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Sample records for duck feather keratin

  1. Identification of a feather β-keratin gene exclusively expressed in pennaceous barbule cells of contour feathers in chicken.

    PubMed

    Kowata, Kinue; Nakaoka, Minori; Nishio, Kaori; Fukao, Ayaka; Satoh, Akira; Ogoshi, Maho; Takahashi, Sumio; Tsudzuki, Masaoki; Takeuchi, Sakae

    2014-05-25

    Feathers are elaborate skin appendages shared by birds and theropod dinosaurs that have hierarchical branching of the rachis, barbs, and barbules. Feather filaments consist of β-keratins encoded by multiple genes, most of which are located in tandem arrays on chromosomes 2, 25, and 27 in chicken. The expansion of the genes is thought to have contributed to feather evolution; however, it is unclear how the individual genes are involved in feather formation. The aim of the present study was to identify feather keratin genes involved in the formation of barbules. Using a combination of microarray analysis, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization, we found an uncharacterized keratin gene on chromosome 7 that was expressed specifically in barbule cells in regenerating chicken feathers. We have named the gene barbule specific keratin 1 (BlSK1). The BlSK1 gene structure was similar to the gene structure of previously characterized feather keratin genes, and consisted of a non-coding leader exon, an intron, and an exon with an open reading frame (ORF). The ORF was predicted to encode a 98 aa long protein, which shared 59% identity with feather keratin B. Orthologs of BlSK1 were found in the genomes of other avian species, including turkey, duck, zebra finch, and flycatcher, in regions that shared synteny with chromosome 7 of chicken. Interestingly, BlSK1 was expressed in feather follicles that generated pennaceous barbules but not in follicles that generated plumulaceous barbules. These results suggested that the composition of feather keratins probably varies depending on the structure of the feather filaments and, that individual feather keratin genes may be involved in building different portions and/or types of feathers in chicken. PMID:24631266

  2. Carbon Fibers from Chicken Feather Keratin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Melissa E.; Wool, Richard

    2006-03-01

    As the availability of synthetic and fossil-fuel based resources is becoming limited, bio-based materials offer an environmentally friendly alternative. Chicken feathers remain a huge agricultural waste. The feathers are comprised of approximately 97% keratin, but are currently used only to enrich animal feed. However, this usage is becoming a problem with the spread of diseases such as Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, commonly called ``Mad Cow Disease.'' The hollow, microcrystalline, oriented keratin feather fibers offer a novel, low cost approach to producing carbon fibers through controlled pyrolysis. Carbonized feather fibers (CFF) were prepared by first heating to 225 ^oC (below the melting point)in N2 for 26 hours to crosslink and stabilize the fiber structure; then carbonization occurred by increasing the temperature to 450 ^oC for two more hours. The resulting CFF were hollow, stiff and strong and had an affine 80% weight loss, which is near the theoretical value for the C-content of keratin. Initial studies showed that a composite with the CFF and an epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) gave an improved fiber modulus ECFF of order 13.5--66.1 GPa. With continued research, the goals are to increase the stiffness of the feathers to 100 GPa, while increasing the strength in the range of 5-10 GPa.

  3. Pure keratin membrane and fibers from chicken feather.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bomou; Qiao, Xue; Hou, Xiuliang; Yang, Yiqi

    2016-08-01

    In this research, keratin was extracted from the disposable chicken feather using l-cysteine as reducing agent. Then, it was re-dissolved in the sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate buffer, and the pure keratin membrane and fiber were fabricated by doctor-blade casting process and wet spinning method, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the chemical and physical properties of resulting powder, membrane and fiber. Compared with the raw chicken feather, the regenerated keratin materials retain its chemical structure and thermal stability, their relative crystallinity is a little different depend on the shaping method, which leads to the difference in moisture regain. The mechanical results show that tensile strength of the keratin membrane researches 3.5MPa, have potential application in biomedical fields. However, the keratin fiber presents low tenacity, i.e. 0.5cN/dtex, this problem should be solved in order to apply the new fiber in textile and material science. PMID:27180293

  4. Development of feather keratin nanoparticles and investigation of their hemostatic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju; Hao, Shilei; Luo, Tiantian; Yang, Qian; Wang, Bochu

    2016-11-01

    Chicken feathers are considered as the major waste in poultry industry, which are mostly constituted of keratin proteins. Development of feather keratin for biomedical application is very attractive for chicken feather recycling. Human hair keratins have been demonstrated the significant hemostatic efficacy in the previous studies, but there are few reports of feather keratin for the hemostatic application. Here, the chicken feather keratin nanoparticle was developed for use as a hemostatic agent. Keratin was extracted from chicken feather in the present study, and a modified ultrasonic dispersion method was used to prepare keratin nanoparticles. The characterizations of feather keratin extracts and nanoparticles were investigated, including electrophoretic separation, amino acid composition, particle size, zeta potential, morphology, chemical structure and crystal form. Additionally, the hemostatic efficacy in vitro and in vivo of keratin nanoparticles were also studied. The results of hemostatic tests showed that the bleeding time and blood loss in tail amputation and liver scratch rat models can be significantly decreased after application of feather keratin nanoparticles, which demonstrated the potential application of feather keratin nanoparticles for hemostasis. PMID:27524078

  5. Industrial application of keratinase and soluble proteins from feather keratins.

    PubMed

    Deivasigamani, B; Alagappan, K M

    2008-11-01

    Feather keratin is highly resistant to degradation, but some keratinase producing microorganisms can easily degrade these insoluble keratins. These keratinase producing species have an important application in removal of poultry waste and recycled into valuable byproduct. Bacillus sp was screened from soil samples of slaughterhouse and poultry farm area using azokeratin medium. Highest keratinase activity (122.5 KU ml(-1)) was observed at 8.0 pH. Submerged fermentation was carried out at 8.0 pH up to 5th days. On 4th day enzyme production was highest (140 KU ml(-1)) with 1% feather (w/v). Crude protein content was high on day 5, around 1.44 mg ml(-1). 75% of filtrate was found to be crude protein. The molecular weight of this keratinase was 32 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The crude protein from feather has of high nutrient value and could be used as animal feed for livestock and fish feed in aquaculture. PMID:19297995

  6. Keratin subsidies promote feather decomposition via an increase in keratin-consuming arthropods and microorganisms in bird breeding colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Masuya, Hayato

    2015-06-01

    Resource subsidies are well known to increase population densities of consumers. The decomposition process of these subsidised resources can be influenced by increasing consumer abundance. However, few studies have assessed whether resource subsidies can promote resource decomposition via a population increase in consumers. Here, we examined the effects of keratin subsidies on feather decomposition in egret and heron breeding colonies. Egrets and herons (Ardeidae) frequently breed in inland forests and provide large amounts of keratin materials to the forest floor in the form of feathers of chicks (that die). We compared the decrease in the weights of egret and heron feathers (experimentally placed on the forest floor) over a 12-month period among egret/heron breeding colonies (five sites) and areas outside of colonies (five sites) in central Japan. Of the feathers placed experimentally on forest floors, 92-97 % and 99-100 % in colonies and 47-50 % and 71-90 % in non-colony areas were decomposed after 4 and 12 months, respectively. Then, decomposition rates of feathers were faster in colonies than in areas outside of colonies, suggesting that keratin subsidies can promote feather decomposition in colonies. Field observations and laboratory experiments indicated that keratin-feeding arthropods and keratinophilic fungi played important roles in feather decomposition. Therefore, scavenging arthropods and keratinophilic fungi, which dramatically increased in egret and heron breeding colonies, could accelerate the decomposition of feathers supplied to the forest floor of colonies.

  7. Keratin subsidies promote feather decomposition via an increase in keratin-consuming arthropods and microorganisms in bird breeding colonies.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Shinji; Masuya, Hayato

    2015-06-01

    Resource subsidies are well known to increase population densities of consumers. The decomposition process of these subsidised resources can be influenced by increasing consumer abundance. However, few studies have assessed whether resource subsidies can promote resource decomposition via a population increase in consumers. Here, we examined the effects of keratin subsidies on feather decomposition in egret and heron breeding colonies. Egrets and herons (Ardeidae) frequently breed in inland forests and provide large amounts of keratin materials to the forest floor in the form of feathers of chicks (that die). We compared the decrease in the weights of egret and heron feathers (experimentally placed on the forest floor) over a 12-month period among egret/heron breeding colonies (five sites) and areas outside of colonies (five sites) in central Japan. Of the feathers placed experimentally on forest floors, 92-97 % and 99-100 % in colonies and 47-50 % and 71-90 % in non-colony areas were decomposed after 4 and 12 months, respectively. Then, decomposition rates of feathers were faster in colonies than in areas outside of colonies, suggesting that keratin subsidies can promote feather decomposition in colonies. Field observations and laboratory experiments indicated that keratin-feeding arthropods and keratinophilic fungi played important roles in feather decomposition. Therefore, scavenging arthropods and keratinophilic fungi, which dramatically increased in egret and heron breeding colonies, could accelerate the decomposition of feathers supplied to the forest floor of colonies. PMID:25903424

  8. Evolutionary relationships among copies of feather beta ({beta}) keratin genes from several avian orders.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Travis C; French, Jeffrey O; Heincelman, Traci J; Jones, Kenneth L; Sawyer, Roger H

    2008-10-01

    The feather beta (β) keratins of the white leghorn chicken (order Galliformes, Gallus gallus domesticus) are the products of a multigene family that includes claw, feather, feather-like, and scale genes (Presland et al. 1989a). Here we characterize the feather β-keratin genes in additional bird species. We designed primers for polymerase chain reactions (PCR) using sequences available from chicken, cloned the resulting amplicons to isolate individual copies, and sequenced multiple clones from each PCR reaction for which we obtained amplicons of the expected size. Feather β-keratins of 18 species from eight avian orders demonstrate DNA sequence variation within and among taxa, even in the protein-coding regions of the genes. Phylogenies of these data suggest that Galliformes (fowl-like birds), Psittaciformes (parrots), and possibly Falconiformes (birds of prey) existed as separate lineages before duplication of the feather β-keratin gene began in Ciconiiformes (herons, storks, and allies), Gruiformes (cranes, rails, and allies), and Piciformes (woodpeckers and allies). Sequences from single species of Coraciiformes (kingfishers) and Columbiformes (pigeons) are monophyletic and strikingly divergent, suggesting feather β-keratin genes in these birds also diverged after these species last shared a common ancestor with the other taxa investigated. Overall, these data demonstrate considerable variation in this structural protein in the relatively recent history of birds, and raise questions concerning the origin and homology of claw, feather-like, and scale β-keratins of birds and the reptilian β-keratins. PMID:21669807

  9. Genomic Organization, Transcriptomic Analysis, and Functional Characterization of Avian α- and β-Keratins in Diverse Feather Forms

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wen-Lang; Yan, Jie; Chen, Chih-Kuan; Lai, Yu-Ting; Wu, Siao-Man; Mao, Chi-Tang; Chen, Jun-Jie; Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Ho, Meng-Ru; Widelitz, Randall B.; Chen, Chih-Feng; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Feathers are hallmark avian integument appendages, although they were also present on theropods. They are composed of flexible corneous materials made of α- and β-keratins, but their genomic organization and their functional roles in feathers have not been well studied. First, we made an exhaustive search of α- and β-keratin genes in the new chicken genome assembly (Galgal4). Then, using transcriptomic analysis, we studied α- and β-keratin gene expression patterns in five types of feather epidermis. The expression patterns of β-keratin genes were different in different feather types, whereas those of α-keratin genes were less variable. In addition, we obtained extensive α- and β-keratin mRNA in situ hybridization data, showing that α-keratins and β-keratins are preferentially expressed in different parts of the feather components. Together, our data suggest that feather morphological and structural diversity can largely be attributed to differential combinations of α- and β-keratin genes in different intrafeather regions and/or feather types from different body parts. The expression profiles provide new insights into the evolutionary origin and diversification of feathers. Finally, functional analysis using mutant chicken keratin forms based on those found in the human α-keratin mutation database led to abnormal phenotypes. This demonstrates that the chicken can be a convenient model for studying the molecular biology of human keratin-based diseases. PMID:25152353

  10. Chitosan scaffolds containing chicken feather keratin nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, S; Sameera, D K; Moorthi, A; Selvamurugan, N

    2013-11-01

    Chicken feathers are considered as major waste from poultry industry. They are mostly constituted by a protein called keratin. In this study, keratin was prepared from chicken feathers and from where keratin nanoparticles (nKer) were synthesized. Since chitosan has excellent properties like controlled biodegradation and biocompatibility, we used keratin nanoparticles along with chitosan matrix as scaffolds (CS/nKer) and they were characterized by SEM, FT-IR and XRD analyses. There was a porous architecture in the scaffolds in the range to support cell infiltration and tissue ingrowth. The keratin nanoparticles had interaction with chitosan matrix and did not alter the semi crystalline nature of chitosan scaffolds. The biodegradation and protein adsorption of the scaffolds were significantly increased upon addition of keratin nanoparticles. The scaffolds were also found to be non-cytotoxic to human osteoblastic cells. Thus, CS/nKer scaffolds could serve as a potential biomimetic substrate for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:24095711

  11. Hydrophobic duck feathers and their simulation on textile substrates for water repellent treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuyang; Chen, Xianqiong; Xin, J H

    2008-12-01

    Inspired by the non-wetting phenomena of duck feathers, the water repellent property of duck feathers was studied at the nanoscale. The microstructures of the duck feather were investigated by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging method through a step-by-step magnifying procedure. The SEM results show that duck feathers have a multi-scale structure and that this multi-scale structure as well as the preening oil are responsible for their super hydrophobic behavior. The microstructures of the duck feather were simulated on textile substrates using the biopolymer chitosan as building blocks through a novel surface solution precipitation (SSP) method, and then the textile substrates were further modified with a silicone compound to achieve low surface energy. The resultant textiles exhibit super water repellent properties, thus providing a simple bionic way to create super hydrophobic surfaces on soft substrates using flexible material as building blocks. PMID:18997276

  12. Keratin Durability Has Implications for the Fossil Record: Results from a 10 Year Feather Degradation Experiment.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Alison E; Zheng, Wenxia; Schweitzer, Mary H

    2016-01-01

    Keratinous 'soft tissue' structures (i.e. epidermally derived and originally non-biomineralized), include feathers, skin, claws, beaks, and hair. Despite their relatively common occurrence in the fossil record (second only to bone and teeth), few studies have addressed natural degradation processes that must occur in all organic material, including those keratinous structures that are incorporated into the rock record as fossils. Because feathers have high preservation potential and strong phylogenetic signal, in the current study we examine feathers subjected to different burial environments for a duration of ~10 years, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and in situ immunofluorescence (IF). We use morphology and persistence of specific immunoreactivity as indicators of preservation at the molecular and microstructural levels. We show that feather keratin is durable, demonstrates structural and microstructural integrity, and retains epitopes suitable for specific antibody recognition in even the harshest conditions. These data support the hypothesis that keratin antibody reactivity can be used to identify the nature and composition of epidermal structures in the rock record, and to address evolutionary questions by distinguishing between alpha- (widely distributed) and beta- (limited to sauropsids) keratin. PMID:27384819

  13. Keratin Durability Has Implications for the Fossil Record: Results from a 10 Year Feather Degradation Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Alison E.; Zheng, Wenxia; Schweitzer, Mary H.

    2016-01-01

    Keratinous ‘soft tissue’ structures (i.e. epidermally derived and originally non-biomineralized), include feathers, skin, claws, beaks, and hair. Despite their relatively common occurrence in the fossil record (second only to bone and teeth), few studies have addressed natural degradation processes that must occur in all organic material, including those keratinous structures that are incorporated into the rock record as fossils. Because feathers have high preservation potential and strong phylogenetic signal, in the current study we examine feathers subjected to different burial environments for a duration of ~10 years, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and in situ immunofluorescence (IF). We use morphology and persistence of specific immunoreactivity as indicators of preservation at the molecular and microstructural levels. We show that feather keratin is durable, demonstrates structural and microstructural integrity, and retains epitopes suitable for specific antibody recognition in even the harshest conditions. These data support the hypothesis that keratin antibody reactivity can be used to identify the nature and composition of epidermal structures in the rock record, and to address evolutionary questions by distinguishing between alpha- (widely distributed) and beta- (limited to sauropsids) keratin. PMID:27384819

  14. Development of colour-producing beta-keratin nanostructures in avian feather barbs.

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O; Dufresne, Eric R; Quinn, Tim; Waters, Karla

    2009-04-01

    The non-iridescent structural colours of avian feather barbs are produced by coherent light scattering from amorphous (i.e. quasi-ordered) nanostructures of beta-keratin and air in the medullary cells of feather barb rami. Known barb nanostructures belong to two distinct morphological classes. 'Channel' nanostructures consist of beta-keratin bars and air channels of elongate, tortuous and twisting forms. 'Spherical' nanostructures consist of highly spherical air cavities that are surrounded by thin beta-keratin bars and sometimes interconnected by tiny passages. Using transmission electron microscopy, we observe that the colour-producing channel-type nanostructures of medullary beta-keratin in feathers of the blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna, Psittacidae) develop by intracellular self-assembly; the process proceeds in the absence of any biological prepattern created by the cell membrane, endoplasmic reticulum or cellular intermediate filaments. We examine the hypothesis that the shape and size of these self-assembled, intracellular nanostructures are determined by phase separation of beta-keratin protein from the cytoplasm of the cell. The shapes of a broad sample of colour-producing channel-type nanostructures from nine avian species are very similar to those self-assembled during the phase separation of an unstable mixture, a process called spinodal decomposition (SD). In contrast, the shapes of a sample of spherical-type nanostructures from feather barbs of six species show a poor match to SD. However, spherical nanostructures show a strong morphological similarity to morphologies produced by phase separation of a metastable mixture, called nucleation and growth. We propose that colour-producing, intracellular, spongy medullary beta-keratin nanostructures develop their characteristic sizes and shapes by phase separation during protein polymerization. We discuss the possible role of capillary flow through drying of medullary cells in the development of the

  15. Development of colour-producing β-keratin nanostructures in avian feather barbs

    PubMed Central

    Prum, Richard O.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Quinn, Tim; Waters, Karla

    2009-01-01

    The non-iridescent structural colours of avian feather barbs are produced by coherent light scattering from amorphous (i.e. quasi-ordered) nanostructures of β-keratin and air in the medullary cells of feather barb rami. Known barb nanostructures belong to two distinct morphological classes. ‘Channel’ nanostructures consist of β-keratin bars and air channels of elongate, tortuous and twisting forms. ‘Spherical’ nanostructures consist of highly spherical air cavities that are surrounded by thin β-keratin bars and sometimes interconnected by tiny passages. Using transmission electron microscopy, we observe that the colour-producing channel-type nanostructures of medullary β-keratin in feathers of the blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna, Psittacidae) develop by intracellular self-assembly; the process proceeds in the absence of any biological prepattern created by the cell membrane, endoplasmic reticulum or cellular intermediate filaments. We examine the hypothesis that the shape and size of these self-assembled, intracellular nanostructures are determined by phase separation of β-keratin protein from the cytoplasm of the cell. The shapes of a broad sample of colour-producing channel-type nanostructures from nine avian species are very similar to those self-assembled during the phase separation of an unstable mixture, a process called spinodal decomposition (SD). In contrast, the shapes of a sample of spherical-type nanostructures from feather barbs of six species show a poor match to SD. However, spherical nanostructures show a strong morphological similarity to morphologies produced by phase separation of a metastable mixture, called nucleation and growth. We propose that colour-producing, intracellular, spongy medullary β-keratin nanostructures develop their characteristic sizes and shapes by phase separation during protein polymerization. We discuss the possible role of capillary flow through drying of medullary cells in the development of the hollow

  16. Keratin homogeneity in the tail feathers of Pavo cristatus and Pavo cristatus mut. alba

    PubMed Central

    Pabisch, S.; Puchegger, S.; Kirchner, H.O.K.; Weiss, I.M.; Peterlik, H.

    2010-01-01

    The keratin structure in the cortex of peacocks’ feathers is studied by X-ray diffraction along the feather, from the calamus to the tip. It changes considerably over the first 5 cm close to the calamus and remains constant for about 1 m along the length of the feather. Close to the tip, the structure loses its high degree of order. We attribute the X-ray patterns to a shrinkage of a cylindrical arrangement of β-sheets, which is not fully formed initially. In the final structure, the crystalline beta-cores are fixed by the rest of the keratin molecule. The hydrophobic residues of the beta-core are locked into a zip-like arrangement. Structurally there is no difference between the blue and the white bird. PMID:20637873

  17. Hydrogen isotope measurement of bird feather keratin, one laboratory's response to evolving methodologies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Majie; Dettman, David L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen in organic tissue resides in a complex mixture of molecular contexts. Some hydrogen, called non-exchangeable (H(non)), is strongly bound, and its isotopic ratio is fixed when the tissue is synthesized. Other pools of hydrogen, called exchangeable hydrogen (H(ex)), constantly exchange with ambient water vapor. The measurement of the δ(2)H(non) in organic tissues such as hair or feather therefore requires an analytical process that accounts for exchangeable hydrogen. In this study, swan feather and sheep wool keratin were used to test the effects of sample drying and capsule closure on the measurement of δ(2)H(non) values, and the rate of back-reaction with ambient water vapor. Homogenous feather or wool keratins were also calibrated at room temperature for use as control standards to correct for the effects of exchangeable hydrogen on feathers. Total δ(2)H values of both feather and wool samples showed large changes throughout the first ∼6 h of drying. Desiccant plus low vacuum seems to be more effective than room temperature vacuum pumping for drying samples. The degree of capsule closure affects exchangeable hydrogen equilibration and drying, with closed capsules responding more slowly. Using one control keratin standard to correct for the δ(2)H(ex) value for a batch of samples leads to internally consistent δ(2)H(non) values for other calibrated keratins run as unknowns. When placed in the context of other recent improvements in the measurement of keratin δ(2)H(non) values, we make recommendations for sample handing, data calibration and the reporting of results. PMID:25358407

  18. Feather keratin hydrolysates obtained from microbial keratinases: effect on hair fiber

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hair is composed mainly of keratin protein and a small amount of lipid. Protein hydrolysates, in particular those with low molecular weight distribution have been known to protect hair against chemical and environmental damage. Many types of protein hydrolysates from plants and animals have been used in hair and personal care such as keratin hydrolysates obtained from nails, horns and wool. Most of these hydrolysates are obtained by chemical hydrolysis and hydrothermal methods, but recently hydrolyzed hair keratin, feather keratin peptides, and feather meal peptides have been obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis using Bacillus spp in submerged fermentation. Results Keratin peptides were obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of keratinases using Bacillus subtilis AMR. The microorganism was grown on a feather medium, pH 8.0 (1% feathers) and supplemented with 0.01% of yeast extract, for 5 days, at 28°C with agitation. The supernatant containing the hydrolysates was colleted by centrifugation and ultra filtered in an AMICON system using nano–membranes (Millipore – YC05). The Proteins and peptides were analyzed using HPTLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. Commercial preparations of keratin hydrolysates were used as a comparative standard. After five days the feather had been degraded (90-95%) by the peptidases and keratinases of the microorganism. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry showed multiple peaks that correspond to peptides in the range of 800 to 1079 Daltons and the commercial hydrolysate was in the range of 900 to 1400 Da. HPTLC showed lower molecular mass peptides and amino acids in the enzymatic hydrolysate when compared with the commercial hydrolysate . A mild shampoo and a rinse off conditioner were formulated with the enzymatic hydrolysate and applied to hair fibers to evaluate the hydration, with and without heat, using a Corneometer® CM 825. The hydration was more efficient with heat, suggesting a more complete incorporation of hydrolysates into the fibers

  19. An investigation on keratin extraction from wool and feather waste by enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Eslahi, Niloofar; Dadashian, Fatemeh; Nejad, Nahid Hemmati

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the possibility of keratin extraction from wool and feather by an enzymatic treatment along with a reducing agent has been investigated. The effects of different parameters, that is, enzyme loading, type of substrate and surfactant, hydrolysis time, and reducing agent concentration, have been examined in order to optimize the enzymatic hydrolysis. The optimal condition for maximum keratin extraction was attained by making use of 1 g/L sodium dodecyl sulfate (an anionic surfactant) and 2.6% (v/v) protease (Savinase), along with 8.6 and 6.4 g/L sodium hydrogen sulfite (a reducing agent) for wool and feathers, respectively, at liquor to fiber ratio of 25 mL/g for 4 hr. The obtained results indicated higher degradation of wool fiber in comparison with feathers, which might be due to the higher hydrophilic nature of the former. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) patterns revealed that the molecular weights of the extracted proteins from wool and feather were lower than those for the untreated fibers. Scanning electron micrographs showed fibers fibrillation and degradation upon enzymatic treatment. Besides, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra indicated no evident changes in the chemical structure of the hydrolyzed fibers. However, wool and feather remainders were mostly composed of α-helix and β-sheets conformations, respectively. PMID:23768110

  20. The Chicken Frizzle Feather Is Due to an α-Keratin (KRT75) Mutation That Causes a Defective Rachis

    PubMed Central

    Foley, John; Foley, Anne; McDonald, Merry-Lynn; Juan, Wen-Tau; Huang, Chih-Jen; Lai, Yu-Ting; Lo, Wen-Sui; Chen, Chih-Feng; Leal, Suzanne M.; Zhang, Huanmin; Widelitz, Randall B.; Patel, Pragna I.; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Feathers have complex forms and are an excellent model to study the development and evolution of morphologies. Existing chicken feather mutants are especially useful for identifying genetic determinants of feather formation. This study focused on the gene F, underlying the frizzle feather trait that has a characteristic curled feather rachis and barbs in domestic chickens. Our developmental biology studies identified defects in feather medulla formation, and physical studies revealed that the frizzle feather curls in a stepwise manner. The frizzle gene is transmitted in an autosomal incomplete dominant mode. A whole-genome linkage scan of five pedigrees with 2678 SNPs revealed association of the frizzle locus with a keratin gene-enriched region within the linkage group E22C19W28_E50C23. Sequence analyses of the keratin gene cluster identified a 69 bp in-frame deletion in a conserved region of KRT75, an α-keratin gene. Retroviral-mediated expression of the mutated F cDNA in the wild-type rectrix qualitatively changed the bending of the rachis with some features of frizzle feathers including irregular kinks, severe bending near their distal ends, and substantially higher variations among samples in comparison to normal feathers. These results confirmed KRT75 as the F gene. This study demonstrates the potential of our approach for identifying genetic determinants of feather forms. PMID:22829773

  1. The chicken frizzle feather is due to an α-keratin (KRT75) mutation that causes a defective rachis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chen Siang; Wu, Ping; Foley, John; Foley, Anne; McDonald, Merry-Lynn; Juan, Wen-Tau; Huang, Chih-Jen; Lai, Yu-Ting; Lo, Wen-Sui; Chen, Chih-Feng; Leal, Suzanne M; Zhang, Huanmin; Widelitz, Randall B; Patel, Pragna I; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Feathers have complex forms and are an excellent model to study the development and evolution of morphologies. Existing chicken feather mutants are especially useful for identifying genetic determinants of feather formation. This study focused on the gene F, underlying the frizzle feather trait that has a characteristic curled feather rachis and barbs in domestic chickens. Our developmental biology studies identified defects in feather medulla formation, and physical studies revealed that the frizzle feather curls in a stepwise manner. The frizzle gene is transmitted in an autosomal incomplete dominant mode. A whole-genome linkage scan of five pedigrees with 2678 SNPs revealed association of the frizzle locus with a keratin gene-enriched region within the linkage group E22C19W28_E50C23. Sequence analyses of the keratin gene cluster identified a 69 bp in-frame deletion in a conserved region of KRT75, an α-keratin gene. Retroviral-mediated expression of the mutated F cDNA in the wild-type rectrix qualitatively changed the bending of the rachis with some features of frizzle feathers including irregular kinks, severe bending near their distal ends, and substantially higher variations among samples in comparison to normal feathers. These results confirmed KRT75 as the F gene. This study demonstrates the potential of our approach for identifying genetic determinants of feather forms. PMID:22829773

  2. Preparation of regenerated keratin sponge from waste feathers by a simple method and its potential use for oil adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Long-Tao; Yang, Guang; Yang, Xue-Xia; Cao, Zhang-Jun; Zhou, Mei-Hua

    2014-04-01

    In this work, pigeon feathers, a kind of totally waste by-product from the poultry industry, were utilized to fabricate a highly porous keratin sponge in a very simple way by freeze-drying treatment of the dissolved keratin solution, and applied for the first time as an oil adsorbent. An improved method was proposed to dissolve the feather keratin using the inexpensive sodium disulfite as the reducing reagent for sulfitolysis reaction, with a much lower concentration of all involving reaction regents. Moreover, the regenerated keratin sponges obtained a high oil adsorption capacity of above 30 g/g for both liquid paraffin and soybean oil, as well as a good oil holding ability, suggesting that this keratin sponge might be a potential for use as oil adsorbent. PMID:24442963

  3. Quail-duck chimeras reveal spatiotemporal plasticity in molecular and histogenic programs of cranial feather development.

    PubMed

    Eames, B Frank; Schneider, Richard A

    2005-04-01

    The avian feather complex represents a vivid example of how a developmental module composed of highly integrated molecular and histogenic programs can become rapidly elaborated during the course of evolution. Mechanisms that facilitate this evolutionary diversification may involve the maintenance of plasticity in developmental processes that underlie feather morphogenesis. Feathers arise as discrete buds of mesenchyme and epithelium, which are two embryonic tissues that respectively form dermis and epidermis of the integument. Epithelial-mesenchymal signaling interactions generate feather buds that are neatly arrayed in space and time. The dermis provides spatiotemporal patterning information to the epidermis but precise cellular and molecular mechanisms for generating species-specific differences in feather pattern remain obscure. In the present study, we exploit the quail-duck chimeric system to test the extent to which the dermis regulates the expression of genes required for feather development. Quail and duck have distinct feather patterns and divergent growth rates, and we exchange pre-migratory neural crest cells destined to form the craniofacial dermis between them. We find that donor dermis induces host epidermis to form feather buds according to the spatial pattern and timetable of the donor species by altering the expression of members and targets of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein, Sonic Hedgehog and Delta/Notch pathways. Overall, we demonstrate that there is a great deal of spatiotemporal plasticity inherent in the molecular and histogenic programs of feather development, a property that may have played a generative and regulatory role throughout the evolution of birds. PMID:15728671

  4. Quail-duck chimeras reveal spatiotemporal plasticity in molecular and histogenic programs of cranial feather development

    PubMed Central

    Eames, B. Frank; Schneider, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The avian feather complex represents a vivid example of how a developmental module composed of highly integrated molecular and histogenic programs can become rapidly elaborated during the course of evolution. Mechanisms that facilitate this evolutionary diversification may involve the maintenance of plasticity in developmental processes that underlie feather morphogenesis. Feathers arise as discrete buds of mesenchyme and epithelium, which are two embryonic tissues that respectively form dermis and epidermis of the integument. Epithelial-mesenchymal signaling interactions generate feather buds that are neatly arrayed in space and time. The dermis provides spatiotemporal patterning information to the epidermis but precise cellular and molecular mechanisms for generating species-specific differences in feather pattern remain obscure. In the present study, we exploit the quail-duck chimeric system to test the extent to which the dermis regulates the expression of genes required for feather development. Quail and duck have distinct feather patterns and divergent growth rates, and we exchange premigratory neural crest cells destined to form the craniofacial dermis between them. We find that donor dermis induces host epidermis to form feather buds according to the spatial pattern and timetable of the donor species by altering the expression of members and targets of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein, Sonic Hedgehog and Delta/Notch pathways. Overall, we demonstrate that there is a great deal of spatiotemporal plasticity inherent in the molecular and histogenic programs of feather development, a property that may have played a generative and regulatory role throughout the evolution of birds. PMID:15728671

  5. The effects of physical and chemical treatments on Na2S produced feather keratin films.

    PubMed

    Poole, Andrew J; Church, Jeffrey S

    2015-02-01

    The industrial utilisation of feather keratin as a biopolymer has proven difficult due to the lack of a viable extraction technique and the poor mechanical properties of the regenerated products. Here, pure keratin films were produced from chicken feathers using sodium sulphide as sole extraction reagent in a scheme that allows films to be formed without residual chemicals. In a comparison to other films, those produced using Na2S extraction were found to be superior to other regenerated protein films and were similar to un-oriented commercial polymers. However, there was considerable variation in tensile properties between twenty repetitions of extracting and casting films which was attributed to variations in chain entanglement caused by the drying conditions. Chemical and physical treatments including crosslinking, dehydration and addition of nano-particles were investigated as means to enhance these properties. Significant increases were achieved by soaking films in isopropyl alcohol or weak acid (13 to 50% increases) or by formaldehyde or glutaraldehyde crosslinking (24 to 40% increases). The wide range of values across the pure keratin films indicates that the best route to further strength improvement may be from optimising self-assembly via controlling drying conditions, rather than from chemical treatment. PMID:25445691

  6. Colour-producing [beta]-keratin nanofibres in blue penguin (Eudyptula minor) feathers

    SciTech Connect

    D; Alba, Liliana; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Clarke, Julia A.; Vinther, Jakob A.; Prum, Richard O.; Shawkey, Matthew D.

    2012-03-26

    The colours of living organisms are produced by the differential absorption of light by pigments (e.g. carotenoids, melanins) and/or by the physical interactions of light with biological nanostructures, referred to as structural colours. Only two fundamental morphologies of non-iridescent nanostructures are known in feathers, and recent work has proposed that they self-assemble by intracellular phase separation processes. Here, we report a new biophotonic nanostructure in the non-iridescent blue feather barbs of blue penguins (Eudyptula minor) composed of parallel {beta}-keratin nanofibres organized into densely packed bundles. Synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and two-dimensional Fourier analysis of electron micrographs of the barb nanostructure revealed short-range order in the organization of fibres at the appropriate size scale needed to produce the observed colour by coherent scattering. These two-dimensional quasi-ordered penguin nanostructures are convergent with similar arrays of parallel collagen fibres in avian and mammalian skin, but constitute a novel morphology for feathers. The identification of a new class of {beta}-keratin nanostructures adds significantly to the known mechanisms of colour production in birds and suggests additional complexity in their self-assembly.

  7. Selective biodegradation of keratin matrix in feather rachis reveals classic bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Lingham-Soliar, Theagarten; Bonser, Richard H. C.; Wesley-Smith, James

    2010-01-01

    Flight necessitates that the feather rachis is extremely tough and light. Yet, the crucial filamentous hierarchy of the rachis is unknown—study hindered by the tight chemical bonding between the filaments and matrix. We used novel microbial biodegradation to delineate the fibres of the rachidial cortex in situ. It revealed the thickest keratin filaments known to date (factor >10), approximately 6 µm thick, extending predominantly axially but with a small outer circumferential component. Near-periodic thickened nodes of the fibres are staggered with those in adjacent fibres in two- and three-dimensional planes, creating a fibre–matrix texture with high attributes for crack stopping and resistance to transverse cutting. Close association of the fibre layer with the underlying ‘spongy’ medulloid pith indicates the potential for higher buckling loads and greater elastic recoil. Strikingly, the fibres are similar in dimensions and form to the free filaments of the feather vane and plumulaceous and embryonic down, the syncitial barbules, but, identified for the first time in 140+ years of study in a new location—as a major structural component of the rachis. Early in feather evolution, syncitial barbules were consolidated in a robust central rachis, definitively characterizing the avian lineage of keratin. PMID:20018788

  8. Immobilization of Keratinase from Aspergillus flavus K-03 for Degradation of Feather Keratin

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular keratinase isolated from Aspergillus flavus K-03 was immobilized on calcium alginate. The properties and reaction activities of free and immobilized keratinase with calcium alginate were characterized. The immobilized keratinase showed proteolytic activity against soluble azo-casein and azo-keratin, and insoluble feather keratin. Heat stability and pH tolerance of keratinase were greatly enhanced by immobilization. It also displayed a higher level of heat stability and an increased tolerance toward alkaline pHs compared with free keratinase. During the durability test at 40℃, 48% of the original enzyme activity of the immobilized keratinase was remained after 7 days of incubation. The immobilized keratinase exhibited better stability, thus increasing its potential for use in industrial application. PMID:24049486

  9. Feather and faecal corticosterone concentrations predict future reproductive decisions in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Warren K; Bate, Lisa J; Landry, Devin W; Chastel, Olivier; Parenteau, Charline; Breuner, Creagh W

    2016-01-01

    Understanding sources of reproductive variation can inform management and conservation decisions, population ecology and life-history theory. Annual reproductive variation can drive population growth rate and can be influenced by factors from across the annual cycle (known as carry-over effects). The majority of studies, however, focus solely on the role of current environmental events. Past events often influence future reproductive decisions and success but can be logistically difficult to collect and quantify, especially in migratory species. Recent work indicates that glucocorticoids may prove good indicators to evaluate carry-over effects across life-history transitions. Here, we evaluated three different measures of glucocorticoid physiology (feathers, faeces and plasma) to evaluate the predictability of future breeding decision in the harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus). We collected tail and back feathers, plasma and faeces for glucocorticoid analysis, and fitted female harlequin ducks with very high-frequency transmitters to track their breeding decisions. Both back feathers (moulted immediately before the current season) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolites were identified as important predictive factors of reproductive decisions; high concentrations of glucocorticoid metabolites in back feathers and faeces predicted a higher likelihood of reproductive deferral for the year. Although back and tail feather corticosterone concentrations were correlated, tail feathers (moulted at the end of the previous breeding season) did not predict breeding decisions. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were collected over too broad a time range after capture to be useful in this study. This study demonstrates the utility of non-invasive corticosterone metrics in predicting breeding decisions and supports the use of feathers to measure carry-over effects in migratory birds. With this technique, we identified the prenuptial moult as an important life

  10. Feather and faecal corticosterone concentrations predict future reproductive decisions in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus)

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Warren K.; Bate, Lisa J.; Landry, Devin W.; Chastel, Olivier; Parenteau, Charline; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding sources of reproductive variation can inform management and conservation decisions, population ecology and life-history theory. Annual reproductive variation can drive population growth rate and can be influenced by factors from across the annual cycle (known as carry-over effects). The majority of studies, however, focus solely on the role of current environmental events. Past events often influence future reproductive decisions and success but can be logistically difficult to collect and quantify, especially in migratory species. Recent work indicates that glucocorticoids may prove good indicators to evaluate carry-over effects across life-history transitions. Here, we evaluated three different measures of glucocorticoid physiology (feathers, faeces and plasma) to evaluate the predictability of future breeding decision in the harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus). We collected tail and back feathers, plasma and faeces for glucocorticoid analysis, and fitted female harlequin ducks with very high-frequency transmitters to track their breeding decisions. Both back feathers (moulted immediately before the current season) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolites were identified as important predictive factors of reproductive decisions; high concentrations of glucocorticoid metabolites in back feathers and faeces predicted a higher likelihood of reproductive deferral for the year. Although back and tail feather corticosterone concentrations were correlated, tail feathers (moulted at the end of the previous breeding season) did not predict breeding decisions. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were collected over too broad a time range after capture to be useful in this study. This study demonstrates the utility of non-invasive corticosterone metrics in predicting breeding decisions and supports the use of feathers to measure carry-over effects in migratory birds. With this technique, we identified the prenuptial moult as an important life

  11. Development of a novel cellulose/duck feather composite fibre regenerated in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Rasike; Wang, Xungai; Byrne, Nolene

    2016-11-20

    By blending cellulose and duck feather in the common solvent 1-allyl-3-methylimidazoloium chloride, a regenerated composite fibre has been developed with improved fibres over regenerated cellulose fibres (RCF). The mechanical properties of composite fibre was shown to be better than RCF with a 63.7% improvement in tensile strain. Here, we thoroughly characterise the composite fibre and show that the composite fibre has many advantages over RCFs both from a spinning perspective and as a regenerated fibre. PMID:27561478

  12. A New Helical Crossed-Fibre Structure of β-Keratin in Flight Feathers and Its Biomechanical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lingham-Soliar, Theagarten; Murugan, Nelisha

    2013-01-01

    The feather aerofoil is unequalled in nature. It is comprised of a central rachis, serial paired branches or barbs, from which arise further branches, the barbules. Barbs and barbules arise from the significantly thinner lateral walls (the epicortex) of the rachis and barbs respectively, as opposed to the thicker dorsal and ventral walls (the cortex). We hypothesized a microstructural design of the epicortex that would resist the vertical or shearing stresses. The microstructures of the cortex and epicortex of the rachis and barbs were investigated in several bird species by microbe-assisted selective disassembly and conventional methods via scanning electron microscopy. We report, preeminent of the finds, a novel system of crossed fibres (ranging from ∼100–800 nm in diameter), oppositely oriented in alternate layers of the epicortex in the rachis and barbs. It represents the first cross-fibre microstructure, not only for the feather but in keratin per se. The cortex of the barbs is comprised of syncitial barbule cells, definitive structural units shown in the rachidial cortex in a related study. The structural connection between the cortex of the rachis and barbs appears uninterrupted. A new model on feather microstructure incorporating the findings here and in the related study is presented. The helical fibre system found in the integument of a diverse range of invertebrates and vertebrates has been implicated in profound functional strategies, perhaps none more so potentially than in the aerofoil microstructure of the feather here, which is central to one of the marvels of nature, bird flight. PMID:23762440

  13. Coupled action of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase-glutathione and keratinase effectively degrades feather keratin and surrogate prion protein, Sup 35NM.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Gupta, Rani

    2012-09-01

    Recombinant Escherichia coli HB101 harboring keratinase rKP2 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa KS-1 degraded 2% chicken feather in LB-Amp medium in 24h. SEM analysis and detailed studies revealed that bacterial colonization of feather was a pre-requisite for degradation of feather by keratinase. The mechanism of sulfitolysis revealed involvement of free cystinyl group as a source of redox during colonization as DTNB inhibited feather degradation by rKP2. Involvement of GGT-GSH system in contribution of free cystinyl group for redox was established by using GGT knockout recombinant E. coli strain that failed to degrade feather inspite of successful colonization and keratinase production. Short term experiments further confirmed enhanced protein release from feather keratin in presence of GGT-GSH redox. In the presence of similar redox, rKP2 also degraded surrogate prion protein, Sup 35NM in 15 min at 37°C, pH 7.0. PMID:22776236

  14. MicroRNA profile analysis on duck feather follicle and skin with high-throughput sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Nie, Qinghua; Su, Ying; Xie, Xiujuan; Luo, Wen; Jia, Xinzheng; Zhang, Xiquan

    2013-04-25

    Skin acts an important protection role in animal survival and it evolves with the animal divergence. We identified the conserved miRNA families of skin among duck and other species. Cluster analysis showed that the species with similar skin characteristics were clustered into the same group, indicating miRNAs are important in skin function and skin evolution. The miRNA profiles demonstrated that different miRNA regulation mechanism may exist in contour feather follicles (with the surrounding skin) and down feather follicles (with the surrounding skin). Comparing the highly abundant miRNAs with those of mammalian hair follicles and skins, different miRNAs and miRNA families were found, suggesting the different ways in feather follicles and mammalian hair follicles. Bioinformatics prediction indicated that seven miRNAs probably targeted the genes of Wnt/β-catenin, Shh/BMP and Notch pathways which were important in feather morphogenesis. Further analysis should be conducted to experimentally validate the relationships between miRNAs and their predicted target genes because the target genes were based exclusively upon the bioinformatics. PMID:23384715

  15. The chicken frizzle feather is due to an a-keratin (KRT75) mutation that causes a defective rachis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feathers have complex forms and are an excellent model to study the development and evolution of morphologies. Existing chicken feather mutants are especially useful for identifying genetic determinants of feather formation. The present study focused on the gene, F, underlying the frizzle feather tr...

  16. Effect of dietary methionine content on growth performance, carcass traits, and feather growth of Pekin duck from 15 to 35 days of age

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Q. F.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, X.; Doster, A.; Murdoch, R.; Makagon, M.; Gardner, A.; Applegate, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to establish the response of Pekin ducks to dietary Met from 15 to 35 d age. Experimental diets were formulated to contain 0.35, 0.45, 0.55, 0.65, and 0.75% Met (0.30, 0.39, 0.45, 0.56, and 0.68% on an analyzed basis, respectively) and 0.3% cysteine (0.25, 0.27, 0.26, 0.26, and 0.28% on an analyzed basis, respectively). Each diet was fed to 10 pens of 55 ducks/pen. Carcass yields and feather growth were determined at 28 and 35 d. Results showed that feeding 0.30% Met (0.55% Met+Cys) significantly impaired ADG, feed-to-gain (F:G) ratio, breast meat yield, and feather growth in comparison to the other dietary treatments (P < 0.05). BW, ADG, F:G, carcass and breast meat weight and yield, breast skin and subcutaneous fat weight and yield, the fourth primary wing feather length, and feather coverage showed significant quadratic broken-line or quadratic polynomial response to increasing dietary Met (P < 0.05). From 15 to 28 d age, the optimal Met requirement for the BW, breast meat yield, and the fourth primary wing feather length were 0.510, 0.445, and 0.404%, respectively, based on quadratic broken-line model, and correspondingly were 0.606, 0.576, and 0.559% by quadratic regression. For ducks from 15 to 35 d age, the optimal Met requirement for BW, breast meat yield, and feather coverage were 0.468, 0.408, and 0.484%, respectively, by quadratic broken-line model, and 0.605, 0.564, and 0.612%, by quadratic regression, respectively. PMID:25971946

  17. Use of Stable Isotopes to Investigate Keratin Deposition in the Claw Tips of Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, John B.; Cutting, Kyle A.; Warren, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotopes derived from the claws of birds could be used to determine the migratory origins of birds if the time periods represented in excised sections of claws were known. We investigated new keratin growth in the claws of adult female Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) by estimating the equilibration rates of stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N, and δ2H) from the breeding grounds into 1 mm claw tips. We sampled birds on their breeding ground through time and found that it took approximately 3–3.5 months for isotope values in most claw tips to equilibrate to isotope values that reflected those present in the environment on their breeding grounds. Results from this study suggest that isotopes equilibrate slowly into claw tips of Lesser Scaup, suggesting isotopes could potentially be used to determine the wintering grounds of birds. We suggest using controlled feeding experiments or longitudinal field investigations to understand claw growth and isotopic equilibration in claw tips. Such information would be valuable in ascertaining whether claw tips can be used in future studies to identify the migratory origins of birds. PMID:24282563

  18. Carbonate deposition on tail feathers of ruddy ducks using evaporation ponds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euliss, N.H., Jr.; Jarvis, R.L.; Gilmer, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Substantial carbonate deposits were observed on rectrices of Ruddy Ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) collected during 1982-1984 on evaporation ponds in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Carbonate deposits were composed of about 75% aragonite and 25% calcite, both polymorphous forms of CaCO3. Significantly more carbonate deposits were observed on Ruddy Ducks as length of exposure to agricultural drain water increased, during the 1983-1984 field season when salt concentrations in the ponds were higher, and in certain evaporation-pond systems.

  19. Identification and profiling of microRNAs associated with white and black plumage pigmentation in the white and black feather bulbs of ducks by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Apopo, S; Liu, H; Jing, L; Du, X; Xie, S; Gong, Y; Xu, R; Li, S

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in many biological processes by regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. However, the mechanism by which specific miRNAs may regulate plumage pigmentation has remained largely elusive. In this study, we sequenced miRNAs using Solexa sequencing and then performed a detailed analysis of their expression profiles between the black and white feather bulbs of ducks from Cui Hei, Kaiya, Liancheng pure breeds and a Kaiya-Liancheng F2 population. mirdeep2 software identified 121 conserved and eight novel miRNAs. Five differentially expressed miRNAs between the two tissues types were also identified by degseq software. Notably, miR-204 was predominantly expressed in black feather bulbs. To further validate the sequencing data, we applied stem-loop quantitative PCR of ten known miRNAs based on the identified sequences. Furthermore, in exploring the temporal expression pattern of miR-204, we performed profiling in nine duck tissues. The targets of these miRNAs were predicted using a PITA algorithm and were later grouped based on Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analysis using the DAVID website. The melanogenesis pathway was among the identified signalling pathways, implying key roles of these miRNAs in plumage pigmentation. Expression analysis of the target genes in the melanogenesis pathways was also performed. This study provides the foundation for subsequent studies on the prospective practical role for such miRNAs in post-transcriptional gene regulation linked to plumage pigmentation. PMID:26369256

  20. Differences in the detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus in feather samples from 4-week-old and 24-week-old infected Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var. domestica).

    PubMed

    Aiello, Roberta; Beato, Maria Serena; Mancin, Marzia; Rigoni, Michela; Tejeda, Aurora Romero; Maniero, Silvia; Capua, Ilaria; Terregino, Calogero

    2013-08-30

    Previous studies have reported the detection of H5N1 HPAI virus in feathers from ducks naturally and experimentally infected and suggested that feather calami (FC) could be used as diagnostic samples for the early detection of H5N1 HPAI infections. Ducks are readily infected with H5N1 HPAI viruses although the development of clinical signs and deaths were reported as age-related with younger birds being more susceptible. The correlation between age and virus localisation in FC of infected ducks has not been studied to date. In the present study juvenile (4-week-old) and adult (24-week-old) Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var. domestica) were infected experimentally with a clade 2.2 H5N1 HPAI virus (A/duck/Nigeria/1071-23/2007). Tracheal (Tr) and cloacal (Cl) swabs and FC were collected at 3, 5, 7 and 10 days post infection and tested by RRT-PCR and a double antibody sandwich-ELISA (DAS-ELISA) developed in house. Virus was detected in swabs and FC of challenged ducks with a higher rate of detection in juvenile ducks. In this age group virus was detected over a longer period of time in FC compared to swabs. Our study showed that FC samples collected from young ducks are a valid diagnostic specimen for H5N1 HPAI virus detection. The DAS-ELISA on FC proved to be a suitable alternative diagnostic test when molecular and/or virus isolation techniques are not available therefore it could be useful in the diagnosis of H5N1 HPAI infections in under-resourced countries. PMID:23608476

  1. 50 CFR 20.91 - Commercial use of feathers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Commercial use of feathers. 20.91 Section... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Feathers or Skins § 20.91 Commercial use of feathers... pillows, and mattresses, and for similar commercial uses the feathers of migratory waterfowl (ducks,...

  2. [Intracranial fat bodies and their potential effect on brain composition and behaviour in domestic ducks with feather crests (3 case studies)].

    PubMed

    Cnotka, J; Frahm, H D; Rehkämper, G

    2006-01-01

    Intracranial fat tissue was found in the brains of three crested ducks. The three ducks differed in the size of their crest and in the volume and the location of the fat body within their brains. The duck with the large crest showed a fat body which counts for 19 % of its brain volume. Due to this fat accumulation, brain structures, mainly the cerebellum, were moved laterally. This duck had serious problems in motor coordination. Fat body of the second duck with a middle sized crest was situated in neostriatum and constituted 0,6 % of total brain volume. Additionally this duck displayed an encephalocele. The last duck did show a small crest. Its fat body was found in the area of the tentorium cerebelli and made up 17 % of its brain volume. The later two ducks were not hampered behaviourally. PMID:16475552

  3. Keratin Transamidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low molecular weight keratin was self-crosslinked by microbial transglutaminase (mTGase) for application to wool fabric. From amino acid determination, keratin produced by the alkaline hydrolysis of wool showed requisite glutamine and lysine required for mTGase-mediated transamidation. Keratin sho...

  4. [Open water systems for species-appropriate housing of Peking ducks--effects on behaviour, feather quality and plugged up nostrils].

    PubMed

    Heyn, Elke; Damme, Klaus; Bergmann, Shana; Remy, Felix; Küster, Yvonne; Erhard, Michael

    2009-01-01

    At present in Germany Peking ducks in commercial housing are on ground with litter and nipple drinkers only and there is no access to open water. With this study we investigated if open water drinkers can affect behaviour and health of ducks positively. In this investigation ten fattening trials with 11 424 ducks, kept with straw, were analyzed. 25% of the compartment (32 m2) were covered with perforated grid, with one of the tested water systems (Nipple drinker, Sparkcup, Shower, Hollow and Round drinker and modified Round drinker) installed. Besides parts of the behaviour of ducks, animal health and hygiene and also economic factors were taken into account. In contrast to pens with nipple-drinkers only, the ducks in pens with open water troughs/showers had the opportunity to exhibit their natural drinking behaviour and water associated activities, such as straining and preening the plumage with water in accordance with the animal welfare requirements. In the free-choice pens, the open water systems were significantly preferred, and over a 24-hour period, the ducks in watering areas with open water troughs showed higher activity. Limiting the access to the open water systems (4, 6 and 8 hours) led to more intense use per time unit. Ducks with access to nipple drinkers only showed a significantly higher percentage of plugged up nostrils than animals from pens with open water drinkers (p < or = 0.05). Open water drinkers also had a positive impact on the plumage condition.The open water drinking systems were very well accepted by the animals and are, concerning behaviour and animal health, an improvement in housing systems of Peking ducks. PMID:19681402

  5. Skin Keratins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengrong; Zieman, Abigail; Coulombe, Pierre A.

    2016-01-01

    Keratins comprise the type I and type II intermediate filament-forming proteins and occur primarily in epithelial cells. They are encoded by 54 evolutionarily conserved genes (28 type I, 26 type II) and regulated in a pairwise and tissue type-, differentiation-, and context-dependent manner. Keratins serve multiple homeostatic and stress-enhanced mechanical and nonmechanical functions in epithelia, including the maintenance of cellular integrity, regulation of cell growth and migration, and protection from apoptosis. These functions are tightly regulated by posttranslational modifications as well as keratin-associated proteins. Genetically determined alterations in keratin-coding sequences underlie highly penetrant and rare disorders whose pathophysiology reflects cell fragility and/or altered tissue homeostasis. Moreover, keratin mutation or misregulation represents risk factors or genetic modifiers for several acute and chronic diseases. This chapter focuses on keratins that are expressed in skin epithelia, and details a number of basic protocols and assays that have proven useful for analyses being carried out in skin. PMID:26795476

  6. beta-Keratins in crocodiles reveal amino acid homology with avian keratins.

    PubMed

    Ye, Changjiang; Wu, Xiaobing; Yan, Peng; Amato, George

    2010-03-01

    The DNA sequences encoding beta-keratin have been obtained from Marsh Mugger (Crocodylus palustris) and Orinoco Crocodiles (Crocodylus intermedius). Through the deduced amino acid sequence, these proteins are rich in glycine, proline and serine. The central region of the proteins are composed of two beta-folded regions and show a high degree of identity with beta-keratins of aves and squamates. This central part is thought to be the site of polymerization to build the framework of beta-keratin filaments. It is believed that the beta-keratins in reptiles and birds share a common ancestry. Near the C-terminal, these beta-keratins contain a peptide rich in glycine-X and glycine-X-X, and the distinctive feature of the region is some 12-amino acid repeats, which are similar to the 13-amino acid repeats in chick scale keratin but absent from avian feather keratin. From our phylogenetic analysis, the beta-keratins in crocodile have a closer relationship with avian keratins than the other keratins in reptiles. PMID:19266314

  7. Biodegradation of Hard Keratins by Two Bacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Wojciech; Rodziewicz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extensive quantities of keratinic by-products are disposed annually by animal-processing industry, causing a mounting ecological problem due to extreme resilience of these materials to enzymatic breakdown. There is a growing trend to apply cheap and environment-friendly methods to recycle keratinic wastes. Soil bacteria of profound keratinolytic potential, especially spore-forming rods from the genus Bacillus, play a significant role in keratinase-mediated biodegradation of keratins, therefore could be effective in hastening their biodegradation. Keratin hydrolysis in microbial cultures is one of the most promising techniques not only to utilize this protein but also to obtain valuable by products. Objectives: The study was undertaken to investigate the biodegradation process of various keratinic materials by two Bacillus strains. Materials and Methods: Two keratinolytic strains, Bacillus cereus and B. polymyxa, were subject to cultures in the presence of several keratinic appendages, like chicken feathers, barbs and rachea of ostrich feathers, pig bristle, lamb wool, human hair and stratum corneum of epidermis, as main nutrient sources. Bacterial ability to decompose these waste materials was evaluated, at the background of keratinase and protease biosynthesis, in brief four-day cultures. Keratinolytic activity was measured on soluble keratin preparation and proteases were assayed on casein. Additionally, amounts of liberated proteins, amino acids and thiols were evaluated. Residual keratin weight was tested afterwards. Results: Both tested strains proved to be more adapted for fast biodegradation of feather β-keratins than hair-type α-keratins. B. cereus revealed its significant proteolytic potential, especially on whole chicken feathers (230 PU) and stratum corneum (180 PU), but also on separated barbs and rachea, which appeared to be moderate protease inducers. Keratinolytic activity of B. cereus was comparable on most substrates and maximum level

  8. Topographical mapping of α- and β-keratins on developing chicken skin integuments: Functional interaction and evolutionary perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Ng, Chen Siang; Yan, Jie; Lai, Yung-Chih; Chen, Chih-Kuan; Lai, Yu-Ting; Wu, Siao-Man; Chen, Jiun-Jie; Luo, Weiqi; Widelitz, Randall B.; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Avian integumentary organs include feathers, scales, claws, and beaks. They cover the body surface and play various functions to help adapt birds to diverse environments. These keratinized structures are mainly composed of corneous materials made of α-keratins, which exist in all vertebrates, and β-keratins, which only exist in birds and reptiles. Here, members of the keratin gene families were used to study how gene family evolution contributes to novelty and adaptation, focusing on tissue morphogenesis. Using chicken as a model, we applied RNA-seq and in situ hybridization to map α- and β-keratin genes in various skin appendages at embryonic developmental stages. The data demonstrate that temporal and spatial α- and β-keratin expression is involved in establishing the diversity of skin appendage phenotypes. Embryonic feathers express a higher proportion of β-keratin genes than other skin regions. In feather filament morphogenesis, β-keratins show intricate complexity in diverse substructures of feather branches. To explore functional interactions, we used a retrovirus transgenic system to ectopically express mutant α- or antisense β-keratin forms. α- and β-keratins show mutual dependence and mutations in either keratin type results in disrupted keratin networks and failure to form proper feather branches. Our data suggest that combinations of α- and β-keratin genes contribute to the morphological and structural diversity of different avian skin appendages, with feather-β-keratins conferring more possible composites in building intrafeather architecture complexity, setting up a platform of morphological evolution of functional forms in feathers. PMID:26598683

  9. Topographical mapping of α- and β-keratins on developing chicken skin integuments: Functional interaction and evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Ng, Chen Siang; Yan, Jie; Lai, Yung-Chih; Chen, Chih-Kuan; Lai, Yu-Ting; Wu, Siao-Man; Chen, Jiun-Jie; Luo, Weiqi; Widelitz, Randall B; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Avian integumentary organs include feathers, scales, claws, and beaks. They cover the body surface and play various functions to help adapt birds to diverse environments. These keratinized structures are mainly composed of corneous materials made of α-keratins, which exist in all vertebrates, and β-keratins, which only exist in birds and reptiles. Here, members of the keratin gene families were used to study how gene family evolution contributes to novelty and adaptation, focusing on tissue morphogenesis. Using chicken as a model, we applied RNA-seq and in situ hybridization to map α- and β-keratin genes in various skin appendages at embryonic developmental stages. The data demonstrate that temporal and spatial α- and β-keratin expression is involved in establishing the diversity of skin appendage phenotypes. Embryonic feathers express a higher proportion of β-keratin genes than other skin regions. In feather filament morphogenesis, β-keratins show intricate complexity in diverse substructures of feather branches. To explore functional interactions, we used a retrovirus transgenic system to ectopically express mutant α- or antisense β-keratin forms. α- and β-keratins show mutual dependence and mutations in either keratin type results in disrupted keratin networks and failure to form proper feather branches. Our data suggest that combinations of α- and β-keratin genes contribute to the morphological and structural diversity of different avian skin appendages, with feather-β-keratins conferring more possible composites in building intrafeather architecture complexity, setting up a platform of morphological evolution of functional forms in feathers. PMID:26598683

  10. The Structure, Functions, and Mechanical Properties of Keratin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKittrick, J.; Chen, P.-Y.; Bodde, S. G.; Yang, W.; Novitskaya, E. E.; Meyers, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Keratin is one of the most important structural proteins in nature and is widely found in the integument in vertebrates. It is classified into two types: α-helices and β-pleated sheets. Keratinized materials can be considered as fiber-reinforced composites consisting of crystalline intermediate filaments embedded in an amorphous protein matrix. They have a wide variety of morphologies and properties depending on different functions. Here, we review selected keratin-based materials, such as skin, hair, wool, quill, horn, hoof, feather, and beak, focusing on the structure-mechanical property-function relationships and finally give some insights on bioinspired composite design based on keratinized materials.

  11. Biodegradation of keratin waste: Theory and practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Korniłłowicz-Kowalska, Teresa; Bohacz, Justyna

    2011-08-01

    Keratin-rich by-products, i.e. bristles, horns and hooves, chicken feathers and similar, are a source of nutrients for animals (amino acids) and plants (N, S). Contemporary developments in the management of keratin waste in feeds and fertilizers comply with human and animal health protection regulations and respect the principles of ecological development. Biotechnological methods employing keratinolytic bacteria and microscopic fungi play a key role in processing keratin waste. This study reviews the current knowledge on the ecology and physiology of keratinolytic microorganisms and presents the biodegradation mechanism of native keratin. The structure and chemical composition of keratin proteins are described, and methods of keratin waste biotransformation into products of practical industrial and natural value, especially composts, are discussed. PMID:21550224

  12. Keratin decomposition by trogid beetles: evidence from a feeding experiment and stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    The decomposition of vertebrate carcasses is an important ecosystem function. Soft tissues of dead vertebrates are rapidly decomposed by diverse animals. However, decomposition of hard tissues such as hairs and feathers is much slower because only a few animals can digest keratin, a protein that is concentrated in hairs and feathers. Although beetles of the family Trogidae are considered keratin feeders, their ecological function has rarely been explored. Here, we investigated the keratin-decomposition function of trogid beetles in heron-breeding colonies where keratin was frequently supplied as feathers. Three trogid species were collected from the colonies and observed feeding on heron feathers under laboratory conditions. We also measured the nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) stable isotope ratios of two trogid species that were maintained on a constant diet (feathers from one heron individual) during 70 days under laboratory conditions. We compared the isotopic signatures of the trogids with the feathers to investigate isotopic shifts from the feathers to the consumers for δ15N and δ13C. We used mixing models (MixSIR and SIAR) to estimate the main diets of individual field-collected trogid beetles. The analysis indicated that heron feathers were more important as food for trogid beetles than were soft tissues under field conditions. Together, the feeding experiment and stable isotope analysis provided strong evidence of keratin decomposition by trogid beetles.

  13. Do feather-degrading bacteria actually degrade feather colour? No significant effects of plumage microbiome modifications on feather colouration in wild great tits.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Staffan; Colmas, Léa; Parthuisot, Nathalie; Heeb, Philipp

    2014-11-01

    Parasites are known to exert selective pressures on host life history traits since the energy and nutrients needed to mount an immune response are no longer available to invest in other functions. Bird feathers harbour numerous microorganisms, some of which are able to degrade feather keratin (keratinolytic microorganisms) and affect feather integrity and colouration in vitro. Although named "feather-degrading" microorganisms, experimental evidence for their effects on feathers of free-living birds is still lacking. Here, we tested whether (i) keratinolytic microorganisms can degrade feathers in vivo and thus modify the colour of feathers during the nesting period and (ii) whether feather microorganisms have a long-term effect on the investment in colouration of newly moulted feathers. We designed treatments to either favour or inhibit bacterial growth, thus experimentally modifying plumage bacterial communities, in a wild breeding population of great tits (Parus major). Our analyses revealed no significant effects of the treatments on feather colours. Moreover, we found that differences in bacterial exposure during nesting did not significantly affect the colouration of newly moulted feathers. Our results suggest that significant feather degradation obtained during in vitro studies could have led to an overestimation of the potential of keratinolytic microorganisms to shape feather colouration in free-living birds. PMID:25228345

  14. Value-added products from chicken feather fiber and protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiuling

    Worldwide poultry consumption has generated a huge amount of feather "waste" annually. Currently, the feather has a low value-being used for animal feed in the world. The quality of fibrous air filters depend on their main component, fibers. The main physical structure of chicken feathers is barbs which can be used directly as fibers. They have small diameter, which makes them a good choice for air filtration. The main chemical structure of chicken feathers is structural fibrous protein, keratin. Therefore, chicken feathers could potentially be used for protein fiber production. To obtain chicken feather fibers, barbs were stripped from the quills by a stripping device and separated with a blender. Some feather fibers were entangled with polyester staple fibers, and needlepunched to form a nonwoven fabric. Some feather fibers were blended with CelBond(TM) bi-component polyester as binder fibers, and pressed between two hot plates to produce thermobonded nonwovens. Whole chicken feathers were ground into powder and their keratin was reduced in water. The reduced keratin was salt precipitated, dried and dissolved in ionic liquid with/without bleach cotton. The reduced chicken feather keratin ionic liquid solutions were spun into regenerated fibers through dry-jet wet spinning. The needlepunched and thermobonded nonwovens were tested for filtration and other properties. With an increase of areal density and feather fiber composition, the air permeability of the needlepunched nonwovens decreased, and their filtration efficiency and pressure drop both increased. The case can be made that feather fibers gave fabrics better filtration at the same fabric weight, but at the expense of air permeability and pressure drop. The scrim and needlepunching process improved the filtration efficiency. Their strength depended on scrim. The hot-press process was very simple. The thermobonded nonwovens had very high air permeability. In them, there was also an inverse relation between

  15. [Water provisions for Muscovy ducks--behaviour at duck showers and modified plasson drinkers].

