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Sample records for dual-source ct initial

  1. Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction Assessment with Dual-Source CT

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhaoying; Ma, Heng; Zhao, Ying; Fan, Zhanming; Zhang, Zhaoqi; Choi, Sang Il; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Liu, Jiayi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction on left atrial (LA) phasic volume and function using dual-source CT (DSCT) and to find a viable alternative prognostic parameter of CT for LV diastolic dysfunction through quantitative evaluation of LA phasic volume and function in patients with LV diastolic dysfunction. Materials and Methods Seventy-seven patients were examined using DSCT and Doppler echocardiography on the same day. Reservoir, conduit, and contractile function of LA were evaluated by measuring LA volume (LAV) during different cardiac phases and all parameters were normalized to body surface area (BSA). Patients were divided into four groups (normal, impaired relaxation, pseudonormal, and restrictive LV diastolic filling) according to echocardiographic findings. The LA phasic volume and function in different stages of LV diastolic function was compared using one-way ANOVA analysis. The correlations between indexed volume of LA (LAVi) and diastolic function in different stages of LV were evaluated using Spearman correlation analysis. Results LA ejection fraction (LAEF), LA contraction, reservoir, and conduit function in patients in impaired relaxation group were not different from those in the normal group, but they were lower in patients in the pseudonormal and restrictive LV diastolic dysfunction groups (P < 0.05). For LA conduit function, there were no significant differences between the patients in the pseudonormal group and restrictive filling group (P = 0.195). There was a strong correlation between the indexed maximal left atrial volume (LAVmax, r = 0.85, P < 0.001), minimal left atrial volume (LAVmin, r = 0.91, P < 0.001), left atrial volume at the onset of P wave (LAVp, r = 0.84, P < 0.001), and different stages of LV diastolic function. The LAVi increased as the severity of LV diastolic dysfunction increased. Conclusions LA remodeling takes place in patients with LV diastolic dysfunction. At the same time, LA

  2. Dual-source multi-energy CT with triple or quadruple x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lifeng; Li, Zhoubo; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-03-01

    Energy-resolved photon-counting CT (PCCT) is promising for material decomposition with multi-contrast agents. However, corrections for non-idealities of PCCT detectors are required, which are still active research areas. In addition, PCCT is associated with very high cost due to lack of mass production. In this work, we proposed an alternative approach to performing multi-energy CT, which was achieved by acquiring triple or quadruple x-ray beam measurements on a dual-source CT scanner. This strategy was based on a "Twin Beam" design on a single-source scanner for dual-energy CT. Examples of beam filters and spectra for triple and quadruple x-ray beam were provided. Computer simulation studies were performed to evaluate the accuracy of material decomposition for multi-contrast mixtures using both tri-beam and quadruple-beam configurations. The proposed strategy can be readily implemented on a dual-source scanner, which may allow material decomposition of multi-contrast agents to be performed on clinical CT scanners with energy-integrating detector.

  3. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source dual-energy CT: Radiation dose and image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lifeng; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng Shuai; Wang Jia; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of virtual monochromatic images synthesized from dual-source dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in comparison with conventional polychromatic single-energy CT for the same radiation dose. Methods: In dual-energy CT, besides the material-specific information, one may also synthesize monochromatic images at different energies, which can be used for routine diagnosis similar to conventional polychromatic single-energy images. In this work, the authors assessed whether virtual monochromatic images generated from dual-source CT scanners had an image quality similar to that of polychromatic single-energy images for the same radiation dose. First, the authors provided a theoretical analysis of the optimal monochromatic energy for either the minimum noise level or the highest iodine contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for a given patient size and dose partitioning between the low- and high-energy scans. Second, the authors performed an experimental study on a dual-source CT scanner to evaluate the noise and iodine CNR in monochromatic images. A thoracic phantom with three sizes of attenuating rings was used to represent four adult sizes. For each phantom size, three dose partitionings between the low-energy (80 kV) and the high-energy (140 kV) scans were used in the dual-energy scan. Monochromatic images at eight energies (40 to 110 keV) were generated for each scan. Phantoms were also scanned at each of the four polychromatic single energy (80, 100, 120, and 140 kV) with the same radiation dose. Results: The optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on several factors: phantom size, partitioning of the radiation dose between low- and high-energy scans, and the image quality metrics to be optimized. With the increase of phantom size, the optimal monochromatic energy increased. With the increased percentage of radiation dose on the low energy scan, the optimal monochromatic energy decreased. When maximizing the iodine CNR in

  4. High-pitch coronary CT angiography with third generation dual-source CT: limits of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Gordic, Sonja; Husarik, Daniela B; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2014-08-01

    To determine the average heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) required for diagnostic imaging of the coronary arteries in patients undergoing high-pitch CT-angiography (CTA) with third-generation dual-source CT. Fifty consecutive patients underwent CTA of the thoracic (n = 8) and thoracoabdominal (n = 42) aorta with third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT with prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gating at a pitch of 3.2. No β-blockers were administered. Motion artifacts of coronary arteries were graded on a 4-point scale. Average HR and HRV were noted. The average HR was 66 ± 11 beats per minute (bpm) (range 45-96 bpm); the HRV was 7.3 ± 4.4 bpm (range 3-20 bpm). Interobserver agreement on grade of image quality for the 642 coronary segments evaluated by both observers was good (κ = 0.71). Diagnostic image quality was found for 608 of the 642 segments (95%) in 43 of 50 patients (86%). In 14% of the patients, image quality was nondiagnostic for at least one segment. HR (p = 0.001) was significantly higher in patients with at least one non-diagnostic segment compared to those without. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in HRV between patients with nondiagnostic segments and those with diagnostic images of all segments. All patients with a HR < 70 bpm had diagnostic image quality in all coronary segments. The effective radiation dose and scan time for the heart were 0.4 ± 0.1 mSv and 0.17 ± 0.02 s, respectively. Third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT allows for coronary angiography in the prospectively ECG-gated high-pitch mode with diagnostic image quality at HR up to 70 bpm. HRV is not significantly related to image quality of coronary CTA.

  5. Dual energy CT with photon counting and dual source systems: comparative evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atak, Haluk; Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, new dual energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) systems—dual source CT (DSCT) and photon counting CT (PCCT) have been introduced. Although these systems have the same clinical targets, they have major differences as they use dual and single kVp acquisitions and different x-ray detection and energy resolution concepts. The purpose of this study was theoretical and experimental comparisons of DSCT and PCCT. The DSCT Siemens Somatom Flash was modeled for simulation study. The PCCT had the same configuration as DSCT except it used a photon counting detector. The soft tissue phantoms with 20, 30, and 38 cm diameters included iodine, CaCO3, adipose, and water samples. The dose (air kerma) was 14 mGy for all studies. The low and high energy CT data were simulated at 80 kVp and 140 kVp for DSCT, and in 20-58 keV and 59-120 keV energy ranges for PCCT, respectively. The experiments used Somatom Flash DSCT system and PCCT system based on photon counting CdZnTe detector with 2  ×  256 pixel configuration and 1  ×  1 mm2 pixels size. In simulated general CT images, PCCT provided higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The PCCT with K-edge filter provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter, and DSCT with 0.4 mm Sn filter provided higher CNR than the DSCT with a 0.8 mm Sn filter. In simulated DE subtracted images, CNR of the DSCT was comparable to the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, DE PCCT with Ho a K-edge filter provided 30-40% higher CNR than the DE DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The experimental PCCT provided higher CNR in general imaging compared to the DSCT. In experimental DE subtracted images, the DSCT provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, experimental CNR with DE PCCT with K-edge filter was 15% higher than in DE DSCT, which is less than 30-40% increase predicted by the simulation study. It is concluded that ideal PCCT can provide substantial advantages over ideal

  6. Dual energy CT with photon counting and dual source systems: comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Atak, Haluk; Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-12-01

    Recently, new dual energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) systems-dual source CT (DSCT) and photon counting CT (PCCT) have been introduced. Although these systems have the same clinical targets, they have major differences as they use dual and single kVp acquisitions and different x-ray detection and energy resolution concepts. The purpose of this study was theoretical and experimental comparisons of DSCT and PCCT. The DSCT Siemens Somatom Flash was modeled for simulation study. The PCCT had the same configuration as DSCT except it used a photon counting detector. The soft tissue phantoms with 20, 30, and 38 cm diameters included iodine, CaCO3, adipose, and water samples. The dose (air kerma) was 14 mGy for all studies. The low and high energy CT data were simulated at 80 kVp and 140 kVp for DSCT, and in 20-58 keV and 59-120 keV energy ranges for PCCT, respectively. The experiments used Somatom Flash DSCT system and PCCT system based on photon counting CdZnTe detector with 2  ×  256 pixel configuration and 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixels size. In simulated general CT images, PCCT provided higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The PCCT with K-edge filter provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter, and DSCT with 0.4 mm Sn filter provided higher CNR than the DSCT with a 0.8 mm Sn filter. In simulated DE subtracted images, CNR of the DSCT was comparable to the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, DE PCCT with Ho a K-edge filter provided 30-40% higher CNR than the DE DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The experimental PCCT provided higher CNR in general imaging compared to the DSCT. In experimental DE subtracted images, the DSCT provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, experimental CNR with DE PCCT with K-edge filter was 15% higher than in DE DSCT, which is less than 30-40% increase predicted by the simulation study. It is concluded that ideal PCCT can provide substantial advantages over ideal

  7. Dual energy CT with photon counting and dual source systems: comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Atak, Haluk; Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-12-01

    Recently, new dual energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) systems-dual source CT (DSCT) and photon counting CT (PCCT) have been introduced. Although these systems have the same clinical targets, they have major differences as they use dual and single kVp acquisitions and different x-ray detection and energy resolution concepts. The purpose of this study was theoretical and experimental comparisons of DSCT and PCCT. The DSCT Siemens Somatom Flash was modeled for simulation study. The PCCT had the same configuration as DSCT except it used a photon counting detector. The soft tissue phantoms with 20, 30, and 38 cm diameters included iodine, CaCO3, adipose, and water samples. The dose (air kerma) was 14 mGy for all studies. The low and high energy CT data were simulated at 80 kVp and 140 kVp for DSCT, and in 20-58 keV and 59-120 keV energy ranges for PCCT, respectively. The experiments used Somatom Flash DSCT system and PCCT system based on photon counting CdZnTe detector with 2  ×  256 pixel configuration and 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixels size. In simulated general CT images, PCCT provided higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The PCCT with K-edge filter provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter, and DSCT with 0.4 mm Sn filter provided higher CNR than the DSCT with a 0.8 mm Sn filter. In simulated DE subtracted images, CNR of the DSCT was comparable to the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, DE PCCT with Ho a K-edge filter provided 30-40% higher CNR than the DE DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The experimental PCCT provided higher CNR in general imaging compared to the DSCT. In experimental DE subtracted images, the DSCT provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, experimental CNR with DE PCCT with K-edge filter was 15% higher than in DE DSCT, which is less than 30-40% increase predicted by the simulation study. It is concluded that ideal PCCT can provide substantial advantages over ideal

  8. Quantitative imaging of chemical composition using dual-energy, dual-source CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Primak, Andrew N.; Yu, Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Morin, Richard L.

    2008-03-01

    Dual-energy x-ray material decomposition has been proposed as a noninvasive quantitative imaging technique for more than 20 years. In this paper, we summarize previously developed dual-energy material decomposition methods and propose a simple yet accurate method for quantitatively measuring chemical composition in vivo. In order to take advantage of the newly developed dual-source CT, the proposed method is based upon post reconstruction (image space) data. Different from other post reconstruction methods, this method is designed to directly measure element composition (mass fraction) in a tissue by a simple table lookup procedure. The method has been tested in phantom studies and also applied to a clinical case. The results showed that this method is capable of accurately measuring elemental concentrations, such as iron in tissue, under low noise imaging conditions. The advantage of this method lies in its simplicity and fast processing times. We believe that this method can be applied clinically to measure the mass fraction of any chemical element in a two-material object, such as to quantify the iron overload in the liver (hemochromatosis). Further investigations on de-noising techniques, as well as clinical validation, are merited.

  9. Dual-energy CT with single- and dual-source scanners: current applications in evaluating the genitourinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F; Cohan, Richard H; Caoili, Elaine M; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M; Wasnik, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Several promising clinical applications for dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in genitourinary imaging have been reported. Dual-energy CT not only provides excellent morphologic detail but also can supply material-specific and quantitative information that may be particularly useful in genitourinary imaging. Dual-energy CT has unique capabilities for characterizing renal lesions by quantifying iodine content and helping identify the mineral contents of renal stones, information that is important for patient care. Virtual unenhanced images reconstructed from dual-energy CT datasets can be useful for detecting calculi within the iodine-filled urinary collecting system, potentially reducing the need for an unenhanced scanning phase at CT urography. Although the underlying principles of dual-energy CT are the same regardless of scanner type, single-source dual-energy scanners with fast kilovoltage switching differ from dual-source dual-energy scanners both in image data acquisition and in processing methods; an understanding of these differences may help optimize dual-energy CT genitourinary protocols. Dual-energy CT performed with a dual-source scanner or with a single-source scanner with fast kilovoltage switching also has some important limitations. Further advances in scanning protocols and refinement of processing techniques to reduce image noise may lead to more widespread use of dual-energy CT.

  10. Adult congenital heart disease imaging with second-generation dual-source computed tomography: initial experiences and findings.

    PubMed

    Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Sidhu, Manavjot S; El-Sherief, Ahmed; Rojas, Carlos; Yeh, Doreen Defaria; Engel, Leif-Christopher; Liberthson, Richard; Abbara, Suhny; Bhatt, Ami

    2012-01-01

    Adult congenital heart disease patients present a unique challenge to the cardiac imager. Patients may present with both acute and chronic manifestations of their complex congenital heart disease and also require surveillance for sequelae of their medical and surgical interventions. Multimodality imaging is often required to clarify their anatomy and physiology. Radiation dose is of particular concern in these patients with lifelong imaging needs for their chronic disease. The second-generation dual-source scanner is a recently available advanced clinical cardiac computed tomography (CT) scanner. It offers a combination of the high-spatial resolution of modern CT, the high-temporal resolution of dual-source technology, and the wide z-axis coverage of modern cone-beam geometry CT scanners. These advances in technology allow novel protocols that markedly reduce scan time, significantly reduce radiation exposure, and expand the physiologic imaging capabilities of cardiac CT. We present a case series of complicated adult congenital heart disease patients imaged by the second-generation dual-source CT scanner with extremely low-radiation doses and excellent image quality.

  11. Effectiveness of Using Dual-source CT and the Upshot it creates on Both Heart Rate and Image Quality

    PubMed Central

    Selçuk, Tuba; Otçu, Hafize; Yüceler, Zeyneb; Bilgili, Çiğdem; Bulakçı, Mesut; Savaş, Yıldıray; Çelik, Ömer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) is important because of the high morbidity and mortality rates. As invasive coronary angiography (ICA) is an invasive procedure, an alternative diagnostic method; coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), has become more widely used by the improvements in detector technology. Aims: In this study, we aimed to examine the accuracy and image quality of high-pitch 128-slice dual-source CTA taking the ICA as reference technique. We also aimed to compare the accuracy and image quality between different heart rate groups of >70 beates per minute (bpm) and ≤70 bpm. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: Among 450 patients who underwent coronary CTA with the FLASH spiral technique, performed with a second generation dual-source computed tomography device with a pitch value of 3.2, 102 patients without stent and/or bypass surgery history and clinically suspected coronary artery disease who underwent ICA within 15 days were enrolled. Image quality was assessed by two independent radiologists using a 4-point scale (1=absence of any artifacts- 4=non-evaluable). A stenosis >50% was considered significant on a per-segment, per-vessel, and per-patient basis and ICA was considered the reference method. Radiation doses were determined using dose length product (DLP) values detected by the computed tomography (CT) device. In addition, patients were classified into two groups according to their heart rates as ≤70 bpm (73 patients) and >70 bpm (29 patients). The relation between the diagnostic accuracy and heart rate groups were evaluated. Results: Overall, 1495 (98%) coronary segments were diagnostic in 102 patients (32 male, 70 female, mean heart rate: 65 bpm). There was a significant correlation between image quality and mean heart rate in the right coronary artery (RCA) segments. The effective radiation dose was 0.98±0.09 mili Sievert (mSv). On a per-patient basis, sensitivity, specificity

  12. Image Quality and Radiation Dose for Prospectively Triggered Coronary CT Angiography: 128-Slice Single-Source CT versus First-Generation 64-Slice Dual-Source CT

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jin; Shi, He-shui; Han, Ping; Yu, Jie; Ma, Gui-na; Wu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to compare the image quality and radiation dose of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) from prospectively triggered 128-slice CT (128-MSCT) versus dual-source 64-slice CT (DSCT). The study was approved by the Medical Ethics Committee at Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Eighty consecutive patients with stable heart rates lower than 70 bpm were enrolled. Forty patients were scanned with 128-MSCT, and the other 40 patients were scanned with DSCT. Two radiologists independently assessed the image quality in segments (diameter >1 mm) according to a three-point scale (1: excellent; 2: moderate; 3: insufficient). The CCTA radiation dose was calculated. Eighty patients with 526 segments in the 128-MSCT group and 544 segments in the DSCT group were evaluated. The image quality 1, 2 and 3 scores were 91.6%, 6.9% and 1.5%, respectively, for the 128-MSCT group and 97.6%, 1.7% and 0.7%, respectively, for the DSCT group, and there was a statistically significant inter-group difference (P ≤ 0.001). The effective doses were 3.0 mSv in the 128-MSCT group and 4.5 mSv in the DSCT group (P ≤ 0.001). Compared with DSCT, CCTA with prospectively triggered 128-MSCT had adequate image quality and a 33.3% lower radiation dose. PMID:27752040

  13. Image Quality of 3rd Generation Spiral Cranial Dual-Source CT in Combination with an Advanced Model Iterative Reconstruction Technique: A Prospective Intra-Individual Comparison Study to Standard Sequential Cranial CT Using Identical Radiation Dose

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Holger; Maros, Máté E.; Meyer, Mathias; Förster, Alex; Haubenreisser, Holger; Kurth, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Flohr, Thomas; Leidecker, Christianne; Groden, Christoph; Scharf, Johann; Henzler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively intra-individually compare image quality of a 3rd generation Dual-Source-CT (DSCT) spiral cranial CT (cCT) to a sequential 4-slice Multi-Slice-CT (MSCT) while maintaining identical intra-individual radiation dose levels. Methods 35 patients, who had a non-contrast enhanced sequential cCT examination on a 4-slice MDCT within the past 12 months, underwent a spiral cCT scan on a 3rd generation DSCT. CTDIvol identical to initial 4-slice MDCT was applied. Data was reconstructed using filtered backward projection (FBP) and 3rd-generation iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm at 5 different IR strength levels. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated subjective image quality using a 4-point Likert-scale and objective image quality was assessed in white matter and nucleus caudatus with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) being subsequently calculated. Results Subjective image quality of all spiral cCT datasets was rated significantly higher compared to the 4-slice MDCT sequential acquisitions (p<0.05). Mean SNR was significantly higher in all spiral compared to sequential cCT datasets with mean SNR improvement of 61.65% (p*Bonferroni0.05<0.0024). Subjective image quality improved with increasing IR levels. Conclusion Combination of 3rd-generation DSCT spiral cCT with an advanced model IR technique significantly improves subjective and objective image quality compared to a standard sequential cCT acquisition acquired at identical dose levels. PMID:26288186

  14. Dual-Source CT Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Stents: In Vitro Evaluation of 22 Different Stent Types

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Michael; Burg, Matthias C.; Bunck, Alexander C.; Heindel, Walter; Seifarth, Harald; Maintz, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To test different peripheral arterial stents using four image reconstruction approaches with respect to lumen visualization, lumen attenuation and image noise in dual-source multidetector row CT (DSCT) in vitro. Methods and Materials. 22 stents (nitinol, steel, cobalt-alloy, tantalum, platinum alloy) were examined in a vessel phantom. All stents were imaged in axial orientation with standard parameters. Image reconstructions were obtained with four different convolution kernels. To evaluate visualization characteristics of the stent, the lumen diameter, intraluminal density and noise were measured. Results. The mean percentage of the visible stent lumen diameter from the nominal stent diameter was 74.5% ± 5.7 for the medium-sharp kernel, 72.8% ± 6.4 for the medium, 70.8% ± 6.4 for the medium-smooth and 67.6% ± 6.6 for the smooth kernel. Mean values of lumen attenuation were 299.7HU ± 127 (medium-sharp), 273.9HU ± 68 (medium), 270.7HU ± 53 (medium-smooth) and 265.8HU ± 43. Mean image noise was: 54.6 ± 6.3, 20.5 ± 1.7, 16.3 ± 1.7, 14.0 ± 2 respectively. Conclusion. Visible stent lumen diameter varies depending on stent type and scan parameters. Lumen diameter visibility increases with the sharpness of the reconstruction kernel. Smoother kernels provide more realistic density measurements inside the stent lumen and less image noise. PMID:22091369

  15. Dual-source spiral CT with pitch up to 3.2 and 75 ms temporal resolution: Image reconstruction and assessment of image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, Thomas G.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; Allmendinger, Thomas; Bruder, Herbert; Petersilka, Martin; Eusemann, Christian D.; Stierstorfer, Karl; Schmidt, Bernhard; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To present the theory for image reconstruction of a high-pitch, high-temporal-resolution spiral scan mode for dual-source CT (DSCT) and evaluate its image quality and dose. Methods: With the use of two x-ray sources and two data acquisition systems, spiral CT exams having a nominal temporal resolution per image of up to one-quarter of the gantry rotation time can be acquired using pitch values up to 3.2. The scan field of view (SFOV) for this mode, however, is limited to the SFOV of the second detector as a maximum, depending on the pitch. Spatial and low contrast resolution, image uniformity and noise, CT number accuracy and linearity, and radiation dose were assessed using the ACR CT accreditation phantom, a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom or a 32 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA CTDI phantom. Slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) were measured for different nominal slice thicknesses, and an anthropomorphic phantom was used to assess image artifacts. Results were compared between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2. In addition, image quality and temporal resolution of an ECG-triggered version of the DSCT high-pitch spiral scan mode were evaluated with a moving coronary artery phantom, and radiation dose was assessed in comparison with other existing cardiac scan techniques. Results: No significant differences in quantitative measures of image quality were found between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2 for spatial and low contrast resolution, CT number accuracy and linearity, SSPs, image uniformity, and noise. The pitch value (1.6{<=}pitch{<=}3.2) had only a minor impact on radiation dose and image noise when the effective tube current time product (mA s/pitch) was kept constant. However, while not severe, artifacts were found to be more prevalent for the dual-source pitch=3.2 scan mode when structures varied markedly along the z axis, particularly for head scans. Images of the moving

  16. Prospectively ECG-Triggered Sequential Dual-Source Coronary CT Angiography in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Influence of Heart Rate on Image Quality and Evaluation of Diagnostic Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Xu, Lei; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Wichmann, Julian L.; Fox, Mary A.; Yan, Jing; Fan, Zhanming; Zhang, Zhaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of mean heart rate (HR) and heart rate variation (HRV) on image quality and diagnostic accuracy of prospectively ECG-triggered sequential dual-source coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods Eighty-five patients (49 women, 36 men; mean age 62.1±9.5 years) with persistent AF underwent prospectively ECG-triggered sequential second-generation dual-source CCTA. Tube current and voltage were adjusted according to body mass index (BMI) and iterative reconstruction was used. Image quality of coronary segments (four-point scale) and presence of significant stenosis (>50%) were evaluated. Diagnostic accuracy was analyzed in 30 of the 85 patients who underwent additional invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Results Only 8 of 1102 (0.7%) segments demonstrated poor image quality. No significant impact on image quality was found for mean HR (94.9±21.8 bpm; r=0.034, p=0.758; F=0.413, p=0.663) or HRV (67.5±22.8 bpm; r=0.097, p=0.377; F=0.111, p=0.895). On per-segment analysis, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 89.7% (26/29), 99.4% (355/357), 92.9% (26/28), and 99.2% (355/358), respectively, with excellent correlation (kappa=0.91) with ICA. Mean effective dose was 3.3±1.0 mSv. Conclusions Prospectively ECG-triggered sequential dual-source CCTA provides diagnostic image quality and good diagnostic accuracy for detection of coronary stenosis in AF patients without significant influence by HR or HRV. PMID:26221952

  17. 3T MRI and 128-slice dual-source CT cisternography images of the cranial nerves a brief pictorial review for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Martinez-Anda, Jaime J; Corona-Cedillo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    There is a broad community of health sciences professionals interested in the anatomy of the cranial nerves (CNs): specialists in neurology, neurosurgery, radiology, otolaryngology, ophthalmology, maxillofacial surgery, radiation oncology, and emergency medicine, as well as other related fields. Advances in neuroimaging using high-resolution images from computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) have made highly-detailed visualization of brain structures possible, allowing normal findings to be routinely assessed and nervous system pathology to be detected. In this article we present an integrated perspective of the normal anatomy of the CNs established by radiologists and neurosurgeons in order to provide a practical imaging review, which combines 128-slice dual-source multiplanar images from CT cisternography and 3T MR curved reconstructed images. The information about the CNs includes their origin, course (with emphasis on the cisternal segments and location of the orifices at the skull base transmitting them), function, and a brief listing of the most common pathologies affecting them. The scope of the article is clinical anatomy; readers will find specialized texts presenting detailed information about particular topics. Our aim in this article is to provide a helpful reference for understanding the complex anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  18. Ultra-low-dose dual-source CT coronary angiography with high pitch: diagnostic yield of a volumetric planning scan and effects on dose reduction and imaging strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, B; Huppertz, A; Lembcke, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of an ultra-low-dose dual-source CT coronary angiography (CTCA) scan with high pitch for delimiting the range of the subsequent standard CTCA scan. Methods: 30 patients with an indication for CTCA were prospectively examined using a two-scan dual-source CTCA protocol (2.0 × 64.0 × 0.6 mm; pitch, 3.4; rotation time of 280 ms; 100 kV): Scan 1 was acquired with one-fifth of the tube current suggested by the automatic exposure control software [CareDose 4D™ (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) using 100 kV and 370 mAs as a reference] with the scan length from the tracheal bifurcation to the diaphragmatic border. Scan 2 was acquired with standard tube current extending with reduced scan length based on Scan 1. Nine central coronary artery segments were analysed qualitatively on both scans. Results: Scan 2 (105.1 ± 10.1 mm) was significantly shorter than Scan 1 (127.0 ± 8.7 mm). Image quality scores were significantly better for Scan 2. However, in 5 of 6 (83%) patients with stenotic coronary artery disease, a stenosis was already detected in Scan 1 and in 13 of 24 (54%) patients with non-stenotic coronary arteries, a stenosis was already excluded by Scan 1. Using Scan 2 as reference, the positive- and negative-predictive value of Scan 1 was 83% (5 of 6 patients) and 100% (13 of 13 patients), respectively. Conclusion: An ultra-low-dose CTCA planning scan enables a reliable scan length reduction of the following standard CTCA scan and allows for correct diagnosis in a substantial proportion of patients. Advances in knowledge: Further dose reductions are possible owing to a change in the individual patient's imaging strategy as a prior ultra-low-dose CTCA scan may already rule out the presence of a stenosis or may lead to a direct transferal to an invasive catheter procedure. PMID:25710210

  19. Application of Prospective ECG-Gated High-Pitch 128-Slice Dual-Source CT Angiography in the Diagnosis of Congenital Extracardiac Vascular Anomalies in Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ximing; Duan, Yanhua; Xu, Wenjian; Li, Haiou; Cao, Ting; Liu, Xuejun; Ji, Xiaopeng; Cheng, Zhaoping; Wang, Anbiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the value of prospective ECG-gated high-pitch 128-slice dual-source CT (DSCT) angiography in the diagnosis of congenital extracardiac vascular anomalies in infants and children in comparison with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Methods Eighty consecutive infants or children clinically diagnosed of congenital heart disease and suspected with extracardiac vascular anomaly were enrolled, and 75 patients were finally included in this prospective study. All patients underwent prospective ECG-gated high-pitch DSCT angiography after TTE with an interval of 1–7 days. The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of high-pitch DSCT angiography and TTE were compared according to the surgical/CCA findings. The image quality of DSCT was assessed using a five-point scale. The effective radiation dose (ED) was calculated. Results A total of 17 congenital heart diseases and 162 separate extracardiac vascular anomalies were confirmed by surgical/CCA findings in 75 patients. The diagnostic accuracy of high-pitch DSCT angiography and TTE was 99.67% and 97.89%, respectively. The sensitivity of high-pitch DSCT angiography and TTE was 97.53% and 79.62%, respectively. There was significant difference regarding to the diagnostic accuracy and the sensitivity between high-pitch DSCT angiography and TTE (χ2 = 23.561 and 28.013, P<0.05). The agreement on the image quality scoring of DSCT between the two observers was excellent (κ = 0.81), and the mean score of image quality was 4.1±0.7. The mean ED of DSCT was 0.29±0.08 mSv. Conclusions Prospective ECG-gated high-pitch 128-slice DSCT angiography with low radiation dose and high diagnostic accuracy has higher sensitivity compared to TTE in the detection of congenital extracardiac vascular anomalies in infants and children. PMID:25546178

  20. Intravenous Contrast Material Administration at High-pitch Dual-source CT Coronary Angiography: Bolus-tracking Technique with Shortened Time of Respiratory Instruction Versus Test Bolus Technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Guo-Rong; Li, Yue-Chun; Han, Rui-Juan; Cui, Li-Fang; Ma, Li-Jun; Li, Li-Gang; Li, Chang-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of acquiring the similar homogeneous enhancement using bolus-tracking techniques with shortened respiratory time in prospectively electrocardiogram-gated high-pitch spiral acquisition mode (Flash mode) coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) compared with test bolus technique. Methods One hundred and eighty-four consecutive patients with mean heart rate ≤65 beats per minute undergoing CCTA were prospectively included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. Patients in the group A (n=92) instructed to shorten respiratory time received CCTA using bolus-tracking technique with high-pitch spiral acquisition mode (Flash mode), while those in the group B (n=92) underwent CCTA with test bolus technique. The attenuation in the ascending aorta, image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio and radiation doses of the two groups were assessed. Results There were no significant differences in the mean attenuation values in the ascending aorta (483.18±59.07 HU vs. 498.7±83.51 HU, P=0.183), image noise (21.4±4.5 HU vs. 20.9±4.3 HU, P=0.414), contrast-to-noise ratio (12.1±4.2 vs. 13.8±5.1, P=0.31) between the groups A and B. There were no significant differences in the radiation dose of dynamic monitoring scans (0.056±0.026 mSv vs. 0.062±0.018 mSv, P=0.068) and radiation dose of angiography (0.94±0.07 mSv vs. 0.96±0.15 mSv, P=0.926) between the two groups, while 15 mL less contrast material volume was administered in the group A than the group B. Conclusion Bolus-tracking technique with shortened time of respiratory in Flash mode of dual-source CT yields the similar homogeneous enhancement with less contrast material in comparison to the test bolus technique.

  1. TH-C-18A-12: Evaluation of the Impact of Body Size and Tube Output Limits in the Optimization of Fast Scanning with High-Pitch Dual Source CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez Giraldo, J; Mileto, A.; Hurwitz, L.; Marin, D.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of body size and tube power limits in the optimization of fast scanning with high-pitch dual source CT (DSCT). Methods: A previously validated MERCURY phantom, made of polyethylene, with circular cross-section of diameters 16, 23, 30 and 37cm, and connected through tapered sections, was scanned using a second generation DSCT system. The DSCT operates with two independently controlled x-ray tube generators offering up to 200 kW power reserve (100 kW per tube). The entire length of the phantom (42cm) was scanned with two protocols using: A)Standard single-source CT (SSCT) protocol with pitch of 0.8, and B) DSCT protocol with high-pitch values ranging from 1.6 to 3.2 (0.2 steps). All scans used 120 kVp with 150 quality reference mAs using automatic exposure control. Scanner radiation output (CTDIvol) and effective mAs values were extracted retrospectively from DICOM files for each slice. Image noise was recorded. All variables were assessed relative to phantom diameter. Results: With standard-pitch SSCT, the scanner radiation output (and tube-current) were progressively adapted with increasing size, from 6 mGy (120 mAs) up to 15 mGy (270 mAs) from the thinnest (16cm) to the thickest diameter (37 cm), respectively. By comparison, using high-pitch (3.2), the scanner output was bounded at about 8 mGy (140 mAs), independent of phantom diameter. Although relative to standard-pitch, the high-pitch led to lower radiation output for the same scan, the image noise was higher, particularly for larger diameters. To match the radiation output adaptation of standard-pitch, a high-pitch mode of 1.6 was needed, with the advantage of scanning twice as fast. Conclusion: To maximize the benefits of fast scanning with high-pitch DSCT, the body size and tube power limits of the system need to be considered such that a good balance between speed of acquisition and image quality are warranted. JCRG is an employee of Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc.

  2. Diagnostic Value of Dual-Source Computerized Tomography Combined with Perfusion Imaging for Peripheral Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xijin; Wang, Shanshan; Jiang, Xingyue; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Wenjian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism has become the third most common cardiovascular disease, which can seriously harm human health. Objectives To investigate the diagnostic value of dual-source computerized tomography (CT) and perfusion imaging for peripheral pulmonary embolism. Patients and Methods Thirty-two patients with suspected pulmonary embolism underwent dual-source CT exams. To compare the ability of pulmonary embolism detection software (PED) with CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in determining the presence, numbers, and locations of pulmonary emboli, the subsequent images were reviewed by two radiologists using both imaging modalities. Also, the diagnostic consistency between PED and CTPA images and dual-energy pulmonary perfusion imaging (DEPI) for segmental pulmonary embolism was compared. Results CTPA images revealed 50 (7.81%) segmental and 56 (4.38%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms, while the PED images showed 68 (10.63%) segmental and 94 (7.34%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms. Thus, the detection rate on PED images for peripheral pulmonary embolism was significantly higher than that of the CTPA images (P < 0.05). There was good consistency for diagnosing segmental pulmonary embolism between PED and CTPA and DEPI (kappa = 0.85). The sensitivity and specificity of DEPI images for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism were 91.7% and 97.5%, respectively. Conclusion PED software of dual-source CT combined with perfusion imaging can significantly improve the detection rate of peripheral pulmonary embolism.

  3. Coronary fly-through or virtual angioscopy using dual-source MDCT data.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Peter M A; de Jonge, Gonda; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2007-11-01

    Coronary fly-through or virtual angioscopy (VA) has been studied ever since its invention in 2000. However, application was limited because it requires an optimal computed tomography (CT) scan and time-consuming post-processing. Recent advances in post-processing software facilitate easy construction of VA, but until now image quality was insufficient in most patients. The introduction of dual-source multidetector CT (MDCT) could enable VA in all patients. Twenty patients were scanned using a dual-source MDCT (Definition, Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using a standard coronary artery protocol. Post-processing was performed on an Aquarius Workstation (TeraRecon, San Mateo, Calif.). Length travelled per major branch was recorded in millimetres, together with the time required in minutes. VA could be performed in every patient for each of the major coronary arteries. The mean (range) length of the automated fly-through was 80 (32-107) mm for the left anterior descending (LAD), 75 (21-116) mm for the left circumflex artery (LCx), and 109 (21-190) mm for the right coronary artery (RCA). Calcifications and stenoses were visualised, as well as most side branches. The mean time required was 3 min for LAD, 2.5 min for LCx, and 2 min for the RCA. Dual-source MDCT allows for high quality visualisation of the coronary arteries in every patient because scanning with this machine is independent of the heart rate. This is clearly shown by the successful VA in all patients. Potential clinical value of VA should be determined in the near future. PMID:17562048

  4. Criteria for CT and Initial Management of Head Injured Infants: A Review.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Naoto; Echigo, Tadashi; Hino, Akihiko; Hashimoto, Naoya; Yamaki, Tarumi

    2016-07-15

    Criteria for computed tomography (CT) to head injured infants have not been established. Since the identification of neurological findings is difficult in infants, examination by CT may be necessary in some cases, but it may be difficult to perform CT because of problems with radiation exposure and body movement. Moreover, even though no intracranial abnormality was found immediately after injury, abnormal findings may appear after several hours. From this viewpoint, course observation after injury may be more important than CT in the initial treatment of head trauma in infants. The complaints and neurological manifestations of infants, particularly those aged 2 or younger, are frequently unclear; therefore, there is an opinion that CT is recommended for all pediatric patients. However, the appropriateness of its use should be determined after confirming the mechanism of injury, consciousness level, neurological findings, and presence/absence of a history of abuse. Among the currently available rules specifying criteria for CT of infants with head trauma, the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) study may be regarded as reliable at present. In Japan, where the majority of emergency hospitals are using CT, it may be necessary to develop criteria for CT in consideration of the actual situation. CT diagnosis for pediatric head trauma is not always necessary. When no imaging is performed, this should be fully explained at the initial treatment before selecting course observation at home. Checking on a state of the patients by telephone is useful for both patients and physicians. PMID:27194179

  5. Criteria for CT and Initial Management of Head Injured Infants: A Review.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Naoto; Echigo, Tadashi; Hino, Akihiko; Hashimoto, Naoya; Yamaki, Tarumi

    2016-07-15

    Criteria for computed tomography (CT) to head injured infants have not been established. Since the identification of neurological findings is difficult in infants, examination by CT may be necessary in some cases, but it may be difficult to perform CT because of problems with radiation exposure and body movement. Moreover, even though no intracranial abnormality was found immediately after injury, abnormal findings may appear after several hours. From this viewpoint, course observation after injury may be more important than CT in the initial treatment of head trauma in infants. The complaints and neurological manifestations of infants, particularly those aged 2 or younger, are frequently unclear; therefore, there is an opinion that CT is recommended for all pediatric patients. However, the appropriateness of its use should be determined after confirming the mechanism of injury, consciousness level, neurological findings, and presence/absence of a history of abuse. Among the currently available rules specifying criteria for CT of infants with head trauma, the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) study may be regarded as reliable at present. In Japan, where the majority of emergency hospitals are using CT, it may be necessary to develop criteria for CT in consideration of the actual situation. CT diagnosis for pediatric head trauma is not always necessary. When no imaging is performed, this should be fully explained at the initial treatment before selecting course observation at home. Checking on a state of the patients by telephone is useful for both patients and physicians.

  6. Criteria for CT and Initial Management of Head Injured Infants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SHIOMI, Naoto; ECHIGO, Tadashi; HINO, Akihiko; HASHIMOTO, Naoya; YAMAKI, Tarumi

    2016-01-01

    Criteria for computed tomography (CT) to head injured infants have not been established. Since the identification of neurological findings is difficult in infants, examination by CT may be necessary in some cases, but it may be difficult to perform CT because of problems with radiation exposure and body movement. Moreover, even though no intracranial abnormality was found immediately after injury, abnormal findings may appear after several hours. From this viewpoint, course observation after injury may be more important than CT in the initial treatment of head trauma in infants. The complaints and neurological manifestations of infants, particularly those aged 2 or younger, are frequently unclear; therefore, there is an opinion that CT is recommended for all pediatric patients. However, the appropriateness of its use should be determined after confirming the mechanism of injury, consciousness level, neurological findings, and presence/absence of a history of abuse. Among the currently available rules specifying criteria for CT of infants with head trauma, the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) study may be regarded as reliable at present. In Japan, where the majority of emergency hospitals are using CT, it may be necessary to develop criteria for CT in consideration of the actual situation. CT diagnosis for pediatric head trauma is not always necessary. When no imaging is performed, this should be fully explained at the initial treatment before selecting course observation at home. Checking on a state of the patients by telephone is useful for both patients and physicians. PMID:27194179

  7. Quantitative assessment of scatter correction techniques incorporated in next generation dual-source computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobberley, Sean David

    Accurate, cross-scanner assessment of in-vivo air density used to quantitatively assess amount and distribution of emphysema in COPD subjects has remained elusive. Hounsfield units (HU) within tracheal air can be considerably more positive than -1000 HU. With the advent of new dual-source scanners which employ dedicated scatter correction techniques, it is of interest to evaluate how the quantitative measures of lung density compare between dual-source and single-source scan modes. This study has sought to characterize in-vivo and phantom-based air metrics using dual-energy computed tomography technology where the nature of the technology has required adjustments to scatter correction. Anesthetized ovine (N=6), swine (N=13: more human-like rib cage shape), lung phantom and a thoracic phantom were studied using a dual-source MDCT scanner (Siemens Definition Flash. Multiple dual-source dual-energy (DSDE) and single-source (SS) scans taken at different energy levels and scan settings were acquired for direct quantitative comparison. Density histograms were evaluated for the lung, tracheal, water and blood segments. Image data were obtained at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp in the SS mode (B35f kernel) and at 80, 100, 140, and 140-Sn (tin filtered) kVp in the DSDE mode (B35f and D30f kernels), in addition to variations in dose, rotation time, and pitch. To minimize the effect of cross-scatter, the phantom scans in the DSDE mode was obtained by reducing the tube current of one of the tubes to its minimum (near zero) value. When using image data obtained in the DSDE mode, the median HU values in the tracheal regions of all animals and the phantom were consistently closer to -1000 HU regardless of reconstruction kernel (chapters 3 and 4). Similarly, HU values of water and blood were consistently closer to their nominal values of 0 HU and 55 HU respectively. When using image data obtained in the SS mode the air CT numbers demonstrated a consistent positive shift of up to 35 HU

  8. Initial experience of Fag-PET/CT guided Imr of head-and-neck carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dian . E-mail: dwang@radonc.mcw.edu; Schultz, Christopher J.; Jursinic, Paul A.; Bialkowski, Mirek; Zhu, X. Ronald; Brown, W. Douglas; Rand, Scott D.; Michel, Michelle A.; Campbell, Bruce H.; Wong, Stuart; Li, X. Allen; Wilson, J. Frank

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (Fag-PET) fused with planning computed tomography (CT) on tumor localization, which guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (Imr) of patients with head-and-neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 through April 2005, we performed Fag-PET/CT guided Imr for 28 patients with head-and-neck carcinoma. Patients were immobilized with face masks that were attached with five fiducial markers. Fag-PET and planning CT scans were performed on the same flattop table in one session and were then fused. Target volumes and critical organs were contoured, and Imr plans were generated based on the fused images. Results: All 28 patients had abnormal increased uptake in Fag-PET/CT scans. PET/CT resulted in CT-based staging changes in 16 of 28 (57%) patients. PET/CT fusions were successfully performed and were found to be accurate with the use of the two commercial planning systems. Volume analysis revealed that the PET/CT-based gross target volumes (GTVs) were significantly different from those contoured from the CT scans alone in 14 of 16 patients. In addition, 16 of 28 patients who were followed for more than 6 months did not have any evidence of locoregional recurrence in the median time of 17 months. Conclusion: Fused images were found to be useful to delineate GTV required in IMRT planning. PET/CT should be considered for both initial staging and treatment planning in patients with head-and-neck carcinoma.

  9. Differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules with dual-source spiral computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhitao; Wang, Yanhui; He, Xueqi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the value of applying dual-source 64-layer spiral computed tomography (CT) in the differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Mediastinal windows from 45 cases were selected to study SPNs (maximum diameter, ≤3 cm), and the pathological nature of lesions was determined by clinical and pathological diagnosis. Conventional 64-layer spiral CT scanning, local enhancement and 3D recombination technologies were used to determine the occurrence rate, lesion diameter, degree of enhancement, lobular sign, spicule sign, pleural indentation sign, vessel convergence sign and bronchus sign. The final diagnoses indicated 34 cases of malignant SPNs (75.6%) and 11 benign cases (24.4%). When the nodule diameter in the malignant group was compared with that of the benign group, the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Nodules in the malignant group showed inhomogeneous enhancement while nodules in the benign group showed homogeneous enhancement. The enhanced CT values in the malignant group were higher than those in the benign group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The proportion of nodules with lobular sign in the malignant group was significantly higher than that in the benign group (P<0.05). The proportion of nodules with calcification, vessel convergence sign and bronchus sign in the malignant group were significantly higher than those in the benign group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). A comparison of vacuole sign, pleural indentation sign, spiculate protuberance and fat occurrence between the two groups yielded no statistically significant differences (P>0.05). The sensitivity of CT enhancement was 85.6%, specificity was 79.6%, positive predicated value was 92.3%, and the negative predicted value was 85.2%. In conclusion, SPNs diagnosed by CT enhancement manifested with enhancement degree, lobular sign, calcification, vessel convergence sign

  10. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  11. Improving initial polyp candidate extraction for CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongbin; Fan, Yi; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2010-04-01

    Reducing the number of false positives (FPs) as much as possible is a challenging task for computer-aided detection (CAD) of colonic polyps. As part of a typical CAD pipeline, an accurate and robust process for segmenting initial polyp candidates (IPCs) will significantly benefit the successive FP reduction procedures, such as feature-based classification of false and true positives (TPs). In this study, we introduce an improved scheme for segmenting IPCs. It consists of two main components. One is geodesic distance-based merging, which merges suspicious patches (SPs) for IPCs. Based on the merged SPs, another component, called convex dilation, grows each SP beyond the inner surface of the colon wall to form a volume of interest (VOI) for that IPC, so that the inner border of the VOI beyond the colon inner surface could be segmented as convex, as expected. The IPC segmentation strategy was evaluated using a database of 50 patient studies, which include 100 scans at supine and prone positions with 84 polyps and masses sized from 6 to 35 mm. The presented IPC segmentation strategy (or VOI extraction method) demonstrated improvements, in terms of having no undesirably merged true polyp and providing more helpful mean and variance of the image intensities rooted from the extracted VOI for classification of the TPs and FPs, over two other VOI extraction methods (i.e. the conventional method of Nappi and Yoshida (2003 Med. Phys. 30 1592-601) and our previous method (Zhu et al 2009 Cancer Manag. Res. 1 1-13). At a by-polyp sensitivity of 0.90, these three methods generated the FP rate (number of FPs per scan) of 4.78 (new method), 6.37 (Nappi) and 7.01 (Zhu) respectively.

  12. Low-Dose PET/CT and Full-Dose Contrast-Enhanced CT at the Initial Staging of Localized Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté-Llobera, Aida; Cortés-Romera, Montserrat; Mercadal, Santiago; Hernández-Gañán, Javier; Pomares, Helena; González-Barca, Eva; Gámez-Cenzano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as the reference imaging technique for the initial staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma until recent days, when the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging as a hybrid technique has become of routine use. However, the performance of both examinations is still common. The aim of this work was to compare the findings between low-dose 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT and full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) in 28 patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to PET/CT findings, in order to avoid the performance of ceCT. For each technique, a comparison in the number of nodal and extranodal involved regions was performed. PET/CT showed more lesions than ceCT in both nodal (41 vs. 36) and extranodal localizations (16 vs. 15). Disease staging according to both techniques was concordant in 22 patients (79%) and discordant in 6 patients (21%), changing treatment management in 3 patients (11%). PET/CT determined a better staging and therapeutic approach, making the performance of an additional ceCT unnecessary. PMID:27559300

  13. Low-Dose PET/CT and Full-Dose Contrast-Enhanced CT at the Initial Staging of Localized Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sabaté-Llobera, Aida; Cortés-Romera, Montserrat; Mercadal, Santiago; Hernández-Gañán, Javier; Pomares, Helena; González-Barca, Eva; Gámez-Cenzano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as the reference imaging technique for the initial staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma until recent days, when the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging as a hybrid technique has become of routine use. However, the performance of both examinations is still common. The aim of this work was to compare the findings between low-dose 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT and full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) in 28 patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to PET/CT findings, in order to avoid the performance of ceCT. For each technique, a comparison in the number of nodal and extranodal involved regions was performed. PET/CT showed more lesions than ceCT in both nodal (41 vs. 36) and extranodal localizations (16 vs. 15). Disease staging according to both techniques was concordant in 22 patients (79%) and discordant in 6 patients (21%), changing treatment management in 3 patients (11%). PET/CT determined a better staging and therapeutic approach, making the performance of an additional ceCT unnecessary.

  14. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a head EDP) were used for the ρ{sub e} calibration. Each acquired lookup table was applied to two radiotherapy plans designed using the XiO TPS with the superposition algorithm for an anthropomorphic phantom. The first radiotherapy plan was for an oral cavity tumor and the second was for a lung tumor. Results: In both treatment plans, the performance of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion was superior to that of the conventional HU–ρ{sub e} conversion in terms of the reliability of dose calculations. Especially, for the oral tumor plan, which dealt with dentition and bony structures, treatment

  15. Iterative Image Reconstruction for Limited-Angle CT Using Optimized Initial Image

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jingyu; Qi, Hongliang; Xu, Yuan; Chen, Zijia; Li, Shulong; Zhou, Linghong

    2016-01-01

    Limited-angle computed tomography (CT) has great impact in some clinical applications. Existing iterative reconstruction algorithms could not reconstruct high-quality images, leading to severe artifacts nearby edges. Optimal selection of initial image would influence the iterative reconstruction performance but has not been studied deeply yet. In this work, we proposed to generate optimized initial image followed by total variation (TV) based iterative reconstruction considering the feature of image symmetry. The simulated data and real data reconstruction results indicate that the proposed method effectively removes the artifacts nearby edges. PMID:27066107

  16. Initial investigation into lower-cost CT for resource limited regions of the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbins, James T., III; Wells, Jered R.; Segars, W. Paul; Li, Christina M.; Kigongo, Christopher J. N.

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes an initial investigation into means for producing lower-cost CT scanners for resource limited regions of the world. In regions such as sub-Saharan Africa, intermediate level medical facilities serving millions have no CT machines, and lack the imaging resources necessary to determine whether certain patients would benefit from being transferred to a hospital in a larger city for further diagnostic workup or treatment. Low-cost CT scanners would potentially be of immense help to the healthcare system in such regions. Such scanners would not produce state-of-theart image quality, but rather would be intended primarily for triaging purposes to determine the patients who would benefit from transfer to larger hospitals. The lower-cost scanner investigated here consists of a fixed digital radiography system and a rotating patient stage. This paper describes initial experiments to determine if such a configuration is feasible. Experiments were conducted using (1) x-ray image acquisition, a physical anthropomorphic chest phantom, and a flat-panel detector system, and (2) a computer-simulated XCAT chest phantom. Both the physical phantom and simulated phantom produced excellent image quality reconstructions when the phantom was perfectly aligned during acquisition, but artifacts were noted when the phantom was displaced to simulate patient motion. An algorithm was developed to correct for motion of the phantom and demonstrated success in correcting for 5-mm motion during 360-degree acquisition of images. These experiments demonstrated feasibility for this approach, but additional work is required to determine the exact limitations produced by patient motion.

  17. Patient and Institutional Characteristics Associated with Initial CT Use for Children Presenting to the Emergency Department with Kidney Stones

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Justin B.; Canning, Douglas A.; Lavelle, Jane; Kalmus, Angela; Tasian, Gregory E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Professional associations recommend ultrasound as the initial imaging study for children with suspected nephrolithiasis; however, computed tomography (CT) remains frequently utilized. We sought to identify patient and institutional characteristics associated with use of CT as the first imaging study for children with nephrolithiasis diagnosed in the emergency department (ED). Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of children with nephrolithiasis aged 2-18 years referred to a free-standing children's hospital from 2003-2012 and identified the imaging modality first used to evaluate the child. ED medical directors where children were first evaluated were sent a questionnaire to ascertain ED characteristics. Multivariate hierarchical logistic regression models were used to determine patient and institutional characteristics associated with initial CT utilization. Results Of 536 eligible children, 323 (60.2%) were evaluated at EDs who returned surveys. Two hundred thirty-eight (71%) underwent CT as the first imaging study. All EDs had ultrasound. Older age was associated with higher initial CT utilization (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.04-1.16).A more recent year of diagnosis (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.72-0.88) and a clinical care pathway that uses ultrasound as the initial imaging study (OR 0.29; 95% CI 0.01-0.38) were associated with lower initial CT utilization. Conclusions A clinical care pathway in the ED was the only institutional characteristic associated with lower CT utilization. Future studies are needed to determine if care pathways that use ultrasound as the initial imaging study for children with suspected nephrolithiasis decrease inappropriate CT utilization and improve adherence to national guidelines. PMID:25305359

  18. Overview of multisource CT systems and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Lu, Yang; Zhuang, Tiange; Wang, Ge

    2010-09-01

    Multiple-source cone-beam scanning is a promising mode for dynamic volumetric CT/micro-CT. The first dynamic CT system is the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR) built in 1979. The pursuance for higher temporal resolution has largely driven the development of CT technology, and recently led to the emergence of Siemens dual-source CT scanner. Given the impact and limitation of dual-source cardiac CT, triple-source cone-beam CT seems a natural extension for future cardiac CT. Our work shows that trinity (triple-source architecture) is superior to duality (dual-source architecture) for helical cone-beam CT in terms of exact reconstruction. In particular, a triple-source helical scan allows a perfect mosaic of longitudinally truncated cone-beam data to satisfy the Orlov condition and yields better noise performance than the dual-source counterpart. In the (2N+1)-source helical CT case, the more sources, the higher temporal resolution. In the N-source saddle CT case, a triple-source scan offers the best temporal resolution for continuous dynamic exact reconstruction of a central volume. The recently developed multi-source cone-beam algorithms include an exact backprojection-filtration (BPF) approach and a "slow" exact filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm for (2N+1)-source helical CT, two fast quasi-exact FBP algorithms for triple-source helical CT, as well as a fast exact FBP algorithm for triple-source saddle CT. Some latest ideas will be also discussed, such as multi-source interior tomography and multi-beam field-emission x-ray CT.

  19. Analysis of Pulmonary Vein Antrums Motion with Cardiac Contraction Using Dual-Source Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    de Guise, Jacques; Vu, Toni; Chartrand-Lefebvre, Carl; Blais, Danis; Lebeau, Martin; Nguyen, Nhu-Tram; Roberge, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the extent of displacement of the pulmonary vein antrums resulting from the intrinsic motion of the heart using 4D cardiac dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). Methods: Ten consecutive female patients were enrolled in this prospective planning study. In breath-hold, a contrast-injected cardiac 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) synchronized to the electrocardiogram was obtained using a prospective sequential acquisition method including the extreme phases of systole and diastole. Right and left atrial fibrillation target volumes (CTVR and CTVL) were defined, with each target volume containing the antral regions of the superior and inferior pulmonary veins. Four points of interest were used as surrogates for the right superior and inferior pulmonary vein antrum (RSPVA and RIPVA) and the left superior and inferior pulmonary vein antrum (LSPVA and LIPVA). On our 4D post-processing workstation (MIM Maestro™, MIM Software Inc.), maximum displacement of each point of interest from diastole to systole was measured in the mediolateral (ML), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior (SI) directions. Results: Median age of the enrolled patients was 60 years (range, 56-71 years). Within the CTVR, the mean displacements of the superior and inferior surrogates were 3 mm vs. 1 mm (p=0.002), 2 mm vs. 0 mm (p= 0.001), and 3 mm vs. 0 mm (p=0.00001), in the ML, AP, and SI directions, respectively. On the left, mean absolute displacements of the LSPVA vs. LIPVA were similar at 4 mm vs. 1 mm (p=0.0008), 2 mm vs. 0 mm (p= 0.001), and 3 mm vs. 1 mm (p=0.00001) in the ML, AP, and SI directions. Conclusion: When isolated from breathing, cardiac contraction is associated with minimal inferior pulmonary veins motion and modest (1-6 mm) motion of the superior veins. Target deformation was thus of a magnitude similar or greater than target motion, limiting the potential gains of cardiac tracking. Optimal strategies for cardiac

  20. Conditional Reasoning in Context: A Dual-Source Model of Probabilistic Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klauer, Karl Christoph; Beller, Sieghard; Hutter, Mandy

    2010-01-01

    A dual-source model of probabilistic conditional inference is proposed. According to the model, inferences are based on 2 sources of evidence: logical form and prior knowledge. Logical form is a decontextualized source of evidence, whereas prior knowledge is activated by the contents of the conditional rule. In Experiments 1 to 3, manipulations of…

  1. Preliminary results on the role of PET/CT in initial staging, restaging, and management of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamitsi, J.; Valotassiou, B.; Iliadis, K.; Kosmidis, P.; Laspas, F.; Vasilaki, M.; Pipini, E.; Petounis, A.; Gogou, L.; Pagou, M.; Dalianis, K.; Efthimiadou, R.; Andreou, J.

