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Sample records for duck hepatitis virus

  1. Experimental transmission of duck hepatitis B virus to Pekin ducks and to domestic geese.

    PubMed

    Marion, P L; Cullen, J M; Azcárraga, R R; Van Davelaar, M J; Robinson, W S

    1987-01-01

    We investigated experimental transmission of duck hepatitis B virus to its original host, the domestic Pekin duck, and to three other avian species. Intramuscular injection of a standard inoculum of duck hepatitis B virus into 2- to 5-day-old Pekin ducklings hatched from a duck hepatitis B virus-free flock resulted in viremia in 100% of 107 animals, indicating that duck hepatitis B virus infection of young progeny of a defined duck hepatitis B virus-free flock occurs reproducibly. When the same inoculum was injected into chicks and Muscovy ducklings of the same age, no evidence of viral infection was detectable. In contrast, hatchlings of two domestic breeds of geese were readily infected by duck hepatitis B virus, developing viremia at a slower rate than Pekin ducklings, but a higher average titer of viremia 4 weeks or more after injection. Neither the pattern of restriction enzyme sites in the viral DNA nor the susceptibility of ducklings to the virus were detectably altered after passage in geese. As in duck hepatitis B virus-infected young ducklings, most of the experimentally infected goslings appeared to be persistently infected and those eventually laying eggs transmitted virus to the progeny. While ducklings exhibited a fairly uniform inflammatory response to the virus, duck hepatitis B virus inoculation of the goslings resulted in both inflammation and an altered hepatocellular morphology not seen in uninjected controls. The host range of duck hepatitis B virus appears to be limited to the primary host and a close taxonomic relative, similar to other members of the hepadnavirus family, hepatitis B virus and ground squirrel hepatitis virus.

  2. Genetic characterization of Duck Hepatitis A Viruses isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Bi, Yuhai; Chen, Can; Yang, Limin; Ding, Chan; Liu, Wenjun

    2013-12-26

    In recent years, the spread of Duck Hepatitis A Viruses (DHAVs) has represented a serious threat and significant economic impact in duck industry of China. The sixteen reported DHAV isolates (15 DHAV-1 strains and one DHAV-3) were identified from infected ducks with clinical symptoms in China between 2009 and 2012. In the present study, the virulence of these viruses and complete sequences of the virion protein 1 (VP1) genes of the 16 DHAVs were characterized. The median embryonic lethal doses (ELD50) of the second generation duck embryo allantoic fluid of the 16 DHAV isolates were calculated on duck and chicken embryos. The results demonstrated that the various DHAV-1 strains have shown different pathogenic ability in embryos, and duck eggs were more susceptible to DHAV than chicken eggs. The histopathological examination revealed significant signs of virus infection, severe vacuolation, and hepatocyte necrosis. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the 15 DHAV-1 viruses display significant correlation in their geographic distribution. The DHAV-1 strains isolated from Shandong Province were more evolutionarily divergent than the JX strains. There were two hypervariable regions in the VP1 protein, which may determine the virulence of DHAV-1 isolates in chicken eggs but not virulence in duck eggs. These results demonstrate the genetic and biological diversity of DHAVs in China and aid in understanding the epidemiology and evolution of DHAVs.

  3. Apoptosis induction in duck tissues during duck hepatitis A virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Sheng, X D; Zhang, W P; Zhang, Q R; Gu, C Q; Hu, X Y; Cheng, G F

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the role of apoptosis in duck viral hepatitis pathogenesis, 4- and 21-d-old ducks were inoculated with duck hepatitis A virus serotype 1 and killed at 2, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h postinfection. TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling was used to detect apoptosis cells. Expression profiles of apoptosis-related genes including caspase-3, -8, -9, and Bcl-2 in spleen, bursa of Fabricius, liver, and the quantity of virus in blood were examined using real-time PCR. The TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling analysis indicated there was a significant difference of apoptotic cells between treatments and controls. The same difference also appeared in virus amount variation in blood during infection. Gene expression analysis revealed that the apoptosis-related gene expression profile was different in the 2 groups, and also different between various organs. This study suggested that apoptosis may play an important role in duck hepatitis A virus serotype 1 infection, and apoptosis suppression might facilitate virus multiplication, resulting in the highest virus concentration in the host.

  4. Replication cycle of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 in duck embryonic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fangke; Chen, Yun; Shi, Jintong; Ming, Ke; Liu, Jiaguo; Xiong, Wen; Song, Meiyun; Du, Hongxu; Wang, Yixuan; Zhang, Shuaibin; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang

    2016-04-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) is an important agent of duck viral hepatitis. Until recently, the replication cycle of DHAV-1 is still unknown. Here duck embryonic hepatocytes infected with DHAV-1 were collected at different time points, and dynamic changes of the relative DHAV-1 gene expression during replication were detected by real-time PCR. And the morphology of hepatocytes infected with DHAV was evaluated by electron microscope. The result suggested that the adsorption of DHAV-1 saturated at 90 min post-infection, and the virus particles with size of about 50 nm including more than 20 nm of vacuum drying gold were observed on the infected cells surface. What's more, the replication lasted around 13 h after the early protein synthesis for about 5h, and the release of DHAV-1 was in steady state after 32 h. The replication cycle will enrich the data for DVH control and provide the foundation for future studies.

  5. Identification of chicken enterovirus-like viruses, duck hepatitis virus type 2 and duck hepatitis virus type 3 as astroviruses.

    PubMed

    Todd, D; Smyth, V J; Ball, N W; Donnelly, B M; Wylie, M; Knowles, N J; Adair, B M

    2009-02-01

    Earlier work identified and biologically characterized antigenically distinct enterovirus-like viruses (ELVs) of chickens. Three of these ELVs can now be identified as astroviruses. Characterization involved the use of a hitherto undescribed, degenerate primer-based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify astrovirus open reading frame (ORF) 1b-specific cDNA fragments followed by nucleotide sequence determination and analysis of the amplified fragments. ELV-1 was confirmed as an isolate of the astrovirus avian nephritis virus (ANV). ELV-4 (isolate 612) and ELV-3 (isolates FP3 and 11672) were antigenically and genetically related to the second characterized astrovirus of chickens, namely chicken astrovirus (CAstV). Using indirect immunofluorescence, the FP3 and 11672 ELV-3 isolates were very closely related to one another, and less closely related to ELV-4 and the previously described CAstV (P22 18.8.00 reference isolate). Comparative analyses based on the ORF 1b amplicon sequences showed that the FP3 and 11672 ELV-3 isolates shared high nucleotide (95%) and amino acid (98%) identities with one another, and lower nucleotide (76% to 79%) and amino acid (84% to 85%) identity levels with ELV-4 and the reference CAstV P22 18.8.00 isolates. The combined degenerate primer RT-PCR and sequencing methods also provided a nucleotide sequence specific to duck hepatitis virus type 2 (DHV-2) (renamed duck astrovirus) and duck hepatitis virus type 3 (DHV-3), which, for the first time, can also be identified as an astrovirus. Phylogenetic analyses based on the amplified ORF 1b sequences showed that ANV was the most distantly related avian astrovirus, with DHV-3 being more closely related to turkey astrovirus type 2 than DHV-2.

  6. Epidemiology and molecular characterisation of duck hepatitis A virus from different duck breeds in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Erfan, Ahmed M; Selim, Abdullah A; Moursi, Mohamed K; Nasef, Soad A; Abdelwhab, E M

    2015-06-12

    Duck hepatitis virus (DHV) is an acute highly contagious disease of ducklings caused by three distinct serotypes of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), a member of the RNA family Picornaviridae, where serotype 1 is the most widespread serotype worldwide. To date, little if any is known about the prevalence and genetic characterisation of DHAV outside Asia. The current study describes surveillance on DHV in 46 commercial duck farms in Egypt with a history of high mortality in young ducklings from 3 to 15 day-old from 2012 to 2014. Clinical samples were examined by generic RT-PCR assays followed by partial sequence analysis of the 5'UTR, VP1 and 3D genes of the vaccine strain and 15 field viruses. The overall positive rate was 37% (n=17/46). All duck breeds (Pekin, Muscovy, Mallard and Green Winged) were susceptible to the disease with mortality ranged from 15% to 96.7%. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Egyptian strains cluster in the DHAV serotype 1 with Asian viruses and distinguishable from the vaccine strains. So far, this is the first report on the genetic characterisation of DHAV in Egypt. This study may be useful to better understand the epidemiology and evolution of DHAV.

  7. Hepatitis B viral clearance studies using duck virus model.

    PubMed

    Long, Z; Sun, C S; White, E M; Horowitz, B; Sito, A F

    1993-01-01

    We have shown data to suggest that the in vivo duck hepatitis B virus system represents an excellent animal model system for the study of hepatitis B virus. Because of the similarity of DHBV to human HBV (including comparable results in virus inactivation studies), the high level of sensitivity of the DHBV assay, and the rapidity, ease, and relative low cost of obtaining results, we propose that the in vivo DHBV titration system be used as a model for human HBV in process validation studies. Data generated in such validation studies have, in fact, been submitted by a number of blood products manufacturers to the U.S. F.D.A. in support of IND applications.

  8. Evaluation of anti-hepadnavirus activity of Phyllanthus amarus and Phyllanthus maderaspatensis in duck hepatitis B virus carrier Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Munshi, A; Mehrotra, R; Ramesh, R; Panda, S K

    1993-12-01

    Extracts of the two traditional Indian herbs, Phyllanthus amarus (P. amarus) and Phyllanthus maderaspatensis (P. maderaspatensis), described by others as useful in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection were studied for antiviral properties on duck hepatitis B virus infection. One hundred and fourteen ducks infected posthatch with the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) were divided into groups at three months of age and treated intraperitoneally with the aqueous, butanol, and alcoholic extracts of these two plants at doses of 25, 50, or 200 mg/kg body weight. Saline-treated animals served as controls. In the ducks negative for DHBV in serum after treatment, we observed replicative intermediates in the liver. There was no definite antiviral property observed in the treated ducks. PMID:8106861

  9. Live Attenuated Vaccine Based on Duck Enteritis Virus against Duck Hepatitis A Virus Types 1 and 3

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhong; Ma, Ji; Huang, Kun; Chen, Huanchun; Liu, Ziduo; Jin, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    As causative agents of duck viral hepatitis, duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) and type 3 (DHAV-3) causes significant economic losses in the duck industry. However, a licensed commercial vaccine that simultaneously controls both pathogens is currently unavailable. Here, we generated duck enteritis virus recombinants (rC-KCE-2VP1) containing both VP1 from DHAV-1 (VP1/DHAV-1) and VP1 from DHAV-3 (VP1/DHAV-3) between UL27 and UL26. A self-cleaving 2A-element of FMDV was inserted between the two different types of VP1, allowing production of both proteins from a single open reading frame. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis results demonstrated that both VP1 proteins were robustly expressed in rC-KCE-2VP1-infected chicken embryo fibroblasts. Ducks that received a single dose of rC-KCE-2VP1 showed potent humoral and cellular immune responses and were completely protected against challenges of both pathogenic DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 strains. The protection was rapid, achieved as early as 3 days after vaccination. Moreover, viral replication was fully blocked in vaccinated ducks as early as 1 week post-vaccination. These results demonstrated, for the first time, that recombinant rC-KCE-2VP1 is potential fast-acting vaccine against DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. PMID:27777571

  10. Quantification of infectious duck hepatitis B virus by radioimmunofocus assay.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D A; Grgacic, E V; Luscombe, C A; Gu, X; Dixon, R

    1997-08-01

    A simple method is described for the precise quantification of infectious duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) in cell culture, using a radioimmunofocus assay (RIFA). Primary duck hepatocyte cell cultures were infected with serial dilutions of viral samples as for a plaque assay, but then maintained with liquid overlay medium. After incubation for up to 14 days, cell monolayers were fixed with acetone, then stained with a monoclonal antibody to DHBV L protein followed by secondary antibody labelled with 125I. Foci of infection (representing individual infectious particles in the inoculum) were detected by autoradiography. The number of foci recovered was increased by addition of dimethyl sulphoxide to culture medium, but was not appreciably altered by the use of semi-solid medium. The titre of virus suspensions determined by RIFA correlated well with titration in ducklings. The RIFA is a useful method for titration of DHBV, as it has a wide dynamic range and is well suited to parallel titration of large numbers of samples. This assay will have wide use for the analysis of DHBV growth kinetics, antiviral efficacy, and virus inactivation procedures.

  11. Duck hepatitis B virus infection of non-hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Walter, E; Teubner, K; Blum, H E; Offensperger, W B; Offensperger, S; Gerok, W

    1991-02-01

    One hundred and seventeen ducklings, 42 inoculated with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) 2 days after hatching and 55 connatally infected, were studied over a 6-month period in parallel with 20 ducklings without DHBV infection. Using immunohistochemical, in situ and blot hybridization analyses, the natural course of hepatic and extrahepatic infection was examined. DHBV infection started in the liver 2-4 days post-inoculation. There, DHBV was found not only in hepatocytes, but also in bile duct epithelial cells. Further, DHBV infection occurred in exocrine and endocrine pancreas (beginning 6-10 days and 20 days post-inoculation, respectively) and in germinal centers of the spleen (beginning 8 weeks post-inoculation). Occasionally viral DNA was also found in kidney glomeruli. Using strand-specific RNA probes, viral DNA in pancreas and spleen was clearly demonstrated to be replicating intermediates. Hepatic and extrahepatic infection with DHBV was not associated with histologic inflammation or pathologic changes in these tissues or the liver. These data indicate that DHBV can infect cells other than hepatocytes. The biological significance of non-hepatocyte infection for the life-cycle of the virus and its potential significance for viral persistence remain to be determined.

  12. Chemical disinfection of duck hepatitis B virus: a model for inactivation of infectivity of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Tsiquaye, K N; Barnard, J

    1993-08-01

    The susceptibility of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) to the virucidal effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was compared to hepatitis B virus (HBV) with the aim of using the duck as a model for studying HBV disinfection. Using viral DNA polymerase (DNAP) as a target, inhibition of DNAP activity by chlorine disinfectants was found to be concentration-dependent but independent of contact time. Two minute exposure of minimal effective concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (domestic bleach: 3600 ppm and industrial bleach: 3180 ppm) and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (3000 ppm available chlorine) to DHBV- and HBV-rich plasma totally inhibited DNA polymerase activity. DHBV particles in DHBV-carrier duck plasma (10(4.5) ID50/mL) were treated with these concentrations and inoculated intravenously into 18 one-day old ducklings (six animals/disinfectant). Analysis of plasma (0, 7 and 14 days post-infection) and post-mortem liver (14 days post-infection) by DNA hybridization techniques showed that DHBV DNA was undetectable in samples from all animals inoculated with disinfected virus particles. However, post-inoculation plasma and liver of 18 of 18 control ducklings inoculated with untreated virions were positive for DHBV DNA. These results show for the first time that total inhibition in vitro of hepadnavirus DNA polymerase activity by chemical disinfectants is predictive of inactivation of infectivity in vivo. PMID:8226434

  13. Nucleotide sequence of a cloned duck hepatitis B virus genome: comparison with woodchuck and human hepatitis B virus sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Mandart, E; Kay, A; Galibert, F

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of an EcoRI duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) clone was elucidated by using the Maxam and Gilbert method. This sequence, which is 3,021 nucleotides long, was compared with the two previously analyzed hepatitis B-like viruses (human and woodchuck). From this comparison, it was shown that DHBV is derived from an ancestor common to the two others but has a slightly different genomic organization. There was no intergenic region between genes 5 and 8, which were fused into a single open reading frame in DHBV. Genes for the surface and core proteins were assigned to open reading frames 7 and 5/8. Amino acid comparisons showed some structural relationship between gene 6 product and avian reverse transcriptase, suggesting either evolution from a common ancestor or convergence to some particular structure to fulfill a specific function. This should be correlated with the synthesis of an RNA intermediate during DNA replication. This is also taken as an argument in favor of the hypothesis that gene 6 codes for the DNA polymerase that is found within the virion. DNA sequence comparison also showed that the two mammalian hepatitis B viruses are more homologous to each other than they are to DHBV, indicating that DHBV starts to evolve on its own earlier than the two other viruses, as do birds compared with mammals. From this it is proposed that the viruses evolved in a fashion parallel to the species they infect. PMID:6699938

  14. Duck Hepatitis B Virus Replication in Primary Bile Duct Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jia-Yee; Culvenor, Janetta G.; Angus, Peter; Smallwood, Richard; Nicoll, Amanda; Locarnini, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Primary cultures of intrahepatic bile duct epithelial (IBDE) cells isolated from duckling livers were successfully grown for studies of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). The primary IBDE cells were characterized by immunohistochemistry using CAM 5.2, a cytokeratin marker which was shown to react specifically to IBDE cells in duck liver tissue sections and in primary cultures of total duck liver cells. Immunofluorescence assay using anti-duck albumin, a marker for hepatocytes, revealed that these IBDE cultures did not appear to contain hepatocytes. A striking feature of these cultures was the duct-like structures present within each cell colony of multilayered IBDE cells. Normal duck serum in the growth medium was found to be essential for the development of these cells into duct-like structures. When the primary cultures of duck IBDE cells were acutely infected with DHBV, dual-labeled confocal microscopy using a combination of anti-DHBV core proteins and CAM 5.2 or a combination of anti-pre-S1 proteins and CAM 5.2 revealed that the IBDE cell colonies contained DHBV proteins. Immunoblot analysis of these cells showed that the DHBV pre-S1 and core proteins were similar to their counterparts in infected primary duck hepatocyte cultures. Southern blot analysis of infected IBDE preparations using a digoxigenin-labeled positive-sense DHBV riboprobe revealed the presence of hepadnavirus covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA, minus-sense single-stranded (SS) DNA , double-stranded linear DNA, and relaxed circular DNA. The presence of minus-sense SS DNA in the acutely infected IBDE cultures is indicative of DHBV reverse transcriptase activity, while the establishment of a pool of viral CCC DNA reveals the ability of these cells to maintain persistent infection. Taken collectively, the results from this study demonstrated that primary duck IBDE cells supported hepadnavirus replication as shown by the de novo synthesis of DHBV proteins and DNA replicative intermediates. PMID

  15. Development of viral disinfectant assays for duck hepatitis B virus using cell culture/PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Young J; Giambrone, Joseph J; Smith, Bruce F

    2002-10-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a worldwide public health problem with chronic carriers at risk for developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Accidental nosocomial infections from inadequately disinfected equipment or exposure to blood and body fluids from patients are major routes. To solve such problems, disinfectants to inactivate HBV must be validated. Duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is accepted as a surrogate for HBV, due to their similar sensitivities to disinfectants and its safety. Ducklings are used for disinfectant efficacy assays; however, the same virus titer is obtained using duck embryonic hepatocytes. Viral titration in disinfectant efficacy assay is conducted using Southern hybridization of infected duck serum. However, this test requires radioisotopes. Therefore, disinfectant assessment protocols were developed using duck embryonic hepatocytes with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or nested PCR. The ease of handling, lowered cost and enhanced sensitivity make PCR desirable. Chicken embryonic hepatocytes were applied to DHBV disinfectant efficacy assay. Results were consistent and could be used under certain conditions. The virucidal activities of two quaternary ammonium chloride disinfectants, n-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (10C-12C) were compared and effective concentrations were 1200 and 1800 ppm, respectively. Efficacies of these disinfectants were validated using real-time quantitative PCR. Results confirmed that the efficacy of n-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride was higher than alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (10C-12C). This assay was useful for rapid discrimination of killing potentials of disinfectants. In conclusion, these assays can be applied to other viruses that are unable to cause CPE in cell cultures and broadened the utility of DHBV as animal model for HBV.

  16. Duck hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA appears to survive hepatocyte mitosis in the growing liver

    SciTech Connect

    Reaiche-Miller, Georget Y.; Thorpe, Michael; Low, Huey Chi; Qiao, Qiao; Scougall, Catherine A.; Mason, William S.; Litwin, Samuel; Jilbert, Allison R.

    2013-11-15

    Nucleos(t)ide analogues that inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA replication are typically used as monotherapy for chronically infected patients. Treatment with a nucleos(t)ide analogue eliminates most HBV DNA replication intermediates and produces a gradual decline in levels of covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for viral RNA synthesis. It remains uncertain if levels of cccDNA decline primarily through hepatocyte death, or if loss also occurs during hepatocyte mitosis. To determine if cccDNA survives mitosis, growing ducklings infected with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) were treated with the nucleoside analogue, Entecavir. Viremia was suppressed at least 10{sup 5}-fold, during a period when average liver mass increased 23-fold. Analysis of the data suggested that if cccDNA synthesis was completely inhibited, at least 49% of cccDNA survived hepatocyte mitosis. However, there was a large duck-to-duck variation in cccDNA levels, suggesting that low level cccDNA synthesis may contribute to this apparent survival through mitosis. - Highlights: • The hepatitis B virus nuclear template is covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). • cccDNA was studied during liver growth in duck hepatitis B virus infected ducks. • Virus DNA replication and new cccDNA synthesis were inhibited with Entecavir. • At least 49% of cccDNA appeared to survive hepatocyte mitosis. • Low level virus DNA synthesis may contribute to survival of cccDNA through mitosis.

  17. Entry of Duck Hepatitis B Virus into Primary Duck Liver and Kidney Cells after Discovery of a Fusogenic Region within the Large Surface Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Maenz, Claudia; Chang, Shau-Feng; Iwanski, Alicja; Bruns, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B viruses exhibit a narrow host range specificity that is believed to be mediated by a domain of the large surface protein, designated L. For duck hepatitis B virus, it has been shown that the pre-S domain of L binds to carboxypeptidase D, a cellular receptor present in many species on a wide variety of cell types. Nonetheless, only hepatocytes become infected. It has remained vague which viral features determine host range specificity and organotropicity. By using chymotrypsin to treat duck hepatitis B virus, we addressed the question of whether a putative fusogenic region within the amino-terminal end of the small surface protein may participate in viral entry and possibly constitute one of the determinants of the host range of the virus. Addition of the enzyme to virions resulted in increased infectivity. Remarkably, even remnants of enzyme-treated subviral particles proved to be inhibitory to infection. A noninfectious deletion mutant devoid of the binding region for carboxypeptidase D could be rendered infectious for primary duck hepatocytes by treatment with chymotrypsin. Although because of the protease treatment mutant and wild-type viruses may have become infectious in an unspecific and receptor-independent manner, their host range specificity was not affected, as shown by the inability of the virus to replicate in different hepatoma cell lines, as well as primary chicken hepatocytes. Instead, the organotropicity of the virus could be reduced, which was demonstrated by infection of primary duck kidney cells. PMID:17360753

  18. Vaccination of ducks with a whole-cell vaccine expressing duck hepatitis B virus core antigen elicits antiviral immune responses that enable rapid resolution of de novo infection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Darren S; Halpern, Michael; Kotlarski, Ieva; Jilbert, Allison R

    2006-05-10

    As a first step in developing immuno-therapeutic vaccines for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection, we examined the ability of a whole-cell vaccine, expressing the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core antigen (DHBcAg), to target infected cells leading to the resolution of de novo DHBV infections. Three separate experiments were performed. In each experiment, ducks were vaccinated at 7 and 14 days of age with primary duck embryonic fibroblasts (PDEF) that had been transfected 48 h earlier with plasmid DNA expressing DHBcAg with and without the addition of anti-DHBcAg (anti-DHBc) antibodies. Control ducks were injected with either 0.7% NaCl or non-transfected PDEF. The ducks were then challenged at 18 days of age by intravenous inoculation with DHBV (5 x 10(8) viral genome equivalents). Liver biopsies obtained on day 4 post-challenge demonstrated that vaccination did not prevent infection of the liver as similar numbers of infected hepatocytes were detected in all vaccinated and control ducks. However, analysis of liver tissue obtained 9 or more days post-challenge revealed that 9 out of 11 of the PDEF-DHBcAg vaccinated ducks and 8 out of 11 ducks vaccinated with PDEF-DHBcAg plus anti-DHBc antibodies had rapidly resolved the DHBV infection with clearance of infected cells. In contrast, 10 out of 11 of the control unvaccinated ducks developed chronic DHBV infection. In conclusion, vaccination of ducks with a whole-cell PDEF vaccine expressing DHBcAg elicited immune responses that induced a rapid resolution of DHBV infection. The results establish that chronic infection can be prevented via the vaccine-mediated induction of a core-antigen-specific immune response.

  19. Binding of nuclear factors to functional domains of the duck hepatitis B virus enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Lilienbaum, A; Crescenzo-Chaigne, B; Sall, A A; Pillot, J; Elfassi, E

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed the structures, relative organization, and activities of binding sites for nuclear factors in the duck hepatitis B virus (duck HBV) enhancer. DNase I footprinting analysis and mobility shift assays demonstrate that this enhancer of 192 bp contains at least three binding sites for transcription factors: one for hepatocyte-adipocyte C/EBP, a second for the liver-specific transactivator hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 HNF-1, and a third for a factor, called F3, which binds to a DNA sequence bearing some resemblance to that for the ubiquitous factor EF-C. Analysis of transcriptional activity reveals that oligonucleotides corresponding to the individual binding sites, inserted upstream from a heterologous promoter, display very weak enhancer activity, whereas the enhancer encompassing these three sites displays very high activity. Analysis of duck HBV enhancer mutants indicates that the deletion of any of these sites leads to a modification of transcriptional enhancer activity. The hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 binding site is crucial, since an internal deletion of 14 bp abolishes the activity. The C/EBP site can act as repressor, and the F3 site is required for full activity. Comparative analysis reveals that the nuclear factors are similar to those bound to the human HBV enhancer but that the organization of their binding sites in the duck HBV enhancer is different. Images PMID:8371357

  20. Recombinant VP1 protein of duck hepatitis virus 1 expressed in Pichia pastoris and its immunogenicity in ducks.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Li, X K; Wu, T C; Wang, Y; Zhang, C J; Cheng, X C; Chen, P Y

    2014-01-01

    The VP1 gene of duck hepatitis virus type 1 (DHV-1) strain VJ09 was amplified by reverse transcription PCR from the liver of a duckling with clinical symptoms of viral hepatitis. The resulting VP1 cDNA was 720 bp in length and encoded a 240-amino-acid protein. In VP1 gene-based phylogenetic analysis, the VJ09 strain grouped with DHV-1 genotype C. The VP1 gene was inserted into the expression vector pPICZαA and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The expressed VP1 protein was purified and identified by western blot analysis. To evaluate the recombinant VP1's immunogenic potential in ducklings, the antibodies raised in the immunized ducklings were titrated by ELISA, and lymphocyte proliferation and virus neutralization assays were performed. The results show that the recombinant VP1 protein induced a significant immune response in ducklings and this could be a candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine against DHV-1 genotype C.

  1. Cloning, expression and purification of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core protein and its use in the development of an indirect ELISA for serologic detection of DHBV infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Jia, Renyong; Wang, Mingshu; Huang, Juan; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Yin, Zhongqiong; Wang, Yin; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2014-05-01

    Infecting ducks with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is widely accepted as a relevant model for studying aspects of human HBV infection. However, efficient and sensitive diagnostic methods for the various infection models are limited. In order to provide a more simple and convenient method for serologic diagnosis, we improved the production of recombinant DHBV viral capsid protein (core protein) and then used it to develop an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting anti-DHBc antibodies (DHBcAg ELISA) in DHBV-infected ducks. Given the positive/negative cut-off value, the maximum dilution of duck sera in which anti-DHBc antibodies could be detected was 1:12,800. In addition, the DHBcAg ELISA displayed no cross reactivity with duck antisera against duck circovirus (DuCV), duck plague virus (DPV), duck hepatitis virus (DHV), duck swollen head septicemia virus (DSHSV), avian influenza virus (AIV), Riemerella anatipestifer, Salmonella anatum, or Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the coefficients of variation (CVs) of inter-assay and intra-assay experiments were both below than 10 %. When compared to PCR for accuracy on clinical samples from cases of suspected DHBV infection, the DHBcAg showed 95.45 % coincidence with PCR. In conclusion, recombinant DHBc was readily produced and used to establish a simple DHBcAg ELISA that provided a highly specific and sensitive method for analysis of clinical samples.

  2. The role of duck hepatitis B virus and aflatoxin B1 in the induction of oxidative stress in the liver.

    PubMed

    Barraud, L; Douki, T; Guerret, S; Chevallier, M; Jamard, C; Trepo, C; Wild, C P; Cadet, J; Cova, L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of our study was to use the Pekin duck model to investigate the interactions between hepadnaviral infection and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) exposure including the role of both factors in the induction of oxidative stress in the liver. AFB1 exposure of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infected Pekin ducks induced a significant increase in viral replication associated with an intense biliary ductular cells proliferation. Interestingly, extremely high levels of AFB1-DNA adducts (40-120 pmol AFB1-Fapy/mg DNA) and AFB1-albumin adducts (1,500-3,000 pg AFB1-lys Eq/mg albumin) were detected in duck liver and serum respectively, as compared to other animal species exposed to a similar AFB1 dose. DHBV infection was found to induce a non-significant increase in AFB1-albumin adduct levels in duck serum. During the treatment duration there was no effect on formation of oxidative base damage within DNA and no effect on oxidative lipid peroxidation following either viral infection or AFB1 exposure. In terms of hepatic antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase) a significant increase in SOD activity occurred following AFB1 exposure, but not DHBV infection, but this was observed only after the cessation of treatment, when biliary ductular cells proliferation was reduced. PMID:11341355

  3. Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) genotype definition: comment on the article by Cha et al.

    PubMed

    Wen, Huiqiang; Han, Lingxia; Zhang, Xiaona; Lian, Chuanjiang; Zhao, Lili; Si, Changde; Chen, Hongyan

    2014-06-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is genetically divided into three different genotypes: the original type DHAV-1, a type recently isolated in Taiwan (DHAV-2), and a recently described type isolated in South Korea and China (DHAV-3). Recently, Cha et al. (2013) concluded that the existence that both DHAV-1 and DHAV-2 had been classified into one branch, with DHAV genotype 3 (DHAV-3) in another, and that the phylogenetic distance unit showed was 0.5, a tremendous value. However, there might be some concerns on the methodology application to define the genotypes of DHAV. Based on 110 genomic and 100 amino acid sequences of DHAV which included all the sequences from Cha et al. (2013) respectively, phylogenetic analysis in the present study showed a distinct and proposed DHAV genotype definition, that both DHAV-2 and DHAV-3 were clustered in one branch while DHAV-1 in another branch only, and that the phylogenetic distance unit of 0.02 was confirmed, which was much smaller than the value 0.5. Taking into account the genotype definition of DHAV, we also conducted the pairwise sequence comparisons (PASC) analysis of 110 genomic sequences, and proposed that the distance genotype definition threshold was 0.045.

  4. Antiviral and immune stimulant activities of glycyrrhizin against duck hepatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Soufy, Hamdy; Yassein, Safaa; Ahmed, Alaa R; Khodier, Mohamed H; Kutkat, Mohamed A; Nasr, Soad M; Okda, Faten A

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of glycyrrhizin as an immune stimulant against duck hepatitis virus (DHV). In vitro study was carried out to determine cytotoxic and antiviral effects of glycyrrhizin in VERO cells. In vivo study was performed on 40 one-day-old White Pekin ducklings. -and the birds weres divided into 4 groups: control, glycyrrhizin treated, vaccinated with live attenuated DHV vaccine and glycyrrhizin treated and vaccinated; to investigate the changes in immunity and challenge test. Blood samples were collected from each duckling for evaluation of cellular and humeral immunity. The in vitro results revealed that glycyrrhizin had antiviral and no toxic effects till 10⁶ dilutions. Higher antibody titer was observed from the 5th week till the end of experiment in glycyrrhizin and vaccinated group. Treatment with glycyrrhizin alone or with DHV vaccine demonstrated a pronounced lymphocytic proliferation response after 4 days post-inoculation till the end of experiment, while vaccinated group revealed a pronounced proliferation response after 24 days post-inoculation. Treatment with glycyrrhizin alone or combination with DHV vaccine revealed good immune stimulant and antiviral effect against DHV. PMID:23983372

  5. Duck Hepatitis B Virus cccDNA Amplification Efficiency in Natural Infection Is Regulated by Virus Secretion Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Previous mutation based studies showed that ablating synthesis of viral envelope proteins led to elevated hepadnaviral covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) amplification, but it remains unknown how cccDNA amplification is regulated in natural hepadnaviral infection because of a lack of research system. In this study we report a simple procedure to prepare two identical duck hepatitis B virus inocula, but they possess 10-100-fold difference in cccDNA amplification in infected cell culture. We demonstrate that the infected cells with higher cccDNA amplification significantly reduce the virus secretion efficiency that results in higher accumulation of relaxed circular DNA (rcDNA) and DHBsAg in the cells. The infected cells with lower cccDNA amplification significantly increase the virus secretion efficiency that leads to lower intracellular rcDNA and DHBsAg accumulation. In contrast with the findings generated in the mutation based experimental system, the regulation of cccDNA amplification in natural hepadnaviral infection bypasses direct regulation of the cellular envelope proteins concentration, instead it modulates virus secretion efficiency that ultimately impacts the intracellular rcDNA concentration, an important factor determining the destination of the synthesized rcDNA in infected cells. PMID:26713436

  6. Establishment and assessment of two methods for quantitative detection of serum duck hepatitis B virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Xi; Huang, Ai-Long; Qi, Zhen-Yuan; Guo, Shu-Hua

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish and assess the methods for quantitative detection of serum duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) DNA by quantitative membrane hybridization using DHBV DNA probe labeled directly with alkaline phosphatase and fluorescence quantitative PCR (qPCR). METHODS: Probes of DHBV DNA labeled directly with alkaline phosphatase and chemiluminescent substrate CDP-star were used in this assay. DHBV DNA was detected by autoradiography, and then scanned by DNA dot-blot. In addition, three primers derived from DHBV DNA S gene were designed. Semi-nested primer was labeled by AmpliSensor. Standard curve of the positive standards of DHBV DNA was established after asymmetric preamplification, semi-nested amplification and on-line detection. Results from 100 samples detected separately by alkaline phosphatase direct-labeled DHBV DNA probe with dot-blot hybridization and digoxigenin-labeled DHBV DNA probe hybridization. Seventy samples of duck serum were tested by fluorescent qPCR and digoxigenin-labeled DHBV DNA probe in dot-blot hybridization assay and the correlation of results was analysed. RESULTS: Sensitivity of alkaline phosphatase direct-labeled DHBV DNA probe was 10 pg. The coincidence was 100% compared with digoxigenin-labeled DHBV DNA probe assay. After 30 cycles, amplification products showed two bands of about 180 bp and 70 bp by 20 g/L agarose gel electrophoresis. Concentration of amplification products was in direct proportion to the initial concentration of positive standards. The detection index was in direct proportion to the quantity of amplification products accumulated in the current cycle. The initial concentration of positive standards was in inverse proportion to the number of cycles needed for enough quantities of amplification products. Correlation coefficient of the results was (0.97, P < 0.01) between fluorescent qPCR and dot-blot hybridization. CONCLUSION: Alkaline phosphatase direct-labeled DHBV DNA probe in dot-blot hybridization and fluorescent q

  7. Merocyanine 540 and Photofrin II as photosensitizers for in vitro killing of duck hepatitis B virus and human hepatoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Shien, Yong-Shau; Kao, Ming-Chien

    1994-03-01

    The feasibility of using merocyanine 540 (MC 540) and Photofrin II (PII) as effective photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents for killing hepatoma cells and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) in vitro was investigated. Cultured duck hepatocytes infected with DHBV and hepatoma cells, Hep 3B and HCC 36, were used as models. MC 540 and PII effectively inhibits the DHBV growth by 90 - 99% in a dose- and light-dependent manner. Photodynamic killing of MC 540 in the two hepatoma cell lines results in 94 - 99% growth inhibition. However, both photosensitizers exhibit dark cytotoxicity (37 - 56%). The present results suggest that MC 540 and PII could be promising and effective photodynamic agents for killing HBV and hepatoma cells.

  8. Assessment of a Flavone-Polysaccharide Based Prescription for Treating Duck Virus Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongxu; Zhang, Shuaibing; Song, Meiyun; Wang, Yixuan; Zeng, Ling; Chen, Yun; Xiong, Wen; Yang, Jingjing; Yao, Fangke; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo

    2016-01-01

    Because polysaccharide and flavone ingredients display good antiviral activity, we developed a flavone/polysaccharide-containing prescription that would be effective against duck viral hepatitis (DVH) and investigated its hepatoprotective effects. Flavones were derived from Hypericum japonicum (HJF) (entire herb of Hypericum japonicum Thunb) and Salvia plebeia (SPF) (entire herb of Salvia plebeia R. Br.), and polysaccharides were derived from Radix Rehmanniae Recens (RRRP) (dried root of Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch). This prescription combination was based on the theory of syndrome differentiation and treatment in traditional Chinese veterinary medicine. In vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted using the three single ingredients compared to the combined HRS prescription to determine their anti-duck hepatitis A viral (anti-DHAV) activity. The results showed that all experimental conditions displayed anti-DHAV activity, but the HRS prescription presented the best effect. To further investigate the hepatoprotective effect of the HRS prescription on DHAV-induced hepatic injury, we tested the mortality rate, the hepatic pathological severity score, plasma biochemical indexes of hepatic function, blood DHAV gene expression levels and peroxidation damage evaluation indexes and then analyzed correlations among these indexes. The results demonstrated that the HRS prescription significantly decreased the mortality rate, reduced the severity of hepatic injury, decreased the hepatic pathological severity score, depressed blood DHAV gene expression levels, and returned the indexes of hepatic function and peroxidation almost to a normal level. These results indicate that the HRS prescription confers an outstanding hepatoprotective effect, and we expect that it will be developed into a new candidate anti-DHAV drug. PMID:26731101

  9. Therapeutic Antiviral Effect of the Nucleic Acid Polymer REP 2055 against Persistent Duck Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Noordeen, Faseeha; Scougall, Catherine A; Grosse, Arend; Qiao, Qiao; Ajilian, Behzad B; Reaiche-Miller, Georget; Finnie, John; Werner, Melanie; Broering, Ruth; Schlaak, Joerg F; Vaillant, Andrew; Jilbert, Allison R

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that nucleic acid polymers (NAPs) have both entry and post-entry inhibitory activity against duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infection. The inhibitory activity exhibited by NAPs prevented DHBV infection of primary duck hepatocytes in vitro and protected ducks from DHBV infection in vivo and did not result from direct activation of the immune response. In the current study treatment of primary human hepatocytes with NAP REP 2055 did not induce expression of the TNF, IL6, IL10, IFNA4 or IFNB1 genes, confirming the lack of direct immunostimulation by REP 2055. Ducks with persistent DHBV infection were treated with NAP 2055 to determine if the post-entry inhibitory activity exhibited by NAPs could provide a therapeutic effect against established DHBV infection in vivo. In all REP 2055-treated ducks, 28 days of treatment lead to initial rapid reductions in serum DHBsAg and DHBV DNA and increases in anti-DHBs antibodies. After treatment, 6/11 ducks experienced a sustained virologic response: DHBsAg and DHBV DNA remained at low or undetectable levels in the serum and no DHBsAg or DHBV core antigen positive hepatocytes and only trace amounts of DHBV total and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) were detected in the liver at 9 or 16 weeks of follow-up. In the remaining 5/11 REP 2055-treated ducks, all markers of DHBV infection rapidly rebounded after treatment withdrawal: At 9 and 16 weeks of follow-up, levels of DHBsAg and DHBcAg and DHBV total and cccDNA in the liver had rebounded and matched levels observed in the control ducks treated with normal saline which remained persistently infected with DHBV. These data demonstrate that treatment with the NAP REP 2055 can lead to sustained control of persistent DHBV infection. These effects may be related to the unique ability of REP 2055 to block release of DHBsAg from infected hepatocytes.

  10. [Effects of hyperin on the cccDNA of duck hepatitis B virus and its immunological regulation].

    PubMed

    Geng, Miao; Wang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Hong-Yan; Yang, Xin-Bo; Huang, Zheng-Ming

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of hyperin on the cccDNA of duck hepatitis B virus and its immunological regulation. Duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infection model and normal mouse spleen lymphocyte were used to evaluate the anti-HBV and immunoregulation effects. The DHBV-DNA of serum was detected at different time points by using serum DOT-BLOT hybridization. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for the determination of nuclear covalent closed circular DNA (cccDNA). Cytokine secretion was determined by ELISA method. DHBV-DNA were inhibited by hyperin (25 or 50 mg x kg(-1)), while cccDNA of liver could be eliminated efficiently by hyperin (25 or 50 mg x kg(-1), P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The T helper 1 effector cytokine was markedly enhanced by hyperin (25 or 50 microg x mL(-1), P < 0.01). In conclusion, hyperin has anti-HBV activity via multiple targets and pathways, and cccDNA may be one of the important targets.

  11. Characterization of a 120-Kilodalton pre-S-binding protein as a candidate duck hepatitis B virus receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, J S; Tong, S P; Wands, J R

    1996-09-01

    Infection by human and animal hepadnaviruses displays remarkable host and tissue tropism. The infection cycle probably initiates with binding of the pre-S domain of viral envelope protein to surface receptors present on the hepatocyte. Three types of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) have their binding sites clustered within residues 83 to 107 of the pre-S protein, suggesting that this region may constitute a major receptor binding site. A 170- or 180-kDa duck protein (p170 or gp180) which binds DHBV particles through this part of the pre-S sequence has been identified recently. Although the p170 binding protein is host (duck) specific, its distribution is not restricted to DHBV-infectible tissues. Using the pre-S protein fused to glutathione S-transferase and immobilized on Sepharose beads, we have now identified an additional binding protein with a size of 120 kDa (p120). p120 expression is restricted to the liver, kidney, and pancreas, the three major organs of DHBV replication. While optimal p170 binding requires an intact pre-S protein, binding to p120 occurs much more efficiently with a few N- or C-terminally truncated forms. The p120 binding site was mapped to residues 98 to 102 of the pre-S region, which overlaps with a cluster of known virus-neutralizing epitopes. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed residues 100 to 102 (Phe-Arg-Arg) as the critical p120 contact site; nonconservative substitution in any of the three positions abolished p120 binding. Double mutations at positions 100 to 102 markedly reduced DHBV infectivity in cell culture. Short pre-S peptides covering the clustered neutralizing epitopes (also p170 and p120 binding sites) reduced DHBV infectivity in primary duck hepatocyte cultures. Thus, p120 represents a candidate component of the DHBV receptor complex.

  12. Tembusu Virus in Ducks, China

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Cun; Liu, Yuehuan; Ye, Weicheng; Han, Jingwen; Ma, Guoming; Zhang, Dongdong; Xu, Feng; Gao, Xuhui; Tang, Yi; Shi, Shaohua; Wan, Chunhe; Zhang, Chen; He, Bin; Yang, Mengjie; Lu, Xinhao; Huang, Yu; Diao, Youxiang; Ma, Xuejun

    2011-01-01

    In China in 2010, a disease outbreak in egg-laying ducks was associated with a flavivirus. The virus was isolated and partially sequenced. The isolate exhibited 87%–91% identity with strains of Tembusu virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus of the Ntaya virus group. These findings demonstrate emergence of Tembusu virus in ducks. PMID:22000358

  13. Inactivation of duck hepatitis B virus by a hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization system: laboratory and 'in use' testing.

    PubMed

    Vickery, K; Deva, A K; Zou, J; Kumaradeva, P; Bissett, L; Cossart, Y E

    1999-04-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important cause of nosocomial infections and can be transmitted by contaminated instruments. However, tests of the efficacy of sterilization of materials and equipment contaminated by HBV are difficult to perform because the virus cannot be cultured in the laboratory. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the capability of a low temperature, hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilizer (Sterrad, Advanced Sterilization Products, Irvine California,) to inactivate duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). In laboratory efficacy studies using DHBV dried on to glass filter carriers and exposed to one-half of the hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization process, there was a 10(7) or greater decrease in the viral titer, with no infectivity detected on the carriers after treatment. In-use studies were performed using a laparoscope that was experimentally contaminated with DHBV to mimic the possible transmission of infection between successive patients. Following exposure to the hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization process no transmission of DHBV infection from the laparoscope occurred despite obvious visual soiling with blood (N = 8) while the transmission rate for the unprocessed laparoscope (positive control) was 100% (26/26), and that for instruments after a water wash was 63% (7/11). In conclusion the hydrogen gas plasma sterilization process completely inactivates DHBV a representative of the hepadna group of viruses.

  14. Rapid detection of duck hepatitis A virus genotype C using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Meng, Chunchun; Liu, Guangqing

    2014-02-01

    A one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was used and optimized to develop a rapid and sensitive detection system for duck hepatitis A virus genotype C (DHAV-C) RNA. A set of four specific primers was designed against highly conserved sequences located within the 3D gene from DHAV (strain GX1201). Under optimal reaction conditions, the sensitivity of DHAV-C-specific RT-LAMP was 100-fold higher than that of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), with a detection limit of 0.3pg (6.59×10(4) copies) per reaction. No cross-reactivity was observed from the samples of other duck viruses, which is in good accordance with RT-PCR. Furthermore, a positive reaction can be visually inspected by observing turbidity or color change after the addition of SYBR green I dye. The DHAV-C-specific RT-LAMP assay was applied to the samples and compared with RT-PCR. The positive-sample ratios were 26.7% (12 of 45) by RT-LAMP and 20% (9 of 45) by RT-PCR. Therefore, the newly developed RT-LAMP assay is a rapid, specific, sensitive, and cost-effective method of DHAV-C detection. This assay has potential applications in both clinical diagnosis and field surveillance of DHAV-C infection.

  15. Enzymatic treatment of duck hepatitis B virus: Topology of the surface proteins for virions and noninfectious subviral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Claudia; Matschl, Urte; Bruns, Michael . E-mail: mbruns@hpi.uni-hamburg.de

    2007-03-01

    The large surface antigen L of duck hepatitis B virus exhibits a mixed topology with the preS domains of the protein alternatively exposed to the particles' interior or exterior. After separating virions from subviral particles (SVPs), we compared their L topologies and showed that both particle types exhibit the same amount of L with the following differences: 1-preS of intact virions was enzymatically digested with chymotrypsin, whereas in SVPs only half of preS was accessible, 2-phosphorylation of L at S118 was completely removed by phosphatase treatment only in virions, 3-iodine-125 labeling disclosed a higher ratio of exposed preS to S domains in virions compared to SVPs. These data point towards different surface architectures of virions and SVPs. Because the preS domain acts in binding to a cellular receptor of hepatocytes, our findings implicate the exclusion of SVPs as competitors for the receptor binding and entry of virions.

  16. Identification of a conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope in the VP1 proteins of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihua; Zhou, Guomei; Xin, Yinghao; Chen, Junhao; Lin, Shaoli; Tian, Ye; Xie, Zhijing; Jiang, Shijin

    2015-11-18

    Duck virus hepatitis (DVH), mainly caused by duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), is a severe disease threaten to duck industry and has worldwide distribution. As the major structural protein, the VP1 protein of DHAV is able to induce neutralizing antibody in ducks. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4F8 against the intact DHAV-1 particles was used to identify the possible epitope in the three serotypes of DHAV. The mAb 4F8 had weak neutralizing activities to both DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, and reacted with the conserved linear B-cell epitopes of (75)GEIILT(80) in DHAV-1 VP1 and (75)GEVILT(80) in DHAV-3 VP1 protein, respectively, while not with DHAV-2 VP1. This was the first report about identification of the common conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which will facilitate understanding of the antigenic structure of VP1 and the serologic diagnosis of DHAV infection.

  17. Duck hepatitis B virus integrations in LMH chicken hepatoma cells: identification and characterization of new episomally derived integrations.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, S S; Jensen, A D; Wang, H; Rogler, C E

    1995-01-01

    While the cytoplasmic phase of the hepadnavirus replication cycle is well understood, very little is known about the nuclear phase. In contrast to retroviruses, proviral integration is not required for hepadnavirus replication; however, some of the viral DNAs in the nucleus are diverted into an integration pathway. Under certain conditions these integrations function as carcinogenic agents. In order to study the integration process, we have utilized LMH-D2 cells, which replicate wild-type duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), to develop the first protocol to detect and characterize integrations of DHBV originating from episomal viral DNAs. Contrary to expectations, our results showed that stable new integrations are readily detectable in subclones of LMH-D2 cells. Complete characterization of one integration revealed a single-genome-length integrant with the structure of double-stranded linear (DSL) DHBV DNAs which are produced by in situ priming during viral replication. The integration contained a terminal redundancy of 6 bp from the r region of the virus DNA minus strand as well as a direct repeat of 70 bp of cellular DNA. On the basis of the structure of the integrant and the cellular DNA target site, we propose a molecular model for the integration mechanism that has some similarities to that of retroviruses. Identification of DSL hepadnavirus DNA integration suggests the possibility that modified DSL viral DNAs may be the precursors to a class of simple, unrearranged hepadnavirus integrations. PMID:7494330

  18. Detection, differentiation, and VP1 sequencing of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and type 3 by a 1-step duplex reverse-transcription PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Wen, X J; Cheng, A C; Wang, M S; Jia, R Y; Zhu, D K; Chen, S; Liu, M F; Liu, F; Chen, X Y

    2014-09-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is an infectious pathogen causing fatal duck viral hepatitis in ducklings. Although both the inactivated vaccines and live attenuated vaccines have been used to protect ducklings, DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 still cause significant serious damage to the duck industry in China and South Korea. For rapid detection, differentiation, and epidemic investigation of DHAV in China, a genotype-specific 1-step duplex reverse-transcription (RT) PCR assay was established in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of the developed RT-PCR assay was evaluated with nucleic acids extracted from 2 DHAV reference strains, and 9 other infectious viruses and bacteria. The genotype-specific primers amplified different size DNA fragments encompassing the complete VP1 gene of the DHAV-1 or DHAV-3. The assay detected the liver samples collected from experimentally infected ducklings and dead ducklings collected from different regions of China. Sequence analysis of these DNA fragments indicated that VP1 sequences of DHAV-1 can be used to distinguish wild type and vaccine strains. The phylogenetic analysis of VP1 sequences indicated that the developed RT-PCR assay can be used for epidemic investigation of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. The developed RT-PCR assay can be used as a specific molecular tool for simultaneous detection, differentiation, and sequencing the VP1 gene of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which can be used for understanding the epidemiology and evolution of DHAV.

  19. A one-step duplex rRT-PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of duck hepatitis A virus genotypes 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qin; Zhu, Dekang; Ma, Guangpeng; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Jia, Renyong; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2016-10-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is a highly infectious pathogen that causes significant bleeding lesions in the viscera of ducklings less than 3 weeks old. There are three serotypes of DHAV: serotype 1 (DHAV-1), serotype 2 (DHAV-2) and serotype 3 (DHAV-3). These serotypes have no cross-antigenicity with each other. To establish an rRT-PCR assay for the rapid detection of a mixed infection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, two pairs of primers and a pair of matching TaqMan probes were designed based on conserved regions of DHAV-1 VP0 and DHAV-3 VP3. Finally, we established a one-step duplex rRT-PCR assay with high specificity and sensitivity for the simultaneous detection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. This method showed no cross-antigenicity with the other pathogens tested, including duck plague virus, Muscovy duck parvovirus, Riemerella anatipestifer, and pathogenic E. coli from ducks. Sensitivity tests identified the minimum detection limits of this method as 98 (DHAV-1) and 10 (DHAV-3) copies/reaction. To validate the method, thirty-eight clinical samples and thirty artificially infected samples collected from dead duck embryos were studied. Thirty-seven samples were positive for DHAV-1, seventeen samples were positive for DHAV-3, and fourteen samples were positive for a mixed infection using the duplex rRT-PCR method. The method established in this study is specific, sensitive, convenient and timesaving and is a powerful tool for detecting DHAV-1, DHAV-3, and their mixed infection and for conducting surveys of pandemic virus strains. PMID:27435338

  20. A one-step duplex rRT-PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of duck hepatitis A virus genotypes 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qin; Zhu, Dekang; Ma, Guangpeng; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Jia, Renyong; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2016-10-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is a highly infectious pathogen that causes significant bleeding lesions in the viscera of ducklings less than 3 weeks old. There are three serotypes of DHAV: serotype 1 (DHAV-1), serotype 2 (DHAV-2) and serotype 3 (DHAV-3). These serotypes have no cross-antigenicity with each other. To establish an rRT-PCR assay for the rapid detection of a mixed infection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, two pairs of primers and a pair of matching TaqMan probes were designed based on conserved regions of DHAV-1 VP0 and DHAV-3 VP3. Finally, we established a one-step duplex rRT-PCR assay with high specificity and sensitivity for the simultaneous detection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. This method showed no cross-antigenicity with the other pathogens tested, including duck plague virus, Muscovy duck parvovirus, Riemerella anatipestifer, and pathogenic E. coli from ducks. Sensitivity tests identified the minimum detection limits of this method as 98 (DHAV-1) and 10 (DHAV-3) copies/reaction. To validate the method, thirty-eight clinical samples and thirty artificially infected samples collected from dead duck embryos were studied. Thirty-seven samples were positive for DHAV-1, seventeen samples were positive for DHAV-3, and fourteen samples were positive for a mixed infection using the duplex rRT-PCR method. The method established in this study is specific, sensitive, convenient and timesaving and is a powerful tool for detecting DHAV-1, DHAV-3, and their mixed infection and for conducting surveys of pandemic virus strains.

  1. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  2. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  3. Mortality from duck plague virus in immunosuppressed adult mallard ducks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, D.R.; Yuill, T.M.; Burgess, E.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Environmental contaminants contain chemicals that, if ingested, could affect the immunological status of wild birds, and in particular, their resistance to infectious disease. Immunosuppression caused by environmental contaminants, could have a major impact on waterfowl populations, resulting in increased susceptibility to contagious disease agents. Duck plague virus has caused repeated outbreaks in waterfowl resulting in mortality. In this study, several doses of cyclophosphamide (CY), a known immunosuppressant, were administered to adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) to determine if a resultant decrease in resistance to a normally sub-lethal strain of duck plague virus would occur, and induce mortality in these birds. Death occurred in birds given CY only, and in birds given virus and CY, but not in those given virus only. There was significantly greater mortality and more rapid deaths in the duck plague virus-infected groups than in groups receiving only the immunosuppressant. A positively correlated dose-response effect was observed with CY mortalities, irrespective of virus exposure. A fuel oil and a crude oil, common environmental contaminants with immunosuppressive capabilities, were tested to determine if they could produce an effect similar to that of CY. Following 28 days of oral oil administration, the birds were challenged with a sub-lethal dose of duck plague virus. No alteration in resistance to the virus (as measured by mortality) was observed, except in the positive CY control group.

  4. Mortality from duck plague virus in immunosuppressed adult mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, D.R.; Yuill, Thomas M.; Burgess, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental contaminants contain chemicals that, if ingested, could affect the immunological status of wild birds, and in particular, their resistance to infectious disease. Immunosuppression caused by environmental contaminants, could have a major impact on waterfowl populations, resulting in increased susceptibility to contagious disease agents. Duck plague virus has caused repeated outbreaks in waterfowl resulting in mortality. In this study, several doses of cyclophosphamide (CY), a known immunosuppressant, were administered to adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) to determine if a resultant decrease in resistance to a normally sub-lethal strain of duck plague virus would occur, and induce mortality in these birds. Death occurred in birds given CY only, and in birds given virus and CY, but not in those given virus only. There was significantly greater mortality and more rapid deaths in the duck plague virus-infected groups than in groups receiving only the immunosuppressant. A positively correlated dose-response effect was observed with CY mortalities, irrespective of virus exposure. A fuel oil and a crude oil, common environmental contaminants with immunosuppressive capabilities, were tested to determine if they could produce an effect similar to that of CY. Following 28 days of oral oil administration, the birds were challenged with a sub-lethal dose of duck plague virus. No alteration in resistance to the virus (as measured by mortality) was observed, except in the positive CY control group.

  5. cis-Acting sequences in addition to donor and acceptor sites are required for template switching during synthesis of plus-strand DNA for duck hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Havert, M B; Loeb, D D

    1997-01-01

    A characteristic of all hepadnaviruses is the relaxed-circular conformation of the DNA genome within an infectious virion. Synthesis of the relaxed-circular genome by reverse transcription requires three template switches. These template switches, as for the template switches or strand transfers of other reverse-transcribing genetic elements, require repeated sequences (the donor and acceptor sites) between which a complementary strand of nucleic acid is transferred. The mechanism for each of the template switches in hepadnaviruses is poorly understood. To determine whether sequences other than the donor and acceptor sites are involved in the template switches of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a series of molecular clones which express viral genomes bearing deletion mutations were analyzed. We found that three regions of the DHBV genome, which are distinct from the donor and acceptor sites, are required for the synthesis of relaxed-circular DNA. One region, located near the 3' end of the minus-strand template, is required for the template switch that circularizes the genome. The other two regions, located in the middle of the genome and near DR2, appear to be required for plus-strand primer translocation. We speculate that these cis-acting sequences may play a role in the organization of the minus-strand DNA template within the capsid particle so that it supports efficient template switching during plus-strand DNA synthesis. PMID:9188603

  6. Immune responses of ducks infected with duck Tembusu virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Wang, Yao; Li, Rong; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Jinzhou; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2015-01-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) can cause serious disease in ducks, characterized by reduced egg production. Although the virus has been isolated and detection methods developed, the host immune responses to DTMUV infection are unclear. Therefore, we systematically examined the expression of immune-related genes and the viral distribution in DTMUV-infected ducks, using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results show that DTMUV replicates quickly in many tissues early in infection, with the highest viral titers in the spleen 1 day after infection. Rig-1, Mda5, and Tlr3 are involved in the host immune response to DTMUV, and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (Il-1β, -2, -6, Cxcl8) and antiviral proteins (Mx, Oas, etc.) are also upregulated early in infection. The expression of Il-6 increased most significantly in the tissues tested. The upregulation of Mhc-I was observed in the brain and spleen, but the expression of Mhc-II was upregulated in the brain and downregulated in the spleen. The expression of the interferons was also upregulated to different degrees in the spleen but that of the brain was various. Our study suggests that DTMUV replicates rapidly in various tissues and that the host immune responses are activated early in infection. However, the overexpression of cytokines may damage the host. These results extend our understanding of the immune responses of ducks to DTMUV infection, and provide insight into the pathogenesis of DTMUV attributable to host factors.

  7. Efficient strategy for constructing duck enteritis virus-based live attenuated vaccine against homologous and heterologous H5N1 avian influenza virus and duck enteritis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhong; Hu, Yong; Liu, Zhigang; Zhong, Wei; Cao, Hangzhou; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin

    2015-04-16

    Duck is susceptible to many pathogens, such as duck hepatitis virus, duck enteritis virus (DEV), duck tembusu virus, H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) in particular. With the significant role of duck in the evolution of H5N1 HPAIV, control and eradication of H5N1 HPAIV in duck through vaccine immunization is considered an effective method in minimizing the threat of a pandemic outbreak. Consequently, a practical strategy to construct a vaccine against these pathogens should be determined. In this study, the DEV was examined as a candidate vaccine vector to deliver the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of H5N1, and its potential as a polyvalent vaccine was evaluated. A modified mini-F vector was inserted into the gB and UL26 gene junction of the attenuated DEV vaccine strain C-KCE genome to generate an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) of C-KCE (vBAC-C-KCE). The HA gene of A/duck/Hubei/xn/2007 (H5N1) was inserted into the C-KCE genome via the mating-assisted genetically integrated cloning (MAGIC) to generate the recombinant vector pBAC-C-KCE-HA. A bivalent vaccine C-KCE-HA was developed by eliminating the BAC backbone. Ducks immunized with C-KCE-HA induced both the cross-reactive antibodies and T cell response against H5. Moreover, C-KCE-HA-immunized ducks provided rapid and long-lasting protection against homologous and heterologous HPAIV H5N1 and DEV clinical signs, death, and primary viral replication. In conclusion, our BAC-C-KCE is a promising platform for developing a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine.

  8. Identification of duck plague virus by polymerase chain reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, W.R.; Brown, Sean E.; Nashold, S.W.; Knudson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detecting duck plague virus. A 765-bp EcoRI fragment cloned from the genome of the duck plague vaccine (DP-VAC) virus was sequenced for PCR primer development. The fragment sequence was found by GenBank alignment searches to be similar to the 3a?? ends of an undefined open reading frame and the gene for DNA polymerase protein in other herpesviruses. Three of four primer sets were found to be specific for the DP-VAC virus and 100% (7/7) of field isolates but did not amplify DNA from inclusion body disease of cranes virus. The specificity of one primer set was tested with genome templates from other avian herpesviruses, including those from a golden eagle, bald eagle, great horned owl, snowy owl, peregrine falcon, prairie falcon, pigeon, psittacine, and chicken (infectious laryngotracheitis), but amplicons were not produced. Hence, this PCR test is highly specific for duck plague virus DNA. Two primer sets were able to detect 1 fg of DNA from the duck plague vaccine strain, equivalent to five genome copies. In addition, the ratio of tissue culture infectious doses to genome copies of duck plague vaccine virus from infected duck embryo cells was determined to be 1:100, making the PCR assay 20 times more sensitive than tissue culture for detecting duck plague virus. The speed, sensitivity, and specificity of this PCR provide a greatly improved diagnostic and research tool for studying the epizootiology of duck plague. /// Se desarroll?? una prueba de reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa para detectar el virus de la peste del pato. Un fragmento EcoRI de 765 pares de bases clonado del genoma del virus vacunal de la peste del pato fue secuenciado para la obtenci??n de los iniciadores de la prueba de la reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa. En investigaciones de alineaci??n en el banco de genes ('GenBank') se encontr?? que la secuencia del fragmento era similar a los extremos 3a?? de un marco de lectura abierto

  9. Generation of stable 3'-mRNA cleavage fragments induced by siRNA in cells with high-levels of duck hepatitis B virus replication.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lin; Mao, Qing; Blum, Hubert E

    2014-01-17

    Therapeutic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have attracted a lot of interest both in basic biomedical sciences as well as in translational medicine. Apart from their therapeutic efficacy adverse effects of siRNAs must be addressed. The generation of stable mRNA cleavage fragments and the translation of N-truncated proteins induced by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASOs) have been reported. Similar to ASOs, siRNAs are considered to function via an antisense mechanism that promotes the cleavage of the target mRNA. To further investigate whether the stable mRNA cleavage fragments also occur in siRNA we constructed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression plasmid, pshRNA794, containing the same sequence reported in experiments using ASOs which directly targeted the overlapping region of the pre-genomic mRNA (pgmRNA) and sub-genomic mRNA (sgmRNA) of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). The shRNA resulted in a 70.9% and 69.9% reduction of the DHBV mRNAs in LMH and HuH-7 cells, respectively. In addition a 70% inhibition of the DHBV DNA level was observed. Interestingly, 3'-mRNA cleavage fragments were detected in LMH but not in HuH-7 cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the ASO sequence was also effective in siRNA. Importantly, our results provide direct evidence that stable 3'-mRNA fragments were generated by siRNA in cells with high levels of DHBV replication. Whether these can cause adverse RNAi effects needs to be explored further.

