases underwent DE-CT prior to SBRT of a total dose of 45-60 Gy in 5-10 fractions. Of these 93 patients, nine patients had two lung tumors. Thus, 102 lung tumors were included in this study. DE-CT was performed for pretreatment evaluation. Regions of interest were set for the entire tumor, and average iodine density was obtained using a dedicated imaging software and evaluated with regard to local control. The median follow-up period was 23.4 months (range, 1.5-54.5 months). The median value of the average iodine density was 1.86 mg/cm(3) (range, 0.40-9.27 mg/cm(3)). Two-year local control rates for the high and low average iodine density groups divided by the median value of the average iodine density were 96.9% and 75.7% (P = 0.006), respectively. Tumors with lower average iodine density showed a worse prognosis, possibly reflecting a hypoxic cell population in the tumor. The average iodine density exhibited a significant impact on local control. Our preliminary results indicate that iodine density evaluated using dual-energy spectral CT may be a useful, noninvasive and quantitative assessment of radio-resistance caused by presumably hypoxic cell populations in tumors.

  17. Prognostic impact of average iodine density assessed by dual-energy spectral imaging for predicting lung tumor recurrence after stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of average iodine density as assessed by dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) for lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). From March 2011 to August 2014, 93 medically inoperable patients with 74 primary lung cancers and 19 lung metastases underwent DE-CT prior to SBRT of a total dose of 45–60 Gy in 5–10 fractions. Of these 93 patients, nine patients had two lung tumors. Thus, 102 lung tumors were included in this study. DE-CT was performed for pretreatment evaluation. Regions of interest were set for the entire tumor, and average iodine density was obtained using a dedicated imaging software and evaluated with regard to local control. The median follow-up period was 23.4 months (range, 1.5–54.5 months). The median value of the average iodine density was 1.86 mg/cm3 (range, 0.40–9.27 mg/cm3). Two-year local control rates for the high and low average iodine density groups divided by the median value of the average iodine density were 96.9% and 75.7% (P = 0.006), respectively. Tumors with lower average iodine density showed a worse prognosis, possibly reflecting a hypoxic cell population in the tumor. The average iodine density exhibited a significant impact on local control. Our preliminary results indicate that iodine density evaluated using dual-energy spectral CT may be a useful, noninvasive and quantitative assessment of radio-resistance caused by presumably hypoxic cell populations in tumors. PMID:26826198

  18. Single-exposure dual-energy computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B K; Huang, H K

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on analysis and development of a single-exposure dual-energy digital radiographic method using computed radiography (Fuji FCR-101 storage phosphor system). A detector sandwich consisting of storage phosphor imaging plates and an interdetector filter is used. The goal of this process is to provide a simple dual-energy method using typical plane-projection radiographic equipment and techniques. This approach exploits the transparency of the storage phosphor plates, using radiographic information that would be otherwise lost, to provide energy selective information essentially as a by-product of the radiographic examination. In order to effectively make use of the large dynamic range of the storage phosphor imaging plates (10,000:1), a computed radiography image reading mode of fixed analog-to-digital converter gain and variable photomultiplier sensitivity provides image data which can be related to relative incident exposure for export to the decomposition algorithm. Scatter rejection requirements necessitated crossed 12:1 grids for a field size of 36 x 36 cm. Optimal technique parameters obtained from computer simulation through minimization of the aluminum and Plexiglas equivalent image uncertainty under conditions of constant absorbed does resulted as: 100 kVp using a 0.15-mm-thick tin (Sn) interdetector filter for the lung field. This yields a surface exposure of 23 mR and a surface absorbed dose of 0.26 mGy for a 23-cm-thick chest. Clinical application in evaluation of the solitary pulmonary nodule is discussed, along with an image set demonstrating this application.

  19. A level crossing enhancement scheme for chest radiograph images.

    PubMed

    Nagesha; Kumar, G Hemantha

    2007-10-01

    A new approach for contrast enhancement of chest radiograph image data is presented. Existing methods for image enhancement focus mainly on the properties of the image to be processed while excluding any consideration of the observer characteristics. In several applications, particularly in the medical imaging area, effective contrast enhancement for diagnostic purposes can be achieved by including certain basic human visual properties. In this paper we shall present a novel (recursive) algorithm that tailors the required amount of contrast enhancement based on a combination of the optimal phase representation and the theory of projection onto a convex set. Constraints of maximum bandwidth of the image data, appropriate knowledge of the amplitude value of the image data, heuristic limitations and level crossing measurements serve to impose additional information. So that, the enhanced image data may better converge to the good quality image.

  20. Search for novel contrast materials in dual-energy x-ray breast imaging using theoretical modeling of contrast-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, R; Maidment, A D A

    2014-08-07

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) dual-energy (DE) x-ray breast imaging uses a low- and high-energy x-ray spectral pair to eliminate soft-tissue signal variation and thereby increase the detectability of exogenous imaging agents. Currently, CEDE breast imaging is performed with iodinated contrast agents. These compounds are limited by several deficiencies, including rapid clearance and poor tumor targeting ability. The purpose of this work is to identify novel contrast materials whose contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is comparable or superior to that of iodine in the mammographic energy range. A monoenergetic DE subtraction framework was developed to calculate the DE signal intensity resulting from the logarithmic subtraction of the low- and high-energy signal intensities. A weighting factor is calculated to remove the dependence of the DE signal on the glandularity of the breast tissue. Using the DE signal intensity and weighting factor, the CNR for materials with atomic numbers (Z) ranging from 1 to 79 are computed for energy pairs between 10 and 50 keV. A group of materials with atomic numbers ranging from 42 to 63 were identified to exhibit the highest levels of CNR in the mammographic energy range. Several of these materials have been formulated as nanoparticles for various applications but none, apart from iodine, have been investigated as CEDE breast imaging agents. Within this group of materials, the necessary dose fraction to the LE image decreases as the atomic number increases. By reducing the dose to the LE image, the DE subtraction technique will not provide an anatomical image of sufficient quality to accompany the contrast information. Therefore, materials with Z from 42 to 52 provide nearly optimal values of CNR with energy pairs and dose fractions that provide good anatomical images. This work is intended to inspire further research into new materials for optimized CEDE breast functional imaging.

  1. Aspects of chest imaging in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Cascade, P N; Kazerooni, E A

    1994-04-01

    Timely performance and accurate interpretation of portable chest radiographs in the ICU setting are fundamental components of quality care. Teamwork between intensive care clinicians and radiologists is necessary to assure that the appropriate studies, of high technical quality, are obtained. By working together to integrate available clinical information with systematic comprehensive analysis of images, accurate diagnoses can be made, optimal treatment instituted, and successful outcomes optimized.

  2. Comparative evaluation of p5+14 with SAP and peptide p5 by dual-energy SPECT imaging of mice with AA amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela; Richey, Tina; Stuckey, Alan; Heidel, R. Eric; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a protein-misfolding disorder characterized by the extracellular deposition of amyloid, a complex matrix composed of protein fibrils, hyper-sulphated glycosaminoglycans and serum amyloid P component (SAP). Accumulation of amyloid in visceral organs results in the destruction of tissue architecture leading to organ dysfunction and failure. Early differential diagnosis and disease monitoring are critical for improving patient outcomes; thus, whole body amyloid imaging would be beneficial in this regard. Non-invasive molecular imaging of systemic amyloid is performed in Europe by using iodine-123-labelled SAP; however, this tracer is not available in the US. Therefore, we evaluated synthetic, poly-basic peptides, designated p5 and p5+14, as alternative radiotracers for detecting systemic amyloidosis. Herein, we perform a comparative effectiveness evaluation of radiolabelled peptide p5+14 with p5 and SAP, in amyloid-laden mice, using dual-energy SPECT imaging and tissue biodistribution measurements. All three radiotracers selectively bound amyloid in vivo; however, p5+14 was significantly more effective as compared to p5 in certain organs. Moreover, SAP bound principally to hepatosplenic amyloid, whereas p5+14 was broadly distributed in numerous amyloid-laden anatomic sites, including the spleen, liver, pancreas, intestines and heart. These data support clinical validation of p5+14 as an amyloid radiotracer for patients in the US. PMID:26936002

  3. Eigen analysis for classifying chest x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, Philip J.; Butler, Anthony P. H.

    2004-10-01

    A method first employed for face recognition has been employed to analyse a set of chest x-ray images. After marking certain common features on the images, they are registered by means of an affine transformation. The differences between each registered image and the mean of all images in the set are computed and the first K principal components are found, where K is less than or equal to the number of images in the set. These form eigenimages (we have coined the term 'eigenchests') from which an approximation to any one of the original images can be reconstructed. Since the method effectively treats each pixel as a dimension in a hyperspace, the matrices concerned are huge; we employ the method developed by Turk and Pentland for face recognition to make the computations tractable. The K coefficients for the eigenimages encode the variation between images and form the basis for discriminating normal from abnormal. Preliminary results have been obtained for a set of eigenimages formed from a set of normal chests and tested on separate sets of normals and patients with pneumonia. The distributions of coefficients have been observed to be different for the two test sets and work is continuing to determine the most sensitive method for detecting the differences.

  4. MO-FG-204-03: Using Edge-Preserving Algorithm for Significantly Improved Image-Domain Material Decomposition in Dual Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W; Niu, T; Xing, L; Xiong, G; Elmore, K; Min, J; Zhu, J; Wang, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To significantly improve dual energy CT (DECT) imaging by establishing a new theoretical framework of image-domain material decomposition with incorporation of edge-preserving techniques. Methods: The proposed algorithm, HYPR-NLM, combines the edge-preserving non-local mean filter (NLM) with the HYPR-LR (Local HighlY constrained backPRojection Reconstruction) framework. Image denoising using HYPR-LR framework depends on the noise level of the composite image which is the average of the different energy images. For DECT, the composite image is the average of high- and low-energy images. To further reduce noise, one may want to increase the window size of the filter of the HYPR-LR, leading resolution degradation. By incorporating the NLM filtering and the HYPR-LR framework, HYPR-NLM reduces the boost material decomposition noise using energy information redundancies as well as the non-local mean. We demonstrate the noise reduction and resolution preservation of the algorithm with both iodine concentration numerical phantom and clinical patient data by comparing the HYPR-NLM algorithm to the direct matrix inversion, HYPR-LR and iterative image-domain material decomposition (Iter-DECT). Results: The results show iterative material decomposition method reduces noise to the lowest level and provides improved DECT images. HYPR-NLM significantly reduces noise while preserving the accuracy of quantitative measurement and resolution. For the iodine concentration numerical phantom, the averaged noise levels are about 2.0, 0.7, 0.2 and 0.4 for direct inversion, HYPR-LR, Iter- DECT and HYPR-NLM, respectively. For the patient data, the noise levels of the water images are about 0.36, 0.16, 0.12 and 0.13 for direct inversion, HYPR-LR, Iter-DECT and HYPR-NLM, respectively. Difference images of both HYPR-LR and Iter-DECT show edge effect, while no significant edge effect is shown for HYPR-NLM, suggesting spatial resolution is well preserved for HYPR-NLM. Conclusion: HYPR

  5. Thoracic dual energy CT: acquisition protocols, current applications and future developments.

    PubMed

    Ohana, M; Jeung, M Y; Labani, A; El Ghannudi, S; Roy, C

    2014-11-01

    Thanks to a simultaneous acquisition at high and low kilovoltage, dual energy computed tomography (DECT) can achieve material-based decomposition (iodine, water, calcium, etc.) and reconstruct images at different energy levels (40 to 140keV). Post-processing uses this potential to maximise iodine detection, which elicits demonstrated added value for chest imaging in acute and chronic embolic diseases (increases the quality of the examination and identifies perfusion defects), follow-up of aortic endografts and detection of contrast uptake in oncology. In CT angiography, these unique features are taken advantage of to reduce the iodine load by more than half. This review article aims to set out the physical basis for the technology, the acquisition and post-processing protocols used, its proven advantages in chest pathologies, and to present future developments.

  6. Dual-energy computed tomography of the head: a phantom study assessing axial dose distribution, eye lens dose, and image noise level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Kawashima, Hiroki; Hamaguchi, Takashi; Takata, Tadanori; Kobayashi, Masanao; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Koshida, Kichiro

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a calibration method for small dosimeters to measure absorbed doses during dual- source dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and to compare the axial dose distribution, eye lens dose, and image noise level between DE and standard, single-energy (SE) head CT angiography. Three DE (100/Sn140 kVp 80/Sn140 kVp, and 140/80 kVp) and one SE (120 kVp) acquisitions were performed using a second-generation dual-source CT device and a female head phantom, with an equivalent volumetric CT dose index. The axial absorbed dose distribution at the orbital level and the absorbed doses for the eye lens were measured using radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters. CT attenuation numbers were obtained in the DE composite images and the SE images of the phantom at the orbital level. The doses absorbed at the orbital level and in the eye lens were lower and standard deviations for the CT attenuation numbers were slightly higher in the DE acquisitions than those in the SE acquisition. The anterior surface dose was especially higher in the SE acquisition than that in the DE acquisitions. Thus, DE head CT angiography can be performed with a radiation dose lower than that required for a standard SE head CT angiography, with a slight increase in the image noise level. The 100/Sn140 kVp acquisition revealed the most balanced axial dose distribution. In addition, our proposed method was effective for calibrating small dosimeters to measure absorbed doses in DECT.

  7. Improved dose calculation accuracy for low energy brachytherapy by optimizing dual energy CT imaging protocols for noise reduction using sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Gaudreault, Mathieu; van Elmpt, Wouter; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the noise reduction achievable from dual energy computed tomography (CT) imaging (DECT) using filtered backprojection (FBP) and iterative image reconstruction algorithms combined with increased imaging exposure. We evaluated the data in the context of imaging for brachytherapy dose calculation, where accurate quantification of electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff is beneficial. A dual source CT scanner was used to scan a phantom containing tissue mimicking inserts. DECT scans were acquired at 80 kVp/140Sn kVp (where Sn stands for tin filtration) and 100 kVp/140Sn kVp, using the same values of the CT dose index CTDIvol for both settings as a measure for the radiation imaging exposure. Four CTDIvol levels were investigated. Images were reconstructed using FBP and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with strength 1,3 and 5. From DECT scans two material quantities were derived, Zeff and ρe. DECT images were used to assign material types and the amount of improperly assigned voxels was quantified for each protocol. The dosimetric impact of improperly assigned voxels was evaluated with Geant4 Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for an (125)I source in numerical phantoms. Standard deviations for Zeff and ρe were reduced up to a factor ∼2 when using SAFIRE with strength 5 compared to FBP. Standard deviations on Zeff and ρe as low as 0.15 and 0.006 were achieved for the muscle insert representing typical soft tissue using a CTDIvol of 40 mGy and 3mm slice thickness. Dose calculation accuracy was generally improved when using SAFIRE. Mean (maximum absolute) dose errors of up to 1.3% (21%) with FBP were reduced to less than 1% (6%) with SAFIRE at a CTDIvol of 10 mGy. Using a CTDIvol of 40mGy and SAFIRE yielded mean dose calculation errors of the order of 0.6% which was the MC dose calculation precision in this study and no error was larger than ±2.5% as opposed to errors of up to -4% with FPB. This

  8. Principles of image processing in digital chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Mathias; Neitzel, Ulrich; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2003-07-01

    Image processing has a major impact on image quality and diagnostic performance of digital chest radiographs. Goals of processing are to reduce the dynamic range of the image data to capture the full range of attenuation differences between lungs and mediastinum, to improve the modulation transfer function to optimize spatial resolution, to enhance structural contrast, and to suppress image noise. Image processing comprises look-up table operations and spatial filtering. Look-up table operations allow for automated signal normalization and arbitrary choice of image gradation. The most simple and still widely applied spatial filtering algorithms are based on unsharp masking. Various modifications were introduced for dynamic range reduction and MTF restoration. More elaborate and more effective are multi-scale frequency processing algorithms. They are based on the subdivision of an image in multiple frequency bands according to its structural composition. This allows for a wide range of image manipulations including a size-independent enhancement of low-contrast structures. Principles of the various algorithms will be explained and their impact on image appearance will be illustrated by clinical examples. Optimum and sub-optimum parameter settings are discussed and pitfalls will be explained.

  9. The prediction of total skeletal muscle mass in a Caucasian population - comparison of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).

    PubMed

    Geisler, Corinna; Pourhassan, Maryam; Braun, Wiebke; Schweitzer, Lisa; Müller, Manfred J

    2017-03-01

    Dual-energy X-ray (DXA) is an alternative to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure skeletal muscle mass. DXA assesses lean body mass (LBM), and MRI measures skeletal muscle mass (SMM). Kim et al. (Am J Clin Nutr 2002; 76: 378; J Appl Physiol (1985) 2004; 97: 655) developed MRI-based algorithms to estimate whole-body SMM by DXA. These algorithms were based on an ethnically mixed study population (Kim et al., Am J Clin Nutr 2002; 76: 378; J Appl Physiol (1985) 2004; 97: 655). It is unclear whether Kim's algorithms are accurate in an exclusive Caucasian population. The aim of our study was to validate Kim's equation in a Caucasian population of 346 subjects. SMMMRI was assessed using MRI, and LBM and BMCDXA were measured by DXA and fat mass (FMADP ) by air-displacement plethysmographie (ADP). SMMMRI and predicted SMM were highly correlated (r = 0·944; P<0·05). The standard error of estimate of the regression equation was 2·4 kg. However, Bland-Altman plots showed a significant (P<0·001) systematic bias between SMMMRI (median 25·1 kg; IQ 20·2-31·1 kg) and predicted SMM (median 26·3 kg; IQ 22·6-33·0 kg), overestimating SMM by 9·8%. Multiple regression analyses showed that weight explained 4·4% of the variance in the differences between SMMMRI and predicted SMM with the major part unexplained. Kim's algorithm has a systematic unexplained bias and is not recommended in Caucasians.

  10. Comparison of two bioelectrical impedance analysis devices with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging in the estimation of body composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Guang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Han-E; Li, Yan; Cheng, Xiao-Guang; Xu, Li; Guo, Zhe; Zhao, Xing-Shan; Sato, Tetsuya; Cao, Qi-Yun; Chen, Ke-Min; Li, Biao

    2013-01-01

    We compared a 4-limb bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) system, HBF 359 (Omron), and a 2-limb foot-to-foot device, BC 532 (Tanita), with the standard dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for the measurement of body fat percentage (BF), skeletal muscle mass percentage (SMM, or fat-free mass [FFM] for BC 532), and visceral fat level (VF). Body composition was measured in 200 healthy volunteers (100 men and 100 women, mean age 48 years) by HBF 359 and BC 532 and by DXA and MRI. The agreement was assessed by correlation analysis and paired t-test. The correlation coefficients between BIA and DXA or MRI ranged from 0.71 to 0.89 for BF, SMM, and VF by HBF 359 and from 0.77 to 0.90 for BF, FFM, and VF by BC 532 in all subjects and in men and women separately (p < 0.001 for all). Compared with DXA, HBF 359 significantly (p < 0.001) underestimated BF by -5.8% in men and -9.6% in women. Compared with MRI, the corresponding underestimatons (negative) or overestimations (positive) by HBF 359 in men and women were, respectively, +1.9% (p = 0.02) and +1.7% (p = 0.10) for SMM, and +13.3% (p < 0.001) and -8.5% (p = 0.006), for VF. The corresponding values by BC 532 in men and women were -10.7 and -6.2% for BF, -1.4 and -2.5% for FFM, and +20.4 and -18.0% for VF. The BIA devices are accurate in the estimation of body composition, especially skeletal muscle mass or FFM.

  11. Dual-energy imaging of bone marrow edema on a dedicated multi-source cone-beam CT system for the extremities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Thawait, G.; Packard, N.; Yorkston, J.; Demehri, S.; Fritz, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Arthritis and bone trauma are often accompanied by bone marrow edema (BME). BME is challenging to detect in CT due to the overlaying trabecular structure but can be visualized using dual-energy (DE) techniques to discriminate water and fat. We investigate the feasibility of DE imaging of BME on a dedicated flat-panel detector (FPD) extremities cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a unique x-ray tube with three longitudinally mounted sources. Methods: Simulations involved a digital BME knee phantom imaged with a 60 kVp low-energy beam (LE) and 105 kVp high-energy beam (HE) (+0.25 mm Ag filter). Experiments were also performed on a test-bench with a Varian 4030CB FPD using the same beam energies as the simulation study. A three-source configuration was implemented with x-ray sources distributed along the longitudinal axis and DE CBCT acquisition in which the superior and inferior sources operate at HE (and collect half of the projection angles each) and the central source operates at LE. Three-source DE CBCT was compared to a double-scan, single-source orbit. Experiments were performed with a wrist phantom containing a 50 mg/ml densitometry insert submerged in alcohol (simulating fat) with drilled trabeculae down to ~1 mm to emulate the trabecular matrix. Reconstruction-based three-material decomposition of fat, soft tissue, and bone was performed. Results: For a low-dose scan (36 mAs in the HE and LE data), DE CBCT achieved combined accuracy of ~0.80 for a pattern of BME spherical lesions ranging 2.5 - 10 mm diameter in the knee phantom. The accuracy increased to ~0.90 for a 360 mAs scan. Excellent DE discrimination of the base materials was achieved in the experiments. Approximately 80% of the alcohol (fat) voxels in the trabecular phantom was properly identified both for single and 3-source acquisitions, indicating the ability to detect edemous tissue (water-equivalent plastic in the body of the densitometry insert) from the fat inside the trabecular matrix

  12. Assessing Cardiac Injury in Mice With Dual Energy-MicroCT, 4D-MicroCT, and MicroSPECT Imaging After Partial Heart Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Min, Hooney; Befera, Nicholas; Clark, Darin; Qi, Yi; Das, Shiva; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a mouse model of cardiac injury after partial heart irradiation (PHI) and to test whether dual energy (DE)-microCT and 4-dimensional (4D)-microCT can be used to assess cardiac injury after PHI to complement myocardial perfusion imaging using micro-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods and Materials: To study cardiac injury from tangent field irradiation in mice, we used a small-field biological irradiator to deliver a single dose of 12 Gy x-rays to approximately one-third of the left ventricle (LV) of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} and Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, where 1 or both alleles of p53 are deleted in endothelial cells. Four and 8 weeks after irradiation, mice were injected with gold and iodinated nanoparticle-based contrast agents, and imaged with DE-microCT and 4D-microCT to evaluate myocardial vascular permeability and cardiac function, respectively. Additionally, the same mice were imaged with microSPECT to assess myocardial perfusion. Results: After PHI with tangent fields, DE-microCT scans showed a time-dependent increase in accumulation of gold nanoparticles (AuNp) in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice. In Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, extravasation of AuNp was observed within the irradiated LV, whereas in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} mice, AuNp were restricted to blood vessels. In addition, data from DE-microCT and microSPECT showed a linear correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.97) between the fraction of the LV that accumulated AuNp and the fraction of LV with a perfusion defect. Furthermore, 4D-microCT scans demonstrated that PHI caused a markedly decreased ejection fraction, and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, to develop in Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, which were associated with compensatory cardiac hypertrophy of the heart that was not irradiated. Conclusions: Our results show that DE-microCT and 4D-microCT with nanoparticle-based contrast agents are novel imaging approaches

  13. Dual-energy CT revisited with multidetector CT: review of principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Aktaş, Aykut

    2011-09-01

    Although dual-energy CT (DECT) was first conceived in the 1970s, it was not widely used for CT indications. Recently, the simultaneous acquisition of volumetric dual-energy data has been introduced using multidetector CT (MDCT) with two X-ray tubes and rapid kVp switching (gemstone spectral imaging). Two major advantages of DECT are material decomposition by acquiring two image series with different kVp and the elimination of misregistration artifacts. Hounsfield unit measurements by DECT are not absolute and can change depending on the kVp used for an acquisition. Typically, a combination of 80/140 kVp is used for DECT, but for some applications, 100/140 kVp is preferred. In this study, we summarized the clinical applications of DECT and included images that were acquired using the dual-source CT and rapid kVp switching. In general, unenhanced images can be avoided by using DECT for body and neurological applications; iodine can be removed from the image, and a virtual, non-contrast (water) image can be obtained. Neuroradiological applications allow for the removal of bone and calcium from the carotid and brain CT angiography. Thorax applications include perfusion imaging in patients with pulmonary thromboemboli and other chest diseases, xenon ventilation-perfusion imaging and solitary nodule characterization. Cardiac applications include dual-energy cardiac perfusion, viability and cardiac iron detection. The removal of calcific plaques from arteries, bone removal and aortic stent graft evaluation may be achieved in the vascular system. Abdominal applications include the detection and characterization of liver and pancreas masses, the diagnosis of steatosis and iron overload, DECT colonoscopy and CT cholangiography. Urinary system applications are urinary calculi characterization (uric acid vs. non-uric acid), renal cyst characterization and mass characterization. Musculoskeletal applications permit the differentiation of gout from pseudogout and a reduction of

  14. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    PubMed Central

    Molloi, Sabee; Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dual energy mammography system. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Dual energy decomposition was applied after scatter correction to calculate breast density. Breast density was also estimated using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding and a fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Chemical analysis was used as the reference standard to assess the accuracy of different techniques to measure breast composition. Results: Breast density measurements using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean algorithm, and dual energy were in good agreement with the measured fibroglandular volume fraction using chemical analysis. The standard error estimates using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean, and dual energy were 9.9%, 8.6%, 7.2%, and 4.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure breast density. The variability in breast density estimation using dual energy mammography was lower than reader assessment rankings, standard histogram thresholding, and fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Improved quantification of breast density is expected to further enhance its utility as a risk factor for breast cancer. PMID:25086548

  15. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Molloi, Sabee Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dual energy mammography system. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Dual energy decomposition was applied after scatter correction to calculate breast density. Breast density was also estimated using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding and a fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Chemical analysis was used as the reference standard to assess the accuracy of different techniques to measure breast composition. Results: Breast density measurements using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean algorithm, and dual energy were in good agreement with the measured fibroglandular volume fraction using chemical analysis. The standard error estimates using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean, and dual energy were 9.9%, 8.6%, 7.2%, and 4.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure breast density. The variability in breast density estimation using dual energy mammography was lower than reader assessment rankings, standard histogram thresholding, and fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Improved quantification of breast density is expected to further enhance its utility as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  16. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  17. An image processing system for digital chest X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Cocklin, M; Gourlay, A; Jackson, P; Kaye, G; Miessler, M; Kerr, I; Lams, P

    1984-01-01

    This paper investigates the requirements for image processing of digital chest X-ray images. These images are conventionally recorded on film and are characterised by large size, wide dynamic range and high resolution. X-ray detection systems are now becoming available for capturing these images directly in photoelectronic-digital form. In this report, the hardware and software facilities required for handling these images are described. These facilities include high resolution digital image displays, programmable video look up tables, image stores for image capture and processing and a full range of software tools for image manipulation. Examples are given of the application of digital image processing techniques to this class of image.

  18. Fat segmentation on chest CT images via fuzzy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Wu, Caiyun; Pednekar, Gargi; Subramanian, Janani Rajan; Lederer, David J.; Christie, Jason; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of fat throughout the body is vital for the study of many diseases. In the thorax, it is important for lung transplant candidates since obesity and being underweight are contraindications to lung transplantation given their associations with increased mortality. Common approaches for thoracic fat segmentation are all interactive in nature, requiring significant manual effort to draw the interfaces between fat and muscle with low efficiency and questionable repeatability. The goal of this paper is to explore a practical way for the segmentation of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) components of chest fat based on a recently developed body-wide automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology. The AAR approach involves 3 main steps: building a fuzzy anatomy model of the body region involving all its major representative objects, recognizing objects in any given test image, and delineating the objects. We made several modifications to these steps to develop an effective solution to delineate SAT/VAT components of fat. Two new objects representing interfaces of SAT and VAT regions with other tissues, SatIn and VatIn are defined, rather than using directly the SAT and VAT components as objects for constructing the models. A hierarchical arrangement of these new and other reference objects is built to facilitate their recognition in the hierarchical order. Subsequently, accurate delineations of the SAT/VAT components are derived from these objects. Unenhanced CT images from 40 lung transplant candidates were utilized in experimentally evaluating this new strategy. Mean object location error achieved was about 2 voxels and delineation error in terms of false positive and false negative volume fractions were, respectively, 0.07 and 0.1 for SAT and 0.04 and 0.2 for VAT.

  19. Assessment of the chest wall thickness of the lawrence livermore torso phantom using a voxel image.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A S M Sabbir; Capello, Kevin; Kramer, Gary H

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the methodology of measuring the chest wall thickness using the voxel image of the Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) torso phantom. The LLNL phantom is used as a standard to calibrate a lung counter consisting of a 2 × 2 array of germanium detectors. In general, an average thickness estimated from four counting positions is used as the chest wall thickness for a given overlay plate. For a given overlay, the outer chest surface differs from that of inner one, and the chest wall thickness varies from one position to other. The LLNL phantom with chest plate and C4 overlay plate installed was scanned with a CT (computed tomography) scanner. The image data, collected in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication) format, were converted to the MCNP input file by using the Scan2Mcnp program. The MCNP file was visualized and analyzed with the Moritz visual editor. An analytic expression was formulated and solved to calculate the chest wall thickness by using the point detector responses (F 5 tally of MCNP). To map the chest thickness, the entire chest wall was meshed into virtual grids of 1 cm width. A source and detector pair was moved along the inner and outer surface of the chest wall from right to left at different heights from neck to abdomen. For each height (z(k)), (x(i), y(j)) coordinates for the detector source pair were calculated from the visual editor and were scaled on-screen. For each (x(i), y(j), z(k)) position, a mesh thickness was measured from on-screen measurement and by solving the detector responses. The chest wall thicknesses at different positions on the outer surface of the chest were compared and verified using two methods.

  20. CT venography after knee replacement surgery: comparison of dual-energy CT-based monochromatic imaging and single-energy metal artifact reduction techniques on a 320-row CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Hatemura, Masahiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background An optimal metal artifact reduction (MAR) technique is needed for a reliable and accurate image-based diagnosis. Purpose Using a 320-row scanner, we compared the dual-energy computed tomography (CT)-based monochromatic and the single-energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) techniques for CT venography (CTV) to identify the better imaging method for diagnosing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients who had undergone knee replacement surgery. Material and Methods Twenty-three consecutive patients with suspected DVT after unilateral knee replacement surgery underwent dual-energy CT (135/80 kVp). Monochromatic images of 35–135 keV were generated; the monochromatic image with the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the popliteal vein near the metal prosthesis were selected. The projection data of 80 kVp were reconstructed using MAR algorithm. The mean SNR ON MAR and the best SNR ON monochromatic images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated visualization of the metal artifacts on a four-point scale where 1 = extensive artifacts, 2 = strong artifacts, 3 = mild artifacts, and 4 = minimal artifacts. Results The mean SNR was significantly higher on the MAR than the monochromatic images (12.8 ± 4.7 versus 7.7 ± 5.1, P < 0.01) and the visual scores were significantly higher for MAR than monochromatic images (2.6 ± 0.8 versus 1.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.01). Conclusion For CTV after knee replacement surgery, the MAR technique is superior to the monochromatic imaging technique. PMID:28321330

  1. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Evaluation of Model-Based Pulmonary Perfusion Analysis With Pyramid Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Image Analysis aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging technique 18,5,17,6. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model based on pyramid images for ventilation analysis. We have further extended the method for ventilation analysis to pulmonary perfusion. This paper focuses on the clinical evaluation of our method for

  2. A dual-view digital tomosynthesis imaging technique for improved chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) has been shown to be useful for reducing the overlapping of abnormalities with anatomical structures at various depth levels along the posterior–anterior (PA) direction in chest radiography. However, DTS provides crude three-dimensional (3D) images that have poor resolution in the lateral view and can only be displayed with reasonable quality in the PA view. Furthermore, the spillover of high-contrast objects from off-fulcrum planes generates artifacts that may impede the diagnostic use of the DTS images. In this paper, the authors describe and demonstrate the use of a dual-view DTS technique to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed volume image data for more accurate rendition of the anatomy and slice images with improved resolution and reduced artifacts, thus allowing the 3D image data to be viewed in views other than the PA view. Methods: With the dual-view DTS technique, limited angle scans are performed and projection images are acquired in two orthogonal views: PA and lateral. The dual-view projection data are used together to reconstruct 3D images using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization iterative algorithm. In this study, projection images were simulated or experimentally acquired over 360° using the scanning geometry for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). While all projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images, selected projections were extracted and used to reconstruct single- and dual-view DTS images for comparison with the CBCT images. For realistic demonstration and comparison, a digital chest phantom derived from clinical CT images was used for the simulation study. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged for the experimental study. The resultant dual-view DTS images were visually compared with the single-view DTS images and CBCT images for the presence of image artifacts and accuracy of CT numbers and anatomy and quantitatively compared with root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) values

  3. Evaluation of image quality of a new CCD-based system for chest imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sund, Patrik; Kheddache, Susanne; Mansson, Lars G.; Bath, Magnus; Tylen, Ulf

    2000-04-01

    The Imix radiography system (Qy Imix Ab, Finland)consists of an intensifying screen, optics, and a CCD camera. An upgrade of this system (Imix 2000) with a red-emitting screen and new optics has recently been released. The image quality of Imix (original version), Imix 200, and two storage-phosphor systems, Fuji FCR 9501 and Agfa ADC70 was evaluated in physical terms (DQE) and with visual grading of the visibility of anatomical structures in clinical images (141 kV). PA chest images of 50 healthy volunteers were evaluated by experienced radiologists. All images were evaluated on Siemens Simomed monitors, using the European Quality Criteria. The maximum DQE values for Imix, Imix 2000, Agfa and Fuji were 11%, 14%, 17% and 19%, respectively (141kV, 5μGy). Using the visual grading, the observers rated the systems in the following descending order. Fuji, Imix 2000, Agfa, and Imix. Thus, the upgrade to Imix 2000 resulted in higher DQE values and a significant improvement in clinical image quality. The visual grading agrees reasonably well with the DQE results; however, Imix 2000 received a better score than what could be expected from the DQE measurements. Keywords: CCD Technique, Chest Imaging, Digital Radiography, DQE, Image Quality, Visual Grading Analysis

  4. Coal worker's lungs - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows coal worker's lungs. There are diffuse, small, light areas on both sides (1 to 3 mm) in ... the lungs. Diseases that may result in an x-ray like this include: simple coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) - ...

  5. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and the heart ... ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, indicated with the arrow (seen on the left ...

  6. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography.

  7. An implementation of dual energy CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W; Hall, E; Doost-Hoseini, A; Alvarez, R; Macovski, A; Cassel, D

    1984-08-01

    We have described a prereconstruction method for dual energy (PREDECT) analysis of CT scans. In theory, this method can (a) eliminate beam hardening and produce an accuracy comparable with monoenergetic scans and (b) provide the effective atomic number and electron density of any voxel scanned. Our implementation proves these statements and eliminates some of the objectionable noise. We constructed a phantom with a cylindrical sleeve-like compartment containing known amounts of high atomic number material simulating a removable skull. Conventional scans, with and without this beam hardener, were done of a water bath containing tubes of high electron and high atomic number material. Dual energy scans were then done for PREDECT. To increase the effective separation of the low and high energy beams by using more appropriate tube filtration, we fabricated a beam filter changer containing erbium, tungsten, aluminum, and steel. We used erbium, tungsten, and steel at high energy and aluminum, steel, and erbium at low energy for data acquisition. The reconstructions were compared visually and numerically for noise levels with the original steel only filtration. We found a decrease in noise down to approximately one-half the prior level when erbium/aluminum or tungsten/aluminum replaced the steel/steel filter. Erbium and tungsten were equally effective. Steel/erbium and steel/aluminum also significantly reduced image noise. The noise in the photoelectric (P) and Compton (C) images is negatively correlated. At any pixel, if the noise is positive in the P image, it is most probably negative in the C. Using this fact, the noise was reduced by postreconstruction processing.

  8. Acute vertebral fracture after spinal fusion: a case report illustrating the added value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography to magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with spinal Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, M; Putzier, M; Pumberger, M; Hermann, K G; Diekhoff, T

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is degraded by metal-implant-induced artifacts when used for the diagnostic assessment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with instrumented spinal fusion. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) offers a promising supplementary imaging tool in these patients. This case report describes an 85-year-old woman who presented with a suspected acute vertebral fracture after long posterior lumbar interbody fusion. This is the first report of a vertebral fracture that showed bone marrow edema on DECT; however, edema was missed by an MRI STIR sequence owing to metal artifacts. Bone marrow assessment using DECT is less susceptible to metal artifacts than MRI, resulting in improved visualization of vertebral edema in the vicinity of fused vertebral bodies.

  9. Similarity searching for chest CT images based on object features and spatial relation maps.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sung-Nien; Chiang, Chih-Tsung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, an object-based image retrieval system for chest CT image databases is proposed. Based on the scheme of the content-based image retrieval method, we proposed an image segmentation method which combines the anatomical knowledge of the chest and the well-known watershed segmentation algorithm. The purpose of segmentation is to identify the mediastinum and the two lung lobes in a chest CT image. The ARGs (attributed relational graphs) are chosen to describe the features of segmented objects. Then, image database is constructed by the feature vectors of images. In database searching, two searching modes are provided that are "query by example" and "query by object". Our system uses Euclidean distance to measure the similarity between the image in query and the image in database. The system output the 30 most similar images in the chest CT image database as query results. The experimental results show that the average precision of our system is about 80% which is impressive in a totally automatic medical image retrieval system. Moreover, query concentrated in certain objects features usually show better result than the regular query by example. The possible reasons are discussed.

  10. Correlation of the clinical and physical image quality in chest radiography for average adults with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Wood, T J; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the quality of visually graded patient (clinical) chest images and a quantitative assessment of chest phantom (physical) images acquired with a computed radiography (CR) imaging system. Methods: The results of a previously published study, in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer-simulated postero-anterior chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme, were used for the clinical image quality measurement. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and effective dose efficiency (eDE) were used as physical image quality metrics measured in a uniform chest phantom. Although optimal values of these physical metrics for chest radiography were not derived in this work, their correlation with VGAS in images acquired without an antiscatter grid across the diagnostic range of X-ray tube voltages was determined using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: Clinical and physical image quality metrics increased with decreasing tube voltage. Statistically significant correlations between VGAS and CNR (R=0.87, p<0.033) and eDE (R=0.77, p<0.008) were observed. Conclusion: Medical physics experts may use the physical image quality metrics described here in quality assurance programmes and optimisation studies with a degree of confidence that they reflect the clinical image quality in chest CR images acquired without an antiscatter grid. Advances in knowledge: A statistically significant correlation has been found between the clinical and physical image quality in CR chest imaging. The results support the value of using CNR and eDE in the evaluation of quality in clinical thorax radiography. PMID:23568362

  11. Automated Image Retrieval of Chest CT Images Based on Local Grey Scale Invariant Features.

    PubMed

    Arrais Porto, Marcelo; Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Textual-based tools are regularly employed to retrieve medical images for reading and interpretation using current retrieval Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) but pose some drawbacks. All-purpose content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems are limited when dealing with medical images and do not fit well into PACS workflow and clinical practice. This paper presents an automated image retrieval approach for chest CT images based local grey scale invariant features from a local database. Performance was measured in terms of precision and recall, average retrieval precision (ARP), and average retrieval rate (ARR). Preliminary results have shown the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The prototype is also a useful tool for radiology research and education, providing valuable information to the medical and broader healthcare community.

  12. TU-D-BRB-03: Dual-Energy CT: Considerations in Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Coolens, C

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT technology is becoming increasingly available to the medical imaging community. In addition, several models of CT simulators sold for use in radiation therapy departments now feature dual-energy technology. The images provided by dual-energy CT scanners add new information to the radiation treatment planning process; multiple spectral components can be used to separate and identify material composition as well as generate virtual monoenergetic images. In turn, this information could be used to investigate pathologic processes, separate the properties of contrast agents from soft tissues, assess tissue response to therapy, and other applications of therapeutic interest. Additionally, the decomposition of materials in images could directly integrate with and impact the accuracy of dose calculation algorithms. This symposium will explore methods of generating dual-energy CT images, spectral and image analysis algorithms, current and future applications of interest in oncologic imaging, and unique considerations when using dualenergy CT images in the radiation treatment planning process.

  13. Lung imaging during acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: computed tomography patterns and diagnostic accuracy of bedside chest radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Mekontso Dessap, Armand; Deux, Jean-François; Habibi, Anoosha; Abidi, Nour; Godeau, Bertrand; Adnot, Serge; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Rahmouni, Alain; Galacteros, Frederic; Maitre, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The lung computed tomography (CT) features of acute chest syndrome (ACS) in sickle cell disease patients is not well described and the diagnostic performance of bedside chest radiograph (CR) has not been tested. Our objectives were to describe CT features of ACS and evaluate the reproducibility and diagnostic performance of bedside CR. Methods We screened 127 consecutive patients during 166 ACS episodes and 145 CT scans (in 118 consecutive patients) were included in the study. Results Among the 145 CT scans, 139 (96%) exhibited a new pulmonary opacity and 84 (58%) exhibited at least one complete lung segment consolidation. Consolidations were predominant as compared to ground-glass opacities and atelectasis. Lung parenchyma was increasingly consolidated from apex to base; the right and left inferior lobes were almost always involved in patients with a new complete lung segment consolidation on CT scan (98% and 95% of cases respectively). Patients with a new complete lung segment consolidation on CT scan had a more severe presentation and course as compared to others. The sensitivity of bedside CR for the diagnosis of ACS using CT as a reference was good (>85%) whereas the specificity was weak (<60%). Conclusion ACS more frequently presented on CT as a consolidation pattern, predominating in lung bases. The reproducibility and diagnostic capacity of bedside CR were far from perfect. These findings may help improve the bedside imaging diagnosis of ACS. PMID:23925645

  14. Conversion to use of digital chest images for surveillance of coal workers' pneumoconiosis (black lung).

    PubMed

    Levine, Betty A; Ingeholm, Mary Lou; Prior, Fred; Mun, Seong K; Freedman, Matthew; Weissman, David; Attfield, Michael; Wolfe, Anita; Petsonk, Edward

    2009-01-01

    To protect the health of active U.S. underground coal miners, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has a mandate to carry out surveillance for coal workers' pneumoconiosis, commonly known as Black Lung (PHS 2001). This is accomplished by reviewing chest x-ray films obtained from miners at approximately 5-year intervals in approved x-ray acquisition facilities around the country. Currently, digital chest images are not accepted. Because most chest x-rays are now obtained in digital format, NIOSH is redesigning the surveillance program to accept and manage digital x-rays. This paper highlights the functional and security requirements for a digital image management system for a surveillance program. It also identifies the operational differences between a digital imaging surveillance network and a clinical Picture Archiving Communication Systems (PACS) or teleradiology system.