    2006-12-01

    AimTo determine true-positive and true-negative rates of PET/CT studies in the staging of lung cancer as compared with conventional imaging (CT and bone scan and occasionally MRI) and the impact of PET/CT on the treatment strategy in patients with lung cancer. Materials and methodTwenty patients (21 studies) with known or suspected lung cancer (14 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), three patients with solitary pulmonary nodule underwent initial staging (seven studies) or restaging (14 studies) with combined FDG PET and CT scans on a PET/CT tomograph. PET/CT images were evaluated separately by two nuclear medicine physicians and two radiologists specialized on PET, CT, and MRI. Histology results and a more than 6 months follow-up served as the reference standards. ResultsAccurate diagnosis was achieved on 16 studies. Site-by-site analysis gave the following results: 16 true-positive sites (seven on histology, nine on >6 months follow-up), six true-negative sites (two on histology, four on >6 months follow-up). On PET/CT, six patients were correctly down-staged, three patients were correctly upstaged and seven patients were diagnosed correctly as being on the same stage (2/7 with increase of extent of disease, 5/7 with the same extent of disease). One patient was falsely upstaged and three patients were falsely down-staged. On the basis of PET/CT results, change of management was induced in six patients, while in 14 patients there was no change induced. In five cases PET/CT was partially accurate: on site-by-site analysis, four sites proved true positive (on histology), one site false positive (on histology), and four sites false negative (one on histology, three on >6 months follow-up). ConclusionIn our early experience, PET/CT contributed significantly to correct staging and management of patients with lung cancer.

  2. Additional value of F-18 FDG PET/CT for initial staging in breast cancer with clinically negative axillary nodes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do-Young; Yoon, Hyun Jin; Son, Hye Joo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of the preoperative ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the initial workup of breast cancer with clinically negative axillary nodes. Whether the status of the clinical axillary nodal involvement can be considered a parameter for making a decision to omit the preoperative ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the situation reported herein was also determined. A total of 178 patients who had newly diagnosed breast cancer and for whom the conventional diagnostic modalities showed no sign of axillary node metastasis were retrospectively enrolled in this study. All the patients underwent preoperative ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT. The images and histologic results that were obtained were analyzed. ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT detected primary lesions in 156 of the 178 patients, with an overall sensitivity of 87.6 %, and false negative results were obtained for 22 patients (12.4 %). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of axillary nodes were 20.8, 86.9, 37.0, 74.8, and 69.1 %, respectively. Extra-axillary node metastasis was identified in two patients (1.1 %) who had internal mammary nodes. There was no distant metastasis, but coexisting primary tumor was detected in five patients (2.8 %). In total, the therapeutic plan was changed based on ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in seven (3.9 %) of the 178 patients, but considering only the cases confined to breast cancer, the change occurred in only two patients (1.1 %). ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT almost did not affect the initial staging and treatment plan in breast cancer with clinically negative axillary node. If the axillary node is clinically negative in the preoperative workup of breast cancer, then ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT can be omitted.

  3. Application of intelligent optimal kV scanning technology (CARE kV) in dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Kang, Shaolei; Han, Dan; Xie, Xiaojie; Deng, Yaming

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the applications and values of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) intelligent optimal kV scanning technology (CARE kV) in coronary CT angiography (CCTA). 150 patients with normal body mass index were performed DSCT coronary angiography, then randomly divided into the "Semi", 120,100 and 80 kV Group, and the 2 "on" groups, with 30 patients in each group. The first 5 groups used the reference voltage as 120 kV, and the reference current as 400 mAs, while the other group used the reference voltage as 100 kV, and the reference current as 400 mAs. The image quality, average CT value, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and radiation dose were comparatively analyzed among the 5 groups. The image quality scores of the five groups showed no significant difference (P > 0.05); the average CT values and image noises had significance (P < 0.05), while SNR and CNR showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). The 80 kV group showed the biggest noise, with the CT value as 700 HU, while the radiation dose was the lowest, followed by the on group. As for the patients with normal body mass index (BMI), CARE kV-"on" could obtain high-quality images and lower radiation dose for CCTA, while the operation was simple and convenient.

  4. Initial prostate cancer diagnosis and disease staging--the role of choline-PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Mapelli, Paola; Picchio, Maria

    2015-09-01

    An early and correct diagnosis together with accurate staging of prostate cancer is necessary in order to plan the most appropriate treatment strategy. Morphological imaging modalities such as transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS), CT, and MRI can have some limitations regarding their accuracy for primary diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer; for instance, they have limited specificity in differentiating cancer from benign prostatic conditions and, by using size as the only criterion to characterize lymph node metastases, they might not be accurate enough for tumour characterization. In this scenario, PET-CT with (11)C-labelled or (18)F-labelled choline derivatives provides morphological and functional characterization and could overcome the limitations of the conventional imaging techniques. PET-CT is one of the most investigated molecular imaging modalities for prostate cancer diagnosis and staging. Currently, the main investigations on the role of PET-CT in the diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer have been performed on a retrospective basis and this type of analysis might be one of the main reasons why different results regarding its diagnostic accuracy have been reported.

  5. An Initial Investigation into the Processes of Change in ACT, CT, and ERP for OCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twohig, Michael P.; Whittal, Maureen L.; Cox, Jared M.; Gunter, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Six adults diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) were treated with either acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), cognitive therapy (CT), or exposure with ritual prevention (ERP) in a preliminary attempt to clarify the similarities or differences between the purported mechanisms of change that underlie these treatments. A new process…

  6. CT-Guided Interventions Using a Free-Hand, Optical Tracking System: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, Tilman Jacob, Augustinus L.; Pansini, Michele; Liu, David; Gutzeit, Andreas; Kos, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    PurposeThe present study was designed to evaluate the geometrical accuracy and clinical applicability of a new, free-hand, CT-guided, optical navigation system.MethodsFifteen procedures in 14 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed. The navigation system was applied for interventional procedures on small target lesions, in cases with long needle paths, narrow access windows, or when an out-of-plane access was expected. Mean lesion volume was 27.9 ml, and mean distance to target measured was 107.5 mm. Eleven of 15 needle trajectories were planned as out-of-plane approaches regarding the axial CT plane.ResultsNinety-one percent of the biopsies were diagnostic. All therapeutic interventions were technically successful. Targeting precision was high with a mean distance of the needle tip from planned target of 1.98 mm. Mean intervention time was 1:12 h. A statistically significant correlation between angular needle deviation and intervention time (p = 0.007), respiratory movement of the target (p = 0.008), and body mass index (p = 0.02) was detected. None of the evaluated parameters correlated significantly with the distance from the needle tip to the planned target.ConclusionsThe application of a navigation system for complex CT-guided procedures provided safe and effective targeting within a reasonable intervention time in our series.

  7. Ultrafast electron transfer reactions initiated by excited CT states of push pull perylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Scott E.; Zhao, Yongyu; Schaller, Richard; Mulloni, Viviana; Just, Eric M.; Johnson, Robert C.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Two new chromophores that absorb in the visible spectrum, the 9-( N-pyrrolidinyl)- and 9-( N-piperidinyl)perylene-3,4-dicarboximides, 5PMI and 6PMI, respectively, were synthesized and shown to possess lowest excited singlet states with about 70% charge transfer (CT) character. Changing the ring size of the cyclic amine from 5 to 6 significantly changes the energies of the CT states, as well as the redox potentials of the chromophores. These chromophores were linked to pyromellitimide (PI) and 1,8:4,5-naphthalenediimide (NI) electron acceptors using a single N-N bond between their respective imides to yield the corresponding donor-acceptor dyads 5PMI-PI, 5PMI-NI, 6PMI-PI, and 6PMI-NI. The donors and acceptors in these molecules are positioned relative to one another in a rod-like arrangement at fixed distances and restricted orientations. The rates of charge separation and recombination were measured using transient absorption spectroscopy. These chromophores were also used to prepare rigid donor-acceptor triads 5PMI-PI-NI and 6PMI-PI-NI, which display one- or two-step electron transfer mechanisms that depend on solvent polarity. These compounds exhibit a broad range of structure and media driven changes in electron transfer mechanism.

  8. Empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Meyer, Esther; Prell, Daniel; Kachelriess, Marc

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Due to x-ray beam polychromaticity and scattered radiation, attenuation measurements tend to be underestimated. Cupping and beam hardening artifacts become apparent in the reconstructed CT images. If only one material such as water, for example, is present, these artifacts can be reduced by precorrecting the rawdata. Higher order beam hardening artifacts, as they result when a mixture of materials such as water and bone, or water and bone and iodine is present, require an iterative beam hardening correction where the image is segmented into different materials and those are forward projected to obtain new rawdata. Typically, the forward projection must correctly model the beam polychromaticity and account for all physical effects, including the energy dependence of the assumed materials in the patient, the detector response, and others. We propose a new algorithm that does not require any knowledge about spectra or attenuation coefficients and that does not need to be calibrated. The proposed method corrects beam hardening in single energy CT data. Methods: The only a priori knowledge entering EBHC is the segmentation of the object into different materials. Materials other than water are segmented from the original image, e.g., by using simple thresholding. Then, a (monochromatic) forward projection of these other materials is performed. The measured rawdata and the forward projected material-specific rawdata are monomially combined (e.g., multiplied or squared) and reconstructed to yield a set of correction volumes. These are then linearly combined and added to the original volume. The combination weights are determined to maximize the flatness of the new and corrected volume. EBHC is evaluated using data acquired with a modern cone-beam dual-source spiral CT scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), with a modern dual-source micro-CT scanner (TomoScope Synergy Twin, CT Imaging GmbH, Erlangen, Germany), and with a modern

  9. Probabilistic conditional reasoning: Disentangling form and content with the dual-source model.

    PubMed

    Singmann, Henrik; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Beller, Sieghard

    2016-08-01

    The present research examines descriptive models of probabilistic conditional reasoning, that is of reasoning from uncertain conditionals with contents about which reasoners have rich background knowledge. According to our dual-source model, two types of information shape such reasoning: knowledge-based information elicited by the contents of the material and content-independent information derived from the form of inferences. Two experiments implemented manipulations that selectively influenced the model parameters for the knowledge-based information, the relative weight given to form-based versus knowledge-based information, and the parameters for the form-based information, validating the psychological interpretation of these parameters. We apply the model to classical suppression effects dissecting them into effects on background knowledge and effects on form-based processes (Exp. 3) and we use it to reanalyse previous studies manipulating reasoning instructions. In a model-comparison exercise, based on data of seven studies, the dual-source model outperformed three Bayesian competitor models. Overall, our results support the view that people make use of background knowledge in line with current Bayesian models, but they also suggest that the form of the conditional argument, irrespective of its content, plays a substantive, yet smaller, role. PMID:27416493

  10. Probabilistic conditional reasoning: Disentangling form and content with the dual-source model.

    PubMed

    Singmann, Henrik; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Beller, Sieghard

    2016-08-01

    The present research examines descriptive models of probabilistic conditional reasoning, that is of reasoning from uncertain conditionals with contents about which reasoners have rich background knowledge. According to our dual-source model, two types of information shape such reasoning: knowledge-based information elicited by the contents of the material and content-independent information derived from the form of inferences. Two experiments implemented manipulations that selectively influenced the model parameters for the knowledge-based information, the relative weight given to form-based versus knowledge-based information, and the parameters for the form-based information, validating the psychological interpretation of these parameters. We apply the model to classical suppression effects dissecting them into effects on background knowledge and effects on form-based processes (Exp. 3) and we use it to reanalyse previous studies manipulating reasoning instructions. In a model-comparison exercise, based on data of seven studies, the dual-source model outperformed three Bayesian competitor models. Overall, our results support the view that people make use of background knowledge in line with current Bayesian models, but they also suggest that the form of the conditional argument, irrespective of its content, plays a substantive, yet smaller, role.

  11. A dual cone-beam CT system for image guided radiotherapy: Initial performance characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hao; Bowsher, James; Yin Fangfang; Giles, William

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of a recently developed benchtop dual cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system with two orthogonally placed tube/detector sets. Methods: The benchtop dual CBCT system consists of two orthogonally placed 40 Multiplication-Sign 30 cm flat-panel detectors and two conventional x-ray tubes with two individual high-voltage generators sharing the same rotational axis. The x-ray source to detector distance is 150 cm and x-ray source to rotational axis distance is 100 cm for both subsystems. The objects are scanned through 200 Degree-Sign of rotation. The dual CBCT system utilized 110 Degree-Sign of projection data from one detector and 90 Degree-Sign from the other while the two individual single CBCTs utilized 200 Degree-Sign data from each detector. The system performance was characterized in terms of uniformity, contrast, spatial resolution, noise power spectrum, and CT number linearity. The uniformities, within the axial slice and along the longitudinal direction, and noise power spectrum were assessed by scanning a water bucket; the contrast and CT number linearity were measured using the Catphan phantom; and the spatial resolution was evaluated using a tungsten wire phantom. A skull phantom and a ham were also scanned to provide qualitative evaluation of high- and low-contrast resolution. Each measurement was compared between dual and single CBCT systems. Results: Compared to single CBCT, the dual CBCT presented: (1) a decrease in uniformity by 1.9% in axial view and 1.1% in the longitudinal view, as averaged for four energies (80, 100, 125, and 150 kVp); (2) comparable or slightly better contrast (0{approx}25 HU) for low-contrast objects and comparable contrast for high-contrast objects; (3) comparable spatial resolution; (4) comparable CT number linearity with R{sup 2}{>=} 0.99 for all four tested energies; (5) lower noise power spectrum in magnitude. Dual CBCT images of the skull phantom and the

  12. SU-D-207-03: Development of 4D-CBCT Imaging System with Dual Source KV X-Ray Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M; Ishihara, Y; Matsuo, Y; Ueki, N; Iizuka, Y; Mizowaki, T; Hiraoka, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purposes of this work are to develop 4D-CBCT imaging system with orthogonal dual source kV X-ray tubes, and to determine the imaging doses from 4D-CBCT scans. Methods: Dual source kV X-ray tubes were used for the 4D-CBCT imaging. The maximum CBCT field of view was 200 mm in diameter and 150 mm in length, and the imaging parameters were 110 kV, 160 mA and 5 ms. The rotational angle was 105°, the rotational speed of the gantry was 1.5°/s, the gantry rotation time was 70 s, and the image acquisition interval was 0.3°. The observed amplitude of infrared marker motion during respiration was used to sort each image into eight respiratory phase bins. The EGSnrc/BEAMnrc and EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc packages were used to simulate kV X-ray dose distributions of 4D-CBCT imaging. The kV X-ray dose distributions were calculated for 9 lung cancer patients based on the planning CT images with dose calculation grid size of 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 mm. The dose covering a 2-cc volume of skin (D2cc), defined as the inner 5 mm of the skin surface with the exception of bone structure, was assessed. Results: A moving object was well identified on 4D-CBCT images in a phantom study. Given a gantry rotational angle of 105° and the configuration of kV X-ray imaging subsystems, both kV X-ray fields overlapped at a part of skin surface. The D2cc for the 4D-CBCT scans was in the range 73.8–105.4 mGy. Linear correlation coefficient between the 1000 minus averaged SSD during CBCT scanning and D2cc was −0.65 (with a slope of −0.17) for the 4D-CBCT scans. Conclusion: We have developed 4D-CBCT imaging system with dual source kV X-ray tubes. The total imaging dose with 4D-CBCT scans was up to 105.4 mGy.

  13. A comparison of the psychological burden of PET/MRI and PET/CT scans and association to initial state anxiety and previous imaging experiences

    PubMed Central

    Neriman, D; Hoath, J; Millner, L; Endozo, R; Azzopardi, G; O'Meara, C; Bomanji, J; Groves, A M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the level of psychological burden experienced by patients undergoing positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI scanning compared with PET/CT. Methods: 100 adult patients referred for PET/CT and underwent PET/MRI scanning were eligible. Initial state, psychological burden of PET/CT and PET/MRI, scan satisfaction and preference were assessed using a purpose-designed questionnaire, comprising 61 five-point Likert scale questions and a three-point tick box question indicating preference between PET/CT and PET/MRI. State anxiety was assessed using the state portion of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared psychological burden experienced by participants following PET/CT and PET/MRI scan. Results: A greater level of psychological burden was experienced by patients during PET/MRI than PET/CT p ≤ 0.001, consistent with patients' preference for PET/CT over PET/MRI (p = 0.013). There was a significant relationship between PET/CT psychological burden and initial state (r = 0.386, p ≤ 0.001). No significant relationship was identified between Initial state and psychological burden of PET MRI (r = −0.089; p = 217). There was a significant relationship between psychological burden of PET/CT and PET/MRI (r = 0.354; p = 0.001). Conclusion: Patients' experience increased psychological burden during PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. Previous scanning experiences and patients' interactions prior to and during PET/MRI improved patient satisfaction. Interventions could be implemented to improve imaging outcome. Advances in knowledge: This study provides evidence for the increased psychological burden of PET/MRI compared with PET/CT, and that people prefer the PET/CT procedure. We have shown that the patients who expressed a preference for PET/MRI demonstrated significantly lower psychological burden for that procedure than those that preferred PET/CT, which indicates that the benefit of reduced

  14. High-rate deposition of abrasion resistant coatings using a dual-source expanding thermal plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaepkens, M.; Selezneva, S.; Moeleker, P.; Iacovangelo, C. D.

    2003-07-01

    A unique high-rate plasma deposition process has been developed to generate abrasion resistant coatings on polymeric substrates. The process relies on the integration of a plurality of individual expanding thermal plasma sources into a multisource setup. In this work, we will discuss the effects of various hardware and process parameters on the performance of a dual-source system that has been used to apply abrasion resistant coatings to polycarbonate substrates. It will be shown that a properly engineered dual-source system can generate transparent organosilicon-based coatings that provide uniform glasslike abrasion resistance across a 30 cm width on substrates that are laterally translated past the dual-source array.

  15. New normative standards of conditional reasoning and the dual-source model

    PubMed Central

    Singmann, Henrik; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Over, David

    2014-01-01

    There has been a major shift in research on human reasoning toward Bayesian and probabilistic approaches, which has been called a new paradigm. The new paradigm sees most everyday and scientific reasoning as taking place in a context of uncertainty, and inference is from uncertain beliefs and not from arbitrary assumptions. In this manuscript we present an empirical test of normative standards in the new paradigm using a novel probabilized conditional reasoning task. Our results indicated that for everyday conditional with at least a weak causal connection between antecedent and consequent only the conditional probability of the consequent given antecedent contributes unique variance to predicting the probability of conditional, but not the probability of the conjunction, nor the probability of the material conditional. Regarding normative accounts of reasoning, we found significant evidence that participants' responses were confidence preserving (i.e., p-valid in the sense of Adams, 1998) for MP inferences, but not for MT inferences. Additionally, only for MP inferences and to a lesser degree for DA inferences did the rate of responses inside the coherence intervals defined by mental probability logic (Pfeifer and Kleiter, 2005, 2010) exceed chance levels. In contrast to the normative accounts, the dual-source model (Klauer et al., 2010) is a descriptive model. It posits that participants integrate their background knowledge (i.e., the type of information primary to the normative approaches) and their subjective probability that a conclusion is seen as warranted based on its logical form. Model fits showed that the dual-source model, which employed participants' responses to a deductive task with abstract contents to estimate the form-based component, provided as good an account of the data as a model that solely used data from the probabilized conditional reasoning task. PMID:24860516

  16. A dedicated cone-beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities imaging: Design, optimization, and initial performance characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Zbijewski, W.; De Jean, P.; Prakash, P.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Machado, A.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This paper reports on the design and initial imaging performance of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) system for musculoskeletal (MSK) extremities. The system complements conventional CT and MR and offers a variety of potential clinical and logistical advantages that are likely to be of benefit to diagnosis, treatment planning, and assessment of therapy response in MSK radiology, orthopaedic surgery, and rheumatology. Methods: The scanner design incorporated a host of clinical requirements (e.g., ability to scan the weight-bearing knee in a natural stance) and was guided by theoretical and experimental analysis of image quality and dose. Such criteria identified the following basic scanner components and system configuration: a flat-panel detector (FPD, Varian 3030+, 0.194 mm pixels); and a low-power, fixed anode x-ray source with 0.5 mm focal spot (SourceRay XRS-125-7K-P, 0.875 kW) mounted on a retractable C-arm allowing for two scanning orientations with the capability for side entry, viz. a standing configuration for imaging of weight-bearing lower extremities and a sitting configuration for imaging of tensioned upper extremity and unloaded lower extremity. Theoretical modeling employed cascaded systems analysis of modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) computed as a function of system geometry, kVp and filtration, dose, source power, etc. Physical experimentation utilized an imaging bench simulating the scanner geometry for verification of theoretical results and investigation of other factors, such as antiscatter grid selection and 3D image quality in phantom and cadaver, including qualitative comparison to conventional CT. Results: Theoretical modeling and benchtop experimentation confirmed the basic suitability of the FPD and x-ray source mentioned above. Clinical requirements combined with analysis of MTF and DQE yielded the following system geometry: a {approx}55 cm source-to-detector distance; 1.3 magnification; a

  17. Automatic localization of landmark sets in head CT images with regression forests for image registration initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongqing; Liu, Yuan; Noble, Jack H.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2016-03-01

    Cochlear Implants (CIs) are electrode arrays that are surgically inserted into the cochlea. Individual contacts stimulate frequency-mapped nerve endings thus replacing the natural electro-mechanical transduction mechanism. CIs are programmed post-operatively by audiologists but this is currently done using behavioral tests without imaging information that permits relating electrode position to inner ear anatomy. We have recently developed a series of image processing steps that permit the segmentation of the inner ear anatomy and the localization of individual contacts. We have proposed a new programming strategy that uses this information and we have shown in a study with 68 participants that 78% of long term recipients preferred the programming parameters determined with this new strategy. A limiting factor to the large scale evaluation and deployment of our technique is the amount of user interaction still required in some of the steps used in our sequence of image processing algorithms. One such step is the rough registration of an atlas to target volumes prior to the use of automated intensity-based algorithms when the target volumes have very different fields of view and orientations. In this paper we propose a solution to this problem. It relies on a random forest-based approach to automatically localize a series of landmarks. Our results obtained from 83 images with 132 registration tasks show that automatic initialization of an intensity-based algorithm proves to be a reliable technique to replace the manual step.

  18. Feasibility and Initial Performance of Simultaneous SPECT-CT Imaging Using a Commercial Multi-Modality Preclinical Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Dustin R.; Austin, Derek W.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging provides coregistered PET-CT and SPECT-CT images; however such multi-modality workflows usually consist of sequential scans from the individual imaging components for each modality. This typical workflow may result in long scan times limiting throughput of the imaging system. Conversely, acquiring multi-modality data simultaneously may improve correlation and registration of images, improve temporal alignment of the acquired data, increase imaging throughput, and benefit the scanned subject by minimizing time under anesthetic. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility and procedure for modifying a commercially available preclinical SPECT-CT platform to enable simultaneous SPECT-CT acquisition. We also evaluate the performance of simultaneous SPECT-CT tomographic imaging with this modified system. Performance was accessed using a 57Co source and image quality was evaluated with 99mTc phantoms in a series of simultaneous SPECT-CT scans. PMID:26146568

  19. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hidetake; Muraishi, Hiroshi; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Yasuo; Satoh, Hitoshi; Abe, Shinji

    2015-07-01

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize an acute-stage cerebral infarction by using dual-energy Computed tomography (DECT) to obtain virtual monochromatic images of this phantom. Virtual monochromatic images were created by using DECT voltages from 40 to 100 keV in steps of 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV in steps of 1 keV, under three conditions of the tube voltage with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images at voltages between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created images. Therefore, the optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  20. Use of 100 kV versus 120 kV in cardiac dual source computed tomography: effect on radiation dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Blankstein, Ron; Bolen, Michael A; Pale, Rodrigo; Murphy, Meagan K; Shah, Amar B; Bezerra, Hiram G; Sarwar, Ammar; Rogers, Ian S; Hoffmann, Udo; Abbara, Suhny; Cury, Ricardo C; Brady, Thomas J

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the effective radiation dose and image quality resulting from use of 100 vs. 120 kV among patients referred for cardiac dual source CT exam (DSCT). Prospective data was collected on 294 consecutive patients referred for DSCT. For each scan, a physician specializing in cardiac CT chose all parameters including tube current and voltage, axial versus helical acquisition, and use of tube current modulation. Lower tube voltage was selected for thinner patients or when lower radiation was desired for younger patients, particularly females. For each study, image quality (IQ) was rated on a subjective IQ score and contrast (CNR) and signal-to-noise (SNR) ratios were calculated. Tube voltage of 100 kV was used for 77 (26%) exams while 120 kV was used for 217 (74%) exams. Use of 100 kV was more common in thinner patients (weight 166 lbs vs. 199 lbs, P < .001). The effective radiation dose for the 100 and 120 kV scans was 8.5 and 15.4 mSv respectively. Among scans utilizing 100 and 120 kV, there was no difference in exam indication, use of beta blockers, heart rate, scan length and use of radiation saving techniques such as prospective ECG triggering and tube current modulation. The IQ score was significantly higher for 100 kV scans. While 100 kV scans were found to have higher image noise then those utilizing 120 kV, the contrast-to-noise and signal-to-noise were significantly higher (SNR: 9.4 vs. 8.3, P = .02; CNR: 6.9 vs. 6.0, P = .02). In selected non-obese patients, use of low kV results in a substantial reduction of radiation dose and may result in improved image quality. These results suggest that low kV should be used more frequently in non-obese patients. PMID:20721630

  1. Measurements of Coronary Artery Aneurysms Due to Kawasaki Disease by Dual-Source Computed Tomography (DSCT).

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Nobuyuki; Tsuda, Etsuko; Kanzaki, Suzu; Kurosaki, Kenichi

    2016-03-01

    Diameters of coronary artery aneurysms (CAAs) complicating acute phase KD can strongly predict the long-term prognosis of coronary artery lesions (CAL). Recently, computed tomographic angiography (CTA) has been used to detect CAL, and the purpose of this study was to determine whether coronary artery diameters measurements by CTA using dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) can be used instead of coronary angiogram (CAG) measurements. Twenty-five patients (22 males and three females) with CAL due to KD, who had undergone both CTA and CAG within one year, were retrospectively evaluated between 2007 and 2013. A prospective electrocardiogram-triggered CTA was performed on a DSCT (SOMATOM(®) Definition, Siemens Healthcare, Germany). Two pediatric cardiologists independently measured the diameters of CAAs twice in each maximum intensity projection (MIP), curved multiplaner reconstruction (MPR) and CAG. We measured 161 segments in total (segment 1-3, 5-7, 11, 13). Diagnostic accuracy was expressed as κ coefficient. A Bland-Altman analysis was also used to assess the intra-observer, inter-observer and inter-modality agreement. The diagnostic quality of CTA was excellent (κ = 0.93). Excellent inter-observer agreement for the diameters of CAAs was obtained for MIP, MPR and CAG and for the intra-observer agreement. The inter-modality agreement was also excellent in measurements of CAA (MPR-CAG: y = 0.9x + 0.40, r = 0.97, p < 0.0001 MIP-CAG: y = x + 0.1, r = 0.94, p < 0.0001). These values in normal coronary arteries were also obtained. We found a significant correlation between CTA and CAG in measuring the coronary arteries. We conclude that measuring coronary artery diameters by CTA is reliable and useful.

  2. Coronary lesion complexity assessed by SYNTAX score in 256-slice dual-source MDCT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Yüceler, Zeyneb; Kantarcı, Mecit; Tanboğa, İbrahim Halil; Sade, Recep; Kızrak, Yeşim; Pirimoğlu, Berhan; Bayraktutan, Ümmügülsüm; Oğul, Hayri; Aksakal, Enbiya

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The SYNTAX Score (SS) has an important role in grading the complexity of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients undergoing revascularization. Noninvasive determination of SS prior to invasive coronary angiography (ICA) might optimize patient management. We aimed to evaluate the agreement between ICA and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) while testing the diagnostic effectiveness of SS-MDCT. METHODS Our study included 108 consecutive patients who underwent both MDCT angiography with a 256-slice dual-source MDCT system and ICA within 14±3 days. SS was calculated for both ICA and MDCT coronary angiography. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the association of SS-MDCT with SS-ICA, and Bland-Altman analysis was performed. RESULTS The degree of agreement between SS-ICA and SS-MDCT was moderate. The mean SS-MDCT was 14.5, whereas the mean SS-ICA was 15.9. After dividing SS into three groups (high [≥33], intermediate [23–32], and low [≤22] subgroups), agreement analysis was repeated. There was a significant correlation between SS-MDCT and SS-ICA in the low SS group (r=0.63, P = 0.043) but no significant correlation in the high SS group (r=0.036, P = 0.677). The inter-test agreement analysis showed at least moderate agreement, whereas thrombotic lesions and the type of bifurcation lesion showed fair agreement. CONCLUSION The calculation of SS-MDCT by adapting SS-ICA parameters achieved nearly the same degree of precision as SS-ICA and was better than SS-ICA, especially in the low SS group. PMID:27328718

  3. Giant coronary aneurysm caused by Kawasaki disease: consistency between catheter angiography and electrocardiogram gated dual-source computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun-Ha; Ju, Jung-Ki; Cho, Min-Jung; Lee, Ji-Won; Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a 5-year-old child with coronary complications due to Kawasaki disease; this patient unintentionally underwent both dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography and invasive coronary angiographic examination in 2 months. This case highlights the strong consistency of the results between DSCT coronary angiography and invasive coronary angiography. Compared to conventional invasive coronary angiography, DSCT coronary angiography offered additional advantages such as minimal invasiveness and less radiation exposure. PMID:26770226

  4. Dual-Source Computed Tomography Evaluation of Children with Congenital Pulmonary Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhanguo; Xu, Wenjian; Huang, Shuran; Chen, Yueqin; Guo, Xiang; Shi, Zhitao

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) technology has been performed well on adults or infants with heart disease, specific knowledge about children with congenital pulmonary valve stenosis (PS) remained to be established. Objectives This original research aimed to establish a professional approach of DSCT performing technology on children and to assess the image quality performed by DSCT to establish a diagnostic evaluation for children with PS. Patients and Methods Ninety-eight children with congenital PS referred to affiliated hospital of Jining medical college were recruited from October 2013 to March 2015. Participants were divided into four groups according to different ages (0 - 1, 1 - 3, 3 - 7, 7 - 14), or three groups according to different heart rates (< 90, 90 - 110, > 110). Image quality of pulmonary valves was assessed based on a four-point grading scale (1 - 4 points). Those cases achieving a score of ≥ 3 points were selected for further investigation, which played a critical role in our analysis. Correlation analysis was used to identify the effects of age and heart rate on image quality. Additionally, the results evaluated by DSCT were compared with those evaluated from the operation, further confirming the accuracy of DSCT. Results Seventy-two cases (73.4%) achieved a score of ≥ 3 points based on pulmonary valve imaging, which were available for further diagnosis. There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between the four groups except 0 - 1 group and 1 - 3 group, 3 - 7 group and 7 - 14 group, and the image quality of elder group was higher than younger group. Image score was gradually decreased with increased heart rate (F = 19.05, P < 0.01). Heart rate was negatively correlated with pulmonary valve scores (r = -0.391, P < 0.001), while there was no correlation between age and scores (r = 0.185, P = 0.070). The number, shape, commissure, and opening status of pulmonary valves evaluated by DSCT were the same

  5. CT-Guided Wire Localization for Involved Axillary Lymph Nodes After Neo-adjuvant Chemotherapy in Patients With Initially Node-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Long; Miyake, Kanae K; Dirbas, Frederick M; Kothary, Nishita; Horst, Kathleen C; Lipson, Jafi A; Carpenter, Catherine; Thompson, Atalie C; Ikeda, Debra M

    2016-07-01

    Resection of biopsy-proven involved axillary lymph nodes (iALNs) is important to reduce the false-negative rates of sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in patients with initially node-positive breast cancer. Preoperative wire localization for iALNs marked with clips placed during biopsy is a technique that may help the removal of iALNs after NAC. However, ultrasound (US)-guided localization is often difficult because the clips cannot always be reliably visible on US. Computed tomography (CT)-guided wire localization can be used; however, to date there have been no reports on CT-guided wire localization for iALNs. The aim of this study was to describe a series of patients who received CT-guided wire localization for iALN removal after NAC and to evaluate the feasibility of this technique. We retrospectively analyzed five women with initially node-positive breast cancer (age, 41-52 years) who were scheduled for SLN biopsy after NAC and received preoperative CT-guided wire localization for iALNs. CT visualized all the clips that were not identified on post-NAC US. The wire tip was deployed beyond or at the target, with the shortest distance between the wire and the index clip ranging from 0 to 2.5 mm. The total procedure time was 21-38 minutes with good patient tolerance and no complications. In four of five cases, CT wire localization aided in identification and resection of iALNs that were not identified with lymphatic mapping. Residual nodal disease was confirmed in two cases: both had residual disease in wire-localized lymph nodes in addition to SLNs. Although further studies with more cases are required, our results suggest that CT-guided wire localization for iALNs is a feasible technique that facilitates identification and removal of the iALNs as part of SLN biopsy after NAC in situations where US localization is unsuccessful. PMID:27061012

  6. CT Imaging for Evaluation of Calcium Crystal Deposition in the Knee: Initial Experience from The Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) Study

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Devyani; Guermazi, Ali; Sieren, Jered P.; Lynch, John; Torner, James; Neogi, Tuhina; Felson, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Role of intra-articular calcium crystals in osteoarthritis (OA) is unclear. Imaging modalities used to date for its evaluation have limitations in their ability to fully characterize intra-articular crystal deposition. Since Computed Tomography (CT) imaging provides excellent visualization of bones and calcified tissue, in this pilot project we evaluated the utility of CT scan in describing intra-articular calcium crystal deposition in the knees. Method We included 12 subjects with and 4 subjects without radiographic chondrocalcinosis in the most recent visit from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) study, which is a longitudinal cohort of community-dwelling older adults with or at risk for knee OA. All subjects underwent CT scans of bilateral knees. Each knee was divided into 25 subregions and each subregion was read for presence of calcium crystals by a musculoskeletal radiologist. To assess reliability, readings were repeated 4 weeks later. Results CT images permitted visualization of 25 subregions with calcification within and around the tibio-femoral and patello-femoral joints in all 24 knees with radiographic chondrocalcinosis. Intra-articular calcification was seen universally including meniscal cartilage (most common site involved in 21/24 knees), hyaline cartilage, cruciate ligaments, medial collateral ligament and joint capsule. Readings showed good agreement for specific tissues involved with calcium deposition (kappa: 0.70, 95% CI 0.62–0.80). Conclusion We found CT scan to be a useful and reliable tool for describing calcium crystal deposition in the knee and therefore potentially for studying role of calcium crystals in OA. We also confirmed that “chondrocalcinosis” is a misnomer because calcification is present ubiquitously. PMID:25451303

  7. Prolonged Cerebral Circulation Time Is the Best Parameter for Predicting Vasospasm during Initial CT Perfusion in Subarachnoid Hemorrhagic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun Fu; Hsu, Sanford P. C.; Lin, Chung Jung; Guo, Wan Yuo; Liao, Chih Hsiang; Chu, Wei Fa; Hung, Sheng Che; Shih, Yang Shin; Lin, Yen Tzu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to imitate angiographic cerebral circulation time (CCT) and create a similar index from baseline CT perfusion (CTP) to better predict vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods Forty-one SAH patients with available DSA and CTP were retrospectively included. The vasospasm group was comprised of patients with deterioration in conscious functioning and newly developed luminal narrowing; remaining cases were classified as the control group. The angiography CCT (XA-CCT) was defined as the difference in TTP (time to peak) between the selected arterial ROIs and the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Four arterial ROIs were selected to generate four corresponding XA-CCTs: the right and left anterior cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRA2 and XA-CCTLA2) and right- and left-middle cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRM2 and XA-CCTLM2). The CCTs from CTP (CT-CCT) were defined as the differences in TTP from the corresponding arterial ROIs and the SSS. Correlations of the different CCTs were calculated and diagnostic accuracy in predicting vasospasm was evaluated. Results Intra-class correlations ranged from 0.96 to 0.98. The correlations of XA-CCTRA2, XA-CCTRM2, XA-CCTLA2, and XA-CCTLM2 with the corresponding CT-CCTs were 0.64, 0.65, 0.53, and 0.68, respectively. All CCTs were significantly prolonged in the vasospasm group (5.8–6.4 s) except for XA-CCTLA2. CT-CCTA2 of 5.62 was the optimal cut-off value for detecting vasospasm with a sensitivity of 84.2% and specificity 82.4% Conclusion CT-CCTs can be used to interpret cerebral flow without deconvolution algorithms, and outperform both MTT and TTP in predicting vasospasm risk. This finding may help facilitate management of patients with SAH. PMID:26986626

  8. Dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography: image quality and stenosis diagnosis in patients with high heart rates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minwen; Li, Jiayi; Xu, Jian; Chen, Kang; Zhao, Hongliang; Huan, Yi

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate prospectively the effects of heart rate and heart-rate variability on dual-source computed tomographic coronary image quality in patients whose heart rates were high, and to determine retrospectively the accuracy of dual-source computed tomographic diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis in the same patients.We compared image quality and diagnostic accuracy in 40 patients whose heart rates exceeded 70 beats/min with the same data in 40 patients whose heart rates were 70 beats/min or slower. In both groups, we analyzed 1,133 coronary arterial segments. Five hundred forty-five segments (97.7%) in low-heart-rate patients and 539 segments (93.7%) in high-heart-rate patients were of diagnostic image quality. We considered P < 0.05 to be statistically significant. No statistically significant differences between the groups were found in diagnostic-image quality scores of total segments or of any coronary artery, nor were any significant differences found between the groups in the accurate diagnosis of angiographically significant stenosis.Calcification was the chief factor that affected diagnostic accuracy. In high-heart-rate patients, heart-rate variability was significantly related to the diagnostic image quality of all segments (P = 0.001) and of the left circumflex coronary artery (P = 0.016). Heart-rate variability of more than 5 beats/min most strongly contributed to an inability to evaluate segments in both groups. When heart rates rose, the optimal reconstruction window shifted from diastole to systole.The image quality of dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography at high heart rates enables sufficient diagnosis of stenosis, although variability of heart rates significantly deteriorates image quality. PMID:19436804

  9. SU-E-I-33: Initial Evaluation of Model-Based Iterative CT Reconstruction Using Standard Image Quality Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gingold, E; Dave, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a new model-based iterative reconstruction with existing reconstruction methods (filtered backprojection and basic iterative reconstruction) using quantitative analysis of standard image quality phantom images. Methods: An ACR accreditation phantom (Gammex 464) and a CATPHAN600 phantom were scanned using 3 routine clinical acquisition protocols (adult axial brain, adult abdomen, and pediatric abdomen) on a Philips iCT system. Each scan was acquired using default conditions and 75%, 50% and 25% dose levels. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection (FBP), conventional iterative reconstruction (iDose4) and a prototype model-based iterative reconstruction (IMR). Phantom measurements included CT number accuracy, contrast to noise ratio (CNR), modulation transfer function (MTF), low contrast detectability (LCD), and noise power spectrum (NPS). Results: The choice of reconstruction method had no effect on CT number accuracy, or MTF (p<0.01). The CNR of a 6 HU contrast target was improved by 1–67% with iDose4 relative to FBP, while IMR improved CNR by 145–367% across all protocols and dose levels. Within each scan protocol, the CNR improvement from IMR vs FBP showed a general trend of greater improvement at lower dose levels. NPS magnitude was greatest for FBP and lowest for IMR. The NPS of the IMR reconstruction showed a pronounced decrease with increasing spatial frequency, consistent with the unusual noise texture seen in IMR images. Conclusion: Iterative Model Reconstruction reduces noise and improves contrast-to-noise ratio without sacrificing spatial resolution in CT phantom images. This offers the possibility of radiation dose reduction and improved low contrast detectability compared with filtered backprojection or conventional iterative reconstruction.

  10. Automated continuous quantitative measurement of proximal airways on dynamic ventilation CT: initial experience using an ex vivo porcine lung phantom

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Moriya, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Kotaro; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Kimoto, Tatsuya; Teramoto, Ryuichi; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of continuous quantitative measurement of the proximal airways, using dynamic ventilation computed tomography (CT) and our research software. Methods A porcine lung that was removed during meat processing was ventilated inside a chest phantom by a negative pressure cylinder (eight times per minute). This chest phantom with imitated respiratory movement was scanned by a 320-row area-detector CT scanner for approximately 9 seconds as dynamic ventilatory scanning. Obtained volume data were reconstructed every 0.35 seconds (total 8.4 seconds with 24 frames) as three-dimensional images and stored in our research software. The software automatically traced a designated airway point in all frames and measured the cross-sectional luminal area and wall area percent (WA%). The cross-sectional luminal area and WA% of the trachea and right main bronchus (RMB) were measured for this study. Two radiologists evaluated the traceability of all measurable airway points of the trachea and RMB using a three-point scale. Results It was judged that the software satisfactorily traced airway points throughout the dynamic ventilation CT (mean score, 2.64 at the trachea and 2.84 at the RMB). From the maximum inspiratory frame to the maximum expiratory frame, the cross-sectional luminal area of the trachea decreased 17.7% and that of the RMB 29.0%, whereas the WA% of the trachea increased 6.6% and that of the RMB 11.1%. Conclusion It is feasible to measure airway dimensions automatically at designated points on dynamic ventilation CT using research software. This technique can be applied to various airway and obstructive diseases. PMID:26445535

  11. Design and development of C-arm based cone-beam CT for image-guided interventions: initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Zambelli, Joseph; Nett, Brian E.; Supanich, Mark; Riddell, Cyril; Belanger, Barry; Mistretta, Charles A.

    2006-03-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is of importance in image-guided intervention (IGI) and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this paper, we present a cone-beam CT data acquisition system using a GE INNOVA 4100 (GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, Wisconsin) clinical system. This new cone-beam data acquisition mode was developed for research purposes without interfering with any clinical function of the system. It provides us a basic imaging pipeline for more advanced cone-beam data acquisition methods. It also provides us a platform to study and overcome the limiting factors such as cone-beam artifacts and limiting low contrast resolution in current C-arm based cone-beam CT systems. A geometrical calibration method was developed to experimentally determine parameters of the scanning geometry to correct the image reconstruction for geometric non-idealities. Extensive phantom studies and some small animal studies have been conducted to evaluate the performance of our cone-beam CT data acquisition system.

  12. CT-Guided Percutaneous Drainage of Infected Collections Due to Gastric Leak After Sleeve Gastrectomy for Morbid Obesity: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kelogrigoris, M. Sotiropoulou, E.; Stathopoulos, K.; Georgiadou, V.; Philippousis, P.; Thanos, L.

    2011-06-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided drainage in treating infected collections due to gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. From January 2007 to June 2009, 21 patients (9 men and 12 women; mean age, 39.2 (range, 26-52) years) with infected collections due to gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity underwent image-guided percutaneous drainage. All procedures were performed using CT guidance and 8- to 12-Fr pigtail drainage catheters. Immediate technical success was achieved in all 21 infected collections. In 18 of 21 collections, we obtained progressive shrinkage of the collection with consequent clinical success (success rate 86%). In three cases, the abdominal fluid collection was not resolved, and the patients were reoperated. Among the 18 patients who avoided surgery, 2 needed replacement of the catheter due to obstruction. No major complications occurred during the procedure. The results of our study support that CT-guided percutaneous drainage is an effective and safe method to treat infected abdominal fluid collections due to gastric leak in patients who had previously underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. It may be considered both as a preparatory step for surgery and a valuable alternative to open surgery. Failure of the procedure does not, however, preclude a subsequent surgical operation.

  13. Pulmonary Masses: Initial Results of Cone-beam CT Guidance with Needle Planning Software for Percutaneous Lung Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Braak, Sicco J.; Herder, Gerarda J. M.; Heesewijk, Johannes P. M. van Strijen, Marco J. L. van

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) findings using cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) guidance (CBCT guidance) and compared to conventional biopsy guidance techniques. Methods: CBCT guidance is a stereotactic technique for needle interventions, combining 3D soft-tissue cone-beam CT, needle planning software, and real-time fluoroscopy. Between March 2007 and August 2010, we performed 84 Tru-Cut PLBs, where bronchoscopy did not provide histopathologic diagnosis. Mean patient age was 64.6 (range 24-85) years; 57 patients were men, and 25 were women. Records were prospectively collected for calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy. We also registered fluoroscopy time, room time, interventional time, dose-area product (DAP), and complications. Procedures were divided into subgroups (e.g., location, size, operator). Results: Mean lesion diameter was 32.5 (range 3.0-93.0) mm, and the mean number of samples per biopsy procedure was 3.2 (range 1-7). Mean fluoroscopy time was 161 (range 104-551) s, room time was 34 (range 15-79) min, mean DAP value was 25.9 (range 3.9-80.5) Gy{center_dot}cm{sup -2}, and interventional time was 18 (range 5-65) min. Of 84 lesions, 70 were malignant (83.3%) and 14 were benign (16.7%). Seven (8.3%) of the biopsy samples were nondiagnostic. All nondiagnostic biopsied lesions proved to be malignant during surgical resection. The outcome for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy was 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 86-96), 100% (95% CI 82-100), 100% (95% CI 96-100), 66.7% (95% CI 55-83), and 91.7% (95% CI 86-96), respectively. Sixteen patients (19%) had minor and 2 (2.4%) had major complications. Conclusion: CBCT guidance is an effective method for PLB, with results comparable to CT/CT fluoroscopy guidance.

  14. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Splenic Enlargement Using Wave Pattern of Spleen in Abdominal CT Images: Initial Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong-Won

    In general, the spleen accompanied by abnormal abdomen is hypertrophied. However, if the spleen size is originally small, it is hard to detect the splenic enlargement due to abnormal abdomen by simply measure the size. On the contrary, the spleen size of a person having a normal abdomen may be large by nature. Therefore, measuring the size of spleen is not a reliable diagnostic measure of its enlargement or the abdomen abnormality. This paper proposes an automatic method to diagnose the splenic enlargement due to abnormality, by examining the boundary pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images.

  15. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI): A Completed Reference Database of Lung Nodules on CT Scans

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) methods for lung nodule detection, classification, and quantitative assessment can be facilitated through a well-characterized repository of computed tomography (CT) scans. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) completed such a database, establishing a publicly available reference for the medical imaging research community. Initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), further advanced by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), and accompanied by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through active participation, this public-private partnership demonstrates the success of a consortium founded on a consensus-based process. Methods: Seven academic centers and eight medical imaging companies collaborated to identify, address, and resolve challenging organizational, technical, and clinical issues to provide a solid foundation for a robust database. The LIDC/IDRI Database contains 1018 cases, each of which includes images from a clinical thoracic CT scan and an associated XML file that records the results of a two-phase image annotation process performed by four experienced thoracic radiologists. In the initial blinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed each CT scan and marked lesions belonging to one of three categories (''nodule{>=}3 mm,''''nodule<3 mm,'' and ''non-nodule{>=}3 mm''). In the subsequent unblinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed their own marks along with the anonymized marks of the three other radiologists to render a final opinion. The goal of this process was to identify as completely as possible all lung nodules in each CT scan without requiring forced consensus. Results: The Database contains 7371 lesions marked ''nodule'' by at least one radiologist. 2669 of these lesions were marked ''nodule{>=}3 mm'' by at least one radiologist, of which 928 (34.7%) received such marks from

  16. Radiologist-initiated double reading of abdominal CT: retrospective analysis of the clinical importance of changes to radiology reports

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jack Gunnar; Stokke, Mali Victoria; Tennstrand, Anne Lise; Aamodt, Rolf; Heggelund, Thomas; Dahl, Fredrik A; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Hurlen, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Background Misinterpretation of radiological examinations is an important contributing factor to diagnostic errors. Consultant radiologists in Norwegian hospitals frequently request second reads by colleagues in real time. Our objective was to estimate the frequency of clinically important changes to radiology reports produced by these prospectively obtained double readings. Methods We retrospectively compared the preliminary and final reports from 1071 consecutive double-read abdominal CT examinations of surgical patients at five public hospitals in Norway. Experienced gastrointestinal surgeons rated the clinical importance of changes from the preliminary to final report. The severity of the radiological findings in clinically important changes was classified as increased, unchanged or decreased. Results Changes were classified as clinically important in 146 of 1071 reports (14%). Changes to 3 reports (0.3%) were critical (demanding immediate action), 35 (3%) were major (implying a change in treatment) and 108 (10%) were intermediate (requiring further investigations). The severity of the radiological findings was increased in 118 (81%) of the clinically important changes. Important changes were made less frequently when abdominal radiologists were first readers, more frequently when they were second readers, and more frequently to urgent examinations. Conclusion A 14% rate of clinically important changes made during double reading may justify quality assurance of radiological interpretation. Using expert second readers and a targeted selection of urgent cases and radiologists reading outside their specialty may increase the yield of discrepant cases. PMID:27013638

  17. Cone beam CT for determining breast cancer margin: an initial experience and its comparison with mammography and specimen radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Juan; Shaw, Chris; Lai, CJ; Rong, John; Wang, Jian; Liu, Wenya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the ability of cone beam CT (CBCT) in determining the breast cancer margin using, to compare the results with mammography and specimen radiography, and to explore the clinical potential of CBCT for breast imaging. Methods: Specimens of 46 breast cancer patients were imaged by using a prototype CBCT system. Each patient underwent mammography, CBCT and X-ray of breast surgical specimen within 6 months. Images of mammography, breast surgical specimen radiography and CBCT were evaluated by an experienced radiologist. Indicators, such as: morphology, glitch, density, invasion, structural distortion and calcification, were observed. Result: There was no significant difference of the calcification, glitch and morphology among three methods. However, there was significant difference in indicators of breast tumor invasion among three methods. There was statistical significance in detecting invasions of breast cancer cells in peripheral tissues among three methods. Conclusion: CBCT shows no superiority over mammography and specimen radiography in determining tumor’s outline and detecting calcification. On the other hand, CBCT demonstrates its advantage in determining the 3 dimensional position of a lesion which could be a potential clinical application in future practices of breast imaging. PMID:26629005

  18. The oil and gas potential of southern Bolivia: Contributions from a dual source rock system

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorn, K.G.

    1996-08-01

    The southern Sub-Andean and Chaco basins of Bolivia produce oil, gas and condensate from reservoirs ranging from Devonian to Tertiary in age. Geochemical evidence points to contributions from two Paleozoic source rocks: the Devonian Los Monos Formation and the Silurian Kirusillas Formation. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, biomarker data, microscopic kerogen analysis, and burial history modeling are used to assess the quality, distribution, and maturity of both source rock systems. The geochemical results are then integrated with the structural model for the area in order to determine the most likely pathways for migration of oil and gas in the thrust belt and its foreland. Geochemical analysis and modeling show that the primary source rock, shales of the Devonian Los Monos Formation, entered the oil window during the initial phase of thrusting in the sub-Andean belt. This provides ideal timing for oil accumulation in younger reservoirs of the thrust belt. The secondary source rock, although richer, consumed most of its oil generating capacity prior to the development of the thrust related structures. Depending on burial depth and location, however, the Silurian source still contributes gas, and some oil, to traps in the region.

  19. Evaluation of coronary flow velocity reserve in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography and dual-source computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Li, Rongjuan; Ren, Hongyan; Wang, Zheng; Li, Zhian; Lin, Jie; Wang, Luya; Yu, Wei; Zhang, Zhaoqi

    2010-10-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis and usually occurs at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study, we used transthoracic Doppler echocardiography (TTDE) to evaluate the dynamic changes of coronary flow in HoFH patients and to detect aortic and coronary atherosclerosis by dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). We studied 20 HoFH patients (12 females, 8 males, mean age 13.1 ± 5.3 years, with a mean low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol of 583 ± 113 mg/dL) and 15 control patients (8 females, 7 males, mean age 15.2 ± 6.9 years, with a mean LDL cholesterol 128 ± 71 mg/dL) using TTDE and DSCT. None of the patients showed evidence of ischemia with standard exercise testing. Though the baseline coronary flow was similar between HoFH patients and normal controls, the hyperemic flow velocities and, thus, the coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) were significantly lower in those with HoFH. All HoFH patients had aortic plaques, nine of them with the coronary artery ostia simultaneously, who had significantly higher LDL-cholesterol and lower CFVR than those without ostia plaques. Our data demonstrated that TTDE together with DSCT could be a useful noninvasive method for detection of coronary flow dynamics and atherosclerosis specifically in HoFH subjects with coronary ostia. PMID:20800956

  20. Dual source fourier transform polarization modulation spectroscopy: an improved method for the measurement of circular and linear dichroism.

    PubMed

    Nafie, Laurence A; Buijs, Henry; Rilling, Allan; Cao, Xiaolin; Dukor, Rina K

    2004-06-01

    It is shown that the use of two sources in a four-port interferometer equipped with cube-corner mirrors leads to increased signal-to-noise ratios in Fourier transform (FT-IR) circular and linear dichroism spectra. The output beam to the sample is a superposition of two interferograms, one from each source, having opposite Fourier phases. These two interferograms cancel one another to the degree that the two sources are matched in intensity. If the radiation from each of the two sources is first polarized orthogonally with respect to the other and passed through a polarization modulator before reaching the sample, the resulting polarization-modulation interferograms are out of Fourier phase and out of polarization-modulation phase. As a result, the polarization-modulation interferograms, due to circular or linear dichroism in the sample, from the two sources combine positively rather than negatively. An improvement in signal-to-noise ratio of up to two (or a factor of four in scan-time reduction for the same signal-to-noise ratio) compared to single source operation can be realized, while at the same time, the potential for saturation of the detector signal is significantly reduced due to the reduction in magnitude of the combined ordinary infrared transmission interferogram. Absorption and circular dichroism spectra from a dual-source FT-IR spectrometer are presented and analyzed.