  10. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  11. Effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on hepatic function in the duck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, J.F.; Dieter, M.P.

    1980-01-01

    1. The indocyanine green dye clearance test for hepatic function was determined in mallard ducks before and during the chronic ingestion (7 months) of representative paraffinic or aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons (PH). 2. No mortality or visible symptoms of toxicity occured in any of the tests. Ingestion of 4000 ppm aromatic PH produced significant increases in liver (25%), plasma clearance of indocyanine green (33%) and hepatic blood flow (30%). 3. Although the aromatics elicited a greater hepatic stress response than the paraffins, the ducks tolerated high concentrations of PH for extended periods.

  12. Interaction between duck hepatitis B virus and a 170-kilodalton cellular protein is mediated through a neutralizing epitope of the pre-S region and occurs during viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tong, S; Li, J; Wands, J R

    1995-01-01

    Identification of cell surface viral binding proteins is important for understanding viral attachment and internalization. We have fused the pre-S domain of the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) large envelope protein to glutathione S-transferase and demonstrated a 170-kDa binding protein (p170) in [35S]methionine-labeled duck hepatocyte lysates. This glycoprotein was found abundantly in all extrahepatic tissues infectible with DHBV and in some noninfectible tissues, though it is not secreted into the blood. The interaction of pre-S fusion protein with p170 was competitively inhibited by wild-type DHBV in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, infection of hepatocytes with DHBV blocked the binding of pre-S fusion protein to p170, which suggests a biological role for p170 during natural infection. The p170 binding site was mapped to a conserved sequence of 16 amino acid residues (positions 87 to 102) by using 24 pre-S deletion mutants; this binding domain coincides with a major virus-neutralizing antibody epitope. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis revealed that an arginine residue at position 97 is critical for p170 binding. p170 was purified by a combination of ion-exchange and affinity chromatographies, and four peptide sequences were obtained. Two peptides showed significant similarities to human and animal carboxypeptides H, M, and N. Taken together, these results raise the possibility that the p170 binding protein is important during the replication cycle of DHBV. PMID:7474130

  13. An outbreak of duck virus enteritis (duck plague) in a captive flock of mixed waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, R.D.; Stein, G.; Novilla, M.N.; Hurley, Sarah S.; Fink, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    An outbreak of duck virus enteritis occurred in a flock of captive waterfowl composed of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), black ducks (Anas rubripes), and Canada geese (Branta canadensis). Although all three species were housed together, morbidity and mortality were confined to the 227 black ducks and Canada geese, of which 180 died and the rest were left in a weakened condition. Lesions are given for 20 black ducks and 4 Canada geese dying from DVE. In addition, both horizontal and vertical transmission are discussed as possible sources of the virus that caused this outbreak.

  14. Effect of age on the pathogenesis of duck tembusu virus in Cherry Valley ducks.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Lv, Chuanwei; Yue, Ruichao; Shi, Ying; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie; Liu, Sidang

    2015-01-01

    The effect of host age on the outcome of duck tembusu virus (DTMUV) infection was studied in ducks. Three groups of Cherry Valley ducks at 1, 3, and 7 weeks of age were intramuscularly infected with DTMUV to systematically observe the clinical symptoms, pathological changes, tissue viral loads, and immune responses. Severe clinical symptoms and neurological dysfunction were observed in 1-week-old ducks as early as 2 days post infection (dpi) and some died at 5-7 dpi. Three weeks-old ducks showed similar but milder symptoms and no deaths. However, 7-weeks-old ducks showed only transient loss of appetite. Gross lesions gradually reduced in severity as ducks matured. One-week-old ducks showed endocardial hemorrhage, splenomegaly, swelling in the lymph follicles of the ileum, liver, and kidney swelling with degeneration, and meningeal hyperemia. Three-weeks-old ducks showed only mild pathological lesions. No visible lesions were observed in 7-weeks-old ducks. However, pathological histology analysis demonstrated all infected ducks displayed viral encephalitis. DTMUV could be detected in the brains of 1-week-old ducks as early as 1 dpi and virus titers of most organs in 1-week-old ducks were significantly higher than that of 3- and 7-weeks-old ducks at 3-5 dpi. The patterns of IFN-γ, IL-2, and serum neutralizing antibodies were similar, and there were significant difference between the youngest ducks and the older ducks at early infection stage (P < 0.05). More important is that although the antibody titers of all infected ducks were similar from 9 to 17 dpi, reduced clearance of virus was observed in the youngest groups comparing with the other two groups, indicating that immune system maturity was more important than the presence of neutralizing antibody. In summary, this study demonstrates that viral pathogenesis is strongest in 1-week-old ducks and the age-related immune response plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DTMUV in ducks.

  15. A survey of North American migratory waterfowl for duck plague (duck virus enteritis) virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, Christopher J.; Docherty, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of migratory waterfowl for duck plague (DP) virus was conducted in the Mississippi and Central flyways during 1982 and in the Atlantic and Pacific flyways during 1983. Cloacal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from 3,169 migratory waterfowl in these four flyways, principally mallards (Anas platyrhynchos L.), black ducks (Anas rubripes Brewster), and pintails (Anas acuta L). In addition 1,033 birds were sampled from areas of recurrent DP outbreaks among nonmigratory and captive waterfowl, and 590 from Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, the site of the only known major DP outbreak in migratory waterfowl. Duck plague virus was not found in any of the samples. Results support the hypothesis that DP is not established in North American migratory waterfowl as an enzootic disease.

  16. Experimental infection of duck origin virulent Newcastle disease virus strain in ducks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Newcastle disease (ND) caused by virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an acute, highly contagious and fatal viral disease affecting most species of birds. Ducks are generally considered to be natural reservoirs or carriers of NDV while being resistant to NDV strains, even those most virulent for chickens; however, natural ND cases in ducks have been gradually increasing in recent years. In the present study, ducks of different breeds and ages were experimentally infected with duck origin virulent NDV strain duck/Jiangsu/JSD0812/2008 (JSD0812) by various routes to investigate the pathogenicity of NDV in ducks. Results Six breeds (mallard, Gaoyou, Shaoxing, Jinding, Shanma, and Pekin ducks) were infected intramuscularly (IM) with JSD0812 strain at the dose of 5 × 108 ELD50. Susceptibility to NDV infection among breeds varied, per morbidity and mortality. Mallard ducks were the most susceptible, and Pekin ducks the most resistant. Fifteen-, 30-, 45-, 60-, and 110-day-old Gaoyou ducks were infected with JSD0812 strain at the dose of 5 × 108 ELD50 either IM or intranasally (IN) and intraocularly (IO), and their disease development, viral shedding, and virus tissue distribution were determined. The susceptibility of ducks to NDV infection decreased with age. Most deaths occurred in 15- and 30-day-old ducklings infected IM. Ducks infected IN and IO sometimes exhibited clinical signs, but seldom died. Clinical signs were primarily neurologic. Infected ducks could excrete infectious virus from the pharynx and/or cloaca for a short period, which varied with bird age or inoculation route; the longest period was about 7 days. The rate of virus isolation in tissues from infected ducks was generally low, even in those from dead birds, and it appeared to be unrelated to bird age and infection route. Conclusions The results confirmed that some of the naturally occurring NDV virulent strains can cause the disease in ducks, and that ducks play an important

  17. Identification of duck plague virus by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hansen, W R; Brown, S E; Nashold, S W; Knudson, D L

    1999-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detecting duck plague virus. A 765-bp EcoRI fragment cloned from the genome of the duck plague vaccine (DP-VAC) virus was sequenced for PCR primer development. The fragment sequence was found by GenBank alignment searches to be similar to the 3' ends of an undefined open reading frame and the gene for DNA polymerase protein in other herpesviruses. Three of four primers sets were found to be specific for the DP-VAC virus and 100% (7/7) of field isolates but did not amplify DNA from inclusion body disease of cranes virus. The specificity of one primer set was tested with genome templates from other avian herpesviruses, including those from a golden eagle, bald eagle, great horned owl, snowy owl, peregrine falcon, prairie falcon, pigeon, psittacine, and chicken (infectious laryngotracheitis), but amplicons were not produced. Hence, this PCR test is highly specific for duck plague virus DNA. Two primer sets were able to detect 1 fg of DNA from the duck plague vaccine strain, equivalent to five genome copies. In addition, the ratio of tissue culture infectious doses to genome copies of duck plague vaccine virus from infected duck embryo cells was determined to be 1:100, making the PCR assay 20 times more sensitive than tissue culture for detecting duck plague virus. The speed, sensitivity, and specificity of this PCR provide a greatly improved diagnostic and research tool for studying the epizootiology of duck plague. PMID:10216766

  18. Complete genome sequence of duck Tembusu virus, isolated from Muscovy ducks in southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wanjun; Chen, Jidang; Wei, Chunya; Wang, Heng; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Minze; Tang, Fengfeng; Xie, Jiexiong; Liang, Huanbin; Zhang, Guihong; Su, Shuo

    2012-12-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of the duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) WJ-1 strain, isolated from Muscovy ducks. This is the first complete genome sequence of DTMUV reported in southern China. Compared with the other strains (TA, GH-2, YY5, and ZJ-407) that were previously found in eastern China, WJ-1 bears a few differences in the nucleotide and amino acid sequences. We found that there are 47 mutations of amino acids encoded by the whole open reading frame (ORF) among these five strains. The whole-genome sequence of DTMUV will help in understanding the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of duck Tembusu virus in southern China.

  19. Different outcomes of infection of chickens and ducks with a duck-origin H9N2 influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Li, C C; Diao, Y X; Sun, X Y; Hao, D M; Liu, X; Ge, P P

    2014-01-01

    As the major aquatic and terrestrial hosts for avian influenza viruses (AIVs), ducks and chickens play a critical role in the evolution and spread of the H9N2 virus. However, the outcomes of infection of ducks and chickens with the H9N2 virus are not sufficiently documented. In this study, we compared the outcomes of infection of chickens and Peking ducks with a duck-origin H9N2 virus. The results showed that this virus caused more pronounced clinical signs and histological lesions in chickens. As for the virus shedding, chickens shed more virus in the trachea and less virus in the cloaca in levels of interferon (IFN) γ were found in the trachea of ducks compared with chickens, while comparison with ducks. As for cytokines, namely IFNs and interleukins (IL), higher higher levels of IFN-β, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-6 were observed in the ileum of chickens compared with ducks. Eventually, serum hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibody titers were higher in chickens than in ducks. Taken together, ducks and chickens use different strategies in response to the H9N2 virus infection in tissues representing main replication sites of low-pathogenic AIVs. Given the different outcomes of the H9N2 virus infection in ducks and chickens, different measures should be taken in vaccination and treatment.

  20. 2',3'-dideoxy-beta-L-5-fluorocytidine inhibits duck hepatitis B virus reverse transcription and suppresses viral DNA synthesis in hepatocytes, both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Zoulim, F; Dannaoui, E; Borel, C; Hantz, O; Lin, T S; Liu, S H; Trépo, C; Cheng, Y C

    1996-01-01

    beta-L-Nucleoside analogs represent a new class of potent antiviral agents with low cytotoxicity which provide new hope in the therapy of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. We evaluated the anti-HBV activity of 2',3'-dideoxy-beta-L-5-fluorocytidine (beta-L-F-ddC), a beta-L-nucleoside analog derived from 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC), in the duck HBV (DHBV) model. This compound was previously shown to inhibit HBV DNA synthesis in a stably transfected hepatoma cell line (F2215). Using a cell-free system for the expression of an enzymatically active DHBV polymerase, we could demonstrate that the triphosphate form of beta-L-F-ddC does inhibit hepadnavirus reverse transcription. In primary duck hepatocyte culture, beta-L-F-ddC showed a potent inhibitory effect on DHBV DNA synthesis which was concentration dependent. Although beta-L-F-ddC was shown to be less active than ddC against the DHBV reverse transcriptase in vitro, beta-L-F-ddC was a stronger inhibitor in hepatocytes. The oral administration of beta-L-F-ddC in experimentally infected ducklings showed that beta-L-F-ddC is a potent inhibitor of viral replication in vivo. Short-term therapy could not prevent a rebound of viral replication after the drug was withdrawn. Preventive therapy with beta-L-F-ddC could delay the onset of viremia by only 1 day compared with the time to the onset of viremia in the control group. The in vivo inhibitory effect of beta-L-F-ddC was much stronger than that of ddC and was not associated with signs of toxicity. Our data show that beta-L-F-ddC inhibits hepadnavirus reverse transcription and is a strong inhibitor of viral replication both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:8834896

  1. Evidence of possible vertical transmission of Tembusu virus in ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Xiuli; Chen, Hao; Ti, Jinfeng; Yang, Guoping; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Yunjian; Diao, Youxiang

    2015-09-30

    In 2013, Tembusu virus (TMUV) infection was successively observed on several breeding duck farms in Shandong province, China. Affected ducks showed consistently acute anorexia, diarrhea and egg production drop. 125 hatching eggs produced by TMUV infected breeding ducks from four duck farms were collected. Among them, 35 hatching eggs were selected randomly from all before incubation for vitelline membrane samples collection. The rest of 90 hatching eggs were incubated routinely. As a result, 16 hatching eggs were found non-embryonated, 28 duck embryos died during incubation and 46 newly hatched ducklings were obtained. Vitelline membranes of non-embryonated hatching eggs, vitelline membrane, brain or liver samples of dead embryos and brain samples of newly hatched ducklings were collected for virus detection. Samples collected from one egg, embryo or duckling were treated as one. Consequently, 18 of 35 (51.43%) hatching eggs, 2 of 16 (12.50%) non-embryonated duck eggs, 17 of 28 (60.71%) dead duck embryos and 5 of 46 (10.87%) newly hatched ducklings were detected positive for TMUV using NS3-based RT-PCR. Overall, 42 of 125 (33.6%) eggs were positive for TMUV. A virus strain, designated as TMUV-SDDE, was isolated from one of these dead duck embryos which were detected TMUV positive. The results of phylogenetic analysis showed that E gene of TMUV-SDDE virus was closely related to other TMUV strains isolated in China during 2010-2013. Pathogenicity studies showed that TMUV-SDDE strain was virulent to ducklings. This is the first report that TMUV is isolated from duck embryos. The findings provide evidence of possible vertical transmission of TMUV from breeding ducks to ducklings. PMID:26187679

  2. Evidence of possible vertical transmission of Tembusu virus in ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Xiuli; Chen, Hao; Ti, Jinfeng; Yang, Guoping; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Yunjian; Diao, Youxiang

    2015-09-30

    In 2013, Tembusu virus (TMUV) infection was successively observed on several breeding duck farms in Shandong province, China. Affected ducks showed consistently acute anorexia, diarrhea and egg production drop. 125 hatching eggs produced by TMUV infected breeding ducks from four duck farms were collected. Among them, 35 hatching eggs were selected randomly from all before incubation for vitelline membrane samples collection. The rest of 90 hatching eggs were incubated routinely. As a result, 16 hatching eggs were found non-embryonated, 28 duck embryos died during incubation and 46 newly hatched ducklings were obtained. Vitelline membranes of non-embryonated hatching eggs, vitelline membrane, brain or liver samples of dead embryos and brain samples of newly hatched ducklings were collected for virus detection. Samples collected from one egg, embryo or duckling were treated as one. Consequently, 18 of 35 (51.43%) hatching eggs, 2 of 16 (12.50%) non-embryonated duck eggs, 17 of 28 (60.71%) dead duck embryos and 5 of 46 (10.87%) newly hatched ducklings were detected positive for TMUV using NS3-based RT-PCR. Overall, 42 of 125 (33.6%) eggs were positive for TMUV. A virus strain, designated as TMUV-SDDE, was isolated from one of these dead duck embryos which were detected TMUV positive. The results of phylogenetic analysis showed that E gene of TMUV-SDDE virus was closely related to other TMUV strains isolated in China during 2010-2013. Pathogenicity studies showed that TMUV-SDDE strain was virulent to ducklings. This is the first report that TMUV is isolated from duck embryos. The findings provide evidence of possible vertical transmission of TMUV from breeding ducks to ducklings.

  3. The sequential tissue distribution of duck Tembusu virus in adult ducks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Jiang, Yongping; Ding, Leilei; Lin, Yuan; Li, Qimeng; He, Xijun; Chen, Qiusheng; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a novel Tembusu virus (TMUV) that caused a severe decrease in the egg production of ducks was isolated in southeast China. Given the novelty of this duck pathogen, little information is available regarding its pathogenesis. Here, we systematically investigated the replication kinetics of TMUV PTD2010 in adult male and female ducks. We found that PTD2010 was detectable in most of the parenchymatous organs as well as the oviduct and intestinal tract from days 1 to 7 after inoculation. Viral titers were maintained at high levels for at least 9 days in the spleen, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, brain, and ovary. No virus was detected in any of these organs or tissues at 18 days after inoculation. PTD2010, thus, causes systemic infections in male and female ducks; its replication kinetics show similar patterns in most organs, with the exception of the ovaries and testes.

  4. Persistence of Avian Influenza Viruses in Lake Sediment, Duck Feces, and Duck Meat ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Jawad; Haumacher, Renate; Ike, Anthony C.; Marschang, Rachel E.

    2011-01-01

    The persistence of 3 low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) (H4N6, H5N1, and H6N8) and one human influenza virus (H1N1) as well as Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and enteric cytopathogenic bovine orphan (ECBO) virus was investigated in lake sediment, duck feces, and duck meat at 30, 20, 10, and 0°C using a germ carrier technique. Virus-loaded germ carriers were incubated in each substrate, and residual infectivity of the eluted virus was quantified on cell culture after regular intervals for a maximum of 24 weeks. Data were analyzed by a linear regression model to calculate T90 values (time required for 90% loss of virus infectivity) and estimated persistence of the viruses. In general, the persistence of all of the viruses was highest in lake sediment, followed by feces, and was the lowest in duck meat at all temperatures. For the avian influenza virus subtypes, T90 values in sediment ranged from 5 to 11, 13 to 18, 43 to 54, and 66 to 394 days at 30, 20, 10, and 0°C, respectively, which were 2 to 5 times higher than the T90 values of the viruses in the feces and meat. Although the individual viruses vary in tenacity, the survival time of influenza viruses was shorter than that of NDV and ECBO virus in all substrates. The results of this study suggest that lake sediment may act as a long-term source of influenza viruses in the aquatic habitat, while the viruses may remain infectious for extended periods of time in duck feces and meat at low temperatures, allowing persistence of the viruses in the environment over winter. PMID:21622783

  5. Post-epizootic surveys of waterfowl for duck plague (duck virus enteritis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, C.J.; Docherty, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Surviving birds from nine duck plague outbreaks in urban and confined waterfowl were sampled for duck plague (DP) virus and DP antibody during 1979-86. Duck plague virus was found in combined oral and cloacal swabs of birds from three outbreaks, and DP-neutralizing antibody was demonstrated in some birds from all nine outbreaks. Greater prevalence of DP antibody and higher titers were found in survivors from confined populations than from free-flying urban populations. Free-flying waterfowl from within 52 km of four DP outbreak sites were also sampled; virus was not found in any birds, but DP antibody was found in urban waterfowl in the vicinity of an outbreak in Potterville, Michigan. No evidence of exposure to or shedding of DP virus in migratory waterfowl was found in two regions where DP appears enzootic in urban and confined waterfowl (Eastern Shore of Maryland and the vicinity of Sacramento, California).

  6. Pathogenicity of duck plague and innate immune responses of the Cherry Valley ducks to duck plague virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Guo, Mengjiao; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Jiyuan; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Duck plague caused by duck plague virus (DPV) is an acute and contagious disease. To better understand the pathogenic mechanism of duck plague virus in ducklings, an infection experiment was performed. Our results showed that typical symptoms were observed in the infected ducklings. DPV could replicate quickly in many tissues, leading to pathological lesions, especially on the spleen. Real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that expression of many innate immune-related genes was mostly up-regulated in the brain, and the antiviral innate immune response was established, but not sufficient to restrict viral replication. In contrast, although the expression of many major pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) increased in the spleen, the expression of most cytokines was declined. Our study indicates that DPV is a pantropic virus that can replicate rapidly in tissues, causing serious pathological lesions but the immune responses are different in the spleen and brain. To our knowledge, this is the first report to systematically explore the expression profiles of the immune genes in the DPV-infected ducks. Our data provide a foundation for further study of the pathogenicity of duck plague. PMID:27553496

  7. Pathogenicity of duck plague and innate immune responses of the Cherry Valley ducks to duck plague virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Guo, Mengjiao; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Jiyuan; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-08-24

    Duck plague caused by duck plague virus (DPV) is an acute and contagious disease. To better understand the pathogenic mechanism of duck plague virus in ducklings, an infection experiment was performed. Our results showed that typical symptoms were observed in the infected ducklings. DPV could replicate quickly in many tissues, leading to pathological lesions, especially on the spleen. Real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that expression of many innate immune-related genes was mostly up-regulated in the brain, and the antiviral innate immune response was established, but not sufficient to restrict viral replication. In contrast, although the expression of many major pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) increased in the spleen, the expression of most cytokines was declined. Our study indicates that DPV is a pantropic virus that can replicate rapidly in tissues, causing serious pathological lesions but the immune responses are different in the spleen and brain. To our knowledge, this is the first report to systematically explore the expression profiles of the immune genes in the DPV-infected ducks. Our data provide a foundation for further study of the pathogenicity of duck plague.

  8. Pathogenicity of duck plague and innate immune responses of the Cherry Valley ducks to duck plague virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Guo, Mengjiao; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Jiyuan; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Duck plague caused by duck plague virus (DPV) is an acute and contagious disease. To better understand the pathogenic mechanism of duck plague virus in ducklings, an infection experiment was performed. Our results showed that typical symptoms were observed in the infected ducklings. DPV could replicate quickly in many tissues, leading to pathological lesions, especially on the spleen. Real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that expression of many innate immune-related genes was mostly up-regulated in the brain, and the antiviral innate immune response was established, but not sufficient to restrict viral replication. In contrast, although the expression of many major pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) increased in the spleen, the expression of most cytokines was declined. Our study indicates that DPV is a pantropic virus that can replicate rapidly in tissues, causing serious pathological lesions but the immune responses are different in the spleen and brain. To our knowledge, this is the first report to systematically explore the expression profiles of the immune genes in the DPV-infected ducks. Our data provide a foundation for further study of the pathogenicity of duck plague. PMID:27553496

  9. The response of ducks to V4 Newcastle disease virus and its transmission to contact ducks and domestic chickens.

    PubMed

    Bouzari, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Experimental infection of Muscovy ducks with V4 strain of Newcastle disease virus was undertaken to determine the response of the ducks to the virus and the possibility of virus transmission to ducks and chickens in village like conditions. Twelve ducks were randomly and equally divided into three groups of control, inoculated and in-contact. Additionally, the chickens were placed into two groups of four animals each, namely in-contact and control. The inoculated and in-contact ducks and in-contact chickens were kept together. The eye drop route was used for inoculation and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibodies were measured for assessment of antibody response and cloacal and pharyngeal swabs were used for detection of the virus. The primary antibody response of inoculated ducks was very high and rapid (geometric mean titers [Log base 2] of up to 5.75 ± 0.50). The in-contact ducks showed antibody response with the same pattern but lower titers than the inoculated ducks (geometric mean titers [Log base 2] of up to 3.25 ± 1.70). The in-contact chickens showed a slight increase of HI antibody (geometric mean titers [Log base 2] of up to 2.25 ± 1.25) while the control chickens did not show any increase. The antibody response indicated the transmission of the virus to contact ducks and chickens. A single isolation of virus confirmed the ability of ducks to excrete the virus. It was concluded that the V4 strain of Newcastle disease virus was highly antigenic for ducks, and ducks can transmit it to other ducks and also in-contact chickens.

  10. Liposomes containing recombinant E protein vaccine against duck Tembusu virus in ducks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tengfei; Liu, Yongxia; Cheng, Jia; Liu, Yanhan; Fan, Wentao; Cheng, Ziqiang; Niu, Xudong; Liu, Jianzhu

    2016-04-27

    To obtain an effective vaccine candidate against duck Tembusu viral (DTMUV) disease which causes egg-drop and great economical loss in the Chinese duck industry, liposome vaccines containing recombinant E protein were prepared and assessed in this study. The recombinant plasmid (PET28a-E) was constructed and transformed into BL21 (DE3) cells to produce E proteins. The recombinant E proteins were purified and entrapped by liposomes through reverse-phase evaporation. Eighty-four cherry valley ducks were randomly divided into seven groups and inoculated intramuscularly at one- or seven-day-old with liposomes-E protein or Freund's adjuvant-E protein vaccine. Blood samples were collected from the first week to the tenth week for serum antibody, plasma for viremia, as well as oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs for virus shedding analyses after being challenged with a 10(2.4) 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) of duck Tembusu virus. Results showed that serum antibody level of the liposomes vaccine was higher than the Freund's adjuvant vaccine, and inoculating twice was superior to once; furthermore, the viremia and virus shedding tests also proved that the liposomes vaccine can provide complete protection against DTMUV challenge. These results demonstrated that the liposomes-E protein vaccine could be used as a potential candidate vaccine to prevent DTMUV infection in ducks. PMID:27016654

  11. Liposomes containing recombinant E protein vaccine against duck Tembusu virus in ducks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tengfei; Liu, Yongxia; Cheng, Jia; Liu, Yanhan; Fan, Wentao; Cheng, Ziqiang; Niu, Xudong; Liu, Jianzhu

    2016-04-27

    To obtain an effective vaccine candidate against duck Tembusu viral (DTMUV) disease which causes egg-drop and great economical loss in the Chinese duck industry, liposome vaccines containing recombinant E protein were prepared and assessed in this study. The recombinant plasmid (PET28a-E) was constructed and transformed into BL21 (DE3) cells to produce E proteins. The recombinant E proteins were purified and entrapped by liposomes through reverse-phase evaporation. Eighty-four cherry valley ducks were randomly divided into seven groups and inoculated intramuscularly at one- or seven-day-old with liposomes-E protein or Freund's adjuvant-E protein vaccine. Blood samples were collected from the first week to the tenth week for serum antibody, plasma for viremia, as well as oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs for virus shedding analyses after being challenged with a 10(2.4) 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) of duck Tembusu virus. Results showed that serum antibody level of the liposomes vaccine was higher than the Freund's adjuvant vaccine, and inoculating twice was superior to once; furthermore, the viremia and virus shedding tests also proved that the liposomes vaccine can provide complete protection against DTMUV challenge. These results demonstrated that the liposomes-E protein vaccine could be used as a potential candidate vaccine to prevent DTMUV infection in ducks.

  12. Pathogenicity of two Egyptian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in domestic ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Domestic ducks have been implicated in the dissemination and evolution of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. Interestingly, the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in domestic ducks has increased over time with some viruses producing 100% mortality in ducks. These changes in vir...

  13. Novel reassortant highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N5) viruses in domestic ducks, China.

    PubMed

    Gu, Min; Liu, Wenbo; Cao, Yongzhong; Peng, Daxin; Wang, Xiaobo; Wan, Hongquan; Zhao, Guo; Xu, Quangang; Zhang, Wei; Song, Qingqing; Li, Yanfang; Liu, Xiufan

    2011-06-01

    In China, domestic ducks and wild birds often share the same water, in which influenza viruses replicate preferentially. Isolation of 2 novel reassortant highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N5) viruses from apparently healthy domestic ducks highlights the role of these ducks as reassortment vessels. Such new subtypes of influenza viruses may pose a pandemic threat.

  14. Duck Tembusu virus exhibits neurovirulence in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Duck Tembusu virus is a member of the Ntaya group in the genus Flavivirus. The virus has been responsible for severe duck egg-drop syndrome in China since 2010. Its emergence and rapid spread have caused great economic loss for the poultry industry. The epidemiology of the virus infection and the potential threat to public health is of great concern because of the infective and zoonotic nature of flaviviruses. Results In this study, the pathogenicity of duck Tembusu virus in BALB/c mice was investigated. Infected mice developed clinical signs, including loss of appetite, ruffled hair, weight loss, disorientation, blindness and paralysis of hind limbs from six days post- infection following intracerebral inoculation. Morbidity was 100%, with mortality ranging from 20 to 80% in three- to eight-week-old mice. High virus titers were recovered from the brain, and the virus was distributed in several organs. Histologically, there was widespread non-suppurative encephalitis in the brain. Lymphocyte depletion in the spleen was observed, along with fatty degeneration in the liver and kidney. Conclusions Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that duck Tembusu virus is highly neurovirulent in BALB/c mice. The mouse model used in this work was able to produce Tembusu virus infection and could be useful for elucidating some of the aspects of the pathophysiology of other flavivirus infections. PMID:23941427

  15. Pathogenicity and genetic characterization of a duck Tembusu virus associated with egg-dropping in Muscovy ducks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Qin; Lin, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Zhan-Xin; Zhang, Kai; Yan, Zhuan-Qiang; Zhou, Qing-Feng; Qin, Jian-Ping; Xie, Qing-Mei; Bi, Ying-Zuo; Chen, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) has spread to the major duck-farming region in China, causing acute egg-production drop in Chinese duck population. In this study, we characterized a DTMUV strain (named GD2014) isolated from an egg-production drop duck farm in Guangdong province, South China. The virus was pathogenic to Muscovy duck embryos and caused severe egg production drop for laying Muscovy ducks. The genome sequence of GD2014 shared 97-99% homologies with other waterfowl-origin Tembusu viruses, and shared 89% identities with MM1775 strain isolated from mosquito. Phylogenetic analysis of entire open reading frame (ORF), E gene and NS5 gene indicated that GD2014 belonged to Ntaya group. These results have implications for understanding the orgin, emergence and pathogenicity of DTMUV as well as for the development of vaccines and diagnostics based on epidemiological data. PMID:27354303

  16. Pathogenicity and genetic characterization of a duck Tembusu virus associated with egg-dropping in Muscovy ducks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Qin; Lin, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Zhan-Xin; Zhang, Kai; Yan, Zhuan-Qiang; Zhou, Qing-Feng; Qin, Jian-Ping; Xie, Qing-Mei; Bi, Ying-Zuo; Chen, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) has spread to the major duck-farming region in China, causing acute egg-production drop in Chinese duck population. In this study, we characterized a DTMUV strain (named GD2014) isolated from an egg-production drop duck farm in Guangdong province, South China. The virus was pathogenic to Muscovy duck embryos and caused severe egg production drop for laying Muscovy ducks. The genome sequence of GD2014 shared 97-99% homologies with other waterfowl-origin Tembusu viruses, and shared 89% identities with MM1775 strain isolated from mosquito. Phylogenetic analysis of entire open reading frame (ORF), E gene and NS5 gene indicated that GD2014 belonged to Ntaya group. These results have implications for understanding the orgin, emergence and pathogenicity of DTMUV as well as for the development of vaccines and diagnostics based on epidemiological data.

  17. [Markers of hepatitis virus].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Fumitaka

    2008-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the major viruses known to cause viral hepatitis. Serological markers are commonly used as diagnostic and/or prognostic indicators of acute or chronic HBV or HCV infection. The ability to detect HBV DNA in serum has been reported to have prognostic value for the outcome of chronic HBV infection. A rapid and sustained drop in HBV DNA or HCV RNA levels in patients under therapy has been shown to be a predictive factor for a favourable treatment outcome. Various techniques for detecting HBV DNA or HCV RNA have already been described; however, there are various problems with the sensitivity or detection range of those methods. New virus measuring methods have recently been reported and used. The Cobas Taq Man HCV Test is a new method to detect HBV DNA and HCV RNA with higher sensitivity and a broader range of quantitation than conventional methods. Some reports have shown that these methods improve therapy monitoring and the management of HBV or HCV infection. Moreover, hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been reported in Japan. The clinical features and viral markers of HEV have also been described. PMID:19086457

  18. Adaptation of a Duck Influenza A Virus in Quail

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shinya; Shinya, Kyoko; Takada, Ayato; Ito, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Le, Quynh Mai; Ebina, Masahito; Kasai, Noriyuki; Kida, Hiroshi; Horimoto, Taisuke; Rivailler, Pierre; Chen, Li Mei; Donis, Ruben O.

    2012-01-01

    Quail are thought to serve as intermediate hosts of influenza A viruses between aquatic birds and terrestrial birds, such as chickens, due to their high susceptibility to aquatic-bird viruses, which then adapt to replicate efficiently in their new hosts. However, does replication of aquatic-bird influenza viruses in quail similarly result in their efficient replication in humans? Using sialic acid-galactose linkage-specific lectins, we found both avian (sialic acid-α2-3-galactose [Siaα2-3Gal] linkages on sialyloligosaccharides)- and human (Siaα2-6Gal)-type receptors on the tracheal cells of quail, consistent with previous reports. We also passaged a duck H3N2 virus in quail 19 times. Sequence analysis revealed that eight mutations accumulated in hemagglutinin (HA) during these passages. Interestingly, many of the altered HA amino acids found in the adapted virus are present in human seasonal viruses, but not in duck viruses. We also found that stepwise stalk deletion of neuraminidase occurred during passages, resulting in reduced neuraminidase function. Despite some hemagglutinin mutations near the receptor binding pocket, appreciable changes in receptor specificity were not detected. However, reverse-genetics-generated viruses that possessed the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of the quail-passaged virus replicated significantly better than the virus possessing the parent HA and neuraminidase in normal human bronchial epithelial cells, whereas no significant difference in replication between the two viruses was observed in duck cells. Further, the quail-passaged but not the original duck virus replicated in human bronchial epithelial cells. These data indicate that quail can serve as intermediate hosts for aquatic-bird influenza viruses to be transmitted to humans. PMID:22090115

  19. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... or past infection, or immunity to hepatitis A Hepatitis B tests: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), you have ...

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Flavivirus, Duck Tembusu Virus, Isolated from Ducks and Geese in China

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Tao; Zhang, Dabing; Ma, Xuejun; Cao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Liu; Ni, Zheng; Ye, Weicheng; Yu, Bin; Hua, Jionggang; Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Duck tembusu virus (DTMUV) is an emerging agent that causes a severe disease in ducks. We report herein the first complete genome sequences of duck tembusu virus strains YY5, ZJ-407, and GH-2, isolated from Shaoxing ducks, breeder ducks, and geese, respectively, in China. The genomes of YY5, ZJ-407, and GH-2 are all 10,990 nucleotides (nt) in length and encode a putative polyprotein of 3,426 amino acids. It is flanked by a 5′ and a 3′ noncoding region (NCR) of 94 and 618 nt, respectively. Knowledge of the whole sequence of DTMUV will be useful for further studies of the mechanisms of virus replication and pathogenesis. PMID:22354945

  1. Complete genome sequence of a novel flavivirus, duck tembusu virus, isolated from ducks and geese in china.

    PubMed

    Yun, Tao; Zhang, Dabing; Ma, Xuejun; Cao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Liu; Ni, Zheng; Ye, Weicheng; Yu, Bin; Hua, Jionggang; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Cun

    2012-03-01

    Duck tembusu virus (DTMUV) is an emerging agent that causes a severe disease in ducks. We report herein the first complete genome sequences of duck tembusu virus strains YY5, ZJ-407, and GH-2, isolated from Shaoxing ducks, breeder ducks, and geese, respectively, in China. The genomes of YY5, ZJ-407, and GH-2 are all 10,990 nucleotides (nt) in length and encode a putative polyprotein of 3,426 amino acids. It is flanked by a 5' and a 3' noncoding region (NCR) of 94 and 618 nt, respectively. Knowledge of the whole sequence of DTMUV will be useful for further studies of the mechanisms of virus replication and pathogenesis.

  2. Case report: epithelial intracytoplasmic herpes viral inclusions associated with an outbreak of duck virus enteritis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, B.C.; Jessup, David A.; Docherty, Douglas E.; Lownestine, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Several muscovy ducks from a free-roaming flock of 65 muscovy and mallard ducks died over a 3-week period. Three muscovy ducks were necropsied. Gross and microscopic changes were compatible with duck virus enteritis, and the virus was isolated. In addition to intranuclear viral inclusion bodies in several tissues, intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were present in esophageal and cloacal epithelium, By electron microscopy, the membrane-bound intracytoplasmic inclusions were found to contain enveloped herpesvirus, and nuclei contained herpes viral nucleocapsids.

  3. Novel reassortant influenza A(H5N8) viruses in domestic ducks, eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Peng, Xiaorong; Xu, Lihua; Jin, Changzhong; Cheng, Linfang; Lu, Xiangyun; Xie, Tiansheng; Yao, Hangping; Wu, Nanping

    2014-08-01

    Domestic ducks are natural reservoirs of avian influenza viruses and serve as reassortant hosts for new virus subtypes. We isolated 2 novel influenza A(H5N8) viruses from domestic ducks in eastern China, sequenced their genomes, and tested their pathogenicity in chickens and mice. Circulation of these viruses may pose health risks for humans.

  4. Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Arthur

    2016-09-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of hepatitis C virus, focusing on transmission, prevention, screening, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:27595226

  5. Expression and distribution of the duck enteritis virus UL51 protein in experimentally infected ducks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chanjuan; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Xu, Chao; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Xiaoyue; Zhu, Dekang; Luo, Qihui; Cui, Hengmin; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Yin; Xu, Zhiwen; Chen, Zhengli; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2010-06-01

    To determine the expression and distribution of tegument proteins encoded by duck enteritis virus (DEV) UL51 gene in tissues of experimentally infected ducks, for the first time, an immunoperoxidase staining method to detect UL51 protein (UL51p) in paraffin-embedded tissues is reported. A rabbit anti-UL51 polyclonal serum, raised against a recombinant 6-His-UL51 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli, was prepared, purified, and used as primary antibodies. Fifty-eight 30-day-old DEV-free ducks were intramuscularly inoculated with the pathogenic DEV CHv strain as infection group, and two ducks were selected as preinfection group. The tissues were collected at sequential time points between 2 and 480 hr postinoculation (PI) and prepared for immunoperoxidase staining. DEV UL51p was first found in the spleen and liver at 8 hr PI; in the bursa of Fabricius and thymus at 12 hr PI; in the Harders glands, esophagus, small intestine (including the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum), and large intestine (including the caecum and rectum) at 24 hr PI; in the glandularis ventriculus at 48 hr PI; and in the pancreas, cerebrum, kidney, lung, and myocardium at 72 hr PI. Throughout the infection process, the UL51p was not seen in the muscle. Furthermore, the intensity of positive staining of DEV UL51p antigen in various tissues increased sharply from 8 to 96 hr PI, peaked during 120-144 hr PI, and then decreased steadily from 216 to 480 hr PI, suggesting that the expressional levels of DEV UL51p in systemic organs have a close correlation with the progression of duck virus enteritis (DVE) disease. A number of DEV UL51p was distributed in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen, liver, esophagus, small intestine, and large intestine of DEV-infected ducks, whereas less DEV UL51p was distributed in the Harders glands, glandularis ventriculus, cerebrum, kidney, lung, pancreas, and myocardium of DEV-infected ducks. Moreover, DEV UL51p can be expressed in the cytoplasm of various types

  6. Expression and immunohistochemical distribution of duck plague virus glycoprotein gE in infected ducks.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Xiang, Jun; Xie, Wei; Shen, Fuxiao; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Luo, Qihui; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2011-03-01

    To determine the distribution of duck plague virus (DPV) gE protein in paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of experimentally DPV-infected ducks, an indirect immunoperoxidase assay was established to detect glycoprotein E (gE) protein for the first time. The rabbit anti-His-gE serum, raised against the recombinant His-gE fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), was prepared and purified. Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence analysis showed that the anti-His-gE serum had a high level of reactivity and specificity and could be used as the first antibody for further experiments to study the distribution of DPV gE protein in DPV-infected tissues. A number of DPV gE proteins were distributed in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen, liver, esophagus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and kidney of DPV-infected ducks and a few DPV gE were distributed in the Harders glands, myocardium, cerebrum, and lung, whereas the gE was not seen in the skin, muscle, and pancreas. Moreover, DPV gE was expressed abundantly in the cytoplasm of lymphocytes, reticulum cells, macrophages, epithelial cells, and hepatocytes. The present study may be useful not only for describing the characteristics of gE expression and distribution in infected ducks but also for understanding the pathogenesis of DPV.

  7. Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Harry R.; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. An improved understanding of the natural history of HEV infection has been achieved within the last decade. Several reservoirs and transmission modes have been identified. Hepatitis E is an underdiagnosed disease, in part due to the use of serological assays with low sensitivity. However, diagnostic tools, including nucleic acid-based tests, have been improved. The epidemiology and clinical features of hepatitis E differ between developing and developed countries. HEV infection is usually an acute self-limiting disease, but in developed countries it causes chronic infection with rapidly progressive cirrhosis in organ transplant recipients, patients with hematological malignancy requiring chemotherapy, and individuals with HIV. HEV also causes extrahepatic manifestations, including a number of neurological syndromes and renal injury. Acute infection usually requires no treatment, but chronic infection should be treated by reducing immunosuppression in transplant patients and/or the use of antiviral therapy. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge about the virus itself, as well as the epidemiology, diagnostics, natural history, and management of HEV infection in developing and developed countries. PMID:24396139

  8. Hepatitis E virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Dalton, Harry R; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. An improved understanding of the natural history of HEV infection has been achieved within the last decade. Several reservoirs and transmission modes have been identified. Hepatitis E is an underdiagnosed disease, in part due to the use of serological assays with low sensitivity. However, diagnostic tools, including nucleic acid-based tests, have been improved. The epidemiology and clinical features of hepatitis E differ between developing and developed countries. HEV infection is usually an acute self-limiting disease, but in developed countries it causes chronic infection with rapidly progressive cirrhosis in organ transplant recipients, patients with hematological malignancy requiring chemotherapy, and individuals with HIV. HEV also causes extrahepatic manifestations, including a number of neurological syndromes and renal injury. Acute infection usually requires no treatment, but chronic infection should be treated by reducing immunosuppression in transplant patients and/or the use of antiviral therapy. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge about the virus itself, as well as the epidemiology, diagnostics, natural history, and management of HEV infection in developing and developed countries. PMID:24396139

  9. Determinants of pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ducks have been implicated in the dissemination and evolution of the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. The pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in domestic ducks has increased over time with some viruses producing 100% mortality in very short time. The determinants of pathogenic...

  10. Hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2007-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a worldwide health problem and may cause acute, fulminant, chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or hepatocelullar carcinoma (HCC). Infection with HBV in infancy or early childhood may lead to a high rate of persistent infection (25-90%), while the rates are lower if infection occurs during adulthood (5-10%). In most endemic areas, infection occurs mainly during early childhood and mother-to-infant transmission accounts for approximately 50% of the chronic infection cases. Hepatitis B during pregnancy does not increase maternal mortality or morbidity or the risk of fetal complications. Approximately 90% of the infants of HBsAg carrier mothers with positive hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg) will become carriers if no immunoprophylaxis is given. Transplacental HBeAg may induce a specific non-responsiveness of helper T cells and HBcAg. Spontaneous HBeAg seroconversion to anti-HBe may develop with time but liver damage may occur during the process of the immune clearance of HBV and HBeAg. Mother-to-infant transmission of HBV from HBeAg negative but HBsAg positive mothers is the most important cause of acute or fulminant hepatitis B in infancy. Although antiviral agents are available to treat and avoid the complications of chronic hepatitis B, prevention of HBV infection is the best way for control. Screening for maternal HBsAg with/without HBeAg, followed by three to four doses of HBV vaccine in infancy and hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) within 24h of birth is the most effective way to prevent HBV infection. In areas with a low prevalence of HBV infection or with limited resources, omitting maternal screening but giving three doses of HBV vaccine universally in infancy can also produce good protective efficacy. The first universal HBV immunisation programme in the world was launched in Taiwan 22 years ago. HBV infection rates, chronicity rates, incidence of HCC and incidence of fulminant hepatitis in children have been effectively

  11. Establishment of an H6N2 influenza virus lineage in domestic ducks in southern China.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Bahl, J; Fan, X H; Vijaykrishna, D; Cheung, C L; Webby, R J; Webster, R G; Chen, H; Smith, Gavin J D; Peiris, J S M; Guan, Y

    2010-07-01

    Multiple reassortment events between different subtypes of endemic avian influenza viruses have increased the genomic diversity of influenza viruses circulating in poultry in southern China. Gene exchange from the natural gene pool to poultry has contributed to this increase in genetic diversity. However, the role of domestic ducks as an interface between the natural gene pool and terrestrial poultry in the influenza virus ecosystem has not been fully characterized. Here we phylogenetically and antigenically analyzed 170 H6 viruses isolated from domestic ducks from 2000 to 2005 in southern China, which contains the largest population of domestic ducks in the world. Three distinct hemagglutinin lineages were identified. Group I contained the majority of isolates with a single internal gene complex and was endemic in domestic ducks in Guangdong from the late 1990s onward. Group II was derived from reassortment events in which the surface genes of group I viruses were replaced with novel H6 and N2 genes. Group III represented H6 viruses that undergo frequent reassortment with multiple virus subtypes from the natural gene pool. Surprisingly, H6 viruses endemic in domestic ducks and terrestrial poultry seldom reassort, but gene exchanges between viruses from domestic ducks and migratory ducks occurred throughout the surveillance period. These findings suggest that domestic ducks in southern China mediate the interaction of viruses between different gene pools and facilitate the generation of novel influenza virus variants circulating in poultry.

  12. Experimental West Nile virus infection in aigamo ducks, a cross between wild ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) and domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var. domesticus).

    PubMed

    Shirafuji, Hiroaki; Kanehira, Katsushi; Kubo, Masanori; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Kamio, Tsugihiko

    2009-06-01

    Four 2-wk-old and four 4-wk-old aigamo ducks, a cross between wild and domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos and Anas platyrhynchos var. domesticus, respectively), were infected with the NY99 strain of West Nile virus (WNV) to investigate WNV's pathogenicity in aigamo ducks and the possibility that they could transmit WNV. In the group of infected 2-wk-old aigamo ducks (2w-infection group), all of the ducks ate and drank less and showed decreased activity, some showed ataxia, and one died. Meanwhile, the group of infected 4 wk olds (4w-infection group) showed no clinical signs during the experimental period. Viremia was observed in all of the ducks in both age groups. Peak viral titers in the three surviving members of the 2w-infection group were 10(3.7)-10(5.3) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml serum; the peak was 10(7.1) PFU/ml serum in the 2w duck that died from the infection. Peak viral titers in the 4w-infection group were 10(4.1)-10(4.9) PFU/ml serum. Viral shedding in the oral and/or cloacal cavity was observed in all four members of the 2w-infection group and in three of the four members of the 4w-infection group. These results suggest that WNV-infected aigamo ducks can transmit WNV. Although aigamo ducks are reared in East Asia, where WNV is an exotic pathogen, the virus could be introduced and spread there in the future; thus it is important to take precautions against an introduction, and measures to prevent infection to aigamo duck operations should be prepared.

  13. The vaccine efficacy of recombinant duck enteritis virus expressing secreted E with or without PrM proteins of duck tembusu virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pucheng; Liu, Jinxiong; Jiang, Yongping; Zhao, Yuhui; Li, Qimeng; Wu, Li; He, Xijun; Chen, Hualan

    2014-09-15

    A newly emerged tembusu virus that causes egg-drop has been affecting ducks in China since 2010. Currently, no vaccine is available for this disease. A live attenuated duck enteritis virus (DEV; a herpesvirus) vaccine has been used routinely to control lethal DEV in ducks since the 1960s. Here, we constructed two recombinant DEVs by transfecting overlapping fosmid DNAs. One virus, rDEV-TE, expresses the truncated form of the envelope glycoprotein (TE) of duck tembusu virus (DTMUV), and the other virus, rDEV-PrM/TE, expresses both the TE and pre-membrane proteins (PrM). Animal study demonstrated that both recombinant viruses induced measurable anti-DTMUV neutralizing antibodies in ducks. After two doses of recombinant virus, rDEV-PrM/TE completely protected ducks from DTMUV challenge, whereas rDEV-TE only conferred partial protection. These results demonstrate that recombinant DEV expressing the TE and pre-membrane proteins is protective and can serve as a potential candidate vaccine to prevent DTMUV infection in ducks. PMID:25087676

  14. The vaccine efficacy of recombinant duck enteritis virus expressing secreted E with or without PrM proteins of duck tembusu virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pucheng; Liu, Jinxiong; Jiang, Yongping; Zhao, Yuhui; Li, Qimeng; Wu, Li; He, Xijun; Chen, Hualan

    2014-09-15

    A newly emerged tembusu virus that causes egg-drop has been affecting ducks in China since 2010. Currently, no vaccine is available for this disease. A live attenuated duck enteritis virus (DEV; a herpesvirus) vaccine has been used routinely to control lethal DEV in ducks since the 1960s. Here, we constructed two recombinant DEVs by transfecting overlapping fosmid DNAs. One virus, rDEV-TE, expresses the truncated form of the envelope glycoprotein (TE) of duck tembusu virus (DTMUV), and the other virus, rDEV-PrM/TE, expresses both the TE and pre-membrane proteins (PrM). Animal study demonstrated that both recombinant viruses induced measurable anti-DTMUV neutralizing antibodies in ducks. After two doses of recombinant virus, rDEV-PrM/TE completely protected ducks from DTMUV challenge, whereas rDEV-TE only conferred partial protection. These results demonstrate that recombinant DEV expressing the TE and pre-membrane proteins is protective and can serve as a potential candidate vaccine to prevent DTMUV infection in ducks.

  15. Characterization of duck H5N1 influenza viruses with differing pathogenicity in mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducks.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yinghua; Wu, Peipei; Peng, Daxin; Wang, Xiaobo; Wan, Hongquan; Zhang, Pinghu; Long, Jinxue; Zhang, Wenjun; Li, Yanfang; Wang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiaorong; Liu, Xiufan

    2009-12-01

    A number of H5N1 influenza outbreaks have occurred in aquatic birds in Asia. As aquatic birds are the natural reservoir of influenza A viruses and do not usually show clinical disease upon infection, the repeated H5N1 outbreaks have highlighted the importance of continuous surveillance on H5N1 viruses in aquatic birds. In the present study we characterized the biological properties of four H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which had been isolated from ducks, in different animal models. In specific pathogen free (SPF) chickens, all four isolates were highly pathogenic. In SPF mice, the S and Y isolates were moderately pathogenic. However, in mallard ducks, two isolates had low pathogenicity, while the other two were highly pathogenic and caused lethal infection. A representative isolate with high pathogenicity in ducks caused systemic infection and replicated effectively in all 10 organs tested in challenged ducks, whereas a representative isolate with low pathogenicity in ducks was only detected in some organs in a few challenged ducks. Comparison of complete genomic sequences from the four isolates showed that the same amino acid residues that have been reported to be associated with virulence and host adaption/restriction of influenza viruses were present in the PB2, HA, NA, M and NS genes, while the amino acid residues at the HA cleavage site were diverse. From these results it appeared that the virulence of H5N1 avian influenza viruses was increased for ducks and that amino acid substitutions at the HA cleavage site might have contributed to the differing pathogenicity of these isolates in mallards. A procedure for the intravenous pathogenicity index test in a mallard model for assessing the virulence of H5/H7 subtype avian influenza viruses in waterfowl is described.

  16. Duck Egg-Drop Syndrome Caused by BYD Virus, a New Tembusu-Related Flavivirus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiuling; Wang, Yongyue; Liu, Peipei; Lu, Xishan; Zhang, Guozhong; Hu, Xueying; Liu, Di; Li, Xiaoxia; Su, Wenliang; Lu, Hao; Mok, Ngai Shing; Wang, Peiyi; Wang, Ming; Tian, Kegong; Gao, George F.

    2011-01-01

    Since April 2010, a severe outbreak of duck viral infection, with egg drop, feed uptake decline and ovary-oviduct disease, has spread around the major duck-producing regions in China. A new virus, named BYD virus, was isolated in different areas, and a similar disease was reproduced in healthy egg-producing ducks, infecting with the isolated virus. The virus was re-isolated from the affected ducks and replicated well in primary duck embryo fibroblasts and Vero cells, causing the cytopathic effect. The virus was identified as an enveloped positive-stranded RNA virus with a size of approximately 55 nm in diameter. Genomic sequencing of the isolated virus revealed that it is closely related to Tembusu virus (a mosquito-borne Ntaya group flavivirus), with 87–91% nucleotide identity of the partial E (envelope) proteins to that of Tembusu virus and 72% of the entire genome coding sequence with Bagaza virus, the most closely related flavivirus with an entirely sequenced genome. Collectively our systematic studies fulfill Koch's postulates, and therefore, the causative agent of the duck egg drop syndrome occurring in China is a new flavivirus. Flavivirus is an emerging and re-emerging zoonotic pathogen and BYD virus that causes severe egg-drop, could be disastrous for the duck industry. More importantly its public health concerns should also be evaluated, and its epidemiology should be closely watched due to the zoonotic nature of flaviviruses. PMID:21455312

  17. Duck egg-drop syndrome caused by BYD virus, a new Tembusu-related flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingliang; Li, Shuang; Hu, Xudong; Yu, Xiuling; Wang, Yongyue; Liu, Peipei; Lu, Xishan; Zhang, Guozhong; Hu, Xueying; Liu, Di; Li, Xiaoxia; Su, Wenliang; Lu, Hao; Mok, Ngai Shing; Wang, Peiyi; Wang, Ming; Tian, Kegong; Gao, George F

    2011-01-01

    Since April 2010, a severe outbreak of duck viral infection, with egg drop, feed uptake decline and ovary-oviduct disease, has spread around the major duck-producing regions in China. A new virus, named BYD virus, was isolated in different areas, and a similar disease was reproduced in healthy egg-producing ducks, infecting with the isolated virus. The virus was re-isolated from the affected ducks and replicated well in primary duck embryo fibroblasts and Vero cells, causing the cytopathic effect. The virus was identified as an enveloped positive-stranded RNA virus with a size of approximately 55 nm in diameter. Genomic sequencing of the isolated virus revealed that it is closely related to Tembusu virus (a mosquito-borne Ntaya group flavivirus), with 87-91% nucleotide identity of the partial E (envelope) proteins to that of Tembusu virus and 72% of the entire genome coding sequence with Bagaza virus, the most closely related flavivirus with an entirely sequenced genome. Collectively our systematic studies fulfill Koch's postulates, and therefore, the causative agent of the duck egg drop syndrome occurring in China is a new flavivirus. Flavivirus is an emerging and re-emerging zoonotic pathogen and BYD virus that causes severe egg-drop, could be disastrous for the duck industry. More importantly its public health concerns should also be evaluated, and its epidemiology should be closely watched due to the zoonotic nature of flaviviruses.

  18. Pathogenicity of reassortant H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in domestic ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks has increased over time. These changes in virulence have been reported with viruses from countries with high population of domestic ducks, including Egypt. In order to understand which viral genes are contri...

  19. Increased virulence in ducks of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses from Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks has increased over time. These changes in virulence have been reported with viruses from countries with high population of domestic ducks. Since 2006, H5N1 HPAI outbreaks in Egypt have been occurring in po...

  20. The pathogenesis of duck virus enteritis in experimentally infected ducks: a quantitative time-course study using TaqMan polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xuefeng, Qi; Xiaoyan, Yang; Anchun, Cheng; Mingshu, Wang; Dekang, Zhu; Renyong, Jia

    2008-06-01

    Duck virus enteritis is an acute and contagious herpesvirus infection of duck, geese and swans with high morbidity and mortality. The kinetics of viral DNA loads and immunohistochemical localization of virulent duck enteritis virus, as well as histopathological examination in various tissues of ducks following oral infection, were investigated. The time course for the appearance of viral antigen and tissue lesions in various tissues was coincident with the levels of duck enteritis virus at the various sites, suggesting that the levels of duck enteritis virus in systemic organs have a close correlation with the progression of disease. The abundance of target epithelial and lymphoid cells may contribute to the high levels of virus infection and replication in lymphoid and intestinal tissues.

  1. Duck enteritis virus glycoprotein D and B DNA vaccines induce immune responses and immunoprotection in Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Cao, Yongsheng; Cui, Lihong; Ma, Bo; Mu, Xiaoyu; Li, Yanwei; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Dan; Wei, Wei; Gao, Mingchun; Wang, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccine is a promising strategy for protection against virus infection. However, little is known on the efficacy of vaccination with two plasmids for expressing the glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) of duck enteritis virus (DEV) in inducing immune response and immunoprotection against virulent virus infection in Pekin ducks. In this study, two eukaryotic expressing plasmids of pcDNA3.1-gB and pcDNA3.1-gD were constructed. Following transfection, the gB and gD expressions in DF1 cells were detected. Groups of ducks were vaccinated with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, and boosted with the same vaccine on day 14 post primary vaccination. We found that intramuscular vaccinations with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, but not control plasmid, stimulated a high frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in Pekin ducks, particularly with both plasmids. Similarly, vaccination with these plasmids, particularly with both plasmids, promoted higher levels of neutralization antibodies against DEV in Pekin ducks. More importantly, vaccination with both plasmids significantly reduced the virulent DEV-induced mortality in Pekin ducks. Our data indicated that vaccination with plasmids for expressing both gB and gD induced potent cellular and humoral immunity against DEV in Pekin ducks. Therefore, this vaccination strategy may be used for the prevention of DEV infection in Pekin ducks.

  2. Studies on vertical and horizontal transmission of duck plague virus in apparently healthy waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burgess, Elizabeth C.

    1978-01-01

    Healthy waterfowl were found to be carriers of duck plague (DP) virus. Black ducks (Anas rubripes) and Canada geese (Branta canadensis) surviving a natural outbreak of DP at Coloma, Wisconsin, in 1973 yielded DP virus in cloacal swabs taken four years postinfection. Experimental infection of previously unexposed mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynochos) with the Coloma strain of DP virus CO-WI (73) also produced cloacal virus shedding for up to four years after infection. A second DP virus strain, LA-SD (73) from the Lake Andes, South Dakota, epornitic, was detected from cloacal swabs of pintail ducks (Anas acuta), gadwall ducks (Anas strepera), wood ducks (Aix sponsa), and Canada geese infected experimentally one year before. The frequency of swabs positive for DP virus varied between individuals within each of the tested species. The amount of detectable DP virus shed was about 100 plaqueforming units of virus percloacal swab. Oral erosions were present in all species tested except Canada geese and gadwall ducks. Erosions occurred at the openings of the sublingual salivary gland ducts. DP virus was isolated from erosions. All ducks with lesions proved to shed DP virus, although not necessarily at the time they had the lesion. Three pintail ducks treated with dexamethasone for ten days, shed DP virus daily for 19 days after the first day of treatment. These birds also shed DP virus the one time they were tested prior to dexamethosone treatment. An acute lethal outbreak occurred in CO-WI (73) carrier birds. Both DP virus and specific lesions were found in dead birds. The deaths coincided with a change in housing and with the simultaneous introduction of co-housed LA-SD (73) infected ducklings. DP virus was isolated from the chorio-allantoic (CA) fluid of a fourteen day pekin embryo and from five of ten infertile pekin eggs laid by DP carrier birds.

  3. A duck enteritis virus-vectored bivalent live vaccine provides fast and complete protection against H5N1 avian influenza virus infection in ducks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Jiang, Yongping; Wu, Li; Zeng, Xianying; Tian, Guobin; Ge, Jinying; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Bu, Zhigao; Chen, Hualan

    2011-11-01

    Ducks play an important role in the maintenance of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in nature, and the successful control of AIVs in ducks has important implications for the eradication of the disease in poultry and its prevention in humans. The inactivated influenza vaccine is expensive, labor-intensive, and usually needs 2 to 3 weeks to induce protective immunity in ducks. Live attenuated duck enteritis virus (DEV; a herpesvirus) vaccine is used routinely to control lethal DEV infections in many duck-producing areas. Here, we first established a system to generate the DEV vaccine strain by using the transfection of overlapping fosmid DNAs. Using this system, we constructed two recombinant viruses, rDEV-ul41HA and rDEV-us78HA, in which the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the H5N1 virus A/duck/Anhui/1/06 was inserted and stably maintained within the ul41 gene or between the us7 and us8 genes of the DEV genome. Duck studies indicated that rDEV-us78HA had protective efficacy similar to that of the live DEV vaccine against lethal DEV challenge; importantly, a single dose of 10(6) PFU of rDEV-us78HA induced complete protection against a lethal H5N1 virus challenge in as little as 3 days postvaccination. The protective efficacy against both lethal DEV and H5N1 challenge provided by rDEV-ul41HA inoculation in ducks was slightly weaker than that provided by rDEV-us78HA. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that recombinant DEV is suitable for use as a bivalent live attenuated vaccine, providing rapid protection against both DEV and H5N1 virus infection in ducks.