    PubMed

    Briese, Andreas; Hänsch, Friederike; Hartung, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Feather pecking and cannibalism are serious problems in keeping Moscovy ducks. Prevention of feather pecking by regularly applied beak and claw trimming are increasingly criticised by the public. The recommendation of the Council of Europe (COE) for the keeping of Muscovy ducks in farming systems calls for environmental enrichment including water for preening and bathing after December 31,2010. A total of 126 female Muscovy ducks (not beak nor claw trimmed) from commercial breeding lines were kept for 63 resp. 70 days in four compartments with 15-16 ducks each during two production cycles. Two pens where equipped either with duck showers or open water facility (modified Plasson drinker). Water provisions were made available for the ducks four hours daily at working days from their fifth week of life until slaughter. Behaviour at the water provision was registered and analysed for the number of ducks being engaged with water (944 hours recordings over 59 days from four pens analysed in five-minute-intervals (11,540 observations). Additionally 858 feather preening bouts (five a day for each compartment) were analysed for the duration of feather preening behaviour at the water provision. From the fifth to the tenth week of life the mean percentage of animals of a pen was significantly higher at the open trough (trough: 8,3% (+/-5,37); shower: 4.9% (+/-6.1), Mann-Whitney p <0,01) and feather preening took significantly longer (trough: 134.4 sec (+/-154.8); shower: 111.2 sec (+/-152.0), Mann-Whitney p <0.01) than at the showers. Bout duration and percentage of animals observed at both water provisions increased with age. Nonetheless only ten percent of the feather preening behaviour exceeded five minutes. Most animals made use of water in the first hour of the time period when water was provided. In the first weeks of water provision open water troughs were used more often and preening behaviour was longer. When given the choice, younger ducks preferred open drinkers to

  16. Feathered Dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norell, Mark A.; Xu, Xing

    2005-01-01

    Recent fossil discoveries from Early Cretaceous rocks of Liaoning Province, China, have provided a wealth of spectacular specimens. Included in these are the remains of several different kinds of small theropod dinosaurs, many of which are extremely closely related to modern birds. Unique preservation conditions allowed soft tissues of some of these specimens to be preserved. Many dinosaur specimens that preserve feathers and other types of integumentary coverings have been recovered. These fossils show a progression of integumentary types from simple fibers to feathers of modern aspect. The distribution of these features on the bodies of these animals is surprising in that some show large tail plumes, whereas others show the presence of wing-like structures on both fore and hind limbs. The phylogenetic distribution of feather types is highly congruent with models of feather evolution developed from developmental biology.

  17. Flexural stiffness of feather shafts: geometry rules over material properties.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Thomas; Emmerlich, Jens; Baumgartner, Werner; Schneider, Jochen M; Wagner, Hermann

    2012-02-01

    Flight feathers of birds interact with the flow field during flight. They bend and twist under aerodynamic loads. Two parameters are mainly responsible for flexibility in feathers: the elastic modulus (Young's modulus, E) of the material (keratin) and the geometry of the rachises, more precisely the second moment of area (I). Two independent methods were employed to determine Young's modulus of feather rachis keratin. Moreover, the second moment of area and the bending stiffness of feather shafts from fifth primaries of barn owls (Tyto alba) and pigeons (Columba livia) were calculated. These species of birds are of comparable body mass but differ in wing size and flight style. Whether their feather material (keratin) underwent an adaptation in stiffness was previously unknown. This study shows that no significant variation in Young's modulus between the two species exists. However, differences in Young's modulus between proximal and distal feather regions were found in both species. Cross-sections of pigeon rachises were particularly well developed and rich in structural elements, exemplified by dorsal ridges and a well-pronounced transversal septum. In contrast, cross-sections of barn owl rachises were less profiled but had a higher second moment of area. Consequently, the calculated bending stiffness (EI) was higher in barn owls as well. The results show that flexural stiffness is predominantly influenced by the geometry of the feathers rather than by local material properties. PMID:22246249

  18. Embryonal feather growth in the chicken

    PubMed Central

    MEYER, WILFRIED; BAUMGÄRTNER, GEORG

    1998-01-01

    Prenatal feather growth development in the chicken was studied in 7 body regions in HH stages 27–45, using direct measurements, specific histological and immunohistochemical methods, and scanning electron microscopy. The results from measurements of absolute length values, and, particularly, growth rate development in each HH stage revealed a distinct phase of most intensive growth in HH stage 40–41, which was preceded by feather follicle insertion and accompanied by the occurrence of α-keratins in barbule cells. Specific regional evaluation demonstrated that growth in the feather follicles of abdominal skin generally showed the slowest progression from absolute values and that in the feather filaments of the developing wings the most rapid progression occurred during HH stage 40–41 from growth rate values. PMID:10029194

  19. Keratins and skin disease.

    PubMed

    Knöbel, Maria; O'Toole, Edel A; Smith, Frances J D

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in keratin genes cause a diverse spectrum of skin, hair and mucosal disorders. Cutaneous disorders include epidermolysis bullosa simplex, palmoplantar keratoderma, epidermolytic ichthyosis and pachyonychia congenita. Both clinical and laboratory observations confirm a major role for keratins in maintaining epidermal cell-cell adhesion. When normal tissue homeostasis is disturbed, for example, during wound healing and cancer, keratins play an important non-mechanical role. Post-translational modifications including glycosylation and phosphorylation of keratins play an important role in protection of epithelial cells from injury. Keratins also play a role in modulation of the immune response. A current focus in the area of keratins and disease is the development of new treatments including small inhibitory RNA (siRNA) to mutant keratins and small molecules to modulate keratin expression. PMID:25620412

  20. Nocardiopsis sp. SD5: a potent feather degrading rare actinobacterium isolated from feather waste in Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subhasish; Dhanasekaran, D; Shanmugapriya, S; Latha, S

    2013-07-01

    Feather waste, generated in large quantities as a byproduct of commercial poultry processing, is nearly pure keratin protein, and keratin in its native state is not degradable by common proteolytic enzymes. The aim of the study was to find a potent feather degrading actinobacteria from feather waste soil. Out of 91 actinobacterial isolates recorded from feather waste soil in Tiruchirappalli and Nammakkal District, Tamil Nadu, India, isolate SD5 was selected for characterization because it exhibited significant keratinolytic activity. On the basis of the phenotypic, biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA gene-sequencing studies, the isolate was identified as Nocardiopsis sp. SD5. Protease and keratinase activity of Nocardiopsis sp. SD5 were analyzed. The enzyme was more stable over the neutral pH and the temperature of 40 °C. The optimum temperature and pH for both proteolytic and keratinolytic activity was determined at 50 °C and pH 9, respectively. Enzyme inhibitors, detergents and chelator declined the enzyme activity with increasing concentration. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and zymogram elucidated the presence of 30 and 60 kDa protease enzymes. These findings indicated that thermo alkaliphilic feather degrading strain Nocardiopsis sp. SD5 could be used to control the feather waste pollution and to convert keratin rich feather waste into useful feedstock for poultry industry. PMID:23864545

  1. Nocardiopsis sp. SD5: A potent feather degrading rare actinobacterium isolated from feather waste in Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subhasish; Dhanasekaran, D; Shanmugapriya, S; Latha, S

    2012-08-23

    Feather waste, generated in large quantities as a byproduct of commercial poultry processing, is nearly pure keratin protein, and keratin in its native state is not degradable by common proteolytic enzymes. The aim of the study was to find a potent feather degrading actinobacteria from feather waste soil. Out of 91 actinobacterial isolates recorded from feather waste soil in Tiruchirappalli and Nammakkal District, Tamil Nadu, India, isolate SD5 was selected for characterization because it exhibited significant keratinolytic activity. On the basis of the phenotypic, biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA gene-sequencing studies, the isolate was identified as Nocardiopsis sp. SD5. Protease and keratinase activity of Nocardiopsis sp. SD5 were analyzed. The enzyme was more stable over the neutral pH and the temperature of 40 °C. The optimum temperature and pH for both proteolytic and keratinolytic activity was determined at 50 °C and pH 9, respectively. Enzyme inhibitors, detergents and chelator declined the enzyme activity with increasing concentration. Non denaturing poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis and zymogram elucidated the presence of 30 kda and 60 kda protease enzymes. These findings indicated that thermo alkaliphilic feather degrading strain Nocardiopsis sp. SD5 could be used to control the feather waste pollution and to convert keratin rich feather waste into useful feedstock for poultry industry. (© 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim). PMID:22914902

  2. Keratinization and its Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Shibani

    2012-01-01

    Keratins are a diverse group of structural proteins that form the intermediate filament network responsible for maintaining the structural integrity of keratinocytes. In humans, there are around 30 keratin families divided into two groups, namely, acidic and basic keratins, which are arranged in pairs. They are expressed in a highly specific pattern related to the epithelial type and stage of cellular differentiation. A total of 54 functional genes exist which codes for these keratin families. The expression of specific keratin genes is regulated by the differentiation of epithelial cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Mutations in most of these genes are now associated with specific tissue fragility disorders which may manifest both in skin and mucosa depending on the expression pattern. The keratins and keratin-associated proteins are useful as differentiation markers because their expression is both region specific and differentiation specific. Antibodies to keratin are considered as important tissue differentiation markers and therefore are an integral aid in diagnostic pathology. The present review discusses the structure of keratin, the various types of keratin and their distribution and the disorders associated with keratinization with special emphasis on the disorders of the oral cavity. A brief note on the clinical significance of keratin is also mentioned. PMID:23074543

  3. Mercury concentrations in feathers of marine birds in Arctic Canada.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Mark L; Braune, Birgit M; Provencher, Jennifer F; Callaghan, D Benjamin; Gilchrist, H Grant; Edmonds, Samuel T; Allard, Karel; O'Driscoll, Nelson J

    2015-09-15

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations are a concern in the Canadian Arctic, because they are relatively high compared to background levels and to similar species farther south, and are increasing in many wildlife species. Among marine birds breeding in the Canadian Arctic, Hg concentrations have been monitored regularly in eggs and intermittently in livers, but feathers have generally not been used as an indicator of Hg exposure or burden. We examined Hg concentrations in six marine bird species in the Canadian Arctic. Ivory gull Pagophila eburnea, feather Hg was exceptionally high, while glaucous gull Larus hyperboreus feather Hg was unexpectedly low, and ratios of feather THg to egg THg varied across species. The proportion of total Hg that was comprised of methyl Hg in ivory gull feathers was lower than in other species, and may be related to photo-demethylation or keratin breakdown in semi-opaque feather tissue. PMID:26130527

  4. A photonic heterostructure produces diverse iridescent colours in duck wing patches

    PubMed Central

    Eliason, Chad M.; Shawkey, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    The colours of birds are diverse but limited relative to the colours they can perceive. This mismatch may be partially caused by the properties of their colour-production mechanisms. Aside from pigments, several classes of highly ordered nanostructures (thin films, amorphous three-dimensional arrays) can produce a range of colours. However, the variability of any single nanostructural class has rarely been explored. Dabbling ducks are a speciose clade with substantial interspecific variation in the iridescent coloration of their wing patches (specula). Here, we use electron microscopy, spectrophotometry, polarization and refractive index-matching experiments, and optical modelling to examine these colours. We show that, in all species examined, speculum colour is produced by a photonic heterostructure consisting of both a single thin-film of keratin and a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of melanosomes in feather barbules. Although the range of possible variations of this heterostructure is theoretically broad, only relatively close-packed, energetically stable variants producing more saturated colours were observed, suggesting that ducks are either physically constrained to these configurations or are under selection for the colours that they produce. These data thus reveal a previously undescribed biophotonic structure and suggest that both physical variability and constraints within single nanostructural classes may help explain the broader patterns of colour across Aves. PMID:22491981

  5. A photonic heterostructure produces diverse iridescent colours in duck wing patches.

    PubMed

    Eliason, Chad M; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2012-09-01

    The colours of birds are diverse but limited relative to the colours they can perceive. This mismatch may be partially caused by the properties of their colour-production mechanisms. Aside from pigments, several classes of highly ordered nanostructures (thin films, amorphous three-dimensional arrays) can produce a range of colours. However, the variability of any single nanostructural class has rarely been explored. Dabbling ducks are a speciose clade with substantial interspecific variation in the iridescent coloration of their wing patches (specula). Here, we use electron microscopy, spectrophotometry, polarization and refractive index-matching experiments, and optical modelling to examine these colours. We show that, in all species examined, speculum colour is produced by a photonic heterostructure consisting of both a single thin-film of keratin and a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of melanosomes in feather barbules. Although the range of possible variations of this heterostructure is theoretically broad, only relatively close-packed, energetically stable variants producing more saturated colours were observed, suggesting that ducks are either physically constrained to these configurations or are under selection for the colours that they produce. These data thus reveal a previously undescribed biophotonic structure and suggest that both physical variability and constraints within single nanostructural classes may help explain the broader patterns of colour across Aves. PMID:22491981

  6. Feather regeneration as a model for organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Wideliz, Randall B; Yue, Zhicao; Li, Ang; Wu, Xiaoshan; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Wu, Ping; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    In the process of organogenesis, different cell types form organized tissues and tissues are integrated into an organ. Most organs form in the developmental stage, but new organs can also form in physiological states or following injuries during adulthood. Feathers are a good model to study post-natal organogenesis because they regenerate episodically under physiological conditions and in response to injuries such as plucking. Epidermal stem cells in the collar can respond to activation signals. Dermal papilla located at the follicle base controls the regenerative process. Adhesion molecules (e.g., NCAM, tenascin), morphogens (e.g., Wnt3a, sprouty, FGF10), and differentiation markers (e.g., keratins) are expressed dynamically in initiation, growth and resting phases of the feather cycle. Epidermal cells are shaped into different feather morphologies based on the molecular micro-environment at the moment of morphogenesis. Chicken feather variants provide a rich resource for us to identify genetic determinants involved in feather regeneration and morphogenesis. An example of using genome-wide SNP analysis to identify alpha keratin 75 as the mutation in frizzled chickens is demonstrated. Due to its accessibility to experimental manipulation and observation, results of regeneration can be analyzed in a comprehensive way. The layout of time dimension along the distal (formed earlier) - proximal (formed later) feather axis makes the morphological analyses easier. Therefore feather regeneration can be a unique model for understanding organogenesis: from activation of stems cell under various physiological conditions to serving as the Rosetta stone for deciphering the language of morphogenesis. PMID:23294361

  7. Feather regeneration as a model for organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Wideliz, Randall B; Yue, Zhicao; Li, Ang; Wu, Xiaoshan; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Wu, Ping; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    In the process of organogenesis, different cell types form organized tissues and tissues are integrated into an organ. Most organs form in the developmental stage, but new organs can also form in physiological states or following injuries during adulthood. Feathers are a good model to study post-natal organogenesis because they regenerate episodically under physiological conditions and in response to injuries such as plucking. Epidermal stem cells in the collar can respond to activation signals. Dermal papilla located at the follicle base controls the regenerative process. Adhesion molecules (e.g., neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), tenascin), morphogens (e.g., Wnt3a, sprouty, fibroblast growth factor [FGF]10), and differentiation markers (e.g., keratins) are expressed dynamically in initiation, growth and resting phases of the feather cycle. Epidermal cells are shaped into different feather morphologies based on the molecular micro-environment at the moment of morphogenesis. Chicken feather variants provide a rich resource for us to identify genetic determinants involved in feather regeneration and morphogenesis. An example of using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis to identify alpha keratin 75 as the mutation in frizzled chickens is demonstrated. Due to its accessibility to experimental manipulation and observation, results of regeneration can be analyzed in a comprehensive way. The layout of time dimension along the distal (formed earlier) to proximal (formed later) feather axis makes the morphological analyses easier. Therefore feather regeneration can be a unique model for understanding organogenesis: from activation of stem cells under various physiological conditions to serving as the Rosetta stone for deciphering the language of morphogenesis. PMID:23294361

  8. Plasma treatment induced wetting transitions on biological tissue (pigeon feathers).

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Grynyov, Roman

    2012-04-01

    We report first the wetting transition from superhydrophobicity to superhydrophilicity observed on nitrogen and air plasma irradiated biological tissue (pigeon feathers). Non-irradiated feathers demonstrate pronounced Cassie-Baxter ("fakir") wetting characterized by high apparent contact angles and low sliding angles. Plasma-irradiated feathers are superhydrophilic. Plasma treatment does not affect the barbs/barbules keratin-built network constituting pigeon pennae, but it changes the Young, advancing and receding angles of the tissue. The mechanism of wetting transition is discussed. PMID:22221456

  9. Microsporum fulvum IBRL SD3: as novel isolate for chicken feathers degradation.

    PubMed

    Darah, I; Nur-Diyana, A; Nurul-Husna, S; Jain, K; Lim, Sheh-Hong

    2013-12-01

    Keratinous wastes have increasingly become a problem and accumulate in the environment mainly in the form of feathers, generated mainly from a large number of poultry industries. As keratins are very difficult to degrade by general proteases, they pose a major environmental problem. Therefore, microorganisms which would effectively degrade keratins are needed for recycling such wastes. A geophilic dermatophyte, Microsporum fulvum IBRL SD3 which was isolated from a soil sample collected from a chicken feather dumping site using a baiting technique, was capable to produce keratinase significantly. The crude keratinase was able to degrade whole chicken feathers effectively. The end product of the degradation was protein that contained essential amino acids and may have potential application in animal feed production. Thus, M. fulvum could be a novel organism to produce keratinase for chicken feathers degradation. PMID:24013862

  10. Effects of radio packages on wild ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmer, D.S.; Ball, I.J.; Cowardin, L.M.; Riechmann, J.H.

    1974-01-01

    A total of 211 wild, free-flying mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and wood ducks (Aix sponsa) were equipped with breast-mounted radio packages during the breeding seasons of 1968-72. Known predation loss was 7.6 and 12.0 percent for mallards and wood ducks respectively, 60 percent occurred within 3 weeks of instrumentation. The highest predation rate for mallards was 0.0048 kills per tracking day and 0.0136 for wood ducks. A higher direct recovery rate for instrumented birds (19.5 percent) than noninstrumented birds (8.1 percent) was probably due to the novelty of the transmitter to hunters. Departure patterns and locations of direct recoveries were similar between radio-equipped and normal-banded birds. Among female wood ducks with radios, recovery rates were lower than expected. Hunters indicated that 84 percent of the instrumented ducks recovered were in good or excellent condition. Recaptures of ducks as long as 1 year after being equipped with radio packages indicated that feather wear and skin abrasion were not serious. A high rate for feeding on land by instrumented mallards was probably due to our ability to more easily locate and observe these birds in cover. Preening rates were higher for instrumented ducks. As the birds became adjusted to the package, preening decreased and feeding on water increased. Social and breeding behavior of instrumented ducks did not appear to be adversely affected by the radio package.

  11. Characterizing wool keratin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Keratin from wool is a reactive, biocompatible, and biodegradable material. Efficient alkaline extractions gave yields of 68% to 82% protein within 2 to 5 hours of exposure at 65 ºC. The water soluble keratin preparations contained intermediate filament and microfibrillar component-proteins of fra...

  12. Despotic Ducks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Randi A.

    2008-01-01

    This field experiment is designed to test for despotic behavior in Mallards ("Anas platyrhynchos"), and to examine how ducks distribute themselves relative to their resources. Students present Mallards with food patches differing in profitability in order to examine whether ducks distribute themselves ideal freely or ideal despotically. Students…

  13. Iridescence in the neck feathers of domestic pigeons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Haiwei; Shi, Lei; Sha, Jing; Li, Yizhou; Qin, Youhua; Dong, Biqin; Meyer, Serge; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhao, Li; Zi, Jian

    2006-11-01

    We conducted structural characterizations, reflection measurements, and theoretical simulations on the iridescent green and purple neck feathers of domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica). We found that both green and purple barbules are composed of an outer keratin cortex layer surrounding a medullary layer. The thickness of the keratin cortex layer shows a distinct difference between green and purple barbules. Green barbules vary colors from green to purple with the observing angle changed from normal to oblique, while purple barbules from purple to green in an opposite way. Both the experimental and theoretical results suggest that structural colors in green and purple neck feathers should originate from the interference in the top keratin cortex layer, while the structure beyond acts as a poor mirror.

  14. Melanin-based color of plumage: role of condition and of feathers' microstructure.

    PubMed

    D'Alba, Liliana; Van Hemert, Caroline; Spencer, Karen A; Heidinger, Britt J; Gill, Lisa; Evans, Neil P; Monaghan, Pat; Handel, Colleen M; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    Whether melanin-based colors honestly signal a bird's condition during the growth of feathers is controversial, and it is unclear if, or how, the physiological processes underlying melanogenesis or the role of the microstructure of feathers in imparting structural color to feathers may be adversely affected by condition. Here, we report results from two experiments designed to measure the effect of condition on expression of eumelanic and pheomelanic coloration in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) and zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), respectively. In chickadees, we compared feathers of birds affected and unaffected by avian keratin disorder, whereas in zebra finches we compared feathers of controls with feathers of those subjected to an unpredictable food supply during development. In both cases, we found that control birds had brighter feathers (higher total reflectance) and more barbules, but similar densities of melanosomes. In addition, the microstructure of the feathers explained variation in color more strongly than did melanosome density. Together, these results suggest that melanin-based coloration may in part be condition-dependent, but that this may be driven by changes in keratin and feather development, rather than melanogenesis itself. Researchers should be cautious when assigning variation in melanin-based color to melanin alone and microstructure of the feather should be taken into account. PMID:24987010

  15. Eggshell bacterial load is related to antimicrobial properties of feathers lining barn swallow nests.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Soler, Juan José; Martín-Platero, Antonio Manuel; Knight, Rob; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Møller, Anders Pape

    2014-02-01

    The use of feathers to line bird's nests has traditionally been interpreted as having a thermoregulatory function. Feather-degrading bacteria growing on feathers lining nests may have antimicrobial properties, which may provide an additional benefit to lining nests with feathers. We test the hypothesis that the production of antimicrobial substances by feather bacteria affects the microbiological environment of the nest, and therefore the bacterial density on eggshells and, indirectly, hatching success. These effects would be expected to differ between nests lined with pigmented and white feathers, because bacteria grow differently on feathers of different colors. We experimentally manipulated the composition of pigmented and unpigmented feathers in nests of the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) and studied the antimicrobial properties against the keratin-degrading bacterium Bacillus licheniformis of bacteria isolated from feathers of each color. Analyzed feathers were collected at the end of the incubation period, and antimicrobial activity was defined as the proportion of bacteria from the feathers that produce antibacterial substances effective against B. licheniformis. Our experimental manipulation affected antimicrobial activity, which was higher in nests with only white feathers at the beginning of incubation. Moreover, white feathers showed higher antimicrobial activity than black ones. Interestingly, antimicrobial activity in feathers of one of the colors correlated negatively with bacterial density on feather of the opposite color. Finally, antimicrobial activity of white feathers was negatively related to eggshell bacterial load. These results suggest that antimicrobial properties of feathers in general and of white feathers in particular affect the bacterial environment in nests. This environment in turn affects the bacterial load on eggshells, which may affect hatching success. PMID:24317898

  16. Melanosomes or Microbes: Testing an Alternative Hypothesis for the Origin of Microbodies in Fossil Feathers

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Alison E.; Zheng, Wenxia; Johnson, Elizabeth A.; Lamanna, Matthew C.; Li, Da-qing; Lacovara, Kenneth J.; Schweitzer, Mary H.

    2014-01-01

    Microbodies associated with fossil feathers, originally attributed to microbial biofilm, have been reinterpreted as melanosomes: pigment-containing, eukaryotic organelles. This interpretation generated hypotheses regarding coloration in non-avian and avian dinosaurs. Because melanosomes and microbes overlap in size, distribution and morphology, we re-evaluate both hypotheses. We compare melanosomes within feathers of extant chickens with patterns induced by microbial overgrowth on the same feathers, using scanning (SEM), field emission (FESEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. Melanosomes are always internal, embedded in a morphologically distinct keratinous matrix. Conversely, microbes grow across the surface of feathers in continuous layers, more consistent with published images from fossil feathers. We compare our results to both published literature and new data from a fossil feather ascribed to Gansus yumenensis (ANSP 23403). ‘Mouldic impressions’ were observed in association with both the feather and sediment grains, supporting a microbial origin. We propose criteria for distinguishing between these two microbodies. PMID:24595214

  17. Melanosomes or Microbes: Testing an Alternative Hypothesis for the Origin of Microbodies in Fossil Feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Alison E.; Zheng, Wenxia; Johnson, Elizabeth A.; Lamanna, Matthew C.; Li, Da-Qing; Lacovara, Kenneth J.; Schweitzer, Mary H.

    2014-03-01

    Microbodies associated with fossil feathers, originally attributed to microbial biofilm, have been reinterpreted as melanosomes: pigment-containing, eukaryotic organelles. This interpretation generated hypotheses regarding coloration in non-avian and avian dinosaurs. Because melanosomes and microbes overlap in size, distribution and morphology, we re-evaluate both hypotheses. We compare melanosomes within feathers of extant chickens with patterns induced by microbial overgrowth on the same feathers, using scanning (SEM), field emission (FESEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. Melanosomes are always internal, embedded in a morphologically distinct keratinous matrix. Conversely, microbes grow across the surface of feathers in continuous layers, more consistent with published images from fossil feathers. We compare our results to both published literature and new data from a fossil feather ascribed to Gansus yumenensis (ANSP 23403). `Mouldic impressions' were observed in association with both the feather and sediment grains, supporting a microbial origin. We propose criteria for distinguishing between these two microbodies.

  18. Arsenic species in poultry feather meal.

    PubMed

    Nachman, K E; Raber, G; Francesconi, K A; Navas-Acien, A; Love, D C

    2012-02-15

    Organoarsenical drugs are widely used in the production of broiler chickens in the United States. Feathers from these chickens are processed into a meal product that is used as an animal feed additive and as an organic fertilizer. Research conducted to date suggests that arsenical drugs, specifically roxarsone, used in poultry production result in the accumulation of arsenic in the keratinous material of poultry feathers. The use of feather meal product in the human food system and in other settings may result in human exposures to arsenic. Consequently, the presence and nature of arsenic in twelve samples of feather meal product from six US states and China were examined. Since arsenic toxicity is highly species-dependent, speciation analysis using HPLC/ICPMS was performed to determine the biological relevance of detected arsenic. Arsenic was detected in all samples (44-4100 μg kg(-1)) and speciation analyses revealed that inorganic forms of arsenic dominated, representing 37 - 83% of total arsenic. Roxarsone was not detected in the samples (<20 μg As kg(-1)). Feather meal products represent a previously unrecognized source of arsenic in the food system, and may pose additional risks to humans as a result of its use as an organic fertilizer and when animal waste is managed. PMID:22244353

  19. Keratin expression in cervical cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Smedts, F.; Ramaekers, F.; Troyanovsky, S.; Pruszczynski, M.; Link, M.; Lane, B.; Leigh, I.; Schijf, C.; Vooijs, P.

    1992-01-01

    Using a panel of 21 monoclonal and 2 polyclonal keratin antibodies, capable of detecting separately 11 subtypes of their epithelial intermediate filament proteins at the single cell level, we investigated keratin expression in 16 squamous cell carcinomas, 9 adenocarcinomas, and 3 adenosquamous carcinomas of the human uterine cervix. The keratin phenotype of the keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma was found to be most complex comprising keratins 4, 5, 6, 8, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, and usually keratin 10. The nonkeratinizing variety of the squamous cell carcinoma expressed keratins 6, 14, 17, and 19 in all cases, usually 4, 5, 7, 8, and 18, and sometimes keratins 10, 13, and 16. Adenocarcinomas displayed a less complex keratin expression pattern comprising keratins 7, 8, 17, 18, and 19, while keratin 14 was often present and keratins 4, 5, 10 and 13 were sporadically found in individual cells in a few cases. These keratin phenotypes may be useful in differential diagnostic considerations when distinguishing between keratinizing and nonkeratinizing carcinomas (using keratin 10, 13, and 16 antibodies), and also in the distinction between nonkeratinizing carcinomas and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, which do not express keratins 5 and 6. Keratin 17 may also be useful in distinguishing carcinomas of the cervix from those of the colon and also from mesotheliomas. Furthermore the presence of keratin 17 in a CIN I, II, or III lesion may indicate progressive potential while its absence could be indicative of a regressive behavior. Because most carcinomas express keratins 8, 14, 17, 18, and 19, we propose that this expression pattern reflects the origin of cervical cancer from a common progenitor cell, i.e., the endocervical reserve cell that has been shown to express keratins 5, 8, 14, 17, 18, and 19. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1379783

  20. Avian skin development and the evolutionary origin of feathers.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Roger H; Knapp, Loren W

    2003-08-15

    The discovery of several dinosaurs with filamentous integumentary appendages of different morphologies has stimulated models for the evolutionary origin of feathers. In order to understand these models, knowledge of the development of the avian integument must be put into an evolutionary context. Thus, we present a review of avian scale and feather development, which summarizes the morphogenetic events involved, as well as the expression of the beta (beta) keratin multigene family that characterizes the epidermal appendages of reptiles and birds. First we review information on the evolution of the ectodermal epidermis and its beta (beta) keratins. Then we examine the morphogenesis of scutate scales and feathers including studies in which the extraembryonic ectoderm of the chorion is used to examine dermal induction. We also present studies on the scaleless (sc) mutant, and, because of the recent discovery of "four-winged" dinosaurs, we review earlier studies of a chicken strain, Silkie, that expresses ptilopody (pti), "feathered feet." We conclude that the ability of the ectodermal epidermis to generate discrete cell populations capable of forming functional structural elements consisting of specific members of the beta keratin multigene family was a plesiomorphic feature of the archosaurian ancestor of crocodilians and birds. Evidence suggests that the discrete epidermal lineages that make up the embryonic feather filament of extant birds are homologous with similar embryonic lineages of the developing scutate scales of birds and the scales of alligators. We believe that the early expression of conserved signaling modules in the embryonic skin of the avian ancestor led to the early morphogenesis of the embryonic feather filament, with its periderm, sheath, and barb ridge lineages forming the first protofeather. Invagination of the epidermis of the protofeather led to formation of the follicle providing for feather renewal and diversification. The observations that

  1. Melanin-based color of plumage: role of condition and of feathers' microstructure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Alba, Liliana; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Spencer, Karen A.; Heidinger, Britt J.; Gill, Lisa; Evans, Neil P.; Monaghan, Pat; Handel, Colleen M.; Shawkey, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Whether melanin-based colors honestly signal a bird's condition during the growth of feathers is controversial, and it is unclear if or how the physiological processes underlying melanogenesis or color-imparting structural feather microstructure may be adversely affected by condition. Here we report results from two experiments designed to measure the effect of condition on expression of eumelanic and pheomelanic coloration in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) and zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), respectively. In chickadees, we compared feathers of birds affected and unaffected by avian keratin disorder, while in zebra finches we compared feathers of controls with feathers of those subjected to an unpredictable food supply during development. In both cases we found that control birds had brighter feathers (higher total reflectance) and more barbules, but similar densities of melanosomes. In addition, the microstructure of the feathers explained variation in color more strongly than did melanosome density. Together, these results suggest that melanin-based coloration may in part be condition-dependent, but that this may be driven by changes in keratin and feather development, rather than melanogenesis itself. Researchers should be cautious when assigning variation in melanin-based color to melanin alone and microstructure of the feather should be taken into account.

  2. Rapid Evolution of Beta-Keratin Genes Contribute to Phenotypic Differences That Distinguish Turtles and Birds from Other Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang I.; Kong, Lesheng; Ponting, Chris P.; Haerty, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Sequencing of vertebrate genomes permits changes in distinct protein families, including gene gains and losses, to be ascribed to lineage-specific phenotypes. A prominent example of this is the large-scale duplication of beta-keratin genes in the ancestors of birds, which was crucial to the subsequent evolution of their beaks, claws, and feathers. Evidence suggests that the shell of Pseudomys nelsoni contains at least 16 beta-keratins proteins, but it is unknown whether this is a complete set and whether their corresponding genes are orthologous to avian beak, claw, or feather beta-keratin genes. To address these issues and to better understand the evolution of the turtle shell at a molecular level, we surveyed the diversity of beta-keratin genes from the genome assemblies of three turtles, Chrysemys picta, Pelodiscus sinensis, and Chelonia mydas, which together represent over 160 Myr of chelonian evolution. For these three turtles, we found 200 beta-keratins, which indicate that, as for birds, a large expansion of beta-keratin genes in turtles occurred concomitantly with the evolution of a unique phenotype, namely, their plastron and carapace. Phylogenetic reconstruction of beta-keratin gene evolution suggests that separate waves of gene duplication within a single genomic location gave rise to scales, claws, and feathers in birds, and independently the scutes of the shell in turtles. PMID:23576313

  3. Multitrait plant growth promoting (PGP) rhizobacterial isolates from Brassica juncea rhizosphere : Keratin degradation and growth promotion.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mohmmad Shahbaz; Siddique, Mohammad Tahir; Verma, Amit; Rao, Yalaga Rama; Nailwal, Tapan; Ansari, Mohammad; Pande, Veena

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth promoting (PGP) rhizobacteria, a beneficial microbe colonizing plant roots, enhanced crop productivity and offers an attractive way to replace chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and supplements. The keratinous waste which comprises feathers, hairs, nails, skin and wool creates problem of solid waste management due to presence of highly recalcitrant keratin. The multi traits rhizobacteria effective to remove both keratine from the environment by producing keratinase enzyme and to eradicate the chemical fertilizer by providing different PGP activity is novel achievement. In the present study, the effective PM2 strain of PGPR was isolated from rhizospheric soil of mustard (Brassica juncea) field, Pantnagar and they were identified on the basis of different biochemical tests as belonging to Bacillus genera. Different plant growth promoting activity, feather degradation and keratinolytic activity was performed and found very effective toward all the parameters. Furthermore, the efficient strain PM2 was identified on the basis of 16s rRNA sequencing and confirmed as Bacillus cereus. The strain PM2 might be used efficiently for keratinous waste management and PGP activity. Therefore, the present study suggests that Bacillus cereus have multi traits activity which extremely useful for different PGP activity and biotechnological process involving keratin hydrolysis, feather biodegradation or in the leather industry. PMID:24778758

  4. Concentration of trace elements in feathers of waterfowl, Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsoo; Oh, Jong-Min

    2014-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) were analyzed in the breast feather of white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons, n = 15), mallards (Anas platyrhynchos, n = 4), and spot-billed ducks (Anas poecilorhyncha, n = 13) found dead in Gimpo, Korea. All of the mallards and eight of the 13 spot-billed ducks had embedded shot. Concentrations of Pb, Cr, Cu, Mn, Zn, and Fe were significantly different among waterfowl species. Mallards with embedded shot had relatively higher Pb, Cr, Mn, and Fe concentrations than the other species. Cd and Cr in feathers of waterfowl species were within the range reported for other birds, and no specimen exceeded the tentative threshold effect levels of Cd (2 μg/g dry weight (dw)) and Cr (2.8 μg/g dw) for birds. However, Pb in feathers of all four mallards and two spot-billed ducks exceeded the threshold for deleterious effects (>4 μg/g dw). Essential elements such as Cu, Mn, Zn, and Fe in the feather of waterfowl species were not at toxic levels and within the background or normal range for the homeostatic mechanisms. PMID:25208517

  5. MICROCRYSTALLINE KERATIN FIBER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biopolymers compose the morphological structures generated in all living organisms. The macroscopic physical properties of biopolymers like keratin are due to molecular level structure and micorcrystallinity, the self-consistent packing arrays of molecular order within a defined space. Fiber proce...

  6. Keratins Are Going Nuclear.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Ryan P; Jacob, Justin T; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2016-08-01

    Previously thought to reside exclusively in the cytoplasm, the cytoskeletal protein keratin 17 (K17) has been recently identified inside the nucleus of tumor epithelial cells with a direct impact on cell proliferation and gene expression. We comment on fundamental questions raised by this new finding and the associated significance. PMID:27505414

  7. A closer look at the feather coloration in the male purple sunbird, Nectarinia asiatica.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Biswa Bhusana; Marathe, Sandhya Amol; Meyer-Rochow, Victor Benno; Mishra, Monalisa

    2016-06-01

    During the breeding season male, but not female, individuals of the purple sunbird possess colourful plumage of chiefly blue and black coloration with a splatter of orange and yellow on the chest. Representative feathers of these colours were collected from male birds during the breeding season and analyzed by reflectance and scanning electron microscopy. The rachis, which is the central support of a feather on which various barbs and barbules are arranged, is spongy and made up of keratin layers with rod-shaped melanosomes sparsely distributed within these layers. Barbs and barbules are the structural units of the feather and depending on how they are arranged provide a characteristic shape to the feather. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) analyses of the feathers revealed the presence of various metal elements that might contribute to the feathers' colorations. Blue feathers are iridescent and contain mainly iron, copper, zinc and cobalt (in that order of abundance); black feathers were also found to contain mainly iron and copper, but chromium instead of zinc and cobalt, while yellow feathers were found to contain predominantly cobalt and nickel. The metal content of the feathers in an as yet unknown way may be involved in the production of the distinct absorbance and reflectance patterns that the brilliant plumage of the purple sunbird is renowned for. PMID:27088228

  8. Bacterial community profiles on feathers during composting as determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rDNA genes.

    PubMed

    Tiquia, S M; Ichida, J M; Keener, H M; Elwell, D L; Burtt, E H; Michel, F C

    2005-05-01

    Composting is one of the more economical and environmentally safe methods of recycling feather waste generated by the poultry industry, since 90% of the feather weight consists of crude keratin protein, and feathers contain 15% N. However, the keratin in waste feathers is resistant to biodegradation and may require the addition of bacterial inocula to enhance the degradation process during composting. Two keratin-degrading bacteria isolated from plumage of wild songbirds and identified as Bacillus licheneformis (OWU 1411T) and Streptomyces sp. (OWU 1441) were inoculated into poultry feather composts (1.13 x 10(8) cfu g(-1) feathers) and co-composted with poultry litter and straw in 200-l compost vessels. Composting temperatures, as well as CO(2) and NH(3) evolution, were measured in these vessels to determine the effects of inoculation on the rate and extent of poultry feather decomposition during composting. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms of 16S rRNA genes were used to follow changes in microbial community structure during composting. The results indicated that extensive carbon conversion occurred in both treatments (55.5 and 56.1%). The addition of the bacterial inocula did not enhance the rate of waste feather composting. The microbial community structure over time was very similar in inoculated and uninoculated waste feather composts. PMID:15614566

  9. Ducks Overboard!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiland, Ingrid; Sheffield, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The authors open this article with a description of an incident that happened in 1992, when 28,800 rubber bath toys (i.e., ducks, frogs, turtles, and beavers) fell off a cargo ship in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. In 2009, these rubber bath toys were still washing ashore on beaches all around the world. This science instruction can be used with…

  10. Preferential utilization and colonization of keratin baits by different myco-keratinophiles.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Sandeep; Sumbali, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Myco-keratinophilic species have a predilection for different keratinous substrates but show variability in their affinity towards them. Keeping this in view, a survey was conducted in the Khardung and Khardung La soils of Ladakh (India) and 28 myco-keratinophilic species belonging to 15 fungal genera (Sarocladium, Aspergillus, Beauveria, Chrysosporium, Cladosporium, Alternaria, Epicoccum, Fusarium, Gibberella, Clonostachys, Paecilomyces, Purpureocillium, Metarhizium, Penicillium and Sagenomella) were isolated by using keratin bait technique. These isolated species were tested for their preferential utilization ability and colonization on different baits by morphological assessment. Different types of keratin baits used were feathers, human hair, human nails and wool. Overall assessment revealed that feathers were colonized and utilized by all the species (100 %), followed in decreasing order by nails (89.29 %), hair (85.71 %) and sheep wool (67.86 %). So, it is concluded that feather baiting technique, could be more useful in trapping keratinophilic fungi than the hair baiting technique which is till date regarded as the best method for the isolation of myco-keratinophiles. On the basis of succession on keratinous baits, the recovered keratinophilic species were also categorized into four categories: early successional species (pioneer colonizers), late successional species (final colonizers), persistent species and no-pattern species. PMID:27516942

  11. Differences in cytocompatibility between collagen, gelatin and keratin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfang; Zhang, Weiwei; Yuan, Jiang; Shen, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Keratins are cysteine-rich intermediate filament proteins found in the cytoskeleton of the epithelial cells and in the matrix of hair, feathers, wool, nails and horns. The natural abundance of cell adhesion sequences, RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) and LDV (Leu-Asp-Val), makes them suitable for tissue engineering applications. The purpose of our study is to evaluate their cytocompatibility as compared to well-known collagen and gelatin proteins. Herein, collagen, gelatin and keratin were blended with poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and electrospun to afford nanofibrous mats, respectively. These PHBV/protein composite mats were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The cytocompatibility was evaluated with cell adhesion, cell viability and cell proliferation. The data from MTT and BrDU revealed that collagen had significantly superior cytocompatibility as compared to gelatin and keratin. Gelatin showed a better cytocompatibility than keratin without statistical significance difference. Finally, we gave the reasons to account for the above conclusions. PMID:26652345

  12. Experimental maturation of feathers: implications for reconstructions of fossil feather colour

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Maria E.; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Orr, Patrick J.; Field, Daniel J.; Wang, Zhengrong

    2013-01-01

    Fossil feathers often preserve evidence of melanosomes—micrometre-scale melanin-bearing organelles that have been used to infer original colours and patterns of the plumage of dinosaurs. Such reconstructions acknowledge that evidence from other colour-producing mechanisms is presently elusive and assume that melanosome geometry is not altered during fossilization. Here, we provide the first test of this assumption, using high pressure–high temperature autoclave experiments on modern feathers to simulate the effects of burial on feather colour. Our experiments show that melanosomes are retained despite loss of visual evidence of colour and complete degradation of other colour-producing structures (e.g. quasi-ordered arrays in barbs and the keratin cortex in barbules). Significantly, however, melanosome geometry and spatial distribution are altered by the effects of pressure and temperature. These results demonstrate that reconstructions of original plumage coloration in fossils where preserved features of melanosomes are affected by diagenesis should be treated with caution. Reconstructions of fossil feather colour require assessment of the extent of preservation of various colour-producing mechanisms, and, critically, the extent of alteration of melanosome geometry. PMID:23536445

  13. Palmoplantar keratoderma with tonotubular keratin.

    PubMed

    Wevers, A; Kuhn, A; Mahrle, G

    1991-04-01

    A 61-year-old man with palmoplantar keratoderma with an unusual tonotubular keratin is reported. The histologic findings, genetic transmission, and clinical course were similar to epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (Voerner type), but keratinocytes ultrastructurally displayed a tonotubular cytoskeleton, which has not been previously described, instead of a tonofilamentous one. Electrophoretically, we found no difference in the keratin pattern of normal plantar skin, skin in palmoplantar keratoderma of Voerner, and that of our patient's skin. Therefore the tubular keratin most likely formed as a result of a posttranslational change of keratin polymerization. PMID:1709652

  14. Spatially modulated structural colour in bird feathers.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Andrew J; Washington, Adam L; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Hill, Christopher J; Bianco, Antonino; Burg, Stephanie L; Dennison, Andrew J C; Snape, Mary; Cadby, Ashley J; Smith, Andrew; Prevost, Sylvain; Whittaker, David M; Jones, Richard A L; Fairclough, J Patrick A; Parker, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Eurasian Jay (Garrulus glandarius) feathers display periodic variations in the reflected colour from white through light blue, dark blue and black. We find the structures responsible for the colour are continuous in their size and spatially controlled by the degree of spinodal phase separation in the corresponding region of the feather barb. Blue structures have a well-defined broadband ultra-violet (UV) to blue wavelength distribution; the corresponding nanostructure has characteristic spinodal morphology with a lengthscale of order 150 nm. White regions have a larger 200 nm nanostructure, consistent with a spinodal process that has coarsened further, yielding broader wavelength white reflectance. Our analysis shows that nanostructure in single bird feather barbs can be varied continuously by controlling the time the keratin network is allowed to phase separate before mobility in the system is arrested. Dynamic scaling analysis of the single barb scattering data implies that the phase separation arrest mechanism is rapid and also distinct from the spinodal phase separation mechanism i.e. it is not gelation or intermolecular re-association. Any growing lengthscale using this spinodal phase separation approach must first traverse the UV and blue wavelength regions, growing the structure by coarsening, resulting in a broad distribution of domain sizes. PMID:26686280

  15. Spatially modulated structural colour in bird feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, Andrew J.; Washington, Adam L.; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O.; Hill, Christopher J.; Bianco, Antonino; Burg, Stephanie L.; Dennison, Andrew J. C.; Snape, Mary; Cadby, Ashley J.; Smith, Andrew; Prevost, Sylvain; Whittaker, David M.; Jones, Richard A. L.; Fairclough, J. Patrick. A.; Parker, Andrew R.

    2015-12-01

    Eurasian Jay (Garrulus glandarius) feathers display periodic variations in the reflected colour from white through light blue, dark blue and black. We find the structures responsible for the colour are continuous in their size and spatially controlled by the degree of spinodal phase separation in the corresponding region of the feather barb. Blue structures have a well-defined broadband ultra-violet (UV) to blue wavelength distribution; the corresponding nanostructure has characteristic spinodal morphology with a lengthscale of order 150 nm. White regions have a larger 200 nm nanostructure, consistent with a spinodal process that has coarsened further, yielding broader wavelength white reflectance. Our analysis shows that nanostructure in single bird feather barbs can be varied continuously by controlling the time the keratin network is allowed to phase separate before mobility in the system is arrested. Dynamic scaling analysis of the single barb scattering data implies that the phase separation arrest mechanism is rapid and also distinct from the spinodal phase separation mechanism i.e. it is not gelation or intermolecular re-association. Any growing lengthscale using this spinodal phase separation approach must first traverse the UV and blue wavelength regions, growing the structure by coarsening, resulting in a broad distribution of domain sizes.

  16. Spatially modulated structural colour in bird feathers

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Andrew J.; Washington, Adam L.; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O.; Hill, Christopher J.; Bianco, Antonino; Burg, Stephanie L.; Dennison, Andrew J. C.; Snape, Mary; Cadby, Ashley J.; Smith, Andrew; Prevost, Sylvain; Whittaker, David M.; Jones, Richard A. L.; Fairclough, J. Patrick. A.; Parker, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Eurasian Jay (Garrulus glandarius) feathers display periodic variations in the reflected colour from white through light blue, dark blue and black. We find the structures responsible for the colour are continuous in their size and spatially controlled by the degree of spinodal phase separation in the corresponding region of the feather barb. Blue structures have a well-defined broadband ultra-violet (UV) to blue wavelength distribution; the corresponding nanostructure has characteristic spinodal morphology with a lengthscale of order 150 nm. White regions have a larger 200 nm nanostructure, consistent with a spinodal process that has coarsened further, yielding broader wavelength white reflectance. Our analysis shows that nanostructure in single bird feather barbs can be varied continuously by controlling the time the keratin network is allowed to phase separate before mobility in the system is arrested. Dynamic scaling analysis of the single barb scattering data implies that the phase separation arrest mechanism is rapid and also distinct from the spinodal phase separation mechanism i.e. it is not gelation or intermolecular re-association. Any growing lengthscale using this spinodal phase separation approach must first traverse the UV and blue wavelength regions, growing the structure by coarsening, resulting in a broad distribution of domain sizes. PMID:26686280

  17. Sparkling feather reflections of a bird-of-paradise explained by finite-difference time-domain modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Michielsen, Kristel; De Raedt, Hans; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2014-01-01

    Birds-of-paradise are nature’s prime examples of the evolution of color by sexual selection. Their brilliant, structurally colored feathers play a principal role in mating displays. The structural coloration of both the occipital and breast feathers of the bird-of-paradise Lawes’ parotia is produced by melanin rodlets arranged in layers, together acting as interference reflectors. Light reflection by the silvery colored occipital feathers is unidirectional as in a classical multilayer, but the reflection by the richly colored breast feathers is three-directional and extraordinarily complex. Here we show that the reflection properties of both feather types can be quantitatively explained by finite-difference time-domain modeling using realistic feather anatomies and experimentally determined refractive index dispersion values of keratin and melanin. The results elucidate the interplay between avian coloration and vision and indicate tuning of the mating displays to the spectral properties of the avian visual system. PMID:24591592

  18. Sparkling feather reflections of a bird-of-paradise explained by finite-difference time-domain modeling.

    PubMed

    Wilts, Bodo D; Michielsen, Kristel; De Raedt, Hans; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2014-03-25

    Birds-of-paradise are nature's prime examples of the evolution of color by sexual selection. Their brilliant, structurally colored feathers play a principal role in mating displays. The structural coloration of both the occipital and breast feathers of the bird-of-paradise Lawes' parotia is produced by melanin rodlets arranged in layers, together acting as interference reflectors. Light reflection by the silvery colored occipital feathers is unidirectional as in a classical multilayer, but the reflection by the richly colored breast feathers is three-directional and extraordinarily complex. Here we show that the reflection properties of both feather types can be quantitatively explained by finite-difference time-domain modeling using realistic feather anatomies and experimentally determined refractive index dispersion values of keratin and melanin. The results elucidate the interplay between avian coloration and vision and indicate tuning of the mating displays to the spectral properties of the avian visual system. PMID:24591592

  19. Influence of dietary feathers on the fecal microbiota in captive Arctic fox: do dietary hair or feathers play a role in the evolution of carnivorous mammals?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Yang, Shuhui; Xu, Yanchun; Dahmer, Thomas D

    2014-11-01

    Hair and feathers are composed of keratin and are indigestible, inalimental and unpalatable for carnivores. However, carnivores often ingest hair and feathers during feeding or when grooming. We hypothesized that ingestion of hair and feathers changes species diversity and relative abundance of bacteria in the gut of carnivores. To test this hypothesis, we added disinfected poultry down feathers to the normal diet of captive Arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus). We then used fluorescently labeled terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs) to examine changes in fecal bacterial diversity and abundance. The results showed that the number of bacterial species increased significantly after feather ingestion, but that total abundance was unchanged. This demonstrated that addition of disinfected feathers to the diet stimulated increased production among less abundant bacteria, resulting in a balancing of relative abundance of different bacterial species, or that some newly-ingested microbial species would colonize the gut because a suitable microhabitat had become available. This implies that the overall production of bacterial metabolites would be made up of a greater range of substances after feather ingestion. On one hand, the host's immune response would be more diverse, increasing the capacity of the immune system to regulate gut microflora. On the other hand, the animal's physiological performance would also be affected. For wild animals, such altered physiological traits would be subjected to natural selection, and, hence, persistent geographic differences in the character of ingested feathers or fur would drive speciation. PMID:25420637

  20. Functional keratin as structural platforms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wool with up to 95% keratin by weight is a rich and pure source of proteinous biomaterial. As polymeric polyamide it exhibits high functionality through amide, carboxyl, sulfoxide, sulfide, and thiosulfide functions. Solubilized wool was transformed into keratin morphologies with the unique characte...

  1. Fossilization of feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul G.; Briggs, Derek E. G.

    1995-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy of feathers has revealed evidence that a bacterial glycocalyx (a network of exocellular polysaccharide fibers) played a role in promoting their fossilization in some cases. This mode of preservation has not been reported in other soft tissues. The majority of fossil feathers are preserved as carbonized traces. More rarely, bacteria on the surface are replicated by authigenic minerals (bacterial autolithification). The feathers of Archaeopteryx are preserved mainly by imprintation following early lithification of the substrate and decay of the feather. Lacustrine settings provide the most important taphonomic window for feather preservation. Preservation in terrestrial and normal-marine settings involves very different processes (in amber and in authigenically mineralized coprolites, respectively). Therefore, there may be a significant bias in the avian fossil record in favor of inland water habitats.

  2. Age determination of female redhead ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dane, C.W.; Johnson, D.H.

    1975-01-01

    Eighty-seven fall-collected wings from female redhead ducks (Aythya americana) were assigned to the adult or juvenile group based on 'tertial' and 'tertial covert' shape and wear. To obtain spring age-related characters from these fall-collected groupings, we considered parameters of flight feathers retained until after the first breeding season. Parameters measured included: markings on and width of greater secondary coverts, and length, weight, and diameter of primary feathers. The best age categorization was obtained with discriminant analysis based on a combination of the most accurately measured parameters. This analysis, applied to 81 wings with complete measurements, resulted in only 1 being incorrectly aged and 3 placed in a questionable category. Discriminant functions used with covert markings and the three 5th primary parameters were applied to 30 known-age juvenile, hand-reared redhead females, 28 were correctly aged, none was incorrectly aged, and only 2 were placed in the questionable category.

  3. Water-stable three-dimensional ultrafine fibrous scaffolds from keratin for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Xu, Helan; Cai, Shaobo; Xu, Lan; Yang, Yiqi

    2014-07-22

    Intrinsically water-stable scaffolds composed of ultrafine keratin fibers oriented randomly and evenly in three dimensions were electrospun for cartilage tissue engineering. Keratin has been recognized as a biomaterial that could substantially support the growth and development of multiple cell lines. Besides, three-dimensional (3D) ultrafine fibrous structures were preferred in tissue engineering due to their structural similarity to native extracellular matrices in soft tissues. Recently, we have developed a nontraditional approach to developing 3D fibrous scaffolds from alcohol-soluble corn protein, zein, and verified their structural advantages in tissue engineering. However, keratin with highly cross-linked molecular structures could not be readily dissolved in common solvents for fiber spinning, which required the remarkable drawability of solution. So far, 3D fibrous scaffolds from pure keratin for biomedical applications have not been reported. In this research, the highly cross-linked keratin from chicken feathers was de-cross-linked and disentangled into linear and aligned molecules with preserved molecular weights, forming highly stretchable spinning dope. The solution was readily electrospun into scaffolds with ultrafine keratin fibers oriented randomly in three dimensions. Due to the highly cross-linked molecular structures, keratin scaffolds showed intrinsic water stability. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells could penetrate much deeper, proliferate, and chondrogenically differentiate remarkably better on the 3D keratin scaffolds than on 2D PLA fibrous scaffolds, 3D soy protein fibrous scaffolds, or 3D commercial nonfibrous scaffolds. In summary, the electrospun 3D ultrafine fibrous scaffolds from keratin could be promising candidates for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25010870

  4. Keratin proteins in human lung carcinomas. Combined use of morphology, keratin immunocytochemistry, and keratin immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed Central

    Banks-Schlegel, S. P.; McDowell, E. M.; Wilson, T. S.; Trump, B. F.; Harris, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Light-microscopic immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy demonstrated that adenocarcinomas (AC) and squamous cell (epidermoid) carcinomas (SCCs) of human lung contained keratin proteins in the form of tonofilament bundles. However, moderately differentiated (md) SCCs contained abundant keratin, whereas poorly differentiated (pd) SCCs and all ACs contained lesser amounts. Lung tumors with the diagnosis of AC or SCC, as defined by WHO criteria, were also analyzed by immunoprecipitation techniques for the presence of keratin proteins. Regardless of the degree of tumor differentiation, SCCs contained a 44 kd keratin which was lacking in ACs. Interestingly, normal bronchial epithelium also contained the same 44 kd keratin. In addition, as SCCs became more differentiated, they exhibited even greater differences in the profile of synthesized keratins. Specifically, the relative abundance of the intermediate-sized keratins (57 and 59 kd) was increased in the md SCCs. Although keratin protein patterns appear to be a valuable adjunct in distinguishing AC from SCC, their usefulness as a diagnostic tool will require survey of a larger number of poorly differentiated tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6198920

  5. Does avian malaria infection affect feather stable isotope signatures?

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Elizabeth; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Lee, Raymond W; Bolshakov, Casimir V; Bensch, Staffan

    2011-12-01

    It is widely accepted that stable isotope ratios in inert tissues such as feather keratin reflect the dietary isotopic signature at the time of the tissue synthesis. However, some elements such as stable nitrogen isotopes can be affected by individual physiological state and nutritional stress. Using malaria infection experiment protocols, we estimated the possible effect of malaria parasite infections on feather carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotope signatures in juvenile common crossbills Loxia curvirostra. The birds were experimentally infected with Plasmodium relictum (lineage SGS1) and P. ashfordi (GRW2), two widespread parasites of passerines. Experimental birds developed heavy parasitemia of both parasites and maintained high levels throughout the experiment (33 days). We found no significant difference between experimental and control birds in both δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of feathers re-grown. The study shows that even heavy primary infections of malaria parasites do not affect feather δ(13)C and δ(15)N isotopic signatures. The results of this experiment demonstrate that feather isotope values of wild-caught birds accurately reflect the dietary isotopic sources at the time of tissue synthesis even when the animal's immune system might be challenged due to parasitic infection. PMID:21671039

  6. Production of feather hydrolysates with antioxidant, angiotensin-I converting enzyme- and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV-inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Fontoura, Roberta; Daroit, Daniel J; Correa, Ana P F; Meira, Stela M M; Mosquera, Mauricio; Brandelli, Adriano

    2014-09-25

    The antioxidant and antihypertensive activities of feather hydrolysates obtained with the bacterium Chryseobacterium sp. kr6 were investigated. Keratin hydrolysates were produced with different concentrations of thermally denatured feathers (10-75 g l(-1)) and initial pH values (6.0-9.0). Soluble proteins accumulated in high amounts in media with 50 and 75 g l(-1) of feathers, reaching values of 18.5 and 22 mg ml(-1), respectively, after 48 hours of cultivation. In media with 50 g l(-1) of feathers, initial pH had minimal effect after 48 hours. Maximal protease production was observed after 24 hours of cultivation, and feather concentration and initial pH values showed no significant effect on enzyme yields at this time. Feather hydrolysates displayed in vitro antioxidant properties, and optimal antioxidant activities were observed in cultures with 50 g l(-1) feathers, at initial pH 8.0, after 48 hours growth at 30°C. Also, feather hydrolysates were demonstrated to inhibit the angiotesin I-converting enzyme by 65% and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV by 44%. The bioconversion of an abundant agroindustrial waste such as chicken feathers can be utilized as a strategy to obtain hydrolysates with antioxidant and antihypertensive activities. Feather hydrolysates might be employed as supplements in animal feed, and also as a potential source of bioactive molecules for feed, food and drug development. PMID:25038398

  7. Determination of trace elements in pigeon and raven feathers by ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adout, Atar; Hawlena, Dror; Maman, Rachel; Paz-Tal, Ofra; Karpas, Zeev

    2007-11-01

    The concentration of 11 trace elements (Mg, Al, Mn, Cu, Zn, Rb, Mo, Cd, Ba, Hg and Pb) and sulfur in feathers of pigeons and ravens was determined by ICPMS after wet digestion of the sample. Pigeon feathers were collected 6rom five habitats: rural, industrial, urban, natural area and from a controlled environment, and raven feathers from the former two habitats. The distribution along the feather shaft was studied and for most elements it was found that the concentration increased from the quill towards the distal end of the feather. There were statistically significant differences in the concentration of trace elements between pigeons from different environments and between ravens and pigeons from similar habitats. It was found that for most elements the lowest concentration was in feathers from the control population and the highest in the industrial habitat. In general, higher concentrations were found in the omnivore raven feathers than in the granivore pigeons. Sulfur, that is abundant in keratin, was found to be a potential internal standard as its concentration presented the lowest variation among different samples. Thus, feathers from common birds, collected from the ground, can serve as bio-indicators of environmental levels of trace elements.

  8. Preparation and characterization of sponge film made from feathers.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaoqian; Cao, Zhangjun; Zhao, Xiaoxiang; Zhou, Meihua; Gao, Pin

    2013-12-01

    Feather wastes generated from poultry farms will pose a problem for disposal, but they are sustainable resources of keratin. Reduction is one of the commonly used methods to obtain soluble keratin from feather. However, the residues generated during feather reduction reaction were rarely investigated. In this study, the residues were transformed into a porous and flexible sponge film by freeze-drying without pretreatment or addition of cross-linking agents. Glycerol was used to alter the physical and chemical characteristics of the sponge film. The film was characterized with a fiber strong stretch instrument, a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscopy, an elemental analyzer, a differential scanning calorimeter and an automatic air permeability apparatus. Tensile strength and melting point of the sponge film with the optimum glycerol content were 6.2 MPa and 170°C respectively. Due to air permeability of 368 mm/s, the film can potentially be used in medicine, biology, textile, environmental technology, and so on. It is ecologically friendly and will produce additional benefits from the renewable materials. The film was utilized as adsorbents to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions and as a filtering material for air pollution. Its maximum Cr(VI) uptake capacity was about 148.8 mg/g and the removal rate of PM10 was 98.3%. PMID:24094181

  9. Grumman JF-1 Duck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Grumman JF-1 Duck: The Grumman JF-1 Duck was in service with the NACA at Langley during the summer of 1934. The JF-1 was notably different from the later J2F Duck in that the JF-1 had a shorter central float. The NACA used the JF-1 in part as a propeller testbed aircraft.

  10. Complex optical structure in the ribbon-like feathers of the African open-bill stork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Lousse, Virginie; Colomer, Jean-François; Rassart, Marie; Louette, Michel

    2006-08-01

    The structural origin of the weak iridescence from the very peculiar ribbon-shaped feathers of the African open-bill stork, Anastomus lamelligerus (Ciconiidae) is investigated, using a combination of spectrophotometry, electron microscopy, and theoretical modelling. The cortex of these feathers can be described as a slab of keratin, transformed into a multilayer by the insertion of thin parallel planes containing harder nodules, disposed sideby- side and oriented along the feather axis. These nodules each show a sperically capped cylindrical shape. An empty cylindrical channel - the vacuole - occupies the long axis of the nodule. These nodules act in a collective and individual way to produce the frequency selection giving rise to the observed dark-green coloration of these special feathers.

  11. Unzipping bird feathers

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Alexander; Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-01-01

    The bird feather vane can be separated into two parts by pulling the barbs apart. The original state can be re-established easily by lightly stroking through the feather. Hooklets responsible for holding vane barbs together are not damaged by multiple zipping and unzipping cycles. Because numerous microhooks keep the integrity of the feather, their properties are of great interest for understanding mechanics of the entire feather structure. This study was undertaken to estimate the separation force of single hooklets and their arrays using force measurement of an unzipping feather vane. The hooklets usually separate in some number synchronously (20 on average) with the highest observed separation force of 1.74 mN (average force 0.27 mN), whereas the single hooklet separation force was 14 μN. A simple numerical model was suggested for a better understanding of zipping and unzipping behaviour in feathers. The model demonstrates features similar to those observed in experiments. PMID:24352674

  12. Unzipping bird feathers.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, Alexander; Filippov, Alexander E; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-03-01

    The bird feather vane can be separated into two parts by pulling the barbs apart. The original state can be re-established easily by lightly stroking through the feather. Hooklets responsible for holding vane barbs together are not damaged by multiple zipping and unzipping cycles. Because numerous microhooks keep the integrity of the feather, their properties are of great interest for understanding mechanics of the entire feather structure. This study was undertaken to estimate the separation force of single hooklets and their arrays using force measurement of an unzipping feather vane. The hooklets usually separate in some number synchronously (20 on average) with the highest observed separation force of 1.74 mN (average force 0.27 mN), whereas the single hooklet separation force was 14 μN. A simple numerical model was suggested for a better understanding of zipping and unzipping behaviour in feathers. The model demonstrates features similar to those observed in experiments. PMID:24352674

  13. Novel photonic crystals: incorporation of nano-CdS into the natural photonic crystals within peacock feathers.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Su, Huilan; Song, Fang; Gu, Jiajun; Di, Zhang; Jiang, Limin

    2009-03-01

    In this investigation, the natural 2D photonic crystals (PhCs) within peacock feathers are applied to incorporate CdS nanocrystallites. Peacock feathers are activated by ethylenediaminetetraacetic/dimethylformamide suspension to increase the reactive sites on the keratin component, on which CdS nanoparticles (nano-CdS) are in situ formed in succession and serve as the "seeds" to direct further incorporation during the following solvothermal procedure. Thus, homogeneous nano-CdS are loaded both on the feathers' surface layer and inside the 2D PhCs. The obtained nano-CdS/peacock feathers hybrids are novel photonic crystals whose photonic stop bands are markedly different from that of the natural PhCs within original peacock feathers, as observed by the reflection spectra. PMID:19437723

  14. Synthesis, structure and antimicrobial property of green composites from cellulose, wool, hair and chicken feather.

    PubMed

    Tran, Chieu D; Prosencyes, Franja; Franko, Mladen; Benzi, Gerald

    2016-10-20

    Novel composites between cellulose (CEL) and keratin (KER) from three different sources (wool, hair and chicken feather) were successfully synthesized in a simple one-step process in which butylmethylimidazolium chloride (BMIm(+)Cl(-)), an ionic liquid, was used as the sole solvent. The method is green and recyclable because [BMIm(+)Cl(-)] used was recovered for reuse. Spectroscopy (FTIR, XRD) and imaging (SEM) results confirm that CEL and KER remain chemically intact and homogeneously distributed in the composites. KER retains some of its secondary structure in the composites. Interestingly, the minor differences in the structure of KER in wool, hair and feather produced pronounced differences in the conformation of their corresponding composites with wool has the highest α-helix content and feather has the lowest content. These results correlate well with mechanical and antimicrobial properties of the composites. Specifically, adding CEL into KER substantially improves mechanical strength of [CEL+KER] composites made from all three different sources, wool, hair and chicken feathers i.e., [CEL+wool], [CEL+hair] and [CEL+feather]. Since mechanical strength is due to CEL, and CEL has only random structure, [CEL+feather] has, expectedly, the strongest mechanical property because feather has the lowest content of α-helix. Conversely, [CEL+wool] composite has the weakest mechanical strength because wool has the highest α-helix content. All three composites exhibit antibacterial activity against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The antibacterial property is due not to CEL but to the protein and strongly depends on the type of the keratin, namely, the bactericidal effect is strongest for feather and weakest for wool. These results together with our previous finding that [CEL+KER] composites can control release of drug such as ciprofloxacin clearly indicate that these composites can potentially be used as wound dressing. PMID:27474680

  15. Increased water contamination and grow-out Pekin duck mortality when raised with water troughs compared to pin-metered water lines using a United States management system.