  1. Utility of [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the Initial Staging and Response Assessment of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hulikal, Narendra; Gajjala, Sivanath Reddy; Kalawat, Teck Chand; Kottu, Radhika; Amancharla Yadagiri, Lakshmi

    2015-12-01

    In India up to 50 % of breast cancer patients still present as locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). The conventional methods of metastatic work up include physical examination, bone scan, chest & abdominal imaging, and biochemical tests. It is likely that the conventional staging underestimates the extent of initial spread and there is a need for more sophisticated staging procedure. The PET/CT can detect extra-axillary and occult distant metastases and also aid in predicting response to chemotherapy at an early point in time. To evaluate the utility of FDG PET/CT in initial staging and response assessment of patients with LABC receiving NACT. A prospective study of all biopsy confirmed female patients diagnosed with LABC receiving NACT from April 2013 to May 2014. The conventional work up included serum chemistry, CECT chest and abdomen and bone scan. A baseline whole body PET/CT was done in all patients. A repeat staging evaluation and a whole body PET/CT was done after 2/3rd cycle of NACT in non-responders and after 3/4 cycles in clinical responders. The histopathology report of the operative specimen was used to document the pathological response. The FDG PET/CT reported distant metastases in 11 of 38 patients, where as conventional imaging revealed metastases in only 6. Almost all the distant lesions detected by conventional imaging were detected with PET/CT, which showed additional sites of metastasis in 3 patients. In 2 patients, PET/CT detected osteolytic bone metastasis which were not detected by bone scan. In 5 patients PET CT detected N3 disease which were missed on conventional imaging. A total of 14 patients had second PET/CT done to assess the response to NACT and 11 patients underwent surgery. Two patients had complete pathological response. Of these 1 patient had complete metabolic and morphologic response and other had complete metabolic and partial morphologic response on second PET/CT scan. The 18 FDG PET/CT can detect more number of

  2. Utility of [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the Initial Staging and Response Assessment of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hulikal, Narendra; Gajjala, Sivanath Reddy; Kalawat, Teck Chand; Kottu, Radhika; Amancharla Yadagiri, Lakshmi

    2015-12-01

    In India up to 50 % of breast cancer patients still present as locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). The conventional methods of metastatic work up include physical examination, bone scan, chest & abdominal imaging, and biochemical tests. It is likely that the conventional staging underestimates the extent of initial spread and there is a need for more sophisticated staging procedure. The PET/CT can detect extra-axillary and occult distant metastases and also aid in predicting response to chemotherapy at an early point in time. To evaluate the utility of FDG PET/CT in initial staging and response assessment of patients with LABC receiving NACT. A prospective study of all biopsy confirmed female patients diagnosed with LABC receiving NACT from April 2013 to May 2014. The conventional work up included serum chemistry, CECT chest and abdomen and bone scan. A baseline whole body PET/CT was done in all patients. A repeat staging evaluation and a whole body PET/CT was done after 2/3rd cycle of NACT in non-responders and after 3/4 cycles in clinical responders. The histopathology report of the operative specimen was used to document the pathological response. The FDG PET/CT reported distant metastases in 11 of 38 patients, where as conventional imaging revealed metastases in only 6. Almost all the distant lesions detected by conventional imaging were detected with PET/CT, which showed additional sites of metastasis in 3 patients. In 2 patients, PET/CT detected osteolytic bone metastasis which were not detected by bone scan. In 5 patients PET CT detected N3 disease which were missed on conventional imaging. A total of 14 patients had second PET/CT done to assess the response to NACT and 11 patients underwent surgery. Two patients had complete pathological response. Of these 1 patient had complete metabolic and morphologic response and other had complete metabolic and partial morphologic response on second PET/CT scan. The 18 FDG PET/CT can detect more number of

  3. Dual energy CT: preliminary observations and potential clinical applications in the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Graser, Anno; Johnson, Thorsten R C; Chandarana, Hersh; Macari, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Dual energy CT (DECT) is a new technique that allows differentiation of materials and tissues based on CT density values derived from two synchronous CT acquisitions at different tube potentials. With the introduction of a new dual source CT system, this technique can now be used routinely in abdominal imaging. Potential clinical applications include evaluation of renal masses, liver lesions, urinary calculi, small bowel, pancreas, and adrenal glands. In CT angiography of abdominal aortic aneurysms, dual energy CT techniques can be used to remove bones from the datasets, and virtual unenhanced images allow differentiation of contrast agent from calcifying thrombus in patients with endovascular stents. This review describes potential applications, practical guidelines, and limitations of dual energy CT in the abdomen.

  4. Dual source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.; Pietsch, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  5. Imaging of the Coronary Venous System: Validation of Three-Dimensional Rotational Venous Angiography Against Dual-Source Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Knackstedt, Christian; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Mischke, Karl; Bruners, Philipp; Schimpf, Thomas; Frechen, Dirk; Schummers, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Kelm, Malte; Schauerte, Patrick

    2008-11-15

    Information on the anatomy of the cardiac venous system (CVS) is increasingly important for cardiac resynchronization therapy or percutaneous transvenous mitral valve annuloplasty. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging can further improve the understanding of the relationship of cardiac structures. This study was performed to validate the accuracy of rotational coronary sinus angiography (CSA) displaying the 3D anatomy of the CVS compared to ECG-gated, contrast-enhanced, cardiac dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). Five domestic pigs (60 kg) underwent DSCT using a standardized examination protocol. Using a standard C-arm for fluoroscopy, a rotational CSA was obtained and 3D-image reconstructions performed. Side branches were identified using both methods and enumerated. Vessel visibility was estimated for each side branch and great cardiac vein/anterior interventricular vein. Also, vessel diameters were measured at distinct landmarks, i.e., side branching. The amount of contrast medium was determined and the effective radiation exposure of both methods was calculated. There was no significant difference regarding the vessel diameter of the great cardiac vein/anterior interventricular vein or its side branches. Also, estimation of vessel visibility was not different between the two imaging modalities. Estimated radiation exposure and amount of contrast medium were lower for rotational CSA. In conclusion, a 3D reconstruction of rotational CSA images is possible. All parts of the CVS are well depicted, allowing a 3D overview of the CVS anatomy. On-site 3D visualization might improve decision making during cardiac interventions. In contrast to DSCT, rotational CSA does not demonstrate the anatomy of the mitral annulus or the course of the left circumflex artery.

  6. An Open Library of CT Patient Projection Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baiyu; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Holmes, David; Fletcher, Joel; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Lack of access to projection data from patient CT scans is a major limitation for development and validation of new reconstruction algorithms. To meet this critical need, we are building a library of CT patient projection data in an open and vendor-neutral format, DICOM-CT-PD, which is an extended DICOM format that contains sinogram data, acquisition geometry, patient information, and pathology identification. The library consists of scans of various types, including head scans, chest scans, abdomen scans, electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated scans, and dual-energy scans. For each scan, three types of data are provided, including DICOM-CT-PD projection data at various dose levels, reconstructed CT images, and a free-form text file. Several instructional documents are provided to help the users extract information from DICOM-CT-PD files, including a dictionary file for the DICOM-CT-PD format, a DICOM-CT-PD reader, and a user manual. Radiologist detection performance based on the reconstructed CT images is also provided. So far 328 head cases, 228 chest cases, and 228 abdomen cases have been collected for potential inclusion. The final library will include a selection of 50 head, chest, and abdomen scans each from at least two different manufacturers, and a few ECG-gated scans and dual-source, dual-energy scans. It will be freely available to academic researchers, and is expected to greatly facilitate the development and validation of CT reconstruction algorithms. PMID:27239087

  7. An open library of CT patient projection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baiyu; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Holmes, David; Fletcher, Joel; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Lack of access to projection data from patient CT scans is a major limitation for development and validation of new reconstruction algorithms. To meet this critical need, we are building a library of CT patient projection data in an open and vendor-neutral format, DICOM-CT-PD, which is an extended DICOM format that contains sinogram data, acquisition geometry, patient information, and pathology identification. The library consists of scans of various types, including head scans, chest scans, abdomen scans, electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated scans, and dual-energy scans. For each scan, three types of data are provided, including DICOM-CT-PD projection data at various dose levels, reconstructed CT images, and a free-form text file. Several instructional documents are provided to help the users extract information from DICOM-CT-PD files, including a dictionary file for the DICOM-CT-PD format, a DICOM-CT-PD reader, and a user manual. Radiologist detection performance based on the reconstructed CT images is also provided. So far 328 head cases, 228 chest cases, and 228 abdomen cases have been collected for potential inclusion. The final library will include a selection of 50 head, chest, and abdomen scans each from at least two different manufacturers, and a few ECG-gated scans and dual-source, dual-energy scans. It will be freely available to academic researchers, and is expected to greatly facilitate the development and validation of CT reconstruction algorithms.

  8. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  9. Technical aspects of CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Maravilla, K R; Pastel, M S

    1978-01-01

    The advent of computed tomography (CT) has initiated a technological revolution which continues to the present time. A brief review of basic principles of CT scanning is presented, and the evolution of modern CT scanner systems is traced. Some early indications of future trends are also presented.

  10. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  11. Improving low-dose cardiac CT images using 3D sparse representation based processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Luyao; Chen, Yang; Luo, Limin

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has been widely used in diagnoses of coronary artery diseases due to the continuously improving temporal and spatial resolution. When helical CT with a lower pitch scanning mode is used, the effective radiation dose can be significant when compared to other radiological exams. Many methods have been developed to reduce radiation dose in coronary CT exams including high pitch scans using dual source CT scanners and step-and-shot scanning mode for both single source and dual source CT scanners. Additionally, software methods have also been proposed to reduce noise in the reconstructed CT images and thus offering the opportunity to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the desired diagnostic performance of a certain imaging task. In this paper, we propose that low-dose scans should be considered in order to avoid the harm from accumulating unnecessary X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. Accordingly, in this paper, a 3D dictionary representation based image processing method is proposed to reduce CT image noise. Information on both spatial and temporal structure continuity is utilized in sparse representation to improve the performance of the image processing method. Clinical cases were used to validate the proposed method.

  12. SNOMED CT in pathology.

    PubMed

    García-Rojo, Marcial; Daniel, Christel; Laurinavicius, Arvydas

    2012-01-01

    Pathology information systems have been using SNOMED II for many years, and in most cases, they are in a migration process to SNOMED CT. COST Action IC0604 (EURO-TELEPATH) has considered terminology normalization one of its strategic objectives. This paper reviews the use of SNOMED CT in healthcare, with a special focus in pathology. Nowadays, SNOMED CT is mainly used for concept search and coding of clinical data. Some ontological errors found in SNOMED CT are described. The Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative has fostered the use of SNOMED CT, also in Pathology, as recommended in the Supplement Anatomic Pathology Structured Reports of the IHE Anatomic Pathology Technical Framework. Rule governing concept post-coordination is also described. Some recent initiatives are trying to define a SNOMED CT subset for Pathology. The Spanish Society of Pathology has defined a subset for specimens and procedures in Pathology. Regarding diagnosis coding, the morphological abnormality sub-hierarchy of SNOMED CT need to be significantly extended and improved to become useful for pathologists. A consensus is needed to encode pathology reports with the adequate hierarchies and concepts. This will make the implementation of pathology structured reports more feasible.

  13. The application of positron emission tomography (PET/CT) in diagnosis of breast cancer. Part II. Diagnosis after treatment initiation, future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jodłowska, Elżbieta; Czepczyński, Rafał; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Rewers, Amanda; Jarząbek, Grażyna; Kędzia, Witold; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Similarly to the applications described in the first part of this publication, positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) is also gaining importance in monitoring a tumour's response to therapy and diagnosing breast cancer recurrences. This is additionally caused by the fact that many new techniques (dual-time point imaging, positron emission tomography with magnetic resonance PET/MR, PET/CT mammography) and radiotracers (16α-18F-fluoro-17β-estradiol, 18F-fluorothymidine) are under investigation. The highest sensitivity and specificity when monitoring response to treatment is achieved when the PET/CT scan is made after one or two chemotherapy courses. Response to anti-hormonal treatment can also be monitored, also when new radiotracers, such as FES, are used. When monitoring breast cancer recurrences during follow-up, PET/CT has higher sensitivity than conventional imaging modalities, making it possible to monitor the whole body simultaneously. New techniques and radiotracers enhance the sensitivity and specificity of PET and this is why, despite relatively high costs, it might become more widespread in monitoring response to treatment and breast cancer recurrences. PMID:27647983

  14. The application of positron emission tomography (PET/CT) in diagnosis of breast cancer. Part II. Diagnosis after treatment initiation, future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jodłowska, Elżbieta; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Rewers, Amanda; Jarząbek, Grażyna; Kędzia, Witold; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Similarly to the applications described in the first part of this publication, positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) is also gaining importance in monitoring a tumour's response to therapy and diagnosing breast cancer recurrences. This is additionally caused by the fact that many new techniques (dual-time point imaging, positron emission tomography with magnetic resonance PET/MR, PET/CT mammography) and radiotracers (16α-18F-fluoro-17β-estradiol, 18F-fluorothymidine) are under investigation. The highest sensitivity and specificity when monitoring response to treatment is achieved when the PET/CT scan is made after one or two chemotherapy courses. Response to anti-hormonal treatment can also be monitored, also when new radiotracers, such as FES, are used. When monitoring breast cancer recurrences during follow-up, PET/CT has higher sensitivity than conventional imaging modalities, making it possible to monitor the whole body simultaneously. New techniques and radiotracers enhance the sensitivity and specificity of PET and this is why, despite relatively high costs, it might become more widespread in monitoring response to treatment and breast cancer recurrences. PMID:27647983

  15. The application of positron emission tomography (PET/CT) in diagnosis of breast cancer. Part II. Diagnosis after treatment initiation, future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jodłowska, Elżbieta; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Rewers, Amanda; Jarząbek, Grażyna; Kędzia, Witold; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Similarly to the applications described in the first part of this publication, positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) is also gaining importance in monitoring a tumour's response to therapy and diagnosing breast cancer recurrences. This is additionally caused by the fact that many new techniques (dual-time point imaging, positron emission tomography with magnetic resonance PET/MR, PET/CT mammography) and radiotracers (16α-18F-fluoro-17β-estradiol, 18F-fluorothymidine) are under investigation. The highest sensitivity and specificity when monitoring response to treatment is achieved when the PET/CT scan is made after one or two chemotherapy courses. Response to anti-hormonal treatment can also be monitored, also when new radiotracers, such as FES, are used. When monitoring breast cancer recurrences during follow-up, PET/CT has higher sensitivity than conventional imaging modalities, making it possible to monitor the whole body simultaneously. New techniques and radiotracers enhance the sensitivity and specificity of PET and this is why, despite relatively high costs, it might become more widespread in monitoring response to treatment and breast cancer recurrences.

  16. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  17. The impact of x-ray tube stabilization on localized radiation dose in axial CT scans: initial results in CTDI phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2016-10-01

    Rise, fall, and stabilization of the x-ray tube output occur immediately before and after data acquisition on some computed tomography (CT) scanners and are believed to contribute additional dose to anatomy facing the x-ray tube when it powers on or off. In this study, we characterized the dose penalty caused by additional radiation exposure during the rise, stabilization, and/or fall time (referred to as overscanning). A 32 cm CT dose-index (CTDI) phantom was scanned on three CT scanners: GE Healthcare LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare Discovery CT750 HD, and Siemens Somatom Definition Flash. Radiation exposure was detected for various x-ray tube start acquisition angles using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed in the peripheral chamber hole at the phantom’s 12 o’clock position. Scan rotation time, ionization chamber location, phantom diameter, and phantom centering were varied to quantify their effects on the dose penalty caused by overscanning. For 1 s single, axial rotations, CTDI at the 12 o’clock chamber position (CTDI100, 12:00) was 6.1%, 4.0%, and 4.4% higher when the start angle of the x-ray tube was aligned at the top of the gantry (12 o’clock) versus when the start angle was aligned at 9 o’clock for the Siemens Flash, GE CT750 HD, and GE VCT scanner, respectively. For the scanners’ fastest rotation times (0.285 s for the Siemens and 0.4 s for both GE scanners), the dose penalties increased to 22.3%, 10.7%, and 10.5%, respectively, suggesting a trade-off between rotation speed and the dose penalty from overscanning. In general, overscanning was shown to have a greater radiation dose impact for larger diameter phantoms, shorter rotation times, and to peripheral phantom locations. Future research is necessary to determine an appropriate method for incorporating the localized dose penalty from overscanning into standard dose metrics, as well as to assess the impact on organ dose.

  18. CT evaluation of intracholecystic bile

    SciTech Connect

    Rebner, M.; Ruggieri, P.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M.

    1985-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used to detect a variety of gallbladder abnormalities, but the accuracy of routine abdominal CT in evaluating intracholecystic bile has not been established. Forty-six patients were identified in whom abdominal CT and sonography were performed within 1 week of each other. Using sonographic results as the standard, sensitivity specificity, and accuracy of CT gallbladder evaluation were calculated; both initial CT interpretations and retrospective review of scans were used for this analysis. In the retrospective review, visual interpretation of gallbladder images and measurement of intracholecystic bile attenuation were analyzed. The most common cause of high-attenuation bile in the series was sludge, a cause not previously reported. It was concluded that intracholecystic bile is poorly evaluated on routine abdominal CT, particularly because of low sensitivity in disease detection.

  19. SU-E-T-287: Robustness Study of Passive-Scattering Proton Therapy in Lung: Is Range and Setup Uncertainty Calculation On the Initial CT Enough to Predict the Plan Robustness?

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X; Dormer, J; Kenton, O; Liu, H; Simone, C; Solberg, T; Lin, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Plan robustness of the passive-scattering proton therapy treatment of lung tumors has been studied previously using combined uncertainties of 3.5% in CT number and 3 mm geometric shifts. In this study, we investigate whether this method is sufficient to predict proton plan robustness by comparing to plans performed on weekly verification CT scans. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients treated with passive-scattering proton therapy were randomly selected. All plans were prescribed 6660cGy in 37 fractions. Each initial plan was calculated using +/− 3.5% range and +/− 0.3cm setup uncertainty in x, y and z directions in Eclipse TPS(Method-A). Throughout the treatment course, patients received weekly verification CT scans to assess the daily treatment variation(Method-B). After contours and imaging registrations are verified by the physician, the initial plan with the same beamline and compensator was mapped into the verification CT. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were evaluated for robustness study. Results: Differences are observed between method A and B in terms of iCTV coverage and lung dose. Method-A shows all the iCTV D95 are within +/− 1% difference, while 20% of cases fall outside +/−1% range in Method-B. In the worst case scenario(WCS), the iCTV D95 is reduced by 2.5%. All lung V5 and V20 are within +/−5% in Method-A while 15% of V5 and 10% of V20 fall outside of +/−5% in Method-B. In the WCS, Lung V5 increased by 15% and V20 increased by 9%. Method A and B show good agreement with regard to cord maximum and Esophagus mean dose. Conclusion: This study suggests that using range and setup uncertainty calculation (+/−3.5% and +/−3mm) may not be sufficient to predict the WCS. In the absence of regular verification scans, expanding the conventional uncertainty parameters(e.g., to +/−3.5% and +/−4mm) may be needed to better reflect plan actual robustness.

  20. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  1. Rotating and semi-stationary multi-beamline architecture study for cardiac CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiao; Fitzgerald, Paul; Gao, Hewei; Jin, Yannan; Wang, Ge; De Man, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Over the past decade, there has been abundant research on future cardiac CT architectures and corresponding reconstruction algorithms. Multiple cardiac CT concepts have been published, including third-generation single-source CT with wide-cone coverage, dual-source CT, and electron-beam CT, etc. In this paper, we apply a Radon space analysis method to two multi-beamline architectures: triple-source CT and semi-stationary ring-source CT. In our studies, we have considered more than thirty cardiac CT architectures and triple-source CT was identified as a promising solution, offering approximately a three-fold advantage in temporal resolution, which can significantly reduce motion artifacts due to the moving heart and lungs. In this work, we describe a triple-source CT architecture with all three beamlines (i.e. source-detector pairs) limited to the cardiac field of view in order to eliminate the radiation dose outside the cardiac region. We also demonstrate the capability of performing full field of view imaging when desired, by shifting the detectors. Ring-source dual-rotating-detector CT is another architecture of interest, which offers the opportunity to provide high temporal resolution using a full-ring stationary source. With this semi-stationary architecture, we found that the azimuthal blur effect can be greater than in a fully-rotating CT system. We therefore propose novel scanning modes to reduce the azimuthal blur in ring-source rotating detector CT. Radon space analysis method proves to be a useful method in CT system architecture study.

  2. Diagnostic Accuracy of Dual-Source Computerized Tomography Coronary Angiography in Symptomatic Patients Presenting to a Referral Cardiovascular Center During Daily Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Arash; Mohammadzadeh, Ali; Joodi, Golsa; Tabatabaei, Mohammad Reza; Sheikholeslami, Farhad; Motevalli, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background There are numerous studies that address the diagnostic value of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) as an alternative to conventional coronary angiography (CCA). However, the benefit of application of DSCT in a real world clinical setting should be evaluated. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of DSCT technique compared with CCA as the gold standard method in detection of coronary artery stenosis among symptomatic patients who are presented to a referral cardiovascular center during daily clinical practice. Patients and Methods Evaluating the medical records of a tertiary care referral cardiovascular center, 47 patients who had undergone DSCT and CCA, and also met the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the study were selected. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and likelihood ratios (LRs) of the DSCT imaging technique were calculated. Results In total, 97.8% of the segments (628/642) could be visualized with diagnostic image quality via DSCT coronary angiography. The mean heart rate during DSCT was 69.2 ± 12.2 bpm (range: 39 - 83 bpm), and the mean Agatston score was 507.7 ± 590.5 (range: 0 - 2328). Per segment analysis of the findings revealed that the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, positive LR (PLR) and negative LR (NLR) of DSCT technique for evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease were 93.7%, 96.8%, 92.7%, 97.2%, 29.4, and 0.066, respectively. Also per vessel, analysis of the findings showed a sensitivity of 97.1%, a specificity of 94.0%, PPV of 95.3%, NPV of 96.3%, PLR of 16.1, and NLR of 0.030. Conclusion Our results indicate that DSCT coronary angiography provides high diagnostic accuracy for the evaluation of CAD patients during daily routine practice of a referral cardiovascular setting.

  3. Diagnostic Value of Prospective Electrocardiogram-triggered Dual-source Computed Tomography Angiography for Infants and Children with Interrupted Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Ou; Wang, Xi-Ming; Nie, Pei; Ji, Xiao-Peng; Cheng, Zhao-Ping; Chen, Jiu-Hong; Xu, Zhuo-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate assessment of intra- as well as extra-cardiac malformations and radiation dosage concerns are especially crucial to infants and children with interrupted aortic arch (IAA). The purpose of this study is to investigate the value of prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) angiography with low-dosage techniques in the diagnosis of IAA. Methods: Thirteen patients with suspected IAA underwent prospective ECG-triggered DSCT scan and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Surgery was performed on all the patients. A five-point scale was used to assess image quality. The diagnostic accuracy of DSCT angiography and TTE was compared with the surgical findings as the reference standard. A nonparametric Chi-square test was used for comparative analysis. P <0.05 was considered as a significant difference. The mean effective radiation dose (ED) was calculated. Results: Diagnostic DSCT images were obtained for all the patients. Thirteen IAA cases with 60 separate cardiovascular anomalies were confirmed by surgical findings. The diagnostic accuracy of TTE and DSCT for total cardiovascular malformations was 93.7% and 97.9% (P > 0.05), and that for extra-cardiac vascular malformations was 92.3% and 99.0% (P < 0.05), respectively. The mean score of image quality was 3.77 ± 0.83. The mean ED was 0.30 ± 0.04 mSv (range from 0.23 mSv to 0.39 mSv). Conclusions: In infants and children with IAA, prospective ECG-triggered DSCT with low radiation exposure and high diagnostic efficiency has higher accuracy compared to TTE in detection of extra-cardiac vascular anomalies. PMID:25947401

  4. Dual-energy CT revisited with multidetector CT: review of principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Aktaş, Aykut

    2011-09-01

    Although dual-energy CT (DECT) was first conceived in the 1970s, it was not widely used for CT indications. Recently, the simultaneous acquisition of volumetric dual-energy data has been introduced using multidetector CT (MDCT) with two X-ray tubes and rapid kVp switching (gemstone spectral imaging). Two major advantages of DECT are material decomposition by acquiring two image series with different kVp and the elimination of misregistration artifacts. Hounsfield unit measurements by DECT are not absolute and can change depending on the kVp used for an acquisition. Typically, a combination of 80/140 kVp is used for DECT, but for some applications, 100/140 kVp is preferred. In this study, we summarized the clinical applications of DECT and included images that were acquired using the dual-source CT and rapid kVp switching. In general, unenhanced images can be avoided by using DECT for body and neurological applications; iodine can be removed from the image, and a virtual, non-contrast (water) image can be obtained. Neuroradiological applications allow for the removal of bone and calcium from the carotid and brain CT angiography. Thorax applications include perfusion imaging in patients with pulmonary thromboemboli and other chest diseases, xenon ventilation-perfusion imaging and solitary nodule characterization. Cardiac applications include dual-energy cardiac perfusion, viability and cardiac iron detection. The removal of calcific plaques from arteries, bone removal and aortic stent graft evaluation may be achieved in the vascular system. Abdominal applications include the detection and characterization of liver and pancreas masses, the diagnosis of steatosis and iron overload, DECT colonoscopy and CT cholangiography. Urinary system applications are urinary calculi characterization (uric acid vs. non-uric acid), renal cyst characterization and mass characterization. Musculoskeletal applications permit the differentiation of gout from pseudogout and a reduction of

  5. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; Haberland, Ulrike; Slump, Cees; Handayani, Astri; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; Stijnen, Marco; Klotz, Ernst; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR) pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0. Results. CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9–1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades. Conclusion. An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques. PMID:26185756

  6. CT scanner x-ray spectrum estimation from transmission measurements

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Wang, Jia; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In diagnostic CT imaging, multiple important applications depend on the knowledge of the x-ray spectrum, including Monte Carlo dose calculations and dual-energy material decomposition analysis. Due to the high photon flux involved, it is difficult to directly measure spectra from the x-ray tube of a CT scanner. One potential method for indirect measurement involves estimating the spectrum from transmission measurements. The expectation maximization (EM) method is an accurate and robust method to solve this problem. In this article, this method was evaluated in a commercial CT scanner. Methods: Two step-wedges (polycarbonate and aluminum) were used to produce different attenuation levels. Transmission measurements were performed on the scanner and the measured data from the scanner were exported to an external computer to calculate the spectra. The EM method was applied to solve the equations that represent the attenuation processes of polychromatic x-ray photons. Estimated spectra were compared to the spectra simulated using a software provided by the manufacturer of the scanner. To test the accuracy of the spectra, a verification experiment was performed using a phantom containing different depths of water. The measured transmission data were compared to the transmission values calculated using the estimated spectra. Results: Spectra of 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp from a dual-source CT scanner were estimated. The estimated and simulated spectra were well matched. The differences of mean energies were less than 1 keV. In the verification experiment, the measured and calculated transmission values were in excellent agreement. Conclusions: Spectrum estimation using transmission data and the EM method is a quantitatively accurate and robust technique to estimate the spectrum of a CT system. This method could benefit studies relying on accurate knowledge of the x-ray spectra from CT scanner. PMID:21452736

  7. Dual-source parallel radiofrequency excitation ACR phantom magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T: Assessment of the effect of image quality on high-contrast spatial resolution, percent signal ghosting, and low-contrast object detectability in comparison with conventional single-source transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung-Bae; Park, Yong-Sung; Choe, Bo-Young

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess dual-source parallel radiofrequency (RF) excitation American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3T compared with conventional single-source RF transmission and compared with the standard ACR MRI phantom test. We used a 3T MR scanner equipped with dual-source parallel RF excitation and an 8-channel head phased array coil. We employed T1- and T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) pulse sequences for an assessment of the impact of image quality on high-contrast spatial resolution, percent signal ghosting and low-contrast object detectability following the ACR MRI quality control (QC) manual. With geometric accuracy and identical slice locations, dual RFs using dual-source parallel RF excitation MR showed an advantage over single RF using dual-source parallel RF excitation MR and conventional MR in terms of high-contrast spatial resolution (p < 0.010), percent signal ghosting (p < 0.010), and low-contrast object detectability (p < 0.010). The quality of the image from the dual-source parallel RF excitation MR equipment was superior to that of the image from conventional MR equipment for the ACR phantom. We need to pursue dual-source parallel RF excitation MR studies involving various clinical cases.

  8. [Development of real-time CT fluoroscopy].

    PubMed

    Katada, K; Anno, H; Takeshita, G; Ogura, Y; Koga, S; Ida, Y; Nonomura, K; Kanno, T; Ohashi, A; Sata, S

    1994-10-25

    A new CT system that permits real-time monitoring of CT images was developed. Phantom and volunteer studies revealed that the images were displayed at a rate of six per second with a delay time of 0.83 second with clinically sufficient resolution (256 x 256) using the newly developed fast image processor and partial-reconstruction algorithm. The clinical trial of stereotactic aspiration of intracerebral hematoma was successful. The initial trial with CT fluoroscopy revealed potential usefulness of the system in biopsy and other CT-guided interventions. PMID:9261196

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen ... and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  10. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  11. Nonlinear registration of serial coronary CT angiography (CCTA) for assessment of changes in atherosclerotic plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Jonghye; Dey, Damini; Cheng, Victor Y.; Hong, Byung-Woo; Ramesh, Amit; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh; Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S.; Germano, Guido; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is a high-resolution three-dimensional imaging technique for the evaluation of coronary arteries in suspected or confirmed coronary artery disease (CAD). Coregistration of serial CCTA scans would allow precise superimposition of images obtained at two different points in time, which could aid in recognition of subtle changes and precise monitoring of coronary plaque progression or regression. To this end, the authors aimed at developing a fully automatic nonlinear volume coregistration for longitudinal CCTA scan pairs. Methods: The algorithm combines global displacement and local deformation using nonlinear volume coregistration with a volume-preserving constraint. Histogram matching of intensities between two serial scans is performed prior to nonlinear coregistration with dense nonparametric local deformation in which sum of squared differences is used as a similarity measure. The approximate segmentation of coronary arteries obtained from commercially available software provides initial anatomical landmarks for the coregistration algorithm that help localize and emphasize the structure of interest. To avoid possible bias caused by incorrect segmentation, the authors convolve the Gaussian kernel with the segmented binary coronary tree mask and define an extended weighted region of interest. A multiresolution approach is employed to represent coarse-to-fine details of both volumes and the energy function is optimized using a gradient descent method. The authors applied the algorithm in ten paired CCTA datasets (20 scans in total) obtained within 10.7{+-}5.7 months from each other on a dual source CT scanner to monitor progression of CAD. Results: Serial CCTA coregistration was successful in 9/10 cases as visually confirmed. The global displacement and local deformation of target registration error obtained from four anatomical landmarks were 2.22{+-}1.15 and 1.56{+-}0.74 mm, respectively, and the inverse consistency error of

  12. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Ge, G; Winkler, M; Cong, W; Wang, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose.

  13. Investigations on x-ray luminescence CT for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Stanton, I. N.; Johnston, S. M.; Johnson, G. A.; Therien, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray Luminescence CT (XLCT) is a hybrid imaging modality combining x-ray and optical imaging in which x-ray luminescent nanophosphors (NPs) are used as emissive imaging probes. NPs are easily excited using common CT energy x-ray beams, and the NP luminescence is efficiently collected using sensitive light-based detection systems. XLCT can be recognized as a close analog to fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT). However, XLCT has remarkable advantages over FDOT due to the substantial excitation penetration depths provided by x-rays relative to laser light sources, long-term photo-stability of NPs, and the ability to tune NP emission within the NIR spectral window. Since XCLT uses an x-ray pencil beam excitation, the emitted light can be measured and back-projected along the x-ray path during reconstruction, where the size of the x-ray pencil beam determines the resolution for XLCT. In addition, no background signal competes with NP luminescence (i.e., no auto fluorescence) in XLCT. Currently, no small animal XLCT system has been proposed or tested. This paper investigates an XLCT system built and integrated with a dual source micro-CT system. A novel sampling paradigms that results in more efficient scanning is proposed and tested via simulations. Our preliminary experimental results in phantoms indicate that a basic CT-like reconstruction is able to recover a map of the NP locations and differences in NP concentrations. With the proposed dual source system and faster scanning approaches, XLCT has the potential to revolutionize molecular imaging in preclinical studies.

  14. Quantification of Urinary Stone Composition in Mixed Stones Using Dual-Energy CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuai; Huang, Alice; Montoya, Juan; Duan, Xinhui; Williams, James C.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using dual-energy computed tomography to accurately quantify uric acid and non-uric-acid components in urinary stones having mixed composition. Materials and Methods A total of 24 urinary stones were analyzed with microCT to serve as the reference standard for uric acid and non-uric-acid composition. These stones were placed in water phantoms to simulate body attenuation of slim to obese adults and scanned on a third-generation dual-source scanner using dual-energy modes adaptively selected based on phantom size. CT number ratio, which is distinct for different materials, was calculated for each pixel of the stones. Each pixel was then classified as uric acid and non-uric-acid by comparing the CT number ratio with preset thresholds ranging from 1.1 to 1.7. Minimal, maximal and root-mean-square errors were calculated by comparing composition to the reference standard and the threshold with the minimal root-mean-square-error was determined. A paired t-test was performed to compare the stone composition determined with dual-energy CT with the reference standard obtained with microCT. Results The optimal CT number ratio threshold ranged from 1.27 to 1.55, dependent on phantom size. The root-mean-square error ranged from 9.60% to 12.87% across all phantom sizes. Minimal and maximal absolute error ranged from 0.04% to 1.24% and from 22.05% to 35.46%, respectively. Dual-energy CT and the reference microCT did not differ significantly on uric acid and non-uric-acid composition (P from 0.20 to 0.96, paired t-test). Conclusion Accurate quantification of uric acid and non-uric-acid composition in mixed stones is possible using dual-energy CT. PMID:27224260

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  16. Acute pancreatitis: prognostic value of CT

    SciTech Connect

    Balthazar, E.J.; Ranson, J.H.C.; Naidich, D.P.; Megibow, A.J.; Caccavale, R.; Cooper, M.M.

    1985-09-01

    In 83 patients with acute pancreatitis, the initial computed tomographic (CT) examinations were classified by degree of disease severity (grades A-E) and were correlated with the clinical follow-up, objective prognostic signs, and complications and death. The length of hospitalization correlated well with the severity of the initial CT findings. Abscesses occurred in 21.6% of the entire group, compared with 60.0% of grade E patients. Pleural effusions were also more common in grade E patients. Abscesses were seen in 80.0% of patients with six to eight prognostic signs, compared with 12.5% of those with zero to two. The use of prognostic signs with initial CT findings results in improved prognostic accuracy. Early CT examination of patients with acute pancreatitis is a useful prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality.

  17. 4D micro-CT using fast prospective gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaolian; Johnston, Samuel M.; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-01-01

    Micro-CT is currently used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. But, there is also significant interest in using this technology to obtain functional information. We report here a new sampling strategy for 4D micro-CT for functional cardiac and pulmonary imaging. Rapid scanning of free-breathing mice is achieved with fast prospective gating (FPG) implemented on a field programmable gate array. The method entails on-the-fly computation of delays from the R peaks of the ECG signals or the peaks of the respiratory signals for the triggering pulses. Projection images are acquired for all cardiac or respiratory phases at each angle before rotating to the next angle. FPG can deliver the faster scan time of retrospective gating (RG) with the regular angular distribution of conventional prospective gating for cardiac or respiratory gating. Simultaneous cardio-respiratory gating is also possible with FPG in a hybrid retrospective/prospective approach. We have performed phantom experiments to validate the new sampling protocol and compared the results from FPG and RG in cardiac imaging of a mouse. Additionally, we have evaluated the utility of incorporating respiratory information in 4D cardiac micro-CT studies with FPG. A dual-source micro-CT system was used for image acquisition with pulsed x-ray exposures (80 kVp, 100 mA, 10 ms). The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent containing 123 mg I ml-1 delivered via a tail vein catheter in a dose of 0.01 ml g-1 body weight. The phantom experiment demonstrates that FPG can distinguish the successive phases of phantom motion with minimal motion blur, and the animal study demonstrates that respiratory FPG can distinguish inspiration and expiration. 4D cardiac micro-CT imaging with FPG provides image quality superior to RG at an isotropic voxel size of 88 µm and 10 ms temporal resolution. The acquisition time for either sampling approach is less than 5 min. The

  18. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  19. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  20. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  1. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  2. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Yang, Jie

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT.

  3. TU-F-18A-09: CT Number Stability Across Patient Sizes Using Virtual-Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, G; Grimes, J; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C; Halaweish, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Virtual-monoenergetic imaging uses dual-energy CT data to synthesize images corresponding to a single photon energy, thereby reducing beam-hardening artifacts. This work evaluated the ability of a commercial virtual-monoenergetic algorithm to achieve stable CT numbers across patient sizes. Methods: Test objects containing a range of iodine and calcium hydroxyapatite concentrations were placed inside 8 torso-shaped water phantoms, ranging in lateral width from 15 to 50 cm, and scanned on a dual-source CT system (Siemens Somatom Force). Single-energy scans were acquired from 70-150 kV in 10 kV increments; dual-energy scans were acquired using 4 energy pairs (low energy: 70, 80, 90, and 100 kV; high energy: 150 kV + 0.6 mm Sn). CTDIvol was matched for all single- and dual-energy scans for a given phantom size. All scans used 128×0.6 mm collimation and were reconstructed with 1-mm thickness at 0.8-mm increment and a medium smooth body kernel. Monoenergetic images were generated using commercial software (syngo Via Dual Energy, VA30). Iodine contrast was calculated as the difference in mean iodine and water CT numbers from respective regions-of-interest in 10 consecutive images. Results: CT numbers remained stable as phantom width varied from 15 to 50 cm for all dual-energy data sets (except for at 50 cm using 70/150Sn due to photon starvation effects). Relative to the 15 cm phantom, iodine contrast was within 5.2% of the 70 keV value for phantom sizes up to 45 cm. At 90/150Sn, photon starvation did not occur at 50 cm, and iodine contrast in the 50-cm phantom was within 1.4% of the 15-cm phantom. Conclusion: Monoenergetic imaging, as implemented in the evaluated commercial system, eliminated the variation in CT numbers due to patient size, and may provide more accurate data for quantitative tasks, including radiation therapy treatment planning. Siemens Healthcare.

  4. Future generation CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Walter, Deborah; De Man, Bruno; Iatrou, Maria; Edic, Peter M

    2004-02-01

    X-ray CT technology has been available for more than 30 years, yet continued technological advances have kept CT imaging at the forefront of medical imaging innovation. Consequently, the number of clinical CT applications has increased steadily. Other imaging modalities might be superior to CT imaging for some specific applications, but no other single modality is more often used in chest imaging today. Future technological developments in the area of high-resolution detectors, high-capacity x-ray tubes, advanced reconstruction algorithms, and improved visualization techniques will continue to expand the imaging capability. Future CT imaging technology will combine improved imaging capability with advanced and specific computer-assisted tools, which will expand the usefulness of CT imaging in many areas.

  5. PET/CT artifacts.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Todd M; Mehta, Ajeet S; Mehta, Amar S; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in positron emission tomography/computed tomographic (PET/CT) imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for AC. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.

  6. Esophageal carcinoma: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Quint, L.E.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.; Gross, B.H.

    1985-04-01

    Preoperative CT scans of 33 patients with esophageal cancer were reviewed to assess staging accuracy and define the role of CT in patients being considered for transhiatal blunt esophagectomy. Surgical and pathological verification was obtained in all cases. Only 13 tumors were staged correctly according to the TNM classification. In addition, CT was not useful in assessing resectability because of its low accuracy in evaluating aortic invasion and the fact that few patients had tracheobronchial or aortic invasion or hepatic metastases at presentation.

  7. Attenuation-based estimation of patient size for the purpose of size specific dose estimation in CT. Part II. Implementation on abdomen and thorax phantoms using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jia; Christner, Jodie A.; Duan Xinhui; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To estimate attenuation using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph (SPR) images in a series of thorax and abdomen phantoms. Methods: Attenuation was quantified in terms of a water cylinder with cross sectional area of A{sub w} from both the CT and SPR images of abdomen and thorax phantoms, where A{sub w} is the area of a water cylinder that would absorb the same dose as the specified phantom. SPR and axial CT images were acquired using a dual-source CT scanner operated at 120 kV in single-source mode. To use the SPR image for estimating A{sub w}, the pixel values of a SPR image were calibrated to physical water attenuation using a series of water phantoms. A{sub w} and the corresponding diameter D{sub w} were calculated using the derived attenuation-based methods (from either CT or SPR image). A{sub w} was also calculated using only geometrical dimensions of the phantoms (anterior-posterior and lateral dimensions or cross sectional area). Results: For abdomen phantoms, the geometry-based and attenuation-based methods gave similar results for D{sub w}. Using only geometric parameters, an overestimation of D{sub w} ranging from 4.3% to 21.5% was found for thorax phantoms. Results for D{sub w} using the CT image and SPR based methods agreed with each other within 4% on average in both thorax and abdomen phantoms. Conclusions: Either the cross sectional CT or SPR images can be used to estimate patient attenuation in CT. Both are more accurate than use of only geometrical information for the task of quantifying patient attenuation. The SPR based method requires calibration of SPR pixel values to physical water attenuation and this calibration would be best performed by the scanner manufacturer.

  8. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT of head and neck tumors: perfusion measurements using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetic model. Initial results and comparison with deconvolution-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Konstantinou, George N.; Sherng Lee, Puor; Thng, Choon Hua; Wagenblast, Jens; Baghi, Mehran; San Koh, Tong

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a two-compartment distributed-parameter (DP) tracer kinetic model to generate functional images of several physiologic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced CT data obtained of patients with extracranial head and neck tumors and to compare the DP functional images to those obtained by deconvolution-based DCE-CT data analysis. We performed post-processing of DCE-CT studies, obtained from 15 patients with benign and malignant head and neck cancer. We introduced a DP model of the impulse residue function for a capillary-tissue exchange unit, which accounts for the processes of convective transport and capillary-tissue exchange. The calculated parametric maps represented blood flow (F), intravascular blood volume (v1), extravascular extracellular blood volume (v2), vascular transit time (t1), permeability-surface area product (PS), transfer ratios k12 and k21, and the fraction of extracted tracer (E). Based on the same regions of interest (ROI) analysis, we calculated the tumor blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) by using a modified deconvolution-based analysis taking into account the extravasation of the contrast agent for PS imaging. We compared the corresponding values by using Bland-Altman plot analysis. We outlined 73 ROIs including tumor sites, lymph nodes and normal tissue. The Bland-Altman plot analysis revealed that the two methods showed an accepted degree of agreement for blood flow, and, thus, can be used interchangeably for measuring this parameter. Slightly worse agreement was observed between v1 in the DP model and BV but even here the two tracer kinetic analyses can be used interchangeably. Under consideration of whether both techniques may be used interchangeably was the case of t1 and MTT, as well as for measurements of the PS values. The application of the proposed DP model is feasible in the clinical routine and it can be used interchangeably for measuring

  10. Cryptosporidiosis of the gastric antrum: Detection using CT

    SciTech Connect

    Soulen, M.C.; Fishman, E.K.; Scatarige, J.C.; Hutchins, D.; Zerhouni, E.

    1986-06-01

    The authors describe a patient who had cryptosporidiosis and cytomegalo-virus infection of the gastric antrum that was initially detected on computed tomography (CT) scans. CT may be useful in the evaluation of immunocompromised patients with diarrheal illness, as well as in the assessment of the gastrointestinal tract.

  11. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls.

  12. Segmentation-free empirical beam hardening correction for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schüller, Sören; Sawall, Stefan; Stannigel, Kai; Hülsbusch, Markus; Ulrici, Johannes; Hell, Erich; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2015-02-15

    proposed algorithm to be segmentation-free (sf). This deformation leads to a nonlinear accentuation of higher CT-values. The original volume and the gray value deformed volume are monochromatically forward projected. The two projection sets are then monomially combined and reconstructed to generate sets of basis volumes which are used for correction. This is done by maximization of the image flatness due to adding additionally a weighted sum of these basis images. sfEBHC is evaluated on polychromatic simulations, phantom measurements, and patient data. The raw data sets were acquired by a dual source spiral CT scanner, a digital volume tomograph, and a dual source micro CT. Different phantom and patient data were used to illustrate the performance and wide range of usability of sfEBHC across different scanning scenarios. The artifact correction capabilities are compared to EBHC. Results: All investigated cases show equal or improved image quality compared to the standard EBHC approach. The artifact correction is capable of correcting beam hardening artifacts for different scan parameters and scan scenarios. Conclusions: sfEBHC generates beam hardening-reduced images and is furthermore capable of dealing with images which are affected by high noise and strong artifacts. The algorithm can be used to recover structures which are hardly visible inside the beam hardening-affected regions.

  13. Effect of nitrogen flow rate on structural, morphological and optical properties of In-rich InxAl1-xN thin films grown by plasma-assisted dual source reactive evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, M.; Ganesh, V.; Goh, B. T.; Dee, C. F.; Mohmad, A. R.; Rahman, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    In-rich InxAl1-xN thin films were deposited on quartz substrate at various nitrogen flow rates by plasma-assisted dual source reactive evaporation technique. The elemental composition, surface morphology, structural and optical properties of the films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis spectrophotometer and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. XPS results revealed that the indium composition (x) of the InxAl1-xN films increases from 0.90 to 0.97 as the nitrogen flow rate is increased from 40 to 100 sccm, respectively. FESEM images of the surface and cross-sectional microstructure of the InxAl1-xN films showed that by increasing the N2 flow rate, the grown particles are highly agglomerated. Raman and XRD results indicated that by increasing nitrogen flow rate the In-rich InxAl1-xN films tend to turn into amorphous state. It was found that band gap energy of the films are in the range of 0.90-1.17 eV which is desirable for the application of full spectra solar cells.

  14. To CT or not to CT? The influence of computed tomography on the diagnosis of appendicitis in obese pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Haven; Burbridge, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background Appendicitis is a common pediatric query. However, obesity often results in nondiagnostic ultrasounds and increased likelihood of abdominal computed tomography (CT). Concern regarding radiation exposure led the Canadian Association of Radiologists to recommend foregoing CT when ultrasounds are nondiagnostic and clinical suspicion is high. We evaluated this recommendation by quantifying the influence of CT on the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis. Methods We performed a 2-year retrospective case series of children presenting with suspected appendicitis. We stratified patients by weight (obese v. nonobese) and pediatric appendicitis score (PAS) and examined how often they received abdominal CT, why they received it, and its influence on diagnosis. Results Of 223 patients (84 obese, 139 nonobese), 54 received CT. Obese patients received CTs more frequently than nonobese patients (29% v. 22%). The most common reason for CT was a nondiagnostic ultrasound (75% in obese, 80% in nonobese patients). Sixty-five percent of CTs obtained after nondiagnostic ultrasounds confirmed the initial diagnosis, but the rates were 80% and 50%, respectively, when only obese and only nonobese patients were considered. Obese patients were 4 times more likely to have a CT confirming their initial appendicitis diagnosis. Conclusion Because obese patients are more likely than nonobese patients to have a CT that confirms appendicitis, when treating an obese pediatric patient with suspected appendicitis and a nondiagnostic ultrasound, surgeons with a high clinical suspicion should strongly consider foregoing CT and proceeding with treatment. PMID:26011850

  15. Predictive value of low tube voltage and dual-energy CT for successful shock wave lithotripsy: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Largo, Remo; Stolzmann, Paul; Fankhauser, Christian D; Poyet, Cédric; Wolfsgruber, Pirmin; Sulser, Tullio; Alkadhi, Hatem; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the capabilities of low tube voltage computed tomography (CT) and dual-energy CT (DECT) for predicting successful shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) of urinary stones in vitro. A total of 33 urinary calculi (six different chemical compositions; mean size 6 ± 3 mm) were scanned using a dual-source CT machine with single- (120 kVp) and dual-energy settings (80/150, 100/150 Sn kVp) resulting in six different datasets. The attenuation (Hounsfield Units) of calculi was measured on single-energy CT images and the dual-energy indices (DEIs) were calculated from DECT acquisitions. Calculi underwent SWL and the number of shock waves for successful disintegration was recorded. The prediction of required shock waves regarding stone attenuation/DEI was calculated using regression analysis (adjusted for stone size and composition) and the correlation between CT attenuation/DEI and the number of shock waves was assessed for all datasets. The median number of shock waves for successful stone disintegration was 72 (interquartile range 30-361). CT attenuation/DEI of stones was a significant, independent predictor (P < 0.01) for the number of required shock waves with the best prediction at 80 kVp (β estimate 0.576) (P < 0.05). Correlation coefficients between attenuation/DEI and the number of required shock waves ranged between ρ = 0.31 and 0.68 showing the best correlation at 80 kVp (P < 0.001). The attenuation of urinary stones at low tube voltage CT is the best predictor for successful stone disintegration, being independent of stone composition and size. DECT shows no added value for predicting the success of SWL.

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses About ...

  18. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... creates detailed pictures of the body, including the pelvis and areas near the pelvis. The test may ...

  19. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... on film. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the leg can be created by adding the slices together. ...

  20. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the colon using a hand-held squeeze bulb. Sometimes an electronic pump is used to deliver ... When you enter the CT scanner room, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  1. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  2. Thin-Section CT Characteristics and Longitudinal CT Follow-up of Chemotherapy Induced Interstitial Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Na; Kim, Mi Young; Koo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Jae Cheol; Song, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of chemotherapy-induced interstitial pneumonitis (CIIP) with longitudinal follow-up. The study was approved by the local ethics committee. One hundred consecutive patients with CIIP between May 2005 and March 2015 were retrospectively enrolled. The initial CT was reviewed by 2 independent chest radiologists and categorized into 1 of 4 CT patterns in accordance with the 2013 guidelines for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia: nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), organizing pneumonia (OP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) mimicking desquamative interstitial pneumonitis, and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). We assessed semiquantitative analysis on a 5% scale to assess the extent of parenchymal abnormalities (emphysema, reticulation, ground-glass opacity, consolidation, honeycombing cyst) and their distribution on initial (n = 100), subsequent (n = 87), and second follow-up CT (n = 48). Interval changes in extent on follow-up CT were compared using paired t test. The clinic-radiologic factors were compared between Group 1 (NSIP and OP patterns) and Group 2 (HP and DAD patterns) using χ2 and independent t tests. The most common pattern of CIIP on the initial CT was HP (51%), followed by NSIP (23%), OP (20%), and DAD (6%). Diffuse ground-glass opacity was the most common pulmonary abnormality. The predominant distribution was bilateral (99%) and symmetric (82%), with no craniocaudal (60%) or axial (79%) dominance. Subsequent and second follow-up CTs showed decreased extent of total pulmonary abnormalities (P < 0.001, respectively). In comparison with Group 1 CIIP, Group 2 CIIP was more likely to be caused by molecularly targeted drugs (P = 0.030), appeared earlier (P = 0.034), and underwent more complete resolution (P < 0.001). Use of a CT pattern–recognition approach to CIIP is appropriate and practical in interpreting radiological findings. PMID:26765442

  3. Automatic initialization for 3D bone registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Pezhman; Taylor, Russell H.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2008-03-01

    In image-guided bone surgery, sample points collected from the surface of the bone are registered to the preoperative CT model using well-known registration methods such as Iterative Closest Point (ICP). These techniques are generally very sensitive to the initial alignment of the datasets. Poor initialization significantly increases the chances of getting trapped local minima. In order to reduce the risk of local minima, the registration is manually initialized by locating the sample points close to the corresponding points on the CT model. In this paper, we present an automatic initialization method that aligns the sample points collected from the surface of pelvis with CT model of the pelvis. The main idea is to exploit a mean shape of pelvis created from a large number of CT scans as the prior knowledge to guide the initial alignment. The mean shape is constant for all registrations and facilitates the inclusion of application-specific information into the registration process. The CT model is first aligned with the mean shape using the bilateral symmetry of the pelvis and the similarity of multiple projections. The surface points collected using ultrasound are then aligned with the pelvis mean shape. This will, in turn, lead to initial alignment of the sample points with the CT model. The experiments using a dry pelvis and two cadavers show that the method can align the randomly dislocated datasets close enough for successful registration. The standard ICP has been used for final registration of datasets.

  4. Composite Synthesis Methodology Development: Nanocrvstalline SiC and Ti3SiC2 Alloys for Reactory Materials – Outline of initial synthesis capabilities M4CT-13PN0405034

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Shin, Yongsoon; Jiang, Weilin; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-03-29

    We have identified three initial preceramic polymers to help produce the SiC-based alloys for this project and have developed simple processing steps to make SiC-based alloy ceramics. The use of unfilled SMP-10 (Polycarbosilane) or SMP-877 (Methyl-Polycarbosilane) is not feasible due to the large mass losses that occur during pyrolysis. The pre-gelling steps below save time when those two polymers are filled with powders. The use of SL-MS30 provides us with a SiC-filled polymer that can be used to test out the CNT mats without further complications due to other powders.

  5. Initiation and propagation of complex 3D networks of cracks in heterogeneous quasi-brittle materials: Direct comparison between in situ testing-microCT experiments and phase field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Yvonnet, J.; Bornert, M.; Chateau, C.

    2016-10-01

    We provide the first direct comparisons, to our knowledge, of complex 3D micro cracking initiation and propagation in heterogeneous quasi-brittle materials modelled by the phase field numerical method and observed in X-ray microtomography images recorded during in situ mechanical testing. Some material parameters of the damage model, including the process zone (internal) length, are identified by an inverse approach combining experimental data and 3D simulations. A new technique is developed to study the micro cracking at a finer scale by prescribing the local displacements measured by digital volume correlation over the boundary of a small sub-volume inside the sample during the numerical simulations. The comparisons, performed on several samples of lightweight plaster and concrete, show a remarkable quantitative agreement between the 3D crack morphology obtained by the model and by the experiments, without any a priori knowledge about the location of the initiation of the cracks in the numerical model. The results indicate that the crack paths can be predicted in a fully deterministic way in spite of the highly random geometry of the microstructure and the brittle nature of its constituents.