  4. Phylogenic analysis of reassorted avian influenza viruses isolated from Korean domestic ducks from 2005 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sook Jung; Kim, Heui Man; Kim, Yun Hee; Hwang, Seon Do; Shin, Jin Soo; Ku, Keun Bon; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2009-02-01

    Ducks have been regarded as animals that can perpetuate most avian influenza viruses since they generally do not show the clear clinical signs such as death and reduced body weight when they are infected. Here, we characterized two H3N2 and one H3N6 avian influenza viruses isolated from ducks on the local farms in Korea from 2005 to 2007. Genetic analysis of these viruses showed that most segments of isolates except NP genes belonged to Eurasian lineage. NP genes of two H3N2 isolates, A/Duck/Korea/S71/07, and A/Duck/Korea/S72/07 belonged to North American lineage. Our results suggest that the genetic reassortment among avian influenza viruses can occur in domestic ducks.

  5. SURVEY FOR WEST NILE VIRUS ANTIBODIES IN WILD DUCKS, 2004-06, USA.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik K; Jankowski, Mark D; Goldberg, Diana; Franson, J Christian

    2016-04-28

    Detection of West Nile virus (WNV) in ducks has been reported in North America in isolated cases of mortality in wild waterbirds and following outbreaks in farmed ducks. Although the virus has been noted as an apparent incidental finding in several species of ducks, little is known about the prevalence of exposure or the outcome of infection with WNV in wild ducks in North America. From 2004-06, we collected sera from 1,406 wild-caught American Wigeon ( Anas americana ), Mallard ( Anas platyrhynchos ), and Northern Pintail ( Anas acuta ) ducks at national wildlife refuges (NWRs) in North Dakota and Wood Ducks ( Aix sponsa ) at NWRs in South Carolina and Tennessee. We measured the prevalence of previous exposure to WNV in these ducks by measuring WNV antibodies and evaluated variation in exposure among species, age, and year. Additionally, we evaluated the performance of a commercial antibody to wild bird immunoglobulin in duck species that varied in their phylogenetic relatedness to the bird species the antibody was directed against. As determined by a screening immunoassay and a confirmatory plaque reduction neutralization assay, the prevalence of WNV antibody was 10%. In light of experimental studies that show ducks to be relatively resistant to mortality caused by WNV, the antibody prevalence we detected suggests that wild ducks may be less-frequently exposed to WNV than expected for birds inhabiting wetlands where they may acquire infection from mosquitoes. PMID:26981693

  6. SURVEY FOR WEST NILE VIRUS ANTIBODIES IN WILD DUCKS, 2004-06, USA.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik K; Jankowski, Mark D; Goldberg, Diana; Franson, J Christian

    2016-04-28

    Detection of West Nile virus (WNV) in ducks has been reported in North America in isolated cases of mortality in wild waterbirds and following outbreaks in farmed ducks. Although the virus has been noted as an apparent incidental finding in several species of ducks, little is known about the prevalence of exposure or the outcome of infection with WNV in wild ducks in North America. From 2004-06, we collected sera from 1,406 wild-caught American Wigeon ( Anas americana ), Mallard ( Anas platyrhynchos ), and Northern Pintail ( Anas acuta ) ducks at national wildlife refuges (NWRs) in North Dakota and Wood Ducks ( Aix sponsa ) at NWRs in South Carolina and Tennessee. We measured the prevalence of previous exposure to WNV in these ducks by measuring WNV antibodies and evaluated variation in exposure among species, age, and year. Additionally, we evaluated the performance of a commercial antibody to wild bird immunoglobulin in duck species that varied in their phylogenetic relatedness to the bird species the antibody was directed against. As determined by a screening immunoassay and a confirmatory plaque reduction neutralization assay, the prevalence of WNV antibody was 10%. In light of experimental studies that show ducks to be relatively resistant to mortality caused by WNV, the antibody prevalence we detected suggests that wild ducks may be less-frequently exposed to WNV than expected for birds inhabiting wetlands where they may acquire infection from mosquitoes.

  7. Survey for West Nile virus antibodies in wild ducks, 2004-06, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofmeister, Erik K.; Jankowski, Mark D.; Goldberg, Diana R.; Franson, J. Christian

    2016-01-01

    Detection of West Nile virus (WNV) in ducks has been reported in North America in isolated cases of mortality in wild waterbirds and following outbreaks in farmed ducks. Although the virus has been noted as an apparent incidental finding in several species of ducks, little is known about the prevalence of exposure or the outcome of infection with WNV in wild ducks in North America. From 2004–06, we collected sera from 1,406 wild-caught American Wigeon (Anas americana), Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) ducks at national wildlife refuges (NWRs) in North Dakota and Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) at NWRs in South Carolina and Tennessee. We measured the prevalence of previous exposure to WNV in these ducks by measuring WNV antibodies and evaluated variation in exposure among species, age, and year. Additionally, we evaluated the performance of a commercial antibody to wild bird immunoglobulin in duck species that varied in their phylogenetic relatedness to the bird species the antibody was directed against. As determined by a screening immunoassay and a confirmatory plaque reduction neutralization assay, the prevalence of WNV antibody was 10%. In light of experimental studies that show ducks to be relatively resistant to mortality caused by WNV, the antibody prevalence we detected suggests that wild ducks may be less-frequently exposed to WNV than expected for birds inhabiting wetlands where they may acquire infection from mosquitoes.

  8. Experimental susceptibility of Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) for West Nile virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofmeister, Erik K.; Porter, Robert E.; Franson, J. Christian

    2015-01-01

    Detection of West Nile virus (WNV) has been reported in a variety of wild ducks in the US, but little is known about the pathogenesis and outcome of exposure of the disease in these species. Previous experimental studies of WNV in ducks either have challenged a small number of ducks with WNV or have tested domesticated ducks. To determine susceptibility and immune response, we challenged 7-wk-old Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) with a 1999 American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) isolate of WNV. Wood Ducks were susceptible to infection with the virus, and, although clinical signs or mortality were not observed, microscopic lesions were noted, particularly in the heart and brain. West Nile virus viremia peaked on day 2 postinfection (pi) at 104.54 plaque-forming units (PFU) of virus/mL serum and WNV was shed orally (between 102and 102.9 PFU per swab) and cloacally. Specific anti-WNV antibody response was rapid, with anti-WNV IgM detected on day 3 pi followed on day 5 pi by anti-WNV IgG. Neutralizing antibodies were detected by plaque-reduction neutralization assay in one duck on day 4 pi, and in all sampled ducks on day 5. These results indicate that Wood Ducks are susceptible to WNV, but it is unlikely that significant WNV mortality events occur in Wood Ducks or that ducks play a significant role in transmission. However, WNV viremia was sufficient, in theory, to infect mosquitoes, and oral and cloacal shedding of the virus may increase the risk of infection to other waterbirds.

  9. Duck Interferon-Inducible Transmembrane Protein 3 Mediates Restriction of Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Blyth, Graham A. D.; Chan, Wing Fuk; Webster, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) can restrict the entry of a wide range of viruses. IFITM3 localizes to endosomes and can potently restrict the replication of influenza A viruses (IAV) and several other viruses that also enter host cells through the endocytic pathway. Here, we investigate whether IFITMs are involved in protection in ducks, the natural host of influenza virus. We identify and sequence duck IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, and IFITM5. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), we demonstrate the upregulation of these genes in lung tissue in response to highly pathogenic IAV infection by 400-fold, 30-fold, 30-fold, and 5-fold, respectively. We express each IFITM in chicken DF-1 cells and show duck IFITM1 localizes to the cell surface, while IFITM3 localizes to LAMP1-containing compartments. DF-1 cells stably expressing duck IFITM3 (but not IFITM1 or IFITM2) show increased restriction of replication of H1N1, H6N2, and H11N9 IAV strains but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Although duck and human IFITM3 share only 38% identity, critical residues for viral restriction are conserved. We generate chimeric and mutant IFITM3 proteins and show duck IFITM3 does not require its N-terminal domain for endosomal localization or antiviral function; however, this N-terminal end confers endosomal localization and antiviral function on IFITM1. In contrast to mammalian IFITM3, the conserved YXXθ endocytosis signal sequence in the N-terminal domain of duck IFITM3 is not essential for correct endosomal localization. Despite significant structural and amino acid divergence, presumably due to host-virus coevolution, duck IFITM3 is functional against IAV. IMPORTANCE Immune IFITM genes are poorly conserved across species, suggesting that selective pressure from host-specific viruses has driven this divergence. We wondered whether coevolution between viruses and their natural host would result in the evasion of IFITM restriction. Ducks are the natural host of avian

  10. Establishment and Lineage Replacement of H6 Influenza Viruses in Domestic Ducks in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kai; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Jia; Cheung, Chung-Lam; Duan, Lian; Hong, Wenshan; Liu, Yongmei; Li, Lifeng; Smith, David K.; Chen, Honglin; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.; Peiris, Malik

    2012-01-01

    Domestic ducks in southern China act as an important reservoir for influenza viruses and have also facilitated the establishment of multiple H6 influenza virus lineages. To understand the continuing evolution of these established lineages, 297 H6 viruses isolated from domestic ducks during 2006 and 2007 were genetically and antigenically analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses showed that group II duck H6 viruses had replaced the previously predominant group I lineage and extended their geographic distribution from coastal to inland regions. Group II H6 virus showed that the genesis and development of multiple types of deletions in the neuraminidase (NA) stalk region could occur in the influenza viruses from domestic ducks. A gradual replacement of the N2 NA subtype with N6 was observed. Significant antigenic changes occurred within group II H6 viruses so that they became antigenically distinguishable from group I and gene pool viruses. Gene exchange between group II H6 viruses and the established H5N1, H9N2, or H6N1 virus lineages in poultry in the region was very limited. These findings suggest that domestic ducks can facilitate significant genetic and antigenic changes in viruses established in this host and highlight gaps in our knowledge of influenza virus ecology and even the evolutionary behavior of this virus family in its aquatic avian reservoirs. PMID:22438558

  11. Establishment and lineage replacement of H6 influenza viruses in domestic ducks in southern China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Zhu, Huachen; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Jia; Cheung, Chung-Lam; Duan, Lian; Hong, Wenshan; Liu, Yongmei; Li, Lifeng; Smith, David K; Chen, Honglin; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J; Peiris, Malik; Guan, Yi

    2012-06-01

    Domestic ducks in southern China act as an important reservoir for influenza viruses and have also facilitated the establishment of multiple H6 influenza virus lineages. To understand the continuing evolution of these established lineages, 297 H6 viruses isolated from domestic ducks during 2006 and 2007 were genetically and antigenically analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses showed that group II duck H6 viruses had replaced the previously predominant group I lineage and extended their geographic distribution from coastal to inland regions. Group II H6 virus showed that the genesis and development of multiple types of deletions in the neuraminidase (NA) stalk region could occur in the influenza viruses from domestic ducks. A gradual replacement of the N2 NA subtype with N6 was observed. Significant antigenic changes occurred within group II H6 viruses so that they became antigenically distinguishable from group I and gene pool viruses. Gene exchange between group II H6 viruses and the established H5N1, H9N2, or H6N1 virus lineages in poultry in the region was very limited. These findings suggest that domestic ducks can facilitate significant genetic and antigenic changes in viruses established in this host and highlight gaps in our knowledge of influenza virus ecology and even the evolutionary behavior of this virus family in its aquatic avian reservoirs.

  12. Novel microRNAs encoded by duck enteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongxiu; Smith, Lorraine P; Petherbridge, Lawrence; Watson, Mick; Nair, Venugopal

    2012-07-01

    Duck enteritis virus (DEV) is an important herpesvirus pathogen associated with acute, highly contagious lethal disease in waterfowls. Using a deep sequencing approach on RNA from infected chicken embryo fibroblast cultures, we identified several novel DEV-encoded micro (mi)RNAs. Unlike most mardivirus-encoded miRNAs, DEV-encoded miRNAs mapped mostly to the unique long region of the genome. The precursors of DEV miR-D18 and miR-D19 overlapped with each other, suggesting similarities to miRNA-offset RNAs, although only the DEV-miR-D18-3p was functional in reporter assays. Identification of these novel miRNAs will add to the growing list of virus-encoded miRNAs enabling the exploration of their roles in pathogenesis. PMID:22492913

  13. Pathogenicity of two Egyptian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in domestic ducks.

    PubMed

    Wasilenko, J L; Arafa, A M; Selim, A A; Hassan, M K; Aly, M M; Ali, A; Nassif, S; Elebiary, E; Balish, A; Klimov, A; Suarez, D L; Swayne, D E; Pantin-Jackwood, M J

    2011-01-01

    Domestic ducks have been implicated in the dissemination and evolution of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. In this study, two H5N1 HPAI viruses belonging to clade 2.2.1 isolated in Egypt in 2007 and 2008 were analyzed for their pathogenicity in domestic Pekin ducks. Both viruses produced clinical signs and mortality, but the 2008 virus was more virulent, inducing early onset of neurological signs and killing all ducks with a mean death time (MDT) of 4.1 days. The 2007 virus killed 3/8 ducks with a MDT of 7 days. Full-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to examine differences in the virus genes that might explain the differences observed in pathogenicity. The genomes differed in 49 amino acids, with most of the differences found in the hemagglutinin protein. This increase in pathogenicity in ducks observed with certain H5N1 HPAI viruses has implications for the control of the disease, since vaccinated ducks infected with highly virulent strains shed viruses for longer periods of time, perpetuating the virus in the environment and increasing the possibility of transmission to susceptible birds.

  14. Complete genomic sequence of a novel reassortant H11N3 influenza virus isolated from domestic ducks in Jiangsu, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoyang; Zhao, Guo; Gu, Xiaobing; Gu, Min; Hu, Jiao; Li, Qunhui; Zhao, Qingqing; Wang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Xiufan

    2012-11-01

    For the first time we report the complete genomic sequence of an H11N3 influenza virus from domestic ducks in China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the H11N3 virus was a novel reassortant with its genes from different subtypes of domestic duck-origin avian influenza viruses, which further underlined that domestic ducks play a key role in the genetic reassortment and evolution of influenza viruses in China.

  15. The effect of Tembusu virus infection in different week-old Cherry Valley breeding ducks.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjian; Dou, Yanguo; Ti, Jinfeng; Wang, Aihua; Cheng, Binghua; Zhang, Xin; Diao, Youxiang

    2016-08-30

    To study the effect of Tembusu virus (TMUV) infection on Cherry Valley Breeding ducks of different ages, 350 five-week-old ducks were divided into 14 groups. Ducks in seven experimental group were respectively infected with 1.265×10(5) mean embryo lethal dose (ELD50) of TMUV-AHQY strain (in 4.2mL) by intravenous route. Ducks in control groups were inoculated with Phosphate-buffered Saline (PBS) in the same way. Clinical symptoms, gross and microscopic lesions, viral loads and serum antibodies were detected and recorded for 20days after infection. Some ducks infected at 7 and 21 week s of age showed severe clinical symptoms including depression and inappetence, and no obvious clinical symptoms were seen in other week-old infected ducks. Severe gross lesions including hepatomegaly, meningeal congestion, myocardial hemorrhage, intestinal, myocardial and pulmonary edema were observed in ducks infected at 7, 18 and 21 weeks of age. No or mild gross lesions were observed in ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age. The main microscopic lesions including hyperaemia, degeneration and necrosis of different cells and inflammatory cellular infiltration mainly consisting of mononuclear cells or lymphocytes were observed in ducks infected at 7 and 21 week of age. But relatively intact structures and rare lymphocytic infiltration were presented in ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age. Viral antigen was more frequently observed in organ slices collected from 7 week-old infected ducks and few positive staining was found in 14 and 16 week-old infected ducks. Less viral loads in different tissues and swabs were detected by a quantitative real-time PCR assay. The level of viral loads in the tissues of ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age was very lower than that of ducks infected at 7 and 21 weeks of age. Meanwhile, less viral copy numbers were detected in swab samples collected from 14 and 16 week-old infected ducks. Ducks infected at 14-week-old developed significantly

  16. The effect of Tembusu virus infection in different week-old Cherry Valley breeding ducks.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjian; Dou, Yanguo; Ti, Jinfeng; Wang, Aihua; Cheng, Binghua; Zhang, Xin; Diao, Youxiang

    2016-08-30

    To study the effect of Tembusu virus (TMUV) infection on Cherry Valley Breeding ducks of different ages, 350 five-week-old ducks were divided into 14 groups. Ducks in seven experimental group were respectively infected with 1.265×10(5) mean embryo lethal dose (ELD50) of TMUV-AHQY strain (in 4.2mL) by intravenous route. Ducks in control groups were inoculated with Phosphate-buffered Saline (PBS) in the same way. Clinical symptoms, gross and microscopic lesions, viral loads and serum antibodies were detected and recorded for 20days after infection. Some ducks infected at 7 and 21 week s of age showed severe clinical symptoms including depression and inappetence, and no obvious clinical symptoms were seen in other week-old infected ducks. Severe gross lesions including hepatomegaly, meningeal congestion, myocardial hemorrhage, intestinal, myocardial and pulmonary edema were observed in ducks infected at 7, 18 and 21 weeks of age. No or mild gross lesions were observed in ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age. The main microscopic lesions including hyperaemia, degeneration and necrosis of different cells and inflammatory cellular infiltration mainly consisting of mononuclear cells or lymphocytes were observed in ducks infected at 7 and 21 week of age. But relatively intact structures and rare lymphocytic infiltration were presented in ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age. Viral antigen was more frequently observed in organ slices collected from 7 week-old infected ducks and few positive staining was found in 14 and 16 week-old infected ducks. Less viral loads in different tissues and swabs were detected by a quantitative real-time PCR assay. The level of viral loads in the tissues of ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age was very lower than that of ducks infected at 7 and 21 weeks of age. Meanwhile, less viral copy numbers were detected in swab samples collected from 14 and 16 week-old infected ducks. Ducks infected at 14-week-old developed significantly

  17. Hepatitis E: the forgotten virus.

    PubMed

    Freshwater, Dennis A

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has a long military association being first discovered during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan in the 1980s after an outbreak of unexplained hepatitis at a military camp. HEV is now endemic in the UK, and should be considered in all cases of jaundice. The prevalence is high in certain operational areas (28.5% in Afghanistan), and maintenance of integrity of food and water supplies together with scrupulous attention to environmental hygiene remains paramount. Pregnancy confers a much higher risk of fulminant hepatitis, with a mortality rate of up to 25%. Management is usually symptomatic, but ribavirin can be considered in non-pregnant patients with fulminant hepatitis. This narrative review examines the presentations and management of Hepatitis E in military populations. PMID:24109137

  18. Experimental susceptibility of wood ducks (Aix sponsa) for West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik; Porter, Robert E; Franson, J Christian

    2015-04-01

    Detection of West Nile virus (WNV) has been reported in a variety of wild ducks in the US, but little is known about the pathogenesis and outcome of exposure of the disease in these species. Previous experimental studies of WNV in ducks either have challenged a small number of ducks with WNV or have tested domesticated ducks. To determine susceptibility and immune response, we challenged 7-wk-old Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) with a 1999 American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) isolate of WNV. Wood Ducks were susceptible to infection with the virus, and, although clinical signs or mortality were not observed, microscopic lesions were noted, particularly in the heart and brain. West Nile virus viremia peaked on day 2 postinfection (pi) at 10(4.54) plaque-forming units (PFU) of virus/mL serum and WNV was shed orally (between 10(2) and 10(2.9) PFU per swab) and cloacally. Specific anti-WNV antibody response was rapid, with anti-WNV IgM detected on day 3 pi followed on day 5 pi by anti-WNV IgG. Neutralizing antibodies were detected by plaque-reduction neutralization assay in one duck on day 4 pi, and in all sampled ducks on day 5. These results indicate that Wood Ducks are susceptible to WNV, but it is unlikely that significant WNV mortality events occur in Wood Ducks or that they play a significant role in transmission. However, WNV viremia was sufficient, in theory, to infect mosquitoes, and oral and cloacal shedding of the virus may increase the risk of infection to other waterbirds.

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Duck Ovarian Follicles Infected with Duck Tembusu Virus by Label-Free LC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kaikai; Zhao, Dongmin; Liu, Yuzhuo; Liu, Qingtao; Huang, Xinmei; Yang, Jing; An, Fengjiao; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) is a newly emerging pathogenic flavivirus that has caused massive economic losses to the duck industry in China. DTMUV infection mainly results in significant decreases in egg production in egg-laying ducks within 1–2 weeks post infection. However, information on the comparative protein expression of host tissues in response to DTMUV infection is limited. In the present study, the cellular protein response to DTMUV infection in duck ovarian follicles was analyzed using nano-flow high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed 131 differentially expressed proteins, among which 53 were up regulated and 78 were down regulated. The identified proteins were involved in the regulation of essential processes such as cellular structure and integrity, RNA processing, protein biosynthesis and modification, vesicle transport, signal transduction, and mitochondrial pathway. Some selected proteins that were found to be regulated in DTMUV-infected tissues were screened by quantitative real-time PCR to examine their regulation at the transcriptional level, western blot analysis was used to validate the changes of some selected proteins on translational level. To our knowledge, this study is the first to analyze the proteomic changes in duck ovarian follicles following DTMUV infection. The protein-related information obtained in this study may be useful to understand the host response to DTMUV infection and the inherent mechanism of DTMUV replication and pathogenicity. PMID:27066001

  20. New hepatitis B virus of cranes that has an unexpected broad host range.

    PubMed

    Prassolov, Alexej; Hohenberg, Heinz; Kalinina, Tatyana; Schneider, Carola; Cova, Lucyna; Krone, Oliver; Frölich, Kai; Will, Hans; Sirma, Hüseyin

    2003-02-01

    All hepadnaviruses known so far have a very limited host range, restricted to their natural hosts and a few closely related species. This is thought to be due mainly to sequence divergence in the large envelope protein and species-specific differences in host components essential for virus propagation. Here we report an infection of cranes with a novel hepadnavirus, designated CHBV, that has an unexpectedly broad host range and is only distantly evolutionarily related to avihepadnaviruses of related hosts. Direct DNA sequencing of amplified CHBV DNA as well a sequencing of cloned viral genomes revealed that CHBV is most closely related to, although distinct from, Ross' goose hepatitis B virus (RGHBV) and slightly less closely related to duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). Phylogenetically, cranes are very distant from geese and ducks and are most closely related to herons and storks. Naturally occurring hepadnaviruses in the last two species are highly divergent in sequence from RGHBV and DHBV and do not infect ducks or do so only marginally. In contrast, CHBV from crane sera and recombinant CHBV produced from LMH cells infected primary duck hepatocytes almost as efficiently as DHBV did. This is the first report of a rather broad host range of an avihepadnavirus. Our data imply either usage of similar or identical entry pathways and receptors by DHBV and CHBV, unusual host and virus adaptation mechanisms, or divergent evolution of the host genomes and cellular components required for virus propagation.

  1. New Hepatitis B Virus of Cranes That Has an Unexpected Broad Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Prassolov, Alexej; Hohenberg, Heinz; Kalinina, Tatyana; Schneider, Carola; Cova, Lucyna; Krone, Oliver; Frölich, Kai; Will, Hans; Sirma, Hüseyin

    2003-01-01

    All hepadnaviruses known so far have a very limited host range, restricted to their natural hosts and a few closely related species. This is thought to be due mainly to sequence divergence in the large envelope protein and species-specific differences in host components essential for virus propagation. Here we report an infection of cranes with a novel hepadnavirus, designated CHBV, that has an unexpectedly broad host range and is only distantly evolutionarily related to avihepadnaviruses of related hosts. Direct DNA sequencing of amplified CHBV DNA as well a sequencing of cloned viral genomes revealed that CHBV is most closely related to, although distinct from, Ross' goose hepatitis B virus (RGHBV) and slightly less closely related to duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). Phylogenetically, cranes are very distant from geese and ducks and are most closely related to herons and storks. Naturally occurring hepadnaviruses in the last two species are highly divergent in sequence from RGHBV and DHBV and do not infect ducks or do so only marginally. In contrast, CHBV from crane sera and recombinant CHBV produced from LMH cells infected primary duck hepatocytes almost as efficiently as DHBV did. This is the first report of a rather broad host range of an avihepadnavirus. Our data imply either usage of similar or identical entry pathways and receptors by DHBV and CHBV, unusual host and virus adaptation mechanisms, or divergent evolution of the host genomes and cellular components required for virus propagation. PMID:12525630

  2. The pathobiology of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza virus in Ruddy ducks and Lesser Scaup

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The susceptibility and pathogenesis of avian influenza virus (AIV) has not been characterized in numerous duck species, especially diving ducks, some of which migrate across the continental U.S. The pathobiology of highly pathogenic (HP) H5N2 AIV was characterized in two diving duck species, Ruddy ...

  3. Molecular characterization of a duck Tembusu virus from China.

    PubMed

    Bai, XiaoFei; Lv, Rang; Liu, ChunGuo; Qiu, Na; He, Yilong; Yin, XiuChen; Li, XiaoJun; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2013-12-01

    A new emerging flavivirus caused severe egg-drop in poultry and spread quickly across most duck-producing regions of China in 2010. Complete genome sequencing indicated that the virus genome is 10,989 nucleotides in length and possesses typical flavivirus genome organization, 5' untranslated region (UTR)-Cv-Ci-prM-M-E-NS1-NS2A-NS2B-NS3-NS4A-2K-NS4B-NS5-3'-UTR. The long open reading frame (ORF) encodes 3,425 amino acids (95-10,372 nt). The 94-nucleotide 5'-UTR is of intermediate size and the 617-nucleotide 3'-UTR is quite long relative to those of other flaviviruses. The polyprotein cleavage sites, potential glycosylation sites, distribution of cysteine residues, and 3'-UTR secondary structure were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein sequences indicates that the HN isolate is closely related to Tembusu viruses of the Ntaya virus group. PMID:23949785

  4. Epidemiology of egg drop syndrome virus in ducks from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cha, S-Y; Kang, M; Park, C-K; Choi, K-S; Jang, H-K

    2013-07-01

    Egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) is an important pathogen of poultry that decreases egg production in chickens and causes respiratory disease in goslings. In 2011, we obtained serum samples from 139 domestic Pekin ducks, 416 one-day-old Pekin ducklings, and 75 wild ducks (67 mallards and 8 pintails) to survey their exposure to EDSV. A total of 123 of 139 sera (88.5%) from Pekin ducks, 396 of the ducklings (95.2%), and 16 of 67 mallards (23.9%) were positive. Field cases of EDSV in wild and domestic ducks were investigated. Six cases from domestic Pekin ducks were identified by PCR detection and were used for virus isolation and molecular analysis. Phylogenetic analyses of the partial hexon and full fiber genes showed that the D11-JW-012 and D11-JW-017 strains among 6 isolates belonged to different clusters compared with other known strains including the 127 strain. We assessed cell growth efficiency by hemagglutination (HA) titers and cytopathic effects in duck embryo liver cells and chicken embryo liver (CEL) cells to investigate host adaptation. The D11-JW-017 strain propagated more in chicken embryo liver than the D11-JW-012 strain and the field isolate from chickens. Our results demonstrate the high prevalence of EDSV in wild and domestic ducks in South Korea and provide information on EDSV from ducks that showed variable adaptability in chickens. PMID:23776265

  5. Sentinel model for influenza A virus monitoring in free-grazing ducks in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Boonyapisitsopa, Supanat; Chaiyawong, Supassama; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Jairak, Waleemas; Prakairungnamthip, Duangduean; Bunpapong, Napawan; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) can cause influenza in birds and mammals. In Thailand, free-grazing ducks are known IAV reservoirs and can spread viruses through frequent movements in habitats they share with wild birds. In this study, the sentinel model for IAV monitoring was conducted over 4 months in two free-grazing duck flocks. IAV subtypes H4N6 (n=1) and H3N8 (n=5) were isolated from sentinel ducks at the ages of 13 and 15 weeks. Clinical signs of depression and ocular discharge were observed in the infected ducks. Phylogenetic analysis and genetic characterization of the isolated IAVs indicated that all Thai IAVs were clustered in the Eurasian lineage and pose low pathogenic avian influenza characteristics. Serological analysis found that antibodies against IAVs could be detected in the ducks since 9-weeks-old. In summary, our results indicate that the sentinel model can be used for IAV monitoring in free-grazing duck flocks. Since free-grazing ducks are potential reservoirs and transmitters of IAVs, routine IAV surveillance in free-grazing duck flocks can be beneficial for influenza prevention and control strategies.

  6. Epidemiology of egg drop syndrome virus in ducks from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cha, S-Y; Kang, M; Park, C-K; Choi, K-S; Jang, H-K

    2013-07-01

    Egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) is an important pathogen of poultry that decreases egg production in chickens and causes respiratory disease in goslings. In 2011, we obtained serum samples from 139 domestic Pekin ducks, 416 one-day-old Pekin ducklings, and 75 wild ducks (67 mallards and 8 pintails) to survey their exposure to EDSV. A total of 123 of 139 sera (88.5%) from Pekin ducks, 396 of the ducklings (95.2%), and 16 of 67 mallards (23.9%) were positive. Field cases of EDSV in wild and domestic ducks were investigated. Six cases from domestic Pekin ducks were identified by PCR detection and were used for virus isolation and molecular analysis. Phylogenetic analyses of the partial hexon and full fiber genes showed that the D11-JW-012 and D11-JW-017 strains among 6 isolates belonged to different clusters compared with other known strains including the 127 strain. We assessed cell growth efficiency by hemagglutination (HA) titers and cytopathic effects in duck embryo liver cells and chicken embryo liver (CEL) cells to investigate host adaptation. The D11-JW-017 strain propagated more in chicken embryo liver than the D11-JW-012 strain and the field isolate from chickens. Our results demonstrate the high prevalence of EDSV in wild and domestic ducks in South Korea and provide information on EDSV from ducks that showed variable adaptability in chickens.

  7. Hepatitis D Virus: A Call to Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus causes an aggressive viral hepatitis with a virulent course of progression to cirrhosis and hepatic decompensation. It relies on hepatitis B coinfection for its pathogenesis and propagation. Hepatitis D virus had become the forgotten virus, with reduced public awareness, medical interest, and research support. Recently, there has been a resurgence of awareness and interest in hepatitis D, with improvements in diagnostic testing and establishment of international collaborative efforts to improve therapy. This article provides a framework to understand the impetus for increased screening as well as to identify key issues toward which collaborative efforts can be directed. PMID:27540336

  8. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques; Dalton, Harry R

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus can cause acute, fulminant and chronic hepatitis and has been associated with a range of extrahepatic manifestations. Guillain-Barré syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy and encephalitis are the main neurological manifestations associated with acute and chronic hepatitis E virus infection. Renal injuries have been also reported, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with or without cryoglobulinemia and membranous glomerulonephritis. Acute pancreatitis, haematological disorders and other autoimmune extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus, such as myocarditis and thyroiditis, have been also reported. In this comprehensive article, we review all published reports describing hepatitisvirus-associated extrahepatic manifestations.

  9. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques; Dalton, Harry R

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus can cause acute, fulminant and chronic hepatitis and has been associated with a range of extrahepatic manifestations. Guillain-Barré syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy and encephalitis are the main neurological manifestations associated with acute and chronic hepatitis E virus infection. Renal injuries have been also reported, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with or without cryoglobulinemia and membranous glomerulonephritis. Acute pancreatitis, haematological disorders and other autoimmune extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus, such as myocarditis and thyroiditis, have been also reported. In this comprehensive article, we review all published reports describing hepatitisvirus-associated extrahepatic manifestations. PMID:27005692

  10. Characterization of an H4N2 avian influenza virus isolated from domestic duck in Dongting Lake wetland in 2009.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Chen, Quanjiao; Chen, Ze

    2012-02-01

    In January 2009, an H4N2 subtype of avian influenza virus [A/duck/Hunan/8-19/2009 (H4N2)] was isolated from domestic ducks in Dongting Lake wetland. The whole genome of the virus was sequenced and the results indicated that multiple gene segments of the virus had a high homology with viruses isolated from wild waterfowl, which indicated that the virus was probably transmitted from wild waterfowl to domestic ducks. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the each gene belonged to the Eurasian lineage of avian influenza viruses, but genetic reassortment occurs between viruses of different subtypes.

  11. Molecular epidemiological investigation of Newcastle disease virus from domestic ducks in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Kyoung; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Kwon, Jun-Hun; Yang, Chang-Bum; Choi, Kang-Seuk

    2009-03-01

    To expand the epidemiological understanding of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) found in domestic ducks in Korea, 14 NDV isolates from apparently healthy domestic ducks were biologically and genetically characterized. Thirteen and 1 isolates of NDV were categorized into lentogenic and velogenic viruses, respectively, based on in vivo pathogenicity tests. Twelve lentogenic viruses showed HA activity to horse RBCs, while 1 lentogenic virus and the velogenic virus were negative. Lentogenic viruses (n=13) had sequence motifs of (112)ERQERL(117) (n=1) or (112)GRQGRL(117) (n=12) at the F0 cleavage site, while the velogenic virus (n=1) had a sequence motif of (112)RRQKRF(117) at the same site. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that at least three distinct genotypes may exist in domestic ducks in Korea; one class I genotype (genotype 2), and two class II (genotypes I and VII) genotypes. The class I virus was most closely related to strains of genotype 2 which were isolated in birds from the USA, Germany and Denmark. Twelve lentogenic class II viruses were grouped together in genotype I, and were then divided into at least three clusters, namely Aomori-like, Ulster2C-like, and V4-like. The velogenic class II virus was assigned to genotype VII which represents viruses responsible for recent epidemics in many Asian countries including Korea. The epidemiological importance of domestic duck isolates of NDV in Korea is discussed.

  12. Phylogenetic and pathotypical analysis of two virulent Newcastle disease viruses isolated from domestic ducks in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shouping; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhao, Changguang; Liu, Dehua; Hu, Yanxin; Zhao, Jixun; Zhang, Guozhong

    2011-01-01

    Two velogenic Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) obtained from outbreaks in domestic ducks in China were characterized in this study. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both strains clustered with the class II viruses, with one phylogenetically close to the genotype VII NDVs and the other closer to genotype IX. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cleavage site of the fusion (F) protein confirmed that both isolates contained the virulent motif (112)RRQK/RRF(117) at the cleavage site. The two NDVs had severe pathogenicity in fully susceptible chickens, resulting in 100% mortality. One of the isolates also demonstrated some pathogenicity in domestic ducks. The present study suggests that more than one genotype of NDV circulates in domestic ducks in China and viral transmission may occur among chickens and domestic ducks.

  13. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in hemodialysis patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Tomokatsu; Joki, Nobuhiko; Inishi, Yoji; Muto, Mikako; Saijo, Motohiko; Hase, Hiroki

    2015-04-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen is widely used in hepatitis B virus surveillance; patients who test negative for the antigen are judged to be uninfected. However, occult hepatitis B virus infection has been confirmed with hepatitis B virus DNA at low levels in the liver and peripheral blood in patients positive for hepatitis B core antibody or hepatitis B surface antibody, even if they test negative for hepatitis B surface antigen. To investigate the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus in hemodialysis patients, we performed cross-sectional analysis of 161 hemodialysis patients in two related institutions for hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B core antibody, and hepatitis B surface antibody. Hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B core antibody, or hepatitis B surface antibody was present in 45 patients (28.0%). Hepatitis B virus DNA was present in six patients (3.7%), all of whom also tested positive for hepatitis B core antibody. Hepatitis B surface antibody positivity was unrelated in only one of the six patients. Four of the six patients were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen; however, two (1.3%) of these with occult hepatitis B virus infection were found to be hepatitis B surface antigen negative. Occult hepatitis B virus infection may be missed in hepatitis B virus surveillance using hepatitis B surface antigen alone; therefore, routine hepatitis B core antibody screening is necessary. Patients who test positive for hepatitis B core antibody should undergo further hepatitis B virus DNA testing to enable accurate hepatitis B virus screening.

  14. Genetic relationship of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks and wild birds in Korea and their pathogenic potential in chickens and ducks.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Gu; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Min-Chul; Paek, Mi-Ra; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Kim, Bang-Sil; Kwon, Jun-Hun; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2012-03-23

    The H3 subtype avian influenza virus (AIV) is one of the most frequently isolated subtypes in domestic ducks, live poultry markets, and wild birds in Korea. In 2002-2009, a total of 45 H3 subtype AIVs were isolated from the feces of clinically normal domestic ducks (n=28) and wild birds (n=17). The most prevalent subtypes in domestic ducks were H3N2 (35.7%), H3N6 (35.7%), H3N8 (25.0%), and H3N1 (3.6%, novel subtype in domestic duck in Korea). In contrast, H3N8 (70.6%) is the most prevalent subtype in wild birds in Korea. In the phylogenetic analysis, HA genes of the Korean H3 AIVs were divided into 3 groups (Korean duck, wild bird 1, and wild bird 2) and all viruses of duck origin except one were clustered in a single group. However, other genes showed extensive diversity and at least 17 genotypes were circulating in domestic ducks in Korea. When the analysis expanded to viruses of wild bird origin, the genetic diversity of Korean H3 AIVs became more complicated. Extensive reassortments may have occurred in H3 subtype influenza viruses in Korea. When we inoculated chickens and ducks with six selected viruses, some of the viruses replicated efficiently without pre-adaptation and shed a significant amount of viruses through oropharyngeal and cloacal routes. This raised concerns that H3 subtype AIV could be a new subtype in chickens in Korea. Continuous surveillance is needed to prepare the advent of a novel subtype AIV in Korea.

  15. Occult hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Sun; Kim, Yoon Jun

    2014-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) refers to the presence of HBV DNA in the absence of detectable hepatitis B surface antigen. Since OBI was first described in the late 1970s, there has been increasing interest in this topic. The prevalence of OBI varies according to the different endemicity of HBV infection, cohort characteristics, and sensitivity and specificity of the methods used for detection. Although the exact mechanism of OBI has not been proved, intra-hepatic persistence of viral covalently closed circular DNA under the host’s strong immune suppression of HBV replication and gene expression seems to be a cause. OBI has important clinical significance in several conditions. First, OBI can be transmitted through transfusion, organ transplantation including orthotopic liver transplantation, or hemodialysis. Donor screening before blood transfusion, prophylaxis for high-risk organ transplantation recipients, and dialysis-specific infection-control programs should be considered to reduce the risk of transmission. Second, OBI may reactivate and cause acute hepatitis in immunocompromised patients or those receiving chemotherapy. Close HBV DNA monitoring and timely antiviral treatment can prevent HBV reactivation and consequent clinical deterioration. Third, OBI may contribute to the progression of hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease including hepatitis C. Finally, OBI seems to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma by its direct proto-oncogenic effect and by indirectly causing persistent hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. However, this needs further investigation. We review published reports in the literature to gain an overview of the status of OBI and emphasize the clinical importance of OBI. PMID:25544873

  16. Xenotransplantation and Hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using pig cells, tissues and organs may be associated with the transmission of porcine microorganisms to the human recipient. Some of these microorganisms may induce a zoonosis, that is an infectious disease induced by microorganisms transmitted from another species. With exception of the porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs), which are integrated in the genome of all pigs, the transmission of all other microorganisms can be prevented by specified or designated pathogen-free (spf or dpf, respectively) production of the animals. However, it is becoming clear in the last years that the hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the viruses which are difficult to eliminate. It is important to note that there are differences between HEV of genotypes (gt) 1 and gt2 on one hand and HEV of gt3 and gt4 on the other. HEV gt1 and gt2 are human viruses, and they induce hepatitis and in the worst case fatal infections in pregnant women. In contrast, HEV gt3 and gt4 are viruses of pigs, and they may infect humans, induce commonly only mild diseases, if any, and are harmless for pregnant women. The goal of this review was to evaluate the risk posed by HEV gt3 and gt4 for xenotransplantation and to indicate ways of their elimination from pigs in order to prevent transmission to the human recipient.

  17. Analysis of the complete genome of Tembusu virus, a flavivirus isolated from ducks in China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Diao, Y; Gao, X; Yu, C; Chen, L; Zhang, D

    2012-08-01

    During investigations into the outbreak of duck viral infection in 2010 in China, with a severe drop in egg production, a flavivirus was isolated from the affected ducks. It was characterized as a Tembusu virus (TMUV). In this study, we obtained a complete genome sequence of Tembusu virus using RT-PCR and RACE techniques. TMUV genome is a singled-stranded RNA, with 10,990 nucleotides in length, and contains a single open reading frame (3410 amino acids) encoding 11 viral proteins with 5'and 3'non-translated regions (NTRs) of 142 and 618 nt, respectively. We characterized the open reading frame (ORF) with respect to gene sizes, cleavage sites and potential glycosylation sites. The different genomic regions of the virus were also compared with those of six other flaviviruses including Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus (WNV), dengue-2 virus, yellow fever virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and Bagaza virus. TMUV demonstrated the highest similarity to Bagaza virus. The result of entire ORF scanning shows that TMUV was close to Bagaza viruses in genetic relatedness. These data demonstrate that TMUV is a unique virus among the mosquito-borne flaviviruses and also provide a useful reference for a critically important study to determine why TMUV is a serious pathogen for ducks.

  18. Experimental infection of mallard ducks with different subtype H5 and H7 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV’s) remain a threat to poultry worldwide. Avian influenza viruses, including HPAIV, are usually non-pathogenic for ducks and other wild aquatic birds, with the exception of some Asian lineage H5N1 HPAIVs which can cause severe disease in ducks. With ...

  19. Different routes of inoculation impact infectivity and pathogenesis of H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus infection in chickens and domestic ducks.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Y K; Swayne, D E

    2010-12-01

    The H5N1 type A influenza viruses classified as Qinghai-like virus (clade 2.2) are a unique lineage of type A influenza viruses with the capacity to produce significant disease and mortality in gallinaceous and anseriform birds, including domestic and wild ducks. The objective of this study was to determine the susceptibility and pathogenesis of chickens and domestic ducks to A/Whooper Swan/Mongolia/224/05 (H5N1) high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus when administered through respiratory or alimentary routes of exposure. The chickens and ducks were more susceptible to the H5N1 HPAI virus, as evidenced by low infectious and lethal viral doses, when exposed by intranasal as compared to alimentary routes of inoculation (intragastric or oral-fed infected chicken meat). In the alimentary exposure pathogenesis study, pathologic changes included hemorrhage, necrosis, and inflammation in association with virus detection. These changes were generally observed in most of the visceral organs of chickens, between 2 and 4 days postinoculation (DPI), and are similar to lesions and virus localization seen in birds in natural cases or in experimental studies using the intranasal route. Alimentary exposure to the virus caused systemic infection in the ducks, characterized by moderate lymphocytic encephalitis, necrotized hepatitis, and pancreatitis with a corresponding demonstration of virus within the lesions. In both chickens and ducks with alimentary exposure, lesions, virus, or both were first demonstrated in the upper alimentary tract on 1 DPI, suggesting that the alimentary tract was the initial site affected upon consumption of infected meat or on gavage of virus in liquid medium. However, as demonstrated in the infectivity study in chickens, alimentary infection required higher exposure doses to produce infection as compared to intranasal exposure in chickens. These data suggest that upper respiratory exposure to H5N1 HPAI virus in birds is more likely to result in

  20. The evolution of H5N1 influenza viruses in ducks in southern China.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Deng, G; Li, Z; Tian, G; Li, Y; Jiao, P; Zhang, L; Liu, Z; Webster, R G; Yu, K

    2004-07-13

    The pathogenicity of avian H5N1 influenza viruses to mammals has been evolving since the mid-1980s. Here, we demonstrate that H5N1 influenza viruses, isolated from apparently healthy domestic ducks in mainland China from 1999 through 2002, were becoming progressively more pathogenic for mammals, and we present a hypothesis explaining the mechanism of this evolutionary direction. Twenty-one viruses isolated from apparently healthy ducks in southern China from 1999 through 2002 were confirmed to be H5N1 subtype influenza A viruses. These isolates are antigenically similar to A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96 (H5N1) virus, which was the source of the 1997 Hong Kong "bird flu" hemagglutinin gene, and all are highly pathogenic in chickens. The viruses form four pathotypes on the basis of their replication and lethality in mice. There is a clear temporal pattern in the progressively increasing pathogenicity of these isolates in the mammalian model. Five of six H5N1 isolates tested replicated in inoculated ducks and were shed from trachea or cloaca, but none caused disease signs or death. Phylogenetic analysis of the full genome indicated that most of the viruses are reassortants containing the A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96-like hemagglutinin gene and the other genes from unknown Eurasian avian influenza viruses. This study is a characterization of the H5N1 avian influenza viruses recently circulating in ducks in mainland China. Our findings suggest that immediate action is needed to prevent the transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses from the apparently healthy ducks into chickens or mammalian hosts.

  1. Development of a highly immunogenic Newcastle disease virus chicken vaccine strain of duck origin.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Kye, S J; Lee, H J; Gaikwad, S; Lee, H S; Jung, S C; Choi, K S

    2016-04-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain NDRL0901 was developed as a live vaccine candidate for control of Newcastle disease. NDV isolate KR/duck/13/07 (DK1307) of duck origin was used as the selected vaccine strain. DK1307 was passaged 6 times in chickens. Then a single clone from the chicken-adapted virus (DK1307C) was finally selected, and the vaccine strain was named NDRL0901. DK1307C and the clone NDRL0901 viruses showed enhanced immunogenicity compared to the DK1307 virus. Principal component analysis based on fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase genes revealed the codon usage pattern in the dataset is distinct separating duck viral sequences and avian sequences, and passage of the duck origin virus into the chicken host causes deviation in the codon usage pattern. The NDRL0901 virus was avirulent and did not acquire viral virulence even after 7 back passages in chickens. When day-old chicks were vaccinated with the NDRL0901 virus via spray, eye drops, and drinking water, the vaccinated birds showed no clinical signs and had significant protection efficacy (>80%) against very virulent NDV (Kr005 strain) infection regardless of the administration route employed. The results indicate that the NDRL0901 strain is safe in chickens and can offer protective immunity.

  2. Effect of species, breed and route of virus inoculation on the pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses continue to be a threat to poultry in many regions of the world. Domestic ducks have been recognized as one of the primary factors in the spread of H5N1 HPAI. In this study we examined the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in different species and breeds of domestic ducks and the effect of route of virus inoculation on the outcome of infection. We determined that the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses varies between the two common farmed duck species, with Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata) presenting more severe disease than various breeds of Anas platyrhynchos var. domestica ducks including Pekin, Mallard-type, Black Runners, Rouen, and Khaki Campbell ducks. We also found that Pekin and Muscovy ducks inoculated with two H5N1 HPAI viruses of different virulence, given by any one of three routes (intranasal, intracloacal, or intraocular), became infected with the viruses. Regardless of the route of inoculation, the outcome of infection was similar for each species but depended on the virulence of the virus used. Muscovy ducks showed more severe clinical signs and higher mortality than the Pekin ducks. In conclusion, domestic ducks are susceptible to H5N1 HPAI virus infection by different routes of exposure, but the presentation of the disease varied by virus strain and duck species. This information helps support the planning and implementation of H5N1 HPAI surveillance and control measures in countries with large domestic duck populations. PMID:23876184

  3. Effect of species, breed and route of virus inoculation on the pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks.

    PubMed

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Swayne, David E; Smith, Diane; Shepherd, Eric

    2013-07-22

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses continue to be a threat to poultry in many regions of the world. Domestic ducks have been recognized as one of the primary factors in the spread of H5N1 HPAI. In this study we examined the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in different species and breeds of domestic ducks and the effect of route of virus inoculation on the outcome of infection. We determined that the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses varies between the two common farmed duck species, with Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata) presenting more severe disease than various breeds of Anas platyrhynchos var. domestica ducks including Pekin, Mallard-type, Black Runners, Rouen, and Khaki Campbell ducks. We also found that Pekin and Muscovy ducks inoculated with two H5N1 HPAI viruses of different virulence, given by any one of three routes (intranasal, intracloacal, or intraocular), became infected with the viruses. Regardless of the route of inoculation, the outcome of infection was similar for each species but depended on the virulence of the virus used. Muscovy ducks showed more severe clinical signs and higher mortality than the Pekin ducks. In conclusion, domestic ducks are susceptible to H5N1 HPAI virus infection by different routes of exposure, but the presentation of the disease varied by virus strain and duck species. This information helps support the planning and implementation of H5N1 HPAI surveillance and control measures in countries with large domestic duck populations.

  4. Psoriasis and hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Katayama, I; Nishioka, K

    1995-11-01

    We have analyzed 8 patients (6 men and 2 women, aged 52 to 70 years) with psoriasis associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among 79 psoriatic patients. Psoriasis preceded in 6 cases. One patient had generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP), and the others had psoriasis vulgaris (PV). The psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) score ranged from 2.7 to 32.4. Two of the patients were treated with interferon-gamma. Anti-HCV antibodies were detected in all cases by second generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent and recombinant immunoblot assay. HCV messenger RNA was demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in the tissue sections of the lesions of 1 of the patients with PV and the patient with GPP, providing evidence for active viral replication in the skin lesion. HCV-related chronic active hepatitis might cause several immunological abnormalities. It is suggested that this infection might be one of the triggering factors of psoriasis.

  5. Experimental co-infections of domestic ducks with a virulent Newcastle disease virus and low or highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Miller, Patti J.; Afonso, Claudio L.; Spackman, Erica; Kapczynski, Darrell; Shepherd, Eric; Smith, Diane; Swayne, David

    2015-01-01

    Infections with avian influenza viruses (AIV) of low and high pathogenicity (LP and HP) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are commonly reported in domestic ducks in many parts of the world. However, it’s not clear if co-infections with these viruses affect the severity of the diseases they produce, the amount of virus shed, and transmission of the viruses. In this study we infected domestic ducks with a virulent NDV virus (vNDV) and either a LPAIV or a HPAIV by giving the viruses individually, simultaneously, or sequentially two days apart. No clinical signs were observed in ducks infected or co-infected with vNDV and LPAIV, but co-infection decreased the number of ducks shedding vNDV and the amount of virus shed (P <0.01) at 4 days post inoculation (dpi). Co-infection didn’t affect the number of birds shedding LPAIV, but more LPAIV was shed at 2 dpi (P <0.0001) from ducks inoculated with only LPAIV compared to ducks co-infected with vNDV. Ducks that received the HPAIV with the vNDV simultaneously survived fewer days (P <0.05) compared to the ducks that received the vNDV two days before the HPAIV. Co-infection also reduced transmission of vNDV to naïve contact ducks housed with the inoculated ducks. In conclusion, domestic ducks can become co-infected with vNDV and LPAIV with no effect on clinical signs but with reduction of virus shedding and transmission. These findings indicate that infection with one virus can interfere with replication of another, modifying the pathogenesis and transmission of the viruses. PMID:25759292

  6. Experimental co-infections of domestic ducks with a virulent Newcastle disease virus and low or highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L; Spackman, Erica; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Shepherd, Eric; Smith, Diane; Swayne, David E

    2015-05-15

    Infections with avian influenza viruses (AIV) of low and high pathogenicity (LP and HP) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are commonly reported in domestic ducks in many parts of the world. However, it is not clear if co-infections with these viruses affect the severity of the diseases they produce, the amount of virus shed, and transmission of the viruses. In this study we infected domestic ducks with a virulent NDV virus (vNDV) and either a LPAIV or a HPAIV by giving the viruses individually, simultaneously, or sequentially two days apart. No clinical signs were observed in ducks infected or co-infected with vNDV and LPAIV, but co-infection decreased the number of ducks shedding vNDV and the amount of virus shed (P<0.01) at 4 days post inoculation (dpi). Co-infection did not affect the number of birds shedding LPAIV, but more LPAIV was shed at 2 dpi (P<0.0001) from ducks inoculated with only LPAIV compared to ducks co-infected with vNDV. Ducks that received the HPAIV with the vNDV simultaneously survived fewer days (P<0.05) compared to the ducks that received the vNDV two days before the HPAIV. Co-infection also reduced transmission of vNDV to naïve contact ducks housed with the inoculated ducks. In conclusion, domestic ducks can become co-infected with vNDV and LPAIV with no effect on clinical signs but with reduction of virus shedding and transmission. These findings indicate that infection with one virus can interfere with replication of another, modifying the pathogenesis and transmission of the viruses.

  7. Reassortant influenza A viruses in wild duck populations: effects on viral shedding and persistence in water.

    PubMed

    Lebarbenchon, Camille; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Lefèvre, Thierry; Yang, My; Ramakrishnan, Muthannan A; Brown, Justin D; Stallknecht, David E

    2012-10-01

    Wild ducks of the genus Anas represent the natural hosts for a large genetic diversity of influenza A viruses. In these hosts, co-infections with different virus genotypes are frequent and result in high rates of genetic reassortment. Recent genomic data have provided information regarding the pattern and frequency of these reassortant viruses in duck populations; however, potential consequences on viral shedding and maintenance in the environment have not been investigated. On the basis of full-genome sequencing, we identified five virus genotypes, in a wild duck population in northwestern Minnesota (USA), that naturally arose from genetic reassortments. We investigated the effects of influenza A virus genotype on the viral shedding pattern in Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and the duration of infectivity in water, under different temperature regimens. Overall, we found that variation in the viral genome composition of these isolates had limited effects on duration, extent and pattern of viral shedding, as well as on the reduction of infectivity in water over time. These results support that, in wild ducks, functionally equivalent gene segments could be maintained in virus populations with no fitness costs when genetic reassortments occur.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a hepatitis B virus endemic in herons.

    PubMed

    Sprengel, R; Kaleta, E F; Will, H

    1988-10-01

    A new hepadnavirus (designated heron hepatitis B virus [HHBV]) has been isolated; this virus is endemic in grey herons (Ardea cinerea) in Germany and closely related to duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) by morphology of viral particles and size of the genome and of the major viral envelope and core proteins. Despite its striking similarities to DHBV, HHBV cannot be transmitted to ducks by infection or by transfection with cloned viral DNA. After the viral genome was cloned and sequenced, a comparative sequence analysis revealed an identical genome organization of HHBV and DHBV (pre-C/C-, pre-S/S-, and pol-ORFs). An open reading frame, designated X in mammalian hepadnaviruses, is not present in DHBV. DHBV and HHBV differ by 21.6% base exchanges, and thus they are less closely related than the two known rodent hepatitis B viruses (16.4%). The nucleocapsid protein and the 17-kilodalton envelope protein sequences of DHBV and HHBV are well conserved. In contrast, the pre-S part of the 34-kilodalton envelope protein which is believed to mediate virus attachment to the cell is highly divergent (less than 50% homology). The availability of two closely related avian hepadnaviruses will now allow us to test recombinant viruses in vivo and in vitro for host specificity-determining sequences.

  9. Characterization of avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in Vietnam in 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Naoki; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Endo, Mayumi; Yoshida, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakurai, Kenji; Hoang, Nam Van; Nguyen, Long Van; Chu, Huy Duc; Tien, Tien Ngoc; Kida, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    In the surveillance of avian influenza in Vietnam, 26 H9N2, 1 H3N2, 1 H3N8, 7 H4N6, 3 H11N3, and 1 H11N9 viruses were isolated from tracheal and cloacal swab samples of 300 domestic ducks in April 2009, and 1 H9N6 virus from 300 bird samples in March 2010. Out of the 27 H9 virus isolates, the hemagglutinins of 18 strains were genetically classified as belonging to the sublineage G1, and the other nine belonged to the Korean sublineage. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that one of the 27 H9 viruses was a reassortant in which the PB2 gene belonged to the Korean sublineage and the other seven genes belonged to the G1 sublineage. Three representative H9N2 viruses were intranasally inoculated into ducks, chickens, pigs, and mice. On the basis of experimental infection studies, it was found that each of the three viruses readily infected pigs and replicated in their upper respiratory tracts, and they infected chickens with slight replication. Viruses were recovered from the lungs of mice inoculated with two of the three isolates. The present results reveal that H9 avian influenza viruses are prevailing and genetic reassortment occurs among domestic ducks in Vietnam. It is recommended that careful surveillance of swine influenza with H9 viruses should be performed to prepare for pandemic influenza.

  10. Protective effects of recombinant glycoprotein D based prime boost approach against duck enteritis virus in mice model.

    PubMed

    Aravind, S; Kamble, Nitin Machindra; Gaikwad, Satish S; Shukla, Sanjeev Kumar; Saravanan, R; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan

    2015-11-01

    Duck virus enteritis, also known as duck plague, is an acute herpes viral infection of ducks caused by duck enteritis virus (DEV). The method of repeated immunization with a live attenuated vaccine has been used for the prevention and control of duck enteritis virus (DEV). However, the incidence of the disease in vaccinated flocks and latency reactivation are the major constraints in the present vaccination programme. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy afforded by intramuscular inoculation of plasmid DNA encoding DEV glycoprotein D (pCDNA-gD) followed by DEV gD expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisia (rgD) was assessed in a murine model. Compared with mice inoculated with DNA (pCDNA-gD) or protein (rgD) only, mice inoculated with the combination of gD DNA and protein had enhanced ELISA antibody titers to DEV and had accelerated clearance of virus following challenge infection. Furthermore, the highest levels of lymphocyte proliferation response, IL-4, IL-12 and IFN-γ production were induced following priming with the DNA vaccine and boosting with the rgD protein. For instance, the specially designed recombinant DEV vector vaccine would be the best choice to use in ducks. It offers an excellent solution to the low vaccination coverage rate in ducks. We expect that the application of this novel vaccine in the near future will greatly decrease the virus load in the environment and reduce outbreaks of DEV in ducks.

  11. Precursor genes of future pandemic influenza viruses are perpetuated in ducks nesting in Siberia.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, K; Takada, A; Ito, T; Imai, M; Takakuwa, H; Hatta, M; Ozaki, H; Tanizaki, T; Nagano, T; Ninomiya, A; Demenev, V A; Tyaptirganov, M M; Karatayeva, T D; Yamnikova, S S; Lvov, D K; Kida, H

    2000-01-01

    Influenza A viruses of different subtypes were isolated from fecal samples of ducks in their nesting areas in Siberia in summer from 1996 to 1998. Phylogenetic analysis of the NP genes of the isolates in Siberia and those in Hokkaido, Japan on their flyway of migration from Siberia to the south in autumn revealed that they belong to the Eurasian lineage of avian influenza viruses. It is noted that the genes of the isolates in Siberia are closely related to those of H5N1 influenza virus strains isolated from chickens and humans in Hong Kong in 1997 as well as to those of isolates from domestic birds in southern China. The results indicate that influenza viruses perpetuated in ducks nesting in Siberia should have contributed genes in the emergence of the H5N1 virus in Hong Kong. Vaccine prepared from avirulent A/duck/Hokkaido/4/96 (H5N3) influenza virus was potent enough to protect mice from challenge with lethal dose of the pathogenic H5N1 virus [19]. Intensive surveillance study of aquatic birds especially in Siberia is, therefore, stressed to provide information on the future pandemic influenza virus strains and for vaccine preparation.

  12. Genetic parameters of product quality and hepatic metabolism in fattened mule ducks.

    PubMed

    Marie-Etancelin, C; Basso, B; Davail, S; Gontier, K; Fernandez, X; Vitezica, Z G; Bastianelli, D; Baéza, E; Bernadet, M-D; Guy, G; Brun, J-M; Legarra, A

    2011-03-01

    Genetic parameters of traits related to hepatic lipid metabolism, carcass composition, and product quality of overfed mule ducks were estimated on both parental lines of this hybrid: the common duck line for the maternal side and the Muscovy line for the paternal side. The originality of the statistical model was to include simultaneously the additive genetic effect of the common ducks and that of the Muscovy ducks, revealing a greater genetic determinism in common than in Muscovy. Plasma metabolic indicators (glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol contents) were heritable, in particular at the end of the overfeeding period, and heritabilities increased with the overfeeding stage. Carcass composition traits were highly heritable in the common line, with values ranging from 0.15 for liver weight, 0.21 for carcass weight, and 0.25 for abdominal fat weight to 0.32 for breast muscle weight. Heritabilities of technological outputs were greater for the fatty liver (0.19 and 0.08, respectively, on common and Muscovy sides for liver melting rate) than for the pectoralis major muscle (between 0.02 and 0.05 on both parental sides for cooking losses). Fortunately, the processing industry is mainly facing problems in liver quality, such as too high of a melting rate, than in meat quality. The meat quality appraisal criteria (such as texture and cooking losses), usually dependent on pH and the rate of decline of pH, were also very lowly heritable. This study demonstrated that genetic determinism of meat quality and ability of overfeeding is not similar in the common population and in the Muscovy population; traits related to fattening, muscle development, and BW have heritability values from 2 to 4 times greater on the common line than on the Muscovy line, which is relevant for considering different selection strategies.

  13. Development and application of an indirect immunoperoxidase assay for the detection of Duck swollen head hemorrhagic disease virus antigen in Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanfeng; Shen, Chanjuan; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Zhang, Na; Zhou, Yi; Zhu, Dekang; Jia, Renyong; Luo, Qihui; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2010-01-01

    An improved indirect immunoperoxidase assay (IPA) was developed to detect antigens of Duck swollen head hemorrhagic disease virus (DSHDV) in paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). This technique used an indirect streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase labeling system with polyclonal antiserum developed against purified DSHDV antigens. Specimens from the experimentally inoculated Pekin ducks with DSHDV and archived paraffin-embedded tissues from natural cases of Duck viral swollen head hemorrhagic disease (DVSHD) were examined by clinical and histological criteria. Positive staining was most widely observed in the cytoplasm of the following organs: immune, digestive, and urinary organs, heart, lung, and trachea, which corresponded to the intracellular distribution of reovirus. The DSHDV antigens were first detected at 4 hr postinoculation in the bursa of Fabricius of infected ducks. Therefore, this method was suitable for the early diagnosis of DVSHD. Immunoperoxidase staining was not present in tissues and organs of sham-inoculated ducks (negative control). The IPA developed in the current study is a convenient, sensitive, and specific means of detecting DSHDV and is applicable to routine diagnosis, retrospective studies, and prospective studies of DSHDV infection in ducks.