    PubMed

    Schenk, A; Porter, A L; Alenciks, E; Frazier, K; Best, A A; Fraley, S M; Fraley, G S

    2016-04-01

    Controversy has developed as to whether or not pin-metered water lines or water troughs are more appropriate for Pekin ducks. We hypothesized that water troughs would show improved duck body conditions and environmental quality compared to pin-metered water lines. To test this hypothesis, we housed ducks in 2 barns, one with water lines and one with water troughs. Water troughs were constructed to meet RSPCA guidelines for number and density of ducks and with recently described verandas. Ducks were divided into 4 pens per barn (n=1,000 ducks/pen). The study was then repeated (n=8 pens per water source) in a cross-over design so the barns each contained the opposite water source to the first experiment. We scored the ducks' body condition using an established scoring rubric and analyzed using SAS Proc GLM-Mix as binomial data. Ducks housed with water troughs showed higher (thus worse condition; P<0.001) scores for eyes, nostrils, feather quality, feather cleanliness, and foot pads. We also compared water condition, water quality, and duck mortality using a Student t test for both water sources each week. We found that the water troughs showed higher iron (P<0.001), nitrites (P<0.001), pH (P<0.01), and bacterial growth (P<0.001). The bacterial growth was shown to have higher (P<0.001)E. coli, coliforms, and Staphylococcusin the water troughs. Water lines typically showed no bacterial growth in culture-based assays. Ducks housed with water troughs used greater (P=0.001) volumes of water compared to ducks housed with water lines. Ducks with water troughs also showed a greater percent (P=0.008) mortality at all ages compared to ducks with water lines. These data suggest that water troughs may not be beneficial for duck welfare and could adversely impact both environment and duck or human health. PMID:26769272

  16. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT BILL-TRIMMING METHODS ON THE WELL-BEING OF PEKIN DUCKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pekin ducks are often bill-trimmed to prevent feather pecking and cannibalism, but this practice has been criticized because of the resulting potential for acute and chronic pain. The goal of this experiment was to compare two different bill-trimming methods, hot blade trimming with cautery (TRIM) a...

  17. Effect of clay content on morphology and processability of electrospun keratin/poly(lactic acid) nanofiber.

    PubMed

    Isarankura Na Ayutthaya, Siriorn; Tanpichai, Supachok; Sangkhun, Weradesh; Wootthikanokkhan, Jatuphorn

    2016-04-01

    This research work has concerned the development of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) removal filters from biomaterials, based on keratin extracted from chicken feather waste and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) (50/50%w/w) blend. Clay (Na-montmorillonite) was also added to the blend solution prior to carrying out an electro-spinning process. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of clay content on viscosity, conductivity, and morphology of the electrospun fibers. Scanning electron micrographs showed that smooth and bead-free fibers were obtained when clay content used was below 2 pph. XRD patterns of the electrospun fibers indicated that the clay was intercalated and exfoliated within the polymers matrix. Percentage crystallinity of keratin in the blend increased after adding the clay, as evidenced from FTIR spectra and DSC thermograms. Transmission electron micrographs revealed a kind of core-shell structure with clay being predominately resided within the keratin rich shell and at the interfacial region. Filtration performance of the electrospun keratin/PLA fibers, described in terms of pressure drop and its capability of removing methylene blue, were also explored. Overall, our results demonstrated that it was possible to improve process-ability, morphology and filtration efficiency of the electrospun keratin fibers by adding a suitable amount of clay. PMID:26776870

  18. Family Feathers. [Videotape Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    Family Feathers is a set of 18 videotapes for parents of preschool children, created by the Alaska Native Home Base Video Project of the Tlingit and Haida Head Start Program. This series offers culturally relevant solutions to the challenges of parenting, drawing on practical advice from Tlingit and Haida parents, wisdom from elders, and some of…

  19. Genome and secretome analyses provide insights into keratin decomposition by novel proteases from the non-pathogenic fungus Onygena corvina.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuhong; Busk, Peter Kamp; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Lange, Lene

    2015-11-01

    Poultry processing plants and slaughterhouses produce huge quantities of feathers and hair/bristle waste annually. These keratinaceous wastes are highly resistant to degradation. Onygena corvina, a non-pathogenic fungus, grows specifically on feathers, hooves, horn, and hair in nature. Hence, the proteases secreted by O. corvina are interesting in view of their potential relevance for industrial decomposition of keratinaceous wastes. We sequenced and assembled the genome of O. corvina and used a method called peptide pattern recognition to identify 73 different proteases. Comparative genome analysis of proteases in keratin-degrading and non-keratin-degrading fungi indicated that 18 putative secreted proteases from four protease families (M36, M35, M43, and S8) may be responsible for keratin decomposition. Twelve of the 18 predicted protease genes could be amplified from O. corvina grown on keratinaceous materials and were transformed into Pichia pastoris. One of the recombinant proteases belonging to the S8 family showed high keratin-degrading activity. Furthermore, 29 different proteases were identified by mass spectrometry in the culture broth of O. corvina grown on feathers and bristle. The culture broth was fractionated by ion exchange chromatography to isolate active fractions with five novel proteases belonging to three protease families (S8, M28, and M3). Enzyme blends composed of three of these five proteases, one from each family, showed high degree of degradation of keratin in vitro. A blend of novel proteases, such as those we discovered, could possibly find a use for degrading keratinaceous wastes and provide proteins, peptides, and amino acids as valuable ingredients for animal feed. PMID:26177915

  20. American Black Duck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longcore, J.R.; Clugston, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    A brief summary of the annual cycle of the American Black duck (Anas rubripes) is presented. The history of the American black duck population is tracked by the Mid-Winter Index (MWI) and related to annual harvest. Previous to effective restrictions in the United States in 1982 and later in Canada, the MWI was declining significantly at about 4% annually. Since restrictions were established the black duck population has stabilized, but to reach the goal of 260,000 wintering black ducks in the Atlantic Flyway continued or even more restrictions will be necessary. If the number of breeding pairs can be increased from current levels the black duck population is expected to increase.

  1. Sprouty/FGF signaling regulates the proximal-distal feather morphology and the size of dermal papillae.

    PubMed

    Yue, Zhicao; Jiang, Ting Xin; Wu, Ping; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2012-12-01

    In a feather, there are distinct morphologies along the proximal-distal axis. The proximal part is a cylindrical stalk (calamus), whereas the distal part has barb and barbule branches. Here we focus on what molecular signaling activity can modulate feather stem cells to generate these distinct morphologies. We demonstrate the drastic tissue remodeling during feather cycling which includes initiation, growth and resting phases. In the growth phase, epithelial components undergo progressive changes from the collar growth zone to the ramogenic zone, to maturing barb branches along the proximal-distal axis. Mesenchymal components also undergo progressive changes from the dermal papilla, to the collar mesenchyme, to the pulp along the proximal-distal axis. Over-expression of Spry4, a negative regulator of receptor tyrosine kinases, promotes barb branch formation at the expense of the epidermal collar. It even induces barb branches from the follicle sheath (equivalent to the outer root sheath in hair follicles). The results are feathers with expanded feather vane regions and small or missing proximal feather shafts (the calamus). Spry4 also expands the pulp region while reducing the size of dermal papillae, leading to a failure to regenerate. In contrast, over-expressing Fgf10 increases the size of the dermal papillae, expands collar epithelia and mesenchyme, but also prevents feather branch formation and feather keratin differentiation. These results suggest that coordinated Sprouty/FGF pathway activity at different stages is important to modulate feather epidermal stem cells to form distinct feather morphologies along the proximal-distal feather axis. PMID:23000358

  2. Environmental-induced acquisition of nuptial plumage expression: a role of denaturation of feather carotenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Blanco, Guillermo; Frías, Oscar; Garrido-Fernández, Juan; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso

    2005-09-22

    Several avian species show a bright carotenoid-based coloration during spring and following a period of duller coloration during the previous winter, despite carotenoids presumably being fully deposited in feathers during the autumn moult. Carotenoid-based breast feathers of male linnets (Carduelis cannabina) increased in hue (redness), saturation and brightness after exposing them to outdoor conditions from winter to spring. This represents the first experimental evidence showing that carotenoid-based plumage coloration may increase towards a colourful expression due to biotic or abiotic environmental factors acting directly on full-grown feathers when carotenoids may be fully functional. Sunlight ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was hypothesized to denature keratin and other proteins that might protect pigments from degradation by this and other environmental factors, suggesting that sunlight UV irradiation is a major factor in the colour increase from winter to spring. Feather proteins and other binding molecules, if existing in the follicles, may be linked to carotenoids since their deposition into feathers to protect colourful features of associated carotenoids during the non-breeding season when its main signalling function may be relaxed. Progress towards uncovering the significance of concealment and subsequent display of colour expression should consider the potential binding and protecting nature of feather proteins associated with carotenoids. PMID:16191594

  3. Opposed expression of IKKα: loss in keratinizing carcinomas and gain in non-keratinizing carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Desheng; Jia, Jiantao; Shi, Ying; Fu, Chunyan; Chen, Ling; Jiang, Yiqun; Zhou, Li; Liu, Shuang; Tao, Yongguang

    2015-01-01

    The functional role of IKKα in vivo is pretty complicated, largely due to its diverse functions through cell autonomous and non-autonomous manners. In addition, most of the studies on IKKα were derived from animal models, whether these findings hold true in human tumors remain unclear. Here we examined the expression of IKKα in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which includes non-keratinizing carcinoma and keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, and lung squamous cell carcinoma with keratinization and non-keratinization. We demonstrated that IKKα expression was almost negative in keratinizing cancer and higher expression of IKKα was found in non-keratinizing cancer, and that IKKα expression correlateed with cellular differentiation of tumors in non-keratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma. These findings demonstrate that IKKα is diversely expressed in keratinizing and non-keratinizing carcinomas in the same type of cancer. PMID:26317791

  4. Structure and functions of keratin proteins in simple, stratified, keratinized and cornified epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Bragulla, Hermann H; Homberger, Dominique G

    2009-01-01

    Historically, the term ‘keratin’ stood for all of the proteins extracted from skin modifications, such as horns, claws and hooves. Subsequently, it was realized that this keratin is actually a mixture of keratins, keratin filament-associated proteins and other proteins, such as enzymes. Keratins were then defined as certain filament-forming proteins with specific physicochemical properties and extracted from the cornified layer of the epidermis, whereas those filament-forming proteins that were extracted from the living layers of the epidermis were grouped as ‘prekeratins’ or ‘cytokeratins’. Currently, the term ‘keratin’ covers all intermediate filament-forming proteins with specific physicochemical properties and produced in any vertebrate epithelia. Similarly, the nomenclature of epithelia as cornified, keratinized or non-keratinized is based historically on the notion that only the epidermis of skin modifications such as horns, claws and hooves is cornified, that the non-modified epidermis is a keratinized stratified epithelium, and that all other stratified and non-stratified epithelia are non-keratinized epithelia. At this point in time, the concepts of keratins and of keratinized or cornified epithelia need clarification and revision concerning the structure and function of keratin and keratin filaments in various epithelia of different species, as well as of keratin genes and their modifications, in view of recent research, such as the sequencing of keratin proteins and their genes, cell culture, transfection of epithelial cells, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Recently, new functions of keratins and keratin filaments in cell signaling and intracellular vesicle transport have been discovered. It is currently understood that all stratified epithelia are keratinized and that some of these keratinized stratified epithelia cornify by forming a Stratum corneum. The processes of keratinization and cornification in skin modifications are

  5. Amorphous diamond-structured photonic crystal in the feather barbs of the scarlet macaw

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Haiwei; Dong, Biqin; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhan, Tianrong; Shi, Lei; Zi, Jian; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Noniridescent coloration by the spongy keratin in parrot feather barbs has fascinated scientists. Nonetheless, its ultimate origin remains as yet unanswered, and a quantitative structural and optical description is still lacking. Here we report on structural and optical characterizations and numerical simulations of the blue feather barbs of the scarlet macaw. We found that the sponge in the feather barbs is an amorphous diamond-structured photonic crystal with only short-range order. It possesses an isotropic photonic pseudogap that is ultimately responsible for the brilliant noniridescent coloration. We further unravel an ingenious structural optimization for attaining maximum coloration apparently resulting from natural evolution. Upon increasing the material refractive index above the level provided by nature, there is an interesting transition from a photonic pseudogap to a complete bandgap. PMID:22615350

  6. A new scenario for the evolutionary origin of hair, feather, and avian scales

    PubMed Central

    Dhouailly, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    In zoology it is well known that birds are characterized by the presence of feathers, and mammals by hairs. Another common point of view is that avian scales are directly related to reptilian scales. As a skin embryologist, I have been fascinated by the problem of regionalization of skin appendages in amniotes throughout my scientific life. Here I have collected the arguments that result from classical experimental embryology, from the modern molecular biology era, and from the recent discovery of new fossils. These arguments shape my view that avian ectoderm is primarily programmed toward forming feathers, and mammalian ectoderm toward forming hairs. The other ectoderm derivatives – scales in birds, glands in mammals, or cornea in both classes – can become feathers or hairs through metaplastic process, and appear to have a negative regulatory mechanism over this basic program. How this program is altered remains, in most part, to be determined. However, it is clear that the regulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is a critical hub. The level of beta-catenin is crucial for feather and hair formation, as its down-regulation appears to be linked with the formation of avian scales in chick, and cutaneous glands in mice. Furthermore, its inhibition leads to the formation of nude skin and is required for that of corneal epithelium. Here I propose a new theory, to be further considered and tested when we have new information from genomic studies. With this theory, I suggest that the alpha-keratinized hairs from living synapsids may have evolved from the hypothetical glandular integument of the first amniotes, which may have presented similarities with common day terrestrial amphibians. Concerning feathers, they may have evolved independently of squamate scales, each originating from the hypothetical roughened beta-keratinized integument of the first sauropsids. The avian overlapping scales, which cover the feet in some bird species, may have developed later in

  7. Intrinsically water-stable keratin nanoparticles and their in vivo biodistribution for targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Helan; Shi, Zhen; Reddy, Narendra; Yang, Yiqi

    2014-09-17

    Highly water-stable nanoparticles of around 70 nm and capable of distributing with high uptake in certain organs of mice were developed from feather keratin. Nanoparticles could provide novel veterinary diagnostics and therapeutics to boost efficiency in identification and treatment of livestock diseases to improve protein supply and ensure safety and quality of food. Nanoparticles could penetrate easily into cells and small capillaries, surpass detection of the immune system, and reach targeted organs because of their nanoscale sizes. Proteins with positive and negative charges and hydrophobic domains enable loading of various types of drugs and, hence, are advantageous over synthetic polymers and carbohydrates for drug delivery. In this research, the highly cross-linked keratin was processed into nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm under mild conditions. Keratin nanoparticles were found supportive to cell growth via an in vitro study and highly stable after stored in physiological environments for up to 7 days. At 4 days after injection, up to 18% of the cells in kidneys and 4% of the cells in liver of mice were penetrated by the keratin nanoparticles. PMID:25174826

  8. Laying hens learn to avoid feathers.

    PubMed

    Harlander-Matauschek, A; Wassermann, F; Zentek, J; Bessei, W

    2008-09-01

    Previous work demonstrated an association between feather pecking and feather eating in laying hens. This raised the question if digestive feedback affects feather eating or feather pecking in laying hens. We hypothesized that feathers enriched with sugar form a positive feedback and feathers enriched with quinine sulfate form a negative feedback. Forty-eight laying hens were kept in individual cages and fed a pelleted diet ad libitum. Twenty-four birds were offered feathers on a daily basis; 12 of these birds were offered feathers soaked in 4% quinine sulfate solution (Q), and the other 12 were offered feathers soaked in 4% sucrose solution (S). The other 24 birds were kept as a control (C) without access to feathers. After a 10-d feather feeding period, 3 groups of 4 S and 4 C birds each and 3 groups of 4 Q and 4 C birds each were assembled. Feather-pecking behavior was recorded over a period of 8 d. The number of Q feathers eaten was significantly lower than the number of S feathers. Birds that were offered Q feathers in the feather feeding phase showed significantly less severe feather pecking than S and C birds. The results clearly show that Q as an unpalatable substance was the signal the animal used to avoid damaging the feather cover in laying hens. PMID:18753438

  9. Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Nafeey, Soufi; Martin, Ines; Felder, Tatiana; Walther, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation. PMID:27039023

  10. Whole-bird models for the magnetic cleansing of oiled feathers.

    PubMed

    Orbell, John D; Ngeh, Lawrence N; Bigger, Stephen W; Zabinskas, Manfred; Zheng, Meris; Healy, Margaret; Jessop, Rosalind; Dann, Peter

    2004-02-01

    Iron powder, a promising dry-cleansing agent for oiled feathers where both the contaminant and the cleansing agent may be harvested magnetically, has been tested on the plumage of whole-bird models. The breast and back plumage of Mallard Duck (Anas platyrhynchos) and Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor) carcasses were patch-contaminated with commercial-grade engine oil, three different crude oils, and an oil/seawater emulsion. The plumage was then subjected to a magnetic cleansing protocol. The contaminant removal was assessed gravimetrically and was found to reflect the outcomes for a previously reported in vitro study using feather clusters. Between 92-98% of the contaminants, and effectively all of the cleansing agent, were removed from the feathers. PMID:14972586

  11. Discovering All Transcriptome Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Scanning for Selection Signatures in Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruiyi; Du, Xiaoyong; Peng, Sixue; Yang, Liubin; Ma, Yunlong; Gong, Yanzhang; Li, Shijun

    2015-01-01

    The duck is one of the most economically important waterfowl as a source of meat, eggs, and feathers. Characterizing the genetic variation in duck species is an important step toward linking genes or genomic regions with phenotypes. Human-driven selection during duck domestication and subsequent breed formation has likely left detectable signatures in duck genome. In this study, we employed a panel of >1.4 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data of 15 duck individuals. The density of the resulting SNPs is significantly positively correlated with the density of genes across the duck genome, which demonstrates that the usage of the RNA-seq data allowed us to enrich variant functional categories, such as coding exons, untranslated regions (UTRs), introns, and downstream/upstream. We performed a complete scan of selection signatures in the ducks using the composite likelihood ratio (CLR) and found 76 candidate regions of selection, many of which harbor genes related to phenotypes relevant to the function of the digestive system and fat metabolism, including TCF7L2, EIF2AK3, ELOVL2, and fatty acid-binding protein family. This study illustrates the potential of population genetic approaches for identifying genomic regions affecting domestication-related phenotypes and further helps to increase the known genetic information about this economically important animal. PMID:26819540

  12. New consensus nomenclature for mammalian keratins

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Jürgen; Bowden, Paul E.; Coulombe, Pierre A.; Langbein, Lutz; Lane, E. Birgitte; Magin, Thomas M.; Maltais, Lois; Omary, M. Bishr; Parry, David A.D.; Rogers, Michael A.; Wright, Mathew W.

    2006-01-01

    Keratins are intermediate filament–forming proteins that provide mechanical support and fulfill a variety of additional functions in epithelial cells. In 1982, a nomenclature was devised to name the keratin proteins that were known at that point. The systematic sequencing of the human genome in recent years uncovered the existence of several novel keratin genes and their encoded proteins. Their naming could not be adequately handled in the context of the original system. We propose a new consensus nomenclature for keratin genes and proteins that relies upon and extends the 1982 system and adheres to the guidelines issued by the Human and Mouse Genome Nomenclature Committees. This revised nomenclature accommodates functional genes and pseudogenes, and although designed specifically for the full complement of human keratins, it offers the flexibility needed to incorporate additional keratins from other mammalian species. PMID:16831889

  13. Degradation of intact chicken feathers by Thermoactinomyces sp. CDF and characterization of its keratinolytic protease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyuan; Cheng, Guyue; Ren, Yuxia; Dai, Zheng; Zhao, Zhong-Shu; Liu, Feng; Li, Shiyong; Wei, Yahan; Xiong, Jing; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Tang, Bing

    2015-05-01

    Thermoactinomyces is known for its resistance to extreme environmental conditions and its ability to digest a wide range of hard-to-degrade compounds. Here, Thermoactinomyces sp. strain CDF isolated from soil was found to completely degrade intact chicken feathers at 55 °C, with the resulting degradation products sufficient to support growth as the primary source of both carbon and nitrogen. Although feathers were not essential for the expression of keratinase, the use of this substrate led to a further 50-300 % increase in enzyme production level under different nutrition conditions, with extracellular keratinolytic activity reaching its highest level (∼400 U/mL) during the late-log phase. Full degradation of feathers required the presence of living cells, which are thought to supply reducing agents necessary for the cleavage of keratin disulfide bonds. Direct contact between the hyphae and substrate may enhance the reducing power and protease concentrations present in the local microenvironment, thereby facilitating keratin degradation. The gene encoding the major keratinolytic protease (protease C2) of strain CDF was cloned, revealing an amino acid sequence identical to that of subtilisin-like E79 protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. E79, albeit with significant differences in the upstream flanking region. Exogenous expression of protease C2 in Escherichia coli resulted in the production of inclusion bodies with proteolytic activity, which could be solubilized to an alkaline solution to produce mature protease C2. Purified protease C2 was able to efficiently hydrolyze α- and β-keratins at 60-80 °C and pH 11.0, representing a promising candidate for enzymatic processing of hard-to-degrade proteins such as keratinous wastes. PMID:25412577

  14. Every Feather Tells a Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby; Chessin, Laura

    2006-01-01

    For Mr. Kim's fifth-grade students, recess is not just for playing and getting exercise! One spring, he observed a small group of his students near their class bluebird box, examining various bird feathers found on the ground. Building on students' natural curiosity, Mr. Kim purchased some feathers for further exploration in the classroom. He was…

  15. Manakins can produce iridescent and bright feather colours without melanosomes.

    PubMed

    Igic, Branislav; D'Alba, Liliana; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2016-06-15

    Males of many species often use colourful and conspicuous ornaments to attract females. Among these, male manakins (family: Pipridae) provide classic examples of sexual selection favouring the evolution of bright and colourful plumage coloration. The highly iridescent feather colours of birds are most commonly produced by the periodic arrangement of melanin-containing organelles (melanosomes) within barbules. Melanin increases the saturation of iridescent colours seen from optimal viewing angles by absorbing back-scattered light; however, this may reduce the wide-angle brightness of these signals, contributing to a dark background appearance. We examined the nanostructure of four manakin species (Lepidothrix isidorei, L. iris, L. nattereri and L. coeruleocapilla) to identify how they produce their bright plumage colours. Feather barbs of all four species were characterized by dense and fibrous internal spongy matrices that likely increase scattering of light within the barb. The iridescent, yet pale or whitish colours of L. iris and L. nattereri feathers were produced not by periodically arranged melanosomes within barbules, but by periodic matrices of air and β-keratin within barbs. Lepidothrix iris crown feathers were able to produce a dazzling display of colours with small shifts in viewing geometry, likely because of a periodic nanostructure, a flattened barb morphology and disorder at a microstructural level. We hypothesize that iridescent plumage ornaments of male L. iris and L. nattereri are under selection to increase brightness or luminance across wide viewing angles, which may potentially increase their detectability by females during dynamic and fast-paced courtship displays in dim light environments. PMID:27307543

  16. Blade feathering system for wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Harner, K.I.; Patrick, J.P.; Vosseller, K.F.

    1984-07-31

    A blade feathering system for wind turbines includes a feather actuator, control means operatively connected thereto and an adjustment means operatively connected to the control means for selectively varying the rate of operation of the feather actuator for feathering the wind turbine blades at a variable rate.

  17. Dramatic colour changes in a bird of paradise caused by uniquely structured breast feather barbules.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Leertouwer, Hein L; Marshall, N Justin; Osorio, Daniel

    2011-07-22

    The breast-plate plumage of male Lawes' parotia (Parotia lawesii) produces dramatic colour changes when this bird of paradise displays on its forest-floor lek. We show that this effect is achieved not solely by the iridescence--that is an angular-dependent spectral shift of the reflected light--which is inherent in structural coloration, but is based on a unique anatomical modification of the breast-feather barbule. The barbules have a segmental structure, and in common with many other iridescent feathers, they contain stacked melanin rodlets surrounded by a keratin film. The unique property of the parotia barbules is their boomerang-like cross section. This allows each barbule to work as three coloured mirrors: a yellow-orange reflector in the plane of the feather, and two symmetrically positioned bluish reflectors at respective angles of about 30°. Movement during the parotia's courtship displays thereby achieves much larger and more abrupt colour changes than is possible with ordinary iridescent plumage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of multiple thin film or multi-layer reflectors incorporated in a single structure (engineered or biological). It nicely illustrates how subtle modification of the basic feather structure can achieve novel visual effects. The fact that the parotia's breast feathers seem to be specifically adapted to give much stronger colour changes than normal structural coloration implies that colour change is important in their courtship display. PMID:21159676

  18. Development, regeneration, and evolution of feathers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Feng; Foley, John; Tang, Pin-Chi; Li, Ang; Jiang, Ting Xin; Wu, Ping; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2015-01-01

    The feather is a complex ectodermal organ with hierarchical branching patterns. It provides functions in endothermy, communication, and flight. Studies of feather growth, cycling, and health are of fundamental importance to avian biology and poultry science. In addition, feathers are an excellent model for morphogenesis studies because of their accessibility, and their distinct patterns can be used to assay the roles of specific molecular pathways. Here we review the progress in aspects of development, regeneration, and evolution during the past three decades. We cover the development of feather buds in chicken embryos, regenerative cycling of feather follicle stem cells, formation of barb branching patterns, emergence of intrafeather pigmentation patterns, interplay of hormones and feather growth, and the genetic identification of several feather variants. The discovery of feathered dinosaurs redefines the relationship between feathers and birds. Inspiration from biomaterials and flight research further fuels biomimetic potential of feathers as a multidisciplinary research focal point. PMID:25387232

  19. Keratin materials for new product development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Keratin from wool is a reactive, biocompatible, and biodegradable material found as pure protein in over 90% by weight of fiber. As a polymeric amide, keratin is a rich source of intermediate filament proteins (IFPs) which are being investigated for a wide range of biomaterial applications. The po...

  20. Do black ducks and wood ducks habituate to aircraft disturbance?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conomy, J.T.; Dubovsky, J.A.; Collazo, J.A.; Fleming, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Requests to increase military aircraft activity in some training facilities in the United States have raised the need to determine if waterfowl and other wildlife are adversely affected by aircraft disturbance. We hypothesized that habituation was a possible proximate factor influencing the low proportion of free-ranging ducks reacting to military aircraft activities in a training range in coastal North Carolina during winters 1991 and 1992. To test this hypothesis, we subjected captive, wild-strain American black ducks (Anas rubripes) and wood ducks (Aix sponsa) to actual and simulated activities of jet aircraft. In the first experiment, we placed black ducks in an enclosure near the center of aircraft activities on Piney Island, a military aircraft target range in coastal North Carolina. The proportion of times black ducks reacted (e.g., alert posture, fleeing response) to visual and auditory aircraft activity decreased from 38 to 6% during the first 17 days of confinement. Response rates remained stable at 5.8% thereafter. In the second experiment, black ducks and wood ducks were exposed to 6 different recordings of jet noise. The proportion of times black ducks reacted to noise decreased (P 0.05) in time-activity budgets of black ducks between pre-exposure to noise and 24 hr after first exposure. Unlike black ducks, wood duck responses to jet noise did not decrease uniformly among experimental groups following initial exposure to noise (P = 0.01). We conclude that initial exposure to aircraft noise elicits behavioral responses from black ducks and wood ducks. With continued exposure of aircraft noise, black ducks may become habituated. However, wood ducks did not exhibit the same pattern of response, suggesting that the ability of waterfowl to habituate to aircraft noise may be species specific.

  1. Structural and regulatory functions of keratins

    SciTech Connect

    Magin, Thomas M. . E-mail: t.magin@uni-bonn.de; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Leube, Rudolf E. . E-mail: leube@uni-mainz.de

    2007-06-10

    The diversity of epithelial functions is reflected by the expression of distinct keratin pairs that are responsible to protect epithelial cells against mechanical stress and to act as signaling platforms. The keratin cytoskeleton integrates these functions by forming a supracellular scaffold that connects at desmosomal cell-cell adhesions. Multiple human diseases and murine knockouts in which the integrity of this system is destroyed testify to its importance as a mechanical stabilizer in certain epithelia. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the precise mechanisms responsible for assembly and disease pathology. In addition to these structural aspects of keratin function, experimental evidence accumulating in recent years has led to a much more complex view of the keratin cytoskeleton. Distinct keratins emerge as highly dynamic scaffolds in different settings and contribute to cell size determination, translation control, proliferation, cell type-specific organelle transport, malignant transformation and various stress responses. All of these properties are controlled by highly complex patterns of phosphorylation and molecular associations.

  2. Construction of a Rapid Feather-Degrading Bacterium by Overexpression of a Highly Efficient Alkaline Keratinase in Its Parent Strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens K11.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lian; Wang, Hui; Lv, Yi; Bai, Yingguo; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Yao, Bin

    2016-01-13

    Keratinase is essential to degrade the main feather component, keratin, and is of importance for wide industrial applications. In this study, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain K11 was found to have significant feather-degrading capacity (completely degraded whole feathers within 24 h). The keratinase encoding gene, kerK, was expressed in Bacillus subtilis SCK6. The purified recombinant KerK showed optimal activity at 50 °C and pH 11.0 and degraded whole feathers within 0.5 h in the presence of DTT. The recombinant plasmids harboring kerK were extracted from B. subtilis SCK6 and transformed into B. amyloliquefaciens K11. As a result, the recombinant B. amyloliquefaciens K11 exhibited enhanced feather-degrading capacity with shortened reaction time within 12 h and increased keratinolytic activity (1500 U/mL) by 6-fold. This efficient and rapid feather-degrading character makes the recombinant strain of B. amyloliquefaciens K11 have potential for applications in feather meal preparation and waste feather disposal. PMID:26671753

  3. Against the Rules: Human Keratin K80

    PubMed Central

    Langbein, Lutz; Eckhart, Leopold; Rogers, Michael A.; Praetzel-Wunder, Silke; Schweizer, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    Of the 54 human keratins, five members have, at present, only been characterized at the gene level. In this study we have investigated the expression patterns of keratin K80, whose gene is located at the centromeric end of the type II keratin gene domain. K80 possesses a number of highly unusual properties. Structurally, it is distinctly closer to type II hair keratins than to type II epithelial keratins. Nonetheless, it is found in virtually all types of epithelia (stratified keratinizing/non-keratinizing, hard-keratinizing, as well as non-stratified tissues, and cell cultures thereof). This conspicuously broad expression range implies an unprecedented in vivo promiscuity of K80, which involves more than 20 different type I partners for intermediate filament (IF) formation. Throughout, K80 expression is related to advanced tissue or cell differentiation. However, instead of being part of the cytoplasmic IF network, K80 containing IFs are located at the cell margins close to the desmosomal plaques, where they are tightly interlaced with the cytoplasmic IF bundles abutting there. In contrast, in cells entering terminal differentiation, K80 adopts the “conventional” cytoplasmic distribution. In evolutionary terms, K80 is one of the oldest keratins, demonstrable down to fish. In addition, KRT80 mRNA is subject to alternative splicing. Besides K80, we describe a smaller but fully functional splice variant K80.1, which arose only during mammalian evolution. Remarkably, unlike the widely expressed K80, the expression of K80.1 is restricted to soft and hard keratinizing epithelial structures of the hair follicle and the filiform tongue papilla. PMID:20843789

  4. Feather seal slot for vanes

    SciTech Connect

    Del Mastro, B. P.; Eckart, F.

    1985-10-22

    The slots for accommodating feather seals in the turbine vanes of a gas turbine engine has the end thereof sealed off by use of weld wire inserted into the slot and simultaneously welded and cut to the required length.

  5. Molecular signaling in feather morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Min; Jiang, Ting Xin; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2006-12-01

    The development and regeneration of feathers have gained much attention recently because of progress in the following areas. First, pattern formation. The exquisite spatial arrangement provides a simple model for decoding the rules of morphogenesis. Second, stem cell biology. In every molting, a few stem cells have to rebuild the entire epithelial organ, providing much to learn on how to regenerate an organ physiologically. Third, evolution and development ('Evo-Devo'). The discovery of feathered dinosaur fossils in China prompted enthusiastic inquiries about the origin and evolution of feathers. Progress has been made in elucidating feather morphogenesis in five successive phases: macro-patterning, micro-patterning, intra-bud morphogenesis, follicle morphogenesis and regenerative cycling. PMID:17049829

  6. Molecular signaling in feather morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Min; Jiang, Ting Xin; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The development and regeneration of feathers have gained much attention recently because of progress in the following areas. First, pattern formation. The exquisite spatial arrangement provides a simple model for decoding the rules of morphogenesis. Second, stem cell biology. In every molting, a few stem cells have to rebuild the entire epithelial organ, providing much to learn on how to regenerate an organ physiologically. Third, evolution and development (‘Evo-Devo’). The discovery of feathered dinosaur fossils in China prompted enthusiastic inquiries about the origin and evolution of feathers. Progress has been made in elucidating feather morphogenesis in five successive phases: macro-patterning, micro-patterning, intra-bud morphogenesis, follicle morphogenesis and regenerative cycling. PMID:17049829

  7. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence and association of lipids and keratin in adhesive gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Stark, Alyssa Y; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Lipid and protein aggregates are one of the fundamental materials of biological systems. Examples include cell membranes, insect cuticle, vertebrate epidermis, feathers, hair and adhesive structures known as 'setae' on gecko toes. Until recently gecko setae were assumed to be composed entirely of keratin, but analysis of footprints left behind by geckos walking on surfaces revealed that setae include various kinds of lipids. However, the arrangement and molecular-level behavior of lipids and keratin in the setae is still not known. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to confirm the presence of lipids and investigate their association with keratin in 'pristine' sheds, or natural molts of the adhesive toe pad and non-adhesive regions of the skin. Analysis was also carried on the sheds after they were 'delipidized' to remove surface lipids. Our results show a distribution of similar lipids in both the skin and toe shed but with different dynamics at a molecular level. The present study can help us understand the gecko system both biologically and for design of synthetic adhesives, but the findings may be relevant to the characteristics of lipid-protein interactions in other biological systems. PMID:25902194

  8. Mechanistic investigation of a hemostatic keratin biomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmany, Maria Bahawdory

    Traumatic injury leads to more productive years lost than heart disease, cancer and stroke combined. Trauma is often accompanied and complicated by uncontrolled bleeding. Human hair keratin biomaterials have demonstrated efficacy in controlling hemorrhage in both small and large animal models; however little is known about the mechanism by which these proteins aid in blood clotting. Inspection of the amino acid sequence of known keratins shows the presence of several cellular binding motifs, suggesting a possible mechanism and potentially eliminating the need to functionalize the material's surface for cellular interaction. In addition to small animal studies, the hemostatic activity of keratin hydrogels was explored through porcine hemorrhage models representing both a high flow and low flow bleed. In both studies, keratin hydrogels appeared to lead to a significant reduction in blood loss. The promising results from these in vivo studies provided the motivation for this project. The objective of this dissertation work was to assess the mechanism of action of a hemostatic keratin biomaterial, and more broadly assess the biomaterial-cellular interaction(s). It is our hypothesis that keratin biomaterials have the capacity to specifically interact with cells and lead to propagation of intracellular signaling pathway, specifically contributing to hemostasis. Through application of biochemical and molecular tools, we demonstrate here that keratin biomaterials contribute to hemostasis through two probable mechanisms; integrin mediated platelet adhesion and increased fibrin polymerization. Platelets are the major cell type involved in coagulation both by acting as a catalytic surface for the clotting cascade and adhering to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins providing a soft platelet plug. Because keratin biomaterials have structural and biochemical characteristics similar to ECM proteins, we utilized several adhesion assays to investigate platelet adhesion to keratin

  9. The Lame Duck Superintendent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keane, William G.; Follo, Eric

    1995-01-01

    According to a survey of 46 recently departed Michigan school superintendents, departing superintendents can announce their intention to leave and still maintain a viable leadership role. Lame-duck superintendents should help the board think through the superintendent-selection process and review possible promotions, recognize staff achievements,…

  10. No Duck Left behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Sandi; Thomas, Julie; Motley, Tammy

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a group of fourth graders joined "Pintail Partners"--a year-long collaborative research effort of scientists, students, classroom teachers, preservice teachers, museum educators, and university professors. Students and teachers followed satellite tracking data (marking the pintail duck's spring migration) and interacted with scientists…

  11. Keratin 8 phosphorylation regulates keratin reorganization and migration of epithelial tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Tobias; Armacki, Milena; Eiseler, Tim; Joodi, Golsa; Temme, Claudia; Jansen, Julia; von Wichert, Götz; Omary, M. Bishr; Spatz, Joachim; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration and invasion are largely dependent on the complex organization of the various cytoskeletal components. Whereas the role of actin filaments and microtubules in cell motility is well established, the role of intermediate filaments in this process is incompletely understood. Organization and structure of the keratin cytoskeleton, which consists of heteropolymers of at least one type 1 and one type 2 intermediate filament, are in part regulated by post-translational modifications. In particular, phosphorylation events influence the properties of the keratin network. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) is a bioactive lipid with the exceptional ability to change the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton, leading to reorganization of keratin filaments, increased elasticity, and subsequently increased migration of epithelial tumor cells. Here we investigate the signaling pathways that mediate SPC-induced keratin reorganization and the role of keratin phosphorylation in this process. We establish that the MEK–ERK signaling cascade regulates both SPC-induced keratin phosphorylation and reorganization in human pancreatic and gastric cancer cells and identify Ser431 in keratin 8 as the crucial residue whose phosphorylation is required and sufficient to induce keratin reorganization and consequently enhanced migration of human epithelial tumor cells. PMID:22344252

  12. Maturation of human gingival keratinocytes cultured with fibroblasts from keratinizing and non-keratinizing epithelia.

    PubMed

    Taichman, L; Sciubba, J; Cho, M I

    1982-01-01

    When keratinocytes from epidermis, gingiva and buccal mucosa are cultured in vitro they form a stratified squamous epithelium that lacks evidence of orthokeratinization or parakeratinization. We attempted to induce orthokeratinization or parakeratinization in cultured gingival keratinocytes by co-cultivation with fibroblasts from human skin, gingiva and buccal mucosa. Keratinization was defined by the morphological appearance of the cultured cells and by the presence of large molecular weight keratin proteins (63,000 and 67,000 mol. wt). Using these criteria, the chosen fibroblasts failed to induce any alteration in the pattern of keratinization. We conclude that under our present culture conditions, fibroblasts alone cannot induce keratinization in cultured keratinocytes. PMID:6180716

  13. How and when the regional competence of chick epidermis is established: feathers vs. scutate and reticulate scales, a problem en route to a solution.

    PubMed

    Prin, Fabrice; Dhouailly, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    Most of the chick body is covered with feathers, while the tarsometatarsus and the dorsal face of the digits form oblong overlapping scales (scuta) and the plantar face rounded nonoverlapping scales (reticula). Feathers and scuta are made of beta-keratins, while the epidermis of reticula and inter-appendage or apteria (nude regions) express a-keratins. These regional characteristics are determined in skin precursors and require an epidermal FGF-like signal to be expressed. Both the initiation of appendages, their outline and pattern depend on signals from the dermis, while their asymmetry and outgrowth depend on epidermal competence. For example, the plantar dermis of the central foot pad induces reticula in a plantar or feathers in an apteric epidermis, in a hexagonal pattern starting from the medial point. By manipulating Shh levels in the epidermis, the regional appendage type can be changed from scuta or reticula to feather, whereas the inhibition of Wnt7a, together with a downregulation of Shh gives rise to reticula and in extreme cases, apteria. During morphogenesis of plantar skin, the epidermal expression of En-1, acting as a repressor both of Wnt7a and Shh, is linked to the formation of reticula. Finally, in birds, the complex formation of feathers, which can be easily triggered, even in the extra-embryonic somatopleure, may result from a basic genetic program, whereas the simple formation of scales appears secondarily derived, as requiring a partial (scuta) or total (reticula) inhibition of epidermal outgrowth and beta-keratin gene expression, an inhibition lost for the scuta in the case of feathered feet breeds. PMID:15272378

  14. Genome sequence of a native-feather degrading extremely thermophilic Eubacterium, Fervidobacterium islandicum AW-1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Jik; Jeong, Haeyoung; Park, Gun-Seok; Kwak, Yunyoung; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Sang Jun; Park, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Kang, Hwan Ku; Shin, Jae-Ho; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Fervidobacterium islandicum AW-1 (KCTC 4680) is an extremely thermophilic anaerobe isolated from a hot spring in Indonesia. This bacterium could degrade native chicken feathers completely at 70 °C within 48 h, which is of potential importance on the basis of relevant environmental and agricultural issues in bioremediation and development of eco-friendly bioprocesses for the treatment of native feathers. However, its genomic and phylogenetic analysis remains unclear. Here, we report the high-quality draft genome sequence of an extremely thermophilic anaerobe, F. islandicum AW-1. The genome consists of 2,359,755 bp, which encodes 2,184 protein-coding genes and 64 RNA-encoding genes. This may reveal insights into anaerobic metabolism for keratin degradation and also provide a biological option for poultry waste treatments. PMID:26421103

  15. Immunofluorescence and Immunohistochemical Detection of Keratins.

    PubMed

    Stumptner, Cornelia; Gogg-Kamerer, Margit; Viertler, Christian; Denk, Helmut; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Reliable detection of keratins in tissues is important for investigating their physiological role and for using keratin expression as a biomarker in medical diagnostics. A particular challenge for the detection of keratins by immunofluorescence microscopy or immunohistochemistry relates to the fact that keratin intermediate filaments are obligatory heteropolymers, which may result in dissociation between RNA and protein expression levels in the event that the homeostasis of the expression of the proper keratin partners is disturbed. Furthermore, variable accessibility of epitopes on keratin polypeptides due to conformational changes may lead to false negative results. Preanalytical effects, such as warm/cold ischemia, fixation, tissue processing, and embedding may result in false negative or inappropriate reactions. An experimental design for how to systematically test preanalytical effects and to validate immunohistochemistry protocols is presented. This kind of evaluation should be performed for each antigen and antibody since the various epitopes recognized by antibodies may behave differently. In this context, one has to be aware that different cell structures may be affected or modified differently by various preanalytical procedures and may thus require different preanalytical and staining protocols. PMID:26795470

  16. 14 CFR 35.22 - Feathering propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... intended to feather from all flight conditions, taking into account expected wear and leakage. Any... control systems that use engine oil to feather must incorporate a method to allow the propeller to...

  17. 14 CFR 35.22 - Feathering propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... intended to feather from all flight conditions, taking into account expected wear and leakage. Any... control systems that use engine oil to feather must incorporate a method to allow the propeller to...

  18. 14 CFR 35.22 - Feathering propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... intended to feather from all flight conditions, taking into account expected wear and leakage. Any... control systems that use engine oil to feather must incorporate a method to allow the propeller to...

  19. 14 CFR 35.22 - Feathering propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... intended to feather from all flight conditions, taking into account expected wear and leakage. Any... control systems that use engine oil to feather must incorporate a method to allow the propeller to...

  20. 14 CFR 35.22 - Feathering propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... intended to feather from all flight conditions, taking into account expected wear and leakage. Any... control systems that use engine oil to feather must incorporate a method to allow the propeller to...

  1. Two Feathers Endowment Scholarship Program: Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    The Saint Paul Foundation contracted with the Wilder Research Center to conduct an evaluation of their Two Feathers Scholarship Program. The Two Feathers Scholarship Program is funded through the Two Feathers Endowment, which is one part of the Foundation's SpectrumTrust. SpectrumTrust is a unique partnership between communities of color and The…

  2. Feather on the Cap of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Cathleen Tsz Ka; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2015-07-01

    Through cyclic regeneration, feather stem cells are molded into different shapes under different physiological states. With its distinct morphology, context-dependent growth, and experimental manipulability, the feather provides a rich model to study growth control, regeneration, and morphogenesis in vivo. Recent examples include novel insights revealed by transient perturbation with chemotherapeutic reagents and irradiation during feather growth. PMID:26066892

  3. Feather on the Cap of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Cathleen; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Through cyclic regeneration, feather stem cells are molded into different shapes under different physiological states. With its distinct morphology, context-dependent growth and experimental manipulability, the feather provides a rich model to study growth control, regeneration and morphogenesis in vivo. Recent examples include novel insights revealed by transient perturbation with chemotherapeutic reagents and irradiation during feather growth. PMID:26066892

  4. Increased water contamination and grow-out Pekin duck mortality when raised with water troughs compared to pin-metered water lines using a United States management system

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, A.; Porter, A. L.; Alenciks, E.; Frazier, K.; Best, A. A.; Fraley, S. M.; Fraley, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy has developed as to whether or not pin-metered water lines or water troughs are more appropriate for Pekin ducks. We hypothesized that water troughs would show improved duck body conditions and environmental quality compared to pin-metered water lines. To test this hypothesis, we housed ducks in 2 barns, one with water lines and one with water troughs. Water troughs were constructed to meet RSPCA guidelines for number and density of ducks and with recently described verandas. Ducks were divided into 4 pens per barn (n = 1,000 ducks/pen). The study was then repeated (n = 8 pens per water source) in a cross-over design so the barns each contained the opposite water source to the first experiment. We scored the ducks’ body condition using an established scoring rubric and analyzed using SAS Proc GLM-Mix as binomial data. Ducks housed with water troughs showed higher (thus worse condition; P < 0.001) scores for eyes, nostrils, feather quality, feather cleanliness, and foot pads. We also compared water condition, water quality, and duck mortality using a Student t test for both water sources each week. We found that the water troughs showed higher iron (P < 0.001), nitrites (P < 0.001), pH (P < 0.01), and bacterial growth (P < 0.001). The bacterial growth was shown to have higher (P < 0.001) E. coli, coliforms, and Staphylococcus in the water troughs. Water lines typically showed no bacterial growth in culture-based assays. Ducks housed with water troughs used greater (P = 0.001) volumes of water compared to ducks housed with water lines. Ducks with water troughs also showed a greater percent (P = 0.008) mortality at all ages compared to ducks with water lines. These data suggest that water troughs may not be beneficial for duck welfare and could adversely impact both environment and duck or human health. PMID:26769272

  5. Wild Duck Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    On April 7, 2005, the Deep Impact spacecraft's Impactor Target Sensor camera recorded this image of M11, the Wild Duck cluster, a galactic open cluster located 6 thousand light years away. The camera is located on the impactor spacecraft, which will image comet Tempel 1 beginning 22 hours before impact until about 2 seconds before impact. Impact with comet Tempel 1 is planned for July 4, 2005.

  6. Nonavian feathers in a late Triassic archosaur.

    PubMed

    Jones, T D; Ruben, J A; Martin, L D; Kurochkin, E N; Feduccia, A; Maderson, P F; Hillenius, W J; Geist, N R; Alifanov, V

    2000-06-23

    Longisquama insignis was an unusual archosaur from the Late Triassic of central Asia. Along its dorsal axis Longisquama bore a series of paired integumentary appendages that resembled avian feathers in many details, especially in the anatomy of the basal region. The latter is sufficiently similar to the calamus of modern feathers that each probably represents the culmination of virtually identical morphogenetic processes. The exact relationship of Longisquama to birds is uncertain. Nevertheless, we interpret Longisquama's elongate integumentary appendages as nonavian feathers and suggest that they are probably homologous with avian feathers. If so, they antedate the feathers of Archaeopteryx, the first known bird from the Late Jurassic. PMID:10864867

  7. Individual Consistency of Feather Pecking Behavior in Laying Hens: Once a Feather Pecker Always a Feather Pecker?

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Courtney L.; Rodenburg, T. Bas; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth; Swanson, Janice C.; Siegford, Janice M.

    2015-01-01

    The pecking behavior [severe feather, gentle feather, and aggressive pecks (AP)] of individual White Shaver non-cage laying hens (n = 300) was examined at 21, 24, 27, 32, and 37 weeks. Hens were housed in 30 groups of 10 hens each and on 3 cm litter with access to a feeder, perch, and two nest boxes. The number of severe feather pecks given (SFPG) and received (SFPR) was used to categorize hens as feather peckers (P), victims (V), neutrals (N), or feather pecker-victims (PV) at each age. Hens categorized as PV exhibited pecking behaviors similar to P and received pecks similar to V. SFP given were correlated with APs given, but not with gentle feather pecks (GFP) given throughout the study. State-transition plot maps illustrated that 22.5% of P remained P, while 44% of PV remained PV throughout the duration of the study. Lifetime behavioral categories identified hens as a consistent feather pecker (5%), consistent neutral (3.9%), consistent victim (7.9%), consistent feather pecker-victim (29.4%), or inconsistent (53.8%) in their behavioral patterns throughout their life. Consistent feather peckers performed more SFP than hens of other categories, and consistent neutral hens received fewer GFP than consistent feather PV. No differences in corticosterone or whole blood serotonin levels were observed among the categories. Approximately, half of the population was classified as a feather pecker at least once during the study, while the remainder was never categorized as a feather pecker. Therefore, even if the development and cause of feather pecking may be multifactorial, once the behavior has been developed, some hens may persist in feather pecking. However, as some hens were observed to never receive or perform SFP, emphasis should be made to select for these hens in future breeding practices. PMID:26664935

  8. Vasoactive Properties of Keratin-Derived Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Fiesky; Trach, Simon; Burnett, Luke; Handa, Rahul; Van Dyke, Mark; Callahan, Michael; Smith, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Objective Keratin proteins have been utilized as biomaterials for decades and are currently under investigation for a variety of tissue regeneration and trauma applications. It has been suggested that certain keratins may have the capacity to act as a colloid in fluid resuscitation applications, providing viscosity and oncotic properties that may be beneficial during acute ischemic events. Oxidized keratin derivatives, also known as keratoses, show good blood and cardiovascular compatibility and thus are the subject of this study. Methods The effects of Keratose compounds will be assessed using a topload intravenous infusion model and observation of changes in the microvasculature of the cremaster muscle of rats. Results Keratose resuscitation fluid (KRF) administration resulted in significant vasodilation in the cremaster muscle. This effect was blocked with pretreatment of L-NA to inhibit nitric oxide. Another keratin fraction, alpha keratose, which is the primary viscosic compound, was not found to induce vasodilation. Conclusions The apparent mechanism of vasodilation was found to be nitric oxide- mediated and isolated to a particular purified fraction, the keratin associated proteins (KAP). PMID:21977948

  9. Why Does the Motorbike Feather?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruocco, A.; De Luca, R.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of motorbike feathering has been analysed by writing the angular momentum theorem for non-inertial reference systems. The acceleration, for which the ideal line joining the median points of the axles of the two wheels makes an angle [theta] with the horizontal, has been calculated neglecting air friction and considering that the…

  10. Eagle Feathers, the Highest Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaverhead, Pete

    Following his own advice that elders of the tribe share their knowledge so that "the way of the Indians would come back to the children of today," Pete Beaverhead (1899-1975) tells of the traditions of respect and honor surrounding the eagle feather in a booklet illustrated with black and white drawings. The eagle is an Indian symbol of power and…

  11. Tembusu Virus in Ducks, China

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Cun; Liu, Yuehuan; Ye, Weicheng; Han, Jingwen; Ma, Guoming; Zhang, Dongdong; Xu, Feng; Gao, Xuhui; Tang, Yi; Shi, Shaohua; Wan, Chunhe; Zhang, Chen; He, Bin; Yang, Mengjie; Lu, Xinhao; Huang, Yu; Diao, Youxiang; Ma, Xuejun

    2011-01-01

    In China in 2010, a disease outbreak in egg-laying ducks was associated with a flavivirus. The virus was isolated and partially sequenced. The isolate exhibited 87%–91% identity with strains of Tembusu virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus of the Ntaya virus group. These findings demonstrate emergence of Tembusu virus in ducks. PMID:22000358

  12. Body condition, food habits, and molt status of late-wintering ruddy ducks in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hohman, W.L.; Ankney, C.D.; Roster, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    We studied body condition, food habits, and molt status of late-wintering ruddy ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) using drainwater evaporation ponds in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California. Levels of body fat and protein were similar by sex but varied by age (adults greater than immatures). Masses of breast and leg muscle protein were greatest in adult males and lowest in immature males, but similar in adult and immature females. Fat and protein levels in late-wintering ruddy ducks were independent of their body size. We detected no differences among sex-age classes in the proportion of animal foods consumed. Aquatic invertebrates composed 85% of the diet; midge larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae) and brine flies (Diptera: Ephydridae) were the principal taxa consumed. Molt score by feather region and overall molt score did not vary by sex or age. Light to moderate molt (25 to 50% molting feathers) was recorded in all feather regions. High levels of body fat and protein were attributed to premigratory hyperphagia and consumption of foods with a high protein:energy ratio.

  13. Brazilian keratin hair treatment: a review.

    PubMed

    Weathersby, Courtney; McMichael, Amy

    2013-06-01

    Brazilian keratin treatments are widely available products that are used by women all over the world to straighten hair. Marketers of these products claim that the keratin treatments render naturally curly hair more manageable and frizz-free while enhancing color and shine, giving the hair a healthier appearance. Although widely used, there have been virtually no reports of adverse side effects. Unfortunately, many of the products that are applied by salon professionals contain formaldehyde or its derivatives and are being marketed as safe. PMID:23725308

  14. Evolution of the morphological innovations of feathers.

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O

    2005-11-15

    Feathers are complex assemblages of multiple morphological innovations. Recent research on the development and evolution of feathers has produced new insights into the origin and diversification of the morphological innovations in feathers. In this article, I review and discuss the contribution of three different factors to the evolution of morphological innovations in feathers: feather tubularity, hierarchical morphological modularity, and the co-option molecular signaling modules. The developing feather germ is a tube of epidermis with a central dermal pulp. The tubular organization of the feather germ and follicle produces multiple axes over which morphological differentiation can be organized. Feather complexity is organized into a hierarchy of morphological modules. These morphological modules evolved through the innovative differentiation along multiple different morphological axes created by the tubular feather germ. Concurrently, many of the morphological innovations of feathers evolved through the evolutionary co-option of plesiomorphic molecular signaling modules. Gene co-option also reveals a role for contingency in the evolution of hierarchical morphological innovations. PMID:16208685

  15. Optimizing the biodegradation of two keratinous wastes through a Bacillus subtilis recombinant strain using a response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Embaby, Amira M; Zaghloul, Taha I; Elmahdy, Ahmed R

    2010-11-01

    Statistical optimization of the biodegradation of two keratinous wastes directed by Bacillus subtilis recombinant cells was carried out by means of a response surface methodology. A Box-Behnken design was employed to predict the optimal levels of three variables namely, keratin percent, incubation time and inoculum size. Analysis of variance revealed that, only keratin percent had the highest significant effect. Canonical analysis and ridge max analysis were used to get the optimal levels of the three predictors along with the optimum levels of the responses. The optimal sets of predicted and validated levels of the three variables were [7.69% (w/v) feathers, 96.58 h and 1.28% (v/v) inoculum size] and [8% (w/v) feathers, 98.45 h, 3.9% (v/v) inoculum size] to achieve the highest levels of soluble proteins (1.25-1.7 mg/ml) and NH(2)-free amino groups (245.82-270.0 μmol leucine/ml), respectively upon using three optimized feathers-based media. These values represented 83.67-100% and 100% adequacy for the models of soluble proteins and NH(2)-free amino groups, respectively. While, [8.23% (w/v) sheep wool, 5.52% (v/v) inoculum size and 46.58 h] and [8.33% (w/v) sheep wool, 5.89% (v/v) inoculum size and 63.46 h] were the optimal sets of predicted and validated levels of the above variables to achieve the highest yields of soluble proteins (3.4-4.6 mg/ml) and NH(2)-free amino groups (290.9-302.0 μmol leucine/ml), respectively upon using three optimized sheep wool-based media. These values represented 100% adequacy for the models of soluble proteins and NH(2)-free amino groups. By the end of the optimization strategy, a fold enhancement (2.14-2.43 and 1.78-2.12) in the levels of released soluble proteins and NH(2)-free amino groups, respectively was obtained upon using three optimized feathers-based media. However, a fold enhancement (4.25-5.75 and 2.42-2.5) in the levels of soluble proteins and NH(2)-free amino groups, respectively was obtained upon using three

  16. Sorption studies of human keratinized tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, G. K.; Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, Sverre

    2010-04-01

    Water content is known to be the most important single parameter for keratinized tissue to remain its vital functions. In that sense, a general knowledge of the water binding properties is of great interest, and a reliable measurement setup must be found. Also, revealing the sorption properties of human keratinized tissues is vital towards a calibration of susceptance based skin hydration measurements that already is an important diagnostic tool in clinical dermatology, and we will see that any hysteresis will complicate such a calibration further. In this study we investigated the sorption properties of keratinized tissues such as human epidermal stratum corneum (SC), hair and nail. The study was performed under controlled environmental conditions with a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) instrument, and the water uptake of the keratinized test samples was measured as the relative humidity in the ambient air was altered step-wisely. In this study, vital and characteristic water sorption properties such as the isotherm, relative water uptake, and hysteresis were investigated and will be discussed.

  17. A Mesozoic bird from Gondwana preserving feathers.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ismar de Souza; Novas, Fernando E; Agnolín, Federico L; Isasi, Marcelo P; Freitas, Francisco I; Andrade, José A

    2015-01-01

    The fossil record of birds in the Mesozoic of Gondwana is mostly based on isolated and often poorly preserved specimens, none of which has preserved details on feather anatomy. We provide the description of a fossil bird represented by a skeleton with feathers from the Early Cretaceous of Gondwana (NE Brazil). The specimen sheds light on the homology and 3D structure of the rachis-dominated feathers, previously known from two-dimensional slabs. The rectrices exhibit a row of rounded spots, probably corresponding to some original colour pattern. The specimen supports the identification of the feather scapus as the rachis, which is notably robust and elliptical in cross-section. In spite of its juvenile nature, the tail plumage resembles the feathering of adult individuals of modern birds. Documentation of rachis-dominated tail in South American enantiornithines broadens the paleobiogeographic distribution of basal birds with this tail feather morphotype, up to now only reported from China. PMID:26035285

  18. A Mesozoic bird from Gondwana preserving feathers

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Carvalho, Ismar; Novas, Fernando E.; Agnolín, Federico L.; Isasi, Marcelo P.; Freitas, Francisco I.; Andrade, José A.

    2015-01-01

    The fossil record of birds in the Mesozoic of Gondwana is mostly based on isolated and often poorly preserved specimens, none of which has preserved details on feather anatomy. We provide the description of a fossil bird represented by a skeleton with feathers from the Early Cretaceous of Gondwana (NE Brazil). The specimen sheds light on the homology and 3D structure of the rachis-dominated feathers, previously known from two-dimensional slabs. The rectrices exhibit a row of rounded spots, probably corresponding to some original colour pattern. The specimen supports the identification of the feather scapus as the rachis, which is notably robust and elliptical in cross-section. In spite of its juvenile nature, the tail plumage resembles the feathering of adult individuals of modern birds. Documentation of rachis-dominated tail in South American enantiornithines broadens the paleobiogeographic distribution of basal birds with this tail feather morphotype, up to now only reported from China. PMID:26035285

  19. Duck viral enteritis in domestic muscovy ducks in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davison, S.; Converse, K.A.; Hamir, A.N.; Eckroade, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Duck viral enteritis (DVE) outbreaks occurred at two different locations in Pennsylvania in 1991 and 1992. In the first outbreak, four ducks died out of a group of 30 domestic ducks; in the second outbreak, 65 ducks died out of a group of 114 domestic ducks, and 15 domestic geese died as well. A variety of species of ducks were present on both premises, but only muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata) died from the disease. On necropsy, gross lesions included hepatomegaly with petechial hemorrhages, petechial hemorrhages in the abdominal fat, petechial hemorrhages on the epicardial surface of the heart, and multifocal to coalescing areas of fibrinonecrotic material over the mucosal surface of the trachea, esophagus, intestine, and cloaca. Histologically, the liver had random multifocal areas of necrosis and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in hepatocytes. DVE virus was isolated and identified using muscovy duck embryo fibroblast inoculation and virus neutralization. /// En dos sitios diferentes se presentaron brotes de enteritis viral de los patos en el estados de Pensilvania en los a??os 1991 y 1992. En el primer brote, cuatro de un lote de 30 patos murieron mientras que en el segundo brote murieron 65 patos de un lote de 114 patos y 15 gansos. En ambas localidades exist?-a una variedad de especies de patos, sin embargo, s??lamente los patos almizcleros (Cairina moschata) murieron. A la necropsia, las lesiones macrosc??picas incluyeron hepatomegalia con hemorragias petequiales, hemorragias petequiales en la grasa abdominal y en la superficie del epicardio, y ?!reas multifocales o coalescentes de material fibrinonecr??tico sobre la superficie de la mucosa de la tr?!quea, es??fago, intestino y cloaca. Histol??gicamente, el h?-gado mostraba ?!reas multifocales de necrosis y cuerpos de inclusi??n intranucleares eosinof?-licos en los hepatocitos. El virus de la enteritis viral de los patos fue aislado e identificado usando fibroblasto de embriones de pato almizclero

  20. Structure and optical function of amorphous photonic nanostructures from avian feather barbs: a comparative small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis of 230 bird species

    PubMed Central

    Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Forster, Jason D.; Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng-Fatt; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Cao, Hui; Dufresne, Eric R.; Prum, Richard O.

    2012-01-01

    Non-iridescent structural colours of feathers are a diverse and an important part of the phenotype of many birds. These colours are generally produced by three-dimensional, amorphous (or quasi-ordered) spongy β-keratin and air nanostructures found in the medullary cells of feather barbs. Two main classes of three-dimensional barb nanostructures are known, characterized by a tortuous network of air channels or a close packing of spheroidal air cavities. Using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and optical spectrophotometry, we characterized the nanostructure and optical function of 297 distinctly coloured feathers from 230 species belonging to 163 genera in 51 avian families. The SAXS data provided quantitative diagnoses of the channel- and sphere-type nanostructures, and confirmed the presence of a predominant, isotropic length scale of variation in refractive index that produces strong reinforcement of a narrow band of scattered wavelengths. The SAXS structural data identified a new class of rudimentary or weakly nanostructured feathers responsible for slate-grey, and blue-grey structural colours. SAXS structural data provided good predictions of the single-scattering peak of the optical reflectance of the feathers. The SAXS structural measurements of channel- and sphere-type nanostructures are also similar to experimental scattering data from synthetic soft matter systems that self-assemble by phase separation. These results further support the hypothesis that colour-producing protein and air nanostructures in feather barbs are probably self-assembled by arrested phase separation of polymerizing β-keratin from the cytoplasm of medullary cells. Such avian amorphous photonic nanostructures with isotropic optical properties may provide biomimetic inspiration for photonic technology. PMID:22572026

  1. The association between plumage damage and feather-eating in free-range laying hens.

    PubMed

    Hartcher, K M; Hemsworth, P H; Wilkinson, S J; Thomson, P C; Cronin, G M

    2016-05-01

    Severe feather-pecking (SFP) persists as a highly prevalent and detrimental behavioural problem in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) worldwide. The present experiment investigated the association between feather-eating and plumage damage, a consequence of SFP, in groups of free-range, ISA Brown laying hens. Single feathers were placed on the floor of the home pens. Feathers were sourced from seven different birds. A total of 50 birds in six pens with extensive plumage damage were compared with birds in six control pens with little plumage damage at 41 to 43 weeks of age (n=12 pens, 600 hens). Birds in pens with extensive plumage damage ingested more feathers (F=8.1, DF=1, 8, P=0.02), and also showed shorter latencies to peck at (χ 2=54.5, DF=1, P<0.001), and ingest feathers (χ 2=55.6, DF=1, P<0.001). Birds ingested feathers from a bird in the free-range facility, in which the testing took place, more quickly than from a bird housed in a separate cage facility (χ 2 = 39.0, DF=6, P<0.001). A second experiment investigated the predictive relationship between feather-eating and plumage damage. Feathers were presented to 16 pens of 50 pullets prior to the development of plumage damage, at 15 weeks of age, and then to the same hens after plumage damage had become prominent, at 40 weeks of age. Birds had a higher probability of ingesting feathers (F=142.0, DF=1, 231, P<0.001), pecked feathers more times (F=11.24, DF=1, 239, P<0.001), and also pecked (χ 2 = 127.3, DF=1, P<0.001) and ingested (χ 2=189.3, DF=1, P<0.001) the feathers more quickly at 40 than 15 weeks of age. There was a trend for an interaction, where birds pecked feathers from the rump more times than feathers from the back at 40 weeks of age (F=3.46, DF=1, 237, P=0.06). However, a lack of variability in plumage damage between pens in this experiment precluded investigation of the predictive relationship. The results from the present study confirm the association between feather-eating and plumage

  2. Cysteic Acid in Dietary Keratin is Metabolized to Glutathione and Liver Taurine in a Rat Model of Human Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Wolber, Frances M.; McGrath, Michelle; Jackson, Felicity; Wylie, Kim; Broomfield, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Poultry feathers, consisting largely of keratin, are a low-value product of the poultry industry. The safety and digestibility of a dietary protein produced from keratin (KER) was compared to a cysteine-supplemented casein-based diet in a growing rat model for four weeks. KER proved to be an effective substitute for casein at 50% of the total dietary protein, with no changes in the rats’ food intake, weight gain, organ weight, bone mineral density, white blood cell counts, liver glutathione, or blood glutathione. Inclusion of KER in the diet reduced total protein digestibility from 94% to 86% but significantly increased total dietary cysteine uptake and subsequent liver taurine levels. The KER diet also significantly increased caecum weight and significantly decreased fat digestibility, resulting in a lower proportion of body fat, and induced a significant increase in blood haemoglobin. KER is therefore a safe and suitable protein substitute for casein, and the cysteic acid in keratin is metabolised to maintain normal liver and blood glutathione levels. PMID:26907334

  3. Cysteic Acid in Dietary Keratin is Metabolized to Glutathione and Liver Taurine in a Rat Model of Human Digestion.

    PubMed

    Wolber, Frances M; McGrath, Michelle; Jackson, Felicity; Wylie, Kim; Broomfield, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Poultry feathers, consisting largely of keratin, are a low-value product of the poultry industry. The safety and digestibility of a dietary protein produced from keratin (KER) was compared to a cysteine-supplemented casein-based diet in a growing rat model for four weeks. KER proved to be an effective substitute for casein at 50% of the total dietary protein, with no changes in the rats' food intake, weight gain, organ weight, bone mineral density, white blood cell counts, liver glutathione, or blood glutathione. Inclusion of KER in the diet reduced total protein digestibility from 94% to 86% but significantly increased total dietary cysteine uptake and subsequent liver taurine levels. The KER diet also significantly increased caecum weight and significantly decreased fat digestibility, resulting in a lower proportion of body fat, and induced a significant increase in blood haemoglobin. KER is therefore a safe and suitable protein substitute for casein, and the cysteic acid in keratin is metabolised to maintain normal liver and blood glutathione levels. PMID:26907334

  4. Comparison of game-farm and wild-strain mallard ducks in accumulation of methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The accumulation of mercury was compared in game-farm and wild-strain mallard ducks fed a diet containing 0.5 ppm mercury in the form of methylmercury dicyandiamide. There were no significant differences between the two strains in levels of mercury that accumulated in blood, kidney, liver, breast muscle, brain, eggs, or ducklings. Mercury levels in blood were significantly correlated with levels in other tissues and eggs, as were levels in down feathers of ducklings with levels in carcasses of ducklings. The results indicate that game-farm mallards are probably suitable substitutes for wild mallards in toxicological work, that blood samples can be used to estimate levels of mercury in other tissues of adults, and that down feathers are predictive of mercury levels in duckling carcasses.