  6. Phantom based evaluation of CT to CBCT image registration for proton therapy dose recalculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Dedes, George; Zöllner, Christoph; Handrack, Josefine; Janssens, Guillaume; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Reiner, Michael; Paganelli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Kamp, Florian; Söhn, Matthias; Wilkens, Jan J.; Baroni, Guido; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perform dose recalculation on the anatomy of the day is important in the context of adaptive proton therapy. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of deformable image registration (DIR) and cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging to generate the daily stopping power distribution of the patient. We investigated the deformation of the planning CT scan (pCT) onto daily CBCT images to generate a virtual CT (vCT) using a deformable phantom designed for the head and neck (H & N) region. The phantom was imaged at a planning CT scanner in planning configuration, yielding a pCT and in deformed, treatment day configuration, yielding a reference CT (refCT). The treatment day configuration was additionally scanned at a CBCT scanner. A Morphons DIR algorithm was used to generate a vCT. The accuracy of the vCT was evaluated by comparison to the refCT in terms of corresponding features as identified by an adaptive scale invariant feature transform (aSIFT) algorithm. Additionally, the vCT CT numbers were compared to those of the refCT using both profiles and regions of interest and the volumes and overlap (DICE coefficients) of various phantom structures were compared. The water equivalent thickness (WET) of the vCT, refCT and pCT were also compared to evaluate proton range differences. Proton dose distributions from the same initial fluence were calculated on the refCT, vCT and pCT and compared in terms of proton range. The method was tested on a clinical dataset using a replanning CT scan acquired close in time to a CBCT scan as reference using the WET evaluation. Results from the aSIFT investigation suggest a deformation accuracy of 2-3 mm. The use of the Morphon algorithm did not distort CT number intensity in uniform regions and WET differences between vCT and refCT were of the order of 2% of the proton range. This result was confirmed by proton dose calculations. The patient results were consistent with phantom observations. In conclusion, our phantom

  7. CT findings in ulcerative, granulomatous, and indeterminate colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, R.M.; Marn, C.S.; Kirby, D.F.; Vogelzang, R.L.; Neiman, H.L.

    1984-08-01

    Eight patients with ulcerative colitis, three with colitis indeterminate, and 15 patients with Crohn disease were studied by computed tomography (CT) to establish CT criteria for each disorder in hopes of providing a new diagnostic perspective useful in the radiographic evaluation of inflammatory colitis. The CT findings in ulcerative colitis included thickening of the colon wall, which was characterized by inhomogeneous attenuation and a target appearance of the rectum, and proliferation of perirectal fat. Bowel wall thickening with homogeneous attenuation, fistula and abscess formation, and mesenteric abnormalities were observed in patients with Crohn colitis. Patients with colitis indeterminate showed colonic changes on CT observed in both disorders. Initial experience suggests that CT can differentiate patients with well established ulcerative and Crohn colitis.

  8. Pyogenic myositis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Butler, G.J.; Maguire, J.H.; Nagel, J.S.

    1988-11-01

    Computed tomography and gallium scintigraphy uncovered clinically occult muscle infection in eight patients. The CT findings included enlargement of the muscle, effacement of the intramuscular fat planes, fluid density, rim enhancement, and involvement of the underlying bone. Computed tomography suggested the diagnosis in seven of eight cases. Gallium scintigraphy was positive in all seven cases in which it was performed.

  9. Seventh-generation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new dual-drum CT system architecture has been recently introduced with the potential to achieve significantly higher temporal resolution than is currently possible in medical imaging CT. The concept relies only on known technologies; in particular rotation speeds several times higher than what is possible today could be achieved leveraging typical x-ray tube designs and capabilities. However, the architecture lends itself to the development of a new arrangement of x-ray sources in a toroidal vacuum envelope containing a rotating cathode ring and a (optionally rotating) shared anode ring to potentially obtain increased individual beam power as well as increase total exposure per rotation. The new x-ray source sub-system design builds on previously described concepts and could make the provision of multiple conventional high-power cathodes in a CT system practical by distributing the anode target between the cathodes. In particular, relying on known magnetic-levitation technologies, it is in principle possible to more than double the relative speed of the electron-beam with respect to the target, thus potentially leading to significant individual beam power increases as compared to today's state-of-the-art. In one embodiment, the proposed design can be naturally leveraged by the dual-drum CT concept previously described to alleviate the problem of arranging a number of conventional rotating anode-stem x-ray tubes and power conditioners on the limited space of a CT gantry. In another embodiment, a system with three cathodes is suggested leveraging the architecture previously proposed by Franke.

  10. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M.; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F.; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  11. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  12. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-02-21

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  13. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-02-21

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  14. Threshold adjusted calcium scoring using CT is less susceptible to cardiac motion and more accurate.

    PubMed

    Groen, J M; Dijkstra, H; Greuter, M J W; Oudkerk, M

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate calcium scoring on computed tomography (CT) using an adjusted threshold depending on the maximum Hounsfield value within the calcification (HU(peak)). The volume of 19 calcifications was retrospectively determined on 64-slice multidetector CT and dual source CT (DSCT) at different thresholds and the threshold associated with the physical volume was determined. In addition, approximately 10 000 computer simulations were done simulating the same process for calcifications with mixed density. Using these data a relation between the HU(peak) and the threshold could be established. Hereafter, this relation was assessed by scanning six calcifications in a phantom at 40-110 beats per minute using DSCT. The influence of motion was determined and the measured calcium scores were compared to the physical volumes and mass. A positive linear correlation was found between the scoring threshold and the HU(peak) of the calcifications both for the phantom measurements as for the computer simulations. Using this relation the individual threshold for each calcification could be calculated. Calcium scores of the moving calcifications determined with an adjusted threshold were approximately 30% less susceptible to cardiac motion compared to standard calcium scoring. Furthermore, these scores approximated the physical volume and mass at least 10% better than the standard calcium scores. The threshold in calcium scoring should be adjusted for each individual calcification based on the HU(peak) of the calcification. Calcium scoring using an adjusted threshold is less susceptible to cardiac motion and more accurate compared to the physical values. PMID:19291982

  15. Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and

  16. Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and

  17. Pulmonary nodule follow-up: be careful with volumetry between contrast enhanced and unenhanced CT

    PubMed Central

    Bülbül, Metin; de Jong, Pim A.

    2016-01-01

    Incident pulmonary nodules are a frequent finding on chest computed tomography (CT) of the lungs requiring follow-up. This case illustrates the importance of taking differences in CT scanning techniques (contrast versus non-contrast enhanced) into account. Comparing nodule size on unenhanced follow-up CT’s with initial contrast-enhanced CT may consequently underestimate growth and mask malignant growth rates as demonstrated by our case report.

  18. Pleuropulmonary and abdominal paragonimiasis: CT and ultrasound findings

    PubMed Central

    Shim, S S; Kim, Y; Lee, J K; Lee, J H; Song, D E

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to review radiological images of patients with Paragonimus westermani (PW) that simultaneously involved the chest and abdomen. Methods Our study included four patients with serologically and histopathologically confirmed paragonimiasis. Abdomen CT (n=3) and chest CT (n=3) scans were available, and abdominal wall ultrasonography was performed in all patients. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical, radiological and histopathological findings of these patients. Results The most common abdominal CT findings were ascites and intraperitoneal or abdominal wall nodules. Low-attenuated serpentine lesions of the liver were another common and relatively specific feature. Conclusion Radiologists should consider the possibility of PW when these abdominal CT findings are noted, especially with pleural effusion or subpleural nodules in patients with initial abdominal symptoms. PMID:22457403

  19. 1236 C/T and 3435 C/T polymorphisms of the ABCB1 gene in Mexican breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Rubio, S A; Quintero-Ramos, A; Durán-Cárdenas, A; Franco-Topete, R A; Castro-Cervantes, J M; Oceguera-Villanueva, A; Jiménez-Pérez, L M; Balderas-Peña, L M A; Morgan-Villela, G; Del-Toro-Arreola, A; Daneri-Navarro, A

    2015-02-13

    MDR1, which is encoded by the ABCB1 gene, is involved in multidrug resistance (hydrophobic), as well as the elimination of xenotoxic agents. The association between ABCB1 gene polymorphisms and breast cancer risk in different populations has been described previously; however, the results have been inconclusive. In this study, we examined the association between polymorphisms 3435 C/T and 1236 C/T in the ABCB1 gene and breast cancer development in Mexican women according to their menopausal status and molecular classification. Molecular subtypes as well as allele and genotype frequencies were analyzed. A total of 248 women with initial breast cancer diagnosis and 180 ethnically matched, healthy, unrelated individuals were enrolled. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was performed to detect polymorphisms 3435 C/T and 1236 C/T in the ABCB1 gene. Premenopausal T allele carriers of the 3435 C/T polymorphism showed a 2-fold increased risk of breast cancer with respect to the reference and postmenopausal groups, as well as triple-negative expression regarding the luminal A/B molecular subrogated subtypes. In contrast, the CT genotype of the 1236 polymorphism was a protective factor against breast cancer. We conclude that the T allele carrier of the 3435 C/T polymorphism in the ABCB1 gene in combination with an estrogen receptor-negative status may be an important risk factor for breast cancer development in premenopausal women.

  20. Research Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    This page provides detailed information about currently funded RFA initiatives both led by DCCPS, and those led by other NIH Institutes and Centers (I/Cs) that include DCCPS as a partner. Each initiative includes a table of funded grants and a map that shows the location of funded institutions.

  1. Technical Note: Relation between dual-energy subtraction of CT images for electron density calibration and virtual monochromatic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: For accurate tissue inhomogeneity correction in radiotherapy treatment planning, the author previously proposed a simple conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide ρ{sub e} range. The purpose of the present study was to reveal the relation between the ΔHU image for ρ{sub e} calibration and a virtually monochromatic CT image by performing numerical analyses based on the basis material decomposition in dual-energy CT. Methods: The author determined the weighting factor, α{sub 0}, of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion through numerical analyses of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report-46 human body tissues using their attenuation coefficients and given ρ{sub e} values. Another weighting factor, α(E), for synthesizing a virtual monochromatic CT image from high- and low-kV CT images, was also calculated in the energy range of 0.03 < E < 5 MeV, assuming that cortical bone and water were the basis materials. The mass attenuation coefficients for these materials were obtained using the XCOM photon cross sections database. The effective x-ray energies used to calculate the attenuation were chosen to imitate a dual-source CT scanner operated at 80–140 and 100–140 kV/Sn. Results: The determined α{sub 0} values were 0.455 for 80–140 kV/Sn and 0.743 for 100–140 kV/Sn. These values coincided almost perfectly with the respective maximal points of the calculated α(E) curves located at approximately 1 MeV, in which the photon-matter interaction in human body tissues is exclusively the incoherent (Compton) scattering. Conclusions: The ΔHU image could be regarded substantially as a CT image acquired with monoenergetic 1-MeV photons, which provides a linear relationship between CT numbers and electron densities.

  2. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  3. Chronic osteomyelitis examined by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Helms, C.A.; Trafton, P.

    1985-01-01

    CT examination of 25 patients who had acute exacerbations of chronic osteomyelitis allowed for the correct identification of single or multiple sequestra in 14 surgical patients. Plain radiographs were equivocal for sequestra in seven of these patients, because the sequestra were too small or because diffuse bony sclerosis was present. CT also demonstrated a foreign body and five soft tissue abscesses not suspected on the basis of plain radiographs. CT studies, which helped guide the operative approach, were also useful in treating those patients whose plain radiographs were positive for sequestra. The authors review the potential role of CT in evaluating patients with chronic osteomyelitis.

  4. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 06: Canada's National Computed Tomography (CT) Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Wardlaw, GM; Martel, N; Blackler, W; Asselin, J-F

    2014-08-15

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in medical imaging is reflected in its' increased use and availability since the early 1990's; however, given CT's relatively larger exposures (vs. planar x-ray) greater care must be taken to ensure that CT procedures are optimised in terms of providing the smallest dose possible while maintaining sufficient diagnostic image quality. The development of CT Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) supports this process. DRLs have been suggested/supported by international/national bodies since the early 1990's and widely adopted elsewhere, but not on a national basis in Canada. Essentially, CT DRLs provide guidance on what is considered good practice for common CT exams, but require a representative sample of CT examination data to make any recommendations. Canada's National CT Survey project, in collaboration with provincial/territorial authorities, has collected a large national sample of CT practice data for 7 common examinations (with associated clinical indications) of both adult and pediatric patients. Following completion of data entry into a common database, a survey summary report and recommendations will be made on CT DRLs from this data. It is hoped that these can then be used by local regions to promote CT practice optimisation and support any dose reduction initiatives.

  5. CT Chest with IV Contrast Compared with CT Angiography after Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Zaw, Andrea A; Stewart, Donovan; Murry, Jason S; Hoang, David M; Sun, Beatrice; Ashrafian, Sogol; Hotz, Heidi; Chung, Rex; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2015-10-01

    Blunt aortic injury (BAI) after chest trauma is a potentially lethal condition that requires rapid diagnosis for appropriate treatment. We compared CT with IV contrast (CTI) with CT with angiography (CTA) during the initial phase of care at an urban Level I trauma center from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Overall, 281 patients met inclusion criteria with 167 (59%) CTI and 114 (41%) CTA. There were no differences between cohorts in age, gender, initial heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and Glasgow Coma Scale. Mortality rates were similar for CTI and CTA (4% vs 8%, P = 0.20). CTI identified any chest injury in 54 per cent of patients compared with 46 per cent with CTA (P = 0.05). The rate of BAI was similar with CTI and CTA (2% vs 2%, P = 0.80), and neither modality was falsely negative. We conclude that CTI and CTA are similar at evaluating trauma patients for BAI, although CTI may be preferable during the initial assessment phase because the contrast injection may be combined with abdominal scanning and image time is reduced when whole-body CT is required. PMID:26463312

  6. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  7. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; Walsum, Theo van

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  8. Thin-Section CT Characteristics and Longitudinal CT Follow-up of Chemotherapy Induced Interstitial Pneumonitis: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Na; Kim, Mi Young; Koo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Jae Cheol; Song, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of chemotherapy-induced interstitial pneumonitis (CIIP) with longitudinal follow-up.The study was approved by the local ethics committee. One hundred consecutive patients with CIIP between May 2005 and March 2015 were retrospectively enrolled. The initial CT was reviewed by 2 independent chest radiologists and categorized into 1 of 4 CT patterns in accordance with the 2013 guidelines for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia: nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), organizing pneumonia (OP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) mimicking desquamative interstitial pneumonitis, and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). We assessed semiquantitative analysis on a 5% scale to assess the extent of parenchymal abnormalities (emphysema, reticulation, ground-glass opacity, consolidation, honeycombing cyst) and their distribution on initial (n = 100), subsequent (n = 87), and second follow-up CT (n = 48). Interval changes in extent on follow-up CT were compared using paired t test. The clinic-radiologic factors were compared between Group 1 (NSIP and OP patterns) and Group 2 (HP and DAD patterns) using χ and independent t tests.The most common pattern of CIIP on the initial CT was HP (51%), followed by NSIP (23%), OP (20%), and DAD (6%). Diffuse ground-glass opacity was the most common pulmonary abnormality. The predominant distribution was bilateral (99%) and symmetric (82%), with no craniocaudal (60%) or axial (79%) dominance. Subsequent and second follow-up CTs showed decreased extent of total pulmonary abnormalities (P < 0.001, respectively). In comparison with Group 1 CIIP, Group 2 CIIP was more likely to be caused by molecularly targeted drugs (P = 0.030), appeared earlier (P = 0.034), and underwent more complete resolution (P < 0.001). Use of a CT pattern-recognition approach to CIIP is appropriate and practical in interpreting radiological findings. PMID:26765442

  9. 4D micro-CT for cardiac and perfusion applications with view under sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, Cristian T.; Johnston, Samuel M.; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G. Allan

    2011-06-01

    Micro-CT is commonly used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. There is growing interest in obtaining functional measurements from 4D micro-CT. We report here strategies for 4D micro-CT with a focus on two applications: (i) cardiac imaging based on retrospective gating and (ii) pulmonary perfusion using multiple contrast injections/rotations paradigm. A dual source micro-CT system is used for image acquisition with a sampling rate of 20 projections per second. The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. Fast scanning of free breathing mice is achieved using retrospective gating. The ECG and respiratory signals are used to sort projections into ten cardiac phases. The pulmonary perfusion protocol uses a conventional contrast agent (Isovue 370) delivered by a micro-injector in four injections separated by 2 min intervals to allow for clearance. Each injection is synchronized with the rotation of the animal, and each of the four rotations is started with an angular offset of 22.5 from the starting angle of the previous rotation. Both cardiac and perfusion protocols result in an irregular angular distribution of projections that causes significant streaking artifacts in reconstructions when using traditional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms. The reconstruction involves the use of the point spread function of the micro-CT system for each time point, and the analysis of the distribution of the reconstructed data in the Fourier domain. This enables us to correct for angular inconsistencies via deconvolution and identify regions where data is missing. The missing regions are filled with data from a high quality but temporally averaged prior image reconstructed with all available projections. Simulations indicate that deconvolution successfully removes the streaking artifacts while preserving temporal information. 4D cardiac micro-CT in a mouse was performed with adequate image quality at isotropic

  10. A MRI-CT prostate registration using sparse representation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Jani, Ashesh B.; Rossi, Peter J.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a new MRI-CT prostate registration using patch-based deformation prediction framework to improve MRI-guided prostate radiotherapy by incorporating multiparametric MRI into planning CT images. Methods: The main contribution is to estimate the deformation between prostate MRI and CT images in a patch-wise fashion by using the sparse representation technique. We assume that two image patches should follow the same deformation if their patch-wise appearance patterns are similar. Specifically, there are two stages in our proposed framework, i.e., the training stage and the application stage. In the training stage, each prostate MR images are carefully registered to the corresponding CT images and all training MR and CT images are carefully registered to a selected CT template. Thus, we obtain the dense deformation field for each training MR and CT image. In the application stage, for registering a new subject MR image with the same subject CT image, we first select a small number of key points at the distinctive regions of this subject CT image. Then, for each key point in the subject CT image, we extract the image patch, centered at the underlying key point. Then, we adaptively construct the coupled dictionary for the underlying point where each atom in the dictionary consists of image patches and the respective deformations obtained from training pair-wise MRI-CT images. Next, the subject image patch can be sparsely represented by a linear combination of training image patches in the dictionary, where we apply the same sparse coefficients to the respective deformations in the dictionary to predict the deformation for the subject MR image patch. After we repeat the same procedure for each subject CT key point, we use B-splines to interpolate a dense deformation field, which is used as the initialization to allow the registration algorithm estimating the remaining small segment of deformations from MRI to CT image

  11. Image reconstruction for hybrid true-color micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Bennett, James; He, Peng; Zainon, Rafidah; Doesburg, Robert; Opie, Alex; Walsh, Mike; Shen, Haiou; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Mou, Xuanqin; Wang, Ge

    2012-06-01

    X-ray micro-CT is an important imaging tool for biomedical researchers. Our group has recently proposed a hybrid "true-color" micro-CT system to improve contrast resolution with lower system cost and radiation dose. The system incorporates an energy-resolved photon-counting true-color detector into a conventional micro-CT configuration, and can be used for material decomposition. In this paper, we demonstrate an interior color-CT image reconstruction algorithm developed for this hybrid true-color micro-CT system. A compressive sensing-based statistical interior tomography method is employed to reconstruct each channel in the local spectral imaging chain, where the reconstructed global gray-scale image from the conventional imaging chain served as the initial guess. Principal component analysis was used to map the spectral reconstructions into the color space. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by numerical simulations, physical phantom experiments, and animal studies. The results confirm the merits of the proposed algorithm, and demonstrate the feasibility of the hybrid true-color micro-CT system. Additionally, a "color diffusion" phenomenon was observed whereby high-quality true-color images are produced not only inside the region of interest, but also in neighboring regions. It appears harnessing that this phenomenon could potentially reduce the color detector size for a given ROI, further reducing system cost and radiation dose.

  12. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  13. CT Angiography after 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5–15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  14. WE-D-9A-02: Automated Landmark-Guided CT to Cone-Beam CT Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, V; Gu, X; Chen, S; Jiang, L; Liu, H; Chiu, T; Yordy, J; Nedzi, L; Mao, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The anatomical changes that occur between the simulation CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) are investigated using an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm with simultaneous intensity correction. LDIR was designed to be accurate in the presence of tissue intensity mismatch and heavy noise contamination. Method: An auto-landmark generation algorithm was used in conjunction with a local small volume (LSV) gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and planning CT. The LSVs offsets were used to perform an initial deformation, generate landmarks, and correct local intensity mismatch. The landmarks act as stabilizing controlpoints in the Demons objective function. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm was evaluated on one synthetic case with ground truth and data of ten head and neck cancer patients. The deformation vector field (DVF) accuracy was accessed using a synthetic case. The Root mean square error of the 3D canny edge (RMSECE), mutual information (MI), and feature similarity index metric (FSIM) were used to access the accuracy of LDIR on the patient data. The quality of the corresponding deformed contours was verified by an attending physician. Results: The resulting 90 percentile DVF error for the synthetic case was within 5.63mm for the original demons algorithm, 2.84mm for intensity correction alone, 2.45mm using controlpoints without intensity correction, and 1.48 mm for the LDIR algorithm. For the five patients the mean RMSECE of the original CT, Demons deformed CT, intensity corrected Demons CT, control-point stabilized deformed CT, and LDIR CT was 0.24, 0.26, 0.20, 0.20, and 0.16 respectively. Conclusion: LDIR is accurate in the presence of multimodal intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination. Since LDIR is GPU based it can be implemented with minimal additional strain on clinical resources. This project has been supported by a CPRIT individual investigator award RP11032.

  15. SU-E-J-148: Tools for Development of 4D Proton CT

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, T; Ramos-Mendez, J; Piersimoni, P; Giacometti, V; Penfold, S; Censor, Y; Faddegon, B; Low, D; Schulte, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop tools for performing 4D proton computed tomography (CT). Methods: A suitable patient with a tumor in the right lower lobe was selected from a set of 4D CT scans. The volumetric CT images formed the basis for calculating the parameters of a breathing model that allows reconstruction of a static reference CT and CT images in each breathing phase. The images were imported into the TOPAS Monte Carlo simulation platform for simulating an experimental proton CT scan with 45 projections spaced by 4 degree intervals. Each projection acquired data for 2 seconds followed by a gantry rotation for 2 seconds without acquisition. The scan covered 180 degrees with individual protons passing through a 9-cm slab of the patient’s lung covering the moving tumor. An initial proton energy sufficient for penetrating the patient from all directions was determined. Performing the proton CT simulation, TOPAS provided output of the proton energy and coordinates registered in two planes before and after the patient, respectively. The set of projection data was then used with an iterative reconstruction algorithm to generate a volumetric proton CT image set of the static reference image and the image obtained under breathing motion, respectively. Results: An initial proton energy of 230 MeV was found to be sufficient, while for an initial energy of 200 MeV a substantial number of protons did not penetrate the patient. The reconstruction of the static reference image set provided sufficient detail for treatment planning. Conclusion: We have developed tools to perform studies of proton CT in the presence of lung motion based on the TOPAS simulation toolkit. This will allow to optimize 4D reconstruction algorithms by synchronizing the acquired proton CT data with a breathing signal and utilizing a breathing model obtained prior to the proton CT scan. This research has been supported by the National Institute Of Biomedical Imaging And Bioengineering of the National

  16. SCB initiator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.

    1994-01-01

    A detonator for high explosives initiated by mechanical impact includes a cylindrical barrel, a layer of flyer material mechanically covering the barrel at one end, and a semiconductor bridge ignitor including a pair of electrically conductive pads connected by a semiconductor bridge. The bridge is in operational contact with the layer, whereby ignition of said bridge forces a portion of the layer through the barrel to detonate the explosive. Input means are provided for igniting the semiconductor bridge ignitor.

  17. SCB initiator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes Jr., Robert W.; Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.

    1994-11-01

    A detonator for high explosives initiated by mechanical impact includes a cylindrical barrel, a layer of flyer material mechanically covering the barrel at one end, and a semiconductor bridge ignitor including a pair of electrically conductive pads connected by a semiconductor bridge. The bridge is in operational contact with the layer, whereby ignition of said bridge forces a portion of the layer through the barrel to detonate the explosive. Input means are provided for igniting the semiconductor bridge ignitor.

  18. Environmental initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.C. Jr.

    1991-11-01

    J I Case, a leading worldwide maker of agricultural and construction equipment based in Racine, Wisconsin, is taking an aggressive and responsible approach to environmental issues. From integrated solid waste handling plans and Freon recovery initiatives, to special employee training programs and voluntary participation in the EPA's Industrial Toxics Program, Case is addressing environmental issues at its facilities and in its products. One of the key environmental initiatives at Case is the company's voluntary participation in the US EPA's Industrial Toxics Program, also known as the 33/50 Program. This program is an EPA pollution prevention initiative started in 1990 that is designed to reduce industrial toxics generation quickly through voluntary actions by industry. The program derives its name from the EPA's national reduction goals for 17 high priority toxic pollutants - 33 percent reduction by 1992 and 50 percent by 1995. As a result, the Pryor Foundry has slashed its emissions of industrial toxic pollutants by 98 percent, from over 350,000 pounds (159 metric tons) in 1988 to around 5,000 pounds (2.27 metric tons) in 1991, with a projected reduction to only 750 pounds (340 kilograms) by 1995.

  19. Assessing Patients’ Cognitive Therapy Skills: Initial Evaluation of the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale

    PubMed Central

    Strunk, Daniel R.; Hollars, Shannon N.; Adler, Abby D.; Goldstein, Lizabeth A.; Braun, Justin D.

    2014-01-01

    In Cognitive Therapy (CT), therapists work to help patients develop skills to cope with negative affect. Most current methods of assessing patients’ skills are cumbersome and impractical for clinical use. To address this issue, we developed and conducted an initial psychometric evaluation of self and therapist reported versions of a new measure of CT skills: the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale (CCTS). We evaluated the CCTS at intake and post-treatment in a sample of 67 patients participating in CT. The CCTS correlated with a preexisting measure of CT skills (the Ways of Responding Questionnaire) and was also related to concurrent depressive symptoms. Across CT, self-reported improvements in CT competencies were associated with greater changes in depressive symptoms. These findings offer initial evidence for the validity of the CCTS. We discuss the CCTS in comparison with other measures of CT skills and suggest future research directions. PMID:25408560

  20. Assessing Patients' Cognitive Therapy Skills: Initial Evaluation of the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Daniel R; Hollars, Shannon N; Adler, Abby D; Goldstein, Lizabeth A; Braun, Justin D

    2014-10-01

    In Cognitive Therapy (CT), therapists work to help patients develop skills to cope with negative affect. Most current methods of assessing patients' skills are cumbersome and impractical for clinical use. To address this issue, we developed and conducted an initial psychometric evaluation of self and therapist reported versions of a new measure of CT skills: the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale (CCTS). We evaluated the CCTS at intake and post-treatment in a sample of 67 patients participating in CT. The CCTS correlated with a preexisting measure of CT skills (the Ways of Responding Questionnaire) and was also related to concurrent depressive symptoms. Across CT, self-reported improvements in CT competencies were associated with greater changes in depressive symptoms. These findings offer initial evidence for the validity of the CCTS. We discuss the CCTS in comparison with other measures of CT skills and suggest future research directions.

  1. The role of bone marrow biopsy and FDG-PET/CT in identifying bone marrow infiltration in the initial diagnosis of high grade non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. Accuracy in a multicenter series of 372 patients.

    PubMed

    Chen-Liang, Tzu-Hua; Martin-Santos, Taida; Jerez, Andres; Senent, Leonor; Orero, Maria Teresa; Remigia, Maria Jose; Muiña, Begoña; Romera, Marta; Fernandez-Muñoz, Hermogenes; Raya, Jose M; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Marta; Lancharro, Aima; Villegas, Carolina; Carlos Herrera, Juan; Frutos, Laura; Luis Navarro, Jose; Uña, Jon; Igua, Carolina; Sanchez-Vaño, Raquel; Cozar, Maria Del Puig; Contreras, Jose; Sanchez-Blanco, Jose Javier; Perez-Ceballos, Elena; Ortuño, Francisco Jose

    2015-08-01

    Bone marrow infiltration (BMI), categorized as an extra-nodal site, affects stage and is associated with poor prognosis in newly diagnosed lymphoma patients. We have evaluated the accuracy of PET/CT and bone marrow biopsy (BMB) to assess BMI in 372 lymphoma patients [140 Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) and 232 High Grade B-cell non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (HG B-NHL), among them 155 Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLCL)]. For HL cases, and taking into account PET/CT, sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were 96.7, 99.3, and 99.3% while those of BMB were 32.3, 83.8, and 85%, respectively. For HG B-NHL and considering PET/CT, sensitivity, NPV, and accuracy were 52.7, 81.7, and 84.1%, while those of BMB were 77.6, 90.2, and 90.7%, respectively. In the HG B-NHL group, 25 patients would have been under-staged without BMB. These results lead us to recommend PET/CT and the avoidance of BMB to assess BMI in HL. In the case of HG B-NHL, bone marrow status should be assessed firstly by means of PET/CT; only in either focal or diffuse PET/CT with low borderline SUV max values or in negative cases, should BMB be carried out afterwards. In the HG B-NHL setting and at the present moment, both techniques are complementary. PMID:25925613

  2. Reducing CT dose in myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Emma; Dixon, Kat L

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the radiation dose arising from computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction to single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging studies without adversely affecting its accuracy. Using the Perspex CTDI phantom with the Xi detector to measure dose, CT scans were acquired using the Siemens Symbia T over the full range of CT settings available. Using the default setting 'AECmean', the measured dose at the centre of the phantom was 1.68 mGy and the breast dose from the scout view was 0.30 mGy. The lowest dose was achieved using the dose modulation setting in which the doses were reduced to 1.21 mGy and undetectable (<0.01 mGy), respectively. To observe the effect of changing these settings, 30 patients received a stress scan with default CT settings and a rest scan utilizing single photon emission computed tomography-guided CT and the dose modulation CT settings. Results showed a mean effective dose reduction of 23.6%. The dose reduction was greatest for larger patients, with the largest dose reduction for one patient being 72%. There was no apparent difference in attenuation correction between the two sets of resultant images. These new lower-dose settings are now applied to all clinical myocardial perfusion imaging studies. PMID:26302461

  3. [Extension study and evaluation of the therapeutic response in a patient with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma using sequential study with ¹⁸F-FDG PET-CT and ¹⁸F-fluoride PET-CT].

    PubMed

    Moragas, M; Soler, M; Riera, E; García, J R

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with lung adenocarcinoma and bone and extraosseus metastases studied with (18)F-FDG PET-CT, (99m)Tc-HMDP and (18)F-fluoride PET-CT. It assesses the usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET-CT for initial staging of the disease and monitoring response to therapy. For the study of the sclerotic bone metastases it shows the superiority of 99mTc-HMDP bone scintigraphy and (18)F-fluoride PET-CT over (18)F-FDG PET-CT, and (18)F-fluoride PET-CT over bone scintigraphy. It also shows the usefulness of (18)F-fluoride PET-CT for monitoring the bone metastases.

  4. Multiple myeloma: evaluation by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiman, J.S.; McLeod, R.A.; Kyle, R.A.; Beabout, J.W.

    1985-02-01

    Although patients who have multiple myeloma usually have straightforward clinical symptoms and corroborative radiographs, in some instances, these patients will present atypically, with symptoms suggesting active disease but radiographs that are normal or nonspecific. The authors reviewed the records of 32 patients who had documented multiple myeloma and had undergone CT examinations, assessing the value of those examinations. Although CT is not indicated in all patients who have multiple myeloma, it is especially useful in patients who have bone pain and normal or nonspecific radiographs. CT provided confirmatory information in all cases in which lesions were seen on radiographs. CT also frequently demonstrated a greater extent of disease than could be appreciated on the radiographs.

  5. Children, CT Scan and Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bajoghli, Morteza; Bajoghli, Farshad; Tayari, Nazila; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Computerized tomography (CT) consists of 25 % of all medical imaging. It was estimated that more than 2% of all carcinomas in the USA are due to CT scans. There is an ongoing focus on the reduction of CT scan radiation dose. Awareness about risk-benefits of CT has increased. Reduction of radiological exam is an important issue because the accumulation effects of radiation can be hazardous. In addition, proper protocol should be followed for diagnostic procedures of ionization radiation and computerized tomography. Effective radiation dose should range from 0.8 to 10.5 millisievert. The same protocol should be followed in different hospitals as well. Basic principles of radiation protection should be monitored. As much as possible, both technician and radiologist must be present during computerized tomography for children, and MRI and ultrasound should be replaced if possible. PMID:21566776

  6. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  7. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    MedlinePlus

    ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) ... time and for your attention! Spotlight Recently posted: Video: Ultrasound-guided Breast Biopsy Video: Breast MRI Video: ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross- ... CT, it is possible to obtain very detailed pictures of the heart and blood vessels in children, ...

  9. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics.

  10. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  11. CT Perfusion of the Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... scanning combines special x-ray equipment with sophisticated computers to produce multiple images or pictures of the ... being studied can then be examined on a computer monitor, printed or transferred to a CD. CT ...

  12. Prognostic significance of adrenal gland morphology at CT in patients with three common malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, C P; Fuqua Iii, J L; Reiner, A S; Moskowitz, C S; Schwartz, L H; Panicek, D M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether minor alterations in adrenal gland morphology at baseline CT in three common cancers indicate early metastasis. Methods 689 patients (237 with lung cancer, 228 with breast cancer, 224 with melanoma) underwent baseline and follow-up CTs that included the adrenals. Two readers independently scored each adrenal at baseline CT as normal, smoothly enlarged, nodular or mass-containing. Adrenals containing a mass >10 mm were excluded. The appearance of each adrenal on the latest available CT was assessed for change since baseline. Cox models were used to assess the association between adrenal morphology at initial CT and subsequent development of adrenal metastasis (defined as new mass >10 mm, corroborated by follow-up imaging). κ statistics were calculated to assess inter-reader agreement. Results Initial and follow-up CT evaluations were recorded for 1317 adrenals (median follow-up, 18.6 months). At initial CT, Readers 1 and 2 interpreted 1242 and 1230 adrenals as normal, 40 and 57 as smoothly enlarged, 29 and 25 as nodular, and 6 and 5 as containing masses ≤10 mm, respectively. κ-values were 0.52 (moderate) at initial CT and 0.70 (substantial) at follow-up. The hazard ratio for developing a metastasis at follow-up CT given an abnormal adrenal assessment at baseline was 0.7 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2–2.1; p=0.47] for Reader 1, and 2.0 (95% CI 0.8–4.7; p=0.12) for Reader 2. Conclusion Minor morphological abnormalities of adrenals at initial CT did not represent early adrenal metastasis in most patients in this population. PMID:21750128

  13. An improved level set method for vertebra CT image segmentation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis and therapy for the lumbar disc herniation requires accurate vertebra segmentation. The complex anatomical structure and the degenerative deformations of the vertebrae makes its segmentation challenging. Methods An improved level set method, namely edge- and region-based level set method (ERBLS), is proposed for vertebra CT images segmentation. By considering the gradient information and local region characteristics of images, the proposed model can efficiently segment images with intensity inhomogeneity and blurry or discontinuous boundaries. To reduce the dependency on manual initialization in many active contour models and for an automatic segmentation, a simple initialization method for the level set function is built, which utilizes the Otsu threshold. In addition, the need of the costly re-initialization procedure is completely eliminated. Results Experimental results on both synthetic and real images demonstrated that the proposed ERBLS model is very robust and efficient. Compared with the well-known local binary fitting (LBF) model, our method is much more computationally efficient and much less sensitive to the initial contour. The proposed method has also applied to 56 patient data sets and produced very promising results. Conclusions An improved level set method suitable for vertebra CT images segmentation is proposed. It has the flexibility of segmenting the vertebra CT images with blurry or discontinuous edges, internal inhomogeneity and no need of re-initialization. PMID:23714300

  14. False lumens in type III aortic dissections: progress CT study

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, T.; Naito, H.; Ohta, M.; Sugahara, T.; Takamiya, M.; Kozuka, T.; Nakajima, N.

    1985-09-01

    The fate of false lumens in 13 patients having Type III aortic dissections was studied using computed tomography (CT). Contrast media filled false lumens with or without thrombosis were observed in ten patients; the false lumens of three patients were entirely thrombosed at initial examination. Follow-up CT studies showed shrinkage or disappearance of the false lumens with thrombosis in four patients, progression of thrombosis in two patients, and enlargement of the false lumen in one patient who subsequently required surgical repair. No change was observed in the remaining six patients during our observation period. CT study provides useful information for evaluating the efficacy of medical treatment and the timing of surgical intervention during follow-up evaluation of medically treated Type III aortic dissections.

  15. False lumens in type III aortic dissections: progress CT study.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Naito, H; Ohta, M; Sugahara, T; Takamiya, M; Kozuka, T; Nakajima, N

    1985-09-01

    The fate of false lumens in 13 patients having Type III aortic dissections was studied using computed tomography (CT). Contrast media filled false lumens with or without thrombosis were observed in ten patients; the false lumens of three patients were entirely thrombosed at initial examination. Follow-up CT studies showed shrinkage or disappearance of the false lumens with thrombosis in four patients, progression of thrombosis in two patients, and enlargement of the false lumen in one patient who subsequently required surgical repair. No change was observed in the remaining six patients during our observation period. CT study provides useful information for evaluating the efficacy of medical treatment and the timing of surgical intervention during follow-up evaluation of medically treated Type III aortic dissections.

  16. Liver recognition based on statistical shape model in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Dehui; Jiang, Xueqing; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an automatic method is proposed to recognize the liver on clinical 3D CT images. The proposed method effectively use statistical shape model of the liver. Our approach consist of three main parts: (1) model training, in which shape variability is detected using principal component analysis from the manual annotation; (2) model localization, in which a fast Euclidean distance transformation based method is able to localize the liver in CT images; (3) liver recognition, the initial mesh is locally and iteratively adapted to the liver boundary, which is constrained with the trained shape model. We validate our algorithm on a dataset which consists of 20 3D CT images obtained from different patients. The average ARVD was 8.99%, the average ASSD was 2.69mm, the average RMSD was 4.92mm, the average MSD was 28.841mm, and the average MSD was 13.31%.

  17. Surface-based registration of liver in ultrasound and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Lu, Kongkuo; Yan, Pingkun; Tahmasebi, Amir; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Venkatesan, Aradhana; Kruecker, Jochen

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is an attractive modality for real-time image-guided interventions. Fusion of US imaging with a diagnostic imaging modality such as CT shows great potential in minimally invasive applications such as liver biopsy and ablation. However, significantly different representation of liver in US and CT turns this image fusion into a challenging task, in particular if some of the CT scans may be obtained without contrast agents. The liver surface, including the diaphragm immediately adjacent to it, typically appears as a hyper-echoic region in the ultrasound image if the proper imaging window and depth setting are used. The liver surface is also well visualized in both contrast and non-contrast CT scans, thus making the diaphragm or liver surface one of the few attractive common features for registration of US and non-contrast CT. We propose a fusion method based on point-to-volume registration of liver surface segmented in CT to a processed electromagnetically (EM) tracked US volume. In this approach, first, the US image is pre-processed in order to enhance the liver surface features. In addition, non-imaging information from the EM-tracking system is used to initialize and constrain the registration process. We tested our algorithm in comparison with a manually corrected vessel-based registration method using 8 pairs of tracked US and contrast CT volumes. The registration method was able to achieve an average deviation of 12.8mm from the ground truth measured as the root mean square Euclidean distance for control points distributed throughout the US volume. Our results show that if the US image acquisition is optimized for imaging of the diaphragm, high registration success rates are achievable.

  18. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach.

  19. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach. PMID:27457483

  20. Radiation Dose to the Radiologist's Hand During Continuous CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckelhuber, Beate M. Leibecke, Thorsten; Schulz, Edda; Melchert, Uwe H.; Bergmann-Koester, Claudia U.; Helmberger, Thomas; Gellissen, Joerg

    2005-06-15

    Computed tomography fluoroscopy (CT fluoroscopy) enables real-time image control over the entire body with high geometric accuracy and, for the most part, without significant interfering artifacts, resulting in increased target accuracy, reduced intervention times, and improved biopsy specimens [1-4]. Depending on the procedure being used, higher radiation doses than in conventional CT-supported interventions might occur. Because the radiologist is present in the CT room during the intervention, he is exposed to additional radiation, which is an important aspect. Initial experience with CT fluoroscopically guided interventions is from the work of Katada et al. in 1994 [5] and only relatively few reports on radiation aspects in CT fluoroscopy are found in the literature [1, 2, 6-11]. To date, there are no reported injuries to patients and radiologists occurring with CT fluoroscopy. The time interval since the wide use of CT fluoroscopy is too short to have data on late effects to the operator using CT fluoroscopy on a daily basis. In addition, the spectrum of CT fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures will expand and more sophisticated procedures requiring longer fluoroscopy times will be performed. Thus, effective exposure reduction is very important. The purpose of our study was to assess the radiation dose to the operator's hand by using data from phantom measurements. In addition, we investigated the effect of a lead drape on the phantom surface adjacent to the scanning plane, the use of thin radiation protective gloves, and the use of different needle holders.

  1. Cranial CT in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: spectrum of diseases and optimal contrast enhancement technique.

    PubMed

    Post, M J; Kursunoglu, S J; Hensley, G T; Chan, J C; Moskowitz, L B; Hoffman, T A

    1985-11-01

    A retrospective review of cranial CT scans obtained over a 4 year period in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and documented central nervous system (CNS) pathology is presented. The spectrum of diseases and the value of CT in detecting new, recurrent, and superimposed disease processes were determined. Fifty-one AIDS patients with confirmed CNS pathology were identified. Six of them had two coexistent diseases. Opportunistic infections predominated, especially Toxoplasma encephalitis and cryptococcal meningitis, while tumor was seen infrequently. Initial CT was positive in 76% of cases. In contrast to meningeal processes, where it was not very effective, CT was very sensitive in detecting most parenchymal disease processes. Characteristic although not pathognomonic CT patterns were found for certain diseases. Improvement or resolution of CT abnormalities in patients on medical therapy for Toxoplasma encephalitis correlated well with clinical improvement. Recurrence of CT abnormalities correlated well with medical noncompliance. The optimal contrast enhancement technique for detecting CNS pathology and for monitoring the effectiveness of medical therapy was also evaluated by a prospective study in which both immediate (IDD) and 1 hr delayed (DDD) double-dose contrast CT scans were compared. The examination found to be diagnostically superior in 30 of the 41 IDD/DDD studies was the delayed scan. It is recommended that CT be used routinely and with the 1 hr DDD scan to evaluate and follow AIDS patients with neurologic symptoms and/or signs.

  2. Multiscale registration of planning CT and daily cone beam CT images for adaptive radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paquin, Dana; Levy, Doron; Xing Lei

    2009-01-15

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is the incorporation of daily images in the radiotherapy treatment process so that the treatment plan can be evaluated and modified to maximize the amount of radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to healthy tissue. Registration of planning images with daily images is thus an important component of ART. In this article, the authors report their research on multiscale registration of planning computed tomography (CT) images with daily cone beam CT (CBCT) images. The multiscale algorithm is based on the hierarchical multiscale image decomposition of E. Tadmor, S. Nezzar, and L. Vese [Multiscale Model. Simul. 2(4), pp. 554-579 (2004)]. Registration is achieved by decomposing the images to be registered into a series of scales using the (BV, L{sup 2}) decomposition and initially registering the coarsest scales of the image using a landmark-based registration algorithm. The resulting transformation is then used as a starting point to deformably register the next coarse scales with one another. This procedure is iterated at each stage using the transformation computed by the previous scale registration as the starting point for the current registration. The authors present the results of studies of rectum, head-neck, and prostate CT-CBCT registration, and validate their registration method quantitatively using synthetic results in which the exact transformations our known, and qualitatively using clinical deformations in which the exact results are not known.

  3. 4D-CT imaging of a volume influenced by respiratory motion on multi-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tinsu; Lee, Ting-Yim; Rietzel, Eike; Chen, George T Y

    2004-02-01

    We propose a new scanning protocol for generating 4D-CT image data sets influenced by respiratory motion. A cine scanning protocol is used during data acquisition, and two registration methods are used to sort images into temporal phases. A volume is imaged in multiple acquisitions of 1 or 2 cm length along the cranial-caudal direction. In each acquisition, the scans are continuously acquired for a time interval greater than or equal to the average respiratory cycle plus the duration of the data for an image reconstruction. The x ray is turned off during CT table translation and the acquisition is repeated until the prescribed volume is completely scanned. The scanning for 20 cm coverage takes about 1 min with an eight-slice CT or 2 mins with a four-slice CT. After data acquisition, the CT data are registered into respiratory phases based on either an internal anatomical match or an external respiratory signal. The internal approach registers the data according to correlation of anatomy in the CT images between two adjacent locations in consecutive respiratory cycles. We have demonstrated the technique with ROIs placed in the region of diaphragm. The external approach registers the image data according to an externally recorded respiratory signal generated by the Real-Time Position Management (RPM) Respiratory Gating System (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Compared with previously reported prospective or retrospective imaging of the respiratory motion with a single-slice or multi-slice CT, the 4D-CT method proposed here provides (1) a shorter scan time of three to six times faster than the single-slice CT with prospective gating; (2) a shorter scan time of two to four times improvement over a previously reported multi-slice CT implementation, and (3) images over all phases of a breathing cycle. We have applied the scanning and registration methods on phantom, animal and patients, and initial results suggest the applicability of both the scanning and the

  4. Simulation of four-dimensional CT images from deformable registration between inhale and exhale breath-hold CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David; Boldea, Vlad; Miguet, Serge; Ginestet, Chantal

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: We propose to simulate an artificial four-dimensional (4-D) CT image of the thorax during breathing. It is performed by deformable registration of two CT scans acquired at inhale and exhale breath-hold. Materials and methods: Breath-hold images were acquired with the ABC (Active Breathing Coordinator) system. Dense deformable registrations were performed. The method was a minimization of the sum of squared differences (SSD) using an approximated second-order gradient. Gaussian and linear-elastic vector field regularizations were compared. A new preprocessing step, called a priori lung density modification (APLDM), was proposed to take into account lung density changes due to inspiration. It consisted of modulating the lung densities in one image according to the densities in the other, in order to make them comparable. Simulated 4-D images were then built by vector field interpolation and image resampling of the two initial CT images. A variation in the lung density was taken into account to generate intermediate artificial CT images. The Jacobian of the deformation was used to compute voxel values in Hounsfield units. The accuracy of the deformable registration was assessed by the spatial correspondence of anatomic landmarks located by experts. Results: APLDM produced statistically significantly better results than the reference method (registration without APLDM preprocessing). The mean (and standard deviation) of distances between automatically found landmark positions and landmarks set by experts were 2.7(1.1) mm with APLDM, and 6.3(3.8) mm without. Interexpert variability was 2.3(1.2) mm. The differences between Gaussian and linear elastic regularizations were not statistically significant. In the second experiment using 4-D images, the mean difference between automatic and manual landmark positions for intermediate CT images was 2.6(2.0) mm. Conclusion: The generation of 4-D CT images by deformable registration of inhale and exhale CT images is

  5. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  6. CtIP-mediated resection is essential for viability and can operate independently of BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Polato, Federica; Callen, Elsa; Wong, Nancy; Faryabi, Robert; Bunting, Samuel; Chen, Hua-Tang; Kozak, Marina; Kruhlak, Michael J; Reczek, Colleen R; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Ludwig, Thomas; Baer, Richard; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Jackson, Stephen; Nussenzweig, André

    2014-06-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is initiated by DNA end resection, a process in which stretches of single-strand DNA (ssDNA) are generated and used for homology search. Factors implicated in resection include nucleases MRE11, EXO1, and DNA2, which process DNA ends into 3' ssDNA overhangs; helicases such as BLM, which unwind DNA; and other proteins such as BRCA1 and CtIP whose functions remain unclear. CDK-mediated phosphorylation of CtIP on T847 is required to promote resection, whereas CDK-dependent phosphorylation of CtIP-S327 is required for interaction with BRCA1. Here, we provide evidence that CtIP functions independently of BRCA1 in promoting DSB end resection. First, using mouse models expressing S327A or T847A mutant CtIP as a sole species, and B cells deficient in CtIP, we show that loss of the CtIP-BRCA1 interaction does not detectably affect resection, maintenance of genomic stability or viability, whereas T847 is essential for these functions. Second, although loss of 53BP1 rescues the embryonic lethality and HR defects in BRCA1-deficient mice, it does not restore viability or genome integrity in CtIP(-/-) mice. Third, the increased resection afforded by loss of 53BP1 and the rescue of BRCA1-deficiency depend on CtIP but not EXO1. Finally, the sensitivity of BRCA1-deficient cells to poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibition is partially rescued by the phospho-mimicking mutant CtIP (CtIP-T847E). Thus, in contrast to BRCA1, CtIP has indispensable roles in promoting resection and embryonic development.

  7. Nasolacrimal Polyurethane Stent: Complications with CT Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Isabel T.; Paul, Laura; Grande, Carlos

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate initial results in patients with epiphora secondary to obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct treated by placement of a polyurethane stent, and to discuss the technical problems and complications arising during the procedure, with visualization of the anatomy of the drainage apparatus using computed tomography (CT). Methods: We inserted 20 polyurethane Song stents under fluoroscopic guidance after dacryocystography in 19 patients with grade 3-4 epiphora caused by idiopathic obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct. CT scans were obtained following stent placement in all patients. Results: We focus on the technical problems and complications that arose during these procedures. During negotiation of the guidewire past the obstruction at the level of the junction of the duct with the lacrimal sac, the guidewire created a false passage in a posterior suborbital direction in two cases and towards the posterior midline in another. In all cases the guidewire was withdrawn and reinserted through the proper anatomic route without further difficulty or complications. In two cases the stent was improperly positioned wholly or partially outside the nasolacrimal system (one medially, one posteriorly). In one case the stent was removed and reinserted; in the other it remains in place and functional. CT was performed in all these cases to ensure proper anatomic alignment and determine what had gone wrong. The epiphora was completely resolved in 13 cases and partially relieved in four; there were three cases of stent obstruction. Epistaxis of short duration (1 hr) occurred in seven patients and headache in one. Conclusions: Treatment of epiphora with polyurethane stents is a technique that is well tolerated by patients and achieves a high success rate, yet problems in placement may be encountered. Though no major consequences for patients are involved, cognizance of such difficulties is important to avoid incorrect positioning of stents.

  8. Unified wavelet and gaussian filtering for segmentation of CT images; application in segmentation of bone in pelvic CT images

    PubMed Central

    Vasilache, Simina; Ward, Kevin; Cockrell, Charles; Ha, Jonathan; Najarian, Kayvan

    2009-01-01

    Background The analysis of pelvic CT scans is a crucial step for detecting and assessing the severity of Traumatic Pelvic Injuries. Automating the processing of pelvic CT scans could impact decision accuracy, decrease the time for decision making, and reduce health care cost. This paper discusses a method to automate the segmentation of bone from pelvic CT images. Accurate segmentation of bone is very important for developing an automated assisted-decision support system for Traumatic Pelvic Injury diagnosis and treatment. Methods The automated method for pelvic CT bone segmentation is a hierarchical approach that combines filtering and histogram equalization, for image enhancement, wavelet analysis and automated seeded region growing. Initial results of segmentation are used to identify the region where bone is present and to target histogram equalization towards the specific area. Speckle Reducing Anisotropic Didffusion (SRAD) filter is applied to accentuate the desired features in the region. Automated seeded region growing is performed to refine the initial bone segmentation results. Results The proposed method automatically processes pelvic CT images and produces accurate segmentation. Bone connectivity is achieved and the contours and sizes of bones are true to the actual contour and size displayed in the original image. Results are promising and show great potential for fracture detection and assessing hemorrhage presence and severity. Conclusion Preliminary experimental results of the automated method show accurate bone segmentation. The novelty of the method lies in the unique hierarchical combination of image enhancement and segmentation methods that aims at maximizing the advantages of the combined algorithms. The proposed method has the following advantages: it produces accurate bone segmentation with maintaining bone contour and size true to the original image and is suitable for automated bone segmentation from pelvic CT images. PMID:19891802

  9. Openness initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  10. New horizons in cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    den Harder, A M; Willemink, M J; de Jong, P A; Schilham, A M R; Rajiah, P; Takx, R A P; Leiner, T

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, cardiovascular computed tomography angiography (CCTA) was associated with considerable radiation doses. The introduction of tube current modulation and automatic tube potential selection as well as high-pitch prospective ECG-triggering and iterative reconstruction offer the ability to decrease dose with approximately one order of magnitude, often to sub-millisievert dose levels. In parallel, advancements in computational technology have enabled the measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) from CCTA data (FFRCT). This technique shows potential to replace invasively measured FFR to select patients in need of coronary intervention. Furthermore, developments in scanner hardware have led to the introduction of dual-energy and photon-counting CT, which offer the possibility of material decomposition imaging. Dual-energy CT reduces beam hardening, which enables CCTA in patients with a high calcium burden and more robust myocardial CT perfusion imaging. Future-generation CT systems will be capable of counting individual X-ray photons. Photon-counting CT is promising and may result in a substantial further radiation dose reduction, vastly increased spatial resolution, and the introduction of a whole new class of contrast agents. PMID:26932775

  11. Racial Differences in CT Phenotypes in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Nadia N.; Washko, George R.; Foreman, Marilyn G.; Han, MeiLan K.; Hoffman, Eric A.; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Barr, R. Graham; Van Beek, Edwin J.R.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Wise, Robert A.; Brown, Robert H.; Black-Shinn, Jennifer; Hokanson, John E.; Hanania, Nicola A.; Make, Barry; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.; Dransfield, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether African Americans (AA) are more susceptible to COPD than non-Hispanic Whites (NHW) and whether racial differences in disease phenotype exist is controversial. The objective is to determine racial differences in the extent of emphysema and airway remodeling in COPD. Methods First, 2,500 subjects enrolled in the COPDGene study were used to evaluate racial differences in quantitative CT (QCT) parameters of % emphysema, air trapping and airway wall thickness. Independent variables studied included race, age, gender, education, BMI, pack-years, smoking status, age at smoking initiation, asthma, previous work in dusty job, CT scanner and center of recruitment. Results Of the 1,063 subjects with GOLD Stage II-IV COPD, 200 self-reported as AA. AAs had a lower mean % emphysema (13.1 % vs. 16.1%, p = 0.005) than NHW and proportionately less emphysema in the lower lung zones. After adjustment for covariates, there was no statistical difference by race in air trapping or airway wall thickness. Measured QCT parameters were more predictive of poor functional status in NHWs compared to AAs. Conclusions AAs have less emphysema than NHWs but the same degree of airway disease. Additional factors not easily assessed by current QCT techniques may account for the poor functional status in AAs. PMID:23413893

  12. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  13. Renal applications of dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT is being increasingly used for abdominal imaging due to its incremental benefit of material characterization without significant increase in radiation dose. Knowledge of the different dual-energy CT acquisition techniques and image processing algorithms is essential to optimize imaging protocols and understand potential limitations while using dual-energy CT renal imaging such as urinary calculi characterization, assessment of renal masses and in CT urography. This review article provides an overview of the current dual-energy CT techniques and use of dual-energy CT in renal imaging.