  14. Differential growth of avian influenza virus in chicken and duck cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ducks and chickens infected with AI viruses display clear differences in disease manifestation. To understand the mechanisms responsible for these differences we have determined the ability of several AI isolates to replicate in primary tracheal epithelial cells and fibroblasts from both species. Re...

  15. [Viral hepatitis: from A to G viruses].

    PubMed

    Figueroa Barrios R, R

    1996-01-01

    Great advances has been achieved in the last 10 years in the study of acute and chronic viral hepatitis. The enigma of non-A non-B viral hepatitis was disclosed when C virus was identified and later when E virus was isolated. New viruses has been searched to explain non-A to non-E viral hepatitis, being reported recently G virus. Epidemiology and clinical aspects has been reviewed identifying unusual clinical forms: choletasic and relapsing hepatitis in HAV infection; escape mutants B virus hepatitis in HVB infection; and the silent evolution to chronicity in more than 70% of cases in HVC infection. Diagnostic techniques has been developed to asses serum antibodies and the virus itself. It is important to quantitate the viral particles in the serum before treatment. PCR technique has been used with good results. A and E virus do not remain in the host and permanent inmunity is obtained after infection is resolved. 10% of B and 80% of C viral hepatitis goes to chronicity. So far, the only drug used to treat chronic viral B, D and C hepatitis is interferon alfa, obtaining good response en 40%. Combinations with Rivabirin and increasing the dose, frequency and duration of interferon treatment are in study. lt is a recomendation to treat acute HCV infection with Interferon alfa to prevent chronicity. Vaccines against A and B virus are used, being included in childhood vaccination programs. No HVC vaccine has developed probably to constant virus mutancy. New chalenges are present in this field and in the identification of new hepatitis viruses. PMID:12165788

  16. Complete genome sequence of a genotype XVII Newcastle disease virus, isolated from an apparently healthy domestic duck in Nigeria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) of genotype XVII is described here. A velogenic strain (duck/Nigeria/903/KUDU-113/1992) was isolated from an apparently healthy free-roaming domestic duck sampled in Kuru, Nigeria, in 1992. Phylogenetic analysis of the f...

  17. Pathogenicity of H3N8 influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in chickens with or without Escherichia coli coinfections.

    PubMed

    Pu, Juan; Fan, Yu Lei; Wang, Zhe; Ma, Bo; Brown, Earl G; Liu, Jin Hua

    2012-09-01

    Influenza viruses from domestic aquatic birds can be transmitted to chickens, resulting in continued prevalence of the disease. H3 viruses are one of the most frequently identified subtypes in domestic ducks. Results from our previous serologic study suggested that H3 virus infections potentially exist in chickens with a wide geographical distribution in China. To better understand their pathogenic potential, two H3N8 influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks were selected for experimental infections in chickens. We found that viral shedding lasted for at least 14 days postinfection for both viruses; however, one virus caused mortality in the chickens when coinfected with Escherichia coli. Sequencing of the viral HA gene isolated from the inoculated chickens revealed two amino acid mutations within the gene. These findings demonstrate the pathogenicity of the H3N8 domestic duck influenza viruses to chickens, highlighting the need for routine epidemiologic investigations of H3 subtype influenza viruses in chicken populations.

  18. Genetic characterization and evolutionary analysis of Newcastle disease virus isolated from domestic duck in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Satish; Kim, Ji-Ye; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Jung, Suk Chan; Choi, Kang-Seuk

    2016-03-15

    Domestic ducks are considered a potential reservoir of Newcastle disease virus. In the study, a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from a domestic duck during surveillance in South Korea was characterized. The complete genome of the NDV isolate was sequenced, and the phylogenetic relationship to reference strains was studied. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strain clustered in genotype I of Class II ND viruses, has highly phylogenetic similarity to NDV strains isolated from waterfowl in China, but was distant from the viruses isolated in chickens and vaccine strains used in South Korea. Pathogenicity experiment in chickens revealed it to be a lentogenic virus. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cleavage site of the fusion (F) protein confirmed that the isolate contained the avirulent motif (112)GKQGRL(117) at the cleavage site and caused no apparent disease in chickens and ducks. With phylogeographic analysis based on fusion gene, we estimate the origin of an ancestral virus of the isolate and its sister strain located in China around 1998. It highlights the need of continuous surveillance to enhance current understanding of the molecular epidemiology and evolution of the pathogenic strains.

  19. Pathogenicity and vaccine efficacy of different clades of Asian H5N1 avian influenza A viruses in domestic ducks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Seiler, Patrick; Forrest, Heather L; Khalenkov, Alexey M; Franks, John; Kumar, Mahesh; Karesh, William B; Gilbert, Martin; Sodnomdarjaa, R; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Govorkova, Elena A; Webster, Robert G

    2008-11-01

    Waterfowl represent the natural reservoir of all subtypes of influenza A viruses, including H5N1. Ducks are especially considered major contributors to the spread of H5N1 influenza A viruses because they exhibit diversity in morbidity and mortality. Therefore, as a preventive strategy against endemic as well as pandemic influenza, it is important to reduce the spread of H5N1 influenza A viruses in duck populations. Here, we describe the pathogenicity of dominant clades (clades 1 and 2) of H5N1 influenza A viruses circulating in birds in Asia. Four representatives of dominant clades of the viruses cause symptomatic infection but lead to different profiles of lethality in domestic ducks. We also demonstrate the efficacy, cross-protectiveness, and immunogenicity of three different inactivated oil emulsion whole-virus H5 influenza vaccines (derived by implementing reverse genetics) to the viruses in domestic ducks. A single dose of the vaccines containing 1 mug of hemagglutinin protein provides complete protection against a lethal A/Duck/Laos/25/06 (H5N1) influenza virus challenge, with no evidence of morbidity, mortality, or shedding of the challenge virus. Moreover, two of the three vaccines achieved complete cross-clade or cross-subclade protection against the heterologous avian influenza virus challenge. Interestingly, the vaccines induce low or undetectable titers of hemagglutination inhibition (HI), cross-HI, and/or virus neutralization antibodies. The mechanism of complete protection in the absence of detectable antibody responses remains an open question.

  20. Differential immune response of mallard duck peripheral blood mononuclear cells to two highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses with distinct pathogenicity in mallard ducks.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhu; Hu, Jiao; He, Liang; Li, Qunhui; Gu, Min; Wang, Xiaoquan; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Huimou; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Xiufan

    2014-02-01

    CK10 and GS10 are two H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza viruses of similar genetic background but differ in their pathogenicity in mallard ducks. CK10 is highly pathogenic whereas GS10 is low pathogenic. In this study, strong inflammatory response in terms of the expression level of several cytokines was observed in mallard duck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) infected with CK10 while mild response was triggered in those by GS10 infection. Two remarkable and intense peaks of immune response were induced by CK10 infection within 24 hours (at 8 and 24 hours post infection, respectively) without reducing the virus replication. Our observations indicated that sustained and intense innate immune responses may be central to the high pathogenicity caused by CK10 in ducks.

  1. Development of a PCR-Based Reverse Genetics System for an Attenuated Duck Tembusu Virus Strain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaogang; Shi, Ying; Yan, Dawei; Li, Xuesong; Yan, Pixi; Gao, Xuyuan; Zhang, Yuee; Yu, Lei; Ren, Chaochao; Li, Guoxin; Yan, Liping; Teng, Qiaoyang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    The infectious disease caused by the duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) has resulted in massive economic losses to the Chinese duck industry in China since 2010. Research on the molecular basis of DTMUV pathogenicity has been hampered by the lack of a reliable reverse genetics system for this virus. Here we developed a PCR-based reverse genetics system with high fidelity for the attenuated DTMUV strain FX2010-180P. The rescued virus was characterized by using both indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA) and whole genome sequencing. The rescued virus (rFX2010-180P) grew to similar titers as compared with the wild-type virus in DF-1 cells, and had similar replication and immunogenicity properties in ducks. To determine whether exogenous proteins could be expressed from DTMUV, both an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene were introduced between the NS5 gene and the 3' non-coding sequence of FX2010-180P. A recombinant DTMUV expressing eGFP was rescued, but eGFP expression was unstable after 4 passages in DF-1 cells due to a deletion of 1,294 nucleotides. The establishment of a reliable reverse genetics system for FX2010-180P provides a foundation for future studies of DTMUV. PMID:27248497

  2. Development of a PCR-Based Reverse Genetics System for an Attenuated Duck Tembusu Virus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaogang; Shi, Ying; Yan, Dawei; Li, Xuesong; Yan, Pixi; Gao, Xuyuan; Zhang, Yuee; Yu, Lei; Ren, Chaochao; Li, Guoxin; Yan, Liping; Teng, Qiaoyang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    The infectious disease caused by the duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) has resulted in massive economic losses to the Chinese duck industry in China since 2010. Research on the molecular basis of DTMUV pathogenicity has been hampered by the lack of a reliable reverse genetics system for this virus. Here we developed a PCR-based reverse genetics system with high fidelity for the attenuated DTMUV strain FX2010-180P. The rescued virus was characterized by using both indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA) and whole genome sequencing. The rescued virus (rFX2010-180P) grew to similar titers as compared with the wild-type virus in DF-1 cells, and had similar replication and immunogenicity properties in ducks. To determine whether exogenous proteins could be expressed from DTMUV, both an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene were introduced between the NS5 gene and the 3' non-coding sequence of FX2010-180P. A recombinant DTMUV expressing eGFP was rescued, but eGFP expression was unstable after 4 passages in DF-1 cells due to a deletion of 1,294 nucleotides. The establishment of a reliable reverse genetics system for FX2010-180P provides a foundation for future studies of DTMUV. PMID:27248497

  3. Replication of 2 subtypes of low-pathogenicity avian influenza virus of duck and gull origins in experimentally infected Mallard ducks.

    PubMed

    Daoust, P-Y; van de Bildt, M; van Riel, D; van Amerongen, G; Bestebroer, T; Vanderstichel, R; Fouchier, R A M; Kuiken, T

    2013-05-01

    Many subtypes of low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus circulate in wild bird reservoirs, but their prevalence may vary among species. We aimed to compare by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, virus isolation, histology, and immunohistochemistry the distribution and pathogenicity of 2 such subtypes of markedly different origins in Mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos): H2N3 isolated from a Mallard duck and H13N6 isolated from a Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis). Following intratracheal and intraesophageal inoculation, neither virus caused detectable clinical signs, although H2N3 virus infection was associated with a significantly decreased body weight gain during the period of virus shedding. Both viruses replicated in the lungs and air sacs until approximately day 3 after inoculation and were associated with a locally extensive interstitial, exudative, and proliferative pneumonia. Subtype H2N3, but not subtype H13N6, went on to infect the epithelia of the intestinal mucosa and cloacal bursa, where it replicated without causing lesions until approximately day 5 after inoculation. Larger quantities of subtype H2N3 virus were detected in cloacal swabs than in pharyngeal swabs. The possible clinical significance of LPAI virus-associated pulmonary lesions and intestinal tract infection in ducks deserves further evaluation.

  4. Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation During Successful Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus With Sofosbuvir and Simeprevir.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jeffrey M; Raphael, Kara Loren; Terry, Charles; Cartwright, Emily J; Pillai, Anjana; Anania, Frank A; Farley, Monica M

    2015-10-15

    Treatment of hepatitis C virus with potent, interferon-free, direct-acting antiviral regimens with no activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) may increase the risk for HBV reactivation in coinfected patients. We present 2 cases of HBV reactivation during treatment with an all-oral regimen of simeprevir and sofosbuvir and discuss strategies to prevent HBV flare.

  5. Corneal Opacity in Domestic Ducks Experimentally Infected With H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Nakamura, K; Yamada, M; Mase, M

    2016-01-01

    Domestic ducks can be a key factor in the regional spread of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus in Asia. The authors performed experimental infections to examine the relationship between corneal opacity and H5N1 HPAI virus infection in domestic ducks (Anas platyrhyncha var domestica). A total of 99 domestic ducks, including 3 control birds, were used in the study. In experiment 1, when domestic ducks were inoculated intranasally with 2 H5N1 HPAI viruses, corneal opacity appeared more frequently than neurologic signs and mortality. Corneal ulceration and exophthalmos were rare findings. Histopathologic examinations of the eyes of domestic ducks in experiment 2 revealed that corneal opacity was due to the loss of corneal endothelial cells and subsequent keratitis with edema. Influenza viral antigen was detected in corneal endothelial cells and some other ocular cells by immunohistochemistry. Results suggest that corneal opacity is a characteristic and frequent finding in domestic ducks infected with the H5N1 HPAI virus. Confirming this ocular change may improve the detection rate of infected domestic ducks in the field.

  6. The genetic and antigenic diversity of avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks, muscovy ducks, and chickens in northern and southern Vietnam, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Nishi, Tatsuya; Nomura, Naoki; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Sakurai, Kenji; Chu, Huy Duc; Thanh, Long Pham; Van Nguyen, Long; Van Hoang, Nam; Tien, Tien Ngoc; Yoshida, Reiko; Takada, Ayato; Kida, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    To estimate the prevalence of avian influenza virus infection in Vietnam, surveillance was conducted in domestic and wild birds from households, live-bird markets, slaughtering sites, and bird sanctuaries in Vietnam between October 2010 and October 2012. Of the 4,550 samples collected, 226 influenza A virus isolates were obtained from domestic ducks, muscovy ducks, and chickens. Of these, 25 and 22 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) were isolated from apparently healthy domestic ducks in live-bird markets and slaughtering sites in northern and southern Vietnam, respectively. The HA genes of H5 viruses isolated from birds in northern Vietnam phylogenetically belonged to the genetic clade 2.3.2.1 and those in southern Vietnam belonged to the genetic clade 1.1. In addition, 39 H3, 12 H4, 1 H5, 93 H6, 2 H7, 18 H9, 3 H10, and 11 H11 viruses were isolated. Phylogenetic and antigenic analyses of the H6 and H9 viruses revealed that they were closely related to the isolates obtained from domestic poultry in China. Phylogenetic analyses of internal gene segments of these isolates revealed that these viruses were circulating in both domestic and wild birds in Asia and reassortment events had occurred frequently. Therefore, it will be important to continue the surveillance and strict controls over the movement and trade of poultry and poultry products in order to eradicate H5N1 HPAIV from Asia.

  7. Host immune responses of ducks infected with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of different pathogenicities.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liangmeng; Jiao, Peirong; Song, Yafen; Cao, Lan; Yuan, Runyu; Gong, Lang; Cui, Jin; Zhang, Shuo; Qi, Wenbao; Yang, Su; Liao, Ming

    2013-10-25

    Our previous studies have illustrated three strains of duck-origin H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) had varying levels of pathogenicity in ducks (Sun et al., 2011). However, the host immune response of ducks infected with those of H5N1 HPAIVs was unclear. Here, we compared viral distribution and mRNA expression of immune-related genes in ducks following infection with the two HPAIV (A/Duck/Guangdong/212/2004, DK212 and A/Duck/Guangdong/383/2008, DK383). DK383 could replicate in the tested tissue of ducks (brain, spleen, lungs, cloacal bursa, kidney, and pancreas) more rapid and efficiently than DK212 at 1 and 2 days post-inoculation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of TLR3, IL-6, IL-8, and MHC class II in brains were higher than those of respective genes in lungs during the early stage of post infection. Furthermore, the expression levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in the brain of ducks following infection with DK383 were remarkably higher than those of ducks infected with DK212, respectively. Our results suggest that the shift in the H5N1 HPAIVs to increased virulence in ducks may be associated with efficient and rapid replication of the virus, accompanied by early destruction of host immune responses. These data are helpful to understand the underlying mechanism of the different outcome of H5N1 HPAIVs infection in ducks.

  8. Structural, Antigenic, and Evolutionary Characterizations of the Envelope Protein of Newly Emerging Duck Tembusu Virus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bing; Ma, Xiuli; Li, Yufeng; Yuan, Xiaoyuan; Qin, Zhuoming; Wang, Dan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Li, Feng; Song, Minxun; Sun, Huaichang

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reported cases of ducks infected with a previously unknown flavivirus in eastern China in April 2010, the virus, provisionally designated Duck Tembusu Virus (DTMUV), has spread widely in domestic ducks in China and caused significant economic losses to poultry industry. In this study, we examined in detail structural, antigenic, and evolutionary properties of envelope (E) proteins of six DTMUV isolates spanning 2010–2012, each being isolated from individual farms with different geographical locations where disease outbreaks were documented. Structural analysis showed that E proteins of DTMUV and its closely related flavivirus (Japanese Encephalitis Virus) shared a conserved array of predicted functional domains and motifs. Among the six DTMUV strains, mutations were observed only at thirteen amino acid positions across three separate domains of the E protein. Interestingly, these genetic polymorphisms resulted in no detectable change in viral neutralization properties as demonstrated in a serum neutralization assay. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the E proteins showed that viruses evolved into two distinct genotypes, termed as DTMUV.I and DTMUV.II, with II emerging as the dominant genotype. New findings described here shall give insights into the antigenicity and evolution of this new pathogen and provide guidance for further functional studies of the E protein for which no effective vaccine has yet been developed. PMID:23990944

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Antigenic Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Campo, David S.; Dimitrova, Zoya; Yokosawa, Jonny; Hoang, Duc; Perez, Nestor O.; Ramachandran, Sumathi; Khudyakov, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine development against hepatitis C virus (HCV) is hindered by poor understanding of factors defining cross-immunoreactivity among heterogeneous epitopes. Using synthetic peptides and mouse immunization as a model, we conducted a quantitative analysis of cross-immunoreactivity among variants of the HCV hypervariable region 1 (HVR1). Analysis of 26,883 immunological reactions among pairs of peptides showed that the distribution of cross-immunoreactivity among HVR1 variants was skewed, with antibodies against a few variants reacting with all tested peptides. The HVR1 cross-immunoreactivity was accurately modeled based on amino acid sequence alone. The tested peptides were mapped in the HVR1 sequence space, which was visualized as a network of 11,319 sequences. The HVR1 variants with a greater network centrality showed a broader cross-immunoreactivity. The entire sequence space is explored by each HCV genotype and subtype. These findings indicate that HVR1 antigenic diversity is extensively convergent and effectively limited, suggesting significant implications for vaccine development. PMID:22355779

  10. Novel reassortant influenza A(H5N8) viruses among inoculated domestic and wild ducks, South Korea, 2014.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Eun-Kyoung; Song, Byung-Min; Jeong, Jipseol; Choi, Jun-Gu; Jeong, Joojin; Moon, Oun-Kyong; Yoon, Hachung; Cho, Youngmi; Kang, Young-Myong; Lee, Hee-Soo; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2015-02-01

    An outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza, caused by a novel reassortant influenza A (H5N8) virus, occurred among poultry and wild birds in South Korea in 2014. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathogenesis in and mode of transmission of this virus among domestic and wild ducks. Three of the viruses had similar pathogenicity among infected domestic ducks: the H5N8 viruses were moderately pathogenic (0%-20% mortality rate); in wild mallard ducks, the H5N8 and H5N1 viruses did not cause severe illness or death; viral replication and shedding were greater in H5N8-infected mallards than in H5N1-infected mallards. Identification of H5N8 viruses in birds exposed to infected domestic ducks and mallards indicated that the viruses could spread by contact. We propose active surveillance to support prevention of the spread of this virus among wild birds and poultry, especially domestic ducks.

  11. The PA protein directly contributes to the virulence of H5N1 avian influenza viruses in domestic ducks.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiasheng; Feng, Huapeng; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Dongming; Shi, Jianzhong; Li, Yanbing; Deng, Guohua; Jiang, Yongping; Li, Xuyong; Zhu, Pengyang; Guan, Yuntao; Bu, Zhigao; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Chen, Hualan

    2011-03-01

    During their circulation in nature, H5N1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) have acquired the ability to kill their natural hosts, wild birds and ducks. The genetic determinants for this increased virulence are largely unknown. In this study, we compared two genetically similar H5N1 AIVs, A/duck/Hubei/49/05 (DK/49) and A/goose/Hubei/65/05 (GS/65), that are lethal for chickens but differ in their virulence levels in ducks. To explore the genetic basis for this difference in virulence, we generated a series of reassortants and mutants of these two viruses. The virulence of the reassortant bearing the PA gene from DK/49 in the GS/65 background increased 10(5)-fold relative to that of the GS/65 virus. Substitution of two amino acids, S224P and N383D, in PA contributed to the highly virulent phenotype. The amino acid 224P in PA increased the replication of the virus in duck embryo fibroblasts, and the amino acid 383D in PA increased the polymerase activity in duck embryo fibroblasts and delayed the accumulation of the PA and PB1 polymerase subunits in the nucleus of virus-infected cells. Our results provide strong evidence that the polymerase PA subunit is a virulence factor for H5N1 AIVs in ducks.

  12. Duck egg drop syndrome virus: an emerging Tembusu-related flavivirus in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, PeiPei; Lu, Hao; Li, Shuang; Wu, Ying; Gao, George Fu; Su, JingLiang

    2013-08-01

    Duck egg drop syndrome virus (DEDSV) is a newly emerging pathogenic flavivirus isolated from ducks in China. DEDSV infection mainly results in severe egg drop syndrome in domestic poultry, which leads to huge economic losses. Thus, the discovery of ways and means to combat DEDSV is urgent. Since 2010, a remarkable amount of progress concerning DEDSV research has been achieved. Here, we review current knowledge on the epidemiology, symptomatology, and pathology of DEDSV. A detailed dissection of the viral genome and polyprotein sequences, comparative analysis of viral antigenicity and the corresponding potential immunity against the virus are also summarized. Current findings indicate that DEDSV should be a distinct species from Tembusu virus. Moreover, the adaption of DEDSV in wildlife and its high homology to pathogenic flaviviruses (e.g., West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and dengue virus), illustrate its reemergence and potential to become a zoonotic pathogen that should not be overlooked. Detailed insight into the antigenicity and corresponding immunity against the virus is of clear significance for the development of vaccines and antiviral drugs specific for DEDSV. PMID:23917842

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Avian Tembusu-Related Virus Strain WR Isolated from White Kaiya Ducks in Fujian, China

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chunhe; Fu, Guanghua; Shi, Shaohua; Cheng, Longfei; Chen, Hongmei

    2012-01-01

    Avian tembusu-related virus, which was first identified in China, is an emerging virus causing serious economic loss to the Chinese poultry industry. We report here the complete genome sequences of avian tembusu-related virus strain WR, isolated from a White Kaiya duck with disease characterized by an abrupt decrease in egg laying with ovarian hemorrhage, which will help in further understanding the molecular and evolutionary characteristics and pathogenesis of avian tembusu-related virus, the new flavivirus affecting ducks in Southern China. PMID:22966199

  14. Origins and Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis D Virus.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Margaret; Locarnini, Stephen; Yuen, Lilly

    2016-01-04

    Members of the family Hepadnaviridae fall into two subgroups: mammalian and avian. The detection of endogenous avian hepadnavirus DNA integrated into the genomes of zebra finches has revealed a deep evolutionary origin of hepadnaviruses that was not previously recognized, dating back at least 40 million and possibly >80 million years ago. The nonprimate mammalian members of the Hepadnaviridae include the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), the ground squirrel hepatitis virus, and arctic squirrel hepatitis virus, as well as a number of members of the recently described bat hepatitis virus. The identification of hepatitis B viruses (HBVs) in higher primates, such as chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbons that cluster with the human HBV, as well as a number of recombinant forms between humans and primates, further implies a more complex origin of this virus. We discuss the current theories of the origin and evolution of HBV and propose a model that includes cross-species transmissions and subsequent recombination events on a genetic backbone of genotype C HBV infection. The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective RNA virus requiring the presence of the HBV for the completion of its life cycle. The origins of this virus remain unknown, although some recent studies have suggested an ancient African radiation. The age of the association between HDV and HBV is also unknown.

  15. Origins and Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis D Virus.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Margaret; Locarnini, Stephen; Yuen, Lilly

    2016-01-01

    Members of the family Hepadnaviridae fall into two subgroups: mammalian and avian. The detection of endogenous avian hepadnavirus DNA integrated into the genomes of zebra finches has revealed a deep evolutionary origin of hepadnaviruses that was not previously recognized, dating back at least 40 million and possibly >80 million years ago. The nonprimate mammalian members of the Hepadnaviridae include the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), the ground squirrel hepatitis virus, and arctic squirrel hepatitis virus, as well as a number of members of the recently described bat hepatitis virus. The identification of hepatitis B viruses (HBVs) in higher primates, such as chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbons that cluster with the human HBV, as well as a number of recombinant forms between humans and primates, further implies a more complex origin of this virus. We discuss the current theories of the origin and evolution of HBV and propose a model that includes cross-species transmissions and subsequent recombination events on a genetic backbone of genotype C HBV infection. The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective RNA virus requiring the presence of the HBV for the completion of its life cycle. The origins of this virus remain unknown, although some recent studies have suggested an ancient African radiation. The age of the association between HDV and HBV is also unknown. PMID:26729756

  16. Dietary L-arginine supplement alleviates hepatic heat stress and improves feed conversion ratio of Pekin ducks exposed to high environmental temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Jiang, W; Wu, L Y

    2014-12-01

    The current intensive indoor production system of commercial Pekin ducks never allows adequate water for swimming or wetting. Therefore, heat stress is a key factor affecting health and growth of ducks in the hot regions and season. Experiment 1 was conducted to study whether heat stress was deleterious to certain organs of ducks. Forty-one-day-old mixed-sex Pekin ducks were randomly allocated to four electrically heated battery brooders comprised of 10 ducks each. Ducks were suddenly exposed to 37 °C ambient temperature for 3 h and then slaughtered, in one brooder at 21 days and in another brooder at 49 days of age. The results showed that body weight and weight of immune organs, particularly liver markedly decreased in acute heat stress ducks compared with the control. Experiment 2 was carried out to investigate the influences of dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplement on weight and compositions of certain lymphoid organs, and growth performance in Pekin ducks, under daily cyclic hot temperature environment. A total of 151-day-old mixed-sex Pekin ducks were randomly divided into one negative control and two treatment groups, fed experimental diets supplemented with 0, 5, and 10 g L-Arginine (L-Arg)/kg to the basal diet respectively. Ducks were exposed to cyclic high temperature simulating natural summer season. The results showed that the addition of L-Arg improves feed conversion ratio (FCR) during a period of 7-week trial, as well as increases hepatic weight relative to body weight at 21 days, while decreases the hepatic water content at 49 days of age. This study indicated that the liver was more sensitive to acute heat stress, and the hepatic relative weight and chemical composition could be regulated by dietary L-Arg supplementation in Pekin ducks being reared at high ambient temperature. These beneficial effects of Arg on liver might be a cause of improved FCR.

  17. Virulence of six strains of duck plague virus in eight waterfowl species.

    PubMed

    Spieker, J O; Yuill, T M; Burgess, E C

    1996-07-01

    Susceptibility of New World waterfowl to the Lake Andes strain of duck plague virus (DPV) was assessed by intramuscular inoculation of adult muscovies (Cairina moschata), mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), Canada geese (Branta canadensis), wood ducks (Aix sponsa), redheads (Aythya americana), gadwalls (Anas strepera), blue-winged teal (Anas discors), and pintails (Anas acuta). The relative virulence of DPV strains isolated from five United States and one Canadian location was established in muscovies, mallards, and Canada geese. Differences in DPV strain virulence were detected by formation of plaques in cell culture. Two strains that consistently formed plaques killed adult mallards while non-plaque forming strains killed hatchling but not adult mallards. Based on mortality after exposure to the Lake Andes strain, blue-winged teal, then wood ducks and redheads were highly susceptible, muscovies and gadwalls moderately susceptible, mallards and Canada geese less susceptible, and pintails the least susceptible. Mean death times were significantly (P < 0.01) different between adult muscovies (4.5 days) versus mallards and Canada geese (5.8 days each). Mean death time of the virulent Lake Andes and Minnesota strains were shorter (P < 0.05) than for the other four, less virulent DPV strains. Four of the less virulent strains killed hatchling but not adult mallards. Susceptibility to mortality was dependent upon age and route of inoculation. The intramuscular route of inoculation required the least amount of virus to kill mallard and muscovy ducks, the intranasal and conjunctival routes required more virus, and the oral route the most virus. This study was conducted from 1974 to 1977 between the months of September and April, with the exception of two titrations conducted in early May at the University of Wisconsin Department of Veterinary Science and the Charmany research facility of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  18. Molecular and antigenic characteristics of Newcastle disease virus isolates from domestic ducks in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Liu, Huairan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Zongxi; Jiang, Yanyu; Xu, Qianqian; Shao, Yuhao; Li, Huixin; Kong, Xiangang; Chen, Hongyan; Liu, Shengwang

    2015-06-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is one of the most devastating diseases to the poultry industry. The causative agents of ND are virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), which are members of the genus Avulavirus within the family Paramyxoviridae. Waterfowl, such as ducks and geese, are generally considered potential reservoirs of NDV and may show few or no clinical signs when infected with viruses that are obviously virulent in chickens. However, ND outbreaks in domestic waterfowl have been frequently reported in many countries in the past decade. In this study, 18 NDV strains isolated from domestic ducks in southern and eastern China, between 2005 and 2013, were genetically and phylogenetically characterized. The complete genomes of these strains were sequenced, and they exhibited genome sizes of 15,186 nucleotides (nt), 15,192 nt, and 15,198 nt, which follow the "rule of six" that is required for the replication of NDV strains. Based on the cleavage site of the F protein and pathogenicity tests in chickens, 17 of our NDV isolates were categorized as lentogenic viruses, and one was characterized as a velogenic virus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the partial sequences of the F gene and the complete genome sequences showed that there are at least four genotypes of NDV circulating in domestic ducks; GD1, AH224, and AH209 belong to genotypes VIId, Ib, and II of class II NDVs, respectively, and the remaining 15 isolates belong to genotype 1b of class I NDVs. Cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition tests demonstrated that the antigenic relatedness between NDV strains may be associated with their genotypes, rather than their hosts. These results suggest that though those NDV isolates were from duck, they still don't form a phylogenetic group because they came from the same species; however, they may play an important role in promoting the evolution of NDVs.

  19. Neuraminidase hemadsorption activity, conserved in avian influenza A viruses, does not influence viral replication in ducks.

    PubMed Central

    Kobasa, D; Rodgers, M E; Wells, K; Kawaoka, Y

    1997-01-01

    The N1 and N9 neuraminidase (NA) subtypes of influenza A viruses exhibit significant hemadsorption activity that localizes to a site distinct from that of the enzymatic active site. To determine the conservation of hemadsorption activity among different NAs, we have examined most of the NA subtypes from avian, swine, equine, and human virus isolates. All subtypes of avian virus NAs examined and one equine virus N8 NA possessed high levels of hemadsorption activity. A swine virus N1 NA exhibited only weak hemadsorption activity, while in human virus N1 and N2 NAs, the activity was detected at a much lower level than in avian virus NAs. NAs which possessed hemadsorption activity for chicken erythrocytes (RBCs) were similarly able to adsorb human RBCs. However, none of the hemadsorption-positive NAs could bind equine, swine, or bovine RBCs, suggesting that RBCs from these species lack molecules, recognized by the NA hemadsorption site, present on human and chicken RBCs. Mutagenesis of the putative hemadsorption site of A/duck/Hong Kong/7/75 N2 NA abolished the high level of hemadsorption activity exhibited by the wild-type protein but also resulted in a 50% reduction of the NA enzymatic activity. A transfectant virus, generated by reverse genetics, containing this mutated NA replicated 10-fold less efficiently in chicken embryo fibroblast cultures than did a transfectant virus expressing the wild-type NA. However, both viruses replicated equally well in Peking ducks. Although conservation of NA hemadsorption activity among avian virus NAs suggests the maintenance of a required function of NA, loss of the activity does not preclude the replication of the virus in an avian host. PMID:9261394

  20. Hepatitis C virus: propagation, quantification, and storage.

    PubMed

    Yi, MinKyung

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases, including chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is well known for its restricted tropism and it does not replicate well in animal species other than humans and chimpanzees. Since classical in vitro propagation of natural HCV isolates is not possible, a protocol for the rescue of infectious virus from cDNA clones (genotype 1a pH77S and genotype 2a pJFH-1) transfected as RNA into permissive cells is described here. Because these two molecular clones behave differently in their ability to propagate and produce infectious virus, different methods for propagation of these two viral strains are described. Methods for infectious virus titration, which can be accomplished by counting foci of infected cells following immunostaining for viral antigen expression in cells infected with serial dilutions of a virus harvest (focus forming unit, or FFU, assay), are also provided.

  1. Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anish

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most prevalent liver diseases in the Western hemisphere. The rising rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus correlate with the increasing incidence of NAFLD, which is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Hepatitis C virus infection is another common cause of liver disease worldwide. Up to 70% of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) will have concomitant steatosis. The presence of NAFLD has been implicated as a cause of lower viral response rates in CHC patients who are treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. This review will focus on the factors that lead to NAFLD in the setting of hepatitis C virus infection, including viral and host factors—in particular, inflammatory mediators, cytokines, and lipid peroxidation. This paper will also discuss the implications of NAFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis regarding fibrosis progression, risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, and limitations with antiviral therapy. PMID:22933860

  2. Reassessing immune control of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher M; Feng, Zongdi; Lemon, Stanley M

    2015-04-01

    There is renewed interest in hepatitis A virus (HAV) pathogenesis and immunity after 2-3 decades of limited progress. From a public health perspective, the average age at infection has increased in developing countries, resulting in more severe hepatitis that is poorly understood mechanistically. More fundamentally, there is interest in comparing immunity to HAV and hepatitis C virus (HCV): small, positive-strand RNA viruses with very different infection outcomes. Here, we review evidence that circulating HAV virions are cloaked in membranes, with consequences for induction of innate immunity and antibody-mediated neutralization. We also consider the contribution of CD4+ helper versus CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to antiviral immunity and liver injury, and present a model of non-cytotoxic immune control of HAV infection.

  3. Pathobiological characterization of low-pathogenicity H5 avian influenza viruses of diverse origins in chickens, ducks and turkeys.

    PubMed

    Pillai, S P S; Pantin-Jackwood, M; Suarez, D L; Saif, Y M; Lee, C-W

    2010-09-01

    We undertook one of the most comprehensive studies on the replication and intraspecies transmission characteristics of low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses in ducks, chickens and turkeys. Our results indicated that most of these isolates could replicate and be transmitted in poultry without inducing clinical disease. However, differences in transmission to contact control birds were noted, emphasizing the importance of having contact control cage mates in biological characterization experiments. Ducks supported the replication of viruses of wild aquatic bird origin in their respiratory and digestive tracts equally well. The viruses from wild aquatic birds were not effectively transmitted among chickens. In contrast, the wild-bird isolates and viruses of domestic bird origin from live-bird markets and commercial poultry operations replicated and were transmitted more efficiently in turkeys than in chickens or ducks. We also found a lower minimal infectious dose requirement for infection of turkeys compared to chickens and ducks. Our data support an important role of turkeys as being more susceptible hosts for avian influenza viruses than domestic ducks and chickens. These results highlight the role of turkeys as intermediate or bridging hosts in the transmission of influenza viruses from wild birds to land-based domestic poultry or among different land-based bird species.

  4. Hepatitis-B virus infection in anaesthetists.

    PubMed

    Carstens, J; Macnab, G M; Kew, M C

    1977-09-01

    To determine whether anaesthetists are at risk from developing hepatitis-B virus (HBV) infection from their patients, 95 anaesthetists working with black South Africans (who have a high prevalence of hepatitis-B antigenaemia) were questioned about attacks of viral hepatitis and their blood was tested for hepatitis-B (surface) antigen (HBsAg) and antibody (Anti-HBs). Anti-HBs was detected in the serum of 17.9% of the anaesthetists, but none was a chronic carrier of HBsAg. Two anaesthetists had suffered from acute viral hepatitis during their careers, one of whom is now positive for Anti-HBs. Forty-five of the anaesthetists (47.4%) were known to have anaesthetized patients with HBs antigenaemia, and of these seven were Anti-HBs-positive. Anaesthetists working with a population having a high carrier rate of HBV appear to be more at risk from HBV infection than the general population. PMID:911589

  5. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein and Hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuaichen; Koh, Samantha S. Y.; Lee, Caroline G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the most associated factors in hepatocarcinogenesis. HBV is able to integrate into the host genome and encode the multi-functional hepatitis B virus x protein (HBx). Although the mechanism between HBx and carcinogenesis is still elusive, recent studies have shown that HBx was able to influence various signaling pathways, as well as epigenetic and genetic processes. This review will examine and summarize recent literature about HBx’s role in these various processes. PMID:27314335

  6. Acute hepatitis associated with autochthonous hepatitis E virus infection--San Antonio, Texas, 2009.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Rania A; Drobeniuc, Jan; Sanchez, Roger; Heseltine, Gary; Alsip, Bryan; Kamili, Saleem; Hu, Dale J; Guerra, Fernando; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2011-10-01

    Locally acquired hepatitis E infection is increasingly being observed in industrialized countries. We report 2 cases of autochthonous acute hepatitis E in the United States. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3a related to US-2 and swine hepatitis E virus strains was isolated from one of the patients, indicating potential food-borne or zoonotic transmission. PMID:21896699

  7. Hepatitis B and hepatitis delta virus infection in South America.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, J R

    1996-01-01

    About 100,000 cases of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occur annually in South America. The overall prevalence of HBV infection in low risk populations ranges from 6.7% to 41%, while hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) rates range from 0.4% to 13%. In high endemicity aboriginal or rural populations, perinatal transmission may play a major part in the spread of HBV. In urban populations, however, horizontal transmission, probably by sexual contact, is the predominant mode of spread, with higher rates of HBV positivity in lower socioeconomic groups. High risk populations such as health care workers and haemodialysis patients show higher rates of HBV infection than comparable populations elsewhere. The risk of posttransfusion hepatitis B remains high in some areas. Concomitant HBV infection may accelerate the chronic liver disease seen in decompensated hepatosplenic schistosomiasis. In the north, the prevalence of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection ranks among the highest in the world. In the south, the problem appears negligible although it is increasing within high risk urban communities. HDV superinfection has been the cause of large outbreaks of fulminant hepatitis. The cost of comprehensive or mass vaccination programmes remains unaffordable for most South American countries. Less expensive alternatives such as low dose intradermal schedules of immunisation have been used with success in selected adult subjects. PMID:8786054

  8. Genetics, Receptor Binding, and Virulence in Mice of H10N8 Influenza Viruses Isolated from Ducks and Chickens in Live Poultry Markets in China

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guohua; Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Jing; Kong, Huihui; Cui, Pengfei; Zhang, Fang; Tan, Dan; Suzuki, Yasuo; Liu, Liling; Jiang, Yongping; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed eight H10N8 viruses isolated from ducks and chickens in live poultry markets from 2009 to 2013 in China. These viruses showed distinct genetic diversity and formed five genotypes: the four duck isolates formed four different genotypes, whereas the four chicken viruses belong to a single genotype. The viruses bound to both human- and avian-type receptors, and four of the viruses caused 12.7% to 22.5% body weight loss in mice. PMID:25855738

  9. Genetics, Receptor Binding, and Virulence in Mice of H10N8 Influenza Viruses Isolated from Ducks and Chickens in Live Poultry Markets in China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guohua; Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Jing; Kong, Huihui; Cui, Pengfei; Zhang, Fang; Tan, Dan; Suzuki, Yasuo; Liu, Liling; Jiang, Yongping; Guan, Yuntao; Chen, Hualan

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed eight H10N8 viruses isolated from ducks and chickens in live poultry markets from 2009 to 2013 in China. These viruses showed distinct genetic diversity and formed five genotypes: the four duck isolates formed four different genotypes, whereas the four chicken viruses belong to a single genotype. The viruses bound to both human- and avian-type receptors, and four of the viruses caused 12.7% to 22.5% body weight loss in mice.

  10. Experimental co-infections of domestic ducks with a virulent Newcastle disease virus and low or highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with Avian influenza viruses (AIV) of low and high pathogenicity (LP and HP), and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are commonly reported in domestic ducks in parts of the world. However, it’s not clear if co-infections with these viruses affect the severity of the diseases they produce, the ...

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a Genotype XVII Newcastle Disease Virus, Isolated from an Apparently Healthy Domestic Duck in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Shittu, Ismaila; Sharma, Poonam; Joannis, Tony M.; Volkening, Jeremy D.; Odaibo, Georgina N.; Olaleye, David O.; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Solomon, Ponman; Abolnik, Celia; Miller, Patti J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.

    2016-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) of genotype XVII is described here. A velogenic strain (duck/Nigeria/903/KUDU-113/1992) was isolated from an apparently healthy free-roaming domestic duck sampled in Kuru, Nigeria, in 1992. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion protein gene and complete genome classified the isolate as a member of NDV class II, genotype XVII. PMID:26847901

  12. [The Isolation and Identification of Infectious Bronchitis Virus PTFY Strain in Muscovy Ducks].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoping; Pan, Shulei; Zhou, Wuduo; Wu, Yijiang; Huang, Yifan; Wu, Baocheng

    2016-03-01

    In July 2009, some farms of breeding Muscovy ducks on the peak of egg laying suffered the decrease of hatching rate and the quality of the eggs showing low mortality and no evident respiratory symptoms. The swelling and congestive ovary was visible after autopsy. This study was brought out for the diagnosis of these cases. The virus was isolated and identified by the methods of virus culture in chicken embryo, physical and chemical properties test, hemagglutinin test, NDV (Newcastle diseases Virus) interference test, electron microscope observation, pathogenicity test and the gene sequence analysis. The results indicated the virus showed the characters of inducing dwarf embryo after inocubation, the sensibility to lipid solvent and the hemagglutination capacity after pancreatic enzyme treatment, the typical morphology of coronavirus, the interference to NDV replication and the homology among 84.7% - 99% of the particial N gene sequences to the reference IBV (Avian infectious bronchitis virus) strains. The strain was identified as IBV isolate and this study confirmed the pathogenicity of IBV to Muscovy ducks. PMID:27396165

  13. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel duck Tembusu virus isolate from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kesen; Huang, Juan; Jia, Renyong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Mingshu; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Liu, Mafeng; Yin, Zhongqiong; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-11-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) has caused significant economic losses in the Chinese duck industry and may have been overlooked regarding its zoonotic transmission potential. A novel TMUV isolate (named CQW1) was separated from the liver tissue of a young duck in Southwest China. The CQW1 isolate proliferated in embryonated duck eggs and led to death within 3-4 days post-inoculation. Furthermore, CQW1 replicated in duck embryo fibroblast (DEF) cells and caused a cytopathic effect (CPE). The disease emerged on a duck farm in Southwest China and was reproduced by animal experiment. We found that CQW1 was detectable by RT-PCR in brain and liver tissues of dead ducklings within 5 days after inoculation. Most importantly, concentrated nuclei, neuronophagia and microglial nodules were observed in the brain tissue of the inoculated ducklings, and additionally, the liver tissue was affected, mainly by disordered lobular architecture, degeneration, necrosis and regenerated hepatocytes. Analysis of the complete genome sequence showed that CQW1 was 10,992 nt in length with two nucleotide insertions and shared 96.8% to 99.1% and 98.4% to 99.6% identity at nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively, with Chinese isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences demonstrated that the CQW1 isolate was closely related to other members of the genus Flavivirus and formed a new clade together with the GX2013H isolate. Also, the CQW1 isolate demonstrated the highest average pairwise distance value among the Chinese isolates. In the present study, we obtained evidence that TMUV is present in Southwest China. Extensive pathological and epidemiological studies are urgently needed. PMID:26303137

  14. Duck tembusu virus and its envelope protein induce programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Shaozhou, Wulin; Li, Chenxi; Zhang, Qingshan; Meng, Runzhe; Gao, Youlan; Liu, Hongyu; Bai, Xiaofei; Chen, Yuhuan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Siguo; Zhang, Yun

    2015-08-01

    The cytopathic effect produced in cells infected with duck tembusu virus (DTMUV) suggests that this emerging virus may induce apoptosis in primary cultures of duck embryo fibroblasts (DEF). Here, we present evidence that DTMUV infection of cultured cells activates apoptosis and that the ability of DTMUV to induce apoptosis is not restricted to cell type because DTMUV-induced apoptosis in duck and mammalian host cells. We further investigated which viral components induce apoptosis in DTMUV-infected host cells. The major envelope glycoprotein (E) was investigated for its apoptotic activities in expressed cells. Transient expression of the E protein alone triggered apoptosis in DEF, Vero, and BHK cells. Expression of the E protein resulted in activation of caspase-3-like proteases in cultured cells. These results indicate that infection of cells with DTMUV or expression of DTMUV E protein alone induces apoptosis, providing the basis for future to define the molecules that play key roles in the fate of DTMUV-infected cells. PMID:26056013

  15. Effects of petroleum on adrenocortical activity and on hepatic naphthalene-metabolizing activity in mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorsline, J.; Holmes, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    Unstressed mallard ducks (Anas platyrhychos), given uncontaminated food and maintained on a short photoperiod, show two daily maxima in plasma corticosterone concentration ([B]); one occurring early in the light phase and a second just before the onset of darkness. After one week of exposure to food containing 3% (v/w) South Louisiana crude oil, plasma [B] were significantly lowered throughout the day. Similar abrupt declines in plasma [B] also occurred during the first 10 days of exposure to food containing 1% and 0.5% crude oil. Although the plasma [B] in birds consuming food contaminated with 0.5% crude oil increased between 10 and 50 days of exposure, the concentration after 50 days was still lower than normal. During the same interval, normal plasma [B] were restored in birds consuming food containing 1% and 3% crude oil. Significant increases occurred in the naphthalene-metabolizing properties of hepatic microsomes prepared from birds acutely exposed to all levels of petroleum-contaminated food and elevated levels were sustained throughout the first 50 days of exposure. Birds given food containing 3% crude oil for more than 50 days, however, showed steady declines in hepatic naphthalene-metabolizing activity. After 500 days, the activity was similar to that found in contemporaneous controls. During the same interval, the plasma [B] increased until the levels were higher than normal after 500 days of exposure; at this time, an inverse relationship, similar to that seen during the first week of exposure to contaminated food, was once more established between plasma [B] and the concomitant hepatic naphthalene-metabolizing activity.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of a Virulent Newcastle Disease Virus Strain Isolated from a Clinically Healthy Duck (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus) in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Abdul; Rehmani, Shafqat F; Wasim, Muhammad; Basharat, Asma; Bibi, Tasra; Arif, Saima; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a virulent Newcastle disease virus (vNDV) strain, duck/Pakistan/Lahore/AW-123/2015, isolated from apparently healthy laying ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus) from the province of Punjab, Pakistan. The virus has a genome length of 15,192 nucleotides and is classified as member of subgenotype VIIi, class II. PMID:27469959

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a Virulent Newcastle Disease Virus Strain Isolated from a Clinically Healthy Duck (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus) in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Wajid, Abdul; Rehmani, Shafqat F.; Wasim, Muhammad; Basharat, Asma; Bibi, Tasra; Arif, Saima; Dimitrov, Kiril M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a virulent Newcastle disease virus (vNDV) strain, duck/Pakistan/Lahore/AW-123/2015, isolated from apparently healthy laying ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus) from the province of Punjab, Pakistan. The virus has a genome length of 15,192 nucleotides and is classified as member of subgenotype VIIi, class II. PMID:27469959

  18. Replication strategy of human hepatitis B virus

    SciTech Connect

    Will, H.; Reiser, W.; Weimer, T.; Pfaff, E.; Buescher, M.; Sprengel, R.; Cattaneo, R.; Schaller, H.

    1987-03-01

    To study the replication strategy of the human hepatitis B virus, the 5' end of the RNA pregenome and the initiation sites of DNA plus and minus strands have been mapped. The RNA pregenome was found to be terminally redundant by 120 nucleotides; it is initiated within the pre-C region and may also function as mRNA for synthesis of the major core protein and the hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase. The hepatitis B virus DNA minus strand is initiated within the direct repeat sequence DR1, it contains a terminal redundancy of up to eight nucleotides, and its synthesis does not require any template switch. The DNA plus strand is primed by a short oligoribonucleotide probably derived from the 5' end of the RNA pregenome, and its synthesis is initiated close to the direct repeat sequence DR2. For its elongation to pass the discontinuity in the DNA minus strand an intramolecular template switch occurs using the terminal redundancy of this template. Thus, the route of reverse transcription and DNA replication of hepatitis B viruses is fundamentally different from that of retroviruses.

  19. The hepatitis delta virus and its infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzeto, M.; Gerin, J.L.; Purcell, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 50 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure and Replication of the Genome of Hepatitis Delta Virus; Clinical Significance of HDV RNA in HDV Disease; HBV DNA in Delta Chronic Carriers; Prevalance of HBV-DNA Among Anti-Hd Positive Patients; and Characterization of LKM/sub 1/ and LKM/sub 2/ Antigens.

  20. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens. PMID:27784846

  1. The dynamics of hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, R J; Nowak, M A; Blumberg, B S

    1996-01-01

    We consider a cellular model of infection by the hepatitis B virus and describe how it may be used to account for two important features of the disease, namely (i) the wide variety of manifestations of infection and the age dependence thereof, and (ii) the typically long delay before the development of virus-induced liver cancer (primary hepatocellular carcinoma). The model is based on the assumption that the liver is comprised of both immature and mature hepatocytes, with these two subpopulations of cells responding contrastingly upon infection by the virus. PMID:8692852

  2. Genomic Characterizations of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from Ducks in Live Bird Markets in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Dongxia; Zhao, Yunling; Castellan, David; Liu, Hualei; Wang, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    One class I Newcastle disease virus (NDV), designated as duck/Guangxi/1261/2015 (GX1261), was isolated from asymptomatic ducks in live bird markets (LBM) from southern China during the national active surveillance for NDVs in 2015. The complete genome length of GX1261 isolate was 15,198 nucleotides with the gene order of 3'-NP-P-M-F-HN-L-5'. The motif at the cleavage site of F protein was 112ERQER/L117, which was typical of low virulence NDV. Several mutations were identified in the functional domains of F and HN proteins, including fusion peptide, heptad repeat region, transmembrane domains and neutralizing epitopes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete F gene revealed that the isolate was clustered into sub-genotype 1c in class I, and showed a high level of similarity with the strains isolated from waterfowl in the United States of America. This is the first report of this kind of virus in the mainland of China. These results demonstrated that GX1261-like viruses might exist in asymptomatic waterfowl, and remain undetected or unidentified. Thus, more investigation needs to be done in order to identify the source of the virus. This study revealed the genetic and phylogenetic characteristics of GX1261 isolate and could help us to better understand the epidemiological context of class I NDV in China. PMID:27391305

  3. Genomic Characterizations of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from Ducks in Live Bird Markets in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Dongxia; Zhao, Yunling; Castellan, David; Liu, Hualei; Wang, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    One class I Newcastle disease virus (NDV), designated as duck/Guangxi/1261/2015 (GX1261), was isolated from asymptomatic ducks in live bird markets (LBM) from southern China during the national active surveillance for NDVs in 2015. The complete genome length of GX1261 isolate was 15,198 nucleotides with the gene order of 3’-NP-P-M-F-HN-L-5’. The motif at the cleavage site of F protein was 112ERQER/L117, which was typical of low virulence NDV. Several mutations were identified in the functional domains of F and HN proteins, including fusion peptide, heptad repeat region, transmembrane domains and neutralizing epitopes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete F gene revealed that the isolate was clustered into sub-genotype 1c in class I, and showed a high level of similarity with the strains isolated from waterfowl in the United States of America. This is the first report of this kind of virus in the mainland of China. These results demonstrated that GX1261-like viruses might exist in asymptomatic waterfowl, and remain undetected or unidentified. Thus, more investigation needs to be done in order to identify the source of the virus. This study revealed the genetic and phylogenetic characteristics of GX1261 isolate and could help us to better understand the epidemiological context of class I NDV in China. PMID:27391305

  4. Hepatitis E virus and neurological injury.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Harry R; Kamar, Nassim; van Eijk, Jeroen J J; Mclean, Brendan N; Cintas, Pascal; Bendall, Richard P; Jacobs, Bart C

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis E is hyperendemic in many developing countries in Asia and Africa, and is caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotypes 1 and 2, which are spread via the faecal-oral route by contaminated water. Recent data show that HEV infection is also endemic in developed countries. In such geographical settings, hepatitis E is caused by HEV genotypes 3 and 4, and is mainly a porcine zoonosis. In a minority of cases, HEV causes acute and chronic hepatitis, but infection is commonly asymptomatic or unrecognized. HEV infection is associated with a number of extrahepatic manifestations, including a range of neurological injuries. To date, 91 cases of HEV-associated neurological injury--most commonly, Guillain-Barré syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy, and encephalitis/myelitis--have been reported. Here, we review the reported cases, discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms, and present our perspectives on future directions and research questions.

  5. Advances and challenges in the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines against hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cova, Lucyna

    2014-01-01

    Despite the existence of an effective prophylactic vaccine, chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem. Because very weak and functionally impaired virus-specific immune responses play a key role in the persistence of HBV infection, the stimulation of these responses appears to be of particular importance for virus clearance. In this regard DNA-based vaccination has emerged as novel, promising therapeutic approach for chronic hepatitis B. This review provides an update of preclinical studies in animal models (mouse, chimpanzee, duck, woodchuck), which evaluated the ability of DNA vaccines targeting hepadnaviral proteins to induce potent and sustained immune responses in naïve animals and to enhance virus clearance and break immune tolerance in chronic virus-carriers. Different strategies have been developed and evaluated in these models to optimize DNA vaccine including genetic adjuvants, combination with antiviral drugs, prime-boost regimens and plasmid delivery. The delivery of DNA by in vivo electroporation appears to be of particular interest for increase of vaccine potency in both small and large animal models. Based on the promising results generated in preclinical studies, first clinical trials of DNA vaccines have been initiated, although effective therapy of chronic hepatitis B awaits further improvements in vaccine efficacy.

  6. Complex reassortment of multiple subtypes of avian influenza viruses in domestic ducks at the Dongting Lake Region of China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guohua; Tan, Dan; Shi, Jianzhong; Cui, Pengfei; Jiang, Yongping; Liu, Liling; Tian, Guobin; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Li, Chengjun; Chen, Hualan

    2013-09-01

    To gain insight into the ecology of avian influenza viruses (AIV), we conducted active influenza virus surveillance in domestic ducks on farms located on the flyway of migratory birds in the Dongting Lake region of Hunan Province, China, from winter 2011 until spring 2012. Specimens comprising 3,030 duck swab samples and 1,010 environmental samples were collected from 101 duck farms. We isolated AIV of various HA subtypes, including H3, H4, H5, H6, H9, H10, H11, and H12. We sequenced the entire coding sequences of the genomes of 28 representative isolates constituting 13 specific subtypes. When the phylogenetic relationships among these isolates were examined, we observed that extensive reassortment events had occurred. Among the 28 Dongting Lake viruses, 21 genotypes involving the six internal genes were identified. Furthermore, we identified viruses or viral genes introduced from other countries, viral gene segments of unknown origin, and a novel HA/NA combination. Our findings emphasize the importance of farmed domestic ducks in the Dongting Lake region to the genesis and evolution of AIV and highlight the need for continued surveillance of domestic ducks in this region.

  7. If You Have Chronic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Infection

    MedlinePlus

    If you have chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection . . . If you have chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, you are not alone. Today, approximately one ... receive pneumococcal polysaccharide vac- cine.  Get vaccinated against hepatitis A. Hepati- tis A can further damage your ...

  8. Glycoprotein C plays a role in the adsorption of duck enteritis virus to chicken embryo fibroblasts cells and in infectivity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Liu, Xiaokun; Zou, Zhong; Jin, Meilin

    2013-06-01

    Unlike glycoprotein C (gC) of many mammalian herpes viruses, gC of some avian herpes viruses does not play a principle role in the binding of virus to heparin sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface. The roles of duck enteritis virus (DEV) gC on viral attachment remained unclear. In this study, we showed that gC expressed in vitro could bind to chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) cells and inhibit the adsorption of duck enteritis virus (DEV) onto CEF cells effectively and antiserum directed against gC inhibited the infection of DEV. Furthermore, it was confirmed that gC protein expressed in baculovirus system did not bind to heparin-Sepharose beads and virus binding to cells were independent of heparin sulfate proteoglycans on the surface of cells. Therefore, gC contributes to adsorption and infection of DEV.

  9. Noninvasive Monitoring of Hepatic Damage from Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alavez-Ramírez, J.; Fuentes-Allen, J. L.; López-Estrada, J.

    2011-01-01

    The mathematical model for the dynamics of the hepatitis C proposed in Avendaño et al. (2002), with four populations (healthy and unhealthy hepatocytes, the viral load of the hepatitis C virus, and T killer cells), is revised. Showing that the reduced model obtained by considering only the first three of these populations, known as basic model, has two possible equilibrium states: the uninfected one where viruses are not present in the individual, and the endemic one where viruses and infected cells are present. A threshold parameter (the basic reproductive virus number) is introduced, and in terms of it, the global stability of both two possible equilibrium states is established. Other central result consists in showing, by model numerical simulations, the feasibility of monitoring liver damage caused by HCV, avoiding unnecessary biopsies and the undesirable related inconveniences/imponderables to the patient; another result gives a mathematical modelling basis to recently developed techniques for the disease assessment based essentially on viral load measurements. PMID:21331263

  10. Hepatitis E virus: the current scenario.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Subrat; Subhadra, Subhra; Singh, Bhupinder; Panda, B K

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis E infection, caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV), is a common cause of acute hepatitis in developing countries with poor sanitation and hygiene. The virus is classified into four genotypes (1-4) with one serotype. Genotypes 1 and 2 exclusively infect humans, whereas genotypes 3 and 4 also infect other animals, particularly pigs. In endemic areas, large outbreaks of acute hepatitis caused by viruses of genotype 1 or 2 frequently occur due to fecal-oral transmission, usually through contamination of drinking water. With a high attack rate in young adults (aged 15-45 years), the disease is particularly severe among pregnant women (20-30% mortality). HEV appears to be a zoonotic disease, with transmission from pigs, wild boars, and deer, or foodborne. Chronic infections are rare, except in immunosuppressed persons, such as organ transplant recipients. A subunit vaccine has been shown to be effective in preventing the clinical disease, but is not yet commercially available. Our understanding of HEV has undergone major changes in recent years and in this article we review the currently available information with regard to the molecular biology, pathobiology, and epidemiology of HEV infection. We also review the current therapeutic interventions and strategies being used to control HEV infection, with emphasis on possible approaches that could be used to develop an effective vaccine against HEV.

  11. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that express hepatitis B virus surface antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Mackett, Michael; Moss, Bernard

    1983-04-01

    Potential live vaccines against hepatitis B virus have been produced. The coding sequence for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) has been inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under control of vaccinia virus early promoters. Cells infected with these vaccinia virus recombinants synthesize and excrete HBsAg and vaccinated rabbits rapidly produce antibodies to HBsAg.

  12. A plant-derived edible vaccine against hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, J; Modelska, A; Figlerowicz, M; Pniewski, T; Letellier, M; Lisowa, O; Yusibov, V; Koprowski, H; Plucienniczak, A; Legocki, A B

    1999-10-01

    The infectious hepatitis B virus represents 42 nm spherical double-shelled particles. However, analysis of blood from hepatitis B virus carriers revealed the presence of smaller 22 nm particles consisting of a viral envelope surface protein. These particles are highly immunogenic and have been used in the design of hepatitis B virus vaccine produced in yeast. Upon expression in yeast, these proteins form virus-like particles that are used for parenteral immunization. Therefore, the DNA fragment encoding hepatitis B virus surface antigen was introduced into Agrobacterium tumerifacience LBA4404 and used to obtain transgenic lupin (Lupinus luteus L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cv. Burpee Bibb expressing envelope surface protein. Mice that were fed the transgenic lupin tissue developed significant levels of hepatitis B virus-specific antibodies. Human volunteers, fed with transgenic lettuce plants expressing hepatitis B virus surface antigen, developed specific serum-IgG response to plant produced protein.