  5. Mechanical and biological properties of oxidized horn keratin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanbin; Shan, Guanghua; Cao, Ping; He, Jia; Lin, Zhongshi; Huang, Yaoxiong; Ao, Ningjian

    2015-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanical and biological properties of oxidized keratin materials, which were obtained by using buffalo horns to oxidize. It could provide a way to evaluate their potential for clinical translatability. The characterization on their composition, mechanical properties, and biological responses was performed. It is found that the oxidation process could lead the disulfide bond to break down and then to form sulfonic acid, or even make partial peptide chain to be fragment for the new modification of amino acid. Hence the oxidized horn keratins have lower thermal stability and hydrolytic stability in comparison with horn keratin, but the degradation products of oxidized horn keratins have no significant difference. In addition, the mechanical properties of oxidized horn keratins are poorer than that of horn keratin, but the oxidized horn keratins still have disulfide bonds to form a three-dimensional structure, which benefits for their mechanical properties. The fracture toughness of oxidized horn keratins increases with the increase in the degree of oxidation. After oxidation, the oxidized horn keratins have lower cytotoxicity and lower hemolysis ratio. Moreover, when the oxidized horn keratins, as well as different concentration of degradation products of oxidized horn keratins, are directly in contact with platelet-rich plasma, platelets are not activated. It suggests that the oxidized horn keratins have good hemocompatibility, without triggering blood thrombosis. The implantation experiment in vivo also demonstrates that the oxidized horn keratins are compatible with the tissue, because there are minimal fibrous capsule and less of infiltration of host cells, without causing serious inflammation. In summary, the oxidized horn keratins can act as implanted biomaterial devices that are directly in contact with blood and tissue. PMID:25492180

  6. Brazil The Duck Lagoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of Brazil covers an area of about 298 kilometers x 358 kilometers, and was captured by the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera on December 27, 2001. The 'Lagoa dos Patos', in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, translates to 'the Duck Lagoon'. It was named by 16th century Jesuit settlers, who asked the King of Spain to grant them title to the lagoon so that they could breed ducks. The King consented, but revoked his edict when he discovered that the 'duck-pond' (measuring about 14,000 square kilometers) was one of the largest lagoonal systems in the world. Note the sediment plume emanating from the southern end of the lagoon. Sailors in the 16th century imagined this outlet to be the mouth of a large river. Early Portuguese explorers mistook the entrance to the lagoon for the mouth of a great river and called it the Rio Grande. A series of wave-like points and curls form 'cusps' on the inner shores of the lagoon. The lagoon's characteristics change with short-term tide-induced cyclic perturbations, and with longer term large scale meteorological conditions. The distinctive wavelike 'cusps' along the inner shores result from the circulation, erosion and accumulation of sediments driven by wind and tidal action. The El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) circulation affects precipitation amount and continental runoff, thereby changing the contents of the lagoon waters. High rainfall and increased freshwater discharge during El Nino events correspond with elevated dissolved nutrient concentrations and increased phytoplankton growth. La Nina years are dry and the associated low rainfall reduces the freshwater recharge to the lagoon, causing an increase in salinity. Occasional blooms of toxic cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa), have been registered in the lagoon when nutrient concentrations are elevated. A number of reeds and grasses are important to the lagoon estuary, including widgeon grass

  7. Heat stress impairs the nutritional metabolism and reduces the productivity of egg-laying ducks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xianyong; Lin, Yingcai; Zhang, Hanxing; Chen, Wei; Wang, Shang; Ruan, Dong; Jiang, Zongyong

    2014-03-01

    This research was conducted to determine the effect of heat stress on the nutritional metabolism and productivity of egg-laying shelducks. Healthy shelducks (n=120) in the early laying stage (uniform body weights and normal feed intakes) were randomly assigned to two identical climate chambers and exposed to constant high temperature (34°C) or control temperature (23°C) for 28d. The heat-exposed ducks had reduced feed intakes and laying rates (P<0.05), increased frequency of panting and spreading wings and dull featheration; egg weight, eggshell thickness and strength, and Haugh unit also decreased and malondialdehyde (MDA) content of egg yolk increased (P<0.05). Compared with the control ducks, the plasma concentrations of HCO3(-), phosphorus, glucose, thyroxine and activities of glutamic-pyruvic transaminase and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase were decreased, while there were increased concentrations of corticosterone (P<0.05). The content of MDA and lactate in plasma and liver was greater in heat-exposed than in control ducks, but superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant enzymes (T-AOC) activities and glutathione (GSH) contents were less. The expression of HSP70 gene expression in the liver was increased in heat-stressed ducks. The relative weight of oviduct, number of large ovarian follicles, length of the oviduct all decreased (P<0.05) in heat-treated ducks, as did expression of carbonic anhydrase and calcium binding protein genes in the shell gland as a result of heat stress. In summary, heat stress decreased the productivity of ducks, which related to reduced feed intake, protein synthesis, endocrine dysfunction, less antioxidant capacity, and derangement of calcium and phosphorous balance. PMID:24491646

  8. Influence of plastic slatted floors compared with pine shaving litter on Pekin Duck condition during the summer months.

    PubMed

    Fraley, S M; Fraley, G S; Karcher, D M; Makagon, M M; Lilburn, M S

    2013-07-01

    The management and well-being of commercial Pekin ducks has been studied in the European Union where straw is the predominant litter source. In the United States, however, the most prevalent litter is wood shavings, with a recent trend toward using plastic slatted flooring. A previous study in the United States evaluated the relationship between flooring type (litter, slats) and duck condition during winter months and found very few differences between the 2 in terms of overall duck condition. The purpose of the current study was to reevaluate the 2 flooring systems during the summer months to determine if seasonal differences would interact with flooring type to have an impact on duck condition. Eighteen commercial barns that produce Pekin ducks for Maple Leaf Farms Inc. (Leesburg, IN), located in northern Indiana and southern Wisconsin (n = 9 litter; n = 9 raised slatted floor), were used for this study. Twenty ducks were randomly selected from 5 predetermined areas within each house (n = 100 total) and scored for eye condition, nostril and feather cleanliness, and feather and foot pad quality at 7, 21, and 32 d of age. Environmental data, including carbon monoxide, ammonia, RH, and temperature, were also obtained at each collection day. The only statistical differences in body condition occurred at 7 d; there were more ducks with clear eyes and eye rings on the litter flooring, whereas average nostril scores were better on the plastic slatted floors. Live weight, weight gain per day, flock mortality, and condemnations at the plant were collected, and the only statistical difference was a higher gain per day for ducks reared on slatted floors compared with litter (P < 0.05). There were no differences between flooring systems in the environmental parameters measured within the barns. In summary, there were very few differences between the litter and slatted flooring systems, indicating that there may not be clear advantages for one particular flooring system over

  9. How do keratinizing disorders and blistering disorders overlap?

    PubMed

    Hamada, Takahiro; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Fukuda, Shunpei; Ishii, Norito; Teye, Kwesi; Numata, Sanae; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Inherited keratinizing disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding cornified cell envelope proteins, enzymes and their inhibitors, adhesion molecules, cytoskeletal proteins and others in the epidermis. These molecules are known to regulate differentiation, proliferation and cell adhesions. Intriguingly, some keratinizing disorders show blistering skin lesions, while some inherited blistering disorders show abnormal keratinization. Therefore, hereditary keratinizing and blistering diseases are closely related and show overlapping genetic backgrounds. In this review, we overviewed keratinizing and blistering disorders in terms of overlapping of the two disease groups. Gene mutations in desmosomal components cause striate keratoderma, Naxos disease, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma and plakophilin deficiency, which first show skin fragility and blisters and later hyperkeratosis. Gene mutations in hemidesmosomal components cause various forms of epidermolysis bullosa, some of which show hyperkeratosis on the nails, palms and soles, in addition to blister formation. Diseases with gene mutations in calcium pump proteins are Darier disease and Hailey-Hailey disease, which show clinicopathological overlaps and develop both keratinizing and blistering skin lesions. Finally, gene mutations in epidermal keratins cause epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic ichthyosis, superficial epidermolytic ichthyosis, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma and pachyonychia congenita/focal palmoplantar keratoderma, which show thickening of the palms and soles with underlying blister formation. In general, responsible proteins for diseases developing both keratinizing and blistering conditions are adhesion molecules, calcium pump proteins and keratins, but not connexins, cornified cell envelop proteins, enzymes or inhibitors. It is still unknown how particular keratinizing diseases develop blisters and vice versa. PMID:23039137

  10. Effect of keratin-gelatin and bFGF-gelatin composite film as a sandwich layer for full-thickness skin mesh graft in experimental dogs.

    PubMed

    Thilagar, S; Jothi, N Arul; Omar, A R Sheikh; Kamaruddin, M Y; Ganabadi, Shanthi

    2009-01-01

    Skin grafts are indicated when there is a major loss of skin. Full-thickness skin graft is an ideal choice to reconstruct defect of irregular surface that is difficult to immobilize. Full-thickness mesh grafts can be applied to patch large skin defect when there is less donor site in extensively traumatized and burned surgical patients. The concept of using natural biomaterials such as keratin, basic fibroblast growth factor is slowly gaining popularity in the field of medical research to achieve early healing. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of gelatin conjoined with keratin processed from the poultry feather and commercially available basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) as a sandwich layer in promoting the viability of full-thickness skin mesh grafts. The efficacy was assessed from the observation of clinical, bacteriological, and histopathological findings in three groups of experimental dogs. The clinical observations such as color, appearance and discharge, and hair growth were selected as criteria which indicated good and early acceptance of graft in keratin-gelatin (group II). On bacteriological examination, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus was identified in few animals. Histopathological study of the patched graft revealed early presences of hair follicles; sebaceous gland, and normal thickness of the epidermis in keratin-gelatin in group II treated animals compared with other group (group I-control, group III-bFGF-gelatin). PMID:18161832

  11. Efficient Degradation of Feather by Keratinase Producing Bacillus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Jeevana Lakshmi, P.; Kumari Chitturi, Ch. M.; Lakshmi, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Keratinase producing microorganisms are being increasingly utilized for degradation and recycling of poultry feather waste. Two native strains BF11 (Bacillus subtilis) and BF21 (Bacillus cereus) degrading keratin completely were characterized. The native strains produced more than 10 KU/mL of enzyme. Strain improvement resulted in isolation of MBF11 and MBF21 from BF11 and BF21 isolates, respectively. Optimization of nutritional and physical parameters of these MBF isolates at laboratory scale increased the overall keratinase activity by 50-fold resulting in a yield of 518–520 KU/mL. Fermentation media designed with starch as carbon source and soya bean meal as nitrogen source supported high levels of enzyme production. The optimum conditions for enzyme production were determined to be pH 8.5 and temperatures of 45–55°C for MBF11 and 37°C for MBF21, respectively. Culture filtrate showed a significant increase in the amounts of cysteine, cystine, methionine, and total free amino acids during the fermentation period. The ratio of organic sulphur concentration was also considerably higher than that of the inorganic sulphate in the culture filtrate suggesting the hydrolysis of disulphide by the isolates. PMID:24298284

  12. Free radical facilitated damage of ungual keratin.

    PubMed

    Khengar, Rajeshree H; Brown, Marc B; Turner, Rob B; Traynor, Matthew J; Holt, Katherine B; Jones, Stuart A

    2010-09-01

    Thioglycolic acid (TA) and urea hydrogen peroxide (urea H(2)O(2)) are thought to disrupt alpha-keratin disulfide links in the nail. However, optimal clinical use of these agents to improve the treatment of nail disorders is currently hindered by a lack of fundamental data to support their mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to investigate how the redox environment of ungual keratin, when manipulated by TA and urea H(2)O(2), influenced the properties of the nail barrier. Potentiometric and voltammetric measurements demonstrated that urea H(2)O(2) obeyed the Nernst equation for a proton coupled one-electron transfer redox process while TA underwent a series of redox reactions that was complicated by electrode adsorption and dimer formation. The functional studies demonstrated that nail permeability, measured through TBF penetration (38.51+/-10.94 microg/cm(2)/h) and nail swelling (244.10+/-14.99% weight increase), was greatest when relatively low concentrations of the thiolate ion were present in the applied solution. Limiting the thiolate ion to low levels in the solution retards thiolate dimerisation and generates thiyl free radicals. It appeared that this free radical generation was fundamental in facilitating the redox-mediated keratin disruption of the ungual membrane. PMID:20550963

  13. Effect of Duck Feet Gelatin Concentration on Physicochemical, Textural, and Sensory Properties of Duck Meat Jellies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of duck feet gelatin concentration on the physicochemical, textural and sensory properties of duck meat jellies. Duck feet gelatin was prepared with acidic swelling and hot water extraction. In this study, four duck meat jellies were formulated with 3, 4, 5, and 6% duck feet gelatin, respectively. In the preliminary experiment, the increase in duck feet gelatin ranged from 5 to 20%, resulting in a significant (p<0.001) increase in the color score, but a decline in the hardness and dispersibility satisfaction scores. An increase in the added amount of duck feet gelatin contributed to decreased lightness and increased protein content in duck meat jellies. Regarding the textural properties, increase in the added amount of duck feet gelatin highly correlated with the hardness in the center (p<0.01, R2=0.91), and edge (p<0.01, R2=0.89), of duck meat jellies. Meanwhile, the increase in duck feet gelatin decreased the score for textural satisfaction; duck meat jellies containing 6% duck feet gelatin had a significantly lower textural satisfaction score, than those containing 3% duck feet gelatin (p<0.05). Furthermore, a significant difference in the overall acceptance of duck meat jellies formulated with 5% duck feet gelatin was observed, as compared to those prepared with 3% duck feet gelatin. Therefore, this study suggested that duck feet gelatin is a useful ingredient for manufacturing cold-cut meat products. In consideration of the sensory acceptance, the optimal level of duck feet gelatin in duck meat jellies was determined to be 5%. PMID:26761181

  14. Pathobiology of avian influenza in domestic ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Domestic ducks are an important source of food and income in many parts of the world. The susceptibility of domestic ducks to avian influenza (AI) viruses varies depending on many factors, including the species and the age of the ducks, the virus strain, and management practices. Although wild wat...

  15. Tembusu-Related Flavivirus in Ducks, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Thontiravong, Aunyaratana; Ninvilai, Patchareeporn; Tunterak, Wikanda; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Chaiyavong, Supassma; Angkabkingkaew, Kingkarn; Mungkundar, Chatthapon; Phuengpho, Woranuch; Oraveerakul, Kanisak

    2015-01-01

    Since 2013, outbreaks of disease caused by duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) have been observed in layer and broiler duck farms in Thailand. The virus is closely related to Chinese DTMUVs and belongs to the Ntaya group of mosquitoborne flaviviruses. These findings represent the emergence of DTMUV in ducks in Thailand. PMID:26584133

  16. Keratin metaplasia in the epithelial lining of odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, Thangadurai; Ramesh, Venkatapathy; Oza, Nirima; Panda, Abikshyeet; Balamurali, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find the prevalence of keratin metaplasia and its relation with clinico-pathological profile of the odontogenic cyst. Materials and Methods: Odontogenic cysts were studied histologically with special stains to identify the presence of keratin and compared with various parameters such as underlying connective tissue inflammation, average epithelial thickness, and site of the cyst, type of the cyst, age and the sex of the patient. Results: Of 71 cases of various odontogenic cysts, 26 (36.6%) cases exhibited keratinization in the epithelial lining. In cysts with severe inflammation there is absence of keratinization. Conclusions: This study reveals higher prevalence of keratin metaplasia in the odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, inflammation is found to be one of factor influencing keratin metaplasia. PMID:25210349

  17. Changes in feather condition in relation to feather pecking and aggressive behaviour in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Bilcík, B; Keeling, L J

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this experiment was to describe and examine the relationship between pecks received by individual birds and the feather and skin damage of those birds at different ages. The effect of group size was also studied. Laying hens were raised in floor pens in group sizes of 15, 30, 60 and 120 birds, each with 4 replicates. Behavioural observations were performed at the ages of 22, 27, 32 and 37 weeks. Detailed feather scoring was carried out at the ages of 18, 23, 28 and 33 weeks. Behavioural observations focused on the number of feather pecks (gentle and severe) and aggressive pecks received, and on the part of the body that was pecked. Scoring of feather and skin damage focused on the same 11 parts of the body. Increasing numbers of aggressive pecks received were associated with decreased body weight and increased feather damage at the ages of 27 and 32 weeks. The number of severe feather pecks received was significantly related with feather damage at all ages; however, no relation with gentle feather pecks received was found. Group size had a significant effect on feather condition, with large group sizes having most feather damage. PMID:10579400

  18. Are melanized feather barbs stronger?

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael; Johnson, Amy S

    2004-01-01

    Melanin has been associated with increased resistance to abrasion, decreased wear and lowered barb breakage in feathers. But, this association was inferred without considering barb position along the rachis as a potentially confounding variable. We examined the cross-sectional area, breaking force, breaking stress, breaking strain and toughness of melanized and unmelanized barbs along the entire rachis of a primary feather from an osprey (Pandion haliaetus). Although breaking force was higher for melanized barbs, breaking stress (force divided by cross-sectional area) was greater for unmelanized barbs. But when position was considered, all mechanical differences between melanized and unmelanized barbs disappeared. Barb breaking stress, breaking strain and toughness decreased, and breaking stiffness increased, distally along the rachis. These proximal-distal material property changes are small and seem unlikely to affect flight performance of barbs. Our observations of barb bending, breaking and morphology, however, lead us to propose a design principle for barbs. We propose that, by being thicker-walled dorso-ventrally, the barb's flexural stiffness is increased during flight; but, by allowing for twisting when loaded with dangerously high forces, barbs firstly avoid failure by bending and secondly avoid complete failure by buckling rather than rupturing. PMID:14668312

  19. Paediatric feather duvet hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Louise E; Guy, Emma

    2015-01-01

    A previously well 12-year-old boy was admitted with a second insidious episode of dyspnoea, dry cough, anorexia, weight loss and chest pain. At admission, he had an oxygen requirement, significantly impaired lung function and reduced exercise tolerance. Initial forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 26%; a 3 min exercise test stopped at 1 min 50 when saturations dropped to 85%. CT scan showed ground-glass nodularity with lymphadenopathy. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and viruses were negative, and microbiology results for the BAL were reported in the absence of histology. This is because at the time the BAL samples were collected, a lung biopsy was performed. The biopsy was consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Echo was normal and CT pulmonary angiography negative. After taking a thorough history, exposure to feather duvets prior to each episode was elicited. IgG of avian precipitants was raised at 10.6 mgA/L (normal <10 mgA/L). Clinical improvement began with avoidance of exposure, while the boy was an inpatient. Antigen avoidance continued on discharge. He continues to improve since discharge. The condition was diagnosed as hypersensitivity pneumonitis secondary to exposure to antigens from feather duvets. PMID:26113584

  20. An outbreak of duck viral enteritis (duck plague) in domestic Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata domesticus) in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Campagnolo, E R; Banerjee, M; Panigrahy, B; Jones, R L

    2001-01-01

    Duck viral enteritis (DVE) was diagnosed in an outbreak of the disease in a resident population of Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata domesticus) on a privately owned multispecies game bird production facility in Illinois, where it claimed 625 ducks. This disease condition had not been reported previously in domestic ducks in Illinois. Although other varieties and age groups of domestic waterfowl (i.e., black ducks, rhumen ducks, Pekin ducks, ducklings, and geese) were present on the game bird farm, the morbidity and mortality (100%) in this epornitic was solely limited to adult ducks of the Muscovy lineage. The clinical signs in the affected ducks were lethargy, diarrhea, dehydration, and death within 2-3 hr of onset of symptoms. Gross pathologic changes were nonspecific and included ecchymotic hemorrhage, effusion of fluid and blood within body cavities reflective of an acute systemic infectious disease. Light microscopic findings were necrosis of primarily digestive lining epithelium and variable lymphohistiocytic infiltration within mucosal and serosal connective tissues. Intranuclear inclusions resembling characteristic herpetic (i.e., Cowdry type A) inclusions were observed primarily in the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive tracts; liver; and spleen. Esophageal candidiasis, bacteriosis, and systemic Pasteurella anatipestifer infections, thought to be concurrent or opportunistic infections, were present in several ducks. DVE virus was demonstrated in infected Muscovy duck embryo fibroblast cells by direct DVE virus-specific fluorescent antibody staining. PMID:11417839

  1. Mercury in feathers from Chilean birds: Influence of location, feeding strategy, and taxonomic affiliation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ochoa-Acua, H.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Gross, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    This study reports baseline concentrations of mercury (Hg) in feathers from different species of birds sampled at various locations off the Chilean coast (Southeastern Pacific). Hg concentrations were evaluated in relation to geographic location, taxonomic affiliation, and feeding strategies. Between January and March of 1995, we collected mature contour feathers from 116 birds belonging to 22 species, mostly seabirds. Birds were collected from 10 different locations (26??09???S, 70??40???W to 54??56???S, 67??37???W). Feather Hg concentrations ranged from 0.11 to 13 ??gg-1 dry weight. We found differences in feather Hg concentrations across taxonomic groups, with highest concentrations in petrels, shearwaters, and albatrosses (Procellaridae), followed by boobies (Sulidae), gulls, terns, skuas (Laridae) and cormorants (Phalacrocoracidae). Ibises and oystercatchers (Threskiornithidae and Charadriidae) had intermediate values, whereas ducks and geese (Anatidae) contained the least amount of Hg. Oceanic species preying on mesopelagic fish (the Procellariformes albatrosses, petrels, and fulmars) had over twice as much Hg (overall average of 3.9 ??gg-1) when compared to the rest of the species sampled (overall average of 1.5 ??gg-1). We did not find higher Hg concentrations in birds inhabiting the more heavily industrialized and urbanized areas of the country (central and northern regions), but in birds inhabiting the remote Juan Ferna??ndez Archipelago. This is not surprising, since all the Procellariformes (the group with highest Hg values in this study) were collected from these islands. Except for Hg in Kermadec petrels (mean of 12 ??gg-1), the range of Hg values reported here (0.11-7.3 ??gg-1) fell below those known to cause adverse health and reproductive effects in birds. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mercury in feathers from Chilean birds: Influence of location, feeding strategy and taxonomic affiliation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ochoa-Acuna, H.G.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Gross, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    This study reports baseline concentrations of mercury (Hg) in feathers from different species of birds sampled at various locations off the Chilean coast (Southeastern Pacific). Hg concentrations were evaluated in relation to geographic location, taxonomic affiliation, and feeding strategies. Between January and March of 1995, we collected mature contour feathers from 116 birds belonging to 22 species, mostly seabirds. Birds were collected from 10 different locations (26?09'S, 70?40'W to 54?56'S, 67?37'W). Feather Hg concentrations ranged from 0.11 to 13 ?g g-1 dry weight. We found differences in feather Hg concentrations across taxonomic groups, with highest concentrations in petrels, shearwaters, and albatrosses (Procellaridae), followed by boobies (Sulidae), gulls, terns, skuas (Laridae) and cormorants (Phalacrocoracidae). Ibises and oystercatchers (Threskiornithidae and Charadriidae) had intermediate values, whereas ducks and geese (Anatidae) contained the least amount of Hg. Oceanic species preying on mesopelagic fish (the Procellariformes albatrosses, petrels, and fulmars) had over twice as much Hg (overall average of 3.9 ?g g-1) when compared to the rest of the species sampled (overall average of 1.5 ?g g-1). We did not find higher Hg concentrations in birds inhabiting the more heavily industrialized and urbanized areas of the country (central and northern regions), but in birds inhabiting the remote Juan Fernandez Archipelago. This is not surprising, since all the Procellariformes (the group with highest Hg values in this study) were collected from these islands. Except for Hg in Kermadec petrels (mean of 12 ?g g-1), the range of Hg values reported here (0.11-7.3 ?g g-1) fell below those known to cause adverse health and reproductive effects in birds.

  3. The control of feather pecking by serotonin.

    PubMed

    van Hierden, Yvonne M; de Boer, Sietse F; Koolhaas, Jaap M; Korte, S Mechiel

    2004-06-01

    Feather-pecking behavior in laying hens (Callus gallus) may be considered a behavioral pathology, comparable to human psychopathological disorders. Scientific knowledge on the causation of such disorders strongly suggests involvement of the serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) system in feather pecking. Previously, chicks from a high-feather-pecking (HFP) line were found to display lower 5-HT turnover levels than chicks from a low-feather-pecking (LFP) line (in response to acute stress; Y. M. van Hierden et al., 2002). The present study investigated whether low 5-HT neurotransmission modulates feather pecking. First. S-15535, a somatodendritic 5-HT-sub(1A) autoreceptor agonist, was demonstrated to be an excellent tool for reducing 5-HT turnover in the forebrain of LFP and HFP chicks. Second, the most effective dose of S-15535 (4.0 mg/kg body weight) significantly increased severe feather-pecking behavior. The results confirmed the postulation that the performance of feather pecking is triggered by low 5-HT neurotransmission. PMID:15174935

  4. Age-class separation of blue-winged ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hohman, W.L.; Moore, J.L.; Twedt, D.J.; Mensik, John G.; Logerwell, E.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate determination of age is of fundamental importance to population and life history studies of waterfowl and their management. Therefore, we developed quantitative methods that separate adult and immature blue-winged teal (Anas discors), cinnamon teal (A. cyanoptera), and northern shovelers (A. clypeata) during spring and summer. To assess suitability of discriminant models using 9 remigial measurements, we compared model performance (% agreement between predicted age and age assigned to birds on the basis of definitive cloacal or rectral feather characteristics) in different flyways (Mississippi and Pacific) and between years (1990-91 and 1991-92). We also applied age-classification models to wings obtained from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service harvest surveys in the Mississippi and Central-Pacific flyways (wing-bees) for which age had been determined using qualitative characteristics (i.e., remigial markings, shape, or wear). Except for male northern shovelers, models correctly aged lt 90% (range 70-86%) of blue-winged ducks. Model performance varied among species and differed between sexes and years. Proportions of individuals that were correctly aged were greater for males (range 63-86%) than females (range 39-69%). Models for northern shovelers performed better in flyway comparisons within year (1991-92, La. model applied to Calif. birds, and Calif. model applied to La. birds: 90 and 94% for M, and 89 and 76% for F, respectively) than in annual comparisons within the Mississippi Flyway (1991-92 model applied to 1990-91 data: 79% for M, 50% for F). Exclusion of measurements that varied by flyway or year did not improve model performance. Quantitative methods appear to be of limited value for age separation of female blue-winged ducks. Close agreement between predicted age and age assigned to wings from the wing-bees suggests that qualitative and quantitative methods may be equally accurate for age separation of male blue-winged ducks. We interpret annual

  5. Binding Interactions of Keratin-Based Hair Fiber Extract to Gold, Keratin, and BMP-2

    PubMed Central

    de Guzman, Roche C.; Tsuda, Shanel M.; Ton, Minh-Thi N.; Zhang, Xiao; Esker, Alan R.; Van Dyke, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Hair-derived keratin biomaterials composed mostly of reduced keratin proteins (kerateines) have demonstrated their utility as carriers of biologics and drugs for tissue engineering. Electrostatic forces between negatively-charged keratins and biologic macromolecules allow for effective drug retention; attraction to positively-charged growth factors like bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) has been used as a strategy for osteoinduction. In this study, the intermolecular surface and bulk interaction properties of kerateines were investigated. Thiol-rich kerateines were chemisorbed onto gold substrates to form an irreversible 2-nm rigid layer for surface plasmon resonance analysis. Kerateine-to-kerateine cohesion was observed in pH-neutral water with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 1.8 × 10−4 M, indicating that non-coulombic attractive forces (i.e. hydrophobic and van der Waals) were at work. The association of BMP-2 to kerateine was found to be greater (KD = 1.1 × 10−7 M), within the range of specific binding. Addition of salts (phosphate-buffered saline; PBS) shortened the Debye length or the electrostatic field influence which weakened the kerateine-BMP-2 binding (KD = 3.2 × 10−5 M). BMP-2 in bulk kerateine gels provided a limited release in PBS (~ 10% dissociation in 4 weeks), suggesting that electrostatic intermolecular attraction was significant to retain BMP-2 within the keratin matrix. Complete dissociation between kerateine and BMP-2 occurred when the PBS pH was lowered (to 4.5), below the keratin isoelectric point of 5.3. This phenomenon can be attributed to the protonation of keratin at a lower pH, leading to positive-positive repulsion. Therefore, the dynamics of kerateine-BMP-2 binding is highly dependent on pH and salt concentration, as well as on BMP-2 solubility at different pH and molarity. The study findings may contribute to our understanding of the release kinetics of drugs from keratin biomaterials and allow for the

  6. The pathogenicity of novel duck reovirus in Cherry Valley ducks.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Wang, Yao; Wang, Youling; Yu, Kexiang; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie

    2016-08-30

    The novel duck reovirus (NDRV) is an emerging, contagious infection. To better realize the pathogenic mechanism of NDRV in ducks, an infection experiment was conducted. The resulting data demonstrated that typical gross lesions were observed in the infected ducks. NDRV was able to replicate in various tissues, leading to these pathological lesions, especially on the liver and spleen. Real-time quantitative PCR showed that the expression of most innate immune-related genes was up-regulated and the antiviral innate immune response could be established in both the liver and spleen. This study indicates that NDRV is a pantropic virus. To resist viral infection, several pathogen recognition receptors can cooperatively recognize NDRV and initiate innate immunity, but the responses are different between different tissues. As far as we know, this is the first systematic investigation of the pathogenicity of NDRV in Cherry Valley ducks based on the host's innate immunity, and these data will provide new insights into the further study of the disease. PMID:27527781

  7. Immune responses of ducks infected with duck Tembusu virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Wang, Yao; Li, Rong; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Jinzhou; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2015-01-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) can cause serious disease in ducks, characterized by reduced egg production. Although the virus has been isolated and detection methods developed, the host immune responses to DTMUV infection are unclear. Therefore, we systematically examined the expression of immune-related genes and the viral distribution in DTMUV-infected ducks, using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results show that DTMUV replicates quickly in many tissues early in infection, with the highest viral titers in the spleen 1 day after infection. Rig-1, Mda5, and Tlr3 are involved in the host immune response to DTMUV, and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (Il-1β, –2, –6, Cxcl8) and antiviral proteins (Mx, Oas, etc.) are also upregulated early in infection. The expression of Il-6 increased most significantly in the tissues tested. The upregulation of Mhc-I was observed in the brain and spleen, but the expression of Mhc-II was upregulated in the brain and downregulated in the spleen. The expression of the interferons was also upregulated to different degrees in the spleen but that of the brain was various. Our study suggests that DTMUV replicates rapidly in various tissues and that the host immune responses are activated early in infection. However, the overexpression of cytokines may damage the host. These results extend our understanding of the immune responses of ducks to DTMUV infection, and provide insight into the pathogenesis of DTMUV attributable to host factors. PMID:26005441

  8. Mortality from duck plague virus in immunosuppressed adult mallard ducks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, D.R.; Yuill, T.M.; Burgess, E.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Environmental contaminants contain chemicals that, if ingested, could affect the immunological status of wild birds, and in particular, their resistance to infectious disease. Immunosuppression caused by environmental contaminants, could have a major impact on waterfowl populations, resulting in increased susceptibility to contagious disease agents. Duck plague virus has caused repeated outbreaks in waterfowl resulting in mortality. In this study, several doses of cyclophosphamide (CY), a known immunosuppressant, were administered to adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) to determine if a resultant decrease in resistance to a normally sub-lethal strain of duck plague virus would occur, and induce mortality in these birds. Death occurred in birds given CY only, and in birds given virus and CY, but not in those given virus only. There was significantly greater mortality and more rapid deaths in the duck plague virus-infected groups than in groups receiving only the immunosuppressant. A positively correlated dose-response effect was observed with CY mortalities, irrespective of virus exposure. A fuel oil and a crude oil, common environmental contaminants with immunosuppressive capabilities, were tested to determine if they could produce an effect similar to that of CY. Following 28 days of oral oil administration, the birds were challenged with a sub-lethal dose of duck plague virus. No alteration in resistance to the virus (as measured by mortality) was observed, except in the positive CY control group.

  9. Mortality from duck plague virus in immunosuppressed adult mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, D.R.; Yuill, Thomas M.; Burgess, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental contaminants contain chemicals that, if ingested, could affect the immunological status of wild birds, and in particular, their resistance to infectious disease. Immunosuppression caused by environmental contaminants, could have a major impact on waterfowl populations, resulting in increased susceptibility to contagious disease agents. Duck plague virus has caused repeated outbreaks in waterfowl resulting in mortality. In this study, several doses of cyclophosphamide (CY), a known immunosuppressant, were administered to adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) to determine if a resultant decrease in resistance to a normally sub-lethal strain of duck plague virus would occur, and induce mortality in these birds. Death occurred in birds given CY only, and in birds given virus and CY, but not in those given virus only. There was significantly greater mortality and more rapid deaths in the duck plague virus-infected groups than in groups receiving only the immunosuppressant. A positively correlated dose-response effect was observed with CY mortalities, irrespective of virus exposure. A fuel oil and a crude oil, common environmental contaminants with immunosuppressive capabilities, were tested to determine if they could produce an effect similar to that of CY. Following 28 days of oral oil administration, the birds were challenged with a sub-lethal dose of duck plague virus. No alteration in resistance to the virus (as measured by mortality) was observed, except in the positive CY control group.

  10. Microrheology of keratin networks in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paust, T.; Paschke, S.; Beil, M.; Marti, O.

    2013-12-01

    Microrheology is a valuable tool to determine viscoelastic properties of polymer networks. For this purpose measurements with embedded tracer beads inside the extracted network of pancreatic cancer cells were performed. Observing the beads motion with a CCD-high-speed-camera leads to the dynamic shear modulus. The complex shear modulus is divided into real and imaginary parts which give insight into the mechanical properties of the cell. The dependency on the distance of the embedded beads to the rim of the nucleus shows a tendency for a deceasing storage modulus. We draw conclusions on the network topology of the keratin network types based on the mechanical behavior.

  11. Microrheology of keratin networks in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Paust, T; Paschke, S; Beil, M; Marti, O

    2013-12-01

    Microrheology is a valuable tool to determine viscoelastic properties of polymer networks. For this purpose measurements with embedded tracer beads inside the extracted network of pancreatic cancer cells were performed. Observing the beads motion with a CCD-high-speed-camera leads to the dynamic shear modulus. The complex shear modulus is divided into real and imaginary parts which give insight into the mechanical properties of the cell. The dependency on the distance of the embedded beads to the rim of the nucleus shows a tendency for a decreasing storage modulus. We draw conclusions on the network topology of the keratin network types based on the mechanical behavior. PMID:24305115

  12. On the uniqueness of color patterns in raptor feathers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    For this study, I compared sequentially molted feathers for a few captive raptors from year to year and symmetrically matched feathers (left/right pairs) for many raptors to see if color patterns of sequential feather pairs were identical or if symmetrical pairs were mirror-image identical. Feather pairs were found to be identical only when without color pattern (e.g., the all-white rectrices of Bald Eagles [Haliaeetus leucocephalus]). Complex patterns were not closely matched, but some simple patterns were sometimes closely matched, although not identical. Previous claims that complex color patterns in feather pairs are fingerprint-identical (and therefore that molted feathers from wild raptors can be used to identify breeding adults from year to year with certainty) were found to be untrue: each feather is unique. Although it is unwise to be certain of bird of origin using normal feathers, abnormal feathers can often be so used. ?? 2009 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  13. Chronological ageing of human hair keratin fibres.

    PubMed

    Thibaut, S; de Becker, E; Bernard, B A; Huart, M; Fiat, F; Baghdadli, N; Luengo, G S; Leroy, F; Angevin, P; Kermoal, A M; Muller, S; Peron, M; Provot, G; Kravtchenko, S; Saint-Léger, D; Desbois, G; Gauchet, L; Nowbuth, K; Galliano, A; Kempf, J Y; Silberzan, I

    2010-12-01

    Examination of very long hair (length > 2.4 m) using a large range of evaluation methods including physical, chemical, biochemical and microscopic techniques has enabled to attain a detailed understanding of natural ageing of human hair keratin fibres. Scrutinizing hair that has undergone little or no oxidative aggression--because of the absence of action of chemical agents such as bleaching or dyeing--from the root to the tip shows the deterioration process, which gradually takes place from the outside to the inside of the hair shaft: first, a progressive abrasion of the cuticle, whilst the cortex structure remains unaltered, is evidenced along a length of roughly 1 m onwards together with constant shine, hydrophobicity and friction characteristics. Further along the fibre, a significant damage to cuticle scales occurs, which correlates well with ceramides and 18-Methyl Eicosanoic Acid (18-MEA) decline, and progressive decrease in keratin-associated protein content. Most physical descriptors of mechanical and optical properties decay significantly. This detailed description of natural ageing of human hair fibres by a fine analysis of hair components and physical parameters in relationship with cosmetic characteristics provides a time-dependent 'damage scale' of human hair, which may help in designing new targeted hair care formulations. PMID:20384898

  14. Ice Formation Delay on Penguin Feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadehbirjandi, Elaheh; Tavakoli-Dastjerdi, Faryar; St. Leger, Judy; Davis, Stephen H.; Rothstein, Jonathan P.; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz

    2015-11-01

    Antarctic penguins reside in a harsh environment where air temperature may reach -40 °C with wind speed of 40 m/s and water temperature remains around -2.2 °C. Penguins are constantly in and out of the water and splashed by waves, yet even in sub-freezing conditions, the formation of macroscopic ice is not observed on their feathers. Bird feathers are naturally hydrophobic; however, penguins have an additional hydrophobic coating on their feathers to reinforce their non-wetting properties. This coating consists of preen oil which is applied to the feathers from the gland near the base of the tail. The combination of the feather's hydrophobicity and surface texture is known to increase the contact angle of water drops on penguin feathers to over 140 ° and classify them as superhydrophobic. We here develop an in-depth analysis of ice formation mechanism on superhydrophobic surfaces through careful experimentations and development of a theory to address how ice formation is delayed on these surfaces. Furthermore, we investigate the anti-icing properties of warm and cold weather penguins with and without preen oil to further design a surface minimizing the frost formation which is of practical interest especially in aircraft industry.

  15. Enhancing the zone of keratinized tissue around implants

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Sarita Joshi; Singh, Pranav Kumar; Mohammed, Shammas; Patel, R. K. V.

    2015-01-01

    Presence or absence of a minimal zone of keratinized tissue around dental implants has been a matter of controversy. However, a consensus exists that a thick zone of keratinized zone around implants provides a prosthetic friendly environment, facilitates precise prosthetic procedures, allows oral hygiene maintenance, resists recession, and enhances esthetic blending. The aim of the present case series was to increase the zone of keratinized soft tissue around dental implants supporting overdentures. Three different surgical techniques modified palatal roll technique with and without apical positioning and connective tissue graft (CTG) were used to achieve this goal. There was a significant gain of keratinized soft tissue with all the three techniques, which remained stable over a period of 6 months. Modified palatal roll technique with and without apical positioning and CTG are simpler surgical techniques, which can be successfully and predictably used for increasing the zone of keratinized tissue around implants. PMID:26929509

  16. Fabrication of keratin-silica hydrogel for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Prachi; Madhan, Balaraman

    2016-09-01

    In the recent past, keratin has been fabricated into different forms of biomaterials like scaffold, gel, sponge, film etc. In lieu of the myriad advantages of the hydrogels for biomedical applications, a keratin-silica hydrogel was fabricated using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Textural analysis shed light on the physical properties of the fabricated hydrogel, inturn enabling the optimization of the hydrogel. The optimized keratin-silica hydrogel was found to exhibit instant springiness, optimum hardness, with ease of spreadability. Moreover, the hydrogel showed excellent swelling with highly porous microarchitecture. MTT assay and DAPI staining revealed that keratin-silica hydrogel was biocompatible with fibroblast cells. Collectively, these properties make the fabricated keratin-silica hydrogel, a suitable dressing material for biomedical applications. PMID:27207052

  17. Insights on the mechanical behavior of keratin fibrils.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Egipto; Cruz, Célia F; Azoia, Nuno G; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-08-01

    A computational molecular model of a truncated keratin protofibril (8 chains of hair keratin, PDB provided in Supplementary material) was used, to run a series of steered molecular dynamics simulations obtaining strain-stress curves. These results were compared with experimental mechanical data on hair fibers. Our data demonstrate that the molecular dynamics simulations can model hair mechanical properties. Simulations done in vacuum showed a better agreement with experimental Young's Modulus (YM) values. The role of hydrogen bonds and the secondary structure of keratin on the mechanical properties was evaluated in detail. The incubation with a fragment of one surfactant protein, the SPD-2 peptide (QAAFSQ), showed the improvement of YM of the hair keratin either by simulations and experimental data. For the first, our research provides mechanistic insights on mechanical microscopic properties of keratin protofibrils through molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27164495

  18. Maturation experiments reveal bias in the fossil record of feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Maria; Field, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The evolutionary history of birds and feathers is a major focus in palaeobiology and evolutionary biology. Diverse exceptionally preserved birds and feathered dinosaurs from Jurassic and Cretaceous biotas in China have provided pivotal evidence of early feathers and feather-like integumentary features, but the true nature of many of these fossil soft tissues is still debated. Interpretations of feathers at intermediate developmental stages (i.e. Stages II, III and IV) and of simple quill-like (Stage I) feathers are particularly controversial. This reflects key uncertainties relating to the preservation potential of feathers at different evolutionary-developmental stages, and to the relative preservation potential of diagnostic features of Stage I feathers and hair. To resolve these issues, we used high pressure-high temperature autoclave experiments to simulate the effects of burial on modern feathers from the Black Coucal (Centropus grilii) and Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), and on human hair. Our results reveal profound differences in the recalcitrance of feathers of different types during maturation: Stage I and Stage V feathers retain diagnostic morphological and ultrastructural details following maturation, whereas other feather types do not. Further, the morphology and arrangement of certain ultrastructural features diagnostic of Stages III and IV, e.g. barbules, are preferentially lost during maturation. These results indicate a pervasive bias in the fossil record of feathers, whereby preservation of feathers at Stages I and V is favored. Critical stages in the evolution of feathers, i.e. Stages II, III and IV, are less likely to be preserved and more likely to be misinterpreted as feathers at earlier developmental stages. Our discovery has major implications for our understanding of the fidelity of the fossil record of feathers and provides a framework for testing the significance of putative examples of fossil feathers at different developmental

  19. Effects of Plectin Depletion on Keratin Network Dynamics and Organization

    PubMed Central

    Moch, Marcin; Windoffer, Reinhard; Schwarz, Nicole; Pohl, Raphaela; Omenzetter, Andreas; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Herb, Fabian; Chaisaowong, Kraisorn; Merhof, Dorit; Ramms, Lena; Fabris, Gloria; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2016-01-01

    The keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton protects epithelial cells against various types of stress and is involved in fundamental cellular processes such as signaling, differentiation and organelle trafficking. These functions rely on the cell type-specific arrangement and plasticity of the keratin system. It has been suggested that these properties are regulated by a complex cycle of assembly and disassembly. The exact mechanisms responsible for the underlying molecular processes, however, have not been clarified. Accumulating evidence implicates the cytolinker plectin in various aspects of the keratin cycle, i.e., by acting as a stabilizing anchor at hemidesmosomal adhesion sites and the nucleus, by affecting keratin bundling and branching and by linkage of keratins to actin filament and microtubule dynamics. In the present study we tested these hypotheses. To this end, plectin was downregulated by shRNA in vulvar carcinoma-derived A431 cells. As expected, integrin β4- and BPAG-1-positive hemidesmosomal structures were strongly reduced and cytosolic actin stress fibers were increased. In addition, integrins α3 and β1 were reduced. The experiments furthermore showed that loss of plectin led to a reduction in keratin filament branch length but did not alter overall mechanical properties as assessed by indentation analyses using atomic force microscopy and by displacement analyses of cytoplasmic superparamagnetic beads using magnetic tweezers. An increase in keratin movement was observed in plectin-depleted cells as was the case in control cells lacking hemidesmosome-like structures. Yet, keratin turnover was not significantly affected. We conclude that plectin alone is not needed for keratin assembly and disassembly and that other mechanisms exist to guarantee proper keratin cycling under steady state conditions in cultured single cells. PMID:27007410

  20. A comparison between Marek's disease virus production in feather pulp versus feather follicle epithelium (FFE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although Marek's disease viral load in chickens can be assessed by quantifying the viral DNA in homogenized feather tips, this value may not correlate to the viral load being shed. This study was designed to determine what portion of the feather tip tissue is most reflective of virus load in the sh...

  1. Condition dependence of iridescent wing flash-marks in two species of dabbling ducks.

    PubMed

    Legagneux, Pierre; Théry, Marc; Guillemain, Matthieu; Gomez, Doris; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2010-03-01

    Growing empirical evidence supports the hypothesis of male mate choice for female ornaments which are thought to reflect individual quality and future breeding ability. While structural colors are clearly used in mate choice and pairing, the condition dependence of such traits is less obvious, particularly in females. We present spectral measurements of wing flash-marks in two species of dabbling ducks during the pairing period and evaluate color and brightness contrasts as seen through the mallard's (Anas platyrhynchos) visual system. We tested for possible relationships between body size (and condition) and feather measurements both on captive and wild individuals. By analyzing reflectance spectra of semi-captive mallards soon after the molting period, we found that brightness was condition related. Color contrast was positively related to body size, but only in females. In wild ducks, color contrast was positively related to body size in the common teal A. crecca only for females. These results suggest that female color traits are likely to be used by males for mate choice, and support the hypothesis that the structural color is condition-dependent. Finally, brightness contrast decreased over time in both duck species. Natural abrasion or the effect of keratinolytic bacteria could explain such pattern. PMID:20117191

  2. Capturing American black ducks in tidal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, M.K., Sr.; Haramis, G.M.; Jorde, D.G.; Stotts, D.B.

    2000-01-01

    We modified conventional, funnel-entrance dabbling duck bait traps to increase captures for banding of American Black Ducks (Anas rubripes) in tidal saltmarsh habitats of Smith Island, Maryland, one of the few remaining strongholds for breeding Black Ducks in the Chesapeake Bay. Traps and trapping techniques were adapted to tidal creeks and refined to improve capture rate, reduce mortality, and minimize interference by gulls. Best results were achieved by synchronizing trapping with predawn, low-tide foraging patterns of Black Ducks. Trap entrances were critical to retaining ducks, and use of loafing platforms reduced overall mortality to 3% of captures per year. We captured 3071 Black Ducks during the 14-year period, 1984-199

  3. Selection and crossbreeding in relation to plumage color inheritance in three chinese egg type duck breeds (anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Lin, R L; Chen, H P; Rouvier, R; Poivey, J P

    2014-08-01

    could provide a solution for producing 3-way crossbred ducks Putian White×(Putian-Ma ×Shan Ma) and Putian White×(Shan Ma×Putian-Ma), with the desired Shan Ma feather color. PMID:25083099

  4. Biodegradation of a keratin waste and the concomitant production of detergent stable serine proteases from Paecilomyces lilacinus.

    PubMed

    Cavello, I A; Cavalitto, S F; Hours, R A

    2012-07-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus (LPS 876) efficiently degraded keratin in chicken feather during submerged cultivation producing extracellular proteases. Characterization of crude protease activity was done including its compatibility in commercial detergents. Optimum pH and temperature were 10.0 and 60 °C, respectively. Protease activity was enhanced by Ca²⁺ but was strongly inhibited by PMSF and by Hg²⁺ suggesting the presence of thiol-dependent serine proteases. The crude protease showed extreme stability toward non-ionic (Tween 20, Tween 85, and Triton X-100) and anionic (SDS) surfactants, and relative stability toward oxidizing agent (H₂O₂ and sodium perborate). In addition, it showed excellent stability and compatibility with various solid and liquid commercial detergents from 30 to 50 °C. The enzyme preparation retained more than 95% of its initial activity with solid detergents (Ariel™ and Drive™) and 97% of its original activity with a liquid detergent (Ace™) after pre-incubation at 40 °C. The protective effect of polyols (propylene glycol, PEG 4000, and glycerol) on the heat inactivation was also examined and the best results were obtained with glycerol from 50 to 60 °C. Considering its promising properties, P. lilacinus enzymatic preparation may be considered as a candidate for use in biotechnological processes (i.e., as detergent additive) and in the processing of keratinous wastes. PMID:22447221

  5. Macroscopic, Histologic, and Ultrastructural Lesions Associated with Avian Keratin Disorder in Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus)

    PubMed Central

    Van Hemert, C.; Armién, A. G.; Blake, J. E.; Handel, C. M.; O’Hara, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    An epizootic of beak abnormalities (avian keratin disorder) was recently detected among wild birds in Alaska. Here we describe the gross, histologic, and ultrastructural features of the disease in 30 affected adult black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus). Grossly, there was elongation of the rhamphotheca, with varying degrees of lateral deviation, crossing, and gapping between the upper and lower beak. Not uncommonly, the claws were overgrown and there was alopecia, scaling, and crusting of the skin. The most prominent histopathologic features in the beak included epidermal hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and core-like intrusions of necrotic debris. In affected birds, particularly those with moderate to severe beak overgrowth, there was remodeling of premaxillary and mandibular bones and various dermal lesions. Lesions analogous to those found in beaks were present in affected claws, indicating that this disorder may target both of these similar tissues. Mild to moderate hyperkeratosis occurred in other keratinized tissues, including skin, feather follicles, and, occasionally, sinus epithelium, but typically only in the presence of microbes. We did not find consistent evidence of a bacterial, fungal, or viral etiology for the beak lesions. The changes observed in affected birds did not correspond with any known avian diseases, suggesting a potentially novel hyperkeratotic disorder in wild birds. PMID:23399850

  6. Macroscopic, histologic, and ultrastructural lesions associated with avian keratin disorder in Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Hemert, C.; Armién, A. G.; Blake, J.E.; Handel, C.M.; O'Hara, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    An epizootic of beak abnormalities (avian keratin disorder) was recently detected among wild birds in Alaska. Here we describe the gross, histologic, and ultrastructural features of the disease in 30 affected adult black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus). Grossly, there was elongation of the rhamphotheca, with varying degrees of lateral deviation, crossing, and gapping between the upper and lower beak. Not uncommonly, the claws were overgrown, and there was alopecia, scaling, and crusting of the skin. The most prominent histopathologic features in the beak included epidermal hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and core-like intrusions of necrotic debris. In affected birds, particularly those with moderate to severe beak overgrowth, there was remodeling of premaxillary and mandibular bones and various dermal lesions. Lesions analogous to those found in beaks were present in affected claws, indicating that this disorder may target both of these similar tissues. Mild to moderate hyperkeratosis occurred in other keratinized tissues, including skin, feather follicles, and, occasionally, sinus epithelium, but typically only in the presence of microbes. We did not find consistent evidence of a bacterial, fungal, or viral etiology for the beak lesions. The changes observed in affected birds did not correspond with any known avian diseases, suggesting a potentially novel hyperkeratotic disorder in wild birds.

  7. Isolation and Analysis of Keratins and Keratin-Associated Proteins from Hair and Wool.

    PubMed

    Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Plowman, Jeffrey E; Harland, Duane P

    2016-01-01

    The presence of highly cross-linked protein networks in hair and wool makes them very difficult substrates for protein extraction, a prerequisite for further protein analysis and characterization. It is therefore imperative that these cross-links formed by disulfide bridges are first disrupted for the efficient extraction of proteins. Chaotropes such as urea are commonly used as efficient extractants. However, a combination of urea and thiourea not only improves recovery of proteins but also results in improved resolution of the keratins in 2DE gels. Reductants also play an important role in protein dissolution. Dithiothreitol effectively removes keratinous material from the cortex, whereas phosphines, like Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, remove material from the exocuticle. The relative extractability of the keratins and keratin-associated proteins is also dependent on the concentration of chaotropes, reductants, and pH, thus providing a means to preferentially extract these proteins. Ionic liquids such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM(+)[Cl](-)) are known to solubilize wool by disrupting noncovalent interactions, specifically intermolecular hydrogen bonds. BMIM(+)[Cl](-) proved to be an effective extractant of wool proteins and complementary in nature to chaotropes such as urea and thiourea for identifying unique peptides of wool proteins using mass spectrometry (MS). Successful identification of proteins resolved by one- or two-dimensional electrophoresis and MS is highly dependent on the optimal recovery of its protease-digested peptides with an efficient removal of interfering substances. The detergent sodium deoxycholate used in conjunction with Empore™ disks improved identification of proteins by mass spectrometry leading to higher percentage sequence coverage, identification of unique peptides and higher score. PMID:26795475

  8. Calcification provides mechanical reinforcement to whale baleen α-keratin

    PubMed Central

    Szewciw, L. J.; de Kerckhove, D. G.; Grime, G. W.; Fudge, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    Hard α-keratins such as hair, nail, wool and horn are stiff epidermal appendages used by mammals in a variety of functions including thermoregulation, feeding and intraspecific competition. Hard α-keratins are fibre-reinforced structures consisting of cytoskeletal elements known as ‘intermediate filaments’ embedded in an amorphous protein matrix. Recent research has shown that intermediate filaments are soft and extensible in living keratinocytes but become far stiffer and less extensible in keratinized cells, and this stiffening may be mediated by air-drying. Baleen, the keratinous plates used by baleen whales during filter feeding, is an unusual mammalian keratin in that it never air dries, and in some species, it represents the most heavily calcified of all the hard α-keratins. We therefore tested the hypothesis that whale baleen is stiffened by calcification. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive description of baleen material properties and show that calcification contributes to overcoming the shortcomings of stiffening this hard α-keratin without the benefit of air-drying. We also demonstrate striking interspecies differences in the calcification patterns among three species of baleen whales and provide novel insights into the function and evolution of this unusual biomaterial. PMID:20392736

  9. Keratins Are Altered in Intestinal Disease-Related Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Helenius, Terhi O; Antman, Cecilia A; Asghar, Muhammad Nadeem; Nyström, Joel H; Toivola, Diana M

    2016-01-01

    Keratin (K) intermediate filaments can be divided into type I/type II proteins, which form obligate heteropolymers. Epithelial cells express type I-type II keratin pairs, and K7, K8 (type II) and K18, K19 and K20 (type I) are the primary keratins found in the single-layered intestinal epithelium. Keratins are upregulated during stress in liver, pancreas, lung, kidney and skin, however, little is known about their dynamics in the intestinal stress response. Here, keratin mRNA, protein and phosphorylation levels were studied in response to murine colonic stresses modeling human conditions, and in colorectal cancer HT29 cells. Dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-colitis was used as a model for intestinal inflammatory stress, which elicited a strong upregulation and widened crypt distribution of K7 and K20. K8 levels were slightly downregulated in acute DSS, while stress-responsive K8 serine-74 phosphorylation (K8 pS74) was increased. By eliminating colonic microflora using antibiotics, K8 pS74 in proliferating cells was significantly increased, together with an upregulation of K8 and K19. In the aging mouse colon, most colonic keratins were upregulated. In vitro, K8, K19 and K8 pS74 levels were increased in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in HT29 cells. In conclusion, intestinal keratins are differentially and dynamically upregulated and post-translationally modified during stress and recovery. PMID:27626448

  10. Keratinization of the esophageal epithelium of domesticated mammals.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Wilfried; Schoennagel, Britta; Kacza, Johannes; Busche, Roger; Hornickel, Isabelle Nina; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Schnapper, Anke

    2014-01-01

    We studied the esophageal epithelium for keratinization characteristics from samples of domesticated mammals of three nutrition groups (herbivores: horse, cattle, sheep; omnivores: pig, dog, rat; carnivores: cat) using histochemistry (keratins, disulfides), sulfur measurements, and cryo-SEM. Keratins were found in all esophageal layers of all species, except for the equine Stratum corneum. The positive reaction staining of Pan-keratin was remarkable, but decreased in intensity toward the outer layers, whereas in the pig and cat, staining was confined to the corneal layer. The herbivores revealed positive staining reactions in the upper Stratum spinosum, particularly in the sheep. Regarding single keratins, CK6 immunostating was found in most esophageal layers, but only weakly or negatively in the porcine and equine Stratum corneum. CK13 staining was restricted to the sheep and here was found in all layers. CK14 could be detected in the equine and feline Stratum basale, and upper vital layers of the dog and rat. CK17 appeared only in the Stratum spinosum and Stratum granulosum, but in all layers of the dog and cat. Disulfides reacted strongest in the Stratum corneum of the herbivores, as corroborated by the sulfur concentrations in the esophagus. Our study emphasized that keratins are very important for the mechanical stability of the epithelial cells and cell layers of the mammalian esophagus. The role of these keratins in the esophageal epithelia is of specific interest owing to the varying feed qualities and mechanical loads of different nutrition groups, which have to be countered. PMID:23948668

  11. The molecular organization of the beta-sheet region in Corneous beta-proteins (beta-keratins) of sauropsids explains its stability and polymerization into filaments.

    PubMed

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Eckhart, Leopold; Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    The hard corneous material of avian and reptilian scales, claws, beak and feathers is mainly derived from the presence of proteins formerly known as beta-keratins but now termed Corneous beta-proteins of sauropsids to distinguish them from keratins, which are members of the intermediate filament protein family. The modeling of the conserved 34 amino acid residues long central beta-sheet region of Corneous beta-proteins using an ab initio protein folding and structure prediction algorithm indicates that this region is formed by four antiparallel beta-sheets. Molecular dynamic simulations and Molecular Mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) analysis showed that the disposition of polar and apolar amino acids within the beta-region gives rise to an amphipathic core whose stability is further increased, especially in an aqueous environment, by the association into a dimer due to apolar interactions and specific amino-acid interactions. The dimers in turn polymerize into a 3nm thick linear beta-filament due to van der Waals and hydrogen-bond interactions. It is suggested that once this nuclear core of anti-parallel sheets evolved in the genome of a reptilian ancestor of the extant reptiles and birds about 300 millions years ago, new properties emerged in the corneous material forming scales, claws, beaks and feathers in these amniotes based on the tendency of these unique corneous proteins to form stable filaments different from keratin intermediate filaments or sterical structures formed by other corneous proteins so far known. PMID:26965557

  12. Sulfur mustard induces the formation of keratin aggregates in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dillman, James F; McGary, Kriston L; Schlager, John J

    2003-12-01

    The vesicant sulfur mustard is an alkylating agent that has the capacity to cross-link biological molecules. We are interested in identifying specific proteins that are altered upon sulfur mustard exposure. Keratins are particularly important for the structural integrity of skin, and several genetically inherited blistering diseases have been linked to mutations in keratin 5 and keratin 14. We examined whether sulfur mustard exposure alters keratin biochemistry in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. Western blotting with specific monoclonal antibodies revealed the formation of stable high-molecular-weight "aggregates" containing keratin 14 and/or keratin 5. These aggregates begin to form within 15 min after sulfur mustard exposure. These aggregates display a complex gel electrophoresis pattern between approximately 100 and approximately 200 kDa. Purification and analysis of these aggregates by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of keratin 14 and keratin 5 and indicate that at least some of the aggregates are composed of keratin 14-keratin 14, keratin 14-keratin 5, or keratin 5-keratin 5 dimers. These studies demonstrate that sulfur mustard induces keratin aggregation in keratinocytes and support further investigation into the role of keratin aggregation in sulfur mustard-induced vesication. PMID:14644625

  13. 14 CFR 25.1153 - Propeller feathering controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... feathering is accomplished by movement of the propeller pitch or speed control lever, there must be means to prevent the inadvertent movement of this lever to the feathering position during normal operation....

  14. 14 CFR 25.1153 - Propeller feathering controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... feathering is accomplished by movement of the propeller pitch or speed control lever, there must be means to prevent the inadvertent movement of this lever to the feathering position during normal operation....

  15. 14 CFR 25.1153 - Propeller feathering controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... feathering is accomplished by movement of the propeller pitch or speed control lever, there must be means to prevent the inadvertent movement of this lever to the feathering position during normal operation....

  16. 14 CFR 25.1153 - Propeller feathering controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... feathering is accomplished by movement of the propeller pitch or speed control lever, there must be means to prevent the inadvertent movement of this lever to the feathering position during normal operation....

  17. 14 CFR 25.1153 - Propeller feathering controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... feathering is accomplished by movement of the propeller pitch or speed control lever, there must be means to prevent the inadvertent movement of this lever to the feathering position during normal operation....

  18. Oil-removal enhancement in media with keratinous or chitinous wastes by hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria isolated from oil-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-González, E; Rojas-Avelizapa, N G; Cruz-Camarillo, R; García-Mena, J; Rojas-Avelizapa, L I

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate oil-degrading bacteria that use chitin or keratin as carbon sources from oil contaminated soils; and additionally to study if oil removal by these bacteria is enhanced when a chitinous or a keratinous waste is added to the culture media. To isolate the above-mentioned bacteria, 12 soil samples were collected close to an oil-well. Such soils showed unsuitable nutrients content, but their counts of heterotrophic bacteria ranged within 10(5)-10(8) CFU g(-1) soil, of which 0.1-77% corresponded to oil hydrocarbon-degrading ones. By sampling on plates, 109 oil-degrading bacterial isolates were obtained. Their keratinase and chitinase activities were then screened by plate assays and spectrophotometric methods, resulting in 13 isolates that were used to integrate two mixed cultures, one keratinolytic and the other chitinolytic. These mixed cultures were grown in media with oil, or oil supplemented with chicken-feathers or shrimp wastes. The oil-hydrocarbon removal was measured by gas chromatography. Results showed that keratinolytic bacteria were better enzyme producers than the chitinolytic ones, and that oil removal in the presence of chicken-feathers was 3.8 times greater than with shrimp wastes, and almost twice, in comparison with oil-only added cultures. Identification of microorganisms from the mixed cultures by 16S rDNA, indicated the presence of seven different bacterial genera; Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, Brevibacillus, Bacillus, Micrococcus, Lysobacter and Nocardiodes. These findings suggest that the isolated microorganisms and the chicken-feather wastes could be applied to the cleaning of oil-contaminated environments, whether in soil or water. PMID:18613616

  19. The Edar subfamily in feather placode formation.

    PubMed

    Drew, Caroline F; Lin, Chih Min; Jiang, Ting Xin; Blunt, Geoff; Mou, Chunyan; Chuong, Cheng Ming; Headon, Denis J

    2007-05-01

    A subgroup of the TNF receptor family, composed of Edar, Troy and Xedar, are implicated in the development of ectodermal appendages, such as hair follicles, teeth and sweat glands. We have isolated chicken orthologues of these three receptors and analysed their roles in early feather development. Conservation of protein sequences between mammalian and avian proteins is variable, with avian Edar showing the greatest degree of sequence identity. cXedar differs from its mammalian orthologue in that it contains an intracellular death domain. All three receptors are expressed during early feather morphogenesis and dominant negative forms of each receptor impair the epithelial contribution to feather bud morphogenesis, while the dermal contribution appears unaffected. Hyperactivation of each receptor leads to more widespread assumption of placode fate, though in different regions of the skin. Receptor signaling converges on NF-kappaB, and inhibiting this transcription factor alters feather bud number and size in a stage-specific manner. Our findings illustrate the roles of these three receptors during avian skin morphogenesis and also suggest that activators of feather placode fate undergo mutual regulation to reach a decision on skin appendage location and size. PMID:17362907

  20. Blood parasites of wood ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Knisley, J.O., Jr.; Knipling, G.D.

    1971-01-01

    Examination of blood films from wood ducks (Aix sponsa) from several northeastern states revealed Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, Plasmodium and a typanosome. Haemoproteus occurred in all areas sampled and birds of the year from Massachusetts demonstrated the highest incidence during the last 2 weeks in August. Leucocytozoon was most prevalent in more northern areas. P. circumflexum and a trypanosome are reported for the first time from this host.