  14. EUROANDRILL Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florindo, Fabio; Steering Committee, Euroandrill

    2010-05-01

    EuroANDRILL is a new initiative to create a European network with the goal to increase future involvement of European countries in the ANDRILL [ANtarctic geological DRILLing] Programme. Antarctica has been heavily glaciated for approximately 34 million years, but its ice sheets have fluctuated considerably and are one of the major driving forces for changes in climate throughout the Cenozoic Era. The spatial scale and temporal pattern of these fluctuations is subject to considerable debate. Understanding the response of large ice masses to climatic forcing is of vital importance because ice volume variations drive global sea level changes and also alter the capacity of ice sheets and sea-ice to act as major heat sinks/insulators. It is particularly important to assess the stability of the cryosphere in the face of rising CO2 levels, as modelling of the climate shift from a warm, vegetated Antarctica to a cold, ice-covered state 34 million years ago suggests a powerful greenhouse gas influence. As Antarctica is the major driver of Earth's climate and sea level, much effort has been expended in deriving models of its behaviour. Some of these models have been successfully validated against modern conditions. EuroANDRILL will provide a coherent, integrated platform for European leadership and involvement in the international ANDRILL programme. The coordination and networking provided by EuroANDRILL will seek to expand participation by European nations, institutions, and individual scientists in the study of the geologic history of the polar regions and their paleoclimatic significance. During the IPY, ANDRILL has been a highly visible and successful programme. This programme seeks to expand on this legacy beyond the IPY and make these contributions sustainable in the European Research Area through networking of research projects and future planning efforts, which establish Europe as a key player in future polar sediment and rock drilling. EuroANDRILL is set up under

  15. Microdrill Initiative - Initial Market Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Spears & Associates, Inc

    2003-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a major research and development initiative to create a small, fast, inexpensive and environmentally friendly rig for drilling 5000 feet boreholes to investigate potential oil and gas reservoirs. DOE wishes to get input from petroleum industry operators, service companies and equipment suppliers on the operation and application of this coiled-tubing-based drilling unit. To that end, DOE has asked Spears & Associates, Inc. (SAI) to prepare a special state-of-the-market report and assist during a DOE-sponsored project-scoping workshop in Albuquerque near the end of April 2003. The scope of the project is four-fold: (1) Evaluate the history, status and future of demand for very small bore-hole drilling; (2) Measure the market for coiled tubing drilling and describe the state-of-the-art; (3) Identify companies and individuals who should have an interest in micro drilling and invite them to the DOE workshop; and (4) Participate in 3 concurrent workshop sessions, record and evaluate participant comments and report workshop conclusions.

  16. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  17. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  18. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 ... facts MDCT is a very fast type of computed tomography (CT) scan. MDCT creates pictures of the healthy ...

  19. Pocket atlas of normal CT anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.B.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a quick reference for interpreting CT scans of the extracranial organs. This collection of 41 CT scans covers all the major organs of the body: neck and larynx; chest; abdomen; male pelvis; and female pelvis.

  20. An Abdominal CT may be Safe in Selected Hypotensive Trauma Patients with Positive FAST Exam

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Mackenzie R.; Holcomb, John B.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Positive Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) and hypotension often indicates urgent surgery. An abdomen/pelvis CT (apCT) may allow less invasive management but the delay may be associated with adverse outcomes. Methods Patients in the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion study with hypotension and a positive FAST (HF+) who underwent a CT (apCT+) were compared to those who did not. Results Of the 92 HF+ identified, 32(35%) underwent apCT during initial evaluation and apCT was associated with decreased odds of an emergency operation, OR 0.11 95% CI (0.001–0.116) and increased odds of angiographic intervention, OR 14.3 95% CI (1.5–135). There was no significant difference in 30 day mortality or need for dialysis. Conclusion An apCt in HF+ patients is associated with reduced odds of emergency surgery, but not mortality. Select HF+ patients can safely undergo apCT to obtain clinically useful information. PMID:25805456

  1. FDG PET/CT Findings in Abdominal Fat Necrosis After Treatment for Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, Julien; Moreau, Aurélie; Sarkozy, Clémentine; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Skanjeti, Andrea; Salles, Gilles; Giammarile, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    FDG PET/CT is now validated in non-Hodgkin lymphoma for response assessment in interim and posttreatment lymphoma. We report the case of a 62-year-old man followed by FDG PET/CT for a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, with initial stage III. The interim FDG PET/CT examination concluded in complete metabolic and morphological response of subdiaphragmatic lymphadenopathy but a persistent abnormal subdiaphragmatic uptake (SUVmax at 9 and Deauville 5-point scale at 5). Therefore, an abdominal biopsy of the corresponding nodules was conducted with a final diagnosis of diffuse fat necrosis. PMID:26825213

  2. Infradiaphragmatic bronchogenic cyst with high CT numbers in a boy with primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, R; Benz-Bohm, G; Berthold, F; Eidt, S; Schmidt, R

    1994-01-01

    Abdominal bronchogenic cysts are very rare with less than 20 published cases. We report the case of a retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst in a 12-year-old boy, who initially presented with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the pelvis. Computed tomography (CT) showed a small, hyperdense nonenhancing mass adjacent to the right crus of the diaphragm. Follow-up CT after chemotherapy showed a decrease in CT attenuation of this mass, but a slight increase in size. At surgery the mass was loosely attached to the diaphragm and final pathology confirmed the diagnosis of a bronchogenic cyst.

  3. Contextual information-aided kidney segmentation in CT sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Enwei; Liang, Yanmei; Fan, Hailun

    2013-03-01

    Based on the continuity of adjacent slices in a medical image sequence, a slice-based 3-D segmentation framework is constructed to extract the intact kidney by processing all slices automatically in the whole sequence. The framework includes four sections: initial segmentation, selection of the most reliable initial segmentation, location and modification of leakage. The crucial section of the proposed framework is selecting the most reliable initial segmentation image, which will be regarded as the reference image to evaluate the continuity of the following slice. Leakage location is carried out based on the contextual features, and the local iterative thresholding (LIT) is used to modify the leakage. As test examples of the framework, abdominal computed tomography (CT) images in enhanced phases are processed to segment kidney automatically. The total of 392 CT images in 7 sequences from 3 patients are selected as training images to determine the parameters in the database, and other 898 CT images in 21 sequences from 7 patients are used as test images to evaluate the effectiveness of the method. An average of three dimensional Dice similarity coefficient (3-D DSC) of 94.7% and average symmetric surface distance (ASSD) of 0.91 mm are obtained, which indicate that the intact kidney can be perfectly extracted with hardly any leakage automatically.

  4. CT "halo sign" in pulmonary tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Gaeta, M; Volta, S; Stroscio, S; Romeo, P; Pandolfo, I

    1992-01-01

    The CT halo sign has been described as the CT finding of a low-attenuation zone surrounding a pulmonary nodule. It is an early clue to the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. We describe a case of CT halo sign associated with a pulmonary tuberculoma. Therefore, we think that a diagnosis other than invasive pulmonary aspergillosis should be considered in the presence of the CT halo sign in immunocompetent patients.

  5. CT Scans - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... الأشعة المقطعية الحاسوبية - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) CT (Computerized Tomography) Scan CT ( ... 扫描 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) CT (Computerized Tomography) Scan CT ( ...

  6. CT dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene cylinders with diameters from 6 to 55 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: ICRU Report No. 87 Committee and AAPM Task Group 200 designed a three-sectional polyethylene phantom of 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in length for evaluating the midpoint dose D{sub L}(0) and its rise-to-the-equilibrium curve H(L) = D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq} from computed tomography (CT) scanning, where D{sub eq} is the equilibrium dose. To aid the use of the phantom in radiation dose assessment and to gain an understanding of dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene, the authors evaluated the short (20 cm) to long (60 cm) phantom dose ratio with a polyethylene diameter of 30 cm, assessed H(L) in polyethylene cylinders of 6–55 cm in diameters, and examined energy absorption in these cylinders. Methods: A GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the single axial scans of polyethylene cylinders (diameters 6–55 cm and length 90 cm, as well as diameter 30 cm and lengths 20 and 60 cm) on a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare). Axial dose distributions were computed on the phantom central and peripheral axes. An average dose over the central 23 or 100 mm region was evaluated for modeling dose measurement using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble chamber or a 10 cm long pencil ion chamber, respectively. The short (20 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were calculated for the 30 cm diameter polyethylene phantoms scanned at four tube voltages (80–140 kV) and a range of beam apertures (1–25 cm). H(L) was evaluated using the dose integrals computed with the 90 cm long phantoms. The resultant H(L) data were subsequently used to compute the fraction of the total energy absorbed inside or outside the scan range (E{sub in}/E or E{sub out}/E) on the phantom central and peripheral axes, where E = LD{sub eq} was the total energy absorbed along the z axis. Results: The midpoint dose in the 60 cm long polyethylene phantom was equal to that in the 90 cm long polyethylene phantom. The short-to-long phantom dose

  7. CT Innovators Reunion: Where Are They Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    Each year, "Campus Technology" ("CT") gazes across higher ed horizons to identify the most innovative IT programs at colleges and universities around the globe. The projects "CT" profiles are inspiring examples of technology making a difference on campus--at least at that moment. The question is, have they stood the test of time? "CT" followed up…

  8. CBV_ASPECTS Improvement over CT_ASPECTS on Determining Irreversible Ischemic Lesion Decreases over Time

    PubMed Central

    Padroni, Marina; Boned, Sandra; Ribó, Marc; Muchada, Marian; Rodriguez-Luna, David; Coscojuela, Pilar; Tomasello, Alejandro; Cabero, Jordi; Pagola, Jorge; Rodriguez-Villatoro, Noelia; Juega, Jesus M.; Sanjuan, Estela; Molina, Carlos A.; Rubiera, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) is a useful scoring system for assessing early ischemic signs on noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Cerebral blood volume (CBV) on CT perfusion defines the core lesion assumed to be irreversibly damaged. We aim to explore the advantages of CBV_ASPECTS over CT_ASPECTS in the prediction of final infarct volume according to time. Methods Consecutive patients with anterior circulation stroke who underwent endovascular reperfusion according to initial CT_ASPECTS ≥7 were studied. CBV_ASPECTS was assessed blindly later on. Recanalization was defined as thrombolysis in cerebral ischemia score 2b-3. Final infarct volumes were measured on follow-up imaging. We compared ASPECTS on CBV and CT images, and defined ASPECTS agreement as: CT_ASPECTS - CBV_ASPECTS ≤1. Results Sixty-five patients, with a mean age of 67 ± 14 years and a median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 16 (range 10–20), were studied. The recanalization rate was 78.5%. The median CT_ASPECTS was 9 (range 8–10), and the CBV_ASPECTS was 8 (range 8–10). The mean time from symptoms to CT was 219 ± 143 min. Fifty patients (76.9%) showed ASPECTS agreement. The ASPECTS difference was inversely correlated to the time from symptoms to CT (r = −0.36, p < 0.01). A ROC curve defined 120 min as the best cutoff point after which the ASPECTS difference becomes more frequently ≤1. After 120 min, 89.5% of the patients showed ASPECTS agreement (as compared with 37.5% for <120 min, p < 0.01). CBV_ASPECTS but not CT_ASPECTS correlated with final infarct (r = −0.33, p < 0.01). However, if CT was done >2 h after symptom onset, CT_ASPECTS also correlated to final infarct (r = −0.39, p = 0.01). Conclusions In acute stroke, CBV_ASPECTS correlates with the final infarct volume. However, when CT is performed after 120 min from symptom onset, CBV_ASPECTS does not add relevant information to CT_ASPECTS. PMID:27781042

  9. Advantages of Combined PET-CT in Mediastinal Staging in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beslic, Nermina; Sadija, Amera; Milardovic, Renata; Ceric, Timur; Ceric, Sejla; Beganovic, Adnan; Kristic, Spomenka; Cavaljuga, Semra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Precise mediastinal lymph node staging in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) provides important prognostic information and it is obligatory in treatment strategy planning. 18Fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography - computerized tomography (PET-CT) based on detection of metabolic activity showed superiority in preoperative staging of lung carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Total number of 26 patients diagnosed with NSCLC were included in this retrospective, cross-sectional study. Status of mediastinal lymph nodes was assessed in all patients comparing contrast enhanced CT and 18F-FDG PET-CT findings. Discussion: We found in our study that 50% of patients had different N stage on contrast enhanced CT comparing to 18F-FDG PET-CT findings. Among the total number of patients which had different nodal status on PET-CT comparing to CT alone, we found in our study that 54% of patients had change in further therapy protocol after PET-CT change of nodal stage. Conclusion: Combined PET-CT which offers advantages of both modalities is excellent method for nodal (N) staging, so it is recommended in initial staging in patients with NSCLC. PET-CT used preopratively for mediastinal nodal staging has significant impact on further therapy planning and also has an consequential impact on health system savings. PMID:27147799

  10. Potential of dual-energy subtraction for converting CT numbers to electron density based on a single linear relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The conversion of the computed tomography (CT) number to electron density is one of the main processes that determine the accuracy of patient dose calculations in radiotherapy treatment planning. However, the CT number and electron density of tissues cannot be generally interrelated via a simple one-to-one correspondence because the CT number depends on the effective atomic number as well as the electron density. The purpose of this study is to present a simple conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number ({Delta}HU) by means of dual-energy CT (DECT) to the relative electron density ({rho}{sub e}) via a single linear relationship. Methods: The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was demonstrated by performing analytical DECT image simulations that were intended to imitate a second-generation dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner with an additional tin filtration for the high-kV tube. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} calibration line was obtained from the image simulation with a 33 cm-diameter electron density calibration phantom equipped with 16 inserts including polytetrafluoroethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and aluminum; the elemental compositions of these three inserts were quite different to those of body tissues. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was also applied to previously published experimental CT data, which were measured using two different CT scanners, to validate the clinical feasibility of the present approach. In addition, the effect of object size on {rho}{sub e}-calibrated images was investigated by image simulations using a 25 cm-diameter virtual phantom for two different filtrations: with and without the tin filter for the high-kV tube. Results: The simulated {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} plot exhibited a predictable linear relationship over a wide range of {rho}{sub e} from 0.00 (air) to 2.35 (aluminum). Resultant values of the coefficient of determination, slope, and intercept of the linear function fitted to the data were close to those

  11. Computer aided detection of oral lesions on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galib, S.; Islam, F.; Abir, M.; Lee, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oral lesions are important findings on computed tomography (CT) images. In this study, a fully automatic method to detect oral lesions in mandibular region from dental CT images is proposed. Two methods were developed to recognize two types of lesions namely (1) Close border (CB) lesions and (2) Open border (OB) lesions, which cover most of the lesion types that can be found on CT images. For the detection of CB lesions, fifteen features were extracted from each initial lesion candidates and multi layer perceptron (MLP) neural network was used to classify suspicious regions. Moreover, OB lesions were detected using a rule based image processing method, where no feature extraction or classification algorithm were used. The results were validated using a CT dataset of 52 patients, where 22 patients had abnormalities and 30 patients were normal. Using non-training dataset, CB detection algorithm yielded 71% sensitivity with 0.31 false positives per patient. Furthermore, OB detection algorithm achieved 100% sensitivity with 0.13 false positives per patient. Results suggest that, the proposed framework, which consists of two methods, has the potential to be used in clinical context, and assist radiologists for better diagnosis.

  12. AREST-CT V1.0 software verification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Engel, D.W.; McGrail, B.P.; Lessor, K.S.

    1995-07-01

    The Analyzer for Radionuclide Source-Term with Chemical Transport (AREST-CT) is a scientific computer code designed for performance assessments of engineered barrier system (EBS) concepts for the underground storage of nuclear waste, including high-level, intermediate, and low-level wastes. The AREST-CT code has features for analyzing the degradation of and release of radionuclides from the waste form, chemical reactions that depend on time and space, and transport of the waste and other products through the EBS. This document provides a description of the verification testing that has been performed on the initial version of ARESTCT (V1.0). Software verification is the process of confirming that the models and algorithms have been correctly implemented into a computer code. Software verification for V1.0 consisted of testing the individual modules (unit tests) and a test of the fully-coupled model (integration testing). The integration test was done by comparing the results from AREST-CT with the results from the reactive transport code CIRF.A. The test problem consisted of a 1-D analysis of the release, transport, and precipitation of {sup 99}{Tc} in an idealized LLW disposal system. All verification tests showed that AREST-CT works properly and in accordance with design specifications.

  13. Collateral Ventilation Quantification Using Xenon-Enhanced Dynamic Dual-Energy CT: Differences between Canine and Swine Models of Bronchial Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Ah; Park, Sang Joon; Lee, Chang Hyun; Park, Chang Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the difference in the degree of collateral ventilation between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction could be detected by using xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Materials and Methods Eight mongrel dogs and six pigs underwent dynamic dual-energy scanning of 64-slice dual-source CT at 12-second interval for 2-minute wash-in period (60% xenon) and at 24-second interval for 3-minute wash-out period with segmental bronchus occluded. Ventilation parameters of magnitude (A value), maximal slope, velocity (K value), and time-to-peak (TTP) enhancement were calculated from dynamic xenon maps using exponential function of Kety model. Results A larger difference in A value between parenchyma was observed in pigs than in dogs (absolute difference, -33.0 ± 5.0 Hounsfield units [HU] vs. -2.8 ± 7.1 HU, p = 0.001; normalized percentage difference, -79.8 ± 1.8% vs. -5.4 ± 16.4%, p = 0.0007). Mean maximal slopes in both periods in the occluded parenchyma only decreased in pigs (all p < 0.05). K values of both periods were not different (p = 0.892) in dogs. However, a significant (p = 0.027) difference was found in pigs in the wash-in period. TTP was delayed in the occluded parenchyma in pigs (p = 0.013) but not in dogs (p = 0.892). Conclusion Xenon-ventilation CT allows the quantification of collateral ventilation and detection of differences between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction. PMID:25995696

  14. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-01-21

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging. PMID:22156174

  15. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  16. Role of PET/CT in Workup of Fever without a Source.

    PubMed

    Dibble, Elizabeth H; Yoo, Don C; Noto, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    Fever without source is a febrile illness without localizing signs or initial obvious cause. Early workup will often include chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis, with or without CT of the chest. To evaluate localizing signs or symptoms or to further evaluate findings from initial studies, targeted imaging according to body part can be performed by using radiography, ultrasonography, CT, or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Nuclear medicine studies can provide imaging of the whole body and may be helpful when the clinical and conventional imaging workup findings are negative or equivocal in identifying a source of fever. Nuclear medicine studies can be used to detect pathologic changes early in a disease course, even in the absence of an anatomic abnormality. Gallium 67 scintigraphy, indium 111- and technetium 99m-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy, and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET)/CT studies are all useful in the evaluation of fever, but the radiopharmaceutical cost for PET/CT is much lower than that for radiolabeled leukocyte studies. The increased use of bundled payments for inpatient admissions requires updated cost evaluations for the preferred nuclear medicine study. For inpatients in whom the findings from the initial clinical workup and imaging studies are nondiagnostic, PET/CT examination may be preferable to radiolabeled leukocyte studies because of its high sensitivity and lower cost. Negative findings at PET/CT can be helpful in excluding a suspected site of infection, and positive findings at PET/CT can be helpful in confirming a suspected site of infection or in identifying an unexpected cause of fever. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27399241

  17. Acute intestinal anisakiasis: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, H N; Avcu, S; Pauwels, W; Mortelé, K J; De Backer, A I

    2012-09-01

    Small bowel anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease that results from consumption of raw or insufficiently pickled, salted, smoked, or cooked wild marine fish infected with Anisakis larvae. We report a case of intestinal anisakiasis in a 63-year-old woman presenting with acute onset of abdominal complaints one day after ingestion of raw wild-caught herring from the Northsea. Computed tomography (CT) scanning demonstrated thickening of the distal small bowel wall, mucosa with hyperenhancement, mural stratification, fluid accumulation within dilated small-bowel loops and hyperemia of mesenteric vessels. In patients with a recent history of eating raw marine fish presenting with acute onset of abdominal complaints and CT features of acute small bowel inflammation the possibility of anisakiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal syndromes.

  18. Postmortem pulmonary CT in hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael; Giugni, Giannina; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    Fatal hypothermia has been associated with pulmonary edema. With postmortem full body computed tomography scanning (PMCT), the lungs can also be examined for CT attenuation. In fatal hypothermia cases low CT attenuation appeared to prevail in the lungs. We compared 14 cases of fatal hypothermia with an age-sex matched control group. Additionally, 4 cases of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning were examined. Furthermore, 10 test cases were examined to test predictability based on PMCT. Two readers measured CT attenuation on four different axial slices across the lungs (blinded to case group and other reader's results). Hypothermia was associated with statistically significantly lower lung PMCT attenuation and lower lung weights than controls, and there was a dose-effect relationship at an environmental temperature cutoff of 2 °C. CO poisoning yielded low pulmonary attenuation but higher lung weights. General model based prediction yielded a 94% probability for fatal hypothermia deaths and a 21% probability for non-hypothermia deaths in the test group. Increased breathing rate is known to accompany both CO poisoning and hypothermia, so this could partly explain the low PMCT lung attenuation due to an oxygen dissociation curve left shift. A more marked distension in fatal hypothermia, compared to CO poisoning, indicates that further, possibly different mechanisms, are involved in these cases. Increased dead space and increased stiffness to deflation (but not inflation) appear to be effects of inhaling cold air (but not CO) that may explain the difference in low PMCT attenuation seen in hypothermia cases. PMID:25326676

  19. CT-assisted agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, James H.; Yancey, Robert N.

    1996-11-01

    The next century will witness at least two great revolutions in the way goods are produced. First, workers will use the medium of virtual reality in all aspects of marketing, research, development, prototyping, manufacturing, sales and service. Second, market forces will drive manufacturing towards small-lot production and just-in-time delivery. Already, we can discern the merging of these megatrends into what some are calling agile manufacturing. Under this new paradigm, parts and processes will be designed and engineered within the mind of a computer, tooled and manufactured by the offspring of today's rapid prototyping equipment, and evaluated for performance and reliability by advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and sophisticated computational models. Computed tomography (CT) is the premier example of an NDE method suitable for future agile manufacturing activities. It is the only modality that provides convenient access to the full suite of engineering data that users will need to avail themselves of computer- aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer- aided engineering capabilities, as well as newly emerging reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and solid freeform fabrication technologies. As such, CT is assured a central, utilitarian role in future industrial operations. An overview of this exciting future for industrial CT is presented.

  20. Postmortem pulmonary CT in hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael; Giugni, Giannina; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    Fatal hypothermia has been associated with pulmonary edema. With postmortem full body computed tomography scanning (PMCT), the lungs can also be examined for CT attenuation. In fatal hypothermia cases low CT attenuation appeared to prevail in the lungs. We compared 14 cases of fatal hypothermia with an age-sex matched control group. Additionally, 4 cases of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning were examined. Furthermore, 10 test cases were examined to test predictability based on PMCT. Two readers measured CT attenuation on four different axial slices across the lungs (blinded to case group and other reader's results). Hypothermia was associated with statistically significantly lower lung PMCT attenuation and lower lung weights than controls, and there was a dose-effect relationship at an environmental temperature cutoff of 2 °C. CO poisoning yielded low pulmonary attenuation but higher lung weights. General model based prediction yielded a 94% probability for fatal hypothermia deaths and a 21% probability for non-hypothermia deaths in the test group. Increased breathing rate is known to accompany both CO poisoning and hypothermia, so this could partly explain the low PMCT lung attenuation due to an oxygen dissociation curve left shift. A more marked distension in fatal hypothermia, compared to CO poisoning, indicates that further, possibly different mechanisms, are involved in these cases. Increased dead space and increased stiffness to deflation (but not inflation) appear to be effects of inhaling cold air (but not CO) that may explain the difference in low PMCT attenuation seen in hypothermia cases.

  1. Conflicting or complementary role of computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the assessment of thymic cancer and thymoma: our experience and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Scagliori, Elena; Evangelista, Laura; Panunzio, Annalori; Calabrese, Fiorella; Nannini, Nazarena; Polverosi, Roberta; Pomerri, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in patients with thymic cancer and thymoma at initial staging. Methods We retrospectively reviewed CT and PET/CT scans of 26 patients with a thymic cancer (n = 9) or thymoma (n = 17). Chest CT findings documented were qualitative and quantitative. Both qualitative and semiquantitative data were recovered by PET/CT. The comparisons among histological entities, outcome, and qualitative data from CT and PET/CT were made by non-parametric analysis. Results PET/CT resulted positive in 15/17 patients with thymoma. CT was available in 5/9 (56%) patients with thymic cancer and in 3/17 with thymoma. All quantitative CT parameters were significantly higher in patients with thymic cancer than thymoma (maximum axial diameter: 45 vs. 20 mm, maximum longitudinal diameter: 69 vs. 21 mm and volume: 77.91 vs. 4.52 mL; all P < 0.05). Conversely, only metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis were significantly different in patients with thymic cancer than thymoma (126.53 vs. 6.03 cm3 and 246.05 vs. 20.32, respectively; both P < 0.05). After a median follow-up time of 17.45 months, four recurrences of disease occurred: three in patients with thymic cancer and one with a type B2 thymoma. CT volume in patients with recurrent disease was 102.19 mL versus a median value of 62.5 mL in six disease-free patients. MTV was higher in the recurrent than disease-free patient subset (143.3 vs. 81.13 cm3), although not statistically significant (P = 0.075). Conclusion Our preliminary results demonstrated that both morphological and metabolic volume could be useful from a diagnostic and prognostic point of view in thymic cancer and thymoma patients. A large multi-center clinical trial experience for confirming the findings of this study seems mandatory. PMID:26273398

  2. Dose calculation using megavoltage cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, Olivier . E-mail: Morin@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Chen, Josephine; Aubin, Michele; Gillis, Amy; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Bose, Supratik; Chen Hong; Descovich, Martina; Xia Ping; Pouliot, Jean

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of performing dose calculation on megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) of head-and-neck patients in order to track the dosimetric errors produced by anatomic changes. Methods and Materials: A simple geometric model was developed using a head-size water cylinder to correct an observed cupping artifact occurring with MVCBCT. The uniformity-corrected MVCBCT was calibrated for physical density. Beam arrangements and weights from the initial treatment plans defined using the conventional CT were applied to the MVCBCT image, and the dose distribution was recalculated. The dosimetric inaccuracies caused by the cupping artifact were evaluated on the water phantom images. An ideal test patient with no observable anatomic changes and a patient imaged with both CT and MVCBCT before and after considerable weight loss were used to clinically validate MVCBCT for dose calculation and to determine the dosimetric impact of large anatomic changes. Results: The nonuniformity of a head-size water phantom ({approx}30%) causes a dosimetric error of less than 5%. The uniformity correction method developed greatly reduces the cupping artifact, resulting in dosimetric inaccuracies of less than 1%. For the clinical cases, the agreement between the dose distributions calculated using MVCBCT and CT was better than 3% and 3 mm where all tissue was encompassed within the MVCBCT. Dose-volume histograms from the dose calculations on CT and MVCBCT were in excellent agreement. Conclusion: MVCBCT can be used to estimate the dosimetric impact of changing anatomy on several structures in the head-and-neck region.

  3. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  4. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  5. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Shigeo; Hamada, Naoki; Ishii, Keizo; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Ohkura, Satoru; Terakawa, Atsuki; Hatori, Yoshinobu; Fujiki, Kota; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Sho

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research.

  6. A microPET/CT system for invivo small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, K.; Wu, Y.; Boone, J. M.; Cherry, S. R.

    2007-07-01

    A microCT scanner was designed, fabricated and integrated with a previously reported microPET II scanner (Tai et al 2003 Phys. Med. Biol. 48 1519, Yang et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 2527), forming a dual modality system for in vivo anatomic and molecular imaging of the mouse. The system was designed to achieve high-spatial-resolution and high-sensitivity PET images with adequate CT image quality for anatomic localization and attenuation correction with low x-ray dose. The system also has relatively high throughput for screening, and a flexible gantry and user interface. X-rays were produced by a 50 kVp, 1.5 mA fixed tungsten anode tube, with a focal spot size of 70 µm. The detector was a 5 × 5 cm2 photodiode detector incorporating 48 µm pixels on a CMOS array and a fast gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS) intensifying screen. The microCT system has a flexible C-arm gantry design with adjustable detector positioning, which acquires CT projection images around the common microPET/CT bed. The design and the initial characterization of the microCT system is described, and images of the first mouse scans with microPET/CT scanning protocols are shown.

  7. Laser CT evaluation on normoxic PAGAT gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. S.; Samuel, E. J. J.; Watanabe, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Optical computed tomography has been shown to be a potentially useful imaging tool for the radiation therapy physicists. In radiation therapy, researchers have used optical CT for the readout of 3D dosimeters. The purpose of this paper is to describe the initial evaluation of a newly fabricated laser CT scanner for 3D gel dosimetry which works using the first generation principle. A normoxic PAGAT (Polyacrylamide Gelatin and Tetrakis) gel is used as a dosimeter for this analysis. When a laser passes through the gel phantom, absorption and scattering of photon take place. The optical attenuation coefficient of the laser can be obtained by measuring its intensity after passing through the gel by a sensor. The scanner motion is controlled by a computer program written in Microsoft Visual C++. Reconstruction and data analysis on the irradiated gel phantom is performed by suitable algorithm using Matlab software.

  8. Automatic co-segmentation of lung tumor based on random forest in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xueqing; Xiang, Dehui; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Weifang; Shi, Fei; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a fully automatic method is proposed to segment the lung tumor in clinical 3D PET-CT images. The proposed method effectively combines PET and CT information to make full use of the high contrast of PET images and superior spatial resolution of CT images. Our approach consists of three main parts: (1) initial segmentation, in which spines are removed in CT images and initial connected regions achieved by thresholding based segmentation in PET images; (2) coarse segmentation, in which monotonic downhill function is applied to rule out structures which have similar standardized uptake values (SUV) to the lung tumor but do not satisfy a monotonic property in PET images; (3) fine segmentation, random forests method is applied to accurately segment the lung tumor by extracting effective features from PET and CT images simultaneously. We validated our algorithm on a dataset which consists of 24 3D PET-CT images from different patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The average TPVF, FPVF and accuracy rate (ACC) were 83.65%, 0.05% and 99.93%, respectively. The correlation analysis shows our segmented lung tumor volumes has strong correlation ( average 0.985) with the ground truth 1 and ground truth 2 labeled by a clinical expert.

  9. Response of osteosarcoma to preoperative intravenous high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mail, J.T.; Cohen, M.D.; Mirkin, L.D.; Provisor, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The histologic response of an osteosarcoma to preamputation high-dose methotrexate therapy can be used to determine the optimum maintenance chemotherapy regimen to be administered after amputation. This study evaluates computed tomography (CT) as a method of assessing the response of the tumor to the methotrexate therapy. Nine patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of an extremity had a CT scan of the tumor at initial presentation. This was compared with a second CT scan after four courses of high-dose intravenous methotrexate. Each set of scans was evaluated for changes in bony destruction, soft-tissue mass, pattern of calcification, and extent of tumor involvement of the marrow cavity. These findings were correlated with the histologic response of the tumor as measured by the degree of tumor necrosis. The changes seen on CT correlated well with the degree of the histologic response in seven of the nine patients.

  10. Comparison of stroke infarction between CT perfusion and diffusion weighted imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Arka, Israna Hossain; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Mukari, Shahizon Azura; Law, Zhe Kang; Sahathevan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results of comparison of automatic segmentations of the infarct core, between that obtained from CT perfusion (based on time to peak parameter) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). For each patient, the two imaging volumes were automatically co-registered to a common frame of reference based on an acquired CT angiography image. The accuracy of image registration is measured by the overlap of the segmented brain from both images (CT perfusion and DWI), measured within their common field of view. Due to the limitations of the study, DWI was acquired as a follow up scan up to a week after initial CT based imaging. However, we found significant overlap of the segmented brain (Jaccard indices of approximately 0.8) and the percentage of infarcted brain tissue from the two modalities were still fairly highly correlated (correlation coefficient of approximately 0.9). The results are promising with more data needed in future for clinical inference.

  11. Preoperative staging of colorectal cancer: CT vs. integrated FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Min, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Chung, Tae Woong; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2008-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging is essential in determining the optimal therapeutic planning for individual patients. The computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer, even if controversial, may be useful for planning surgery and/or neoadjuvant therapy, particularly when local tumor extension into adjacent organs or distant metastases are detected. There have been significant changes in the CT technology with the advent of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanner. Advances in CT technology have raised interest in the potential role of CT for detection and staging of colorectal cancer. In recent studies, MDCT with MPR images has shown promising accuracy in the evaluation of local extent and nodal involvement of colorectal cancer. Combined PET/CT images have significant advantages over either alone because it provides both functional and anatomical data. Therefore, it is natural to expect that PET/CT would improve the accuracy of preoperative staging of colorectal cancer. The most significant additional information provided by PET/CT relates to the accurate detection of distant metastases. For the evaluation of patients with colorectal cancer, CT has relative advantages over PET/CT in regard to the depth of tumor invasion through the wall, extramural extension, and regional lymph node metastases. PET/CT should be performed on selected patients with suggestive but inconclusive metastatic lesions with CT. In addition, PET/CT with dedicated CT protocols, such as contrast-enhanced PET/CT and PET/CT colonography, may replace the diagnostic CT for the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer.

  12. Improvement of the cine-CT based 4D-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Sun Xiaojun; Luo Dershan

    2007-11-15

    An improved 4D-CT utility has been developed on the GE LightSpeed multislice CT (MSCT) and Discovery PET/CT scanners, which have the cine CT scan capability. Two new features have been added in this 4D-CT over the commercial Advantage 4D-CT from GE. One feature was a new tool for disabling parts of the respiratory signal with irregular respiration and improving the accuracy of phase determination for the respiratory signal from the Varian real-time positioning and monitoring (RPM) system before sorting of the cine CT images into the 4D-CT images. The second feature was to allow generation of the maximum-intensity-projection (MIP), average (AVG) and minimum-intensity-projection (mip) CT images from the cine CT images without a respiratory signal. The implementation enables the assessment of tumor motion in treatment planning with the MIP, AVG, and mip CT images on the GE MSCT and PET/CT scanners without the RPM and the Advantage 4D-CT with a GE Advantage windows workstation. Several clinical examples are included to illustrate this new application.

  13. Dual Source Mass Spectrometer and Sample Handling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cornish, T. J.; Cheng, A. F.; Niemann, H. B.; Harpold, D. N.; Gorevan, S. P.; Rafeek, S.; Yucht, D.

    2002-01-01

    We present details of a miniature integrated time-of-flight mass spectrometer and sample handling system under development to address some of the needs for in situ sample analysis on landed missions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of CT Enterography for Active Inflammatory Terminal Ileal Crohn Disease: Comparison of Full-Dose and Half-Dose Images Reconstructed with FBP and Half-Dose Images with SAFIRE.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Namita S; Baker, Mark E; Goenka, Ajit H; Bullen, Jennifer A; Obuchowski, Nancy A; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Einstein, David; Feldman, Myra K; Kanmaniraja, Devaraju; Purysko, Andrei S; Vahdat, Noushin; Primak, Andrew N; Karim, Wadih; Herts, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy and image quality of computed tomographic (CT) enterographic images obtained at half dose and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with those of full-dose CT enterographic images reconstructed with FBP for active inflammatory terminal or neoterminal ileal Crohn disease. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Ninety subjects (45 with active terminal ileal Crohn disease and 45 without Crohn disease) underwent CT enterography with a dual-source CT unit. The reference standard for confirmation of active Crohn disease was active terminal ileal Crohn disease based on ileocolonoscopy or established Crohn disease and imaging features of active terminal ileal Crohn disease. Data from both tubes were reconstructed with FBP (100% exposure); data from the primary tube (50% exposure) were reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE strengths 3 and 4, yielding four datasets per CT enterographic examination. The mean volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) at full dose were 13.1 mGy (median, 7.36 mGy) and 15.9 mGy (median, 13.06 mGy), respectively, and those at half dose were 6.55 mGy (median, 3.68 mGy) and 7.95 mGy (median, 6.5 mGy). Images were subjectively evaluated by eight radiologists for quality and diagnostic confidence for Crohn disease. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated, and the multireader, multicase analysis of variance method was used to compare reconstruction methods on the basis of a noninferiority margin of 0.05. Results The mean AUCs with half-dose scans (FBP, 0.908; SAFIRE 3, 0.935; SAFIRE 4, 0.924) were noninferior to the mean AUC with full-dose FBP scans (0.908; P < .003). The proportion of images with inferior quality was significantly higher with all

  15. CT assessment of silicosis in exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Bégin, R; Bergeron, D; Samson, L; Boctor, M; Cantin, A

    1987-03-01

    For evaluation of the clinical usefulness of CT of the thorax in workers exposed to silica, 58 workers with long-term exposure to silica in the granite and foundry industries of the Eastern Townships of Quebec were examined. CT scans were compared with standard posteroanterior chest radiographs by using the International Labour Office 1980 grading system for silicosis. Six areas of the lung in each patient were assessed by both techniques for profusion (number) of opacities (small nodules), coalescence, and the presence of large opacities. CT scans and chest radiographs yielded similar average scores for detection of opacities. CT identified significantly more coalescence and large opacities in patients with simple silicosis. In patients with complicated silicosis, CT results were comparable with those of chest radiographs. CT of the thorax in workers exposed to silica does not identify more patients with minimal parenchymal disease, but it does detect earlier changes of coalescence.

  16. Gastric interposition following transhiatal esophagectomy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.H.; Agha, F.P.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.

    1985-04-01

    Transhiatal esophagectomy without thoracotomy (THE) but with gastric interposition results in less morbidity and mortality than standard transpleural esophagectomy with thoracotomy. Barium examination has been the primary radiographic study following THE for detecting postoperative complications. The authors reviewed computed tomography (CT) scans of 21 patients who had undergone THE and correlated CT appearance with clinical status and with findings of the barium studies. Local mediastinal recurrent neoplasm was detected by CT in seven patients; barium study within 2 weeks of the CT scan failed to detect tumor recurrence in three of these patients. CT is the modality of choice for detecting locally recurrent neoplasm and distant metastases following THE and may also be helpful in patients with postoperative mediastinal abscess. Normal mediastinal CT anatomy after esophagectomy is reviewed in order to warn against pitfalls in scan interpretation.

  17. The assessment of industrial CT's probing error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yushu; Gao, Sitian; Song, Xu; Li, Dongsheng; Li, Wei; Li, Qi; Li, Shi; Chen, Siwen

    2014-11-01

    Similar to traditional CMM, probing error of industrial CT is used for assessing the 3D measurement error of the machine in a very small measurement volume. A research on the assessment of probing error of industrial CT is conducted here. Lots of assessment tests are carried out on the industrial CT Metrotom1500 in the National institute of metrology, using standard balls with different size and materials. The test results demonstrate that probing error of industrial CT can be affected seriously by the measurement strategy and standard balls. According to some further analysis about the test results, the assessment strategy of industrial CT's probing error is concluded preliminary, which can ensure the comparability of the assessment results in different industrial CT system.

  18. NOTE: The influence of CT image noise on proton range calculation in radiotherapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.; Paige, Sandra L.

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this note is to evaluate the relationship between the stochastic errors in CT numbers and the standard deviation of the computed proton beam range in radiotherapy planning. The stochastic voxel-to-voxel variation in CT numbers called 'noise,' may be due to signal registration, processing and numerical image reconstruction technique. Noise in CT images may cause a deviation in the computed proton range from the physical proton range, even assuming that the error due to CT number-stopping power calibration is removed. To obtain the probability density function (PDF) of the computed proton range, we have used the continuing slowing down approximation (CSDA) and the uncorrelated white Gaussian noise along the proton path. The model of white noise was accepted because for the slice-based fan-beam CT scanner; the power-spectrum properties apply only to the axial (x, y) domain and the noise is uncorrelated in the z domain. However, the possible influence of the noise power spectrum on the standard deviation of the range should be investigated in the future. A random number generator was utilized for noise simulation and this procedure was iteratively repeated to obtain convergence of range PDF, which approached a Gaussian distribution. We showed that the standard deviation of the range, σ, increases linearly with the initial proton energy, computational grid size and standard deviation of the voxel values. The 95% confidence interval width of the range PDF, which is defined as 4σ, may reach 0.6 cm for the initial proton energy of 200 MeV, computational grid 0.25 cm and 5% standard deviation of CT voxel values. Our results show that the range uncertainty due to random errors in CT numbers may be significant and comparable to the uncertainties due to calibration of CT numbers. Presented at the 51st Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Anaheim, CA, July 26-30, 2009.

  19. Cortical Tremor (CT) with coincident orthostatic movements.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Frucht, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Cortical tremor (CT) is a form of cortical reflex myoclonus that can mimic essential tremor (ET). Clinical features that are helpful in distinguishing CT from ET are the irregular and jerky appearance of the movements. We report two patients with CT with coexisting orthostatic movements, either orthostatic tremor (OT) or myoclonus, who experienced functional improvement in both cortical myoclonus and orthostatic movements when treated with levetiracetam. PMID:26788343

  20. Normal conus medullaris: CT criteria for recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, J.P.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, I.L.; Rauschning, W.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-06-01

    The normal CT configuration and dimension of the conus medullaris and adjacent spinal cord were determined in 30 patients who had no clinical evidence of conus compression. CT studies were also correlated with anatomic sections in cadavers. The normal conus on CT has a distinctive oval configuration, an arterior sulcus, and a posterior promontory. The anteroposterior diameter ranged from 5 to 8 mm; the transverse diameter from 8 to 11 mm. Intramedullary processes altered both the dimensions and configuration of the conus.

  1. Radiation dose measurements in coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with high radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of coronary CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during coronary CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190

  2. SU-E-J-267: Change in Mean CT Intensity of Lung Tumors During Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahon, R; Tennyson, N; Weiss, E; Hugo, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate CT intensity change of lung tumors during radiation therapy. Methods: Repeated 4D CT images were acquired on a CT simulator during the course of therapy for 27 lung cancer patients on IRB approved protocols. All subjects received definitive radiation treatment ± chemotherapy. CT scans were completed prior to treatment, and 2–7 times during the treatment course. Primary tumor was delineated by an experienced Radiation Oncologist. Contours were thresholded between −100 HU and 200 HU to remove airways and bone. Correlations between the change in the mean tumor intensity and initial tumor intensity, SUVmax, and tumor volume change rate were investigated. Reproducibility was assessed by evaluating the variation in mean intensity over all phases in 4DCT, for a subgroup of 19 subjects. Results: Reproducibility of tumor intensity between phases as characterized by the root mean square of standard deviation across 19 subjects was 1.8 HU. Subjects had a mean initial tumor intensity of 16.5 ± 11.6 HU and an overall reduction in HU by 10.3 ± 8.5 HU. Evaluation of the changes in tumor intensity during treatment showed a decrease of 0.3 ± 0.3 HU/day for all subjects, except three. No significant correlation was found between change in HU/day and initial HU intensity (p=0.53), initial PET SUVmax (p=0.69), or initial tumor volume (p=0.70). The rate of tumor volume change was weakly correlated (R{sup 2}=0.05) with HU change (p=0.01). Conclusion: Most lung cancer subjects showed a marked trend of decreasing mean tumor CT intensity throughout radiotherapy, including early in the treatment course. Change in HU/day is not correlated with other potential early predictors for response, such as SUV and tumor volume change. This Result supports future studies to evaluate change in tumor intensity on CT as an early predictor of response.

  3. Laxative-free CT colonography

    PubMed Central

    Slater, A; Betts, M; D'Costa, H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine if the introduction of faecal tagging to CT colonography (CTC) made the examination easier to tolerate or reduced the number of false-positives. Methods Our department changed bowel preparation for CT colonography from Picolax (Ferring Pharmaceuticals Ltd, London, UK) to Gastrografin® (Bracco Diagnostics Inc, Princeton, NJ) only with a modified diet. Questionnaires were given to a subgroup of patients within these cohorts. The numbers of false-positives were compared between two cohorts before and after this change. false-positives were defined as lesions reported on CT that were not confirmed by subsequent endoscopic examination. Polyps were matched if they were in the same or adjacent segments, and were within 5 mm of the reported size. Results 412 patients were identified from the Picolax cohort, and 116 from the Gastrografin cohort. 62 patients in each group completed questionnaires. Gastrografin produced less diarrhoea; 34% had five or more bowel motions in the previous day and night, compared with 77% for Picolax (p<0.001), although more patients found drinking it unpleasant compared with Picolax (85% reported drinking Picolax as “easy” vs 61% for Gastrografin; p=0.002). Picolax produced more non-diagnostic examinations, although this difference was not statistically significant. There was not a significant reduction in the numbers of false-positives (2 out of 112 for Gastrografin group, 14 out of 389 for the Picolax group; p=0.54). Conclusion Switching from Picolax to Gastrografin as a CTC preparation technique produced less diarrhoea, but did not reduce the number of false-positives. PMID:22167512

  4. Helical 4D CT and Comparison with Cine 4D CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tinsu

    4D CT was one of the most important developments in radiation oncology in the last decade. Its early development in single slice CT and commercialization in multi-slice CT has radically changed our practice in radiation treatment of lung cancer, and has enabled the stereotactic radiosurgery of early stage lung cancer. In this chapter, we will document the history of 4D CT development, detail the data sufficiency condition governing the 4D CT data collection; present the design of the commercial helical 4D CTs from Philips and Siemens; compare the differences between the helical 4D CT and the GE cine 4D CT in data acquisition, slice thickness, acquisition time and work flow; review the respiratory monitoring devices; and understand the causes of image artifacts in 4D CT.

  5. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  6. CT Colonography: Pitfalls in Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis As with any radiologic imaging test, there are a number of potential interpretive pitfalls at CT colonography (CTC) that need to be recognized and handled appropriately. Perhaps the single most important step in learning to avoid most of these diagnostic traps is simply to be aware of their existence. With a little experience, most of these potential pitfalls will be easily recognized. This review will systematically cover the key pitfalls confronting the radiologist at CTC interpretation, primarily dividing them into those related to technique and those related to underlying anatomy. Tips and pointers for how to effectively handle these potential pitfalls are included. PMID:23182508

  7. Pediatric CT quality management and improvement program.

    PubMed

    Larson, David B; Molvin, Lior Z; Wang, Jia; Chan, Frandics P; Newman, Beverley; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2014-10-01

    Modern CT is a powerful yet increasingly complex technology that continues to rapidly evolve; optimal clinical implementation as well as appropriate quality management and improvement in CT are challenging but attainable. This article outlines the organizational structure on which a CT quality management and improvement program can be built, followed by a discussion of common as well as pediatric-specific challenges. Organizational elements of a CT quality management and improvement program include the formulation of clear objectives; definition of the roles and responsibilities of key personnel; implementation of a technologist training, coaching and feedback program; and use of an efficient and accurate monitoring system. Key personnel and roles include a radiologist as the CT director, a qualified CT medical physicist, as well as technologists with specific responsibilities and adequate time dedicated to operation management, CT protocol management and CT technologist education. Common challenges in managing a clinical CT operation are related to the complexity of newly introduced technology, of training and communication and of performance monitoring. Challenges specific to pediatric patients include the importance of including patient size in protocol and dose considerations, a lower tolerance for error in these patients, and a smaller sample size from which to learn and improve.

  8. Imaging and PET-PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Von Schulthess, Gustav K; Hany, Thomas F

    2008-03-01

    PET-CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes "hardware-fusion" to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. For this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several well-designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT.

  9. An auxiliary CT tabletop for radiography at the time of CT.

    PubMed

    McCollough, C H; Daly, T R; King, B F; LeRoy, A J

    2001-01-01

    An auxiliary CT tabletop was designed and manufactured such that radiographic images might be acquired, with use of a ceiling-mounted X-ray tube, without removing the patient from the CT table. The tabletop required no modifications to the original CT table housing and did not produce artifacts in the CT images. Radiographs obtained with the overhead X-ray tube and auxiliary tabletop demonstrated image quality equivalent to traditional radiographs.

  10. Coronary artery bypass graft flow: qualitative evaluation with cine single-detector row CT and comparison with findings at angiography.

    PubMed

    Tello, Richard; Hartnell, George G; Costello, Philip; Ecker, Christian P

    2002-09-01

    A four-point ordinal-scale qualitative flow index was used for assessment of patency of 75 coronary artery bypass grafts in 26 patients examined with spiral computed tomography (CT). CT findings were compared with selective graft angiographic findings. Of 54 open grafts, 52 were patent at initial selective graft angiography and 50 were patent at spiral CT; accuracy rates were 97% (73 of 75) and 95% (71 of 75), respectively. Spiral CT flow index agreed with angiographically determined flow in 85% (95% CI: 0.77, 0.93) of grafts. The kappa statistic demonstrated very good to excellent intermodality (0.75) and interobserver (0.89) agreement. Spiral CT may be a feasible means of assessing quality of flow in bypass grafts. PMID:12202732

  11. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    SciTech Connect

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; Den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-04-15

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the possibility to obtain CTA images from the CTP examination, thereby possibly obviating the CTA examination. This would save the patient exposure to radiation, contrast, and time. Each CTP frame is a CTA image with a varying amount of contrast enhancement and with high noise. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) we combined all 3D images into one 3D image after registration to correct for patient motion between time frames. Image combination consists of weighted averaging in which the weighting factor of each frame is proportional to the arterial contrast. It can be shown that the arterial CNR is maximized in this procedure. An additional advantage of the use of the time series of CTP images is that automatic differentiation between arteries and veins is possible. This feature was used to mask veins in the resulting 3D images to enhance visibility of arteries in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. With a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner (64x0.625 mm) CTP examinations of eight patients were performed on 80 mm of brain using the toggling table technique. The CTP examination consisted of a time series of 15 3D images (2x64x0.625 mm; 80 kV; 150 mAs each) with an interval of 4 s. The authors measured the CNR in images obtained with weighted averaging, images obtained with plain averaging, and images with maximal arterial enhancement. The authors also compared CNR and quality of the images with that of regular CTA examinations and examined the effectiveness of automatic vein masking in MIP images. The CNR of the weighted averaged images is, on the average, 1.73 times the CNR of an image at maximal arterial enhancement in the CTP series, where the use of plain averaging

  12. [CT kinetics of intratumor liposome deposits].

    PubMed

    Wowra, B; Mentrup, E; Zeller, W J; Stricker, H; Sturm, V

    1988-04-01

    CT follow-up studies of liposome-entrapped metrizamide after intraneoplastic injection into neurogenic s.c. rat tumors were performed. By closely resembling clinical examination conditions, the experimental design has proven suitable in determining the in vivo kinetics of these interstitial liposome deposits. When compared to free metrizamide which may be considered an analogue of water-soluble chemotherapeutics, the encapsulation of metrizamide in liposomes resulted in a retarded decline of the contrast enhancement. Diffusion of liposomes could not be detected and the X-ray attenuation values measured within the liposome deposits continuously decreased with time for both types of liposomes. In the case of multilamellar vesicles, this significantly corresponded to a zero order kinetics with a mean halflife of 300 h. An initial increment in the X-ray attenuation of the liposome deposits might be due to the interstitial absorption of the water component of the liposome-dispersion. Because of the pronounced retardation effect of multilamellar liposomes resulting in a 140-fold prolongation of the interstitial retention time of metrizamide and due to their release kinetics these vesicles may be an appropriate carrier system for a local interstitial chemotherapy modality. Small unilamellar vesicles having an interstitial half-life of 14 h may be used as a faster component of a composed therapy system.

  13. CT/MRI of neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Reznek, Rodney H

    2006-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are often thought to be rare and rather recherché cancers which are of little concern to the general physician, surgeon or radiologist because of their rarity and esoteric nature. In fact, while relatively uncommon, the total group of gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) tumours incorporates the spectrum of all types of carcinoids, incuding bronchial carcinoids, and the whole gamut of islet-cell tumours. Some of these may present as functioning tumours, with a plethora of hormonal secretions and concomitant clinical syndromes, and GEPs in general have an incidence around 30 per million population per year. This means that in the whole European Union, for example, there will be in the region of 12000 new patients every year presenting with one or another manifestation of these tumours. Furthermore, the comparatively long survival of many of these patients, compared to more common adenocarcinomas or epithelial tumours, implies that the point prevalence is also not inconsiderable. However, it is undoubtedly true that these tumours can be difficult to identify, especially in their early stages, and it is then that radiological investigation becomes of paramount importance. Having taken into account all these considerations, most investigators would initiate investigation of a suspected or biochemically proven islet-cell tumour with cross-sectional imaging—either CT or MRI. This will clearly identify the larger lesions, allow assessment of the entire abdomen, and provide valuable information on the presence of hepatic metastates. PMID:17114072

  14. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Rie Ø.; Strauch, Louise S.; Sandgaard, Michael; Kristensen, Thomas S.; Nielsen, Michael B.; Lauridsen, Carsten A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to provide an overview of the use of Dynamic Contrast-enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT) in patients with pancreatic cancer. This study was composed according to the PRISMA guidelines 2009. The literature search was conducted in PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases to identify all relevant publications. The QUADAS-2 tool was implemented to assess the risk of bias and applicability concerns of each included study. The initial literature search yielded 483 publications. Thirteen articles were included. Articles were categorized into three groups: nine articles concerning primary diagnosis or staging, one article about tumor response to treatment, and three articles regarding scan techniques. In exocrine pancreatic tumors, measurements of blood flow in eight studies and blood volume in seven studies were significantly lower in tumor tissue, compared with measurements in pancreatic tissue outside of tumor, or normal pancreatic tissue in control groups of healthy volunteers. The studies were heterogeneous in the number of patients enrolled and scan protocols. Perfusion parameters measured and analyzed by DCE-CT might be useful in the investigation of characteristic vascular patterns of exocrine pancreatic tumors. Further clinical studies are desired for investigating the potential of DCE-CT in pancreatic tumors. PMID:27608045

  15. Patient setup for PET/CT acquisition in radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Mary; Vaandering, Aude

    2010-09-01

    PET/CT imaging modalities have been shown to be useful in the diagnosis, staging, and monitoring of malignant diseases. Its inclusion into the treatment planning process is now central to modern radiotherapy practice. However, it is essential to be cognisant of the factors that are necessary in order to ensure that the acquired images are consistent with the requirements for both treatment planning and treatment delivery. Essential parameters required in image acquisition for radiotherapy planning and treatment include consistencies of table tops and the use of laser light for patient set-up. But they also include the accurate definition of the patient's initial positioning and the use of proper immobilization devices in the radiotherapy department. While determining this optimum set-up, patient psychological factors and limitations that may be due to the subsequent use of PET/CT for planning purposes need to be taken into account. Furthermore, patient set-up data need to be properly recorded and transmitted to the imaging departments. To ensure the consistency of patient set-up, the radiation therapist should ideally be directly involved in informing and positioning the patient on the PET/CT. However, a proper exchange of patient-related information can also be achieved by a close liaison between the two departments and by the use of clear detailed protocols per type of patient set-up and/or per localization of tumour site. PMID:20727605

  16. The benefit of personalized hybrid SPECT/CT pulmonary imaging.

    PubMed

    Simanek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid pulmonary imaging in the present day has seen a fusion of various uses of CT scans, including angiography (CTAG), diagnostic CT, low dose CT (LDCT), and perfusion or ventilation scintigraphy in tomographic or planar imaging. Determining the most effective individualized test for the complete diagnostics of patients with pulmonary symptoms for various groups of patients is a major issue. The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of the implementation of hybrid imaging in current methods of nuclear medicine in differential diagnostics of pulmonary embolism (PE). 326 patients were examined for symptomatology of PE. Patients were initially examined with SPECT perfusion scintigraphy. SPECT finding without sub-segmental or segmental defects was considered unproven PE but the finding of more segments or sub-segments in various lung parts was considered nearly proven PE. In the case of unclear findings, LDCT was added and in the case of a higher suspicion of PE, a ventilation examination was applied. It was possible to determine 83% of patients with the occurrence or exclusion of PE only on the basis of the perfusion SPECT examination and an X-ray or LDCT. LDCT was determined with 26% of the patients. With 41% of them, the use of LDCT resulted in an alternative diagnosis, explaining perfusion abnormalities. The research proved that use of SPECT/LDCT for differential diagnosis of lung symptoms brings about improvement in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism or the identification of other lung diseases when lung perfusion abnormalities are recorded. PMID:27648373

  17. The benefit of personalized hybrid SPECT/CT pulmonary imaging

    PubMed Central

    Simanek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid pulmonary imaging in the present day has seen a fusion of various uses of CT scans, including angiography (CTAG), diagnostic CT, low dose CT (LDCT), and perfusion or ventilation scintigraphy in tomographic or planar imaging. Determining the most effective individualized test for the complete diagnostics of patients with pulmonary symptoms for various groups of patients is a major issue. The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of the implementation of hybrid imaging in current methods of nuclear medicine in differential diagnostics of pulmonary embolism (PE). 326 patients were examined for symptomatology of PE. Patients were initially examined with SPECT perfusion scintigraphy. SPECT finding without sub-segmental or segmental defects was considered unproven PE but the finding of more segments or sub-segments in various lung parts was considered nearly proven PE. In the case of unclear findings, LDCT was added and in the case of a higher suspicion of PE, a ventilation examination was applied. It was possible to determine 83% of patients with the occurrence or exclusion of PE only on the basis of the perfusion SPECT examination and an X-ray or LDCT. LDCT was determined with 26% of the patients. With 41% of them, the use of LDCT resulted in an alternative diagnosis, explaining perfusion abnormalities. The research proved that use of SPECT/LDCT for differential diagnosis of lung symptoms brings about improvement in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism or the identification of other lung diseases when lung perfusion abnormalities are recorded.