  13. Hepatitis C virus: A global view.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amal Ahmed; Elbedewy, Tamer A; El-Serafy, Magdy; El-Toukhy, Naglaa; Ahmed, Wesam; Ali El Din, Zaniab

    2015-11-18

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global challenge; 130-175 million are chronically infected. Over 350000 die each year from HCV. Chronic HCV is the primary cause of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and end-stage liver disease. Management of chronic HCV is aimed at preventing cirrhosis, reducing the risk of HCC, and treating extra hepatic complications. New treatments for chronic HCV has been devoted based on direct-acting antivirals, as pegylated interferon (peginterferon) is responsible for many side effects and limits treatment access. Sofosbuvir is the first compound to enter the market with Peginterferon-free combination regimens. PMID:26609344

  14. Induced immunity against hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Said, Zeinab Nabil Ahmed; Abdelwahab, Kouka Saadeldin

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection with its consequent development of HBV chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma is a global mandatory goal. Fortunately, safe and effective HBV vaccines are currently available. Universal hepatitis B surface antigen HBV vaccination coverage is almost done. Growing knowledge based upon monitoring and surveillance of HBV vaccination programs has accumulated and the policy of booster vaccination has been evaluated. This review article provides an overview of the natural history of HBV infection, immune responses and the future of HBV infection. It also summarizes the updated sources, types and uses of HBV vaccines, whether in the preclinical phase or in the post-field vaccination. PMID:26140085

  15. The hepatitis delta virus: Replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sureau, Camille; Negro, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective virus and a satellite of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Its RNA genome is unique among animal viruses, but it shares common features with some plant viroids, including a replication mechanism that uses a host RNA polymerase. In infected cells, HDV genome replication and formation of a nucleocapsid-like ribonucleoprotein (RNP) are independent of HBV. But the RNP cannot exit, and therefore propagate, in the absence of HBV, as the latter supplies the propagation mechanism, from coating the HDV RNP with the HBV envelope proteins for cell egress to delivery of the HDV virions to the human hepatocyte target. HDV is therefore an obligate satellite of HBV; it infects humans either concomitantly with HBV or after HBV infection. HDV affects an estimated 15 to 20 million individuals worldwide, and the clinical significance of HDV infection is more severe forms of viral hepatitis--acute or chronic--, and a higher risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison to HBV monoinfection. This review covers molecular aspects of HDV replication cycle, including its interaction with the helper HBV and the pathogenesis of infection in humans. PMID:27084031

  16. An attenuated duck plague virus (DPV) vaccine induces both systemic and mucosal immune responses to protect ducks against virulent DPV infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Juan; Jia, Renyong; Wang, Mingshu; Shu, Bing; Yu, Xia; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Yin, Zhongqiong; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2014-04-01

    Duck plague (DP) is a severe disease caused by DP virus (DPV). Control of the disease is recognized as one of the biggest challenges in avian medicine. Vaccination is an efficient way to control DPV, and an attenuated vaccine is the main routine vaccine. The attenuated DPV vaccine strain CHa is a modified live vaccine, but the systemic and mucosal immune responses induced by this vaccine have been poorly understood. In this study, the immunogenicity and efficacy of the vaccine were evaluated after subcutaneous immunization of ducks. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were counted by flow cytometry, and humoral and mucosal Ig antibodies were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed that high levels of T cells and Ig antibodies were present postimmunization and that there were more CD4(+) T cells than CD8(+) T cells. Titers of humoral IgG were higher than those of humoral IgA. Local IgA was found in each sample, whereas local IgG was found only in the spleen, thymus, bursa of Fabricius, harderian gland, liver, bile, and lung. In a protection assay, the attenuated DPV vaccine completely protected ducks against 1,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of the lethal DPV strain CHv via oral infection. These data suggest that this subcutaneous vaccine elicits sufficient systemic and mucosal immune responses against lethal DPV challenge to be protective in ducks. This study provides broad insights into understanding the immune responses to the attenuated DPV vaccine strain CHa through subcutaneous immunization in ducks.

  17. Serological evidence of widespread West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus infection in native domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var domesticus) in Kuttanad region, Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Kalaiyarasu, Semmannan; Mishra, Niranjan; Khetan, Rohit Kumar; Singh, Vijendra Pal

    2016-10-01

    Birds can act as reservoirs of West Nile virus (WNV) with a key role in its epidemiology. WNV lineage 1 associated fatal cases of human encephalitis in 2011 and acute flaccid paralysis in 2013 were reported in Alappuzha district, Kerala, India. But no information is available on WNV circulation in domestic ducks, which are abundant, cohabit with humans and occupy wetlands and water bodies in the region. To determine the extent of WNV infection, we investigated 209 sera, 250 oral and 350 cloacal swab samples from local Chara and Chemballi domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var domesticus) in the districts of Alappuzha, Kottayam, Kollam and Pathanamthitta collected during January and March 2015. The serum samples were tested for WNV antibodies first by a competition ELISA and then by a micro virus neutralization test (micro-VNT), while oral and cloacal swabs were subjected to WNV real-time RT-PCR. Ninety five ducks showed evidence of flavivirus antibodies by ELISA. End point neutralizing antibody titre against WNV and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) revealed WNV specific antibodies in 24 (11.5%) ducks in 3 districts, JEV specific antibodies in 21 (10%) ducks in 2 districts and flavivirus specific antibodies in 19 (9%) ducks. However, no WNV genomic RNA could be detected. The results of this study demonstrate evidence of widespread WNV and JEV infection in domestic ducks in Kuttanad region, Kerala with a higher seroprevalence to WNV than JEV. Additionally, it highlights the utility of domestic ducks as a surveillance tool to detect WNV/JEV circulation in a region. PMID:27638121

  18. Serological evidence of widespread West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus infection in native domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var domesticus) in Kuttanad region, Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Kalaiyarasu, Semmannan; Mishra, Niranjan; Khetan, Rohit Kumar; Singh, Vijendra Pal

    2016-10-01

    Birds can act as reservoirs of West Nile virus (WNV) with a key role in its epidemiology. WNV lineage 1 associated fatal cases of human encephalitis in 2011 and acute flaccid paralysis in 2013 were reported in Alappuzha district, Kerala, India. But no information is available on WNV circulation in domestic ducks, which are abundant, cohabit with humans and occupy wetlands and water bodies in the region. To determine the extent of WNV infection, we investigated 209 sera, 250 oral and 350 cloacal swab samples from local Chara and Chemballi domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var domesticus) in the districts of Alappuzha, Kottayam, Kollam and Pathanamthitta collected during January and March 2015. The serum samples were tested for WNV antibodies first by a competition ELISA and then by a micro virus neutralization test (micro-VNT), while oral and cloacal swabs were subjected to WNV real-time RT-PCR. Ninety five ducks showed evidence of flavivirus antibodies by ELISA. End point neutralizing antibody titre against WNV and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) revealed WNV specific antibodies in 24 (11.5%) ducks in 3 districts, JEV specific antibodies in 21 (10%) ducks in 2 districts and flavivirus specific antibodies in 19 (9%) ducks. However, no WNV genomic RNA could be detected. The results of this study demonstrate evidence of widespread WNV and JEV infection in domestic ducks in Kuttanad region, Kerala with a higher seroprevalence to WNV than JEV. Additionally, it highlights the utility of domestic ducks as a surveillance tool to detect WNV/JEV circulation in a region.

  19. Update on occult hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Makvandi, Manoochehr

    2016-01-01

    The event of mutations in the surface antigen gene of hepatitis B virus (HBV) results in undetectable hepatitis B surface antigen with positive/negative anti-hepatitis B core (anti-HBc) antibody status in serum and this phenomenon is named occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). The presence of anti-HBc antibody in serum is an important key for OBI tracking, although about 20% of OBI cases are negative for anti-HBc antibody. The diagnosis of OBI is mainly based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR assays. However, real-time PCR is a more reliable method than PCR. OBI is a great issue for the public health problem and a challenge for the clinical entity worldwide. The persistence of OBI may lead to the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. With regard to OBI complications, the screening of HBV DNA by the highly sensitive molecular means should be implemented for: (1) patients with a previous history of chronic or acute HBV infection; (2) patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus/human immunodeficiency virus; (3) patients undergoing chemotherapy or anti-CD20 therapy; (4) recipients of organ transplant; (5) blood donors; (6) organ transplant donors; (7) thalassemia and hemophilia patients; (8) health care workers; (9) patients with liver related disease (cryptogenic); (10) hemodialysis patients; (11) patients undergoing lamivudine or interferon therapy; and (12) children in time of HBV vaccination especially in highly endemic areas of HBV. Active HBV vaccination should be implemented for the close relatives of patients who are negative for OBI markers. Thus, the goal of this review is to evaluate the rate of OBI with a focus on status of high risk groups in different regions of the world.

  20. Genetic characterization of H1 avian influenza viruses isolated from migratory birds and domestic ducks in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ok-Mi; Kim, Yong-Joo; Choi, Jun-Gu; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Min-Chul; Kwon, Jun-Hun; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2011-02-01

    H1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) isolated from migratory birds and domestic ducks from 2003 to 2007 were analyzed to determine their genetic relationship. Phylogenic analysis with nucleotide sequences of all eight gene segments showed that 13 H1 AIVs from migratory birds and domestic ducks belonged to Eurasian avian lineages and were closely related to each other. Compared with H1 influenza viruses of swine or human origin in Korea, there was no evidence of reassortment among the human, swine, and avian hosts. Our results show that H1 AIVs isolated in Korea from 2003 to 2007 were genetically stable. However, continued surveillance is needed considering the role of migratory birds and domestic duck as a source of AIVs.

  1. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of H2N7 avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in Zhejiang Province, Eastern China, 2013.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaorong; Wu, Haibo; Jin, Changzhong; Yao, Hangping; Lu, Xiangyun; Cheng, Linfang; Wu, Nanping

    2014-04-01

    Two H2N7 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from domestic ducks in live poultry markets in Zhejiang Province, Eastern China, 2013. All viruses were characterized by whole-genome sequencing with subsequent phylogenetic analysis and genetic comparison. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that the viruses clustered in the Eurasian lineage of AIVs and originated from genes reassortment among different viruses co-circulating in domestic ducks in Eastern China. The hemagglutinin cleavage site of all viruses indicated that the two strains were low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Considering the important role of the domestic ducks in the dissemination and reassortment of AIVs, continued surveillance of circulating H2 subtype AIVs in domestic ducks in live poultry markets is needed.

  2. Hepatitis E virus infection among domestic animals in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Shen, Q; Mou, J; Gong, G; Yang, Z; Cui, L; Zhu, J; Ju, G; Hua, X

    2008-08-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a zoonotic pathogen of which several species of animal were reported as reservoirs. Antibodies to HEV and HEV RNA have been detected in some Chinese population and swine groups but few other domestic animals. In this study, to investigate the HEV prevalence, we tested sera from 788 pigs, 100 cows, 50 goats, 49 horses, 101 pet dogs, 105 chickens, 47 duck and 45 pigeons in eastern China for anti-HEV immunoglobulin G (IgG). We also tested 50% of the swine sera, all of sera from the other domestic animals and 13 Shanghai human sera which were positive for anti-HEV immunoglobulin M (IgM) for HEV RNA using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicated that 82.5% (222/269) of the sows, 53.9% (104/193) of the 4- to 6-month-old swine, 63.4% (168/265) of the 1- to 3-month-old swine, 55.7% (34/61) of the slaughterhouse swine, 24% (12/50) of the goats, 16.3% (8/49) of the horses, 17.8% (21/101) of the pet dogs, 6% (6/100) of the cows, 12.8% (6/47) of the ducks, 4.4% (2/45) of the pigeons and 1.9% (2/105) of the chickens exhibited positive for anti-HEV IgG. Inhibition assay confirmed the infection with HEV or HEV-like viruses in these domestic animals except pigeons and chickens. From the sera, we isolated 18 swine HEV strains, one horse HEV strain and two human HEV strains. Sequence analysis showed that the horse HEV isolate and one swine isolate belonged to genotype 3. The other isolates belonged to genotype 4. The two human isolates were phylogenetically closely related to eight of the swine isolates. In short, the presence of anti-HEV antibody had been confirmed in several species of domestic animals in eastern China and HEV RNA has been identified in swine, human and horse. This suggested that the authorities should pay more attention to the prevalence of HEV in eastern China.

  3. Discrete virus infection model of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Min, Lequan; Pian, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    In 1996 Nowak and his colleagues proposed a differential equation virus infection model, which has been widely applied in the study for the dynamics of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Biological dynamics may be described more practically by discrete events rather than continuous ones. Using discrete systems to describe biological dynamics should be reasonable. Based on one revised Nowak et al's virus infection model, this study introduces a discrete virus infection model (DVIM). Two equilibriums of this model, E1 and E2, represents infection free and infection persistent, respectively. Similar to the case of the basic virus infection model, this study deduces a basic virus reproductive number R0 independing on the number of total cells of an infected target organ. A proposed theorem proves that if the basic virus reproductive number R0<1 then the virus free equilibrium E1 is locally stable. The DVIM is more reasonable than an abstract discrete susceptible-infected-recovered model (SIRS) whose basic virus reproductive number R0 is relevant to the number of total cells of the infected target organ. As an application, this study models the clinic HBV DNA data of a patient who was accepted via anti-HBV infection therapy with drug lamivudine. The results show that the numerical simulation is good in agreement with the clinic data.

  4. Assembly of hepatitis delta virus particles.

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, W S; Bayer, M; Taylor, J

    1992-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a subviral satellite of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Since the RNA genome of HDV can replicate in cultured cells in the absence of HBV, it has been suggested that the only helper function of HBV is to supply HBV coat proteins in the assembly process of HDV particles. To examine the factors involved in such virion assembly, we transiently cotransfected cells with various hepadnavirus constructs and cDNAs of HDV and analyzed the particles released into the medium. We report that the HDV genomic RNA and the delta antigen can be packaged by coat proteins of either HBV or the related hepadnavirus woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV). Among the three co-carboxy-terminal coat proteins of WHV, the smallest form was sufficient to package the HDV genome; even in the absence of HDV RNA, the delta antigen could be packaged by this WHV coat protein. Also, of the two co-amino-terminal forms of the delta antigen, only the larger form was essential for packaging. Images PMID:1548764

  5. Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Iran is known as an endemic country for hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, while there are variations in the epidemiology of HEV infection throughout the country. The available epidemiological studies in different regions of Iran show HEV seroprevalence of 1.1%-14.2% among general population, 4.5% -14.3% among blood donors, 6.1%-22.8% among injecting drug users, 6.3%-28.3% among hemodialysis patients, 1.6%-11.3% among patients infected with other hepatitis viruses, 27.5% among patients with chronic liver disease, 30.8% among kidney transplant recipient patients, and 10%-16.4% among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. These variations reflect differences in the status of public health and hygiene, risk factors, and routes of transmission in different regions and groups. Therefore, it is necessary to review the epidemiology of HEV infection to determine the most prevalent risk factors and routes of transmission, and to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive strategies employed in the public health services of the country. Moreover, the other epidemiological aspects of HEV, including the genotypic pattern, extra hepatic manifestations, and incidence of chronic infection need to be investigated among Iranian population to expand the current knowledge on the epidemiology of HEV and to clarify the real burden of HEV infection. Therefore, this review was performed to provide a general overview regarding the epidemiology of HEV in Iran. PMID:27298557

  6. Hepatitis G virus infections in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Löve, A; Stanzeit, B; Gudmundsson, S; Widell, A

    1999-05-01

    This study describes the prevalence of hepatitisG virus (HGV) in Iceland, in blood donors and in persons with parenteral risk factors. Among 370 randomly selected Icelandic blood donors, the prevalence of HGV viraemia was 3.8%, whereas the prevalence of HGV antibodies in the same donor group was found to be 13.2%, thus indicating that at least 17% of blood donors in Iceland had previously been exposed to HGV. Previous exposure was seen in all age groups and also in older blood donors. Among intravenous drug users (IVDUs), the prevalence of HGV was much higher. Among 109 hepatitisC virus (HCV) antibody-positive serum samples collected in the years 1992-1997, 33. 9% were polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive for HGV and 48.6% had HGV antibodies. Thus, the pattern of HGV in IVDUs was similar to findings among IVDUs in other western countries. HGV viraemia was detected neither in 10 patients with haemophilia nor in five dialysis patients. However, six of the 10 haemophilic patients and one of the five dialysis patients had HGV antibody. In conclusion, unlike hepatitis C, which seems to have been introduced into Iceland relatively recently and has remained virtually confined to IVDUs, exposure to HGV is common among all age groups in the general population, suggesting that the virus has been prevalent in Iceland for much longer, making additional routes of transmission probable. PMID:10607239

  7. Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2016-06-14

    Iran is known as an endemic country for hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, while there are variations in the epidemiology of HEV infection throughout the country. The available epidemiological studies in different regions of Iran show HEV seroprevalence of 1.1%-14.2% among general population, 4.5% -14.3% among blood donors, 6.1%-22.8% among injecting drug users, 6.3%-28.3% among hemodialysis patients, 1.6%-11.3% among patients infected with other hepatitis viruses, 27.5% among patients with chronic liver disease, 30.8% among kidney transplant recipient patients, and 10%-16.4% among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. These variations reflect differences in the status of public health and hygiene, risk factors, and routes of transmission in different regions and groups. Therefore, it is necessary to review the epidemiology of HEV infection to determine the most prevalent risk factors and routes of transmission, and to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive strategies employed in the public health services of the country. Moreover, the other epidemiological aspects of HEV, including the genotypic pattern, extra hepatic manifestations, and incidence of chronic infection need to be investigated among Iranian population to expand the current knowledge on the epidemiology of HEV and to clarify the real burden of HEV infection. Therefore, this review was performed to provide a general overview regarding the epidemiology of HEV in Iran. PMID:27298557

  8. [Culture of hepatitis virus B].

    PubMed

    Panouse-Perrin, J; Couroucé-Pauty, A M; Rachman, F

    1975-01-01

    For the last 25 years, numerous attempts have been made to isolate the HBV agent responsible for hepatitis B by means of cultures 'in vitro'. We have undertaken longterm cultures of children's hepatic tissue (C.H.), conjunctive tissue (human adult H.A.F. and human embryonic fibroblasts H.E.F.) and KB cells; these were put in the presence of 7 sera HB + rich in Dane particles. These cells were trypsinized twice a week for almost 3 months and did not present any cytopathogenic effects. Electromicroscopy revealed, 15 days after infection, the presence of icosahedral particles (25 to 27 nm in diameter), free or in dense clusters, but more often empty (20 nm in diameter). These structures seemed to be made up of an assembly of capsomers approximately 5 nm in diameter, joined together in fours to form a ridge. Older cultures revealed clusters of icosahedrons some of which degenerated spontaneously; others were surrounded by proteinic structure having a fringed aspect. Certain rare particles of 35 to 45 nm in diameter are similar to full Dane particles. EID immunological results were positive in the case of sera of patients convalescent from hepatitis B, containing anti-HBc antibodies, on C.H. cells the 27th and 40th days, and negative with anti-HBs antibodies. By immunofluorescence we observed 12 to 20 days after infection of the cells, a clear fluorescence at first nuclear, then essentially cytoplasmic, by means of fluorescent anti-HBc sera of human or animal origin. With the fluorescent anti-HBs antibodies, the reaction is weak and solely cytoplasmic although in DRI, with H.E.F. and KB cells, we obtained from time to time weakly positive results in HBs. The relations between the morphological structures and the immunological results observed are discussed.

  9. A 4-year study of avian influenza virus prevalence and subtype diversity in ducks of Newfoundland, Canada.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyan; Wille, Michelle; Dobbin, Ashley; Robertson, Gregory J; Ryan, Pierre; Ojkic, Davor; Whitney, Hugh; Lang, Andrew S

    2013-10-01

    The island of Newfoundland, Canada, is at the eastern edge of North America and has migratory bird connections with the continental mainland as well as across the North Atlantic Ocean. Here, we report a 4-year avian influenza virus (AIV) epidemiological study in ducks in the St. John's region of Newfoundland. The overall prevalence of AIV detection in ducks during this study was 7.2%, with American Black Ducks contributing the vast majority of the collected samples and the AIV positives. The juvenile ducks showed a significantly higher AIV detection rate (10.6%) compared with adults (3.4%). Seasonally, AIV prevalence rates were higher in the autumn (8.4%), but positives were still detected in the winter (4.6%). Preliminary serology tests showed a high incidence of previous AIV infection (20/38, 52.6%). A total of 43 viruses were characterized for their HA-NA or HA subtypes, which revealed a large diversity of AIV subtypes and little recurrence of subtypes from year to year. Investigation of the movement patterns of ducks in this region showed that it is a largely non-migratory duck population, which may contribute to the observed pattern of high AIV subtype turnover. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 H1N1 and one H5N4 AIVs showed these viruses were highly similar to other low pathogenic AIV sequences from waterfowl in North America and assigned all gene segments into American-avian clades. Notably, the H1N1 viruses, which were identified in consecutive years, possessed homologous genomes. Such detection of homologous AIV genomes across years is rare, but indicates the role of the environmental reservoir in viral perpetuation.

  10. Characterization and Sequencing of an H6N6 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Sansui Sheldrake Ducks in Guizhou, Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiaqi; Ji, Xinqin; Xu, Houqiang; Ruan, Yong; Zhao, Jiafu

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an H6N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) isolated from Sansui Sheldrake ducks in Guizhou Province, China, in 2014. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the H6N6 virus was a reassortant virus derived from three different H6 subtype lineages. The finding of this study will help us understand the epidemiology and the evolutionary characteristics of H6 subtypes of AIV in ducks in southwestern China. PMID:27174267

  11. Recombinant egg drop syndrome subunit vaccine offers an alternative to virus propagation in duck eggs.

    PubMed

    Gutter, B; Fingerut, E; Gallili, G; Eliahu, D; Perelman, B; Finger, A; Pitcovski, J

    2008-02-01

    Egg drop syndrome (EDS) virus vaccines are routinely produced in embryonated duck eggs (Solyom et al., 1982). This procedure poses the risk of dissemination of pathogens, such as avian influenza virus, as the eggs used are not from specific pathogen free birds. To address this problem, the knob and part of the shaft domain of the fibre protein of the EDS virus (termed knob-s) were expressed in Escherichia coli and assessed as a subunit vaccine. A single vaccination with the recombinant protein induced the production of anti-EDS virus antibodies, as detected by haemagglutination inhibition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization tests, for at least 20 weeks. A positive correlation was demonstrated between these three assays. A dose-response assessment showed that the vaccine was effective over the range of 2 to 64 microg protein per dose. Two vaccinations with the recombinant protein, administered before the onset of lay, induced high haemagglutination inhibition antibody titres, comparable with those induced by an inactivated whole-virus vaccine. The vaccine did not have any adverse effects on egg production, quality or weight. The present study has shown that two vaccinations with the recombinant knob-s protein elicited high neutralizing antibody titres that persisted for more than 50 weeks of lay.

  12. Proteins of duck influenza virus responsible for acquisition of pathogenicity in chickens.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Soda, Kosuke; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Kida, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    Influenza virus rgVac1sub-P0 (H5N1) (rgVac1-P0), in which a pair of dibasic amino acid residues was introduced at the cleavage site of the HA of a reassortant of H5N2 and H7N1 viruses of duck origin, was low pathogenic in chickens. Vac1sub-P3 (H5N1) (Vac1-P3) was selected as a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus by 3 consecutive passages in chickens from low pathogenic strain rgVac1-P0. Comparison of amino acid sequences of the virus proteins and experimental infection of chickens with a series of recombinant viruses demonstrated that in addition to the HA, each of the PA, NP, M1, and M2 of Vac1-P3 are responsible for the acquisition of pathogenicity in chickens. These 4 proteins of Vac1-P3 synergistically contributed to efficient virus replication in chickens.

  13. Duck MDA5 functions in innate immunity against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infections.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liangmeng; Cui, Jin; Song, Yafen; Zhang, Shuo; Han, Fei; Yuan, Runyu; Gong, Lang; Jiao, Peirong; Liao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) is an important intracellular receptor that recognizes long molecules of viral double-stranded RNA in innate immunity. To understand the mechanism of duck MDA5-mediated innate immunity, we cloned the MDA5 cDNA from the Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicates that duck MDA5 mRNA was constitutively expressed in all sampled tissues. A significant increase of MDA5 mRNA was detected in the brain, spleen and lungs of ducks after infection with an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV). We investigated the role of the predicted functional domains of MDA5. The results indicate the caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) of duck MDA5 had a signal transmission function through IRF-7-dependent signaling pathway. Overexpression of the CARD strongly activated the chicken IFN-β promoter and upregulated the mRNA expression of antiviral molecules (such as OAS, PKR and Mx), proinflammatory cytokines (such as IL-2, IL-6, IFN-α and IFN-γ, but not IL-1β and IL-8) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLR) (RIG-I and LGP2) without exogenous stimulation. We also demonstrate the NS1 of the H5N1 HPAIV inhibited the duck MDA5-mediated signaling pathway in vitro. These results suggest that duck MDA5 is an important receptor for inducing antiviral activity in the host immune response of ducks.

  14. Viral dynamics in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, M A; Bonhoeffer, S; Hill, A M; Boehme, R; Thomas, H C; McDade, H

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections with the reverse transcriptase inhibitor lamivudine leads to a rapid decline in plasma viremia and provides estimates for crucial kinetic constants of HBV replication. We find that in persistently infected patients, HBV particles are cleared from the plasma with a half-life of approximately 1.0 day, which implies a 50% daily turnover of the free virus population. Total viral release into the periphery is approximately 10(11) virus particles per day. Although we have no direct measurement of the infected cell mass, we can estimate the turnover rate of these cells in two ways: (i) by comparing the rate of viral production before and after therapy or (ii) from the decline of hepatitis B antigen during treatment. These two independent methods give equivalent results: we find a wide distribution of half-lives for virus-producing cells, ranging from 10 to 100 days in different patients, which may reflect differences in rates of lysis of infected cells by immune responses. Our analysis provides a quantitative understanding of HBV replication dynamics in vivo and has implications for the optimal timing of drug treatment and immunotherapy in chronic HBV infection. This study also represents a comparison for recent findings on the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The total daily production of plasma virus is, on average, higher in chronic HBV carriers than in HIV-infected patients, but the half-life of virus-producing cells is much shorter in HIV. Most strikingly, there is no indication of drug resistance in HBV-infected patients treated for up to 24 weeks. PMID:8633078

  15. Relationship between H5N2 avian influenza viruses isolated from wild and domestic ducks in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pasick, John; Handel, Katherine; Robinson, John; Bowes, Victoria; Li, Yan; Leighton, Ted; Kehler, Helen; Ridd, Deidre; Cottam-Birt, Colleen

    2007-03-01

    In the summer of 2005 a Canadian national surveillance program for influenza A viruses in wild aquatic birds was initiated. The program involved collaboration between federal and provincial levels of government and was coordinated by the Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre. The surveillance plan targeted young-of-the-year Mallards along with other duck species at six sampling locations along the major migratory flyways across Canada. Beginning in early August, cloacal swabs were taken from 704 ducks on two lakes adjacent to one another near Kamloops, British Columbia. The swabs were screened for the presence of influenza A RNA using a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) assay that targets the M1 gene. Swab samples that gave positive results underwent further testing using H5- and H7-specific RRT-PCR assays. One hundred and seventy-four cloacal swab specimens gave positive or suspicious results for the presence of an H5 virus. A portion of these (28/35) were confirmed using an H5-specific conventional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay and an H5 virus was eventually isolated from 24/127 swab specimens. Neuraminidase typing revealed the presence of H5N2 and H5N9 viruses. In mid-November of 2005 an H5N2 virus was detected in a commercial duck operation in the lower mainland of British Columbia, approximately 120 km from where the H5N2-positive wild ducks were sampled. Molecular genetic analysis of the H5N2 viruses isolated from wild and domestic ducks was carried out to determine their kinship.

  16. Infectious bursal disease virus antibodies in eider ducks and Herring Gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmen, T.; Franson, J.C.; Docherty, D.E.; Kilpi, Mikael; Hario, Martti; Creekmore, L.H.; Petersen, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    We measured antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) in blood of nesting Common Eider (Somateria mollissima) females and immature Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) in the Baltic Sea, and in blood of Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri) females nesting in a remote area of western Alaska. Positive (??? 1:16) IBDV titers occurred in 75% of the eiders and 45% of the Herring Gull chicks. In eiders, the prevalence of positive titers differed among locations. We found no evidence that IBDV exposure impaired the immune function of Herring Gull chicks, based on their response to inoculation of sheep red blood cells. We suggest that eider ducks and Herring Gulls have been exposed to IBDV, even in locations where contact with poultry is unlikely. The presence of this virus in wild bird populations is of concern because it causes mortality of up to 30% in susceptible poultry.

  17. Characterization of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and intracellular localization signals in Duck Enteritis Virus UL54.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoyue; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2016-08-01

    Duck Enteritis virus (DEV) UL54 is a homolog of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) trafficking protein ICP27, which plays an essential role in infection. In this study, DEV UL54 shuttling between the nucleus and cytoplasm was verified with a heterokaryon assay. One predicted nuclear export sequence (NES) (339-348 aa) was shown to be functional and chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent; however, the insensitivity of UL54 to Leptomycin B (LMB) and NES mutation suggests that other mechanisms are responsible for the observed nuclear export. Next, three non-classical nuclear localization sequences (NLSs), referred to as NLS1 (105-122 aa), NLS2 (169-192 aa) and NLS3 (257-274 aa), were identified. Furthermore, a recombinant DEV with the UL54 NLSs deleted (DEV- UL54 mNLSs) was constructed and showed that UL54 NLSs moderately affected DEV growth. PMID:27157269

  18. Characterization of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and intracellular localization signals in Duck Enteritis Virus UL54.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoyue; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2016-08-01

    Duck Enteritis virus (DEV) UL54 is a homolog of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) trafficking protein ICP27, which plays an essential role in infection. In this study, DEV UL54 shuttling between the nucleus and cytoplasm was verified with a heterokaryon assay. One predicted nuclear export sequence (NES) (339-348 aa) was shown to be functional and chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent; however, the insensitivity of UL54 to Leptomycin B (LMB) and NES mutation suggests that other mechanisms are responsible for the observed nuclear export. Next, three non-classical nuclear localization sequences (NLSs), referred to as NLS1 (105-122 aa), NLS2 (169-192 aa) and NLS3 (257-274 aa), were identified. Furthermore, a recombinant DEV with the UL54 NLSs deleted (DEV- UL54 mNLSs) was constructed and showed that UL54 NLSs moderately affected DEV growth.

  19. Development of a solid-phase competition ELISA to detect antibodies against newly emerged Duck Tembusu virus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuguang; Ji, Yanhong; Liu, Bin; Dafallah, Rihab Muhammad; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-11-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) was first isolated in Northern China in 2010, and is an emerging viral pathogen that is now rapidly spreading to most Chinese provinces causing a severe disease and economic losses for the duck breeding industry. The virus can affect ducks, chickens and geese, but currently there are no commercial ELISA methods for detecting antibodies against DTMUV from different species, or for assessing antibody titers in infected birds. In the present study, a solid-phase competition ELISA for this purpose was developed. The sensitivity and specificity of this test were 97.6% and 100%, respectively, when the percent inhibition (PI) was set at 15% using a serum dilution of 1:16. No cross-reaction with the sera against other avian viral pathogens was found in the study and the ELISA results generated for duck and chicken sera from the field were totally consistent with those of the classical virus neutralization assay. Therefore, this solid-phase competition ELISA represents a sensitive, specific and quantitative tool for the serological detection of Tembusu virus in different birds to facilitate the prevention and control of this disease.

  20. Effect of roxarsone inclusion in the diet on the performance and hepatic lipid metabolism of laying Tsaiya duck.

    PubMed

    Chen, K L; Wu, C P; Chiou, P W

    2000-07-01

    1. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of roxarsone (3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid) inclusion in the diet on the performance, liver function and lipid metabolism in the liver of laying Brown Tsaiya ducks. 2. Sixty 36-week-old laying ducks were selected and allocated at random into 4 dietary treatments with 3 replications for each treatment. Feeding was for 7 weeks with 3 weeks of experimental diets followed by a 4 week withdrawal period. The experimental diets were supplemented with 0, 50, 100 and 300 mg/kg roxarsone, respectively 3. Dietary inclusion of 50 or 100 mg/kg roxarsone did not significantly promote performance. Inclusion of 300 mg/kg significantly depressed (P<0.05) performance, liver weight and content, serum triacylglycerol (TG), serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) and increased (P<0.05) cholesterol, creatine kinase (CK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in the serum at the end of 3 weeks on the experimental diet. 4. Laying characteristics returned to normal 4 weeks after withdrawal of roxarsone. The liver weight, fat and TG in the liver and serum concentrations of TG, NEFA, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and AST increased significantly (P<0.05), while the level of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) decreased (P<0.05) at the end of the withdrawal period. More prominent vacuolised hepatic fatty cells were observed in laying ducks treated with 300 mg/kg of roxarsone. PMID:11081432

  1. Effect of roxarsone inclusion in the diet on the performance and hepatic lipid metabolism of laying Tsaiya duck.

    PubMed

    Chen, K L; Wu, C P; Chiou, P W

    2000-07-01

    1. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of roxarsone (3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid) inclusion in the diet on the performance, liver function and lipid metabolism in the liver of laying Brown Tsaiya ducks. 2. Sixty 36-week-old laying ducks were selected and allocated at random into 4 dietary treatments with 3 replications for each treatment. Feeding was for 7 weeks with 3 weeks of experimental diets followed by a 4 week withdrawal period. The experimental diets were supplemented with 0, 50, 100 and 300 mg/kg roxarsone, respectively 3. Dietary inclusion of 50 or 100 mg/kg roxarsone did not significantly promote performance. Inclusion of 300 mg/kg significantly depressed (P<0.05) performance, liver weight and content, serum triacylglycerol (TG), serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) and increased (P<0.05) cholesterol, creatine kinase (CK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in the serum at the end of 3 weeks on the experimental diet. 4. Laying characteristics returned to normal 4 weeks after withdrawal of roxarsone. The liver weight, fat and TG in the liver and serum concentrations of TG, NEFA, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and AST increased significantly (P<0.05), while the level of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) decreased (P<0.05) at the end of the withdrawal period. More prominent vacuolised hepatic fatty cells were observed in laying ducks treated with 300 mg/kg of roxarsone.

  2. Limited hepatitis B virus replication space in the chronically hepatitis C virus-infected liver.

    PubMed

    Wieland, S F; Asabe, S; Engle, R E; Purcell, R H; Chisari, F V

    2014-05-01

    We compared the kinetics and magnitude of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-naive and chronically HCV-infected chimpanzees in whose livers type I interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression is strongly induced. HBV infection was delayed and attenuated in the HCV-infected animals, and the number of HBV-infected hepatocytes was drastically reduced. These results suggest that establishment of HBV infection and its replication space is limited by the antiviral effects of type I interferon in the chronically HCV-infected liver.

  3. Experimentally Infected Domestic Ducks Show Efficient Transmission of Indonesian H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus, but Lack Persistent Viral Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Wibawa, Hendra; Bingham, John; Nuradji, Harimurti; Lowther, Sue; Payne, Jean; Harper, Jenni; Junaidi, Akhmad; Middleton, Deborah; Meers, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Ducks are important maintenance hosts for avian influenza, including H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. A previous study indicated that persistence of H5N1 viruses in ducks after the development of humoral immunity may drive viral evolution following immune selection. As H5N1 HPAI is endemic in Indonesia, this mechanism may be important in understanding H5N1 evolution in that region. To determine the capability of domestic ducks to maintain prolonged shedding of Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 virus, two groups of Pekin ducks were inoculated through the eyes, nostrils and oropharynx and viral shedding and transmission investigated. Inoculated ducks (n = 15), which were mostly asymptomatic, shed infectious virus from the oral route from 1 to 8 days post inoculation, and from the cloacal route from 2–8 dpi. Viral ribonucleic acid was detected from 1–15 days post inoculation from the oral route and 1–24 days post inoculation from the cloacal route (cycle threshold <40). Most ducks seroconverted in a range of serological tests by 15 days post inoculation. Virus was efficiently transmitted during acute infection (5 inoculation-infected to all 5 contact ducks). However, no evidence for transmission, as determined by seroconversion and viral shedding, was found between an inoculation-infected group (n = 10) and contact ducks (n = 9) when the two groups only had contact after 10 days post inoculation. Clinical disease was more frequent and more severe in contact-infected (2 of 5) than inoculation-infected ducks (1 of 15). We conclude that Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus does not persist in individual ducks after acute infection. PMID:24392085

  4. Experimentally infected domestic ducks show efficient transmission of Indonesian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, but lack persistent viral shedding.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, Hendra; Bingham, John; Nuradji, Harimurti; Lowther, Sue; Payne, Jean; Harper, Jenni; Junaidi, Akhmad; Middleton, Deborah; Meers, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Ducks are important maintenance hosts for avian influenza, including H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. A previous study indicated that persistence of H5N1 viruses in ducks after the development of humoral immunity may drive viral evolution following immune selection. As H5N1 HPAI is endemic in Indonesia, this mechanism may be important in understanding H5N1 evolution in that region. To determine the capability of domestic ducks to maintain prolonged shedding of Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 virus, two groups of Pekin ducks were inoculated through the eyes, nostrils and oropharynx and viral shedding and transmission investigated. Inoculated ducks (n = 15), which were mostly asymptomatic, shed infectious virus from the oral route from 1 to 8 days post inoculation, and from the cloacal route from 2-8 dpi. Viral ribonucleic acid was detected from 1-15 days post inoculation from the oral route and 1-24 days post inoculation from the cloacal route (cycle threshold <40). Most ducks seroconverted in a range of serological tests by 15 days post inoculation. Virus was efficiently transmitted during acute infection (5 inoculation-infected to all 5 contact ducks). However, no evidence for transmission, as determined by seroconversion and viral shedding, was found between an inoculation-infected group (n = 10) and contact ducks (n = 9) when the two groups only had contact after 10 days post inoculation. Clinical disease was more frequent and more severe in contact-infected (2 of 5) than inoculation-infected ducks (1 of 15). We conclude that Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus does not persist in individual ducks after acute infection.

  5. Cell entry of hepatitis C virus

    SciTech Connect

    Bartosch, Birke . E-mail: Birke.Bartosch@ens-lyon.fr; Cosset, Francois-Loic . E-mail: Francois-Loic.Cosset@ens-lyon.fr

    2006-04-25

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), an important human pathogen, is an enveloped, positive-stranded RNA virus classified in the hepacivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. Cell attachment of flaviviruses generally leads to endocytosis of bound virions. Systems that support HCV replication and particle formation in vitro are emerging only now, 16 years after the discovery of the virus. Albeit this limitation, the route of HCV cell entry as well as 'capture' molecules involved in low-affinity interactions for the initial contact of HCV with target cells and potential high-affinity receptor candidates that may mediate HCV trafficking and fusion has been described. The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of different HCV model systems to our current knowledge about structure of the HCV GPs E1 and E2 and their roles in cell entry comprising cell attachment, interactions with cellular receptors, endocytosis, and fusion.

  6. Interferon-λ in the Immune Response to Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pagliaccetti, Nicole E.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 500 million people worldwide are chronically infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV), and are therefore at an increased risk for developing fatal liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The intracellular antiviral responses induced by interferon (IFN)-α/-β and/or IFN-γ play critical roles in the pathogenesis of HBV and HCV infection, and the function of IFN-λ in the host immune response to these viruses is beginning to be revealed. A better understanding of how IFN-λ influences HBV or HCV persistence is not only important for understanding the mechanisms of chronic virus infection, but also may lead to new approaches for improved antiviral therapies. PMID:20645875

  7. Tissue tropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in naturally infected mute swans (Cygnus Olor ), domestic geese (Aser Anser var. domestica), pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) and mulard ducks ( Cairina moschata x anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Szeredi, Levente; Dán, Adám; Pálmai, Nimród; Ursu, Krisztina; Bálint, Adám; Szeleczky, Zsófia; Ivanics, Eva; Erdélyi, Károly; Rigó, Dóra; Tekes, Lajos; Glávits, Róbert

    2010-03-01

    The 2006 epidemic due to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) subtype H5N1 in Hungary caused the most severe losses in waterfowl which were, according to the literature at the time, supposed to be the most resistant to this pathogen. The presence of pathological lesions and the amount of viral antigen were quantified by gross pathology, histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the organs of four waterfowl species [mute swans (n = 10), domestic geese (n = 6), mulard ducks (n = 6) and Pekin ducks (n = 5)] collected during the epidemic. H5N1 subtype HPAIV was isolated from all birds examined. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRRT-PCR) was also applied on a subset of samples [domestic geese (n = 3), mulard (n = 4) and Pekin duck (n = 4)] in order to compare its sensitivity with IHC. Viral antigen was detected by IHC in all cases. However, the overall presence of viral antigen in tissue samples was quite variable: virus antigen was present in 56/81 (69%) swan, 22/38 (58%) goose, 28/46 (61%) mulard duck and 5/43 (12%) Pekin duck tissue samples. HPAIV subtype H5N1 was detected by qRRT-PCR in all birds examined, in 19/19 (100%) goose, 7/28 (25%) mulard duck and 12/28 (43%) Pekin duck tissue samples. As compared to qRRTPCR, the IHC was less sensitive in geese and Pekin ducks but more sensitive in mulard ducks. The IHC was consistently positive above 4.31 log10 copies/reaction but it gave very variable results below that level. Neurotropism of the isolated virus strains was demonstrated by finding the largest amount of viral antigen and the highest average RNA load in the brain in all four waterfowl species examined.

  8. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool to ... risk for severe disease. Others A variety of viruses can affect the liver Signs and Symptoms Hepatitis ...

  9. [Hepatitis E virus: Blood transfusion implications].

    PubMed

    Gallian, P; Piquet, Y; Assal, A; Djoudi, R; Chiaroni, J; Izopet, J; Tiberghien, P

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a non-enveloped RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Autochthonous hepatitis E occurring in developed countries is caused by genotypes 3 and 4 and is a zoonotic infection. Humans are infected mostly after ingestion of undercooked meat from infected animals. Most HEV 3 and 4 infections are clinically inapparent. However, genotype 3 (HEV 3) can lead to chronic hepatitis in immuno-compromised patients such as organ-transplant recipients and patients with haematological malignancies. In Europe, HEV 3 is implicated in transfusion-transmitted HEV infection. In France, as observed in several European countries, prevalence of HEV RNA and specific IgG antibodies are high indicating that viral circulation is important. The systematic HEV NAT screening of blood donations used for preparation of solvent detergent plasma indicate that 1 to 2218 donation is infected by HEV RNA. The need or implementation's impacts of safety measures to prevent HEV transmission by blood transfusion are under reflexion by French's health authorities. The HEV NAT screening is the only available tool of prevention. Alternative strategies are under investigation including individual or mini pool NAT testing all or part of blood donations. PMID:25267201

  10. Persistence of avian influenza virus (H5N1) in feathers detached from bodies of infected domestic ducks.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yu; Nakamura, Kikuyasu; Yamada, Manabu; Mase, Masaji

    2010-08-01

    Asian lineage highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) continues to cause mortality in poultry and wild bird populations at a panzootic scale. However, little is known about its persistence in contaminated tissues derived from infected birds. We investigated avian influenza virus (H5N1) persistence in feathers detached from bodies of infected ducks to evaluate their potential risk for environmental contamination. Four-week-old domestic ducks were inoculated with different clades of avian influenza virus (H5N1). Feathers, drinking water, and feces were collected on day 3 postinoculation and stored at 4 degrees C or 20 degrees C. Viral persistence in samples was investigated for 360 days by virus isolation and reverse transcription-PCR. Infectious viruses persisted for the longest period in feathers, compared with drinking water and feces, at both 4 degrees C and 20 degrees C. Viral infectivity persisted in the feathers for 160 days at 4 degrees C and for 15 days at 20 degrees C. Viral titers of 10(4.3) 50% egg infectious doses/ml or greater were detected for 120 days in feathers stored at 4 degrees C. Viral RNA in feathers was more stable than the infectivity. These results indicate that feathers detached from domestic ducks infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) can be a source of environmental contamination and may function as fomites with high viral loads in the environment.

  11. Hepatitis B virus infection in immigrant populations

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Alessio, Loredana; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Macera, Margherita; Sagnelli, Caterina; Zampino, Rosa; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common cause of hepatitis worldwide, with nearly 350 million people chronically infected and 600000 deaths per year due to acute liver failure occurring during acute hepatitis or, more frequently, in HBV-related liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Ongoing immigration from countries with a high HBV endemicity to those with a low HBV endemicity warrants particular attention to prevent the spread of HBV infection to the native population. This review article analyzes the epidemiology and virological and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in immigrant populations and in their host countries, and suggests prophylactic measures to prevent the spread of this infection. Among the immigrants from different geographical areas, those from South East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa show the highest prevalences of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers, in accordance with the high endemicity of the countries of origin. The molecular characteristics of HBV infection in immigrants reflect those of the geographical areas of origin: HBV genotype A and D predominate in immigrants from Eastern Europe, B and C in those from Asia and genotype E in those from Africa. The literature data on the clinical course and treatment of HBsAg-positive immigrants are scanty. The management of HBV infection in immigrant populations is difficult and requires expert personnel and dedicated structures for their assistance. The social services, voluntary operators and cultural mediators are essential to achieve optimized psychological and clinical intervention. PMID:26730274

  12. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ram; Gershwin, M Eric; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2008-02-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases have long been an enigmatic subject that have involved genetic and environmental factors. Recent intriguing data has contributed to the mechanisms involved, including the relationship of infectious agents and loss of tolerance. This loss of tolerance is illustrated by the data on the immune response to Hepatitis B virus such as the molecular mimicry between HBV antigens and self proteins, the generation of immune complexes between HBV antigens and antibodies, and apoptosis/tissue damage resulting in the exposure of intracellular antigens to the immune system. In this paper, we review the current database related to HBV infection and a variety of autoimmune conditions, including autoimmune hepatitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, aplastic anemia, antiphospholipid syndrome, polyarteritis nodosa, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, thyroid disease and uveitis. PMID:18270862

  13. [Herpes simplex virus hepatitis; rare in immunocompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Ozokcu, Leyla; de Bruijckere, Leo M; Jansen, Jan; van den Berge, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman was referred with fever and abdominal pain with peritoneal irritation. A diagnostic laparoscopy showed hepatic lesions. Histopathological investigation of the liver biopsy showed hepatitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). The patient was treated with acyclovir and recovered well. HSV is a rare cause of viral hepatitis and has a high mortality rate.

  14. Spontaneous Clearance of Hepatitis C Virus during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Clohessy, Penelope; Polis, Suzanne; Post, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is expected to be unlikely in pregnancy due to the relative immunosuppression and increase in viraemia that occurs. We report the first case of spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurring in pregnancy. PMID:27757149

  15. Hepatitis viruses and liver transplantation: evolving trends in antiviral management.

    PubMed

    Verna, Elizabeth C

    2014-08-01

    Viral hepatitis is both a leading indication for liver transplant (LT) and an important cause of posttransplant graft loss and mortality. Treatment and prevention of hepatitis B virus in LT recipients, with the observed corresponding improvement in post-LT outcomes, is among the great success stories in transplantation. By comparison, treatment of hepatitis C virus with safe and effective regimens is only just becoming a reality. Chronic hepatitis E virus infection in LT recipients represents a newly described phenomenon that can also lead to graft loss; early diagnosis and treatment may be key in the management of these patients. PMID:25017077

  16. Egg drop syndrome virus enters duck embryonic fibroblast cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingjing; Tan, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Caihong; Xu, Jiamin; Wang, Jingyu

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies of egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) is restricted to serological surveys, disease diagnostics, and complete viral genome analysis. Consequently, the infection characteristics and entry routes of EDSV are poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to explore the entry pathway of EDSV into duck embryonic fibroblast (DEF) cells as well as the infection characteristics and proliferation of EDSV in primary DEF and primary chicken embryo liver (CEL) cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the virus triggered DEF cell membrane invagination as early as 10 min post-infection and that integrated endocytic vesicles formed at 20 min post-infection. The virus yield in EDSV-infected DEF cells treated with chlorpromazine (CPZ), sucrose, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), or NH4Cl was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Compared with the mock treatment, CPZ and sucrose greatly inhibited the production of viral progeny in a dose-dependent manner, while MβCD treatment did not result in a significant difference. Furthermore, NH4Cl had a strong inhibitory effect on the production of EDSV progeny. In addition, indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated that virus particles clustered on the surface of DEF cells treated with CPZ or sucrose. These results indicate that EDSV enters DEF cells through clathrin-mediated endocytosis followed by a pH-dependent step, which is similar to the mechanism of entry of human adenovirus types 2 and 5. PMID:26200954

  17. Egg drop syndrome virus enters duck embryonic fibroblast cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingjing; Tan, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Caihong; Xu, Jiamin; Wang, Jingyu

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies of egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) is restricted to serological surveys, disease diagnostics, and complete viral genome analysis. Consequently, the infection characteristics and entry routes of EDSV are poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to explore the entry pathway of EDSV into duck embryonic fibroblast (DEF) cells as well as the infection characteristics and proliferation of EDSV in primary DEF and primary chicken embryo liver (CEL) cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the virus triggered DEF cell membrane invagination as early as 10 min post-infection and that integrated endocytic vesicles formed at 20 min post-infection. The virus yield in EDSV-infected DEF cells treated with chlorpromazine (CPZ), sucrose, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), or NH4Cl was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Compared with the mock treatment, CPZ and sucrose greatly inhibited the production of viral progeny in a dose-dependent manner, while MβCD treatment did not result in a significant difference. Furthermore, NH4Cl had a strong inhibitory effect on the production of EDSV progeny. In addition, indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated that virus particles clustered on the surface of DEF cells treated with CPZ or sucrose. These results indicate that EDSV enters DEF cells through clathrin-mediated endocytosis followed by a pH-dependent step, which is similar to the mechanism of entry of human adenovirus types 2 and 5.

  18. Characterization of a novel H3N2 influenza virus isolated from domestic ducks in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chong; Yu, Meng; Liu, Litao; Sun, Honglei

    2016-08-01

    Cases of human infection with a novel H7N9 avian influenza virus (AIV) were first reported in March 2013, which caused 115 deaths within a single year. Beyond that, other subtypes of H7 AIV were isolated from poultry in eastern China during the same period, including H7N7 and H7N2 AIV. In the present study, a subtype H3N2 AIV was isolated from ducks from Anhui Province, China. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that seven gene segments of this virus showed the highest sequence homology with that of the H7 subtype influenza virus, which is presumed to be the reassortants of the H3 and H7 subtypes AIV. The present study also reconfirmed that the reassortment between the H7 subtype and waterfowl-originating AIVs universally occurred in waterfowl. Animal inoculation tests showed that the virus has low pathogenicity in chickens; however, it could be replicated in the lungs of mice. The emergence of this H3N2 isolate emphasizes the importance of enhancing the surveillance of waterfowl-originating AIVs, the identification of novel reassortant strains, and characterization of their biological properties.

  19. Biosensors for hepatitis B virus detection.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chun-Yan; Fu, Wei-Ling

    2014-09-21

    A biosensor is an analytical device used for the detection of analytes, which combines a biological component with a physicochemical detector. Recently, an increasing number of biosensors have been used in clinical research, for example, the blood glucose biosensor. This review focuses on the current state of biosensor research with respect to efficient, specific and rapid detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV). The biosensors developed based on different techniques, including optical methods (e.g., surface plasmon resonance), acoustic wave technologies (e.g., quartz crystal microbalance), electrochemistry (amperometry, voltammetry and impedance) and novel nanotechnology, are also discussed. PMID:25253948

  20. Hepatitis C virus replication in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Niu, J; Kumar, U; Monjardino, J; Goldin, R; Rosin, D; Thomas, H C

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is reported in both tumour and non-tumour tissue in a case of hepatocellular carcinoma. Viral replication was established by showing the presence of minus strand HCV RNA by PCR amplification, after excluding residual reverse transcriptase activity of Taq polymerase. No minus strand was found in serum derived virion RNA. PCR amplified products from both tumour and non-tumour parenchyma were sequenced in the 5' non-coding region and shown to be identical. The genotype of this Indonesian patient was found to be 1b (or II), the most prevalent type in the Far East. Images PMID:7490330

  1. Timeline: Targeted Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Teitzel, Gail

    2016-09-22

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection can cause liver cirrhosis and cancer, and early treatment options were non-specific and could be toxic. Work aimed at elucidating the viral life cycle has led to better treatment options through the development of direct-acting antivirals, as exemplified by the work of Ralf Bartenschlager, Charles Rice, and Michael Sofia who have received the Lasker∼DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for their work on this effort. Key events in understanding HCV replication and development of direct-acting antivirals are shown in this Timeline. PMID:27662096

  2. Biosensors for hepatitis B virus detection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chun-Yan; Fu, Wei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    A biosensor is an analytical device used for the detection of analytes, which combines a biological component with a physicochemical detector. Recently, an increasing number of biosensors have been used in clinical research, for example, the blood glucose biosensor. This review focuses on the current state of biosensor research with respect to efficient, specific and rapid detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV). The biosensors developed based on different techniques, including optical methods (e.g., surface plasmon resonance), acoustic wave technologies (e.g., quartz crystal microbalance), electrochemistry (amperometry, voltammetry and impedance) and novel nanotechnology, are also discussed. PMID:25253948

  3. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells.

  4. Molecular Biology of Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Christoph; Mason, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the prototype of a family of small DNA viruses that productively infect hepatocytes, the major cell of the liver, and replicate by reverse transcription of a terminally redundant viral RNA, the pregenome. Upon infection, the circular, partially double-stranded virion DNA is converted in the nucleus to a covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) that assembles into a minichromosome, the template for viral mRNA synthesis. Infection of hepatocytes is non-cytopathic. Infection of the liver may be either transient (<6 months) or chronic and life long, depending on the ability of the host immune response to clear the infection. Chronic infections can cause immune mediated liver damage progressing to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The mechanisms of carcinogenesis are unclear. Antiviral therapies with nucleoside analog inhibitors of viral DNA synthesis delay sequelae, but cannot cure HBV infections due to the persistence of cccDNA in hepatocytes. PMID:25759099

  5. Effect of species, breed and route of virus inoculation on the pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses continue to be a threat to poultry in many regions of the world. Domestic ducks have been recognized as one of the primary factors in the spread of H5N1 HPAI. To improve the control of this disease it’s necessary to better understand the pathog...

  6. Molecular characterization of a reassortant H11N9 subtype avian influenza virus isolated from a domestic duck in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Peng, Xiuming; Peng, Xiaorong; Wu, Nanping

    2015-10-01

    During surveillance for avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in live-poultry markets in Eastern China in 2013, an H11N9 AIV was isolated from a domestic duck. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this strain received its genes from H11, H3, H10, and H7 AIVs of poultry in China. This strain was found to be minimally pathogenic in mice and was able to replicate in mice without prior adaptation. Considering that the reassorted H11N9 viruses were isolated from domestic ducks in this study, it is possible that these ducks play an important role in the generation of novel reassorted H11 AIVs.

  7. Low pathogenic H7 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in South Korea and the close association with isolates of wild birds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Park, Choi-Kyu; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Oem, Jae-Ku; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Choi, Jun-Gu; Lee, O-Soo; Bae, You-Chan

    2012-06-01

    We characterized low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses of the H7 subtype that were isolated from domestic ducks and wild birds in South Korea from 2008 to 2011. A total of 20 H7 viruses were collected from live-bird markets (LBMs), duck farms and wild-bird habitats using avian influenza (AI) surveillance and epidemiological approaches. A phylogenetic analysis of the H7 viruses that were isolated from domestic ducks and wild birds demonstrated that they were separated into 12 genotypes (A-D and Wb-1-8, respectively), indicating genetic diversity. These H7 viruses were related to the recently isolated Eurasian LPAI H7 viruses and various influenza viruses that are circulating in Asia, including southern China and South Korea. The same genotype was not found between domestic poultry and wild-bird isolates; however, most of the H7 viruses in poultry (genotypes B and C) were closely related to the H7 virus isolated from a wild bird (genotype Wb-3). Animal-challenge studies revealed that certain H7 AI viruses replicated well only in chickens or ducks depending on the genotype, indicating that the pathogenicity of H7 viruses has the potential to be altered due to multiple reassortments, and these viruses can potentially expand their host range. Our results are evidence of abundant and frequent reassortment between H7 viruses in poultry and wild birds and emphasize the continuing need to monitor the evolutionary genetics of the influenza virus in poultry and wild birds.

  8. An investigation of duck circovirus and co-infection in Cherry Valley ducks in Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingxiao; Jiang, Shijin; Wu, Jiaqiang; Zhao, Qin; Sun, Yani; Kong, Yibo; Li, Xiaoxia; Yao, Meiling; Chai, Tongjie

    2009-01-13

    The co-infection of duck circovirus (DuCV) with Riemerella anatipestifer (RA) or/and Escherichia coli (E. coli) or/and duck hepatitis virus I (DHV-I) in Cherry Valley ducks in China's Shandong Province was investigated by using polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR)-based methods. For this study, 742 ducks sampled at random from 70 duck farms during 2006-2007 were examined using PCR and dot-blot hybridisation (DBH) tests. Overall the DuCV infection rate was 33.29%. Compared with those at 2 weeks of age, the ducks at 3-4 weeks of age were more susceptible to DuCV infection. Compared with the DuCV-negative ones, the DuCV-positive ducks had a higher rate of infection by DHV-I (25.5% vs. 7.475%), RA (23.48% vs. 8.28%) and E. coli (16.19% vs. 4.85%). This investigation shows that DuCV infection is common in Cherry Valley ducks on some farms in Shandong Province.