  15. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM).

    PubMed

    Daniaux, Martin; De Zordo, Tobias; Santner, Wolfram; Amort, Birgit; Koppelstätter, Florian; Jaschke, Werner; Dromain, Clarisse; Oberaigner, Willi; Hubalek, Michael; Marth, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography is one of the latest developments in breast care. Imaging with contrast agents in breast cancer was already known from previous magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography studies. However, high costs, limited availability-or high radiation dose-led to the development of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM). We reviewed the current literature, present our experience, discuss the advantages and drawbacks of CESM and look at the future of this innovative technique.

  16. Improvement of the clinical use of computed radiography for mobile chest imaging: Image quality and patient dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rill, Lynn Neitzey

    Chest radiography is technically difficult because of the wide variation of tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Mobile chest radiography, performed bedside on hospital inpatients, presents additional difficulties due to geometrical and equipment limitations inherent to mobile x-ray procedures and the severity of illness in patients. Computed radiography (CR) offers a new approach for mobile chest radiography by utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. Photostimulable phosphors are more efficient in absorbing lower-energy x-rays than standard intensifying screens and overcome some image quality limitations of mobile chest imaging, particularly because of the inherent latitude. This study evaluated changes in imaging parameters for CR to take advantage of differences between CR and screen-film radiography. Two chest phantoms, made of acrylic and aluminum, simulated x-ray attenuation for average-sized and large- sized adult chests. The phantoms contained regions representing the lungs, heart and subdiaphragm. Acrylic and aluminum disks (1.9 cm diameter) were positioned in the chest regions to make signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements for different combinations of imaging parameters. Disk thicknesses (contrast) were determined from disk visibility. Effective dose to the phantom was also measured for technique combinations. The results indicated that using an anti-scatter grid and lowering x- ray tube potential improved the SNR significantly; however, the dose to the phantom also increased. An evaluation was performed to examine the clinical applicability of the observed improvements in SNR. Parameter adjustments that improved phantom SNRs by more than 50% resulted in perceived image quality improvements in the lung region of clinical mobile chest radiographs. Parameters that produced smaller improvements in SNR had no apparent effect on clinical image quality. Based on this study, it is recommended that a 3:1 grid be used for

  17. Whole-Chest 64-MDCT of Emergency Department Patients with Nonspecific Chest Pain: Radiation Dose and Coronary Artery Image Quality with Prospective ECG Triggering Versus Retrospective ECG Gating

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, William P.; Branch, Kelley R.; May, Janet M.; Mitsumori, Lee M.; Strote, Jared N.; Warren, Bill H.; Dubinsky, Theodore J.; Lockhart, David W.; Caldwell, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the patient radiation dose and coronary artery image quality of long-z-axis whole-chest 64-MDCT performed with retrospective ECG gating with those of CT performed with prospective ECG triggering in the evaluation of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain. Subjects and Methods Consecutively registered emergency department patients with nonspecific low-to-moderate-risk chest pain underwent whole-chest CT with retrospective gating (n = 41) or prospective triggering (n = 31). Effective patient radiation doses were estimated and compared by use of unpaired Student's t tests. Two reviewers independently scored the quality of images of the coronary arteries, and the scores were compared by use of ordinal logistic regression. Results Age, heart rate, body mass index, and z-axis coverage were not statistically different between the two groups. For retrospective gating, the mean effective radiation dose was 31.8 ± 5.1 mSv; for prospective triggering, the mean effective radiation dose was 9.2 ± 2.2 mSv (prospective triggering 71% lower, p < 0.001). Two of 512 segments imaged with retrospective gating were nonevaluable (0.4%), and two of 394 segments imaged with prospective triggering were nonevaluable (0.5%). Prospectively triggered images were 2.2 (95% CI, 1.1–4.5) times as likely as retrospectively gated images to receive a high image quality score for each segment after adjustment for segment differences (p < 0.05). Conclusion For long-z-axis whole-chest 64-MDCT of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain, use of prospective ECG triggering may result in substantially lower patient radiation doses and better coronary artery image quality than is achieved with retrospective ECG gating. PMID:19457832

  18. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation. PMID:25709942

  19. Quantitative analysis of rib kinematics based on dynamic chest bone images: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-04-01

    An image-processing technique for separating bones from soft tissue in static chest radiographs has been developed. The present study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic bone images in quantitative analysis of rib movement. Dynamic chest radiographs of 16 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector and processed to create bone images by using commercial software (Clear Read BS, Riverain Technologies). Velocity vectors were measured in local areas on the dynamic images, which formed a map. The velocity maps obtained with bone and original images for scoliosis and normal cases were compared to assess the advantages of bone images. With dynamic bone images, we were able to quantify and distinguish movements of ribs from those of other lung structures accurately. Limited rib movements of scoliosis patients appeared as a reduced rib velocity field, resulting in an asymmetrical distribution of rib movement. Vector maps in all normal cases exhibited left/right symmetric distributions of the velocity field, whereas those in abnormal cases showed asymmetric distributions because of locally limited rib movements. Dynamic bone images were useful for accurate quantitative analysis of rib movements. The present method has a potential for an additional functional examination in chest radiography.

  20. Volumetric lean percentage measurement using dual energy mammography

    PubMed Central

    Ducote, Justin L.; Klopfer, Michael J.; Molloi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography, which has demonstrated accurate measurement in phantoms, has been proposed as one possible method. To examine the use of chemical analysis as a possible means to validate breast density measurements from dual energy mammography, a bovine tissue model was investigated. Known quantities of lean and adipose tissue were compared with composition values measured from dual energy images and chemical analysis. Methods: Theoretical simulations were performed to assess the impact variations in breast composition would have on measurement of breast density from a single calibration. Fourteen ex-vivo tissue samples composed of varying amounts of pure lean tissue and pure adipose tissue (lean percentage) from 0 to 100%, in increments of 10%, were imaged using dual energy mammography. This was followed by chemical analysis based on desiccation, trituration, and fat extraction with petroleum ether to determine water, lipid, and protein content. The volumetric lean percentage (VLP) as measured from images (VLPI) and as derived from chemical analysis data (VLPCA) were compared with the VLP calculated from measurements of sample mass with a scale (VLPM). Finally, data from the bovine tissue model in this study were compared to compositional data from a previous report of human tissue composition. Results: The results from simulation suggest a substantial impact on measuring breast density is likely due to changes in anatomical breast composition. VLPI was related to the VLPM by VLPI = 1.53 VLPM + 10.0 (r2>0.99). VLPCA was related to VLPM by VLPCA = 0.76 VLPM + 22.8 (r2>0.99). VLPI was related to VLPCA by VLPI = 2.00 VLPCA − 35.6 (r2>0.99). Bovine adipose tissue was shown to be very similar to human adipose tissue in terms of water, lipid, and protein content with RMS differences of 1.2%. Bovine lean tissue was shown to be very similar to human skeletal

  1. Fireworks-induced chest wall granulomatous disease: 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Le, Stephanie T; Nguyen, Ba Duong

    2014-04-01

    The authors present a case of 18F-FDG-avid granulomatous reaction induced by fireworks injury of the chest wall in a patient with esophageal adenocarcinoma. This hypermetabolic lesion, involving the right pectoralis muscles, appeared slightly more prominent on restaging PET/CT imaging following chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Excisional biopsy of the lesion established the diagnosis of foreign-body granulomatous-type inflammation with surrounding foci of non-polarizable black foreign material and ruled out malignancy. The patient recalled accidentally shooting himself in the chest with a Roman candle at the age of 3.

  2. Rest myocardial perfusion imaging in a patient with atypical chest pain and a nondiagnostic electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Grube, Heinrich; Rosenblatt, Jeffrey

    2010-02-01

    ACC/AHA guidelines assign a class I indication for use of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for the evaluation of chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndromes and a nondiagnostic ECG. However, MPI is not a widely used modality for the evaluation of patients who present to the ER with chest pain and an intermediate pretest probability for coronary artery disease.We report a case in which resting MPI was pivotal in diagnosing acute myocardial infarction and expedited the appropriate reperfusion strategy.

  3. Image quality of digital chest X-rays: wet versus dry laser printers.

    PubMed

    Zähringer, M; Wassmer, G; Krug, B; Winnekendonk, G; Gossmann, A; Lackner, K J

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the image quality of digital chest x-rays (Thoravision) obtained with 2 "wet" laser imagers of different matrix sizes and a "dry" system. Fifty chest x-rays in 2 planes were printed out in normal (100%) and reduced (61%) format using 3 different systems: 2 "wet" laser imagers (Agfa Matrix LR 3300, 4256 x 5174 pixels, 315 dpi; Agfa Scopix LR 5200, 8512 x 10348 pixels, 630 dpi), and one "dry" system (Agfa Drystar 3000,4352 x 5295 pixels, 330 dpi). All tests yielded normal findings. Anonymous images were evaluated by 4 independent reviewers on record forms rating the detectability of predefined anatomic structures. When the image quality of diagnosis-relevant, anatomic structures was evaluated on digital chest x-rays reproduced in normal and reduced format, the wet laser imagers did not show significant advantages over the dry system, Agfa Drystar 3000. The Agfa Drystar 3000 system is a feasible alternative for reproducing digital images, particularly for decentralized archives.

  4. Dual-Energy X-Radiography With Gadolinium Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutt, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Image resolution increased, and cost reduced. Proposed dual-energy x-ray imaging system, continuous bremsstrahlung spectrum from x-ray tube filtered by foil of nonradioactive gadolinium or another rare-earth metal to form two-peaked energy spectrum. After passing through patient or object under examination, filtered radiation detected by array of energy-discriminating, photon-counting detectors. Detector outputs processed to form x-ray image for each peak and possibly enhanced image based on data taken at both peaks.

  5. Optical tomography method that accounts for tilted chest wall in breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Zhu, Quing

    2010-01-01

    The chest wall underneath breast tissue distorts light reflection measurements, especially measurements obtained from distant source-detector pairs. For patients with a chest wall located at a shallower depth, the chest-wall effect needs to be considered in the image reconstruction procedure. Following our previous studies, this work systemically evaluates the performance of a two-layer model-based reconstruction using the finite element method, and compares it with the performance of the semi-infinite model. The results obtained from simulations and phantom experiments show that the two-layer model improves the light quantification of the targets. The improvements are attributed to improved background estimation and more accurate weight matrix calculation using a two-layer model compared to the semi-infinite model. Fitted two-layer background optical properties obtained from a group of ten patients with chest walls located less than 2 cm deep are more representative of breast tissue and chest-wall optical properties. PMID:20799793

  6. Assessment of low-contrast detectability for compressed digital chest images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Larry T.; Insana, Michael F.; McFadden, Michael A.; Hall, Timothy J.; Cox, Glendon G.

    1994-04-01

    The ability of human observers to detect low-contrast targets in screen-film (SF) images, computed radiographic (CR) images, and compressed CR images was measured using contrast detail (CD) analysis. The results of these studies were used to design a two- alternative forced-choice (2AFC) experiment to investigate the detectability of nodules in adult chest radiographs. CD curves for a common screen-film system were compared with CR images compressed up to 125:1. Data from clinical chest exams were used to define a CD region of clinical interest that sufficiently challenged the observer. From that data, simulated lesions were introduced into 100 normal CR chest films, and forced-choice observer performance studies were performed. CR images were compressed using a full-frame discrete cosine transform (FDCT) technique, where the 2D Fourier space was divided into four areas of different quantization depending on the cumulative power spectrum (energy) of each image. The characteristic curve of the CR images was adjusted so that optical densities matched those of the SF system. The CD curves for SF and uncompressed CR systems were statistically equivalent. The slope of the CD curve for each was - 1.0 as predicted by the Rose model. There was a significant degradation in detection found for CR images compressed to 125:1. Furthermore, contrast-detail analysis demonstrated that many pulmonary nodules encountered in clinical practice are significantly above the average observer threshold for detection. We designed a 2AFC observer study using simulated 1-cm lesions introduced into normal CR chest radiographs. Detectability was reduced for all compressed CR radiographs.

  7. Semi-automatic central-chest lymph-node definition from 3D MDCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Higgins, William E.

    2010-03-01

    Central-chest lymph nodes play a vital role in lung-cancer staging. The three-dimensional (3D) definition of lymph nodes from multidetector computed-tomography (MDCT) images, however, remains an open problem. This is because of the limitations in the MDCT imaging of soft-tissue structures and the complicated phenomena that influence the appearance of a lymph node in an MDCT image. In the past, we have made significant efforts toward developing (1) live-wire-based segmentation methods for defining 2D and 3D chest structures and (2) a computer-based system for automatic definition and interactive visualization of the Mountain central-chest lymph-node stations. Based on these works, we propose new single-click and single-section live-wire methods for segmenting central-chest lymph nodes. The single-click live wire only requires the user to select an object pixel on one 2D MDCT section and is designed for typical lymph nodes. The single-section live wire requires the user to process one selected 2D section using standard 2D live wire, but it is more robust. We applied these methods to the segmentation of 20 lymph nodes from two human MDCT chest scans (10 per scan) drawn from our ground-truth database. The single-click live wire segmented 75% of the selected nodes successfully and reproducibly, while the success rate for the single-section live wire was 85%. We are able to segment the remaining nodes, using our previously derived (but more interaction intense) 2D live-wire method incorporated in our lymph-node analysis system. Both proposed methods are reliable and applicable to a wide range of pulmonary lymph nodes.

  8. Digital chest radiography: an update on modern technology, dose containment and control of image quality

    PubMed Central

    Neitzel, Ulrich; Venema, Henk W.; Uffmann, Martin; Prokop, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of digital radiography not only has revolutionized communication between radiologists and clinicians, but also has improved image quality and allowed for further reduction of patient exposure. However, digital radiography also poses risks, such as unnoticed increases in patient dose and suboptimum image processing that may lead to suppression of diagnostic information. Advanced processing techniques, such as temporal subtraction, dual-energy subtraction and computer-aided detection (CAD) will play an increasing role in the future and are all targeted to decrease the influence of distracting anatomic background structures and to ease the detection of focal and subtle lesions. This review summarizes the most recent technical developments with regard to new detector techniques, options for dose reduction and optimized image processing. It explains the meaning of the exposure indicator or the dose reference level as tools for the radiologist to control the dose. It also provides an overview over the multitude of studies conducted in recent years to evaluate the options of these new developments to realize the principle of ALARA. The focus of the review is hereby on adult applications, the relationship between dose and image quality and the differences between the various detector systems. PMID:18431577

  9. Quantitative analysis of rib movement based on dynamic chest bone images: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Oda, M.; Mitsutaka, M.; Suzuki, K.; Sakuta, K.; Kawashima, H.

    2014-03-01

    Rib movement during respiration is one of the diagnostic criteria in pulmonary impairments. In general, the rib movement is assessed in fluoroscopy. However, the shadows of lung vessels and bronchi overlapping ribs prevent accurate quantitative analysis of rib movement. Recently, an image-processing technique for separating bones from soft tissue in static chest radiographs, called "bone suppression technique", has been developed. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic bone images created by the bone suppression technique in quantitative analysis of rib movement. Dynamic chest radiographs of 10 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). Bone suppression technique based on a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) was applied to the dynamic chest images to create bone images. Velocity vectors were measured in local areas on the dynamic bone images, which formed a map. The velocity maps obtained with bone and original images for scoliosis and normal cases were compared to assess the advantages of bone images. With dynamic bone images, we were able to quantify and distinguish movements of ribs from those of other lung structures accurately. Limited rib movements of scoliosis patients appeared as reduced rib velocity vectors. Vector maps in all normal cases exhibited left-right symmetric distributions, whereas those in abnormal cases showed nonuniform distributions. In conclusion, dynamic bone images were useful for accurate quantitative analysis of rib movements: Limited rib movements were indicated as a reduction of rib movement and left-right asymmetric distribution on vector maps. Thus, dynamic bone images can be a new diagnostic tool for quantitative analysis of rib movements without additional radiation dose.

  10. Stress Tests for Chest Pain: When You Need an Imaging Test -- and When You Don't

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Resources Stress Tests for Chest Pain Stress Tests for Chest Pain When you need an imaging test—and when you don’t DOWNLOAD PDF If ... that suggests you might have heart disease, a test that stresses the heart can help you and ...

  11. Development of functional chest imaging with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Fujimura, Masaki; Yasui, Masahide; Nakayama, Kazuya; Matsui, Takeshi; Hayashi, Norio; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic FPD permits the acquisition of distortion-free radiographs with a large field of view and high image quality. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of functional imaging for evaluating the pulmonary sequential blood distribution with an FPD, based on changes in pixel values during cardiac pumping. Dynamic chest radiographs of seven normal subjects were obtained in the expiratory phase by use of an FPD system. We measured the average pixel value in each region of interest that was located manually in the heart and lung areas. Subsequently, inter-frame differences and differences from a minimum-intensity projection image, which was created from one cardiac cycle, were calculated. These difference values were then superimposed on dynamic chest radiographs in the form of a color display, and sequential blood distribution images and a blood distribution map were created. The results were compared to typical data on normal cardiac physiology. The clinical effectiveness of our method was evaluated in a patient who had abnormal pulmonary blood flow. In normal cases, there was a strong correlation between the cardiac cycle and changes in pixel value. Sequential blood distribution images showed a normal pattern at determined by the physiology of pulmonary blood flow, with a symmetric distribution and no blood flow defects throughout the entire lung region. These findings indicated that pulmonary blood flow was reflected on dynamic chest radiographs. In an abnormal case, a defect in blood flow was shown as defective in color in a blood distribution map. The present method has the potential for evaluation of local blood flow as an optional application in general chest radiography.

  12. Respiratory kinematics by optoelectronic analysis of chest-wall motion and ultrasonic imaging of the diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Macklem, P. T.

    1998-07-01

    Although from a respiratory point of view, compartmental volume change or lack of it is the most crucial variable, it has not been possible to measure the volume of chest wall compartments directly. Recently we developed a new method based on a optoelectronic motion analyzer that can give the three-dimensional location of many markers with the temporal and spatial accuracy required for respiratory measurements. Marker's configuration has been designed specifically to measure the volume of three chest wall compartments, the pulmonary and abdominal rib cage compartments and the abdomen, directly. However, it can not track the exact border between the two rib cage compartments (pulmonary and abdominal) which is determined by the cephalic extremity of the area of apposition of the diaphragm to the inner surface of the rib cage, and which can change systematically as a result of disease processes. The diaphragm displacement can be detected by ultrasonography. In the present study, we propose an integrated system able to investigate the relationships between external (chest wall) and internal (diaphragm) movements of the different respiratory structures by simultaneous external imaging with the optoelectronic system combined with internal kinematic imaging using ultrasounds. 2D digitized points belonging to the lower lung margin, taken from ultrasonographic views, are mapped into the 3D space, where chest wall markers are acquired. Results are shown in terms of accuracy of 3D probe location, relative movement between the probe and the body landmarks, dynamic relationships between chest wall volume and position of the diaphragm during quiet breathing, slow inspirations, relaxations and exercise.

  13. Calculation of images from an anthropomorphic chest phantom using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, Gustaf; Malusek, Alexandr; Sandborg, Michael; Dance, David R.; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2006-03-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulation of chest x-ray imaging systems has hitherto been performed using anthropomorphic phantoms with too large (3 mm) voxel sizes. The aim for this work was to develop and use a Monte Carlo computer program to compute projection x-ray images of a high-resolution anthropomorphic voxel phantom for visual clinical image quality evaluation and dose-optimization. An Alderson anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged in a CT-scanner and reconstructed with isotropic voxels of 0.7 mm. The phantom was segmented and included in a Monte Carlo computer program using the collision density estimator to derive the energies imparted to the detector per unit area of each pixel by scattered photons. The image due to primary photons was calculated analytically including a pre-calculated detector response function. Attenuation and scatter of x-rays in the phantom, grid and image detector was considered. Imaging conditions (tube voltage, anti-scatter device) were varied and the images compared to a real computed radiography (Fuji FCR 9501) image. Four imaging systems were simulated (two tube voltages 81 kV and 141 kV using either a grid with ratio 10 or a 30 cm air gap). The effect of scattered radiation on the visibility of thoracic vertebrae against the heart and lungs is demonstrated. The simplicity in changing the imaging conditions will allow us not only to produce images of existing imaging systems, but also of hypothetical, future imaging systems. We conclude that the calculated images of the high-resolution voxel phantom are suitable for human detection experiments of low-contrast lesions.

  14. Investigation of image components affecting the detection of lung nodules in digital chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bath, Magnus; Hakansson, Markus; Borjesson, Sara; Hoeschen, Christoph; Tischenko, Oleg; Bochud, Francois O.; Verdun, Francis R.; Ullman, Gustaf; Kheddache, Susanne; Tingberg, Anders; Mansson, Lars Gunnar

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate and quantify the effects of system noise, nodule location, anatomical noise and anatomical background on the detection of lung nodules in different regions of the chest x-ray. Simulated lung nodules of diameter 10 mm but with varying detail contrast were randomly positioned in four different kinds of images: 1) clinical images collected with a 200 speed CR system, 2) images containing only system noise (including quantum noise) at the same level as the clinical images, 3) clinical images with removed anatomical noise, 4) artificial images with similar power spectrum as the clinical images but random phase spectrum. An ROC study was conducted with 5 observers. The detail contrast needed to obtain an Az of 0.80, C0.8, was used as measure of detectability. Five different regions of the chest x-ray were investigated separately. The C0.8 of the system noise images ranged from only 2% (the hilar regions) to 20% (the lateral pulmonary regions) of those of the clinical images. Compared with the original clinical images, the C0.8 was 16% lower for the de-noised clinical images and 71% higher for the random phase images, respectively, averaged over all five regions. In conclusion, regarding the detection of lung nodules with a diameter of 10 mm, the system noise is of minor importance at clinically relevant dose levels. The removal of anatomical noise and other noise sources uncorrelated from image to image leads to somewhat better detection, but the major component disturbing the detection is the overlapping of recognizable structures, which are, however, the main aspect of an x-ray image.

  15. Quantitative analysis of the central-chest lymph nodes based on 3D MDCT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Bascom, Rebecca; Mahraj, Rickhesvar P. M.; Higgins, William E.

    2009-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In lung-cancer staging, central-chest lymph nodes and associated nodal stations, as observed in three-dimensional (3D) multidetector CT (MDCT) scans, play a vital role. However, little work has been done in relation to lymph nodes, based on MDCT data, due to the complicated phenomena that give rise to them. Using our custom computer-based system for 3D MDCT-based pulmonary lymph-node analysis, we conduct a detailed study of lymph nodes as depicted in 3D MDCT scans. In this work, the Mountain lymph-node stations are automatically defined by the system. These defined stations, in conjunction with our system's image processing and visualization tools, facilitate lymph-node detection, classification, and segmentation. An expert pulmonologist, chest radiologist, and trained technician verified the accuracy of the automatically defined stations and indicated observable lymph nodes. Next, using semi-automatic tools in our system, we defined all indicated nodes. Finally, we performed a global quantitative analysis of the characteristics of the observed nodes and stations. This study drew upon a database of 32 human MDCT chest scans. 320 Mountain-based stations (10 per scan) and 852 pulmonary lymph nodes were defined overall from this database. Based on the numerical results, over 90% of the automatically defined stations were deemed accurate. This paper also presents a detailed summary of central-chest lymph-node characteristics for the first time.

  16. Non-invasive methods for the determination of body and carcass composition in livestock: dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound: invited review.

    PubMed

    Scholz, A M; Bünger, L; Kongsro, J; Baulain, U; Mitchell, A D

    2015-07-01

    The ability to accurately measure body or carcass composition is important for performance testing, grading and finally selection or payment of meat-producing animals. Advances especially in non-invasive techniques are mainly based on the development of electronic and computer-driven methods in order to provide objective phenotypic data. The preference for a specific technique depends on the target animal species or carcass, combined with technical and practical aspects such as accuracy, reliability, cost, portability, speed, ease of use, safety and for in vivo measurements the need for fixation or sedation. The techniques rely on specific device-driven signals, which interact with tissues in the body or carcass at the atomic or molecular level, resulting in secondary or attenuated signals detected by the instruments and analyzed quantitatively. The electromagnetic signal produced by the instrument may originate from mechanical energy such as sound waves (ultrasound - US), 'photon' radiation (X-ray-computed tomography - CT, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry - DXA) or radio frequency waves (magnetic resonance imaging - MRI). The signals detected by the corresponding instruments are processed to measure, for example, tissue depths, areas, volumes or distributions of fat, muscle (water, protein) and partly bone or bone mineral. Among the above techniques, CT is the most accurate one followed by MRI and DXA, whereas US can be used for all sizes of farm animal species even under field conditions. CT, MRI and US can provide volume data, whereas only DXA delivers immediate whole-body composition results without (2D) image manipulation. A combination of simple US and more expensive CT, MRI or DXA might be applied for farm animal selection programs in a stepwise approach.

  17. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and database system for chest diagnosis based on multihelical CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru; Sasagawa, Michizou

    2004-04-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause, accounting for about 20% of all cancer deaths for males in Japan. Myocardial infarction is also known as a most fearful adult disease. Recently, multi-helical CT scanner advanced remarkably at the speed at which the chest CT images were acquired for screening examination. This screening examination requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of multi-helical CT for mass screening. To overcome this problem, our group has developed a computer-aided diagnosis algorithm to automatically detect suspicious regions of lung cancer and coronary calcifications in chest CT images, so far. And in this time, our group has developed a newly computer-aided diagnosis workstation and database. These consist in three. First, it is an image processing system to automatically detect suspicious bronchial regions, pulmonary artery regions, plumonary vein regions and myocardial infarction regions at high speed. Second, they are two 1600 x 1200 matrix black and white liquid crystal monitor. Third, it is a terminal of image storage. These are connected mutually on the network. This makes it much easier to read images, since the 3D image of suspicious regions and shadow of suspicious regions can be displayed simultaneously on two 1600 x 1200 matrix liquid crystal monitor. The experimental results indicate that a newly computer-aided diagnosis workstation and database system can be effectively used in clinical practice to increase the speed and accuracy of routine diagnosis.

  18. Comparison of Ga-67 planar imaging and single photon emission computed tomography in malignant chest disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Rosenthal, D.; Kaplan, W.D.; English, R.E.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-05-01

    To determine the value of Ga-67 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients (pts) with malignant chest disease, the authors compared Ga-67 planar scans (ps) and SPECT with the medical records in twenty-five consecutive patients. Twenty-three examinations were performed on 17 pts with Hodgkin's disease (HD) and three pts with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Five examinations were performed on 5 pts with bronchogenic carcinoma (BC). The two modalities were evaluated for (1) presence or absence of disease, (2) number of foci of abnormal uptake and (3) extent of disease. In pts with lymphoma, SPECT defined the extent of disease better than planar imaging in eight examinations; it demonstrated para-cardial involvement in one pt, separated hilar from mediastinal disease in 4, and demonstrated posterior mediastinal disease in 3. SPECT clarified suspicious foci on planar images in seven examinations, correctly ruled out disease in two pts with equivocal planar images and did not exchange planar image findings in six examinations. In pts with bronchogenic carcinoma, both medalities correctly ruled out mediastinal involvement in three pts. SPECT detected mediastinal lymph node involvement in one pt with equivocal planar images. Both SPECT and planar imaging missed direct tumor extension to the mediastinum in one pt. They conclude that Ga-67 with SPECT is better than planar images for staging of chest lymphoma and BC. Since it defines different lymph node groups it carries a good potential for staging as well as follow up of those pts.

  19. Computerized scheme for detection of diffuse lung diseases on CR chest images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Roberto R., Jr.; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Feng; Li, Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a new computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for detection of diffuse lung disease in computed radiographic (CR) chest images. One hundred ninety-four chest images (56 normals and 138 abnormals with diffuse lung diseases) were used. The 138 abnormal cases were classified into three levels of severity (34 mild, 60 moderate, and 44 severe) by an experienced chest radiologist with use of five different patterns, i.e., reticular, reticulonodular, nodular, air-space opacity, and emphysema. In our computerized scheme, the first moment of the power spectrum, the root-mean-square variation, and the average pixel value were determined for each region of interest (ROI), which was selected automatically in the lung fields. The average pixel value and its dependence on the location of the ROI were employed for identifying abnormal patterns due to air-space opacity or emphysema. A rule-based method was used for determining three levels of abnormality for each ROI (0: normal, 1: mild, 2: moderate, and 3: severe). The distinction between normal lungs and abnormal lungs with diffuse lung disease was determined based on the fractional number of abnormal ROIs by taking into account the severity of abnormalities. Preliminary results indicated that the area under the ROC curve was 0.889 for the 44 severe cases, 0.825 for the 104 severe and moderate cases, and 0.794 for all cases. We have identified a number of problems and reasons causing false positives on normal cases, and also false negatives on abnormal cases. In addition, we have discussed potential approaches for improvement of our CAD scheme. In conclusion, the CAD scheme for detection of diffuse lung diseases based on texture features extracted from CR chest images has the potential to assist radiologists in their interpretation of diffuse lung diseases.

  20. Segmentation of the central-chest lymph nodes in 3D MDCT images.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kongkuo; Higgins, William E

    2011-09-01

    Central-chest lymph nodes play a vital role in lung-cancer staging. The definition of lymph nodes from three-dimensional (3D) multidetector computed-tomography (MDCT) images, however, remains an open problem. We propose two methods for computer-based segmentation of the central-chest lymph nodes from a 3D MDCT scan: the single-section live wire and the single-click live wire. For the single-section live wire, the user first applies the standard live wire to a single two-dimensional (2D) section after which automated analysis completes the segmentation process. The single-click live wire is similar but is almost completely automatic. Ground-truth studies involving human 3D MDCT scans demonstrate the robustness, efficiency, and intra-observer and inter-observer reproducibility of the methods.

  1. Fifty years of computer analysis in chest imaging: rule-based, machine learning, deep learning.

    PubMed

    van Ginneken, Bram

    2017-03-01

    Half a century ago, the term "computer-aided diagnosis" (CAD) was introduced in the scientific literature. Pulmonary imaging, with chest radiography and computed tomography, has always been one of the focus areas in this field. In this study, I describe how machine learning became the dominant technology for tackling CAD in the lungs, generally producing better results than do classical rule-based approaches, and how the field is now rapidly changing: in the last few years, we have seen how even better results can be obtained with deep learning. The key differences among rule-based processing, machine learning, and deep learning are summarized and illustrated for various applications of CAD in the chest.

  2. Gray-scale transform and evaluation for digital x-ray chest images on CRT monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Isao; Suzuki, Junji; Ono, Sadayasu; Kitamura, Masayuki; Ando, Yutaka

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, an experimental evaluation of a super high definition (SHD) imaging system for digital x-ray chest images is presented. The SHD imaging system is proposed as a platform for integrating conventional image media. We are involved in the use of SHD images in the total digitizing of medical records that include chest x-rays and pathological microscopic images, both which demand the highest level of quality among the various types of medical images. SHD images use progressive scanning and have a spatial resolution of 2000 by 2000 pixels or more and a temporal resolution (frame rate) of 60 frames/sec or more. For displaying medical x-ray images on a CRT, we derived gray scale transform characteristics based on radiologists' comments during the experiment, and elucidated the relationship between that gray scale transform and the linearization transform for maintaining the linear relationship with the luminance of film on a light box (luminance linear transform). We then carried out viewing experiments based on a five-stage evaluation. Nine radiologists participated in our experiment, and the ten cases evaluated included pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, and pneumonia. The experimental results indicated that conventional film images and those on super high definition CRT monitors have nearly the same quality. They also show that the gray scale transform for CRT images decided according to radiologists' comments agrees with the luminance linear transform in the high luminance region. And in the low luminance region, it was found that the gray scale transform had the characteristics of level expansion to increase the number of levels that can be expressed.

  3. A comparative study for chest radiograph image retrieval using binary texture and deep learning classification.

    PubMed

    Anavi, Yaron; Kogan, Ilya; Gelbart, Elad; Geva, Ofer; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-08-01

    In this work various approaches are investigated for X-ray image retrieval and specifically chest pathology retrieval. Given a query image taken from a data set of 443 images, the objective is to rank images according to similarity. Different features, including binary features, texture features, and deep learning (CNN) features are examined. In addition, two approaches are investigated for the retrieval task. One approach is based on the distance of image descriptors using the above features (hereon termed the "descriptor"-based approach); the second approach ("classification"-based approach) is based on a probability descriptor, generated by a pair-wise classification of each two classes (pathologies) and their decision values using an SVM classifier. Best results are achieved using deep learning features in a classification scheme.

  4. Computerized detection of lung nodules by means of "virtual dual-energy" radiography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2013-02-01

    Major challenges in current computer-aided detection (CADe) schemes for nodule detection in chest radiographs (CXRs) are to detect nodules that overlap with ribs and/or clavicles and to reduce the frequent false positives (FPs) caused by ribs. Detection of such nodules by a CADe scheme is very important, because radiologists are likely to miss such subtle nodules. Our purpose in this study was to develop a CADe scheme with improved sensitivity and specificity by use of "virtual dual-energy" (VDE) CXRs where ribs and clavicles are suppressed with massive-training artificial neural networks (MTANNs). To reduce rib-induced FPs and detect nodules overlapping with ribs, we incorporated the VDE technology in our CADe scheme. The VDE technology suppressed rib and clavicle opacities in CXRs while maintaining soft-tissue opacity by use of the MTANN technique that had been trained with real dual-energy imaging. Our scheme detected nodule candidates on VDE images by use of a morphologic filtering technique. Sixty morphologic and gray-level-based features were extracted from each candidate from both original and VDE CXRs. A nonlinear support vector classifier was employed for classification of the nodule candidates. A publicly available database containing 140 nodules in 140 CXRs and 93 normal CXRs was used for testing our CADe scheme. All nodules were confirmed by computed tomography examinations, and the average size of the nodules was 17.8 mm. Thirty percent (42/140) of the nodules were rated "extremely subtle" or "very subtle" by a radiologist. The original scheme without VDE technology achieved a sensitivity of 78.6% (110/140) with 5 (1165/233) FPs per image. By use of the VDE technology, more nodules overlapping with ribs or clavicles were detected and the sensitivity was improved substantially to 85.0% (119/140) at the same FP rate in a leave-one-out cross-validation test, whereas the FP rate was reduced to 2.5 (583/233) per image at the same sensitivity level as the

  5. Improved texture analysis for automatic detection of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs with bone suppression images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Hogeweg, Laurens; Philipsen, Rick; Schalekamp, Steven; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-03-01

    Computer aided detection (CAD) of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs (CXR) is challenging due to over-lapping structures. Suppression of normal structures can reduce overprojection effects and can enhance the appearance of diffuse parenchymal abnormalities. In this work, we compare two CAD systems to detect textural abnormalities in chest radiographs of TB suspects. One CAD system was trained and tested on the original CXR and the other CAD system was trained and tested on bone suppression images (BSI). BSI were created using a commercially available software (ClearRead 2.4, Riverain Medical). The CAD system is trained with 431 normal and 434 abnormal images with manually outlined abnormal regions. Subtlety rating (1-3) is assigned to each abnormal region, where 3 refers to obvious and 1 refers to subtle abnormalities. Performance is evaluated on normal and abnormal regions from an independent dataset of 900 images. These contain in total 454 normal and 1127 abnormal regions, which are divided into 3 subtlety categories containing 280, 527 and 320 abnormal regions, respectively. For normal regions, original/BSI CAD has an average abnormality score of 0.094+/-0.027/0.085+/-0.032 (p - 5.6×10-19). For abnormal regions, subtlety 1, 2, 3 categories have average abnormality scores for original/BSI of 0.155+/-0.073/0.156+/-0.089 (p = 0.73), 0.194+/-0.086/0.207+/-0.101 (p = 5.7×10-7), 0.225+/-0.119/0.247+/-0.117 (p = 4.4×10-7), respectively. Thus for normal regions, CAD scores slightly decrease when using BSI instead of the original images, and for abnormal regions, the scores increase slightly. We therefore conclude that the use of bone suppression results in slightly but significantly improved automated detection of textural abnormalities in chest radiographs.

  6. Enhancement of chest radiographs obtained in the intensive care unit through bone suppression and consistent processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng; Zhong, Sikai; Yao, Liping; Shang, Yanfeng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Portable chest radiographs (CXRs) are commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to detect subtle pathological changes. However, exposure settings or patient and apparatus positioning deteriorate image quality in the ICU. Chest x-rays of patients in the ICU are often hazy and show low contrast and increased noise. To aid clinicians in detecting subtle pathological changes, we proposed a consistent processing and bone structure suppression method to decrease variations in image appearance and improve the diagnostic quality of images. We applied a region of interest-based look-up table to process original ICU CXRs such that they appeared consistent with each other and the standard CXRs. Then, an artificial neural network was trained by standard CXRs and the corresponding dual-energy bone images for the generation of a bone image. Once the neural network was trained, the real dual-energy image was no longer necessary, and the trained neural network was applied to the consistent processed ICU CXR to output the bone image. Finally, a gray level-based morphological method was applied to enhance the bone image by smoothing other structures on this image. This enhanced image was subtracted from the consistent, processed ICU CXR to produce a soft tissue image. This method was tested for 20 patients with a total of 87 CXRs. The findings indicated that our method suppressed bone structures on ICU CXRs and standard CXRs, simultaneously maintaining subtle pathological changes.

  7. Enhancement of chest radiographs obtained in the intensive care unit through bone suppression and consistent processing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Zhong, Sikai; Yao, Liping; Shang, Yanfeng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-03-21

    Portable chest radiographs (CXRs) are commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to detect subtle pathological changes. However, exposure settings or patient and apparatus positioning deteriorate image quality in the ICU. Chest x-rays of patients in the ICU are often hazy and show low contrast and increased noise. To aid clinicians in detecting subtle pathological changes, we proposed a consistent processing and bone structure suppression method to decrease variations in image appearance and improve the diagnostic quality of images. We applied a region of interest-based look-up table to process original ICU CXRs such that they appeared consistent with each other and the standard CXRs. Then, an artificial neural network was trained by standard CXRs and the corresponding dual-energy bone images for the generation of a bone image. Once the neural network was trained, the real dual-energy image was no longer necessary, and the trained neural network was applied to the consistent processed ICU CXR to output the bone image. Finally, a gray level-based morphological method was applied to enhance the bone image by smoothing other structures on this image. This enhanced image was subtracted from the consistent, processed ICU CXR to produce a soft tissue image. This method was tested for 20 patients with a total of 87 CXRs. The findings indicated that our method suppressed bone structures on ICU CXRs and standard CXRs, simultaneously maintaining subtle pathological changes.

  8. PVAL breast phantom for dual energy calcification detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukou, V.; Martini, N.; Velissarakos, K.; Gkremos, D.; Fountzoula, C.; Bakas, A.; Michail, C.; Kandarakis, I.; Fountos, G.

    2015-09-01

    Microcalcifications are the main indicator for breast cancer. Dual energy imaging can enhance the detectability of calcifications by suppressing the tissue background. Two digital images are obtained using two different spectra, for the low- and high-energy respectively, and a weighted subtracted image is produced. In this study, a dual energy method for the detection of the minimum breast microcalcification thickness was developed. The used integrated prototype system consisted of a modified tungsten anode X-ray tube combined with a high resolution CMOS sensor. The breast equivalent phantom used was an elastically compressible gel of polyvinyl alcohol (PVAL). Hydroxyapatite was used to simulate microcalcifications with thicknesses ranging from 50 to 500 μm. The custom made phantom was irradiated with 40kVp and 70kVp. Tungsten (W) anode spectra filtered with 100μm Cadmium and 1000pm Copper, for the low- and high-energy, respectively. Microcalcifications with thicknesses 300μm or higher can be detected with mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.62mGy.

  9. Prospects for in vivo estimation of photon linear attenuation coefficients using postprocessing dual-energy CT imaging on a commercial scanner: Comparison of analytic and polyenergetic statistical reconstruction algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Joshua D.; Whiting, Bruce R.; O’Sullivan, Joseph A.; Politte, David G.; Klahr, Paul H.; Yu, Yaduo; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate patient-specific photon cross-section information is needed to support more accurate model-based dose calculation for low energy photon-emitting modalities in medicine such as brachytherapy and kilovoltage x-ray imaging procedures. A postprocessing dual-energy CT (pDECT) technique for noninvasive in vivo estimation of photon linear attenuation coefficients has been experimentally implemented on a commercial CT scanner and its accuracy assessed in idealized phantom geometries. Methods: Eight test materials of known composition and density were used to compare pDECT-estimated linear attenuation coefficients to NIST reference values over an energy range from 10 keV to 1 MeV. As statistical image reconstruction (SIR) has been shown to reconstruct images with less random and systematic error than conventional filtered backprojection (FBP), the pDECT technique was implemented with both an in-house polyenergetic SIR algorithm, alternating minimization (AM), as well as a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm. Improvement from increased spectral separation was also investigated by filtering the high-energy beam with an additional 0.5 mm of tin. The law of propagated uncertainty was employed to assess the sensitivity of the pDECT process to errors in reconstructed images. Results: Mean pDECT-estimated linear attenuation coefficients for the eight test materials agreed within 1% of NIST reference values for energies from 1 MeV down to 30 keV, with mean errors rising to between 3% and 6% at 10 keV, indicating that the method is unbiased when measurement and calibration phantom geometries are matched. Reconstruction with FBP and AM algorithms conferred similar mean pDECT accuracy. However, single-voxel pDECT estimates reconstructed on a 1 × 1 × 3 mm3 grid are shown to be highly sensitive to reconstructed image uncertainty; in some cases pDECT attenuation coefficient estimates exhibited standard deviations on the order of 20% around the mean

  10. SU-E-I-38: Improved Metal Artifact Correction Using Adaptive Dual Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X; Elder, E; Roper, J; Dhabaan, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Methods: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Results: Highly attenuating copper rods cause severe streaking artifacts on standard CT images. EDEC improves the image quality, but cannot eliminate the streaking artifacts. Compared to EDEC, the proposed ADEC method further reduces the streaking resulting from metallic inserts and beam-hardening effects and obtains material decomposition images with significantly improved accuracy. Conclusion: We propose an adaptive dual energy calibration method to correct for metal artifacts. ADEC is evaluated with the Shepp-Logan phantom, and shows superior metal artifact correction performance. In the future, we will further evaluate the performance of the proposed method with phantom and patient data.