  1. Dexamethasone inhibits corticosterone deposition in feathers of greenfinches.

    PubMed

    Hõrak, Peeter; Männiste, Marju; Meitern, Richard; Sild, Elin; Saks, Lauri; Sepp, Tuul

    2013-09-15

    Corticosterone (CORT) content of feathers is a potent source of information about activation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis during feather growth, which is used for assessment of well-being and stress history of individuals and populations in avian studies. However, little is known about factors affecting deposition of CORT into feathers and how feather CORT covaries with other markers of stress imposed upon individuals during feather growth. We addressed these questions by measuring CORT levels in feathers of wild-caught greenfinches (Carduelis chloris) brought into captivity. One tail feather was removed from all the birds upon arrival to the laboratory and the CORT levels of replacement feathers, grown in captivity were recorded. The birds were subjected to treatments of immune activation (by injection of phytohaemagglutinin) and synthetic glucocorticoid (dexamethasone, DEX) administration. Only DEX injection affected feather CORT levels. DEX-injected birds deposited on average 37% less of CORT in their feathers than saline-injected birds. Despite significant effects of DEX and immune activation treatments on differential leukocyte counts, we did not find any correlations between CORT and leukocyte hemoconcentrations or heterophil/lymphocyte ratios (a haematological index of stress), measured at three stages of feather growth. Our findings provide novel evidence that feather CORT levels are sensitive to manipulation of hormonal balance of birds, thereby supporting the diagnostic value of feather CORT measurements. However, we did not find any evidence about covariation between feather CORT and other markers of stress perceived during the period of feather growth. This calls for further research on information content of feather CORT, preferably in experiments manipulating more diverse array of psychological, immunological and abiotic stressors. PMID:23856540

  2. A New Primer for Sex Identification of Ducks and a Minimally Invasive Technique for Sampling of Allantoic Fluid to Detect Sex during Bird Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifang; Hu, Yan; Song, Chi; Ji, Gaige; Liu, Hongxiang; Xu, Wenjuan; Ding, Jing

    2015-01-01

    During the early incubation period of the duck, from embryonic day 1 to 13, a precise identification of the sex may be difficult. In a preliminary test, we found a defect in the use of the classical P2/P8, 1237L/1272H, and 2550F/2718R primers for chromo-helicase-DNA-binding 1 gene (CHD1) as a PCR-based test to identify sex in ducks. Therefore, universal PCR primers HPF/HPR for sexing ducks were designed. The PCR product was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed using GenBank. The effectiveness of the primers was compared using samples of blood and feathers from adult birds and chorioallantoic membranes and allantoic fluid (AF) of embryos as a source of DNA. The 495-bp CHD1-Z and the 351-bp CHD1-W PCR amplicons could be easily distinguished on a 3% agarose gel, and females (ZW) displayed 2 visible bands whereas only a single band was found in males (ZZ). The results indicated that HPF/HPR primers were highly efficient and more reliable than the classical primers used for sexing ducks. During the design of the new primers, an AF sampling technique was established to collect a very small amount of AF from free-living birds. This technique, which was minimally invasive, had no adverse effects on either embryos or the post-hatching survival of young ducks and could be used in developmental biology research in birds. PMID:25895514

  3. Engineering stem cells into organs: Topobiological transformations demonstrated by beak, feather and other ectodermal organ morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Wu, Ping; Plikus, Maksim; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall Bruce

    2015-01-01

    To accomplish regenerative medicine, several critical issues in stem cell biology have to be solved, including the identification of sources, expanding populations, building them into organs, and assimilating them to the host. While many stem cells can now differentiate along certain lineages, knowledge on how to use them to build organs lags behind. Here we focus on topobiological events that bridge this gap, i.e., the regulation of number, size, axis, shape, arrangement, and architecture during organogenesis. Rather than reviewing detailed molecular pathways known to disrupt organogenesis when perturbed, we highlight conceptual questions at the topobiological level, and ask how cellular and molecular mechanisms can work to explain these phenomena. The avian integument is used as the Rosetta stone because the molecular activities are linked to organ forms which are visually apparent and have functional consequences during evolution as shown by the fossil record and extant diversity. For example, we show that feather pattern formation is the equilibrium of stochastic interactions among multiple activators and inhibitors. While morphogens and receptors are coded by the genome, the result is based on the summed physical-chemical properties on the whole cell surface and is self-organizing. For another example, we show developing chicken and duck beaks contain differently configured localized growth zones (LoGZ) and can modulate chicken beaks to phenocopy diverse avian beaks in Nature by altering the position, number, size, and duration of LoGZs. Different organs have their unique topology and we also discuss shaping mechanisms of the liver and different ways of branching morphogenesis. Multi-primordia organs (e.g., feathers, hairs, teeth) have additional topographic specificities across the body surface, an appendage field, or within an appendage. Promises and problems in reconstituted feather / hair follicles and other organs are discussed. Finally, simple

  4. Dkk2/Frzb in the dermal papillae regulates feather regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chu, Qiqi; Cai, Linyan; Fu, Yu; Chen, Xi; Yan, Zhipeng; Lin, Xiang; Zhou, Guixuan; Han, Hao; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng-ming; Wu, Wei; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-03-15

    Avian feathers have robust growth and regeneration capability. To evaluate the contribution of signaling molecules and pathways in these processes, we profiled gene expression in the feather follicle using an absolute quantification approach. We identified hundreds of genes that mark specific components of the feather follicle: the dermal papillae (DP) which controls feather regeneration and axis formation, the pulp mesenchyme (Pp) which is derived from DP cells and nourishes the feather follicle, and the ramogenic zone epithelium (Erz) where a feather starts to branch. The feather DP is enriched in BMP/TGF-β signaling molecules and inhibitors for Wnt signaling including Dkk2/Frzb. Wnt ligands are mainly expressed in the feather epithelium and pulp. We find that while Wnt signaling is required for the maintenance of DP marker gene expression and feather regeneration, excessive Wnt signaling delays regeneration and reduces pulp formation. Manipulating Dkk2/Frzb expression by lentiviral-mediated overexpression, shRNA-knockdown, or by antibody neutralization resulted in dual feather axes formation. Our results suggest that the Wnt signaling in the proximal feather follicle is fine-tuned to accommodate feather regeneration and axis formation. PMID:24463139

  5. In-situ modification, regeneration, and application of keratin biopolymer for arsenic removal.

    PubMed

    Khosa, Muhammad A; Ullah, Aman

    2014-08-15

    Chemical modification of chicken feathers (CF) and their subsequent role in arsenic removal from water is presented in this paper. The ground CF were chemically treated with four selective dopants such as poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) diglycidyl ether, poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), allyl alcohol (AA) and TrisilanolCyclohexyl POSS. After modification, the solubilized keratin was regenerated by precipitation at acidic pH. The structural changes and properties of modified biopolymer were compared with untreated CF and confirmed by different characterization techniques such as SEM, FTIR, XRD, and DSC. The TGA data was used to discuss thermal decomposition and kinetic behavior of modified biopolymer exhaustively. The modified biopolymers were further investigated as biosorbents for their application in As(III) removal from water. The AA and POSS supported biosorbents executed high removal capacity for As(III) up to 11.5 × 10(-2)and 11.0 × 10(-2)mg/g from 100ml arsenic polluted water solution respectively. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG(0), ΔH(0), ΔS(0) were also evaluated with the finding that overall sorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Based on linear and non-linear regression analysis, Freundlich Isotherm model showed good fit for obtained sorption data apart from high linear regression values supporting Langmuir isotherm model in sorption of As(III). PMID:24996154

  6. Feather eating and its associations with plumage damage and feathers on the floor in commercial farms of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Riber, A B; Hinrichsen, L K

    2016-07-01

    Feather eating has been associated with feather pecking, which continues to pose economic and welfare problems in egg production. Knowledge on feather eating is limited and studies of feather eating in commercial flocks of laying hens have not been performed previously. Therefore, the main objective was to investigate feather eating and its association with plumage damage and floor feather characteristics in commercial flocks of layers in barn and organic production systems. The study was performed in 13 flocks of barn layers and 17 flocks of organic layers. Each flock was visited at around 32 and 62 weeks of age. During both visits, the plumage condition was assessed and the density of floor feathers recorded. In week 62, droppings and floor feathers were collected. Droppings were examined for presence of feather content, whereas length, downiness and pecking damage were recorded for each floor feather. In week 62, a higher prevalence of hens with poor plumage condition was found in barn (22.2%) compared with organic production systems (7.4%; P<0.001), but the prevalence of droppings with feather content did not differ between the two production systems (8.5% in barn v. 4.3% in organic; P=0.99). Our hypothesis about a positive correlation between feather eating and plumage damage was not supported as no correlation was found between the prevalence of poor plumage condition and the prevalence of droppings with feather content. However, the prevalence of pecking damaged floor feathers was positively correlated both with prevalence of droppings with feather content (P<0.05) and poor plumage condition (P<0.01), indicating a possible association between feather eating and feather pecking. In conclusion, it was confirmed that feather eating occurs on-farm, but feather eating was only found to be positively correlated to the number of floor feathers with pecking damage and not as expected to the prevalence of plumage damage. More research is needed into the sources from

  7. Effect of age on the pathogenesis of duck tembusu virus in Cherry Valley ducks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Lv, Chuanwei; Yue, Ruichao; Shi, Ying; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie; Liu, Sidang

    2015-01-01

    The effect of host age on the outcome of duck tembusu virus (DTMUV) infection was studied in ducks. Three groups of Cherry Valley ducks at 1, 3, and 7 weeks of age were intramuscularly infected with DTMUV to systematically observe the clinical symptoms, pathological changes, tissue viral loads, and immune responses. Severe clinical symptoms and neurological dysfunction were observed in 1-week-old ducks as early as 2 days post infection (dpi) and some died at 5–7 dpi. Three weeks-old ducks showed similar but milder symptoms and no deaths. However, 7-weeks-old ducks showed only transient loss of appetite. Gross lesions gradually reduced in severity as ducks matured. One-week-old ducks showed endocardial hemorrhage, splenomegaly, swelling in the lymph follicles of the ileum, liver, and kidney swelling with degeneration, and meningeal hyperemia. Three-weeks-old ducks showed only mild pathological lesions. No visible lesions were observed in 7-weeks-old ducks. However, pathological histology analysis demonstrated all infected ducks displayed viral encephalitis. DTMUV could be detected in the brains of 1-week-old ducks as early as 1 dpi and virus titers of most organs in 1-week-old ducks were significantly higher than that of 3- and 7-weeks-old ducks at 3–5 dpi. The patterns of IFN-γ, IL-2, and serum neutralizing antibodies were similar, and there were significant difference between the youngest ducks and the older ducks at early infection stage (P < 0.05). More important is that although the antibody titers of all infected ducks were similar from 9 to 17 dpi, reduced clearance of virus was observed in the youngest groups comparing with the other two groups, indicating that immune system maturity was more important than the presence of neutralizing antibody. In summary, this study demonstrates that viral pathogenesis is strongest in 1-week-old ducks and the age-related immune response plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DTMUV in ducks. PMID:26106382

  8. A Numerical Study of Feathering Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wing-Kit; Wang, Hsiang-Hsu

    2016-06-01

    The stability of a spiral shock of self-gravitating, magnetized interstellar medium is studied by performing two-dimensional numerical simulations of a local patch of tight-winding spiral arm. As previously suggested by the linear studies, two types of instabilities are identified, namely, wiggle instability and feathering instability. The former instability occurs in the hydrodynamics limit and results in short wavelength perturbations. On the other hand, the feathering instability requires both self-gravitating and magnetic fields and results in wider structures.

  9. Relative contributions of pigments and biophotonic nanostructures to natural color production: a case study in budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) feathers.

    PubMed

    D'Alba, Liliana; Kieffer, Leah; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2012-04-15

    Understanding the mechanistic bases of natural color diversity can provide insight into its evolution and inspiration for biomimetic optical structures. Metazoans can be colored by absorption of light from pigments or by scattering of light from biophotonic nanostructures, and these mechanisms have largely been treated as distinct. However, the interactions between them have rarely been examined. Captive breeding of budgerigars (Aves, Psittacidae, Melopsittacus undulatus) has produced a wide variety of color morphs spanning the majority of the spectrum visible to birds, including the ultraviolet, and thus they have been used as examples of hypothesized structure-pigment interactions. However, empirical data testing these interactions in this excellent model system are lacking. Here we used ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, light and electron microscopy, pigment extraction experiments and optical modeling to examine the physical bases of color production in seven budgerigar morphs, including grey and chromatic (purple to yellow) colors. Feathers from all morphs contained quasi-ordered air-keratin 'spongy layer' matrices, but these were highly reduced and irregular in grey and yellow feathers. Similarly, all feathers but yellow and grey had a layer of melanin-containing melanosomes basal to the spongy layer. The presence of melanosomes likely increases color saturation produced by spongy layers whereas their absence may allow increased expression of yellow colors. Finally, extraction of yellow pigments caused some degree of color change in all feathers except purple and grey, suggesting that their presence and contribution to color production is more widespread than previously thought. These data illustrate how interactions between structures and pigments can increase the range of colors attainable in birds and potentially in synthetic systems. PMID:22442364

  10. D.U.C.K. Walking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steller, Jenifer J.

    This manual presents a schoolwide walking program that includes aerobic fitness information, curriculum integration, and walking tours. "Discover and Understand Carolina Kids by Walking" is D.U.C.K. Walking. An aerobic walking activity, D.U.C.K. Walking has two major goals: (1) to promote regular walking as a way to exercise at any age; and (2) to…

  11. Blood parasites from California ducks and geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.

    1951-01-01

    Blood smears were procured from 1,011 geese and ducks of 19 species from various locations in California. Parasites were found in 28 individuals. The parasites observed included Haemoproteus hermani, Leucocytozoon simondi, microfilaria, Plasmodium relictum (=P. biziurae), and Plasmodium sp. with elongate gametocytes. This is the first report of a natural infection with a Plasmodium in North American wild ducks.

  12. Locating and managing peninsulas for nesting ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lokemoen, J.T.; Messmer, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this extension bulletin is to guide the management of nesting ducks on peninsulas on public and private lands. Managing peninsulas for ducks is a relatively new strategy that was developed in the grassland region of western North America. Information contained in this bulletin is primarily from studies conducted by biologists working at the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center.

  13. Synthesis of Keratin-based Nanofiber for Biomedical Engineering.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Zanshe S; Rijal, Nava P; Jarvis, David; Edwards, Angela; Bhattarai, Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning, due to its versatility and potential for applications in various fields, is being frequently used to fabricate nanofibers. Production of these porous nanofibers is of great interest due to their unique physiochemical properties. Here we elaborate on the fabrication of keratin containing poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers (i.e., PCL/keratin composite fiber). Water soluble keratin was first extracted from human hair and mixed with PCL in different ratios. The blended solution of PCL/keratin was transformed into nanofibrous membranes using a laboratory designed electrospinning set up. Fiber morphology and mechanical properties of the obtained nanofiber were observed and measured using scanning electron microscopy and tensile tester. Furthermore, degradability and chemical properties of the nanofiber were studied by FTIR. SEM images showed uniform surface morphology for PCL/keratin fibers of different compositions. These PCL/keratin fibers also showed excellent mechanical properties such as Young's modulus and failure point. Fibroblast cells were able to attach and proliferate thus proving good cell viability. Based on the characteristics discussed above, we can strongly argue that the blended nanofibers of natural and synthetic polymers can represent an excellent development of composite materials that can be used for different biomedical applications. PMID:26889917

  14. Expression patterns of keratin intermediate filament and keratin associated protein genes in wool follicles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhidong; Gordon, Steven W; Nixon, Allan J; Bawden, C Simon; Rogers, Michael A; Wildermoth, Janet E; Maqbool, Nauman J; Pearson, Allan J

    2009-03-01

    The catalogue of hair keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) and keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) present in wool follicles is incomplete. The full coding sequences for three novel sheep KIFs (KRT27, KRT35 and KRT38) and one KAP (KRTAP4-3) were established in this study. Spatial expression patterns of these and other genes (KRT31, KRT85, KRTAP6-1 and trichohyalin) were determined by in situ hybridisation in wool follicles at synchronised stages of growth. Transcription proceeded in the order: trichohyalin, KRT27, KRT85, KRT35, KRT31, KRT38, KRTAP6-1 and KRTAP4-3, as determined by increasing distance of their expression zones from the germinal matrix in anagen follicles. Expression became gradually more restricted to the lower follicle during follicle regression (catagen), and ceased during dormancy (telogen). Some genes (KRT27, KRT31, KRT85 and KRTAP6-1), but not others, were expressed in cortical cells forming the brush-end, indicating specific requirements for the formation of this anchoring structure. The resumption of keratin expression was observed only in later stages of follicle reactivation (proanagen). KIF expression patterns in primary wool follicles showed general resemblance to their human homologues but with some unique features. Consistent differences in localisation between primary and secondary wool follicles were observed. Asymmetrical expression of KRT27, KRT31, KRT35, KRT85 and trichohyalin genes in secondary follicles were associated with bulb deflection and follicle curvature, suggesting a role in the determination of follicle and fibre morphology. PMID:19272529

  15. Identification of shed or plucked origin of Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus) tail feathers: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Sahajpal, Vivek; Goyal, S P

    2008-06-01

    Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) tail covert feathers were studied to investigate the difference between shed and plucked feathers in the context of wildlife offence cases involving the killing of the Indian national bird for the purpose of plucking feathers. Plucked feathers were distinguished from shed feathers by examining their roots under low magnification of a stereoscopic microscope. A chemical test to show the presence of blood on the roots of plucked feathers was used to corroborate the plucked origin of feathers. PMID:18700500

  16. Isolation, sequence, and expression of a human keratin K5 gene: transcriptional regulation of keratins and insights into pairwise control.

    PubMed Central

    Lersch, R; Stellmach, V; Stocks, C; Giudice, G; Fuchs, E

    1989-01-01

    The mitotically active basal layers of most stratified squamous epithelia express 10 to 30% of their total protein as keratin. The two keratins specifically expressed in these cells are the type II keratin K5 (58 kilodaltons) and its corresponding partner, type I keratin K14 (50 kilodaltons), both of which are essential for the formation of 8-nm filaments. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying the coordinate regulation of the two keratins is an important first step in understanding epidermal differentiation and in designing promoters that will enable delivery and expression of foreign gene products in stratified squamous epithelia, e.g., skin. Previously, we reported the sequence of the gene encoding human K14 (D. Marchuk, S. McCrohon, and E. Fuchs, Cell 39:491-498, 1984; Marchuk et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:1609-1613, 1985). We have now isolated and characterized the gene encoding human K5. The sequence of the coding portion of this gene matched perfectly with that of a partial K5 cDNA sequence obtained from a cultured human epidermal library (R. Lersch and E. Fuchs, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:486-493, 1988), and gene transfection studies indicated that the gene is functional. Nuclear runoff experiments demonstrated that the K5 and K14 genes were both transcribed at dramatically higher levels in cultured human epidermal cells than in fibroblasts, indicating that at least part of the regulation of the expression of this keratin pair is at the transcriptional level. When the K5 gene was transfected transiently into NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, foreign expression of the gene caused the appearance of endogenous mouse K14 and the subsequent formation of a keratin filament array in the cells. In this case, transcriptional changes did not appear to be involved in the regulation, suggesting that there may be multiple control mechanisms underlying the pairwise expression of keratins. Images PMID:2476664

  17. High feather corticosterone indicates better coccidian infection resistance in greenfinches.

    PubMed

    Sild, Elin; Meitern, Richard; Männiste, Marju; Karu, Ulvi; Hõrak, Peeter

    2014-08-01

    Differential exposure or sensitivity to stressors can have substantial effects on the variation in immune responsiveness of animals. However, the questions about the causes and consequences of these processes have remained largely unclear, particularly as regards wild animals and their natural pathogens. Here we ask how a potential marker of stress responses, the feather corticosterone (CORT) content, reflects the resistance to an experimental infection with natural coccidian parasites in wild-caught captive greenfinches (Carduelis chloris). CORT content of tail feathers grown in captivity correlated positively with a behavioural measure of captivity-intolerance, i.e., the amount of damage accrued to tail feathers in captivity that results from flapping against cage bars. This finding is consistent with an idea that feather CORT reflects the amount of stress experienced during feather growth. Experimental infection with heterologous coccidian strains increased feather CORT levels. Birds with highest feather CORT levels appeared most resistant to new infection, assessed on the basis of parasite oocyst shedding at the peak phase of infection. Birds with highest feather CORT levels also cleared the infection faster than the birds with lower feather CORT levels. These findings provide the first evidence about positive covariation between feather CORT and resistance to a natural pathogen in a wild bird species. Assuming that feather CORT levels reflect circulating hormone titres, these findings suggest that parasite-mediated selection may contribute to maintenance of phenotypes with high corticosterone responsiveness to stress, despite potential negative behavioural consequences. PMID:24953456

  18. Body molt of male long-tailed ducks in the nearshore waters of the north slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, M.D.; Grand, J.B.; Flint, P.L.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the timing and intensity of body molt in relation to stage of remige growth for postbreeding adult male Long-tailed Ducks (Clangula hyemalis) off the coast of northern Alaska. During this period, remige and rectrix feathers are molted simultaneously with body feathers during the prebasic molt, which results in a period of increased energetic and nutritional demands. We collected birds from late July through mid-August and recorded intensity of molt in eight regions: head and neck, back and rump, greater coverts, lesser coverts, flank and sides, breast, belly, and tail. Using nonlinear regression, we estimated the peak intensity and variation for each region in relation to ninth primary length. We found little evidence of molt in the head and neck region. The greater and lesser coverts, and back and rump reached peak molt intensities earliest and were followed by tail, breast, and belly. Molt intensity in the flank and side region was highly variable and indicated a more prolonged molting pattern in relation to other regions. While body molt occurs simultaneously with wing molt, we found that molt among regions occurred in a staggered pattern. Long-tailed Ducks may employ this staggered molting pattern to minimize the energetic and nutritional requirements of molt.

  19. Windmill with direction-controlled feathering

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, H. G.

    1984-10-02

    A windmill employs a separate wind vane pivotably mounted on the chassis of the windmill. An internal sensor detects the relative angle between the wind vane and the windmill and activates the pitch-control mechanism of the windmill to feather the windmill blades whenever the angle exceeds a predetermined maximum.

  20. Modelling the growth of feather crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, H.J.; Hunt, J.D.; Evans, P.V.

    1997-02-01

    An existing numerical model of dendritic growth has been adapted to model the growth of twinned columnar dendrites (feather crystals) in a binary aluminium alloy, Examination of the effect of dendrite tip angle on growth has led to an hypothesis regarding the stability of a pointed tip morphology in these crystals.

  1. Expression of Hex during feather bud development.

    PubMed

    Obinata, Akiko; Akimoto, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    We studied proline-rich divergent homeobox gene Hex/Prh expression in the dorsal skin of chick embryo during feather bud development. Hex mRNA expression was first observed in the dorsolateral ectoderm and mesenchyme at 5 days, then in the epithelium and the dermis of the dorsal skin before placode (primordium of feather bud) formation and then was restricted to the placode and the dermis under the placode. Afterward, Hex expression was seen in the epidermis and the dermis of the posterior region of short bud. In accordance with Hex mRNA expression in the placode, Hex protein was observed in the epidermis as well as in the dermis of the placode. Immunoelectron microscopic study indicated that the protein located both in the nuclei and cytoplasm of the epidermis and the dermis at the short bud stage. The Wnt signaling pathway plays an essential role in the early inductive events in hair (Wnt3a and 7a) and feather (Wnt7a) follicles. The pattern of Hex expression in the epidermis was similar to that of Wnt7a, while little, if any, expression of Wnt7a was detected in the dermis under the placode or the dermis of the short bud compared with that of Hex, suggesting that Hex plays an important role in the initiation of feather morphogenesis. PMID:16172986

  2. CHICKEN FEATHER FIBERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Summary of Findings (Outputs/Outcomes):

    A Sievert’s apparatus for measuring the H2 storage capacities of adsorbents was built. The nitrogen adsorption and H2 storage test performed on the pyrolyzed chicken feather fibers (PCFF) prepared by a p...

  3. The Weight of Iron and Feathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zendri, G.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the popular question concerning the difference in weight between 1 kg of iron and 1 kg of feathers, by taking into account the non-trivial aspect of the semantic interpretation of "weight" and the weighting procedure. The inclusion of air buoyancy makes the correct answer an interesting one. We describe and comment on the…

  4. Duck plague: carrier state and gross pathology in black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ossa, Jorge E.

    1975-01-01

    Duck plague (UP) is a highly fatal disease of ducks, geese, and swans (family Anatidae), produced by a reticulo-endotheliotrophic virus classified as a member of the Herpesvirus group. The disease was recognized in Europe in 1949. On the American continent, the disease was first diagnosed in the United States in 1967. Very little is known of DP virus ecology, particularly of the mechanisms of interepizootic survival and movement. The tendency of the IIerpesviruses to enter into a quiescent state after an overt or inapparent infection is a proven characteristic for most of the members of this group. Herpes simplex, which is the model of the Herpesviruses, is said to be the classical example of a persistent recurrent viral infection. Burnet and Williams (4) were the first to recognize this kind of relationship between herpes simplex and its host in 1939. Later, it was found that the reactivation of the virus can be brought on by a variety of stimuli either physiological (menstruation), pathological (anaphylactic shock), chemical (pesticides) or physical (sunburn). This same latency property has been proved for every member of this group of viruses which has been studied adequately, DP is among the few Herpesviruses for which the carrier state has not been demonstrated, but there is circumstantial evidence suggesting it. The carrier state for DP seems to be a likely explanation for the persistence and the particular pattern of movement of this disease.

  5. Experimental infection of duck origin virulent Newcastle disease virus strain in ducks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Newcastle disease (ND) caused by virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an acute, highly contagious and fatal viral disease affecting most species of birds. Ducks are generally considered to be natural reservoirs or carriers of NDV while being resistant to NDV strains, even those most virulent for chickens; however, natural ND cases in ducks have been gradually increasing in recent years. In the present study, ducks of different breeds and ages were experimentally infected with duck origin virulent NDV strain duck/Jiangsu/JSD0812/2008 (JSD0812) by various routes to investigate the pathogenicity of NDV in ducks. Results Six breeds (mallard, Gaoyou, Shaoxing, Jinding, Shanma, and Pekin ducks) were infected intramuscularly (IM) with JSD0812 strain at the dose of 5 × 108 ELD50. Susceptibility to NDV infection among breeds varied, per morbidity and mortality. Mallard ducks were the most susceptible, and Pekin ducks the most resistant. Fifteen-, 30-, 45-, 60-, and 110-day-old Gaoyou ducks were infected with JSD0812 strain at the dose of 5 × 108 ELD50 either IM or intranasally (IN) and intraocularly (IO), and their disease development, viral shedding, and virus tissue distribution were determined. The susceptibility of ducks to NDV infection decreased with age. Most deaths occurred in 15- and 30-day-old ducklings infected IM. Ducks infected IN and IO sometimes exhibited clinical signs, but seldom died. Clinical signs were primarily neurologic. Infected ducks could excrete infectious virus from the pharynx and/or cloaca for a short period, which varied with bird age or inoculation route; the longest period was about 7 days. The rate of virus isolation in tissues from infected ducks was generally low, even in those from dead birds, and it appeared to be unrelated to bird age and infection route. Conclusions The results confirmed that some of the naturally occurring NDV virulent strains can cause the disease in ducks, and that ducks play an important

  6. Expressed miRNAs target feather related mRNAs involved in cell signaling, cell adhesion and structure during chicken epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weier; Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2016-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miRNA regulation contributes to a diverse set of processes including cellular differentiation and morphogenesis which leads to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms and is thus key to animal development. Feathers are one of the most distinctive features of extant birds and are important for multiple functions including flight, thermal regulation, and sexual selection. However, the role of miRNAs in feather development has been woefully understudied despite the identification of cell signaling pathways, cell adhesion molecules and structural genes involved in feather development. In this study, we performed a microarray experiment comparing the expression of miRNAs and mRNAs among three embryonic stages of development and two tissues (scutate scale and feather) of the chicken. We combined this expression data with miRNA target prediction tools and a curated list of feather related genes to produce a set of 19 miRNA-mRNA duplexes. These targeted mRNAs have been previously identified as important cell signaling and cell adhesion genes as well as structural genes involved in feather and scale morphogenesis. Interestingly, the miRNA target site of the cell signaling pathway gene, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family, Member A3 (ALDH1A3), is unique to birds indicating a novel role in Aves. The identified miRNA target site of the cell adhesion gene, Tenascin C (TNC), is only found in specific chicken TNC splice variants that are differentially expressed in developing scutate scale and feather tissue indicating an important role of miRNA regulation in epidermal differentiation. Additionally, we found that β-keratins, a major structural component of avian and reptilian epidermal appendages, are targeted by multiple miRNA genes. In conclusion, our work provides quantitative expression data on miRNAs and m

  7. Keratins as components of the enamel organic matrix.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Olivier; Beniash, Elia; Morasso, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Dental enamel is the hardest tissue in the human body, and although it starts as a tissue rich in proteins, by the time of eruption of the tooth in the oral cavity only a small fraction of the protein remains. While this organic matrix of enamel represents less than 1% by weight it plays essential roles in improving both toughness and resilience to chemical attacks. Despite the fact that the first studies of the enamel matrix began in the 19th century, its exact composition and mechanisms of its function remain poorly understood. It was proposed that keratin or a keratin-like primitive epithelial component exists in mature enamel, however due to the extreme insolubility of its organic matrix the presence of keratins there was never clearly established. We have recently identified expression of a number of hair keratins in ameloblasts, the enamel secreting cells, and demonstrated their incorporation into mature enamel. Mutation in epithelial hair keratin KRT75 leads to a skin condition called pseudofollicularis barbae. Carriers of this mutation have an altered enamel structure and mechanical properties. Importantly, these individuals have a much higher prevalence of caries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing a direct link between a mutation in a protein-coding region of a gene and increased caries rates. In this paper we present an overview of the evidence of keratin-like material in enamel that has accumulated over the last 150years. Furthermore, we propose potential mechanisms of action of KTR75 in enamel and highlight the clinical implications of the link between mutations in KRT75 and caries. Finally, we discuss the potential use of keratins for enamel repair. PMID:26709044

  8. In vitro response of macrophage polarization to a keratin biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Fearing, Bailey V; Van Dyke, Mark E

    2014-07-01

    Macrophage response to biomaterials is emerging as a major focus in tissue repair and wound healing. Macrophages are able to differentiate into two distinct states, eliciting divergent effects. The M1 phenotype is considered pro-inflammatory and up-regulates activity related to tissue destruction, whereas the M2 phenotype is considered anti-inflammatory and supports tissue remodeling. Both are necessary but a fine balance must be maintained as dysregulation of naïve macrophages to M1 or M2 polarization has been implicated in several disease and injury models, and has been suggested as a potential cause for poor outcomes. Keratin biomaterials have been shown using different animal models to promote regeneration in several tissues. A potential common mechanism may be the general capability for keratin biomaterials to elicit beneficial inflammatory responses during the early stages of regeneration. In the present study, a keratin biomaterial was utilized in vitro to examine its effects on polarization toward one of these two macrophage phenotypes, and thus its role in inflammation. Exposure of a monocytic cell line to keratin biomaterial substrates was shown to bias macrophages toward an M2 phenotype, while a collagen control surface produced both M1 and M2 macrophages. Furthermore, keratin treatment was similar to the M2 positive control and was similarly effective at down-regulating the M1 response. Keratin biomaterial influenced greater production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and decreased amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The use of a keratin biomaterial in regenerative medicine may therefore provide additional benefit by regulating a positive remodeling response. PMID:24726958

  9. Avian Influenza Ecology in North Atlantic Sea Ducks: Not All Ducks Are Created Equal

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Russell, Robin E.; Franson, J. Christian; Soos, Catherine; Dusek, Robert J.; Allen, R. Bradford; Nashold, Sean W.; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Jónsson, Jón Eínar; Ballard, Jennifer R.; Harms, Naomi Jane; Brown, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Wild waterfowl are primary reservoirs of avian influenza viruses (AIV). However the role of sea ducks in the ecology of avian influenza, and how that role differs from freshwater ducks, has not been examined. We obtained and analyzed sera from North Atlantic sea ducks and determined the seroprevalence in those populations. We also tested swab samples from North Atlantic sea ducks for the presence of AIV. We found relatively high serological prevalence (61%) in these sea duck populations but low virus prevalence (0.3%). Using these data we estimated that an antibody half-life of 141 weeks (3.2 years) would be required to attain these prevalences. These findings are much different than what is known in freshwater waterfowl and have implications for surveillance efforts, AIV in marine environments, and the roles of sea ducks and other long-lived waterfowl in avian influenza ecology. PMID:26677841

  10. Avian influenza ecology in North Atlantic sea ducks: Not all ducks are created equal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Russell, Robin E.; Franson, J. Christian; Soos, Catherine; Dusek, Robert J.; Allen, R. Bradford; Nashold, Sean W.; Teslaa, Joshua L.; Jónsson, Jón Einar; Ballard, Jennifer R.; Harms, Naomi Jnae; Brown, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Wild waterfowl are primary reservoirs of avian influenza viruses (AIV). However the role of sea ducks in the ecology of avian influenza, and how that role differs from freshwater ducks, has not been examined. We obtained and analyzed sera from North Atlantic sea ducks and determined the seroprevalence in those populations. We also tested swab samples from North Atlantic sea ducks for the presence of AIV. We found relatively high serological prevalence (61%) in these sea duck populations but low virus prevalence (0.3%). Using these data we estimated that an antibody half-life of 141 weeks (3.2 years) would be required to attain these prevalences. These findings are much different than what is known in freshwater waterfowl and have implications for surveillance efforts, AIV in marine environments, and the roles of sea ducks and other long-lived waterfowl in avian influenza ecology.

  11. Habitats of North American sea ducks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derksen, Dirk V.; Petersen, Margaret R.; Savard, Jean-Pierre L.

    2015-01-01

    Breeding, molting, fall and spring staging, and wintering habitats of the sea duck tribe Mergini are described based on geographic locations and distribution in North America, geomorphology, vegetation and soil types, and fresh water and marine characteristics. The dynamics of habitats are discussed in light of natural and anthropogenic events that shape areas important to sea ducks. Strategies for sea duck habitat management are outlined and recommendations for international collaboration to preserve key terrestrial and aquatic habitats are advanced. We follow the definition of habitat advanced by Odum (1971), which is the place or space where an organism lives. Weller (1999) emphasized that habitats for waterbirds required presence of sufficient resources (i.e., food, water, cover, space) for maintenance during a portion of their annual cycle. Habitats exploited by North American sea ducks are diverse, widespread across the continent and adjacent marine waters and until recently, most were only superficially known. Even following a 15-year-long effort through the Sea Duck Joint Venture and U.S. and Canadian Endangered/Threatened Species programs to fund research focused on sea duck habitats there are still important gaps in our understanding of key elements required by some species during various life stages. Importantly, many significant habitats, especially staging and wintering sites, have been and continue to be destroyed or altered, largely as a result of anthropogenic effects. Our goal here is to develop a comprehensive summary of marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats and their characteristics by considering sea duck species with similar needs as groups (e.g., eiders) within the tribe Mergini. Additionally, this chapter will examine threats and changes to sea duck habitats from human-caused and natural events. Finally, we will evaluate conservation and management programs underway or available for maintenance and enhancement of habitats critical for

  12. Hydrodynamic drag of diving birds: effects of body size, body shape and feathers at steady speeds.

    PubMed

    Lovvorn, J; Liggins, G A; Borstad, M H; Calisal, S M; Mikkelsen, J

    2001-05-01

    For birds diving to depths where pressure has mostly reduced the buoyancy of air spaces, hydrodynamic drag is the main mechanical cost of steady swimming. Drag is strongly affected by body size and shape, so such differences among species should affect energy costs. Because flow around the body is complicated by the roughness and vibration of feathers, feathers must be considered in evaluating the effects of size and shape on drag. We investigated the effects of size, shape and feathers on the drag of avian divers ranging from wing-propelled auklets weighing 75 g to foot-propelled eiders weighing up to 2060 g. Laser scanning of body surfaces yielded digitized shapes that were averaged over several specimens per species and then used by a milling machine to cut foam models. These models were fitted with casts of the bill area, and their drag was compared with that of frozen specimens. Because of the roughness and vibration of the feathers, the drag of the frozen birds was 2-6 times that of the models. Plots of drag coefficient (C(D)) versus Reynolds number (Re) differed between the model and the frozen birds, with the pattern of difference varying with body shape. Thus, the drag of cast models or similar featherless shapes can differ both quantitatively and qualitatively from that of real birds. On the basis of a new towing method with no posts or stings that alter flow or angles of attack, the dimensionless C(D)/Re curves differed among a size gradient of five auklet species (75-100g) with similar shapes. Thus, extrapolation of C(D)/Re curves among related species must be performed with caution. At lower speeds, the C(D) at a given Re was generally higher for long-necked birds that swim with their neck extended (cormorants, grebes, some ducks) than for birds that swim with their head retracted (penguins, alcids), but this trend was reversed at high speeds. Because swimming birds actually travel at a range of instantaneous speeds during oscillatory strokes, species

  13. Micromechanical properties of keratin intermediate filament networks.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; DeGiulio, James V; Lorand, Laszlo; Goldman, Robert D; Ridge, Karen M

    2008-01-22

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) form cytoskeletal KIF networks that are essential for the structural integrity of epithelial cells. However, the mechanical properties of the in situ network have not been defined. Particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) was used to obtain the micromechanical properties of the KIF network in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs), independent of other cytoskeletal components, such as microtubules and microfilaments. The storage modulus (G') at 1 Hz of the KIF network decreases from the perinuclear region (335 dyn/cm(2)) to the cell periphery (95 dyn/cm(2)), yielding a mean value of 210 dyn/cm(2). These changes in G' are inversely proportional to the mesh size of the network, which increases approximately 10-fold from the perinuclear region (0.02 microm(2)) to the cell periphery (0.3 microm(2)). Shear stress (15 dyn/cm(2) for 4 h) applied across the surface of AECs induces a more uniform distribution of KIF, with the mesh size of the network ranging from 0.02 microm(2) near the nucleus to only 0.04 microm(2) at the cell periphery. This amounts to a 40% increase in the mean G'. The storage modulus of the KIF network in the perinuclear region accurately predicts the shear-induced deflection of the cell nucleus to be 0.87 +/- 0.03 microm. The high storage modulus of the KIF network, coupled with its solid-like rheological behavior, supports the role of KIF as an intracellular structural scaffold that helps epithelial cells to withstand external mechanical forces. PMID:18199836

  14. Hawaiian Duck's Future Threatened by Feral Mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uyehara, Kimberly J.; Engilis, Andrew, Jr.; Reynolds, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    Nearly 70 percent of Hawaii's native bird species are found nowhere else on Earth, and many of these species are declining or in danger of extinction. Although the Hawaiian Islands were once home to a remarkable diversity of waterfowl, only three species remain-the Hawaiian Goose (Nene), Laysan Duck, and Hawaiian Duck (Koloa maoli)-all Federally endangered. The Koloa maoli is the only Hawaiian bird threatened by 'genetic extinction' from hybridization with an invasive species-feral Mallard ducks. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) biologists in Hawaii are working to find the causes of bird endangerment and ways to prevent extinction of the Koloa maoli and other threatened birds.

  15. FGF induces new feather buds from developing avian skin.

    PubMed

    Widelitz, R B; Jiang, T X; Noveen, A; Chen, C W; Chuong, C M

    1996-12-01

    Induction of skin appendages involves a cascade of molecular events. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of peptide growth factors is involved in cell proliferation and morphogenesis. We explored the role of the FGFs during skin appendage induction using developing chicken feather buds as a model. FGF-1, FGF-2, or FGF-4 was added directly to the culture medium or was released from pre-soaked Affigel blue beads. Near the midline, FGFs led to fusion of developing feather buds, representing FGFs' ability to expand feather bud domains in developing skin. In lateral regions of the explant where feather placodes have not formed, FGF treatment produces a zone of condensation and a region with an increased number of feather buds. In ventral epidermis that is normally apteric (without feathers), FGFs can also induce new feather buds. Like normal feather buds, the newly induced buds express Shh. The expression of Grb, Ras, Raf, and Erk, intracellular signaling molecules known to be downstream to tyrosine kinase receptors such as the FGF receptor, was enriched in feather bud domains. Genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinase, suppressed feather bud formation and the effect of FGF. These results indicate that there are varied responses to FGFs depending on epithelial competence. All the phenotypic responses, however, show that FGFs facilitate the formation of skin appendage domains. PMID:8941663

  16. Structural resonance and mode of flutter of hummingbird tail feathers.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher J; Elias, Damian O; Girard, Madeline B; Prum, Richard O

    2013-09-15

    Feathers can produce sound by fluttering in airflow. This flutter is hypothesized to be aeroelastic, arising from the coupling of aerodynamic forces to one or more of the feather's intrinsic structural resonance frequencies. We investigated how mode of flutter varied among a sample of hummingbird tail feathers tested in a wind tunnel. Feather vibration was measured directly at ~100 points across the surface of the feather with a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV), as a function of airspeed, Uair. Most feathers exhibited multiple discrete modes of flutter, which we classified into types including tip, trailing vane and torsional modes. Vibratory behavior within a given mode was usually stable, but changes in independent variables such as airspeed or orientation sometimes caused feathers to abruptly 'jump' from one mode to another. We measured structural resonance frequencies and mode shapes directly by measuring the free response of 64 feathers stimulated with a shaker and recorded with the SLDV. As predicted by the aeroelastic flutter hypothesis, the mode shape (spatial distribution) of flutter corresponded to a bending or torsional structural resonance frequency of the feather. However, the match between structural resonance mode and flutter mode was better for tip or torsional mode shapes, and poorer for trailing vane modes. Often, the 3rd bending structural harmonic matched the expressed mode of flutter, rather than the fundamental. We conclude that flutter occurs when airflow excites one or more structural resonance frequencies of a feather, most akin to a vibrating violin string. PMID:23737565

  17. An outbreak of duck virus enteritis (duck plague) in a captive flock of mixed waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, R.D.; Stein, G., Jr.; Novilla, M.N.; Hurley, Sarah S.; Fink, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    An outbreak of duck virus enteritis occurred in a flock of captive waterfowl composed of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), black ducks (Anas rubripes), and Canada geese (Branta canadensis). Although all three species were housed together, morbidity and mortality were confined to the 227 black ducks and Canada geese, of which 180 died and the rest were left in a weakened condition. Lesions are given for 20 black ducks and 4 Canada geese dying from DVE. In addition, both horizontal and vertical transmission are discussed as possible sources of the virus that caused this outbreak.

  18. Disruption of the keratin filament network during epithelial cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, E B; Goodman, S L; Trejdosiewicz, L K

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of keratin filaments during cell division was examined in a wide range of epithelial lines from several species. Almost half of them show keratin disruption as described previously: by immunofluorescence, filaments are replaced during mitosis by a 'speckled' pattern of discrete cytoplasmic dots. In the electron microscope these ' speckles ' are seen as granules around the cell periphery, just below the actin cortical mesh, with no detectable 10 nm filament structure inside them and no keratin filament bundles in the rest of the cytoplasm. A time course of the filament reorganization was constructed from double immunofluorescence data; filaments are disrupted in prophase, and the filament network is intact again by cytokinesis. The phenomenon is restricted to cells rich in keratin filaments, such as keratinocytes; it is unrelated to the co-existence of vimentin in many of these cells, and vimentin is generally maintained as filaments while the keratin is restructured. Some resistance to the effect may be conferred by an extended cycle time. Filament reorganization takes place within minutes, so that a reversible mechanism seems more likely than one involving de novo protein synthesis, at this metabolically quiet stage of the cell cycle. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6202508

  19. Unique amino acid signatures that are evolutionarily conserved distinguish simple-type, epidermal and hair keratins

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Pavel; Usachov, Valentyn; Debes, Cedric; Gräter, Frauke; Parry, David A. D.; Omary, M. Bishr

    2011-01-01

    Keratins (Ks) consist of central α-helical rod domains that are flanked by non-α-helical head and tail domains. The cellular abundance of keratins, coupled with their selective cell expression patterns, suggests that they diversified to fulfill tissue-specific functions although the primary structure differences between them have not been comprehensively compared. We analyzed keratin sequences from many species: K1, K2, K5, K9, K10, K14 were studied as representatives of epidermal keratins, and compared with K7, K8, K18, K19, K20 and K31, K35, K81, K85, K86, which represent simple-type (single-layered or glandular) epithelial and hair keratins, respectively. We show that keratin domains have striking differences in their amino acids. There are many cysteines in hair keratins but only a small number in epidermal keratins and rare or none in simple-type keratins. The heads and/or tails of epidermal keratins are glycine and phenylalanine rich but alanine poor, whereas parallel domains of hair keratins are abundant in prolines, and those of simple-type epithelial keratins are enriched in acidic and/or basic residues. The observed differences between simple-type, epidermal and hair keratins are highly conserved throughout evolution. Cysteines and histidines, which are infrequent keratin amino acids, are involved in de novo mutations that are markedly overrepresented in keratins. Hence, keratins have evolutionarily conserved and domain-selectively enriched amino acids including glycine and phenylalanine (epidermal), cysteine and proline (hair), and basic and acidic (simple-type epithelial), which reflect unique functions related to structural flexibility, rigidity and solubility, respectively. Our findings also support the importance of human keratin ‘mutation hotspot’ residues and their wild-type counterparts. PMID:22215855

  20. Effects of oxidative treatments on human hair keratin films.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Ito, Y; Watanabe, T; Kawasoe, T

    2012-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen peroxide and commercial bleach on hair and human hair keratin films were examined by protein solubility, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Protein solubility in solutions containing urea decreased when the keratin films were treated with hydrogen peroxide or bleach. Oxidative treatments promoted the urea-dependent morphological change by turning films from opaque to transparent in appearance. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting showed that the oxidation of amino acids and proteins occurred due to the oxidative treatments, and such occurrence was more evident in the bleach-treated films than in the hydrogen peroxide-treated films. Compared with hair samples, the formation of cysteic acid was more clearly observed in the keratin films after the oxidative treatments. PMID:22487448

  1. Mechanics of Individual Keratin Bundles in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Jens-Friedrich; Möbius, Wiebke; Köster, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Along with microtubules and microfilaments, intermediate filaments are a major component of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and play a key role in cell mechanics. In cells, keratin intermediate filaments form networks of bundles that are sparser in structure and have lower connectivity than, for example, actin networks. Because of this, bending and buckling play an important role in these networks. Buckling events, which occur due to compressive intracellular forces and cross-talk between the keratin network and other cytoskeletal components, are measured here in situ. By applying a mechanical model for the bundled filaments, we can access the mechanical properties of both the keratin bundles themselves and the surrounding cytosol. Bundling is characterized by a coupling parameter that describes the strength of the linkage between the individual filaments within a bundle. Our findings suggest that coupling between the filaments is mostly complete, although it becomes weaker for thicker bundles, with some relative movement allowed. PMID:25468348

  2. Pyrolyzed feather fibers for adsorbent and high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoz, Erman

    Chicken feather fibers (CFF) are problematic and costly for the poultry industry in terms of managing maintenance and disposal. Considering their great availability, low cost, and unique protein structure, CFF can be an environmentally friendly and bio-renewable candidate to replace petroleum products. CFF's low degradation and melting temperature render them useless at high temperatures. Pyrolysis methods were developed for CFF by using two temperature steps to convert them into high temperature resistant and adsorbent fibers while retaining their original physical appearance and affine dimensions. An intermolecular crosslinking mechanism in the first step of pyrolysis at 215 ºC for 24 h provided an intact fibrous structure with no subsequent melting. The evidence obtained from the thermal, bulk, and surface analysis techniques was indication of the simultaneous side chain degradation, polypeptide backbone scission, disulfide bond cleavage, and isopeptide crosslinking. The variation in the reaction kinetics of disulfide bond cleavage and isopeptide crosslinking played an important role in the melting transition. Consequently, long-lasting heat treatments below the melting point provided sufficient crosslinks in the protein matrix to keep the fibrous structure intact. Water-insoluble and crosslinked CFF reinforced the triglyceride-fatty acid based composites by providing a 15 fold increase in storage and tensile modulus at room temperature. These thermally stable fibers can be used instead of CFF in composites which may require high temperature compounding and molding processes. The second step of pyrolysis at 400--450 ºC for 1 h resulted in microporous fibers with a micropore volume of ˜0.18 cm3/g STP and with a narrower pore size distribution than commercial activated carbons through thermal degradation. Nearly all accessible pores in the microporous pyrolyzed chicken feather fibers (PCFF) had diameters less than 1 nm and therefore, showed a potential to be

  3. Biothermoplastics from hydrolyzed and citric acid crosslinked chicken feathers.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Narendra; Chen, Lihong; Yang, Yiqi

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach of developing thermoplastic films from feathers by alkaline hydrolysis and crosslinking with citric acid. Unlike previous approaches that used toxic chemicals, complicated and/or expensive methods to develop films, in this research, feathers were hydrolyzed using various concentrations of alkali and the hydrolyzed feathers were compression molded into films using glycerol as plasticizer and crosslinked with citric acid to improve water stability. Alkali hydrolyzed feathers could be compression molded into films with tensile strength of 5.9 MPa and elongation of 31.7% but had poor wet strength. Feather films crosslinked with citric acid had tensile strength of 1.9 MPa and elongation of 24.6% after being in 90% humidity at 21 °C for 24 hours. Alkaline hydrolysis and citric acid crosslinking provides an opportunity to develop inexpensive and biodegradable thermoplastics from the inexpensive, renewable and sustainable poultry feathers. PMID:23827561

  4. FGF signaling is required for initiation of feather placode development.

    PubMed

    Mandler, Markus; Neubüser, Annette

    2004-07-01

    Morphogenesis of hairs and feathers is initiated by an as yet unknown dermal signal that induces placode formation in the overlying ectoderm. To determine whether FGF signals are required for this process we over-expressed soluble versions of FGFR1 or FGFR2 in the skin of chicken embryos. This produced a complete failure of feather formation prior to any morphological or molecular signs of placode development. We further show that Fgf10 is expressed in the dermis of nascent feather primordia, and that anti-FGF10 antibodies block feather placode development in skin explants. In addition we show that FGF10 can induce expression of positive and negative regulators of feather development and can induce its own expression under conditions of low BMP signaling. Together these results demonstrate that FGF signaling is required for the initiation of feather placode development and implicate FGF10 as an early dermal signal involved in this process. PMID:15201222

  5. Mercury levels in feathers of Magellanic penguins.

    PubMed

    Frias, Jorgelina E; Gil, Mónica N; Esteves, José L; García Borboroglu, Pablo; Kane, Olivia J; Smith, Jeff R; Boersma, P Dee

    2012-06-01

    Feathers are useful to determine mercury (Hg) contamination. We evaluated the mercury concentration in feathers of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) age 1.5 years to 25 years at Punta Tombo, Argentina before and during their molt. Mercury ranged between <1.4 and 367 ng/g dry weight, with three extreme high values (8996 ng/g, 3011 ng/g and 1340 ng/g) all in young adults. The median concentration was lowest for juveniles and significantly higher for adults but with high variation among older adults. Males and females had similar mercury loads. Compared with other penguin species, concentrations in Magellanic penguins were low. Mercury levels for Magellanic penguins in the Southwest Atlantic for older adults averaged 206±98 ng/g, and serve as a baseline for biomonitoring and/or ecotoxicological studies. PMID:22465054

  6. Effects of ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase on immortalization of feather keratinocyte stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yulin; Yu, Minli; Wu, Fabai; Sun, Jianguo; Wood, Chris; Hattori, Masa-Aki; Wang, Jinfu; Xi, Yongmei

    2009-12-15

    Normal somatic cells possess a finite life span owing to replicative senescence. Telomerase functions as a potential regulator of senescence in various cells. Expression level of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is correlated with telomerase activity and cellular immortalization. In this study, we investigated the effects of ectopic expression of hTERT on proliferation potential of chicken feather keratinocyte stem cells (FKSCs). We established FKSCs transduced with hTERT catalytic subunit fused with EGFP marker gene (hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs). hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs had the great potential of proliferation in vitro and expressed kerainocyte stem cell markers integrin beta1 and CD49c. Keratin 15 and keratin 19, as native FKSCs, were also detected in hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs. By the analysis of fluorescent RT-PCR, western blotting and TRAP assay, hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs were positive for telomerase activity, in comparison with native FKSCs showing no telomerase activity. We demonstrated that ectopic expression of hTERT could result in immortalization of FKSCs. Tumorigenecity of hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs were examined by soft agar assay and transplantation into NOD-SCID mice. Results showed that hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs sustained the cellular characteristics of native FKSCs and had no transforming activity. In vivo differentiation multipotentials of hTERT-EGFP-FKSCs were confirmed by transplantation into developing chicken embryos and in situ hybridization analysis. These data provide a novel framework for understanding human telomerase activity in different species and suggest a new insight for manipulating hTERT for therapeutic purposes in treating tissue injury and aging. PMID:19551764

  7. Floods on Duck and Little Duck Rivers and Grindstone Hollow, Hunt, Hickory Flat, and Wolf Creeks in the vicinity of Manchester, Tennessee. [Duck River; Little Duck River

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    This flood hazard report describes the extent and severity of the flood potential along selected reaches of the Duck and Little Duck Rivers, and Grindstone Hollow, Hunt, Hickory Flat, and Wolf Creeks in the vicinity of Manchester, Tennessee. The report was prepared by TVA as a result of a request from the city of Manchester for TVA technical assistance in evaluating alternative solutions to local flood problems. 5 references, 12 figures, 12 tables.

  8. Breeding productivity of Smith Island black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haramis, G.M.; Jorde, D.G.; Olsen, G.H.; Stotts, D.B.; Harrison, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the breeding performance of American black ducks (Anas rubripes) on Smith Island, Chesapeake Bay, to improve our understanding of island black duck breeding ecology and to make management recommendations to enhance productivity. During 1995-96, we implanted 56 female black ducks with 20-g radio transmitters and tracked 35 of the individuals through the breeding season to locate nests, determine nest fate, and identify brood habitat. We also increased preseason banding efforts and compared capture characteristics over 12 years with those from the Deal Island Wildlife Management Area, a banding site on the mainland of Tangier Sound. A low rate of nesting (37%), lack of renesting, and poor hatching success (31%) indicated that island salt marsh habitats present a harsh environment for breeding black ducks. Black ducks located 11 of 13 nests (85%) in black needlerush (Juncus roemerianus) marsh where they were vulnerable to flooding from extreme tides and to egg predators. No nests were found on forested tree hammocks, a feature that distinguishes Smith Island from nearby South Marsh and Bloodsworth Islands. Nest predators included red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), herring gulls (Larus argentams), fish crows (Corvus ossifragus), and, potentially, Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus). Unlike mainland red foxes, foxes radio tracked on Smith Island were found to be capable swimmers and effective low marsh predators. We found shoreline meadows of widgeon grass (Ruppia maritima) to be important foraging sites for black ducks and suspected that the virtual absence of fresh water in this high salinity environment (1217+ ppt) to incur some cost in terms of growth and survival of ducklings. Preseason bandings revealed a high proportion of banded adults and a strong positive correlation in age ratios with the Deal Island banding site. This latter finding strongly suggests a negative universal effect of storm tides on nest success for Tangier Sound black ducks. Management to

  9. Propeller/fan-pitch feathering apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, Jan C. (Inventor); Adamson, Arthur P. (Inventor); Bathori, Julius (Inventor); Walker, Neil (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A pitch feathering system for a gas turbine driven aircraft propeller having multiple variable pitch blades utilizes a counter-weight linked to the blades. The weight is constrained to move, when effecting a pitch change, only in a radial plane and about an axis which rotates about the propeller axis. The system includes a linkage allowing the weight to move through a larger angle than the associated pitch change of the blade.

  10. The ectodysplasin pathway in feather tract development.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Leslie; Lindon, Catherine; Morgan, Bruce A

    2005-03-01

    The ectodysplasin pathway, comprising the ligand ectodysplasin, its receptor Edar and a dedicated death domain adaptor protein Edaradd, plays an important role in epidermal organ formation in mammals. Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins cause dysplasia or absence of teeth, sweat glands and hair follicles. However, the relative position of this pathway in the regulatory hierarchy directing follicle formation remains unclear. In this work, the chicken orthologs of Eda, Edar and Edaradd were cloned to exploit the temporal precision of the feather tract system in order to study the role of the ectodysplasin pathway. We find that these genes are expressed in a similar pattern during feather and hair development, with the notable difference that the ligand Eda, which is expressed in the epidermis of the mouse, is expressed in the dermis of the feather tract. Contrary to conclusions reached from the analysis of mutant mice, we find that localization of Edar expression to the nascent placode is coincident or subsequent to the local expression of other markers of placodal differentiation, and not an upstream event in tract patterning. Furthermore, forced expression of BMP and activated beta-catenin demonstrate that local expression of Edar is dictated by the interaction between these two pathways. These results suggest that activation of the ectodysplasin pathway may be permissive for activating signals to overcome signals that inhibit placode formation, but the function of this pathway in the specification of follicle initiation lies downstream of other patterning events. PMID:15673574

  11. Dermo-epidermal interactions in reptilian scales: speculations on the evolution of scales, feathers, and hairs.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2004-07-15

    The dermal influence on the epidermis during scale formation in reptiles is poorly known. Cells of the superficial dermis are not homogeneously distributed beneath the epidermis, but are instead connected to specific areas of the epidermis. Dermal cells are joined temporarily or cyclically through the basement membrane, with the reactive region of the epidermis forming specific regions of dermo-epidermal interactions. In these regions morphoregulatory molecules may be exchanged between the dermis and the connected epidermis. Possible changes in the localization of these regions in the skin may result in the production of different appendages, in accordance with the genetic makeup of the epidermis in each species. Regions of dermo-epidermal interactions seem to move their position during development. A hypothesis on the development and evolution of scales, hairs, and feathers from sarcopterigian fish to amniotes is presented, based on the different localization and extension of regions of dermo-epidermal interactions in the skin. It is hypothesized that, during phylogenesis, possible variations in the localization and extension of these regions, from the large scales of basic amniotes to those of sauropsid amniotes, may have originated scales with hard (beta)-keratin. In extant reptiles, extended regions of dermo-epidermal interaction form most of the expanse of outer scale surface. It is hypothesized that the reduction of large regions of dermo-epidermal interactions into small areas in the skin were the origin of dermal condensations. In mammals, small regions of dermo-epidermal interactions have invaginated, forming the dermal papilla with the associated hair matrix epidermis. In birds, small regions of dermo-epidermal interactions have reduced the original scale surface of archosaurian scales, forming the dermal papilla. The latter has invaginated in association with the collar epidermis from which feathers were produced. PMID:15287101

  12. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  13. BALD ROCK AND MIDDLE FORK FEATHER RIVER ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorensen, Martin L.; Buehler, Alan R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral-resource assessment of the Bald Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Areas in California indicate several areas within the Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area that have probable mineral-resource potential. A probable potential for placer gold exists at various localities, both in areas covered by Tertiary volcanic rocks and in small streams that drain into the Middle Fork of the Feather River. A probable potential for small deposits of chromite exists in tracts underlain by ultramafic rocks in the Melones fault zone. A probable potential for lead-silver deposits is recognized at the east end of the Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area.

  14. Primitive wing feather arrangement in Archaeopteryx lithographica and Anchiornis huxleyi.

    PubMed

    Longrich, Nicholas R; Vinther, Jakob; Meng, Qingjin; Li, Quangguo; Russell, Anthony P

    2012-12-01

    In modern birds (Neornithes), the wing is composed of a layer of long, asymmetrical flight feathers overlain by short covert feathers. It has generally been assumed that wing feathers in the Jurassic bird Archaeopteryx and Cretaceous feathered dinosaurs had the same arrangement. Here, we redescribe the wings of the archaic bird Archaeopteryx lithographica and the dinosaur Anchiornis huxleyi and show that their wings differ from those of Neornithes in being composed of multiple layers of feathers. In Archaeopteryx, primaries are overlapped by long dorsal and ventral coverts. Anchiornis has a similar configuration but is more primitive in having short, slender, symmetrical remiges. Archaeopteryx and Anchiornis therefore appear to represent early experiments in the evolution of the wing. This primitive configuration has important functional implications: although the slender feather shafts of Archaeopteryx and Anchiornis make individual feathers weak, layering of the wing feathers may have produced a strong airfoil. Furthermore, the layered arrangement may have prevented the feathers from forming a slotted tip or separating to reduce drag on the upstroke. The wings of early birds therefore may have lacked the range of functions seen in Neornithes, limiting their flight ability. PMID:23177480

  15. The disposition of oxytetracycline to feathers after poultry treatment.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Bjorn J A; Bor, Gerrit; Gerritsen, Henk W; Jansen, Larissa J M; Zuidema, Tina

    2013-01-01

    In the combat against bacterial resistance, there is a clear need to check the use of antibiotics in animal husbandry, including poultry breeding. The use of chicken feathers as a tool for the detection of use of antibiotics was investigated. An extraction method for the analysis of oxytetracycline (OTC) from feathers was developed and was tested by using incurred feathers obtained from a controlled animal treatment study. The use of McIlvain-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid buffer only in combination with acetone gave the highest extraction yield, indicating the need of an organic solvent for feather extraction. By using the developed method, it was found that after a withdrawal time, the OTC concentration in feathers is in the mg kg⁻¹ range, far higher than that in muscle and liver tissue. Based on the analysis of individual segments of feathers from OTC-treated chicken, evidence was found supporting the hypothesis of secretion of antibiotics through the uropygial gland and external spread over feathers by grooming behaviour. It was also found that part of the administered OTC is built into the feather rachis. Finally, we provide the first evidence that the analysis of individual segments of the rachis can be used as a tool to discriminate among different treatment strategies, for example, therapeutic versus subtherapeutic. As a result, we concluded that the analysis of feathers is an extremely valuable tool in residue analysis of antibiotics. PMID:24160860

  16. West Nile virus detection in nonvascular feathers from avian carcasses.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Nicole M; Young, Ginger R; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Brault, Aaron C; Reisen, William K; Komar, Nicholas

    2009-09-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a public health threat and has caused the death of thousands of North American birds. As such, surveillance for WNV has been ongoing, utilizing numerous biological specimens and testing methods. Nonvascular (i.e., fully grown) feathers would provide a simple method of collection from either dead or live birds of all ages and molt cycles, with presumably less biosafety risk compared with other specimen types, including feather pulp. The current study evaluates WNV detection in nonvascular feathers removed from naturally infected avian carcasses of several species groups. Feathers of corvid passeriforms had the highest sensitivity of detection (64%), followed by noncorvid passeriforms (43%), columbiforms (33%), and falconiforms (31%). Storing feathers for 1 year at -20 degrees C or at ambient room temperature resulted in detection rates of infectious WNV of 16% and zero, respectively, but had no effect on detection rates of WNV RNA in a subset of matched feather pairs (47% for both storage temperatures). The efficacy of WNV detection in nonvascular feathers is greatly enhanced by testing multiple feathers. The advantages of using nonvascular feathers over other tissues may outweigh the relatively low detectability of WNV RNA in certain situations such as remote areas lacking resources for acquiring other types of samples or maintaining the cold chain. PMID:19737756

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Duck Tembusu Virus Isolated from Pekin Ducks in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Zhang, Chuanpeng; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of the duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) SH001 strain, isolated from Pekin ducks in Shanghai, China, in 2013. The genome of SH001 is 10,990 nucleotides (nt) in length and contains a single open reading frame encoding a putative polyprotein of 3,425 amino acids. PMID:25908131

  18. Production and properties of keratinolytic proteases from three novel Gram-negative feather-degrading bacteria isolated from Brazilian soils.

    PubMed

    Bach, Evelise; Daroit, Daniel Joner; Corrêa, Ana Paula Folmer; Brandelli, Adriano

    2011-11-01

    The keratinolytic potential and protease properties of three novel Gram-negative feather-degrading bacteria isolated from Brazilian soils was described. Aeromonas hydrophila K12, Chryseobacterium indologenes A22 and Serratia marcescens P3 were able to degrade feather meal, producing high amounts of soluble proteins and forming thiol groups. The proteases of strains K12, A22 and P3 had optimal pH of 8.0, 7.5 and 6.0, respectively; this last is an uncommon feature for bacterial keratinases. The optimal temperature was in the range 45-55°C. All three proteases were active towards azokeratin and were inhibited by EDTA, suggesting that they are keratinolytic metalloproteases. The proteolytic activity of K12 was stimulated by organic solvents and the detergent SDS, suggesting its potential application for detergent formulations and peptide synthesis. Strains A22, K12 and P3 have great potential for use in biotechnological processes involving hydrolysis of keratinous byproducts. PMID:21526391

  19. Keratin capped silver nanoparticles - synthesis and characterization of a nanomaterial with desirable handling properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) were produced with keratin stabilizer and the NPs exhibited unimodal Gaussian distribution with average diameter of 3.5nm +/- 0.7 nm. The molecular mass of keratin stabilizer was 6-8 kDa. The mass of keratin capped NPs was >250 kDa to indicate the formation of crosslinked...

  20. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF BROWN DUCK LAKE, LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF BROWN DUCK LAKE, LOOKING WEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Brown Duck Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.4 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  1. 1. OVERALL VIEW OF BROWN DUCK LAKE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW OF BROWN DUCK LAKE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Brown Duck Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.4 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  2. Campylobacter populations in wild and domesticated Mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Colles, Frances M; Ali, Jan S; Sheppard, Samuel K; McCarthy, Noel D; Maiden, Martin C J

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the Campylobacter genotypes that colonize farmed and wild ducks will help to assess the proportion of human disease that is potentially attributable to the consumption of duck meat and environmental exposure to duck faeces. Comparison of temporally and geographically matched farmed and wild ducks showed that they had different Campylobacter populations in terms of: (i) prevalence, (ii) Campylobacter species and (iii) diversity of genotypes. Furthermore, 92.4% of Campylobacter isolates from farmed ducks were sequence types (STs) commonly associated with human disease, in contrast to just one isolate from the wild ducks. Only one ST, ST-45, was shared between the two sources, accounting for 0.9% of wild duck isolates and 5% of farmed duck isolates. These results indicate that domestic ‘niche’ as well as host type may affect the distribution of Campylobacter, and that husbandry practises associated with intensive agriculture may be involved in generating a reservoir of human disease associated lineages. PMID:22164198

  3. Keratin sponge/hydrogel part 1. fabrication and characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Keratin sponge/hydrogel products formed by either the oxidation or reduction of U.S. domestic fine- or coarse-grade wool exhibited distinctively different topologies and molecular weights of 6- 8 kDa and 40-60 kDa, each with unique macro-porous structure and microstructural behaviors. The sponge/ ...