  9. Isolation and identification of Duck tembusu virus strain lH and development of latex-agglutination diagnostic method for rapid detection of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanxi; Wen, Yaping; Yifan Huang; Wu, Yijian; Cai, Yilong; Xu, Lihui; Wang, Changkang; Li, Ang; Wu, Baocheng; Chen, Jilong

    2014-12-01

    SUMMARY. An outbreak of egg-drop syndrome occurred on a Sheldrake duck farm in Longhai in Fujian Province, China, in 2012. The main clinical symptoms were sharply reduced egg production, crooked necks, and death. We isolated the virus from the sick ducks, identified it, and observed the histopathologic changes after viral infection. We detected viral RNA in the blood and feces of the infected ducks and developed a latex-agglutination diagnostic method to detect anti-Tembusu-virus antibodies. Our results show that the pathogenic virus is a Tembusu virus. The histopathologic changes included follicular cell degeneration and necrosis, follicular cavity filled with blood cells, massive necrosis in the brain, and degeneration and necrosis of the nerve and glial cells. When the transmission of the virus in the infected ducks was studied, the duck blood was positive for viral nucleic acid for up to 29 days, and the feces were positive for viral nucleic acid for up to 13 days. We successfully established a simple, rapid, and easy- to-use latex-agglutination diagnostic method for the detection of antibodies against duck Tembusu virus. PMID:25619007

  10. Chaperones in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Khachatoorian, Ronik; French, Samuel W

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects approximately 3% of the world population or more than 185 million people worldwide. Each year, an estimated 350000-500000 deaths occur worldwide due to HCV-associated diseases including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is the most common indication for liver transplantation in patients with cirrhosis worldwide. HCV is an enveloped RNA virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the Flaviviridae family. The HCV viral life cycle in a cell can be divided into six phases: (1) binding and internalization; (2) cytoplasmic release and uncoating; (3) viral polyprotein translation and processing; (4) RNA genome replication; (5) encapsidation (packaging) and assembly; and (6) virus morphogenesis (maturation) and secretion. Many host factors are involved in the HCV life cycle. Chaperones are an important group of host cytoprotective molecules that coordinate numerous cellular processes including protein folding, multimeric protein assembly, protein trafficking, and protein degradation. All phases of the viral life cycle require chaperone activity and the interaction of viral proteins with chaperones. This review will present our current knowledge and understanding of the role of chaperones in the HCV life cycle. Analysis of chaperones in HCV infection will provide further insights into viral/host interactions and potential therapeutic targets for both HCV and other viruses. PMID:26783419

  11. A rat model for hepatitis E virus

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Niraj; Verbeken, Erik; Ramaekers, Kaat; Dallmeier, Kai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the prime causes of acute viral hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis E is increasingly recognized as an important problem in the transplant setting. Nevertheless, the fundamental understanding of the biology of HEV replication is limited and there are few therapeutic options. The development of such therapies is partially hindered by the lack of a robust and convenient animal model. We propose the infection of athymic nude rats with the rat HEV strain LA-B350 as such a model. A cDNA clone, pLA-B350, was constructed and the infectivity of its capped RNA transcripts was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a subgenomic replicon, pLA-B350/luc, was constructed and validated for in vitro antiviral studies. Interestingly, rat HEV proved to be less sensitive to the antiviral activity of α-interferon, ribavirin and mycophenolic acid than genotype 3 HEV (a strain that infects humans). As a proof-of-concept, part of the C-terminal polymerase sequence of pLA-B350/luc was swapped with its genotype 3 HEV counterpart: the resulting chimeric replicon replicated with comparable efficiency as the wild-type construct, confirming that LA-B350 strain is amenable to humanization (replacement of certain sequences or motifs by their counterparts from human HEV strains). Finally, ribavirin effectively inhibited LA-B350 replication in athymic nude rats, confirming the suitability of the rat model for antiviral studies. PMID:27483350

  12. Neuralgic amyotrophy and hepatitis E virus infection

    PubMed Central

    van Eijk, Jeroen J.J.; Madden, Richie G.; van der Eijk, Annemiek A.; Hunter, Jeremy G.; Reimerink, Johan H.J.; Bendall, Richard P.; Pas, Suzan D.; Ellis, Vic; van Alfen, Nens; Beynon, Laura; Southwell, Lucy; McLean, Brendan; Jacobs, Bart C.; van Engelen, Baziel G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is an association between an acute preceding hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection and neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), and if so, whether patients with HEV-related NA differ from patients without an associated HEV infection. Methods: HEV testing was conducted in a retrospective cohort of 28 Cornish patients with NA (2011–2013) and a prospective cohort of 38 consecutive Dutch patients with NA (2004–2007). Acute-phase serum samples were analyzed for the presence of anti-HEV immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG and HEV RNA (quantitative real-time PCR). Results: Five cases (10.6%) of acute hepatitis E infection were identified in a total group of 47 patients with NA of whom serum samples were available. In 4 patients, HEV RNA was detected in serum samples taken at presentation. All patients with HEV-associated NA had clinical and electrophysiologic evidence of bilateral brachial plexus involvement. Anti-HEV IgM positivity was not related to age, sex, disease severity, disease course, or outcome. Conclusions: Acute hepatitis E is found in 10% of patients with NA from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. Further research is required to investigate the role of HEV in NA in other geographical locations and to determine pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:24401685

  13. Hepatitis B virus burden in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Zampino, Rosa; Boemio, Adriana; Sagnelli, Caterina; Alessio, Loredana; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio; Sagnelli, Evangelista; Coppola, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has shown an intermediate or high endemicity level in low-income countries over the last five decades. In recent years, however, the incidence of acute hepatitis B and the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen chronic carriers have decreased in several countries because of the HBV universal vaccination programs started in the nineties. Some countries, however, are still unable to implement these programs, particularly in their hyperendemic rural areas. The diffusion of HBV infection is still wide in several low-income countries where the prevention, management and treatment of HBV infection are a heavy burden for the governments and healthcare authorities. Of note, the information on the HBV epidemiology is scanty in numerous eastern European and Latin-American countries. The studies on molecular epidemiology performed in some countries provide an important contribution for a more comprehensive knowledge of HBV epidemiology, and phylogenetic studies provide information on the impact of recent and older migratory flows. PMID:26576083

  14. The Hepatitis E virus intraviral interactome

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Andreas; Stellberger, Thorsten; Gebhardt, Anna; Kurz, Marisa; Friedel, Caroline C.; Uetz, Peter; Nitschko, Hans; Baiker, Armin; Vizoso-Pinto, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging virus causing epidemic acute hepatitis in developing countries as well as sporadic cases in industrialized countries. The life cycle of HEV is still poorly understood and the lack of efficient cell culture systems and animal models are the principal limitations for a detailed study of the viral replication cycle. Here we exhaustively examine all possible intraviral protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of HEV by systematic Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and LuMPIS screens, providing a basis for studying the function of these proteins in the viral replication cycle. Key PPIs correlate with the already published HEV 3D structure. Furthermore, we report 20 novel PPIs including the homodimerization of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), the self-interaction of the papain like protease, and ORF3 interactions with the papain-like protease and putative replicase components: RdRp, methylase and helicase. Furthermore, we determined the dissociation constant (Kd) of ORF3 interactions with the viral helicase, papain-like protease and methylase, which suggest a regulatory function for ORF3 in orchestrating the formation of the replicase complex. These interactions may represent new targets for antiviral drugs. PMID:26463011

  15. Hepatitis C virus and neurological damage

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammed; Ibrahim, Sara M; Iqbal, Waqas; Rauff, Bisma; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection exhibits a wide range of extrahepatic complications, affecting various organs in the human body. Numerous HCV patients suffer neurological manifestations, ranging from cognitive impairment to peripheral neuropathy. Overexpression of the host immune response leads to the production of immune complexes, cryoglobulins, as well as autoantibodies, which is a major pathogenic mechanism responsible for nervous system dysfunction. Alternatively circulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and HCV replication in neurons is another factor that severely affects the nervous system. Furthermore, HCV infection causes both sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy in the mixed cryoglobulinemia as well as known as an important risk aspect for stroke. These extrahepatic manifestations are the reason behind underlying hepatic encephalopathy and chronic liver disease. The brain is an apt location for HCV replication, where the HCV virus may directly wield neurotoxicity. Other mechanisms that takes place by chronic HCV infection due the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders includes derangement of metabolic pathways of infected cells, autoimmune disorders, systemic or cerebral inflammation and alterations in neurotransmitter circuits. HCV and its pathogenic role is suggested by enhancement of psychiatric and neurological symptoms in patients attaining a sustained virologic response followed by treatment with interferon; however, further studies are required to fully assess the impact of HCV infection and its specific antiviral targets associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27134702

  16. Oral manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Carrozzo, Marco; Scally, Kara

    2014-01-01

    Extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect a variety of organ systems with significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most frequently reported EHM of HCV infection, involve the oral region predominantly or exclusively. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is potentially malignant and represents cell-mediated reaction to a variety of extrinsic antigens, altered self-antigens, or super antigens. Robust epidemiological evidence support the link between OLP and HCV. As the virus may replicate in the oral mucosa and attract HCV-specific T lymphocytes, HCV may be implicated in OLP pathogenesis. Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy, characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes and a multitude of other systemic signs and symptoms. SjS patients have also an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with chronic hepatitis C do frequently have histological signs of Sjögren-like sialadenitis with mild or even absent clinical symptoms. However, it is still unclear if HCV may cause a disease mimicking SjS or it is directly responsible for the development of SjS in a specific subset of patients. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral malignant tumour and at least in some part of the world could be linked to HCV. PMID:24976694

  17. Oral manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Carrozzo, Marco; Scally, Kara

    2014-06-28

    Extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect a variety of organ systems with significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most frequently reported EHM of HCV infection, involve the oral region predominantly or exclusively. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is potentially malignant and represents cell-mediated reaction to a variety of extrinsic antigens, altered self-antigens, or super antigens. Robust epidemiological evidence support the link between OLP and HCV. As the virus may replicate in the oral mucosa and attract HCV-specific T lymphocytes, HCV may be implicated in OLP pathogenesis. Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy, characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes and a multitude of other systemic signs and symptoms. SjS patients have also an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with chronic hepatitis C do frequently have histological signs of Sjögren-like sialadenitis with mild or even absent clinical symptoms. However, it is still unclear if HCV may cause a disease mimicking SjS or it is directly responsible for the development of SjS in a specific subset of patients. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral malignant tumour and at least in some part of the world could be linked to HCV. PMID:24976694

  18. Prevalence of Hepatitis Virus Infections in an Institution for Persons with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Bradley A.; Vazquez, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 1,235 residents of Sonoma Developmental Center found 3 residents had hepatitis C virus infections, and 633 had past or current hepatitis B virus infections. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection rose rapidly with longer residence in institutions. Hepatitis A virus infection had occurred in 494 residents. (Contains…

  19. Different routes of inoculation impact infectivity and pathogenesis of H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus infection in chickens and domestic ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The H5N1 type A influenza viruses classified as Qinghai-like virus (clade 2.2) are a unique lineage of type A influenza viruses with the capacity to produce significant disease and mortality in gallinaceous birds and water fowl including ducks. The objective of this study was to determine the suscep...

  20. Type III interferon gene expression in response to influenza virus infection in chicken and duck embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijie; Zou, Tingting; Hu, Xiaotong; Jin, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-λs) comprise a group of newly identified antiviral cytokines that are functionally similar to type I IFNs and elicit first-line antiviral responses. Recently, type III IFNs were identified in several species; however, little information is available about type III IFNs in ducks. We compared the expression of type III IFNs and their receptor in chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs) and duck embryonic fibroblasts (DEFs) in response to influenza virus infection. The results showed that the expression of type III IFNs was upregulated in both DEFs and CEFs following infection with H1N1 influenza virus or treatment with poly (I:C), and expression levels were significantly higher in CEFs than in DEFs at each time point. The expression of the receptor for type III IFNs (IL-28Rα) was also upregulated following infection with H1N1 virus or treatment with poly (I:C) and was significantly higher in CEFs than in DEFs at each time point. The expression of the receptor for type III IFNs occurred from 8 hpi and remained at similar levels until 36 hpi in CEFs, but the expression level was elevated from 36 hpi in DEFs. These findings revealed the existence of distinct expression patterns for type III IFNs in chickens and ducks in response to influenza virus infection. The provided data are fundamentally useful in furthering our understanding of type III IFNs and innate antiviral responses in different species.

  1. Type III interferon gene expression in response to influenza virus infection in chicken and duck embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijie; Zou, Tingting; Hu, Xiaotong; Jin, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-λs) comprise a group of newly identified antiviral cytokines that are functionally similar to type I IFNs and elicit first-line antiviral responses. Recently, type III IFNs were identified in several species; however, little information is available about type III IFNs in ducks. We compared the expression of type III IFNs and their receptor in chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs) and duck embryonic fibroblasts (DEFs) in response to influenza virus infection. The results showed that the expression of type III IFNs was upregulated in both DEFs and CEFs following infection with H1N1 influenza virus or treatment with poly (I:C), and expression levels were significantly higher in CEFs than in DEFs at each time point. The expression of the receptor for type III IFNs (IL-28Rα) was also upregulated following infection with H1N1 virus or treatment with poly (I:C) and was significantly higher in CEFs than in DEFs at each time point. The expression of the receptor for type III IFNs occurred from 8 hpi and remained at similar levels until 36 hpi in CEFs, but the expression level was elevated from 36 hpi in DEFs. These findings revealed the existence of distinct expression patterns for type III IFNs in chickens and ducks in response to influenza virus infection. The provided data are fundamentally useful in furthering our understanding of type III IFNs and innate antiviral responses in different species. PMID:26598110

  2. Review: Occult hepatitis C virus infection: still remains a controversy.

    PubMed

    Vidimliski, Pavlina Dzekova; Nikolov, Igor; Geshkovska, Nadica Matevska; Dimovski, Aleksandar; Rostaing, Lionel; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2014-09-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by the presence of HCV RNA in the liver cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the patients whose serum samples test negative for HCV RNA, with or without presence of HCV antibodies. The present study reviews the existing literature on the persistence of occult hepatitis C virus infection, with description of the clinical characteristics and methods for identification of occult hepatitis C. Occult hepatitis C virus infection was detected in patients with abnormal results of liver function tests of unknown origin, with HCV antibodies and HCV RNA negativity in serum, and also in patients with spontaneous or treatment-induced recovery from hepatitis C. The viral replication in the liver cells and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells was present in all clinical presentations of occult hepatitis C. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells represent an extra-hepatic site of HCV replication. The reason why HCV RNA was not detectable in the serum of patients with occult hepatitis C, could be the low number of circulating viral particles not detectable by the diagnostic tests with low sensitivity. It is uncertain whether occult hepatitis C is a different clinical entity or just a form of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Data accumulated over the last decade demonstrated that an effective approach to the diagnosis of HCV infection would be the implementation of more sensitive HCV RNA diagnostic assays, and also, examination of the presence of viral particles in the cells of the immune system.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a waterborne emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Thus far, an HEV outbreak has not been reported in the U.S., although a swine variant of the virus is common in Midwestern hogs. Because viruses isolated from two ...

  4. Genetic analysis of H3 subtype influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in northern China during 2004-2005.

    PubMed

    Pu, Juan; Liu, Qin-Fang; Xia, Ying-Ju; Fan, Yu-Lei; Brown, Earl G; Tian, Fu-Lin; Liu, Jin-Hua

    2009-02-01

    The broad distribution and prevalence of H3 subtype influenza viruses in avian and mammalian hosts constitutes a global threat to both human and veterinary health. In this present study, six H3N8 influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks during 2004-2005 in northern China were genetically and phylogenetically characterized. Sequence analysis showed that HA, NA, and M genes of all the six H3N8 isolates had a close relationship with those of Equine/Jilin/1/89 (H3N8) virus, which once caused outbreak in equine populations in northern China. The PB2 and PA genes of the viruses possessed the highest similarities with highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses currently circulating in this region. These findings emphasize the importance of avian influenza virus surveillance in this region for understanding the genesis and emergency of novel reassortants with pandemic potential.

  5. Comparative hepatic cytochrome P450 activities and contaminant concentrations in caged carp and juvenile ducks

    SciTech Connect

    O`Keefe, P.; Gierthy, J.; Connor, S.; Bush, B.; Hong, C.S.; Wood, L.; Clayton, W.; Storm, R.

    1995-12-31

    Juvenile carp (Cyprinius carpio) weighing approx. 60 g were placed in cages located on the surface of sediments near an aluminum plant and an automobile parts plant in the Massena area of the St. Lawrence River. Fish were removed at weekly intervals over a 35 day exposure period and composited samples of liver tissue, cranial lipid, and fillet tissue were prepared for analysis of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs). Liver tissue was also stored at {minus}80 C for determination of microsomal Cytochrome P450 activity using the aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) assay. A control exposure was carried out upstream at an uncontaminated site. Juvenile pre-flight ducks (mallards, gadwalls, wood ducks and common mergansers) were collected in the contaminated areas on the St. Lawrence and on the Hudson River two to three months after hatching. Control pre-flight mallards, wood ducks and common mergansers were collected from remote lakes in the Addirondack State Park. Samples of subcutaneous fat and liver tissue were removed for analysis as described above for the carp. There was a three fold increase in AHH activity in the carp liver tissue at the end of the 35 day exposure period and there was a similar increase it activity for the mallards, common mergansers and wood ducks compared to controls. For each species the enzyme activity increases will be compared to the contaminant concentrations.

  6. Prevention of transmission of HIV, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and tuberculosis in prisoners.

    PubMed

    Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Reid, Stewart E; Schwitters, Amee; Wiessing, Lucas; El-Bassel, Nabila; Dolan, Kate; Moazen, Babak; Wirtz, Andrea L; Verster, Annette; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-09-10

    The prevalence of HIV, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and tuberculosis are higher in prisons than in the general population in most countries worldwide. Prisons have emerged as a risk environment for these infections to be further concentrated, amplified, and then transmitted to the community after prisoners are released. In the absence of alternatives to incarceration, prisons and detention facilities could be leveraged to promote primary and secondary prevention strategies for these infections to improve prisoners health and reduce risk throughout incarceration and on release. Effective treatment of opioid use disorders with opioid agonist therapies (eg, methadone and buprenorphine) prevents blood-borne infections via reductions in injection in prison and after release. However, large gaps exist in the implementation of these strategies across all regions. Collaboration between the criminal justice and public health systems will be required for successful implementation of these strategies. PMID:27427456

  7. Viral (hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, HIV) persistence and immune homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Ying; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q; Jia, Zhan S

    2014-01-01

    Immune homeostasis is a host characteristic that maintains biological balance within a host. Humans have evolved many host defence mechanisms that ensure the survival of individuals upon encountering a pathogenic infection, with recovery or persistence from a viral infection being determined by both viral factors and host immunity. Chronic viral infections, such as hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and HIV, often result in chronic fluctuating viraemia in the face of host cellular and humoral immune responses, which are dysregulated by multi-faceted mechanisms that are incompletely understood. This review attempts to illuminate the mechanisms involved in this process, focusing on immune homeostasis in the setting of persistent viral infection from the aspects of host defence mechanism, including interferon-stimulated genes, apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 (APOBEC3), autophagy and interactions of various immune cells, cytokines and regulatory molecules. PMID:24965611

  8. Prevention of transmission of HIV, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and tuberculosis in prisoners.

    PubMed

    Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Reid, Stewart E; Schwitters, Amee; Wiessing, Lucas; El-Bassel, Nabila; Dolan, Kate; Moazen, Babak; Wirtz, Andrea L; Verster, Annette; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-09-10

    The prevalence of HIV, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and tuberculosis are higher in prisons than in the general population in most countries worldwide. Prisons have emerged as a risk environment for these infections to be further concentrated, amplified, and then transmitted to the community after prisoners are released. In the absence of alternatives to incarceration, prisons and detention facilities could be leveraged to promote primary and secondary prevention strategies for these infections to improve prisoners health and reduce risk throughout incarceration and on release. Effective treatment of opioid use disorders with opioid agonist therapies (eg, methadone and buprenorphine) prevents blood-borne infections via reductions in injection in prison and after release. However, large gaps exist in the implementation of these strategies across all regions. Collaboration between the criminal justice and public health systems will be required for successful implementation of these strategies.

  9. Hepatitis delta virus: protein composition of delta antigen and its hepatitis B virus-derived envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Bonino, F; Heermann, K H; Rizzetto, M; Gerlich, W H

    1986-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV)-associated particles were purified from the serum of an experimentally infected chimpanzee by size chromatography and by density centrifugation. Hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) was detected after mild detergent treatment at a column elution volume corresponding to 36-nm particles and banded at a density of 1.25 g/ml. The serum had an estimated titer of 10(9) to 10(10) HDV-associated particles and had only a 10-fold excess of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) not associated with HDAg. Therefore, HDV appears to be much more efficiently packed and secreted than is its helper virus, hepatitis B virus (HBV), which is usually accompanied by a 1,000-fold excess of HBsAg. The protein compositions of the HDAg-containing particles were analyzed by immunoblotting with HDAg-, HBsAg-, and hepatitis B core antigen-specific antisera and monoclonal antibodies to HBV surface gene products. The HBsAg envelope of HDAg contained approximately 95% P24/GP27s, 5% GP33/36s, and 1% P39/GP42s proteins. This protein composition was more similar to that of the 22-nm particles of HBsAg than to that of complete HBV. The significant amount of GP33/36s suggests that the HBsAg component of the HDV-associated particle carries the albumin receptor. Two proteins of 27 and 29 kilodaltons which specifically bound antibody to HDAg but not HBV-specific antibodies were detected in the interior of the 36-nm particle. Since these proteins were structural components of HDAg and were most likely coded for by HDV, they were designated P27d and P29d. Images PMID:3701932

  10. [Protein subunit vaccines: example of vaccination against hepatitis B virus].

    PubMed

    Degos, F

    1995-06-15

    Hepatitis B vaccine has been used for over 10 years. It is efficient and safe. Protection of risk groups against hepatitis B virus infection is now achieved and vaccination of newborns and adolescents is a main public health problem. Bad responders are well characterized and immunomodulatory interventions (cytokines) must be tested in these patients. Response to hepatitis B vaccine is genetically determined and the possibility of vaccine induced escape mutants should lead to careful epidemiological studies of the spread of hepatitis B virus infection.

  11. Hepatitis C virus infection and the brain.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, Karin; Tryc, Anita B; Heeren, Meike; Worthmann, Hans; Pflugrad, Henning; Berding, Georg; Bokemeyer, Martin; Tillmann, Hans L; Goldbecker, Annemarie

    2009-03-01

    There is growing evidence that hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection may affect the brain. About half of the HCV-infected patients complain of chronic fatigue irrespective of their stage of liver disease or virus replication rate. Even after successful antiviral therapy fatigue persists in about one third of the patients. Many patients, in addition, report of deficits in attention, concentration and memory, some also of depression. Psychometric testing revealed deficits in attention and verbal learning ability as characteristic for HCV-afflicted patients with normal liver function. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies showed alterations of the cerebral choline, N-acetyl-aspartate, and creatine content in the basal ganglia, white matter and frontal cortex, respectively. Recently, pathologic cerebral serotonin and dopamine transporter binding and regional alterations of the cerebral glucose utilisation compatible with alterations of the dopaminergic attentional system were observed. Several studies detected HCV in brain samples or cerebro-spinal fluid. Interestingly, viral sequences in the brain often differed from those in the liver, but were closely related to those found in lymphoid tissue. Therefore, the Trojan horse hypothesis emerged: HCV-infected mononuclear blood cells enter the brain, enabling the virus to reside within the brain (probably in microglia) and to infect brain cells, especially astrocytes. PMID:19130196

  12. Hepatitis C virus antibody titration in patients with chronic hepatitis C, before and after interferon treatment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Yamada, G; Miyamoto, R; Doi, T; Endo, H; Nishimoto, H; Fujiki, S; Shimomura, H; Mizuno, M; Tsuji, T

    1992-10-01

    We measured hepatitis C virus antibody titers in 13 patients with chronic hepatitis C to determine whether titration of hepatitis C virus antibody was useful or not, to predict and evaluate the efficacy of interferon (IFN) treatment. During administration of IFN, hepatitis C virus titers declined in all patients. Antibody titers performed before treatment as well as just at the end of treatment did not correlate with change of the alanine aminotransferase levels during administration of IFN. Antibody titers declined continuously after treatment in 5 patients with normal alanine amino-transferase levels for over 6 months after discontinuation of IFN. Antibody titers rose again in 6 patients whose alanine aminotransferase levels fluctuated after treatment. An exceptional pattern of change occurred in 2 patients whose antibody titers declined continuously although their alanine aminotransferase levels fluctuated after treatment. Repeated titration of hepatitis C virus antibody appears to be useful for evaluating the long-term efficacy of IFN treatment.

  13. Outbreak of duck plague (duck herpesvirus enteritis) in numerous species of captive ducks and geese in temporal conjunction with enforced biosecurity (in-house keeping) due to the threat of avian influenza A virus of the subtype Asia H5N1.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Kuczka, A; Kühnhold, A; Bunzenthal, C; Bönner, B M; Hanka, K; Redmann, T; Yilmaz, A

    2007-01-01

    The continuing westward spread of avian influenza A virus of the subtype H5N1 in free-living and domestic birds forced the European Union and the German federal government to enhance all biosecurity measures including in-house keeping of all captive birds from October 20 to December 15, 2005. Movement of captive ducks and geese of many different species from a free-range system to tight enclosures and maintenance for prolonged times in such overcrowded sheds resulted in pronounced disturbance of natural behaviour, interruption of mating and breeding activities and possibly additional stress. Under these conditions the birds developed signs of severe disease and enhanced mortality twentyfour days later. A total of 17 out of 124 (14%) adult birds and 149 out of 184 year-old birds (81 %) died during the outbreak. A herpesvirus was isolated from many organs of succumbed ducks and geese that was identified as a duck plague herpesvirus by cross neutralization test using known antisera against duck plague virus. The published host range of duck plague comprises 34 species within the order Anseriformes. We report here on additional 14 species of this order that were found to be susceptible to duck plague virus. The exact source of the herpesvirus could not identified. However, low antibody titres in some ducks at day of vaccination indicate that at least some of the birds were latently infected with a duck plague herpesvirus. The remaining healthy appearing birds were subcutaneously vaccinated with a modified live duck plague vaccine (Intervet, Boxmeer, NL) that stopped losses and resulted in seroconversion in most of the vaccinated birds.

  14. [Periarteritis nodosa induced by hepatitis B virus].

    PubMed

    Mouthon, L

    1999-03-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) induced by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a rare condition whose incidence has decreased markedly over the last decade. HBV-related PAN is an acute condition that occurs within six months of HVB infection and shares many features with classic PAN. Some manifestations, however, are more common in HBV-related PAN, such as abdominal signs, renal failure, malignant arterial hypertension, and orchitis. Tests for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody are usually negative. Management combines a short course of steroid therapy, plasma exchanges, and antiviral drugs. The ten-year disease-free survival rate is 80%. Over half the patients develop antibody to Hbe and 24.4% to HBs. PMID:10214615

  15. Sofosbuvir treatment and hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yasui, Shin; Arai, Makoto; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious problem worldwide. The use of interferon-based therapy has made HCV eradication challenging. The recent appearance of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) has changed HCV therapy. Combining the use of DAAs with peginterferon and ribavirin has improved treatment efficacy. Furthermore, the combination of different orally administered DAAs has enabled interferon-free therapy with much higher efficacy and safety. In particular, sofosbuvir, a nucleotide-based NS5B inhibitor, prevents HCV RNA synthesis by acting as a "chain terminator". Treatment with sofosbuvir has attained an extremely high rate of sustained virologic response. The current review summarizes the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir therapy. PMID:26839641

  16. Hepatitis C virus infection protein network

    PubMed Central

    de Chassey, B; Navratil, V; Tafforeau, L; Hiet, M S; Aublin-Gex, A; Agaugué, S; Meiffren, G; Pradezynski, F; Faria, B F; Chantier, T; Le Breton, M; Pellet, J; Davoust, N; Mangeot, P E; Chaboud, A; Penin, F; Jacob, Y; Vidalain, P O; Vidal, M; André, P; Rabourdin-Combe, C; Lotteau, V

    2008-01-01

    A proteome-wide mapping of interactions between hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human proteins was performed to provide a comprehensive view of the cellular infection. A total of 314 protein–protein interactions between HCV and human proteins was identified by yeast two-hybrid and 170 by literature mining. Integration of this data set into a reconstructed human interactome showed that cellular proteins interacting with HCV are enriched in highly central and interconnected proteins. A global analysis on the basis of functional annotation highlighted the enrichment of cellular pathways targeted by HCV. A network of proteins associated with frequent clinical disorders of chronically infected patients was constructed by connecting the insulin, Jak/STAT and TGFβ pathways with cellular proteins targeted by HCV. CORE protein appeared as a major perturbator of this network. Focal adhesion was identified as a new function affected by HCV, mainly by NS3 and NS5A proteins. PMID:18985028

  17. Chronic hepatitis B virus in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Gish, Robert G; Sollano, Jose D; Lapasaran, Alex; Ong, Janus P

    2016-05-01

    Multiple studies have shown a high prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection in the Philippines, not only in high-risk populations but also in the general population. The most recent national study estimated HBsAg seroprevalence to be 16.7%, corresponding to an estimated 7.3 million CHB adults. The factors underlying the high prevalence of CHB and its sequelae include the inadequate use of vaccination for prevention and the lack of treatment for many Filipinos. Because without medical monitoring and treatment of CHB the risk of progression to liver failure and death is 25-30%, the ultimate medical and societal costs will be very high if the Philippines fails to properly address hepatitis B infection. It will be very important to move forward with programs that can help to ensure universal vaccination of newborns, screening and vaccination nationwide, and monitoring and treatment for CHB persons. It will also be crucial to address transmission of HBV in the health-care setting (via contaminated needles and syringes and inadequately sterilized hospital equipment) and via injection drug use and tattooing. Because of the relatively low average per capita income and the lack of coverage by PhilHealth of outpatient visits and medications, there is an urgent need to move forward with a nationally supported program that includes education for both the general public and health-care workers on liver disease and screening for hepatitis viruses, followed by, as appropriate, vaccination or treatment, with expanded government coverage for these for all those who could not otherwise afford it. PMID:26643262

  18. Hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 240 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 75% of whom reside in Asia. Approximately 600000 of infected patients die each year due to HBV-related diseases or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The endemicity of hepatitis surface antigen in Indonesia is intermediate to high with a geographical difference. The risk of HBV infection is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, men having sex with men, and health care workers. Occult HBV infection has been detected in various groups such as blood donors, HD patients, and HIV-infected individuals and children. The most common HBV subgenotype in Indonesia is B3 followed by C1. Various novel subgenotypes of HBV have been identified throughout Indonesia, with the novel HBV subgenotypes C6-C16 and D6 being successfully isolated. Although a number of HBV subgenotypes have been discovered in Indonesia, genotype-related pathogenicity has not yet been elucidated in detail. Therefore, genotype-related differences in the prognosis of liver disease and their effects on treatments need to be determined. A previous study conducted in Indonesia revealed that hepatic steatosis was associated with disease progression. Pre-S2 mutations and mutations at C1638T and T1753V in HBV/B3 have been associated with advanced liver diseases including HCC. However, drug resistance to lamivudine, which is prominent in Indonesia, remains obscure. Although the number of studies on HBV in Indonesia has been increasing, adequate databases on HBV infection are limited. We herein provided an overview of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in Indonesia. PMID:26478663

  19. Hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2015-10-14

    Approximately 240 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 75% of whom reside in Asia. Approximately 600000 of infected patients die each year due to HBV-related diseases or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The endemicity of hepatitis surface antigen in Indonesia is intermediate to high with a geographical difference. The risk of HBV infection is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, men having sex with men, and health care workers. Occult HBV infection has been detected in various groups such as blood donors, HD patients, and HIV-infected individuals and children. The most common HBV subgenotype in Indonesia is B3 followed by C1. Various novel subgenotypes of HBV have been identified throughout Indonesia, with the novel HBV subgenotypes C6-C16 and D6 being successfully isolated. Although a number of HBV subgenotypes have been discovered in Indonesia, genotype-related pathogenicity has not yet been elucidated in detail. Therefore, genotype-related differences in the prognosis of liver disease and their effects on treatments need to be determined. A previous study conducted in Indonesia revealed that hepatic steatosis was associated with disease progression. Pre-S2 mutations and mutations at C1638T and T1753V in HBV/B3 have been associated with advanced liver diseases including HCC. However, drug resistance to lamivudine, which is prominent in Indonesia, remains obscure. Although the number of studies on HBV in Indonesia has been increasing, adequate databases on HBV infection are limited. We herein provided an overview of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in Indonesia.

  20. Effects of dietary gossypol concentration on growth performance, blood profiles, and hepatic histopathology in meat ducks.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q F; Yang, G L; Liu, G N; Wang, J P; Bai, S P; Ding, X M; Luo, Y H; Zhang, K Y

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of gossypol from cottonseed meal (CSM) on growth performance, blood biochemical profiles, and liver histopathology of ducks. A total of 900 1-d-old ducks were randomly allocated to 5 treatments with 12 pens/treatment and 15 ducks/pen. The 5 experimental diets were formulated in such a way that 0% (a corn-soybean meal basal diet, diet 1), 25% (diet 2), 50% (diet 3), 75% (diet 4), and 100% (diet 5) of protein from soybean meal were replaced with that from CSM. All diets were formulated on a digestible amino acid basis. The experiment included 2 phases, the starter phase (1 to 3 wk) where the test diets contained graded levels of CSM and the growth phase (4 to 5 wk) where birds were fed a corn-soybean basal diet to examine the recovery of ducks after CSM withdrawal. Dietary CSM and gossypol linearly (P < 0.01) and quadratically (P < 0.01) decreased ADG and ADFI during d 1 to 14. The threshold of daily total gossypol (TG) and free gossypol (FG) intake based on ADG on d 1 to 7 and d 7 to 14 were 32.20 and 2.64 mg/d, and 92.12 and 9.62 mg/d, respectively. Serum alanine aminotransferase increased (P < 0.05) linearly with increasing level of gossypol in the diets (d 7), whereas aspartate aminotransferase increased (P < 0.05) linearly and quadratically (d 14). Serum albumin concentration decreased (P < 0.05) quadratically with increasing dietary CSM concentrations on d 21. The degree of damage to the liver increased markedly with increasing dietary CSM and gossypol content and the length of CSM and gossypol intake. On d 35, there was no difference on BW and blood profiles of ducks among all treatments. These results suggest that meat ducks' dietary TG and FG concentration should be lower than 928.9 and 77.2 mg/kg, respectively, during d 1 to 21 of age and that a 2-wk withdrawal of diets containing gossypol should be considered.

  1. New Therapies for Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Polenakovik, Hari

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), the major etiologic agent of "non-A, non-B hepatitis" was discovered 26 years ago. Even before its discovery, interferon-α (IFN) was already being used for treatment of this infection. The next two decades saw a series of incremental improvements of the IFN therapies by extending the duration of therapy, using IFN in combination with oral ribavirin, using pegylated IFN with ribavirin, and most recently adding oral compounds that inhibit the HCV replication (directly acting antivirals - DAAs) to that regimen. DAAs target multiple steps in the HCV life cycle and are now used in combination to treat HCV infection without the need of IFN. These IFN-free, oral DAAs regimens are highly efficacious, have minimal toxicity and are given for short duration. Approved DAAs can cure more then 90% of persons with chronic HCV infection, thereby reducing the risk of death from cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, these drugs are very expensive, and currently their exorbitant cost significantly restricts the access to this therapy for many HCV infected patients. PMID:27442378

  2. Interleukin 28B genetic polymorphism and hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toru

    2014-09-14

    Interleukin (IL) 28B genetic polymorphism is significantly associated with the sustained virological response rate in patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with pegylated interferon-α (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin and with spontaneous hepatitis C virus clearance. However, a consensus on the relationship between IL28B genetic polymorphism and the favorable outcome of chronic hepatitis B virus infection defined by hepatitis B e antigen seroconversion, and/or hepatitis B surface antigen seroclearance in patients treated with interferon or PEG-IFN has not been reached. Several reports failed to show a positive association, while some studies demonstrated a positive association in certain subject settings. More prospective studies including large cohorts are needed to determine the possible association between IL28B genetic polymorphism and the outcome of interferon or PEG-IFN treatment for chronic hepatitis B.

  3. IFNL4 affects clearance of hepatitis C virus

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have discovered a new human interferon gene, Interferon Lambda 4 (IFNL4), that affects clearance of the hepatitis C virus. They also identified an inherited genetic variant within IFNL4 that predicts how people respond to treatment for hepatit

  4. NIH Scientists Shed Light on Mystery Surrounding Hepatitis B Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research 2013 January 2013 (historical) NIH Scientists Shed Light on Mystery Surrounding Hepatitis B Virus Discovery Is ... the University of Oxford, U.K., have shed light on a long-standing enigma about the structure ...

  5. Pioneering a Global Cure for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Vilarinho, Silvia; Lifton, Richard P

    2016-09-22

    This year's Lasker∼Debakey Clinical Medical Research Award honors Ralf Bartenschlager, Charles Rice, and Michael Sofia, pioneers in the development of curative and safe therapies for the 170 million people with hepatitis C virus infection. PMID:27634325

  6. Characteristics of an outpatient chronic hepatitis B virus infection cohort

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Danyenne Rejane; Tenore, Simone de Barros; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Lewi, David Salomão; Ferreira, Paulo Roberto Abrão

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To characterize a chronic hepatitis B cohort based on initial and follow-up clinical evaluations. Methods: A retrospective and descriptive analysis of clinical and laboratory data from chronic HBsAg adult carriers, without HIV, unexposed to treatment, with at least two outpatient visits, between February 2006 and November 2012. Fisher´s exact test, χ², Wilcoxon, Spearman, multiple comparisons and Kappa tests were applied, the level of significance adopted was 5%, with a 95% confidence interval. Results: 175 patients with mean age of 42.95±12.53 years were included: 93 (53.1%) were men, 152 (86.9%) were negative for hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg), 3 (1.7%) had hepatitis C coinfection, 15 (8.6%) had cirrhosis, and 2 (1.1%) had hepatocellular carcinoma. Genotype A predominated. Sixty-six patients (37.7%) had active hepatitis, 6 (3.4%) presented immune tolerance, and 38 (21.7%) were inactive carriers. Exacerbations and/or viral breakthrough were detected in 16 patients (9.1%). In 32 patients (18.3%), hepatitis B virus DNA remained persistently elevated and alanine aminotransferase levels were normal, whereas in 17 (9.7%), there was low hepatitis B virus DNA and alterated alanine aminotransferase. If only initial alanine aminotransferase and hepatitis B virus DNA values were considered, 15 cases of active hepatitis would not have been detected. Advanced fibrosis was more common in HBeAg-positive patients, and it was significantly associated with transaminases, hepatitis B virus DNA, and age. Conclusion: Many patients had active hepatitis, but almost 25%, who were HBeAg non-reactive, were only identified because of combined analyses of the hepatitis B virus DNA and transaminases levels, sometimes associated with histological data, after clinical follow-up. PMID:26154539

  7. Influenza surveillance in birds in Italian wetlands (1992-1998): is there a host restricted circulation of influenza viruses in sympatric ducks and coots?

    PubMed

    De Marco, M A; Campitelli, L; Foni, E; Raffini, E; Barigazzi, G; Delogu, M; Guberti, V; Di Trani, L; Tollis, M; Donatelli, I

    2004-03-01

    We report the results of a 6-year serological and virological monitoring performed in ducks and coots in Italy, in order to assess the degree of influenza A virus circulation in these birds during wintering. A total of 1039 sera collected from 1992 to 1998 was screened by a double antibody sandwich blocking ELISA (NP-ELISA): seroprevalence of antibodies to influenza A viruses was significantly higher in ducks compared to coots (52.2% vs. 7.1%, respectively). The hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay, performed on NP-ELISA positive sera, showed that 16.9% of these duck sera and 33.3% of these coot sera had antibodies to at least one influenza virus HA subtype: ducks showed HI antibodies against most of the HA subtypes, except for the H3, H4, H7, and H12; coots were seropositive to the H3 and H10 subtypes, only. From 1993 to 1998, 22 virus strains were obtained from 802 cloacal swabs, with an overall virus isolation frequency of 2.7%. Viruses belonging to the H1N1 subtype were by far the most commonly circulating strains (18/22) and were isolated mainly from ducks (17/18). The remaining viruses were representative of the H10N8, H5N2 and H3N8 subtypes. Our data indicate some differences between influenza A virus circulation in sympatric ducks and coots and a significant antigenic diversity between some reference strains and viruses recently isolated in Italy. PMID:15036528

  8. Influenza surveillance in birds in Italian wetlands (1992-1998): is there a host restricted circulation of influenza viruses in sympatric ducks and coots?

    PubMed

    De Marco, M A; Campitelli, L; Foni, E; Raffini, E; Barigazzi, G; Delogu, M; Guberti, V; Di Trani, L; Tollis, M; Donatelli, I

    2004-03-01

    We report the results of a 6-year serological and virological monitoring performed in ducks and coots in Italy, in order to assess the degree of influenza A virus circulation in these birds during wintering. A total of 1039 sera collected from 1992 to 1998 was screened by a double antibody sandwich blocking ELISA (NP-ELISA): seroprevalence of antibodies to influenza A viruses was significantly higher in ducks compared to coots (52.2% vs. 7.1%, respectively). The hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay, performed on NP-ELISA positive sera, showed that 16.9% of these duck sera and 33.3% of these coot sera had antibodies to at least one influenza virus HA subtype: ducks showed HI antibodies against most of the HA subtypes, except for the H3, H4, H7, and H12; coots were seropositive to the H3 and H10 subtypes, only. From 1993 to 1998, 22 virus strains were obtained from 802 cloacal swabs, with an overall virus isolation frequency of 2.7%. Viruses belonging to the H1N1 subtype were by far the most commonly circulating strains (18/22) and were isolated mainly from ducks (17/18). The remaining viruses were representative of the H10N8, H5N2 and H3N8 subtypes. Our data indicate some differences between influenza A virus circulation in sympatric ducks and coots and a significant antigenic diversity between some reference strains and viruses recently isolated in Italy.

  9. Hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The interaction of HCV with its human host is complex and multilayered; stemming in part from the fact that HCV is a RNA virus with no ability to integrate in the host's genome. Direct and indirect mechanisms of HCV-induced HCC include activation of multiple host pathways such as liver fibrogenic pathways, cellular and survival pathways, interaction with the immune and metabolic systems. Host factors also play a major role in HCV-induced HCC as evidenced by genomic studies identifying polymorphisms in immune, metabolic, and growth signaling systems associated with increased risk of HCC. Despite highly effective direct-acting antiviral agents, the morbidity and incidence of liver-related complications of HCV, including HCC, is likely to persist in the near future. Clinical markers to selectively identify HCV subjects at higher risk of developing HCC have been reported however they require further validation, especially in subjects who have experienced sustained virological response. Molecular biomarkers allowing further refinement of HCC risk are starting to be implemented in clinical platforms, allowing objective stratification of risk and leading to individualized therapy and surveillance for HCV individuals. Another role for molecular biomarker-based stratification could be enrichment of HCC chemoprevention clinical trials leading to smaller sample size, shorter trial duration, and reduced costs. PMID:26157746

  10. Advanced Molecular Surveillance of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Rahal, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important public health problem worldwide. HCV exploits complex molecular mechanisms, which result in a high degree of intrahost genetic heterogeneity. This high degree of variability represents a challenge for the accurate establishment of genetic relatedness between cases and complicates the identification of sources of infection. Tracking HCV infections is crucial for the elucidation of routes of transmission in a variety of settings. Therefore, implementation of HCV advanced molecular surveillance (AMS) is essential for disease control. Accounting for virulence is also important for HCV AMS and both viral and host factors contribute to the disease outcome. Therefore, HCV AMS requires the incorporation of host factors as an integral component of the algorithms used to monitor disease occurrence. Importantly, implementation of comprehensive global databases and data mining are also needed for the proper study of the mechanisms responsible for HCV transmission. Here, we review molecular aspects associated with HCV transmission, as well as the most recent technological advances used for virus and host characterization. Additionally, the cornerstone discoveries that have defined the pathway for viral characterization are presented and the importance of implementing advanced HCV molecular surveillance is highlighted. PMID:25781918

  11. Fibromyalgia-associated hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rivera, J; de Diego, A; Trinchet, M; García Monforte, A

    1997-09-01

    The objective was to determine whether there might be an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection and fibromyalgia (FM). We determined the prevalence of HCV infection in 112 FM patients, in comparison with matched rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients from the out-patient clinic of a teaching tertiary care general hospital. Furthermore, we looked for evidence of FM in 58 patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis due to HCV, compared with matched surgery clinic patients, HCV antibodies were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA). Serum RNA of HCV (HCV-RNA) was determined by polymerase chain reaction. In the group of FM patients, HCV antibodies were found by ELISA in 17 (15.2%) patients and in six (5.3%) of the RA controls (P < 0.05). RIBA was positive in 16 and indeterminate in one of the FM patients. Serum HCV-RNA was found in 13 of these FM patients. In eight (47%) FM patients, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was normal, although HCV-RNA was detected in four (50%) of them. In the group of patients with chronic hepatitis due to HCV, all patients had HCV antibodies and the presence of HCV-RNA in serum. Within these patients, 31 (53%) had diffuse musculoskeletal pain, while six (10%) fulfilled FM diagnostic criteria. In the control group, 13/58 (22%) had diffuse musculoskeletal pain (P < 0.001), whereas only one female patient (1.7%) fulfilled FM criteria (P < 0.05). Serum ALT was 51.7 +/- 38.4 in FM patients, whereas it was 122 +/- 76.3 in patients with HCV chronic hepatitis but without FM (P < 0.001). There were no statistical differences in autoimmune markers between patients with and without FM. These data suggest that there exists an association between FM and active HCV infection in some of our patients. FM is not associated with liver damage or autoimmune markers in these patients. HCV infection should be considered in FM patients even though ALT elevations were absent.

  12. Effect of age on the pathogenesis of DHV-1 in Pekin ducks and on the innate immune responses of ducks to infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Cuiping; Yu, Shengqing; Duan, Yunbing; Hu, Yue; Qiu, Xvsheng; Tan, Lei; Sun, Yingjie; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun; Ding, Chan

    2014-05-01

    Duck hepatitis virus (DHV) affects 1-week-old but not 3-week-old ducks, and it causes a more severe disease in the younger ducks. These differences may be partially due to the host response to DHV infection. In order to understand this difference, we characterized the pathobiology of and innate immune response to DHV infection in 1-day-old (1D) and 3-week-old (3 W) ducks. Viral RNA was detected in duck livers at 24, 36 and 72 h after inoculation with DHV at a dose of 10(3) LD50. Virus-induced pathology ranged from no clinical signs to severe disease and death, and it was more severe in the 1D ducks. Infection with DHV induced up-regulation of gene expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7, TLR3, retinoic-acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5), interleukin (IL)-6, interferon (IFN)-α, interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1), interferon-stimulated gene 12 (ISG12), and 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like gene (OASL) in the livers of 3 W ducks. Of these, IL-6, OASL and ISG12 mRNA levels were more than 100-fold higher in infected 3 W ducks than in mock-infected ducks of the same age. These genes were induced much less in infected 1D ducklings. We present evidence that a lower level of viral replication in the hepatocytes of 3 W ducks, whose basal level of cytokines is higher than that in 1D ducklings, may be related to the strong innate immunity induced. From our data, we conclude that duck age plays an important role in the pathogenicity of and innate immune responses to DHV.

  13. Vasculitis as a Presenting Manifestation of Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpreet; Sukhija, Gagandeep; Kaur, Parminder; Govil, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is responsible for causing hepatic complications like acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma along with some uncommon immune mediated extrahepatic manifestations. Vasculitis remains an uncommon extrahepatic complication of hepatitis B virus infection. Herein we report a case of hepatitis B infection that presented with leucocytoclastic vasculitis as an initial manifestation and managed successfully with entacavir therapy. PMID:27042512

  14. Reduced antibody reactivity to hepatitis C virus antigens in hemodialysis patients coinfected with hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Devesa, M; Khudyakov, Y E; Capriles, F; Blitz, L; Fields, H A; Liprandi, F; Pujol, F H

    1997-01-01

    Antibody reactivities to hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens and to synthetic peptides derived from different parts of the HCV genome (core, NS4, and NS5) were evaluated in HCV-infected hemodialysis patients. In the RIBA 3 assay, NS5 was significantly less recognizable by sera of hemodialysis patients compared to other HCV-infected subjects. Among hemodialysis patients, those coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) (positive for hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg+]) showed a reduction in reactivity to C33 and C100. Sera of only 23% of the hemodialysis patients (37 of 161) reacted with more than three of eight peptides tested, significantly fewer than the 60% (12 of 20) of the sera of other HCV-infected patients tested (P = 0.001). This immunosuppression was also manifested by a reduced frequency of recognition of additional peptides on follow-up. An even more reduced reactivity was observed among the HBV-coinfected patients (HBsAg+). The low-responder hemodialysis patients were not infected with any particular genotype of HCV, and the same HCV genotypes observed in the whole group of hemodialysis patients (1a, 1b, 2a, and 3a) were found circulating in the low-responder group. Even in this low-responder population, the good performance of two peptides (peptide 716, corresponding to a portion of the core, and peptide 59, corresponding to a portion of NS4) corroborates the immunodominance of the conserved epitopes within these peptides. PMID:9384281

  15. Type A influenza virus surveillance in free-flying, nonmigratory ducks residing on the eastern shore of Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slemons, R.D.; Hansen, W.R.; Converse, K.A.; Senne, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Virus surveillance in free-flying, nonmigratory ducks living on the eastern shore of Maryland indicated that influenza A viruses were introduced into the area or that the prevalence of endemic infections increased between July 15 and August 27, 1998. Cloacal swabs collected between May 28 and July 15, 1998, were negative for influenza A virus recovery (0/233), whereas 13.9% (29/209) of swabs collected between August 27 and September 2, 1998, were positive for influenza A virus recovery. Five hemagglutinin subtypes (H2, H3, H6, H9, and H12), six neuraminidase subtypes (N1, N2, N4, N5, N6, and N8), and nine HA-NA combinations were identified among 29 influenza A isolates. Interestingly, 18 of the 29 isolates initially appeared to contain two or more HA and/or NA subtypes. The free-flying, nonmigratory ducks served as excellent sentinels for the early detection of type A influenza viruses in the southern half of the Atlantic Migratory Waterfowl Flyway during the earliest phase of the yearly southern migration.

  16. Antiviral activity and mode of action of extracts from neem seed kernel against duck plague virus in vitro1.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Song, X; Yin, Z Q; Cheng, A C; Jia, R Y; Deng, Y X; Ye, K C; Shi, C F; Lv, C; Zhang, W

    2012-11-01

    Four fractions obtained from alcohol extracts of neem (Azadirachta indica) seed kernel by column chromatography were investigated for antivirus activity against the duck plague virus (DPV) in vitro. Duck embryo fibroblasts (DEF) infected with DPV were treated with the neem seed kernel extracts, and the effect of antivirus was judged by 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-y1)-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide colorimetric method assay and direct immunofluorescence assay. The mode of action was tested by the plaque reduction assay. The results showed that fractions 1 to 3 were inactive. The median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of fraction 4 was 10.9 μg/mL and inhibited the virus protein expression in the direct immunofluorescence assay. In the plaque reduction assay, fraction 4 could significantly reduce the number of plaques compared with the negative control (P < 0.01) in all modes of action. This study indicated that the fourth fraction obtained from neem seed kernel could improve the viability of infected cells, and reduce the cytopathic effects caused by DPV and the amount of the virus protein expressed in virus-infected cells. The antiviral activity works in the whole process of virus infecting the normal cells. PMID:23091135

  17. Formation of Hepatitis B Virus Covalently Closed Circular DNA: Removal of Genome-Linked Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weifan; Hu, Jianming

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) contains a small, partially double-stranded, relaxed circular (RC) DNA genome. RC DNA needs to be converted to covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA, which serves as the template for all viral RNA transcription. As a first step toward understanding how CCC DNA is formed, we analyzed the viral and host factors that may be involved in CCC DNA formation, using transient and stable DNA transfections of HBV and the related avian hepadnavirus, duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). Our results show that HBV CCC DNA formed in hepatoma cells was derived predominantly from RC DNA with a precise junction sequence. In contrast to that of DHBV, HBV CCC DNA formation in cultured cells was accompanied by the accumulation of a RC DNA species from which the covalently attached viral reverse transcriptase (RT) protein was removed (protein-free or PF-RC DNA). Furthermore, whereas envelope deficiency led to increased CCC DNA formation in DHBV, it resulted mainly in increased PF-RC, but not CCC, DNA in HBV, suggesting that the envelope protein(s) may negatively regulate a step in CCC DNA formation that precedes deproteination in both HBV and DHBV. Interestingly, PF-RC DNA, in contrast to RT-linked RC DNA, contained, almost exclusively, mature plus-strand DNA, suggesting that the RT protein was removed preferentially from mature RC DNA. PMID:17409153

  18. Transcriptional analysis of the innate immune response of ducks to different species-of-origin low pathogenic H7 avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Ducks represent an important reservoir for avian influenza (AI) viruses and are partly responsible for the worldwide dissemination of AI. Due to the ability of some low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) of the hemagglutinin H7 subtype to mutate into a highly pathogenic form o...

  19. Mutations in core nucleotide sequence of hepatitis B virus correlate with fulminant and severe hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ehata, T; Omata, M; Chuang, W L; Yokosuka, O; Ito, Y; Hosoda, K; Ohto, M

    1993-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus leads to a wide spectrum of liver injury, including self-limited acute hepatitis, fulminant hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis with progression to cirrhosis or acute exacerbation to liver failure, as well as an asymptomatic chronic carrier state. Several studies have suggested that the hepatitis B core antigen could be an immunological target of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. To investigate the reason why the extreme immunological attack occurred in fulminant hepatitis and severe exacerbation patients, the entire precore and core region of hepatitis B virus DNA was sequenced in 24 subjects (5 fulminant, 10 severe fatal exacerbation, and 9 self-limited acute hepatitis patients). No significant change in the nucleotide sequence and deduced amino acid residue was noted in the nine self-limited acute hepatitis patients. In contrast, clustering changes in a small segment of 16 amino acids (codon 84-99 from the start of the core gene) in all seven adr subtype infected fulminant and severe exacerbation patients was found. A different segment with clustering substitutions (codon 48-60) was also found in seven of eight adw subtype infected fulminant and severe exacerbation patients. Of the 15 patients, 2 lacked precore stop mutation which was previously reported to be associated with fulminant hepatitis. These data suggest that these core regions with mutations may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis B viral disease, and such mutations are related to severe liver damage. Images PMID:8450049

  20. Characterization of a novel reassortant influenza A virus (H2N2) from a domestic duck in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mai-Juan; Yang, Xiao-Xian; Qian, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Si-Yan; Hua, Sha; Wang, Tie-Cheng; Chen, Shan-Hui; Ma, Guang-Yuan; Sang, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Lin-Na; Wu, Ai-Ping; Jiang, Tai-Jiao; Gao, Yu-Wei; Gray, Gregory C; Zhao, Teng; Ling, Xia; Wang, Jing-Lin; Lu, Bing; Qian, Jun; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2014-12-23

    While H2N2 viruses have been sporadically isolated from wild and domestic birds, H2N2 viruses have not been detected among human populations since 1968. Should H2N2 viruses adapt to domestic poultry they may pose a risk of infection to people, as most anyone born after 1968 would likely be susceptible to their infection. We report the isolation of a novel influenza A virus (H2N2) cultured in 2013 from a healthy domestic duck at a live poultry market in Wuxi City, China. Sequence data revealed that the novel H2N2 virus was similar to Eurasian avian lineage avian influenza viruses, the virus had been circulating for ≥ two years among poultry, had an increase in α2,6 binding affinity, and was not highly pathogenic. Approximately 9% of 100 healthy chickens sampled from the same area had elevated antibodies against the H2 antigen. Fortunately, there was sparse serological evidence that the virus was infecting poultry workers or had adapted to infect other mammals. These findings suggest that a novel H2N2 virus has been circulating among domestic poultry in Wuxi City, China and has some has increased human receptor affinity. It seems wise to conduct better surveillance for novel influenza viruses at Chinese live bird markets.

  1. Differences in pathogenicity, response to vaccination, and innate immune responses in different types of ducks infected with a virulent H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus from Vietnam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild ducks are reservoirs of avian influenza viruses in nature, and usually don’t show signs of disease. However, some Asian lineage H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses can cause disease and death in both wild and domestic ducks. The objective of this study was to compare the cli...

  2. Hepatitis E virus is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Kokki, I.; Smith, D.; Simmonds, P.; Ramalingam, S.; Wellington, L.; Willocks, L.; Johannessen, I.; Harvala, H.

    2015-01-01

    Acute viral hepatitis affects all ages worldwide. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is increasingly recognized as a major cause of acute hepatitis in Europe. Because knowledge of its characteristics is limited, we conducted a retrospective study to outline demographic and clinical features of acute HEV in comparison to hepatitis A, B and C in Lothian over 28 months (January 2012 to April 2014). A total of 3204 blood samples from patients with suspected acute hepatitis were screened for hepatitis A, B and C virus; 913 of these samples were also screened for HEV. Demographic and clinical information on patients with positive samples was gathered from electronic patient records. Confirmed HEV samples were genotyped. Of 82 patients with confirmed viral hepatitis, 48 (59%) had acute HEV. These patients were older than those infected by hepatitis A, B or C viruses, were more often male and typically presented with jaundice, nausea, vomiting and/or malaise. Most HEV cases (70%) had eaten pork or game meat in the few months before infection, and 14 HEV patients (29%) had a recent history of foreign travel. The majority of samples were HEV genotype 3 (27/30, 90%); three were genotype 1. Acute HEV infection is currently the predominant cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian and presents clinically in older men. Most of these infections are autochthonous, and further studies confirming the sources of infection (i.e. food or blood transfusion) are required. PMID:26904201

  3. [Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus infection in Spain].

    PubMed

    Echevarría, José Manuel; Fogeda, Marta; Avellón, Ana

    2015-04-01

    The general features of the epidemiology and ecology of hepatitis E virus in Spain are already known after 20 years of investigations. Genotype 3 strains, mainly from sub-genotype 3f, circulated among swine livestock and certain wild mammals, and would be sporadically transmitted to humans through direct contact with the reservoirs or by consumption of foods derived from them. Bivalve shellfish contaminated by hepatitis E virus from sewage could also play a role in transmission. Although the interpretation of results from seroprevalence studies in low endemic settings is still controversial, antibody to hepatitis E virus displays an overall prevalence less than 10% among the population of Spain, increasing significantly with age. From the, approximately, 150 cases of acute hepatitis E recorded in the international literature, males older than 40 years, suffering a mild, locally acquired disease predominate. In addition, hepatitis E might be more frequent in the North of the country than in other regions. Although the disease does not usually have a great clinical relevance, the occasional finding of cases of fulminant hepatitis, and of ribavirin-resistant, chronic hepatitis E virus infections among the immunocompromised would recommend the surveillance of the infection by the public health authority and a better implementation of specific diagnostic procedures in clinical laboratories.

  4. Titration of the infectivity of hepatitis D virus in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Ponzetto, A; Hoyer, B H; Popper, H; Engle, R; Purcell, R H; Gerin, J L

    1987-01-01

    The infectivity of hepatitis D virus (HDV) was evaluated by intravenous inoculation of chimpanzees. HDV was present in the inoculum at a titer of 10(11) chimpanzee infectious doses (CID). In contrast, the titer of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the same inoculum was 10(6) CID. All HBV-infected chimpanzees inoculated with less than or equal to 10(-11) dilutions of the HDV-positive plasma were superinfected; an animal receiving a 10(-12) dilution did not develop markers of HDV replication in serum or liver. All HDV-infected chimpanzees had marked elevations of serum alanine aminotransferase activities. The incubation period from exposure to development of hepatitis was inversely related to the dose of HDV inoculum, although the severity and duration of hepatitis were independent of it. All animals recovered and rapidly developed antibody to hepatitis D antigen.

  5. A preliminary study of the role of ducks in the transmission of Newcastle disease virus to in-contact rural free-range chickens.

    PubMed

    Otim Onapa, M; Christensen, H; Mukiibi, G M; Bisgaard, M

    2006-05-01

    The role of ducks in the transmission of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) to free-range village chicken was investigated experimentally. Newcastle disease (ND) seronegative ducklings reared in a pen were infected oronasally with velogenic NDV of intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI) 1.8 isolated from outbreaks in village chickens in Uganda. A first group of 3-week-old ND seronegative chicks was mixed with the ducks and they were kept together for 7 days. Both ducks and chicks were observed for ND clinical signs and any mortality, and they were bled and their sera were tested for ND antibodies by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. The chicks were removed, euthanized and examined for any ND lesions, while the ducks were transferred to a fresh pen and a second group of chicks was introduced and observed and treated as above. The ducks and the chicks tested positive for ND antibodies 7 days post infection and contact, respectively, but showed no clinical signs, post-mortem lesions or mortality. The mean ND antibody titre of the second group of chicks was lower than for the first group. This study has shown that although ducks can be infected with velogenic NDV, they do not show clinical signs but are able to transmit NDV to in-contact chicks. Further investigations are needed of the lack of clinical signs in the in-contact chicks and how long the ducks remain infective.

  6. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    In Iran, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is relatively low according to the population-based epidemiological studies. However, the epidemiology of HCV is changing and the rate of HCV infection is increasing due to the growth in the number of injecting drug users in the society. In addition, a shift has occurred in the distribution pattern of HCV genotypes among HCV-infected patients in Iran. Genotype 1a is the most prevalent genotype in Iran, but in recent years, an increase in the frequency of 3a and a decrease in 1a and 1b have been reported. These variations in the epidemiology of HCV reflect differences in the routes of transmission, status of public health, lifestyles, and risk factors in different groups and geographic regions of Iran. Health policy makers should consider these differences to establish better strategies for control and prevention of HCV infection. Therefore, this review was conducted to present a clear view regarding the current epidemiology of HCV infection in Iran. PMID:26478671

  7. Occult hepatitis B virus and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pollicino, Teresa; Saitta, Carlo

    2014-05-28

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) is a challenging pathobiological and clinical issue that has been widely debated for several decades. By definition, OBI is characterized by the persistence of HBV DNA in the liver tissue (and in some cases also in the serum) in the absence of circulating HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). Many epidemiological and molecular studies have indicated that OBI is an important risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. OBI may exert direct pro-oncogenic effects through the activation of the same oncogenic mechanisms that are activated in the course of an HBsAg-positive infection. Indeed, in OBI as in HBV-positive infection, HBV DNA can persist in the hepatocytes both integrated into the host genome as well as free episome, and may maintain the capacity to produce proteins-mainly X protein and truncated preS-S protein - provided with potential transforming properties. Furthermore, OBI may indirectly favor HCC development. It has been shown that the persistence of very low viral replicative activity during OBI may induce mild liver necro-inflammation continuing for life, and substantial clinical evidence indicates that OBI can accelerate the progression of liver disease towards cirrhosis that is considered the most important risk factor for HCC development.

  8. [Hepatitis caused by virus C. Risk factors].

    PubMed

    Garassini, M E; Pulgar, Y; Alvarado, M; Garassini, M A

    1995-01-01

    To establish the risk factors to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, we studied 120 patients divided in 2 groups: A first group of 40 patients with HCV infection, 24 (60%) with past medical history of blood transfusion, 14 (35%) of them also had hemodialysis and 3 Kidney transplant. 10 patients (25%) had mayor surgery without transfusion, 3 had frequent visits to the dentist and 3 month baby whose mother was HCV positive. In 4 patients we found no risk factors. A second group of 80 patients who visit our clinic for the first time, 2 were found positive for HCV (1.6%). 13 of them had blood transfusion, one was HCV+ (OR: 5.5, P = 0.73). 41 had history of mayor surgery, one HCV+ (OR: 0.95, P = 1.000). The risk factors related to HCV infection in our population were blood transfusion, hemodialysis and mayor surgery. The use of EV drugs, tatoos, sexual behavior, interfamiliar or vertical transmission were not risk factor in our population. PMID:8598255

  9. Hepatitis C virus: Virology, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Chun; Lo, Shih-Yen

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years of study has provided a better understanding of hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, including the general properties of viral RNA and proteins. This effort facilitates the development of sensitive diagnostic tools and effective antiviral treatments. At present, serologic screening test is recommended to perform on individuals in the high risk groups and nucleic acid tests are recommended to confirm the active HCV infections. Quantization and genotyping of HCV RNAs are important to determine the optimal duration of anti-viral therapy and predict the likelihood of response. In the early 2000s, pegylated interferon plus ribavirin became the standard anti-HCV treatment. However, this therapy is not ideal. To 2014, boceprevir, telaprevir, simeprevir, sofosbuvir and Harvoni are approved by Food and Drug Administration for the treat of HCV infections. It is likely that the new all-oral, interferon-free, pan-genotyping anti-HCV therapy will be available within the next few years. Majority of HCV infections will be cured by these anti-viral treatments. However, not all patients are expected to be cured due to viral resistance and the high cost of antiviral treatments. Thus, an efficient prophylactic vaccine will be the next challenge in the fight against HCV infection. PMID:26052383

  10. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  11. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2015-10-14

    In Iran, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is relatively low according to the population-based epidemiological studies. However, the epidemiology of HCV is changing and the rate of HCV infection is increasing due to the growth in the number of injecting drug users in the society. In addition, a shift has occurred in the distribution pattern of HCV genotypes among HCV-infected patients in Iran. Genotype 1a is the most prevalent genotype in Iran, but in recent years, an increase in the frequency of 3a and a decrease in 1a and 1b have been reported. These variations in the epidemiology of HCV reflect differences in the routes of transmission, status of public health, lifestyles, and risk factors in different groups and geographic regions of Iran. Health policy makers should consider these differences to establish better strategies for control and prevention of HCV infection. Therefore, this review was conducted to present a clear view regarding the current epidemiology of HCV infection in Iran.