  11. Homogeneous Canine Chest Phantom Construction: A Tool for Image Quality Optimization.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Ana Luiza Menegatti; Rosa, Maria Eugênia Dela; Giacomini, Guilherme; Bacchim Neto, Fernando Antonio; Yamashita, Seizo; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Duarte, Sergio Barbosa; Miranda, José Ricardo de Arruda; de Pina, Diana Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Digital radiographic imaging is increasing in veterinary practice. The use of radiation demands responsibility to maintain high image quality. Low doses are necessary because workers are requested to restrain the animal. Optimizing digital systems is necessary to avoid unnecessary exposure, causing the phenomenon known as dose creep. Homogeneous phantoms are widely used to optimize image quality and dose. We developed an automatic computational methodology to classify and quantify tissues (i.e., lung tissue, adipose tissue, muscle tissue, and bone) in canine chest computed tomography exams. The thickness of each tissue was converted to simulator materials (i.e., Lucite, aluminum, and air). Dogs were separated into groups of 20 animals each according to weight. Mean weights were 6.5 ± 2.0 kg, 15.0 ± 5.0 kg, 32.0 ± 5.5 kg, and 50.0 ± 12.0 kg, for the small, medium, large, and giant groups, respectively. The one-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in all simulator material thicknesses (p < 0.05) quantified between groups. As a result, four phantoms were constructed for dorsoventral and lateral views. In conclusion, the present methodology allows the development of phantoms of the canine chest and possibly other body regions and/or animals. The proposed phantom is a practical tool that may be employed in future work to optimize veterinary X-ray procedures.

  12. Homogeneous Canine Chest Phantom Construction: A Tool for Image Quality Optimization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Digital radiographic imaging is increasing in veterinary practice. The use of radiation demands responsibility to maintain high image quality. Low doses are necessary because workers are requested to restrain the animal. Optimizing digital systems is necessary to avoid unnecessary exposure, causing the phenomenon known as dose creep. Homogeneous phantoms are widely used to optimize image quality and dose. We developed an automatic computational methodology to classify and quantify tissues (i.e., lung tissue, adipose tissue, muscle tissue, and bone) in canine chest computed tomography exams. The thickness of each tissue was converted to simulator materials (i.e., Lucite, aluminum, and air). Dogs were separated into groups of 20 animals each according to weight. Mean weights were 6.5 ± 2.0 kg, 15.0 ± 5.0 kg, 32.0 ± 5.5 kg, and 50.0 ± 12.0 kg, for the small, medium, large, and giant groups, respectively. The one-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in all simulator material thicknesses (p < 0.05) quantified between groups. As a result, four phantoms were constructed for dorsoventral and lateral views. In conclusion, the present methodology allows the development of phantoms of the canine chest and possibly other body regions and/or animals. The proposed phantom is a practical tool that may be employed in future work to optimize veterinary X-ray procedures. PMID:27101001

  13. Diagnostic accuracy and added value of dual-energy subtraction radiography compared to standard conventional radiography using computed tomography as standard of reference

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Katharina; Baessler, Marco; Baumueller, Stephan; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate diagnostic performance of dual-energy subtraction radiography (DESR) for interpretation of chest radiographs compared to conventional radiography (CR) using computed tomography (CT) as standard of reference. Material and methods A total of 199 patients (75 female, median age 67) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved clinical trial. All patients were scanned in posteroanterior and lateral direction with dual-shot DE-technique. Chest CT was performed within ±72 hours. The system provides three types of images: bone weighted-image, soft tissue weighted-image, herein termed as DESR-images, and a standard image, termed CR-image (marked as CR-image). Images were evaluated by two radiologists for presence of inserted life support lines, pneumothorax, pleural effusion, infectious consolidation, interstitial lung changes, tumor, skeletal alterations, soft tissue alterations, aortic or tracheal calcification and pleural thickening. Inter-observer agreement between readers and diagnostic performance were calculated. McNemar’s test was used to test for significant differences. Results Mean inter-observer agreement throughout the investigated parameters was higher in DESR images compared to CR-images (kDESR = 0.935 vs. kCR = 0.858). DESR images provided significantly increased sensitivity compared to CR-images for the detection of infectious consolidations (42% vs. 62%), tumor (46% vs. 57%), interstitial lung changes (69% vs. 87%) and aortic or tracheal calcification (25 vs. 73%) (p<0.05). There were no significant differences in sensitivity for the detection of inserted life support lines, pneumothorax, pleural effusion, skeletal alterations, soft tissue alterations or pleural thickening (p>0.05). Conclusion DESR increases significantly the sensibility without affecting the specificity evaluating chest radiographs, with emphasis on the detection of interstitial lung diseases. PMID:28301584

  14. Assessment and optimisation of the image quality of chest-radiography systems.

    PubMed

    Redlich, U; Hoeschen, C; Doehring, W

    2005-01-01

    A complete evaluation strategy had been developed for thoracic X-ray imaging. It has been validated by investigating five chest-radiography systems, two of these systems after optimising image processing. The systems were a screen-film combination, a selenium drum, a conventional and a transparent imaging plate and a Cs/I-based flat panel detector (the two latter ones have been optimised using different post processing). At first all detectors have been characterised using physical parameters like DQE and MTF. After that all systems have been evaluated by human observer studies using anatomy in clinical images (VGA, ICS) and added pathological structures in thoracic phantom images (ROC). The ranking of the image quality of the systems was nearly the same in all studies. There was a similar assessment of main image quality parameters like spatial resolution, dynamic range and MTF. The modification of image post processing changed the visibility of pathological structures more than the visualisation of the anatomical criteria. The assessment of the clinical image quality has to be done for anatomical structures, and the recognition of pathological structures has to be evaluated.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in the evaluation of cancer patients: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Hochhegger, Bruno; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Santana, Pablo Rydz Pinheiro; Sousa, Arthur Soares; Souza, Luciana Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages in the evaluation of cancer patients with thoracic lesions, including involvement of the chest wall, pleura, lungs, mediastinum, esophagus and heart. It is a quite useful tool in the diagnosis, staging, surgical planning, treatment response evaluation and follow-up of these patients. In the present review, the authors contextualize the relevance of MRI in the evaluation of thoracic lesions in cancer patients. Considering that MRI is a widely available method with high contrast and spatial resolution and without the risks associated with the use of ionizing radiation, its use combined with new techniques such as cine-MRI and functional methods such as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful as an alternative tool with performance comparable or complementary to conventional radiological methods such as radiography, computed tomography and PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of patients with thoracic neoplasias. PMID:25798006

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in the evaluation of cancer patients: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Hochhegger, Bruno; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Santana, Pablo Rydz Pinheiro; Sousa, Arthur Soares; Souza, Luciana Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages in the evaluation of cancer patients with thoracic lesions, including involvement of the chest wall, pleura, lungs, mediastinum, esophagus and heart. It is a quite useful tool in the diagnosis, staging, surgical planning, treatment response evaluation and follow-up of these patients. In the present review, the authors contextualize the relevance of MRI in the evaluation of thoracic lesions in cancer patients. Considering that MRI is a widely available method with high contrast and spatial resolution and without the risks associated with the use of ionizing radiation, its use combined with new techniques such as cine-MRI and functional methods such as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful as an alternative tool with performance comparable or complementary to conventional radiological methods such as radiography, computed tomography and PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of patients with thoracic neoplasias.

  17. Severity Quantification of Pediatric Viral Respiratory Illnesses in Chest X-ray Images

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazunori; Golbaz, Marzieh; Mansoor, Awais; Perez, Geovanny F; Pancham, Krishna; Khan, Abia; Nino, Gustavo; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of severity of viral respiratory illnesses (VRIs) allows early interventions to prevent morbidity and mortality in young children. This paper proposes a novel imaging biomarker framework with chest X-ray image for assessing VRI’s severity in infants, developed specifically to meet the distinct challenges for pediatric population. The proposed framework integrates three novel technical contributions: a) lung segmentation using weighted partitioned active shape model, b) obtrusive object removal using graph cut segmentation with asymmetry constraint, and c) severity quantification using information-theoretic heterogeneity measures. This paper presents our pilot experimental results with a dataset of 148 images and the ground-truth severity scores given by a board-certified pediatric pulmonologist, demonstrating the effectiveness and clinical relevance of the presented framework. PMID:26736226

  18. In vivo body composition in autochthonous and conventional pig breeding groups by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging under special consideration of Cerdo Ibérico.

    PubMed

    Kremer, P V; Fernández-Fígares, I; Förster, M; Scholz, A M

    2012-12-01

    The improvement of carcass quality is one of the main breeding goals in pig production. To select appropriate breeding animals, it is of major concern to exactly and reliably analyze the body composition in vivo. Therefore, the objective of the study was to examine whether the combination of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the opportunity to reliably analyze quantitative and qualitative body composition characteristics of different pig breeding groups in vivo. In this study, a total of 77 pigs were studied by DXA and MRI at an average age of 154 days. The pigs originated from different autochthonous or conventional breeds or crossbreeds and were grouped into six breed types: Cerdo Ibérico (Ib); Duroc × Ib (Du_Ib); White Sow Lines (WSL, including German Landrace and German Large White); Hampshire/Pietrain (Pi_Ha, including Hampshire, Pietrain × Hampshire (PiHa) and Pietrain × PiHa); Pietrain/Duroc (Pi_Du, including Pietrain × Duroc (PiDu) and Pietrain × PiDu); crossbred WSL (PiDu_WSL, including Pietrain × WSL and PiDu × WSL). A whole-body scan was performed by DXA with a GE Lunar DPX-IQ in order to measure the amount and percentage of fat tissue (FM; %FM), lean tissue (LM; %LM) and bone mineral, whereas a Siemens Magnetom Open with a large body coil was used for MRI in the thorax region between 13th and 14th vertebrae in order to measure the area of the loin (LA) and the above back fat area (FA) of both body sides. A GLM procedure using SAS 9.2 was used to analyze the data. As expected, the native breed Ib followed by Du_Ib crossbreeds showed the highest %FM (27.2%, 25.0%) combined with the smallest LA (46.2 cm2, 73.6 cm2), whereas Ib had the lowest BW at an average age of 154 days. Pigs with Pi_Ha origin presented the least %FM (12.4%) and largest LA (99.5 cm2). The WSL and PiDu_WSL showed an intermediate body composition. Therefore, it could be concluded that DXA and MRI and especially their combination

  19. Informatics in radiology: dual-energy electronic cleansing for fecal-tagging CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenli; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, June-Goo; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2013-05-01

    Electronic cleansing (EC) is an emerging technique for the removal of tagged fecal materials at fecal-tagging computed tomographic (CT) colonography. However, existing EC methods may generate various types of artifacts that severely impair the quality of the cleansed CT colonographic images. Dual-energy fecal-tagging CT colonography is regarded as a next-generation imaging modality. EC that makes use of dual-energy fecal-tagging CT colonographic images promises to be effective in reducing cleansing artifacts by means of applying the material decomposition capability of dual-energy CT. The dual-energy index (DEI), which is calculated from the relative change in the attenuation values of a material at two different photon energies, is a reliable and effective indicator for differentiating tagged fecal materials from various types of tissues on fecal-tagging CT colonographic images. A DEI-based dual-energy EC scheme uses the DEI to help differentiate the colonic lumen-including the luminal air, tagged fecal materials, and air-tagging mixture-from the colonic soft-tissue structures, and then segments the entire colonic lumen for cleansing of the tagged fecal materials. As a result, dual-energy EC can help identify partial-volume effects in the air-tagging mixture and inhomogeneous tagging in residual fecal materials, the major causes of EC artifacts. This technique has the potential to significantly improve the quality of EC and promises to provide images of a cleansed colon that are free of the artifacts commonly observed with conventional single-energy EC methods.

  20. Informatics in Radiology: Dual-Energy Electronic Cleansing for Fecal-Tagging CT Colonography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, June-Goo; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Electronic cleansing (EC) is an emerging technique for the removal of tagged fecal materials at fecal-tagging computed tomographic (CT) colonography. However, existing EC methods may generate various types of artifacts that severely impair the quality of the cleansed CT colonographic images. Dual-energy fecal-tagging CT colonography is regarded as a next-generation imaging modality. EC that makes use of dual-energy fecal-tagging CT colonographic images promises to be effective in reducing cleansing artifacts by means of applying the material decomposition capability of dual-energy CT. The dual-energy index (DEI), which is calculated from the relative change in the attenuation values of a material at two different photon energies, is a reliable and effective indicator for differentiating tagged fecal materials from various types of tissues on fecal-tagging CT colonographic images. A DEI-based dual-energy EC scheme uses the DEI to help differentiate the colonic lumen—including the luminal air, tagged fecal materials, and air-tagging mixture—from the colonic soft-tissue structures, and then segments the entire colonic lumen for cleansing of the tagged fecal materials. As a result, dual-energy EC can help identify partial-volume effects in the air-tagging mixture and inhomogeneous tagging in residual fecal materials, the major causes of EC artifacts. This technique has the potential to significantly improve the quality of EC and promises to provide images of a cleansed colon that are free of the artifacts commonly observed with conventional single-energy EC methods. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23479680

  1. A method for smoothing segmented lung boundary in chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Yeny; Hong, Helen

    2007-03-01

    To segment low density lung regions in chest CT images, most of methods use the difference in gray-level value of pixels. However, radiodense pulmonary vessels and pleural nodules that contact with the surrounding anatomy are often excluded from the segmentation result. To smooth lung boundary segmented by gray-level processing in chest CT images, we propose a new method using scan line search. Our method consists of three main steps. First, lung boundary is extracted by our automatic segmentation method. Second, segmented lung contour is smoothed in each axial CT slice. We propose a scan line search to track the points on lung contour and find rapidly changing curvature efficiently. Finally, to provide consistent appearance between lung contours in adjacent axial slices, 2D closing in coronal plane is applied within pre-defined subvolume. Our method has been applied for performance evaluation with the aspects of visual inspection, accuracy and processing time. The results of our method show that the smoothness of lung contour was considerably increased by compensating for pulmonary vessels and pleural nodules.

  2. Automated segmentation of cardiac visceral fat in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac visceral fat was segmented from low-dose non-contrast chest CT images using a fully automated method. Cardiac visceral fat is defined as the fatty tissues surrounding the heart region, enclosed by the lungs and posterior to the sternum. It is measured by constraining the heart region with an Anatomy Label Map that contains robust segmentations of the lungs and other major organs and estimating the fatty tissue within this region. The algorithm was evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets. Based on visual inspection, 343 cases had good cardiac visceral fat segmentation. For quantitative evaluation, manual markings of cardiac visceral fat regions were made in 3 image slices for 45 low-dose scans and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was computed. The automated algorithm achieved an average DSC of 0.93. Cardiac visceral fat volume (CVFV), heart region volume (HRV) and their ratio were computed for each case. The correlation between cardiac visceral fat measurement and coronary artery and aortic calcification was also evaluated. Results indicated the automated algorithm for measuring cardiac visceral fat volume may be an alternative method to the traditional manual assessment of thoracic region fat content in the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk.

  3. Segmentation of the sternum from low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Xie, Yiting; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    Segmentation of the sternum in medical images is of clinical significance as it frequently serves as a stable reference to image registration and segmentation of other organs in the chest region. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the sternum in low-dose chest CT images (LDCT). The proposed algorithm first locates an axial seed slice and then segments the sternum cross section on the seed slice by matching a rectangle model. Furthermore, it tracks and segments the complete sternum in the cranial and caudal direction respectively through sequential axial slices starting from the seed slice. The cross section on each axial slice is segmented using score functions that are designed to have local maxima at the boundaries of the sternum. Finally, the sternal angle is localized. The algorithm is designed to be specifically robust with respect to cartilage calcifications and to accommodate the high noise levels encountered with LDCT images. Segmentation of 351 cases from public datasets was evaluated visually with only 1 failing to produce a usable segmentation. 87.2% of the 351 images have good segmentation and 12.5% have acceptable segmentation. The sternal body segmentation and the localization of the sternal angle and the vertical extents of the sternum were also evaluated quantitatively for 25 good cases and 25 acceptable cases. The overall weighted mean DC of 0.897 and weighted mean distance error of 2.88 mm demonstrate that the algorithm achieves encouraging performance in both segmenting the sternal body and localizing the sternal angle.

  4. Techniques for deriving tissue structure from multiple projection dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Jr., Harry K. (Inventor); Beck, Thomas J. (Inventor); Feldmesser, Howard S. (Inventor); Magee, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Techniques for deriving bone properties from images generated by a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry apparatus include receiving first image data having pixels indicating bone mineral density projected at a first angle of a plurality of projection angles. Second image data and third image data are also received. The second image data indicates bone mineral density projected at a different second angle. The third image data indicates bone mineral density projected at a third angle. The third angle is different from the first angle and the second angle. Principal moments of inertia for a bone in the subject are computed based on the first image data, the second image data and the third image data. The techniques allow high-precision, high-resolution dual-energy x-ray attenuation images to be used for computing principal moments of inertia and strength moduli of individual bones, plus risk of injury and changes in risk of injury to a patient.

  5. Desmoid Tumor of the Chest Wall Mimicking Recurrent Breast Cancer: Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyeong A; An, Yeong Yi

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumor of breast is a rare benign, locally aggressive tumor with a high recurrence rate. It has been associated with scar from previous breast surgery or trauma. Especially in breast cancer patients with previous operation history, it may simulate recurrent breast cancer clinically and radiologically. We presented multimodality imaging findings (ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography/computed tomography) of chest wall desmoid tumor mimicking recurrent breast cancer in a 38-year-old patient with a history of left modified mastectomy. The desmoid tumor is a rare benign tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant local tumor recurrence after breast cancer operation. Biopsy was required for accurate diagnosis and wide local excision was its appropriate surgical management. PMID:27895871

  6. Initial use of fast switched dual energy CT for coronary artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlicek, William; Panse, Prasad; Hara, Amy; Boltz, Thomas; Paden, Robert; Yamak, Didem; Licato, Paul; Chandra, Naveen; Okerlund, Darin; Dutta, Sandeep; Bhotika, Rahul; Langan, David

    2010-04-01

    Coronary CT Angiography (CTA) is limited in patients with calcified plaque and stents. CTA is unable to confidently differentiate fibrous from lipid plaque. Fast switched dual energy CTA offers certain advantages. Dual energy CTA removes calcium thereby improving visualization of the lumen and potentially providing a more accurate measure of stenosis. Dual energy CTA directly measures calcium burden (calcium hydroxyapatite) thereby eliminating a separate non-contrast series for Agatston Scoring. Using material basis pairs, the differentiation of fibrous and lipid plaques is also possible. Patency of a previously stented coronary artery is difficult to visualize with CTA due to resolution constraints and localized beam hardening artifacts. Monochromatic 70 keV or Iodine images coupled with Virtual Non-stent images lessen beam hardening artifact and blooming. Virtual removal of stainless steel stents improves assessment of in-stent re-stenosis. A beating heart phantom with 'cholesterol' and 'fibrous' phantom coronary plaques were imaged with dual energy CTA. Statistical classification methods (SVM, kNN, and LDA) distinguished 'cholesterol' from 'fibrous' phantom plaque tissue. Applying this classification method to 16 human soft plaques, a lipid 'burden' may be useful for characterizing risk of coronary disease. We also found that dual energy CTA is more sensitive to iodine contrast than conventional CTA which could improve the differentiation of myocardial infarct and ischemia on delayed acquisitions. These phantom and patient acquisitions show advantages with using fast switched dual energy CTA for coronary imaging and potentially extends the use of CT for addressing problem areas of non-invasive evaluation of coronary artery disease.

  7. Acute chest pain: the role of MR imaging and MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Hunold, Peter; Bischoff, Peter; Barkhausen, Jörg; Vogt, Florian M

    2012-12-01

    MR imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) have gained a high level of diagnostic accuracy in cardiovascular disease. MRI in cardiac disease has been established as the non-invasive standard of reference in many pathologies. However, in acute chest pain the situation is somewhat special since many of the patients presenting in the emergency department suffer from potentially life-threatening disease including acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and acute aortic syndrome. Those patients need a fast and definitive evaluation under continuous monitoring of vital parameters. Due to those requirements MRI seems to be less suitable compared to X-ray coronary angiography and multislice computed tomography angiography (CTA). However, MRI allows for a comprehensive assessment of all clinically stable patients providing unique information on the cardiovascular system including ischemia, inflammation and function. Furthermore, MRI and MRA are considered the method of choice in patients with contraindications to CTA and for regular follow-up in known aortic disease. This review addresses specific features of MRI and MRA for different cardiovascular conditions presenting with acute chest pain.

  8. Laser reflectance imaging of human chest for localization of internal organs.

    PubMed

    Pandian, P S; Kumaravel, M; Singh, Megha

    2010-05-01

    The normalized backscattered intensity (NBI) profiles at various locations of human thorax by multiprobe laser reflectometer are obtained. These data after digitization, interpolation, and filtering are color-coded and displayed as images on the outline of the human thorax. For optical characterization of tissues in terms of their parameters, scattering and absorption coefficients and the anisotropy parameter (g) are obtained by matching the measured NBI profile with that as obtained by Monte Carlo simulation procedure. Corresponding to the variation of the NBI over the various regions, the optical parameters show their respective changes. The maximum absorption and minimum scattering coefficients are observed at the areola, clavicle, sternum, scapula, and vertebral column. The minimum absorption and maximum scattering coefficients are observed at the pectoralis major of chest and rectus abdominis of abdomen regions, as compared to the other regions, attributed to their tissue compositional variations. To visualize the various tissues in lower regions of the thorax, the color-coded scheme of the NBI variation, as measured by the third fiber, is further expanded. By this procedure, the outlines of the heart and lungs, as detected through intercostals regions, are observed, which is in good agreement with that as determined by the chest radiograph of the same subject taken in PA position. Similarly the lower sections of the liver and stomach, due to their distinct optical parameters, are also observed.

  9. Comparison of two methods for evaluating image quality of chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, C.; Sund, P.; Tingberg, A.; Keddache, S.; Mansson, L. G.; Almen, A.; Mattsson, S.

    2000-04-01

    The Imix radiography system (Oy Imix Ab, Finland) consists of an intensifying screen, optics, and a CCD camera. An upgrade of this system (Imix 2000) with a red-emitting screen and new optics has recently been released. The image quality of Imix (original version), Imix 2000, and two storage-phosphor systems, Fuji FCR 9501 and Agfa ADC70 was evaluated in physical terms (DQE) and with visual grading of the visibility of anatomical structures in clinical images (141 kV). PA chest images of 50 healthy volunteers were evaluated by experienced radiologists. All images were evaluated on Siemens Simomed monitors, using the European Quality Criteria. The maximum DQE values for Imix, Imix 2000 Agfa and Fuji were 11%, 14%, 17% and 19%, respectively (141 kV, 5 (mu) Gy). Using the visual grading, the observers rated the systems in the following descending order: Fuji, Imix 2000, Agfa, and Imix. Thus, the upgrade to Imix 2000 resulted in higher DQE values and a significant improvement in clinical image quality. The visual grading agrees reasonably well with the DQE results; however, Imix 2000 received a better score than what could be expected from the DQE measurements.

  10. Dose optimization for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography based on an energy-resolved photon-counting detector: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) has been used to decompose breast images and improve diagnostic accuracy for tumor detection. However, this technique causes an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy in material decomposition due to the limitations of conventional X-ray detectors. In this study, we simulated the dual-energy CEDM with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector (ERPCD) for reducing radiation dose and improving the quantitative accuracy of material decomposition images. The ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM was compared to the conventional dual-energy CEDM in terms of radiation dose and quantitative accuracy. The correlation between radiation dose and image quality was also evaluated for optimizing the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM technique. The results showed that the material decomposition errors of the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM were 0.56-0.67 times lower than those of the conventional dual-energy CEDM. The imaging performance of the proposed technique was optimized at the radiation dose of 1.09 mGy, which is a half of the MGD for a single view mammogram. It can be concluded that the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM with an optimal exposure level is able to improve the quality of material decomposition images as well as reduce radiation dose.

  11. Chest Imaging in CF Studies: What Counts, and Can be Counted?

    PubMed Central

    Szczesniak, Rhonda; Turkovic, Lidija; Andrinopoulou, Eleni-Rosalina; Tiddens, Harm A. W. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The dawn of precision medicine and CFTR modulators require more detailed assessment of lung structure in cystic fibrosis (CF) clinical studies. High-resolution chest computed tomography (CT) scoring has yielded sensitive markers for the study of CF disease progression and therapeutic effectiveness. Similarly, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is in development to generate structural as well as functional markers. Results The aim of this review is to characterize the role of CT and MRI markers in clinical studies, and to discuss study design, data processing and statistical challenges unique to these endpoints in CF studies. Suggestions to overcome these challenges in CF studies are included. Conclusions To maximize the potential of CT and MRI markers in clinical studies and advance treatment of CF disease progression, efforts should be made to develop data repositories, promote standardization and conduct reproducible research. PMID:28040479

  12. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutarou; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru

    2007-03-01

    Multislice CT scanner advanced remarkably at the speed at which the chest CT images were acquired for mass screening. Mass screening based on multislice CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images and a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification. Moreover, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by using a lung cancer screening algorithm built into mobile helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening done in the region without the hospital. We also have developed electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system for the community health in two or more regions by using the Virtual Private Network router and Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system for safety of medical information. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have now developed a new computer-aided workstation and database that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. This paper describes basic studies that have been conducted to evaluate this new system.

  13. Quantization techniques for the compression of chest images by JPEG-type algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Walter F.; Gur, David

    1992-06-01

    The Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG) compression standard specifies a quantization procedure but does not specify a particular quantization table. In addition, there are quantization procedures which are effectively compatible with the standard but do not adhere to the simple quantization scheme described therein. These are important considerations, since it is the quantization procedure that primarily determines the compression ratio as well as the kind of information lost or artifacts introduced. A study has been conducted of issues related to the design of quantization techniques tailored for the compression of 12-bit chest images in radiology. Psycho-physical based quantization alone may not be optimal for images that are to be compressed and then used for primary diagnosis. Two specific examples of auxiliary techniques which can be used in conjunction with JPEG compression are presented here. In particular, preprocessing of the source image is shown to be advantageous under certain circumstances. In contrast, a proposed quantization technique in which isolated nonzero coefficients are removed has been shown to be generally detrimental. Image quality here is primarily measured by mean square error (MSE), although this study is in anticipation of more relevant reader performance studies of compression.

  14. Computed tomography with single-shot dual-energy sandwich detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Youn, Hanbean; Kim, Daecheon; Kim, Dong Woon; Jeon, Hosang; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Single-shot dual-energy sandwich detector can produce sharp images because of subtraction of images from two sub-detector layers, which have different thick x-ray converters, of the sandwich detector. Inspired by this observation, the authors have developed a microtomography system with the sandwich detector in pursuit of high-resolution bone-enhanced small-animal imaging. The preliminary results show that the bone-enhanced images reconstructed with the subtracted projection data are better in visibility of bone details than the conventionally reconstructed images. In addition, the bone-enhanced images obtained from the sandwich detector are relatively immune to the artifacts caused by photon starvation. The microtomography with the single-shot dual-energy sandwich detector will be useful for the high-resolution bone imaging.

  15. Automated measurement of pulmonary artery in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    A new measurement of the pulmonary artery diameter is obtained where the artery may be robustly segmented between the heart and the artery bifurcation. An automated algorithm is presented that can make this pulmonary artery measurement in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images. The algorithm uses a cylinder matching method following geometric constraints obtained from other adjacent organs that have been previously segmented. This new measurement and the related ratio of pulmonary artery to aortic artery measurement are compared to traditional manual approaches for pulmonary artery characterization. The algorithm was qualitatively evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets; 324 out of the 347 cases had good segmentations and in the other 23 cases there was significant boundary inaccuracy. For quantitative evaluation, the comparison was to manually marked pulmonary artery boundary in an axial slice in 45 cases; the resulting average Dice Similarity Coefficient was 0.88 (max 0.95, min 0.74). For the 45 cases with manual markings, the correlation between the automated pulmonary artery to ascending aorta diameter ratio and manual ratio at pulmonary artery bifurcation level was 0.81. Using Bland-Altman analysis, the mean difference of the two ratios was 0.03 and the limits of agreement was (-0.12, 0.18). This automated measurement may have utility as an alternative to the conventional manual measurement of pulmonary artery diameter at the bifurcation level especially in the context of noisy low-dose CT images.

  16. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-12-07

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients  =  80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of  -0.93 (p  =  0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of  -0.95 (p  =  0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of  -0.85 (p  =  0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely.

  17. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. S.; Wood, T. J.; Saunderson, J. R.; Beavis, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients  =  80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of  -0.93 (p  =  0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of  -0.95 (p  =  0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of  -0.85 (p  =  0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely.

  18. A general framework of noise suppression in material decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Petrongolo, Michael; Dong, Xue; Zhu, Lei

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: As a general problem of dual-energy CT (DECT), noise amplification in material decomposition severely reduces the signal-to-noise ratio on the decomposed images compared to that on the original CT images. In this work, the authors propose a general framework of noise suppression in material decomposition for DECT. The method is based on an iterative algorithm recently developed in their group for image-domain decomposition of DECT, with an extension to include nonlinear decomposition models. The generalized framework of iterative DECT decomposition enables beam-hardening correction with simultaneous noise suppression, which improves the clinical benefits of DECT. Methods: The authors propose to suppress noise on the decomposed images of DECT using convex optimization, which is formulated in the form of least-squares estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance–covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-squares term. Analytical formulas are derived to compute the variance–covariance matrix for decomposed images with general-form numerical or analytical decomposition. As a demonstration, the authors implement the proposed algorithm on phantom data using an empirical polynomial function of decomposition measured on a calibration scan. The polynomial coefficients are determined from the projection data acquired on a wedge phantom, and the signal decomposition is performed in the projection domain. Results: On the Catphan{sup ®}600 phantom, the proposed noise suppression method reduces the average noise standard deviation of basis material images by one to two orders of magnitude, with a superior performance on spatial resolution as shown in comparisons of line-pair images and modulation transfer function measurements. On the synthesized monoenergetic CT images, the noise standard deviation is

  19. Chest-wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound images using thoracic volume classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Zhang, Wei; Mann, Ritse M.; Platel, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are expected to improve effectiveness and efficiency of radiologists in reading automated 3D breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. One challenging task on developing CAD is to reduce a large number of false positives. A large amount of false positives originate from acoustic shadowing caused by ribs. Therefore determining the location of the chestwall in ABUS is necessary in CAD systems to remove these false positives. Additionally it can be used as an anatomical landmark for inter- and intra-modal image registration. In this work, we extended our previous developed chestwall segmentation method that fits a cylinder to automated detected rib-surface points and we fit the cylinder model by minimizing a cost function which adopted a term of region cost computed from a thoracic volume classifier to improve segmentation accuracy. We examined the performance on a dataset of 52 images where our previous developed method fails. Using region-based cost, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall decreased from 7.57±2.76 mm to 6.22±2.86 mm.art.

  20. [Adaptive Wiener filter based on Gaussian mixture distribution model for denoising chest X-ray CT image].

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Motohiro; Yamane, Nobumoto; Morikawa, Yoshitaka

    2008-05-20

    In recent decades, X-ray CT imaging has become more important as a result of its high-resolution performance. However, it is well known that the X-ray dose is insufficient in the techniques that use low-dose imaging in health screening or thin-slice imaging in work-up. Therefore, the degradation of CT images caused by the streak artifact frequently becomes problematic. In this study, we applied a Wiener filter (WF) using the universal Gaussian mixture distribution model (UNI-GMM) as a statistical model to remove streak artifact. In designing the WF, it is necessary to estimate the statistical model and the precise co-variances of the original image. In the proposed method, we obtained a variety of chest X-ray CT images using a phantom simulating a chest organ, and we estimated the statistical information using the images for training. The results of simulation showed that it is possible to fit the UNI-GMM to the chest X-ray CT images and reduce the specific noise.

  1. Chest Pain with Normal Thallium-201 Myocardial Perfusion Image – Is It Really Normal?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pang-Yen; Lin, Wen-Yu; Lin, Li-Fan; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Yang, Shih-Ping; Liou, Jun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Background Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion image (MPI) is commonly used to detect coronary artery disease in patients with chest pain. Although a normal thallium-201 MPI result is generally considered to be a good prognosis and further coronary angiogram is not recommended, there are still a few patients who suffer from unexpected acute coronary events. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical prognosis in patients with normal thallium-201 MPI. Methods From January 2006 to August 2012, a total 22,003 patients undergoing thallium-201 MPI in one tertiary center were screened. Of these, 8092 patients had normal results and were investigated retrospectively. During follow-up, 54 patients underwent coronary angiogram because of refractory typical angina pectoris or unexpected acute coronary events. These 54 patients were divided into 2 groups: group I consisted of 26 (48.1%) patients with angiography-proven significant coronary artery stenosis, and group II consisted of 28 (51.9%) patients without significant stenosis. Results Patients in group I had a higher prevalence of prior coronary stenting and electrocardiographic features of ST depression compared with patients in group II. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that both prior coronary stenting and ST depression were risk predictors of unexpected acute coronary events in the patients with normal thallium-201 MPI [odds ratio (OR), 5.93; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-34.06, p = 0.05 and OR, 7.10; 95% CI: 1.28-39.51, p = 0.03,respectively]. Conclusions Although there is a low incidence of unexpected acute coronary events in patients with chest pain and normal thallium-201 MPI, physicians should be aware of the potentials risk in certain patients in this specific population. PMID:27274174

  2. Dual energy iodine contrast CT with monochromatic x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Wu, X.Y.; Kress, J.

    1995-12-31

    Computed tomography (CT) with monochromatic x-ray beams was used to image phantoms and a live rabbit using the preclinical Multiple Energy Computed Tomography (MECT) system at the National Synchrotron Light Source. MECT has a horizontal fan beam with a subject apparatus rotating about a vertical axis. Images were obtained at 43 keV for single-energy studies, and at energies immediately below and above the 33.17 keV iodine K-edge for dual-energy subtraction CT. Two CdWO{sub 4}-photodiode array detectors were used. The high-resolution detector (0.5 mm pitch, uncollimated) provided 14 line pair/cm in-plane spatial resolution, with lower image noise than conventional CT. Images with the low-resolution detector (1.844-mm pitch, collimated to 0.922 mm detector elements) had a sensitivity for iodine of {approx} 60 {micro}g/cc in 11-mm channels inside a 135 mm-diameter acrylic cylindrical phantom for a slice height of 2.5 mm and a surface does of {approx} 4 cGy. The image noise was {approx} 1 Hounsfield Unit (HU); it was {approx} 3 HU for the same phantom imaged with conventional CT at approximately the same dose, slice height, and spatial resolution ({approx} 7 lp/cm). These results show the potential advantage of MECT, despite present technical limitations.

  3. Automatic segmentation of ground-glass opacity nodule on chest CT images by histogram modeling and local contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Julip; Hong, Helen; Goo, Jin Mo

    2012-03-01

    We propose an automatic segmentation of Ground Glass Opacity (GGO) nodules on chest CT images by histogram modeling and local contrast. First, optimal volume circumscribing a nodule is calculated by clicking inside of GGO nodule. To remove noises while preserving a nodule boundary, anisotropic diffusion filtering is applied to the optimal volume. Second, for deciding an appropriate threshold value of GGO nodule, histogram modeling is performed by Gaussian Mixture Modeling (GMM) with three components such as lung parenchyma, nodule, and chest wall or vessels. Third, the attached chest wall and vessels are separated from the GGO nodules by maximum curvature points linking and morphological erosion with adaptive circular mask. Fourth, initial boundary of GGO nodule is refined using local contrast information. Experimental results show that attached neighbor structures are well separated from GGO nodules while missed GGO region is refined. The proposed segmentation method can be used for measurement of the growth rate of nodule and the proportion of solid portion inside nodule.

  4. 2D image reconstruction of a human chest by using Calderon's method and the adjacent current pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Z.; Xu, L.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, Calderon's method is applied to a chest-like sensing region, as monitored by electrical impedance tomography. This method provides a direct algorithm for image reconstruction, where the gray value at any pixel of the reconstructed image is computed using a direct and independent approach. The major calculations of image reconstruction in Calderon's method are implemented for a circular boundary and, as a result, the complicated calculations of the scattering transform, as required by non-circular boundaries, are avoided. A unique conformal transformation is used to map a unit disk onto a sensing region with a non-circular boundary, such as a chest-like region. A new method to calculate the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map is also introduced, which is used to compute the scattering transform. The feasibility of the proposed method has been validated by testing the construction of phantoms with chest-like boundaries. Data collected from the chest of a male subject has been used to visualize lung movement, as monitored by the electrical impedance tomography system.

  5. Application of off-line image processing for optimization in chest computed radiography using a low cost system.

    PubMed

    Muhogora, Wilbroad E; Msaki, Peter; Padovani, Renato

    2015-03-08

     The objective of this study was to improve the visibility of anatomical details by applying off-line postimage processing in chest computed radiography (CR). Four spatial domain-based external image processing techniques were developed by using MATLAB software version 7.0.0.19920 (R14) and image processing tools. The developed techniques were implemented to sample images and their visual appearances confirmed by two consultant radiologists to be clinically adequate. The techniques were then applied to 200 chest clinical images and randomized with other 100 images previously processed online. These 300 images were presented to three experienced radiologists for image quality assessment using standard quality criteria. The mean and ranges of the average scores for three radiologists were characterized for each of the developed technique and imaging system. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to test the difference of details visibility between the images processed using each of the developed techniques and the corresponding images processed using default algorithms. The results show that the visibility of anatomical features improved significantly (0.005 ≤ p ≤ 0.02) with combinations of intensity values adjustment and/or spatial linear filtering techniques for images acquired using 60 ≤ kVp ≤ 70. However, there was no improvement for images acquired using 102 ≤ kVp ≤ 107 (0.127 ≤ p ≤ 0.48). In conclusion, the use of external image processing for optimization can be effective in chest CR, but should be implemented in consultations with the radiologists.

  6. Comparison of clinical and physical measures of image quality in chest and pelvis computed radiography at different tube voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Sandborg, Michael; Tingberg, Anders; Ullman, Gustaf; Dance, David R.; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2006-11-15

    The aim of this work was to study the dependence of image quality in digital chest and pelvis radiography on tube voltage, and to explore correlations between clinical and physical measures of image quality. The effect on image quality of tube voltage in these two examinations was assessed using two methods. The first method relies on radiologists' observations of images of an anthropomorphic phantom, and the second method was based on computer modeling of the imaging system using an anthropomorphic voxel phantom. The tube voltage was varied within a broad range (50-150 kV), including those values typically used with screen-film radiography. The tube charge was altered so that the same effective dose was achieved for each projection. Two x-ray units were employed using a computed radiography (CR) image detector with standard tube filtration and antiscatter device. Clinical image quality was assessed by a group of radiologists using a visual grading analysis (VGA) technique based on the revised CEC image criteria. Physical image quality was derived from a Monte Carlo computer model in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio, SNR, of anatomical structures corresponding to the image criteria. Both the VGAS (visual grading analysis score) and SNR decrease with increasing tube voltage in both chest PA and pelvis AP examinations, indicating superior performance if lower tube voltages are employed. Hence, a positive correlation between clinical and physical measures of image quality was found. The pros and cons of using lower tube voltages with CR digital radiography than typically used in analog screen-film radiography are discussed, as well as the relevance of using VGAS and quantum-noise SNR as measures of image quality in pelvis and chest radiography.

  7. A Method to Improve Electron Density Measurement of Cone-Beam CT Using Dual Energy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Men, Kuo; Dai, Jian-Rong; Li, Ming-Hui; Chen, Xin-Yuan; Zhang, Ke; Tian, Yuan; Huang, Peng; Xu, Ying-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a dual energy imaging method to improve the accuracy of electron density measurement with a cone-beam CT (CBCT) device. Materials and Methods. The imaging system is the XVI CBCT system on Elekta Synergy linac. Projection data were acquired with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively, to set up a basis material decomposition model. Virtual phantom simulation and phantoms experiments were carried out for quantitative evaluation of the method. Phantoms were also scanned twice with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively. The data were decomposed into projections of the two basis material coefficients according to the model set up earlier. The two sets of decomposed projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images of the basis material coefficients. Then, the images of electron densities were calculated with these CBCT images. Results. The difference between the calculated and theoretical values was within 2% and the correlation coefficient of them was about 1.0. The dual energy imaging method obtained more accurate electron density values and reduced the beam hardening artifacts obviously. Conclusion. A novel dual energy CBCT imaging method to calculate the electron densities was developed. It can acquire more accurate values and provide a platform potentially for dose calculation. PMID:26346510

  8. A clinical evaluation of total variation-Stokes image reconstruction strategy for low-dose CT imaging of the chest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Moore, William; Bhattacharji, Priya; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-03-01

    One hundred "normal-dose" computed tomography (CT) studies of the chest (i.e., 1,160 projection views, 120kVp, 100mAs) data sets were acquired from the patients who were scheduled for lung biopsy at Stony Brook University Hospital under informed consent approved by our Institutional Review Board. To mimic low-dose CT imaging scenario (i.e., sparse-view scan), sparse projection views were evenly extracted from the total 1,160 projections of each patient and the total radiation dose was reduced according to how many sparse views were selected. A standard filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was applied to the 1160 projections to produce reference images for comparison purpose. In the low-dose scenario, both the FBP and total variation-stokes (TVS) algorithms were applied to reconstruct the corresponding low-dose images. The reconstructed images were evaluated by an experienced thoracic radiologist against the reference images. Both the low-dose reconstructions and the reference images were displayed on a 4- megapixel monitor in soft tissue and lung windows. The images were graded by a five-point scale from 0 to 4 (0, nondiagnostic; 1, severe artifact with low confidence; 2, moderate artifact or moderate diagnostic confidences; 3, mild artifact or high confidence; 4, well depicted without artifacts). Quantitative evaluation measurements such as standard deviations for different tissue types and universal quality index were also studied and reported for the results. The evaluation concluded that the TVS can reduce the view number from 1,160 to 580 with slightly lower scores as the reference, resulting in a dose reduction to close 50%.

  9. Segmentation of the whole breast from low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Salvatore, Mary; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    The segmentation of whole breast serves as the first step towards automated breast lesion detection. It is also necessary for automatically assessing the breast density, which is considered to be an important risk factor for breast cancer. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the whole breast in low-dose chest CT images (LDCT), which has been recommended as an annual lung cancer screening test. The automated whole breast segmentation and potential breast density readings as well as lesion detection in LDCT will provide useful information for women who have received LDCT screening, especially the ones who have not undergone mammographic screening, by providing them additional risk indicators for breast cancer with no additional radiation exposure. The two main challenges to be addressed are significant range of variations in terms of the shape and location of the breast in LDCT and the separation of pectoral muscles from the glandular tissues. The presented algorithm achieves robust whole breast segmentation using an anatomy directed rule-based method. The evaluation is performed on 20 LDCT scans by comparing the segmentation with ground truth manually annotated by a radiologist on one axial slice and two sagittal slices for each scan. The resulting average Dice coefficient is 0.880 with a standard deviation of 0.058, demonstrating that the automated segmentation algorithm achieves results consistent with manual annotations of a radiologist.