  18. PIXSCAN: Pixel detector CT-scanner for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpierre, P.; Debarbieux, F.; Basolo, S.; Berar, J. F.; Bonissent, A.; Boudet, N.; Breugnon, P.; Caillot, B.; Cassol Brunner, F.; Chantepie, B.; Clemens, J. C.; Dinkespiler, B.; Khouri, R.; Koudobine, I.; Mararazzo, V.; Meessen, C.; Menouni, M.; Morel, C.; Mouget, C.; Pangaud, P.; Peyrin, F.; Rougon, G.; Sappey-Marinier, D.; Valton, S.; Vigeolas, E.

    2007-02-01

    The PIXSCAN is a small animal CT-scanner based on hybrid pixel detectors. These detectors provide very large dynamic range of photons counting at very low detector noise. They also provide high counting rates with fast image readout. Detection efficiency can be optimized by selecting the sensor medium according to the working energy range. Indeed, the use of CdTe allows a detection efficiency of 100% up to 50 keV. Altogether these characteristics are expected to improve the contrast of the CT-scanner, especially for soft tissues, and to reduce both the scan duration and the absorbed dose. A proof of principle has been performed by assembling into a PIXSCAN-XPAD2 prototype the photon counting pixel detector initially built for detection of X-ray synchrotron radiations. Despite the relatively large pixel size of this detector (330×330 μm 2), we can present three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of mice at good contrast and spatial resolution. A new photon counting chip (XPAD3) is designed in sub-micronique technology to achieve 130×130 μm 2 pixels. This improved circuit has been equipped with an energy selection circuit to act as a band-pass emission filter. Furthermore, the PIXSCAN-XPAD3 hybrid pixel detectors will be combined with the Lausanne ClearPET scanner demonstrator. CT image reconstruction in this non-conventional geometry is under study for this purpose.

  19. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Rie Ø; Strauch, Louise S; Sandgaard, Michael; Kristensen, Thomas S; Nielsen, Michael B; Lauridsen, Carsten A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to provide an overview of the use of Dynamic Contrast-enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT) in patients with pancreatic cancer. This study was composed according to the PRISMA guidelines 2009. The literature search was conducted in PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases to identify all relevant publications. The QUADAS-2 tool was implemented to assess the risk of bias and applicability concerns of each included study. The initial literature search yielded 483 publications. Thirteen articles were included. Articles were categorized into three groups: nine articles concerning primary diagnosis or staging, one article about tumor response to treatment, and three articles regarding scan techniques. In exocrine pancreatic tumors, measurements of blood flow in eight studies and blood volume in seven studies were significantly lower in tumor tissue, compared with measurements in pancreatic tissue outside of tumor, or normal pancreatic tissue in control groups of healthy volunteers. The studies were heterogeneous in the number of patients enrolled and scan protocols. Perfusion parameters measured and analyzed by DCE-CT might be useful in the investigation of characteristic vascular patterns of exocrine pancreatic tumors. Further clinical studies are desired for investigating the potential of DCE-CT in pancreatic tumors. PMID:27608045

  20. The benefit of personalized hybrid SPECT/CT pulmonary imaging

    PubMed Central

    Simanek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid pulmonary imaging in the present day has seen a fusion of various uses of CT scans, including angiography (CTAG), diagnostic CT, low dose CT (LDCT), and perfusion or ventilation scintigraphy in tomographic or planar imaging. Determining the most effective individualized test for the complete diagnostics of patients with pulmonary symptoms for various groups of patients is a major issue. The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of the implementation of hybrid imaging in current methods of nuclear medicine in differential diagnostics of pulmonary embolism (PE). 326 patients were examined for symptomatology of PE. Patients were initially examined with SPECT perfusion scintigraphy. SPECT finding without sub-segmental or segmental defects was considered unproven PE but the finding of more segments or sub-segments in various lung parts was considered nearly proven PE. In the case of unclear findings, LDCT was added and in the case of a higher suspicion of PE, a ventilation examination was applied. It was possible to determine 83% of patients with the occurrence or exclusion of PE only on the basis of the perfusion SPECT examination and an X-ray or LDCT. LDCT was determined with 26% of the patients. With 41% of them, the use of LDCT resulted in an alternative diagnosis, explaining perfusion abnormalities. The research proved that use of SPECT/LDCT for differential diagnosis of lung symptoms brings about improvement in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism or the identification of other lung diseases when lung perfusion abnormalities are recorded. PMID:27648373

  1. Colitis detection on abdominal CT scans by rich feature hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Lay, Nathan; Wei, Zhuoshi; Lu, Le; Kim, Lauren; Turkbey, Evrim; Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-03-01

    Colitis is inflammation of the colon due to neutropenia, inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn disease), infection and immune compromise. Colitis is often associated with thickening of the colon wall. The wall of a colon afflicted with colitis is much thicker than normal. For example, the mean wall thickness in Crohn disease is 11-13 mm compared to the wall of the normal colon that should measure less than 3 mm. Colitis can be debilitating or life threatening, and early detection is essential to initiate proper treatment. In this work, we apply high-capacity convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to bottom-up region proposals to detect potential colitis on CT scans. Our method first generates around 3000 category-independent region proposals for each slice of the input CT scan using selective search. Then, a fixed-length feature vector is extracted from each region proposal using a CNN. Finally, each region proposal is classified and assigned a confidence score with linear SVMs. We applied the detection method to 260 images from 26 CT scans of patients with colitis for evaluation. The detection system can achieve 0.85 sensitivity at 1 false positive per image.

  2. New approach to diagnosis of pulmonary embolism using multislice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niethammer, Matthias U.; Schoepf, Uwe J.; Wildberger, Hoachim E.; Klotz, Ernst; Fichte, Heinz; Schaller, Stefan

    2001-05-01

    Suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common indication for CT scanning of the thorax. Usually, intravenous contrast agent is administered utilizing a power-injector and the vascular structures are examined for the presence of pulmonary emboli. Current Multi-Slice CT-technology allows extending this morphological analysis by adding a more functional visualization of the actual parenchymal perfusion disturbance. We have developed a new image processing technique which allows selective color encoded display of parenchymal enhancement of the lung, which will be reduced in the presence of PE. Based on thin slice reconstructions an automatic 3D segmentation of the lung is performed followed by threshold based extraction of the major airways and vascular structures. This allows applying an adaptive 3D low-pass filter to the parenchymal volume only. The filtered volume data are then color encoded and overlaid onto the original CT-images. This combination of low-resolution perfusion-weighted color maps and high-resolution gray scale structural data from the same data set greatly enhances visualization of spatial relationships. The resulting images can be displayed in axial, sagittal and coronal orientation. Initial experience indicates that this new technique provides relevant additional information for the clinical management of patients with proven PE. A larger controlled patient study is under way.

  3. Metastatic meningioma: positron emission tomography CT imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, C; O'Connor, O J; O'Regan, K N; Keohane, C; Dineen, J; Hinchion, J; Sweeney, B; Maher, M M

    2010-01-01

    The imaging findings of a case of metastasing meningioma are described. The case illustrates a number of rare and interesting features. The patient presented with haemoptysis 22 years after the initial resection of an intracranial meningioma. CT demonstrated heterogeneous masses with avid peripheral enhancement without central enhancement. Blood supply to the larger lesion was partially from small feeding vessels from the inferior pulmonary vein. These findings correlate with a previously published case in which there was avid uptake of fluoro-18-deoxyglucose peripherally with lesser uptake centrally. The diagnosis of metastasing meningioma was confirmed on percutaneous lung tissue biopsy. PMID:21088084

  4. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT

    PubMed Central

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J.; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T.; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm. Guy

    2013-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and the coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology (BEST) Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging. PMID:22551595

  5. Pitfalls in CT recognition of mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, H.S.; Aronberg, D.J.; Sagel, S.S.

    1985-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become the most accurate radiologic technique for the evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. Since the introduction of thoracic CT, a variety of anatomic structures, both normal and aberrant, have been described that can be confused with enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes; these represent potential diagnostic pitfalls. This essay illustrates many of these structures and distinguish them from abnormal lymph nodes.

  6. CT of schistosomal calcification of the intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.; Hebbar, G.; Khalifa, A.; Cherian, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of schistosomal colonic calcification on abdominal radiographs has been described. The appearance on computed tomography (CT) is equally distinctive and occurs with varying degrees of genitourinary calcification. The authors have experience in three cases with the appearance on CT of intestinal calcification due to schistosomiasis.

  7. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  8. Prediction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) positivity in patients with high-risk primary melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, Maria; Kjaer, Andreas; Wu, Max; Martineau, Lea; Nosrati, Mehdi; Leong, Stanley PL; Sagebiel, Richard W; III, James R Miller; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool to identify occult melanoma metastasis. To date, it is controversial which patients with primary cutaneous melanoma should have staging PET/CT. In this retrospective analysis of more than 800 consecutive patients with cutaneous melanoma, we sought to identify factors predictive of PET/CT positivity in the setting of newly-diagnosed high-risk primary melanoma to determine those patients most appropriate to undergo a PET/CT scan as part of their diagnostic work up. 167 patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk primary cutaneous melanoma underwent a PET/CT scan performed as part of their initial staging. Clinical and histologic factors were evaluated as possible predictors of melanoma metastasis identified on PET/CT scanning using both univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In all, 32 patients (19.2%) had a positive PET/CT finding of metastatic melanoma. In more than half of these patients (56.3%), PET/CT scanning identified disease that was not detectable on clinical examination. Mitotic rate, tumor thickness, lymphadenopathy, and bleeding were significantly predictive of PET/CT positivity. A combinatorial index constructed from these factors revealed a significant association between number of high-risk factors observed and prevalence of PET/CT positivity, which increased from 5.8% (with the presence of 0-2 factors) to 100.0%, when all four factors were present. These results indicate that combining clinical and histologic prognostic factors enables the identification of patients with a higher likelihood of a positive PET/CT scan. PMID:27766186

  9. The fibromatoses: CT-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Francis, I R; Dorovini-Zis, K; Glazer, G M; Lloyd, R V; Amendola, M A; Martel, W

    1986-11-01

    Although CT has been used in the evaluation of benign fibroblastic tumors (fibromatoses), data are lacking on radiologic-histopathologic correlation. In an attempt to explain the variable CT appearance of these lesions, a retrospective analysis was carried out of CT findings and histopathologic features in nine patients with fibromatoses. In three of four patients who had precontrast CT scans, the tumors were hyperdense relative to muscle, whereas in one patient the lesion was hypodense. The postenhancement appearance was variable. The pathologic specimens were analyzed and graded for collagen content, cellular content, tumor necrosis, and tumor vascularity. No consistent relationship could be established between the CT appearance of these lesions and their histologic appearance.

  10. A Wiki Based CT Protocol Management System.

    PubMed

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P; Rubert, Nicholas; Belden, Daryn; Ciano, Amanda; Duplissis, Andrew; Hermanns, Ashley; Monette, Stephen; Saldivar, Elliott Janssen

    2015-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin Madison Department of Radiology, CT protocol management requires maintenance of thousands of parameters for each scanner. Managing CT protocols is further complicated by the unique configurability of each scanner. Due to recent Joint Commission requirements, now all CT protocol changes must be documented and reviewed by a site's CT protocol optimization team. The difficulty of managing the CT protocols was not in assembling the protocols, but in managing and implementing changes. This is why a wiki based solution for protocol management was implemented. A wiki inherently keeps track of all changes, logging who made the changes and when, allowing for editing and viewing permissions to be controlled, as well as allowing protocol changes to be instantly relayed to all scanner locations.

  11. Three-dimensional CT image segmentation by volume growing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dongping; Conners, Richard W.; Araman, Philip A.

    1991-11-01

    The research reported in this paper is aimed at locating, identifying, and quantifying internal (anatomical or physiological) structures, by 3-D image segmentation. Computerized tomography (CT) images of an object are first processed on a slice-by-slice basis, generating a stack of image slices that have been smoothed and pre-segmented. The image smoothing operation is executed by a spatially adaptive filter, and the 2-D pre-segmentation is achieved by a thresholding process whereby each individual pixel in the input image space is consistently assigned a label, according to its CT number, i.e., the gray-level value. Given a sequence of pre-segmented images as 3-D input scene (a stack of image slices), the spatial connectivity that exists among neighboring image pixels is utilized in a volume growing process which generates a number of well-defined volumetric regions or image solides, each representing an individual anatomical or physiological structure in the input scene. The 3-D segmentation is implemented using a volume growing process so that the aspect of pixel spatial connectivity is incorporated into the image segmentation procedure. To initialize the volume growing process for each volumetric region in the input 3-D scene, a seed location for a region is defined and loaded into a queue data structure called seed queue. The volume growing process consists of a set of procedures that perform different operations on the volumetric data of a CT image sequence. Examples of experiment of the described system with CT image data of several hardwood logs are given to demonstrate usefulness and flexibility of this approach. This allows solutions to industrial web inspection, as well as to several problems in medical image analysis where low-level image segmentation plays an important role toward successful image interpretation tasks.

  12. Limits of Ultra-Low Dose CT Attenuation Correction for PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2010-01-29

    We present an analysis of the effects of ultra-low dose X-ray computerized tomography (CT) based attenuation correction for positron emission tomography (PET). By ultra low dose we mean less than approximately 5 mAs or 0.5 mSv total effective whole body dose. The motivation is the increased interest in using respiratory motion information acquired during the CT scan for both phase-matched CT-based attenuation correction and for motion estimation. Since longer duration CT scans are desired, radiation dose to the patient can be a limiting factor. In this study we evaluate the impact of reducing photon flux rates in the CT data on the reconstructed PET image by using the CATSIM simulation tool for the CT component and the ASIM simulation tool for the PET component. The CT simulation includes effects of the x-ray tube spectra, beam conditioning, bowtie filter, detector noise, and bean hardening correction. The PET simulation includes the effect of attenuation and photon counting. Noise and bias in the PET image were evaluated from multiple realizations of test objects. We show that techniques can be used to significantly reduce the mAs needed for CT based attenuation correction if the CT is not used for diagnostic purposes. The limiting factor, however, is not the noise in the CT image but rather the bias introduced by CT sinogram elements with no detected flux. These results constrain the methods that can be used to lower CT dose in a manner suitable for attenuation correction of PET data. We conclude that ultra-low-dose CT for attenuation correction of PET data is feasible with current PET/CT scanners.

  13. Segmentation of tooth in CT images for the 3D reconstruction of teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Hoon; Chae, Ok-Sam

    2004-05-01

    In the dental field, the 3D tooth model in which each tooth can be manipulated individually is an essential component for the simulation of orthodontic surgery and treatment. To reconstruct such a tooth model from CT slices, we need to define the accurate boundary of each tooth from CT slices. However, the global threshold method, which is commonly used in most existing 3D reconstruction systems, is not effective for the tooth segmentation in the CT image. In tooth CT slices, some teeth touch with other teeth and some are located inside of alveolar bone whose intensity is similar to that of teeth. In this paper, we propose an image segmentation algorithm based on B-spline curve fitting to produce smooth tooth regions from such CT slices. The proposed algorithm prevents the malfitting problem of the B-spline algorithm by providing accurate initial tooth boundary for the fitting process. This paper proposes an optimal threshold scheme using the intensity and shape information passed by previous slice for the initial boundary generation and an efficient B-spline fitting method based on genetic algorithm. The test result shows that the proposed method detects contour of the individual tooth successfully and can produce a smooth and accurate 3D tooth model for the simulation of orthodontic surgery and treatment.

  14. Group-wise registration of ultrasound to CT images of human vertebrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Sean; Mousavi, Parvin; Fichtinger, Gabor; Pichora, David; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2009-02-01

    Automatic registration of ultrasound (US) to computed tomography (CT) datasets is a challenge of considerable interest, particularly in orthopaedic and percutaneous interventions. We propose an algorithm for group-wise volume-to-volume registration of US to CT images of the lumbar spine. Each vertebra in CT is treated as a sub-volume and transformed individually. The sub-volumes are then reconstructed into a single volume. The algorithm dynamically combines simulated US reflections from the vertebrae surfaces and surrounding soft tissue in the reconstructed CT, with scaled CT data to simulate US images of the spine anatomy. The simulated US data is used to register preoperative CT data to intra-operative US images. Covariance Matrix Adaption - Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES) is utilized as the optimization strategy. The registration is tested using a phantom of the lumbar spine (L3-L5). Initial misalignments of up to 8 mm were registered with a mean target registration error of 1.87+/-0.73 mm for L3, 2.79+/-0.93 mm for L4, 1.72+/-0.70 mm for L5, and 2.08+/-0.55 mm across the entire volume. To select an appropriate optimization strategy, we performed a volume-to- volume registration of US to CT of the lumbar spine, allowing no relative motion between vertebrae. We compare the results of this registration using three optimization strategies: simplex, gradient descent and CMA-ES. CMA-ES was found to converge slower than gradient descent and simplex, but was more robust for rigid volume-to-volume registration for initial misalignments up to 20 mm.

  15. Segmentation of Costal Cartilage in Abdominal CT Data using Watershed Markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Andrew B.; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2007-05-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is a promising non-invasive technique that heats a specific tumor region to fatal levels, while minimizing cell death in nearby healthy areas. For liver applications, the rib cage limits the transducer placement. A treatment plan based on CT images would segment the ribs and provide visualization of them and the tumor. A HIFU simulation of deposited heat would also require rib segmentation. Unfortunately, the ribs are difficult to segment on CT as they transition to cartilage, with CT units similar to that of the liver. The purpose of this work was to develop a rib segmentation algorithm based on CT images for HIFU treatment planning. After an initial threshold of the CT data, rib regions were characterized based on their size, and if a region were greater than a predetermined area parameter (i.e. it consisted of rib and liver), a marker based watershed transformation separated the two regions and continued to the next inferior slice. After false positives were removed by a predetermined volume parameter, the remaining objects were reassigned high CT values. Preliminary results from six human CT datasets indicated this segmentation method works well, successfully distinguishing the ribs from nearby organs. Of the fifty-five ribs counted in these datasets, only five contained small errors due to reconstruction shading irregularities, with four of these in one dataset. Once all cartilage was assigned high CT numbers, any commercially available 3D rendering software (e.g. OsiriX) can be used to visualize the ribs and tumor.

  16. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Munley, Michael T.; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-12-15

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed 'CTDI-aperture' is introduced.

  17. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Robert L; Munley, Michael T; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-12-01

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed "CTDI-aperture" is introduced.

  18. Cytomegalovirus pneumonia in transplant patients: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Eun-Young Kang; Patz, E.F. Jr.; Mueller, N.L.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the CT findings of cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia in transplant patients. The study included 10 transplant patients who had chest CT scan and pathologically proven isolated pulmonary CMV infection. Five patients had bone marrow transplant and five had solid organ transplant. The CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for pattern and distribution of disease and the CT findings compared with the findings on open lung biopsy (n = 9) and autopsy (n = 1). Nine of 10 patients had parenchymal abnormalities apparent at CT and I had normal CT scans. The findings in the nine patients included small nodules (n = 6), consolidation (n = 4), ground-glass attenuation (n = 4), and irregular lines (n = 1). The nodules had a bilateral and symmetric distribution and involved all lung zones. The consolidation was most marked in the lower lung zones. The CT findings of CMV pneumonia in transplant patients are heterogeneous. The most common patterns include small nodules and areas of consolidation. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. [CT in preoperative assessment of renal tumors?].

    PubMed

    Lanng, C; Bowall, P; Egeblad, M; Meyhoff, H H

    1992-04-13

    The value of CT-scanning as part of the preoperative morphological investigation of patients with renal tumours was calculated in a material of 28 patients. In eight patients, operative treatment was not found to be indicated. In the 20 patients in whom operation was undertaken, the operative and histological findings were compared with the findings on CT-scanning. In cases of disagreement, the CT-scanning findings were reassessed. It was found that interpretation of the CT-scan was accurate in 40% of the cases while minor disagreements were present in 25% but these did not have any significance for the indications for operation. In the remaining 35% considerable disagreement was found between the CT-scan and the operative or histological findings such as invasion of neighbouring organs, cysts interpreted as solid tumours with necrosis and as regards interpretation of the retroperitoneal glands. The present authors consider that CT-scanning provides an important supplement to the conventional morphological investigation of renal tumours with intravenous urography and radiography of the thorax. CT-scanning appears to be preferable to ultrasonic scanning in cases which are difficult to review and where expert interpretation of ultrasonic findings is not available. In addition, routine preoperative biopsy of the tumour guided by ultrasound is recommended together with peroperative biopsy for freeze microscopic examination prior to nephrectomy.

  20. Iterative image reconstruction in spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Daniel; Michel, Eric; Kim, Hye S.; Kim, Jae G.; Han, Byung H.; Cho, Min H.; Lee, Soo Y.

    2012-03-01

    Scan time of spectral-CTs is much longer than conventional CTs due to limited number of x-ray photons detectable by photon-counting detectors. However, the spectral pixel information in spectral-CT has much richer information on physiological and pathological status of the tissues than the CT-number in conventional CT, which makes the spectral- CT one of the promising future imaging modalities. One simple way to reduce the scan time in spectral-CT imaging is to reduce the number of views in the acquisition of projection data. But, this may result in poorer SNR and strong streak artifacts which can severely compromise the image quality. In this work, spectral-CT projection data were obtained from a lab-built spectral-CT consisting of a single CdTe photon counting detector, a micro-focus x-ray tube and scan mechanics. For the image reconstruction, we used two iterative image reconstruction methods, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the total variation minimization based on conjugate gradient method (CG-TV), along with the filtered back-projection (FBP) to compare the image quality. From the imaging of the iodine containing phantoms, we have observed that SIRT and CG-TV are superior to the FBP method in terms of SNR and streak artifacts.

  1. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  2. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  3. CT & CBCT imaging: assessment of the orbits.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, David C

    2012-11-01

    The orbits can be visualized easily on routine or customized protocols for computed tomography (CT) or cone beam CT (CBCT) scans. Detailed orbital investigations are best performed with 3-dimensional imaging methods. CT scans are preferred for visualizing the osseous orbital anatomy and fissures while magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for evaluating tumors and inflammation. CBCT provides high-resolution anatomic data of the sinonasal spaces, airway, soft tissue surfaces, and bones but does not provide much detail within the soft tissues. This article discusses CBCT imaging of the orbits, osseous anatomy of the orbits, and CBCT investigation of selected orbital pathosis.

  4. Fenestral otosclerosis: significance of preoperative CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, J.D.; Faerber, E.N.; Wolfson, R.J.; Marlowe, F.I.

    1984-06-01

    Thirty-five consecutive patients with the clinical diagnosis of fenestral otosclerosis were evaluated with high-resolution computed tomography (CT). Twenty-six were diagnosed as having this disorder by CT evidence of abnormal bony excrescences at or adjacent to the oval window. Sections were also evaluated for evidence of plaque formation elsewhere in the lateral wall of the labyrinth and for surgical obstacles such as an abnormally wide cochlear aqueduct, a high jugular vein, and a dehiscent facial nerve. It is concluded that fenestral otosclerosis may be accurately diagnosed with proper CT techniques.

  5. Endocrine scintigraphy with hybrid SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka Kit; Fig, Lorraine M; Youssef, Ehab; Ferretti, Alice; Rubello, Domenico; Gross, Milton D

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging of endocrine disorders takes advantage of unique cellular properties of endocrine organs and tissues that can be depicted by targeted radiopharmaceuticals. Detailed functional maps of biodistributions of radiopharmaceutical uptake can be displayed in three-dimensional tomographic formats, using single photon emission computed tomography (CT) that can now be directly combined with simultaneously acquired cross-sectional anatomic maps derived from CT. The integration of function depicted by scintigraphy and anatomy with CT has synergistically improved the efficacy of nuclear medicine imaging across a broad spectrum of clinical applications, which include some of the oldest imaging studies of endocrine dysfunction.

  6. [Helical CT of urinary tract: clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Roy, C; Tuchmann, C; Guth, S; Lang, H; Saussine, C; Jacqmin, D

    2000-09-01

    Helical CT is the most useful imaging modality to evaluate kidney diseases. Different imaging protocols are used to assess the correct diagnosis in each clinical situation. The nephrographic phase (between 90 and 100 s of delay after injection) is more accurate than the cortical phase (between 30 and 40 s of delay) to depict and characterise small renal masses. Multiplanar and 3D reconstruction are useful to plan partial kidney surgery or percutaneous surgery of lithiasis. In emergency, spiral CT, if available, is suitable to assess renal colic. Spiral CT is the best modality to evaluate traumatic kidney.

  7. Effect of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients With Clinical Stage II and III Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Groheux, David Moretti, Jean-Luc; Baillet, Georges; Espie, Marc; Giacchetti, Sylvie; Hindie, Elif; Hennequin, Christophe; Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert; Cuvier, Caroline; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel; Sarandi, Farid; Misset, Jean-Louis

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential effect of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial assessment of patients with clinical Stage II or III breast cancer. Methods and Materials: During 14 consecutive months, 39 patients (40 tumors) who presented with Stage II or III breast cancer on the basis of a routine extension assessment were prospectively included in this study. PET/CT was performed in addition to the initial assessment. Results: In 3 cases, PET/CT showed extra-axillary lymph node involvement that had not been demonstrated with conventional techniques. Two of these patients had hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the subpectoral and infraclavicular regions, and the third had a hypermetabolic internal mammary node. PET/CT showed distant uptake in 4 women. Of these 4 women, 1 had pleural involvement and 3 had bone metastasis. Overall, of the 39 women, the PET/CT results modified the initial stage in 7 (18%). The modified staging altered the treatment plan for 5 patients (13%). It led to radiotherapy in 4 patients (bone metastasis, pleural lesion, subpectoral lymph nodes, and internal mammary nodes) and excision of, and radiotherapy to, the infraclavicular lymph nodes in 1 patient. Conclusions: PET/CT can provide information on extra-axillary lymph node involvement and can uncover occult distant metastases in a significant percentage of patients. Therefore, initial PET/CT could enable better treatment planning for patients with Stage II and III breast cancer.

  8. Edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) for MRI-CT image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Bigong; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the joint/simultaneous X-ray CT and MRI image reconstruction. In particular, a novel algorithm is proposed for MRI image reconstruction from highly under-sampled MRI data and CT images. It consists of two steps. First, a training dataset is generated from a series of well-registered MRI and CT images on the same patients. Then, an initial MRI image of a patient can be reconstructed via edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) based on the training dataset and a CT image of the patient. Second, an MRI image is reconstructed using the dictionary learning (DL) algorithm from highly under-sampled k-space data and the initial MRI image. Our algorithm can establish a one-to-one correspondence between the two imaging modalities, and obtain a good initial MRI estimation. Both noise-free and noisy simulation studies were performed to evaluate and validate the proposed algorithm. The results with different under-sampling factors show that the proposed algorithm performed significantly better than those reconstructed using the DL algorithm from MRI data alone.

  9. Actinomycosis involving the chest wall: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, W.R.; Sagel, S.S.

    1982-11-01

    Two cases of pulmonary actinomycosis with extension to involve the chest wall that were evaluated using computerized tomography are reported. In both cases, the relation of pulmonary and chest wall disease was best shown using CT. (KRM)

  10. MR and CT appearance of cardiac hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, J.L.; Kessler, R.M.; Raizada, V.; Williamson, M.R.

    1996-05-01

    We present a case of cardiac hemangioma in a symptomatic patient. MR and CT each have specific characteristics that should make one consider including or excluding this in the differential diagnosis of a cardiac tumor. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  11. CT in the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Gatewood, O.M.B.; Jones, B.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1985-06-01

    Enterovesical fistulae are difficult to demonstrate by conventional radiographic methods. Computed tomography (CT), a sensitive, noninvasive method of documenting the presence of such fistulae, is unique in its ability to outline the extravesical component of the primary disease process. Twenty enterovesical fistulae identified by CT were caused by diverticulitis (nine), carcinoma of the rectosigmoid (two), Crohn disease (three), gynecologic tumors (two), bladder cancer (one), cecal carcinoma (one), prostatic neoplasia (one), and appendiceal abscess (one). The CT findings included intravesical air (90%), passage of orally or rectally administered contrast medium into the bladder (20%), focal bladder-wall thickening (90%), thickening of adjacent bowel wall (85%), and an extraluminal mass that often contained air (75%). CT proved to be an important new method in the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae.

  12. Use of CT in stapedial otosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Henrikson, G.C.; Deitch, R.L.; Norouzi, P.; Kumar, A.; Kriz, R.; Valvassori, G.E.

    1985-09-01

    Otosclerosis (otospongiosis) is a primary focal disease of the labyrinthine capsule. The stapes footplate is fixed when the spongiotic focus expands and invades the oval window. Persons with stapedial otosclerosis experience a progressive conductive hearing loss. In many cases, cochlear degeneration is observed, in which a mixed hearing loss occurs. Using computed tomography (CT), the authors studied the ears of 45 selected patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss. CT proved valuable in determining otosclerotic changes of the oval window and otic capsule. Spongiotic changes of the otic capsule are better appreciated by CT than complex motion tomography. The usefulness of CT in diagnosing other causes of conductive or mixed hearing loss is also described.

  13. CT of soft-tissue neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Weekes, R.G.; McLeod, R.A.; Reiman, H.M.; Pritchard, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    The computed tomographic scans (CT) of 84 patients with untreated soft-tissue neoplasms were studied, 75 with primary and nine with secondary lesions. Each scan was evaluated using several criteria: homogeneity and density, presence and type of calcification, presence of bony destruction, involvement of multiple muscle groups, definition of adjacent fat, border definition, and vessel or nerve involvement. CT demonstrated the lesion in all 84 patients and showed excellent anatomic detail in 64 of the 75 patients with primary neoplasms. The CT findings were characteristic enough to suggest the histology of the neoplasm in only 13 lesions (nine lipomas, three hemangiomas, one neurofibroma). No malignant neoplasm had CT characteristics specific enough to differentiate it from any other malignant tumor. However, malignant neoplasms could be differentiated from benign neoplasms in 88% of the cases.

  14. Micro-CT imaging of Randall's plaques.

    PubMed

    Williams, James C; Lingeman, James E; Coe, Fredric L; Worcester, Elaine M; Evan, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Micro-computed tomographic imaging (micro-CT) provides unprecedented information on stone structure and mineral composition. High-resolution micro-CT even allows visualization of the lumens of tubule and/or vessels within Randall's plaque, on stones or in papillary biopsies, thus giving a non-destructive way to study these sites of stone adhesion. This paper also shows an example of a stone growing on a different anchoring mechanism: a mineral plug within the lumen of a Bellini duct (BD plug). Micro-CT shows striking structural differences between stones that have grown on Randall's plaque and those that have grown on BD plugs. Thus, Randall's plaque can be distinguished by micro-CT, and this non-destructive method shows great promise in helping to elucidate the different mechanisms by which small stones are retained in the kidney during the development of nephrolithiasis. PMID:25096802

  15. CT appearance of a traumatic cataract.

    PubMed

    Segev, Y; Goldstein, M; Lazar, M; Reider-Groswasser, I

    1995-05-01

    We describe a case of a traumatic cataract that presented on CT as a hypodense lens with a hyderdense rim. The finding reflects the pathogenesis of this entity: a capsular tear and consequent entry of fluid into the lens.

  16. CT thermometry for cone-beam CT guided ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, Zachary; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Li, Ming; Wood, Bradford J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring temperature during a cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided ablation procedure is important for prevention of over-treatment and under-treatment. In order to accomplish ideal temperature monitoring, a thermometry map must be generated. Previously, this was attempted using CBCT scans of a pig shoulder undergoing ablation.1 We are extending this work by using CBCT scans of real patients and incorporating more processing steps. We register the scans before comparing them due to the movement and deformation of organs. We then automatically locate the needle tip and the ablation zone. We employ a robust change metric due to image noise and artifacts. This change metric takes windows around each pixel and uses an equation inspired by Time Delay Analysis to calculate the error between windows with the assumption that there is an ideal spatial offset. Once the change map is generated, we correlate change data with measured temperature data at the key points in the region. This allows us to transform our change map into a thermal map. This thermal map is then able to provide an estimate as to the size and temperature of the ablation zone. We evaluated our procedure on a data set of 12 patients who had a total of 24 ablation procedures performed. We were able to generate reasonable thermal maps with varying degrees of accuracy. The average error ranged from 2.7 to 16.2 degrees Celsius. In addition to providing estimates of the size of the ablation zone for surgical guidance, 3D visualizations of the ablation zone and needle are also produced.

  17. CT and PET-CT of a dog with multiple pulmonary adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jisun; Kwon, Seong Young; Cena, Rohani; Park, Seungjo; Oh, Juyeon; Oui, Heejin; Cho, Kyoung-Oh; Min, Jung-Joon; Choi, Jihye

    2014-04-01

    A 10-year-old, intact female Yorkshire terrier had multiple pulmonary nodules on thoracic radiography and ultrasonography with no lesions elsewhere. Computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) were performed to identify metastasis and undetected primary tumors. On CT examination, pulmonary nodules had a hypoattenuating center with thin peripheral enhancement, suggesting ischemic or necrotizing lesion. In PET-CT at 47 min after intravenous injection of 11.1 MBq/kg of FDG, the maximum standardized uptake value of each pulmonary nodule was about from 3.8 to 6.4. There were no abnormal lesions except for four pulmonary nodules on the CT and PET-CT. Primary lung tumor was tentatively diagnosed, and palliative therapy using 2 mg/kg tramadol and 2.2 mg/kg carprofen twice per day was applied. After the dog's euthanasia due to deteriorated clinical signs and poor prognosis, undifferentiated pulmonary adenocarcinoma was diagnosed through histopathologic and immunochemistry examination. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study of CT and PET-CT features of canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma. In this case, multiple pulmonary adenocarcinoma could be determined on the basis of FDG PET-CT through screening the obvious distant metastasis and/or lymph node invasions and excluding unknown primary tumors.

  18. CT of trauma to the abnormal kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Rhyner, P.; Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    1984-04-01

    Traumatic injuries to already abnormal kidneys are difficult to assess by excretory urography and clinical evaluation. Bleeding and urinary extravasation may accompany minor trauma; conversely, underlying tumors, perirenal hemorrhage, and extravasation may be missed on urography. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in eight cases including three neoplasms, one adult polycystic disease, one simple renal cyst, two hydronephrotic kidneys, and one horseshoe kidney. CT provided specific and clinically useful information in each case that was not apparent on excretory urography.

  19. Nonsynonymous synonyms: correcting and improving SNOMED CT.

    PubMed

    Nash, Shelley K

    2003-01-01

    SNOMED CT was created from a merger of SNOMED RT and United Kingdom's National Health Service's Clinical Terms Version 3. The resulting terminology has a plethora of synonymous terms. This paper discusses how a review synonyms in the Procedure section of SNOMED CT revealed some nonsynonmous synonyms, hypothesizes why errors in synonymy may have occurred, and explains the steps taken to resolve nonsynonymous concepts previously assigned to synonyms.

  20. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  1. Data Compression Techniques For CT Image Archival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, John F.; Rhodes, Michael L.; Rosner, Bruce

    1983-05-01

    Large digital files are inherent to CT image data. CT installations that routinely archive patient data are penalized computer time, technologist time, tape purchase, and file space. This paper introduces compression techniques that reduce the amount of tape needed to store image data and the amount of computer time to do so. The benefits delivered by this technique have also been applied to online disk systems. Typical reductions of 40% to 50% of original file space is reported.

  2. Performance evaluation of the General Electric eXplore CT 120 micro-CT using the vmCT phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, M. A.; Warnock, G.; Plenevaux, A.; Choquet, P.; Constantinesco, A.; Salmon, E.; Luxen, A.; Seret, A.

    2011-08-01

    The eXplore CT 120 is the latest generation micro-CT from General Electric. It is equipped with a high-power tube and a flat-panel detector. It allows high resolution and high contrast fast CT scanning of small animals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the eXplore CT 120 with that of the eXplore Ultra, its predecessor for which the methodology using the vmCT phantom has already been described [1].The phantom was imaged using typical a rat (fast scan or F) or mouse (in vivo bone scan or H) scanning protocols. With the slanted edge method, a 10% modulation transfer function (MTF) was observed at 4.4 (F) and 3.9-4.4 (H) mm-1 corresponding to 114 μm resolution. A fairly larger MTF was obtained by the coil method with the MTF for the thinnest coil (3.3 mm-1) equal to 0.32 (F) and 0.34 (H). The geometric accuracy was better than 0.3%. There was a highly linear (R2>0.999) relationship between measured and expected CT numbers for both the CT number accuracy and linearity sections of the phantom. A cupping effect was clearly seen on the uniform slices and the uniformity-to-noise ratio ranged from 0.52 (F) to 0.89 (H). The air CT number depended on the amount of polycarbonate surrounding the area where it was measured; a difference as high as approximately 200 HU was observed. This hindered the calibration of this scanner in HU. This is likely due to the absence of corrections for beam hardening and scatter in the reconstruction software. However in view of the high linearity of the system, the implementation of these corrections would allow a good quality calibration of the scanner in HU. In conclusion, the eXplore CT 120 achieved a better spatial resolution than the eXplore Ultra (based on previously reported specifications) and future software developments will include beam hardening and scatter corrections that will make the new generation CT scanner even more promising.

  3. CT evaluation of the colon: inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Horton, K M; Corl, F M; Fishman, E K

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is valuable for detection and characterization of many inflammatory conditions of the colon. At CT, a dilated, thickened appendix is suggestive of appendicitis. A 1-4-cm, oval, fatty pericolic lesion with surrounding mesenteric inflammation is diagnostic of epiploic appendagitis. The key to distinguishing diverticulitis from other inflammatory conditions of the colon is the presence of diverticula in the involved segment. In typhlitis, CT demonstrates cecal distention and circumferential thickening of the cecal wall, which may have low attenuation secondary to edema. In radiation colitis, the clinical history is the key to suggesting the diagnosis because the CT findings can be nonspecific. The location of the involved segment and the extent and appearance of wall thickening may help distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. In ischemic colitis, CT typically demonstrates circumferential, symmetric wall thickening with fold enlargement. CT findings of graft-versus-host disease include small bowel and colonic wall thickening, which may result in luminal narrowing and separation of bowel loops. In infectious colitis, the site and thickness of colon affected may suggest a specific organism. The amount of wall thickening in pseudomembranous colitis is typically greater than in any other inflammatory disease of the colon except Crohn disease. PMID:10715339

  4. Computer aided diagnosis for severity assessment of pneumoconiosis using CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hidenobu; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Kato, Katsuya; Kishimoto, Takumi; Ashizawa, Kazuto

    2016-03-01

    240,000 participants have a screening for diagnosis of pneumoconiosis every year in Japan. Radiograph is used for staging of severity in pneumoconiosis worldwide. This paper presents a method for quantitative assessment of severity in pneumoconiosis using both size and frequency of lung nodules that detected by thin-section CT images. This method consists of three steps. First, thoracic organs (body, ribs, spine, trachea, bronchi, lungs, heart, and pulmonary blood vessels) are segmented. Second, lung nodules that have radius over 1.5mm are detected. These steps used functions of our developed computer aided detection system of chest CT images. Third, severity in pneumoconiosis is quantified using size and frequency of lung nodules. This method was applied to nine pneumoconiosis patients. The initial results showed that proposed method can assess severity in pneumoconiosis quantitatively. This paper demonstrates effectiveness of our method in diagnosis and prognosis of pneumoconiosis in CT screening.

  5. Strategic Initiatives and Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard Community Coll., Columbia, MD.

    This document outlines Howard Community College's (HCC) six strategic initiatives and goals. Each of the strategic initiatives is presented, along with a context for the statement and a list of goals to be achieved in support of the overall initiative. First, HCC will be a learning community that provides possibilities for learning that address…

  6. APEC Smart Grid Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2012-03-01

    This brief paper describes the activities of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Smart Grid Initiative (ASGI) which is being led by the U.S. and developed by the APEC Energy Working Group. In the paper, I describe the origin of the initiative and briefly mention the four major elements of the initiative along with existing APEC projects which support it.

  7. CT Pneumocolonography In Normal Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Steffey, Michele A.; Daniel, Leticia; Taylor, Sandra L.; Chen, Rachel X.; Zwingenberger, Allison L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives of this experimental study were to describe effects of varying technical components that may contribute to an optimal protocol for CT pneumocolonography (CTP) in dogs, and to develop a standardized methodology for CTP as a future potential diagnostic tool in canine clinical patients with large bowel disease. Eight purpose-bred intact male hound cross research dogs were enrolled and randomized to groups based on variables of pressure/body position (n=4) and insufflation time (n=4). For each segment of large bowel (rectum, colorectal junction, descending colon, transverse colon, ascending colon), the adequacy of bowel preparation, % of bowel lumen filled with fecal material, and bowel tortuosity or folding were assessed. Measurements of bowel wall thickness (cm), cross-sectional bowel lumen diameter (cm), and cross-sectional bowel luminal area (cm2) were obtained at standardized locations within the large bowel. False discovery rates (FDR) were calculated to adjust for multiple testing. Values of FDR < 0.05 were considered significant. Differences in mean cross-sectional area and diameter and bowel wall thickness under increasing pressure were not significant after adjusting for multiple testing; some had raw p values <0.05. Ascending colon diameter and ascending colon area significantly increased with insufflation time (FDR<0.05). No other response variables showed a significant change with insufflation time. The optimal insufflation pressure for maintaining pneumocolon in this study was determined to be 20 mmHg. CTP is a feasible technique to provide consistent distension for imaging of the large bowel and further study on application of CTP in clinical patients is warranted. PMID:25545308

  8. CT liver volumetry using geodesic active contour segmentation with a level-set algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Epstein, Mark L.; Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Obajuluwa, Ademola; Xu, Jianwu; Hori, Masatoshi; Baron, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Automatic liver segmentation on CT images is challenging because the liver often abuts other organs of a similar density. Our purpose was to develop an accurate automated liver segmentation scheme for measuring liver volumes. We developed an automated volumetry scheme for the liver in CT based on a 5 step schema. First, an anisotropic smoothing filter was applied to portal-venous phase CT images to remove noise while preserving the liver structure, followed by an edge enhancer to enhance the liver boundary. By using the boundary-enhanced image as a speed function, a fastmarching algorithm generated an initial surface that roughly estimated the liver shape. A geodesic-active-contour segmentation algorithm coupled with level-set contour-evolution refined the initial surface so as to more precisely fit the liver boundary. The liver volume was calculated based on the refined liver surface. Hepatic CT scans of eighteen prospective liver donors were obtained under a liver transplant protocol with a multi-detector CT system. Automated liver volumes obtained were compared with those manually traced by a radiologist, used as "gold standard." The mean liver volume obtained with our scheme was 1,520 cc, whereas the mean manual volume was 1,486 cc, with the mean absolute difference of 104 cc (7.0%). CT liver volumetrics based on an automated scheme agreed excellently with "goldstandard" manual volumetrics (intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.95) with no statistically significant difference (p(F<=f)=0.32), and required substantially less completion time. Our automated scheme provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring liver volumes.

  9. Initiation of vascular development.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-06-01

    The initiation of vascular development occurs during embryogenesis and the development of lateral organs, such as lateral roots and leaves. Understanding the mechanism underlying the initiation of vascular development has been an important goal of plant biologists. Auxin flow is a crucial factor involved in the initiation of vascular development. In addition, recent studies have identified key factors that regulate the establishment of vascular initial cells in embryos and roots. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in this field and discuss the initiation of vascular development.

  10. [Update: standardized CT/HRCT classification of occupational and environmental thoracic diseases in Germany].

    PubMed

    Hering, K G; Hofmann-Preiß, K; Kraus, T

    2014-04-01

    The high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) coding scheme of the international classification of occupational and environmental respiratory diseases (ICOERD) presented here is an instrument for a standardized semiquantitative description of occupation and environment-linked as well as other pulmonary and pleural diseases. Analogous to the International Labour Organization (ILO) classification, the ICOERD coding scheme should always be used when the CT/HRCT examination is employed for occupational medical investigations or expert opinions. After publication of the guidelines and recommendations on diagnostics and expert assessment of asbestos-linked diseases and silicosis, the application of a standardized investigation program and assessment with the ICOERD classification form are obligatory, at least for the initial assessment. Furthermore, its use in the field of follow-up assessments of occupational diseases should be encouraged in order to guarantee comparability between individual reports (interreader variability) and at least a semiquantitative assessment of disease progression in isolated cases. Because the anatomical structures in projection radiography and CT are not presented identically, a 1:1 transfer of the results of the ILO classification to the CT/HRCT coding scheme is not possible. An overview image of the thorax does not allow overlap-free reproduction of structures, in contrast to CT. These methodological differences can in cases of isolated assessment result in different opinions of projection and CT images mostly by different investigators. In cases of discrepant opinions an integrated report of findings by combination of all information from both procedures is necessary. PMID:24737105

  11. Feature-based US to CT registration of the aortic root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pencilla; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Jones, Doug L.; Bainbridge, Daniel; Chu, Michael W.; Drangova, Maria; Hata, Noby; Jain, Ameet; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    A feature-based registration was developed to align biplane and tracked ultrasound images of the aortic root with a preoperative CT volume. In transcatheter aortic valve replacement, a prosthetic valve is inserted into the aortic annulus via a catheter. Poor anatomical visualization of the aortic root region can result in incorrect positioning, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Registration of pre-operative CT to transesophageal ultrasound and fluoroscopy images is a major step towards providing augmented image guidance for this procedure. The proposed registration approach uses an iterative closest point algorithm to register a surface mesh generated from CT to 3D US points reconstructed from a single biplane US acquisition, or multiple tracked US images. The use of a single simultaneous acquisition biplane image eliminates reconstruction error introduced by cardiac gating and TEE probe tracking, creating potential for real-time intra-operative registration. A simple initialization procedure is used to minimize changes to operating room workflow. The algorithm is tested on images acquired from excised porcine hearts. Results demonstrate a clinically acceptable accuracy of 2.6mm and 5mm for tracked US to CT and biplane US to CT registration respectively.

  12. Implementation and evaluation of a protocol management system for automated review of CT protocols.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Joshua; Leng, Shuai; Zhang, Yi; Vrieze, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-09-08

    Protocol review is important to decrease the risk of patient injury and increase the consistency of CT image quality. A large volume of CT protocols makes manual review labor-intensive, error-prone, and costly. To address these challenges, we have developed a software system for automatically managing and monitoring CT proto-cols on a frequent basis. This article describes our experiences in the implementation and evaluation of this protocol monitoring system. In particular, we discuss various strategies for addressing each of the steps in our protocol-monitoring workflow, which are: maintaining an accurate set of master protocols, retrieving protocols from the scanners, comparing scanner protocols to master protocols, reviewing flagged differences between the scanner and master protocols, and updating the scanner and/or master protocols. In our initial evaluation focusing only on abdo-men and pelvis protocols, we detected 309 modified protocols in a 24-week trial period. About one-quarter of these modified protocols were determined to contain inappropriate (i.e., erroneous) protocol parameter modifications that needed to be corrected on the scanner. The most frequently affected parameter was the series description, which was inappropriately modified 47 times. Two inappropriate modifications were made to the tube current, which is particularly important to flag as this parameter impacts both radiation dose and image quality. The CT protocol changes detected in this work provide strong motivation for the use of an automated CT protocol quality control system to ensure protocol accuracy and consistency.

  13. Implementation and evaluation of a protocol management system for automated review of CT protocols.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Joshua; Leng, Shuai; Zhang, Yi; Vrieze, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Protocol review is important to decrease the risk of patient injury and increase the consistency of CT image quality. A large volume of CT protocols makes manual review labor-intensive, error-prone, and costly. To address these challenges, we have developed a software system for automatically managing and monitoring CT proto-cols on a frequent basis. This article describes our experiences in the implementation and evaluation of this protocol monitoring system. In particular, we discuss various strategies for addressing each of the steps in our protocol-monitoring workflow, which are: maintaining an accurate set of master protocols, retrieving protocols from the scanners, comparing scanner protocols to master protocols, reviewing flagged differences between the scanner and master protocols, and updating the scanner and/or master protocols. In our initial evaluation focusing only on abdo-men and pelvis protocols, we detected 309 modified protocols in a 24-week trial period. About one-quarter of these modified protocols were determined to contain inappropriate (i.e., erroneous) protocol parameter modifications that needed to be corrected on the scanner. The most frequently affected parameter was the series description, which was inappropriately modified 47 times. Two inappropriate modifications were made to the tube current, which is particularly important to flag as this parameter impacts both radiation dose and image quality. The CT protocol changes detected in this work provide strong motivation for the use of an automated CT protocol quality control system to ensure protocol accuracy and consistency. PMID:27685112

  14. Male and Female Human Body Tissue Radiation Shielding Models Based upon CT-scan Data for Organ Dose Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qualls, G.; Nealy, J.; Wilson, J.; Cucinotta, F.

    As present and future human space mission lengths are extended, it becomes increasingly important and valuable to have accurate analytic predictions of radiation doses to specific tissues within the body. New computational models are being developed to help predict the effective radiation shielding to points inside the human body provided by the surrounding body tissue. A female body tissue model, based upon a full-body CT-scan from the Visible Human Project, is presented along with a male body tissue model based upon a full-body CT-scan data set obtained from Johns Hopkins University. The advantages of using CT-scan based models are presented along with initial results and comparisons to previous models. Details of the data processing required to transform a raw CT-scan into a tissue shielding model are also presented.

  15. False Suggestion of Malignant Transformation of Benign Bone Tumor by 18F-FDG PET/CT: A Potential Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Ren; Kuo, Yu-Cheng; Hsu, Cheng-Nan; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-10-01

    A 68-year-old man underwent serial F-FDG PET/CT scan follow-up for lung cancer. Then 5.5 years after the initial F-FDG PET/CT scan, the presumed benign bone tumor in the left clavicle showed markedly increased FDG uptake during follow-up; in contrast, the Tc-MDP bone scan paradoxically exhibited no apparent interval change since last bone scan 5.5 years earlier. He underwent a CT-guided biopsy, and the pathological diagnosis was benign fibrous histiocytoma. The result was consistent with the lack of progression in Tc-MDP bone scan, whereas the F-FDG PET/CT scan gave a false-positive impression of malignant transformation. PMID:27556801

  16. Initial Events in Bacterial Transcription Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Emily F.; Record, M. Thomas; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Transcription initiation is a highly regulated step of gene expression. Here, we discuss the series of large conformational changes set in motion by initial specific binding of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) to promoter DNA and their relevance for regulation. Bending and wrapping of the upstream duplex facilitates bending of the downstream duplex into the active site cleft, nucleating opening of 13 bp in the cleft. The rate-determining opening step, driven by binding free energy, forms an unstable open complex, probably with the template strand in the active site. At some promoters, this initial open complex is greatly stabilized by rearrangements of the discriminator region between the −10 element and +1 base of the nontemplate strand and of mobile in-cleft and downstream elements of RNAP. The rate of open complex formation is regulated by effects on the rapidly-reversible steps preceding DNA opening, while open complex lifetime is regulated by effects on the stabilization of the initial open complex. Intrinsic DNA opening-closing appears less regulated. This noncovalent mechanism and its regulation exhibit many analogies to mechanisms of enzyme catalysis. PMID:26023916

  17. Current role of hybrid CT/angiography system compared with C-arm cone beam CT for interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Arai, Y; Inaba, Y; Inoue, M; Nishiofuku, H; Anai, H; Hori, S; Sakaguchi, H; Kichikawa, K

    2014-09-01

    Hybrid CT/angiography (angiography) system and C-arm cone beam CT provide cross-sectional imaging as an adjunct to angiography. Current interventional oncological procedures can be conducted precisely using these two technologies. In this article, several cases using a hybrid CT/angiography system are shown first, and then the advantages and disadvantages of the hybrid CT/angiography and C-arm cone beam CT are discussed with literature reviews.

  18. Metrology with μCT: precision challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppes, Alexander; Neuser, Eberhard

    2008-08-01

    Over the last years computed tomography (CT) with conventional x-ray sources has evolved from imaging method in medicine to a well established technology for industrial applications in the field of material science, microelectronics, geology, etc. By using modern microfocus and nanofocus® X-ray tubes, parts can be scanned with sub-micrometer resolutions. Currently, micro-CT is used more and more as a technology for metrological applications. Especially if complex parts with hidden or difficult accessible surfaces have to be measured, CT offers big advantages comparing with conventional tactile or optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs): high density of measurement points and fast capturing of the complete sample's geometry. When using this modern technology the question arises how precise a CT based CMM can measure in comparison to conventional CMMs? To characterize the metrological capabilities of a tactile or optical CMM, internationally standardized characteristics like length measurement error and probing error are used. To increase the acceptance of CT as a metrological method, the definition and usage of these parameters is important. In this paper, an overview of the process chain in CT based metrology will be given and metrological characteristics will be described. With the help of a special material standard designed and calibrated by PTB-National Metrology Institute of Germany-the influence of methods for beam hardening correction and for surface extraction on the metrological characteristics will be analyzed. It will be shown that with modern micro-CT systems length measurement error of less than 1μm for an object diameter of 20 mm can be reached.