  12. Hepatitis C virus: Virology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Chun; Lo, Shih-Yen

    2015-06-01

    More than twenty years of study has provided a better understanding of hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, including the general properties of viral RNA and proteins. This effort facilitates the development of sensitive diagnostic tools and effective antiviral treatments. At present, serologic screening test is recommended to perform on individuals in the high risk groups and nucleic acid tests are recommended to confirm the active HCV infections. Quantization and genotyping of HCV RNAs are important to determine the optimal duration of anti-viral therapy and predict the likelihood of response. In the early 2000s, pegylated interferon plus ribavirin became the standard anti-HCV treatment. However, this therapy is not ideal. To 2014, boceprevir, telaprevir, simeprevir, sofosbuvir and Harvoni are approved by Food and Drug Administration for the treat of HCV infections. It is likely that the new all-oral, interferon-free, pan-genotyping anti-HCV therapy will be available within the next few years. Majority of HCV infections will be cured by these anti-viral treatments. However, not all patients are expected to be cured due to viral resistance and the high cost of antiviral treatments. Thus, an efficient prophylactic vaccine will be the next challenge in the fight against HCV infection.

  13. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Tirana, Albania.

    PubMed

    Haldeda, Migena; Baume, Julien; Tamalet, Catherine; Bizhga, Melpomeni; Colson, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a worldwide concern. Knowledge of the HCV genotype is clinically important because it predicts the rate of response to therapy and guides the treatment duration. Moreover, it allows molecular epidemiology to be performed. To our knowledge, the prevalence of HCV genotypes has been assessed only once in Albania, using a line probe genotyping assay. We determined HCV genotypes by population sequencing of HCV-infected patients in Tirana, Albania. HCV genotype and sequence analyses were performed for serum samples collected from January 2011 through May 2012 from 61 HCV-seropositive patients using population sequencing of the NS3 protease gene and alternatively the NS5b gene and the 5' untranslated region (UTR). HCV RNA was retrieved from the blood samples of 50 patients. The HCV NS3 protease gene was sequenced for 28 patients and NS5b and/or 5'UTR fragments were sequenced for an additional 22 patients. The predominant genotype was 1b in 25 patients (50%), followed by genotypes 2c, 4a, 3a, and 1a in 18%, 14%, 8%, and 6% of cases, respectively. Best matches for these HCV RNAs in GenBank were obtained in different countries worldwide. One NS3 protease naturally harbored an amino acid conferring minor drug resistance to newly available HCV protease inhibitors. In conclusion, HCV-1b was predominant in the present Albanian population, as in southeastern Europe.

  14. Tembusu-Related Flavivirus in Ducks, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thontiravong, Aunyaratana; Ninvilai, Patchareeporn; Tunterak, Wikanda; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Chaiyavong, Supassma; Angkabkingkaew, Kingkarn; Mungkundar, Chatthapon; Phuengpho, Woranuch; Oraveerakul, Kanisak; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2015-12-01

    Since 2013, outbreaks of disease caused by duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) have been observed in layer and broiler duck farms in Thailand. The virus is closely related to Chinese DTMUVs and belongs to the Ntaya group of mosquitoborne flaviviruses. These findings represent the emergence of DTMUV in ducks in Thailand.

  15. Pathobiology of avian influenza in domestic ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Domestic ducks are an important source of food and income in many parts of the world. The susceptibility of domestic ducks to avian influenza (AI) viruses varies depending on many factors, including the species and the age of the ducks, the virus strain, and management practices. Although wild wat...

  16. Tembusu-Related Flavivirus in Ducks, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Thontiravong, Aunyaratana; Ninvilai, Patchareeporn; Tunterak, Wikanda; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Chaiyavong, Supassma; Angkabkingkaew, Kingkarn; Mungkundar, Chatthapon; Phuengpho, Woranuch; Oraveerakul, Kanisak

    2015-01-01

    Since 2013, outbreaks of disease caused by duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) have been observed in layer and broiler duck farms in Thailand. The virus is closely related to Chinese DTMUVs and belongs to the Ntaya group of mosquitoborne flaviviruses. These findings represent the emergence of DTMUV in ducks in Thailand. PMID:26584133

  17. A serological survey of antibodies to H5, H7 and H9 avian influenza viruses amongst the duck-related workers in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Ma, Chunna; Shi, Weixian; Cui, Shujuan; Lu, Guilan; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhang, Daitao; Liu, Yimeng; Liang, Huijie; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Li; Seale, Holly; Wang, Quanyi

    2012-01-01

    The continued spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of H5 and H7 subtypes and low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses of H5, H7 and H9 subtypes in birds and the subsequent infections in humans pose an ongoing pandemic threat. It has been proposed that poultry workers are at higher risk of exposure to HPAI or LPAI viruses and subsequently infection due to their repeated exposure to chickens or domestic waterfowl. The aim of this study was to examine the seroprevalence of antibodies against H5, H7 and H9 viruses amongst duck-related workers in Beijing, China and the risk factors associated with seropositivity. In March, 2011, 1741 participants were recruited from (1) commercial duck-breeding farms; (2) private duck-breeding farms; and (3) duck-slaughtering farms. Local villagers who bred ducks in their backyards were also recruited. A survey was administered by face-to-face interview, and blood samples were collected from subjects for antibody testing against H5, H7 and H9 viruses. We found that none of the subjects were seropositive for either H5 or H7 viruses, and only 0.7% (12/1741) had antibody against H9. A statistically significant difference in H9 antibody seroprevalence existed between the various categories of workers (P = 0.005), with the highest figures recorded amongst the villagers (1.7%). Independent risk factors associated with seropositivity toinfection with H9 virus included less frequent disinfection of worksite (OR, 5.13 [95% CI, 1.07-24.58]; P = 0.041; ≤ twice monthly versus>twice monthly) and handling ducks with wounds on hands (OR, 4.13 [95% CI, 1.26-13.57]; P = 0.019). Whilst the risk of infection with H5, H7 and H9 viruses appears to be low among duck-related workers in Beijing, China, ongoing monitoring of infection with the H9 virus is still warranted, especially amongst villagers who breed backyard ducks to monitor for any changes.

  18. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection in healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; De Pascalis, Stefania; Onorato, Lorenzo; Calò, Federica; Sagnelli, Caterina; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 3 million healthcare workers per year receive an injury with an occupational instrument, with around 2000000 exposures to hepatitis B virus (HBV) and 1000000 to hepatitis C virus (HCV). Although an effective HBV vaccine has been available since the early eighties, and despite the worldwide application of universal vaccination programs started in the early nineties, HBV still remains a prominent agent of morbidity and mortality. There is no vaccine to limit the diffusion of HCV infection, which progresses to chronicity in the majority of cases and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide due to a chronic liver disease. Healthcare workers are frequently exposed by a mucosal-cutaneous or percutaneous route to accidental contact with human blood and other potentially infectious biological materials while carrying out their occupational duties. Mucosal-cutaneous exposure occurs when the biological material of a potentially infected patient accidentally comes in contact with the mucous membranes of the eyes or mouth or with the skin of a healthcare worker. Percutaneous exposure occurs when an operator accidentally injures himself with a sharp contaminated object, like a needle, blade or other sharp medical instrument. About 75% of the total occupational exposure is percutaneous and 25% mucosal-cutaneous, the risk of infecting a healthcare worker being higher in percutaneous than in mucosal-cutaneous exposure. All healthcare workers should be considered for HBV vaccination and should meticulously apply the universal prophylactic measures to prevent exposure to HBV and HCV. PMID:26925201

  19. Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes Among Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Hormozgan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Farzaneh; Moosavy, Seyed Hamid; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Eghbali, Hajar; Mahboobi, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    Background More than 170 million people in the world are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Determination of HCV genotype before starting the treatment is required, because HCV genotype affects the course of treatment and drug dosage Objectives We aimed to evaluate HCV genotypes among patients with positive results for anti-HCV in Bandar Abbas from 2011 to 2012. Patients and Methods Five hundred and nine consecutive patients with established chronic HCV infection referred to Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center, Blood Transfusion and Center for Special Diseases from March 2011 to March 2012 were enrolled in this cross sectional study. Five mL of peripheral blood was taken from precipitants and viral RNA extracted after plasma separation. Hepatitis C virus RNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR) assay and then HCV genotypes analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. Results In overall, 509 patients enrolled to this study. The mean age of these patients was 38.87 ± 9.55 years ranging from 1 to 90 years. Routs of transmission were: 238 (46.7%) inject of substance, 149 (29.3%) unknown rout, 62 (12.2%) blood transfusion, 50 (9.8%) sexual contact, and 10 (2%) mother to child. Frequency of HCV genotypes were: 316 (62.1%) 1a, 117 (23%) 1b, and 76 (14.9%) 3a. there was no significant association between HCV genotypes and gender, educational degree, risk factor of Hepatitis C, job, monthly income, HIV infection, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, Intravenous drug injection, and underlying disease (P > 0.05). Conclusions This results the same as many similar studies demonstrated that common HCV genotypes in Iranian patients were 1a, 3a and 1b, respectively. Patients with 1a and 1b genotypes have lower responses to interferon treatment, and it is reasonable to perform early screening to diagnose and determine HCV genotype for effective treatment and diagnose high-risk cases. PMID:24403914

  20. Genetic characterization of a novel astrovirus in Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qinfeng; Liu, Ning; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Fumin; Zhang, Dabing

    2015-06-01

    Three divergent groups of duck astroviruses (DAstVs), namely DAstV-1, DAstV-2 (formerly duck hepatitis virus type 3) and DAstV-3 (isolate CPH), and other avastroviruses are known to infect domestic ducks. To provide more data regarding the molecular epidemiology of astroviruses in domestic ducks, we examined the prevalence of astroviruses in 136 domestic duck samples collected from four different provinces of China. Nineteen goose samples were also included. Using an astrovirus-specific reverse transcription-PCR assay, two groups of astroviruses were detected from our samples. A group of astroviruses detected from Pekin ducks, Shaoxing ducks and Landes geese were highly similar to the newly discovered DAstV-3. More interestingly, a novel group of avastroviruses, which we named DAstV-4, was detected in Pekin ducks. Following full-length sequencing and sequence analysis, the variation between DAstV-4 and other avastroviruses in terms of lengths of genome and internal component was highlighted. Sequence identity and phylogenetic analyses based on the amino acid sequences of the three open reading frames (ORFs) clearly demonstrated that DAstV-4 was highly divergent from all other avastroviruses. Further analyses showed that DAstV-4 shared low levels of genome identities (50-58%) and high levels of mean amino acid genetic distances in the ORF2 sequences (0.520-0.801) with other avastroviruses, suggesting DAstV-4 may represent an additional avastrovirus species although the taxonomic relationship of DAstV-4 to DAstV-3 remains to be resolved. The present works contribute to the understanding of epidemiology, ecology and taxonomy of astroviruses in ducks.

  1. Hepatitis A Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Among Blood Donors in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hesamizadeh, Khashayar; Sharafi, Heidar; Keyvani, Hossein; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Najafi-Tireh Shabankareh, Azar; Sharifi Olyaie, Roghiyeh; Keshvari, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Hepatitis E virus (HEV) are both transmitted by the fecal-oral route and are known as the leading causes of acute viral hepatitis in the world, especially in developing countries. There is a lack of updated data on HAV and HEV seroprevalence in Iran. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HAV and HEV among a group of blood donors in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was performed from July 2014 to December 2014, on a total of 559 blood donors referred to the Tehran blood transfusion center. The serum samples were tested for antibodies to HAV and HEV, using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results In the present study, 536 (95.9%) cases were male and 23 (4.1%) female with mean age of 38 years. Out of 559 blood donors, 107 (19.1%) were first-time donors, 163 (29.2%) lapsed donors and 289 (51.7%) regular donors. Anti-HAV was found in 395 (70.7%) and anti-HEV in 45 (8.1%) of the blood donors. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence increased by age. There was no significant difference between genders in terms of anti-HAV and anti-HEV status. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence was significantly related to the level of education, where the donors with higher level of education had lower rate of HAV and HEV seroprevalence. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence was significantly higher in regular and lapsed donors than in first-time donors. Conclusions The present study showed that both HAV and HEV infections are still endemic in Iran. PMID:27110256

  2. Effect of intranasal immunization with inactivated avian influenza virus on local and systemic immune responses in ducks.

    PubMed

    Kang, H; Wang, H; Yu, Q; Yang, Q

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of co-administration of inactivated avian influenza H9N2 virus and adjuvants in waterfowls, 10-d-old ducks were immunized intranasally with inactivated avian influenza virus (IAIV) combined with CpG DNA and sodium cholate. Immunoglobulin A and IgG antibody levels in throat and tracheal tissues increased significantly, as did specific IgA and IgG antibody levels in the serum after intranasal immunization with IAIV combined with CpG DNA and sodium cholate, compared with immunization with IAIV only. Furthermore, enhanced hemagglutination inhibition titers were also detected in serum samples taken between the third and seventh weeks after immunization with IAIV and both adjuvants compared with IAIV alone. The expression of IL-2 and IL-6 in tracheal and lung tissues increased significantly in the early period after booster immunization. However, the enhancement induced by a single adjuvant was insignificant, and no significant change was detected in the antibody titers or cytokine levels between the ducks that received IAIV alone or saline. In the viral challenge study, prior administration of both CpG DNA and sodium cholate with IAIV reduced the viral titers in the oropharynx and cloaca swabs. Our study suggests that the combination of CpG DNA and sodium cholate could be beneficial to immunization with inactivated H9N2 virus by enhancing the local and systemic immune responses. PMID:22499863

  3. [Occult hepatitis B virus infection in chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Young; Park, Eui Ju

    2013-09-01

    Occult HBV infection is defined as the presence of HBV DNA in the liver (with or without detectable or undetectable HBV DNA in the serum) of individuals testing negative for HBsAg. Studies on occult HBV infection in hepatitis C patients have reported highly variable prevalence, because the prevalence of occult HBV infection varies depending on the hepatitis B risk factors and methodological approaches. The most reliable diagnostic approach for detecting occult HBV detection is through examination of liver DNA extracts. HCV has been suspected to strongly suppress HBV replication up to the point where it may be directly responsible for occult HBV infection development. However, more data are needed to arrive at a definitive conclusion regarding the role of HCV in inducing occult HBV infection. Occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients is a complex biological entity with possible relevant clinical implications. Influence of occult HBV infection on the clinical outcomes of chronic hepatitis C may be considered negative. However, recent studies have shown that occult HBV infection could be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and contribute to the worsening of the course of chronic liver disease over time in chronic hepatitis C patients. Nevertheless, the possible role of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C is still unresolved and no firm conclusion has been made up until now. It still remains unclear how occult HBV infection affects the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Therefore, in order to resolve current controversies and understand the pathogenic role and clinical impacts of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients, well-designed clinical studies are needed.

  4. Isolation and characterization of a novel H10N2 avian influenza virus from a domestic duck in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Lu, Rufeng; Wu, Xiaoxin; Peng, Xiaorong; Xu, Lihua; Cheng, Linfang; Lu, Xiangyun; Jin, Changzhong; Xie, Tiansheng; Yao, Hangping; Wu, Nanping

    2015-01-01

    During the surveillance for avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in live poultry markets (LPMs) in Eastern China, in 2013, an H10N2 AIV was isolated from a domestic duck. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this strain received its genes from H10, H1 and H7 AIVs of wild birds in China. The virulence of this strain was examined in chickens and mice, and was found to be low pathogenic in chickens but demonstrated moderate pathogenicity in mice. These results suggest that active surveillance of AIVs in LPMs should be used in an early warning system for avian influenza outbreaks.

  5. Indocyanine green: A test of hepatic function and a measure of plasma volume in the duck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    1. 1. The exponential removal of ICG from the plasma by the mallard duck liver made possible the measurement of fractional dye clearance (K), plasma volume (PV) and plasma clearance (PC). 2. 2. Values obtained for K (14.9%/min), PV (39.2 ml/kg) and PC (5.8 ml/min per kg) agreed with those obtained by other techniques used in a number of species. 3. 3. Sex did not affect the removal of ICG by the liver. However, increases in K, PV and PC were noted in hen mallards in laying condition. 4. 4. The data should prove useful as baseline values for physiological and pathological studies on the avian liver

  6. Pathogenicity in domestic ducks and mice of highly pathogenic H5N1 clade 2.3.2.1 influenza viruses recently circulating in Eastern Asia.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Mi; Choi, Jun-Gu; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Bang-Sil; Batchuluun, Damdinjav; Erdene-Ochir, Tseren-Ochir; Kim, Min-Chul; Kwon, Jun-Hun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2013-12-27

    Influenza virus A (H5N1) clade 2.3.2.1 has recently caused widespread outbreaks of disease in domestic poultry and wild birds in Eastern Asia. In the current study, the antigenicity and pathogenicity of three clade 2.3.2.1 viruses (Ck/Kr/Gimje/08, Ws/Mongolia/1/09, and Ws/Mongolia/7/10) were investigated in domestic ducks and mice. The H5N1 influenza viruses in this study were antigenically similar to each other (r-values of 0.35-1.4). The three viruses replicated systemically in all tissues tested in domestic ducks, indicating high pathogenicity. However, the viruses produced different clinical signs and mortality rates: Ck/Kr/Gimje/08 and Ws/Mongolia/1/09 resulted in 100% mortality with severe neurological signs, whereas Ws/Mongolia/7/10 resulted in 50% mortality with relatively mild neurological signs. In mice, infection with Ck/Kr/Gimje/08 and Ws/Mongolia/7/10 resulted in weight loss that peaked at 4 days post-infection (22.3% and 20.8%, respectively), same MLD50 (2.2 Log10 EID50) and systemic replication. The three viruses had K deletion at the -2 position of the HA1-connecting peptide (PQRERRRK-R), which is associated with increased virulence in domestic ducks and harbored NA stalk deletion, NS1 deletion and mutation of P42S in NS1, and full length (90aa) in PB1-F2, which confer increased virulence in mice. Our study shows that clade 2.3.2.1 viruses from Korea and Mongolia are antigenically similar and highly pathogenic in both domestic ducks and mice. Moreover, we provide molecular determinants of the clade 2.3.2.1 viruses associated with the pathogenicity in domestic ducks and mice, respectively.

  7. Unfolded protein response in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shiu-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus of clinical importance. The virus establishes a chronic infection and can progress from chronic hepatitis, steatosis to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The mechanisms of viral persistence and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Recently the unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular homeostatic response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, has emerged to be a major contributing factor in many human diseases. It is also evident that viruses interact with the host UPR in many different ways and the outcome could be pro-viral, anti-viral or pathogenic, depending on the particular type of infection. Here we present evidence for the elicitation of chronic ER stress in HCV infection. We analyze the UPR signaling pathways involved in HCV infection, the various levels of UPR regulation by different viral proteins and finally, we propose several mechanisms by which the virus provokes the UPR. PMID:24904547

  8. Hepatitis C virus infection in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Pichard, Anais; Pol, Stanislas

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is observed in around 20% of dialysis patients and in allograft recipients and results in a significant morbidity and mortality, especially after transplantation. Its prevalence has markedly decreased in patients who are candidates for transplantation since the introduction of screening, hygiene and prevention measures, including systematic screening of blood and organ donations, use of erythropoietin, and compliance with universal hygiene rules. A liver biopsy is preferable to non-invasive biochemical and/or morphological tests of fibrosis to evaluate liver fibrosis before and even after transplantation. In HCV-infected dialyzed patients who are not candidates for renal transplantation, the indication for antiviral therapy is limited to significant fibrosis (fibrosis ≥ 2 on the METAVIR scale). Antiviral treatment should be proposed to any HCV-infected candidate for renal transplantation, whatever the baseline histopathology. The recommendation is to use standard interferon-α as monotherapy, but pegylated interferon can be used, resulting in sustained virological response, while low doses of combined ribavirin may enhance the antiviral efficacy. After transplantation, interferon-α is contra-indicated but may be used in patients for whom the benefits of antiviral treatment clearly outweigh the risks, especially that of allograft rejection. All cirrhotic patients should be screened for hepatocellular carcinoma, whose risk is enhanced by immunosuppressive regimens. Sustained suppression of necro-inflammation may result in the reversal of cirrhosis, which reduces liver-related morbidity and improves patient and allograft survival. Finally, due to the high mortality after renal transplantation, active cirrhosis must be considered to be a contraindication to kidney transplantation, but an indication to combined liver-kidney transplantation; on the contrary, inactive compensated cirrhosis may permit renal transplantation alone.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of a Rat Hepatitis E Virus Strain Isolated in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Debing, Yannick; Emerson, Suzanne U.; Purcell, Robert H.; Dallmeier, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a common cause of acute hepatitis in humans. Related viruses have been isolated from multiple animal species, including rats, but their impact on human health is unclear. We present the first full-length genome sequence of a rat hepatitis E virus strain isolated in the United States (LA-B350). PMID:25377700

  10. 21 CFR 610.47 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... Disease Agents § 610.47 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an establishment... after a donor tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection when tested under §...

  11. 21 CFR 610.47 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... Disease Agents § 610.47 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an establishment... after a donor tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection when tested under §...

  12. 21 CFR 610.47 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... Disease Agents § 610.47 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an establishment... after a donor tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection when tested under §...

  13. 21 CFR 610.47 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... Disease Agents § 610.47 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an establishment... after a donor tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection when tested under §...

  14. 21 CFR 610.47 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... Disease Agents § 610.47 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an establishment... after a donor tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection when tested under §...

  15. Hepatitis E Virus Infection among Solid Organ Transplant Recipients, the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Pas, Suzan D.; de Man, Rob A.; Mulders, Claudia; Balk, Aggie H.M.M.; van Hal, Peter T.W.; Weimar, Willem; Koopmans, Marion P.G.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.

    2012-01-01

    We screened 1,200 living heart, lung, liver, and kidney transplant recipients for hepatitis E virus infection by reverse transcription PCR. In 12 (1%) patients, hepatitis E virus infection was identified; in 11 patients, chronic infection developed. This immunocompromised population is at risk for hepatitis E virus infection. PMID:22516170

  16. Hepatitis A virus detection in food: current and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, G; Bosch, A; Pintó, R M

    2007-07-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is responsible for around half of the total number of hepatitis infections diagnosed worldwide. HAV infection is mainly propagated via the faecal-oral route and as a consequence of globalisation, transnational outbreaks of foodborne infections are reported with increasing frequency. Molecular procedures are now available and should be employed for the direct surveillance of HAV in food and environmental samples.

  17. Yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine: efficacy with hepatitis B immune globulin in prevention of perinatal hepatitis B virus transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.E.; Taylor, P.E.; Tong, M.J.; Toy, P.T.; Vyas, G.N.; Nair, P.V.; Weissman, J.Y.; Krugman, S.

    1987-05-15

    A yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was licensed recently by the Food and Drug administration and is now available. To assess the efficacy of the yeast-recombinant vaccine, the authors administered the vaccine in combination with hepatitis B immune globulin to high-risk newborns. If infants whose mothers were positive for both hepatitis B surface antigen and the e antigen receive no immunoprophylaxis, 70% to 90% become infected with the virus, and almost all become chronic carriers. Among infants in this study who received hepatitis B immune globulin at birth and three 5-/sup +/g doses of yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine, only 4.8% became chronic carriers, a better than 90% level of protection and a rate that is comparable with that seen with immune globulin and plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine. Hepatitis surface antigen and antibodies were detected by radioimmunoassay. These data suggest that, in this high-risk setting, the yeast-recombinant vaccine is as effective as the plasma-derived vaccine in preventing hepatitis B virus infection and the chronic carrier state.

  18. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in Zhejiang Province in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Wu, Nanping; Peng, Xiaorong; Jin, Changzhong; Lu, Xiangyun; Cheng, Linfang; Yao, Hangping; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-08-01

    In 2013, 15 avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H3N2 (n = 7), H3N3 (n = 3), H3N6 (n = 3), and H3N8 (n = 2), were isolated from domestic ducks in Zhejiang Province in China. These strains were characterized by whole genome sequencing with subsequent phylogenetic analysis and genetic comparison. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that these strains clustered in the AIV Eurasian lineage. Analysis of the neuraminidase (NA) gene indicates that a re-assortment event between H3 and H9N2 AIV occurred in these ducks. The molecular markers analyzed over the genome of all viruses indicated that these strains were low-pathogenic AIVs. Although there was no evidence of re-assortment in subtype H3 AIVs among the avian species' and mammalian hosts in this study, continued surveillance is needed considering the important role of domestic ducks in AIV re-assortment.

  19. Hepatitis delta virus in intravenous drug users in Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Duraisamy, G; Zuridah, H; Ariffin, Y; Kek, C S

    1994-09-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is an RNA containing virus that requires hepatitis B virus (HBV) to supply the envelope proteins. HDV only infect man in the presence of HBV, either as a coinfection or as superinfection in HBV carriers. In the presence of hepatitis B infection, the HDV may cause more severe liver damage than that caused by the hepatitis B virus alone. HDV infection was studied in 44 HBsAg positive serum samples collected from male intravenous drug users sent for screening to the Blood Services Centre (BSC), Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL) between 1990 and 1992. The majority (39) were in the 20 to 39 age group. The youngest was 19 years old and the oldest was 61 years old. There were 25 Malays, 13 Chinese, five Indians and one Albanian. Anti hepatitis delta antibody (Anti-HDV) was detected in 15 out of 44 (34%) of the drug addicts. These results shows an increased in delta infection in HBsAg positive intravenous drug addicts compared to the surveillance results in 1985 when no delta antibodies were detected, and the 1986 and 1989 surveillance which showed 17.8% and 20% delta antibody positivity respectively.

  20. Vaccination of chimpanzees against infection by the hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Q L; Kuo, G; Ralston, R; Weiner, A; Chien, D; Van Nest, G; Han, J; Berger, K; Thudium, K; Kuo, C

    1994-01-01

    A high incidence of community-acquired hepatitis C virus infection that can lead to the progressive development of chronic active hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and primary hepatocellular carcinoma occurs throughout the world. A vaccine to control the spread of this agent that represents a major cause of chronic liver disease is therefore needed. Seven chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have been immunized with both putative envelope glycoproteins [E1 (gp33) and E2 (gp72)] that were copurified from HeLa cells infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus expression vector. Despite the induction of a weak humoral immune response to these viral glycoproteins in experimentally infected chimpanzees, a strong humoral immune response was obtained in all vaccines. The five highest responders showed complete protection against an i.v. challenge with homologous hepatitis C virus 1. The remaining two vaccines became infected, but both infection and disease may have been ameliorated in comparison with four similarly challenged control chimpanzees, all of which developed acute hepatitis and chronic infections. These results provide considerable encouragement for the eventual control of hepatitis C virus infection by vaccination. PMID:7509068

  1. Zoonotic Hepatitis E Virus: Classification, Animal Reservoirs and Transmission Routes

    PubMed Central

    Doceul, Virginie; Bagdassarian, Eugénie; Demange, Antonin; Pavio, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    During the past ten years, several new hepatitis E viruses (HEVs) have been identified in various animal species. In parallel, the number of reports of autochthonous hepatitis E in Western countries has increased as well, raising the question of what role these possible animal reservoirs play in human infections. The aim of this review is to present the recent discoveries of animal HEVs and their classification within the Hepeviridae family, their zoonotic and species barrier crossing potential, and possible use as models to study hepatitis E pathogenesis. Lastly, this review describes the transmission pathways identified from animal sources. PMID:27706110

  2. Dangers of immunosuppressive therapy in hepatitis B virus carriers.

    PubMed Central

    Lueg, E; Heathcote, J

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the risk of hepatic failure in hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers given intermittent immunosuppressive therapy. DATA SOURCES: The key words "immunosuppression" and "hepatitis B" were used to search MEDLINE for relevant articles in English published from 1970 to 1990; the bibliographies of these articles were reviewed for additional publications. Also included were articles published in 1991. STUDY SELECTION: Articles were included if they documented the use of immunosuppressive drugs to treat chronic hepatitis B or another condition in patients at high risk for the HBV carrier state. RESULTS: Long-term immunosuppressive therapy has not improved the survival of patients with chronic hepatitis B. The withdrawal of such therapy from HBV carriers has resulted in a flare-up of potentially fatal hepatitis in 20% to 50%, regardless of whether underlying liver disease was present. The presence of replicating viral DNA in the serum of HBV carriers may identify those who are at high risk of the deleterious effects of immunosuppressive therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term immunosuppressive therapy is not advised for liver disease in HBV carriers. For other conditions in such people continuous rather than intermittent therapy is safer. Patients at high risk for hepatitis B should be screened for this virus when immunosuppressive therapy is contemplated. PMID:1393929

  3. Development and field application of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Newcastle disease virus antibodies in chickens and ducks.

    PubMed

    Phan, L V; Park, M-J; Kye, S-J; Kim, J-Y; Lee, H-S; Choi, K-S

    2013-08-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (C-ELISA) using a baculovirus-expressed recombinant nucleocapsid protein antigen (rNDV-N) and an rNDV-N-specific monoclonal antibody (5B3) was developed for the detection of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) antibodies, and its diagnostic performance was evaluated. The specificity and sensitivity of the C-ELISA was found to be 98.4 and 98.9%, respectively, for chickens, and 98.2 and 97.9% for ducks. However, the C-ELISA showed weak cross-reaction with hyperimmune antisera to some other avian paramyxovirus serotypes. In all experimentally vaccinated chickens, seroconversion rates at 7 d postinoculation were 100 and 40% when measured by C-ELISA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI), respectively. In field trials, the C-ELISA showed positive results in 98.9% of HI-positive sera and 40.8% of HI-negative sera from NDV-vaccinated chickens (n = 705). In domestic ducks (n = 158) from NDV-positive duck farms (n = 8), the positive rates according to C-ELISA were significantly higher than those according to the HI test. At the same time, 98.1% of ducks (n = 209) from NDV-negative duck farms (n = 11) were also negative by C-ELISA. Our results indicate that C-ELISA could be a useful alternative to HI testing for detecting NDV antibodies in different avian species such as chickens and ducks.

  4. Role of N Glycosylation of Hepatitis B Virus Envelope Proteins in Morphogenesis and Infectivity of Hepatitis Delta Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sureau, Camille; Fournier-Wirth, Chantal; Maurel, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) particles are coated with the large (L), middle (M), and small (S) hepatitis B virus envelope proteins. In the present study, we constructed glycosylation-defective envelope protein mutants and evaluated their capacity to assist in the maturation of infectious HDV in vitro. We observed that the removal of N-linked carbohydrates on the S, M, and L proteins was tolerated for the assembly of subviral hepatitis B virus (HBV) particles but was partially inhibitory for the formation of HDV virions. However, when assayed on primary cultures of human hepatocytes, virions coated with S, M, and L proteins lacking N-linked glycans were infectious. Furthermore, in the absence of M, HDV particles coated with nonglycosylated S and L proteins retained infectivity. These results indicate that carbohydrates on the HBV envelope proteins are not essential for the in vitro infectivity of HDV. PMID:12692255

  5. Management of hepatitis B virus infection during treatment for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Shoji; Takemura, Shigekazu; Tanaka, Shogo; Shinkawa, Hiroji; Nishioka, Takayoshi; Nozawa, Akinori; Kinoshita, Masahiko; Hamano, Genya; Ito, Tokuji; Urata, Yorihisa

    2015-07-21

    Although liver resection is considered the most effective treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), treatment outcomes are unsatisfactory because of the high rate of HCC recurrence. Since we reported hepatitis B e-antigen positivity and high serum hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA concentrations are strong risk factors for HCC recurrence after curative resection of HBV-related HCC in the early 2000s, many investigators have demonstrated the effects of viral status on HCC recurrence and post-treatment outcomes. These findings suggest controlling viral status is important to prevent HCC recurrence and improve survival after curative treatment for HBV-related HCC. Antiviral therapy after curative treatment aims to improve prognosis by preventing HCC recurrence and maintaining liver function. Therapy with interferon and nucleos(t)ide analogs may be useful for preventing HCC recurrence and improving overall survival in patients who have undergone curative resection for HBV-related HCC. In addition, reactivation of viral replication can occur after liver resection for HBV-related HCC. Antiviral therapy can be recommended for patients to prevent HBV reactivation. Nevertheless, further studies are required to establish treatment guidelines for patients with HBV-related HCC.

  6. Cytokine profiles and hepatic injury in occult hepatitis C versus chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mousa, N; Eldars, W; Eldegla, H; Fouda, O; Gad, Y; Abousamra, N; Elmasry, E; Arafa, M

    2014-01-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a new entity that should be considered when diagnosing patients with abnormal liver functions of unknown origin. This work was carried out to evaluate T-helper 1/T-helper 2 (Th1/Th2) cytokine profiles in patients with occult HCV infection versus chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection, also to investigate any association between theses cytokines and liver histological features in both groups. Serum levels of Th1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4 and IL-10) were measured in 35 patients with occult HCV infection compared to 50 patients with chronic hepatitis C infection and 30 healthy controls. We have found that Th1 cytokines were significantly increased in patients with CHC infection than in both occult HCV infection and control groups (p less than 0.001). On the other hand, serum IL-4 levels were higher in occult HCV infection than in CHC and control groups (p less than 0.001). Furthermore, serum IL-10 levels were higher in both patient groups vs control group (pless than 0.001), with no significant difference between CHC and occult HCV groups. Finally, only serum IL-10 levels were significantly higher among patients with high activity (A2-A3) than those with low activity (A0-A1) in both CHC and occult HCV groups (p=0.038, p=0.025, respectively). Patients with occult HCV infection exhibited a distinct immunoregulatory cytokine pattern that is shifted towards the Th2 arm.

  7. Taraxacum mongolicum extract exhibits a protective effect on hepatocytes and an antiviral effect against hepatitis B virus in animal and human cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Guan, Rong-Fa; Wu, Yi-Hang; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Wen-Yan; Zhang, Yong-Yong; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Jun; Shi, Shu-Yun; Zhao, Yu

    2014-04-01

    In order to validate the antiviral effect against hepatitis B virus (HBV) of Taraxacum mongolicum (T. mongolicum), the protective effect on hepatocytes, and antiviral properties against duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) and HBV of T. mongolicum extract (TME) were evaluated in chemically-injured neonatal rat hepatocytes, DHBV-infected duck fetal hepatocytes and HBV-transfected HepG2.2.15 cells, respectively. The results demonstrated that TME at 50-100 µg/ml improved D-galactosamine (D-GalN), thioacetamide (TAA) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-injured rat hepatocytes, and produced protection rates of 42.2, 34.6 and 43.8% at 100 µg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, TME at 1-100 µg/ml markedly inhibited DHBV DNA replication. Additionally, TME at 25-100 µg/ml reduced HBsAg and HBeAg levels and produced inhibition rates of 91.39 and 91.72% at 100 µg/ml, respectively. TME markedly inhibited HBV DNA replication at 25-100 µg/ml. The results demonstrate the potent antiviral effect of T. mongolicum against HBV effect. The protective of TME effect on hepatocytes may be achieved by its ability to ameliorate oxidative stress. The antiviral properties of TME may contribute to blocking protein synthesis steps and DNA replication. Furthermore, major components of TME were quantificationally analyzed. These data provide scientific evidence supporting the traditional use of TME in the treatment of hepatitis.

  8. Taraxacum mongolicum extract exhibits a protective effect on hepatocytes and an antiviral effect against hepatitis B virus in animal and human cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Guan, Rong-Fa; Wu, Yi-Hang; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Wen-Yan; Zhang, Yong-Yong; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Jun; Shi, Shu-Yun; Zhao, Yu

    2014-04-01

    In order to validate the antiviral effect against hepatitis B virus (HBV) of Taraxacum mongolicum (T. mongolicum), the protective effect on hepatocytes, and antiviral properties against duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) and HBV of T. mongolicum extract (TME) were evaluated in chemically-injured neonatal rat hepatocytes, DHBV-infected duck fetal hepatocytes and HBV-transfected HepG2.2.15 cells, respectively. The results demonstrated that TME at 50-100 µg/ml improved D-galactosamine (D-GalN), thioacetamide (TAA) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-injured rat hepatocytes, and produced protection rates of 42.2, 34.6 and 43.8% at 100 µg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, TME at 1-100 µg/ml markedly inhibited DHBV DNA replication. Additionally, TME at 25-100 µg/ml reduced HBsAg and HBeAg levels and produced inhibition rates of 91.39 and 91.72% at 100 µg/ml, respectively. TME markedly inhibited HBV DNA replication at 25-100 µg/ml. The results demonstrate the potent antiviral effect of T. mongolicum against HBV effect. The protective of TME effect on hepatocytes may be achieved by its ability to ameliorate oxidative stress. The antiviral properties of TME may contribute to blocking protein synthesis steps and DNA replication. Furthermore, major components of TME were quantificationally analyzed. These data provide scientific evidence supporting the traditional use of TME in the treatment of hepatitis. PMID:24481875

  9. Surveillance for avirulent Newcastle disease viruses in domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos and Cairina moschata) at live bird markets in Eastern China and characterization of the viruses isolated.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowen; Wang, Xiaoquan; Wu, Shuang; Hu, Shunlin; Peng, Yi; Xue, Feng; Liu, Xiufan

    2009-10-01

    We isolated and identified 201 Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) from domestic ducks in a 5-year surveillance study at live bird markets in Eastern China. Seventy-three of these isolates were characterized biologically and genetically. Fusion protein (F) genes of these isolates were amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Intracerebral pathogenicity index tests in 1-day-old specific-pathogen-free chickens and the mean death time of embryonated fowl eggs in addition to the cleavage site analysis of the F-protein precursor for these viruses showed that they were all avirulent NDVs. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of the F gene showed that 30 isolates clustered into the class I clade and the other 43 isolates clustered into genotype I of class II, but diverged from the vaccine virus Queensland V4, which is extensively used in China. Most class I viruses (18/30) formed a separate branch closest to the Hong Kong live bird market strains that have been recently designated as genotype 3, while the rest (12/30) were closely related to some European viruses within genotype 2. All of the 43 class II genotype I viruses diverged from viruses originally assigned to genotype Ia and formed a separate sublineage designated as Ib with water bird isolates from the Far East, suggesting the possible transmission between the wild and domestic waterfowl. The results in the present study clearly showed that the domestic duck population carries avirulent NDVs with genetic divergence regularly and may act as one of the important reservoirs.

  10. Genetic and antigenic characteristics of H4 subtype avian influenza viruses in Korea and their pathogenicity in quails, domestic ducks and mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Mi; Choi, Jun-Gu; Kim, Kwang-Il; Park, Ha-Young; Park, Choi-Kyu; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    In Korea, a nationwide surveillance programme was implemented in 2003 to identify highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (AIVs). AIVs belonging to one of the most common haemagglutinin subtypes, H4, were isolated from two domestic ducks and 52 wild birds between 2004 and 2010. These H4 AIVs could be further classified into three neuraminidase subtypes: H4N6 (94.4%), H4N2 (3.7%) and H4N3 (1.9%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the H4 AIVs had a variety of genetic constellations, with at least nine different genotypes represented. The pathogenicity of these H4 viruses was assessed in quails, domestic ducks and mice. None of the H4 AIVs induced clinical signs in quails or domestic ducks. Viral shedding in quails was relatively high, and virus was recovered up to 5-7 days post-inoculation (p.i.) in oropharyngeal swabs, but the viruses replicated poorly in domestic ducks. Quails may act as an intermediate host in which AIVs are amplified and transmitted to other species. In mice, all of the AIVs were recovered efficiently at relatively high titres from the lungs up to 7 days p.i., demonstrating the potential for AIVs to infect mice directly without prior adaptation. None of the AIVs induced clinical signs nor was any lethal to infected mice. However, there was significant loss of body weight in mice infected with viruses of duck origin. It is suggested that the active surveillance of influenza viruses needs to be enhanced in domestic poultry as well as in wild birds, and that it should include assessment of pathogenicity in animal models.

  11. Sampling of sea ducks for influenza A viruses in Alaska during winter provides lack of evidence for epidemiological peak of infection.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew B.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Wasley, Jeff; Esler, Daniel N.; Stalknecht, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Sampling of sea ducks for influenza A viruses in Alaska during winter provided no evidence for an epidemiologic peak of infection. Isolates were recovered, however, that provide information on viral diversity and dispersal that may not be realized through sampling efforts focused on other avian taxa.

  12. Characterization of the Pathogenesis of H10N3, H10N7, and H10N8 Subtype Avian Influenza Viruses Circulating in Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miaomiao; Zhang, Xingxing; Xu, Kaidi; Teng, Qiaoyang; Liu, Qinfang; Li, Xuesong; Yang, Jianmei; Xu, Jianqing; Chen, Hongjun; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    Three H10 subtype avian influenza viruses were isolated from domestic ducks in China, designated as SH602/H10N8, FJ1761/H10N3 and SX3180/H10N7, with an intravenous pathogenicity index (IVPI) of 0.39, 1.60, and 1.27, respectively. These H10 viruses showed a complex pathology pattern in different species, although full genome characterizations of the viruses could not identify any molecular determinant underlying the observed phenotypes. Our findings describe the pathobiology of the three H10 subtype AIVs in chickens, ducks, and mice. FJ1761/H10N3 evolved E627K and Q591K substitutions in the gene encoding the PB2 protein in infected mice with severe lung damage, suggesting that H10 subtype avian influenza viruses are a potential threat to mammals. PMID:27678170

  13. Length Variations in the NA Stalk of an H7N1 Influenza Virus Have Opposite Effects on Viral Excretion in Chickens and Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, T. W.; Munier, S.; Larcher, T.; Soubieux, D.; Ledevin, M.; Esnault, E.; Tourdes, A.; Croville, G.; Guérin, J.-L.; Quéré, P.; Volmer, R.

    2012-01-01

    A deletion of ∼20 amino acids in the stalk of neuraminidase is frequently observed upon transmission of influenza A viruses from waterfowl to domestic poultry. A pair of recombinant H7N1 viruses bearing either a short- or long-stalk neuraminidase was genetically engineered. Inoculation of the long-stalk-neuraminidase virus resulted in a higher cloacal excretion in ducks and led conversely to lower-level oropharyngeal excretion in chickens, associated with a higher-level local immune response and better survival. Therefore, a short-stalk neuraminidase is a determinant of viral adaptation and virulence in chickens but is detrimental to virus replication and shedding in ducks. PMID:22013034

  14. Experimental infection of highly and low pathogenic avian influenza viruses to chickens, ducks, tree sparrows, jungle crows, and black rats for the evaluation of their roles in virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Hiono, Takahiro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ogasawara, Kohei; Endo, Mayumi; Kuribayashi, Saya; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Motohashi, Yurie; Chu, Duc-Huy; Suzuki, Mizuho; Ichikawa, Takaya; Nishi, Tatsuya; Abe, Yuri; Matsuno, Keita; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Tanigawa, Tsutomu; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) have spread in both poultry and wild birds. Determining transmission routes of these viruses during an outbreak is essential for the control of avian influenza. It has been widely postulated that migratory ducks play crucial roles in the widespread dissemination of HPAIVs in poultry by carrying viruses along with their migrations; however close contacts between wild migratory ducks and poultry are less likely in modern industrial poultry farming settings. Therefore, we conducted experimental infections of HPAIVs and low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) to chickens, domestic ducks, tree sparrows, jungle crows, and black rats to evaluate their roles in virus transmission. The results showed that chickens, ducks, sparrows, and crows were highly susceptible to HPAIV infection. Significant titers of virus were recovered from the sparrows and crows infected with HPAIVs, which suggests that they potentially play roles of transmission of HPAIVs to poultry. In contrast, the growth of LPAIVs was limited in each of the animals tested compared with that of HPAIVs. The present results indicate that these common synanthropes play some roles in influenza virus transmission from wild birds to poultry.

  15. Experimental infection of highly and low pathogenic avian influenza viruses to chickens, ducks, tree sparrows, jungle crows, and black rats for the evaluation of their roles in virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Hiono, Takahiro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ogasawara, Kohei; Endo, Mayumi; Kuribayashi, Saya; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Motohashi, Yurie; Chu, Duc-Huy; Suzuki, Mizuho; Ichikawa, Takaya; Nishi, Tatsuya; Abe, Yuri; Matsuno, Keita; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Tanigawa, Tsutomu; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-15

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) have spread in both poultry and wild birds. Determining transmission routes of these viruses during an outbreak is essential for the control of avian influenza. It has been widely postulated that migratory ducks play crucial roles in the widespread dissemination of HPAIVs in poultry by carrying viruses along with their migrations; however close contacts between wild migratory ducks and poultry are less likely in modern industrial poultry farming settings. Therefore, we conducted experimental infections of HPAIVs and low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) to chickens, domestic ducks, tree sparrows, jungle crows, and black rats to evaluate their roles in virus transmission. The results showed that chickens, ducks, sparrows, and crows were highly susceptible to HPAIV infection. Significant titers of virus were recovered from the sparrows and crows infected with HPAIVs, which suggests that they potentially play roles of transmission of HPAIVs to poultry. In contrast, the growth of LPAIVs was limited in each of the animals tested compared with that of HPAIVs. The present results indicate that these common synanthropes play some roles in influenza virus transmission from wild birds to poultry. PMID:26711036

  16. Increasing Contact with Hepatitis E Virus in Red Deer, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Maribel; Martín, Marga; Vicente, Joaquín; Segalés, Joaquim; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian

    2010-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in red deer in mainland Spain, we tested red deer for HEV RNA and antibodies. Overall, 10.4% and 13.6% of serum samples were positive by ELISA and reverse transcription–PCR, respectively. The increasing prevalence suggests a potential risk for humans. PMID:21122241

  17. Wildlife Reservoir for Hepatitis E Virus, Southwestern France

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sebastien; Top, Sokunthea; Bertagnoli, Stephane; Dubois, Martine; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Pigs are a reservoir for hepatitis E virus (HEV). To determine the relative contribution of game to the risk for human HEV infection in southwestern France, we tested wildlife samples. HEV RNA was in 3.3% of wildlife livers, indicating that in this region, eating game meat is as risky as eating pork. PMID:26079541

  18. Persistent cryoglobulinemic vasculitis following successful treatment of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Levine, James W; Gota, Carmen; Fessler, Barri J; Calabrese, Leonard H; Cooper, Sheldon M

    2005-06-01

    There is a well established link between type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and HCV is believed to be the cause of cryoprotein formation and tissue deposition. Successful treatment of HCV infection has resulted in resolution of cryoglobulinemia and vasculitis. We describe 4 patients who had persistent MC and vasculitis despite successful eradication of HCV with antiviral therapy.

  19. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Humans and Swine, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Annalisa; Gonzales, José Luis; Bonelli, Sara Irene; Valda, Ybar; Pieri, Angela; Segundo, Higinio; Ibañez, Ramón; Mantella, Antonia; Bartalesi, Filippo; Tolari, Francesco; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We determined the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in persons in 2 rural communities in southeastern Bolivia and the presence of HEV in human and swine fecal samples. HEV seroprevalence was 6.3%, and HEV genotype 3 strains with high sequence homology were detected. PMID:21801630

  20. Absence of Active Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Clinics in Zambia and Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Wandeler, Gilles; Mulenga, Lloyd; Hobbins, Michael; Joao, Candido; Sinkala, Edford; Hector, Jonas; Aly, Musa; Chi, Benjamin H.; Egger, Matthias; Vinikoor, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the prevalence of replicating hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Among 1812 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus, no patient in rural Mozambique and 4 patients in urban Zambia were positive for anti-HCV antibodies. Of these, none had confirmed HCV replication. PMID:27047986

  1. Hepatitis E virus as an emerging zoonotic pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Ahn, Hee-Seop; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Yoo, Han-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E outbreaks are a serious public health concern in developing countries. The disease causes acute infections, primarily in young adults. The mortality rate is approximately 2%; however, it can exceed 20% in pregnant women in some regions in India. The causative agent, hepatitis E virus (HEV), has been isolated from several animal species, including pigs. HEV genotypes 3 and 4 have been isolated from both humans and animals, and are recognized as zoonotic pathogens. Seroprevalence studies in animals and humans indirectly suggest that HEV infections occur worldwide. The virus is primarily transmitted to humans via undercooked animal meats in developed countries. Moreover, transfusion- and transplantation-mediated HEV infections have recently been reported. This review summarizes the general characteristics of hepatitis E, HEV infection status in animals and humans, the zoonotic transmission modes of HEV, and HEV vaccine development status. PMID:27051334

  2. [Amniocentesis and viral risk (hepatitis B, C virus and HIV)].

    PubMed

    Ducarme, G; Ceccaldi, P-F; Bernuau, J; Luton, D

    2009-10-01

    Very few studies have properly addressed to the risk of fetal hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection through amniocentesis. For HBV, this risk is low. However, knowledge of the maternal hepatitis B e antigen status is valuable in the counselling of risks associated with amniocentesis. For HCV, the risk is not well known but cannot be excluded. For HIV, it seems rational to propose a viral test before amniocentesis for patients with contamination's risk and to postpone the sampling in cases with positive results in order to obtain an undetectable HIV-1 RNA viral load. For these reasons, it can be useful to analyse for each virus the benefit of amniocentesis and the risk of mother-to-infant transmission, and to inform the patient. PMID:19679409

  3. Pathobiology and Treatment of Hepatitis Virus-Related Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Stasi, Roberto; Chia, Lian Wea; Kalkur, Pallavi; Lowe, Robert; Shannon, Muriel S.

    2009-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a well recognized complication of infections, including those from hepatotropic viruses. Thrombocytopenia may actually be the only manifestation of vital hepatitis, which should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). The mechanisms of thrombocytopenia associated with viral hepatitis vary widely depending on the specific infectious agent and the severity of liver disease. Most of the studies have described thrombocytopenia in association with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, the most common cause of chronic infection worldwide. Studies have shown that treatment of HCV infection often results in substantial improvement or complete recovery of the thrombocytopenia. In patients with thrombocytopenia associated with HCV-related chronic liver disease, the use of eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin receptor agonist, normalizes platelet levels thereby permitting the initiation of antiviral therapy. PMID:21415958

  4. Replicative and transcriptional activities of hepatitis B virus in patients coinfected with hepatitis B and hepatitis delta viruses.

    PubMed

    Pollicino, Teresa; Raffa, Giuseppina; Santantonio, Teresa; Gaeta, Giovanni Battista; Iannello, Giuliano; Alibrandi, Angela; Squadrito, Giovanni; Cacciola, Irene; Calvi, Chiara; Colucci, Giuseppe; Levrero, Massimo; Raimondo, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis delta virus (HDV) interplay was investigated by examining liver and serum samples from 21 coinfected and 22 HBV-monoinfected patients with chronic liver disease. Different real-time PCR assays were applied to evaluate intrahepatic amounts of HBV DNA, covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), pregenomic RNA (pgRNA), pre-S/S RNAs, and HDV RNA. Besides HBV DNA and HDV RNA levels, HBsAg concentrations in the sera were also determined. HDV-coinfected cases showed significantly lower median levels of serum HBV DNA (-5 log), intrahepatic relaxed-circular DNA (-2 log), and cccDNA (-2 log) than those of HBV-monoinfected cases. Interestingly, pgRNA and pre-S/S RNA amounts were significantly lower (both -1 log) in HDV-positive patients, whereas serum HBsAg concentrations were comparable between the two patient groups. Pre-S/S RNA and HBsAg amounts per cccDNA molecule were higher in HDV-positive patients (3-fold and 1 log, respectively), showing that HBV replication was reduced, whereas synthesis of envelope proteins was not specifically decreased. The ratios of cccDNA to intracellular total HBV DNA showed a larger proportion of cccDNA molecules in HDV-positive cases. For these patients, both intrahepatic and serum HDV RNA amounts were associated with cccDNA but not with HBsAg or HBV DNA levels. Finally, HBV genomes with large deletions in the basal core promoter/precore region were detected in 5/21 HDV-positive patients but in no HDV-negative patients and were associated with lower viremia levels. These findings provide significant information about the interference exerted by HDV on HBV replication and transcription activities in the human liver.

  5. Detection of Pathogenic Viruses in Sewage Provided Early Warnings of Hepatitis A Virus and Norovirus Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Hellmér, Maria; Paxéus, Nicklas; Magnius, Lars; Enache, Lucica; Arnholm, Birgitta; Johansson, Annette; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Most persons infected with enterically transmitted viruses shed large amounts of virus in feces for days or weeks, both before and after onset of symptoms. Therefore, viruses causing gastroenteritis may be detected in wastewater, even if only a few persons are infected. In this study, the presence of eight pathogenic viruses (norovirus, astrovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, Aichi virus, parechovirus, hepatitis A virus [HAV], and hepatitis E virus) was investigated in sewage to explore whether their identification could be used as an early warning of outbreaks. Samples of the untreated sewage were collected in proportion to flow at Ryaverket, Gothenburg, Sweden. Daily samples collected during every second week between January and May 2013 were pooled and analyzed for detection of viruses by concentration through adsorption to milk proteins and PCR. The largest amount of noroviruses was detected in sewage 2 to 3 weeks before most patients were diagnosed with this infection in Gothenburg. The other viruses were detected at lower levels. HAV was detected between weeks 5 and 13, and partial sequencing of the structural VP1protein identified three different strains. Two strains were involved in an ongoing outbreak in Scandinavia and were also identified in samples from patients with acute hepatitis A in Gothenburg during spring of 2013. The third strain was unique and was not detected in any patient sample. The method used may thus be a tool to detect incipient outbreaks of these viruses and provide early warning before the causative pathogens have been recognized in health care. PMID:25172863

  6. Detection of pathogenic viruses in sewage provided early warnings of hepatitis A virus and norovirus outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Hellmér, Maria; Paxéus, Nicklas; Magnius, Lars; Enache, Lucica; Arnholm, Birgitta; Johansson, Annette; Bergström, Tomas; Norder, Heléne

    2014-11-01

    Most persons infected with enterically transmitted viruses shed large amounts of virus in feces for days or weeks, both before and after onset of symptoms. Therefore, viruses causing gastroenteritis may be detected in wastewater, even if only a few persons are infected. In this study, the presence of eight pathogenic viruses (norovirus, astrovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, Aichi virus, parechovirus, hepatitis A virus [HAV], and hepatitis E virus) was investigated in sewage to explore whether their identification could be used as an early warning of outbreaks. Samples of the untreated sewage were collected in proportion to flow at Ryaverket, Gothenburg, Sweden. Daily samples collected during every second week between January and May 2013 were pooled and analyzed for detection of viruses by concentration through adsorption to milk proteins and PCR. The largest amount of noroviruses was detected in sewage 2 to 3 weeks before most patients were diagnosed with this infection in Gothenburg. The other viruses were detected at lower levels. HAV was detected between weeks 5 and 13, and partial sequencing of the structural VP1protein identified three different strains. Two strains were involved in an ongoing outbreak in Scandinavia and were also identified in samples from patients with acute hepatitis A in Gothenburg during spring of 2013. The third strain was unique and was not detected in any patient sample. The method used may thus be a tool to detect incipient outbreaks of these viruses and provide early warning before the causative pathogens have been recognized in health care.

  7. Does Tyrosyl DNA Phosphodiesterase-2 Play a Role in Hepatitis B Virus Genome Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Boregowda, Rajeev; Sohn, Ji A.; Ledesma, Felipe Cortes; Caldecott, Keith W.; Seeger, Christoph; Hu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication and persistence are sustained by a nuclear episome, the covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA, which serves as the transcriptional template for all viral RNAs. CCC DNA is converted from a relaxed circular (RC) DNA in the virion early during infection as well as from RC DNA in intracellular progeny nucleocapsids via an intracellular amplification pathway. Current antiviral therapies suppress viral replication but cannot eliminate CCC DNA. Thus, persistence of CCC DNA remains an obstacle toward curing chronic HBV infection. Unfortunately, very little is known about how CCC DNA is formed. CCC DNA formation requires removal of the virally encoded reverse transcriptase (RT) protein from the 5’ end of the minus strand of RC DNA. Tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase-2 (Tdp2) was recently identified as the enzyme responsible for cleavage of tyrosyl-5’ DNA linkages formed between topoisomerase II and cellular DNA. Because the RT-DNA linkage is also a 5’ DNA-phosphotyrosyl bond, it has been hypothesized that Tdp2 might be one of several elusive host factors required for CCC DNA formation. Therefore, we examined the role of Tdp2 in RC DNA deproteination and CCC DNA formation. We demonstrated Tdp2 can cleave the tyrosyl-minus strand DNA linkage using authentic HBV RC DNA isolated from nucleocapsids and using RT covalently linked to short minus strand DNA produced in vitro. On the other hand, our results showed that Tdp2 gene knockout did not block CCC DNA formation during HBV infection of permissive human hepatoma cells and did not prevent intracellular amplification of duck hepatitis B virus CCC DNA. These results indicate that although Tdp2 can remove the RT covalently linked to the 5’ end of the HBV minus strand DNA in vitro, this protein might not be required for CCC DNA formation in vivo. PMID:26079492

  8. Isolation and molecular characterization of reassortant H11N3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in Zhejiang Province in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Peng, Xiuming; Peng, Xiaorong; Wu, Nanping

    2016-10-01

    In July 2013, six H11N3 subtype avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from domestic ducks in Zhejiang Province in Eastern China. These strains were characterized by whole genome sequencing with subsequent phylogenetic analysis and genetic comparison. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that these strains clustered in the AIV Eurasian lineage, and these strains received their genes from H11, H7, and H1 AIVs in Eastern China. These strains were found to be minimally pathogenic in mice, and were able to replicate in mice without prior adaptation. Continued surveillance is needed considering the important role of domestic ducks in AIV reassortment.

  9. Genomic Diversity of Hepatitis B Virus Infection Associated With Fulminant Hepatitis B Development

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Thomas; Amini-Bavil-Olyaee, Samad; Tacke, Frank; Maes, Piet; Van Ranst, Marc; Pourkarim, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-01-01

    Context: After five decades of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) vaccine discovery, HBV is still a major public health problem. Due to the high genetic diversity of HBV and selective pressure of the host immune system, intra-host evolution of this virus in different clinical manifestations is a hot topic of research. HBV infection causes a range of clinical manifestations from acute to chronic infection, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Among all forms of HBV infection manifestations, fulminant hepatitis B infection possesses the highest fatality rate. Almost 1% of the acutely infected patients develop fulminant hepatitis B, in which the mortality rate is around 70%. Evidence Acquisition: All published papers deposited in Genbank, on the topic of fulminant hepatitis were reviewed and their virological aspects were investigated. In this review, we highlight the genomic diversity of HBV reported from patients with fulminant HBV infection. Results: The most commonly detected diversities affect regulatory motifs of HBV in the core and S region, indicating that these alterations may convert the virus to an aggressive strain. Moreover, mutations at T-cell and B-cell epitopes located in pre-S1 and pre-S2 proteins may lead to an immune evasion of the virus, likely favoring a more severe clinical course of infection. Furthermore, point and frame shift mutations in the core region increase the viral replication of HBV and help virus to evade from immune system and guarantee its persistence. Conclusions: Fulminant hepatitis B is associated with distinct mutational patterns of HBV, underlining that genomic diversity of the virus is an important factor determining its pathogenicity. PMID:26288637

  10. Molecular mechanism of hepatitis B virus-induced hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tarocchi, Mirko; Polvani, Simone; Marroncini, Giada; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global public health problem with approximately 2 billion people that have been exposed to the virus. HBV is a member of a family of small, enveloped DNA viruses called hepadnaviruses, and has a preferential tropism for hepatocytes of mammals and birds. Epidemiological studies have proved a strong correlation between chronic hepatitis B virus infection and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC is the fifth most common malignancy with about 700000 new cases each year, and more than 50% of them arise in HBV carriers. A large number of studies describe the way in which HBV can contribute to HCC development. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed, including the accumulation of genetic damage due to immune-mediated hepatic inflammation and the induction of oxidative stress. There is evidence of the direct effects of the viral proteins HBx and HBs on the cell biology. Integration of HBV-DNA into the human genome is considered an early event in the carcinogenic process and can induce, through insertional mutagenesis, the alteration of gene expression and chromosomal instability. HBV has also epigenetic effects through the modification of the genomic methylation status. Furthermore, the virus plays an important role in the regulation of microRNA expression. This review will summarize the many mechanisms involved in HBV-related liver carcinogenesis. PMID:25206269

  11. Impact of cellular autophagy on viruses: Insights from hepatitis B virus and human retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a protein degradative process important for normal cellular metabolism. It is apparently used also by cells to eliminate invading pathogens. Interestingly, many pathogens have learned to subvert the cell’s autophagic process. Here, we review the interactions between viruses and cells in regards to cellular autophagy. Using findings from hepatitis B virus and human retroviruses, HIV-1 and HTLV-1, we discuss mechanisms used by viruses to usurp cellular autophagy in ways that benefit viral replication. PMID:23110561

  12. Chemical disinfection of hepatitis A virus on environmental surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Mbithi, J N; Springthorpe, V S; Sattar, S A

    1990-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus disinfection was assessed on contaminated stainless-steel disks. Ten microliters of fecally suspended hepatitis A virus was deposited on the center of each disk, dried for 20 min, and then covered with 20 microliters of the test product for 1 min. Of the 20 formulations tested, only 2% glutaraldehyde, a quaternary ammonium formulation containing 23% HCl (toilet bowl cleaner), and sodium hypochlorite (greater than 5,000 ppm [greater than 5,000 micrograms/ml] of free chlorine) reduced the virus titer by greater than 99.9%; phenolics, iodine-based products, alcohols, and solutions of acetic, peracetic, citric, and phosphoric acids were unable to do so. PMID:2176450

  13. Hepatitis E virus infection: Epidemiology and treatment implications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ga Young; Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Intharasongkroh, Duangnapa; Sa-nguanmoo, Pattaratida; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Chirathaworn, Chintana; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is now established as an emerging enteric viral hepatitis. Standard treatments in acute and chronic hepatitis E remain to be established. This study undertakes a review of the epidemiology, treatment implication and vaccine prevention from published literature. HEV infection is a worldwide public health problem and can cause acute and chronic hepatitis E. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 are primarily found in developing countries due to waterborne transmission, while the zoonotic potential of genotypes 3 and 4 affects mostly industrialized countries. An awareness of HEV transmission through blood donation, especially in the immunocompromised and solid organ transplant patients, merits an effective anti-viral therapy. There are currently no clear indications for the treatment of acute hepatitis E. Despite concerns for side effects, ribavirin monotherapy or in combination with pegylated interferon alpha for at least 3 mo appeared to show significant efficacy in the treatment of chronic hepatitis E. However, there are no available treatment options for specific patient population groups, such as women who are pregnant. Vaccination and screening of HEV in blood donors are currently a global priority in managing infection. New strategies for the treatment and control of hepatitis E are required for both acute and chronic infections, such as prophylactic use of medications, controlling large outbreaks, and finding acceptable antiviral therapy for pregnant women and other patient groups for whom the current options of treatment are not viable. PMID:26568916

  14. Hepatitis C virus: molecular biology & current therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suresh D

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a small (approximately 55 to 65 nm), spherical, enveloped, hepatotropic RNA virus that causes acute and chronic hepatitis in humans. Persistent virus infection with HCV often leads to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). At present there is neither a selective antiviral therapy nor a preventive vaccine. The only available treatment option is a long-acting pegylated-interferon-alpha, given in combination with nucleoside analog ribavirin, which is not very effective. Molecular studies of HCV began with the successful cloning of its genome in 1989. For many years, research to develop therapeutics was stalled by the inability to grow virus in tissue culture. A major milestone was achieved with the recent development of a robust cell culture system for HCV propagation. HCV proteins assemble and form replication complexes on modified host membranes, called as membranous webs. Even though HCV is detected and targeted by host immune mechanisms, it establishes and maintains a life-long persistent infection. HCV has evolved multiple strategies to survive and persist in hostile cellular environments; and the viral population is known to rapidly change during the course of a natural infection thereby escaping immune surveillance. Rapid mutations also help virus to survive by selecting for the variants which are resistant to antiviral drugs. Although precise mechanisms regulating HCV entry into hepatic cells via receptors remain unknown, HCV also has the capability of direct cell-to-cell transmission. The extremely complex and incompletely understood nature of the HCV lifecycle has complicated the discovery of new therapies. A complete understanding of the functional roles played by the HCV proteins during HCV lifecycle is vital for developing a successful cure. This review deals with current status of efforts in addressing these daunting tasks and challenges in developing therapeutics against chronic and rapidly changing hepatitis C virus

  15. Hepatitis C virus: Promising discoveries and new treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Padilla, Marina Aiello; Caserta, Leonardo Cardia; Miotto, Noelle; Vigani, Aline Gonzalez; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in therapy, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains an important global health issue. It is estimated that a significant part of the world population is chronically infected with the virus, and many of those affected may develop cirrhosis or liver cancer. The virus shows considerable variability, a characteristic that directly interferes with disease treatment. The response to treatment varies according to HCV genotype and subtype. The continuous generation of variants (quasispecies) allows the virus to escape control by antivirals. Historically, the combination of ribavirin and interferon therapy has represented the only treatment option for the disease. Currently, several new treatment options are emerging and are available to a large part of the affected population. In addition, the search for new substances with antiviral activity against HCV continues, promising future improvements in treatment. Researchers should consider the mutation capacity of the virus and the other variables that affect treatment success. PMID:27605875

  16. Hepatitis C virus: Promising discoveries and new treatments.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Padilla, Marina Aiello; Caserta, Leonardo Cardia; Miotto, Noelle; Vigani, Aline Gonzalez; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2016-07-28

    Despite advances in therapy, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains an important global health issue. It is estimated that a significant part of the world population is chronically infected with the virus, and many of those affected may develop cirrhosis or liver cancer. The virus shows considerable variability, a characteristic that directly interferes with disease treatment. The response to treatment varies according to HCV genotype and subtype. The continuous generation of variants (quasispecies) allows the virus to escape control by antivirals. Historically, the combination of ribavirin and interferon therapy has represented the only treatment option for the disease. Currently, several new treatment options are emerging and are available to a large part of the affected population. In addition, the search for new substances with antiviral activity against HCV continues, promising future improvements in treatment. Researchers should consider the mutation capacity of the virus and the other variables that affect treatment success.