  10. Prognostic value of exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Guiney, T.E.; Newell, J.B.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Accurate prognostic information is important in determining optimal management of patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain. In this study, the ability of exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging to predict future cardiac events (cardiovascular death or nonfatal myocardial infarction) was correlated with clinical, coronary and left ventricular angiographic and exercise electrocardiographic data in 139 consecutive, nonsurgically managed patients followed-up over a 3 to 5 year period (mean follow-up, 3.7 +/- 0.9), using a logistic regression analysis. Among patients without prior myocardial infarction (100 of 139), the number of myocardial segments with transient thallium-201 defects was the only statistically significant predictor of future cardiac events when all patient variables were evaluated. Among patients with myocardial infarction before evaluation (39 of 139), angiographic ejection fraction was the only significant predictor of future cardiac events when all variables were considered. This study suggests an approach to evaluate the risk of future cardiac events in patients with possible ischemic heart disease.

  11. Noise Suppression for Dual-Energy CT through Entropy Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    In dual energy CT (DECT), noise amplification during signal decomposition significantly limits the utility of basis material images. Since clinically relevant objects typically contain a limited number of different materials, we propose an Image-domain Decomposition method through Entropy Minimization (IDEM) for noise suppression in DECT. Pixels of decomposed images are first linearly transformed into 2D clusters of data points, which are highly asymmetric due to strong signal correlation. An optimal axis is identified in the 2D space via numerical search such that the projection of data clusters onto the axis has minimum entropy. Noise suppression is performed on each image pixel by estimating the center-of-mass value of each data cluster along the direction perpendicular to the projection axis. The IDEM method is distinct from other noise suppression techniques in that it does not suppress pixel noise by reducing spatial variation between neighboring pixels. As supported by studies on Catphan©600 and anthropomorphic head phantoms, this feature endows our algorithm with a unique capability of reducing noise standard deviation on DECT decomposed images by approximately one order of magnitude while preserving spatial resolution and image noise power spectra (NPS). Compared with a filtering method and recently developed iterative method at the same level of noise suppression, the IDEM algorithm obtains high-resolution images with less artifacts. It also maintains accuracy of electron density measurements with less than 2% bias error. The IDEM method effectively suppresses noise of DECT for quantitative use, with appealing features on preservation of image spatial resolution and NPS. PMID:25955585

  12. Noise Suppression for Dual-Energy CT Through Entropy Minimization.

    PubMed

    Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2015-11-01

    In dual energy CT (DECT), noise amplification during signal decomposition significantly limits the utility of basis material images. Since clinically relevant objects typically contain a limited number of different materials, we propose an Image-domain Decomposition method through Entropy Minimization (IDEM) for noise suppression in DECT. Pixels of decomposed images are first linearly transformed into 2D clusters of data points, which are highly asymmetric due to strong signal correlation. An optimal axis is identified in the 2D space via numerical search such that the projection of data clusters onto the axis has minimum entropy. Noise suppression is performed on each image pixel by estimating the center-of-mass value of each data cluster along the direction perpendicular to the projection axis. The IDEM method is distinct from other noise suppression techniques in that it does not suppress pixel noise by reducing spatial variation between neighboring pixels. As supported by studies on Catphan©600 and anthropomorphic head phantoms, this feature endows our algorithm with a unique capability of reducing noise standard deviation on DECT decomposed images by approximately one order of magnitude while preserving spatial resolution and image noise power spectra (NPS). Compared with a filtering method and recently developed iterative method at the same level of noise suppression, the IDEM algorithm obtains high-resolution images with less artifacts. It also maintains accuracy of electron density measurements with less than 2% bias error. The IDEM method effectively suppresses noise of DECT for quantitative use, with appealing features on preservation of image spatial resolution and NPS.

  13. Evaluation of a new system for chest tomosynthesis: aspects of image quality of different protocols determined using an anthropomorphic phantom

    PubMed Central

    Sundin, A; Aspelin, P; Båth, M; Nyrén, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the image quality obtained with the different protocols in a new chest digital tomosynthesis (DTS) system. Methods: A chest phantom was imaged with chest X-ray equipment with DTS. 10 protocols were used, and for each protocol, nine acquisitions were performed. Four observers visually rated the quality of the reconstructed section images according to pre-defined quality criteria in four different classes. The data were analysed with visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis, using the vendor-recommended protocol [12-s acquisition time, source-to-image distance (SID) 180 cm] as reference, and the area under the VGC curve (AUCVGC) was determined for each protocol and class of criteria. Results: Protocols with a smaller swing angle resulted in a lower image quality for the classes of criteria “disturbance” and “homogeneity in nodule” but a higher image quality for the class “structure”. The class “demarcation” showed little dependency on the swing angle. All protocols but one (6.3 s, SID 130 cm) obtained an AUCVGC significantly <0.5 (indicating lower quality than reference) for at least one class of criteria. Conclusion: The study indicates that the DTS protocol with 6.3 s yields image quality similar to that obtained with the vendor-recommended protocol (12 s) but with the clinically important advantage for patients with respiratory impairment of a shorter acquisition time. Advances in knowledge: The study demonstrates that the image quality may be strongly affected by the choice of protocol and that the vendor-recommended protocol may not be optimal. PMID:26118300

  14. Dual energy scanning beam laminographic x-radiography

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Randolph F.

    1998-01-01

    A multiple x-ray energy level imaging system includes a scanning x-ray beam and two detector design having a first low x-ray energy sensitive detector and a second high x-ray energy sensitive detector. The low x-ray energy detector is placed next to or in front of the high x-ray energy detector. The low energy sensitive detector has small stopping power for x-rays. The lower energy x-rays are absorbed and converted into electrical signals while the majority of the higher energy x-rays pass through undetected. The high energy sensitive detector has a large stopping power for x-rays as well as it having a filter placed between it and the object to absorb the lower energy x-rays. In a second embodiment; a single energy sensitive detector is provided which provides an output signal proportional to the amount of energy in each individual x-ray it absorbed. It can then have an electronic threshold or thresholds set to select two or more energy ranges for the images. By having multiple detectors located at different positions, a dual energy laminography system is possible.

  15. Dual energy scanning beam laminographic x-radiography

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, S.; Wojcik, R.F.

    1998-04-21

    A multiple x-ray energy level imaging system includes a scanning x-ray beam and two detector design having a first low x-ray energy sensitive detector and a second high x-ray energy sensitive detector. The low x-ray energy detector is placed next to or in front of the high x-ray energy detector. The low energy sensitive detector has small stopping power for x-rays. The lower energy x-rays are absorbed and converted into electrical signals while the majority of the higher energy x-rays pass through undetected. The high energy sensitive detector has a large stopping power for x-rays as well as it having a filter placed between it and the object to absorb the lower energy x-rays. In a second embodiment; a single energy sensitive detector is provided which provides an output signal proportional to the amount of energy in each individual x-ray it absorbed. It can then have an electronic threshold or thresholds set to select two or more energy ranges for the images. By having multiple detectors located at different positions, a dual energy laminography system is possible. 6 figs.

  16. Dual-energy computed tomography for gout diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Choi, Hyon K

    2013-01-01

    The central feature of gout is deposition of monosodium urate crystals. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is a recently developed advanced imaging method that enables visualisation of urate deposits by analysis of the chemical composition of the scanned materials. This review summarises recent research describing the use of DECT in gout management. This technology may assist in both diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. Studies of patients with established disease indicate diagnostic accuracy for gout is high. Excellent inter-reader agreement has been reported for detection of urate deposits by use of DECT. Automated volume assessment software also enables rapid and reproducible measurement of urate deposits within tophi, suggesting that this modality may be useful for monitoring the disease. Although several case reports indicate DECT can be used to reveal reduction in the size of urate deposits, the sensitivity to change in response to urate-lowering therapy has not yet been systematically reported. DECT images reveal variable urate deposition within tophi of the same physical size. The ability to visualise urate deposits in tissue may provide new insights into the pathology and mechanisms of gout.

  17. Technical principles of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Blake, G M; Fogelman, I

    1997-07-01

    Since its introduction nearly ten years ago, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has become the single most widely used technique for performing bone densitometry studies. One reason for its popularity is the ability of DXA systems to measure bone mineral density (BMD) in the spine and proximal femur, the two most common sites for osteoporotic fractures. Other advantages of DXA include the exceptionally low radiation dose to patients, short scan times, high resolution images, good precision and inherent stability of calibration. For these reasons DXA scans are widely used to diagnose osteoporosis, assist making decisions in treatment, and as a follow-up response to therapy. Another important application has been the use of DXA in many clinical trials of new treatments for osteoporosis. Since the first generation pencil beam DXA systems became available, the most significant technical innovation has been the introduction of fan beam systems with shorter scan times, increased patient throughput, and improved image quality. New clinical applications include the measurement of lateral spine and total body BMD, body composition, and vertebral morphometry. Despite these advances, posteroanterior (PA) spine and proximal femur scans remain the most widely used application because of their utility in treatment decisions and monitoring response to therapy.

  18. Automated aortic calcification detection in low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Htwe, Yu Maw; Padgett, Jennifer; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    The extent of aortic calcification has been shown to be a risk indicator for vascular events including cardiac events. We have developed a fully automated computer algorithm to segment and measure aortic calcification in low-dose noncontrast, non-ECG gated, chest CT scans. The algorithm first segments the aorta using a pre-computed Anatomy Label Map (ALM). Then based on the segmented aorta, aortic calcification is detected and measured in terms of the Agatston score, mass score, and volume score. The automated scores are compared with reference scores obtained from manual markings. For aorta segmentation, the aorta is modeled as a series of discrete overlapping cylinders and the aortic centerline is determined using a cylinder-tracking algorithm. Then the aortic surface location is detected using the centerline and a triangular mesh model. The segmented aorta is used as a mask for the detection of aortic calcification. For calcification detection, the image is first filtered, then an elevated threshold of 160 Hounsfield units (HU) is used within the aorta mask region to reduce the effect of noise in low-dose scans, and finally non-aortic calcification voxels (bony structures, calcification in other organs) are eliminated. The remaining candidates are considered as true aortic calcification. The computer algorithm was evaluated on 45 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Using linear regression, the automated Agatston score is 98.42% correlated with the reference Agatston score. The automated mass and volume score is respectively 98.46% and 98.28% correlated with the reference mass and volume score.

  19. Automated coronary artery calcification detection on low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) measurement from low-dose CT images can be used to assess the risk of coronary artery disease. A fully automatic algorithm to detect and measure CAC from low-dose non-contrast, non-ECG-gated chest CT scans is presented. Based on the automatically detected CAC, the Agatston score (AS), mass score and volume score were computed. These were compared with scores obtained manually from standard-dose ECG-gated scans and low-dose un-gated scans of the same patient. The automatic algorithm segments the heart region based on other pre-segmented organs to provide a coronary region mask. The mitral valve and aortic valve calcification is identified and excluded. All remaining voxels greater than 180HU within the mask region are considered as CAC candidates. The heart segmentation algorithm was evaluated on 400 non-contrast cases with both low-dose and regular dose CT scans. By visual inspection, 371 (92.8%) of the segmentations were acceptable. The automated CAC detection algorithm was evaluated on 41 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Manual markings were performed on both low-dose and standard-dose scans for these cases. Using linear regression, the correlation of the automatic AS with the standard-dose manual scores was 0.86; with the low-dose manual scores the correlation was 0.91. Standard risk categories were also computed. The automated method risk category agreed with manual markings of gated scans for 24 cases while 15 cases were 1 category off. For low-dose scans, the automatic method agreed with 33 cases while 7 cases were 1 category off.

  20. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Aneurysm Chest CT Scan Chest X Ray Pleurisy and Other Pleural Disorders Pulmonary Hypertension Send a ... X Ray Clinical Trials Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Pacemaker Pleurisy and Other Pleural Disorders Pulmonary Hypertension Rate This ...

  1. Validation of an image-based technique to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs with an observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; McAdams, H. Page; Foos, David H.; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    We previously proposed a novel image-based quality assessment technique1 to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this paper, an observer study was designed and conducted to systematically validate this technique. Ten metrics were involved in the observer study, i.e., lung grey level, lung detail, lung noise, riblung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm-lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. For each metric, three tasks were successively presented to the observers. In each task, six ROI images were randomly presented in a row and observers were asked to rank the images only based on a designated quality and disregard the other qualities. A range slider on the top of the images was used for observers to indicate the acceptable range based on the corresponding perceptual attribute. Five boardcertificated radiologists from Duke participated in this observer study on a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer ranking orders and the algorithmic ranking orders. Based on the collected acceptable ranges, quality consistency ranges were statistically derived. The observer study showed that, for each metric, the averaged ranking orders of the participated observers were strongly correlated with the algorithmic orders. For the lung grey level, the observer ranking orders completely accorded with the algorithmic ranking orders. The quality consistency ranges derived from this observer study were close to these derived from our previous study. The observer study indicates that the proposed image-based quality assessment technique provides a robust reflection of the perceptual image quality of the clinical chest radiographs. The derived quality consistency ranges can be used to automatically predict the acceptability of a clinical chest radiograph.

  2. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.H.M.

    1982-01-01

    This review of chest radiology reexamines normal findings on plain chest radiographs, and presents a new plain film view for detecting metastases in the lungs, and describes new findings on acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Various chest radiologic procedures are examined. (KRM)

  3. Dual Energy and Low kVp CT in the Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Benjamin M.; Shepherd, John A; Wang, Zhen J; Teh, Hui Seong; Hartman, Robert; Prevrhal, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Low kVp settings provide high conspicuity of contrast materials at CT but may result in high image noise, particularly in larger patients. Material decomposition at dual energy CT can differentiate renal stones by their composition, quantify tissue iron stores, improve the detection of pathologic hyperenhancement, and reduce contrast material and radiation dose compared to conventional CT. Further clinical research and technique refinement will be needed as the usage of these exiciting technologies spreads. PMID:19542394

  4. Quantification of breast density with dual energy mammography: An experimental feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Breast density, the percentage of glandular breast tissue, has been shown to be a strong indicator of breast cancer risk. A quantitative method to measure breast density with dual energy mammography was investigated using physical phantoms. Methods: The dual energy mammography system used a tungsten anode x-ray tube with a 50 {mu}m rhodium beam filter for low energy images and a 300 {mu}m copper beam filter for high energy images. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Four different phantom studies were used to evaluate the technique. The first study consisted of phantoms with thicknesses of 2.5-8.5 cm in 0.5 cm steps with variable densities centered at a mean of 28%. The second study consisted of phantoms at a fixed thickness of 4.0 cm, which ranged in densities from 0% to 100% in increments of 12.5%. The third study consisted of 4.0 cm thick phantoms at densities of 25%, 50% and 75% each imaged at three areal sizes, approximately 62.5, 125, and 250 cm{sup 2}, in order to assess the effect of breast size on density measurement. The fourth study consisted of step phantoms designed to more closely mimic the shape of a female breast with maximal thicknesses from 3.0 to 7.0 cm at a fixed density of 50%. All images were corrected for x-ray scatter. Results: The RMS errors in breast density measurements were 0.44% for the variable thickness phantoms, 0.64% for the variable density phantoms, 2.87% for the phantoms of different areal sizes, and 4.63% for step phantoms designed to closely resemble the shape of a breast. Conclusions: The results of the phantom studies indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to measure breast density with an RMS error of approximately 5%.

  5. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... inside the scanner. For some diagnoses, a contrast dye, often iodine-based, may be injected into a ... your arm before the imaging test. This contrast dye highlights areas inside your chest and creates clearer ...

  6. Semi-automated measurements of heart-to-mediastinum ratio on 123I-MIBG myocardial scintigrams by using image fusion method with chest X-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Ryosuke; Hara, Takeshi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Ishihara, Tadahiko; Zhou, Xiangrong; Muramatsu, Chisako; Abe, Yoshiteru; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    MIBG (iodine-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine) is a radioactive medicine that is used to help diagnose not only myocardial diseases but also Parkinson's diseases (PD) and dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The difficulty of the segmentation around the myocardium often reduces the consistency of measurement results. One of the most common measurement methods is the ratio of the uptake values of the heart to mediastinum (H/M). This ratio will be a stable independent of the operators when the uptake value in the myocardium region is clearly higher than that in background, however, it will be unreliable indices when the myocardium region is unclear because of the low uptake values. This study aims to develop a new measurement method by using the image fusion of three modalities of MIBG scintigrams, 201-Tl scintigrams, and chest radiograms, to increase the reliability of the H/M measurement results. Our automated method consists of the following steps: (1) construct left ventricular (LV) map from 201-Tl myocardium image database, (2) determine heart region in chest radiograms, (3) determine mediastinum region in chest radiograms, (4) perform image fusion of chest radiograms and MIBG scintigrams, and 5) perform H/M measurements on MIBG scintigrams by using the locations of heart and mediastinum determined on the chest radiograms. We collected 165 cases with 201-Tl scintigrams and chest radiograms to construct the LV map. Another 65 cases with MIBG scintigrams and chest radiograms were also collected for the measurements. Four radiological technologists (RTs) manually measured the H/M in the MIBG images. We compared the four RTs' results with our computer outputs by using Pearson's correlation, the Bland-Altman method, and the equivalency test method. As a result, the correlations of the H/M between four the RTs and the computer were 0.85 to 0.88. We confirmed systematic errors between the four RTs and the computer as well as among the four RTs. The variation range of the H

  7. Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D) Improves Chest CT Image Quality and Reduces Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Miyara, Tetsuhiro; Honda, Osamu; Kamiya, Hisashi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Moriya, Hiroshi; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Noma, Satoshi; Kamiya, Ayano; Tanaka, Yuko; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the advantages of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D) for image quality improvement and dose reduction for chest computed tomography (CT). Methods Institutional Review Boards approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-eight subjects underwent chest CT at five institutions using identical scanners and protocols. During a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120, and 60 mA. Scan data were converted to images using AIDR3D and a conventional reconstruction mode (without AIDR3D). Using a 5-point scale from 1 (non-diagnostic) to 5 (excellent), three blinded observers independently evaluated image quality for three lung zones, four patterns of lung disease (nodule/mass, emphysema, bronchiolitis, and diffuse lung disease), and three mediastinal measurements (small structure visibility, streak artifacts, and shoulder artifacts). Differences in these scores were assessed by Scheffe's test. Results At each tube current, scans using AIDR3D had higher scores than those without AIDR3D, which were significant for lung zones (p<0.0001) and all mediastinal measurements (p<0.01). For lung diseases, significant improvements with AIDR3D were frequently observed at 120 and 60 mA. Scans with AIDR3D at 120 mA had significantly higher scores than those without AIDR3D at 240 mA for lung zones and mediastinal streak artifacts (p<0.0001), and slightly higher or equal scores for all other measurements. Scans with AIDR3D at 60 mA were also judged superior or equivalent to those without AIDR3D at 120 mA. Conclusion For chest CT, AIDR3D provides better image quality and can reduce radiation exposure by 50%. PMID:25153797

  8. Benefits of texture analysis of dual energy CT for Computer-Aided pulmonary embolism detection.

    PubMed

    Foncubierta-Rodríguez, Antonio; Jiménez del Toro, Óscar Alfonso; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning; Depeursinge, Adrien

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is an avoidable cause of death if treated immediately but delays in diagnosis and treatment lead to an increased risk. Computer-assisted image analysis of both unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) have proven useful for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Dual energy CT provides additional information over the standard single energy scan by generating four-dimensional (4D) data, in our case with 11 energy levels in 3D. In this paper a 4D texture analysis method capable of detecting pulmonary embolism in dual energy CT is presented. The method uses wavelet-based visual words together with an automatic geodesic-based region of interest detection algorithm to characterize the texture properties of each lung lobe. Results show an increase in performance with respect to the single energy CT analysis, as well as an accuracy gain compared to preliminary work on a small dataset.

  9. Pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging is similar to chest tomography in detecting inflammation in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Carolina de Souza; Warszawiak, Danny; Paiva, Eduardo Dos Santos; Escuissato, Dante Luiz

    2017-02-20

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are prevalent complications of systemic sclerosis (SS) and are currently the leading causes of death related to the disease. The accurate recognition of these conditions is therefore of utmost importance for patient management. A study was carried out with 24 SS patients being followed at the Rheumatology Department of the Hospital de Clínicas of Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR) and 14 healthy volunteers, with the objective of evaluating the usefulness of lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when assessing ILD in SS patients. The results obtained with lung MRI were compared to those obtained by computed tomography (CT) of the chest, currently considered the examination of choice when investigating ILD in SS patients. The assessed population was predominantly composed of women with a mean age of 50 years, limited cutaneous SS, and a disease duration of approximately 7 years. In most cases, there was agreement between the findings on chest CT and lung MRI. Considering it is a radiation-free examination and capable of accurately identifying areas of lung tissue inflammatory involvement, lung MRI showed to be a useful examination, and further studies are needed to assess whether there is an advantage in using lung MRI instead of chest CT when assessing ILD activity in SS patients.

  10. Recent Advances in Computed Tomographic Technology: Cardiopulmonary Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Azadeh; Lo Gullo, Roberto; Murugan, Venkatesh; Otrakji, Alexi; Digumarthy, Subba; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2017-03-01

    Cardiothoracic diseases result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Chest computed tomography (CT) has been an imaging modality of choice for assessing a host of chest diseases, and technologic advances have enabled the emergence of coronary CT angiography as a robust noninvasive test for cardiac imaging. Technologic developments in CT have also enabled the application of dual-energy CT scanning for assessing pulmonary vascular and neoplastic processes. Concerns over increasing radiation dose from CT scanning are being addressed with introduction of more dose-efficient wide-area detector arrays and iterative reconstruction techniques. This review article discusses the technologic innovations in CT and their effect on cardiothoracic applications.

  11. Dual-energy CT in gout - A review of current concepts and applications.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hong; Chin, Teck Yew; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2017-02-26

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is a relatively recent development in the imaging of gouty arthritis. Its availability and usage have become increasingly widespread in recent years. DECT is a non-invasive method for the visualisation, characterisation and quantification of monosodium urate crystal deposits which aids the clinician in the early diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of this condition. This article aims to give an up to date review and summary of existing literature on the role and accuracy of DECT in the imaging of gout. Techniques in image acquisition, processing and interpretation will be discussed along with pitfalls, artefacts and clinical applications.

  12. A method to produce and validate a digitally reconstructed radiograph-based computer simulation for optimisation of chest radiographs acquired with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a computer model to produce realistic simulated computed radiography (CR) chest images using CT data sets of real patients. Methods Anatomical noise, which is the limiting factor in determining pathology in chest radiography, is realistically simulated by the CT data, and frequency-dependent noise has been added post-digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation to simulate exposure reduction. Realistic scatter and scatter fractions were measured in images of a chest phantom acquired on the CR system simulated by the computer model and added post-DRR calculation. Results The model has been validated with a phantom and patients and shown to provide predictions of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), tissue-to-rib ratios (TRRs: a measure of soft tissue pixel value to that of rib) and pixel value histograms that lie within the range of values measured with patients and the phantom. The maximum difference in measured SNR to that calculated was 10%. TRR values differed by a maximum of 1.3%. Conclusion Experienced image evaluators have responded positively to the DRR images, are satisfied they contain adequate anatomical features and have deemed them clinically acceptable. Therefore, the computer model can be used by image evaluators to grade chest images presented at different tube potentials and doses in order to optimise image quality and patient dose for clinical CR chest radiographs without the need for repeat patient exposures. PMID:21933979

  13. Algorithmic scatter correction in dual-energy digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Mou, Xuanqin; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Lau, Beverly A.; Chan, Suk-tak; Zhang, Lei

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Small calcifications are often the earliest and the main indicator of breast cancer. Dual-energy digital mammography (DEDM) has been considered as a promising technique to improve the detectability of calcifications since it can be used to suppress the contrast between adipose and glandular tissues of the breast. X-ray scatter leads to erroneous calculations of the DEDM image. Although the pinhole-array interpolation method can estimate scattered radiations, it requires extra exposures to measure the scatter and apply the correction. The purpose of this work is to design an algorithmic method for scatter correction in DEDM without extra exposures.Methods: In this paper, a scatter correction method for DEDM was developed based on the knowledge that scattered radiation has small spatial variation and that the majority of pixels in a mammogram are noncalcification pixels. The scatter fraction was estimated in the DEDM calculation and the measured scatter fraction was used to remove scatter from the image. The scatter correction method was implemented on a commercial full-field digital mammography system with breast tissue equivalent phantom and calcification phantom. The authors also implemented the pinhole-array interpolation scatter correction method on the system. Phantom results for both methods are presented and discussed. The authors compared the background DE calcification signals and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of calcifications in the three DE calcification images: image without scatter correction, image with scatter correction using pinhole-array interpolation method, and image with scatter correction using the authors' algorithmic method.Results: The authors' results show that the resultant background DE calcification signal can be reduced. The root-mean-square of background DE calcification signal of 1962 μm with scatter-uncorrected data was reduced to 194 μm after scatter correction using the authors' algorithmic method. The range of

  14. Dual-energy technique for digital flat-panel detectors without x-ray tube voltage switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coello, Christopher S.; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Arques, Marc; Rohr, Pierre; Odet, Christophe

    2007-03-01

    Dual-energy imaging increases the possibility of pulmonary nodule detection by reducing the bone structure noise. The major problem of the dual-energy acquisition process with digital flat-panel detectors is the interval of time between low-energy (LE) exposure and high-energy (HE) exposure. Due to misregistration between LE and HE images, motion artifacts pollute the subtracted image. This paper presents a new acquisition approach for dual-energy imaging developed in order to reduce this inter-exposure time. The idea is to keep the tube voltage constant and to just switch a filter in front of the imaged object and thus to modulate the outgoing x-ray spectrum. The first part of this study presents how to optimize system parameters for the new acquisition protocol: source voltage, dynamic filtration before the patient, exposure time for LE and HE acquisition. The tube load is kept constant to focus the optimization study on the dose and the exposure time. A noise quality factor (NQF) and a spectral quality factor (SQF) are used as criteria for optimization. The new approach system is then compared to the state-of-the-art system with voltage switching between low and high energy. A filtering algorithm of dual energy acquisitions enabling a significant noise reduction is presented. Performance between its combination with the new acquisition protocol and the reference one are compared. For a limited noise quality factor, three times faster acquisition time is obtained using the new system. Noise reduction techniques improve the image SNR by 61% in the new system and only 32% in the reference system, without taking into account the impact of better registration on the dual-energy image quality.

  15. Image quality evaluation for CARE kV technique combined with iterative reconstruction for chest computed tomography scanning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Li, Zheng-Liang; Gao, Yi; Yang, Ya-Ying; Zhao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: To investigate the radiation dose and image quality for iterative reconstruction combined with the CARE kV technique in chest computed tomography (CT) scanning for physical examination. Methods: A total of 130 patients who underwent chest CT scanning were randomly chosen and the quality reference value was set as 80 mAs. The scanning scheme was set and the patients were randomly divided into groups according to the scanning scheme. Sixty patients underwent a chest scan with 100 kV using the CARE kV technique and SAFIRE reconstruction (value=3) (experimental group) and the other 70 patients underwent chest scanning with 120 kV (control group). The mean CT value, image noise (SD), and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the apex of the lung, the level of the descending aorta bifurcation of the trachea, and the middle area of the left atrium were measured. The image quality was assessed on a 5-point scale by two radiologists and results of the two groups were compared. The CT dose index of the volume (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (ED) were compared. Results: All the images for both groups satisfied the diagnosis requirement. There was no statistical difference in the image quality between the two methods (P > 0.05). The mean CT value of the apex of the lung, the level of the descending aorta bifurcation of the trachea, and the middle area of the left atrium were not significantly different for both groups (P > 0.05), while the image noise (SD) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the apex of the lung, the level of the descending aorta bifurcation of the trachea, and the middle area of the left atrium were statistically different for both groups (P < 0.05). The CTDIvol was 3.29 ± 1.17 mGy for the experimental group and 5.30 ± 1.53 mGy for the control group. The DLP was 114.9 ± 43.73 mGy cm for the low-dose group and 167.6 ± 44.59 mGy cm for the control group. The ED was 1.61 ± 0

  16. Performance assessment of multi-frequency processing of ICU chest images for enhanced visualization of tubes and catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Couwenhoven, Mary E.; Foos, David H.; Doran, James; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2008-03-01

    An image-processing method has been developed to improve the visibility of tube and catheter features in portable chest x-ray (CXR) images captured in the intensive care unit (ICU). The image-processing method is based on a multi-frequency approach, wherein the input image is decomposed into different spatial frequency bands, and those bands that contain the tube and catheter signals are individually enhanced by nonlinear boosting functions. Using a random sampling strategy, 50 cases were retrospectively selected for the study from a large database of portable CXR images that had been collected from multiple institutions over a two-year period. All images used in the study were captured using photo-stimulable, storage phosphor computed radiography (CR) systems. Each image was processed two ways. The images were processed with default image processing parameters such as those used in clinical settings (control). The 50 images were then separately processed using the new tube and catheter enhancement algorithm (test). Three board-certified radiologists participated in a reader study to assess differences in both detection-confidence performance and diagnostic efficiency between the control and test images. Images were evaluated on a diagnostic-quality, 3-megapixel monochrome monitor. Two scenarios were studied: the baseline scenario, representative of today's workflow (a single-control image presented with the window/level adjustments enabled) vs. the test scenario (a control/test image pair presented with a toggle enabled and the window/level settings disabled). The radiologists were asked to read the images in each scenario as they normally would for clinical diagnosis. Trend analysis indicates that the test scenario offers improved reading efficiency while providing as good or better detection capability compared to the baseline scenario.

  17. Dual-energy snap-shot perfusion CT in suspect pulmonary nodules and masses and for lung cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Sudarski, Sonja; Hagelstein, Claudia; Weis, Meike; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Apfaltrer, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) has proven its clinical usefulness for improved tissue characterization within the past years. In thoracic oncology, DECT can be used to differentiate between benign and malignant pulmonary nodules and masses. In patients with known lung cancer, DECT can add incremental functional information to staging scans, therapeutic response evaluation, as well as to the assessment of lung function. This review aims to give an overview on the current clinical utilities of DECT of the chest, its multiple post-processing applications and dose saving options. Furthermore, this review highlights promising applications of DECT that merit implementation in future clinical routine.

  18. A tandem-based compact dual-energy gamma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.N.; Ludewigt, B.; Tanaka, N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.; Antolak, A.J.; Morse, D.H.; Raber, T.

    2009-11-11

    A dual-energy tandem-type gamma generator has been developed at E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. The tandem accelerator geometry allows higher energy nuclear reactions to be reached, thereby allowing more flexible generation of MeV-energy gammas for active interrogation applications.

  19. A parameterized logarithmic image processing method with Laplacian of Gaussian filtering for lung nodule enhancement in chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Yao, Liping; Chen, Bao

    2016-11-01

    The enhancement of lung nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) plays an important role in the manual as well as computer-aided detection (CADe) lung cancer. In this paper, we proposed a parameterized logarithmic image processing (PLIP) method combined with the Laplacian of a Gaussian (LoG) filter to enhance lung nodules in CXRs. We first applied several LoG filters with varying parameters to an original CXR to enhance the nodule-like structures as well as the edges in the image. We then applied the PLIP model, which can enhance lung nodule images with high contrast and was beneficial in extracting effective features for nodule detection in the CADe scheme. Our method combined the advantages of both the PLIP algorithm and the LoG algorithm, which can enhance lung nodules in chest radiographs with high contrast. To test our nodule enhancement method, we tested a CADe scheme, with a relatively high performance in nodule detection, using a publically available database containing 140 nodules in 140 CXRs enhanced through our nodule enhancement method. The CADe scheme attained a sensitivity of 81 and 70 % with an average of 5.0 frame rate (FP) and 2.0 FP, respectively, in a leave-one-out cross-validation test. By contrast, the CADe scheme based on the original image recorded a sensitivity of 77 and 63 % at 5.0 FP and 2.0 FP, respectively. We introduced the measurement of enhancement by entropy evaluation to objectively assess our method. Experimental results show that the proposed method obtains an effective enhancement of lung nodules in CXRs for both radiologists and CADe schemes.

  20. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  1. Value of tomographic thallium-201 imaging in patients with chest pain following coronary artery bypass grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Starling, M.R.; Walsh, R.A.; Dehmer, G.J.; Lasher, J.C.; Blumhardt, R.

    1987-02-01

    To determine whether thallium-201 washout profile analysis can detect regional myocardial ischemia caused by coronary artery bypass graft occlusion or progression of disease in nonbypassed coronary arteries, 19 consecutive patients with chest pain following bypass grafting were evaluated with coronary arteriography and thallium-201 scintigraphy. Twenty of the 55 coronary artery regions were perfused by an occluded bypass graft or a significantly stenosed (greater than or equal to 70% diameter narrowing) nonbypassed coronary artery, while 35 coronary regions were perfused by patent bypass grafts or insignificantly diseased coronary arteries. The tomographic thallium-201 washout profile results correlated with the bypass graft and coronary arteriographic findings. The sensitivity of tomographic thallium-201 washout profile abnormalities for arteriographic abnormalities was 75%, while the specificity was 86%. The authors conclude that tomographic thallium-201 washout profile analysis may be very useful in the evaluation of patients with chest pain following coronary artery bypass grafting by detecting regional myocardial ischemia caused by occlusion of specific bypass grafts or progression of disease in nonbypassed coronary arteries.

  2. Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction for Dual-Energy X-Ray CT Using a Joint Quadratic Likelihood Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruoqiao; Thibault, Jean-Baptiste; Bouman, Charles A; Sauer, Ken D; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray CT (DECT) has the potential to improve contrast and reduce artifacts as compared to traditional CT. Moreover, by applying model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) to dual-energy data, one might also expect to reduce noise and improve resolution. However, the direct implementation of dual-energy MBIR requires the use of a nonlinear forward model, which increases both complexity and computation. Alternatively, simplified forward models have been used which treat the material-decomposed channels separately, but these approaches do not fully account for the statistical dependencies in the channels. In this paper, we present a method for joint dual-energy MBIR (JDE-MBIR), which simplifies the forward model while still accounting for the complete statistical dependency in the material-decomposed sinogram components. The JDE-MBIR approach works by using a quadratic approximation to the polychromatic log-likelihood and a simple but exact nonnegativity constraint in the image domain. We demonstrate that our method is particularly effective when the DECT system uses fast kVp switching, since in this case the model accounts for the inaccuracy of interpolated sinogram entries. Both phantom and clinical results show that the proposed model produces images that compare favorably in quality to previous decomposition-based methods, including FBP and other statistical iterative approaches.

  3. Dual-Energy CT Angiography in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, Carolin Jochum, Susanne; Sadick, Maliha; Huck, Kurt; Ziegler, Peter; Fink, Christian; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Diehl, Steffen J.

    2009-07-15

    We sought to study the accuracy of dual-energy computed tomographic angiography (DE-CTA) for the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity by using the dual-energy bone removal technique compared with a commercially available conventional bone removal tool. Twenty patients underwent selective digital subtraction angiography and DE-CTA of the pelvis and lower extremities. CTA data were postprocessed with two different applications: conventional bone removal and dual-energy bone removal. All data were reconstructed and evaluated as 3D maximum-intensity projections. Time requirements for reconstruction were documented. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and concordance of DE-CTA regarding degree of stenosis and vessel wall calcification were calculated. A total of 359 vascular segments were analyzed. Compared with digital subtraction angiography, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, respectively, of CTA was 97.2%, 94.1%, and 94.7% by the dual-energy bone removal technique. The conventional bone removal tool delivered a sensitivity of 77.1%, a specificity of 70.7%, and an accuracy of 72.0%. Best results for both postprocessing methods were achieved in the vascular segments of the upper leg. In severely calcified segments, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy stayed above 90% by the dual-energy bone removal technique, whereas the conventional bone removal technique showed a substantial decrease of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. DE-CTA is a feasible and accurate diagnostic method in the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Results obtained by DE-CTA are superior to the conventional bone removal technique and less dependent on vessel wall calcifications.

  4. [Influence of "optical illusion" on the detectability of pneumothorax in diagnosis for chest CT images: substantiation by visual psychological simulation images].

    PubMed

    Henmi, Shuichi

    2008-10-20

    Some cases have been reported in which an optical illusion of lightness perception influences the detectability in diagnosis of low-density hematoma in head CT images in addition to the visual impression of the photographic density of the brain. Therefore, in this study, the author attempted to compare the detectability in diagnosis for chest images with pneumothorax using visual subjective evaluation, and investigated the influence of optical illusion on that detectability in diagnosis. Results indicated that in the window setting of lung, on such an occasion when the low-absorption free space with pneumothorax forms a crescent or the reduced lung borders on the chest-wall, an optical illusion in which the visual impression on the difference of the film contrast between the lung and the low-absorption free space with pneumothorax was psychologically emphasized when contrast was observed. In all cases the detectability in diagnosis for original images with the white thorax and mediastinum was superior to virtual images. Further, in case of the virtual double window setting of lung, thorax, and mediastinum, under the influence of the difference in the radiological anatomy of thorax and mediastinum as a result of the grouping theories of lightness computation, an optical illusion different from the original images was observed.

  5. Statement of Work Third Party Algorithm Development and Evaluation of Detection of Liquid Explosives in Dual-Energy Digital Radiographic/TIP Ready X-ray Images - Public Version

    SciTech Connect

    Nekoogar, F; Martz, Jr., H E

    2009-09-23

    The purpose of this statement of work is for third party collaborators to train, validate and have Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS) evaluate algorithms to detect liquid threats in digital radiography (DR)/TIP Ready X-ray (TRX) images that will be provided by LLNS through the Transportation and Security Administration (TSA). LLNS will provide a set of images with threat(s) to determine detection rates and non-threat images from airports to determine false alarm rates. A key including a bounding box showing the locations of the threats and non-threats will be provided for the images. It is expected that the Subcontractor shall use half of the images with their keys for training the algorithms and the other half shall be used for validation (third party evaluation) purposes. The Subcontractor shall not use the key to the second half of the data other than for the validation and reporting of the performance of its algorithm (not for training). The Subcontractor has 45 business days from the receipt of datasets and the Subcontract to: (1) Run their detection/classification algorithms on the data; (2) Deliver a final report describing their performance by generating Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves using their algorithm; and (3) Deliver a copy of the third party's executable software (already trained and validated by the datasets) to LLNL accompanied by a user manual. LLNS will evaluate the performance of the same algorithm on another separate set of data. LLNS evaluation of the Subcontractor's algorithm will be documented in a final report within 30 days of receiving the executable code. This report will be sent to TSA and the report may be disseminated to the Subcontract at TSA's discretion.

  6. Visualizing and enhancing a deep learning framework using patients age and gender for chest x-ray image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anavi, Yaron; Kogan, Ilya; Gelbart, Elad; Geva, Ofer; Greenspan, Hayit

    2016-03-01

    We explore the combination of text metadata, such as patients' age and gender, with image-based features, for X-ray chest pathology image retrieval. We focus on a feature set extracted from a pre-trained deep convolutional network shown in earlier work to achieve state-of-the-art results. Two distance measures are explored: a descriptor-based measure, which computes the distance between image descriptors, and a classification-based measure, which performed by a comparison of the corresponding SVM classification probabilities. We show that retrieval results increase once the age and gender information combined with the features extracted from the last layers of the network, with best results using the classification-based scheme. Visualization of the X-ray data is presented by embedding the high dimensional deep learning features in a 2-D dimensional space while preserving the pairwise distances using the t-SNE algorithm. The 2-D visualization gives the unique ability to find groups of X-ray images that are similar to the query image and among themselves, which is a characteristic we do not see in a 1-D traditional ranking.

  7. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes Chest pain can also be caused by: Panic attack. If you have periods of intense fear accompanied ... fear of dying, you may be experiencing a panic attack. Shingles. Caused by a reactivation of the chickenpox ...

  8. Dual Energy CT Pulmonary Angiography with 6g Iodine—A Propensity Score-Matched Study

    PubMed Central

    Higashigaito, Kai; Martini, Katharina; Wurnig, Moritz; Seifert, Burkhardt; Keller, Dagmar; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of low contrast media (CM) dose dual-energy computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) with advanced monoenergetic reconstructions in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and Methods The study had institutional review board approval; all patients gave written informed consent. Forty-one patients (25 men, 16 women, mean age 62.9±14.7 years) undergoing low CM dose (15ml, 6g iodine) dual-energy CTPA with advanced monoenergetic reconstructions were matched via propensity-scoring based on logistic regression analysis with a comparison group of 41 patients (24 men, 17 women, mean age 62.7±13.9 years) undergoing standard CM dose single-energy CTPA (80ml, 24g iodine). Subjective (noise, artifacts) and objective (attenuation, noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)) image quality was assessed by two blinded, independent readers. All patients underwent clinical follow-up after three months for evaluation of adverse events. Results Interrater agreement for subjective image quality in both groups ranged from fair to excellent (ICC: 0.46–0.84); agreement for objective image quality was excellent (ICC: 0.83–0.93). There was no significant difference regarding subjective noise (p = 0.15–0.72) and artifacts (p = 0.16–1) between the low and the standard CM dose group. There was no significant difference regarding CNR between the CM dose groups (p = 0.11–0.87). Seven of the 41 (17%) patients in the low and 5/41 (12%) in the standard CM dose group were diagnosed with PE (p = 0.32). No patient suffered from subsequent PE or PE-associated death during the follow-up period. Conclusion Dual-energy CTPA with advanced monoenergetic reconstruction is feasible with 6g iodine and allows for the diagnosis and safe exclusion of central, lobar, and segmental PE. PMID:27907049

  9. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunobu, Y; Shiotsuki, K; Morishita, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body.

  10. Application of dual-energy x-ray techniques for automated food container inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashishekhar, N.; Veselitza, D.

    2016-02-01

    Manufacturing for plastic food containers often results in small metal particles getting into the containers during the production process. Metal detectors are usually not sensitive enough to detect these metal particles (0.5 mm or lesser), especially when the containers are stacked in large sealed shipping packages; X-ray inspection of these packages provides a viable alternative. This paper presents the results of an investigation into dual-energy X-ray techniques for automated detection of small metal particles in plastic food container packages. The sample packages consist of sealed cardboard boxes containing stacks of food containers: plastic cups for food, and Styrofoam cups for noodles. The primary goal of the investigation was to automatically identify small metal particles down to 0.5 mm diameter in size or less, randomly located within the containers. The multiple container stacks in each box make it virtually impossible to reliably detect the particles with single-energy X-ray techniques either visually or with image processing. The stacks get overlaid in the X-ray image and create many indications almost identical in contrast and size to real metal particles. Dual-energy X-ray techniques were investigated and found to result in a clear separation of the metal particles from the food container stack-ups. Automated image analysis of the resulting images provides reliable detection of the small metal particles.