  19. A computer simulation method for low-dose CT images by use of real high-dose images: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, Tomomi; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Goto, Makoto; Hatemura, Masahiro; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Practical simulations of low-dose CT images have a possibility of being helpful means for optimization of the CT exposure dose. Because current methods reported by several researchers are limited to specific vendor platforms and generally rely on raw sinogram data that are difficult to access, we have developed a new computerized scheme for producing simulated low-dose CT images from real high-dose images without use of raw sinogram data or of a particular phantom. Our computerized scheme for low-dose CT simulation was based on the addition of a simulated noise image to a real high-dose CT image reconstructed by the filtered back-projection algorithm. First, a sinogram was generated from the forward projection of a high-dose CT image. Then, an additional noise sinogram resulting from use of a reduced exposure dose was estimated from a predetermined noise model. Finally, a noise CT image was reconstructed with a predetermined filter and was added to the real high-dose CT image to create a simulated low-dose CT image. The noise power spectrum and modulation transfer function of the simulated low-dose images were very close to those of the real low-dose images. In order to confirm the feasibility of our method, we applied this method to clinical cases which were examined with the high dose initially and then followed with a low-dose CT. In conclusion, our proposed method could simulate the low-dose CT images from their real high-dose images with sufficient accuracy and could be used for determining the optimal dose setting for various clinical CT examinations.

  20. Segmentation and separation of venous vasculatures in liver CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Hansen, Christian; Zidowitz, Stephan; Hahn, Horst K.

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided analysis of venous vasculatures including hepatic veins and portal veins is important in liver surgery planning. The analysis normally consists of two important pre-processing tasks: segmenting both vasculatures and separating them from each other by assigning different labels. During the acquisition of multi-phase CT images, both of the venous vessels are enhanced by injected contrast agent and acquired either in a common phase or in two individual phases. The enhanced signals established by contrast agent are often not stably acquired due to non-optimal acquisition time. Inadequate contrast and the presence of large lesions in oncological patients, make the segmentation task quite challenging. To overcome these diffculties, we propose a framework with minimal user interactions to analyze venous vasculatures in multi-phase CT images. Firstly, presented vasculatures are automatically segmented adopting an efficient multi-scale Hessian-based vesselness filter. The initially segmented vessel trees are then converted to a graph representation, on which a series of graph filters are applied in post-processing steps to rule out irrelevant structures. Eventually, we develop a semi-automatic workow to refine the segmentation in the areas of inferior vena cava and entrance of portal veins, and to simultaneously separate hepatic veins from portal veins. Segmentation quality was evaluated with intensive tests enclosing 60 CT images from both healthy liver donors and oncological patients. To quantitatively measure the similarities between segmented and reference vessel trees, we propose three additional metrics: skeleton distance, branch coverage, and boundary surface distance, which are dedicated to quantifying the misalignment induced by both branching patterns and radii of two vessel trees.

  1. FACTS: Fully Automatic CT Segmentation of a Hip Joint.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chengwen; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Li; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-05-01

    Extraction of surface models of a hip joint from CT data is a pre-requisite step for computer assisted diagnosis and planning (CADP) of periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). Most of existing CADP systems are based on manual segmentation, which is time-consuming and hard to achieve reproducible results. In this paper, we present a Fully Automatic CT Segmentation (FACTS) approach to simultaneously extract both pelvic and femoral models. Our approach works by combining fast random forest (RF) regression based landmark detection, multi-atlas based segmentation, with articulated statistical shape model (aSSM) based fitting. The two fundamental contributions of our approach are: (1) an improved fast Gaussian transform (IFGT) is used within the RF regression framework for a fast and accurate landmark detection, which then allows for a fully automatic initialization of the multi-atlas based segmentation; and (2) aSSM based fitting is used to preserve hip joint structure and to avoid penetration between the pelvic and femoral models. Taking manual segmentation as the ground truth, we evaluated the present approach on 30 hip CT images (60 hips) with a 6-fold cross validation. When the present approach was compared to manual segmentation, a mean segmentation accuracy of 0.40, 0.36, and 0.36 mm was found for the pelvis, the left proximal femur, and the right proximal femur, respectively. When the models derived from both segmentations were used to compute the PAO diagnosis parameters, a difference of 2.0 ± 1.5°, 2.1 ± 1.6°, and 3.5 ± 2.3% were found for anteversion, inclination, and acetabular coverage, respectively. The achieved accuracy is regarded as clinically accurate enough for our target applications. PMID:25366904

  2. AAPM/RSNA Physics Tutorial for Residents: Topics in CT. Radiation dose in CT.

    PubMed

    McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2002-01-01

    This article describes basic radiation dose concepts as well as those specifically developed to describe the radiation dose from computed tomography (CT). Basic concepts of radiation dose are reviewed, including exposure, absorbed dose, and effective dose. Radiation dose from CT demonstrates variations within the scan plane and along the z axis because of its unique geometry and usage. Several CT-specific dose descriptors have been developed: the Multiple Scan Average Dose descriptor, the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) and its variations (CTDI(100), CTDI(w), CTDI(vol)), and the dose-length product. Factors that affect radiation dose from CT include the beam energy, tube current-time product, pitch, collimation, patient size, and dose reduction options. Methods of reducing the radiation dose to a patient from CT include reducing the milliampere-seconds value, increasing the pitch, varying the milliampere-seconds value according to patient size, and reducing the beam energy. The effective dose from CT can be estimated by using Monte Carlo methods to simulate CT of a mathematical patient model, by estimating the energy imparted to the body region being scanned, or by using conversion factors for general anatomic regions. Issues related to radiation dose from CT are being addressed by the Society for Pediatric Radiology, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the American College of Radiology, and the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the Food and Drug Administration.

  3. Random Walk and Graph Cut for Co-Segmentation of Lung Tumor on PET-CT Images.

    PubMed

    Ju, Wei; Xiang, Dehui; Xiang, Deihui; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Lirong; Kopriva, Ivica; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-12-01

    Accurate lung tumor delineation plays an important role in radiotherapy treatment planning. Since the lung tumor has poor boundary in positron emission tomography (PET) images and low contrast in computed tomography (CT) images, segmentation of tumor in the PET and CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we effectively integrate the two modalities by making fully use of the superior contrast of PET images and superior spatial resolution of CT images. Random walk and graph cut method is integrated to solve the segmentation problem, in which random walk is utilized as an initialization tool to provide object seeds for graph cut segmentation on the PET and CT images. The co-segmentation problem is formulated as an energy minimization problem which is solved by max-flow/min-cut method. A graph, including two sub-graphs and a special link, is constructed, in which one sub-graph is for the PET and another is for CT, and the special link encodes a context term which penalizes the difference of the tumor segmentation on the two modalities. To fully utilize the characteristics of PET and CT images, a novel energy representation is devised. For the PET, a downhill cost and a 3D derivative cost are proposed. For the CT, a shape penalty cost is integrated into the energy function which helps to constrain the tumor region during the segmentation. We validate our algorithm on a data set which consists of 18 PET-CT images. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is superior to the graph cut method solely using the PET or CT is more accurate compared with the random walk method, random walk co-segmentation method, and non-improved graph cut method.

  4. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mosebach, Jennifer; Pan, Leyun; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    PET/MRI represents a promising hybrid imaging modality with several potential clinical applications. Although PET/MRI seems highly attractive in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM), its role has not yet been evaluated. The aims of this prospective study are to evaluate the feasibility of 18F-FDG PET/MRI in detection of MM lesions, and to investigate the reproducibility of bone marrow lesions detection and quantitative data of 18F-FDG uptake between the functional (PET) component of PET/CT and PET/MRI in MM patients. The study includes 30 MM patients. All patients initially underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT (60 min p.i.), followed by PET/MRI (120 min p.i.). PET/CT and PET/MRI data were assessed and compared based on qualitative (lesion detection) and quantitative (SUV) evaluation. The hybrid PET/MRI system provided good image quality in all cases without artefacts. PET/MRI identified 65 of the 69 lesions, which were detectable with PET/CT (94.2%). Quantitative PET evaluations showed the following mean values in MM lesions: SUVaverage=5.5 and SUVmax=7.9 for PET/CT; SUVaverage=3.9 and SUVmax=5.8 for PET/MRI. Both SUVaverage and SUVmax were significantly higher on PET/CT than on PET/MRI. Spearman correlation analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between both lesional SUVaverage (r=0.744) and lesional SUVmax (r=0.855) values derived from PET/CT and PET/MRI. Regarding detection of myeloma skeletal lesions, PET/MRI exhibited equivalent performance to PET/CT. In terms of tracer uptake quantitation, a significant correlation between the two techniques was demonstrated, despite the statistically significant differences in lesional SUVs between PET/CT and PET/MRI. PMID:26550538

  5. Segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT and MR images based on 3D deterministic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štern, Darko; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2011-03-01

    The evaluation of vertebral deformations is of great importance in clinical diagnostics and therapy of pathological conditions affecting the spine. Although modern clinical practice is oriented towards the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, as they can provide a detailed 3D representation of vertebrae, the established methods for the evaluation of vertebral deformations still provide only a two-dimensional (2D) geometrical description. Segmentation of vertebrae in 3D may therefore not only improve their visualization, but also provide reliable and accurate 3D measurements of vertebral deformations. In this paper we propose a method for 3D segmentation of individual vertebral bodies that can be performed in CT and MR images. Initialized with a single point inside the vertebral body, the segmentation is performed by optimizing the parameters of a 3D deterministic model of the vertebral body to achieve the best match of the model to the vertebral body in the image. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on five CT (40 vertebrae) and five T2-weighted MR (40 vertebrae) spine images, among them five are normal and five are pathological. The results show that the proposed method can be used for 3D segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT and MR images and that the proposed model can describe a variety of vertebral body shapes. The method may be therefore used for initializing whole vertebra segmentation or reliably describing vertebral body deformations.

  6. Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

    2007-03-31

    The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was

  7. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM LOG-INACTIVATION WITH OZONE USING EFFLUENT CT 10, GEOMETRIC MEAN CT 10 EXTENDED INTEGRATED CT 10 AND EXTENDED-CSTR CALCULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The draft Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule ("LT2ESWTR") contains Cryptosporidium log-inactivation CT tables. Depending on the water temperature, the Cryptosporidium CT values that are listed are 15 to 25 times greater than CT values fo...

  8. Fast CT-CT fluoroscopy registration with respiratory motion compensation for image-guided lung intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Po; Xue, Zhong; Lu, Kongkuo; Yang, Jianhua; Wong, Stephen T.

    2012-02-01

    CT-fluoroscopy (CTF) is an efficient imaging method for guiding percutaneous lung interventions such as biopsy. During CTF-guided biopsy procedure, four to ten axial sectional images are captured in a very short time period to provide nearly real-time feedback to physicians, so that they can adjust the needle as it is advanced toward the target lesion. Although popularly used in clinics, this traditional CTF-guided intervention procedure may require frequent scans and cause unnecessary radiation exposure to clinicians and patients. In addition, CTF only generates limited slices of images and provides limited anatomical information. It also has limited response to respiratory movements and has narrow local anatomical dynamics. To better utilize CTF guidance, we propose a fast CT-CTF registration algorithm with respiratory motion estimation for image-guided lung intervention using electromagnetic (EM) guidance. With the pre-procedural exhale and inhale CT scans, it would be possible to estimate a series of CT images of the same patient at different respiratory phases. Then, once a CTF image is captured during the intervention, our algorithm can pick the best respiratory phase-matched 3D CT image and performs a fast deformable registration to warp the 3D CT toward the CTF. The new 3D CT image can be used to guide the intervention by superimposing the EM-guided needle location on it. Compared to the traditional repetitive CTF guidance, the registered CT integrates both 3D volumetric patient data and nearly real-time local anatomy for more effective and efficient guidance. In this new system, CTF is used as a nearly real-time sensor to overcome the discrepancies between static pre-procedural CT and the patient's anatomy, so as to provide global guidance that may be supplemented with electromagnetic (EM) tracking and to reduce the number of CTF scans needed. In the experiments, the comparative results showed that our fast CT-CTF algorithm can achieve better registration

  9. Assessment of the effects of CT dose in averaged x-ray CT images of a dose-sensitive polymer gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairn, T.; Kakakhel, M. B.; Johnston, H.; Jirasek, A.; Trapp, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio achievable in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images of polymer gels can be increased by averaging over multiple scans of each sample. However, repeated scanning delivers a small additional dose to the gel which may compromise the accuracy of the dose measurement. In this study, a NIPAM-based polymer gel was irradiated and then CT scanned 25 times, with the resulting data used to derive an averaged image and a "zero-scan" image of the gel. Comparison between these two results and the first scan of the gel showed that the averaged and zero-scan images provided better contrast, higher contrast-to- noise and higher signal-to-noise than the initial scan. The pixel values (Hounsfield units, HU) in the averaged image were not noticeably elevated, compared to the zero-scan result and the gradients used in the linear extrapolation of the zero-scan images were small and symmetrically distributed around zero. These results indicate that the averaged image was not artificially lightened by the small, additional dose delivered during CT scanning. This work demonstrates the broader usefulness of the zero-scan method as a means to verify the dosimetric accuracy of gel images derived from averaged x-ray CT data.

  10. Severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults: chest radiographic and CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dingyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Zhiwei; Cao, Jian; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe adenovirus pneumonia and its associated imaging features are well-described in immunocompromised patients but are rare and poorly understood in immunocompetent adults. We sought to describe the radiographic and CT findings of severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in eight immunocompetent adults. Methods We reviewed systematically chest imaging manifestations of laboratory-confirmed severe adenovirus pneumonia in eight immunocompetent adults from April 2012 to April 2014. Results All patients showed abnormal results on initial chest radiograph and CT, with the exception of one normal initial chest radiograph. The abnormalities of the initial chest radiographs were unilateral (n=4) or bilateral (n=3), including consolidation (n=4), dense patchy opacity (n=3), ground glass opacity (GGO) (n=1), and pleural effusion (n=1). The initial CT findings consisted of unilateral (n=5) and bilateral (n=3) abnormalities, including consolidation (n=8), GGO (n=2), pleural effusion (n=3) and small nodules (n=1). Focal consolidation was the predominant finding in six patients whose initial CT scans were examined within one week after illness onset. Follow-up radiologic findings showed rapid development of bilateral consolidation within ten days after illness onset, usually accompanied by adjacent ground-glass opacity and pleural effusion. The parenchymal abnormalities began to absorb around two weeks after illness onset, with no appearances of fibrosis. Conclusions Severe adenovirus CAP in immunocompetent adults mainly appears as focal consolidation followed by rapid progression to bilateral consolidation, usually accompanied by adjacent GGO and pleural effusion, which may resemble bacterial pneumonia. Adenovirus should be considered in severe pneumonia cases with negative cultures and failure to respond to antibiotics. PMID:27162658

  11. [Analysis of Factors on Clinical Application of Vehicle CT Shelter].

    PubMed

    Shuai, Wanjun; Chao, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Dong, Can; Gao, Huayong; Tan, Shulin; Niu, Fu

    2015-09-01

    To assure the clinical quality and requirement of CT shelter used in field environment, the factors related with the practical application were studied. The evaluation indicators of CT equipment were investigated. Based on the technical modification of vehicle shelter CT, the scanning conditions of shelter CT were analyzed. Moreover, the comparative study was done between shelter CT and common CT in hospitals. In result, in order to meet maneuverability application in the field, vehicle shelter CT was restrictive by the field conditions, traffic impacts and running requirement. The application of vehicle shelter CT was affected by the factors, such as mechanical stabilization, moving precision, power fluctuations and variations of temperature and humidity, etc. The results were helpful to improve the clinical quality of vehicle shelter CT and made a base for the quality control study in the future. PMID:26904889

  12. Medipix-based Spectral Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; He, Peng; Bennett, James; Amir, Raja; Dobbs, Bruce; Mou, Xuanqin; Wei, Biao; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Since Hounsfield's Nobel Prize winning breakthrough decades ago, X-ray CT has been widely applied in the clinical and preclinical applications - producing a huge number of tomographic gray-scale images. However, these images are often insufficient to distinguish crucial differences needed for diagnosis. They have poor soft tissue contrast due to inherent photon-count issues, involving high radiation dose. By physics, the X-ray spectrum is polychromatic, and it is now feasible to obtain multi-energy, spectral, or true-color, CT images. Such spectral images promise powerful new diagnostic information. The emerging Medipix technology promises energy-sensitive, high-resolution, accurate and rapid X-ray detection. In this paper, we will review the recent progress of Medipix-based spectral micro-CT with the emphasis on the results obtained by our team. It includes the state- of-the-art Medipix detector, the system and method of a commercial MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) spectral micro-CT, and the design and color diffusion of a hybrid spectral micro-CT. PMID:24194631

  13. Chest pain: coronary CT in the ER.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Erica; Seitun, Sara; Guaricci, Andrea I; Cademartiri, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac CT has developed into a robust clinical tool during the past 15 years. Of the fields in which the potential of cardiac CT has raised more interest is chest pain in acute settings. In fact, the possibility to exclude with high reliability obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients at low-to-intermediate risk is of great interest both from the clinical standpoint and from the management standpoint. Several other modalities, with or without imaging, have been used during the past decades in the settings of new onset chest pain or in acute chest pain for both diagnostic and prognostic assessment of CAD. Each one has advantages and disadvantages. Most imaging modalities also focus on inducible ischaemia to guide referral to invasive coronary angiography. The advent of cardiac CT has introduced a new practice diagnostic paradigm, being the most accurate non-invasive method for identification and exclusion of CAD. Furthermore, the detection of subclinical CAD and plaque imaging offer the opportunity to improve risk stratification. Moreover, recent advances of the latest generation CT scanners allow combining both anatomical and functional imaging by stress myocardial perfusion. The role of cardiac CT in acute settings is already important and will become progressively more important in the coming years. PMID:26866681

  14. Virtual hybrid bronchoscopy using PET/CT data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Seemann, Marcus D.

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the possibilities, advantages and limitations of virtual bronchoscopy using data sets from positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). Eight consecutive patients with lung cancer underwent PET/CT. PET was performed with F-18-labelled 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D: -glucose ((18)F-FDG). The tracheobronchial system was segmented with a volume-growing algorithm, using the CT data sets, and visualized with a shaded-surface rendering method. The primary tumours and the lymph node metastases were segmented for virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the CT data set and for virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy using the PET/CT data set. Virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the low-dose or diagnostic CT facilitates the detection of anatomical/morphological structure changes of the tracheobronchial system. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy was superior to virtual CT-bronchoscopy in the detection of lymph node metastases (P=0.001), because it uses the CT information and the molecular/metabolic information from PET. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy with a transparent colour-coded shaded-surface rendering model is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy of identification and characterization of malignancies, assessment of tumour staging, differentiation of viable tumour tissue from atelectases and scars, verification of infections, evaluation of therapeutic response and detection of an early stage of recurrence that is not detectable or is misjudged in comparison with virtual CT-bronchoscopy.

  15. Progress in Initiator Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hrousis, C A; Christensen, J S

    2009-05-04

    There is great interest in applying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation techniques to the designs of electrical high explosive (HE) initiators, for the purpose of better understanding a design's sensitivities, optimizing its performance, and/or predicting its useful lifetime. Two MHD-capable LLNL codes, CALE and ALE3D, are being used to simulate the process of ohmic heating, vaporization, and plasma formation in the bridge of an initiator, be it an exploding bridgewire (EBW), exploding bridgefoil (EBF) or slapper type initiator. The initiation of the HE is simulated using Tarver Ignition & Growth reactive flow models. 1-D, 2-D and 3-D models have been constructed and studied. The models provide some intuitive explanation of the initiation process and are useful for evaluating the potential impact of identified aging mechanisms (such as the growth of intermetallic compounds or powder sintering). The end product of this work is a simulation capability for evaluating margin in proposed, modified or aged initiation system designs.

  16. Liver segmentation for CT images using GVF snake

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fan; Zhao Binsheng; Kijewski, Peter K.; Wang Liang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2005-12-15

    Accurate liver segmentation on computed tomography (CT) images is a challenging task especially at sites where surrounding tissues (e.g., stomach, kidney) have densities similar to that of the liver and lesions reside at the liver edges. We have developed a method for semiautomatic delineation of the liver contours on contrast-enhanced CT images. The method utilizes a snake algorithm with a gradient vector flow (GVF) field as its external force. To improve the performance of the GVF snake in the segmentation of the liver contour, an edge map was obtained with a Canny edge detector, followed by modifications using a liver template and a concavity removal algorithm. With the modified edge map, for which unwanted edges inside the liver were eliminated, the GVF field was computed and an initial liver contour was formed. The snake algorithm was then applied to obtain the actual liver contour. This algorithm was extended to segment the liver volume in a slice-by-slice fashion, where the result of the preceding slice constrained the segmentation of the adjacent slice. 551 two-dimensional liver images from 20 volumetric images with colorectal metastases spreading throughout the livers were delineated using this method, and also manually by a radiologist for evaluation. The difference ratio, which is defined as the percentage ratio of mismatching volume between the computer and the radiologist's results, ranged from 2.9% to 7.6% with a median value of 5.3%.

  17. Computerized scheme for vertebra detection in CT scout image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Chen, Qiang; Zhou, Hanxun; Zhang, Guodong; Cong, Lin; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Our purposes are to develop a vertebra detection scheme for automated scan planning, which would assist radiological technologists in their routine work for the imaging of vertebrae. Because the orientations of vertebrae were various, and the Haar-like features were only employed to represent the subject on the vertical, horizontal, or diagonal directions, we rotated the CT scout image seven times to make the vertebrae roughly horizontal in least one of the rotated images. Then, we employed Adaboost learning algorithm to construct a strong classifier for the vertebra detection by use of Haar-like features, and combined the detection results with the overlapping region according to the number of times they were detected. Finally, most of the false positives were removed by use of the contextual relationship between them. The detection scheme was evaluated on a database with 76 CT scout image. Our detection scheme reported 1.65 false positives per image at a sensitivity of 94.3% for initial detection of vertebral candidates, and then the performance of detection was improved to 0.95 false positives per image at a sensitivity of 98.6% for the further steps of false positive reduction. The proposed scheme achieved a high performance for the detection of vertebrae with different orientations.

  18. Who initiates emergency commitments?

    PubMed

    Christy, Annette; Handelsman, Jessica B; Hanson, Ardis; Ochshorn, Ezra

    2010-04-01

    Florida's Mental Health Act was amended in 2005 and 2006 to include licensed mental health counselors and licensed marriage and family therapists, respectively, to the list of professionals authorized to initiate emergency commitments. The present study evaluates the volume of involuntary emergency commitments by type of initiator for a 5 year period. The results indicate that allowing licensed mental health counselors and licensed marriage and family therapist to initiate emergency commitments has not been related to increased numbers of emergency commitments or a higher proportion of emergency commitments being initiated by mental health professionals. Potential policy and fiscal implications, as well as future directions for research, are discussed. PMID:19597746

  19. Small-animal CT: Its difference from, and impact on, clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritman, Erik L.

    2007-10-01

    For whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of small rodents, a voxel resolution of at least 10 -3 mm 3 is needed for scale-equivalence to that currently achieved in clinical CT scanners (˜1 mm 3) in adult humans. These "mini-CT" images generally require minutes rather than seconds to complete a scan. The radiation exposure resulting from these mini-CT scans, while higher than clinical CT scans, is below the level resulting in acute tissue damage. Hence, these scans are useful for performing clinical-type diagnostic and monitoring scans for animal models of disease and their response to treatment. "Micro-CT", with voxel size <10 -5 mm 3, has been useful for imaging isolated, intact organs at an almost cellular level of resolution. Micro-CT has the great advantage over traditional microscopic methods in that it generates detailed three-dimensional images in relatively large, opaque volumes such as an intact rodent heart or kidney. The radiation exposure needed in these scans results in acute tissue damage if used in living animals. Experience with micro-CT is contributing to exploration of new applications for clinical CT imaging by providing insights into different modes of X-ray image formation as follows: Spatial resolution should be sufficient to detect an individual Basic Functional Unit (BFU, the smallest collection of diverse cells, such as hepatic lobule, that behaves like the organ), which requires voxels ˜10 -3 mm 3 in volume, so that the BFUs can be counted. Contrast resolution sufficient to allow quantitation of: New microvascular growth, which manifests as increased tissue contrast due to X-ray contrast agent in those vessels' lumens during passage of injected contrast agent in blood. Impaired endothelial integrity which manifests as increased opacification and delayed washout of contrast from tissues. Discrimination of pathological accumulations of metals such as Fe and Ca, which occur in the arterial wall following hemorrhage or tissue damage

  20. High-Pitch, Low-Voltage and Low-Iodine-Concentration CT Angiography of Aorta: Assessment of Image Quality and Radiation Dose with Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yanguang; Sun, Zhonghua; Xu, Lei; Li, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Yan, Zixu; Fan, Zhanming

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the image quality of aorta obtained by dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA), performed with high pitch, low tube voltage, and low iodine concentration contrast medium (CM) with images reconstructed using iterative reconstruction (IR). Methods One hundred patients randomly allocated to receive one of two types of CM underwent DSCTA with the electrocardiogram-triggered Flash protocol. In the low-iodine group, 50 patients received CM containing 270 mg I/mL and were scanned at low tube voltage (100 kVp). In the high-iodine CM group, 50 patients received CM containing 370 mg I/mL and were scanned at the tube voltage (120 kVp). The filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm was used for reconstruction in both groups. In addition, the IR algorithm was used in the low-iodine group. Image quality of the aorta was analyzed subjectively by a 3-point grading scale and objectively by measuring the CT attenuation in terms of the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios (SNR and CNR, respectively). Radiation and CM doses were compared. Results The CT attenuation, subjective image quality assessment, SNR, and CNR of various aortic regions of interest did not differ significantly between two groups. In the low-iodine group, images reconstructed by FBP and IR demonstrated significant differences in image noise, SNR, and CNR (p<0.05). The low-iodine group resulted in 34.3% less radiation (4.4 ± 0.5 mSv) than the high-iodine group (6.7 ± 0.6 mSv), and 27.3% less iodine weight (20.36 ± 2.65 g) than the high-iodine group (28 ± 1.98 g). Observers exhibited excellent agreement on the aortic image quality scores (κ = 0.904). Conclusions CT images of aorta could be obtained within 2 s by using a DSCT Flash protocol with low tube voltage, IR, and low-iodine-concentration CM. Appropriate contrast enhancement was achieved while maintaining good image quality and decreasing the radiation and iodine doses. PMID:25643353

  1. Improved dose calculation accuracy for low energy brachytherapy by optimizing dual energy CT imaging protocols for noise reduction using sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Gaudreault, Mathieu; van Elmpt, Wouter; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the noise reduction achievable from dual energy computed tomography (CT) imaging (DECT) using filtered backprojection (FBP) and iterative image reconstruction algorithms combined with increased imaging exposure. We evaluated the data in the context of imaging for brachytherapy dose calculation, where accurate quantification of electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff is beneficial. A dual source CT scanner was used to scan a phantom containing tissue mimicking inserts. DECT scans were acquired at 80 kVp/140Sn kVp (where Sn stands for tin filtration) and 100 kVp/140Sn kVp, using the same values of the CT dose index CTDIvol for both settings as a measure for the radiation imaging exposure. Four CTDIvol levels were investigated. Images were reconstructed using FBP and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with strength 1,3 and 5. From DECT scans two material quantities were derived, Zeff and ρe. DECT images were used to assign material types and the amount of improperly assigned voxels was quantified for each protocol. The dosimetric impact of improperly assigned voxels was evaluated with Geant4 Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for an (125)I source in numerical phantoms. Standard deviations for Zeff and ρe were reduced up to a factor ∼2 when using SAFIRE with strength 5 compared to FBP. Standard deviations on Zeff and ρe as low as 0.15 and 0.006 were achieved for the muscle insert representing typical soft tissue using a CTDIvol of 40 mGy and 3mm slice thickness. Dose calculation accuracy was generally improved when using SAFIRE. Mean (maximum absolute) dose errors of up to 1.3% (21%) with FBP were reduced to less than 1% (6%) with SAFIRE at a CTDIvol of 10 mGy. Using a CTDIvol of 40mGy and SAFIRE yielded mean dose calculation errors of the order of 0.6% which was the MC dose calculation precision in this study and no error was larger than ±2.5% as opposed to errors of up to -4% with FPB. This

  2. Semiautomatic three-dimensional CT ventricular volumetry in patients with congenital heart disease: agreement between two methods with different user interaction.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang-Hyub

    2015-12-01

    To assess agreement between two semi-automatic, three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) ventricular volumetry methods with different user interactions in patients with congenital heart disease. In 30 patients with congenital heart disease (median age 8 years, range 5 days-33 years; 20 men), dual-source, multi-section, electrocardiography-synchronized cardiac CT was obtained at the end-systolic (n = 22) and/or end-diastolic (n = 28) phase. Nineteen left ventricle end-systolic (LV ESV), 28 left ventricle end-diastolic (LV EDV), 22 right ventricle end-systolic (RV ESV), and 28 right ventricle end-diastolic volumes (RV EDV) were successfully calculated using two semi-automatic, 3D segmentation methods with different user interactions (high in method 1, low in method 2). The calculated ventricular volumes of the two methods were compared and correlated. A P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. LV ESV (35.95 ± 23.49 ml), LV EDV (88.76 ± 61.83 ml), and RV ESV (46.87 ± 47.39 ml) measured by method 2 were slightly but significantly smaller than those measured by method 1 (41.25 ± 26.94 ml, 92.20 ± 62.69 ml, 53.61 ± 50.08 ml for LV ESV, LV EDV, and RV ESV, respectively; P ≤ 0.02). In contrast, no statistically significant difference in RV EDV (122.57 ± 88.57 ml in method 1, 123.83 ± 89.89 ml in method 2; P = 0.36) was found between the two methods. All ventricular volumes showed very high correlation (R = 0.978, 0.993, 0.985, 0.997 for LV ESV, LV EDV, RV ESV, and RV EDV, respectively; P < 0.001) between the two methods. In patients with congenital heart disease, 3D CT ventricular volumetry shows good agreement and high correlation between the two methods, but method 2 tends to slightly underestimate LV ESV, LV EDV, and RV ESV.

  3. Dual energy CT: How well can pseudo-monochromatic imaging reduce metal artifacts?

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchenbecker, Stefan Faby, Sebastian; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc; Lell, Michael

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Dual Energy CT (DECT) provides so-called monoenergetic images based on a linear combination of the original polychromatic images. At certain patient-specific energy levels, corresponding to certain patient- and slice-dependent linear combination weights, e.g., E = 160 keV corresponds to α = 1.57, a significant reduction of metal artifacts may be observed. The authors aimed at analyzing the method for its artifact reduction capabilities to identify its limitations. The results are compared with raw data-based processing. Methods: Clinical DECT uses a simplified version of monochromatic imaging by linearly combining the low and the high kV images and by assigning an energy to that linear combination. Those pseudo-monochromatic images can be used by radiologists to obtain images with reduced metal artifacts. The authors analyzed the underlying physics and carried out a series expansion of the polychromatic attenuation equations. The resulting nonlinear terms are responsible for the artifacts, but they are not linearly related between the low and the high kV scan: A linear combination of both images cannot eliminate the nonlinearities, it can only reduce their impact. Scattered radiation yields additional noncanceling nonlinearities. This method is compared to raw data-based artifact correction methods. To quantify the artifact reduction potential of pseudo-monochromatic images, they simulated the FORBILD abdomen phantom with metal implants, and they assessed patient data sets of a clinical dual source CT system (100, 140 kV Sn) containing artifacts induced by a highly concentrated contrast agent bolus and by metal. In each case, they manually selected an optimal α and compared it to a raw data-based material decomposition in case of simulation, to raw data-based material decomposition of inconsistent rays in case of the patient data set containing contrast agent, and to the frequency split normalized metal artifact reduction in case of the metal

  4. CT densitometry of the lungs: Scanner performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kemerink, G.J.; Lamers, R.J.S.; Thelissen, G.R.P.; Engelshoven, J.M.A. van

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to establish the reproducibility and accuracy of the CT scanner in densitometry of the lungs. Scanner stability was assessed by analysis of daily quality checks. Studies using a humanoid phantom and polyethylene foams for lung were performed to measure reproducibility and accuracy. The dependence of the CT-estimated density on reconstruction filter, zoom factor, slice thickness, table height, data truncation, and objects outside the scan field was determined. Stability of the system at air density was within {approx}1 HU and at water density within {approx}2 HU. Reproducibility and accuracy for densities found for lung were within 2-3%. Dependence on the acquisition and reconstruction parameters was neglible, with the exceptions of the ultra high resolution reconstruction algorithm in the case of emphysema, and objects outside the scan field. The performance of the CT scanner tested is quite adequate for densitometry of the lungs. 26 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging in neurology.

    PubMed

    Ciarmiello, Andrea; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Meniconi, Martina; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo; Gaeta, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the SPECT/CT hybrid modality has led to a rapid development of imaging techniques in nuclear medicine, opening new perspectives for imaging staff and patients as well. However, while, the clinical role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is well consolidated, the diffusion and the consequent value of single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) has yet to be weighed, Hence, there is a need for a careful analysis, comparing the "potential" benefits of the hybrid modality with the "established" ones of the standalone machine. The aim of this article is to analyze the impact of this hybrid tool on the diagnosis of diseases of the central nervous system, comparing strengths and weaknesses of both modalities through the use of SWOT analysis. PMID:25143053

  6. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-06-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence.

  7. Fracture Detection in Traumatic Pelvic CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Davuluri, Pavani; Ward, Kevin R.; Cockrell, Charles; Hobson, Rosalyn; Najarian, Kayvan

    2012-01-01

    Fracture detection in pelvic bones is vital for patient diagnostic decisions and treatment planning in traumatic pelvic injuries. Manual detection of bone fracture from computed tomography (CT) images is very challenging due to low resolution of the images and the complex pelvic structures. Automated fracture detection from segmented bones can significantly help physicians analyze pelvic CT images and detect the severity of injuries in a very short period. This paper presents an automated hierarchical algorithm for bone fracture detection in pelvic CT scans using adaptive windowing, boundary tracing, and wavelet transform while incorporating anatomical information. Fracture detection is performed on the basis of the results of prior pelvic bone segmentation via our registered active shape model (RASM). The results are promising and show that the method is capable of detecting fractures accurately. PMID:22287952

  8. A method for benchmarking CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Al-Farsi, A; Michael, G; Thiele, D

    2005-09-01

    This study involved the development of an objective method to compare the performance of five CT scanners for the purpose of benchmarking. The method used to assess the scanners was to determine the dose-normalised noise at a spatial resolution of 5.5 cm(-1). This gave a dose-normalised percent noise between 0.37% and 0.76%. The scanners were also assessed for radiation dose to patients undergoing abdomen and head CT examinations. Patients' dose-length product (DLP) for the abdomen clinical examinations varied from 305 to 685 mGy-cm, and for the head clinical examinations from 333 to 900 mGy-cm. The study results demonstrated that the comparison of dose and spatial resolution normalised percent noise levels is a useful method of comparing CT scanner performance.

  9. Comparison of SPECT/CT, MRI and CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-xu; Han, Peng-hui; Zhang, Guo-qian; Wang, Rui-hao; Ge, Yong-bin; Ren, Zhi-gang; Li, Jian-sheng; Fu, Wen-hai

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is crucial for correct staging, assessing treatment response and contouring the tumor target in radiotherapy planning, as well as improving the patient's prognosis. To compare the diagnostic efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for the detection of skull base invasion in NPC. Sixty untreated patients with histologically proven NPC underwent SPECT/CT imaging, contrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Of the 60 patients, 30 had skull base invasion confirmed by the final results of contrast-enhanced MRI, CT and six-month follow-up imaging (MRI and CT). The diagnostic efficacy of the three imaging modalities in detecting skull base invasion was evaluated. The rates of positive findings of skull base invasion for SPECT/CT, MRI and CT were 53.3%, 48.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 93.3%, 86.7% and 90.0% for SPECT/CT fusion imaging, 96.7%, 100.0% and 98.3% for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 66.7%, 100.0% and 83.3% for contrast-enhanced CT. MRI showed the best performance for the diagnosis of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, followed closely by SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT had poorer specificity than that of both MRI and CT, while CT had the lowest sensitivity.

  10. Alpha image reconstruction (AIR): A new iterative CT image reconstruction approach using voxel-wise alpha blending

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Christian; Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-06-15

    factor for contrast-resolution plots. Furthermore, the authors calculate the contrast-to-noise ratio with the low contrast disks and the authors compare the agreement of the reconstructions with the ground truth by calculating the normalized cross-correlation and the root-mean-square deviation. To evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method, the authors reconstruct patient data acquired with a Somatom Definition Flash dual source CT scanner (Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). Results: The results of the simulation study show that among the compared algorithms AIR achieves the highest resolution and the highest agreement with the ground truth. Compared to the reference FBP reconstruction AIR is able to reduce the relative pixel noise by up to 50% and at the same time achieve a higher resolution by maintaining the edge information from the basis images. These results can be confirmed with the patient data. Conclusions: To evaluate the AIR algorithm simulated and measured patient data of a state-of-the-art clinical CT system were processed. It is shown, that generating CT images through the reconstruction of weighting coefficients has the potential to improve the resolution noise trade-off and thus to improve the dose usage in clinical CT.

  11. Implementation and characterization of a 320-slice volumetric CT scanner for simulation in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, C.; Breen, S.; Purdie, T. G.; Owrangi, A.; Publicover, J.; Bartolac, S.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Effective target definition and broad employment of treatment response assessment with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in radiation oncology requires increased speed and coverage for use within a single bolus injection. To this end, a novel volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion One, Toshiba, Tochigi Pref., Japan) has been installed at the Princess Margaret Hospital for implementation into routine CT simulation. This technology offers great advantages for anatomical and functional imaging in both scan speed and coverage. The aim of this work is to investigate the system's imaging performance and quality as well as CT quantification accuracy which is important for radiotherapy dose calculations. Methods: The 320-slice CT scanner uses a 160 mm wide-area (2D) solid-state detector design which provides the possibility to acquire a volumetric axial length of 160 mm without moving the CT couch. This is referred to as ''volume'' and can be scanned with a rotation speed of 0.35-3 s. The scanner can also be used as a 64-slice CT scanner and perform conventional (axial) and helical acquisitions with collimation ranges of 1-32 and 16-32 mm, respectively. Commissioning was performed according to AAPM Reports TG 66 and 39 for both helical and volumetric imaging. Defrise and other cone-beam image analysis tests were performed. Results: Overall, the imaging spatial resolution and geometric efficiency (GE) were found to be very good (>10 lp/mm, <1 mm spatial integrity and GE{sub 160mm}=85%) and within the AAPM guidelines as well as IEC recommendations. Although there is evidence of some cone-beam artifacts when scanning the Defrise phantom, image quality was found to be good and sufficient for treatment planning (soft tissue noise <10 HU). Measurements of CT number stability and contrast-to-noise values across the volume indicate clinically acceptable scan accuracy even at the field edge. Conclusions: Initial experience with this exciting new technology confirms its accuracy for

  12. Literature review of SNOMED CT use

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dennis; de Keizer, Nicolette; Lau, Francis; Cornet, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this paper is to report on the use of the systematised nomenclature of medicine clinical terms (SNOMED CT) by providing an overview of published papers. Methods Published papers on SNOMED CT between 2001 and 2012 were identified using PubMed and Embase databases using the keywords ‘systematised nomenclature of medicine’ and ‘SNOMED CT’. For each paper the following characteristics were retrieved: SNOMED CT focus category (ie, indeterminate, theoretical, pre-development/design, implementation and evaluation/commodity), usage category (eg, prospective content coverage, used to classify or code in a study), medical domain and country. Results Our search strategy identified 488 papers. A comparison between the papers published between 2001–6 and 2007–12 showed an increase in every SNOMED CT focus category. The number of papers classified as ‘theoretical’ increased from 46 to 78, ‘pre-development/design’ increased from 61 to 173 and ‘implementation’ increased from 10 to 34. Papers classified as ‘evaluation/commodity’ only started to appear from 2010. Conclusions The majority of studies focused on ‘theoretical’ and ‘pre-development/design’. This is still encouraging as SNOMED CT is being harmonized with other standardized terminologies and is being evaluated to determine the content coverage of local terms, which is usually one of the first steps towards adoption. Most implementations are not published in the scientific literature, requiring a look beyond the scientific literature to gain insights into SNOMED CT implementations. PMID:23828173

  13. [CT-expo--a novel program for dose evaluation in CT].

    PubMed

    Stamm, G; Nagel, H D

    2002-12-01

    CT-Expo is a novel MS Excel application for assessing the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing CT examinations, based on computational methods that were used to analyze the data collected in the German survey on CT practice in 1999. The program enables the calculation of all dose quantities of practical value, such as axial dose free-in-air, weighted CTDI, dose-length product, effective dose and uterine dose. In contrast to existing programs for CT dose assessment, CT-Expo offers a number of unique features, such as gender-specific dose calculation for all age groups (adults, children, newborns), applicability to all existing scanner models including correction of scanner-specific influences, and the possibility of comparison with the results from the German CT survey on CT practice. Three different application modules offer free and standardized dose calculations as well as a comprehensive benchmarking section including guidance on dose optimization. The program is available as shareware in both German and English version. Additional information and a demo version free of charge can be requested via e-mail from the author's address stamm.georg@mh-hannover. de) or from the web page http://www.mh-hannover.de/kliniken/radiologie/str_04.html.

  14. Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu; Duan, Jianghui; Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of −950 Hu in inspiration and −950 to −890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under −930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 ± 9.66 and 13.95 ± 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the −950 to −890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

  15. Computer-aided diagnosis in thoracic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang

    2009-10-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) provides a computer output as a "second opinion" in order to assist radiologists in the diagnosis of various diseases on medical images. Currently, a hot topic in CAD is the development of computerized schemes for detection of lung abnormalities, such as lung nodule and interstitial lung disease, in computed tomography (CT) images. The author describes in this article the current status of the CAD schemes for the detection of lung nodules and interstitial lung disease in CT developed by the author and his colleagues at the University of Chicago and Duke University.

  16. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  17. Bone SPECT/CT in skeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    The utility of radionuclide bone scanning in skeletal trauma has been greatly enhanced over the last decade by hybrid technology merging multislice CT with SPECT that can take advantage of CT-based correction of attenuation and scatter. The resulting images have been particularly helpful in giving us new insights into the evaluation of foot and ankle injuries and vertebral pathology both before and after surgery. The physiological information and anatomical detail allow a better understanding of the causes of patients' pain and have proven to be particularly useful in planning surgical intervention.

  18. Intracerebral pneumatoceles following facial trauma: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, D.B.; Hertzanu, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Three patients with delayed frontal intracerebral pneumatoceles following facial injury are presented. In one patient an unusual appearance of bilateral and symmetrical frontal lobe pneumatoceles was demonstrated. While diagnosis is not difficult on routine radiographs, CT is valuable for determining effects on the brain and clearly delineating the fracture site; CT shows the location of the pneumatocele and may show an associated air-fluid level, mass effect or surrounding edema, or rim enhancement following administration of contrast material. The radiological appearances in conjunction with the clinical findings are highly characteristic and should not be mistaken for gas-forming cerebral abscesses.

  19. CT and sonography of the acute abdomen

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, J.R. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This new book provides practical, expert guidance on the use of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound to diagnose acute disorders of the liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, aorta, and pelvis. The book describes the diagnostic strengths and limitations of CT and ultrasound, tells how to determine the preferred imaging technique for a given clinical situation, and gives step-by-step instructions for performing the procedure. Complementing the text are more than 750 high-resolution scans made on state-of-the-art equipment.

  20. SU-E-J-35: Clinical Performance Evaluation of a Phase II Proton CT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Mandapaka, A; Ghebremedhin, A; Farley, D; Giacometti, V; Vence, N; Bashkirov, V; Patyal, B; Schulte, R; Plautz, T; Zatserklyaniy, A; Johnson, R; Sadrozinski, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop the methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of a Phase II Proton CT scanner Methods: Range errors on the order of 3%-5% constitute a major uncertainty in current charged particle treatment planning based on Hounsfield Unit (HU)-relative stopping power (RSP) calibration curves. Within our proton CT collaboration, we previously developed and built a Phase I proton CT scanner that provided a sensitive area of 9 cm (axial) × 18 cm (in-plane). This scanner served to get initial experience with this new treatment planning tool and to incorporate lessons learned into the next generation design. A Phase II scanner was recently completed and is now undergoing initial performance testing. It will increase the proton acquisition rate and provide a larger detection area of 9 cm x 36 cm. We are now designing a comprehensive evaluation program to test the image quality, imaging dose, and range uncertainty associated with this scanner. The testing will be performed along the lines of AAPM TG 66. Results: In our discussion of the evaluation protocol we identified the following priorities. The image quality of proton CT images, in particular spatial resolution and low-density contrast discrimination, will be evaluated with the Catphan600 phantom. Initial testing showed that the Catphan uniformity phantom did not provide sufficient uniformity; it was thus replaced by a cylindrical water phantom. The imaging dose will be tested with a Catphan dose module, and compared to a typical cone beam CT dose for comparable image quality. Lastly, we developed a dedicated dosimetry range phantom based on the CIRS pediatric head phantom HN715. Conclusion: A formal evaluation of proton CT as a new tool for proton treatment planning is an important task. The availability of the new Phase II proton CT scanner will allow us to perform this task. This research is supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH under award number R01

  1. Illinois: Prevention Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Prevention Initiative provides grants to home-based and center-based programs to expand access to the Early Head Start (EHS) model as well as other birth to 3 models. The goal is to serve additional children birth to age 3 and help grantees increase program quality. The initiative to expand access to EHS and other models was…

  2. Prioritizing Scientific Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahcall, John N.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the way in which a limited number of astronomy research initiatives were chosen and prioritized based on a consensus of members from the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee. A list of recommended equipment initiatives and estimated costs is provided. (KR)

  3. Estimation of skull table thickness with clinical CT and validation with microCT.

    PubMed

    Lillie, Elizabeth M; Urban, Jillian E; Weaver, Ashley A; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Brain injuries resulting from motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are extremely common yet the details of the mechanism of injury remain to be well characterized. Skull deformation is believed to be a contributing factor to some types of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Understanding biomechanical contributors to skull deformation would provide further insight into the mechanism of head injury resulting from blunt trauma. In particular, skull thickness is thought be a very important factor governing deformation of the skull and its propensity for fracture. Current computed tomography (CT) technology is limited in its ability to accurately measure cortical thickness using standard techniques. A method to evaluate cortical thickness using cortical density measured from CT data has been developed previously. This effort validates this technique for measurement of skull table thickness in clinical head CT scans using two postmortem human specimens. Bone samples were harvested from the skulls of two cadavers and scanned with microCT to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated cortical thickness measured from clinical CT. Clinical scans were collected at 0.488 and 0.625 mm in plane resolution with 0.625 mm thickness. The overall cortical thickness error was determined to be 0.078 ± 0.58 mm for cortical samples thinner than 4 mm. It was determined that 91.3% of these differences fell within the scanner resolution. Color maps of clinical CT thickness estimations are comparable to color maps of microCT thickness measurements, indicating good quantitative agreement. These data confirm that the cortical density algorithm successfully estimates skull table thickness from clinical CT scans. The application of this technique to clinical CT scans enables evaluation of cortical thickness in population-based studies.

  4. MR to CT registration of brains using image synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the preferred imaging modality for patient dose calculation for radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) is used along with CT to identify brain structures due to its superior soft tissue contrast. Registration of MR and CT is necessary for accurate delineation of the tumor and other structures, and is critical in radiotherapy planning. Mutual information (MI) or its variants are typically used as a similarity metric to register MRI to CT. However, unlike CT, MRI intensity does not have an accepted calibrated intensity scale. Therefore, MI-based MR-CT registration may vary from scan to scan as MI depends on the joint histogram of the images. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic framework for MR-CT registration by synthesizing a synthetic CT image from MRI using a co-registered pair of MR and CT images as an atlas. Patches of the subject MRI are matched to the atlas and the synthetic CT patches are estimated in a probabilistic framework. The synthetic CT is registered to the original CT using a deformable registration and the computed deformation is applied to the MRI. In contrast to most existing methods, we do not need any manual intervention such as picking landmarks or regions of interests. The proposed method was validated on ten brain cancer patient cases, showing 25% improvement in MI and correlation between MR and CT images after registration compared to state-of-the-art registration methods.

  5. Deep convolutional networks for pancreas segmentation in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Holger R.; Farag, Amal; Lu, Le; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Automatic organ segmentation is an important prerequisite for many computer-aided diagnosis systems. The high anatomical variability of organs in the abdomen, such as the pancreas, prevents many segmentation methods from achieving high accuracies when compared to state-of-the-art segmentation of organs like the liver, heart or kidneys. Recently, the availability of large annotated training sets and the accessibility of affordable parallel computing resources via GPUs have made it feasible for "deep learning" methods such as convolutional networks (ConvNets) to succeed in image classification tasks. These methods have the advantage that used classification features are trained directly from the imaging data. We present a fully-automated bottom-up method for pancreas segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images of the abdomen. The method is based on hierarchical coarse-to-fine classification of local image regions (superpixels). Superpixels are extracted from the abdominal region using Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC). An initial probability response map is generated, using patch-level confidences and a two-level cascade of random forest classifiers, from which superpixel regions with probabilities larger 0.5 are retained. These retained superpixels serve as a highly sensitive initial input of the pancreas and its surroundings to a ConvNet that samples a bounding box around each superpixel at different scales (and random non-rigid deformations at training time) in order to assign a more distinct probability of each superpixel region being pancreas or not. We evaluate our method on CT images of 82 patients (60 for training, 2 for validation, and 20 for testing). Using ConvNets we achieve maximum Dice scores of an average 68% +/- 10% (range, 43-80%) in testing. This shows promise for accurate pancreas segmentation, using a deep learning approach and compares favorably to state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Method for transforming CT images for attenuation correction in PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Jonathan P.J.; Townsend, David W.; Rappoport, Vitaliy; Bendriem, Bernard

    2006-04-15

    A tube-voltage-dependent scheme is presented for transforming Hounsfield units (HU) measured by different computed tomography (CT) scanners at different x-ray tube voltages (kVp) to 511 keV linear attenuation values for attenuation correction in positron emission tomography (PET) data reconstruction. A Gammex 467 electron density CT phantom was imaged using a Siemens Sensation 16-slice CT, a Siemens Emotion 6-slice CT, a GE Lightspeed 16-slice CT, a Hitachi CXR 4-slice CT, and a Toshiba Aquilion 16-slice CT at kVp ranging from 80 to 140 kVp. All of these CT scanners are also available in combination with a PET scanner as a PET/CT tomograph. HU obtained for various reference tissue substitutes in the phantom were compared with the known linear attenuation values at 511 keV. The transformation, appropriate for lung, soft tissue, and bone, yields the function 9.6x10{sup -5}{center_dot}(HU+1000) below a threshold of {approx}50 HU and a{center_dot}(HU+1000)+b above the threshold, where a and b are fixed parameters that depend on the kVp setting. The use of the kVp-dependent scaling procedure leads to a significant improvement in reconstructed PET activity levels in phantom measurements, resolving errors of almost 40% otherwise seen for the case of dense bone phantoms at 80 kVp. Results are also presented for patient studies involving multiple CT scans at different kVp settings, which should all lead to the same 511 keV linear attenuation values. A linear fit to values obtained from 140 kVp CT images using the kVp-dependent scaling plotted as a function of the corresponding values obtained from 80 kVp CT images yielded y=1.003x-0.001 with an R{sup 2} value of 0.999, indicating that the same values are obtained to a high degree of accuracy.

  7. BRCA1-CtIP interaction in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Gautier, Jean

    2016-07-01

    DNA termini at double-strand breaks are often chemically heterogeneous and require processing before initiation of repair. In a recent report, we demonstrated that CtIP and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) nuclease complex cooperate with BRCA1 to specifically repair topoisomerase II-DNA adducted breaks. In contrast, BRCA1 is dispensable for repair of restriction endonuclease-generated double-strand breaks. PMID:27652321

  8. BRCA1-CtIP interaction in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Gautier, Jean

    2016-07-01

    DNA termini at double-strand breaks are often chemically heterogeneous and require processing before initiation of repair. In a recent report, we demonstrated that CtIP and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) nuclease complex cooperate with BRCA1 to specifically repair topoisomerase II-DNA adducted breaks. In contrast, BRCA1 is dispensable for repair of restriction endonuclease-generated double-strand breaks.

  9. Biomechanically constrained groupwise ultrasound to CT registration of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sean; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Fichtinger, Gabor; Boisvert, Jonathan; Pichora, David; Borshneck, Dan; Mousavi, Parvin

    2012-04-01

    We present a groupwise US to CT registration algorithm for guiding percutaneous spinal interventions. In addition, we introduce a comprehensive validation scheme that accounts for changes in the curvature of the spine between preoperative and intraoperative imaging. In our registration methodology, each vertebra in CT is treated as a sub-volume and transformed individually. A biomechanical model is used to constrain the displacement of the vertebrae relative to one another. The sub-volumes are then reconstructed into a single volume. During each iteration of registration, an US image is simulated from the reconstructed CT volume and an intensity-based similarity metric is calculated with the real US image. Validation studies are performed on CT and US images from a sheep cadaver, five patient-based phantoms designed to preserve realistic curvatures of the spine and a sixth patient-based phantom where the curvature of the spine is changed between preoperative and intraoperative imaging. For datasets where the spine curve between two imaging modalities was artificially perturbed, the proposed methodology was able to register initial misalignments of up to 20mm with a success rate of 95%. For the phantom with a physical change in the curvature of the spine introduced between the US and CT datasets, the registration success rate was 98.5%. Finally, the registration success rate for the sheep cadaver with soft-tissue information was 87%. The results demonstrate that our algorithm allows for robust registration of US and CT datasets, regardless of a change in the patients pose between preoperative and intraoperative image acquisitions.