  4. Keratin sponge/hydrogel II, active agent delivery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Keratin sponge/hydrogels from oxidation and reduction hydrolysis of fine and coarse wool fibers were formed to behave as cationic hydrogels to swell and release active agents in the specific region of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Their porous, interpenetrating networks (IPN) were effective for...

  5. Pathogenicity of duck plague and innate immune responses of the Cherry Valley ducks to duck plague virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Guo, Mengjiao; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Jiyuan; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Duck plague caused by duck plague virus (DPV) is an acute and contagious disease. To better understand the pathogenic mechanism of duck plague virus in ducklings, an infection experiment was performed. Our results showed that typical symptoms were observed in the infected ducklings. DPV could replicate quickly in many tissues, leading to pathological lesions, especially on the spleen. Real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that expression of many innate immune-related genes was mostly up-regulated in the brain, and the antiviral innate immune response was established, but not sufficient to restrict viral replication. In contrast, although the expression of many major pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) increased in the spleen, the expression of most cytokines was declined. Our study indicates that DPV is a pantropic virus that can replicate rapidly in tissues, causing serious pathological lesions but the immune responses are different in the spleen and brain. To our knowledge, this is the first report to systematically explore the expression profiles of the immune genes in the DPV-infected ducks. Our data provide a foundation for further study of the pathogenicity of duck plague. PMID:27553496

  6. Pathogenicity of duck plague and innate immune responses of the Cherry Valley ducks to duck plague virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Guo, Mengjiao; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Jiyuan; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Duck plague caused by duck plague virus (DPV) is an acute and contagious disease. To better understand the pathogenic mechanism of duck plague virus in ducklings, an infection experiment was performed. Our results showed that typical symptoms were observed in the infected ducklings. DPV could replicate quickly in many tissues, leading to pathological lesions, especially on the spleen. Real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that expression of many innate immune-related genes was mostly up-regulated in the brain, and the antiviral innate immune response was established, but not sufficient to restrict viral replication. In contrast, although the expression of many major pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) increased in the spleen, the expression of most cytokines was declined. Our study indicates that DPV is a pantropic virus that can replicate rapidly in tissues, causing serious pathological lesions but the immune responses are different in the spleen and brain. To our knowledge, this is the first report to systematically explore the expression profiles of the immune genes in the DPV-infected ducks. Our data provide a foundation for further study of the pathogenicity of duck plague. PMID:27553496

  7. Keratin promoter based gene manipulation in the murine conducting airway

    PubMed Central

    Malkoski, Stephen P.; Cleaver, Timothy G.; Lu, Shi-Long; Lighthall, Jessyka G.; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2010-01-01

    Systems capable of targeting genetic manipulations to keratin-positive airway basal cells are more poorly developed than systems targeting other airway epithelial cell populations and this has likely hindered development of animal models of diseases such as lung squamous cell carcinoma. Although keratin promoter driven-Cre recombinase constructs are potentially useful for targeting these cells, these constructs have substantially higher activity in the skin and oral epithelium than in the airways. We developed a method for delivering RU486, the conditional activator of Cre recombinase progesterone receptor (CrePR) fusion proteins to the lung and then examined the activity of three keratin-driven CrePR constructs in the conducting airways. We also developed a technique for survival bronchioalveolar lavage on non-ventilated animals to examine the effects of the acetone/oil vehicle required to deliver RU486 to the lung. K5CrePR1 and K14CrePR1 constructs differ only in the keratin promoter used to target CrePR1 expression while K5Cre*PR contains a truncated progesterone receptor designed to reduce RU486-independent Cre activity. While all three constructs demonstrate RU486-inducible Cre activity in the conducting airways, both construct activity and tightness of regulation vary considerably. K5Cre*PR is the most tightly regulated Cre driver making it ideal for targeting somatic mutations to the airway epithelia while K5CrePR1 and K14CrePR1 may be better suited to studying diseases of the conducting airways where gene targeting of keratin expressing cells and their derivatives is desired. PMID:20140084

  8. 78 FR 10201 - Proposed Information Collection; Electronic Duck Stamp Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Information Collection; Electronic Duck Stamp Program AGENCY: Fish... stamp images are also popular collector items. The Electronic Duck Stamp Act of 2005 (Pub. L. 109-266... electronic Federal Duck Stamps. The electronic stamp is valid for 45 days from the date of purchase and...

  9. Do All Ducks Lay Eggs? The Generic Overgeneralization Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Sarah-Jane; Khemlani, Sangeet; Glucksberg, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Generics are statements such as "tigers are striped" and "ducks lay eggs". They express general, though not universal or exceptionless, claims about kinds (Carlson & Pelletier, 1995). For example, the generic "ducks lay eggs" seems true even though many ducks (e.g. the males) do not lay eggs. The universally quantified version of the statement…

  10. Yellow Ducks Overboard! A Lesson in Geography and World Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Paul; Beauboeuf, Donna

    2012-01-01

    This lesson was inspired by the book, "10 Little Rubber Ducks" by Eric Carle, which discusses ocean pollution. The book was inspired by an incident in 1992: A shipping container tumbled into the North Pacific Ocean, broke open, and 28,800 little rubber ducks (and other plastic bath toys) were lost at sea. The ducks were manufactured in China, and…

  11. A COMPARISON BETWEEN MDV PRODUCTION IN FEATHER PULP VERSUS FEATHER FOLLICLE EPITHELIUM (FFE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease is a lymphoproliferative disease in chickens caused by the alphaherpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV). After a cytolytic phase in lymphoid tissue (i.e. thymus, spleen and bursa) the virus travels to the feather follicle epithelium (FFE). The FFE is the only known location that sh...

  12. Corvidae feather pulp and West Nile virus detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Romaine Long, R.; Griffin, Katie M.; Saito, E.K.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated cloacal swab, vascular pulp of flight feather, and kidney and spleen pool samples from carcasses of members of the family Corvidae as sources of West Nile virus (WNV). The cloacal swab, kidney and spleen pool, and feather pulp were the source of WNV in 38%, 43%, and 77%, respectively, of the carcasses.

  13. Fish oil disrupts seabird feather microstructure and waterproofing.

    PubMed

    Morandin, Lora A; O'Hara, Patrick D

    2014-10-15

    Seabirds and other aquatic avifauna are highly sensitive to exposure to petroleum oils. A small amount of oil is sufficient to break down the feather barrier that is necessary to prevent water penetration and hypothermia. Far less attention has been paid to potential effects on aquatic birds of so called 'edible oils', non-petroleum oils such as vegetable and fish oils. In response to a sardine oil discharge by a vessel off the coast of British Columbia, we conducted an experiment to assess if feather exposure to sheens of sardine oil (ranging from 0.04 to 3 μm in thickness) resulted in measurable oil and water uptake and significant feather microstructure disruption. We designed the experiment based on a previous experiment on effects of petroleum oils on seabird feathers. Feathers exposed to the thinnest fish oil sheens (0.04 μm) resulted in measurable feather weight gain (from oil and water uptake) and significant feather microstructure disruption. Both feather weight gain and microstructure disruption increased with increasing fish oil thickness. Because of the absence of primary research on effects of edible oils on sea birds, we conducted interviews with wildlife rehabilitation professionals with experience rehabilitating sea birds after edible oil exposure. The consensus from interviews and our experiment indicated that physical contact with fish and other 'edible oils' in the marine environment is at least as harmful to seabirds as petroleum oils. PMID:25089687

  14. 14 CFR 25.1027 - Propeller feathering system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller feathering system. 25.1027 Section 25.1027 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1027 Propeller feathering system. (a) If the propeller...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1027 - Propeller feathering system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller feathering system. 23.1027 Section 23.1027 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1027 Propeller feathering system....

  16. 50 CFR 20.91 - Commercial use of feathers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commercial use of feathers. 20.91 Section 20.91 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR..., or barter for millinery or ornamental use the feathers of migratory game birds taken under...

  17. "Duck stamp" dollars reserve native prairie tracts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ducks and wetlands are inseparable in the prairies. Hunters know this, bird watchers know this, wildlife managers know this, and most importantly people who manage the croplands and rangelands know this. The 1,746 tracts of native prairie within these upland-wetland complexes known as Waterfowl Production Areas are not the only lands purchased with "duck stamp" dollars. Considerable acreages have also been purchased in central and southern parts of the United States to provide staging, resting, and wintering areas for waterfowl. Since 1934, when "duck stamps" were first sold, nearly 2.5 million acres of waterfowl habitats have been acquired or taken under easement within the United States with revenue from these sales. By purchasing "duck stamps", more than 2.2 million people provide over $16.5 million in annual revenue. It is certainly gratifying to know that some of the remaining native prairie remnants in the Northern Great Plains are being reserved for the future with "duck stamp" dollars.

  18. Mercury concentrations in feathers of wading birds from Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.; Spalding, M.; Morrison, D.

    1997-01-01

    Primary or tail feathers were collected from 92 wading birds in Florida from Lake Okeechobee and wetlands farther south, from 1987 to 1990. Mean concentrations detected in feathers of nestlings were 2.0 ppm Hg in roseate spoonbills (Ajaia ajaja), 3.5 ppm Hg in great blue herons (Ardea herodias), 4.7 ppm Hg in great white herons (Ardea herodias occidentalis), and 7.1 ppm Hg in great egrets (Casmerodius albus). Concentrations in feathers of great white herons increased with the age of the bird, from 4.7 ppm Hg in nestlings, to 6.7 ppm Hg in juveniles, and 8.2 ppm Hg in adults. Mercury concentrations were greatest in species consuming large fish. Feathers collected from wood storks (Mycteria americana) contained an average of 3.3 ppm Hg. Mercury concentrations in feathers of wading birds from southern Florida were greater than those reported in feathers of wading birds from Asia. Both liver and feather Hg concentrations were known for 25 wading birds. The regression of liver (wet weight) Hg concentrations (Y) on feather Hg concentrations (X) was: log(Y) = 1.52 log(X) - 0.722. The correlation coefficient was 0.84. If reproductive disorders are expected when concentrations in feathers of adult birds average 9 ppm Hg, as might be inferred from a published laboratory study on mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), then Hg in southern Florida may be high enough to reduce productivity of wading bird populations. However, additional controlled studies are needed before a minimum toxic concentration in feathers can be designated with confidence.

  19. Thallium contamination in wild ducks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Mariko; Mori, Makoto; Akinaga, Mayumi; Yugami, Kyoko; Oya, Chika; Hondo, Ryo; Ueda, Fukiko

    2005-07-01

    Although thallium (Tl) is toxic to both humans and animals, there is little information on contamination in wildlife. In this study, Tl contents in wild ducks in Japan were determined. Contents of Tl in kidney and liver ranged from 0.42 to 119.61 and 0.10 to 33.94 microg/g dry weight, respectively. Significant correlations between Tl contents in kidney and liver were observed for all dabbling ducks except mallard (Anas platyrhynchos); similar correlations were not observed in diving ducks. Variation in Tl content was observed between sampling locations with the highest mean Tl content in the Eurasian wigeon (Anas penelope) collected in Ibaraki Prefecture. PMID:16244083

  20. Heritabilities and genetic correlations of body weights and feather length in growing Muscovy selected in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y H; Poivey, J P; Rouvier, R; Wang, C T; Tai, C

    1999-12-01

    1. Heritabilities and genetic correlations in the base population of a closed strain of Muscovy duck, moderately selected for body weight at 10 weeks of age, have been estimated from the data of 9 successive generations for the following traits: male and female body weight at 10 and 18 weeks of age (BW10m, BW18m, BW10f, BW18f) and length of the 8th primary feather at 10 weeks of age (F110m, F110f). 2. Multivariate REML with an animal model was used, pooling data from the 9 generations (3283 and 3289 male and female offspring respectively). The same trait expressed in male and female was considered as 2 different traits. 3. The 8th primary feather was longer in females than in males by 6% to 22% at 10 weeks of age. Body weight was heavier in males than in females by 42% to 58% at 10 weeks of age and by 57% to 75% at 18 weeks of age. 3. The heritability estimates for body weight traits showed moderate values, being a little higher for females than for males at the same age, increasing with age from h2=0.24 at BW10m to h2=0.43 at BW18f. 4. The heritability estimates for feather length showed that a greater response would be obtained in selection for male feather length (h2=0.37) than for female length (h2=0.14). Both have high genetic correlations with body weight so they could be indirectly improved. 5. Heritabilities of the difference in body weights between males and females at 10 weeks (h2=0.07) and 18 weeks of age (h2=0.10) were small, as well as for feather length (h2=0.10). It would probably be difficult to modify sexual dimorphism in body weight through selection. 6. Genetic correlations between BW10m, BW18m and BW10f, BW18f were respectively r(g)=0.77 and r(g)=0.80. They were larger for body weight at the same ages between males and females, r(g)=0.90 (r(g)=0.88 between F110m and F110f). Body weight in males and females at the same age should be better considered as 2 different traits in a selection programme. 7. The cumulated predicted genetic gains

  1. 50 CFR 20.92 - Personal use of feathers or skins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Personal use of feathers or skins. 20.92... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Feathers or Skins § 20.92 Personal use of feathers... permit the feathers and skins of lawfully taken migratory game birds....

  2. 50 CFR 20.92 - Personal use of feathers or skins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Personal use of feathers or skins. 20.92... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Feathers or Skins § 20.92 Personal use of feathers... permit the feathers and skins of lawfully taken migratory game birds....

  3. 50 CFR 20.92 - Personal use of feathers or skins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Personal use of feathers or skins. 20.92... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Feathers or Skins § 20.92 Personal use of feathers... permit the feathers and skins of lawfully taken migratory game birds....

  4. 50 CFR 20.92 - Personal use of feathers or skins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personal use of feathers or skins. 20.92... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Feathers or Skins § 20.92 Personal use of feathers... permit the feathers and skins of lawfully taken migratory game birds....

  5. 50 CFR 20.92 - Personal use of feathers or skins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Personal use of feathers or skins. 20.92... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Feathers or Skins § 20.92 Personal use of feathers... permit the feathers and skins of lawfully taken migratory game birds....

  6. Benefits, costs, and determinants of dominance in American black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hepp, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    Behavioural dominance was studied in captive American black ducks (Anas rubripes) during October-December 1984. Eighty ducks were marked individually, and groups of 10 ducks consisting of 5 adults (3 males and 2 females) and 5 juveniles (3 males and 2 females) were assigned to each of 8 experimental pens. Ducks in 4 pens received an ad libitum diet, and ducks in the other 4 pens were given a restricted diet. Dominance structure within pens was linear. Adults were dominant to young, and body mass had no influence on dominance rank. The effect of sex on dominance rank was age-specific. Adult males were dominant to adult females and to young black ducks of both sexes; however, dominance rank of young males did not differ from adult or young females. Paired adults were dominant to unpaired adults and to young individuals that were either paired or unpaired. Paired young black ducks were similar in dominance rank to unpaired adults and unpaired young indicating that pairing did not make these individuals more dominant. Ducks on the restricted diet gained less body mass than ducks on the ad libitum diet, but dominant and subordinate black ducks within treatment groups experienced similar changes in body mass during the early winter. Dominant black ducks interacted more frequently and were more likely to form pair bonds than subordinates, thus higher energy costs of dominant individuals may explain the poor relationship between physical condition and dominance rank. There was a significant positive association between the dominance ranks of pair members.

  7. Ducks: the "Trojan horses" of H5N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Negovetich, Nicholas J; Forrest, Heather L; Webster, Robert G

    2009-07-01

    Wild ducks are the main reservoir of influenza A viruses that can be transmitted to domestic poultry and mammals, including humans. Of the 16 hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes of influenza A viruses, only the H5 and H7 subtypes cause highly pathogenic (HP) influenza in the natural hosts. Several duck species are naturally resistant to HP Asian H5N1 influenza viruses. These duck species can shed and spread virus from both the respiratory and intestinal tracts while showing few or no disease signs. While the HP Asian H5N1 viruses are 100% lethal for chickens and other gallinaceous poultry, the absence of disease signs in some duck species has led to the concept that ducks are the "Trojan horses" of H5N1 in their surreptitious spread of virus. An important unresolved issue is whether the HP H5N1 viruses are maintained in the wild duck population of the world. Here, we review the ecology and pathobiology of ducks infected with influenza A viruses and ducks' role in the maintenance and spread of HP H5N1 viruses. We also identify the key questions about the role of ducks that must be resolved in order to understand the emergence and control of pandemic influenza. It is generally accepted that wild duck species can spread HP H5N1 viruses, but there is insufficient evidence to show that ducks maintain these viruses and transfer them from one generation to the next. PMID:19627369

  8. Conservation of the structure of keratin intermediate filaments: molecular mechanism by which different keratin molecules integrate into preexisting keratin intermediate filaments during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Steinert, P M; Marekov, L N; Parry, D A

    1993-09-28

    During development and differentiation, the intermediate filament component of the cytoskeleton of many cells and tissues is rebuilt by a dynamic exchange process in which one set of protein chains is replaced by another, without recourse to creation of a new network. One major example is the replacement of keratin 5/keratin 14 (K5/K14) keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) by K1/K10 KIFs during terminal differentiation in the epidermis. The present work was undertaken to explore how this may occur. We have induced lysine-lysine cross-links with disulfosuccinimidyl tartrate in K5/K14 KIFs in order to determine the axial dimensions and relative axial alignments of the K5/K14 molecules. Many of the cross-links induced in subfilamentous oligomers containing one, two, or three molecules were also found in the intact KIF, indicating that the body of data thus generated provides physiologically relevant information on the structural organization in the KIF. A least-squares analysis using as data the positions of lysine residues involved in 23 induced cross-links has allowed the axial alignments of the various coiled-coil segments in the rod domain to be determined. Three modes of antiparallel alignment of two neighboring molecules were found: A11 (staggered by -16.7 nm), A22 (staggered by 28.8 nm), and A12 (almost in register; staggered by only 0.3 nm). Since the axial repeat length is about 1 nm less than the molecular length, the data require a fourth mode of molecule alignment, termed ACN, in which similarly directed molecules are overlapped by the equivalent of about 5-10 residues.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7691168

  9. Organization of the human keratin type II gene cluster at 12q13

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S.J.; LeBlanc-Straceski, J.; Krauter, K.

    1994-12-01

    Keratin proteins constitute intermediate filaments and are the major differentiation products of mammalian epithelial cells. The epithelial keratins are classified into two groups, type I and type II, and one member of each group is expressed in a given epithelial cell differentiation stage. Mutations in type I and type II keratin genes have now been implicated in three different human genetic disorders, epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. Members of the type I keratins are mapped to human chromosome 17, and the type II keratin genes are mapped to chromosome 12. To understand the organization of the type II keratin genes on chromosome 12, we isolated several yeast artificial chromosomes carrying these keratin genes and examined them in detail. We show that eight already known type II keratin genes are located in a cluster at 12q13, and their relative organization reflects their evolutionary relationship. We also determined that a type I keratin gene, KRT8, is located next to its partner, KRT18, in this cluster. Careful examination of the cluster also revealed that there may be a number of additional keratin genes at this locus that have not been described previously. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Distinct Impact of Two Keratin Mutations Causing Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex on Keratinocyte Adhesion and Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Homberg, Melanie; Ramms, Lena; Schwarz, Nicole; Dreissen, Georg; Leube, Rudolf E; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-10-01

    Keratin filaments constitute the major component of the epidermal cytoskeleton from heterodimers of type I and type II keratin subunits. Missense mutations in keratin 5 or keratin 14, highly expressed in the basal epidermis, cause the severe skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) in humans by rendering the keratin cytoskeleton sensitive to mechanical stress; yet, the mechanisms by which individual mutations cause cell fragility are incompletely understood. Here, we compared the K14p.Arg125Pro with the K5p.Glu477Asp mutation, both giving rise to severe generalized EBS, by stable expression in keratin-free keratinocytes. This revealed distinctly different effects on keratin cytoskeletal organization, in agreement with in vivo observations, thus validating the cell system. Although the K14p.Arg125Pro mutation led to impaired desmosomes, downregulation of desmosomal proteins, and weakened epithelial sheet integrity upon shear stress, the K5p.Glu477Asp mutation did not impair these functions, although causing EBS with squamous cell carcinoma in vivo. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated that K14 mutant cells were even less resistant against deformation compared with keratin-free keratinocytes. Thus, a keratin mutation causing EBS compromises cell stiffness to a greater extent than the lack of keratins. Finally, re-expression of K14 in K14 mutant cells did not rescue the above defects. Collectively, our findings have implications for EBS therapy approaches. PMID:25961909

  11. The Sequential Tissue Distribution of Duck Tembusu Virus in Adult Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Jiang, Yongping; Ding, Leilei; Lin, Yuan; Li, Qimeng; He, Xijun; Chen, Qiusheng; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a novel Tembusu virus (TMUV) that caused a severe decrease in the egg production of ducks was isolated in southeast China. Given the novelty of this duck pathogen, little information is available regarding its pathogenesis. Here, we systematically investigated the replication kinetics of TMUV PTD2010 in adult male and female ducks. We found that PTD2010 was detectable in most of the parenchymatous organs as well as the oviduct and intestinal tract from days 1 to 7 after inoculation. Viral titers were maintained at high levels for at least 9 days in the spleen, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, brain, and ovary. No virus was detected in any of these organs or tissues at 18 days after inoculation. PTD2010, thus, causes systemic infections in male and female ducks; its replication kinetics show similar patterns in most organs, with the exception of the ovaries and testes. PMID:25215289

  12. [Cytokinetics and keratins of keratinocytes from skin of the elderly].

    PubMed

    Wevers, A; Schulze, H J; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1989-11-15

    Regarding the keratin pattern of non-exposed skin, we found no significant qualitative or quantitative differences between 6 old persons (mean age 85 years) and 4 young adults (mean age 20 years). There was, however, a slight increase of proliferation keratins (K6, K16) in aged skin. In non-exposed skin taken from 6 old (mean age 70 years) and 5 young persons (mean age 37 years), longterm primary submersion cultures of keratinocytes did not show any significant differences as far as the classical parameters of growth behavior were concerned (i.e. plating efficiency, cell count, and labeled thymidine incorporation). In accordance with these findings, daily measurements of the thymidine kinase activity in the supernatants revealed discrete but not significant differences between keratinocytes in aged people and those in young persons. PMID:2481907

  13. Keratinization Disorders and Genetic Aspects in Palmar and Plantar Keratodermas.

    PubMed

    Stypczyńska, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar; Zegarska, Barbara; Czajkowski, Rafał

    2016-06-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a heterogeneous group of hereditary and acquired disorders characterized by abnormal thickening of the palms and soles. There are three clinical patterns: diffuse, focal, and punctuate. Palmoplantar keratodermas can be divided into the following functional subgroups: disturbed gene functions in structural proteins (keratins), cornified envelope (loricrin, transglutaminase), cohesion (plakophilin, desmoplakin, desmoglein 1), cell-to-cell communication (connexins) and transmembrane signal transduction (cathepsin C). Unna-Thost disease is the most common variety of hereditary PPK. Mutations in keratin 1 have been reported in Unna-Thost disease. We report 12 cases in which Unna-Thost disease was diagnosed. Genealogical study demonstrated that the genodermatosis was a familial disease inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder. Dermatological examination revealed yellowish hyperkeratosis on the palms and soles. Oral mucosa, teeth, and nails remained unchanged. Histopathological examination of the biopsy sample taken from the soles of the patients showed orthokeratotic keratosis, hypergranulosis, and acanthosis without epidermolysis. PMID:27477171

  14. Thermal and chemical effects of turkey feathers pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kluska, Jacek; Kardaś, Dariusz; Heda, Łukasz; Szumowski, Mateusz; Szuszkiewicz, Jarosław

    2016-03-01

    This study examines the thermal and chemical effects of the pyrolysis of turkey feathers. Research of feathers pyrolysis is important because of their increasing production and difficulties of their utilization. The experiments were carried out by means of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and two pyrolytic reactors. The experimental investigation indicated that the feather material liquefies at temperatures between 210 and 240°C. This liquefaction together with the agglomeration of various dispersed and porous elements of the feathers into larger droplets leads to the volume reduction. Moreover, this work presents characteristics of the composition of the solid, liquid and gaseous products of turkey feathers pyrolysis at different temperatures. The higher heating value (HHV) of gaseous products in temperature 900°C equals 19.28 MJ/Nm(3) making the gases suitable for use as a fuel. The thermochemical conversion of turkey feathers leads to the formation of poisonous compounds such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in the liquid (0.13%) and gaseous (88 mg/Nm(3)) products. The phenomenon of liquefaction of feathers is important because it can lead to rapid degradation of the walls of reactors, and the formation of deposits. PMID:26783100

  15. Influence of microemulsion structure on cystine reactivity with keratin fibres.

    PubMed

    Solans, C; Parra, J L; Erra, P; Azemar, N; Clausse, M; Touraud, D

    1987-10-01

    Summary The activity of thioglycolic acid, incorporated in a microemulsion, towards cystine residues present in keratin proteins has been investigated. In an attempt to relate the structural state of the microemulsions to cystine reactivity, an appropriate model system showing a large microemulsion domain with diverse structures was chosen. The realm of preferentially hydrocarbon-continuous microemulsion-type media was found to induce the highest activity. PMID:19456980

  16. Influence of keratin on native cellular fluorescence of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Rick A.; Savage, Howard E.; Sacks, Peter G.; Alfano, Robert R.; Schantz, Stimson P.

    1996-04-01

    Cellular differentiation is a characteristic that defines normal and neoplastic tissue. Epithelial tumors express keratins that are quantitatively and qualitatively different from normal tissue. Therefore, a study was designed to test the hypothesis that native cellular fluorescence (NCF) can be used to detect in vivo differentiation changes associated with higher keratin content in epidermal thick skin and callus when compared with non-keratinized forearm skin. Nineteen control subjects (males, N equals 12; females, N equals 7) were tested using a xenon based fluorescence spectrophotometer (Mediscience Corp.). Seven emission and five excitation spectra were recorded from two sites on each subject: the ventral forearm and palmar hand at the metacarpal-phalangeal joint. Wavelength ratios were used to quantitate three emission and three excitation scans. Two sample t-test analysis was performed for forearm (FA) vs. hand thick skin (HTS) and callus (CAL). The emission scans ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320 - 580 nm; (lambda) Ex 340 nm, (lambda) Em 360 - 660 nm; (lambda) Ex 365 nm, (lambda) Em 400 - 700 nm) are statistically significant (P less than 0.0001) at the wavelength ratios 340 nm/440 nm, 420 nm/540 nm, and 440 nm/540 nm, respectively. The excitation scans ((lambda) Ex 200 - 320 nm, (lambda) Em 340 nm; (lambda) Ex 200 - 360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm; (lambda) Ex 270 - 500 nm, (lambda) Em 520 nm) are statistically significant (P less than 0.0001) at the wavelength ratios 260 nm/290 nm, 290 nm/340 nm, and 320 nm/345 nm, respectively. In vivo tissue fluorescence can be used to detect the influence of keratin on the spectral profiles of the epidermis.

  17. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Sara A.; McGettrick, Julie R.; Hansen, Warren K.; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  18. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers.

    PubMed

    Berk, Sara A; McGettrick, Julie R; Hansen, Warren K; Breuner, Creagh W

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  19. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R.; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L.; Morasso, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder–associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75A161T and KRT75E337K, are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75A161T variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries. PMID:25347471

  20. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L; Morasso, Maria I

    2014-12-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder-associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75(A161T) and KRT75(E337K), are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75(A161T) variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries. PMID:25347471

  1. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Wood Duck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sousa, Patrick J.; Farmer, Adrian H.

    1983-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop models for breeding and wintering habitats for the wood duck (Aix sponsa). The models are scaled to produce indices of habitat suitability between 0 (unsuitable habitat) and 1 (optimally suitable habitat). Habitat suitability indices are designed for use with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  2. Monoclonal Antibody Analysis of Keratin Expression in the Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franko, Maryellen C.; Gibbs, Clarence J.; Rhoades, Dorothy A.; Carleton Gajdusek, D.

    1987-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against a 65-kDa brain protein demonstrates an epitope found in keratin from human epidermis. By indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody decorates intracytoplasmic filaments in a subclass of astrocytes and Purkinje cells of adult hamster brain. Double-label immunofluorescence study using antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein and this antibody reveals the 65-kDa protein to be closely associated with glial filaments in astrocytes of fetal mouse brain cultures. Immunoblot analysis of purified human epidermal keratin and hamster brain homogenate confirms the reactivity of this antibody to epidermal keratin polypeptides. All the major epidermal keratins were recognized by this antibody. It did not bind to the remaining major intermediate filament proteins. These findings suggest that monoclonal antibody 34C9 recognizes a cytoskeletal structure connected with intermediate filaments. In addition, the monoclonal antibody demonstrates that epidermal keratins share an epitope not only among themselves but also with a ``neural keratin.''

  3. Factors limiting traditional household duck production in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M A; Skerratt, L F; Rahman, M A; Beg, A B M Rabiul Alam; Debnath, N C

    2010-10-01

    A cross sectional survey of duck production was carried out in 2002 on 771 traditional, semiscavenging household duck farms on the coastal Island of Hatia. We determined the socioeconomic characteristics of duck farmers and their management systems, identified the factors associated with egg production, and measured the level of selected duck diseases and current preventive strategies. Household family size varied from 1 to 14 individuals and women were the main caretakers of ducks. Around 34% of keepers were illiterate. Most duck products (eggs and meat; 85%) were sold at the local market. Duck houses were poorly ventilated and a variety of bedding materials were used. Feed was available in nearby scavenging areas; however, additional feed was frequently supplied by farmers. Almost all farmers (96%) ranked the rainy season as the best time for rearing ducks due to greater feed availability. The annual egg production was 79 eggs per layer with a weight of 48 g and a hatchability rate of 87%. Egg production varied by zone (p < 0.05). The odds of suboptimal egg production was 0.5 times lower in educated farmers (p = 0.001). The odds of suboptimal egg production was 2.5 times more likely in ducks that attained sexual maturity at >22 weeks (p<0.001). Most farmers ranked duck plague as the most important disease, followed by duck cholera, botulism, and duck viral hepatitis. Preventive vaccination was sporadic and used by few farmers (28%). There are significant opportunities for improved duck production on the Island of Hatia and in Bangladesh generally. PMID:20517644

  4. Theory of the development of curved barbs and their effects on feather morphology.

    PubMed

    Feo, Teresa J; Simon, Emma; Prum, Richard O

    2016-08-01

    Feathers exhibit an extraordinary diversity of shapes, which are used by birds to accomplish a diverse set of functions. Pennaceous feathers have a double branched morphology that develops from a tube of epidermis, and variation in branch geometry determines feather shape. Feather development is both complex (i.e., a simple developmental modification can have multiple effects on mature feather shape), and redundant (i.e., different developmental modifications can create the same shape). Due to this, it is not readily apparent how different feather shapes develop. In many feathers, barbs are not straight, but instead curve in toward, or away, from the feather tip. Barb curvature can affect the shape of mature feathers but the development of curved barbs is unknown. Previous research has hypothesized that barb curvature could develop either during the helical growth of barb ridges in the tubular feather germ, or during barb angle expansion as the feather unfurls from the sheath. To better understand the development of curved barbs and their effects on mature feathers we present a theoretical model of curved barb development and test the model with empirical investigations of feathers. We find that curved barbs affect many aspects of feather morphology including vane width, barb length, and barb spacing. In real feathers, curved barbs can develop both during helical barb ridge growth and during barb angle expansion, with most of the observed curvature due to barb angle expansion. Our results demonstrate that barb angle expansion as a feather unfurls from the sheath is a complex and dynamic process that plays an important role in determining the shape and structure of mature feathers. Curved barbs create heterogeneity in barb geometry within the feather vane, which could have important implications for aerodynamic function and the development of within feather pigmentation patterns. J. Morphol. 277:995-1013, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27185293

  5. Adult human keratinocyte cultures express 40, 52, 58 and 67 KD keratins

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, R.S.; Chandrakasan, G.; Hussain, M.Z.; Enriquez, B.; Ryder, M.I.

    1986-03-01

    Keratins are complex fibrous proteins characteristic of epithelial cells. Although several different classes of keratins are known to occur in the epidermis, the expression of all keratins has not been observed in vitro. The authors have developed a procedure that allows us to culture and passage up to ten times, adult human kerationcytes, in the absence of mesenchymal substrates. EM examination of stratifying cultures showed the presence of numerous tonofilaments, desmosomes and keratohyaline granules. The expression of different classes of keratins was examined by immunofluorescence, radiolabeling, SDS-PAGE and Western blot, using mouse monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of water-insoluble proteins showed the presence of keratins of M.W. 40 kd, 50-52 kd, 56-57 kd and 65-67 kd. The expression of 40kd keratin is known to be associated with basal cells. In their culture system basal cells secrete a well-defined basement membrane on which they rest. These cells may be responsible for the 40kd keratin. The expression of 65-67kd keratins has not previously been observed in vitro. These keratins are considered to be markers for terminal differentiation of epidermal cells. These proteins are presumed to be synthesized in their cultures by sloughing layers of rough, granular cells.

  6. Ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of keratin intermediate filaments in mechanically stimulated A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Jaitovich, Ariel; Mehta, Semil; Na, Ni; Ciechanover, Aaron; Goldman, Robert D; Ridge, Karen M

    2008-09-12

    We previously reported that shear stress induces phosphorylation and disassembly of keratin intermediate filaments (IFs). Shear stress also induces a time- and strain-dependent degradation of keratin IFs, and the current study examines the mechanisms involved in degradation of keratin proteins in human A549 cells exposed to 0-24 h of shear stress (7.5-30 dynes/cm(2)). Ubiquitin was found to be covalently associated with keratin proteins immunoprecipitated from shear-stressed cells, and pretreatment with the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 prevented the degradation of the keratin IF network. Importantly, phosphorylation of K8 Ser-73 is required for the shear stress-mediated ubiquitination, disassembly, and degradation of the keratin IF network. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that shear stress caused the thin array of keratin fibrils observed in control cells to be reorganized into a perinuclear aggregate, known as an aggresome, and that ubiquitin was also associated with this structure. Finally, the E2 enzymes, UbcH5b, -c, and Ubc3, but not E2-25K are required for the shear stress-mediated ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation of keratin proteins. These data suggest that shear stress promotes the disassembly and degradation of the keratin IF network via phosphorylation and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:18617517

  7. Effects of oil and oil burn residues on seabird feathers.

    PubMed

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Linnebjerg, Jannie Fries; Sørensen, Martin X; Brogaard, Nicholas L; Rigét, Frank F; Kristensen, Paneeraq; Jomaas, Grunde; Boertmann, David M; Wegeberg, Susse; Gustavson, Kim

    2016-08-15

    It is well known, that in case of oil spill, seabirds are among the groups of animals most vulnerable. Even small amounts of oil can have lethal effects by destroying the waterproofing of their plumage, leading to loss of insulation and buoyancy. In the Arctic these impacts are intensified. To protect seabirds, a rapid removal of oil is crucial and in situ burning could be an efficient method. In the present work exposure effects of oil and burn residue in different doses was studied on seabird feathers from legally hunted Common eider (Somateria mollissima) by examining changes in total weight of the feather and damages on the microstructure (Amalgamation Index) of the feathers before and after exposure. The results of the experiments indicate that burn residues from in situ burning of an oil spill have similar or larger fouling and damaging effects on seabird feathers, as compared to fresh oil. PMID:27234369

  8. Feather-like development of Triassic diapsid skin appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Sebastian; Buchwitz, Michael; Fischer, Jan; Krause, Daniel; Georgi, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Of the recent sauropsid skin appendage types, only feathers develop from a cylindrical epidermal invagination, the follicle, and show hierarchical branching. Fossilized integuments of Mesozoic diapsids have been interpreted as follicular and potential feather homologues, an idea particularly controversially discussed for the elongate dorsal skin projections of the small diapsid Longisquama insignis from the Triassic of Kyrgyzstan. Based on new finds and their comparison with the type material, we show that Longisquama’s appendages consist of a single-branched internal frame enclosed by a flexible outer membrane. Not supporting a categorization either as feathers or as scales, our analysis demonstrates that the Longisquama appendages formed in a two-stage, feather-like developmental process, representing an unusual early example for the evolutionary plasticity of sauropsid integument.

  9. Humid microclimates within the plumage of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) can potentially facilitate long distance dispersal of propagules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan, Neil E.; Kelly, Tom C.; Davenport, John; Jansen, Marcel A. K.

    2015-05-01

    Birds as carriers of propagules are major agents in the dispersal of plants, animals, fungi and microbes. However, there is a lack of empirical data in relation to bird-mediated, epizoochorous dispersal. The microclimate found within the plumage likely plays a pivotal role in survival during flight conditions. To investigate the potential of epizoochory, we have analysed the microclimatic conditions within the plumage of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). Under similar ambient conditions of humidity and temperature, a sample of mallards showed a consistent microclimatic regime with variation across the body surface. The highest (mean) temperature and specific humidity occurred between feathers of the postpatagium. The lowest humidity was found between feathers of the centre back and the lowest temperature in the crissum. Observed differences in plumage depth and density, and distance from the skin, are all likely to be determining factors of microclimate condition. Specific humidity found within the plumage was on average 1.8-3.5 times greater than ambient specific humidity. Thus, the plumage can supply a microclimate buffered from that of the exterior environment. Extrapolating survival data for Lemna minor desiccation at various temperature and humidity levels to the measured plumage microclimatic conditions of living birds, survival for up to 6 h can be anticipated, especially in crissum, crural and breast plumage. The results are discussed in the context of potential long distance epizoochorous dispersal by A. platyrhynchos and similar species.

  10. Does Water Temperature Affect the Timing and Duration of Remigial Moult in Sea Ducks? An Experimental Approach

    PubMed Central

    Viain, Anouck; Guillemette, Magella

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic birds have high cost of thermoregulation, especially during the moulting period, yet the effect of water temperature on the moulting strategy of aquatic birds has rarely been studied. Our general hypothesis is that energy savings associated with lower thermoregulation costs would be allocated to moulting processes. We predicted that aquatic birds moulting in warm water would have a higher level of body reserves, a faster growth rate of feathers, and an earlier remigial moult onset compared with birds moulting in cold water. We used the common eider (Somateria mollissima dresseri), a large sea duck, as the model species. Captive individuals were experimentally exposed to warm (18°C) and cold (8°C) water treatments during a three year period with individuals swapped between treatments. We found a similar feather growth rate for the two water temperature treatments and in contrast to our predictions, eiders exposed to warm water had a lower body mass and showed a delayed onset of remigial moult of approximately 7 days compared with those exposed to cold water. Our data indicate that body mass variations influence the timing of moult in unexpected ways and we suggest that it likely controls the occurrence of wing moult through a hormonal cascade. This study emphasizes the importance of improving our knowledge of the effects of water temperature on remigial moult of aquatic birds, to better assert the potential effects of global warming on their survival. PMID:27177039

  11. Fossil evidence for evolution of the shape and color of penguin feathers.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Julia A; Ksepka, Daniel T; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo; Altamirano, Ali J; Shawkey, Matthew D; D'Alba, Liliana; Vinther, Jakob; DeVries, Thomas J; Baby, Patrice

    2010-11-12

    Penguin feathers are highly modified in form and function, but there have been no fossils to inform their evolution. A giant penguin with feathers was recovered from the late Eocene (~36 million years ago) of Peru. The fossil reveals that key feathering features, including undifferentiated primary wing feathers and broad body contour feather shafts, evolved early in the penguin lineage. Analyses of fossilized color-imparting melanosomes reveal that their dimensions were similar to those of non-penguin avian taxa and that the feathering may have been predominantly gray and reddish-brown. In contrast, the dark black-brown color of extant penguin feathers is generated by large, ellipsoidal melanosomes previously unknown for birds. The nanostructure of penguin feathers was thus modified after earlier macrostructural modifications of feather shape linked to aquatic flight. PMID:20929737

  12. Study of temporal trends in mercury concentrations in the primary flight feathers of Strix aluco.

    PubMed

    Varela, Z; García-Seoane, R; Fernández, J A; Carballeira, A; Aboal, J R

    2016-08-01

    Temporal trends in Hg concentrations were determined in the primary flight feathers of 146 specimens of Strix aluco which had died in various Wildlife Recovery Centres in Galicia (NW Spain) between 1997 and 2014. The aim of the study was to determine whether standardization of a primary flight feather (or feathers) in this species is essential for identifying temporal trends in Hg concentrations. For this purpose, we had to first standardize the feather(s) analyzed to enable comparison of the levels of Hg detected in different feathers. The results show a high degree of both inter and intra-individual variability but despite that, it was possible to identify P5 as the most representative feather taking into account the amount of metal excreted in each feather and the intra-individual variability: its median was 133ng, which represents 15% (from 7% to 15%) of the total Hg present in all the primary feathers. However, this "standard feather" did not reveal any temporal trend in Hg concentrations for the study period. This lack of trend was found irrespective of the feather considered and it is expected that detection of any existing trend would also not depend on the feather considered. We conclude that use of any particular feather is not essential for identifying temporal trends in Hg concentrations, because the pattern will be identified regardless of the feather selected. PMID:27123972

  13. Molecular Biology of Feather Morphogenesis: A Testable Model for Evo-Devo Research

    PubMed Central

    WIDELITZ, RANDALL B.; JIANG, TING XIN; YU, MINGKE; SHEN, TED; SHEN, JEN-YEE; WU, PING; YU, ZHICAO; CHUONG, CHENG-MING

    2015-01-01

    Darwin’s theory describes the principles that are responsible for evolutionary change of organisms and their attributes. The actual mechanisms, however, need to be studied for each species and each organ separately. Here we have investigated the mechanisms underlying these principles in the avian feather. Feathers comprise one of the most complex and diverse epidermal organs as demonstrated by their shape, size, patterned arrangement and pigmentation. Variations can occur at several steps along each level of organization, leading to highly diverse forms and functions. Feathers develop gradually during ontogeny through a series of steps that may correspond to the evolutionary steps that were taken during the phylogeny from a reptilian ancestor to birds. These developmental steps include 1) the formation of feather tract fields on the skin surfaces; 2) periodic patterning of the individual feather primordia within the feather tract fields; 3) feather bud morphogenesis establishing anterio - posterior (along the cranio - caudal axis) and proximo - distal axes; 4) branching morphogenesis to create the rachis, barbs and barbules within a feather bud; and 5) gradual modulations of these basic morphological parameters within a single feather or across a feather tract. Thus, possibilities for variation in form and function of feathers occur at every developmental step. In this paper, principles guiding feather tract formation, distributions of individual feathers within the tracts and variations in feather forms are discussed at a cellular and molecular level. PMID:12949772

  14. Feathering instability of spiral arms. II. Parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wing-Kit

    2014-09-10

    We report the results of a parameter study of the feathering stability in the galactic spiral arms. A two-dimensional, razor-thin magnetized self-gravitating gas disk with an imposed two-armed stellar spiral structure is considered. Using the formulation developed previously by Lee and Shu, a linear stability analysis of the spiral shock is performed in a localized Cartesian geometry. Results of the parameter study of the base state with a spiral shock are also presented. The single-mode feathering instability that leads to growing perturbations may explain the feathering phenomenon found in nearby spiral galaxies. The self-gravity of the gas, characterized by its average surface density, is an important parameter that (1) shifts the spiral shock farther downstream and (2) increases the growth rate and decreases the characteristic spacing of the feathering structure due to the instability. On the other hand, while the magnetic field suppresses the velocity fluctuation associated with the feathers, it does not strongly affect their growth rate. Using a set of typical parameters of the grand-design spiral galaxy M51 at 2 kpc from the center, the spacing of the feathers with the maximum growth rate is found to be 530 pc, which agrees with the previous observational studies.

  15. Feathering Instability of Spiral Arms. II. Parameter Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wing-Kit

    2014-09-01

    We report the results of a parameter study of the feathering stability in the galactic spiral arms. A two-dimensional, razor-thin magnetized self-gravitating gas disk with an imposed two-armed stellar spiral structure is considered. Using the formulation developed previously by Lee & Shu, a linear stability analysis of the spiral shock is performed in a localized Cartesian geometry. Results of the parameter study of the base state with a spiral shock are also presented. The single-mode feathering instability that leads to growing perturbations may explain the feathering phenomenon found in nearby spiral galaxies. The self-gravity of the gas, characterized by its average surface density, is an important parameter that (1) shifts the spiral shock farther downstream and (2) increases the growth rate and decreases the characteristic spacing of the feathering structure due to the instability. On the other hand, while the magnetic field suppresses the velocity fluctuation associated with the feathers, it does not strongly affect their growth rate. Using a set of typical parameters of the grand-design spiral galaxy M51 at 2 kpc from the center, the spacing of the feathers with the maximum growth rate is found to be 530 pc, which agrees with the previous observational studies.

  16. Do feather-degrading bacteria affect sexually selected plumage color?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawkey, Matthew D.; Pillai, Shreekumar R.; Hill, Geoffrey E.

    2009-01-01

    Models of parasite-mediated sexual selection propose that males with more elaborate sexual traits will have fewer parasites. These models have generally been tested using metazoan or protozoan parasites of the blood, gut, or integument. Fewer studies have examined sexual ornaments in relation to bacterial infections. While most surface bacteria are harmless or beneficial, feather-degrading bacteria may have detrimental effects. In this study, we examined the relationships between overall bacterial load, feather-degrading bacterial load, and sexually selected carotenoid-based plumage color in a wild population of house finches ( Carpodacus mexicanus). We found that males with the redder plumage preferred by females had similar overall bacterial loads, but lower feather-degrading bacterial loads, than males with less red plumage. These data suggest that plumage color can signal abundance of feather-degrading bacteria to potential mates. It remains unclear whether feather-degrading bacteria directly or indirectly affect plumage color, but the observed correlations suggest that feather-degrading bacteria may play some role in sexual selection.

  17. Distribution of unique red feather pigments in parrots

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Kevin J; Nogare, Mary C

    2005-01-01

    In many birds, red, orange and yellow feathers are coloured by carotenoid pigments, but parrots are an exception. For over a century, biochemists have known that parrots use an unusual set of pigments to produce their rainbow of plumage colours, but their biochemical identity has remained elusive until recently. Here, we use high-performance liquid chromatography to survey the pigments present in the red feathers of 44 species of parrots representing each of the three psittaciform families. We found that all species used the same suite of five polyenal lipochromes (or psittacofulvins) to colour their plumage red, indicating that this unique system of pigmentation is remarkably conserved evolutionarily in parrots. Species with redder feathers had higher concentrations of psittacofulvins in their plumage, but neither feather colouration nor historical relatedness predicted the ratios in which the different pigments appeared. These polyenes were absent from blood at the time when birds were replacing their colourful feathers, suggesting that parrots do not acquire red plumage pigments from the diet, but instead manufacture them endogenously at growing feathers. PMID:17148123

  18. Involvement of the Sonic hedgehog gene in chick feather formation.

    PubMed

    Nohno, T; Kawakami, Y; Ohuchi, H; Fujiwara, A; Yoshioka, H; Noji, S

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of chick feather formation, we observed expression patterns of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) gene, which is one of the vertebrate homologs of the Drosophila segment polarity gene, hedgehog, and encodes a signaling molecule functioning in limb pattern formation and motor neuron induction. We found that the Shh gene is also expressed in the apical region of the feather placodes and then in nine to eleven longitudinal stripes along feather filaments. The stripe was found to correspond to one of the outer marginal zones of each barb ridge, termed the zone of Shh expression. No significant expression signal was detected in the scale bud of developing legs. Thus, Shh is likely to function as an epithelial signaling molecule in epithelio-mesenchymal interaction during feather formation. Furthermore, since genes of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4) are coexpressed with Shh during feather formation as observed in limb morphogenesis, interactions among FGF-4, Shh and BMP-2 may be involved in formation of feather filaments and barbs in a similar fashion as elucidated in limb pattern formation. PMID:7818537

  19. Domestic ducks and H5N1 influenza epidemic, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Songserm, Thaweesak; Jam-on, Rungroj; Sae-Heng, Numdee; Meemak, Noppadol; Hulse-Post, Diane J; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine M; Webster, Robert G

    2006-04-01

    In addition to causing 12 human deaths and 17 cases of human infection, the 2004 outbreak of H5N1 influenza virus in Thailand resulted in the death or slaughter of 60 million domestic fowl and the disruption of poultry production and trade. After domestic ducks were recognized as silent carriers of H5N1 influenza virus, government teams went into every village to cull flocks in which virus was detected; these team efforts markedly reduced H5N1 infection. Here we examine the pathobiology and epidemiology of H5N1 influenza virus in the 4 systems of duck raising used in Thailand in 2004. No influenza viruses were detected in ducks raised in "closed" houses with high biosecurity. However, H5N1 influenza virus was prevalent among ducks raised in "open" houses, free-ranging (grazing) ducks, and backyard ducks. PMID:16704804

  20. Localisation of keratin K78 in the basal layer and first suprabasal layers of stratified epithelia completes expression catalogue of type II keratins and provides new insights into sequential keratin expression.

    PubMed

    Langbein, Lutz; Eckhart, Leopold; Fischer, Heinz; Rogers, Michael A; Praetzel-Wunder, Silke; Parry, David A D; Kittstein, Walter; Schweizer, Juergen

    2016-03-01

    Among the 26 human type II keratins, K78 is the only one that has not yet been explored with regard to its expression characteristics. Here, we show that, at both the transcriptional and translational levels, K78 is strongly expressed in the basal and parabasal cell layers with decreasing intensity in the lower suprabasal cells of keratinising and non-keratinising squamous epithelia and keratinocyte cultures. The same pattern has been detected at the transcriptional level in the corresponding mouse epithelia. Murine K78 protein, which contains an extraordinary large extension of its tail domain, which is unique among all known keratins, is not detectable by the antibody used. Concomitant studies in human epithelia have confirmed K78 co-expression with the classical basal keratins K5 and K14. Similarly, K78 co-expression with the differentiation-related type I keratins K10 (epidermis) and K13 (non-keratinising epithelia) occurs in the parabasal cell layer, whereas that of the corresponding type II keratins K1 (epidermis) and K4 (non-keratinising epithelia) unequivocally starts subsequent to the respective type I keratins. Our data concerning K78 expression modify the classical concept of keratin pair K5/K14 representing the basal compartment and keratin pairs K1/K10 or K4/K13 defining the differentiating compartment of stratified epithelia. Moreover, the K78 expression pattern and the decoupled K1/K10 and K4/K13 expression define the existence of a hitherto unperceived early differentiation stage in the parabasal layer characterized by K78/K10 or K78/K13 expression. PMID:26340985

  1. Efficient Strategy to Generate a Vectored Duck Enteritis Virus Delivering Envelope of Duck Tembusu Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhong; Liu, Zhigang; Jin, Meilin

    2014-01-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) is a recently emerging pathogenic flavivirus that has resulted in a huge economic loss in the duck industry. However, no vaccine is currently available to control this pathogen. Consequently, a practical strategy to construct a vaccine against this pathogen should be determined. In this study, duck enteritis virus (DEV) was examined as a candidate vaccine vector to deliver the envelope (E) of DTMUV. A modified mini-F vector was inserted into the SORF3 and US2 gene junctions of the attenuated DEV vaccine strain C-KCE genome to generate an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) of C-KCE (vBAC-C-KCE). The envelope (E) gene of DTMUV was inserted into the C-KCE genome through the mating-assisted genetically integrated cloning (MAGIC) strategy, resulting in the recombinant vector, pBAC-C-KCE-E. A bivalent vaccine C-KCE-E was generated by eliminating the BAC backbone. Immunofluorescence and western blot analysis results indicated that the E proteins were vigorously expressed in C-KCE-E-infected chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs). Duck experiments demonstrated that the insertion of the E gene did not alter the protective efficacy of C-KCE. Moreover, C-KCE-E-immunized ducks induced neutralization antibodies against DTMUV. These results demonstrated, for the first time, that recombinant C-KCE-E can serve as a potential bivalent vaccine against DEV and DTMUV. PMID:24956180

  2. Liposomes containing recombinant E protein vaccine against duck Tembusu virus in ducks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tengfei; Liu, Yongxia; Cheng, Jia; Liu, Yanhan; Fan, Wentao; Cheng, Ziqiang; Niu, Xudong; Liu, Jianzhu

    2016-04-27

    To obtain an effective vaccine candidate against duck Tembusu viral (DTMUV) disease which causes egg-drop and great economical loss in the Chinese duck industry, liposome vaccines containing recombinant E protein were prepared and assessed in this study. The recombinant plasmid (PET28a-E) was constructed and transformed into BL21 (DE3) cells to produce E proteins. The recombinant E proteins were purified and entrapped by liposomes through reverse-phase evaporation. Eighty-four cherry valley ducks were randomly divided into seven groups and inoculated intramuscularly at one- or seven-day-old with liposomes-E protein or Freund's adjuvant-E protein vaccine. Blood samples were collected from the first week to the tenth week for serum antibody, plasma for viremia, as well as oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs for virus shedding analyses after being challenged with a 10(2.4) 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) of duck Tembusu virus. Results showed that serum antibody level of the liposomes vaccine was higher than the Freund's adjuvant vaccine, and inoculating twice was superior to once; furthermore, the viremia and virus shedding tests also proved that the liposomes vaccine can provide complete protection against DTMUV challenge. These results demonstrated that the liposomes-E protein vaccine could be used as a potential candidate vaccine to prevent DTMUV infection in ducks. PMID:27016654

  3. Effects of scalp dermatitis on chemical property of hair keratin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Shin, Min Kyung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-05-01

    The effects of scalp dermatitis (seborrheic dermatitis (SD), psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis (AD)) on chemical properties of hair keratin were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Hairs were collected from lesional regions affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD and non-lesional regions separately. The hairs with SD were taken from patients with ages of 16-80 years. The ages of patients with psoriasis ranged from 8 to 67 years, and all patients exhibited moderate disease. Hairs with AD were taken from the patients with ages of 24-45 years and the average SCORing atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) was 48.75. Hairs from 20 normal adults were collected as a control. The FT-IR absorbance bands were analyzed by the Gaussian model to obtain the center frequency, half width, height, and area of each band. The height and area of all bands in the spectra were normalized to the amide I centered at 1652 cm-1 to quantitatively analyze the chemical composition of keratin. The spectra of hair with scalp dermatitis were different with that of control, the amide A components centered at 3278 cm-1 were smaller than those of the control. The psoriasis hair showed a large difference in the IR absorbance band between lesional and non-lesional hairs indicating good agreement with the morphological changes. The hairs with diseases did not show differences in the content of cystine, which was centered at 1054 cm-1, from the control. The chemical properties of keratin were not significantly different between the hairs affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD. However, the changes induced by scalp dermatitis were different with weathering. Therefore, FT-IR analysis could be used to screen differences between the physiological and pathological conditions of scalp hair.

  4. Pathogenicity and genetic characterization of a duck Tembusu virus associated with egg-dropping in Muscovy ducks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Qin; Lin, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Zhan-Xin; Zhang, Kai; Yan, Zhuan-Qiang; Zhou, Qing-Feng; Qin, Jian-Ping; Xie, Qing-Mei; Bi, Ying-Zuo; Chen, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) has spread to the major duck-farming region in China, causing acute egg-production drop in Chinese duck population. In this study, we characterized a DTMUV strain (named GD2014) isolated from an egg-production drop duck farm in Guangdong province, South China. The virus was pathogenic to Muscovy duck embryos and caused severe egg production drop for laying Muscovy ducks. The genome sequence of GD2014 shared 97-99% homologies with other waterfowl-origin Tembusu viruses, and shared 89% identities with MM1775 strain isolated from mosquito. Phylogenetic analysis of entire open reading frame (ORF), E gene and NS5 gene indicated that GD2014 belonged to Ntaya group. These results have implications for understanding the orgin, emergence and pathogenicity of DTMUV as well as for the development of vaccines and diagnostics based on epidemiological data. PMID:27354303

  5. Diagnosis of duck plague in waterfowl by polymerase chain reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, W.R.; Nashold, S.W.; Docherty, D.E.; Brown, S.E.; Knudson, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    A recently developed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used for diagnosis of duck plague in waterfowl tissues from past and current cases of waterfowl mortality and to identify duck plague virus in combined cloacal/oral-pharyngeal swab samples from healthy mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) after a disease outbreak. The PCR was able to detect viral DNA from all the individual or pooled tissues assayed from 10 waterfowl, including liver and spleen samples from three Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata domesticus) that did not yield virus isolates. The strong staining intensity of the PCR products from the waterfowl tissues indicated that large amounts of virus were present, even when virus was not isolated. Duck plague DNA was also detected in a cloacal swab sample from a wood duck (Aix sponsa) carcass submitted for diagnosis. The PCR assay identified duck plague DNA in 13 swab samples that produced virus isolates from carrier mallards sampled in 1981 after a duck plague die-off. The duck plague PCR clearly demonstrated the ability to quickly diagnose duck plague in suspect mortality cases and to detect virus shed by carrier waterfowl.

  6. Quantification of feather structure, wettability and resistance to liquid penetration

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Siddarth; Chhatre, Shreerang S.; Guardado, Jesus O.; Park, Kyoo-Chul; Parker, Andrew R.; Rubner, Michael F.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Cohen, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Birds in the cormorant (Phalacrocoracidae) family dive tens of metres into water to prey on fish while entraining a thin layer of air (a plastron film) within the microstructures of their feathers. In addition, many species within the family spread their wings for long periods of time upon emerging from water. To investigate whether wetting and wing-spreading are related to feather structure, microscopy and photographic studies have previously been used to extract structural parameters for barbs and barbules. In this work, we describe a systematic methodology to characterize the quasi-hierarchical topography of bird feathers that is based on contact angle measurements using a set of polar and non-polar probing liquids. Contact angle measurements on dip-coated feathers of six aquatic bird species (including three from the Phalacrocoracidae family) are used to extract two distinguishing structural parameters, a dimensionless spacing ratio of the barbule (D*) and a characteristic length scale corresponding to the spacing of defect sites. The dimensionless spacing parameter can be used in conjunction with a model for the surface topography to enable us to predict a priori the apparent contact angles of water droplets on feathers as well as the water breakthrough pressure required for the disruption of the plastron on the feather barbules. The predicted values of breakthrough depths in water (1–4 m) are towards the lower end of typical diving depths for the aquatic bird species examined here, and therefore a representative feather is expected to be fully wetted in a typical deep dive. However, thermodynamic surface energy analysis based on a simple one-dimensional cylindrical model of the feathers using parameters extracted from the goniometric analysis reveals that for water droplets on feathers of all six species under consideration, the non-wetting ‘Cassie–Baxter’ composite state represents the global energy minimum of the system. By contrast, for other

  7. A survey of North American migratory waterfowl for duck plague (duck virus enteritis) virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, Christopher J.; Docherty, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of migratory waterfowl for duck plague (DP) virus was conducted in the Mississippi and Central flyways during 1982 and in the Atlantic and Pacific flyways during 1983. Cloacal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from 3,169 migratory waterfowl in these four flyways, principally mallards (Anas platyrhynchos L.), black ducks (Anas rubripes Brewster), and pintails (Anas acuta L). In addition 1,033 birds were sampled from areas of recurrent DP outbreaks among nonmigratory and captive waterfowl, and 590 from Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, the site of the only known major DP outbreak in migratory waterfowl. Duck plague virus was not found in any of the samples. Results support the hypothesis that DP is not established in North American migratory waterfowl as an enzootic disease.

  8. Post-epizootic surveys of waterfowl for duck plague (duck virus enteritis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, C.J.; Docherty, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Surviving birds from nine duck plague outbreaks in urban and confined waterfowl were sampled for duck plague (DP) virus and DP antibody during 1979-86. Duck plague virus was found in combined oral and cloacal swabs of birds from three outbreaks, and DP-neutralizing antibody was demonstrated in some birds from all nine outbreaks. Greater prevalence of DP antibody and higher titers were found in survivors from confined populations than from free-flying urban populations. Free-flying waterfowl from within 52 km of four DP outbreak sites were also sampled; virus was not found in any birds, but DP antibody was found in urban waterfowl in the vicinity of an outbreak in Potterville, Michigan. No evidence of exposure to or shedding of DP virus in migratory waterfowl was found in two regions where DP appears enzootic in urban and confined waterfowl (Eastern Shore of Maryland and the vicinity of Sacramento, California).

  9. Keratins control intercellular adhesion involving PKC-α–mediated desmoplakin phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Cornelia; Loschke, Fanny; Schwarz, Nicole; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of epithelial cell adhesion is crucial for epidermal morphogenesis and homeostasis and relies predominantly on the interaction of keratins with desmosomes. Although the importance of desmosomes to epidermal coherence and keratin organization is well established, the significance of keratins in desmosome organization has not been fully resolved. Here, we report that keratinocytes lacking all keratins show elevated, PKC-α–mediated desmoplakin phosphorylation and subsequent destabilization of desmosomes. We find that PKC-α activity is regulated by Rack1–keratin interaction. Without keratins, desmosomes assemble but are endocytosed at accelerated rates, rendering epithelial sheets highly susceptible to mechanical stress. Re-expression of the keratin pair K5/14, inhibition of PKC-α activity, or blocking of endocytosis reconstituted both desmosome localization at the plasma membrane and epithelial adhesion. Our findings identify a hitherto unknown mechanism by which keratins control intercellular adhesion, with potential implications for tumor invasion and keratinopathies, settings in which diminished cell adhesion facilitates tissue fragility and neoplastic growth. PMID:23690176

  10. Cysteine Prevents the Reduction in Keratin Synthesis Induced by Iron Deficiency in Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Irace, Carlo; Capuozzo, Antonella; Piccolo, Marialuisa; Di Pascale, Antonio; Russo, Annapina; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Lepre, Fabio; Russo, Giulia; Santamaria, Rita

    2016-02-01

    L-cysteine is currently recognized as a conditionally essential sulphur amino acid. Besides contributing to many biological pathways, cysteine is a key component of the keratin protein by its ability to form disulfide bridges that confer strength and rigidity to the protein. In addition to cysteine, iron represents another critical factor in regulating keratins expression in epidermal tissues, as well as in hair follicle growth and maturation. By focusing on human keratinocytes, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cysteine supplementation as nutraceutical on keratin biosynthesis, as well as to get an insight on the interplay of cysteine availability and cellular iron status in regulating keratins expression in vitro. Herein we demonstrate that cysteine promotes a significant up-regulation of keratins expression as a result of de novo protein synthesis, while the lack of iron impairs keratin expression. Interestingly, cysteine supplementation counteracts the adverse effect of iron deficiency on cellular keratin expression. This effect was likely mediated by the up-regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin, the main cellular proteins involved in iron homeostasis, at last affecting the labile iron pool. In this manner, cysteine may also enhance the metabolic iron availability for DNA synthesis without creating a detrimental condition of iron overload. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first study in an in vitro keratinocyte model providing evidence that cysteine and iron cooperate for keratins expression, indicative of their central role in maintaining healthy epithelia. PMID:26212225

  11. [Increased expression of proliferation keratins K 6 and K 16 in unaffected skin in exacerbated psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Wevers, A; Arnold, H G; Bonnekoh, B; Schulze, H J; Mahrle, G

    1990-05-01

    The in vivo expression of the proliferation keratins K 6 and K 16 is characteristic for hyperproliferative diseases and positive in psoriatic lesions. Our study was performed in order to investigate the in vitro expression of proliferation keratins and to settle the question whether they are also inducible in organ cultures of uninvolved psoriatic skin, possibly differing from normal skin. PMID:1696047

  12. Keratin 17 expression as a marker for epithelial transformation in viral warts.

    PubMed Central

    Proby, C. M.; Churchill, L.; Purkis, P. E.; Glover, M. T.; Sexton, C. J.; Leigh, I. M.

    1993-01-01

    The profile of keratin expression in benign warts from various cutaneous and mucosal sites along with dysplastic warts and squamous cell carcinomas has been examined using a panel of monospecific antibodies to epithelial keratins. Viral warts and verrucous keratoses from immunosuppressed renal transplant recipients show a spectrum of squamous atypia from benign lesions, from minimal changes to full thickness dysplasia. Changes associated with malignancy include loss of differentiation-specific keratins 1 and 10 together with expansion of basal cell epitopes and inappropriate expression of simple epithelial keratins 8, 18, and 19 in advanced squamous cell carcinoma. This late expression of keratins 8 and 18 contrasts with early expression of keratin 17 in all dysplastic lesions examined. Keratin 17 is found suprabasally in hyperproliferative lesions, including benign warts, but marked basal plus suprabasal expression is seen increasingly in malignantly transformed epidermis. These findings were not specific to immunosuppression, as shown by identical findings in control squamous cell carcinoma from nonimmunosuppressed individuals. Keratin 17 expression may prove prognostically helpful when assessing dysplasia in epidermal tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7504888

  13. Removal of Pb(II) from water using keratin colloidal solution obtained from wool.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Yuri; Okiharu, Tomoki; Nakajima, Haruka; Fujii, Toshihiro; Shirai, Koji; Moriwaki, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of keratin colloidal solution, which was obtained from wool, for the removal of Pb(II) from water. The addition of keratin colloidal solution (15 g L(-1), 0.30 mL) to a Pb(II) solution (1.0 mM, 0.90 mL, pH 5.0) resulted in the formation and precipitation of a Pb-keratin aggregate. Measurement of the Pb(II) and protein concentrations in the supernatant solution revealed that 88 and 99 % of the Pb(II) and keratin protein were removed from the solution, respectively. The maximum Pb(II) uptake capacity of keratin in the colloidal solution was 43.3 mg g(-1). In addition, the Pb-keratin aggregate was easily decomposed via the addition of nitric acid, which enabled the recovery of Pb(II). However, aggregation did not occur in solutions with Pb(II) concentrations below 0.10 mM. Therefore, we used a keratin colloidal solution encapsulated in a dialysis cellulose tube to remove Pb(II) from 0.10 mM solutions, which enabled the removal of 95 % of the Pb(II). From these results, we conclude that keratin colloidal solution is useful for the treatment of water polluted with Pb(II). PMID:23608990

  14. Molecular evidence for an activator–inhibitor mechanism in development of embryonic feather branching

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Matthew P.; Williamson, Scott; Fallon, John F.; Meinhardt, Hans; Prum, Richard O.