  11. Applying high frame-rate digital radiography and dual-energy distributed-sources for advanced tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travish, Gil; Rangel, Felix J.; Evans, Mark A.; Schmiedehausen, Kristin

    2013-09-01

    Conventional radiography uses a single point x-ray source with a fan or cone beam to visualize various areas of the human body. An imager records the transmitted photons—historically film and now increasingly digital radiography (DR) flat panel detectors—followed by optional image post-processing. Some post-processing techniques of particular interest are tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction. Tomosynthesis adds the ability to recreate quasi-3D images from a series of 2D projections. These exposures are typically taken along an arc or other path; and, tomosynthesis reconstruction is used to form a three-dimensional representation of the area of interest. Dual-energy radiography adds the ability to enhance or "eliminate" structures based on their different attenuation of well-separated end-point energies in two exposures. These advanced capabilities come at a high cost in terms of complexity, imaging time, capital equipment, space, and potentially reduced image quality due to motion blur if acquired sequentially. Recently, the prospect of creating x-ray sources, which are composed of arrays of micro-emitters, has been put forward. These arrays offer a flat-panel geometry and may afford advantages in fabrication methodology, size and cost. They also facilitate the use of the dual energy technology. Here we examine the possibility of using such an array of x-ray sources combined with high frame-rate (~kHz) DR detectors to produce advanced medical images without the need for moving gantries or other complex motion systems. Combining the advantages of dual energy imaging with the ability to determine the relative depth location of anatomical structures or pathological findings from imaging procedures should prove to be a powerful diagnostic tool. We also present use cases that would benefit from the capabilities of this modality.

  12. Quantification of breast density with dual energy mammography: An experimental feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Breast density, the percentage of glandular breast tissue, has been shown to be a strong indicator of breast cancer risk. A quantitative method to measure breast density with dual energy mammography was investigated using physical phantoms. Methods: The dual energy mammography system used a tungsten anode x-ray tube with a 50 μm rhodium beam filter for low energy images and a 300 μm copper beam filter for high energy images. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Four different phantom studies were used to evaluate the technique. The first study consisted of phantoms with thicknesses of 2.5–8.5 cm in 0.5 cm steps with variable densities centered at a mean of 28%. The second study consisted of phantoms at a fixed thickness of 4.0 cm, which ranged in densities from 0% to 100% in increments of 12.5%. The third study consisted of 4.0 cm thick phantoms at densities of 25%, 50% and 75% each imaged at three areal sizes, approximately 62.5, 125, and 250 cm2, in order to assess the effect of breast size on density measurement. The fourth study consisted of step phantoms designed to more closely mimic the shape of a female breast with maximal thicknesses from 3.0 to 7.0 cm at a fixed density of 50%. All images were corrected for x-ray scatter. Results: The RMS errors in breast density measurements were 0.44% for the variable thickness phantoms, 0.64% for the variable density phantoms, 2.87% for the phantoms of different areal sizes, and 4.63% for step phantoms designed to closely resemble the shape of a breast. Conclusions: The results of the phantom studies indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to measure breast density with an RMS error of approximately 5%. PMID:20229889

  13. A non-contact method for imaging the posterior chest using magnetic induction principles that allows to monitor pulmonary oedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giirsoy, D.; Scharfetter, H.

    2010-04-01

    Real time monitoring of lung function is of particular importance for the patients who are in the intensive care unit, and thus spend long durations of time in a supine position. This kind of recumbent positioning of the patients gives rise to a markedly increased fluid accumulation in the posterior lung regions associated with the gravity dependency. In order to monitor the temporal behavior of the accumulation, we proposed a non-contact semi-tomography method which uses magnetic induction principles. In the proposed method, an eddy current density is induced within the dorsal tissues including the posterior lungs via the transmitter coils which are embedded into the patient bed, and the magnetic field strength is measured similarly using an array of sensor coils in a non-contact manner. For the assessment of the method, we used a patient specific, MRI-guided realistic chest model and presented the reconstructed time-differential images.

  14. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and database system for chest diagnosis based on multi-helical CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutarou; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru; Sasagawa, Michizou

    2006-03-01

    Multi-helical CT scanner advanced remarkably at the speed at which the chest CT images were acquired for mass screening. Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images and a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification. We also have developed electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system for the community health in two or more regions by using the Virtual Private Network router and Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system for safety of medical information. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have now developed a new computer-aided workstation and database that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. This paper describes basic studies that have been conducted to evaluate this new system. The results of this study indicate that our computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and safety of medical information.

  15. Analysis of ROC on chest direct digital radiography (DR) after image processing in diagnosis of SARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Guozheng; Lan, Rihui; Zeng, Qingsi; Zheng, Zhong

    2004-05-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS, also called Infectious Atypical Pneumonia), which initially broke out in late 2002, has threatened the public"s health seriously. How to confirm the patients contracting SARS becomes an urgent issue in diagnosis. This paper intends to evaluate the importance of Image Processing in the diagnosis on SARS at the early stage. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analysis has been employed in this study to compare the value of DR images in the diagnosis of SARS patients before and after image processing by Symphony Software supplied by E-Com Technology Ltd., and DR image study of 72 confirmed or suspected SARS patients were reviewed respectively. All the images taken from the studied patients were processed by Symphony. Both the original and processed images were taken into ROC analysis, based on which the ROC graph for each group of images has been produced as described below: For processed images: a = 1.9745, b = 1.4275, SA = 0.8714; For original images: a = 0.9066, b = 0.8310, SA = 0.7572; (a - intercept, b - slop, SA - Area below the curve). The result shows significant difference between the original images and processed images (P<0.01). In summary, the images processed by Symphony are superior to the original ones in detecting the opacity lesion, and increases the accuracy of SARS diagnosis.

  16. Evaluation of a prototype dual-energy computed tomographic apparatus. II. Determination of vertebral bone mineral content.

    PubMed

    Vetter, J R; Perman, W H; Kalender, W A; Mazess, R B; Holden, J E

    1986-01-01

    A prototype dual-energy computed tomographic (CT) scanner (Siemens Somatom DR3) with rapid kVp switching and prereconstruction processing has been used to measure vertebral bone mineral density. With this approach misregistration and beam hardening inaccuracies can be reduced considerably. Basis material images of aluminum- and Lucite-equivalent density enable measurements of bone mineral density that are nearly independent of the amount of marrow fat. To simulate variable marrow fat, alcohol-water mixtures were used as media in calibration standards. A section of dried trabecular bone was also scanned immersed in varying alcohol-water mixtures. In both simulations it was shown that the dual-energy measurement is nearly independent of marrow composition whereas the single-energy measurement would be strongly influenced by marrow fat. Dual-energy CT was compared to dual-photon absorptiometry (153Gd) for the measurement of bone mineral mass of ten excised human vertebrae. There was a high degree of correlation between the two measurements (r = 0.97). Dual-energy and single-energy CT measurements on 17 patients with suspected metabolic bone disease strongly support the conclusion that the influence of fat can lead to significant errors in single-energy determinations of the mineral density of trabecular bone.

  17. Stress Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Observation Unit Care Reduces Cost for Patients With Emergent Chest Pain: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Hoekstra, James W.; Case, Doug; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hiestand, Brian; Diercks, Deborah B.; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Study objective We determine whether imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an observation unit would reduce medical costs among patients with emergent non-low-risk chest pain who otherwise would be managed with an inpatient care strategy. Methods Emergency department patients (n=110) at intermediate or high probability for acute coronary syndrome without electrocardiographic or biomarker evidence of a myocardial infarction provided consent and were randomized to stress cardiac MRI in an observation unit versus standard inpatient care. The primary outcome was direct hospital cost calculated as the sum of hospital and provider costs. Estimated median cost differences (Hodges-Lehmann) and distribution-free 95% confidence intervals (Moses) were used to compare groups. Results There were 110 participants with 53 randomized to cardiac MRI and 57 to inpatient care; 8 of 110 (7%) experienced acute coronary syndrome. In the MRI pathway, 49 of 53 underwent stress cardiac MRI, 11 of 53 were admitted, 1 left against medical advice, 41 were discharged, and 2 had acute coronary syndrome. In the inpatient care pathway, 39 of 57 patients initially received stress testing, 54 of 57 were admitted, 3 left against medical advice, and 6 had acute coronary syndrome. At 30 days, no subjects in either group experienced acute coronary syndrome after discharge. The cardiac MRI group had a reduced median hospitalization cost (Hodges-Lehmann estimate $588; 95% confidence interval $336 to $811); 79% were managed without hospital admission. Conclusion Compared with inpatient care, an observation unit strategy involving stress cardiac MRI reduced incident cost without any cases of missed acute coronary syndrome in patients with emergent chest pain. PMID:20554078

  18. Study on Dual-Energy X-ray Computed Tomography using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoo, T.; Torikoshi, M.; Endo, M.; Natsuhori, M.; Kakizaki, T.; Yamada, N.; Itoh, N.; Uesugi, K.; Yagi, N.

    2004-05-01

    The electron density is one of the most important elements for the treatment planning in the radiotherapy, because this information is used for the range estimation of the heavy-ion beam. In order to measure more precise electron density, we have developed the dual-energy x-ray CT system using synchrotron radiation. The x-ray detector consists of 256 × 96 scintillator-array. It can take more than a hundred projection images per second. The response of the detector to x-rays was proved to be linear up to at least 1013 photon/pixel. The experiments were carried out using two monochromatic x-rays of 40 keV and 70 keV at the beam-line BL20B2 of SPring-8. As the results from samples of water, ethanol and solutions of dipotassium hydrogenphosphate with five concentrations, the electron densities measured in the dual-energy x-ray CT method were in agreement with the theoretical values by about ± 1%. This is almost the same level as that achieved by the one-dimensional CT system we developed previously. In addition, a sample of kidney of a pig fixed by formalin neutral buffer solution was used to distinguish the tissues in the CT images based on the electron density and the effective atomic number that was additionally obtained in the dual-energy x-ray CT. It suggested that renal pelvis was enriched with adipose tissue, and it was difficult to distinguish renal cortex and renal medulla.

  19. Study on Dual-Energy X-ray Computed Tomography using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunoo, T.; Torikoshi, M.; Endo, M.; Natsuhori, M.; Kakizaki, T.; Yamada, N.; Itoh, N.; Uesugi, K.; Yagi, N.

    2004-05-12

    The electron density is one of the most important elements for the treatment planning in the radiotherapy, because this information is used for the range estimation of the heavy-ion beam. In order to measure more precise electron density, we have developed the dual-energy x-ray CT system using synchrotron radiation. The x-ray detector consists of 256 x 96 scintillator-array. It can take more than a hundred projection images per second. The response of the detector to x-rays was proved to be linear up to at least 1013 photon/pixel. The experiments were carried out using two monochromatic x-rays of 40 keV and 70 keV at the beam-line BL20B2 of SPring-8. As the results from samples of water, ethanol and solutions of dipotassium hydrogenphosphate with five concentrations, the electron densities measured in the dual-energy x-ray CT method were in agreement with the theoretical values by about {+-} 1%. This is almost the same level as that achieved by the one-dimensional CT system we developed previously. In addition, a sample of kidney of a pig fixed by formalin neutral buffer solution was used to distinguish the tissues in the CT images based on the electron density and the effective atomic number that was additionally obtained in the dual-energy x-ray CT. It suggested that renal pelvis was enriched with adipose tissue, and it was difficult to distinguish renal cortex and renal medulla.

  20. Dual-energy electronic cleansing for non-cathartic CT colonography: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wenli; Liu, Bob; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2010-03-01

    Partial volume effect and inhomogeneity are two major causes of artifacts in electronic cleansing (EC) for non-cathartic CT colonography (CTC). Our purpose was to develop a novel method of EC for non-cathartic dual-energy CTC (DECTC) using a subvoxel multi-spectral material classifier and a regional material decomposition method for differentiation of residual fecal materials from colonic soft-tissue structures. In this study, an anthropomorphic colon phantom, which was filled with a mixture of aqueous fiber (psyllium), ground foodstuff (cereal), and non-ionic iodinated agent (Omnipaque iohexol, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI), was scanned by a dual-energy CT scanner (SOMATON, Siemens) with two photon energies: 80 kVp and 140 kVp. The DE-CTC images were subjected to a dual-energy EC (DE-EC) scheme, in which a multi-spectral material classifier was used to compute the fraction of each material within one voxel by an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. This was followed by a regional material segmentation method for identifying of homogeneous sub-regions (tiles) as fecal materials from other tissue types. The results were compared with the structural-analysis cleansing (SA-EC) method based upon the CTC images of native phantom without fillings. The mean cleansing ratio of the DE-EC scheme was 96.57+/-1.21% compared to 76.3+/-5.56% of the SA-EC scheme. The soft-tissue preservation ratio of the DE-EC scheme was 97.05%+/-0.64% compared to 99.25+/-0.77% of the SA-EC scheme.

  1. Dual energy micro CT SkyScan 1173 for the characterization of urinary stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitri, L. A.; Asyana, V.; Ridwan, T.; Anwary, F.; Soekersi, H.; Latief, F. D. E.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of the composition of urinary stones is an essential part to determine suitable treatments for patients. The aim of this research is to characterize the urinary stones by using dual energy micro CT SkyScan 11173. This technique combines high-energy and low- energy scanning during a single acquisition. Six human urinary stones were scanned in vitro using 80 kV and 120 kV micro CT SkyScan 1173. Projected images were produced by micro CT SkyScan 1173 and then reconstructed using NRecon (in-house software from SkyScan) to obtain a complete 3D image. The urinary stone images were analysed using CT analyser to obtain information of internal structure and Hounsfield Unit (HU) values to determine the information regarding the composition of the urinary stones, respectively. HU values obtained from some regions of interest in the same slice are compared to a reference HU. The analysis shows information of the composition of the six scanned stones obtained. The six stones consist of stone number 1 (calcium+cystine), number 2 (calcium+struvite), number 3 (calcium+cystine+struvite), number 4 (calcium), number 5 (calcium+cystine+struvite), and number 6 (calcium+uric acid). This shows that dual energy micro CT SkyScan 1173 was able to characterize the composition of the urinary stone.

  2. Advances in imaging chest tuberculosis: blurring of differences between children and adults.

    PubMed

    Andronikou, Savvas; Vanhoenacker, Filip M; De Backer, Adelard I

    2009-12-01

    This article reviews the ongoing role of imaging in the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and its complications. A modern imaging classification of TB, taking into account both adults and children and the blurring of differences in the presentation patterns, must be absorbed into daily practice. Clinicians must not only be familiar with imaging features of TB but also become expert at detecting these when radiologists are unavailable. Communication between radiologists and clinicians with regard to local constraints, patterns of disease, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection rates, and imaging parameters relevant for management (especially in drug resistance programs) is paramount for making an impact with imaging, and preserving clinician confidence. Recognition of special imaging, anatomic and vulnerability differences between children and adults is more important than trying to define patterns of disease exclusive to children.

  3. Automatic segmentation of solitary pulmonary nodules based on local intensity structure analysis and 3D neighborhood features in 3D chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Honma, Hirotoshi; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) segmentation method based on local intensity structure analysis and neighborhood feature analysis in chest CT images. Automated segmentation of SPNs is desirable for a chest computer-aided detection/diagnosis (CAS) system since a SPN may indicate early stage of lung cancer. Due to the similar intensities of SPNs and other chest structures such as blood vessels, many false positives (FPs) are generated by nodule detection methods. To reduce such FPs, we introduce two features that analyze the relation between each segmented nodule candidate and it neighborhood region. The proposed method utilizes a blob-like structure enhancement (BSE) filter based on Hessian analysis to augment the blob-like structures as initial nodule candidates. Then a fine segmentation is performed to segment much more accurate region of each nodule candidate. FP reduction is mainly addressed by investigating two neighborhood features based on volume ratio and eigenvector of Hessian that are calculates from the neighborhood region of each nodule candidate. We evaluated the proposed method by using 40 chest CT images, include 20 standard-dose CT images that we randomly chosen from a local database and 20 low-dose CT images that were randomly chosen from a public database: LIDC. The experimental results revealed that the average TP rate of proposed method was 93.6% with 12.3 FPs/case.

  4. WE-G-204-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): Effect of Image Processing Parameters On Nodule Detectability in Chest Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Little, K; Lu, Z; MacMahon, H; Reiser, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of varying system image processing parameters on lung nodule detectability in digital radiography. Methods: An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged in the posterior-anterior position using a GE Discovery XR656 digital radiography system. To simulate lung nodules, a polystyrene board with 6.35mm diameter PMMA spheres was placed adjacent to the phantom (into the x-ray path). Due to magnification, the projected simulated nodules had a diameter in the radiographs of approximately 7.5 mm. The images were processed using one of GE’s default chest settings (Factory3) and reprocessed by varying the “Edge” and “Tissue Contrast” processing parameters, which were the two user-configurable parameters for a single edge and contrast enhancement algorithm. For each parameter setting, the nodule signals were calculated by subtracting the chest-only image from the image with simulated nodules. Twenty nodule signals were averaged, Gaussian filtered, and radially averaged in order to generate an approximately noiseless signal. For each processing parameter setting, this noise-free signal and 180 background samples from across the lung were used to estimate ideal observer performance in a signal-known-exactly detection task. Performance was estimated using a channelized Hotelling observer with 10 Laguerre-Gauss channel functions. Results: The “Edge” and “Tissue Contrast” parameters each had an effect on the detectability as calculated by the model observer. The CHO-estimated signal detectability ranged from 2.36 to 2.93 and was highest for “Edge” = 4 and “Tissue Contrast” = −0.15. In general, detectability tended to decrease as “Edge” was increased and as “Tissue Contrast” was increased. A human observer study should be performed to validate the relation to human detection performance. Conclusion: Image processing parameters can affect lung nodule detection performance in radiography. While validation with a

  5. Chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Budassi, S A

    1978-09-01

    For any patient with obvious or suspected chest trauma, one must first assure an adequate airway and adequate ventilation. One should never hesitate to administer oxygen to a victim with a chest injury. The nurse should be concerned with adequate circulation--this may mean the administration of intravenous fluids, specifically volume expanders, via large-bore cannulae. Any obvious open chest wound should be sealed, and any fractures should be splinted. These patients should be rapidly transported to the nearest Emergency Department capable of handling this type of injury. The majority of patients who arrive in the Emergency Department following blunt or penetrating trauma should be considered to be in critical condition until proven otherwise. On presentation, it is essential to recognize those signs, symptoms, and laboratory values that identify the patient's condition as life-threatening. Simple recognition of these signs and symptoms and early appropriate intervention may alter an otherwise fatal outcome.

  6. Automated bone removal in CT angiography: Comparison of methods based on single energy and dual energy scans

    SciTech Connect

    Straten, Marcel van; Schaap, Michiel; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Greuter, Marcel J.; Lugt, Aad van der; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dual energy based methods for bone removal in computed tomography angiography (CTA) images and compare these with single energy based methods that use an additional, nonenhanced, CT scan. Methods: Four different bone removal methods were applied to CT scans of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom, acquired with a second generation dual source CT scanner. The methods differed by the way information on the presence of bone was obtained (either by using an additional, nonenhanced scan or by scanning with two tube voltages at the same time) and by the way the bone was removed from the CTA images (either by masking or subtracting the bone). The phantom contained parts which mimic vessels of various diameters in direct contact with bone. Both a quantitative and qualitative analysis of image quality after bone removal was performed. Image quality was quantified by the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) normalized to the square root of the dose (CNRD). At locations where vessels touch bone, the quality of the bone removal and the vessel preservation were visually assessed. The dual energy based methods were assessed with and without the addition of a 0.4 mm tin filter to the high voltage x-ray tube filtration. For each bone removal method, the dose required to obtain a certain CNR after bone removal was compared with the dose of a reference scan with the same CNR but without automated bone removal. The CNRD value of the reference scan was maximized by choosing the lowest tube voltage available. Results: All methods removed the bone completely. CNRD values were higher for the masking based methods than for the subtraction based methods. Single energy based methods had a higher CNRD value than the corresponding dual energy based methods. For the subtraction based dual energy method, tin filtration improved the CNRD value with approximately 50%. For the masking based dual energy method, it was easier to differentiate between iodine and bone when tin filtration

  7. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography: initial clinical results of a multireader, multicase study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) as an adjunct to mammography (MX) ± ultrasonography (US) with the diagnostic accuracy of MX ± US alone. Methods One hundred ten consenting women with 148 breast lesions (84 malignant, 64 benign) underwent two-view dual-energy CEDM in addition to MX and US using a specially modified digital mammography system (Senographe DS, GE Healthcare). Reference standard was histology for 138 lesions and follow-up for 12 lesions. Six radiologists from 4 institutions interpreted the images using high-resolution softcopy workstations. Confidence of presence (5-point scale), probability of cancer (7-point scale), and BI-RADS scores were evaluated for each finding. Sensitivity, specificity and ROC curve areas were estimated for each reader and overall. Visibility of findings on MX ± CEDM and MX ± US was evaluated with a Likert scale. Results The average per-lesion sensitivity across all readers was significantly higher for MX ± US ± CEDM than for MX ± US (0.78 vs. 0.71 using BIRADS, p = 0.006). All readers improved their clinical performance and the average area under the ROC curve was significantly superior for MX ± US ± CEDM than for MX ± US ((0.87 vs 0.83, p = 0.045). Finding visibility was similar or better on MX ± CEDM than MX ± US in 80% of cases. Conclusions Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography as an adjunct to MX ± US improves diagnostic accuracy compared to MX ± US alone. Addition of iodinated contrast agent to MX facilitates the visualization of breast lesions. PMID:22697607

  8. Calcium scoring with dual-energy CT in men and women: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Liu, Songtao; Myers, Kyle; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Zeng, Rongping; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to quantify and compare the potential impact of gender differences on coronary artery calcium scoring with dual-energy CT. An anthropomorphic thorax phantom with four synthetic heart vessels (diameter 3-4.5 mm: female/male left main and left circumflex artery) were scanned with and without female breast plates. Ten repeat scans were acquired in both single- and dual-energy modes and reconstructed at six reconstruction settings: two slice thicknesses (3 mm, 0.6 mm) and three reconstruction algorithms (FBP, IR3, IR5). Agatston and calcium volume scores were estimated from the reconstructed data using a segmentation-based approach. Total calcium score (summation of four vessels), and male/female calcium scores (summation of male/female vessels scanned in phantom without/with breast plates) were calculated accordingly. Both Agatston and calcium volume scores were found comparable between single- and dual-energy scans (Pearson r= 0.99, p<0.05). The total calcium scores were larger for the thinner slice thickness. Among the scores obtained from the three reconstruction algorithms, FBP yielded the highest and IR5 yielded the lowest scores. The total calcium scores from the phantom without breast plates were significantly larger than those from the phantom with breast plates, and the difference increased with the stronger denoising in iterative algorithm and with thicker slices. Both gender-based anatomical differences and vessel size impacted the calcium scores. The calcium volume scores tended to be underestimated when the vessels were smaller. These findings are valuable for understanding inconsistencies between women and men in calcium scoring, and for standardizing imaging protocols for improved gender-specific calcium scoring.

  9. Predicting Football Players' Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Body Composition Using Standard Anthropometric Measures

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jonathan M.; Lambert, Brad S.; Martin, Steven E.; Green, John S.; Crouse, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The recent increase in athlete size, particularly in football athletes of all levels, coupled with the increased health risk associated with obesity warrants continued monitoring of body composition from a health perspective in this population. Equations developed to predict percentage of body fat (%Fat) have been shown to be population specific and might not be accurate for football athletes. Objective: To develop multiple regression equations using standard anthropometric measurements to estimate dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry %Fat (DEXA%Fat) in collegiate football players. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Patients and Other Participants: One hundred fifty-seven National Collegiate Athletic Association Division IA football athletes (age  =  20 ± 1 years, height  =  185.6 ± 6.5 cm, mass  =  103.1 ± 20.4 kg, DEXA%Fat  =  19.5 ± 9.1%) participated. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants had the following measures: (1) body composition testing with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; (2) skinfold measurements in millimeters, including chest, triceps, subscapular, midaxillary, suprailiac, abdominal (SFAB), and thigh; and (3) standard circumference measurements in centimeters, including ankle, calf, thigh, hip (AHIP), waist, umbilical (AUMB), chest, wrist, forearm, arm, and neck. Regression analysis and fit statistics were used to determine the relationship between DEXA%Fat and each skinfold thickness, sum of all skinfold measures (SFSUM), and individual circumference measures. Results: Statistical analysis resulted in the development of 3 equations to predict DEXA%Fat: model 1, (0.178 • AHIP) + (0.097 • AUMB) + (0.089 • SFSUM) − 19.641; model 2, (0.193 • AHIP) + (0.133 • AUMB) + (0.371 • SFAB) − 23.0523; and model 3, (0.132 • SFSUM) + 3.530. The R2 values were 0.94 for model 1, 0.93 for model 2, and 0.91 for model 3 (for all, P < .001). Conclusions: The equations developed provide an accurate way to assess DEXA

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru

    2008-03-01

    Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images, a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification and a vertebra body analysis algorithm for quantitative evaluation of osteoporosis likelihood by using helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening. The function to observe suspicious shadow in detail are provided in computer-aided diagnosis workstation with these screening algorithms. We also have developed the telemedicine network by using Web medical image conference system with the security improvement of images transmission, Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system. Biometric face authentication used on site of telemedicine makes "Encryption of file" and Success in login" effective. As a result, patients' private information is protected. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have developed a new computer-aided workstation and a new telemedicine network that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. The results of this study indicate that our radiological information system without film by using computer-aided diagnosis workstation and our telemedicine network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and security improvement of medical information.

  11. Computer-aided diagnosis for osteoporosis using chest 3D CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, K.; Matsuhiro, M.; Suzuki, H.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.

    2016-03-01

    The patients of osteoporosis comprised of about 13 million people in Japan and it is one of the problems the aging society has. In order to prevent the osteoporosis, it is necessary to do early detection and treatment. Multi-slice CT technology has been improving the three dimensional (3-D) image analysis with higher body axis resolution and shorter scan time. The 3-D image analysis using multi-slice CT images of thoracic vertebra can be used as a support to diagnose osteoporosis and at the same time can be used for lung cancer diagnosis which may lead to early detection. We develop automatic extraction and partitioning algorithm for spinal column by analyzing vertebral body structure, and the analysis algorithm of the vertebral body using shape analysis and a bone density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis diagnosis support system obtained high extraction rate of the thoracic vertebral in both normal and low doses.

  12. Dual-energy approach to contrast-enhanced mammography using the balanced filter method: Spectral optimization and preliminary phantom measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2007-11-15

    Dual-energy contrast agent-enhanced mammography is a technique of demonstrating breast cancers obscured by a cluttered background resulting from the contrast between soft tissues in the breast. The technique has usually been implemented by exploiting two exposures to different x-ray tube voltages. In this article, another dual-energy approach using the balanced filter method without switching the tube voltages is described. For the spectral optimization of dual-energy mammography using the balanced filters, we applied a theoretical framework reported by Lemacks et al. [Med. Phys. 29, 1739-1751 (2002)] to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an iodinated contrast agent subtraction image. This permits the selection of beam parameters such as tube voltage and balanced filter material, and the optimization of the latter's thickness with respect to some critical quantity--in this case, mean glandular dose. For an imaging system with a 0.1 mm thick CsI:Tl scintillator, we predict that the optimal tube voltage would be 45 kVp for a tungsten anode using zirconium, iodine, and neodymium balanced filters. A mean glandular dose of 1.0 mGy is required to obtain an SNR of 5 in order to detect 1.0 mg/cm{sup 2} iodine in the resulting clutter-free image of a 5 cm thick breast composed of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissue. In addition to spectral optimization, we carried out phantom measurements to demonstrate the present dual-energy approach for obtaining a clutter-free image, which preferentially shows iodine, of a breast phantom comprising three major components - acrylic spheres, olive oil, and an iodinated contrast agent. The detection of iodine details on the cluttered background originating from the contrast between acrylic spheres and olive oil is analogous to the task of distinguishing contrast agents in a mixture of glandular and adipose tissues.

  13. A computer-aided diagnosis system to detect pathologies in temporal subtraction images of chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looper, Jared; Harrison, Melanie; Armato, Samuel G.

    2016-03-01

    Radiologists often compare sequential radiographs to identify areas of pathologic change; however, this process is prone to error, as human anatomy can obscure the regions of change, causing the radiologists to overlook pathology. Temporal subtraction (TS) images can provide enhanced visualization of regions of change in sequential radiographs and allow radiologists to better detect areas of change in radiographs. Not all areas of change shown in TS images, however, are actual pathology. The purpose of this study was to create a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system that identifies which regions of change are caused by pathology and which are caused by misregistration of the radiographs used to create the TS image. The dataset used in this study contained 120 images with 74 pathologic regions on 54 images outlined by an experienced radiologist. High and low ("light" and "dark") gray-level candidate regions were extracted from the images using gray-level thresholding. Then, sampling techniques were used to address the class imbalance problem between "true" and "false" candidate regions. Next, the datasets of light candidate regions, dark candidate regions, and the combined set of light and dark candidate regions were used as training and testing data for classifiers by using five-fold cross validation. Of the classifiers tested (support vector machines, discriminant analyses, logistic regression, and k-nearest neighbors), the support vector machine on the combined candidates using synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE) performed best with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.85, a sensitivity of 85%, and a specificity of 84%.

  14. Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry: Beyond Bone Mineral Density Determination

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Significant improvements in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) concerning quality, image resolution and image acquisition time have allowed the development of various functions. DXA can evaluate bone quality by indirect analysis of micro- and macro-architecture of the bone, which and improve the prediction of fracture risk. DXA can also detect existing fractures, such as vertebral fractures or atypical femur fractures, without additional radiologic imaging and radiation exposure. Moreover, it can assess the metabolic status by the measurement of body composition parameters like muscle mass and visceral fat. Although more studies are required to validate and clinically use these parameters, it is clear that DXA is not just for bone mineral densitometry. PMID:26996419

  15. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  16. Optimization of Dual-Energy Xenon-CT for Quantitative Assessment of Regional Pulmonary Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Fuld, Matthew K.; Halaweish, Ahmed; Newell, John D.; Krauss, Bernhard; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Dual-energy X-ray computed tomography (DECT) offers visualization of the airways and quantitation of regional pulmonary ventilation using a single breath of inhaled xenon gas. In this study we seek to optimize scanning protocols for DECT xenon gas ventilation imaging of the airways and lung parenchyma and to characterize the quantitative nature of the developed protocols through a series of test-object and animal studies. Materials and Methods The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approved all animal studies reported here. A range of xenon-oxygen gas mixtures (0, 20, 25, 33, 50, 66, 100%; balance oxygen) were scanned in syringes and balloon test-objects to optimize the delivered gas mixture for assessment of regional ventilation while allowing for the development of improved three-material decomposition calibration parameters. Additionally, to alleviate gravitational effects on xenon gas distribution, we replaced a portion of the oxygen in the xenon/oxygen gas mixture with helium and compared gas distributions in a rapid-prototyped human central-airway test-object. Additional syringe tests were performed to determine if the introduction of helium had any effect on xenon quantitation. Xenon gas mixtures were delivered to anesthetized swine in order to assess airway and lung parenchymal opacification while evaluating various DECT scan acquisition settings. Results Attenuation curves for xenon were obtained from the syringe test objects and were used to develop improved three-material decomposition parameters (HU enhancement per percent xenon: Within the chest phantom: 2.25 at 80kVp, 1.7 at 100 kVp, and 0.76 at 140 kVp with tin filtration; In open air: 2.5 at 80kVp, 1.95 at 100 kVp, and 0.81 at 140 kVp with tin filtration). The addition of helium improved the distribution of xenon gas to the gravitationally non-dependent portion of the airway tree test-object, while not affecting quantitation of xenon in the three-material decomposition DECT. 40%Xe

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Appearances in the Postoperative Breast: The Clinical Target Volume-Tumor and Its Relationship to the Chest Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Whipp, Elisabeth C. Halliwell, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To describe and measure the postoperative complexes and their relationship to the chest wall in 100 randomly chosen MRI breast scans, to attempt a better understanding of the changes taking place in the postoperative breast. Methods and Materials: Appearances and measurements of MRI postoperative cavities were analyzed in a cohort of 100 randomly selected patients who underwent a single open MRI scan in the conventional breast radiotherapy treatment position before routine two-dimensional simulation. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging appearances of postoperative cavities seem to differ qualitatively from descriptions of CT and ultrasound cavities in the literature. Rather than being principally homogeneous, heterogeneous cavities were seen in 85%, irregular in 51%. The size of cavity was inversely related to the time elapsed since surgery. Cavities directly touched the chest wall in 53% of cases; 89% lay within 10 mm of the chest wall. Regular, annular concentric rings of differing signal were seen in 32% of cases; such appearances have not been previously described. These patterns suggest that seromas may not shrink entirely as a result of simple serous fluid absorption; instead, new tissue may be being laid down. Because large, regular spheroidal/ellipsoidal cavities with crisp margins may be seromas under pressure, greater target shifts during radiation may need to be anticipated in such cases. Conclusions: Postsurgical cavities in the conserved breast on MRI are commonly heterogeneous, irregular, and lie close to the chest wall. Magnetic resonance imaging studies may help in better understanding the natural history of postoperative cavities.

  18. WE-G-BRF-05: Feasibility of Markerless Motion Tracking Using Dual Energy Cone Beam Computed Tomography (DE-CBCT) Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Panfil, J; Patel, R; Surucu, M; Roeske, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare markerless template-based tracking of lung tumors using dual energy (DE) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections versus single energy (SE) CBCT projections. Methods: A RANDO chest phantom with a simulated tumor in the upper right lung was used to investigate the effectiveness of tumor tracking using DE and SE CBCT projections. Planar kV projections from CBCT acquisitions were captured at 60 kVp (4 mAs) and 120 kVp (1 mAs) using the Varian TrueBeam and non-commercial iTools Capture software. Projections were taken at approximately every 0.53° while the gantry rotated. Due to limitations of the phantom, angles for which the shoulders blocked the tumor were excluded from tracking analysis. DE images were constructed using a weighted logarithmic subtraction that removed bony anatomy while preserving soft tissue structures. The tumors were tracked separately on DE and SE (120 kVp) images using a template-based tracking algorithm. The tracking results were compared to ground truth coordinates designated by a physician. Matches with a distance of greater than 3 mm from ground truth were designated as failing to track. Results: 363 frames were analyzed. The algorithm successfully tracked the tumor on 89.8% (326/363) of DE frames compared to 54.3% (197/363) of SE frames (p<0.0001). Average distance between tracking and ground truth coordinates was 1.27 +/− 0.67 mm for DE versus 1.83+/−0.74 mm for SE (p<0.0001). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the effectiveness of markerless template-based tracking using DE CBCT. DE imaging resulted in better detectability with more accurate localization on average versus SE. Supported by a grant from Varian Medical Systems.

  19. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation for chest diagnosis based on multihelical CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutarou; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru; Sasagawa, Michizou

    2005-04-01

    Mass screening based on helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images and a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification. We also have developed electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system for the community health in two or more regions by using the Virtual Private Network router. This electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system were developed so as not to loosen the communication among staffs of hospital. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have now developed a new computer-aided workstation and database that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. This paper describes basic studies that have been conducted to evaluate this new system.

  20. Entrance surface dose and image quality: comparison of adult chest and abdominal X-ray examinations in general practitioner clinics, public and private hospitals in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hambali, Ahmad Shariff; Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Wang, Hwee-Beng; Jamal, Noriah; Spelic, David C; Suleiman, Orhan H

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the entrance surface dose (ESD) and image quality of adult chest and abdominal X-ray examinations conducted at general practitioner (GP) clinics, and public and private hospitals in Malaysia. The surveyed facilities were randomly selected within a given category (28 GP clinics, 20 public hospitals and 15 private hospitals). Only departmental X-ray units were involved in the survey. Chest examinations were done at all facilities, while only hospitals performed abdominal examinations. This study used the x-ray attenuation phantoms and protocols developed for the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) survey program in the United States. The ESD was calculated from measurements of exposure and clinical geometry. An image quality test tool was used to evaluate the low-contrast detectability and high-contrast detail performance under typical clinical conditions. The median ESD value for the adult chest X-ray examination was the highest (0.25 mGy) at GP clinics, followed by private hospitals (0.22 mGy) and public hospitals (0.17 mGy). The median ESD for the adult abdominal X-ray examination at public hospitals (3.35 mGy) was higher than that for private hospitals (2.81 mGy). Results of image quality assessment for the chest X-ray examination show that all facility types have a similar median spatial resolution and low-contrast detectability. For the abdominal X-ray examination, public hospitals have a similar median spatial resolution but larger low-contrast detectability compared with private hospitals. The results of this survey clearly show that there is room for further improvement in performing chest and abdominal X-ray examinations in Malaysia.

  1. A tandem-based compact dual-energy gamma generator.

    PubMed

    Persaud, A; Kwan, J W; Leitner, M; Leung, K-N; Ludewigt, B; Tanaka, N; Waldron, W; Wilde, S; Antolak, A J; Morse, D H; Raber, T

    2010-02-01

    A dual-energy tandem-type gamma generator has been developed at E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. The tandem accelerator geometry allows higher energy nuclear reactions to be reached, thereby allowing more flexible generation of MeV-energy gammas for active interrogation applications. Both positively charged ions and atoms of hydrogen are created from negative ions via a gas stripper. In this paper, we show first results of the working tandem-based gamma generator and that a gas stripper can be utilized in a compact source design. Preliminary results of monoenergetic gamma production are shown.

  2. Low-dose dual-energy electronic cleansing for fecal-tagging CT Colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wenli; Zhang, Da; Lee, June-Goo; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    Dual-energy electronic cleansing (DE-EC) provides a promising means for cleansing the tagged fecal materials in fecaltagging CT colonography (CTC). However, the increased radiation dose due to the double exposures in dual-energy CTC (DE-CTC) scanning is a major limitation for the use of DE-EC in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a low-dose DE-EC scheme in fecal-tagging DE-CTC. In this study, a custom-made anthropomorphic colon phantom, which was filled with simulated tagged materials by non-ionic iodinated contrast agent (Omnipaque iohexol, GE Healthcare), was scanned by a dual-source CT scanner (SOMATON Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) at two photon energies: 80 kVp and 140 kVp with nine different tube current settings ranging from 12 to 74 mAs for 140 kVp, and then reconstructed by soft-tissue reconstruction kernel (B30f). The DE-CTC images were subjected to a low-dose DE-EC scheme. First, our image-space DE-CTC denoising filter was applied for reduction of image noise. Then, the noise-reduced images were processed by a virtual lumen tagging method for reduction of partial volume effect and tagging inhomogeneity. The results were compared with the registered CTC images of native phantom without fillings. Preliminary results showed that our low-dose DE-EC scheme achieved the cleansing ratios, defined by the proportion of the cleansed voxels in the tagging mask, between 93.18% (12 mAs) and 96.62% (74 mAs). Also, the soft-tissue preservation ratios, defined by the proportion of the persevered voxels in the soft-tissue mask, were maintained in the range between 94.67% and 96.41%.

  3. Detection of Bone Marrow Edema in Nondisplaced Hip Fractures: Utility of a Virtual Unenhanced Dual-Energy CT Application.

    PubMed

    Kellock, Trenton T; Nicolaou, Savvas; Kim, Sandra S Y; Al-Busaidi, Sultan; Louis, Luck J; O'Connell, Tim W; Ouellette, Hugue A; McLaughlin, Patrick D

    2017-03-16

    Purpose To quantify the sensitivity and specificity of dual-energy computed tomographic (CT) virtual noncalcium images in the detection of nondisplaced hip fractures and to assess whether obtaining these images as a complement to bone reconstructions alters sensitivity, specificity, or diagnostic confidence. Materials and Methods The clinical research ethics board approved chart review, and the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. The authors retrospectively identified 118 patients who presented to a level 1 trauma center emergency department and who underwent dual-energy CT for suspicion of a nondisplaced traumatic hip fracture. Clinical follow-up was the standard of reference. Three radiologists interpreted virtual noncalcium images for traumatic bone marrow edema. Bone reconstructions for the same cases were interpreted alone and then with virtual noncalcium images. Diagnostic confidence was rated on a scale of 1 to 10. McNemar, Fleiss κ, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for statistical analysis. Results Twenty-two patients had nondisplaced hip fractures and 96 did not have hip fractures. Sensitivity with virtual noncalcium images was 77% and 91% (17 and 20 of 22 patients), and specificity was 92%-99% (89-95 of 96 patients). Sensitivity increased by 4%-5% over that with bone reconstruction images alone for two of the three readers when both bone reconstruction and virtual noncalcium images were used. Specificity remained unchanged (99% and 100%). Diagnostic confidence in the exclusion of fracture was improved with combined bone reconstruction and virtual noncalcium images (median score: 10, 9, and 10 for readers 1, 2, and 3, respectively) compared with bone reconstruction images alone (median score: 9, 8, and 9). Conclusion When used as a supplement to standard bone reconstructions, dual-energy CT virtual noncalcium images increased sensitivity for the detection of nondisplaced traumatic hip fractures and improved diagnostic confidence in

  4. Comparison of image quality among three X-ray systems for chest radiography: first step in optimisation.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, D; Ubeda, C; Calcagno, S; Acevedo, J; Pardo, D

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of three digital X-ray systems [one flat-panel (DR) and two computed radiography (CR)] for chest radiography in terms of the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) delivered to a polymethyl methacrylate phantom of 20 cm (equivalent to an adult patient) and image quality through of numerical evaluations using a test object (TO). The tube charge applied was ranged from 0.6 to 32 mAs, to a fixed tension of 125 kVp. The DR system presented the highest mean values of ESAK (615.9 µGy) along with the highest signal-to-noise ratio values, whereas CR systems showed a better high-contrast spatial resolution. Differences were statistically significant in both cases regarding the tube charge used. Thus, this parameter should be mainly considered to optimise the radiological protection through exposure settings selected. This survey represents the first effort to achieve optimisation in digital radiology for Chile.