  10. High Resolution Imaging of Murine Myocardial Infarction With Delayed Enhancement and Cine Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Badea, Cristian; Hedlund, Laurence W; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Sosnovik, David E.; Johnson, G Allan; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of delayed enhancement µCT imaging to quantify myocardial infarct size in experimental mouse models. Methods and Results A total of 20 mice were imaged 5 or 35 days after surgical ligation of the left coronary artery, or sham surgery (n=6–7 per group). We utilized a prototype εCT which covers a 3D volume with an isotropic spatial resolution of 100 µm. A series of image acquisitions were started after a 200 µL bolus of a high molecular weight blood pool CT agent to outline the ventricles. CT imaging was continuously performed over 60 minutes, while an intravenous constant infusion with iopamidol 370 was started at a dosage of 1 mL/h. Thirty minutes after the initiation of this infusion, signal intensity in Hounsfild Units was significantly higher in the infarct than in the remote, uninjured myocardium. Cardiac morphology and motion was visualized with excellent contrast and in fine detail. In vivo CT determination of infarct extension and transmurality was in good agreement with ex vivo staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (5 days post MI: r2= 0.86, p < 0.01; 35 days post MI r2=0.92, p < 0.01). In addition, we detected significant left ventricular remodeling consisting of left ventricular dilation and decreased ejection fraction. Conclusion 3D cine µCT reliably and rapidly quantifies infarct size and assesses murine anatomy and physiology after coronary ligation, despite the small size and the fast movement of the mouse heart. This efficient imaging tool is a valuable addition to the current phenotyping armamentarium and will allow rapid testing of novel drugs and cell based interventions in murine models. PMID:17322414

  11. Clinical evaluation of semi-automatic landmark-based lesion tracking software for CT-scans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate a semi-automatic landmark-based lesion tracking software enabling navigation between RECIST lesions in baseline and follow-up CT-scans. Methods The software automatically detects 44 stable anatomical landmarks in each thoraco/abdominal/pelvic CT-scan, sets up a patient specific coordinate-system and cross-links the coordinate-systems of consecutive CT-scans. Accuracy of the software was evaluated on 96 RECIST lesions (target- and non-target lesions) in baseline and follow-up CT-scans of 32 oncologic patients (64 CT-scans). Patients had to present at least one thoracic, one abdominal and one pelvic RECIST lesion. Three radiologists determined the deviation between lesions’ centre and the software’s navigation result in consensus. Results The initial mean runtime of the system to synchronize baseline and follow-up examinations was 19.4 ± 1.2 seconds, with subsequent navigation to corresponding RECIST lesions facilitating in real-time. Mean vector length of the deviations between lesions’ centre and the semi-automatic navigation result was 10.2 ± 5.1 mm without a substantial systematic error in any direction. Mean deviation in the cranio-caudal dimension was 5.4 ± 4.0 mm, in the lateral dimension 5.2 ± 3.9 mm and in the ventro-dorsal dimension 5.3 ± 4.0 mm. Conclusion The investigated software accurately and reliably navigates between lesions in consecutive CT-scans in real-time, potentially accelerating and facilitating cancer staging. PMID:25609496

  12. Automatic Segmentation and Online virtualCT in Head-and-Neck Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peroni, Marta; Ciardo, Delia; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Riboldi, Marco; Comi, Stefania; Alterio, Daniela; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an efficient and automatic strategy to generate online virtual computed tomography (CT) scans for adaptive radiation therapy (ART) in head-and-neck (HN) cancer treatment. Method: We retrospectively analyzed 20 patients, treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), for an HN malignancy. Different anatomical structures were considered: mandible, parotid glands, and nodal gross tumor volume (nGTV). We generated 28 virtualCT scans by means of nonrigid registration of simulation computed tomography (CTsim) and cone beam CT images (CBCTs), acquired for patient setup. We validated our approach by considering the real replanning CT (CTrepl) as ground truth. We computed the Dice coefficient (DSC), center of mass (COM) distance, and root mean square error (RMSE) between correspondent points located on the automatically segmented structures on CBCT and virtualCT. Results: Residual deformation between CTrepl and CBCT was below one voxel. Median DSC was around 0.8 for mandible and parotid glands, but only 0.55 for nGTV, because of the fairly homogeneous surrounding soft tissues and of its small volume. Median COM distance and RMSE were comparable with image resolution. No significant correlation between RMSE and initial or final deformation was found. Conclusion: The analysis provides evidence that deformable image registration may contribute significantly in reducing the need of full CT-based replanning in HN radiation therapy by supporting swift and objective decision-making in clinical practice. Further work is needed to strengthen algorithm potential in nGTV localization.

  13. Samonella-and Shigella-induced ileitis: CT findings in four patients

    SciTech Connect

    Balthazar, E.J.; Charles, H.W.; Megibow, A.J.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and illustrate the CT appearance of four cases of acute terminal ileitis induced by nontyphoidal Salmonella and Shigella infection and to review the radiographic and endoscopic findings of these entities. The medical records, CT examinations, and small bowel examinations of three patients with Salmonella ileitis and one patient with Shigella ileitis were retrospectively reviewed. CT examinations were done in four patients, colonoscopy in three patients, and small bowel examinations in two patients. Stool cultures established the diagnosis of nontyphoidal Salmonella enteritis in three patients and Shigella enteritis in one patient. The patients symptoms and clinical findings resolved promptly following supportive therapy and appropriate antibiotic therapy. CT showed slight circumferential and homogeneous thickening of the terminal ileum over a segment of 10-15 cm in patients with Salmonella ileitis. Associated mild thickening of the wall of the colon was present in addition. Small bowel examination performed in one patient revealed a spastic terminal ileum with thickened mucosal folds. Colonoscopy revealed acute colitis involving the colon diffusely in one case, but sparing the distal 50 cm of the colon in one case. CT showed more pronounced thickening of the terminal ileum and a target configuration in the patient with Shigella ileitis. Small bowel examination revealed narrowing, irregular contour, several large nodular defects, and a severely ulcerated mucosa affecting the terminal ileum. Colonoscopy revealed a normal colon and large ulcerations with fibro-purulent exudate in the terminal ileum. In patients with severe Salmonella or Shigella infections or persistent and/or confusing clinical presentations, CT can play a complementary but important role in the initial diagnostic evaluation. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Follow-up segmentation of lung tumors in PET and CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opfer, Roland; Kabus, Sven; Schneider, Torben; Carlsen, Ingwer C.; Renisch, Steffen; Sabczynski, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    Early response assessment of cancer therapy is a crucial component towards a more effective and patient individualized cancer therapy. Integrated PET/CT systems provide the opportunity to combine morphologic with functional information. We have developed algorithms which allow the user to track both tumor volume and standardized uptake value (SUV) measurements during the therapy from series of CT and PET images, respectively. To prepare for tumor volume estimation we have developed a new technique for a fast, flexible, and intuitive 3D definition of meshes. This initial surface is then automatically adapted by means of a model-based segmentation algorithm and propagated to each follow-up scan. If necessary, manual corrections can be added by the user. To determine SUV measurements a prioritized region growing algorithm is employed. For an improved workflow all algorithms are embedded in a PET/CT therapy monitoring software suite giving the clinician a unified and immediate access to all data sets. Whenever the user clicks on a tumor in a base-line scan, the courses of segmented tumor volumes and SUV measurements are automatically identified and displayed to the user as a graph plot. According to each course, the therapy progress can be classified as complete or partial response or as progressive or stable disease. We have tested our methods with series of PET/CT data from 9 lung cancer patients acquired at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto. Each patient underwent three PET/CT scans during a radiation therapy. Our results indicate that a combination of mean metabolic activity in the tumor with the PET-based tumor volume can lead to an earlier response detection than a purely volume based (CT diameter) or purely functional based (e.g. SUV max or SUV mean) response measures. The new software seems applicable for easy, faster, and reproducible quantification to routinely monitor tumor therapy.

  15. [Potentialities of temporal bone CT in the diagnosis of chronic purulent otitis media and its complications].

    PubMed

    Zelikovich, E I

    2004-01-01

    Temporal bone CT was used to examine a group of 87 patients with chronic purulent otitis media (103 temporal bones). The patients' age ranged from 2 to 74 years. A scheme was developed and proposed to evaluate the temporal bone by CT. The CT signs of chronic purulent otitis media uncomplicated by cholesteatoma and those of cholesteatomic purulent otitis were identified. The CT symptomatology of chronic purulent otitis includes: sclerotic changes in the bone tissue of the mastoid process, impaired pneumatization of the cavities of the middle ear, including the tympanic cavity, destructive changes in auditory ossicles, carious changes in the walls of the cavities of the middle ear. The CT semiotics of cholesteatoma depends on its site and spread into the temporal bone and includes as follows: deformation of the epitympanum due to soft tissue mass-induced destruction of the lateral wall; the dilated entrance into the antrum; the presence of a cavity with the sclerosed walls in the antromastoid area; carious changes in the auditory ossicles; the displacement of a chain of ossicles medially or laterally in relation to the initial site of cholesteatoma. CT reflects carious changes in the walls of the cavities of the middle ear, including the roof and labyrinthine wall of the tympanum, which allows labyrinthine fistula and intracranial cholesteatomic complications. The study of the temporal bone by the proposed scheme may reveal anomalies and the specific features of its structure: the presentation of the sigmoid sinus, the high elevation of the bulb of the jugular vein, diverticulum of the latter, the low standing of the bottom of the ACH.

  16. 123. Mystic River Bridge. Mystic, New London Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. Mystic River Bridge. Mystic, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 132.16. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. 122. Four Blade Semaphore Tower. Groton, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    122. Four Blade Semaphore Tower. Groton, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.60. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. 38. Saga Interlocking Tower. Greens Farms, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Saga Interlocking Tower. Greens Farms, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 47.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  19. 74. Oliver Street Bridge. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. Oliver Street Bridge. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 73.08. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  20. 40. Bridgeport Station. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Bridgeport Station. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 55.69. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  1. 19. Courtland Avenue Bridge. Stamford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Courtland Avenue Bridge. Stamford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 35.21. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  2. 41. Bridgeport Station. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Bridgeport Station. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 55.69. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  3. 44. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 55.82. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  4. 55. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 60.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  5. 10. Mianus River Bridge. Cos Cob, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Mianus River Bridge. Cos Cob, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 29.91. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  6. 33. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 44.30. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  7. 26. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 41.47. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  8. 32. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 44.30. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  9. 43. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 55.82. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  10. 31. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 44.30. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  11. 52. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 60.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  12. 47. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 55.82. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  13. 11. Mianus River Bridge. Cos Cob, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Mianus River Bridge. Cos Cob, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 29.91. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  14. 29. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 41.47. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  15. 30. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 41.47. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  16. 9. MIANUS RIVER BRIDGE. COS COB, FAIRFIELD CO., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. MIANUS RIVER BRIDGE. COS COB, FAIRFIELD CO., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 29.91 - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. 34. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 44.30. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. 35. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 44.30. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  19. 50. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 60.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  20. 45. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 55.82. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  1. 54. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 60.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  2. 51. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 60.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  3. 48. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 55.82. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  4. 46. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Pequonock River Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 55.82. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  5. 89. East Haven Tunnel. East Haven, New Haven Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. East Haven Tunnel. East Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 77.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  6. 73. Oliver Street Bridge. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. Oliver Street Bridge. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 73.08. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  7. 36. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Saugatuck River Bridge. Saugatuck, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 44.30. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  8. 42. Bridgeport Station. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Bridgeport Station. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 55.69. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  9. 37. Saga Interlocking Tower. Greens Farms, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Saga Interlocking Tower. Greens Farms, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 47.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  10. 27. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 41.47. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  11. 49. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 60.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  12. 25. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 41.47. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  13. 75. Blatchley Avenue Bridge. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. Blatchley Avenue Bridge. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 74.18. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  14. 39. Fairfield Avenue Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Fairfield Avenue Bridge. Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 55.68. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  15. 53. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 60.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  16. 57. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 60.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. 8. MIANUS RIVER BRIDGE. COS COB, FAIRFIELD CO., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. MIANUS RIVER BRIDGE. COS COB, FAIRFIELD CO., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 29.91 - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. 56. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Housatonic River Bridge. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 60.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  19. 28. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Norwalk River Bridge. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 41.47. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  20. [Radiation dosage of various CT techniques in diagnostic lung imaging].

    PubMed

    Heinz-Peer, G; Weninger, F; Nowotny, R; Herold, C J

    1996-06-01

    Introduction of the computed tomography index CTDI and the multiple scan average dose (MSAD) has led to standardization of the dose description in CT examinations. Despite the use of these dose parameters, many different dosages are reported in the literature for different CT methods. In addition, there is still a wide range of radiation dosimetry results reported for conventional CT, helical CT, and HRCT used in chest examinations. The variations in dosage are mainly due to differences in factors affecting the dose, i.e. beam geometry, beam quality, scanner geometry ("generation"), and operating parameters. In addition, CT dosimetry instrumentation and methodology make a contribution to dosages. Recent studies calculating differences in factors affecting dosage and CT dosimetry and using similar operating parameters, show similar results in CT dosimetry for conventional and helical CT. On the other hand, dosages for HRCT were greatly reduced. This was mainly caused by narrow beam collimation and increasing section spacing.

  1. Localized peribronchial thickening: a CT sign of occult bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, W.L. Jr.; Roberts, L. Jr.; McLendon, R.E.; Hill, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    The authors present a case with repeated positive sputum cytologies in which CT proved complementary to nonlocalizing endoscopies by identifying bronchogenic carcinoma as focal specimen provided precise pathologic correlation of the CT findings with a small squamous cell carcinoma.

  2. 100. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  3. 102. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    102. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  4. 96. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    96. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  5. 101. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    101. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  6. 98. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  7. 97. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  8. 99. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  9. 20. Typical circuit breaker gantry. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Typical circuit breaker gantry. Norwalk, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 41.20. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  10. [Indications for low-dose CT in the emergency setting].

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Rutschmann, Olivier; de Perrot, Thomas; Caviezel, Alessandro; Platon, Alexandra

    2009-08-19

    CT delivers a large dose of radiation, especially in abdominal imaging. Recently, a low-dose abdominal CT protocol (low-dose CT) has been set-up in our institution. "Low-dose CT" is almost equivalent to a single standard abdominal radiograph in term of dose of radiation (about one sixth of those delivered by a standard CT). "Low-dose CT" is now used routinely in our emergency service in two main indications: patients with a suspicion of renal colic and those with right lower quadrant pain. It is obtained without intravenous contrast media. Oral contrast is given to patients with suspicion of appendicitis. "Low-dose CT" is used in the frame of well defined clinical algorithms, and does only replace standard CT when it can reach a comparable diagnostic quality.

  11. Automatic segmentation of vertebral contours from CT images using fuzzy corners.

    PubMed

    Athertya, Jiyo S; Saravana Kumar, G

    2016-05-01

    Automatic segmentation of bone in computed tomography (CT) images is critical for the implementation of computer-assisted diagnosis which has increasing potential in the evaluation of various spine disorders. Of the many techniques available for delineating the region of interest (ROI), active contour methods (ACM) are well-established techniques that are used to segment medical images. The initialization for these methods is either through manual intervention or by applying a global threshold, thus making them semi-automatic in nature. The paper presents a methodology for automatic contour initialization in ACM and demonstrates the applicability of the method for medical image segmentation from spinal CT images. Initially, a set of feature markers from the image is extracted to construct an initial contour for the ACM. A fuzzified corner metric, based on image intensity, is proposed to identify the feature markers to be enclosed by the contour. A concave hull based on α shape, is constructed using these fuzzy corners to give the initial contour. The proposed method was evaluated against conventional feature detectors and other initialization methods. The results show the method׳s robust performance in the presence of simulated Gaussian noise levels. The method enables the ACM to efficiently converge to the ground truth segmentation. The reference standard for comparison was the annotated images from a radiologist, and the Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance measures were used to evaluate the segmentation. PMID:27017068

  12. A Hybrid Method for Pancreas Extraction from CT Image Based on Level Set Methods

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hanqing; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel semiautomatic method to extract the pancreas from abdominal CT images. Traditional level set and region growing methods that request locating initial contour near the final boundary of object have problem of leakage to nearby tissues of pancreas region. The proposed method consists of a customized fast-marching level set method which generates an optimal initial pancreas region to solve the problem that the level set method is sensitive to the initial contour location and a modified distance regularized level set method which extracts accurate pancreas. The novelty in our method is the proper selection and combination of level set methods, furthermore an energy-decrement algorithm and an energy-tune algorithm are proposed to reduce the negative impact of bonding force caused by connected tissue whose intensity is similar with pancreas. As a result, our method overcomes the shortages of oversegmentation at weak boundary and can accurately extract pancreas from CT images. The proposed method is compared to other five state-of-the-art medical image segmentation methods based on a CT image dataset which contains abdominal images from 10 patients. The evaluated results demonstrate that our method outperforms other methods by achieving higher accuracy and making less false segmentation in pancreas extraction. PMID:24066016

  13. A hybrid method for pancreas extraction from CT image based on level set methods.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiyan; Tan, Hanqing; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel semiautomatic method to extract the pancreas from abdominal CT images. Traditional level set and region growing methods that request locating initial contour near the final boundary of object have problem of leakage to nearby tissues of pancreas region. The proposed method consists of a customized fast-marching level set method which generates an optimal initial pancreas region to solve the problem that the level set method is sensitive to the initial contour location and a modified distance regularized level set method which extracts accurate pancreas. The novelty in our method is the proper selection and combination of level set methods, furthermore an energy-decrement algorithm and an energy-tune algorithm are proposed to reduce the negative impact of bonding force caused by connected tissue whose intensity is similar with pancreas. As a result, our method overcomes the shortages of oversegmentation at weak boundary and can accurately extract pancreas from CT images. The proposed method is compared to other five state-of-the-art medical image segmentation methods based on a CT image dataset which contains abdominal images from 10 patients. The evaluated results demonstrate that our method outperforms other methods by achieving higher accuracy and making less false segmentation in pancreas extraction.

  14. CT and intracranial manifestations of otorhinologic disease.

    PubMed

    Keller, M A; Holgate, R C; McClarty, B M

    1982-12-01

    Most inflammatory and neoplastic diseases of the ear, nose, nasopharynx, and paranasal sinuses have the capability of intracranial extension. CT is extremely important in defining such lesions, and surpasses complex motion tomography in delineating the extracranial soft tissue involvement and intracranial spread. Trauma can simultaneously affect both intracranial and extracranial compartments but because of its scope, is not dealt with in this submission.

  15. [CT findings in "fresh" cerebral paragonimiasis].

    PubMed

    Li, H Z; Xie, F W; Sun, S C

    1992-01-01

    There are few reports on CT findings in "fresh" cerebral paragonimiasis. We have experienced four cases of "fresh" cerebral paragonimiasis examined by CT scan. Three patients were children aged 7, 9, and 14 years, and one was an adult aged 25 years. Three patients were examined by CT scan 2 to 6 months after the onset of high grade fever, convulsion and focal deficit signs, and a patient was examined one month after his progressive visual disturbance. The unique CT findings are multilocular cystic lesions in temporo-occipital or in temporo-parietal lobes with extensive brain edema. Two cases were also associated with "soap-bubble" calcifications. The cysts were more dense than CSF and enhanced by contrast media. The histopathological specimen showed that the eggs of paragonimus were in the abscess cavity, of which the wall was composed with highly vascular gliomesenchymal capsule and numerous cell infiltration. Three patients underwent craniotomy for removal of abscess and decompression. Bitionol were administered and all patients recovered well. We also discussed the differential diagnosis of cerebral parasitic granulomas.

  16. 75 FR 32821 - Connecticut Disaster #CT-00014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Connecticut Disaster CT-00014 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Connecticut (FEMA..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  17. 76 FR 74115 - Connecticut Disaster # CT-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION Connecticut Disaster CT-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A Escobar, Office of...

  18. Multislice helical CT: image temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Hui, H; Pan, T; Shen, Y

    2000-05-01

    A multislice helical computed tomography (CT) halfscan (HS) reconstruction algorithm is proposed for cardiac applications. The imaging performances (in terms of the temporal resolution, z-axis resolution, image noise, and image artifacts) of the HS algorithm are compared to the existing algorithms using theoretical models and clinical data. A theoretical model of the temporal resolution performance (in terms of the temporal sensitivity profile) is established for helical CT, in general, i.e., for any number of detector rows and any reconstruction algorithm used. It is concluded that the HS reconstruction results in improved image temporal resolution than the corresponding 180 degrees LI (linear interpolation) reconstruction and is more immune to the inconsistent data problem induced by cardiac motions. The temporal resolution of multislice helical CT with the HS algorithm is comparable to that of single-slice helical CT with the HS algorithm. In practice, the 180 degrees LI and HS-LI algorithms can be used in parallel to generate two image sets from the same scan acquisition, one (180 degrees LI) for improved z-resolution and noises, and the other (HS-LI) for improved image temporal resolution.

  19. Spiral CT pneumocolon: applications, status and limitations.

    PubMed

    Harvey, C J; Renfrew, I; Taylor, S; Gillams, A R; Lees, W R

    2001-01-01

    CT pneumocolon is a promising new technique in the diagnosis and management of colon pathology. CT pneumocolon can detect (sensitivity >95%) and stage (accuracy 79%) colorectal cancer and is very accurate in the differentiation of malignant from benign colonic pathologies. It has excellent detection rates for polyps >10 mm in diameter. Several studies using 3D virtual colonoscopy have already proven its high sensitivity and specificity in polyp detection making this technique robust as a screening tool. The combined results for virtual colonoscopy, from all centres, show a sensitivity of >85% in the detection of polyps 10 mm or greater in size, 70-80% for 5-9 mm polyps and an overall specificity of 90%. CT pneumocolon is a safe, non-invasive and cost-effective method for detecting colonic carcinomas and adenomas and correctly identifying which patients need further colonoscopy. The technique is quick, well tolerated and non-operator dependent. It can also image the proximal colon when distal stenoses prevent endoscopic and barium examination. CT pneumocolon is able to identify the features and complications of inflammatory bowel disease. Further research is warranted to fully assess its impact in terms of a screening tool, acceptability, availability and cost benefit.

  20. ctDNA DLBCL Detection Lancet Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    Measurement of circulating tumor DNA in blood can be used to detect disease recurrence in patients with a curable form of cancer known as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). In most patients, measurement of ctDNA enabled detection of microscopic diseas

  1. CT evaluation of primary benign retroperitoneal tumor.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, K; Yamada, T; Saitoh, Y; Yoshikawa, D; Aburano, T; Hashimoto, H; Yachiku, S

    1994-01-01

    We studied CT patterns in 21 cases of primary benign retroperitoneal tumor including teratoma in nine cases, schwannoma in six, leiomyoma in three, lipoma in one, lymphangioma in one, and neurofibroma in one. The tumors were analyzed for size, internal homogeneity, CT density, calcification, border with neighboring organs, and contrast enhancement (CE). The mean diameter of the tumors was 10.2 (+/- 4.8) cm. Internal homogeneous distribution was observed in 33%, calcification in 43%, and well-defined border in 86%. The CT density and calcification were compared according to histology, and the results were as follows: teratoma showed fat density in 78%, water density in 100%, and calcification in 89%; schwannoma showed water density in 100% and septal CE in 33%; leiomyoma showed soft tissue density in 100%, CE in 100%, and water density in 33%; lipoma showed fat density and calcification; and lymphangioma and neurofibroma showed water density. Internal homogeneity, fat density, cyst formation, and calcification are considered to be important predictors of primary benign retroperitoneal tumor on CT.

  2. CT perfusion: principles, applications, and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Yim

    2004-10-01

    The fast scanning speed of current slip-ring CT scanners has enabled the development of perfusion imaging techniques with intravenous injection of contrast medium. In a typical CT perfusion study, contrast medium is injected and rapid scanning at a frequency of 1-2 Hz is used to monitor the first circulation of the injected contrast medium through a 1-2 cm thick slab of tissue. From the acquired time-series of CT images, arteries can be identified within the tissue slab to derive the arterial contrast concentration curve, Ca(t) while each individual voxel produces a tissue residue curve, Q(t) for the corresponding tissue region. Deconvolution between the measured Ca(t) and Q(t) leads to the determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in brain studies. In this presentation, an important application of CT perfusion in acute stroke studies - the identification of the ischemic penumbra via the CBF/CBV mismatch and factors affecting the quantitative accuracy of deconvolution, including partial volume averaging, arterial delay and dispersion are discussed.

  3. Coronary CT angiography: Beyond morphological stenosis analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-12-26

    Rapid technological developments in computed tomography (CT) imaging technique have made coronary CT angiography an attractive imaging tool in the detection of coronary artery disease. Despite visualization of excellent anatomical details of the coronary lumen changes, coronary CT angiography does not provide hemodynamic changes caused by presence of plaques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a widely used method in the mechanical engineering field to solve complex problems through analysing fluid flow, heat transfer and associated phenomena by using computer simulations. In recent years, CFD is increasingly used in biomedical research due to high performance hardware and software. CFD techniques have been used to study cardiovascular hemodynamics through simulation tools to assist in predicting the behaviour of circulatory blood flow inside the human body. Blood flow plays a key role in the localization and progression of coronary artery disease. CFD simulation based on 3D luminal reconstructions can be used to analyse the local flow fields and flow profiling due to changes of vascular geometry, thus, identifying risk factors for development of coronary artery disease. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the coronary CT-derived CFD applications in coronary artery disease.

  4. AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: topics in CT. Image processing in CT.

    PubMed

    Cody, Dianna D

    2002-01-01

    Several image-processing methods for computed tomographic (CT) examinations are currently being used in clinical radiology departments. Image processing involves operations such as reformatting of original CT images, volume-rendered displays, surface-rendered displays, and physiologic imaging analysis. The reformatting process does not alter the CT voxels in any way; instead it uses them in off-axis views and displays the images produced from the original reconstruction process in an orientation other than how they were originally generated. Sagittal, coronal, oblique, and curved reformatting are standard reformatting methods. Other reformatting techniques include maximum-intensity projection, minimum-intensity projection, and variable thickness viewing. Volume and surface rendering are two different methods for reformatting axial images into three-dimensional views. CT perfusion allows the measurement of physiologic parameters over time. Additional postprocessing efforts can potentially add value to the patients and their outcomes, as can be seen in the cases that illustrate this article.

  5. Autonomous aircraft initiative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewett, Marle D.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a consulting effort to aid NASA Ames-Dryden in defining a new initiative in aircraft automation are described. The initiative described is a multi-year, multi-center technology development and flight demonstration program. The initiative features the further development of technologies in aircraft automation already being pursued at multiple NASA centers and Department of Defense (DoD) research and Development (R and D) facilities. The proposed initiative involves the development of technologies in intelligent systems, guidance, control, software development, airborne computing, navigation, communications, sensors, unmanned vehicles, and air traffic control. It involves the integration and implementation of these technologies to the extent necessary to conduct selected and incremental flight demonstrations.

  6. The RAS Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the RAS Initiative to explore innovative approaches for attacking the proteins encoded by mutant forms of RAS genes and to ultimately create effective, new therapies for RAS-related cancers.

  7. RAS Initiative - Community Outreach

    Cancer.gov

    Through community and technical collaborations, workshops and symposia, and the distribution of reference reagents, the RAS Initiative seeks to increase the sharing of knowledge and resources essential to defeating cancers caused by mutant RAS genes.

  8. Advanced Concepts Research Initiative

    EPA Science Inventory

    This initiative is investigating various approaches to controlling and treating wet-weather flow (WWF) discharges in the urban watershed. WWF, including combined sewer overflow (CSO), sanitary sewer overflow (SSO) and stormwater discharges are leading causes of receiving water q...

  9. RAS Initiative - Events

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  10. Piezoelectrically Initiated Pyrotechnic Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quince, Asia; Dutton, Maureen; Hicks, Robert; Burnham, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a pyrotechnic initiator and piezoelectric initiation system. The device will be capable of being initiated mechanically; resisting initiation by EMF, RF, and EMI (electromagnetic field, radio frequency, and electromagnetic interference, respectively); and initiating in water environments and space environments. Current devices of this nature are initiated by the mechanical action of a firing pin against a primer. Primers historically are prone to failure. These failures are commonly known as misfires or hang-fires. In many cases, the primer shows the dent where the firing pin struck the primer, but the primer failed to fire. In devices such as "T" handles, which are commonly used to initiate the blowout of canopies, loss of function of the device may result in loss of crew. In devices such as flares or smoke generators, failure can result in failure to spot a downed pilot. The piezoelectrically initiated ignition system consists of a pyrotechnic device that plugs into a mechanical system (activator), which on activation, generates a high-voltage spark. The activator, when released, will strike a stack of electrically linked piezo crystals, generating a high-voltage, low-amperage current that is then conducted to the pyro-initiator. Within the initiator, an electrode releases a spark that passes through a pyrotechnic first-fire mixture, causing it to combust. The combustion of the first-fire initiates a primary pyrotechnic or explosive powder. If used in a "T" handle, the primary would ramp the speed of burn up to the speed of sound, generating a shock wave that would cause a high explosive to go "high order." In a flare or smoke generator, the secondary would produce the heat necessary to ignite the pyrotechnic mixture. The piezo activator subsystem is redundant in that a second stack of crystals would be struck at the same time with the same activation force, doubling the probability of a first strike spark generation. If the first

  11. Clinical micro-CT for dental imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Cho, Min Kook; Shon, Cheol-Soon; Cho, Bong Hae; Kim, Chang Hyuk; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2009-02-01

    We exploit the development of a clinical computed microtomography (micro-CT) system for dental imaging. While the conventional dental CT simply serves implant treatment, the clinical dental micro-CT may provide clinicians with a histologic evaluation. To investigate the feasibility of the realization of a dental micro-CT, we have constructed an experimental test system which mainly consists of a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder, and a flat-panel detector. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array coupled to a CsI:Tl scintillator. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector was measured as a function of magnification based on the measured modulation-transfer function (MTF) and noise-power spectrum (NPS). The best MTF and DQE performances were achieved at the magnification factor of 3. Similar tendency of the spatial resolving power in tomography was also observed with a wire phantom having a 25 μm diameter. From the investigation of tomographs reconstructed from a humanoid skull phantom, the application of magnification in the system largely reduced both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for a fixed dose at the entrance surface of the detector, 1.2 mGy, while this setup increased the dose at the object plane from 4.7 mGy to 19.1 mGy for the magnification factor from 2 to 4, respectively. Although the quantum mottles at the high magnification factor tackled the practical use in the clinic, the information contained in the magnified CT images was quite promising.

  12. Imaging features of rhinosporidiosis on contrast CT

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Shailesh M; Irodi, Aparna; Khiangte, Hannah L; Rupa, V; Naina, P

    2013-01-01

    Context: Rhinosporidiosis is a chronic granulomatous disease endemic in certain regions of India. Computed tomography (CT) imaging appearances of rhinosporidiosis have not been previously described in the literature. Aims: To study imaging features in rhinosporidiosis with contrast-enhanced CT and elucidate its role in the evaluation of this disease. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients with pathologically proven rhinosporidiosis were included in the study. Contrast-enhanced CT images were analyzed retrospectively and imaging findings were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: A total of 29 lesions were found and evaluated. On contrast-enhanced CT, rhinosporidiosis was seen as moderately enhancing lobulated or irregular soft tissue mass lesions in the nasal cavity (n = 13), lesions arising in nasal cavity and extending through choana into nasopharynx (n = 5), pedunculated polypoidal lesions arising from the nasopharyngeal wall (n = 5), oropharyngeal wall (n = 2), larynx (n = 1), bronchus (n = 1), skin and subcutaneous tissue (n = 2). The inferior nasal cavity comprising nasal floor, inferior turbinate, and inferior meatus was the most common site of involvement (n = 13). Surrounding bone involvement was seen in the form of rarefaction (n = 6), partial (n = 3) or complete erosion (n = 3) of inferior turbinate, thinning of medial maxillary wall (n = 2), and septal erosion (n = 2). Nasolacrimal duct involvement was seen in four cases. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced CT has an important role in delineating the site and extent of the disease, as well as the involvement of surrounding bone, nasolacrimal duct and tracheobronchial tree. This provides a useful roadmap prior to surgery. PMID:24347850

  13. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. Case Report A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. Conclusions In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management. PMID:25593635

  14. Cone beam CT guidance provides superior accuracy for complex needle paths compared with CT guidance

    PubMed Central

    Braak, S J; Fütterer, J J; van Strijen, M J L; Hoogeveen, Y L; de Lange, F; Schultze Kool, L J

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the accuracy of cone beam CT (CBCT) guidance and CT guidance in reaching small targets in relation to needle path complexity in a phantom. Methods: CBCT guidance combines three-dimensional CBCT imaging with fluoroscopy overlay and needle planning software to provide real-time needle guidance. The accuracy of needle positioning, quantified as deviation from a target, was assessed for inplane, angulated and double angulated needle paths. Four interventional radiologists reached four targets along the three paths using CBCT and CT guidance. Accuracies were compared between CBCT and CT for each needle path and between the three approaches within both modalities. The effect of user experience in CBCT guidance was also assessed. Results: Accuracies for CBCT were significantly better than CT for the double angulated needle path (2.2 vs 6.7 mm, p<0.001) for all radiologists. CBCT guidance showed no significant differences between the three approaches. For CT, deviations increased with increasing needle path complexity from 3.3 mm for the inplane placements to 4.4 mm (p=0.007) and 6.7 mm (p<0.001) for the angulated and double angulated CT-guided needle placements, respectively. For double angulated needle paths, experienced CBCT users showed consistently higher accuracies than trained users [1.8 mm (range 1.2–2.2) vs 3.3 mm (range 2.1–7.2) deviation from target, respectively; p=0.003]. Conclusion: In terms of accuracy, CBCT is the preferred modality, irrespective of the level of user experience, for more difficult guidance procedures requiring double angulated needle paths as in oncological interventions. Advances in knowledge: Accuracy of CBCT guidance has not been discussed before. CBCT guidance allows accurate needle placement irrespective of needle path complexity. For angulated and double-angulated needle paths, CBCT is more accurate than CT guidance. PMID:23913308

  15. 15. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 30.26. (See HAER No. CT-13 for further documentation on this structure). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  16. 14. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 30.26. (See HAER No. CT-13 for further documentation on this structure). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. 17. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 30.26. (See HAER No. CT-13 for further documentation on this structure). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. 13. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 30.26. (See HAER No. CT-13 for further documentation on this structure). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  19. 16. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 30.26. (See HAER No. CT-13 for further documentation on this structure). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  20. 18. Mill River Bridge. Stamford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Mill River Bridge. Stamford, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 32.85. (See HAER No. CT-9 for documentation on Stamford Station). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  1. 12. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Riverside Avenue Bridge. Riverside, Fairfield Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 30.26. (See HAER No. CT-13 for further documentation on this structure). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  2. 21 CFR 1020.33 - Computed tomography (CT) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... paragraphs (b), (c)(1), and (c)(2) are applicable as specified herein to CT x-ray systems manufactured or... applicable to CT x-ray systems manufactured or remanufactured on or after November 29, 1984. (b) Definitions... selectable parameters governing the operation of a CT x-ray system including nominal tomographic...

  3. 21 CFR 1020.33 - Computed tomography (CT) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... paragraphs (b), (c)(1), and (c)(2) are applicable as specified herein to CT x-ray systems manufactured or... applicable to CT x-ray systems manufactured or remanufactured on or after November 29, 1984. (b) Definitions... selectable parameters governing the operation of a CT x-ray system including nominal tomographic...

  4. 21 CFR 1020.33 - Computed tomography (CT) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... paragraphs (b), (c)(1), and (c)(2) are applicable as specified herein to CT x-ray systems manufactured or... applicable to CT x-ray systems manufactured or remanufactured on or after November 29, 1984. (b) Definitions... selectable parameters governing the operation of a CT x-ray system including nominal tomographic...

  5. 21 CFR 1020.33 - Computed tomography (CT) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... paragraphs (b), (c)(1), and (c)(2) are applicable as specified herein to CT x-ray systems manufactured or... applicable to CT x-ray systems manufactured or remanufactured on or after November 29, 1984. (b) Definitions... selectable parameters governing the operation of a CT x-ray system including nominal tomographic...

  6. 21 CFR 1020.33 - Computed tomography (CT) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... paragraphs (b), (c)(1), and (c)(2) are applicable as specified herein to CT x-ray systems manufactured or... applicable to CT x-ray systems manufactured or remanufactured on or after November 29, 1984. (b) Definitions... selectable parameters governing the operation of a CT x-ray system including nominal tomographic...

  7. Reference standard and statistical model for intersite and temporal comparisons of CT attenuation in a multicenter quantitative lung study

    PubMed Central

    Sieren, J. P.; Newell, J. D.; Judy, P. F.; Lynch, D. A.; Chan, K. S.; Guo, J.; Hoffman, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to detect and analyze anomalies between a large number of computed tomography (CT) scanners, tracked over time, utilized to collect human pulmonary CT data for a national multicenter study: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease genetic epidemiology study (COPDGene). Methods: A custom designed CT reference standard “Test Object” has been developed to evaluate the relevant differences in CT attenuation between CT scanners in COPDGene. The materials used in the Test Object to assess CT scanner accuracy and precision included lung equivalent foam (−856 HU), internal air (−1000 HU), water (0 HU), and acrylic (120 HU). Nineteen examples of the Test Object were manufactured. Initially, all Test Objects were scanned on the same CT scanner before the Test Objects were sent to the 20 specific sites and 42 individual CT scanners that were used in the study. The Test Objects were scanned over 17 months while the COPDGene study continued to recruit subjects. A mixed linear effect statistical analysis of the CT scans on the 19 Test Objects was performed. The statistical model reflected influence of reconstruction kernels, tube current, individual Test Objects, CT scanner models, and temporal consistency on CT attenuation. Results: Depending on the Test Object material, there were significant differences between reconstruction kernels, tube current, individual Test Objects, CT scanner models, and temporal consistency. The two Test Object materials of most interest were lung equivalent foam and internal air. With lung equivalent foam, there were significant (p < 0.05) differences between the Siemens B31 (−856.6, ±0.82; mean ± SE) and the GE Standard (−856.6 ± 0.83) reconstruction kernel relative to the Siemens B35 reference standard (−852.5 ± 1.4). Comparing lung equivalent foam attenuation there were also significant differences between CT scanner models (p < 0.01), tube current (p < 0.005), and in temporal consistency (p

  8. Operational radiation safety for PET-CT, SPECT-CT, and cyclotron facilities.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, Pat; Dauer, Lawrence; St Germain, Jean

    2008-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are well- established and indispensable imaging modalities in modern medicine. State-of-the-art computed tomography (CT) scanners have now been integrated into multi-modality PET-CT and SPECT-CT devices, and these devices, particularly PET-CT scanners, are dramatically impacting clinical practice. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), by far the most widely used radiopharmaceutical for clinical PET imaging in general and oncologic PET imaging in particular, is highly accurate in detecting (approximately 90%) and staging many types of tumors, monitoring therapy response, and differentiating benign from malignant lesions. Several factors, including the relatively high administered activities [e.g., 370-740 MBq (10-20 mCi) of FDG], the high patient throughput (up to 30 patients per d), and in particular, the uniquely high energies (for a diagnostic setting) of the 511-keV positron-negatron annihilation photons, make shielding requirements, workflow, and other radiation protection issues important considerations in the design of a PET or PET-CT facility. The Report of Task Group 108 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) provides a comprehensive summary of shielding design and related considerations, along with illustrative calculations. Whether in the form of a PET-CT or a SPECT-CT device, the introduction of CT scanners into a nuclear medicine setting has created new and complex radiation protection issues concerning the radiation burden and attendant risks accrued by patients undergoing such multi-modality procedures (especially in those instances in which higher-dose, diagnostic-quality CT studies are done as part of the PET-CT or SPECT-CT exam). In addition, because PET is dependent on the availability of short-lived 18F (Tp = 110 min) primarily in the form of FDG, and other short-lived positron emitters such as 11C (20 min), 13N (10 min), and 15O (2 min

  9. A Putative Case of Methotrexate-Related Lymphoma: Clinical Course and PET/CT Findings

    PubMed Central

    Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Ganon, James; Blodgett, Todd; Garcia, Christine; Jacobs, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune conditions develop lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) at a higher frequency than normal both in association with and independent of Methotrexate (MTX). We describe a case of MTX-associated lymphoma in a patient with psoriasis on long-standing MTX. The case is notable for the initial tumor burden, the dramatic disappearance of the PET-CT findings on discontinuation of MTX, and the subsequent early regrowth of disease. Our case report is illustrative of an MTX-related NHL in an autoimmune patient. Conclusion. Withdrawal of MTX in a patient with lymphoma is reasonable before initiating chemotherapy, but observation for early regrowth of disease is necessary. PMID:20069057

  10. 3D patient-specific model of the tibia from CT for orthopedic use

    PubMed Central

    González-Carbonell, Raide A.; Ortiz-Prado, Armando; Jacobo-Armendáriz, Victor H.; Cisneros-Hidalgo, Yosbel A.; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Objectives 3D patient-specific model of the tibia is used to determine the torque needed to initialize the tibial torsion correction. Methods The finite elements method is used in the biomechanical modeling of tibia. The geometric model of the tibia is obtained from CT images. The tibia is modeled as an anisotropic material with non-homogeneous mechanical properties. Conclusions The maximum stress is located in the shaft of tibia diaphysis. With both meshes are obtained similar results of stresses and displacements. For this patient-specific model, the torque must be greater than 30 Nm to initialize the correction of tibial torsion deformity. PMID:25829755

  11. Fluence-field modulated x-ray CT using multiple aperture devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stayman, J. Webster; Mathews, Aswin; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Gang, Grace; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Kawamoto, Satomi; Blevis, Ira; Levinson, Reuven

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a novel strategy for fluence field modulation (FFM) in x-ray CT using multiple aperture devices (MADs). MAD filters permit FFM by blocking or transmitting the x-ray beam on a fine (0.1-1 mm) scale. The filters have a number of potential advantages over other beam modulation strategies including the potential for a highly compact design, modest actuation speed and acceleration requirements, and spectrally neutral filtration due to their essentially binary action. In this work, we present the underlying MAD filtration concept including a design process to achieve a specific class of FFM patterns. A set of MAD filters is fabricated using a tungsten laser sintering process and integrated into an x-ray CT test bench. A characterization of the MAD filters is conducted and compared to traditional attenuating bowtie filters and the ability to flatten the fluence profile for a 32 cm acrylic phantom is demonstrated. MAD-filtered tomographic data was acquired on the CT test bench and reconstructed without artifacts associated with the MAD filter. These initial studies suggest that MAD-based FFM is appropriate for integration in clinical CT system to create patient-specific fluence field profile and reduce radiation exposures.

  12. The Use of PET-CT in the Assessment of Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Owen J.; McDermott, Shanaugh; Slattery, James; Sahani, Dushyant; Blake, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer, accounting for 53,219 deaths in 2007 and an estimated 146,970 new cases in the USA during 2009. The combination of FDG PET and CT has proven to be of great benefit for the assessment of colorectal cancer. This is most evident in the detection of occult metastases, particularly intra- or extrahepatic sites of disease, that would preclude a curative procedure or in the detection of local recurrence. FDG PET is generally not used for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer although there are circumstances where PET-CT may make the initial diagnosis, particularly with its more widespread use. In addition, precancerous adenomatous polyps can also be detected incidentally on whole-body images performed for other indications; sensitivity increases with increasing polyp size. False-negative FDG PET findings have been reported with mucinous adenocarcinoma, and false-positive findings have been reported due to inflammatory conditions such as diverticulitis, colitis, and postoperative scarring. Therefore, detailed evaluation of the CT component of a PET/CT exam, including assessment of the entire colon, is essential. PMID:22312527

  13. Increased salivary gland density on contrast-enhanced CT after head and neck radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bronstein, A.D.; Nyberg, D.A.; Schwartz, A.N.; Shuman, W.P.; Griffin, B.R.

    1987-12-01

    In an attempt to determine whether radiation therapy leads to an increased density of salivary glands on subsequent contrast-enhanced CT, 109 CT scans from 78 patients with head and neck tumors were reviewed. The density of parotid and submandibular glands was subjectively evaluated (compared with adjacent muscle) and correlated with treatment including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Density of the parotid and/or submandibular glands was found to be significantly associated with previous irradiation on contrast-enhanced scans (p less than .05). One or both glands were denser than normal in seven (44%) of 16 patients who received only radiation therapy and in eight (38%) of 21 who received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, compared with only two (10%) of 20 patients who received chemotherapy alone and two (4%) of 52 patients who received neither. The type or amount of irradiation, type of chemotherapy, or timing of the CT scan after the initiation of treatment was not found to be significant. We conclude that the density of the parotid and/or submandibular glands on contrast-enhanced CT is frequently increased after radiation therapy for tumors of the head and neck.

  14. Comparison of several artificial neural network classifiers for CT images of hardwood logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoldt, Daniel L.; He, Jing; Abbott, A. Lynn

    1998-02-01

    Knowledge of internal log defects, obtained by scanning, is critical to efficiency improvements for future hardwood sawmills. Nevertheless, before computed tomography (CT) scanning can be applied in industrial operations, we need to automatically interpret scan information so that it can provide the saw operator with the information necessary to make proper sawing decisions. Our current approach to automatically label features in CT images of hardwood logs classifies each pixel individually using a back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) and feature vectors that include a small, local neighborhood of pixels and the distance of the target pixel to the center of the log. Initially, this ANN was able to classify clearwood, bark, decay, knots, and voids in CT images of two species of oak with 95% pixel-wise accuracy. Recently we have investigated other ANN classifiers, comparing 2D versus 3D neighborhoods and species-dependent (single species) versus species- independent (multiple species) classifiers using oak, yellow poplar, and cherry CT images. When considered individually, the resulting species-dependent classifiers yield similar levels of accuracy (96 - 98%). 3D neighborhoods work better for multiple-species classifiers and 2D is better for single-species. Under certain conditions there is no statistical difference in accuracy between single- and multiple-species classifiers, suggesting that a multiple- species classifier can be applied broadly with high accuracy.

  15. Fluence-Field Modulated X-ray CT using Multiple Aperture Devices

    PubMed Central

    Stayman, J. Webster; Mathews, Aswin; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Gang, Grace; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Kawamoto, Satomi; Blevis, Ira; Levinson, Reuven

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel strategy for fluence field modulation (FFM) in x-ray CT using multiple aperture devices (MADs). MAD filters permit FFM by blocking or transmitting the x-ray beam on a fine (0.1–1 mm) scale. The filters have a number of potential advantages over other beam modulation strategies including the potential for a highly compact design, modest actuation speed and acceleration requirements, and spectrally neutral filtration due to their essentially binary action. In this work, we present the underlying MAD filtration concept including a design process to achieve a specific class of FFM patterns. A set of MAD filters is fabricated using a tungsten laser sintering process and integrated into an x-ray CT test bench. A characterization of the MAD filters is conducted and compared to traditional attenuating bowtie filters and the ability to flatten the fluence profile for a 32 cm acrylic phantom is demonstrated. MAD-filtered tomographic data was acquired on the CT test bench and reconstructed without artifacts associated with the MAD filter. These initial studies suggest that MAD-based FFM is appropriate for integration in clinical CT system to create patient-specific fluence field profile and reduce radiation exposures. PMID:27110052

  16. FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of anal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, Shane E.; Grigsby, Perry W. . E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu; Siegel, Barry A.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: Surgical staging and treatment of anal carcinoma has been replaced by noninvasive staging studies and combined modality therapy. In this study, we compare computed tomography (CT) and physical examination to [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the staging of carcinoma of the anal canal, with special emphasis on determination of spread to inguinal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between July 2003 and July 2005, 41 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved anal carcinoma underwent a complete staging evaluation including physical examination, CT, and 2-FDG-PET/CT. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 89 years. Nine men were HIV-positive. Treatment was with standard Nigro regimen. Results: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) detected 91% of nonexcised primary tumors, whereas CT visualized 59%. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal uptake in pelvic nodes of 5 patients with normal pelvic CT scans. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal nodes in 20% of groins that were normal by CT, and in 23% without abnormality on physical examination. Furthermore, 17% of groins negative by both CT and physical examination showed abnormal uptake on FDG-PET/CT. HIV-positive patients had an increased frequency of PET-positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography detects the primary tumor more often than CT. FDG-PET/CT detects substantially more abnormal inguinal lymph nodes than are identified by standard clinical staging with CT and physical examination.

  17. Attenuation correction of PET cardiac data with low-dose average CT in PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama; Luo, Dershan; Liu, Hui H.; Chi Paichun, M.; Mar, Martha V.; Gladish, Gregory; Truong, Mylene; Erasmus, Jeremy Jr.; Liao Zhongxing; Macapinlac, H. A.

    2006-10-15

    We proposed a low-dose average computer tomography (ACT) for attenuation correction (AC) of the PET cardiac data in PET/CT. The ACT was obtained from a cine CT scan of over one breath cycle per couch position while the patient was free breathing. We applied this technique on four patients who underwent tumor imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG in PET/CT, whose PET data showed high uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the heart and whose CT and PET data had misregistration. All four patients did not have known myocardiac infarction or ischemia. The patients were injected with 555-740 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG and scanned 1 h after injection. The helical CT (HCT) data were acquired in 16 s for the coverage of 100 cm. The PET acquisition was 3 min per bed of 15 cm. The duration of cine CT acquisition per 2 cm was 5.9 s. We used a fast gantry rotation cycle time of 0.5 s to minimize motion induced reconstruction artifacts in the cine CT images, which were averaged to become the ACT images for AC of the PET data. The radiation dose was about 5 mGy for 5.9 s cine duration. The selection of 5.9 s was based on our analysis of the respiratory signals of 600 patients; 87% of the patients had average breath cycles of less than 6 s and 90% had standard deviations of less than 1 s in the period of breath cycle. In all four patient studies, registrations between the CT and the PET data were improved. An increase of average uptake in the anterior and the lateral walls up to 48% and a decrease of average uptake in the septal and the inferior walls up to 16% with ACT were observed. We also compared ACT and conventional slow scan CT (SSCT) of 4 s duration in one patient study and found ACT was better than SSCT in depicting average respiratory motion and the SSCT images showed motion-induced reconstruction artifacts. In conclusion, low-dose ACT improved registration of the CT and the PET data in the heart region in our study of four patients. ACT was superior than SSCT for depicting average respiration

  18. Dual-energy X-ray micro-CT imaging of hybrid Ni/Al open-cell foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fíla, T.; Kumpová, I.; Koudelka, P.; Zlámal, P.; Vavřík, D.; Jiroušek, O.; Jung, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we employ dual-energy X-ray microfocus tomography (DECT) measurement to develop high-resolution finite element (FE) models that can be used for the numerical assessment of the deformation behaviour of hybrid Ni/Al foam subjected to both quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading. Cubic samples of hybrid Ni/Al open-cell foam with an edge length of [15]mm were investigated by the DECT measurement. The material was prepared using AlSi7Mg0.3 aluminium foam with a mean pore size of [0.85]mm, coated with nanocrystalline nickel (crystallite size of approx. [50]nm) to form a surface layer with a theoretical thickness of [0.075]mm. CT imaging was carried out using state-of-the-art DSCT/DECT X-ray scanner developed at Centre of Excellence Telč. The device consists of a modular orthogonal assembly of two tube-detector imaging pairs, with an independent geometry setting and shared rotational stage mounted on a complex 16-axis CNC positioning system to enable unprecedented measurement variability for highly-detailed tomographical measurements. A sample of the metal foam was simultaneously irradiated using an XWT-240-SE reflection type X-ray tube and an XWT-160-TCHR transmission type X-ray tube. An enhanced dual-source sampling strategy was used for data acquisition. X-ray images were taken using XRD1622 large area GOS scintillator flat panel detectors with an active area of [410 × 410]mm and resolution [2048 × 2048]pixels. Tomographic scanning was performed in 1,200 projections with a 0.3 degree angular step to improve the accuracy of the generated models due to the very complex microstructure and high attenuation of the investigated material. Reconstructed data was processed using a dual-energy algorithm, and was used for the development of a 3D model and voxel model of the foam. The selected parameters of the models were compared with nominal parameters of the actual foam and showed good correlation.

  19. Evaluation of CT-based SUV normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Pottel, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine patients’ lean body mass (LBM) and lean tissue (LT) mass using a computed tomography (CT)-based method, and to compare standardized uptake value (SUV) normalized by these parameters to conventionally normalized SUVs. Head-to-toe positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examinations were retrospectively retrieved and semi-automatically segmented into tissue types based on thresholding of CT Hounsfield units (HU). The following HU ranges were used for determination of CT-estimated LBM and LT (LBMCT and LTCT):  -180 to  -7 for adipose tissue (AT), -6 to 142 for LT, and 143 to 3010 for bone tissue (BT). Formula-estimated LBMs were calculated using formulas of James (1976 Research on Obesity: a Report of the DHSS/MRC Group (London: HMSO)) and Janmahasatian et al (2005 Clin. Pharmacokinet. 44 1051-65), and body surface area (BSA) was calculated using the DuBois formula (Dubois and Dubois 1989 Nutrition 5 303-11). The CT segmentation method was validated by comparing total patient body weight (BW) to CT-estimated BW (BWCT). LBMCT was compared to formula-based estimates (LBMJames and LBMJanma). SUVs in two healthy reference tissues, liver and mediastinum, were normalized for the aforementioned parameters and compared to each other in terms of variability and dependence on normalization factors and BW. Comparison of actual BW to BWCT shows a non-significant difference of 0.8 kg. LBMJames estimates are significantly higher than LBMJanma with differences of 4.7 kg for female and 1.0 kg for male patients. Formula-based LBM estimates do not significantly differ from LBMCT, neither for men nor for women. The coefficient of variation (CV) of SUV normalized for LBMJames (SUVLBM-James) (12.3%) was significantly reduced in liver compared to SUVBW (15.4%). All SUV variances in mediastinum were significantly reduced (CVs were 11.1-12.2%) compared to SUVBW (15.5%), except SUVBSA (15.2%). Only SUVBW and SUVLBM-James show

  20. Evaluation of CT-based SUV normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Pottel, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine patients’ lean body mass (LBM) and lean tissue (LT) mass using a computed tomography (CT)-based method, and to compare standardized uptake value (SUV) normalized by these parameters to conventionally normalized SUVs. Head-to-toe positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examinations were retrospectively retrieved and semi-automatically segmented into tissue types based on thresholding of CT Hounsfield units (HU). The following HU ranges were used for determination of CT-estimated LBM and LT (LBMCT and LTCT):  ‑180 to  ‑7 for adipose tissue (AT), ‑6 to 142 for LT, and 143 to 3010 for bone tissue (BT). Formula-estimated LBMs were calculated using formulas of James (1976 Research on Obesity: a Report of the DHSS/MRC Group (London: HMSO)) and Janmahasatian et al (2005 Clin. Pharmacokinet. 44 1051–65), and body surface area (BSA) was calculated using the DuBois formula (Dubois and Dubois 1989 Nutrition 5 303–11). The CT segmentation method was validated by comparing total patient body weight (BW) to CT-estimated BW (BWCT). LBMCT was compared to formula-based estimates (LBMJames and LBMJanma). SUVs in two healthy reference tissues, liver and mediastinum, were normalized for the aforementioned parameters and compared to each other in terms of variability and dependence on normalization factors and BW. Comparison of actual BW to BWCT shows a non-significant difference of 0.8 kg. LBMJames estimates are significantly higher than LBMJanma with differences of 4.7 kg for female and 1.0 kg for male patients. Formula-based LBM estimates do not significantly differ from LBMCT, neither for men nor for women. The coefficient of variation (CV) of SUV normalized for LBMJames (SUVLBM-James) (12.3%) was significantly reduced in liver compared to SUVBW (15.4%). All SUV variances in mediastinum were significantly reduced (CVs were 11.1–12.2%) compared to SUVBW (15.5%), except SUVBSA (15.2%). Only SUVBW and SUVLBM