    2005-01-01

    The developmental basis of morphological complexity remains a central question in developmental and evolutionary biology. Feathers provide a unique system to analyze the development of complex morphological novelties. Here, we describe the interactions between Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) signaling during feather barb ridge morphogenesis. We demonstrate that activator–inhibitor models of Shh and Bmp2 signaling in the tubular feather epithelium are sufficient to explain the initial formation of a meristic pattern of barb ridges and the observed variation in barb morphogenesis in chick natal down feathers. Empirical tests support the assumptions of the model that, within the feather ectoderm, Shh (activator) up-regulates its own transcription and that of Bmp2 (inhibitor), whereas Bmp2 signaling down-regulates Shh expression. More complex models incorporating a second activator and dorsal/ventral polarized modification of activator signaling can produce all of the barb morphogenesis patterns observed during the growth of more complex branched pennaceous feathers: new barb ridge formation, helical growth, and barb ridge fusion. An integrated model of feather morphogenesis and evolution suggests that plumulaceous feather structure evolved by the establishment of activator–inhibitor interactions between Shh and Bmp2 signaling in the basal epithelium of the feather germ. Subsequently, pennaceous feather structure evolved through the integration of barb ridge morphogenesis with a second, local inhibitor and a dorsal/ventral signal gradient within the feather. The model is congruent with paleontological evidence that plumulaceous feathers are primitive to pennaceous feathers. PMID:16087884

  15. Molecular evidence for an activator-inhibitor mechanism in development of embryonic feather branching.

    PubMed

    Harris, Matthew P; Williamson, Scott; Fallon, John F; Meinhardt, Hans; Prum, Richard O

    2005-08-16

    The developmental basis of morphological complexity remains a central question in developmental and evolutionary biology. Feathers provide a unique system to analyze the development of complex morphological novelties. Here, we describe the interactions between Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) signaling during feather barb ridge morphogenesis. We demonstrate that activator-inhibitor models of Shh and Bmp2 signaling in the tubular feather epithelium are sufficient to explain the initial formation of a meristic pattern of barb ridges and the observed variation in barb morphogenesis in chick natal down feathers. Empirical tests support the assumptions of the model that, within the feather ectoderm, Shh (activator) up-regulates its own transcription and that of Bmp2 (inhibitor), whereas Bmp2 signaling down-regulates Shh expression. More complex models incorporating a second activator and dorsal/ventral polarized modification of activator signaling can produce all of the barb morphogenesis patterns observed during the growth of more complex branched pennaceous feathers: new barb ridge formation, helical growth, and barb ridge fusion. An integrated model of feather morphogenesis and evolution suggests that plumulaceous feather structure evolved by the establishment of activator-inhibitor interactions between Shh and Bmp2 signaling in the basal epithelium of the feather germ. Subsequently, pennaceous feather structure evolved through the integration of barb ridge morphogenesis with a second, local inhibitor and a dorsal/ventral signal gradient within the feather. The model is congruent with paleontological evidence that plumulaceous feathers are primitive to pennaceous feathers. PMID:16087884

  16. Adrenal gland denervation and diving in ducks.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, H J; Jones, D R; Lacombe, A M

    1987-06-01

    The extreme elevation in plasma levels of free norepinephrine (NE) and free epinephrine (EP), which occurs during forced diving of ducks (Anas platyrhynchos), was studied before and after denervation of the adrenal glands. In intact animals both NE and EP concentration increased by up to two orders of magnitude in a 4-min dive but by a significantly lesser amount if the duck breathed O2 before the dive. Denervating the adrenal glands reduced the amounts of both catecholamines (CA) released during dives, plasma EP decreased to 10%, and NE to 50% of values obtained before denervation. Breathing O2 before a dive virtually eliminated CA release in denervates, indicating that hypoxia was the important non-neural releasing agent. Hypoxia was also the most important neural releasing agent compared with hypercapnia, acidosis, or hypoglycemia. Adrenal denervation did not cause significant changes in heart rate, blood pressure, arterial blood gas tensions, pH, or plasma glucose during dives, although denervation caused increased variation in some of these variables. In ducks CA release in dives is largely due to decreasing arterial O2 partial pressure, and full expression of the response is dependent on intact innervation of the adrenal gland. PMID:3591985

  17. Characterisation of keratin biomass from butchery and wool industry wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccola, Marina; Aluigi, Annalisa; Tonin, Claudio

    2009-12-01

    The chemical and structural characteristics of wool and horn-hoof were compared with the aim of better addressing possible exploitation of protein biomasses available as waste from textile industry and butchery. Amino acid analysis showed that wool has a higher amount of cystine and a lower amount of the amino acids that favour α-helix formation than horn-hoof. The difference in the α-helix content is confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. Electrophoresis separation patterns showed two characteristic protein fractions related to low-sulphur proteins (between 60,000 and 45,000 Da) in wool, while different low-sulphur proteins are present in horn-hoof. These data are partially confirmed by DSC analyses that showed different endothermic peaks at temperatures higher than 200 °C in the horn-hoof thermograms, probably due to denaturation of α-keratins at different molecular weights. Moreover, wool keratin was more hygroscopic and showed a higher extractability with reducing agents than horn-hoof. On the basis of these results, waste wool is a more suitable source than horn-hoof for uses involving protein extraction, but application can be envisaged also in surfactant foams for fire extinguishers and slow-release nitrogen fertilizer.

  18. Concordant evolution of plumage colour, feather microstructure and a melanocortin receptor gene between mainland and island populations of a fairy-wren.

    PubMed

    Doucet, S M; Shawkey, M D; Rathburn, M K; Mays, H L; Montgomerie, R

    2004-08-22

    Studies of the patterns of diversification of birds on islands have contributed a great deal to the development of evolutionary theory. In white-winged fairy-wrens, Malurus leucopterus, mainland males develop a striking blue nuptial plumage whereas those on nearby islands develop black nuptial plumage. We explore the proximate basis for this divergence by combining microstructural feather analysis with an investigation of genetic variation at the melanocortin-1 receptor locus (MC1R). Fourier analysis revealed that the medullary keratin matrix (spongy layer) of the feather barbs of blue males was ordered at the appropriate nanoscale to produce the observed blue colour by coherent light scattering. Surprisingly, the feather barbs of black males also contained a spongy layer that could produce a similar blue colour. However, black males had more melanin in their barbs than blue males, and this melanin may effectively mask any structural colour produced by the spongy layer. Moreover, the presence of this spongy layer suggests that black island males evolved from a blue-plumaged ancestor. We also document concordant patterns of variation at the MC1R locus, as five amino acid substitutions were perfectly associated with the divergent blue and black plumage phenotypes. Thus, with the possible involvement of a melanocortin receptor locus, increased melanin density may mask the blue-producing microstructure in black island males, resulting in the divergence of plumage coloration between mainland and island white-winged fairy-wrens. Such mechanisms may also be responsible for plumage colour diversity across broader geographical and evolutionary scales. PMID:15306285

  19. Keratin film ablation for the fabrication of brick and mortar skin structure using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Bibi Safia; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Dou, Yuehua; Alam, Khan; Attaullah, Shehnaz; Zari, Islam

    2015-09-01

    The patterning of thin keratin films has been explored to manufacture model skin surfaces based on the "bricks and mortar" view of the relationship between keratin and lipids. It has been demonstrated that laser light is capable of preparing keratin-based "bricks and mortar" wall structure as in epidermis, the outermost layer of the human skin. "Bricks and mortar" pattern in keratin films has been fabricated using an ArF excimer laser (193 nm wavelength) and femtosecond laser (800 and 400 nm wavelength). Due to the very low ablation threshold of keratin, femtosecond laser systems are practical for laser processing of proteins. These model skin structures are fabricated for the first time that will help to produce potentially effective moisturizing products for the protection of skin from dryness, diseases and wrinkles.

  20. Click chemistry modification of natural keratin fibers for sustained shrink-resist performance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Cai, Jackie Y; Church, Jeffrey S; Wang, Lijing

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel chemical treatment for achieving sustained shrink-resist performance on natural keratin fibers. The new treatment involves the controlled reduction of keratin in the cuticle region of the fiber, and the application of a water soluble diacrylate, namely glycerol 1,3-diglycerolate diacrylate (GDA), on the reduced keratin substrate. The acrylate groups of the GDA react with cysteine residues in the reduced keratin through thiol-ene click reactions at room temperature, leading to GDA grafting and the formation of GDA crosslinks in the keratin structure. The modified substrates were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and assessed for its shrink-resistance and wet burst strength. This chemical modification has shown to alter the fiber surface morphology and hydrophilicity, resulting in substantially improved shrink-resistance with good fiber strength retention. Possible shrink-resistance mechanisms were also discussed. PMID:25840149

  1. Feathering collisions in beating reed simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Tamara; Abel, Jonathan S.; Smith, Julius O.

    2003-10-01

    Pressure controlled valves are the primary sound production mechanisms for woodwind and brass musical instruments, as well as for many bioacoustic vocal systems such as the larynx and syrinx (the vocal organ in birds). During sound production, air flow sets a reed or membrane into motion creating a variable height in the valve channel and, potentially, periodically closing the channel completely. Depending on how this event is handled, an abrupt termination of air flow between open and closed states can cause undesirable discontinuities and inaccuracies in a discrete-time simulation-particularly at relatively low audio sampling rates. A solution was developed by re-examining the behavior of the differential equation governing volume flow through a pressure-controlled valve, paying particular attention to this rather troublesome transition. A closed-form solution for the time evolution of volume flow is given and used to derive an update for volume flow. The result is a smoother, more accurate, and nearly alias-free transition from open to closed. ``Feathered collisions'' of this nature can refine the sound quality produced by the numerical simulation of beating reeds, such as in clarinets, at typical audio sampling rates.

  2. Investigating the microstructure of keratin extracted from wool: peptide sequence (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and protein conformation (FTIR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Keratin was extracted from wool by reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol. It was isolated as intact keratin and characterized by its similar molecular weight, protein composition, and secondary structure to native keratin. Gel electrophoresis patterns and MALDI-TOF/TOF peptide sequences provided the ide...

  3. Regulation of keratin expression by ultraviolet radiation: differential and specific effects of ultraviolet B and ultraviolet a exposure.

    PubMed

    Bernerd, F; Del Bino, S; Asselineau, D

    2001-12-01

    Skin, the most superficial tissue of our body, is the first target of environmental stimuli, among which is solar ultraviolet radiation. Very little is known about the regulation of keratin gene expression by ultraviolet radiation, however, although (i) it is well established that ultraviolet exposure is involved in skin cancers and photoaging and (ii) keratins represent the major epidermal proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze the regulation of human keratin gene expression under ultraviolet B (290-320 nm) or ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) irradiation using a panel of constructs comprising different human keratin promoters cloned upstream of a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene and transfected into normal epidermal keratinocytes. By this approach, we demonstrated that ultraviolet B upregulated the transcription of keratin 19 gene and to a lesser extent the keratin 6, keratin 5, and keratin 14 genes. The DNA sequence responsible for keratin 19 induction was localized between -130 and +1. In contrast to ultraviolet B, ultraviolet A irradiation induced only an increase in keratin 17, showing a differential gene regulation between these two ultraviolet ranges. The induction of keratin 19 was confirmed by studying the endogenous protein in keratinocytes in classical cultures as well as in skin reconstructed in vitro and normal human skin. These data show for the first time that keratin gene expression is regulated by ultraviolet radiation at the transcriptional level with a specificity regarding the ultraviolet domain of solar light. PMID:11886503

  4. Growth curve analyses in selected duck lines.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, K; Vinyard, B; Akbar, M K; Shafer, D J; Turk, C M

    2001-12-01

    1. Growth patterns of male ducks from 4 lines (lines A, B, C and D) selected for market weight were analysed and compared to growth patterns of ducks in the respective line 7 generations earlier. Growth curves were analysed using procedures derived from the Weibull sigmoidal function and the linear-linear relative growth rate model and simple allometry. 2. The ducks were fed ad libitum under 24-h lighting throughout the experiment. At weekly intervals from the time of hatch through 70 d of age, 16 ducks from each line were killed to determine body, carcase, breast-muscle, leg and thigh-muscle, and abdominal fat weights. 3. Line A was the heaviest line, followed by line B, line C and line D. However, body weight, carcase weight and breast-muscle weight at 49 d of age were not significantly different between lines A and B. After 7 generations of selection, the breast-muscle yield was increased to >19% and the abdominal fat percent was reduced to <1.4% in all lines. 4. The Weibull growth curve analysis of body weight showed an increase in the asymptotes during selection, while the age of the inflection point remained constant in all lines (21.3 to 26.0 d). For breast-muscle growth, ducks reached the inflection point 12.8 to 14.3 d later than for body weight. Between line A and line B, asymptotes for body weight, asymptotes for breast-muscle weight and allometric growth coefficients of breast muscle and leg and thigh muscles from 14 to 49 d were not significantly different. 5. The relative growth rate model discriminated body and breast-muscle growth patterns of line A and line B. The initial decline in the relative body growth rate was less and the time to reach the transition was longer in line A than line B. On the other hand, the initial decline in the relative breast-muscle growth rate was greater in line A than line B. PMID:11811908

  5. Differential extraction of keratin subunits and filaments from normal human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Eichner, R; Kahn, M

    1990-04-01

    We have investigated keratin interactions in vivo by sequentially extracting water-insoluble proteins from normal human epidermis with increasing concentrations of urea (2, 4, 6, and 9.5 M) and examining each extract by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblot analysis using monoclonal anti-keratin antibodies, and EM. The viable layers of normal human epidermis contain keratins K1, K2, K5, K10/11, K14, and K15, which are sequentially expressed during the course of epidermal differentiation. Only keratins K5, K14, and K15, which are synthesized by epidermal basal cells, were solubilized in 2 M urea. Extraction of keratins K1, K2, and K10/11, which are expressed only in differentiating suprabasal cells, required 4-6 M urea. Negative staining of the 2-M urea extract revealed predominantly keratin filament subunits, whereas abundant intermediate-sized filaments were observed in the 4-urea and 6-M urea extracts. These results indicate that in normal human epidermis, keratins K5, K14, and K15 are more soluble than the differentiation-specific keratins K1, K2, and K10/11. This finding suggests that native keratin filaments of different polypeptide composition have differing properties, despite their similar morphology. Furthermore, the observation of stable filaments in 4 and 6 M urea suggests that epidermal keratins K1, K2, and K10/11, which ultimately form the bulk of the protective, nonviable stratum corneum, may comprise filaments that are unusually resistant to denaturation. PMID:1691188

  6. k0-INAA for determining chemical elements in bird feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    França, Elvis J.; Fernandes, Elisabete A. N.; Fonseca, Felipe Y.; Antunes, Alexsander Z.; Bardini Junior, Claudiney; Bacchi, Márcio A.; Rodrigues, Vanessa S.; Cavalca, Isabel P. O.

    2010-10-01

    The k0-method instrumental neutron activation analysis ( k0-INAA) was employed for determining chemical elements in bird feathers. A collection was obtained taking into account several bird species from wet ecosystems in diverse regions of Brazil. For comparison reason, feathers were actively sampled in a riparian forest from the Marins Stream, Piracicaba, São Paulo State, using mist nets specific for capturing birds. Biological certified reference materials were used for assessing the quality of analytical procedure. Quantification of chemical elements was performed using the k0-INAA Quantu Software. Sixteen chemical elements, including macro and micronutrients, and trace elements, have been quantified in feathers, in which analytical uncertainties varied from 2% to 40% depending on the chemical element mass fraction. Results indicated high mass fractions of Br (max=7.9 mg kg -1), Co (max=0.47 mg kg -1), Cr (max=68 mg kg -1), Hg (max=2.79 mg kg -1), Sb (max=0.20 mg kg -1), Se (max=1.3 mg kg -1) and Zn (max=192 mg kg -1) in bird feathers, probably associated with the degree of pollution of the areas evaluated. In order to corroborate the use of k0-INAA results in biomonitoring studies using avian community, different factor analysis methods were used to check chemical element source apportionment and locality clustering based on feather chemical composition.

  7. Dynamics of mercury in blood and feathers of great skuas

    SciTech Connect

    Bearhop, S.; Ruxton, G.D.; Furness, R.W.

    2000-06-01

    Mercury dynamics in the blood and feathers of captive great skuas, Catharacta skua, were monitored over 56 weeks. Prior to the onset of molt, mercury intake was solely from their maintenance ration of sprats, Sprattus sprattus. For the first half of molt, in addition to mercury intake from sprats, birds were fed different doses of methylmercuric chloride weekly for 20 weeks. During the second half of molt, dosing was stopped and mercury intake was solely from sprats. Blood was sampled throughout the study and feather growth was monitored. Prior to the onset of molt, mercury concentrations increased over the first 51 to 71 d and appeared to level off after this period. Repeated dosing models based on mammalian pharmacokinetics were, in general, too simplistic to be applicable to the birds in the study. During molt, the elimination of mercury from the blood is probably best described by a three-compartment model. Mercury concentrations in feathers were significantly correlated with those in blood at the time of their growth, suggesting that blood and feathers reflect mercury intake over the same time period. Individuals varied in their ability to excrete ingested mercury into the feathers.

  8. Observations on the Growth of Roughness Elements Into Icing Feathers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Tsao, Jen, Ching

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experiment conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center to understand the process by which icing feathers are formed in the initial stages of ice accretion formation on swept wings. Close-up photographic data were taken on an aluminum NACA 0012 swept wing tip airfoil. Two types of photographic data were obtained: time sequence close-up photographic data during the run and close-up photographic data of the ice accretion at the end of each run. Icing runs were conducted for short ice accretion times from 10 to 180 sec. The time sequence close-up photographic data was used to study the process frame by frame and to create movies of how the process developed. The movies confirmed that at glaze icing conditions in the attachment line area icing feathers develop from roughness elements. The close-up photographic data at the end of each run showed that roughness elements change into a pointed shape with an upstream facet and join on the side with other elements having the same change to form ridges with pointed shape and upstream facet. The ridges develop into feathers when the upstream facet grows away to form the stem of the feather. The ridges and their growth into feathers were observed to form the initial scallop tips present in complete scallops.

  9. A feather precipitation hydrogen isoscape for New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, K. M.; Wassenaar, L. I.; Soto, D. X.; Bartle, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    Forensic isotopic assays of feathers from historical Maori cloaks are a potential tool to link historical artefacts back to their native locales (Iwi) in New Zealand. In order to test this approach, we sampled feathers from extant museum archived birds of known origin for their feather hydrogen isotopes (δyHf) to assign their regional origin and location over time. We obtained feathers from two non-migratory bird species widely distributed around New Zealand, tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae) and quail (Callipepla californica). Feathers were sampled from archived birds collected between 1880-2002 held in 3 New Zealand museum collections. We determined regression coefficients of δ2H on location, latitude, δ2Hprecipitation, and age. The data showed that ground dwelling quail had higher regression coefficients with respect to latitude (r2=0.46) than the nectar feeding tui (r2=0.39). On the whole, both resident birds showed promise as regional geographical indicators of their habitat (r2=0.58). Year of collection had no meaningful effect on isotopic composition. We conclude that isotopic assays may therefore be used to aid in regional assignments relevant to the interpretation of historical artefacts.

  10. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Dove, Carla J.; Grimaldi, David A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-01-01

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy. PMID:24909554

  11. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Dove, Carla J.; Grimaldi, David A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-06-01

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Hormonal treatment and flight feather molt in immature Sandhill Cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    Molt, the production of a new generation of feathers, is a poorly understood physiological phenomenon in nondomestic birds. Often in large birds like geese, flight is restricted by clipping the primary remiges on 1 wing and flight is restored after the molt when the primaries are replaced. A similar technique would be desirable for use with cranes conditioned for release to the native habitat. However, immature sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) did not appear to replace their primaries annually; therefore, we studied their flight feather molt (from 4 months to 3.5 years of age) and attempted to influence molting. Under natural conditions tail feathers (rectrices) were replaced annually and all secondaries replaced in 2.5-year-old birds. However, replacement of primaries in immature sandhill cranes appears to be a gradual process beginning the 2nd year; about 33% of the original primaries (present at 10 months of age) persisted in the 3.5-year-oId birds. Pulling out the primaries of immature sandhill cranes induces the growth of new primaries, as is true of many other birds. However, the new primaries were incapable of supporting flight, fell out repeatedly, and those that remained were often deformed. Pulling the primaries, under the influence of tranquilizers and anesthetics to relax the feather papillae, also did not induce normal growth of the replacement primaries. Progesterone (including excessively high doses), thyroxine, and follicle stimulating hormone, although effective in inducing feather replacement in domestic poultry, had no effect on crane molt.

  13. The distribution of molybdenum in the tissues of wild ducks.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Mariko; Sasaki, Rei; Yamashita, Yuko; Akinaga, Mayumi; Anan, Nana; Sasaki, Sakura; Hondo, Ryo; Ueda, Fukiko

    2002-07-01

    The Mo contents and the relations between Mo and Cu or Cr contents were investigated in the organs of Japanese wild ducks (spotbill duck, pintail, wigeon, scaup and tufted duck). The highest Mo content in kidney and liver of the dabbling ducks were more than 30 microg g(-1) dry weight (microg g(-1) d. wt.), though that of diving ducks were less than 11 microg g(-1) d. wt. The contents were lower in the ducks migrating within Japan, Eurasia and North America than those in the birds migrating between Japan and Eurasia. The contents of liver in all species were more than 50 and less than 5 microg g(-1) d. wt. for Cu and Cr, respectively. Significant correlations were found between Mo and both elements in pintail and scaup, and Mo and Cr in tufted duck. These results suggest that the contamination of wild ducks reflects the reproductive area, and not the collected area. Mo contents closely correlated with the Cu and/or Cr contaminations. PMID:12180653

  14. Efficacy Evaluation of an Inactivated Duck Tembusu Virus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Liu, Yuehuan; Wang, Xiuqing; Yang, Baoshou; He, Pingyou; Yang, Zhiyuan; Duan, Huijuan; Xie, Jia; Zou, Lihong; Zhao, Jicheng; Pan, Jie

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the potential use of an inactivated virus-based vaccine for the control and prevention of the newly emerged duck Tembusu virus infection in China, a duck Tembusu virus isolate, Tembusu-HB, was propagated in 12-day-old duck embryos and inactivated by treatment with formaldehyde. The inactivated viral antigen was emulsified with mineral oil, and five batches of the vaccine were manufactured. The immunogenicity and protection efficacy of the vaccine were evaluated in Beijing ducks and Beijing white geese. Results showed that more than 80% of immunized ducks were protected against virulent virus challenge after two intramuscular or subcutaneous injections of the inactivated vaccine, as evidenced by the negative virus isolation results. The protection is also correlated with a positive virus-specific antibody response as detected by ELISA. In contrast, none of the control ducks and geese had any detectable antibody response. Virus was isolated from all control ducks and geese after virulent virus challenge. Interestingly, a variable level of protection (20%-80%) was observed in Beijing white geese immunized twice with the same batches of vaccine, suggesting a species-specific effect of the vaccine. Overall, the results clearly suggest that the inactivated duck Tembusu virus vaccine is immunogenic and provides protection against virulent virus challenge. PMID:26473674

  15. Vaccination of domestic ducks against H5N1 HPAI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Domestic ducks play an important role in the epidemiology of H5N1 and H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, and therefore, successful control of HPAI in ducks is vital for the eradication of the disease in poultry. Vaccination can be used as a tool for supporting eradication by inc...

  16. Complete Genomic Sequence of Duck Flavivirus from China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Liu, Chunguo; Li, Gang; Li, Xiaojun; Yin, Xiuchen; Chen, Yuhuan

    2012-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of the Chinese duck flavivirus TA strain. This work is the first to document the complete genomic sequence of this previously unknown duck flavivirus strain. The sequence will help further relevant epidemiological studies and extend our general knowledge of flaviviruses. PMID:22354941

  17. Duck plague epizootics in the United States, 1967-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Converse, K.A.; Kidd, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    In 1967, the first confirmed diagnosis of duck plague (DP) in the USA was made from pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus) on commercial duck farms on Long Island, New York. Within 10 mo, DP was confirmed as the cause of death in migratory waterfowl on a Long Island bay. This paper reviews 120 DP epizootics reported from 1967 to 1995 that involved waterfowl species native to North America or were reported in areas with free-flying waterfowl at risk. Duck plague epizootics occurred in 21 states with the greatest number reported in Maryland (29), New York (18), California (16), and Pennsylvania (13). The greatest frequency of epizootics (86%) was detected during the months of March to June. At least 40 waterfowl species were affected with the highest frequency of epizootics reported in captive or captive-reared ducks including muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata) (68%), mallard ducks (A. platyrhynchos) (18%) and black ducks (A. rubripes) (14%). The greatest number of waterfowl died in three epizootics that involved primarily migratory birds in 1967 and 1994 in New York (USA) and 1973 in South Dakota (USA). The greatest number of DP epizootics reported since 1967 appear to have involved flocks of non-migratory rather than migratory waterfowl; therefore, in our opinion it remains unknown if DP is enzootic in either non-migratory or migratory waterfowl.

  18. Immunoglobulin genetics and antibody responses to influenza in ducks.

    PubMed

    Magor, Katharine E

    2011-09-01

    The role of the duck as the natural host and reservoir of influenza and efforts to vaccinate ducks during recent outbreaks of avian influenza has renewed interest in the duck antibody response. Ducks have unique antibody structures and expression, with consequences for their function. Aspects of immunoglobulin genetics, gene expression, and antibody function will be reviewed in the context of the duck immune response to influenza. Ducks have three immunoglobulin isotypes, IgM, IgA and IgY in translocon arrangement. The order of heavy chain genes in the locus is unusual, IGHM, IGHA and IGHY, with IGHA in inverse transcriptional orientation. IgH and IgL gene rearrangement in ducks involves limited V, (D) and J element recombination and diversity is generated by gene conversion from pseudogenes. IgY, the functional equivalent of IgG, is produced in two secreted forms, a full-length form and one lacking the third and fourth C region domains, which predominates later in the immune response and lacks the biological effector functions of IgG. The unusual features of duck antibodies may contribute to weak antibody responses and the perpetuation of the virus in this animal reservoir. PMID:21377488

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of duck interleukin-17

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) belonging to the Th17 family is a proinflammatory cytokine produced by activated T cells. A 1034-bp cDNA encoding duck IL-17 (duIL-17) was cloned from ConA-activated splenic lymphocytes of ducks. The encoded protein, predicted to consisted of 169 amino acids, displayed a molec...

  20. [Water supply for Peking ducks--possible alternatives for bathing].

    PubMed

    Heyn, E; Damme, K; Manz, M; Remy, F; Erhard, M H

    2006-03-01

    In order to investigate possible advantages of open water drinkers such as troughs and bells in the intensive husbandry of ducks, we evaluated in this study the effect of open water systems on the behavior and health of peking ducks. In this investigation six fattening trials each with 1152 Cherry Valley Peking ducks were analyzed. The average fattening period was 47 to 49 days. The ducks were kept on straw in six standardized compartments each 32 qm with 192 ducks. 25% of the compartment with perforated grid, with one of the tested water systems. In contrast to pens with nipple-drinkers only, the ducks in pens with open water troughs/showers had the opportunity to exhibit their natural drinking behavior and water associated activities in accordance with the animal welfare requirements. In the free-choice pens the open water systems were significantly preferred, and over a 24-hour period the ducks in watering areas with open water troughs showed higher activity. Limiting the access to the open water systems to eight, four or two hours per day led to an increased use per time unit. Ducks with access to nipple drinkers only showed a significantly higher percentage of plugged up nostrils than animals from pens with open water drinkers. Open water drinkers had also a positive impact on the plumage condition. PMID:16669187

  1. Plumage colour and feather pecking in laying hens, a chicken perspective?

    PubMed

    Bright, A

    2007-06-01

    1. This study investigated whether feather damage due to feather pecking and bird behaviour were influenced by plumage colour in Oakham Blue laying hens (black, white, grey colour variants). The reflectance properties of feathers and spectral composition of light environments experienced by the hens were also examined. 2. Nine hundred and seventy-nine birds were inspected and scored for feather damage; 10.5 h of video recordings were examined to record feather pecking and bird behaviour. Feathers and light environments were measured using a USB-2000 spectrometer and DH-2000-CAL-DTH lamp. 3. Oakham Blue birds with white plumage had less feather damage due to feather pecking than black or grey birds. There was more severe feather pecking in the mornings than in the afternoon. White birds feather pecked severely more than black or grey birds, although there were no other behavioural differences between plumage colours. 4. White feathers reflected at a higher intensity than black or grey feathers. However, black and grey feather spectra were relatively flat and the contribution of UV wavelengths to plumage reflection was proportionally greater than that for white feathers. 5. Light intensity inside a poultry house was 100 x (UW/cm2/nm) less than on the range and there was low or no UV reflectance. Under the dim, artificial lights inside a poultry house, Oakham Blue hens with black and grey feathers may be less visible to conspecifics than white birds because their plumage reflects at a lower intensity. Furthermore, the lack of available UV light inside vs. outside and the higher contribution of UV reflectance to black and grey plumage may make black and grey birds appear more different inside the house than white birds. It is possible that this novel/unusual appearance may make black or grey Oakham Blue hens more susceptible to feather pecking. PMID:17578687

  2. Barn owl feathers as biomonitors of mercury: sources of variation in sampling procedures.

    PubMed

    Roque, Inês; Lourenço, Rui; Marques, Ana; Coelho, João Pedro; Coelho, Cláudia; Pereira, Eduarda; Rabaça, João E; Roulin, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    Given their central role in mercury (Hg) excretion and suitability as reservoirs, bird feathers are useful Hg biomonitors. Nevertheless, the interpretation of Hg concentrations is still questioned as a result of a poor knowledge of feather physiology and mechanisms affecting Hg deposition. Given the constraints of feather availability to ecotoxicological studies, we tested the effect of intra-individual differences in Hg concentrations according to feather type (body vs. flight feathers), position in the wing and size (mass and length) in order to understand how these factors could affect Hg estimates. We measured Hg concentration of 154 feathers from 28 un-moulted barn owls (Tyto alba), collected dead on roadsides. Median Hg concentration was 0.45 (0.076-4.5) mg kg(-1) in body feathers, 0.44 (0.040-4.9) mg kg(-1) in primary and 0.60 (0.042-4.7) mg kg(-1) in secondary feathers, and we found a poor effect of feather type on intra-individual Hg levels. We also found a negative effect of wing feather mass on Hg concentration but not of feather length and of its position in the wing. We hypothesize that differences in feather growth rate may be the main driver of between-feather differences in Hg concentrations, which can have implications in the interpretation of Hg concentrations in feathers. Finally, we recommend that, whenever possible, several feathers from the same individual should be analysed. The five innermost primaries have lowest mean deviations to both between-feather and intra-individual mean Hg concentration and thus should be selected under restrictive sampling scenarios. PMID:26718850

  3. The effects of harvest regulations on behaviors of duck hunters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugen, Matthew T.; Powell, Larkin A.; Vrtiska, Mark P.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty exists as to how duck harvest regulations influence waterfowl hunter behavior. We used the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Parts Collection Survey to examine how harvest regulations affected behaviors of Central Flyway duck hunters. We stratified hunters into ranked groups based on seasonal harvest and identified three periods (1975–1984, 1988–1993, 2002–2011) that represented different harvest regulations (moderate, restrictive, and liberal, respectively; season length and daily bag limits smallest in restrictive seasons and largest in liberal seasons). We examined variability of seven measures of duck hunter behaviors across the periods: days harvesting ducks, daily harvest, hunter mobility, mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) selectivity, gender selectivity, daily female mallard harvest, and timing of harvest. Hunters reported harvesting ducks on more days, at a higher efficiency, and in slightly more counties during liberal seasons relative to restrictive and moderate seasons. We provide evidence to suggest that future regulation change will affect hunter behaviors.

  4. 75 FR 30013 - South Feather Water and Power Agency; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission South Feather Water and Power Agency; Notice of Availability of...), Commission staff has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) regarding South Feather Water and Power Agency... Creek development of the South Feather Power Project (FERC No. 2088). Sly Creek is located on Sly...

  5. Cellular and Cytokine Responses in Feathers of Chickens Vaccinated Against Marek's Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to characterize cellular and cytokine responses as indicators of cell-mediated immune response in feathers of chickens vaccinated against Marek’s disease (MD). Feathers constitute the site of virus shedding in the case of Marek’s disease virus (MDV). The feather sample...

  6. Genome Sequences of Beak and Feather Disease Virus in Urban Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus)

    PubMed Central

    Collings, David A.; Collings, Berwyn G.; Julian, Laurel; Kurenbach, Brigitta

    2015-01-01

    Beak and feather disease viral genomes were recovered from two deceased juvenile urban rainbow lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus) that lacked tail feathers. These genomes share ~95% pairwise identity with two beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) genomes identified in wild and captive Australian T. haematodus birds and ~92% identity to those in wild New Caledonian T. haematodus deplanchii birds. PMID:25908126

  7. Theoretical morphology and development of flight feather vane asymmetry with experimental tests in parrots.

    PubMed

    Feo, Teresa J; Prum, Richard O

    2014-06-01

    Asymmetry in flight feather vane width is a major functional innovation associated with the evolution of flight in the ancestors of birds. However, the developmental and morphological basis of feather shape is not simple, and the developmental processes involved in vane width asymmetry are poorly understood. We present a theoretical model of feather morphology and development that describes the possible ways to modify feather development and produce vane asymmetry. Our model finds that the theoretical morphospace of feather shape is redundant, and that many different combinations of parameters could be responsible for vane asymmetry in a given feather. Next, we empirically measured morphological and developmental model parameters in asymmetric and symmetric feathers from two species of parrots to identify which combinations of parameters create vane asymmetry in real feathers. We found that both longer barbs, and larger barb angles in the relatively wider trailing vane drove asymmetry in tail feathers. Developmentally, longer barbs were the result of an offset of the radial position of the new barb locus, whereas larger barb angles were produced by differential expansion of barbs as the feather unfurls from the tubular feather germ. In contrast, the helical angle of barb ridge development did not contribute to vane asymmetry and could be indicative of a constraint. This research provides the first comprehensive description of both the morphological and developmental modifications responsible for vane asymmetry within real feathers, and identifies key steps that must have occurred during the evolution of vane asymmetry. PMID:24816758

  8. Do spotless starlings place feathers at their nests by ultraviolet color?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés, Jesús M.; Parejo, Deseada; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Navarro, Carlos; Soler, Juan J.

    2010-02-01

    A considerable number of bird species carry feathers to their nests. Feathers’ presence in the nests has traditionally been explained by their insulating properties. Recently, however, it has been suggested that feathers carried to the nests by females of the spotted starling ( Sturnus unicolor L.) could have an ornamental function based on their ultraviolet (300-400 nm) and human-visible longer wavelength (400-700 nm) coloration. In our population, 95.7% of feathers found inside next-boxes occupied by nesting starlings were rock dove fly feathers. Of these feathers, 82.7% were naturally positioned with their reverse side oriented toward the entrance hole and 42.4% of all found feathers were situated within the nest-cup. Here we experimentally assess the signaling function of ultraviolet coloration of feathers in nests of spotless starlings by providing nests with a number of pigeon flight feathers that were respectively treated on their obverse, reverse, both, or neither side with a UV blocker. Starlings placed 42.5% of the experimental feathers in the nest-cup irrespective of the UV block treatment. Orientation of feathers toward the entrance hole was not related with their ultraviolet radiation. However, feathers placed within the nest-cup were more likely found with their reverse side oriented toward the entrance hole confirming our correlative findings. These results suggest a minor role of ultraviolet coloration on feather location by spotless starlings.

  9. Chicken genomics: feather-pecking and victim pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Linda; Andersson, Leif; Schütz, Karin E; Kerje, Susanne; Fredriksson, Robert; Carlborg, Orjan; Cornwallis, Charles K; Pizzari, Tommaso; Jensen, Per

    2004-10-01

    Feather-pecking in domestic birds is associated with cannibalism and severe welfare problems. It is a dramatic example of a spiteful behaviour in which the victim's fitness is reduced for no immediate direct benefit to the perpetrator and its evolution is unexplained. Here we show that the plumage pigmentation of a chicken may predispose it to become a victim: birds suffer more drastic feather-pecking when the colour of their plumage is due to the expression of a wild recessive allele at PMEL17, a gene that controls plumage melanization, and when these birds are relatively common in a flock. These findings, obtained using an intercross between a domestic fowl and its wild ancestor, have implications for the welfare of domestic species and offer insight into the genetic changes associated with the evolution of feather-pecking during the early stages of domestication. PMID:15470416

  10. Melanin Concentration Gradients in Modern and Fossil Feathers

    PubMed Central

    Field, Daniel J.; D’Alba, Liliana; Vinther, Jakob; Webb, Samuel M.; Gearty, William; Shawkey, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    In birds and feathered non-avian dinosaurs, within-feather pigmentation patterns range from discrete spots and stripes to more subtle patterns, but the latter remain largely unstudied. A ∼55 million year old fossil contour feather with a dark distal tip grading into a lighter base was recovered from the Fur Formation in Denmark. SEM and synchrotron-based trace metal mapping confirmed that this gradient was caused by differential concentration of melanin. To assess the potential ecological and phylogenetic prevalence of this pattern, we evaluated 321 modern samples from 18 orders within Aves. We observed that the pattern was found most frequently in distantly related groups that share aquatic ecologies (e.g. waterfowl Anseriformes, penguins Sphenisciformes), suggesting a potential adaptive function with ancient origins. PMID:23555675

  11. Molecular composition and ultrastructure of Jurassic paravian feathers

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Johan; Sjövall, Peter; Carney, Ryan M.; Cincotta, Aude; Uvdal, Per; Hutcheson, Steven W.; Gustafsson, Ola; Lefèvre, Ulysse; Escuillié, François; Heimdal, Jimmy; Engdahl, Anders; Gren, Johan A.; Kear, Benjamin P.; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Yans, Johan; Godefroit, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Feathers are amongst the most complex epidermal structures known, and they have a well-documented evolutionary trajectory across non-avian dinosaurs and basal birds. Moreover, melanosome-like microbodies preserved in association with fossil plumage have been used to reconstruct original colour, behaviour and physiology. However, these putative ancient melanosomes might alternatively represent microorganismal residues, a conflicting interpretation compounded by a lack of unambiguous chemical data. We therefore used sensitive molecular imaging, supported by multiple independent analytical tests, to demonstrate that the filamentous epidermal appendages in a new specimen of the Jurassic paravian Anchiornis comprise remnant eumelanosomes and fibril-like microstructures, preserved as endogenous eumelanin and authigenic calcium phosphate. These results provide novel insights into the early evolution of feathers at the sub-cellular level, and unequivocally determine that melanosomes can be preserved in fossil feathers. PMID:26311035

  12. Molecular composition and ultrastructure of Jurassic paravian feathers.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Johan; Sjövall, Peter; Carney, Ryan M; Cincotta, Aude; Uvdal, Per; Hutcheson, Steven W; Gustafsson, Ola; Lefèvre, Ulysse; Escuillié, François; Heimdal, Jimmy; Engdahl, Anders; Gren, Johan A; Kear, Benjamin P; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Yans, Johan; Godefroit, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Feathers are amongst the most complex epidermal structures known, and they have a well-documented evolutionary trajectory across non-avian dinosaurs and basal birds. Moreover, melanosome-like microbodies preserved in association with fossil plumage have been used to reconstruct original colour, behaviour and physiology. However, these putative ancient melanosomes might alternatively represent microorganismal residues, a conflicting interpretation compounded by a lack of unambiguous chemical data. We therefore used sensitive molecular imaging, supported by multiple independent analytical tests, to demonstrate that the filamentous epidermal appendages in a new specimen of the Jurassic paravian Anchiornis comprise remnant eumelanosomes and fibril-like microstructures, preserved as endogenous eumelanin and authigenic calcium phosphate. These results provide novel insights into the early evolution of feathers at the sub-cellular level, and unequivocally determine that melanosomes can be preserved in fossil feathers. PMID:26311035

  13. Morphology of primary feathers in two falcon species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honisch, B.; Bleckmann, H.; Schmitz, H.; Schmitz, A.

    2012-04-01

    Primary feathers allow birds to fly; however, morphology and material properties of theses feathers vary in different bird species. We therefore analysed both morphology and material properties of primary feathers in two raptor species, the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) which is the fastest vertical flyer known, and the kestrel (Falco tinnunculus), using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanoindentation. The program AutoCAD was used for the computation of the moments of inertia. The reduced E-modulus of the cortex of the rachis of the first, fifth, and tenth primary were measured at proximal (10% of total rachis length), central (50%) and distal (75%) cross-sections. In all cross sections the kestrel showed higher E-moduli than the peregrine falcon (values varied between 6.7 and 9.1 GPa). In the primaries, values increased from proximal to central but decreased distally. Looking at the hardness, the kestrel had higher values than the peregrine falcon yet again. The main differences occurred in the first primary. Values ranged between 0.17 and 0.4 GPa. SEM studies revealed that the tenth primary was more stable in the peregrine falcon, featuring more hamuli than the kestrel at all analysed positions and longer hamuli at the distal positions. The higher moments of inertia found in the peregrine falcon caused a much higher bending stiffness in this species. Values were 4.4 to 9.1 times larger in the peregrine falcon than in the kestrel. Because the given structures are responsible for the stability of the feather face it seems that the feathers of F. peregrinus are more robust than those of F. tinnunculus. Even when considering the higher body mass of the peregrine falcon compared to the kestrel (3.4 times), the determined stability of the feather compensates for this problem.

  14. FeatherSail - Design, Development and Future Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C.; Scheierl, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    To the present day, the idea of using solar sails for space propulsion is still just a concept, but one that provides a great potential for future space exploration missions. Several notable solar propulsion missions and experiments have been performed and more are still in the development stage. Solar Sailing is a method of space flight propulsion, which utilizes the light photons to propel spacecrafts through the vacuum of space. This concept will be tested in the near future with the launch of the NanoSail-D satellite. NanoSail-D is a nano-class satellite, <10kg, which will deploy a thin lightweight sheet of reflective material used to propel the satellite in its low earth orbit. Using the features of the NanoSail-D architecture, a second-generation solar sail design concept, dubbed FeatherSail, has been developed. The goal of the FeatherSail project is to create a sail vehicle with the ability to provide steering from the sails and increase the areal density. The FeatherSail design will utilize the NanoSail-D based extendable boom technology with only one sail on each set of booms. This design also allows each of the four sails to feather as much as ninety degrees. The FeatherSail concept uses deployable solar arrays to generate the power necessary for deep space missions. In addition, recent developments in low power, low temperature Silicon-Germanium electronics provide the capability for long duration deep space missions. It is envisioned that the FeatherSail conceptual design will provide the impetus for future sail vehicles, which may someday visit distant places that mankind has only observed.

  15. Band reporting probablilities of mallards, American black ducks, and wood ducks in eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrettson, Pamela R; Raftovich, Robert V; Hines, James; Zimmerman, Guthrie

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of band reporting probabilities are used for managing North American waterfowl to convert band recovery probabilities into harvest probabilities, which are used to set harvest regulations. Band reporting probability is the probability that someone who has shot and retrieved a banded bird will report the band. This probability can vary relative to a number of factors, particularly the inscription on the band and the ease with which it can be reported. Other factors, such as geographic reporting region, and species and sex of the bird may also play a role. We tested whether reporting probabilities of wood ducks (Aix sponsa) and American black ducks (black ducks; Anas rubripes) differed from those of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and whether band reporting varied geographically or by the sex of the banded bird. In the analysis of spatially comparable wood duck and mallard data, a band reporting probability of 0.73 (95% CI = 0.67–0.78) was appropriate for use across species, sex, and reporting region within the United States. In the black duck–mallard comparison, the band reporting probability of black ducks in Eastern Canada (0.50, 95% CI = 0.44–0.57) was lower than in the Eastern United States (0.73, 95% CI = 0.62–0.83). These estimates reflected an increase in overall band reporting probability following the addition of a toll-free telephone number to band inscriptions. Lower reporting in Eastern Canada may be because of cultural, linguistic, or logistical barriers. © 2013 The Wildlife Society.

  16. Evaluation of anti-hepadnavirus activity of Phyllanthus amarus and Phyllanthus maderaspatensis in duck hepatitis B virus carrier Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Munshi, A; Mehrotra, R; Ramesh, R; Panda, S K

    1993-12-01

    Extracts of the two traditional Indian herbs, Phyllanthus amarus (P. amarus) and Phyllanthus maderaspatensis (P. maderaspatensis), described by others as useful in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection were studied for antiviral properties on duck hepatitis B virus infection. One hundred and fourteen ducks infected posthatch with the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) were divided into groups at three months of age and treated intraperitoneally with the aqueous, butanol, and alcoholic extracts of these two plants at doses of 25, 50, or 200 mg/kg body weight. Saline-treated animals served as controls. In the ducks negative for DHBV in serum after treatment, we observed replicative intermediates in the liver. There was no definite antiviral property observed in the treated ducks. PMID:8106861

  17. Feather mites of Calidris fuscicollis (Aves: Scolopacidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gomes, S N; Pesenti, T C; Cirne, M P; Müller, G

    2015-11-01

    During the period 2010-2012, eighty individuals of Calidris fuscicollis (Vieillot, 1819) were collected on the southern coast of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, with the objective of determining the presence of feather mites. Of the 80 birds examined, 32.5% were infested by mites, identified as Avenzoaria calidridis (Oudemans, 1904) (Avenzoariidae) (31.25%), Montchadskiana securicata (Megnin & Trouessart 1884) (Pterolichidae) (22.5%) and Alloptes limosae (Dubinin, 1951) (Alloptidae) (6.25%). This is the first report of feather mites on Calidris fuscicollis in Brazil. PMID:26675921

  18. Delayed Wound Healing in Keratin 6a Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Sonja M.; Bundman, Donnie S.; Roop, Dennis R.

    2000-01-01

    Keratin 6 (K6) expression in the epidermis has two components: constitutive expression in the innermost layer of the outer root sheath (ORS) of hair follicles and inducible expression in the interfollicular epidermis in response to stressful stimuli such as wounding. Mice express two K6 isoforms, MK6a and MK6b. To gain insight into the functional significance of these isoforms, we generated MK6a-deficient mice through mouse embryonic stem cell technology. Upon wounding, MK6a was induced in the outer ORS and the interfollicular epidermis including the basal cell layer of MK6a+/+ mice, whereas MK6b induction in MK6a−/− mice was restricted to the suprabasal layers of the epidermis. After superficial wounding of the epidermis by tape stripping, MK6a−/− mice showed a delay in reepithelialization from the hair follicle. However, the healing of full-thickness skin wounds was not impaired in MK6a−/− animals. Migration and proliferation of MK6a−/− keratinocytes were not impaired in vitro. Furthermore, the migrating and the proliferating keratinocytes of full-thickness wounds in MK6a−/− animals expressed neither MK6a nor MK6b. These data indicate that MK6a does not play a major role in keratinocyte proliferation or migration but point to a role in the activation of follicular keratinocytes after wounding. This study represents the first report of a keratin null mutation that results in a wound healing defect. PMID:10866680

  19. From buds to follicles: matrix metalloproteinases in developmental tissue remodeling during feather morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Tuan, Tai Lan; Wu, Ping; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2011-06-01

    Organogenesis involves a series of dynamic morphogenesis and remodeling processes. Since feathers exhibit complex forms, we have been using the feather as a model to analyze how molecular pathways and cellular events are used. While several major molecular pathways have been studied, the roles of matrix degrading proteases and inhibitors in feather morphogenesis are unknown. Here we addressed this knowledge gap by studying the temporal and spatial expression of proteases and inhibitors in developing feathers using mammalian antibodies that cross react with chicken proteins. We also investigated the effect of protease inhibitors on feather development employing an in vitro feather bud culture system. The results show that antibodies specific for mammalian MMP2 and TIMP2 stained positive in both feather epithelium and mesenchyme. The staining co-localized in structures of E10-E13 developing feathers. Interestingly, MMP2 and TIMP2 exhibited a complementary staining pattern in developing E15 and E20 feathers and in maturing feather filaments. Although they exhibited a slight delay in feather bud development, similar patterns of MMP2 and TIMP2 staining were observed in in vitro culture explants. The broad spectrum pharmacological inhibitors AG3340 and BB103 (MMP inhibitors) but not Aprotinin (a plasmin inhibitor) showed a reversible effect on epithelium invagination and feather bud elongation. TIMP2, a physiological inhibitor to MMPs, exhibited a similar effect. Markers of feather morphogenesis showed that MMP activity was required for both epithelium invagination and mesenchymal cell proliferation. Inhibition of MMP activity led to an overall delay in the expression of molecules that regulate either early feather bud growth and/or differentiation and thereby produced abnormal buds with incomplete follicle formation. This work demonstrates that MMPs and their inhibitors are not only important in injury repair, but also in development tissue remodeling as demonstrated

  20. Efficiency of methionine retention in ducks.

    PubMed

    Adeola, Olayiwola

    2007-03-01

    The accretion of methionine and protein as a function of methionine intake was assessed in growing ducks between 22 and 42 d post-hatching. Four graded doses of dl-methionine at 0, 0 x 5, 1 x 0 or 1 x 5 g/kg diet were added to a methionine-limiting basal diet and fed to four replicate groups of four ducks each. The growth and efficiency of food use for growth increased linearly (P<0 x 05) as a function of methionine intake. The accretion of body protein increased (P<0 x 001) from 87 x 5 to 182 x 2 g, and that of methionine from 1616 to 3125 mg, over the 21 d period as dietary methionine increased. The accretion rate of methionine in the body (y, mg/d) as a function of methionine intake (x, mg/d) of ducks fed diets containing supplemental methionine at 0, 0 x 5, 1 x 0 or 1 x 5 g/kg diet from day 22 to day 42 post-hatching gave the regression equation: y=-148 x 86 (se 32 x 558)+0 x 312 (se 0 x 0384)X, r2=0 x 8253. For protein accretion rate in the body (y, mg/d) as a function of methionine intake (x, mg/d), the regression equation was: y= -9782 (se 2204)+19 x 505 (se 2 x 5994)x, r2=0 x 8009. There was a linear relationship between methionine (y, mg/d) and protein (x, mg/d) accretion in ducks that was described by the equation y=12 x 757 (se 7 x 4019)+0 x 01 525 (se 0 x 00 107)x, r2=0 x 9355. The results of these studies suggest a constant utilisation of methionine over the range 2 x 4-3 x 9 g digestible methionine/kg diet, with an efficiency of 31 %. Furthermore, the results suggest a quantitative relationship of 15 mg methionine for every gram of protein accretion. PMID:17313709

  1. Ducks launch into flight at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A flock of ducks launch into the morning sky in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  2. Effects of dietary vanadium in mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Dieter, M.P.

    1978-01-01

    Adult mallard ducks fed 0, 1, 10, or 100 ppm vanadyl sulfate in the diet were sacrificed after 12 wk on treatment; tissues were analyzed for vanadium. No birds died during the study and body weights did not change. Vanadium accumulated to higher concentrations in the bone and liver than in other tissues. Concentrations in bones of hens were five times those in bones of drakes, suggesting an interaction between vanadium and calcium mobilization in laying hens. Vanadium concentrations in most tissues were significantly correlated and increased with treatment level. Lipid metabolism was altered in laying hens fed 100 ppm vanadium. Very little vanadium accumulated in the eggs of laying hens.

  3. In vitro phosphorylation as tool for modification of silk and keratin fibrous materials.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-05-01

    An overview is given of the recent work on in vitro enzymatic phosphorylation of silk fibroin and human hair keratin. Opposing to many chemical "conventional" approaches, enzymatic phosphorylation is in fact a mild reaction and the treatment falls within "green chemistry" approach. Silk and keratin are not phosphorylated in vivo, but in vitro. This enzyme-driven modification is a major technological breakthrough. Harsh chemical chemicals are avoided, and mild conditions make enzymatic phosphorylation a real "green chemistry" approach. The current communication presents a novel approach stating that enzyme phosphorylation may be used as a tool to modify the surface charge of biocompatible materials such as keratin and silk. PMID:27075736

  4. Biological armors under impact--effect of keratin coating, and synthetic bio-inspired analogues.

    PubMed

    Achrai, B; Bar-On, B; Wagner, H D

    2015-01-01

    A number of biological armors, such as turtle shells, consist of a strong exoskeleton covered with a thin keratin coating. The mechanical role upon impact of this keratin coating has surprisingly not been investigated thus far. Low-velocity impact tests on the turtle shell reveal a unique toughening phenomenon attributed to the thin covering keratin layer, the presence of which noticeably improves the fracture energy and shell integrity. Synthetic substrate/coating analogues were subsequently prepared and exhibit an impact behavior similar to the biological ones. The results of the present study may improve our understanding, and even future designs, of impact-tolerant structures. PMID:25599251

  5. Keratin gene mutations in disorders of human skin and its appendages.

    PubMed

    Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A; Syed, Deeba N; Adhami, Vaqar M; Liovic, Mirjana; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-04-15

    Keratins, the major structural protein of all epithelia are a diverse group of cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins that form intermediate filament networks, providing structural support to keratinocytes that maintain the integrity of the skin. Expression of keratin genes is usually regulated by differentiation of the epidermal cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Amongst the 54 known functional keratin genes in humans, about 22 different genes including, the cornea, hair and hair follicle-specific keratins have been implicated in a wide range of hereditary diseases. The exact phenotype of each disease usually reflects the spatial expression level and the types of mutated keratin genes, the location of the mutations and their consequences at sub-cellular levels as well as other epigenetic and/or environmental factors. The identification of specific pathogenic mutations in keratin disorders formed the basis of our understanding that led to re-classification, improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, prenatal testing and genetic counseling in severe keratin genodermatoses. Molecular defects in cutaneous keratin genes encoding for keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) causes keratinocytes and tissue-specific fragility, accounting for a large number of genetic disorders in human skin and its appendages. These diseases are characterized by keratinocytes fragility (cytolysis), intra-epidermal blistering, hyperkeratosis, and keratin filament aggregation in severely affected tissues. Examples include epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS; K5, K14), keratinopathic ichthyosis (KPI; K1, K2, K10) i.e. epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI; K1, K10) and ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS; K2), pachyonychia congenita (PC; K6a, K6b, K16, K17), epidermolytic palmo-plantar keratoderma (EPPK; K9, (K1)), monilethrix (K81, K83, K86), ectodermal dysplasia (ED; K85) and steatocystoma multiplex. These keratins also have been identified to have roles in apoptosis, cell proliferation

  6. Assessment of recombinant beak and feather disease virus capsid protein as a vaccine for psittacine beak and feather disease.

    PubMed

    Bonne, Nicolai; Shearer, Patrick; Sharp, Margaret; Clark, Phillip; Raidal, Shane

    2009-03-01

    Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) is a significant pathogen of wild Australasian and African psittacine birds. We assessed the immunogenicity of recombinant BFDV capsid (recBFDVcap) to protect against the development of psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD). Long-billed corellas (Cacatua tenuirostris) (n=13) received (by injection) 1 ml vaccine containing 10 microg recBFDVcap on day 0 and 0.4 ml vaccine containing 66.8 microg recBFDVcap on day 11. All vaccinated corellas and five non-vaccinated control corellas were given 0.4 ml BFDV suspension [titre=log(2) 12 haemagglutination units (HAU) 50 microl(-1)] intramuscularly and 0.1 ml orally 16 days after booster vaccination. Blood was collected during the vaccination period and blood and feathers were collected after BFDV administration. Testing of blood samples included BFDV DNA detection by PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) as well as antibody detection by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and on feather samples, BFDV DNA and antigen was detected by haemagglutination (HA) and qPCR. Four of 97 blood samples collected from vaccinated birds after virus challenge tested positive by PCR, whereas 17 of 35 samples taken from non-vaccinated control corellas tested positive. Vaccinated birds did not develop feather lesions, had only transient PCR-detectable viraemia and had no evidence of persistent infection 270 days post-challenge using PCR, histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Non-vaccinated control corellas developed transient feather lesions and had PCR, HI and HA test results consistent with PBFD. They were BFDV PCR-positive for up to 41 days post-challenge and qPCR demonstrated reduced virus replication in vaccinated birds compared with non-vaccinated control birds. PMID:19218209

  7. A full annual cycle modeling framework for American black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Orin J.; McGowan, Conor; Devers, Patrick K.; Brook, Rodney W.; Huang, Min; Jones, Malcom; McAuley, Daniel G.; Zimmerman, Guthrie

    2016-01-01

    American black ducks (Anas rubripes) are a harvested, international migratory waterfowl species in eastern North America. Despite an extended period of restrictive harvest regulations, the black duck population is still below the population goal identified in the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP). It has been hypothesized that density-dependent factors restrict population growth in the black duck population and that habitat management (increases, improvements, etc.) may be a key component of growing black duck populations and reaching the prescribed NAWMP population goal. Using banding data from 1951 to 2011 and breeding population survey data from 1990 to 2014, we developed a full annual cycle population model for the American black duck. This model uses the seven management units as set by the Black Duck Joint Venture, allows movement into and out of each unit during each season, and models survival and fecundity for each region separately. We compare model population trajectories with observed population data and abundance estimates from the breeding season counts to show the accuracy of this full annual cycle model. With this model, we then show how to simulate the effects of habitat management on the continental black duck population.

  8. Upregulation of duck interleukin-17A during Riemerella anatipestifer infection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Cherry P; Kim, Woo H; Diaz, Joyce Anne R; Jeong, Jipseol; Afrin, Fahmida; Kim, Suk; Jang, Hyung-Kwan; Lee, Byung-Hyung; Yim, Dongjean; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Min, Wongi

    2016-10-01

    Although IL-17 cytokines play critical roles in host defense immunity, dysregulated expression of these cytokines is associated with inflammation and autoimmune diseases. Riemerella anatipestifer is the most important infectious bacterium in the duck industry. Interestingly, not all avian species are equally susceptible to R. anatipestifer infection. This paper reports the first description of mortality rate, bacterial burden, and expression profiles of immune-related genes between ducks and chickens infected with R. anatipestifer. Ducks exhibited increased susceptibility to R. anatipestifer infection compared to chickens, as determined by mortality rate and bacterial burden. Comparative expression analyses of immune-related genes in R. anatipestifer-infected tissues obtained from both species revealed that TLR3, TLR7, IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-γ transcript levels were higher in chickens, whereas TLR4 and IL-17A transcript levels were higher in ducks. Marked increases in expression of IL-17A and IL-6, but not TGF-β, were associated with Th17 cell differentiation in duck splenic lymphocytes, but not in chicken splenic lymphocytes, stimulated with R. anatipestifer. Moreover, upregulation of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17A mRNA expressions, but not TGF-β, was confirmed in the liver and spleen of ducks infected with R. anatipestifer, indicating that IL-17A is strongly associated with Riemerella infection in ducks. PMID:27212414

  9. Multiple losses of flight and recent speciation in steamer ducks.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Tara L; Letts, Brandon; Shapiro, Beth

    2012-06-22

    Steamer ducks (Tachyeres) comprise four species, three of which are flightless. The flightless species are believed to have diverged from a flying common ancestor during the Late Pleistocene; however, their taxonomy remains contentious. Of particular interest is the previously unstudied population of flying steamer ducks in the Falkland Islands. We present the first genetic data from this insular population, and illustrate that the flying and flightless steamer ducks on the Falkland Islands are genetically indistinguishable, in contrast to their traditional classification as separate species. The three species that reside in continental South America form a genetically distinct lineage from the Falkland Island ducks. The Falkland steamer ducks diverged from their continental relatives 2.2-0.6 million years ago, coincident with a probable land bridge connecting the Falkland Islands to the mainland. The three continental species share a common ancestor approximately 15 000 years ago, possibly owing to isolation during a recent glacial advance. The continental steamer duck species are not reciprocally monophyletic, but show some amount of genetic differentiation between them. Each lineage of Tachyeres represents a different stage between flight and flightlessness. Their phylogenetic relationships suggest multiple losses of flight and/or long-term persistence of mixed-flight capability. As such, steamer ducks may provide a model system to study the evolution of flightlessness. PMID:22319122

  10. Fall food habits of ducks near Santee Refuge, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGilvrey, F.B.

    1966-01-01

    During the 1961 waterfowl hunting season, 360 stomachs of 10 duck species were collected from hunters near the Santee National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Marion, South Carolina. Based on percentage of total volume, 20 of the most important foods are listed. The six most important duck species in the kill were: mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), wood duck (Aix sponsa), widgeon (Mareca americam), pintail (Anas acuta) , black duck ( Anas rubripes) , and green-winged teal (Anas carolinensis). Six plant species made up 5 percent or more of the total volume of food items found in the stomachs of all ducks. Only seeds of oaks (Quercus sp.), corn, sweet gum (Liquidambar Styraciflua), and buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) were consumed. Some seed, but mostly the vegetative portions of hydrochloa (Hydrochloa carolinensis) and only the vegetative portions of southern rice cutgrass (Leersia hexandra) were taken. The more important game ducks concentrated on the refuge farmlands when water levels were below 72 feet mean sea level (msl). When levels reached 75 feet msl, natural foods became available, ducks dispersed from refuge areas, and hunting success increased greatly.