  5. Multimaterial Decomposition Algorithm for the Quantification of Liver Fat Content by Using Fast-Kilovolt-Peak Switching Dual-Energy CT: Experimental Validation.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Tomoko; Hori, Masatoshi; Lamb, Peter; Sasaki, Kosuke; Wakayama, Tetsuya; Chiba, Yasutaka; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Murakami, Takamichi

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To assess the ability of fast-kilovolt-peak switching dual-energy computed tomography (CT) by using the multimaterial decomposition (MMD) algorithm to quantify liver fat. Materials and Methods Fifteen syringes that contained various proportions of swine liver obtained from an abattoir, lard in food products, and iron (saccharated ferric oxide) were prepared. Approval of this study by the animal care and use committee was not required. Solid cylindrical phantoms that consisted of a polyurethane epoxy resin 20 and 30 cm in diameter that held the syringes were scanned with dual- and single-energy 64-section multidetector CT. CT attenuation on single-energy CT images (in Hounsfield units) and MMD-derived fat volume fraction (FVF; dual-energy CT FVF) were obtained for each syringe, as were magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy measurements by using a 1.5-T imager (fat fraction [FF] of MR spectroscopy). Reference values of FVF (FVFref) were determined by using the Soxhlet method. Iron concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and divided into three ranges (0 mg per 100 g, 48.1-55.9 mg per 100 g, and 92.6-103.0 mg per 100 g). Statistical analysis included Spearman rank correlation and analysis of covariance. Results Both dual-energy CT FVF (ρ = 0.97; P < .001) and CT attenuation on single-energy CT images (ρ = -0.97; P < .001) correlated significantly with FVFref for phantoms without iron. Phantom size had a significant effect on dual-energy CT FVF after controlling for FVFref (P < .001). The regression slopes for CT attenuation on single-energy CT images in 20- and 30-cm-diameter phantoms differed significantly (P = .015). In sections with higher iron concentrations, the linear coefficients of dual-energy CT FVF decreased and those of MR spectroscopy FF increased (P < .001). Conclusion Dual-energy CT FVF allows for direct quantification of fat content in units of volume percent. Dual-energy CT FVF was larger in 30

  6. Multimaterial Decomposition Algorithm for the Quantification of Liver Fat Content by Using Fast-Kilovolt-Peak Switching Dual-Energy CT: Clinical Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Tomoko; Yada, Norihisa; Hori, Masatoshi; Maenishi, Osamu; Lamb, Peter; Sasaki, Kosuke; Onoda, Minori; Kudo, Masatoshi; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Murakami, Takamichi

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To assess the clinical accuracy and reproducibility of liver fat quantification with the multimaterial decomposition (MMD) algorithm, comparing the performance of MMD with that of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy by using liver biopsy as the reference standard. Materials and Methods This prospective study was approved by the institutional ethics committee, and patients provided written informed consent. Thirty-three patients suspected of having hepatic steatosis underwent non-contrast material-enhanced and triple-phase dynamic contrast-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography (CT) (80 and 140 kVp) and single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy within 30 days before liver biopsy. Percentage fat volume fraction (FVF) images were generated by using the MMD algorithm on dual-energy CT data to measure hepatic fat content. FVFs determined by using dual-energy CT and percentage fat fractions (FFs) determined by using MR spectroscopy were compared with histologic steatosis grade (0-3, as defined by the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease activity score system) by using Jonckheere-Terpstra trend tests and were compared with each other by using Bland-Altman analysis. Real non-contrast-enhanced FVFs were compared with triple-phase contrast-enhanced FVFs to determine the reproducibility of MMD by using Bland-Altman analyses. Results Both dual-energy CT FVF and MR spectroscopy FF increased with increasing histologic steatosis grade (trend test, P < .001 for each). The Bland-Altman plot of dual-energy CT FVF and MR spectroscopy FF revealed a proportional bias, as indicated by the significant positive slope of the line regressing the difference on the average (P < .001). The 95% limits of agreement for the differences between real non-contrast-enhanced and contrast-enhanced FVFs were not greater than about 2%. Conclusion The MMD algorithm quantifying hepatic fat in dual-energy CT images is accurate and reproducible across imaging phases. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental

  7. [Diagnostic detection performance of a simulated nodule in chest computed tomography images and gray and color nuclear medicine images: comparison between a medical liquid crystal display monitor and an ordinary liquid crystal display monitor].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Eiichiro; Kamimae, Riyou; Miyashita, Kenta; Ueda, Rina; Kanmae, Yusuke; Kubo, Mikayo; Shirasaka, Natsumi; Takeda, Taiki; Hashimoto, Noriyuki

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the detection performance of simulated nodules in chest computed tomography (CT) images and nuclear medicine images with an ordinary liquid crystal display (LCD) and a medical LCD (grayscale standard display function: GSDF) and gamma 2.2. We collected 72 chest CT image slices obtained from an LSCT phantom with simulated signals composed of various sizes and CT values and 78 slices of monochrome and color nuclear medicine images obtained from a digital phantom with a simulated signal composed of various sizes and radiation levels. Six observers performed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis using a continuous scale. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated for each monitor. The average AUC values for detection of chest CT images on a medical LCD (GSDF), medical LCD (gamma 2.2), and ordinary LCD were 0.71, 0.67, and 0.73, respectively. The average AUC values for detection of monochrome nuclear medicine images using a medical LCD (GSDF), medical LCD (gamma 2.2), and ordinary LCD were 0.81, 0.75, and 0.72, respectively. The average AUC values for detection of color nuclear medicine images on a medical LCD (GSDF), medical LCD (gamma 2.2), and ordinary LCD were 0.88, 0.86, and 0.90, respectively. Observer performance for detection of simulated nodules in chest CT images and nuclear medicine images was not significantly different between the three LCD monitors. We therefore conclude that an ordinary LCD monitor can be used to detect simulated nodules in chest CT images and nuclear medicine images.

  8. TU-F-18A-09: CT Number Stability Across Patient Sizes Using Virtual-Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, G; Grimes, J; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C; Halaweish, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Virtual-monoenergetic imaging uses dual-energy CT data to synthesize images corresponding to a single photon energy, thereby reducing beam-hardening artifacts. This work evaluated the ability of a commercial virtual-monoenergetic algorithm to achieve stable CT numbers across patient sizes. Methods: Test objects containing a range of iodine and calcium hydroxyapatite concentrations were placed inside 8 torso-shaped water phantoms, ranging in lateral width from 15 to 50 cm, and scanned on a dual-source CT system (Siemens Somatom Force). Single-energy scans were acquired from 70-150 kV in 10 kV increments; dual-energy scans were acquired using 4 energy pairs (low energy: 70, 80, 90, and 100 kV; high energy: 150 kV + 0.6 mm Sn). CTDIvol was matched for all single- and dual-energy scans for a given phantom size. All scans used 128×0.6 mm collimation and were reconstructed with 1-mm thickness at 0.8-mm increment and a medium smooth body kernel. Monoenergetic images were generated using commercial software (syngo Via Dual Energy, VA30). Iodine contrast was calculated as the difference in mean iodine and water CT numbers from respective regions-of-interest in 10 consecutive images. Results: CT numbers remained stable as phantom width varied from 15 to 50 cm for all dual-energy data sets (except for at 50 cm using 70/150Sn due to photon starvation effects). Relative to the 15 cm phantom, iodine contrast was within 5.2% of the 70 keV value for phantom sizes up to 45 cm. At 90/150Sn, photon starvation did not occur at 50 cm, and iodine contrast in the 50-cm phantom was within 1.4% of the 15-cm phantom. Conclusion: Monoenergetic imaging, as implemented in the evaluated commercial system, eliminated the variation in CT numbers due to patient size, and may provide more accurate data for quantitative tasks, including radiation therapy treatment planning. Siemens Healthcare.

  9. Computerized image-searching method for finding correct patients for misfiled chest radiographs in a PACS server by use of biological fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Toge, Risa; Morishita, Junji; Sasaki, Yasuo; Doi, Kunio

    2013-07-01

    We have developed an automated image-searching method based on biological fingerprints for identifying correct patients in misfiled chest radiographs in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) server. We used five biological fingerprints including distinctive anatomic structures in a misfiled chest radiograph of an unknown patient to find another image of the same patient stored with correct patient information in a PACS server. The correlation values were determined for the corresponding biological fingerprints in all images in the image server. The correlation indices as a measure of the overall similarity of the two images were determined from the summation of five correlation values and the combination of correlation values with the weighting factors. Finally, the correct patient was identified automatically by the image with the highest correlation index. By use of the summation of five correlation values as the correlation index, 78.0% (156/200) of the 200 patients for misfiled images were correctly identified in the database. When we applied the weighting factors for each biological fingerprint to determine the correlation index, the performance in identifying the correct patient was improved to 87.5% (175/200). An additional 5.0% (10/200) of images were included in the Top 10 ranking of the correlation index in the database. These cases could be identified manually by radiology personnel. We conclude that the automated image-searching method based on biological fingerprints with weighting factors would be useful for identification of the correct patient in the case of misfiled chest radiographs in a PACS server.

  10. Iterative dual energy material decomposition from spatial mismatched raw data sets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xing; Hu, Jing-Jing; Zhao, Yun-Song; Zhang, Hui-Tao; Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Today's clinical dual energy computed tomography (DECT) scanners generally measure different rays for different energy spectra and acquire spatial mismatched raw data sets. The deficits in clinical DECT technologies suggest that mainly image based material decomposition methods are in use nowadays. However, the image based material decomposition is an approximate technique, and beam hardening artifacts remain in decomposition results. A recently developed image based iterative method for material decomposition from inconsistent rays (MDIR) can achieve much better image quality than the conventional image based methods. Inspired by the MDIR method, this paper proposes an iterative method to indirectly perform raw data based DECT even with completely mismatched raw data sets. The iterative process is initialized by density images that were obtained from an image based material decomposition. Then the density images are iteratively corrected by comparing the estimated polychromatic projections and the measured polychromatic projections. Only three iterations of the method are sufficient to greatly improve the qualitative and quantitative information in material density images. Compared with the MDIR method, the proposed method needs not to perform additional water precorrection. The advantages of the method are verified with numerical experiments from inconsistent noise free and noisy raw data.

  11. Segmentation methods for breast vasculature in dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Kristen C.; Lee, Hyo Min; Singh, Tanushriya; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis (DE CE-DBT) uses an iodinated contrast agent to image the three-dimensional breast vasculature. The University of Pennsylvania has an ongoing DE CE-DBT clinical study in patients with known breast cancers. The breast is compressed continuously and imaged at four time points (1 pre-contrast; 3 post-contrast). DE images are obtained by a weighted logarithmic subtraction of the high-energy (HE) and low-energy (LE) image pairs. Temporal subtraction of the post-contrast DE images from the pre-contrast DE image is performed to analyze iodine uptake. Our previous work investigated image registration methods to correct for patient motion, enhancing the evaluation of vascular kinetics. In this project we investigate a segmentation algorithm which identifies blood vessels in the breast from our temporal DE subtraction images. Anisotropic diffusion filtering, Gabor filtering, and morphological filtering are used for the enhancement of vessel features. Vessel labeling methods are then used to distinguish vessel and background features successfully. Statistical and clinical evaluations of segmentation accuracy in DE-CBT images are ongoing.

  12. A case of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome, which presented an acute interstitial pneumonia-like image on chest CT scan.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Susaki, Kentaro; Danjo, Junichi; Nakashima, Shusaku; Shimada, Hiromi; Izumikawa, Miharu; Takeuchi, Yohei; Mitsunaka, Hiroki; Bandoh, Shuji; Imataki, Osamu; Nose, Masato; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) complicated with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). A female patient was diagnosed with acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) with MCTD by chest CT scan. Corticosteroid therapy was refractory for lung involvement, and she died due to acute respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed that AIP was compatible with lung involvement of CAPS. We therefore suggest that chest CT might reveal AIP-like findings in CAPS patients whose condition is complicated with pulmonary manifestations.

  13. Fat quantification and analysis of lung transplant patients on unenhanced chest CT images based on standardized anatomic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.; Wu, Caiyun; Christie, Jason; Lederer, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Chest fat estimation is important for identifying high-risk lung transplant candidates. In this paper, an approach to chest fat quantification based on a recently formulated concept of standardized anatomic space (SAS) is presented. The goal of this paper is to seek answers to the following questions related to chest fat quantification on single slice versus whole volume CT, which have not been addressed in the literature. What level of correlation exists between total chest fat volume and fat areas measured on single abdominal and thigh slices? What is the anatomic location in the chest where maximal correlation of fat area with fat volume can be expected? Do the components of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) have the same area-to-volume correlative behavior or do they differ? The SAS approach includes two steps: calibration followed by transformation which will map the patient slice locations non-linearly to SAS. The optimal slice locations found for SAT and VAT based on SAS are different and at the mid-level of the T8 vertebral body for SAT and mid-level of the T7 vertebral body for VAT. Fat volume and area on optimal slices for SAT and VAT are correlated with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.97 and 0.86, respectively. The correlation of chest fat volume with abdominal and thigh fat areas is weak to modest.

  14. Quantification of breast density with dual energy mammography: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Ducote, Justin L; Molloi, Sabee

    2008-12-01

    Breast density, the percentage of glandular breast tissue, has been identified as an important yet underutilized risk factor in the development of breast cancer. A quantitative method to measure breast density with dual energy imaging was investigated using a computer simulation model. Two configurations to measure breast density were evaluated: the usage of monoenergetic beams and an ideal detector, and the usage of polyenergetic beams with spectra from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with a detector modeled after a digital mammography system. The simulation model calculated the mean glandular dose necessary to quantify the variability of breast density to within 1/3%. The breast was modeled as a semicircle 10 cm in radius with equal homogenous thicknesses of adipose and glandular tissues. Breast thicknesses were considered in the range of 2-10 cm and energies in the range of 10-150 keV for the two monoenergetic beams, and 20-150 kVp for spectra with a tungsten anode x-ray tube. For a 4.2 cm breast thickness, the required mean glandular doses were 0.183 microGy for two monoenergetic beams at 19 and 71 keV, and 9.85 microGy for two polyenergetic spectra from a tungsten anode at 32 and 96 kVp with beam filtrations of 50 microm Rh and 300 microm Cu for the low and high energy beams, respectively. The results suggest that for either configuration, breast density can be precisely measured with dual energy imaging requiring only a small amount of additional dose to the breast. The possibility of using a standard screening mammogram as the low energy image is also discussed.

  15. Quantification of breast density with dual energy mammography: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2008-12-15

    Breast density, the percentage of glandular breast tissue, has been identified as an important yet underutilized risk factor in the development of breast cancer. A quantitative method to measure breast density with dual energy imaging was investigated using a computer simulation model. Two configurations to measure breast density were evaluated: the usage of monoenergetic beams and an ideal detector, and the usage of polyenergetic beams with spectra from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with a detector modeled after a digital mammography system. The simulation model calculated the mean glandular dose necessary to quantify the variability of breast density to within (1/3)%. The breast was modeled as a semicircle 10 cm in radius with equal homogenous thicknesses of adipose and glandular tissues. Breast thicknesses were considered in the range of 2-10 cm and energies in the range of 10-150 keV for the two monoenergetic beams, and 20-150 kVp for spectra with a tungsten anode x-ray tube. For a 4.2 cm breast thickness, the required mean glandular doses were 0.183 {mu}Gy for two monoenergetic beams at 19 and 71 keV, and 9.85 {mu}Gy for two polyenergetic spectra from a tungsten anode at 32 and 96 kVp with beam filtrations of 50 {mu}m Rh and 300 {mu}m Cu for the low and high energy beams, respectively. The results suggest that for either configuration, breast density can be precisely measured with dual energy imaging requiring only a small amount of additional dose to the breast. The possibility of using a standard screening mammogram as the low energy image is also discussed.

  16. Quantification of breast density with dual energy mammography: A simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2008-01-01

    Breast density, the percentage of glandular breast tissue, has been identified as an important yet underutilized risk factor in the development of breast cancer. A quantitative method to measure breast density with dual energy imaging was investigated using a computer simulation model. Two configurations to measure breast density were evaluated: the usage of monoenergetic beams and an ideal detector, and the usage of polyenergetic beams with spectra from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with a detector modeled after a digital mammography system. The simulation model calculated the mean glandular dose necessary to quantify the variability of breast density to within 1∕3%. The breast was modeled as a semicircle 10 cm in radius with equal homogenous thicknesses of adipose and glandular tissues. Breast thicknesses were considered in the range of 2–10 cm and energies in the range of 10–150 keV for the two monoenergetic beams, and 20–150 kVp for spectra with a tungsten anode x-ray tube. For a 4.2 cm breast thickness, the required mean glandular doses were 0.183 μGy for two monoenergetic beams at 19 and 71 keV, and 9.85 μGy for two polyenergetic spectra from a tungsten anode at 32 and 96 kVp with beam filtrations of 50 μm Rh and 300 μm Cu for the low and high energy beams, respectively. The results suggest that for either configuration, breast density can be precisely measured with dual energy imaging requiring only a small amount of additional dose to the breast. The possibility of using a standard screening mammogram as the low energy image is also discussed. PMID:19175100

  17. Impact of bone suppression imaging on the detection of lung nodules in chest radiographs: analysis of multiple reading sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schalekamp, S.; van Ginneken, B.; Schaefer-Prokop, C. M.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2013-03-01

    Observer studies are frequently performed to test new modalities. Correct study design is important to generate reliable results. Two most frequently used observer study designs are the sequential and the independent reading design. We investigated the effect of different observer study designs on reader performance results and statistical power. The study included multiple assessments of chest radiographs (CXR) with bone suppression images (BSI) for the detection of lung nodules. In a fully crossed study design 8 observers assessed first radiographs without and with BSI sequentially. Secondly they scored radiographs independently having BSI available from the beginning. Five months later, the same readers scored the same cases again in an independent reading session, completing the three scorings for CXRs with BSI. Observer performance was compared using multi reader multi case (MRMC) receiver operating characteristics (ROC). To estimate reader variance, Dorfman, Berbaum, Metz (DBM) variance component estimates were calculated. No significant difference between the sequential and the independent reading sessions could be found (p=0.51; p=0.61). Both reading designs showed increased performance with BSI, with a significant increase for the sequential and the independent reading session after five months (p=0.002; p=0.007). Total observer variance between sequential and independent reading design remained the same. A strong increase of uncorrelated components was found in the independent reading sessions, masking the ability to demonstrate differences in observer performance across modalities. In conclusion, results of the sequential and the independent study design did not show a significant difference. The independent study design had less power compared to the sequential study design due to a strong increase of uncorrelated variance components.

  18. Dual-energy computed tomography for detection of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Danad, Ibrahim; Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Min, James K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have fulfilled the prerequisites for the cardiac application of dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging. By exploiting the unique characteristics of materials when exposed to two different x-ray energies, DECT holds great promise for the diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease. It allows for the assessment of myocardial perfusion to discern the hemodynamic significance of coronary disease and possesses high accuracy for the detection and characterization of coronary plaques, while facilitating reductions in radiation dose. As such, DECT enabled cardiac CT to advance beyond the mere detection of coronary stenosis expanding its role in the evaluation and management of coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:26549789

  19. [Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in Ilizarov lower extremity lengthening: preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Wroński, S; Wojciechowski, P; Wójcik, K; Kusz, D

    1999-01-01

    Ilizarov method for lower extremity lengthening has been employed in 107 patients. Some 25% of numerous complications are bony union disturbances. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) for assessment of new bone formation was introduced to reduce these problems. Detailed densitometry methodology developed on the ground of 93 measurements in 11 patients is presented. Pre-operative measurement was followed by subsequent evaluations done every 3 weeks after the onset of distraction. DEXA was capable of showing the callus 3-4 weeks earlier than conventional radiography. DEXA allows for adjusting the pace of lengthening to the extent of new bone mineralization, evaluation of lengthening achieved, determining the timing for safe removal of the apparatus. The need for temporary rearranging of the apparatus and troublesome image analysis are among the drawbacks of the method.

  20. Assessment of vectorial total variation penalties on realistic dual-energy CT data.

    PubMed

    Rigie, David S; Sanchez, Adrian A; La Rivière, Patrick J

    2017-04-21

    Vectorial extensions of total variation have recently been developed for regularizing the reconstruction and denoising of multi-channel images, such as those arising in spectral computed tomography. Early studies have focused mainly on simulated, piecewise-constant images whose structure may favor total-variation penalties. In the current manuscript, we apply vectorial total variation to real dual-energy CT data of a whole turkey in order to determine if the same benefits can be observed in more complex images with anatomically realistic textures. We consider the total nuclear variation ([Formula: see text]) as well as another vectorial total variation based on the Frobenius norm ([Formula: see text]) and standard channel-by-channel total variation ([Formula: see text]). We performed a series of 3D TV denoising experiments comparing the three TV variants across a wide range of smoothness parameter settings, optimizing each regularizer according to a very-high-dose 'ground truth' image. Consistent with the simulation studies, we find that both vectorial TV variants achieve a lower error than the channel-by-channel TV and are better able to suppress noise while preserving actual image features. In this real data study, the advantages are subtler than in the previous simulation study, although the [Formula: see text] penalty is found to have clear advantages over either [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] when comparing material images formed from linear combinations of the denoised energy images.

  1. Implementation of dual-energy technique for virtual monochromatic and linearly mixed CBCTs

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hao; Giles, William; Ren Lei; Bowsher, James; Yin Fangfang

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To implement dual-energy imaging technique for virtual monochromatic (VM) and linearly mixed (LM) cone beam CTs (CBCTs) and to demonstrate their potential applications in metal artifact reduction and contrast enhancement in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: A bench-top CBCT system was used to acquire 80 kVp and 150 kVp projections, with an additional 0.8 mm tin filtration. To implement the VM technique, these projections were first decomposed into acrylic and aluminum basis material projections to synthesize VM projections, which were then used to reconstruct VM CBCTs. The effect of VM CBCT on the metal artifact reduction was evaluated with an in-house titanium-BB phantom. The optimal VM energy to maximize contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for iodine contrast and minimize beam hardening in VM CBCT was determined using a water phantom containing two iodine concentrations. The LM technique was implemented by linearly combining the low-energy (80 kVp) and high-energy (150 kVp) CBCTs. The dose partitioning between low-energy and high-energy CBCTs was varied (20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% for low-energy) while keeping total dose approximately equal to single-energy CBCTs, measured using an ion chamber. Noise levels and CNRs for four tissue types were investigated for dual-energy LM CBCTs in comparison with single-energy CBCTs at 80, 100, 125, and 150 kVp. Results: The VM technique showed substantial reduction of metal artifacts at 100 keV with a 40% reduction in the background standard deviation compared to a 125 kVp single-energy scan of equal dose. The VM energy to maximize CNR for both iodine concentrations and minimize beam hardening in the metal-free object was 50 keV and 60 keV, respectively. The difference of average noise levels measured in the phantom background was 1.2% between dual-energy LM CBCTs and equivalent-dose single-energy CBCTs. CNR values in the LM CBCTs of any dose partitioning are better than those of 150 kVp single-energy CBCTs. The

  2. Efficacy of fixed filtration for rapid kVp-switching dual energy x-ray systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Yuan; Wang, Adam S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Dose efficiency of dual kVp imaging can be improved if the two beams are filtered to remove photons in the common part of their spectra, thereby increasing spectral separation. While there are a number of advantages to rapid kVp-switching for dual energy, it may not be feasible to have two different filters for the two spectra. Therefore, the authors are interested in whether a fixed added filter can improve the dose efficiency of kVp-switching dual energy x-ray systems. Methods: The authors hypothesized that a K-edge filter would provide the energy selectivity needed to remove overlap of the spectra and hence increase the precision of material separation at constant dose. Preliminary simulations were done using calcium and water basis materials and 80 and 140 kVp x-ray spectra. Precision of the decomposition was evaluated based on the propagation of the Poisson noise through the decomposition function. Considering availability and cost, the authors chose a commercial Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S screen as the filter for their experimental validation. Experiments were conducted on a table-top system using a phantom with various thicknesses of acrylic and copper and 70 and 125 kVp x-ray spectra. The authors kept the phantom exposure roughly constant with and without filtration by adjusting the tube current. The filtered and unfiltered raw data of both low and high energy were decomposed into basis material and the variance of the decomposition for each thickness pair was calculated. To evaluate the filtration performance, the authors measured the ratio of material decomposition variance with and without filtration. Results: Simulation results show that the ideal filter material depends on the object composition and thickness, and ranges across the lanthanide series, with higher atomic number filters being preferred for more attenuating objects. Variance reduction increases with filter thickness, and substantial reductions (40%) can be achieved with a 2× loss in

  3. Validation of a New Skinfold Prediction Equation Based on Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Cowan, Celsi; Thyfault, John; LaFontaine, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Skinfold prediction equations recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine underestimate body fat percentage. The purpose of this research was to validate an alternative equation for men created from dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Two hundred ninety-seven males, aged 18-65, completed a skinfold assessment and dual energy x-ray…

  4. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  5. Phantom-less bone mineral density (BMD) measurement using dual energy computed tomography-based 3-material decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Philipp; Sedlmair, Martin; Krauss, Bernhard; Wichmann, Julian L.; Bauer, Ralf W.; Flohr, Thomas G.; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disease usually diagnosed at the manifestation of fragility fractures, which severely endanger the health of especially the elderly. To ensure timely therapeutic countermeasures, noninvasive and widely applicable diagnostic methods are required. Currently the primary quantifiable indicator for bone stability, bone mineral density (BMD), is obtained either by DEXA (Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) or qCT (quantitative CT). Both have respective advantages and disadvantages, with DEXA being considered as gold standard. For timely diagnosis of osteoporosis, another CT-based method is presented. A Dual Energy CT reconstruction workflow is being developed to evaluate BMD by evaluating lumbar spine (L1-L4) DE-CT images. The workflow is ROI-based and automated for practical use. A dual energy 3-material decomposition algorithm is used to differentiate bone from soft tissue and fat attenuation. The algorithm uses material attenuation coefficients on different beam energy levels. The bone fraction of the three different tissues is used to calculate the amount of hydroxylapatite in the trabecular bone of the corpus vertebrae inside a predefined ROI. Calibrations have been performed to obtain volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) without having to add a calibration phantom or to use special scan protocols or hardware. Accuracy and precision are dependent on image noise and comparable to qCT images. Clinical indications are in accordance with the DEXA gold standard. The decomposition-based workflow shows bone degradation effects normally not visible on standard CT images which would induce errors in normal qCT results.

  6. Development of a prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system with fast image reconstruction using graphics processing unit (GPU) programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Seungwan; Lee, Haenghwa; Lee, Donghoon; Choi, Seungyeon; Shin, Jungwook; Seo, Chang-Woo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2017-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis offers the advantage of low radiation doses compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) by utilizing small numbers of projections ( 80) acquired over a limited angular range. It produces 3D volumetric data, although there are artifacts due to incomplete sampling. Based upon these characteristics, we developed a prototype digital tomosynthesis R/F system for applications in chest imaging. Our prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system contains an X-ray tube with high power R/F pulse generator, flat-panel detector, R/F table, electromechanical radiographic subsystems including a precise motor controller, and a reconstruction server. For image reconstruction, users select between analytic and iterative reconstruction methods. Our reconstructed images of Catphan700 and LUNGMAN phantoms clearly and rapidly described the internal structures of phantoms using graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values of the CTP682 module of Catphan700 were higher in images using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) than in those using filtered back-projection (FBP) for all materials by factors of 2.60, 3.78, 5.50, 2.30, 3.70, and 2.52 for air, lung foam, low density polyethylene (LDPE), Delrin® (acetal homopolymer resin), bone 50% (hydroxyapatite), and Teflon, respectively. Total elapsed times for producing 3D volume were 2.92 s and 86.29 s on average for FBP and SART (20 iterations), respectively. The times required for reconstruction were clinically feasible. Moreover, the total radiation dose from our system (5.68 mGy) was lower than that of conventional chest CT scan. Consequently, our prototype tomosynthesis R/F system represents an important advance in digital tomosynthesis applications.

  7. A theoretical investigation of spectra utilization for a CMOS based indirect detector for dual energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyvas, N.; Martini, N.; Koukou, V.; Michail, C.; Sotiropoulou, P.; Valais, I.; Kandarakis, I.; Fountos, G.

    2015-09-01

    Dual Energy imaging is a promising method for visualizing masses and microcalcifications in digital mammography. Currently commercially available detectors may be suitable for dual energy mammographic applications. The scope of this work was to theoretically examine the performance of the Radeye CMOS digital indirect detector under three low- and high-energy spectral pairs. The detector was modeled through the linear system theory. The pixel size was equal to 22.5μm and the phosphor material of the detector was a 33.9 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor screen. The examined spectral pairs were (i) a 40kV W/Ag (0.01cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations, (ii) a 40kV W/Cd (0.013cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations and (iii) a 40kV W/Pd (0.008cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations. For each combination the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE), showing the signal to noise ratio transfer, the detector optical gain (DOG), showing the sensitivity of the detector and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the detector output signal were calculated. The second combination exhibited slightly higher DOG (326 photons per X-ray) and lower CV (0.755%) values. In terms of electron output from the RadEye CMOS, the first two combinations demonstrated comparable DQE values; however the second combination provided an increase of 6.5% in the electron output.

  8. Material differentiation in forensic radiology with single-source dual-energy computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Thomas D; Thali, Yannick; Bolliger, Stephan A; Somaini-Mathier, Sandra; Thali, Michael J; Hatch, Gary M; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the use of dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in differentiating frequently encountered foreign material on CT images using a standard single-source CT scanner. We scanned 20 different, forensically relevant materials at two X-Ray energy levels (80 and 130 kVp) on CT. CT values were measured in each object at both energy levels. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to determine intra-reader reliability. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to assess significance levels between X-Ray attenuation at 80 and 130 kVp. T test was used to investigate significance levels between mean HU values of individual object pairings at single energy levels of 80 and 130 kVp, respectively. ANOVA revealed that the difference in attenuation between beam energies of 80 kVp compared to 130 kVp was statistically significant (p < 0.005) for all materials except brass and lead. ICC was excellent at 80 kVp (0.999, p < 0.001) and at 130 kVp (0.998, p < 0.001). T test showed that using single energy levels of 80 and 130 kVp respectively 181/190 objects pairs could be differentiated from one another based on HU measurements. Using the combined information from both energy levels, 189/190 object pairs could be differentiated. Scanning with different energy levels is a simple way to apply dual-energy technique on a regular single-energy CT and improves the ability to differentiate foreign bodies with CT, based on their attenuation values.

  9. Modeling indirect detectors for performance optimization of a digital mammographic detector for dual energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, N.; Koukou, V.; Kalyvas, N.; Sotiropoulou, P.; Michail, C.; Valais, I.; Bakas, A.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.; Fountos, G.

    2015-01-01

    Dual Energy imaging is a promising method for visualizing masses and microcalcifications in digital mammography. The advent of two X-ray energies (low and high) requires a suitable detector. The scope of this work is to determine optimum detector parameters for dual energy applications. The detector was modeled through the linear cascaded (LCS) theory. It was assumed that a phosphor material was coupled to a CMOS photodetector (indirect detection). The pixel size was 22.5 μm. The phosphor thickness was allowed to vary between 20mg/cm2 and 160mg/cm2 The phosphor materials examined where Gd2O2S:Tb and Gd2O2S:Eu. Two Tungsten (W) anode X-ray spectra at 35 kV (filtered with 100 μm Palladium (Pd)) and 70 kV (filtered with 800 pm Ytterbium (Yb)), corresponding to low and high energy respectively, were considered to be incident on the detector. For each combination the contrast- to-noise ratio (CNR) and the detector optical gain (DOG), showing the sensitivity of the detector, were calculated. The 40 mg/cm2 and 70 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb exhibited the higher DOG values for the low and high energy correspondingly. Higher CNR between microcalcification and mammary gland exhibited the 70mg/cm2 and the 100mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb for the low and the high energy correspondingly.

  10. Dual-energy digital mammography: calibration and inverse-mapping techniques to estimate calcification thickness and glandular-tissue ratio.

    PubMed

    Kappadath, S Cheenu; Shaw, Chris C

    2003-06-01

    Breast cancer may manifest as microcalcifications in x-ray mammography. Small microcalcifications, essential to the early detection of breast cancer, are often obscured by overlapping tissue structures. Dual-energy imaging, where separate low- and high-energy images are acquired and synthesized to cancel the tissue structures, may improve the ability to detect and visualize microcalcifications. Transmission measurements at two different kVp values were made on breast-tissue-equivalent materials under narrow-beam geometry using an indirect flat-panel mammographic imager. The imaging scenario consisted of variable aluminum thickness (to simulate calcifications) and variable glandular ratio (defined as the ratio of the glandular-tissue thickness to the total tissue thickness) for a fixed total tissue thickness--the clinical situation of microcalcification imaging with varying tissue composition under breast compression. The coefficients of the inverse-mapping functions used to determine material composition from dual-energy measurements were calculated by a least-squares analysis. The linear function poorly modeled both the aluminum thickness and the glandular ratio. The inverse-mapping functions were found to vary as analytic functions of second (conic) or third (cubic) order. By comparing the model predictions with the calibration values, the root-mean-square residuals for both the cubic and the conic functions were approximately 50 microm for the aluminum thickness and approximately 0.05 for the glandular ratio.

  11. TH-A-18C-07: Noise Suppression in Material Decomposition for Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X; Petrongolo, M; Wang, T; Zhu, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A general problem of dual-energy CT (DECT) is that the decomposition is sensitive to noise in the two sets of dual-energy projection data, resulting in severely degraded qualities of decomposed images. We have previously proposed an iterative denoising method for DECT. Using a linear decomposition function, the method does not gain the full benefits of DECT on beam-hardening correction. In this work, we expand the framework of our iterative method to include non-linear decomposition models for noise suppression in DECT. Methods: We first obtain decomposed projections, which are free of beam-hardening artifacts, using a lookup table pre-measured on a calibration phantom. First-pass material images with high noise are reconstructed from the decomposed projections using standard filter-backprojection reconstruction. Noise on the decomposed images is then suppressed by an iterative method, which is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, we include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. Analytical formulae are derived to compute the variance-covariance matrix from the measured decomposition lookup table. Results: We have evaluated the proposed method via phantom studies. Using non-linear decomposition, our method effectively suppresses the streaking artifacts of beam-hardening and obtains more uniform images than our previous approach based on a linear model. The proposed method reduces the average noise standard deviation of two basis materials by one order of magnitude without sacrificing the spatial resolution. Conclusion: We propose a general framework of iterative denoising for material decomposition of DECT. Preliminary phantom studies have shown the proposed method improves the image uniformity and reduces noise level without resolution loss. In the future

  12. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  13. Characterization of Small Focal Renal Lesions: Diagnostic Accuracy with Single-Phase Contrast-enhanced Dual-Energy CT with Material Attenuation Analysis Compared with Conventional Attenuation Measurements.

    PubMed

    Marin, Daniele; Davis, Drew; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Patel, Bhavik; Gupta, Rajan T; Mileto, Achille; Nelson, Rendon C

    2017-03-28

    Purpose To determine whether single-phase contrast material-enhanced dual-energy material attenuation analysis improves the characterization of small (1-4 cm) renal lesions compared with conventional attenuation measurements by using histopathologic analysis and follow-up imaging as the clinical reference standards. Materials and Methods In this retrospective, HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved study, 136 consecutive patients (95 men and 41 women; mean age, 54 years) with 144 renal lesions (111 benign, 33 malignant) measuring 1-4 cm underwent single-energy unenhanced and contrast-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen. For each renal lesion, attenuation measurements were obtained; attenuation change of greater than or equal to 15 HU was considered evidence of enhancement. Dual-energy attenuation measurements were also obtained by using iodine-water, water-iodine, calcium-water, and water-calcium material basis pairs. Mean lesion attenuation values and material densities were compared between benign and malignant renal lesions by using the two-sample t test. Diagnostic accuracy of attenuation measurements and dual-energy material densities was assessed and validated by using 10-fold cross-validation to limit the effect of optimistic bias. Results By using cross-validated optimal thresholds at 100% sensitivity, iodine-water material attenuation images significantly improved specificity for differentiating between benign and malignant renal lesions compared with conventional enhancement measurements (93% [103 of 111]; 95% confidence interval: 86%, 97%; vs 81% [90 of 111]; 95% confidence interval: 73%, 88%) (P = .02). Sensitivity with iodine-water and calcium-water material attenuation images was also higher than that with conventional enhancement measurements, although the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion Contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT with material attenuation analysis improves specificity for

  14. Total variation superiorization in dual-energy CT reconstruction for proton therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiahua; Penfold, Scott

    2017-04-01

    Proton therapy is a precise form of radiotherapy in which the range of an energetic beam of protons within a patient must be accurately known. The current approach based on single-energy computed tomography (SECT) can lead to uncertainties in the proton range of approximately 3%. This range of uncertainty may lead to under-dosing of the tumour or over-dosing of healthy tissues. Dual-energy CT (DECT) theoretically has the potential to reduce these range uncertainties by quantifying electron density and the effective atomic number. In practice, however, DECT images reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) tend to suffer from high levels of noise. The objective of the current work was to examine the effect of total variation superiorization (TVS) on proton therapy planning accuracy when compared with FBP. A virtual CT scanner was created with the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4. Tomographic images were reconstructed with FBP and TVS combined with diagonally relaxed orthogonal projections (TVS-DROP). A total variation minimization (TVM) filter was also applied to the image reconstructed with FBP (FBP-TVM). Quantitative accuracy and variance of proton relative stopping power (RSP) derived from each image set was assessed. Mean RSPs were comparable with each image; however, the standard deviation of pixel values with TVS-DROP was reduced by a factor of 0.44 compared with the FBP image and a factor of 0.66 when compared with the FBP-TVM image. Proton doses calculated with the TVS-DROP image set were also better able to predict a reference dose distribution when compared with the FBP and FBP-TVM image sets. The study demonstrated the potential advantages of TVS-DROP as an image reconstruction method for DECT applied to proton therapy treatment planning.

  15. Experimental verification of ion stopping power prediction from dual energy CT data in tissue surrogates.

    PubMed

    Hünemohr, Nora; Krauss, Bernhard; Tremmel, Christoph; Ackermann, Benjamin; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2014-01-06

    We present an experimental verification of stopping-power-ratio (SPR) prediction from dual energy CT (DECT) with potential use for dose planning in proton and ion therapy. The approach is based on DECT images converted to electron density relative to water ϱe/ϱe, w and effective atomic number Zeff. To establish a parameterization of the I-value by Zeff, 71 tabulated tissue compositions were used. For the experimental assessment of the method we scanned 20 materials (tissue surrogates, polymers, aluminum, titanium) at 80/140Sn kVp and 100/140Sn kVp (Sn: additional tin filtration) and computed the ϱe/ϱe, w and Zeff with a purely image based algorithm. Thereby, we found that ϱe/ϱe, w (Zeff) could be determined with an accuracy of 0.4% (1.7%) for the tissue surrogates with known elemental compositions. SPRs were predicted from DECT images for all 20 materials using the presented approach and were compared to measured water-equivalent path lengths (closely related to SPR). For the tissue surrogates the presented DECT approach was found to predict the experimental values within 0.6%, for aluminum and titanium within an accuracy of 1.7% and 9.4% (from 16-bit reconstructed DECT images).

  16. Deep learning for electronic cleansing in dual-energy CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Rie; Näppi, Janne J.; Hironakaa, Toru; Kim, Se Hyung; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel deep-learning-based electronic cleansing (EC) method for dual-energy CT colonography (DE-CTC). In this method, an ensemble of deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) is used to classify each voxel of DE-CTC image volumes into one of five multi-material (MUMA) classes: luminal air, soft tissue, tagged fecal material, or a partial-volume boundary between air and tagging or that of soft tissue and tagging. Each DCNN acts as a voxel classifier. At each voxel, a region-of-interest (ROI) centered at the voxel is extracted. After mapping the pixels of the ROI to the input layer of a DCNN, a series of convolutional and max-pooling layers is used to extract features with increasing levels of abstraction. The output layer produces the probabilities at which the input voxel belongs to each of the five MUMA classes. To develop an ensemble of DCNNs, we trained multiple DCNNs based on multi-spectral image volumes derived from the DE-CTC images, including material decomposition images and virtual monochromatic images. The outputs of these DCNNs were then combined by means of a meta-classifier for precise classification of the voxels. Finally, the electronically cleansed CTC images were generated by removing regions that were classified as other than soft tissue, followed by colon surface reconstruction. Preliminary results based on 184,320 images sampled from 30 clinical CTC cases showed a higher accuracy in labeling these classes than that of our previous machine-learning methods, indicating that deep-learning-based multi-spectral EC can accurately remove residual fecal materials from CTC images without generating major EC artifacts.

  17. Pulmonary imaging of pandemic influenza H1N1 infection: relationship between clinical presentation and disease burden on chest radiography and CT

    PubMed Central

    Abbo, L; Quartin, A; Morris, M I; Saigal, G; Ariza-Heredia, E; Mariani, P; Rodriguez, O; Muñoz-Price, L S; Ferrada, M; Ramee, E; Rosas, M I; Gonzalez, I A; Fishman, J

    2010-01-01

    The potential for pulmonary involvement among patients presenting with novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) is high. To investigate the utility of chest imaging in this setting, we correlated clinical presentation with chest radiographic and CT findings in patients with proven H1N1 cases. Subjects included all patients presenting with laboratory-confirmed H1N1 between 1 May and 10 September 2009 to one of three urban hospitals. Clinical information was gathered retrospectively, including symptoms, possible risk factors, treatment and hospital survival. Imaging studies were re-read for study purposes, and CXR findings compared with CT scans when available. During the study period, 157 patients presented with subsequently proven H1N1 infection. Hospital admission was necessary for 94 (60%) patients, 16 (10%) were admitted to intensive care and 6 (4%) died. An initial CXR, carried out for 123 (78%) patients, was abnormal in only 40 (33%) cases. Factors associated with increased likelihood for radiographic lung abnormalities were dyspnoea (p<0.001), hypoxaemia (p<0.001) and diabetes mellitus (p = 0.023). Chest CT was performed in 21 patients, and 19 (90%) showed consolidation, ground-glass opacity, nodules or a combination of these findings. 4 of 21 patients had negative CXR and positive CT. Compared with CT, plain CXR was less sensitive in detecting H1N1 pulmonary disease among immunocompromised hosts than in other patients (p = 0.0072). A normal CXR is common among patients presenting to the hospital for H1N1-related symptoms without evidence of respiratory difficulties. The CXR may significantly underestimate lung involvement in the setting of immunosuppression. PMID:20551254

  18. MO-A-BRD-02: Noise Suppression for Dual-Energy CT Through Entropy Minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Petrongolo, M; Niu, T; Zhu, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In dual energy CT (DECT), noise amplification during signal decomposition significantly limits the utility of basis material images. Since clinically relevant objects contain a limited number of materials, we propose to suppress noise in decomposed images through entropy minimization within a 2D transformation space. Distinct from other noise suppression techniques, the entropy minimization method does not estimate and suppress noise based on spatial variations of signals and thus maximally preserves image spatial resolution. Methods: From decomposed images, we first generate a 2D plot of scattered data points, using basis material densities as coordinates. Data points representing the same material generate a cluster with a highly asymmetric shape. We orient an axis by minimizing the entropy in a 1D histogram of these points projected onto the axis. To suppress noise, we replace the pixel values of decomposed images with center-of-mass values in the direction perpendicular to the optimized axis. The proposed method's performance is assessed using a Catphan 600 phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Electron density calculations are used to quantify its accuracy. Our results are compared to those without noise suppression, with a filtering method, and with a recently developed iterative method. Results: On both phantoms, the proposed method reduces noise standard deviations of the decomposed images by at least on order of magnitude. In the Catphan study, this method retains the spatial resolution of the CT images and increases the accuracy of electron density calculations. In the head phantom study, the proposed method outperforms the others in retaining fine, intricate structures. Conclusion: This work shows that the proposed method of noise suppression through entropy minimization for DECT suppresses noise without loss of spatial resolution while increasing electron density calculation accuracy. Future investigations will analyze possible bias and

  19. Dual energy with dual source CT and kVp switching with single source CT: a comparison of dual energy performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Kappler, S.; Reinwand, M.; Stierstorfer, K.

    2009-02-01

    Stimulated by the introduction of clinical dual source CT, the interest in dual energy methods has been increasing in the past years. Whereas the potential of material decomposition by dual energy methods is known since the early 1980ies, the realization of dual energy methods is a wide field of today's research. Energy separation can be achieved with energy selective detectors or by varying X-ray source spectra. This paper focuses on dual energy techniques with varying X-ray spectra. These can be provided by dual source CT devices, operated with different kVp settings on each tube. Excellent spectral separation is the key property for use in clinical routine. The drawback of higher cost for two tubes and two detectors leads to an alternative realization, where a single source CT yields different spectra by fast kVp switching from reading to reading. This provides access to dual-energy methods in single source CT. However, this technique comes with some intrinsic limitations. The maximum X-ray flux is reduced in comparison to the dual source system. The kVp rise and fall time between each reading reduces the spectral separation. In comparison to dual source CT, for a constant number of projections per energy spectrum the temporal resolution is reduced; a reasonable trade of between reduced numbers of projection and limited temporal resolution has to be found. The overall dual energy performance is the guiding line for our investigations. We present simulations and measurements which benchmark both solutions in terms of spectral behavior, especially of spectral separation.

  20. Effect of Picture Archiving and Communication System Image Manipulation on the Agreement of Chest Radiograph Interpretation in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Denise A.; Naqvi, Asad Ahmed; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth; Flavin, Michael P.; Manson, David; Soboleski, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Variability in image interpretation has been attributed to differences in the interpreters’ knowledge base, experience level, and access to the clinical scenario. Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) has allowed the user to manipulate the images while developing their impression of the radiograph. The aim of this study was to determine the agreement of chest radiograph (CXR) impressions among radiologists and neonatologists and help determine the effect of image manipulation with PACS on report impression. Materials and Methods: Prospective cohort study included 60 patients from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit undergoing CXRs. Three radiologists and three neonatologists reviewed two consecutive frontal CXRs of each patient. Each physician was allowed manipulation of images as needed to provide a decision of “improved,” “unchanged,” or “disease progression” lung disease for each patient. Each physician repeated the process once more; this time, they were not allowed to individually manipulate the images, but an independent radiologist presets the image brightness and contrast to best optimize the CXR appearance. Percent agreement and opposing reporting views were calculated between all six physicians for each of the two methods (allowing and not allowing image manipulation). Results: One hundred percent agreement in image impression between all six observers was only seen in 5% of cases when allowing image manipulation; 100% agreement was seen in 13% of the cases when there was no manipulation of the images. Conclusion: Agreement in CXR interpretation is poor; the ability to manipulate the images on PACS results in a decrease in agreement in the interpretation of these studies. New methods to standardize image appearance and allow improved comparison with previous studies should be sought to improve clinician agreement in interpretation consistency and advance patient care. PMID:27274414

  1. A balanced filterless K-edge energy window multilayer detector for dual energy computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.

    2010-04-01

    Ross (or balanced) filter-based systems have been studied extensively in the past, however they have only recently been studied for medical applications such as computed tomography and contrast-enhanced mammography. Balanced filters are filters composed of different materials which have thicknesses designed to match the attenuation for all radiation energies except those within a certain energy window (between the K-edges of the filter materials). Images obtained using different filters to attenuate the incident x-rays can be subtracted to obtain an image which contains information solely within the energy window. The disadvantage of this image acquisition method is the requirement of a separate exposure for each filter. This can lead to motion artifacts in the resulting image for example due to cardiac, respiratory, or patient movement. In this paper we investigate a filterless, multilayer detector design using the general concept of balanced filters. In the proposed detector, energy discrimination is achieved using stacked layers of different conversion materials. Similar to how the thicknesses of balanced filters are chosen, the thicknesses of the conversion layers are designed to match the attenuation of x-rays except between the K-edges of the conversion materials. Motion artifacts are suppressed in the final image due to the simultaneous acquisition of images on all layers during a single exposure. The proposed multilayer design can be used for a number of applications depending on the energy range of interest. To study the proposed design, we consider dual energy computed tomography (CT) using a gadolinium-based contrast agent.

  2. A statistical iterative reconstruction framework for dual energy computed tomography without knowing tube spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shaojie; Mou, Xuanqin

    2016-09-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) has significant impacts on material characterization, bone mineral density inspection, nondestructive evaluation and so on. In spite of great progress has been made recently on reconstruction algorithms for DECT, there still exist two main problems: 1) For polyenergetic X-ray source, the tube spectrum needed in reconstruction is not always available. 2) The reconstructed image of DECT is very sensitive to noise which demands special noise suppression strategy in reconstruction algorithm design. In this paper, we propose a novel method for DECT reconstruction that reconstructs tube spectrum from projection data and suppresses image noise by introducing l1-norm based regularization into statistical reconstruction for polychromatic DECT. The contribution of this work is twofold. 1) A three parameters model is devised to represent spectrum of ployenergetic X-ray source. And the parameters can be estimated from projection data by solving an optimization problem. 2) With the estimated tube spectrum, we propose a computation framework of l1-norm regularization based statistical iterative reconstruction for polychromatic DECT. Simulation experiments with two phantoms were conducted to evaluate the proposed method. Experimental results demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the spectrum model in terms of that comparable reconstruction image quality can be achieved with the estimated and ideal spectrum, and validate that the proposed method works with attractive performance in terms of accuracy of reconstructed image. The root mean square error (RMSE) between the reconstructed image and the ground truth image are 7.648 × 10-4 and 2.687 x 10-4 for the two phantoms, respectively.

  3. Dual-energy CT of the heart--principles and protocols.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Florian; Ruzsics, Balazs; Schoepf, U Joseph; Bastarrika, Gorka; Chiaramida, Salvatore A; Abro, Joseph A; Brothers, Robin L; Vogt, Sebastian; Schmidt, Bernhard; Costello, Philip; Zwerner, Peter L

    2008-12-01

    The introduction of coronary CT angiography (cCTA) has reinvigorated the debate whether management of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) should be primarily based on physiological versus anatomical testing. Anatomical testing (i.e., cCTA or invasive catheterization) enables direct visualization and grading of coronary artery stenoses but has shortcomings for gauging the hemodynamic significance of lesions for myocardial perfusion. Conversely, rest/stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has been extensively validated for assessing the clinical significance of CAD by demonstrating fixed or reversible perfusion defects but has only limited anatomical information. There is early evidence that contrast medium enhanced dual-energy cCTA (DECT) has potential for the comprehensive analysis of coronary artery morphology as well as changes in myocardial perfusion. DECT exploits the fact that tissues in the human body and iodine-based contrast media have unique absorption characteristics when penetrated with different X-ray energy levels, which enables mapping the iodine (and thus blood) distribution within the myocardium. The purpose of this communication is to describe the practical application of this emerging technology for the comprehensive diagnosis of coronary artery disease in the context of the currently used tomographic imaging modalities (cCTA, nuclear MPI, MR MPI).

  4. Complementary contrast media for metal artifact reduction in dual-energy computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jack W.; Edic, Peter M.; FitzGerald, Paul F.; Torres, Andrew S.; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Metal artifacts have been a problem associated with computed tomography (CT) since its introduction. Recent techniques to mitigate this problem have included utilization of high-energy (keV) virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images, produced via dual-energy CT (DECT). A problem with these high-keV images is that contrast enhancement provided by all commercially available contrast media is severely reduced. Contrast agents based on higher atomic number elements can maintain contrast at the higher energy levels where artifacts are reduced. This study evaluated three such candidate elements: bismuth, tantalum, and tungsten, as well as two conventional contrast elements: iodine and barium. A water-based phantom with vials containing these five elements in solution, as well as different artifact-producing metal structures, was scanned with a DECT scanner capable of rapid operating voltage switching. In the VMS datasets, substantial reductions in the contrast were observed for iodine and barium, which suffered from contrast reductions of 97% and 91%, respectively, at 140 versus 40 keV. In comparison under the same conditions, the candidate agents demonstrated contrast enhancement reductions of only 20%, 29%, and 32% for tungsten, tantalum, and bismuth, respectively. At 140 versus 40 keV, metal artifact severity was reduced by 57% to 85% depending on the phantom configuration. PMID:26839905

  5. Ice core stratigraphy using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroger, Chris; Thomson, Julian; Bertler, Nancy; Morgenstern, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    We are presenting a technique using x-rays to detect strata caused by density variation in 94 mm diameter ice cores. Moreover, high resolution density is determined. A 54 m long ice core retrieved from the Tasman Glacier of the Southern Alps in New Zealand has been x-ray scanned and the images were analysed. As a dual energy capable x-ray (DEXA) scanner was used, DEXA analysis techniques were used where appropriate, such as for the enhancement of strata visibility in the images. Density calculations though were based on a single energy model, using the fundamental law of x-ray attenuation. As the model does not precisely reflect realistic conditions, calibrations were made for the material properties and pixel scaling. Results of detected strata were compared to traditional visual light methods, where up to a depth of ~35 m better detail was achieved using x-rays. Density data was checked against the average volumetric density. Results compare well with the volumetric density, however a small bias exists, which at present requires further investigation.

  6. Predictive value of low tube voltage and dual-energy CT for successful shock wave lithotripsy: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Largo, Remo; Stolzmann, Paul; Fankhauser, Christian D; Poyet, Cédric; Wolfsgruber, Pirmin; Sulser, Tullio; Alkadhi, Hatem; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the capabilities of low tube voltage computed tomography (CT) and dual-energy CT (DECT) for predicting successful shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) of urinary stones in vitro. A total of 33 urinary calculi (six different chemical compositions; mean size 6 ± 3 mm) were scanned using a dual-source CT machine with single- (120 kVp) and dual-energy settings (80/150, 100/150 Sn kVp) resulting in six different datasets. The attenuation (Hounsfield Units) of calculi was measured on single-energy CT images and the dual-energy indices (DEIs) were calculated from DECT acquisitions. Calculi underwent SWL and the number of shock waves for successful disintegration was recorded. The prediction of required shock waves regarding stone attenuation/DEI was calculated using regression analysis (adjusted for stone size and composition) and the correlation between CT attenuation/DEI and the number of shock waves was assessed for all datasets. The median number of shock waves for successful stone disintegration was 72 (interquartile range 30-361). CT attenuation/DEI of stones was a significant, independent predictor (P < 0.01) for the number of required shock waves with the best prediction at 80 kVp (β estimate 0.576) (P < 0.05). Correlation coefficients between attenuation/DEI and the number of required shock waves ranged between ρ = 0.31 and 0.68 showing the best correlation at 80 kVp (P < 0.001). The attenuation of urinary stones at low tube voltage CT is the best predictor for successful stone disintegration, being independent of stone composition and size. DECT shows no added value for predicting the success of SWL.

  7. Statistical methods for analysis of coordination of chest wall motion using optical reflectance imaging of multiple markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, C. M.; Ghezzo, R. H.; Cala, S. J.; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, P. T.; Rochester, D. F.

    1994-07-01

    To analyze coordination of chest wall motion we have used principle component analysis (PCA) and multiple regression analysis (MRA) with respect to spirometry on the displacements of 93 optical reflective markers placed upon the chest wall (CW). Each marker is tracked at 10 Hz with an accuracy of 0.2 mm in each spatial dimension using the ELITE system (IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 11:943-949, 1985). PCA enables the degree of linear coordination between all of the markers to be assessed using the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance of the matrix of marker displacements in each dimension against time. Thus the number of linear degrees of freedom (DOF) which contribute more than a particular amount to the total variance can be determined and analyzed. MRA with respect to spirometrically measured lung volume changes enables identification of the CW points whose movement correlates best with lung volume. We have used this analysis to compare a quiet breathing sequence with one where tidal volume was increased fourfold involuntarily and show that the number of DOF with eigenvalues accounting for >5% of the covariance increased from 2 to 3. Also the point whose movement correlated best with lung volume changed from halfway down the lower costal margin to a more lateral point at the level of the bottom of the sternum. This quantification of CW coordination may be useful in analysis and staging of many respiratory disorders and is applicable to any nonrigid body motion where points can be tracked.

  8. TU-CD-BRA-11: Application of Bone Suppression Technique to Inspiratory/expiratory Chest Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, R; Sanada, S; Sakuta, K; Kawashima, H; Kishitani, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images normally obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to investigate the usefulness of bone suppression technique in quantitative analysis of pulmonary function in inspiratory/expiratory chest radiography. Methods: Commercial bone suppression image processing software (ClearRead; Riverain Technologies) was applied to paired inspiratory/expiratory chest radiographs of 107 patients (normal, 33; abnormal, 74) to create corresponding bone suppression images. The abnormal subjects had been diagnosed with pulmonary diseases, such as pneumothorax, pneumonia, emphysema, asthma, and lung cancer. After recognition of the lung area, the vectors of respiratory displacement were measured in all local lung areas using a cross-correlation technique. The measured displacement in each area was visualized as displacement color maps. The distribution pattern of respiratory displacement was assessed by comparison with the findings of lung scintigraphy. Results: Respiratory displacement of pulmonary markings (soft tissues) was able to be quantified separately from the rib movements on bone suppression images. The resulting displacement map showed a left-right symmetric distribution increasing from the lung apex to the bottom region of the lung in many cases. However, patients with ventilatory impairments showed a nonuniform distribution caused by decreased displacement of pulmonary markings, which were confirmed to correspond to area with ventilatory impairments found on the lung scintigrams. Conclusion: The bone suppression technique was useful for quantitative analysis of respiratory displacement of pulmonary markings without any interruption of the rib shadows. Abnormal areas could be detected as decreased displacement of pulmonary markings. Inspiratory/expiratory chest radiography combined

  9. Dose reduction in skeletal and chest radiography using a large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide: technical background, basic image quality parameters, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Völk, Markus; Hamer, Okka W; Feuerbach, Stefan; Strotzer, Michael

    2004-05-01

    The two most frequently performed diagnostic X-ray examinations are those of the extremities and of the chest. Thus, dose reduction in the field of conventional skeletal and chest radiography is an important issue and there is a need to reduce man-made ionizing radiation. The large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide provides a significant reduction of radiation dose in skeletal and chest radiography compared with traditional imaging systems. This article describes the technical background and basic image quality parameters of this 43 x 43-cm digital system, and summarizes the available literature (years 2000-2003) concerning dose reduction in experimental and clinical studies. Due to its high detective quantum efficiency and dynamic range compared with traditional screen-film systems, a dose reduction of up to 50% is possible without loss of image quality.

  10. A scatter correction method for contrast-enhanced dual-energy digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yihuan; Peng, Boyu; Lau, Beverly A.; Hu, Yue-Houng; Scaduto, David A.; Zhao, Wei; Gindi, Gene

    2015-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced dual energy digital breast tomosynthesis (CE-DE-DBT) is designed to image iodinated masses while suppressing breast anatomical background. Scatter is a problem, especially for high energy acquisition, in that it causes severe cupping artifact and iodine quantitation errors. We propose a patient specific scatter correction (SC) algorithm for CE-DE-DBT. The empirical algorithm works by interpolating scatter data outside the breast shadow into an estimate within the breast shadow. The interpolated estimate is further improved by operations that use an easily obtainable (from phantoms) table of scatter-to-primary-ratios (SPR)—a single SPR value for each breast thickness and acquisition angle. We validated our SC algorithm for two breast emulating phantoms by comparing SPR from our SC algorithm to that measured using a beam-passing pinhole array plate. The error in our SC computed SPR, averaged over acquisition angle and image location, was about 5%, with slightly worse errors for thicker phantoms. The SC projection data, reconstructed using OS-SART, showed a large degree of decupping. We also observed that SC removed the dependence of iodine quantitation on phantom thickness. We applied the SC algorithm to a CE-DE-mammographic patient image with a biopsy confirmed tumor at the breast periphery. In the image without SC, the contrast enhanced tumor was masked by the cupping artifact. With our SC, the tumor was easily visible. An interpolation-based SC was proposed by (Siewerdsen et al 2006 Med. Phys. 33 187-97) for cone-beam CT (CBCT), but our algorithm and application differ in several respects. Other relevant SC techniques include Monte-Carlo and convolution-based methods for CBCT, storage of a precomputed library of scatter maps for DBT, and patient acquisition with a beam-passing pinhole array for breast CT. Our SC algorithm can be accomplished in clinically acceptable times, requires no additional imaging hardware or extra patient dose and is

  11. A scatter correction method for contrast-enhanced dual-energy digital breast tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yihuan; Peng, Boyu; Lau, Beverly A.; Hu, Yue-Houng; Scaduto, David A.; Zhao, Wei; Gindi, Gene

    2015-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced dual energy digital breast tomosynthesis (CE-DE-DBT) is designed to image iodinated masses while suppressing breast anatomical background. Scatter is a problem, especially for high energy acquisition, in that it causes severe cupping artifact and iodine quantitation errors. We propose a patient specific scatter correction (SC) algorithm for CE-DE-DBT. The empirical algorithm works by interpolating scatter data outside the breast shadow into an estimate within the breast shadow. The interpolated estimate is further improved by operations that use an easily obtainable (from phantoms) table of scatter-to-primary-ratios (SPR) - a single SPR value for each breast thickness and acquisition angle. We validated our SC algorithm for two breast emulating phantoms by comparing SPR from our SC algorithm to that measured using a beam-passing pinhole array plate. The error in our SC computed SPR, averaged over acquisition angle and image location, was about 5%, with slightly worse errors for thicker phantoms. The SC projection data, reconstructed using OS-SART, showed a large degree of decupping. We also observed that SC removed the dependence of iodine quantitation on phantom thickness. We applied the SC algorithm to a CE-DE-mammographic patient image with a biopsy confirmed tumor at the breast periphery. In the image without SC, the contrast enhanced tumor was masked by the cupping artifact. With our SC, the tumor was easily visible. An interpolation-based SC was proposed by (Siewerdsen et al., 2006) for cone-beam CT (CBCT), but our algorithm and application differ in several respects. Other relevant SC techniques include Monte-Carlo and convolution-based methods for CBCT, storage of a precomputed library of scatter maps for DBT, and patient acquisition with a beam-passing pinhole array for breast CT. Our SC algorithm can be accomplished in clinically acceptable times, requires no additional imaging hardware or extra patient dose and is easily transportable

  12. A stoichiometric calibration method for dual energy computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Alexandra E.; Carrier, Jean-François; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculation relies crucially on patient composition data. The computed tomography (CT) calibration methods based on the stoichiometric calibration of Schneider et al (1996 Phys. Med. Biol. 41 111-24) are the most reliable to determine electron density (ED) with commercial single energy CT scanners. Along with the recent developments in dual energy CT (DECT) commercial scanners, several methods were published to determine ED and the effective atomic number (EAN) for polyenergetic beams without the need for CT calibration curves. This paper intends to show that with a rigorous definition of the EAN, the stoichiometric calibration method can be successfully adapted to DECT with significant accuracy improvements with respect to the literature without the need for spectrum measurements or empirical beam hardening corrections. Using a theoretical framework of ICRP human tissue compositions and the XCOM photon cross sections database, the revised stoichiometric calibration method yields Hounsfield unit (HU) predictions within less than ±1.3 HU of the theoretical HU calculated from XCOM data averaged over the spectra used (e.g., 80 kVp, 100 kVp, 140 kVp and 140/Sn kVp). A fit of mean excitation energy (I-value) data as a function of EAN is provided in order to determine the ion stopping power of human tissues from ED-EAN measurements. Analysis of the calibration phantom measurements with the Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash dual source CT scanner shows that the present formalism yields mean absolute errors of (0.3 ± 0.4)% and (1.6 ± 2.0)% on ED and EAN, respectively. For ion therapy, the mean absolute errors for calibrated I-values and proton stopping powers (216 MeV) are (4.1 ± 2.7)% and (0.5 ± 0.4)%, respectively. In all clinical situations studied, the uncertainties in ion ranges in water for therapeutic energies are found to be less than 1.3 mm, 0.7 mm and 0.5 mm for protons, helium and carbon ions respectively, using a generic

  13. New developed DR detector performs radiographs of hand, pelvic and premature chest anatomies at a lower radiation dose and/or a higher image quality.

    PubMed

    Precht, Helle; Tingberg, Anders; Waaler, Dag; Outzen, Claus Bjørn

    2014-02-01

    A newly developed Digital Radiography (DR) detector has smaller pixel size and higher fill factor than earlier detector models. These technical advantages should theoretically lead to higher sensitivity and higher spatial resolution, thus making dose reduction possible without scarifying image quality compared to previous DR detector versions. To examine whether the newly developed Canon CXDI-70C DR detector provides an improved image quality and/or allows for dose reductions in hand and pelvic bone examinations as well as premature chest examinations, compared to the previous (CXDI-55C) DR detector version. A total of 450 images of a technical Contrast-Detail phantom were imaged on a DR system employing various kVp and mAs settings, providing an objective image quality assessment. In addition, 450 images of anthropomorphic phantoms were taken and analyzed by three specialized radiologists using Visual Grading Analysis (VGA). The results from the technical phantom studies showed that the image quality expressed as IQFINV values was on average approximately 45 % higher with the CXDI-70C detector compared to the CXDI-55C detector. Consistently, the VGA results from the anatomical phantom studies indicated that by using the CXDI-70C detector, diagnostic image quality could be maintained at a dose reduction of in average 30 %, depending on anatomy and kVp level. This indicates that the CXDI-70C detector is significantly more sensitive than the previous model, and supports a better clinical image quality. By using the newly developed DR detector a significant dose reduction is possible while maintaining image quality.

  14. Spatially varying scatter compensation for chest radiographs using a hybrid Madaline artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Joseph Y.; Baydush, Alan H.; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    We developed a hybrid artificial neural network for scatter compensation in digital portable chest radiographs. The network inputs an image region of interest (ROI), and outputs the scatter estimate at the ROI's center. We segmented each image into four regions by relative detected exposure, then trained a separate Adaline (adaptive linear element) or adaptive filter for each region. We produced a spatially varying hybrid Madaline (mulitple Adaline) by combining outputs from weight matrices of different sizes trained for different durations. The network was trained with 20 patient or 1280 examples, then evaluated with another 5 patients or 320 examples. Scatter estimation errors were not very different, ranging from the Adaline's 6.9 percent to the hybrid Madaline's 5.5 percent. Primary errors (more relevant to quantitative radiography techniques like dual energy imaging) were 43 percent for the Adaline, reduced to 27 percent for the Madaline, and further reduced to 19 percent for the hybrid Madaline. The trained weight matrices, which act like convolution filters, resembled the shape and magnitude of scatter point spread functions. All networks outperformed conventional convolution-subraction techniques using analytical kernels. With its spatially varying neural network model, the hybrid Madaline provided the most accurate and robust estimation of scatter and primary exposures.

  15. Development of Portable Digital Radiography System with a Device for Monitoring X-ray Source-Detector Angle and Its Application in Chest Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Heo, Dong-Woon; Jeong, Chang-Won; Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Jun, Hong Young; Han, Seung-Jun; Ha, Taeuk; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2017-01-01

    This study developed a device measuring the X-ray source-detector angle (SDA) and evaluated the imaging performance for diagnosing chest images. The SDA device consisted of Arduino, an accelerometer and gyro sensor, and a Bluetooth module. The SDA values were compared with the values of a digital angle meter. The performance of the portable digital radiography (PDR) was evaluated using the signal-to-noise (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), spatial resolution, distortion and entrance surface dose (ESD). According to different angle degrees, five anatomical landmarks were assessed using a five-point scale. The mean SNR and CNR were 182.47 and 141.43. The spatial resolution and ESD were 3.17 lp/mm (157 μm) and 0.266 mGy. The angle values of the SDA device were not significantly difference as compared to those of the digital angle meter. In chest imaging, the SNR and CNR values were not significantly different according to the different angle degrees. The visibility scores of the border of the heart, the fifth rib and the scapula showed significant differences according to different angles (p < 0.05), whereas the scores of the clavicle and first rib were not significant. It is noticeable that the increase in the SDA degree was consistent with the increases of the distortion and visibility score. The proposed PDR with a SDA device would be useful for application in the clinical radiography setting according to the standard radiography guidelines. PMID:28272336

  16. Detection of occult, undisplaced hip fractures with a dual-energy CT algorithm targeted to detection of bone marrow edema.

    PubMed

    Reddy, T; McLaughlin, P D; Mallinson, P I; Reagan, A C; Munk, P L; Nicolaou, S; Ouellette, H A

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe our initial clinical experience with dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) virtual non-calcium (VNC) images for the detection of bone marrow (BM) edema in patients with suspected hip fracture following trauma. Twenty-five patients presented to the emergency department at a level 1 trauma center between January 1, 2011 and January 1, 2013 with clinical suspicion of hip fracture and normal radiographs were included. All CT scans were performed on a dual-source, dual-energy CT system. VNC images were generated using prototype software and were compared to regular bone reconstructions by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. Radiological and/or clinical diagnosis of fracture at 30-day follow-up was used as the reference standard. Twenty-one patients were found to have DECT-VNC signs of bone marrow edema. Eighteen of these 21 patients were true positive and three were false positive. A concordant fracture was clearly seen on bone reconstruction images in 15 of the 18 true positive cases. In three cases, DECT-VNC was positive for bone marrow edema where bone reconstruction CT images were negative. Four patients demonstrated no DECT-VNC signs of bone marrow edema: two cases were true negative, two cases were false negative. When compared with the gold standard of hip fracture determined at retrospective follow-up, the sensitivity of DECT-VNC images of the hip was 90 %, specificity was 40 %, positive predictive value was 86 %, and negative predictive value was 50 %. Our initial experience would suggest that DECT-VNC is highly sensitive but poorly specific in the diagnosis of hip fractures in patients with normal radiographs. The value of DECT-VNC primarily lies in its ability to help detect fractures which may be subtle or undetectable on bone reconstruction CT images.

  17. Tophaceous Gout in an Anorectic Patient Visualized by Dual Energy Computed Tomography (DECT)

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Heidi Dahl; Sheta, Hussam Mahmoud; Morillon, Melanie Birger; Hansen, Inger Marie Jensen

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 40 Final Diagnosis: Gout Symptoms: Joint pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Dual energy Computed tomography Specialty: Rheumatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Gout is characterized by deposition of uric acid crystals (monosodium urate) in tissues and fluids. This can cause acute inflammatory arthritis. The 2015 ACR/EULAR criteria for the diagnosis of gout include dual energy computed tomography (DECT)-demonstrated monosodium urate crystals as a new criterion. DECT is a spectral decomposition that permits recognition of different types of tissues based on their characteristic energy-dependent photon attenuation. A positive scan is defined as the presence of urate at articular or periarticular sites. Case Report: We describe a 51-year-old woman known to have anorexia nervosa. During our clinical examination, we detected plenty of tophi on both hands, but no swollen joints. The diagnosis of gout was made by visualizing crystals in a biopsy from a tophus. The first line of treatment was allopurinol, the second line was rasburicase, and the current treatment is febuxostat 80 mg/day, allopurinol 300 mg twice a day, and colchicine 0.5 mg twice a day. The patient has unchanged arthralgia and the size and number of tophi remain the same as before treatment in spite of active treatment for 3 years. Previously the patient had problems with adherence, but now she claims that she follows the proposed treatment. The last plasma urate (P-urate) was 0.57 mmol/L. Following two years of treatment, DECT of hands visualized monosodium urate crystal deposits in the tophi, as seen on the clinical photos, but also crystals in relation to the tendons and soft tissue. Conclusions: DECT is an imaging modality useful to assess urate crystal deposits at diagnosis of gout and could be considered during treatment evaluation. Lack of adherence to treatment should be considered when P-urate values vary significantly and when DECT scans

  18. Dual energy CT via fast kVp switching spectrum estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dan; Langan, David A.; Wu, Xiaoye; Pack, Jed D.; Benson, Thomas M.; Tkaczky, J. Eric; Schmitz, Andrea M.

    2009-02-01

    Recently there has been significant interest in dual energy CT imaging with several acquisition methods being actively pursued. Here we investigate fast kVp switching where the kVp alternates between low and high kVp every view. Fast kVp switching enables fine temporal registration, helical and axial acquisitions, and full field of view. It also presents several processing challenges. The rise and fall of the kVp, which occurs during the view integration period, is not instantaneous and complicates the measurement of the effective spectrum for low and high kVp views. Further, if the detector digital acquisition system (DAS) and generator clocks are not fully synchronous, jitter is introduced in the kVp waveform relative to the view period. In this paper we develop a method for estimation of the resulting spectrum for low and high kVp views. The method utilizes static kVp acquisitions of air with a small bowtie filter as a basis set. A fast kVp acquisition of air with a small bowtie filter is performed and the effective kVp is estimated as a linear combination of the basis vectors. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated through the reconstruction of a water phantom acquired with a fast kVp acquisition. The impact of jitter due to the generator and detector DAS clocks is explored via simulation. The error is measured relative to spectrum variation and material decomposition accuracy.

  19. Calcification content quantification by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry with a 2D digital radiographic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinten, Jean M.; Robert-Coutant, Christine; Darboux, Michel; Gonon, Georges; Bordy, Thomas

    2003-06-01

    In a previous paper (SPIE Medical Imaging 2001), a dual energy method for bone densitometry using a 2D digital radiographic detector has been presented. In this paper, calcium content quantification performance of the approach is precised. The main challenge is to achieve quantification using scatter-corrected dual energy acquisitions. Therefore a scatter estimation approach, based on an expression of scatter as a functional of the primary flux, has been developed. This expression is derived from the Klein and Nishina equation and includes tabulated scatter level values. The calcium quantification performances are validated on two configurations. A first one is issued from criteria developed by the French "Groupe de Recherche et d'Information sur les Osteoporoses." It is based on the use of a phantom made of five 3mm thick PVC sheets in the form of five steps, representing five different bone mineral density values, included in a lucite container filled with water. Additional lucite plates can be put over the phantom. This phantom has been used for evaluation of quantification robustness versus patient thickness and composition variations, and for accuracy evaluation. The second configuration, composed of small calcified objects (representative of lung nodules), is used for evaluating capacities to differentiate calcified from non calcified nodules and to test calcium content quantification performance.

  20. Dual-energy CT after radiofrequency ablation of liver, kidney, and lung lesions: a review of features.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Frederik; Van Hedent, Steven; Van Gompel, Gert; Buls, Nico; Craggs, Gordon; Vandemeulebroucke, Jef; Ros, Pablo R; de Mey, Johan

    2015-06-01

    Early detection of residual tumour and local tumour progression (LTP) after radiofrequency (RF) ablation is crucial in the decision whether or not to re-ablate. In general, standard contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used to evaluate the technique effectiveness; however, it is difficult to differentiate post-treatment changes from residual tumour. Dual-energy CT (DECT) is a relatively new technique that enables more specific tissue characterisation of iodine-enhanced structures because of the isolation of iodine in the imaging data. Necrotic post-ablation zones can be depicted as avascular regions by DECT on greyscale- and colour-coded iodine images. Synthesised monochromatic images from dual-energy CT with spectral analysis can be used to select the optimal keV to achieve the highest contrast-to-noise ratio between tissues. This facilitates outlining the interface between the ablation zone and surrounding tissue. Post-processing of DECT data can lead to an improved characterisation and delineation of benign post-ablation changes from LTP. Radiologists need to be familiar with typical post-ablation image interpretations when using DECT techniques. Here, we review the spectrum of changes after RF ablation of liver, kidney, and lung lesions using single-source DECT imaging, with the emphasis on the additional information obtained and pitfalls encountered with this relatively new technique. Teaching Points •Technical success of RF ablation means complete destruction of the tumour. •Assessment of residual tumour on contrast-enhanced CT is hindered by post-ablative changes. •DECT improves material differentiation and may improve focal lesion characterisation. •Iodine maps delineate the treated area from the surrounding parenchyma well.

  1. Dosimetric Evaluation of Metal Artefact Reduction using Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) Algorithm and Dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT) Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguda, Edcer Jerecho

    Purpose: Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the standard diagnostic imaging modalities for the evaluation of a patient's medical condition. In comparison to other imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), CT is a fast acquisition imaging device with higher spatial resolution and higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for bony structures. CT images are presented through a gray scale of independent values in Hounsfield units (HU). High HU-valued materials represent higher density. High density materials, such as metal, tend to erroneously increase the HU values around it due to reconstruction software limitations. This problem of increased HU values due to metal presence is referred to as metal artefacts. Hip prostheses, dental fillings, aneurysm clips, and spinal clips are a few examples of metal objects that are of clinical relevance. These implants create artefacts such as beam hardening and photon starvation that distort CT images and degrade image quality. This is of great significance because the distortions may cause improper evaluation of images and inaccurate dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Different algorithms are being developed to reduce these artefacts for better image quality for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. However, very limited information is available about the effect of artefact correction on dose calculation accuracy. This research study evaluates the dosimetric effect of metal artefact reduction algorithms on severe artefacts on CT images. This study uses Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI)-based MAR algorithm, projection-based Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) algorithm, and the Dual-Energy method. Materials and Methods: The Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI)-based and SMART Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) algorithms are metal artefact reduction protocols embedded in two different CT scanner models by General Electric (GE), and the Dual-Energy Imaging Method was developed at Duke University. All three

  2. Measurement of breast tissue composition with dual energy cone-beam computed tomography: A postmortem study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a three-material compositional measurement of water, lipid, and protein content of breast tissue with dual kVp cone-beam computed tomography (CT) for diagnostic purposes. Methods: Simulations were performed on a flat panel-based computed tomography system with a dual kVp technique in order to guide the selection of experimental acquisition parameters. The expected errors induced by using the proposed calibration materials were also estimated by simulation. Twenty pairs of postmortem breast samples were imaged with a flat-panel based dual kVp cone-beam CT system, followed by image-based material decomposition using calibration data obtained from a three-material phantom consisting of water, vegetable oil, and polyoxymethylene plastic. The tissue samples were then chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein contents after imaging to allow direct comparison with data from dual energy decomposition. Results: Guided by results from simulation, the beam energies for the dual kVp cone-beam CT system were selected to be 50 and 120 kVp with the mean glandular dose divided equally between each exposure. The simulation also suggested that the use of polyoxymethylene as the calibration material for the measurement of pure protein may introduce an error of −11.0%. However, the tissue decomposition experiments, which employed a calibration phantom made out of water, oil, and polyoxymethylene, exhibited strong correlation with data from the chemical analysis. The average root-mean-square percentage error for water, lipid, and protein contents was 3.58% as compared with chemical analysis. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the water, lipid, and protein contents can be accurately measured using dual kVp cone-beam CT. The tissue compositional information may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:23718593

  3. Surface extraction from multi-material components for metrology using dual energy CT.

    PubMed

    Heinzl, Christoph; Kastner, Johann; Gröller, Eduard

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method for creating surface models of multi-material components using dual energy computed tomography (DECT). The application scenario is metrology and dimensional measurement in industrial high resolution 3D x-ray computed tomography (3DCT). Based on the dual source / dual exposure technology this method employs 3DCT scans of a high precision micro-focus and a high energy macro-focus x-ray source. The presented work makes use of the advantages of dual x-ray exposure technology in order to facilitate dimensional measurements of multi-material components with high density material within low density material. We propose a workflow which uses image fusion and local surface extraction techniques: a prefiltering step reduces noise inherent in the data. For image fusion the datasets have to be registered. In the fusion step the benefits of both scans are combined. The structure of the specimen is taken from the low precision, blurry, high energy dataset while the sharp edges are adopted and fused into the resulting image from the high precision, crisp, low energy dataset. In the final step a reliable surface model is extracted from the fused dataset using a local adaptive technique. The major contribution of this paper is the development of a specific workflow for dimensional measurements of multi-material industrial components, which takes two x-ray CT datasets with complementary strengths and weaknesses into account. The performance of the workflow is discussed using a test specimen as well as two real world industrial parts. As result, a significant improvement in overall measurement precision, surface geometry and mean deviation to reference measurement compared to single exposure scans was facilitated.

  4. Measurement of breast tissue composition with dual energy cone-beam computed tomography: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Huanjun; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a three-material compositional measurement of water, lipid, and protein content of breast tissue with dual kVp cone-beam computed tomography (CT) for diagnostic purposes. Methods: Simulations were performed on a flat panel-based computed tomography system with a dual kVp technique in order to guide the selection of experimental acquisition parameters. The expected errors induced by using the proposed calibration materials were also estimated by simulation. Twenty pairs of postmortem breast samples were imaged with a flat-panel based dual kVp cone-beam CT system, followed by image-based material decomposition using calibration data obtained from a three-material phantom consisting of water, vegetable oil, and polyoxymethylene plastic. The tissue samples were then chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein contents after imaging to allow direct comparison with data from dual energy decomposition. Results: Guided by results from simulation, the beam energies for the dual kVp cone-beam CT system were selected to be 50 and 120 kVp with the mean glandular dose divided equally between each exposure. The simulation also suggested that the use of polyoxymethylene as the calibration material for the measurement of pure protein may introduce an error of -11.0%. However, the tissue decomposition experiments, which employed a calibration phantom made out of water, oil, and polyoxymethylene, exhibited strong correlation with data from the chemical analysis. The average root-mean-square percentage error for water, lipid, and protein contents was 3.58% as compared with chemical analysis. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the water, lipid, and protein contents can be accurately measured using dual kVp cone-beam CT. The tissue compositional information may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer diagnosis.

  5. Liver fat quantification using fast kVp-switching dual energy CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriston, Andras; Mendonça, Paulo; Silva, Alvin; Paden, Robert G.; Pavlicek, William; Sahani, Dushyant; Janos Kis, Benedek; Rusko, Laszlo; Okerlund, Darin; Bhotika, Rahul

    2011-03-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a liver disease that occurs in patients that lack a history of the well-proven association of alcohol use. A major symptom of NASH is increased fat deposition in the liver. Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) with fast kVp-switching enables projection-based material decomposition, offering the opportunity to accurately characterize tissue types, e.g., fat and healthy liver tissue, based on their energy-sensitive material attenuation and density. We describe our pilot efforts to apply GSI to locate and quantify the amount of fat deposition in the liver. Two approaches are presented, one that computes percentage fat from the difference in HU values at high and low energies and the second based on directly computing fat volume fraction at each voxel using multi-material decomposition. Simulation software was used to create a phantom with a set of concentric rings, each composed of fat and soft tissue in different relative amounts with attenuation values obtained from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Monte Carlo 80 and 140 kVp X-ray projections were acquired and CT images of the phantom were reconstructed. Results demonstrated the sensitivity of dual energy CT to the presence of fat and its ability to distinguish fat from soft tissue. Additionally, actual patient (liver) datasets were acquired using GSI and monochromatic images at 70 and 140 keV were reconstructed. Preliminary results demonstrate a tissue sensitivity that appears sufficient to quantify fat content with a degree of accuracy as may be needed for non-invasive clinical assessment of NASH.

  6. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P < .001) and positive smoking history (P = .001) were associated with increased likelihood of a recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in

  7. Enhanced diagnostic value for coronary CT angiography of calcified coronary arteries using dual energy and a novel high-Z contrast material: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jack W.; Ordovas, Karen G.; Sun, Yuxin; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2016-03-01

    Dual-energy CT is emerging as a dose-saving tool for coronary CT angiography that allows calcium-scoring without the need for a separate unenhanced scan acquisition. Unfortunately the similar attenuation coefficient profiles of iodine and calcium limits the accuracy of their decomposition in the material basis images. We evaluate a tungsten-based contrast material with a more distinct attenuation profile from calcium, and compare its performance to a conventional iodinated agent. We constructed a custom thorax phantom containing simulated sets of vessels 3, 6 and 9 mm in diameter. The vessel sets were walled with concentric and eccentric calcifications ("plaque") with concentrations of 0, 20, 30 and 40% weight calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP). The phantom was filled sequentially with iodine and tungsten contrast material, and scanned helically using a fast-kV-switching DECT scanner. At material decomposition, both iodine and tungsten vessel lumens were separable from the HAP vessel walls, but separation was superior with tungsten which showed minimal false positive signal in the HAP image. Assessing their relative performance using line profiles, the HAP signal was greater in the tungsten separation in 6/9 of the vessel sets, and within 15% of the iodine separation for the remaining 3/9 sets. The robust phantom design enabled systematic evaluation of dual-energy material separation for calcium and a candidate non-iodinated vascular contrast element. This approach can be used to screen further agents and also refine dual energy CT material decomposition approaches.

  8. Comparison of CT and dual-energy DEXA using a modified trunk compartment in the measurement of abdominal fat.

    PubMed

    Lane, James T; Mack-Shipman, Lynn R; Anderson, Joseph C; Moore, Timothy E; Erickson, Judi M; Ford, Timothy C; Stoner, Julie A; Larsen, Jennifer L

    2005-08-01

    The quantification of abdominal fat is a marker of health risk. While dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is easily applied, it measures overall fat, although abdominal fat may be a better indicator of health risk from obesity. We have evaluated whether a subcomponent of DEXA measurements correlates better with computed tomography (CT) for body fat than those traditionally used. Forty-seven healthy adults (22 M/25 F), aged 54.5+/-15.8 yr (mean+/-SD), with BMI of 27.1+/-4.6 kg/m2 participated in a cross-sectional study. Body fat was measured using abdominal CT and DEXA for total fat, trunk fat, and a modified trunk measurement that excludes the chest, termed "lower trunk," and compared. The coefficient of variation for DEXA measurements for trunk, lower trunk, and total body were 1.98, 3.12, and 0.85%, respectively. Mean DEXA for percentage fat ranged from 31.7% to 34.1% for trunk, lower trunk, and total body, compared to 54.2% for abdominal CT (p<0.003 for each pairwise comparison). Lower trunk, whole trunk, and total body DEXA measurements were not different. Measurement of subcomponents of fat content by DEXA is not superior to whole body measurements and remains consistently lower than measurements by CT.