  11. Feather corticosterone content in predatory birds in relation to body condition and hepatic metal concentration.

    PubMed

    Strong, Rebecca J; Pereira, M Glória; Shore, Richard F; Henrys, Peter A; Pottinger, Tom G

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of measuring corticosterone in feathers from cryo-archived raptor specimens, in order to provide a retrospective assessment of the activity of the stress axis in relation to contaminant burden. Feather samples were taken from sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus, kestrel Falco tinnunculus, buzzard Buteo buteo, barn owl Tyto alba, and tawny owl Strix aluco and the variation in feather CORT concentrations with respect to species, age, sex, feather position, and body condition was assessed. In sparrowhawks only, variation in feather CORT content was compared with hepatic metal concentrations. For individuals, CORT concentration (pgmm(-1)) in adjacent primary flight feathers (P5 and P6), and left and right wing primaries (P5), was statistically indistinguishable. The lowest concentrations of CORT were found in sparrowhawk feathers and CORT concentrations did not vary systematically with age or sex for any species. Significant relationships between feather CORT content and condition were observed in only tawny owl and kestrel. In sparrowhawks, feather CORT concentration was found to be positively related to the hepatic concentrations of five metals (Cd, Mn, Co, Cu, Mo) and the metalloid As. There was also a negative relationship between measures of condition and total hepatic metal concentration in males. The results suggest that some factors affecting CORT uptake by feathers remain to be resolved but feather CORT content from archived specimens has the potential to provide a simple effects biomarker for exposure to environmental contaminants. PMID:25776461

  12. Developmental expression of chicken FOXN1 and putative target genes during feather development.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Diana K; Zhang, Li S; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Yaklichkin, Sergey Y

    2014-01-01

    FOXN1 is a member of the forkhead box family of transcription factors. FOXN1 is crucial for hair outgrowth and thymus differentiation in mammals. Unlike the thymus, which is found in all amniotes, hair is an epidermal appendage that arose after the last shared common ancestor between mammals and birds, and hair and feathers differ markedly in their differentiation and gene expression. Here, we show that FOXN1 is expressed in embryonic chicken feathers, nails and thymus, demonstrating an evolutionary conservation that goes beyond obvious homology. At embryonic day (ED) 12, FOXN1 is expressed in some feather buds and at ED13 expression extends along the length of the feather filament. At ED14 FOXN1 mRNA is restricted to the proximal feather filament and is not detectable in distal feather shafts. At the base of the feather, FOXN1 is expressed in the epithelium of the feather sheath and distal barb and marginal plate, whereas in the midsection FOXN1 transcripts are mainly detected in the barb plates of the feather filament. FOXN1 is also expressed in claws; however, no expression was detected in skin or scales. Despite expression of FOXN1 in developing feathers, examination of chick homologs of five putative mammalian FOXN1 target genes shows that, while these genes are expressed in feathers, there is little similarity to the FOXN1 expression pattern, suggesting that some gene regulatory networks may have diverged during evolution of epidermal appendages. PMID:24860996

  13. A cis-Regulatory Mutation of PDSS2 Causes Silky-Feather in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chungang; Gao, Yu; Dorshorst, Ben; Song, Chi; Gu, Xiaorong; Li, Qingyuan; Li, Jinxiu; Liu, Tongxin; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Zhao, Yiqiang; Wang, Yanqiang; Fei, Jing; Li, Huifang; Chen, Kuanwei; Qu, Hao; Shu, Dingming; Ashwell, Chris; Da, Yang; Andersson, Leif; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Silky-feather has been selected and fixed in some breeds due to its unique appearance. This phenotype is caused by a single recessive gene (hookless, h). Here we map the silky-feather locus to chromosome 3 by linkage analysis and subsequently fine-map it to an 18.9 kb interval using the identical by descent (IBD) method. Further analysis reveals that a C to G transversion located upstream of the prenyl (decaprenyl) diphosphate synthase, subunit 2 (PDSS2) gene is causing silky-feather. All silky-feather birds are homozygous for the G allele. The silky-feather mutation significantly decreases the expression of PDSS2 during feather development in vivo. Consistent with the regulatory effect, the C to G transversion is shown to remarkably reduce PDSS2 promoter activity in vitro. We report a new example of feather structure variation associated with a spontaneous mutation and provide new insight into the PDSS2 function. PMID:25166907

  14. A cis-regulatory mutation of PDSS2 causes silky-feather in chickens.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chungang; Gao, Yu; Dorshorst, Ben; Song, Chi; Gu, Xiaorong; Li, Qingyuan; Li, Jinxiu; Liu, Tongxin; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Zhao, Yiqiang; Wang, Yanqiang; Fei, Jing; Li, Huifang; Chen, Kuanwei; Qu, Hao; Shu, Dingming; Ashwell, Chris; Da, Yang; Andersson, Leif; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning

    2014-08-01

    Silky-feather has been selected and fixed in some breeds due to its unique appearance. This phenotype is caused by a single recessive gene (hookless, h). Here we map the silky-feather locus to chromosome 3 by linkage analysis and subsequently fine-map it to an 18.9 kb interval using the identical by descent (IBD) method. Further analysis reveals that a C to G transversion located upstream of the prenyl (decaprenyl) diphosphate synthase, subunit 2 (PDSS2) gene is causing silky-feather. All silky-feather birds are homozygous for the G allele. The silky-feather mutation significantly decreases the expression of PDSS2 during feather development in vivo. Consistent with the regulatory effect, the C to G transversion is shown to remarkably reduce PDSS2 promoter activity in vitro. We report a new example of feather structure variation associated with a spontaneous mutation and provide new insight into the PDSS2 function. PMID:25166907

  15. Rapid brain cooling in diving ducks.

    PubMed

    Caputa, M; Folkow, L; Blix, A S

    1998-08-01

    Hypothermia may limit asphyxic damages to the brain, and many small homeotherms have been shown to use anapyrexic strategies when exposed to asphyxic conditions. Larger homeotherms do not seem to use the same strategy, but could save oxygen and prevent hypoxic brain damage by employing selective brain cooling (SBC) in connection with asphyxia. To test the hypothesis that selective brain cooling may take place in connection with asphyxia, we have recorded brain [hypothalamic (THyp)] and body [colonic (TC)] temperatures and heart rates in four Pekin ducks during 5-min simulated (head submersion) diving in cold water (10 degrees C). Diving resulted in a drop in THyp (3.1 +/- 1.4 degrees C) that continued into the recovery period (P < 0.001). Restricting heat loss from the buccal cavity and eyes during diving compromised brain cooling in an additive manner. TC was not influenced by diving. Control cooling of the head with crushed ice during a 5-min period of undisturbed breathing had no effect on THyp. Warm water (35 degrees C) markedly reduced brain cooling, and dive capacity was reduced by approximately 14% (P < 0.05) compared with diving in water at 10 degrees C. The data suggest that SBC is used in ducks during diving, and we propose that this mechanism may enable the bird to save oxygen for prolonged aerobic submergence and to protect the brain from asphyxic damages. PMID:9688670

  16. Heart and body growth in ducks.

    PubMed

    Gille, U; Salomon, F V

    1994-01-01

    Growth of body and heart weight in drakes was measured to 154 days of age in Mallards, 2 lines of White Pekins (Anas platyrhynchos), Muscovys (Cairina moschata), and a Muscovy x White Pekin cross. Allometric heart growth was slightly negative in the Mallard and its domestic forms (allometric exponent 0.895 < b < 0.943) whereas no significant difference from isometry was detected in Muscovy ducks and its cross. The relation between heart and body weight, using all stocks combined, yielded an exponent b = 0.937, being significantly smaller than 1. Coefficients of determination were high varying between 0.981 and 0.992. Breaks, i.e. changes of the slope during the postnatal development, could not be detected in any of the stocks. Using the modified Janoschek growth curve, both heart and body weight showed a similar growth pattern with respect to time. The degree of maturity at hatching and at the point of inflection (ui) was similar within stocks for both weights. This was also true for the age at maximum growth. The similarity between heart and whole body growth patterns, which is not found in most of the other internal organs, implies strong functional constraints. The ui values varied between 32 and 50% which should be taken into account when choosing an appropriate model. Differences among the various types of ducks resulting from their origin or domestication are discussed. PMID:7928022

  17. Feathering Instability of Spiral Arms. I. Formulation of the Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wing-Kit; Shu, Frank H.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we study the feathering substructures along spiral arms by considering the perturbational gas response to a spiral shock. Feathers are density fluctuations that jut out from the spiral arm to the interarm region at pitch angles given by the quantum numbers of the doubly periodic structure. In a localized asymptotic approximation, related to the shearing sheet except that the inhomogeneities occur in space rather than in time, we derive the linearized perturbation equations for a razor-thin disk with turbulent interstellar gas, frozen-in magnetic field, and gaseous self-gravity. Apart from the modal quantum numbers, the individual normal modes of the system depend on seven dimensionless quantities that characterize the underlying time-independent axisymmetric state plus its steady, nonlinear, two-armed spiral-shock response to a hypothesized background density wave supported by the disk stars of the galaxy. We show that some of these normal modes have positive growth rates. Their overdensity contours in the post-shock region are very reminiscent of observed feathering substructures in full magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The feathering substructures are parasitic instabilities intrinsic to the system; thus, their study not only provides potential diagnostics for important parameters that characterize the interstellar medium of external galaxies, but also yields a deeper understanding of the basic mechanism that drives the formation of the giant molecular clouds and the OB stars that outline observed grand-design spirals.

  18. Spiral Shock and Feathering Instability in Spiral Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wing-Kit

    2013-11-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to understand the feathering substructures along spiral arms by considering the perturbational gas response to a spiral shock. Feathers are density fluctuations that jut out from the spiral arm to the interarm region at large pitch angles. In a localized asymptotic approximation, related to the shearing sheet except that the inhomogeneities occur in space rather than in time, we derive the linearized perturbation equations for a razor-thin disk with turbulent interstellar gas, frozen-in magnetic field, and gaseous self-gravity. In the addition to the formulation, we investigate how individual normal modes of the system depend on seven dimensionless quantities that characterize the underlying time-independent axisymmetric state plus its steady, nonlinear, two-armed spiral-shock response to a hypothesized background density wave supported by the disk stars of the galaxy. In a particular case using galactic parameters at the inner part of M51 galaxy, we show that the normal mode with the maximum growth rate has the wavelength along the spiral arm that matches the observation of spacing of the feathers at around 500 pc. We also demonstrate that the self-gravity is an important parameter governing the feathering instability.

  19. 14 CFR 23.1153 - Propeller feathering controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller feathering controls. 23.1153 Section 23.1153 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories §...

  20. beta-catenin signaling can initiate feather bud development.

    PubMed

    Noramly, S; Freeman, A; Morgan, B A

    1999-08-01

    Intercellular signaling by a subset of Wnts is mediated by stabilization of cytoplasmic beta-catenin and its translocation to the nucleus. Immunolocalization of beta-catenin in developing chick skin reveals that this signaling pathway is active in a dynamic pattern from the earliest stages of feather bud development. Forced activation of this pathway by expression of a stabilized beta-catenin in the ectoderm results in the ectopic formation of feather buds. This construct is sufficient to induce bud formation since it does so both within presumptive feather tracts and in normally featherless regions where tract-specific signals are absent. It is also insensitive to the lateral inhibition that mediates the normal spacing of buds and can induce ectopic buds in interfollicular skin. However, additional patterning signals cooperate with this pathway to regulate gene expression within domains of stabilized beta-catenin expression. Localized activation of this pathway within the bud as it develops is required for normal morphogenesis and ectopic activation of the pathway leads to abnormally oriented buds and growths on the feather filaments. These results suggest that activation of the beta-catenin pathway initiates follicle development in embryonic skin and plays important roles in the subsequent morphogenesis of the bud. PMID:10409498

  1. Ecomorphology of parasite attachment: experiments with feather lice.

    PubMed

    Bush, Sarah E; Sohn, Edward; Clayton, Dale H

    2006-02-01

    The host specificity of some parasites can be reinforced by morphological specialization for attachment to mobile hosts. For example, ectoparasites with adaptations for attaching to hosts of a particular size might not be able to remain attached to larger or smaller hosts. This hypothesis is suggested by the positive correlation documented between the body sizes of many parasites and their hosts. We adopted an ecomorphological approach to test the attachment hypothesis. We tested the ability of host-specific feather lice (Phthiraptera: Ischnocera) to attach to 6 novel species of pigeons and doves that vary in size by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, Rock Pigeon lice (Columbicola columbae) remained attached equally well to all 6 novel host species. We tested the relative importance of 3 factors that could facilitate louse attachment: whole-body insertion, tarsal claw use, and mandible use. Insertion, per se, was not necessary for attachment. However, insertion on coarse feathers of large hosts allowed lice to access feather barbules with their mandibles. Mandible use was a key component of attachment regardless of feather size. Attachment constraints do not appear to reinforce host specificity in this system. PMID:16629310

  2. Chicken Feather Fiber as an Additive in MDF Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Medium density fiberboard (MDF) panels were made with aspen fiber and 0% to 95% chicken feather fiber (CFF) in 2.5%, 5% or 25% increments, using 5% phenol formaldehyde resin as the adhesive. Panels were tested for mechanical and physical properties as well as decay. The addition of CFF decreased t...

  3. 50 CFR 20.91 - Commercial use of feathers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... game authorities, except that: (a) No person shall purchase, sell, barter, or offer to purchase, sell, or barter for millinery or ornamental use the feathers of migratory game birds taken under authority... mounted specimens of migratory game birds taken under authority of this part....

  4. 50 CFR 20.91 - Commercial use of feathers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... game authorities, except that: (a) No person shall purchase, sell, barter, or offer to purchase, sell, or barter for millinery or ornamental use the feathers of migratory game birds taken under authority... mounted specimens of migratory game birds taken under authority of this part....

  5. 50 CFR 20.91 - Commercial use of feathers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... game authorities, except that: (a) No person shall purchase, sell, barter, or offer to purchase, sell, or barter for millinery or ornamental use the feathers of migratory game birds taken under authority... mounted specimens of migratory game birds taken under authority of this part....

  6. A starling-deterrent wood duck nest box

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGilvrey, F.B.; Uhler, F.M.

    1971-01-01

    In many parts of the United States, the starling (Sturnus vulgaris) has I become a serious competitor for nest boxes erected for wood ducks (Aix sponsa). Research at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and at Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge near Rock Hall, Maryland, demonstrated that horizontal nest structures with semicircular entrance holes 11 inches in diameter were acceptable to nesting wood ducks but discouraged nesting by starlings. Starlings seemed to prefer boxes in open impoundments to those in wooded impoundments, whereas wood ducks seemed to show no preference.

  7. A solitary case of duck plague in a wild mallard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wobeser, G.; Docherty, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Duck plague was diagnosed on the basis of pathology and virus isolation in a wild female mallard Anas platyrhynchos found dead near Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Day-old Pekin ducklings and one of two adult mallards died with lesions typical of duck plague following inoculation of tissue from the wild bird. This is believed to be the only reported case of duck plague in a wild bird since a major outbreak occurred in South Dakota in 1973, and the fourth such report in North America.

  8. Structural basis for heteromeric assembly and perinuclear organization of keratin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hun; Kim, Min-Sung; Chung, Byung Min; Leahy, Daniel J; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2013-01-01

    There is as yet no high-resolution data regarding the structure and organization of keratin intermediate filaments, which are obligate heteropolymers providing vital mechanical support in epithelia. We report the crystal structure of interacting 2B regions from the central coiled-coil domains of keratins 5 and 14 (K5 and K14), expressed in progenitor keratinocytes of epidermis. The interface of the K5–K14 coiled-coil heterodimer has asymmetric salt bridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts, and its surface exhibits a notable charge polarization. A trans-dimer homotypic disulfide bond involving Cys367 in K14's stutter region occurs in the crystal and in skin keratinocytes, where it is concentrated in a keratin filament cage enveloping the nucleus. We show that K14-Cys367 impacts nuclear shape in cultured keratinocytes and that mouse epidermal keratinocytes lacking K14 show aberrations in nuclear structure, highlighting a new function for keratin filaments. PMID:22705788

  9. Abnormal organization of keratin intermediate filaments in cultured keratinocytes of epidermolysis bullosa simplex.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Y; Inoue, S; Yaoita, H

    1989-01-01

    Distinctive abnormality in the organization of keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) was found for the first time in cultured epidermal keratinocytes from two patients with hereditary epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), which showed cleavages above the basement membrane zone due to the fragility of basal cells. KIFs in EBS keratinocytes revealed an irregular radial arrangement composed of sparse but thick KIF bundles. Furthermore, these KIF bundles in many cells changed into numerous ball-like keratin aggregates and disappeared beyond these keratin aggregates in the peripheral cytoplasm. Electron microscopy of cultured EBS keratinocytes showed that many ball-like structures consisting of fine filaments or granules or homogeneous substances were scattered in the peripheral regions of the cell attaching to the dish, and intermediate filaments appeared to be emanating from or surrounding the structures. These ball-like keratin aggregates have never been observed in normal human keratinocytes. PMID:2471468

  10. Novel immobilization of a quaternary ammonium moiety on keratin fibers for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Cai, Jackie Y; Liu, Xin; Church, Jeffrey S; Wang, Lijing

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for immobilizing a quaternary ammonium moiety on a keratinous substrate for enhanced medical applications. The method involves the generation of thiols by controlled reduction of cystine disulfide bonds in the keratin, followed by reaction with [2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride through thiol-ene click chemistry. The modified substrate was characterized with Raman and infrared spectroscopy, and assessed for its antibacterial efficacy and other performance changes. The results have demonstrated that the quaternary ammonium moiety has been effectively attached onto the keratin structure, and the resultant keratin substrate exhibits a multifunctional effect including antibacterial and antistatic properties, improved liquid moisture management property, improved dyeability and a non-leaching characteristic of the treated substrate. PMID:24971553

  11. Interleukin-6 induces keratin expression in intestinal epithelial cells: potential role of keratin-8 in interleukin-6-induced barrier function alterations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixin; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Theiss, Arianne L; Merlin, Didier; Sitaraman, Shanthi V

    2007-03-16

    Keratin 8 (K8) and keratin-18 (K18) are the major intermediate filament proteins in the intestinal epithelia. The regulation and function of keratin in the intestinal epithelia is largely unknown. In this study we addressed the role and regulation of K8 and K18 expression by interleukin 6 (IL-6). Caco2-BBE cell line and IL-6 null mice were used to study the effect of IL-6 on keratin expression. Keratin expression was studied by Northern blot, Western blot, and confocal microscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by apical-to-basal transport of a fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran probe (FD-4). K8 was silenced using the small interfering RNA approach. IL-6 significantly up-regulated mRNA and protein levels of K8 and K18. Confocal microscopy showed a reticular pattern of intracellular keratin localized to the subapical region after IL-6 treatment. IL-6 also induced serine phosphorylation of K8. IL-6 decreased paracellular flux of FD-4 compared with vehicle-treated monolayers. K8 silencing abolished the decrease in paracellular permeability induced by IL-6. Administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) significantly increased intestinal permeability in IL-6-/- mice compared with wild type mice given DSS. Collectively, our data demonstrate that IL-6 regulates the colonic expression of K8 and K18, and K8/K18 mediates barrier protection by IL-6 under conditions where intestinal barrier is compromised. Thus, our data uncover a novel function of these abundant cytoskeletal proteins, which may have implications in intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease wherein barrier dysfunction underlies the inflammatory response. PMID:17213200

  12. Module Based Complexity Formation: Periodic Patterning in Feathers and Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Yeh, Chao-Yuan; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Patterns describe order which emerges from homogeneity. Complex patterns on the integument are striking because of their visibility throughout an organism's lifespan. Periodic patterning is an effective design because the ensemble of hair or feather follicles (modules) allows the generation of complexity, including regional variations and cyclic regeneration, giving the skin appendages a new lease on life. Spatial patterns include the arrangements of feathers and hairs in specified number, size, and spacing. We explore how a field of equivalent progenitor cells can generate periodically arranged modules based on genetic information, physical-chemical rules and developmental timing. Reconstitution experiments suggest a competitive equilibrium regulated by activators / inhibitors involving Turing reaction-diffusion. Temporal patterns result from oscillating stem cell activities within each module (micro-environment regulation), reflected as growth (anagen) and resting (telogen) phases during the cycling of feather and hair follicles. Stimulating modules with activators initiates the spread of regenerative hair waves, while global inhibitors outside each module (macro-environment) prevent this. Different wave patterns can be simulated by Cellular Automata principles. Hormonal status and seasonal changes can modulate appendage phenotypes, leading to “organ metamorphosis”, with multiple ectodermal organ phenotypes generated from the same precursors. We discuss potential evolutionary novel steps using this module based complexity in several amniote integument organs, exemplified by the spectacular peacock feather pattern. We thus explore the application of the acquired knowledge of patterning in tissue engineering. New hair follicles can be generated after wounding. Hairs and feathers can be reconstituted through self-organization of dissociated progenitor cells. PMID:23539312

  13. Affinity of Luliconazole to Keratin Prepared from Healthy Human Nailand Porcine Hoof.

    PubMed

    Hasuko, Masayuki; Toga, Tetsuo; Tsunemitsu, Toshiya; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Koga, Hiroyasu; Hirano, Hirofumi; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Luliconazole (LLCZ), an imidazole derivative with a broad spectrum of potent antifungal activity especially for T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes, is under development as a new drug for treatment of tinea unguium. It is well known that curative effect of an antifungal agent in dermatophytosis is affected by the pharmacokinetics of an agent at the infection loci as well as its antifungal activity, but there is no report about the affinity of LLCZ to nail keratin. We studied LLCZ affinity to keratin powder prepared from healthy human nail and porcine hoof. The LLCZ adsorbed to keratin preparations was washed with phosphate buffer, and its concentration in the buffer supernatant was measured by HPLC. Antifungal titer of the supernatant was also biologically confirmed by disk diffusion assay. Adsorption rate of LLCZ was 80% or more, and LLCZ was gradually liberated into washing buffer. Cumulative liberation rate in 10 times repeated washing against initially adsorbed drug amount was 47.4% for keratin from human nail and was either 52.5% or 50.8% (depending on the LLCZ concentration) for keratin from porcine hoof. The supernatant showed antifungal potential to T. rubrum. These results indicate that LLCZ applied to the nail surface is fully adsorbed to nail keratin and gradually liberated from it. The nail keratin could function as drug reservoir to supply biologically active LLCZ to the nail tissue region of infection loci. The LLCZ delivered to the loci would exert its antifungal potential on tinea unguium. This study also suggests the versatility of porcine hoof powder as an alternative to human nail keratin preparation for non-clinical study. PMID:26936352

  14. Basal-cell keratins in cervical reserve cells and a comparison to their expression in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Smedts, F.; Ramaekers, F.; Troyanovsky, S.; Pruszczynski, M.; Robben, H.; Lane, B.; Leigh, I.; Plantema, F.; Vooijs, P.

    1992-01-01

    Expression of keratins 5, 14 and 17 in endocervical subcolumnar reserve cells was detected by means of immunohistochemical studies using polypeptide specific monoclonal antibodies. These particular keratins that were found among others in basal cells could also be detected to a variable extent in metaplastic and dysplastic cervical lesions. In some cases of immature squamous metaplasia all three keratin subtypes were expressed throughout the full thickness of the epithelium. In contrast, in mature squamous metaplasia a compartmentalization of these keratins was observed. Mature squamous metaplastic epithelium showed a keratin distribution pattern comparable to ectocervical squamous epithelium, with the exception of keratin 17, which was only sporadically found in the basal layer of ectocervical epithelium and was always present in the basal cells of mature squamous metaplastic epithelium. During progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia a clear increase in the expression of keratin 17 was observed. However, also keratins 5 and 14 were expressed. Our results demonstrate that a considerable number of premalignant lesions of the uterine cervix express the same keratins as found in the progenitor reserve cells. Lesions that lack expression of keratin 17 may form a distinct group, which are regressive in nature and do not progress into cervical cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1372156

  15. A homozygous mutation in keratin 5 is a fully dominant allele responsible for epidermolysis bullosa simplex

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, K.; Smith, L.; Ehrlich, P.

    1994-09-01

    Molecular, ultrastructural, and clinical analysis of a large family with epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) and multiple consanguineous marriages has identified one affected individual who inherited defective keratin 5 genes from both of her affected parents. EBS are skin blistering disorders caused by abnormal keratin filament assembly or function due to a mutation in either of the two structural proteins keratin 5 or keratin 14. Linkage analysis with DNA markers near each keratin gene demonstrated that the defect in this family mapped near keratin 5 (K5) with a LOD score of 7.60, {theta}=0.0 for the proximal marker D12S14. Sequencing of the K5 gene identified an Asn substitution of a highly conserved Lys at codon 173 in the 5{prime} end of the central rod domain. The mutation was found in 33 affected family members but not in 5 unaffected members or 25 unrelated, unaffected individuals. Both linkage and sequence analysis verified that one affected individual was homozygous for the K5 mutation. In this family, clinical examination and analysis of epidermal ultrastructure by electron microscopy were consistent with the Koebner subtype of EBS. Despite the absence of any normal K5 protein in the skin, the clinical and ultrastructural phenotypes of the homozygous individual did not differ significantly from those of affected heteozygous relatives. This K5 mutation is a fully dominant allele.

  16. Raman spectroscopic study of keratin 8 knockdown oral squamous cell carcinoma derived cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Alam, Hunain; Dmello, Crismita; Vaidya, Milind M.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2012-03-01

    Keratins are one of most widely used markers for oral cancers. Keratin 8 and 18 are expressed in simple epithelia and perform both mechanical and regulatory functions. Their expression are not seen in normal oral tissues but are often expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Aberrant expression of keratins 8 and 18 is most common change in human oral cancer. Optical-spectroscopic methods are sensitive to biochemical changes and being projected as novel diagnostic tools for cancer diagnosis. Aim of this study was to evaluate potentials of Raman spectroscopy in detecting minor changes associated with differential level of keratin expression in tongue-cancer-derived AW13516 cells. Knockdown clones for K8 were generated and synchronized by growing under serum-free conditions. Cell pellets of three independent experiments in duplicate were used for recording Raman spectra with fiberoptic-probe coupled HE-785 Raman-instrument. A total of 123 and 96 spectra from knockdown clones and vector controls respectively in 1200-1800 cm-1 region were successfully utilized for classification using LDA. Two separate clusters with classification-efficiency of ~95% were obtained. Leave-one-out cross-validation yielded ~63% efficiency. Findings of the study demonstrate the potentials of Raman spectroscopy in detecting even subtle changes such as variations in keratin expression levels. Future studies towards identifying Raman signals from keratin in oral cells can help in precise cancer diagnosis.

  17. Complete Structure of an Epithelial Keratin Dimer: Implications for Intermediate Filament Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Bray, David J.; Walsh, Tiffany R.; Noro, Massimo G.; Notman, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Keratins are cytoskeletal proteins that hierarchically arrange into filaments, starting with the dimer sub-unit. They are integral to the structural support of cells, in skin, hair and nails. In skin, keratin is thought to play a critical role in conferring the barrier properties and elasticity of skin. In general, the keratin dimer is broadly described by a tri-domain structure: a head, a central rod and a tail. As yet, no atomistic-scale picture of the entire dimer structure exists; this information is pivotal for establishing molecular-level connections between structure and function in intermediate filament proteins. The roles of the head and tail domains in facilitating keratin filament assembly and function remain as open questions. To address these, we report results of molecular dynamics simulations of the entire epithelial human K1/K10 keratin dimer. Our findings comprise: (1) the first three-dimensional structural models of the complete dimer unit, comprising of the head, rod and tail domains; (2) new insights into the chirality of the rod-domain twist gained from analysis of the full domain structure; (3) evidence for tri-subdomain partitioning in the head and tail domains; and, (4) identification of the residue characteristics that mediate non-covalent contact between the chains in the dimer. Our findings are immediately applicable to other epithelial keratins, such as K8/K18 and K5/K14, and to intermediate filament proteins in general. PMID:26181054

  18. Establishment and characterization of duck embryo epithelial (DEE) cell line and its use as a new approach toward DHAV-1 propagation and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenxiu; Said, Abdelrahman; Wang, Yan; Fu, Qiang; Xiao, Yueqiang; Lv, Sufang; Shen, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    The primary cell culture was derived from duck embryonic tissue, digested with collagenase type I. The existence of cell colonies with epithelial-like morphology, named duck embryo epithelial (DEE), were purified and optimally maintained at 37°C in M199 medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum. The purified cells were identified as epithelial cell line by detecting Keratin-18 expression using immunofluorescence assay. Our findings demonstrated that DEE cell line can be propagated in culture with (i) a great capacity to adhere, (ii) a great proliferation activity, and (iii) a population doubling time of approximately 18h. Chromosomal features of the DEE cell line were remained constant after the 50th passage. Further characterizations of DEE cell line showed that cell line can normally be grown even after several passages and never converted to tumorigenic cells either in vitro or in vivo study. Susceptibility of DEE cell line was determined for transfection and duck hepatitis A type 1 virus (DHAV-1)-infection. Interestingly, the 50% egg lethal dose (ELD50) of the propagated virus in DEE cell line was higher than ELD50 of the propagated virus in embryonated eggs. Finally, DEE cell line was evaluated to be used as a candidate for DHAV-1 vaccine development. Our results showed that the propagated DHAV-1 vaccine strain SDE in DEE cell line was able to protect ducklings against DHAV-1 challenge. Taken together, our findings suggest that the DEE cell line can serve as a valuable tool for DHAV-1 propagation and vaccine production. PMID:26739426

  19. Bottom's Semiology: The Duck-Rabbit and Magritte's Pipe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthoff, Ann E.

    1993-01-01

    Explores how a dyadic understanding of perception cancels the validity it might have as a model for the linguistic process. Discusses commonly misunderstood exhibits in the gallery of perception studies--the duck-rabbit and Magritte's pipe. (RS)

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Youxian duck.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qian; Qiu, Lei; Cao, Rong; Jiang, Gui-Tao; Dai, Qiu-Zhong; Zhang, Shi-Rui; Hou, De-Xing; He, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Youxian duck is one of the famous native breed in China. In this work we reported the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Youxian duck in Human Province for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome is 16,606 bp, with the base composition of 29.21% for A, 22.18% for T, 32.83% for C, 15.78% for G, in the order C > A > T > G feature occurring in the Youxian duck. It is made up of two ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and one non-coding control region (D-loop region). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Youxian duck will be useful for the phylogenetics of poultry, and be available as basic data for the genetics and breeding. PMID:24938109

  1. Do wintering Harlequin Ducks forage nocturnally at high latitudes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizzolo, D.J.; Esler, Daniel; Roby, D.D.; Jarvis, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    We monitored radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to determine whether nocturnal feeding was part of their foraging strategy during winter in south-central Alaska. Despite attributes of our study site (low ambient temperatures, harsh weather, short day length) and study species (small body size, high daytime foraging rates) that would be expected to favor nocturnal foraging, we found no evidence of nocturnal dive-feeding. Signals from eight radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks never exhibited signal loss due to diving during a total of 780 minutes of nocturnal monitoring. In contrast, the same eight birds exhibited signal loss during 62 ± 7% (SE) of 5-minute diurnal monitoring periods (total of 365 minutes of monitoring). Our results suggest that Harlequin Ducks in south-central Alaska face a stringent time constraint on daytime foraging during midwinter. Harlequin Ducks wintering at high latitudes, therefore, may be particularly sensitive to factors that increase foraging requirements or decrease foraging efficiency.

  2. Sex determination of duck embryos: observations on syrinx development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Robert E.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Franson, J. Christian

    2013-01-01

    Ducks exhibit sexual dimorphism in vocal anatomy. Asymmetrical ossification of the syrinx (bulla syringealis) is discernable at about 10 days of age in male Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) embryos, but information is lacking on the early development of the bulla in wild ducks. To evaluate the reliability of this characteristic for sexing developing embryos, we examined the syrinx of dead embryos and compared results with molecular sexing techniques in high arctic nesting Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima). Embryos 8 days or older were accurately (100%) sexed based on the presence/absence of a bulla, 2 days earlier than Pekin duck. The use of the tracheal bulla can be a valuable technique when sex identification of embryos or young ducklings is required.

  3. Toward a Deuterium Feather Isoscape for Sub-Saharan Africa: Progress, Challenges and the Path Ahead

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Expósito, Carlos; Ramírez, Francisco; Afán, Isabel; Forero, Manuela G.; Hobson, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge to the application of continent-wide feather isoscapes for geographic assignment of migrant birds is the lack of ground-truthed samples. This is especially true for long-distance Palearctic-Afrotropical migrants. We used spatially-explicit information on the δ2H composition of archived feathers from Green-backed/Grey-backed Camaroptera, to create a feather δ2H isoscape for sub-Saharan Africa. We sampled from 34 out of 41 sub-Saharan countries, totaling 205 sampling localities. Feather samples were obtained from museum collections (n = 224, from 1950 to 2014) for δ2H assay. Region, altitude, annual rainfall and seasonal patterns in precipitation were revealed as relevant explanatory variables for spatial patterns in feather δ2H. Predicted feather δ2H values ranged from -4.0 ‰ to -63.3 ‰, with higher values observed in the Great Rift Valley and South Africa, and lower values in central Africa. Our feather isoscape differed from that modelled previously using a precipitation δ2H isoscape and an assumed feather-to-precipitation calibration, but the relatively low model goodness fit (F10,213 = 5.98, p<0.001, R2 = 0.18) suggests that other, non-controlled variables might be driving observed geographic patterns in feather δ2H values. Additional ground-truthing studies are therefore recommended to improve the accuracy of the African feather δ2H isoscape. PMID:26356677

  4. Bristles before down: a new perspective on the functional origin of feathers.

    PubMed

    Persons, Walter S; Currie, Philip J

    2015-04-01

    Over the course of the last two decades, the understanding of the early evolution of feathers in nonavian dinosaurs has been revolutionized. It is now recognized that early feathers had a simple form comparable in general structure to the hairs of mammals. Insight into the prevalence of simple feathers throughout the dinosaur family tree has gradually arisen in tandem with the growing evidence for endothermic dinosaur metabolisms. This has led to the generally accepted opinion that the early feather coats of dinosaurs functioned as thermo insulation. However, thermo insulation is often erroneously stated to be a likely functional explanation for the origin of feathers. The problem with this explanation is that, like mammalian hair, simple feathers could serve as insulation only when present in sufficiently high concentrations. The theory therefore necessitates the origination of feathers en masse. We advocate for a novel origin theory of feathers as bristles. Bristles are facial feathers common among modern birds that function like mammalian tactile whiskers, and are frequently simple and hair-like in form. Bristles serve their role in low concentrations, and therefore offer a feasible first stage in feather evolution. PMID:25756292

  5. Roles of EphB3/Ephrin-B1 Interactions in Feather Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suksaweang, Sanong; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Roybal, Paul; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Widelitz, Randall

    2013-01-01

    Background The Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their ephrin ligands are involved in morphogenesis during organ formation. Methods We studied their role in feather morphogenesis, focusing on ephrin-B1 and its receptor EphB3. Results Early in feather development ephrin-B1 is expressed in the dermal condensation, not inter-bud mesenchyme. Later, in feather buds, it is in both epithelium and mesenchyme. In the feather follicle, it is enriched in the feather filament epithelium and marginal plate that sets the boundary between barb ridges. EphB3 also is expressed in epithelia. In the feather bud, its expression is restricted to the posterior bud. In the follicle, its expression forms a circle at the bud base which may set the boundary between bud and inter-bud domains. Perturbation with ephrin-B1-Fc altered feather primordia segregation and feather bud elongation. Conclusion Analyses reveal ephrin-B1-Fc caused three types of changes: blurred placode boundaries with loose dermal condensations, incomplete follicle invagination with less compact dermal papillae, and aberrant barb ridge patterning in feather filament morphogenesis. Thus, while ephrin-B1 suppression does not inhibit the initial emergence of a new epithelial domain, Eph/ephrin-B1 interaction is required for its proper completion. We propose that interaction between ephrin B1 and its receptor is involved in boundary stabilization during feather morphogenesis. PMID:23319347

  6. Avian influenza, domestic ducks and rice agriculture in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Marius; Xiao, Xiangming; Chaitaweesub, Prasit; Kalpravidh, Wantanee; Premashthira, Sith; Boles, Stephen; Slingenbergh, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) caused by H5N1 viruses has become a global scale problem which first emerged in southern China and from there spread to other countries in Southeast and East Asia, where it was first confirmed in end 2003. In previous work, geospatial analyses demonstrated that free grazing ducks played critical role in the epidemiology of the disease in Thailand in the winter 2004/2005, both in terms of HPAI emergence and spread. This study explored the geographic association between free grazing duck census counts and current statistics on the spatial distribution of rice crops in Thailand, in particular the crop calendar of rice production. The analysis was carried out using both district level rice statistics and rice distribution data predicted with the aid of remote sensing, using a rice-detection algorithm. The results indicated a strong association between the number of free grazing ducks and the number of months during which second-crop rice harvest takes place, as well as with the rice crop intensity as predicted by remote sensing. These results confirmed that free grazing duck husbandry was strongly driven by agricultural land use and rice crop intensity, and that this later variable can be readily predicted using remote sensing. Analysis of rice cropping patterns may provide an indication of the location of populations of free grazing ducks in other countries with similar mixed duck and rice production systems and less detailed duck census data. Apart from free ranging ducks and rice cropping, the role of hydrology and seasonality of wetlands and water bodies in the HPAI risk analysis is also discussed in relation to the presumed dry season aggregation of wild waterfowl and aquatic poultry offering much scope for virus transmission. PMID:18418464

  7. Parsley-induced photosensitivity in ostriches and ducks.

    PubMed

    Perelman, B; Kuttin, E S

    1988-01-01

    Clinical and pathological changes suggesting an acute case of photo-sensitivity were observed in a flock of ostriches. A preliminary diagnosis of parsley (Petroselinum sativum)-induced photosensitisation was confirmed by experimental reproduction of the typical lesions in ducks. This seems to be the first report on natural and experimental induction of photosensitivity in ostriches and ducks caused by the ingestion of parsley. PMID:18766676

  8. Avian influenza, domestic ducks and rice agriculture in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Marius; Xiao, Xiangming; Chaitaweesub, Prasit; Kalpravidh, Wantanee; Premashthira, Sith; Boles, Stephen; Slingenbergh, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) caused by H5N1 viruses has become a global scale problem which first emerged in southern China and from there spread to other countries in Southeast and East Asia, where it was first confirmed in end 2003. In previous work, geospatial analyses demonstrated that free grazing ducks played critical role in the epidemiology of the disease in Thailand in the winter 2004/2005, both in terms of HPAI emergence and spread. This study explored the geographic association between free grazing duck census counts and current statistics on the spatial distribution of rice crops in Thailand, in particular the crop calendar of rice production. The analysis was carried out using both district level rice statistics and rice distribution data predicted with the aid of remote sensing, using a rice-detection algorithm. The results indicated a strong association between the number of free grazing ducks and the number of months during which second-crop rice harvest takes place, as well as with the rice crop intensity as predicted by remote sensing. These results confirmed that free grazing duck husbandry was strongly driven by agricultural land use and rice crop intensity, and that this later variable can be readily predicted using remote sensing. Analysis of rice cropping patterns may provide an indication of the location of populations of free grazing ducks in other countries with similar mixed duck and rice production systems and less detailed duck census data. Apart from free ranging ducks and rice cropping, the role of hydrology and seasonality of wetlands and water bodies in the HPAI risk analysis is also discussed in relation to the presumed dry season aggregation of wild waterfowl and aquatic poultry offering much scope for virus transmission. PMID:18418464

  9. Flightlessness and the energetic cost of wing molt in a large sea duck.

    PubMed

    Guillemette, Magella; Pelletier, David; Grandbois, Jean-Marc; Butler, Patrick J

    2007-11-01

    Although the replacement of feathers apparently represents the major event of somatic production in the annual cycle of wild birds, knowledge about the energetics of molt has always been hampered by logistical and technical difficulties, which are exacerbated by the fact that birds are able to compensate behaviorally to buffer any variation in energy demand. During wing molt, sea ducks (Mergini) and other diving birds lose all of their wing feathers at once, leading to a period of temporary flightlessness of variable duration, a condition that considerably restricts their movements and increases the probability of predation. In the present study, we present the first results aimed at quantifying the duration of flightlessness, energy expenditure, and foraging effort during molt of a wing-propelled diving bird, the Common Eider (Somateria mollissima). Data loggers were implanted in the body cavity of 13 females to record heart rate and hydrostatic pressure (depth) every two seconds for a period of 220 days. Flight frequency and duration were assessed from elevated and constant heart rate, and the absence of flight was used to quantify the duration of flightlessness, which lasted, on average, 36 +/- 8 days (mean +/- SD). Using a period of four weeks before and four weeks after the flightless period, we found that dive depth (ranging from 1 to 2 m, on average) and daily diving time did not vary during the course of the study. Daily metabolic rate increased by 9%, and resting metabolic rate by 12% from the pre-molt period to the flightless period and remained high during the post-molt period. This study indicates that the energetic costs of replacing flight remiges in female eiders are substantial, although this is not associated with any change in foraging effort, which suggests that female Common Eiders lose mass during wing molt. Finally, estimates of energy savings associated with the total absence of flights during wing molt represent 6% of daily metabolic rate or

  10. Novel Picornavirus Associated with Avian Keratin Disorder in Alaskan Birds

    PubMed Central

    Van Hemert, Caroline; Dumbacher, John P.; Handel, Colleen M.; Tihan, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian keratin disorder (AKD), characterized by debilitating overgrowth of the avian beak, was first documented in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) in Alaska. Subsequently, similar deformities have appeared in numerous species across continents. Despite the widespread distribution of this emerging pathology, the cause of AKD remains elusive. As a result, it is unknown whether suspected cases of AKD in the afflicted species are causally linked, and the impacts of this pathology at the population and community levels are difficult to evaluate. We applied unbiased, metagenomic next-generation sequencing to search for candidate pathogens in birds affected with AKD. We identified and sequenced the complete coding region of a novel picornavirus, which we are calling poecivirus. Subsequent screening of 19 AKD-affected black-capped chickadees and 9 control individuals for the presence of poecivirus revealed that 19/19 (100%) AKD-affected individuals were positive, while only 2/9 (22%) control individuals were infected with poecivirus. Two northwestern crows (Corvus caurinus) and two red-breasted nuthatches (Sitta canadensis) with AKD-consistent pathology also tested positive for poecivirus. We suggest that poecivirus is a candidate etiological agent of AKD. PMID:27460795

  11. Strong Keratin-like Nanofibers Made of Globular Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Yael; Makarov, Vadim; Admon, Arie; Zussman, Eyal

    2008-03-01

    Protein fibers as elementary structural and functional elements in nature inspire the engineering of protein-based products for versatile bio-medical applications. We have recently used the electrospinning process to fabricate strong sub-micron fibers made solely of serum albumin (SA). This raises the challenges of turning a globular non-viscous protein solution into a polymer--like spinnable solution and producing keratin-like fibers enriched in inter S-S bridges. A stable spinning process was achieved by using SA solution in a rich trifluoroethanol-water mixture with β-mercaptoethanol. The breakage of the intra disulfide bridges, as identified by mass spectrometry, together with the denaturing alcohol, enabled a pronounced expansion of the protein. This in turn, affects the rheological properties of the solution. X-ray diffraction pattern of the fibers revealed equatorial orientation, indicating the alignment of structures along the fiber axis. The mechanical properties reached remarkable average values (Young's modulus of 1.6GPa, and max stress of 36MPa) as compared to other fibrous protein nanofibers. These significant results are attributed to both the alignment and inter disulfide bonds (cross linking) that were formed by spontaneous post-spinning oxidation.

  12. Unusual focal keratin expression in plexiform angiomyxoid myofibroblastic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Quero, Giuseppe; Musarra, Teresa; Carrato, Alfredo; Fici, Michelangelo; Martini, Maurizio; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Alfieri, Sergio; Ricci, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Plexiform angiomyxoid myofibroblastic tumor (PAMT), also known as plexiform fibromyxoma, is a rare distinctive benign intramural tumor, typical of gastric antrum, commonly causing mucosal ulceration with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and anemia, effectively treated by complete surgical resection usually accomplished by distal gastrectomy. Methods and Results: We herein report a 47-year-old man presenting with a syncopal episode, regurgitation and epigastric discomfort, bearing a gastric antral myxoid plexiform tumor positive for α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin and, partially, for caldesmon, desmin, and CD10; CD117, DOG1, CD34, S100, CAM5.2, CK20, CK7, EMA, p53, CDX2, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, Melan-A, and HMB-45 were all negative. All these features are typical of PAMT. Of note, focal positivity for AE1/AE3 and pan-CK KL1 was also present. Conclusions: The finding of a focal keratin expression in PAMT contributes to enlarge the immunophenotypic spectrum of this tumor type and is relevant for avoiding presurgical misdiagnoses which could ultimately lead to inappropriate overtreatment of patients with PAMT. PMID:27428222

  13. Proportion of recovered duck bands that are reported

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinson, R.K.

    1966-01-01

    Band-reporting rates (the proportion of duck bands recovered by hunters that are actually reported to the Bird Banding Laboratory) appear to have decreased between the late 1950's and early 1960's. About one-half the banded ducks bagged during the 1958-59 and 1959-60 hunting seasons were reported-a rate similar to those recorded in other studies conducted during the early and mid-1950's. Band-reporting rates were lower for the 1962-63 and 1962-64 hunting seasons; less than one-third of the banded ducks bagged were reported. This decrease in band-reporting rates was concurrent with significant changes in duck hunting regulations, the volume of duck banding, and the method used to relay information to the person who reports a band. Band-reporting rates differed for various species of ducks. In general, band-reporting rates were high on canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria), redheads (A. americana), and pintails Anas acuta) and low for teals (Anas discors and A. carolinensis).

  14. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of the duck viperin gene.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zifu; Ji, Yanhong; Fu, Yuguang; Liu, Bin; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-10-01

    Viperin is well known as one of the interferon-stimulated genes involved in innate immunity. Recent studies showed that this gene is mainly responsible for antiviral response to a large variety of viral infections. In this study, we successfully cloned and characterized the complete coding sequence of duck viperin gene. The duck viperin gene encodes 363 amino acids (aa) and is highly similar to viperins from other species. Moreover, secondary and 3D structures were predicted, and these structures showed two main domains, one signal peptide, and one radical S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) domain. Additionally, the duck viperin expression was analyzed in vitro and in vivo, and analysis results indicated that the duck viperin can be strongly up-regulated by poly(I:C) and Newcastle disease virus in primary duck embryo fibroblast cells. Results also demonstrated that Newcastle disease virus significantly induced duck viperin expression in the spleen, kidneys, liver, brain, and blood. Our findings will contribute to future studies on the detailed functions and potential underlying mechanisms of this novel protein in innate immunity. PMID:26049096

  15. Updating movement estimates for American black ducks (Anas rubripes).

    PubMed

    Robinson, Orin J; McGowan, Conor P; Devers, Patrick K

    2016-01-01

    Understanding migratory connectivity for species of concern is of great importance if we are to implement management aimed at conserving them. New methods are improving our understanding of migration; however, banding (ringing) data is by far the most widely available and accessible movement data for researchers. Here, we use band recovery data for American black ducks (Anas rubripes) from 1951-2011 and analyze their movement among seven management regions using a hierarchical Bayesian framework. We showed that black ducks generally exhibit flyway fidelity, and that many black ducks, regardless of breeding region, stopover or overwinter on the Atlantic coast of the United States. We also show that a non-trivial portion of the continental black duck population either does not move at all or moves to the north during the fall migration (they typically move to the south). The results of this analysis will be used in a projection modeling context to evaluate how habitat or harvest management actions in one region would propagate throughout the continental population of black ducks. This analysis may provide a guide for future research and help inform management efforts for black ducks as well as other migratory species. PMID:26989624

  16. Updating movement estimates for American black ducks (Anas rubripes)

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Conor P.; Devers, Patrick K.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding migratory connectivity for species of concern is of great importance if we are to implement management aimed at conserving them. New methods are improving our understanding of migration; however, banding (ringing) data is by far the most widely available and accessible movement data for researchers. Here, we use band recovery data for American black ducks (Anas rubripes) from 1951–2011 and analyze their movement among seven management regions using a hierarchical Bayesian framework. We showed that black ducks generally exhibit flyway fidelity, and that many black ducks, regardless of breeding region, stopover or overwinter on the Atlantic coast of the United States. We also show that a non-trivial portion of the continental black duck population either does not move at all or moves to the north during the fall migration (they typically move to the south). The results of this analysis will be used in a projection modeling context to evaluate how habitat or harvest management actions in one region would propagate throughout the continental population of black ducks. This analysis may provide a guide for future research and help inform management efforts for black ducks as well as other migratory species. PMID:26989624

  17. Multiple roles for keratin intermediate filaments in the regulation of epithelial barrier function and apico-basal polarity

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Pedro J.; Forteza, Radia; Mashukova, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    abstract As multicellular organisms evolved a family of cytoskeletal proteins, the keratins (types I and II) expressed in epithelial cells diversified in more than 20 genes in vertebrates. There is no question that keratin filaments confer mechanical stiffness to cells. However, such a number of genes can hardly be explained by evolutionary advantages in mechanical features. The use of transgenic mouse models has revealed unexpected functional relationships between keratin intermediate filaments and intracellular signaling. Accordingly, loss of keratins or mutations in keratins that cause or predispose to human diseases, result in increased sensitivity to apoptosis, regulation of innate immunity, permeabilization of tight junctions, and mistargeting of apical proteins in different epithelia. Precise mechanistic explanations for these phenomena are still lacking. However, immobilization of membrane or cytoplasmic proteins, including chaperones, on intermediate filaments (“scaffolding”) appear as common molecular mechanisms and may explain the need for so many different keratin genes in vertebrates. PMID:27583190

  18. Multiple roles for keratin intermediate filaments in the regulation of epithelial barrier function and apico-basal polarity.

    PubMed

    Salas, Pedro J; Forteza, Radia; Mashukova, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    As multicellular organisms evolved a family of cytoskeletal proteins, the keratins (types I and II) expressed in epithelial cells diversified in more than 20 genes in vertebrates. There is no question that keratin filaments confer mechanical stiffness to cells. However, such a number of genes can hardly be explained by evolutionary advantages in mechanical features. The use of transgenic mouse models has revealed unexpected functional relationships between keratin intermediate filaments and intracellular signaling. Accordingly, loss of keratins or mutations in keratins that cause or predispose to human diseases, result in increased sensitivity to apoptosis, regulation of innate immunity, permeabilization of tight junctions, and mistargeting of apical proteins in different epithelia. Precise mechanistic explanations for these phenomena are still lacking. However, immobilization of membrane or cytoplasmic proteins, including chaperones, on intermediate filaments ("scaffolding") appear as common molecular mechanisms and may explain the need for so many different keratin genes in vertebrates. PMID:27583190

  19. Pintail ducks tread the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Male (foreground) and female pintail ducks climb onto a grassy spot in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The pintails can be found in the marshes, prairie ponds and tundra of Alaska, Greenland and north and western United States; in the winter they range south and east to Central America and the West Indies, sometimes in salt marshes such as the refuge offers. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  20. Pintail ducks tread the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A male pintail duck (foreground) paddles in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center while a female behind him bobs for food. The pintails can be found in the marshes, prairie ponds and tundra of Alaska, Greenland and north and western United States; in the winter they range south and east to Central America and the West Indies, sometimes in salt marshes such as the refuge offers. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  1. Pintail ducks tread the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A male pintail duck (left) and female pintail (right) look like bookends on a glass-topped table in the winter waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The pintails can be found in the marshes, prairie ponds and tundra of Alaska, Greenland and north and western United States; in the winter they range south and east to Central America and the West Indies, sometimes in salt marshes such as the refuge offers. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  2. Pintail ducks tread the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Two female pintail ducks search for food in the winter waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The pintails can be found in the marshes, prairie ponds and tundra of Alaska, Greenland and north and western United States; in the winter they range south and east to Central America and the West Indies, sometimes in salt marshes such as the refuge offers. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  3. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    The stereo-anaglyph view presented here is a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  4. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Polar Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

  5. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Vertical Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  6. Metal and sediment ingestion by dabbling ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.; Spann, J.; Day, D.

    1999-01-01

    The chemical analysis of intestinal digesta from hunter-killed carcasses or of wildlife scat is a promising means of estimating the exposure of wildlife to those environmental contaminants that, like lead, are poorly absorbed in the digestive tract. When evaluating contaminants at a site, biologists may find the results of this non-destructive approach more straightforward to interpret in terms of exposure to wildlife than would be analyses of soils, sediments, water, or wildlife tissues. To illustrate the approach, we collected digesta from 47 waterfowl shot by hunters at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, in Delaware, USA. The waterfowl digesta contained an average of approximately 2.4% sediment, estimated from the Al concentrations in the digesta, a marker for sediment. Al concentrations were significantly correlated with concentrations of Cr (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r=0.57), V (r=0.70), Ni (r=0.31), and Pb (r=0.55), and we concluded that these metals were ingested mainly with sediment. American widgeon (Anas americana) ingested sediment at a rate of about four times that of three other species of dabbling ducks (Anas crecca, A. acuta, A. rubripes) and had several times the exposure to the sediment-associated metals. The digesta of one American black duck contained a high concentration of lead (70 mg/kg, dry wt.), presumably from lead shot, but none of the other samples had notably elevated metal concentrations. We suggest that scat and digesta be analyzed more widely by biologists and resource managers seeking a simple, inexpensive assessment of contaminants in local wildlife habitat.

  7. Metal and sediment ingestion by dabbling ducks.

    PubMed

    Beyer, W N; Spann, J; Day, D

    1999-07-01

    The chemical analysis of intestinal digesta from hunter-killed carcasses or of wildlife scat is a promising means of estimating the exposure of wildlife to those environmental contaminants that, like lead, are poorly absorbed in the digestive tract. When evaluating contaminants at a site, biologists may find the results of this non-destructive approach more straightforward to interpret in terms of exposure to wildlife than would be analyses of soils, sediments, water, or wildlife tissues. To illustrate the approach, we collected digesta from 47 waterfowl shot by hunters at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, in Delaware, USA. The waterfowl digesta contained an average of approximately 2.4% sediment, estimated from the Al concentrations in the digesta, a marker for sediment. Al concentrations were significantly correlated with concentrations of Cr (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r = 0.57), V (r = 0.70), Ni (r = 0.31), and Pb (r = 0.55), and we concluded that these metals were ingested mainly with sediment. American widgeon (Anas americana) ingested sediment at a rate of about four times that of three other species of dabbling ducks (Anas crecca, A. acuta, A. rubripes) and had several times the exposure to the sediment-associated metals. The digesta of one American black duck contained a high concentration of lead (70 mg/kg, dry wt.), presumably from lead shot, but none of the other samples had notably elevated metal concentrations. We suggest that scat and digesta be analyzed more widely by biologists and resource managers seeking a simple, inexpensive assessment of contaminants in local wildlife habitat. PMID:10472136

  8. Fabrication of duck's feet collagen-silk hybrid biomaterial for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Hyeon; Park, Hae Sang; Lee, Ok Joo; Chao, Janet Ren; Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Jung Min; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Ye Ri; Song, Jeong Eun; Khang, Gilson; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-04-01

    Collagen constituting the extracellular matrix has been widely used as biocompatible material for human use. In this study, we have selected duck's feet for extracting collagen. A simple method not utilizing harsh chemical had been employed to extract collagen from duck's feet. We fabricated duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold for the purpose of modifying the degradation rate of duck's feet collagen. This study suggests that extracted collagen from duck's feet is biocompatible and resembles collagen extracted from porcine which is commercially used. Duck's feet collagen is also economically feasible and it could therefore be a good candidate as a tissue engineering material. Further, addition of silk to fabricate a duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold could enhance the biostability of duck's feet collagen scaffold. Duck's feet collagen/silk scaffold increased the cell viability compared to silk alone. Animal studies also showed that duck's feet collagen/silk scaffold was more biocompatible than silk alone and more biostable than duck's feet or porcine collagen alone. Additionally, the results revealed that duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold had high porosity, cell infiltration and proliferation. We suggest that duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold could be used as a dermal substitution for full thickness skin defects. PMID:26748068

  9. Three tightly linked genes encoding human type I keratins: conservation of sequence in the 5'-untranslated leader and 5'-upstream regions of coexpressed keratin genes.

    PubMed Central

    RayChaudhury, A; Marchuk, D; Lindhurst, M; Fuchs, E

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated and subcloned three separate segments of human DNA which share strong sequence homology with a previously sequenced gene encoding a type I keratin, K14 (50 kilodaltons). Restriction endonuclease mapping has demonstrated that these three genes are tightly linked chromosomally, whereas the K14 gene appears to be separate. As judged by positive hybridization-translation and Northern blot analyses, the central linked gene encodes a keratin, K17, which is expressed in abundance with K14 and two other type I keratins in cultured human epidermal cells. None of these other epidermal keratin mRNAs appears to be generated from the K17 gene through differential splicing of its transcript. The sequence of the K17 gene reveals striking homologies not only with the coding portions and intron positions of the K14 gene, but also with its 5'-noncoding and 5'-upstream sequences. These similarities may provide an important clue in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the coexpression of the two genes. Images PMID:2431270

  10. Sensitivity of embryos of chicken, domestic duck, and common eider duck to polychlorinated and non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Brunstroem, B.

    1995-12-31

    Embryos of chicken (Gallus domesticus), domestic duck (Anas platyrhynchos), and common eider duck (Somateria mollissima) were exposed in ovo to PCBs and to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Two coplanar PCBs, 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB {number_sign}77) and 3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB {number_sign}126), were considerably more lethal and potent as inducers of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) in chicken embryos (Gallus domesticus) than in embryos of the other two species. In chicken embryos, these compounds caused edema and eye and beak deformities. An artificial mixture of 18 PAHs which all have been detected in environmental samples, was slightly more toxic to embryos of the domestic duck and the common eider duck than to chicken embryos. The most potent compound in the mixture was benzo(k)fluoranthene. When chicken embryo livers were exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in vitro, EROD was induced by very low concentrations and the EC{sub 50} value obtained was 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} M. Livers from embryos of eider ducks and domestic ducks were 2--4 orders of magnitude less responsive to TCDD than chicken embryo livers in terms of EROD induction in vitro.

  11. Comparison of Bioactive Compounds and Quality Traits of Breast Meat from Korean Native Ducks and Commercial Ducks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Jayasena, Dinesh D; Kim, Sun Hyo; Kim, Hyun Joo; Heo, Kang Nyung; Song, Ji Eun; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to compare the bioactive compound content and quality traits of breast meat from male and female Korean native ducks (KND) and commercial ducks (CD, Cherry Valley). Meat from three 6-wk old birds of each sex from KND and CD were evaluated for carcass and breast weights, pH, color, cooking loss, shear force, and bioactive compound (creatine, carnosine, anserine, betaine, and L-carnitine) content. KND showed significantly higher carcass weights than CD whereas no such difference (p>0.05) was found between male and female ducks. The breed and sex had no significant effects on the breast weight, pH value, and shear force. However, KND had significantly lower cooking loss values than did CD. Creatine, anserine, and L-carnitine contents were significantly higher in KND than in CD and were predominant in female ducks compared to males. The results of this study provide rare information regarding the amounts and the determinants of several bioactive compounds in duck meat, which can be useful for selection and breeding programs, and for popularizing indigenous duck meat. PMID:26761808

  12. A biotechnological process for treatment and recycling poultry feathers as a feed ingredient.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, A; Coello, N

    2005-10-01

    A strain of Kocuria rosea with keratinolytic capacity was cultured aerobically on submerged feathers to obtain a fermented feather meal (FFM). This FFM enriched with cells of K. rosea mainly contains crude protein (71%). The pepsin digestibility of the fermented product (88%) was similar to the value of the commercial feather meal and more than 70% greater that untreated feathers. The bacterial biomass improved the content of amino acids lysine (3.46%), histidine (0.94%) and methionine (0.69%). Additionally, the amino acid availability tested by in vivo assay was greater than commercial feather meal. The microbial cells also supplied carotenoid pigments to FFM (68 ppm). These results suggest that feather meal enriched with K. rosea may be useful in animal feeding as protein and pigment source. PMID:16023573

  13. Abortive placode formation in the feather tract of the scaleless chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Leslie; Lindon, Catherine M; Freeman, Allison; Morgan, Bruce A

    2007-11-01

    The featherless phenotype of the scaleless mutant provides a model for delineating the process of feather follicle formation. Initial studies established that the mutation affects the epidermis and suggested that epidermis is unable to respond to signals from underlying dermis, or propagate a reciprocal signal. The work presented here demonstrates that scaleless epidermis does indeed respond to the initial inductive signals from dermis, as indicated by the localization of nuclear beta-catenin and transient focal expression of genes expressed in the placode of wild-type feather rudiments. In the sporadic "escaper" feathers that form in scaleless, expression of many genes associated with the progression of feather development is comparable to that in wild-type embryos. An exception is the ectodysplasin receptor gene Edar, which is expressed at lower levels in mutant feather buds. These observations suggest that the scaleless mutation impairs the locally augmented expression of Edar required to stabilize the placodal fate and sustain feather development. PMID:17948257

  14. Sonic Hedgehog functions by localizing the region of proliferation in early developing feather buds.

    PubMed

    McKinnell, Iain W; Turmaine, Mark; Patel, Ketan

    2004-08-01

    Feathers are formed following a series of reciprocal signals between the epithelium and the mesenchyme. Initially, the formation of a dense dermis leads to the induction of a placode in the overlying ectoderm. The ectoderm subsequently signals back to the dermis to promote cell division. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is a secreted protein expressed in the ectoderm that has previously been implicated in mitogenic and morphogenetic processes throughout feather bud development. We therefore interfered with Shh signaling during early feather bud development and observed a dramatic change in feather form and prominence. Surprisingly, outgrowth did occur and was manifest as irregular, fused, and ectopic feather domains at both molecular and morphological levels. Experiments with Di-I and BrdU indicated that this effect was at least in part caused by the dispersal of previously aggregated proliferating dermal cells. We propose that Shh maintains bud development by localizing the dermal feather progenitors. PMID:15242792

  15. Epiplakin Deficiency Aggravates Murine Caerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis and Favors the Formation of Acinar Keratin Granules

    PubMed Central

    Wögenstein, Karl L.; Szabo, Sandra; Lunova, Mariia; Wiche, Gerhard; Haybaeck, Johannes; Strnad, Pavel; Boor, Peter; Wagner, Martin; Fuchs, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Epiplakin, a member of the plakin protein family, is exclusively expressed in epithelial tissues and was shown to bind to keratins. Epiplakin-deficient (EPPK−/−) mice showed no obvious spontaneous phenotype, however, EPPK−/− keratinocytes displayed faster keratin network breakdown in response to stress. The role of epiplakin in pancreas, a tissue with abundant keratin expression, was not yet known. We analyzed epiplakin’s expression in healthy and inflamed pancreatic tissue and compared wild-type and EPPK−/− mice during caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. We found that epiplakin was expressed primarily in ductal cells of the pancreas and colocalized with apicolateral keratin bundles in murine pancreatic acinar cells. Epiplakin’s diffuse subcellular localization in keratin filament-free acini of K8-deficient mice indicated that its filament-associated localization in acinar cells completely depends on its binding partner keratin. During acute pancreatitis, epiplakin was upregulated in acinar cells and its redistribution closely paralleled keratin reorganization. EPPK−/− mice suffered from aggravated pancreatitis but showed no obvious regeneration phenotype. At the most severe stage of the disease, EPPK−/− acinar cells displayed more keratin aggregates than those of wild-type mice. Our data propose epiplakin to be a protective protein during acute pancreatitis, and that its loss causes impaired disease-associated keratin reorganization. PMID:25232867

  16. Molecular characterization of a novel type II keratin gene (sseKer3) in the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis): Differential expression of keratin genes by salinity.

    PubMed

    Infante, Carlos; Ponce, Marian; Asensio, Esther; Zerolo, Ricardo; Manchado, Manuel

    2011-09-01

    Keratins make up the largest subgroup of intermediate filaments and, in chordates, represent the most abundant proteins in epithelial cells. Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is a commercially important flatfish in which only two type I keratin genes, sseKer1 and sseKer2, have been described. We obtained the entire cDNAs encoding for a novel type II keratin, referred to as sseKer3. Main features and sequence identities with other fish and mammalian type II keratins are described. Expression profiles during larval development and in juvenile tissues were analyzed using a real-time PCR approach. In juvenile fish, sseKer3 was strongly expressed in gills, intestine, skin and stomach. During metamorphosis climax a drop in sseKer3 expression was observed. Transcriptional regulation of sseKer3 by thyroid hormones (THs) was also evaluated. Larvae exposed to the goitrogen thiourea (TU) exhibited higher mRNA levels than untreated control. Moreover, adding exogenous T4 hormone to TU-treated larvae restored or even reduced the sseKer3 transcript levels with respect to the untreated control. The possible role of keratins in osmotic stress response was evaluated in juvenile gills exposed to three different water salinities (15, 37 and 60psu). Whereas no significant changes in sseKer2 expression were detected; sseKer1 was early (12h) up-regulated at hypo-osmotic conditions and sseKer3 was down-regulated both at low and high salinity after 24h and 48h. Their possible role is discussed. PMID:21536146

  17. Coevolution of caudal skeleton and tail feathers in birds.

    PubMed

    Felice, Ryan N

    2014-12-01

    Birds are capable of a wide range of aerial locomotor behaviors in part because of the derived structure and function of the avian tail. The tail apparatus consists of a several mobile (free) caudal vertebrae, a terminal skeletal element (the pygostyle), and an articulated fan of tail feathers that may be spread or folded, as well as muscular and fibroadipose structures that facilitate tail movements. Morphological variation in both the tail fan and the caudal skeleton that supports it are well documented. The structure of the tail feathers and the pygostyle each evolve in response to functional demands of differing locomotor behaviors. Here, I test whether the integument and skeleton coevolve in this important locomotor module. I quantified feather and skeletal morphology in a diverse sample of waterbirds and shorebirds using a combination of linear and geometric morphometrics. Covariation between tail fan shape and skeletal morphology was then tested using phylogenetic comparative methods. Pygostyle shape is found to be a good predictor of tail fan shape (e.g., forked, graduated), supporting the hypothesis that the tail fan and the tail skeleton have coevolved. This statistical relationship is used to reconstruct feather morphology in an exemplar fossil waterbird, Limnofregata azygosternon. Based on pygostyle morphology, this taxon is likely to have exhibited a forked tail fan similar to that of its extant sister clade Fregata, despite differing in inferred ecology and other aspects of skeletal anatomy. These methods may be useful in reconstructing rectricial morphology in other extinct birds and thus assist in characterizing the evolution of flight control surfaces in birds. PMID:25139752

  18. FeatherSail--Design, Development and Future Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C.; Scheierl, John M.

    2010-01-01

    This CD contains the slide presentation and a brief video of the solar sail concept. Solar Sailing is a method of space flight propulsion, which utilizes the light photons to propel spacecrafts through the vacuum of space. The goal of the FeatherSail project is to create a sail vehicle with the ability to provide steering from the sails and increase the areal density.

  19. Melanosome evolution indicates a key physiological shift within feathered dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Li, Quanguo; Clarke, Julia A; Gao, Ke-Qin; Zhou, Chang-Fu; Meng, Qingjin; Li, Daliang; D'Alba, Liliana; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2014-03-20

    Inference of colour patterning in extinct dinosaurs has been based on the relationship between the morphology of melanin-containing organelles (melanosomes) and colour in extant bird feathers. When this relationship evolved relative to the origin of feathers and other novel integumentary structures, such as hair and filamentous body covering in extinct archosaurs, has not been evaluated. Here we sample melanosomes from the integument of 181 extant amniote taxa and 13 lizard, turtle, dinosaur and pterosaur fossils from the Upper-Jurassic and Lower-Cretaceous of China. We find that in the lineage leading to birds, the observed increase in the diversity of melanosome morphologies appears abruptly, near the origin of pinnate feathers in maniraptoran dinosaurs. Similarly, mammals show an increased diversity of melanosome form compared to all ectothermic amniotes. In these two clades, mammals and maniraptoran dinosaurs including birds, melanosome form and colour are linked and colour reconstruction may be possible. By contrast, melanosomes in lizard, turtle and crocodilian skin, as well as the archosaurian filamentous body coverings (dinosaur 'protofeathers' and pterosaur 'pycnofibres'), show a limited diversity of form that is uncorrelated with colour in extant taxa. These patterns may be explained by convergent changes in the key melanocortin system of mammals and birds, which is known to affect pleiotropically both melanin-based colouration and energetic processes such as metabolic rate in vertebrates, and may therefore support a significant physiological shift in maniraptoran dinosaurs. PMID:24522537

  20. Archaeopteryx feathers and bone chemistry fully revealed via synchrotron imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, U.; Morton, R. W.; Manning, P. L.; Sellers, W. I.; Farrar, S.; Huntley, K. G.; Wogelius, R. A.; Larson, P.

    2010-01-01

    Evolution of flight in maniraptoran dinosaurs is marked by the acquisition of distinct avian characters, such as feathers, as seen in Archaeopteryx from the Solnhofen limestone. These rare fossils were pivotal in confirming the dinosauria-avian lineage. One of the key derived avian characters is the possession of feathers, details of which were remarkably preserved in the Lagerstätte environment. These structures were previously simply assumed to be impressions; however, a detailed chemical analysis has, until now, never been completed on any Archaeopteryx specimen. Here we present chemical imaging via synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence (SRS-XRF) of the Thermopolis Archaeopteryx, which shows that portions of the feathers are not impressions but are in fact remnant body fossil structures, maintaining elemental compositions that are completely different from the embedding geological matrix. Our results indicate phosphorous and sulfur retention in soft tissue as well as trace metal (Zn and Cu) retention in bone. Other previously unknown chemical details of Archaeopteryx are also revealed in this study including: bone chemistry, taphonomy (fossilization process), and curation artifacts. SRS-XRF represents a major advancement in the study of the life chemistry and fossilization processes of Archaeopteryx and other extinct organisms because it is now practical to image the chemistry of large specimens rapidly at concentration levels of parts per million. This technique has wider application to the archaeological, forensic, and biological sciences, enabling the mapping of “unseen” compounds critical to understanding biological structures, modes of preservation, and environmental context. PMID:20457935