  9. Determinants of Detection of Stones and Calcifications in the Hepatobiliary System on Virtual Nonenhanced Dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-Ming; Wang, Xuan; Xue, Hua-Dan; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Sun, Hao; Chen, Yu; He, Yong-Lan

    2016-06-20

    Objective To retrospectively determine the features of stones and calcifications in hepatobiliary system on virtual nonenhanced (VNE) dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and to evaluate the possibility of VNE images in diagnosis for those lesions.Methods A total of 128 gall stones and calcifications of the liver found in 110 patients were examined with triple phase abdominal CT scan from July 2007 to December 2011, in which true nonenhanced (TNE) phase and arterial phase were performed with single-energy CT (120 kVp) and portal venous phase was performed with dual-energy CT (100 kVp and 140 kVp). VNE images were generated from the portal venous phase dual-energy CT data sets by using commercially VNC software. The mean CT values for the stone, liver, bile and paraspinal muscle, mean lesion density and size in area dimension, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of lesion to the liver or bile, and image noise were assessed and compared between VNE and TNE images. The effective dose and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) were also calculated.Results The mean CT values of the lesions measured on VNE images declined significantly compared with those measured on TNE images (164.51±102.13 vs. 290.72±197.80 HU, P<0.001), so did the lesion-to-liver CNR (10.80±11.82 vs.18.81±17.06, P<0.001) and the lesion-to-bile CNR (17.24±14.41 vs. 21.32±17.31, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in size of lesions area between VNE and TNE images (0.69±0.88 vs. 0.72±0.85 cm(2), P=0.062). Compared to the 128 lesions found in TNE images, VNE images showed the same density in 30 (23.4%) lesions, lighter density in 88 (68.8%) lesions, while failed to show 10 (7.8%) lesions, and showed the same size in 61 (47.7%) lesions and smaller size in 57 (44.5%) lesions. The CT cutoff values of lesion and size were 229.21 HU and 0.15 cm(2), respectively. The total effective dose for triple phase scan protocol with TNE images was 19.51±7.03 mSv, and the SSDE was 39.84±11.10 mGy. The

  10. [Lateral chest X-rays. Radiographic anatomy].

    PubMed

    García Villafañe, C; Pedrosa, C S

    2014-01-01

    Lateral chest views constitute an essential part of chest X-ray examinations, so it is fundamental to know the anatomy on these images and to be able to detect the variations manifested on these images in different diseases. The aim of this article is to review the normal anatomy and main normal variants seen on lateral chest views. For teaching purposes, we divide the thorax into different spaces and analyze each in an orderly way, especially emphasizing the anatomic details that are most helpful for locating lesions that have already been detected in the posteroanterior view or for detecting lesions that can be missed in the posteroanterior view.

  11. Arterial double-contrast dual-energy MDCT: in-vivo rabbit atherosclerosis with iodinated nanoparticles and gadolinium agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Raz; Kafri, Galit; Altman, Ami; Goshen, Liran; Planer, David; Sosna, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    An in-vivo feasibility study of potentially improved atherosclerosis CT imaging is presented. By administration of two different contrast agents to rabbits with induced atherosclerotic plaques we aim at identifying both soft plaque and vessel lumen simultaneously. Initial injection of iodinated nanoparticle (INP) contrast agent (N1177 - Nanoscan Imaging), two to four hours before scan, leads to its later accumulation in macrophage-rich soft plaque, while a second gadolinium contrast agent (Magnevist) injected immediately prior to the scan blends with the aortic blood. The distinction between the two agents in a single scan is achieved with a double-layer dual-energy MDCT (Philips Healthcare) following material separation analysis using the reconstructed images of the different x-ray spectra. A single contrast agent injection scan, where only INP was injected two hours prior to the scan, was compared to a double-contrast scan taken four hours after INP injection and immediately after gadolinium injection. On the single contrast agent scan we observed along the aorta walls, localized iodine accumulation which can point on INP uptake by atherosclerotic plaque. In the double-contrast scan the gadolinium contributes a clearer depiction of the vessel lumen in addition to the lasting INP presence. The material separation shows a good correlation to the pathologies inferred from the conventional CT images of the two different scans while performing only a single scan prevents miss-registration problems and reduces radiation dose. These results suggest that a double-contrast dual-energy CT may be used for advanced clinical diagnostic applications.

  12. Radiation dose efficiency of dual-energy CT benchmarked against single-source, kilovoltage-optimized scans

    PubMed Central

    Pratap, Jit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the radiation dose and image quality implications of dual-energy CT (DECT) use, compared with kilovoltage-optimized single-source/single-energy CT (SECT) on a dual-source Siemens Somatom® Definition Flash CT scanner (Siemens Healthcare, Forcheim, Germany). Methods: With equalized radiation dose (volumetric CT dose index), image noise (standard deviation of CT number) and signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) were measured and compared across three techniques: 100, 120 and 100/140 kVp (dual energy). Noise in a 30-cm-diameter water phantom and SDNR within unenhanced soft-tissue regions of a small adult (50 kg/165 cm) anthropomorphic phantom were utilized for the assessment. Results: Water phantom image noise decreased with DECT compared with the lower noise SECT setting of 120 kVp (p = 0.046). A decrease in SDNR within the anthropomorphic phantom was demonstrated at 120 kVp compared with the SECT kilovoltage-optimized setting of 100 kVp (p = 0.001). A further decrease in SDNR was observed for the DECT technique when compared with 120 kVp (p = 0.01). Conclusion: On the Siemens Somatom Definition Flash system (Siemens Healthcare), and for equalized radiation dose conditions, image quality expressed as SDNR of unenhanced soft tissue may be compromised for DECT when compared with kilovoltage-optimized SECT, particularly for smaller patients. Advances in knowledge: DECT on a dual-source CT scanner may require a radiation dose increase to maintain unenhanced soft-tissue contrast detectability, particularly for smaller patients. PMID:26559438

  13. TU-A-12A-08: Computing Longitudinal Material Changes in Bone Metastases Using Dual Energy Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtlein, CR; Hwang, S; Veeraraghavan, H; Fehr, D; Humm, J; Deasy, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This study demonstrates a methodology for tracking changes in metastatic bone disease using trajectories in material basis space in serial dual energy computed tomography (DECT) studies. Methods: This study includes patients with bone metastases from breast cancer that had clinical surveillance CT scans using a General Electric CT750HD in dual energy mode. A radiologist defined regions-of-interested (ROI) for bone metastasis, normal bone, and marrow across the serial DECT scans. Our approach employs a Radon transform to forward-projection the basis images, namely, water and iodine, into sinogram space. This data is then repartitioned into fat/bone and effective density/Z image pairs using assumed energy spectrums for the x-ray energies. This approach both helps remove negative material densities and avoids adding spectrum-hardening artifacts. These new basis data sets were then reconstructed via filtered back-projection to create new material basis pair images. The trajectories of these pairs were then plotted in the new basis space providing a means to both visualize and quantitatively measure changes in the material properties of the tumors. Results: ROI containing radiologist defined metastatic bone disease showed well-defined trajectories in both fat/bone and effective density/Z space. ROI that contained radiologist defined normal bone and marrow did not exhibit any discernible trajectories and were stable from scan to scan. Conclusions: The preliminary results show that changes in material composition and effective density/Z image pairs were seen primarily in metastasis and not in normal tissue. This study indicates that by using routine clinical DECT it may be possible to monitor therapy response of bone metastases because healing or worsening bone metastases change material composition of bone. Additional studies are needed to further validate these results and to test for their correlation with outcome.

  14. Spiral computed tomographic scanning of the chest with three dimensional imaging in the diagnosis and management of paediatric intrathoracic airway obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Sagy, M.; Poustchi-Amin, M.; Nimkoff, L.; Silver, P.; Shikowitz, M.; Leonidas, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The usefulness of spiral computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest with three dimensional imaging (3D-CT) of intrathoracic structures in the diagnosis and management of paediatric intrathoracic airway obstruction was assessed. METHODS: A retrospective review was made of five consecutive cases (age range six months to four years) admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit and paediatric radiology division of a tertiary care children's hospital with severe respiratory decompensation suspected of being caused by intrathoracic large airway obstruction. Under adequate sedation, the patients underwent high speed spiral CT scanning of the thorax. Non-ionic contrast solution was injected in two patients to demonstrate the anatomical relationship between the airway and the intrathoracic large vessels. Using computer software, three-dimensional images of intrathoracic structures were then reconstructed by the radiologist. RESULTS: In all five patients the imaging results were useful in directing the physician to the correct diagnosis and appropriate management. In one patient, who had undergone repair of tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve, the 3D-CT image showed bilateral disruptions in the integrity of the tracheobronchial tree due to compression by a dilated pulmonary artery. This patient underwent pulmonary artery aneurysmorrhaphy and required continued home mechanical ventilation via tracheostomy. In three other patients with symptoms of lower airway obstruction the 3D-CT images showed significant stenosis in segments of the tracheobronchial tree in two of them, and subsequent bronchoscopy established a diagnosis of segmental bronchomalacia. These two patients required mechanical ventilation and distending pressure to relieve their bronchospasm. In another patient who had undergone surgical repair of intrathoracic tracheal stenosis three years prior to admission the 3D-CT scan ruled out restenosis as the reason for her acute respiratory

  15. Evaluation of pulmonary function using single-breath-hold dual-energy computed tomography with xenon

    PubMed Central

    Kyoyama, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sakai, Kosuke; Saito, Yuriko; Mikami, Shintaro; Moriyama, Gaku; Yanagita, Hisami; Watanabe, Wataru; Otani, Katharina; Honda, Norinari; Uematsu, Kazutsugu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Xenon-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography (xenon-enhanced CT) can provide lung ventilation maps that may be useful for assessing structural and functional abnormalities of the lung. Xenon-enhanced CT has been performed using a multiple-breath-hold technique during xenon washout. We recently developed xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique to assess ventilation. We sought to evaluate whether xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique correlates with pulmonary function testing (PFT) results. Twenty-six patients, including 11 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, underwent xenon-enhanced CT and PFT. Three of the COPD patients underwent xenon-enhanced CT before and after bronchodilator treatment. Images from xenon-CT were obtained by dual-source CT during a breath-hold after a single vital-capacity inspiration of a xenon–oxygen gas mixture. Image postprocessing by 3-material decomposition generated conventional CT and xenon-enhanced images. Low-attenuation areas on xenon images matched low-attenuation areas on conventional CT in 21 cases but matched normal-attenuation areas in 5 cases. Volumes of Hounsfield unit (HU) histograms of xenon images correlated moderately and highly with vital capacity (VC) and total lung capacity (TLC), respectively (r = 0.68 and 0.85). Means and modes of histograms weakly correlated with VC (r = 0.39 and 0.38), moderately with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (r = 0.59 and 0.56), weakly with the ratio of FEV1 to FVC (r = 0.46 and 0.42), and moderately with the ratio of FEV1 to its predicted value (r = 0.64 and 0.60). Mode and volume of histograms increased in 2 COPD patients after the improvement of FEV1 with bronchodilators. Inhalation of xenon gas caused no adverse effects. Xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique depicted functional abnormalities not detectable on thin-slice CT. Mode, mean, and volume of HU histograms of xenon images

  16. Polynomial dual energy inverse functions for bone Calcium/Phosphorus ratio determination and experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulou, P; Fountos, G; Martini, N; Koukou, V; Michail, C; Kandarakis, I; Nikiforidis, G

    2016-12-01

    An X-ray dual energy (XRDE) method was examined, using polynomial nonlinear approximation of inverse functions for the determination of the bone Calcium-to-Phosphorus (Ca/P) mass ratio. Inverse fitting functions with the least-squares estimation were used, to determine calcium and phosphate thicknesses. The method was verified by measuring test bone phantoms with a dedicated dual energy system and compared with previously published dual energy data. The accuracy in the determination of the calcium and phosphate thicknesses improved with the polynomial nonlinear inverse function method, introduced in this work, (ranged from 1.4% to 6.2%), compared to the corresponding linear inverse function method (ranged from 1.4% to 19.5%).

  17. Algebraic dual-energy magnetic analysis with application to variable reluctance motor design

    SciTech Connect

    Tolikas, M.; Lang, J.H.; Kirtley, J.L. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The dual-energy method has been successfully employed in the calculation of static resistances, capacitances and inductances, yielding fast and accurate solutions. Two different directions can be followed in applying the method, one is the more widely known method of tubes and slices, the other is the algebraic approach and is explored further in this paper. The present literature on the algebraic dual-energy method involves trivial examples with boundaries, boundary conditions and source distributions that are easily handled. However, the geometry of the variable reluctance motor at the unaligned position, the dominating curvatures characterizing its electromagnetic field distribution and the presence of a large number of boundary conditions arising at the steel boundaries, provide a challenging exercise in the application, behavior and effectiveness of the dual-energy method in a realistic framework.

  18. Dual energy CT with photon counting and dual source systems: comparative evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atak, Haluk; Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, new dual energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) systems—dual source CT (DSCT) and photon counting CT (PCCT) have been introduced. Although these systems have the same clinical targets, they have major differences as they use dual and single kVp acquisitions and different x-ray detection and energy resolution concepts. The purpose of this study was theoretical and experimental comparisons of DSCT and PCCT. The DSCT Siemens Somatom Flash was modeled for simulation study. The PCCT had the same configuration as DSCT except it used a photon counting detector. The soft tissue phantoms with 20, 30, and 38 cm diameters included iodine, CaCO3, adipose, and water samples. The dose (air kerma) was 14 mGy for all studies. The low and high energy CT data were simulated at 80 kVp and 140 kVp for DSCT, and in 20-58 keV and 59-120 keV energy ranges for PCCT, respectively. The experiments used Somatom Flash DSCT system and PCCT system based on photon counting CdZnTe detector with 2  ×  256 pixel configuration and 1  ×  1 mm2 pixels size. In simulated general CT images, PCCT provided higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The PCCT with K-edge filter provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter, and DSCT with 0.4 mm Sn filter provided higher CNR than the DSCT with a 0.8 mm Sn filter. In simulated DE subtracted images, CNR of the DSCT was comparable to the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, DE PCCT with Ho a K-edge filter provided 30-40% higher CNR than the DE DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The experimental PCCT provided higher CNR in general imaging compared to the DSCT. In experimental DE subtracted images, the DSCT provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, experimental CNR with DE PCCT with K-edge filter was 15% higher than in DE DSCT, which is less than 30-40% increase predicted by the simulation study. It is concluded that ideal PCCT can provide substantial advantages over ideal

  19. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and telemedicine network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaru; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2009-02-01

    Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. Moreover, the doctor who diagnoses a medical image is insufficient in Japan. To overcome these problems, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images, a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification and a vertebra body analysis algorithm for quantitative evaluation of osteoporosis likelihood by using helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening. The functions to observe suspicious shadow in detail are provided in computer-aided diagnosis workstation with these screening algorithms. We also have developed the telemedicine network by using Web medical image conference system with the security improvement of images transmission, Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system. Biometric face authentication used on site of telemedicine makes "Encryption of file" and "Success in login" effective. As a result, patients' private information is protected. We can share the screen of Web medical image conference system from two or more web conference terminals at the same time. An opinion can be exchanged mutually by using a camera and a microphone that are connected with workstation. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have developed a new computer-aided workstation and a new telemedicine network that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. The results of this study indicate that our radiological information system without film by using computer-aided diagnosis workstation and our telemedicine network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and

  20. Excretory urography using dual-energy scanned projection radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Soomer, F.G.; Brody, W.R.; Gross, D.; Macovski, A.; Hall, A.; Pelc, N.

    1981-11-01

    Excretory urograms of 10 patients were obtained using a GE 8800 CT scanner with Scout View which had been modified for dual-kVp scanned projection radiography. Using this system, it is possible to combine images obtained simultaneously at 85 and 135 kVp to create subtraction images from which substances of desired mean atomic number have been removed. This permits improved visualization of the genitourinary system on urograms by (a) eliminating obscuring bowel gas shadows and (b) enhancement of both iodinated contrast media and retroperitoneal fat planes.

  1. Detecting meaningful body composition changes in athletes using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Colyer, Steffi L; Roberts, Simon P; Robinson, Jonathan B; Thompson, Dylan; Stokes, Keith A; Bilzon, James L J; Salo, Aki I T

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) imaging is considered to provide a valid and reliable estimation of body composition when stringent scanning protocols are adopted. However, applied practitioners are not always able to achieve this level of control and the subsequent impact on measurement precision is not always taken into account when evaluating longitudinal body composition changes. The primary aim of this study was to establish the reliability of DXA in an applied elite sport setting to investigate whether real body composition changes can be detected. Additionally, the performance implications of these changes during the training year were investigated. Forty-eight well-trained athletes (from four diverse sports) underwent two DXA scans using a 'real-world' approach (with limited pre-scan controls), typically within 48 h, to quantify typical error of measurement (TEM). Twenty-five athletes underwent further scans, before and after specific training and competition blocks. 'True' body composition changes were evaluated using 2  ×  TEM thresholds. Twelve bob skeleton athletes also performed countermovement jump and leg press tests at each time point. Many 'true' body composition changes were detected and coincided with the primary training emphases (e.g. lean mass gains during hypertrophy-based training). Clear relationships (r  ±  90% CI) were observed between performance changes (countermovement jump and leg press) and changes in lean mass (0.53  ±  0.26 and 0.35  ±  0.28, respectively) and fat mass (-0.44  ±  0.27 and  -0.37  ±  0.28, respectively). DXA was able to detect real body composition changes without the use of stringent scanning controls. Associations between changes in body composition and performance demonstrated the potential influence of these changes on strength and power indices.

  2. Tophaceous Gout in an Anorectic Patient Visualized by Dual Energy Computed Tomography (DECT).

    PubMed

    Christensen, Heidi Dahl; Sheta, Hussam Mahmoud; Morillon, Melanie Birger; Hansen, Inger Marie Jensen

    2016-07-15

    BACKGROUND Gout is characterized by deposition of uric acid crystals (monosodium urate) in tissues and fluids. This can cause acute inflammatory arthritis. The 2015 ACR/EULAR criteria for the diagnosis of gout include dual energy computed tomography (DECT)-demonstrated monosodium urate crystals as a new criterion. DECT is a spectral decomposition that permits recognition of different types of tissues based on their characteristic energy-dependent photon attenuation. A positive scan is defined as the presence of urate at articular or periarticular sites. CASE REPORT We describe a 51-year-old woman known to have anorexia nervosa. During our clinical examination, we detected plenty of tophi on both hands, but no swollen joints. The diagnosis of gout was made by visualizing crystals in a biopsy from a tophus. The first line of treatment was allopurinol, the second line was rasburicase, and the current treatment is febuxostat 80 mg/day, allopurinol 300 mg twice a day, and colchicine 0.5 mg twice a day. The patient has unchanged arthralgia and the size and number of tophi remain the same as before treatment in spite of active treatment for 3 years. Previously the patient had problems with adherence, but now she claims that she follows the proposed treatment. The last plasma urate (P-urate) was 0.57 mmol/L. Following two years of treatment, DECT of hands visualized monosodium urate crystal deposits in the tophi, as seen on the clinical photos, but also crystals in relation to the tendons and soft tissue.  CONCLUSIONS DECT is an imaging modality useful to assess urate crystal deposits at diagnosis of gout and could be considered during treatment evaluation. Lack of adherence to treatment should be considered when P-urate values vary significantly and when DECT scans over years persistently visualize monosodium urate crystals.

  3. Optimization of energy level for coronary angiography with dual-energy and dual-source computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Okayama, Satoshi; Seno, Ayako; Soeda, Tsunenari; Takami, Yasuhiro; Kawakami, Rika; Somekawa, Satoshi; Ishigami, Ken-Ichi; Takeda, Yukiji; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Horii, Manabu; Uemura, Shiro; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2012-04-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) uses polyenergetic X-rays at 100- and 140-kVp tube energy, and generates 120-kVp composite images that are referred to as polyenergetic images (PEIs). Moreover, DE-CT can produce monoenergetic images (MEIs) at any effective energy level. We evaluated whether the image quality of coronary angiography is improved by optimizing the energy levels of DE-CT. We retrospectively evaluated data sets obtained from 24 consecutive patients using cardiac DE-CT at 100- and 140-kVp tube energy with a dual-source scanner. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were evaluated in the left ascending coronary artery in PEIs, and in MEIs reconstructed at 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 130, 160 and 190 keV. Energy levels of 100, 120 and 140 kVp generated the highest SNRs in PEIs from 10, 12 and 2 patients, respectively, at 60, 70 and 80 keV in MEIs from 2, 10 and 10 patients, respectively, and at 90 and 100 keV in those from one patient each. Optimization of the energy level for each patient increased the SNR by 16.6% in PEIs (P < 0.0001) and by 18.2% in MEIs (P < 0.05), compared with 120-kVp composite images. The image quality of coronary angiography using DE-CT can be improved by optimizing the energy level for individual patients.

  4. A dual-energy approach for improvement of the measurement consistency in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Anton; Pejryd, Lars

    2016-11-01

    Computed tomography is increasingly adopted by industries for metrological and material evaluation. The technology enables new measurement possibilities, while also challenging old measurement methods in their established territories. There are, however, uncertainties related with the computed tomography method. Investigation of multi-material components with, in particular, varying material thickness can result in unreliable measurements. In this paper the effects of multi-materials, and differing material thickness, on computed tomography measurement consistency has been studied. The aim of the study was to identify measurement inconsistencies and attempt to correct these with a dual-energy computed tomography approach. In this pursuit, a multi-material phantom was developed, containing reliable measurement points and custom-ability with regards to material combinations. A dual-energy method was developed and implemented using sequential acquisition and pre-reconstruction fusing of projections. It was found that measurements made on the multi-material phantom with a single computed tomography scan were highly inconsistent. It was also found that the dual-energy approach was able to reduce the measurement inconsistencies. However, more work is required with the automation of the dual-energy approach presented in this paper since it is highly operator dependant.

  5. Dual-energy contrast enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis: concept, method, and evaluation on phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puong, Sylvie; Patoureaux, Fanny; Iordache, Razvan; Bouchevreau, Xavier; Muller, Serge

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we present the development of dual-energy Contrast-Enhanced Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (CEDBT). A method to produce background clutter-free slices from a set of low and high-energy projections is introduced, along with a scheme for the determination of the optimal low and high-energy techniques. Our approach consists of a dual-energy recombination of the projections, with an algorithm that has proven its performance in Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography1 (CEDM), followed by an iterative volume reconstruction. The aim is to eliminate the anatomical background clutter and to reconstruct slices where the gray level is proportional to the local iodine volumetric concentration. Optimization of the low and high-energy techniques is performed by minimizing the total glandular dose to reach a target iodine Signal Difference to Noise Ratio (SDNR) in the slices. In this study, we proved that this optimization could be done on the projections, by consideration of the SDNR in the projections instead of the SDNR in the slices, and verified this with phantom measurements. We also discuss some limitations of dual-energy CEDBT, due to the restricted angular range for the projection views, and to the presence of scattered radiation. Experiments on textured phantoms with iodine inserts were conducted to assess the performance of dual-energy CEDBT. Texture contrast was nearly completely removed and the iodine signal was enhanced in the slices.

  6. Comparison of Anthropometry to Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry: A New Prediction Equation for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Swan, Pamela D.; DeSimone, Rosemarie

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of three recommended anthropometric equations for women and then develop an updated prediction equation using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The percentage of body fat (%BF) by anthropometry was significantly correlated (r = .896-. 929; p [is less than] .01) with DXA, but each equation…

  7. MO-FG-204-06: A New Algorithm for Gold Nano-Particle Concentration Identification in Dual Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L; Shen, C; Ng, M; Zeng, T; Lou, Y; Jia, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Gold nano-particle (GNP) has recently attracted a lot of attentions due to its potential as an imaging contrast agent and radiotherapy sensitiser. Imaging the GNP at its low contraction is a challenging problem. We propose a new algorithm to improve the identification of GNP based on dual energy CT (DECT). Methods: We consider three base materials: water, bone, and gold. Determining three density images from two images in DECT is an under-determined problem. We propose to solve this problem by exploring image domain sparsity via an optimization approach. The objective function contains four terms. A data-fidelity term ensures the fidelity between the identified material densities and the DECT images, while the other three terms enforces the sparsity in the gradient domain of the three images corresponding to the density of the base materials by using total variation (TV) regularization. A primal-dual algorithm is applied to solve the proposed optimization problem. We have performed simulation studies to test this model. Results: Our digital phantom in the tests contains water, bone regions and gold inserts of different sizes and densities. The gold inserts contain mixed material consisting of water with 1g/cm3 and gold at a certain density. At a low gold density of 0.0008 g/cm3, the insert is hardly visible in DECT images, especially for those with small sizes. Our algorithm is able to decompose the DECT into three density images. Those gold inserts at a low density can be clearly visualized in the density image. Conclusion: We have developed a new algorithm to decompose DECT images into three different material density images, in particular, to retrieve density of gold. Numerical studies showed promising results.

  8. SU-E-J-59: Feasibility of Markerless Tumor Tracking by Sequential Dual-Energy Fluoroscopy On a Clinical Tumor Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Dhont, J; Poels, K; Verellen, D; Tournel, K; Gevaert, T; Steenbeke, F; Burghelea, M; De Ridder, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of markerless tumor tracking through the implementation of a novel dual-energy imaging approach into the clinical dynamic tracking (DT) workflow of the Vero SBRT system. Methods: Two sequential 20 s (11 Hz) fluoroscopy sequences were acquired at the start of one fraction for 7 patients treated for primary and metastatic lung cancer with DT on the Vero system. Sequences were acquired using 2 on-board kV imaging systems located at ±45° from the MV beam axis, at respectively 60 kVp (3.2 mAs) and 120 kVp (2.0 mAs). Offline, a normalized cross-correlation algorithm was applied to match the high (HE) and low energy (LE) images. Per breathing phase (inhale, exhale, maximum inhale and maximum exhale), the 5 best-matching HE and LE couples were extracted for DE subtraction. A contrast analysis according to gross tumor volume was conducted based on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Improved tumor visibility was quantified using an improvement ratio. Results: Using the implanted fiducial as a benchmark, HE-LE sequence matching was effective for 13 out of 14 imaging angles. Overlying bony anatomy was removed on all DE images. With the exception of two imaging angles, the DE images showed no significantly improved tumor visibility compared to HE images, with an improvement ratio averaged over all patients of 1.46 ± 1.64. Qualitatively, it was observed that for those imaging angles that showed no significantly improved CNR, the tumor tissue could not be reliably visualized on neither HE nor DE images due to a total or partial overlap with other soft tissue. Conclusion: Dual-energy subtraction imaging by sequential orthogonal fluoroscopy was shown feasible by implementing an additional LE fluoroscopy sequence. However, for most imaging angles, DE images did not provide improved tumor visibility over single-energy images. Optimizing imaging angles is likely to improve tumor visibility and the efficacy of dual-energy imaging. This work was in

  9. Quantification of Urinary Stone Composition in Mixed Stones Using Dual-Energy CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuai; Huang, Alice; Montoya, Juan; Duan, Xinhui; Williams, James C.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using dual-energy computed tomography to accurately quantify uric acid and non-uric-acid components in urinary stones having mixed composition. Materials and Methods A total of 24 urinary stones were analyzed with microCT to serve as the reference standard for uric acid and non-uric-acid composition. These stones were placed in water phantoms to simulate body attenuation of slim to obese adults and scanned on a third-generation dual-source scanner using dual-energy modes adaptively selected based on phantom size. CT number ratio, which is distinct for different materials, was calculated for each pixel of the stones. Each pixel was then classified as uric acid and non-uric-acid by comparing the CT number ratio with preset thresholds ranging from 1.1 to 1.7. Minimal, maximal and root-mean-square errors were calculated by comparing composition to the reference standard and the threshold with the minimal root-mean-square-error was determined. A paired t-test was performed to compare the stone composition determined with dual-energy CT with the reference standard obtained with microCT. Results The optimal CT number ratio threshold ranged from 1.27 to 1.55, dependent on phantom size. The root-mean-square error ranged from 9.60% to 12.87% across all phantom sizes. Minimal and maximal absolute error ranged from 0.04% to 1.24% and from 22.05% to 35.46%, respectively. Dual-energy CT and the reference microCT did not differ significantly on uric acid and non-uric-acid composition (P from 0.20 to 0.96, paired t-test). Conclusion Accurate quantification of uric acid and non-uric-acid composition in mixed stones is possible using dual-energy CT. PMID:27224260

  10. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for chest x-rays consists of ... tube is positioned about six feet away. The equipment may also be arranged with the x-ray ...

  11. Eigen nodule: view-based recognition of lung nodule in chest x-ray CT images using subspace method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Fukano, Gentaro; Takizawa, Hotaka; Mizuno, Shinji; Yamamoto, Shinji; Matsumoto, Tohru; Tateno, Yukio; Iinuma, Takeshi

    2004-05-01

    We previously proposed a recognition method of lung nodules based on experimentally selected feature values (such as contrast, circularities, etc.) of the suspicious shadows detected by our Quoit filter. In this paper, we propose a new recognition method of lung nodule using each CT value itself in ROI (region of interest) area as a feature value. In the clustering stage, first, the suspicious shadows are classified into some clusters using Principal Component (PC) theories. A set of CT values in each ROI is regarded as a feature vector, and then the eigen vectors and the eigen values are calculated for each cluster by applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The eigen vectors (we call them Eigen Images) corresponding to the first 10 largest eigen values, are utilized as base vectors for subspaces of the clusters in the feature space. In the discrimination stage, correlations are measured between the unknown shadow and the subspace which is spanned by the Eigen Images. If the correlation with the abnormal subspace is large, the suspicious shadow is determined to be abnormal. Otherwise, it is determined to be normal. By applying our new method, good results have been acquired.

  12. A dual energy CT study on vascular effects of gold nanoparticles in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Jeffrey R.; Hoye, Jocelyn; Deland, Katherine; Whitley, Melodi; Qi, Yi; Moding, Everett; Kirsch, David G.; West, Jennifer; Badea, Cristian T.

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are emerging as promising agents for both cancer therapy and CT imaging. AuNPs are delivered to tumors via the enhanced permeability and retention effect and they preferentially accumulate in close proximity to the tumor blood vessels. AuNPs produce low-energy, short-range photoelectrons during external beam radiation therapy (RT), boosting dose. This work is focused on understanding how tumor vascular permeability is influenced by AuNP-augmented radiation therapy (RT), and how this knowledge can potentially improve the delivery of additional nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutics. We use dual energy (DE) CT to detect accumulation of AuNPs and increased vascular permeability to liposomal iodine (i.e. a surrogate for chemotherapeutics with liposome encapsulation) following RT. We used sarcoma tumors generated in LSL-KrasG12D; p53FL/FL conditional mutant mice. A total of n=37 mice were used in this study. The treated mice were injected with 20 mg AuNP (0.1 ml/25 g mouse) 24 hours before delivery of 5 Gy RT (n=5), 10 Gy RT (n=3) or 20 Gy RT (n=6). The control mice received no AuNP injection and either no RT (n=6), 5 Gy RT (n=3), 10 Gy RT (n=3), 20 Gy RT (n=11). Twenty four hours post-RT, the mice were injected with liposomal iodine (0.3 ml/25 mouse) and imaged with DE-CT three days later. The results suggest that independent of any AuNP usage, RT levels of 10 Gy and 20 Gy increase the permeability of tumor vasculature to liposomal iodine and that the increase in permeability is dose-dependent. We found that the effect of RT on vasculature may already be at its maximum response i.e. saturated at 20 Gy, and therefore the addition of AuNPs had almost no added benefit. Similarly, at 5 Gy RT, our data suggests that there was no effect of AuNP augmentation on tumor vascular permeability. However, by using AuNPs with 10 Gy RT, we observed an increase in the vascular permeability, however this is not yet statistically significant due to the small

  13. Use of a titanium alloy (Chest Way) in the surgical stabilization of flail chest.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tomoki; Matsuzaki, Tomohiko; Aruga, Naohiro; Imamura, Naoko; Hamanaka, Rurika; Ikoma, Yoichiro; Masuda, Ryota; Iwazaki, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    To avoid the complications of internal pneumatic stabilization for flail chest, we performed stabilization of the chest wall with a metal bar using the Nuss procedure. Here, we used a highly elastic lightweight biocompatible titanium alloy Chest Way (Solve Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan), enabling magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was a 37-year-old man who sustained injuries in a car crash. Gradually increasing subcutaneous emphysema was present. Bilateral pleural drainage and tracheal intubation were conducted on the scene, and a peripheral venous line was established. The patient was then transferred to our hospital by helicopter. A titanium alloy Chest Way was inserted to manage his flail chest accompanied by multiple rib fractures on the left side. Two days later, artificial respiration was no longer required.

  14. MO-FG-204-01: Improved Noise Suppression for Dual-Energy CT Through Entropy Minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Petrongolo, M; Zhu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In dual energy CT (DECT), noise amplification during signal decomposition significantly limits the utility of basis material images. Since clinically relevant objects contain a limited number of materials, we propose to suppress noise for DECT based on image entropy minimization. An adaptive weighting scheme is employed during noise suppression to improve decomposition accuracy with limited effect on spatial resolution and image texture preservation. Methods: From decomposed images, we first generate a 2D plot of scattered data points, using basis material densities as coordinates. Data points representing the same material generate a highly asymmetric cluster. We orient an axis by minimizing the entropy in a 1D histogram of these points projected onto the axis. To suppress noise, we replace pixel values of decomposed images with center-of-mass values in the direction perpendicular to the optimal axis. To limit errors due to cluster overlap, we weight each data point’s contribution based on its high and low energy CT values and location within the image. The proposed method’s performance is assessed on physical phantom studies. Electron density is used as the quality metric for decomposition accuracy. Our results are compared to those without noise suppression and with a recently developed iterative method. Results: The proposed method reduces noise standard deviations of the decomposed images by at least one order of magnitude. On the Catphan phantom, this method greatly preserves the spatial resolution and texture of the CT images and limits induced error in measured electron density to below 1.2%. In the head phantom study, the proposed method performs the best in retaining fine, intricate structures. Conclusion: The entropy minimization based algorithm with adaptive weighting substantially reduces DECT noise while preserving image spatial resolution and texture. Future investigations will include extensive investigations on material decomposition

  15. Investigation of dual-energy X-ray photon counting using a cadmium telluride detector with dual-energy selection electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Kosuge, Yoshiyuki; Yamanome, Hayato; Mikata, Akiko; Miura, Tatsuya; Oda, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Tomotaka; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    To obtain two kinds of tomograms at two different X-ray energy ranges simultaneously, we have developed a dual-energy X-ray photon counter with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and two energy-selecting devices (ESDs). The ESD consists of two comparators and a microcomputer (MC). X-ray photons are detected using the CdTe detector, and the event pulses from a shaping amplifier are sent to two ESDs simultaneously to determine two energy ranges. X-ray photons in the two ranges are counted using the MCs, and the logical pulses from the MCs are input to frequency-to-voltage converters (FVCs). The outputs from the two FVCs are input to a personal computer through an analog-to-digital converter to carry out dual-energy computed tomography. The tube voltage and current were 80 kV and 8.5 μA, respectively. Two tomograms were obtained simultaneously with two energy ranges. K-edge CT using iodine and gadolinium media was carried out utilizing two energy ranges of 33-45 and 50-65 keV, respectively. The maximum count rate was 6.8 kilocounts per second with energies ranging from 10 to 80 keV, and the exposure time for tomography was 9.8 min.

  16. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  17. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  18. Chest tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics Chest Injuries and Disorders Collapsed Lung Critical Care Lung Diseases Pleural Disorders A.D.A. ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  19. Chest Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... your neck and your abdomen. It includes the ribs and breastbone. Inside your chest are several organs, ... and collapsed lung Pleural disorders Esophagus disorders Broken ribs Thoracic aortic aneurysms Disorders of the mediastinum, the ...

  20. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be done if you have signs of tuberculosis , lung cancer , or other chest or lung diseases . ... the blood vessels Pneumonia Scarring of lung tissue Tuberculosis In the heart: Problems with the size or ...

  1. SU-E-I-41: Dictionary Learning Based Quantitative Reconstruction for Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT (DECT)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q; Xing, L; Xiong, G; Elmore, K; Min, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: DECT collects two sets of projection data under higher and lower energies. With appropriates composition methods on linear attenuation coefficients, quantitative information about the object, such as density, can be obtained. In reality, one of the important problems in DECT is the radiation dose due to doubled scans. This work is aimed at establishing a dictionary learning based reconstruction framework for DECT for improved image quality while reducing the imaging dose. Methods: In our method, two dictionaries were learned respectively from the high-energy and lowenergy image datasets of similar objects under normal dose in advance. The linear attenuation coefficient was decomposed into two basis components with material based composition method. An iterative reconstruction framework was employed. Two basis components were alternately updated with DECT datasets and dictionary learning based sparse constraints. After one updating step under the dataset fidelity constraints, both high-energy and low-energy images can be obtained from the two basis components. Sparse constraints based on the learned dictionaries were applied to the high- and low-energy images to update the two basis components. The iterative calculation continues until a pre-set number of iteration was reached. Results: We evaluated the proposed dictionary learning method with dual energy images collected using a DECT scanner. We re-projected the projection data with added Poisson noise to reflect the low-dose situation. The results obtained by the proposed method were compared with that obtained using FBP based method and TV based method. It was found that the proposed approach yield better results than other methods with higher resolution and less noise. Conclusion: The use of dictionary learned from DECT images under normal dose is valuable and leads to improved results with much lower imaging dose.

  2. Estimating breast thickness for dual-energy subtraction in contrast-enhanced digital mammography using calibration phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Kristen C.; Kwon, Young Joon; Aziz, Moez Karim; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (DE CE-DM) uses an iodinated contrast agent to image the perfusion and vasculature of the breast. DE images are obtained by a weighted logarithmic subtraction of the high-energy (HE) and low-energy (LE) image pairs. We hypothesized that the optimal DE subtraction weighting factor is thickness-dependent, and developed a method for determining breast tissue composition and thickness in DE CE-DM. Phantoms were constructed using uniform blocks of 100% glandular-equivalent and 100% adipose-equivalent material. The thickness of the phantoms ranged from 3 to 8 cm, in 1 cm increments. For a given thickness, the glandular-adipose composition of the phantom was varied using different combinations of blocks. The logarithmic LE and logarithmic HE signal intensities were measured; they decrease linearly with increasing glandularity for a given thickness. The signals decrease with increasing phantom thickness and the x-ray signal decreases linearly with thickness for a given glandularity. As the thickness increases, the attenuation difference per additional glandular block decreases, indicating beam hardening. From the calibration mapping, we have demonstrated that we can predict percent glandular tissue and thickness when given two distinct signal intensities. Our results facilitate the subtraction of tissue at the boundaries of the breast, and aid in discriminating between contrast agent uptake in glandular tissue and subtraction artifacts.

  3. Single Phase Dual-energy CT Angiography: One-stop-shop Tool for Evaluating Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qian Qian; Tang, Chun Xiang; Zhao, Yan E; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Chen, Guo Zhong; Lu, Guang Ming; Zhang, Long Jiang

    2016-05-25

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages have extremely high case fatality in clinic. Early and rapid identifications of ruptured intracranial aneurysms seem to be especially important. Here we evaluate clinical value of single phase contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT angiograph (DE-CTA) as a one-stop-shop tool in detecting aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. One hundred and five patients who underwent true non-enhanced CT (TNCT), contrast-enhanced DE-CTA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were included. Image quality and detectability of intracranial hemorrhage were evaluated and compared between virtual non-enhanced CT (VNCT) images reconstructed from DE-CTA and TNCT. There was no statistical difference in image quality (P > 0.05) between VNCT and TNCT. The agreement of VNCT and TNCT in detecting intracranial hemorrhage reached 98.1% on a per-patient basis. With DSA as reference standard, sensitivity and specificity on a per-patient were 98.3% and 97.9% for DE-CTA in intracranial aneurysm detection. Effective dose of DE-CTA was reduced by 75.0% compared to conventional digital subtraction CTA. Thus, single phase contrast-enhanced DE-CTA is optimal reliable one-stop-shop tool for detecting intracranial hemorrhage with VNCT and intracranial aneurysms with DE-CTA with substantial radiation dose reduction compared with conventional digital subtraction CTA.

  4. TH-A-18C-08: Design of a Small Animal Contrast Enhanced Dual Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R; Pan, T; Li, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT has a variety of uses in a small animal setting including quantification and enhanced visualization of contrast agent. This study aims to determine the best energy combinations for contrast enhanced DECT on the XRAD 225Cx (Precision x-ray), a small animal IGRT system with a nominal energy range of 20 – 225 kVp. Focus was placed on material density accuracy and low contrast detectability. Methods: Simulations of single energy scans of an object containing concentrations of iodine varying from 0.5 to 50 mg/ml were performed using the simulation package ImaSim. Energy spectra from 50 – 220 kVp were calculated using the same software. For approximate Poisson noise modeling, mAs were chosen such that 30% of the total 10cGy dose was assigned to the low energy scan. A calibration involving projections of objects containing different thicknesses of iodine (0–0.5 mm) and water (0–50 mm) was performed for each energy and fit to a cubic equation as the calibration curve for each energy pair. Results: Contrast to noise ratios of the iodine material images and accuracies in iodine density measurements were measured. Gradual improvements in each metric were seen with increasing high energy. Larger improvements in CNR were observed for decreasing the low energy. Errors in iodine density were generally close to 5% for concentrations of iodine above 3 mg/ml but increased to around 15% for 50 kVp, likely due to its proximity to the discontinuity caused by the k-edge of iodine. Conclusion: Based on these simulations, the best energy combination for detecting low concentrations of iodine using a projection space calibration procedure is 50/200 kVp. However, if accuracy is most important 80/220 kVp is ideal, with 60/220 kVp being a good compromise to achieve both goals. Future work is necessary to verify these conclusions with physical data.

  5. [Cardiac causes of chest pain].

    PubMed

    Wächter, C; Markus, B; Schieffer, B

    2017-01-01

    Because of the life-threatening character and a high prevalence in emergency rooms, cardiac causes are important differential diagnoses of acute chest pain with the need for rapid clarification. In this context the working diagnosis "acute coronary syndrome" (ACS) plays a major role. In a synopsis of the clinical presentation, medical history, electrocardiogram and analysis of cardiac biomarkers, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and unstable angina pectoris can be specified as entities of ACS. The treatment of ACS consists of an immediate anti-ischemic therapy, anti-thrombotic therapy and invasive coronary diagnostics with subsequent interventional or operative revascularization therapy. The timing of invasive management is essentially determined by the individual patient risk, with the exception of STEMI where interventional revascularization must be undertaken within 120 min of diagnosis. In this context the GRACE 2.0 and TIMI risk score have become established as reliable tools. Another rare but fatal cause of acute chest