  17. Hepatitis C virus: Promising discoveries and new treatments.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Padilla, Marina Aiello; Caserta, Leonardo Cardia; Miotto, Noelle; Vigani, Aline Gonzalez; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2016-07-28

    Despite advances in therapy, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains an important global health issue. It is estimated that a significant part of the world population is chronically infected with the virus, and many of those affected may develop cirrhosis or liver cancer. The virus shows considerable variability, a characteristic that directly interferes with disease treatment. The response to treatment varies according to HCV genotype and subtype. The continuous generation of variants (quasispecies) allows the virus to escape control by antivirals. Historically, the combination of ribavirin and interferon therapy has represented the only treatment option for the disease. Currently, several new treatment options are emerging and are available to a large part of the affected population. In addition, the search for new substances with antiviral activity against HCV continues, promising future improvements in treatment. Researchers should consider the mutation capacity of the virus and the other variables that affect treatment success. PMID:27605875

  18. Hepatitis C virus: Promising discoveries and new treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Padilla, Marina Aiello; Caserta, Leonardo Cardia; Miotto, Noelle; Vigani, Aline Gonzalez; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in therapy, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains an important global health issue. It is estimated that a significant part of the world population is chronically infected with the virus, and many of those affected may develop cirrhosis or liver cancer. The virus shows considerable variability, a characteristic that directly interferes with disease treatment. The response to treatment varies according to HCV genotype and subtype. The continuous generation of variants (quasispecies) allows the virus to escape control by antivirals. Historically, the combination of ribavirin and interferon therapy has represented the only treatment option for the disease. Currently, several new treatment options are emerging and are available to a large part of the affected population. In addition, the search for new substances with antiviral activity against HCV continues, promising future improvements in treatment. Researchers should consider the mutation capacity of the virus and the other variables that affect treatment success.

  19. [Prokaryotic expression of vp3 gene of Muscovy duck parvovirus, and its antiserum preparation for detection of virus multiplication].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Zhu, Yumin; Dong, Shijuan; Yu, Ruisong; Zhang, Yuanshu; Li, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    New epidemic broke out in recent year which was suspected to be caused by variant Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV). For this reason, new MDPV detection methods are needed for the new virus strains. In this study, a pair of primers were designed according to the full-length genome of MDPV strain SAAS-SHNH, which were identified in 2012, and were used to amplify the vp3 gene of MDPV by polymerase chain reaction. After being sequenced, the vp3 gene was subcloned into the prokaryotic expression vector PET28a. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21 and induced with IPTG. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis showed the MDPV vp3 gene was successfully expressed. After being purified by Ni2+ affinity chromatography system, the recombinant protein was used as antigen to immunize rabbits to obtain antiserum. Western blotting analysis showed that the acquired antiserum could react specifically with VP3 protein of J3D6 strain and MDPV vaccine strain. The antiserum could also be used for detection of cultured MDPV from primary duck embryo fibroblasts by immune fluorescence assay (IFA). It could be concluded that the VP3 protein and its antibody prepared in the research could be used for detection of VP3 antiserum and antigen respectively.

  20. An experimental model to analyse the risk of introduction of a duck-originated H5 low-pathogenic avian influenza virus in poultry through close contact and contaminative transmission.

    PubMed

    Claes, G; Marché, S; Dewulf, J; Van Den Berg, T; Lambrecht, B

    2014-09-01

    Aquatic wild birds are often carriers of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs). If H5 and H7 LPAIVs are transmitted to poultry and have the opportunity to circulate, a highly pathogenic AIV may arise. Contact with aquatic wild birds is one of the most important ways in which these LPAIVs can be introduced into poultry flocks. In this study, the transmissibility of a duck-originated H5 LPAIV between ducks and chickens was analysed in a series of animal experiments, using different transmission routes. Results indicate that the outcome of virus intake by chickens exposed to infectious ducks depends on the way the virus is presented. Faecally contaminated drinking water proved to be the most efficient route by which the virus can be transmitted to chickens. The results from this study also suggest that some duck-originated H5 LPAIVs may be introduced to poultry but do not have the potential to become established in poultry populations.

  1. New models of hepatitis E virus replication in human and porcine hepatocyte cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute, enterically-transmitted hepatitis. It is associated with large epidemics in tropical and subtropical regions where it is endemic or with sporadic cases in non-endemic regions. Unlike other hepatitis viruses, HEV has several animal reservoirs. Phylogenetic studie...

  2. A novel linear neutralizing epitope of hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zi-Min; Tang, Ming; Zhao, Min; Wen, Gui-Ping; Yang, Fan; Cai, Wei; Wang, Si-Ling; Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2015-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a serious public health problem that causes acute hepatitis in humans and is primarily transmitted through fecal and oral routes. The major anti-HEV antibody responses are against conformational epitopes located in a.a. 459-606 of HEV pORF2. All reported neutralization epitopes are present on the dimer domain constructed by this peptide. While looking for a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb)-recognized linear epitope, we found a novel neutralizing linear epitope (L2) located in a.a. 423-437 of pORF2. Moreover, epitope L2 is proved non-immunodominant in the HEV-infection process. Using the hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) as a carrier to display this novel linear epitope, we show herein that this epitope could induce a neutralizing antibody response against HEV in mice and could protect rhesus monkeys from HEV infection. Collectively, our results showed a novel non-immunodominant linear neutralizing epitope of hepatitis E virus, which provided additional insight of HEV vaccine. PMID:26051517

  3. Genetic relatedness of H6 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds and domestic ducks in Korea and their pathogenicity in animals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oem, Jae-Ku; Kim, Seong-Hee; Lee, Mun-Han; Lee, O-Soo; Park, Choi-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    We report the genetic characterization of H6 avian influenza (AI) viruses isolated from domestic ducks and wild birds in Korea between April 2008 and April 2009. A phylogenetic analysis showed that the H6N1 viruses of wild birds and domestic ducks were of the same genotype (K-1) and were similar to the H6N1 virus isolated from a live poultry market in 2003, as six of the eight gene segments of those viruses had a common source. However, the H6N2 viruses of domestic poultry were separated into four genotypes (K-2a, K-2b, K-2c and K-2d) by at least a triple reassortment between influenza viruses of low pathogenicity from Korean poultry (H9N2 and H3N2) and viruses from aquatic birds. In an experimental infection of animals, certain H6 AI viruses replicated well in chickens and mice without pre-adaptation, indicating that H6 virus pathogenicity has the potential to be altered due to multiple reassortments, and that these reassortments could result in interspecies transmission to mammals.

  4. Hepatitis C Virus Treatment: Is It Possible To Cure All Hepatitis C Virus Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Andrew J.; Naggie, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapeutics have brought combinations of direct acting antiviral medications that offer interferon-free, well-tolerated regimens with sustained virologic response rates greater than 90% in clinical trials for many patient groups. The successes have prompted discussions regarding cure for all patients. These regimens have already demonstrated the ability to cure previously challenging patient groups, including human immunodeficiency virus–HCV coinfection, decompensated cirrhosis, and post-liver transplantation. Limitations exist in the current portfolio of agents, with suboptimal outcomes for genotype 3 and limited data in genotypes 5 and 6. More data are urgently needed in patients with chronic kidney disease and in children. With ongoing developments, highly effective regimens for all these patient groups are within reach. To deliver HCV treatment throughout the world and particularly in low-and middle-income countries, regimens need to be affordable but also pan-genotypic, well-tolerated, and delivered once daily for 4–8 weeks. With such a regimen, cure for all patients would then hinge on the ability to identify patients with HCV infection and deliver treatment within their communities. This review will discuss the strategies that will be necessary to realize this opportunity to cure all persons with HCV infection. PMID:26192145

  5. Hepatitis E virus: An ancient hidden enemy in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Fierro, Nora A; Realpe, Mauricio; Meraz-Medina, Tzintli; Roman, Sonia; Panduro, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a common cause of acute clinical hepatitis worldwide. HEV is an RNA-containing virus and the only member of the genus Hepevirus in the family Hepeviridae. Human HEV is classified into four genotypes widely distributed across the world. The virus is mainly transmitted via the fecal-oral route, and water-borne epidemics have become characteristic of hepatitis E in developing countries, including those in Latin America. The zoonotic potential of HEV is broadly recognized. Thus, there is an urgent need to re-evaluate virus transmission scenarios and to enforce epidemiological surveillance systems. Additionally, it is known that HEV infections, initially defined as self-limiting, can also take chronic courses in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, we recently reported a high seroprevalence of HEV in samples from cirrhotic patients with no other etiological agents present, suggesting the potential role of HEV in the development of chronic liver illness. In this review, HEV genomic variability, transmission, chronic infectious course, zoonotic potential and treatment are discussed. Focus is placed on the impact of HEV infection in Latin America, to support the development of specific control strategies and the handling of this important and typically imperceptible viral infection. PMID:26900289

  6. [IMMUNOPATHOGENESIS OF OCCULT INFECTION CAUSED BY HEPATITIS B VIRUS].

    PubMed

    Semenenko, T A; Suslov, A P

    2015-01-01

    The concept of occult infection caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) is determined as the presence of HBV DNA in blood sera or liver with the absence of detectable HBsAg. The actuality of this problem is associated with the fact, that occult hepatitis B (OHB) can be transmitted during hemotransfusions, cause reactivation of chronic hepatitis B in immune compromised individuals, facilitate development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Several different hypotheses of OHB immunopathogenesis have been proposed, including a low number of copies of HBV DNA, altered immune response of the macroorganism, genetic variability of the S gene, integration of viral DNA into host genome, infection of mononuclear cells of peripheral blood, presence of immune complexes that hide HBsAg, and interference by other viruses such as HCV and HIV. Molecular mechanisms of HBV virus in HBsAg-negative individuals are not fully understood, however, viral mutations seem a very significant factor. Approaches of OHB prophylaxis including use of a polyvalent vaccine, that allows vaccination against wild and mutant HBV viruses, are examined. PMID:26950999

  7. Prolonged excretion of a low-pathogenicity H5N2 avian influenza virus strain in the Pekin duck

    PubMed Central

    Carranza-Flores, José Manuel; Padilla-Noriega, Luis; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    H5N2 strains of low-pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) have been circulating for at least 17 years in some Mexican chicken farms. We measured the rate and duration of viral excretion from Pekin ducks that were experimentally inoculated with an H5N2 LPAIV that causes death in embryonated chicken eggs (A/chicken/Mexico/2007). Leghorn chickens were used as susceptible host controls. The degree of viral excretion was evaluated with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) using samples from oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs. We observed prolonged excretion from both species of birds lasting for at least 21 days. Prolonged excretion of LPAIV A/chicken/Mexico/2007 is atypical. PMID:23820212

  8. Effect of swine hepatitis E virus on the livers of experimentally infected Mongolian gerbils by swine hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifei; Shi, Ruihan; She, Ruiping; Soomro, Majid Hussain; Mao, Jingjing; Du, Fang; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Can

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that hepatitis E virus (HEV) can be transmitted between rats, pigs, cattle, rabbits, chicken, cats, and deer. Because wild and domestic rodents have anti-HEV antibodies, they are considered potential reservoirs of HEV. In the current study, Mongolian gerbils were experimentally infected with swine hepatitis E virus and the effects of this infection were investigated. After inoculation with HEV, the liver-to-body weight ratio increased at 7 dpi. Mongolian gerbils demonstrated significant increase (p<0.05) in Aspartate Transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and total bilirubin (T-BIL) concentrations in the sera, and HEV IgG was detected at 21 days post-inoculation (dpi). Real-time PCR revealed that the copies of HEV RNA in the liver were detected at 7 dpi, and peaked at 28 dpi at a concentration of 7.73 logs g(-1). Using both light and electron microscopy, hepatic lesions were observed in the HEV inoculated animals. In the experimental group, characteristic viral hepatitis lesions were prominent in the liver. HEV antigen was detected in the liver by immunohistochemistry, and HEV ORF3 antigen was detectable in liver by Western blot. These results clearly demonstrate that viral load of HEV in livers was dynamic, and ultrastructural hepatic injury in HEV infected Mongolian gerbils and anti-HEV IgG positive seroconversion were observed during infection. PMID:26093307

  9. Genetic Analysis of Avian Influenza Viruses: Cocirculation of Avian Influenza Viruses with Allele A and B Nonstructural Gene in Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) Ducks Wintering in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Jahangir, Alam; Ruenphet, Sakchai; Sultana, Nadia; Shoham, Dany; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    The pandemic influenza virus strains of 1918 (H1N1), 1957 (H2N2), 1968 (H3N2), and 2009 (H1N1) have genes related to avian influenza viruses (AIVs). The nonstructural (NS) gene of AIVs plays a significant role in host-viral interaction. However, little is known about the degree of diversity of this gene in Northern pintail (Anas acuta) ducks wintering in Japan. This study describes characteristics of pintail-originated H1N1, H1N2, H1N3, H5N2, H5N3, H5N9, and H7N7 viruses. Most of the viruses were revealed to be avian strains and not related to pandemic and seasonal flu strains. Nevertheless, the NP genes of 62.5% (5/8) viruses were found closely related to a A/swine/Korea/C12/08, indicating exchange of genetic material and ongoing mammalian-linked evolution of AIVs. Besides, all the viruses, except Aomori/422/07 H1N1, contain PSIQSR∗GLF motif usually found in avian, porcine, and human H1 strains. The Aomori/422/07 H1N1 has a PSVQSR∗GLF motif identical to a North American strain. This findings linked to an important intercontinental, Asian-American biogeographical interface. Phylogenetically all the viruses were clustered in Eurasian lineage. Cocirculation of allele A and B (NS gene) viruses was evident in the study implying the existence of a wide reservoir of influenza A viruses in pintail wintering in Japan. PMID:23320157

  10. Hepatitis D Virus Coinfection and Superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    HDV is a defective RNA pathogen requiring the simultaneous presence of HBV to complete its life cycle. Two major specific patterns of infection have been described: the coinfection with HDV and HBV of a susceptible, anti-HBs-negative individual, or the HDV superinfection of a chronic HBV carrier. Coinfection mostly leads to the eradication of both agents, whereas the majority of patients with HDV superinfection evolve to chronic HDV infection and hepatitis. Chronic HDV infection worsens the preexisting HBV-related liver damage. HDV-associated chronic liver disease (chronic hepatitis D) is characterized by necroinflammation and the relentless deposition of collagen culminating, within a few decades, into the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25368018

  11. Extra-hepatic replication and infection of hepatitis E virus in neuronal-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Drave, S A; Debing, Y; Walter, S; Todt, D; Engelmann, M; Friesland, M; Wedemeyer, H; Neyts, J; Behrendt, P; Steinmann, E

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the causative agent of hepatitis E in humans and a member of the genus Orthohepevirus in the family Hepeviridae. Infection usually leads to acute hepatitis that can become fulminant, particularly among pregnant women and in patients with preexisting liver disease, or may evolve to a chronic state, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. HEV has been shown to produce a range of extra-hepatic manifestations including aplastic anaemia, acute thyroiditis, glomerulonephritis as well as neurological disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy and encephalitis. The pathogenesis of these neurological injuries remains largely unknown, and it is also uncertain whether or not HEV can directly infect neuronal cells. In this study, we investigated whether HEV is capable of completing the viral life cycle in human neuronal-derived cell lines such as neuroepithelioma (SK-N-MC), desmoplastic cerebellar medulloblastoma (DAOY), glioblastoma multiforme (DBTRG), glioblastoma astrocytoma (U-373 MG) and oligodendrocytic (M03.13) cells. Following transfection of these cells with HEV Gaussia luciferase reporter virus, all tested cell lines supported HEV RNA replication. Furthermore, extra- and intracellular viral capsid was detected by an HEV antigen ELISA as a marker for virus assembly and release. Permissiveness for HEV cell entry could be demonstrated for the oligodendrocytic cell line M03.13. In conclusion, these results indicate that HEV tropism is not restricted to the liver and HEV can potentially complete the full viral life cycle in neuronal-derived tissues explaining neurologic disorders during HEV infection. PMID:26891712

  12. Distribution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Azerbaijani Patients With Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Keyvani, Hossein; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Esghaei, Maryam; Fakhim, Shahin; Ataei Pirkooh, Angila; Behnava, Bita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been classified into ten genotypes (A-J) based on genome sequence divergence, which is very important for etiological and clinical investigations. HBV genotypes have distinct geographical distributions worldwide. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of HBV genotypes among Azerbaijani patients with chronic hepatitis B, came from the Republic of Azerbaijan country to Iran to receive medical care. Patients and Methods: One hundred and three patients with chronic HBV infection, referred to hospitals related to Iran University of Medical Sciences and Tehran Hepatitis Center from August 2011 to July 2014, were enrolled in this cross sectional study. About 3-milliliter of peripheral blood was taken from each patient. After viral DNA extraction, HBV genotypes were tested using the INNO-LiPA™ HBV kit (Innogenetics, Ghent, Belgium). HBV genotyping was confirmed using sequencing of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and polymerase (pol) regions of HBV. Results: The mean age of patients was 35.9 ± 11.7 years (19-66). Of 103 patients, 72 (69.9%) were male. In the present study, the predominant HBV genotype was D (93.2%) followed by genotype A (5.8%) and concurrent infection with A and D genotypes (0.97%). Conclusions: The main and frequent HBV genotype among Azerbaijani patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection was genotype D followed by genotype A. PMID:25685166

  13. Genetic recombination of the hepatitis C virus: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Morel, V; Fournier, C; François, C; Brochot, E; Helle, F; Duverlie, G; Castelain, S

    2011-02-01

    Genetic recombination is a well-known feature of RNA viruses that plays a significant role in their evolution. Although recombination is well documented for Flaviviridae family viruses, the first natural recombinant strain of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was identified as recently as 2002. Since then, a few other natural inter-genotypic, intra-genotypic and intra-subtype recombinant HCV strains have been described. However, the frequency of recombination may have been underestimated because not all known HCV recombinants are screened for in routine practice. Furthermore, the choice of treatment regimen and its predictive outcome remain problematic as the therapeutic strategy for HCV infection is genotype dependent. HCV recombination also raises many questions concerning its mechanisms and effects on the epidemiological and physiopathological features of the virus. This review provides an update on recombinant HCV strains, the process that gives rise to recombinants and clinical implications of recombination.

  14. Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Nonpregnant Adolescents and Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of hepatitis B screening: People who are at ... that slow down the virus). Potential Benefits and Harms of Hepatitis B Screening and Treatment The Task ...

  15. Molecular anatomy of mouse hepatitis virus persistence: coevolution of increased host cell resistance and virus virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Baric, R S

    1996-01-01

    Persistent infection of murine astrocytoma (DBT) cells with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) has been established. From this in vitro virus-host system, persistence is mediated at the level of cellular MHV receptor (MHVR) expression and increased virus virulence. MHV persistence selects for resistant host cell populations which abate virus replication. Reductions in MHVR expression were significantly associated with increased host resistance, and transfection of MHVR into resistant host cells completely restored the capacity of cells to support efficient replication of MHV strain A59. The emergence of resistant host cells coselected for variant viruses that had increased avidity for MHVR and also recognized different receptors for entry into resistant cells. These data illustrate that MHV persistence in vitro provides a model to identify critical sites of virus-host interaction at the cellular level which are altered during the evolution of host cell resistance to viral infection and the coevolution of virus virulence. PMID:8648732

  16. Lethal Mutagenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Induced by Favipiravir

    PubMed Central

    de Ávila, Ana I.; Gallego, Isabel; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rice, Charles M.; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral approach that consists in extinguishing a virus by an excess of mutations acquired during replication in the presence of a mutagen. Here we show that favipiravir (T-705) is a potent mutagenic agent for hepatitis C virus (HCV) during its replication in human hepatoma cells. T-705 leads to an excess of G → A and C → U transitions in the mutant spectrum of preextinction HCV populations. Infectivity decreased significantly in the presence of concentrations of T-705 which are 2- to 8-fold lower than its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50). Passaging the virus five times in the presence of 400 μM T-705 resulted in virus extinction. Since T-705 has undergone advanced clinical trials for approval for human use, the results open a new approach based on lethal mutagenesis to treat hepatitis C virus infections. If proven effective for HCV in vivo, this new anti-HCV agent may be useful in patient groups that fail current therapeutic regimens. PMID:27755573

  17. Border Control in Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Inhibiting Viral Entry.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Cameron J; Liang, T Jake

    2015-09-11

    A new era has begun in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with powerful yet expensive therapies. New treatments are emerging that target the entry step of HCV and could potentially block reinfection after liver transplant. These treatments include antibodies, which target the virus or host receptors required by HCV. Additionally, several new and previously approved small-molecule compounds have been described that target unique aspects of HCV entry. Overall, the blocking entry represents an attractive strategy that could yield powerful combination therapies to combat HCV. PMID:27617924

  18. Recent insights into hepatitis B virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Ozawa, Makoto; Kohara, Michinori; Elmdaghri, Naima; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) poses a threat to global public health mainly because of complications of HBV-related chronic liver disease. HBV exhibits a narrow host range, replicating primarily in hepatocytes by a still poorly understood mechanism. For the generation of progeny virions, HBV depends on interactions with specific host factors through its life cycle. Revealing and characterizing these interactions are keys to identifying novel antiviral targets, and to developing specific treatment strategies for HBV patients. In this review, recent insights into the HBV-host interactions, especially on virus entry, intracellular trafficking, genome transcription and replication, budding and release, and even cellular restriction factors were reviewed. PMID:24604126

  19. Hepatitis B virus infection and primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Feitelson, M

    1992-01-01

    For many years, epidemiological studies have demonstrated a strong link between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and the development of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC). Other hepatocarcinogens such as hepatitis C virus and aflatoxin also contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis either in conjunction with HBV infection or alone. Cellular and molecular biological studies are providing explanations for the HBV-PHC relationship, and models are now being formulated to further test the relative importance of various factors such as viral DNA integration, activation of oncogenes, genetic instability, loss of tumor suppressor genes, and trans-activating properties of HBV to the pathogenesis of PHC. Further research will probably define more than a single mechanism whereby chronic HBV infection results in PHC. PMID:1323384

  20. CD81 and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fénéant, Lucie; Levy, Shoshana; Cocquerel, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a global public health problem affecting over 160 million individuals worldwide. Its symptoms include chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is an enveloped RNA virus mainly targeting liver cells and for which the initiation of infection occurs through a complex multistep process involving a series of specific cellular entry factors. This process is likely mediated through the formation of a tightly orchestrated complex of HCV entry factors at the plasma membrane. Among HCV entry factors, the tetraspanin CD81 is one of the best characterized and it is undoubtedly a key player in the HCV lifecycle. In this review, we detail the current knowledge on the involvement of CD81 in the HCV lifecycle, as well as in the immune response to HCV infection. PMID:24509809

  1. Occupational hepatitis B virus infection in sewage workers.

    PubMed

    Arvanitidou, M; Constantinidis, T C; Doutsos, J; Mandraveli, K; Katsouyannopoulos, V

    1998-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study the employees of a Sewage Company were tested for hepatitis B virus (HBV) markers--HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc--to determine the prevalence of HBV infection and assess the risk of exposed sewage workers becoming infected, so as to evaluate the necessity for appropriate vaccination. The overall prevalence of HBV markers was 43.9% and 6.6% of the employees were HBsAg carriers. In the univariate analysis the prevalence of past and current infection was significantly associated with exposure to sewage (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001) and with educational level (p < 0.001). However, the logistic regression analysis confirmed that only exposure to sewage was independently associated with positivity for HBV infection (p < 0.001). Workers exposed to sewage should therefore be considered for vaccination against hepatitis B virus.

  2. Update on hepatitis B and C virus diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Livia Melo; Cruz, Helena Medina; Barbosa, Jakeline Ribeiro; Bezerra, Cristianne Sousa; Portilho, Moyra Machado; Scalioni, Letícia de Paula

    2015-01-01

    Viral hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) are responsible for the most of chronic liver disease worldwide and are transmitted by parenteral route, sexual and vertical transmission. One important measure to reduce the burden of these infections is the diagnosis of acute and chronic cases of HBV and HCV. In order to provide an effective diagnosis and monitoring of antiviral treatment, it is important to choose sensitive, rapid, inexpensive, and robust analytical methods. Primary diagnosis of HBV and HCV infection is made by using serological tests for detecting antigens and antibodies against these viruses. In order to confirm primary diagnosis, to quantify viral load, to determine genotypes and resistance mutants for antiviral treatment, qualitative and quantitative molecular tests are used. In this manuscript, we review the current serological and molecular methods for the diagnosis of hepatitis B and C. PMID:26568915

  3. Genetic variation of occult hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui-Lan; Li, Xu; Li, Jun; Zhang, Zhen-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI), characterized as the persistence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) seronegativity and low viral load in blood or liver, is a special form of HBV infection. OBI may be related mainly to mutations in the HBV genome, although the underlying mechanism of it remains to be clarified. Mutations especially within the immunodominant “α” determinant of S protein are “hot spots” that could contribute to the occurrence of OBI via affecting antigenicity and immunogenicity of HBsAg or replication and secretion of virion. Clinical reports account for a large proportion of previous studies on OBI, while functional analyses, especially those based on full-length HBV genome, are rare. PMID:27053845

  4. Current treatments for chronic hepatitis B virus infections.

    PubMed

    Zoulim, Fabien; Lebossé, Fanny; Levrero, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Over 240 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and although a prophylactic vaccine and effective antiviral therapies are available, no cure exists. Curative regimens are urgently needed because up to one million deaths per year are caused by HBV-related liver cancer and end-stage liver disease. HBV is an hepatotropic virus which belongs to the Hepadnaviridae family and replicates its DNA genome via a reverse transcriptase mechanism. Effective therapies have been developed for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection in the last two decades. They rely on the use of interferon alpha and its pegylated formulation, and on nucleos(t)ide analogs that inhibit viral polymerase activity. Their results are discussed in this review as well as future perspectives. PMID:27318098

  5. Mini review: current molecular methods for the detection and quantification of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Albertoni, Guilherme; Castelo Girão, Manoel João Batista; Schor, Nestor

    2014-08-01

    The detection of acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is vital for controlling the spread of HIV, HBV, and HCV to uninfected individuals. Considering that these viruses have high replication rates and are undetectable by serological markers, early detection upon transmission is crucial. Various nucleic acid assays have been developed for diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring of infections. In the past decade, rapid and sensitive molecular techniques such as PCR have revolutionized the detection of a variety of infectious viruses, including HIV, HCV, and HBV. Here, we describe two of the most commonly used licensed methods for the detection and quantification of HIV, HCV, and HBV: the cobas TaqScreen MPX (PCR) test and the Tigris System. We used transcription-mediated amplification to review and compare the development and efficiency of these technologies. PMID:24927665

  6. Hepatitis E Virus Superinfection and Clinical Progression in Hepatitis B Patients.

    PubMed

    Hoan, Nghiem Xuan; Tong, Hoang Van; Hecht, Nicole; Sy, Bui Tien; Marcinek, Patrick; Meyer, Christian G; Song, Le Huu; Toan, Nguyen Linh; Kurreck, Jens; Kremsner, Peter G; Bock, C-Thomas; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection may cause acute hepatitis and lead to hepatic failure in developing and developed countries. We studied HEV seroprevalences in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection to understand the consequences of HEV superinfection in a Vietnamese population. This cross-sectional study was conducted from 2012 to 2013 and included 1318 Vietnamese patients with HBV-related liver diseases and 340 healthy controls. The case group included patients with acute (n = 26) and chronic hepatitis B (n = 744), liver cirrhosis (n = 160), hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 166) and patients with both liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 222). Anti-HEV IgG and IgM antibodies were assessed in patients and controls by ELISA. HEV-RNA was identified by PCR assays and sequencing. Seroprevalences of anti-HEV IgG among hepatitis B patients and controls were 45% and 31%, respectively (adjusted P = 0.034). Anti-HEV IgM seroprevalences were 11.6% and 4.7% in patients and controls, respectively (adjusted P = 0.005). Seroprevalences were higher among the elder individuals. When stratifying for patient groups, those with liver cirrhosis had the highest anti-HEV IgG (52%) and anti-HEV IgM (19%) seroprevalences. Hepatitis B patients with current HEV infection had abnormal liver function tests compared to patients with past or without HEV infection. One HEV isolate was retrieved from a patient with both liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and identified as HEV genotype 3. This study indicates high prevalences of HEV infection in Vietnamese HBV patients and among healthy individuals and shows that HEV superinfection may influence the outcome and progression of HBV-related liver disease.

  7. Impact of hepatitis B virus carrier serostatus on neonatal outcomes after IVF-ET

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shengli; Li, Rong; Zheng, Xiaoying; Wang, Lina; Ren, Xiulian; Chen, Lixue; Liu, Qinli; Liu, Ping; Qiao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of infertile, hepatitis B virus-infected individuals have opted for assisted reproductive technology. However, the impact of the hepatitis B virus carrier serostatus on neonatal outcomes has not been evaluated. Data from 504 patients who delivered singletons were analyzed. In females, hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen, and antibody to hepatitis core antigen seropositivity significantly decreased the gestational age at delivery. In contrast, the male hepatitis B virus serostatus did not affect the gestational age at delivery. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that maternal weight, gestational age at delivery, and infant gender were significantly related to birth weight. The present retrospective study showed that in females, hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen, and antibody to hepatitis core antigen seropositivity was significantly associated with the gestational age at delivery after in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET). PMID:26131226

  8. Immunization with live nonpathogenic H5N3 duck influenza virus protects chickens against highly pathogenic H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Gambaryan, A S; Boravleva, E Y; Lomakina, N F; Kropotkina, E A; Gordeychuk, I V; Chvala, I A; Drygin, V V; Klenk, H-D; Matrosovich, M N

    2016-01-01

    Development of an effective, broadly-active and safe vaccine for protection of poultry from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) remains an important practical goal. In this study we used a low pathogenic wild aquatic bird virus isolate А/duck/Moscow/4182/2010 (H5N3) (dk/4182) as a live candidate vaccine. We compared this virus with four live 1:7 reassortant anti-H5N1 candidate vaccine viruses with modified hemagglutinin from either A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1) or A/Kurgan/3/05 (H5N1) and the rest of the genes from either H2N2 cold-adapted master strain A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (rVN-Len and rKu-Len) or H6N2 virus A/gull/Moscow/3100/2006 (rVN-gull and rKu-gull). The viruses were tested in parallel for pathogenicity, immunogenicity and protective effectiveness in chickens using aerosol, intranasal and oral routes of immunization. All five viruses showed zero pathogenicity indexes in chickens. Viruses rVN-gull and rKu-gull were immunogenic and protective, but they were insufficiently attenuated and caused significant mortality of 1-day-old chickens. The viruses with cold-adapted backbones (rVN-Len and rKu-Len) were completely nonpathogenic, but they were significantly less immunogenic and provided lower protection against lethal challenge with HPAIV A/Chicken/Kurgan/3/05 (H5N1) as compared with three other vaccine candidates. Unlike other four viruses, dk/4182 was both safe and highly immunogenic in chickens of any age regardless of inoculation route. Single administration of 106 TCID50 of dk/4182 virus via drinking water provided complete protection of 30-days-old chickens from 100 LD50 of the challenge virus. Our results suggest that low pathogenic viruses of wild aquatic birds can be used as safe and effective live poultry vaccines against highly pathogenic avian viruses. PMID:27640442

  9. Aspirin inhibits hepatitis C virus entry by downregulating claudin-1.

    PubMed

    Yin, P; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin has previously been reported to inhibit hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. The aim of this study was to investigate whether aspirin is involved in blocking HCV entry. We found that aspirin inhibits the entry of HCVpp and infectious HCV. The level of claudin-1, an HCV receptor, is reduced by aspirin. Our results extend the anti-HCV effect of aspirin to the HCV entry step and further reinforce the anti-HCV role of aspirin.

  10. Molecular Biology and Infection of Hepatitis E Virus.

    PubMed

    Nan, Yuchen; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a viral pathogen transmitted primarily via fecal-oral route. In humans, HEV mainly causes acute hepatitis and is responsible for large outbreaks of hepatitis across the world. The case fatality rate of HEV-induced hepatitis ranges from 0.5 to 3% in young adults and up to 30% in infected pregnant women. HEV strains infecting humans are classified into four genotypes. HEV strains from genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic, whereas those from genotypes 1 and 2 have no known animal reservoirs. Recently, notable progress has been accomplished for better understanding of HEV biology and infection, such as chronic HEV infection, in vitro cell culture system, quasi-enveloped HEV virions, functions of the HEV proteins, mechanism of HEV antagonizing host innate immunity, HEV pathogenesis and vaccine development. However, further investigation on the cross-species HEV infection, host tropism, vaccine efficacy, and HEV-specific antiviral strategy is still needed. This review mainly focuses on molecular biology and infection of HEV and offers perspective new insight of this enigmatic virus.

  11. Molecular Biology and Infection of Hepatitis E Virus.

    PubMed

    Nan, Yuchen; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a viral pathogen transmitted primarily via fecal-oral route. In humans, HEV mainly causes acute hepatitis and is responsible for large outbreaks of hepatitis across the world. The case fatality rate of HEV-induced hepatitis ranges from 0.5 to 3% in young adults and up to 30% in infected pregnant women. HEV strains infecting humans are classified into four genotypes. HEV strains from genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic, whereas those from genotypes 1 and 2 have no known animal reservoirs. Recently, notable progress has been accomplished for better understanding of HEV biology and infection, such as chronic HEV infection, in vitro cell culture system, quasi-enveloped HEV virions, functions of the HEV proteins, mechanism of HEV antagonizing host innate immunity, HEV pathogenesis and vaccine development. However, further investigation on the cross-species HEV infection, host tropism, vaccine efficacy, and HEV-specific antiviral strategy is still needed. This review mainly focuses on molecular biology and infection of HEV and offers perspective new insight of this enigmatic virus. PMID:27656178

  12. Prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Kenya, 2007.

    PubMed

    Ly, Kathleen N; Kim, Andrea A; Umuro, Mamo; Drobenuic, Jan; Williamson, John M; Montgomery, Joel M; Fields, Barry S; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2016-08-01

    Current estimates put the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Kenya at 5-8%. We determined the HBV infection prevalence in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative Kenyan adult and adolescent population based on samples collected from a national survey. We analyzed data from HIV-negative participants in the 2007 Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey to estimate the HBV infection prevalence. We defined past or present HBV infection as presence of total hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb), and chronic HBV infection (CHBI) as presence of both total HBcAb and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). We calculated crude and adjusted odds of HBV infection by demographic characteristics and risk factors using logistic regression analyses. Of 1,091 participants aged 15-64 years, approximately 31.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.0-35.3%) had exposure to HBV, corresponding to approximately 6.1 million (CI = 5.4-6.8 million) with past or present HBV infection. The estimated prevalence of CHBI was 2.1% (95% CI = 1.4-3.1%), corresponding to approximately 398,000 (CI = 261,000-602,000) with CHBI. CHBI is a major public health problem in Kenya, affecting approximately 400,000 persons. Knowing the HBV infection prevalence at baseline is important for planning and public health policy decision making and for monitoring the impact of viral hepatitis prevention programs.

  13. Molecular Biology and Infection of Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yuchen; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a viral pathogen transmitted primarily via fecal-oral route. In humans, HEV mainly causes acute hepatitis and is responsible for large outbreaks of hepatitis across the world. The case fatality rate of HEV-induced hepatitis ranges from 0.5 to 3% in young adults and up to 30% in infected pregnant women. HEV strains infecting humans are classified into four genotypes. HEV strains from genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic, whereas those from genotypes 1 and 2 have no known animal reservoirs. Recently, notable progress has been accomplished for better understanding of HEV biology and infection, such as chronic HEV infection, in vitro cell culture system, quasi-enveloped HEV virions, functions of the HEV proteins, mechanism of HEV antagonizing host innate immunity, HEV pathogenesis and vaccine development. However, further investigation on the cross-species HEV infection, host tropism, vaccine efficacy, and HEV-specific antiviral strategy is still needed. This review mainly focuses on molecular biology and infection of HEV and offers perspective new insight of this enigmatic virus.

  14. Molecular Biology and Infection of Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yuchen; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a viral pathogen transmitted primarily via fecal-oral route. In humans, HEV mainly causes acute hepatitis and is responsible for large outbreaks of hepatitis across the world. The case fatality rate of HEV-induced hepatitis ranges from 0.5 to 3% in young adults and up to 30% in infected pregnant women. HEV strains infecting humans are classified into four genotypes. HEV strains from genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic, whereas those from genotypes 1 and 2 have no known animal reservoirs. Recently, notable progress has been accomplished for better understanding of HEV biology and infection, such as chronic HEV infection, in vitro cell culture system, quasi-enveloped HEV virions, functions of the HEV proteins, mechanism of HEV antagonizing host innate immunity, HEV pathogenesis and vaccine development. However, further investigation on the cross-species HEV infection, host tropism, vaccine efficacy, and HEV-specific antiviral strategy is still needed. This review mainly focuses on molecular biology and infection of HEV and offers perspective new insight of this enigmatic virus. PMID:27656178

  15. Host RNA circles and the origin of hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John M

    2014-03-21

    Recent reports show that many cellular RNAs are processed to form circular species that are relatively abundant and resistant to host nucleases. In some cases, such circles actually bind host microRNAs. Such depletion of available microRNAs appears to have biological roles; for instance, in homeostasis and disease. These findings regarding host RNA circles support a speculative reappraisal of the origin and mode of replication of hepatitis delta virus, hepatitis delta virus (HDV), an agent with a small circular RNA genome; specifically, it is proposed that in hepatocytes infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), some viral RNA species are processed to circular forms, which by a series of chance events lead to an RNA that can be both replicated by host enzymes and assembled, using HBV envelope proteins, to form particles some of which are infectious. Such a model also may provide some new insights into the potential pathogenic potential of HDV infections. In return, new insights into HDV might provide information leading to a better understanding of the roles of the host RNA circles.

  16. New antiviral targets for innovative treatment concepts for hepatitis B virus and hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Durantel, David; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Current therapies of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) remain limited to pegylated-interferon-alpha (PegIFN-α) or any of the five approved nucleos(t)ide analogues (NUC) treatments. While viral suppression can be achieved in the majority of patients with the high-barrier-to-resistance new-generation of NUC, i.e. entecavir and tenofovir, HBsAg loss is achieved by PegIFN-α and/or NUC in only 10% of patients, after a 5-year follow-up. Attempts to improve the response by administering two different NUC or a combination of NUC and PegIFN-α have not provided a dramatic increase in the rate of functional cure. Because of this and the need of long-term NUC administration, there is a renewed interest regarding the understanding of various steps of the HBV replication cycle, as well as specific virus-host cell interactions, in order to define new targets and develop new antiviral drugs. This includes a direct inhibition of viral replication with entry inhibitors, drugs targeting cccDNA, siRNA targeting viral transcripts, capsid assembly modulators, and approaches targeting the secretion of viral envelope proteins. Restoration of immune responses is a complementary approach. The restoration of innate immunity against HBV can be achieved, with TLR agonists or specific antiviral cytokine delivery. Restoration of adaptive immunity may be achieved with inhibitors of negative checkpoint regulators, therapeutic vaccines, or autologous transfer of engineered HBV-specific T cells. Novel targets and compounds will readily be evaluated using both relevant and novel in vitro and in vivo models of HBV infection. The addition of one or several new drugs to current therapies should offer the prospect of a markedly improved response to treatments and an increased rate of functional cure. This should lead to a reduced risk of antiviral drug resistance, and to a decreased incidence of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  17. New antiviral targets for innovative treatment concepts for hepatitis B virus and hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Durantel, David; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Current therapies of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) remain limited to pegylated-interferon-alpha (PegIFN-α) or any of the five approved nucleos(t)ide analogues (NUC) treatments. While viral suppression can be achieved in the majority of patients with the high-barrier-to-resistance new-generation of NUC, i.e. entecavir and tenofovir, HBsAg loss is achieved by PegIFN-α and/or NUC in only 10% of patients, after a 5-year follow-up. Attempts to improve the response by administering two different NUC or a combination of NUC and PegIFN-α have not provided a dramatic increase in the rate of functional cure. Because of this and the need of long-term NUC administration, there is a renewed interest regarding the understanding of various steps of the HBV replication cycle, as well as specific virus-host cell interactions, in order to define new targets and develop new antiviral drugs. This includes a direct inhibition of viral replication with entry inhibitors, drugs targeting cccDNA, siRNA targeting viral transcripts, capsid assembly modulators, and approaches targeting the secretion of viral envelope proteins. Restoration of immune responses is a complementary approach. The restoration of innate immunity against HBV can be achieved, with TLR agonists or specific antiviral cytokine delivery. Restoration of adaptive immunity may be achieved with inhibitors of negative checkpoint regulators, therapeutic vaccines, or autologous transfer of engineered HBV-specific T cells. Novel targets and compounds will readily be evaluated using both relevant and novel in vitro and in vivo models of HBV infection. The addition of one or several new drugs to current therapies should offer the prospect of a markedly improved response to treatments and an increased rate of functional cure. This should lead to a reduced risk of antiviral drug resistance, and to a decreased incidence of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PMID:27084032

  18. [Meeting Report: 20 years after the First International Symposium on hepatitis C virus and related viruses].

    PubMed

    Carnero, Elena; Díez, Juana; Fortes, Purificación; Gastaminza, Pablo; Majano, Pedro; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Pérez-del-Pulgar, Sofía; Quer, Josep; López-Labrador, F Xavier

    2013-12-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) was discovered by the team of Michael Houghton at Chiron Corporation in 1989 and the first symposium on HCV and related viruses was held in Venice, Italy, shortly after, in 1992. This conference was organized to advance knowledge on what then was a mysterious virus responsible for most cases of «non-A, non-B» hepatitis. During the 20 years since the first conference, the scientific quality of presentations has steadily increased, together with the tremendous advances in basic and clinical research and epidemiology. What started as a small conference on a new virus, about which there were very few data, has today become a first-in-class congress: a meeting place for basic researchers, clinicians, epidemiologists, public health experts, and industry members to present the most important advances and their application to HCV treatment and control. The nineteenth HCV symposium was held in September 2012, once again in Venice.

  19. Mechanisms of Methods for Hepatitis C Virus Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Pfaender, Stephanie; Brinkmann, Janine; Todt, Daniel; Riebesehl, Nina; Steinmann, Joerg; Steinmann, Jochen; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Virus inactivation by chemical disinfectants is an important instrument for infection control in medical settings, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we systematically investigated the effects of several antiviral treatments on hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles as model for enveloped viruses. Studies were performed with authentic cell culture-derived viruses, and the influence of chemical disinfectants, heat, and UV treatment on HCV was analyzed by the determination of infectious particles in a limiting-dilution assay, by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, by core enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and by proteolytic protection assay. All different inactivation methods resulted in a loss of HCV infectivity by targeting different parts of the virus particle. Alcohols such as ethanol and 2-propanol did not affect the viral RNA genome integrity but disrupted the viral envelope membrane in a capsid protection assay. Heat and UV treatment of HCV particles resulted in direct damage of the viral genome since transfection of viral particle-associated RNA into permissive cells did not initiate RNA replication. In addition, heat incubation at 80°C disrupted the HCV envelope, rendering the viral capsid susceptible to proteolytic digest. This study demonstrated the molecular processes of viral inactivation of an enveloped virus and should facilitate the development of effective disinfection strategies in infection control not only against HCV but also against other enveloped viruses. PMID:25527548

  20. [The diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection].

    PubMed

    Gervain, Judit

    2014-06-29

    The successful therapy of hepatitis C viral infection requires that the illness is diagnosed before the development of structural changes of the liver. Testing is stepwise consisting of screening, diagnosis, and anti-viral therapy follow-up. For these steps there are different biochemical, serological, histological and molecular biological methods available. For screening, alanine aminotransferase and anti-HCV tests are used. The diagnosis of infection is confirmed using real-time polymerase chain reaction of the viral nucleic acid. Before initiation of the therapy liver biopsy is recommended to determine the level of structural changes in the liver. Alternatively, transient elastography or blood biomarkers may be also used for this purpose. Differential diagnosis should exclude the co-existence of other viral infections and chronic hepatitis due to other origin, with special attention to the presence of autoantibodies. The outcome of the antiviral therapy and the length of treatment are mainly determined by the viral genotype. In Hungary, most patients are infected with genotype 1, subtype b. The polymorphism type that occurs in the single nucleotide located next to the interleukin 28B region in chromosome 19 and the viral polymorphism type Q80K for infection with HCV 1a serve as predictive therapeutic markers. The follow-up of therapy is based on the quantitative determination of viral nucleic acid according to national and international protocols and should use the same method and laboratory throughout the treatment of an individual patient.

  1. Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Phung, Bao-Chau; Sogni, Philippe; Launay, Odile

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus (HBV and HIV) infection share transmission patterns and risk factors, which explains high prevalence of chronic HBV infection in HIV infected patients. The natural course of HBV disease is altered by the HIV infection with less chance to clear acute HBV infection, faster progression to cirrhosis and higher risk of liver-related death in HIV-HBV co-infected patients than in HBV mono-infected ones. HIV infected patients with chronic hepatitis B should be counseled for liver damage and surveillance of chronic hepatitis B should be performed to screen early hepatocellular carcinoma. Noninvasive tools are now available to evaluate liver fibrosis. Isolated hepatitis B core antibodies (anti-HBc) are a good predictive marker of occult HBV infection. Still the prevalence and significance of occult HBV infection is controversial, but its screening may be important in the management of antiretroviral therapy. Vaccination against HBV infection is recommended in non-immune HIV patients. The optimal treatment for almost all HIV-HBV co-infected patients should contain tenofovir plus lamivudine or emtricitabine and treatment should not be stopped to avoid HBV reactivation. Long term tenofovir therapy may lead to significant decline in hepatitis B surface Antigen. The emergence of resistant HBV strains may compromise the HBV therapy and vaccine therapy. PMID:25516647

  2. Genetic characterization of hepadnaviruses associated with histopathological changes in the liver of duck and goose embryos.

    PubMed

    Biđin, Marina; Tišljar, Marina; Biđin, Zdenko; Lojkić, Ivana; Majnarić, Darko

    2014-12-01

    Avian hepadnaviruses are etiological agents of hepatitis B, that has been identified primarily in ducks, and more recently in various avian species. In this paper, 16 hepadnaviruses were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the field samples from dead embryos of commercially reared domestic duck and goose. Based on the molecular analysis of the S-protein gene sequences and phylogenetic Neighbor-joining tree, identified viruses were clustered in the same genetic group, indicating no host-related diversity. Both duck and goose-origin hepadnaviruses were grouped within the cluster consisting of "Western-country" and "Chinese" duck hepatitis B (DHBV) isolates, showing more evolutionary distances with other known avian hepadnaviruses. Histopathologically, the lesions observed in the liver tissue from hepadnavirus positive duck and goose embryos varied from low to mild degree of perivascular mononuclear cells and mixed cell infiltrations, followed by mild vacuolar changes. Small focal necrotic changes in the liver parenchyma, and bile ductular proliferation were also found in examined liver samples. Generally, the microscopic findings resemble those described in experimentally infected ducks, while this was the first description of hepadnavirus associated lesions in domestic goose. Although hepadnaviruses are considered to have a very narrow host range, this study showed that domestic ducks and geese are susceptible to infection with genetically almost identical hepadnaviruses, that were likely to produce similar microscopic changes in the liver of both duck and goose embryos. The impact of naturally occurred hepadnavirus infection and possible synergistic interactions with other infectious or non-infectious agents on embryo viability needs further investigation.

  3. Persistence of Hepatitis C Virus Traces after Spontaneous Resolution of Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Annie Y.; Hoare, Matthew; Shankar, Arun N.; Allison, Michael; Alexander, Graeme J. M.; Michalak, Tomasz I.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) frequently causes chronic hepatitis, while spontaneous recovery from infection is infrequent. Persistence of HCV after self-limited (spontaneous) resolution of hepatitis C was rarely investigated. The current study aimed to assess incidence and robustness of HCV persistence after self-resolved hepatitis C in individuals with normal liver enzymes and undetectable virus by conventional tests. Applying high sensitivity HCV RNA detection approaches, we analyzed plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals with previous hepatitis C infection. Parallel plasma and PBMC from 24 such non-viraemic individuals followed for 0.3–14.4 (mean 6.4) years were examined. Additional samples from 9 of them were obtained 4.5–7.2 (mean 5.9) years later. RNA was extracted from 250 μl plasma and, if HCV negative, from ~5 ml after ultracentrifugation, and from ex vivo stimulated PBMC. PBMC with evidence of HCV replication from 4 individuals were treated with HCV protease inhibitor, telaprevir. HCV RNA was detected in 14/24 (58.3%) plasma and 11/23 (47.8%) PBMC obtained during the first collection. HCV RNA replicative strand was evident in 7/11 (63.6%) PBMC. Overall, 17/24 (70.8%) individuals carried HCV RNA at mean follow-up of 5.9 years. Samples collected 4.5–7.2 years later revealed HCV in 4/9 (44.4%) plasma and 5/9 (55.5%) PBMC, while 4 (80%) of these 5 PBMC demonstrated virus replicative strand. Overall, 6/9 (66.7%) individuals remained viraemic for up to 20.7 (mean 12.7) years. Telaprevir entirely eliminated HCV replication in the PBMC examined. In conclusion, our results indicate that HCV can persist long after spontaneous resolution of hepatitis C at levels undetectable by current testing. An apparently effective host immune response curtailing hepatitis appears insufficient to completely eliminate the virus. The long-term morbidity of asymptomatic HCV carriage should be examined even in individuals who achieve undetectable HCV

  4. Detection of SENV Virus in Healthy, Hepatitis B- and Hepatitis C-Infected Individuals in Yazd Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Sayedeh Azimeh; Bouzari, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background: SEN virus (SENV) is the latest virus proposed as a cause of unknown hepatitis cases. Among nine detected genotypes of the virus, genotypes D and H are more frequent in hepatitis cases of unknown origin. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of SENV-D and SENV-H genotypes in the sera of healthy individuals and hepatitis B and C patients. Methods: Totally, 200 serum samples from healthy individuals as well as 50 hepatitis B and 50 hepatitis C patients were collected. Anti-HCV (hepatitis C virus), anti-human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-HBV (hepatitis B virus) core antigen were detected, and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were measured. Viral DNA was subjected to nested PCR. Fisher's exact and unpaired ANOVA tests were used for statistical analyses. Results: SENV was detected in 90%, 66%, and 46% of the healthy individuals HBV and HCV-positive individuals, respectively. The frequency of SENV and its two genotypes were significantly lower in hepatitis B and hepatitis C patients (P<0.01). Also, the frequency of SENV-H was higher than SENV-D in all studied groups. In SENV-positive HBV patients, the level of ALT and AST enzymes were significantly less than SENV-negative patients (P<0.05). It was the same for SENV-H-negative and -positive cases. Conclusions: The levels of liver enzymes were significantly lower in HBV patients co-infected with SENV compared to HBV patients (P<0.05), indicating a positive impact of the virus in liver pathology by decreasing liver damage and thus decreasing the liver enzymes. PMID:26948255

  5. Muscovy duck retinoic acid-induced gene I (MdRIG-I) functions in innate immunity against H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIV) infections.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Huang, Qingqing; Ji, Wenhui; Du, Bin; Fu, Qiang; An, Huiting; Li, Jing; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan; Sun, Jianhe

    2015-02-15

    Retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that senses pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) is a large duck different from other species of ducks, and is more susceptible to some microbial pathogens. In this study, the Muscovy duck RIG-I gene (MdRIG-I) was identified. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that MdRIG-I mRNA was widely expressed in different tissues, especially in those with mucosa. RIG-I null DF-1 cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding MdRIG-I or CARDs domain can activate IRF-3 and NF-κB to up-regulated activity of IFN-β promoter. The components of the signaling pathway downstream of RIG-I in mammalian cells including IRF-3, NF-κB, IFN-β and the IFN-stimulated genes Mx-1, PKR and MDA5 were significantly up-regulated in CARDs-overexpressing-DF-1 cells. Implicating RIG-I in the antiviral response to an infection in vivo, we found that RIG-I expression in brain, spleen, lung and bursa were up-regulated in ducks challenged with H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV), whose six internal genes were closely related to the H7N9 and H10N8 AIV. In vitro, DF-1 cells transfected with MdRIG-I plasmid can respond significantly to H9N2 AIV, evident through enhancement of IFN-β promoter activity and decreased virus titer. Altogether, these results indicated that MdRIG-I is a novel member of RLR gene family, engaging in the early stage of antiviral innate immunity.

  6. Evolution of hepatitis B virus liver disease after hepatic replacement. Practical and theoretical considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. J.; Todo, S.; Van Thiel, D. H.; Fung, J. J.; Iwaki, Y.; Sysyn, G.; Ming, W.; Trager, J.; Starzl, T. E.

    1990-01-01

    The morphologic evolution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) liver disease in 45 hepatic allograft recipients who were HBV surface-antigen positive (HBs-Ag+) at the time of liver replacement and who survived for more than 60 days was studied by routine histologic and immunocytochemical analysis of serial pathology specimens. The findings in these patients were compared to a control group of 30 individuals who were immune to the HBV (anti-HBs antibody positive), but required hepatic replacement for other reasons. Eight of the forty-five (18%) HBsAg-positive patients have no serologic evidence of HBV reinfection after transplantation. All 37 remaining patients are reinfected; 21 (47%) developed chronic active hepatitis and/or cirrhosis, 3 (7%) developed submassive necrosis, and 6 (14%) developed chronic lobular hepatitis. One patient lost her graft to chronic rejection, despite reinfection with the B virus. Four other patients (9%) developed a chronic carrier state. No long-term follow-up biopsies were available in the remaining two patients. The histologic features associated with dysfunction related to recurrent HBV infection evolved from an acute to chronic phase and were similar to hepatitis B seen in nonallografted livers. Furthermore HBV-related lesions could be separated from rejection using routine histology alone. The only exception to this conclusion was the occurrence of a peculiar HBV-related lesion in two recipients, described herein. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of viral antigens in almost all cases. Hepatic inflammation also was commonly present during HBV disease and consisted mostly of accessory cells and T lymphocytes. Analysis of the effect of major histocompatibility complex matching revealed no clear association between the number of class I or II matches or mismatches and the development, or pattern, of active hepatitis in the allograft. Peculiar pathologic alterations in several of the biopsies and failed allografts after HBV

  7. Multiplex qPCR for serodetection and serotyping of hepatitis viruses: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Irshad, Mohammad; Gupta, Priyanka; Mankotia, Dhananjay Singh; Ansari, Mohammad Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The present review describes the current status of multiplex quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays developed and used globally for detection and subtyping of hepatitis viruses in body fluids. Several studies have reported the use of multiplex qPCR for the detection of hepatitis viruses, including hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV), and hepatitis E virus (HEV). In addition, multiplex qPCR has also been developed for genotyping HBV, HCV, and HEV subtypes. Although a single step multiplex qPCR assay for all six hepatitis viruses, i.e., A to G viruses, is not yet reported, it may be available in the near future as the technologies continue to advance. All studies use a conserved region of the viral genome as the basis of amplification and hydrolysis probes as the preferred chemistries for improved detection. Based on a standard plot prepared using varying concentrations of template and the observed threshold cycle value, it is possible to determine the linear dynamic range and to calculate an exact copy number of virus in the specimen. Advantages of multiplex qPCR assay over singleplex or other molecular techniques in samples from patients with co-infection include fast results, low cost, and a single step investigation process. PMID:27239109

  8. Trafficking of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein during Virus Particle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Counihan, Natalie A.; Rawlinson, Stephen M.; Lindenbach, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is directed to the surface of lipid droplets (LD), a step that is essential for infectious virus production. However, the process by which core is recruited from LD into nascent virus particles is not well understood. To investigate the kinetics of core trafficking, we developed methods to image functional core protein in live, virus-producing cells. During the peak of virus assembly, core formed polarized caps on large, immotile LDs, adjacent to putative sites of assembly. In addition, LD-independent, motile puncta of core were found to traffic along microtubules. Importantly, core was recruited from LDs into these puncta, and interaction between the viral NS2 and NS3-4A proteins was essential for this recruitment process. These data reveal new aspects of core trafficking and identify a novel role for viral nonstructural proteins in virus particle assembly. PMID:22028650

  9. Virus evolution during chronic hepatitis B virus infection as revealed by ultradeep sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Jones, Leandro R; Sede, Mariano; Manrique, Julieta M; Quarleri, Jorge

    2016-02-01

    Despite chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (CHB) being a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer, HBV evolution during CHB is not fully understood. Recent studies have indicated that virus diversity progressively increases along the course of CHB and that some virus mutations correlate with severe liver conditions such as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Using ultradeep sequencing (UDS) data from an intrafamilial case, we detected such mutations at low frequencies among three immunotolerant patients and at high frequencies in an inactive carrier. Furthermore, our analyses indicated that the HBV population from the seroconverter patient underwent many genetic changes in response to virus clearance. Together, these data indicate a potential use of UDS for developing non-invasive biomarkers for monitoring disease changes over time or in response to specific therapies. In addition, our analyses revealed that virus clearance seemed not to require the virus effective population size to decline. A detailed genetic analysis of the viral lineages arising during and after the clearance suggested that mutations at or close to critical elements of the core promoter (enhancer II, epsilon encapsidation signal, TA2, TA3 and direct repeat 1-hormone response element) might be responsible for a sustained replication. This hypothesis requires the decline in virus load to be explained by constant clearance of virus-producing hepatocytes, consistent with the sustained progress towards serious liver conditions experienced by many CHB patients. PMID:26581478

  10. Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Virion and Covalently Closed Circular DNA Formation in Primary Tupaia Hepatocytes and Human Hepatoma Cell Lines upon HBV Genome Transduction with Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shaotang; Nassal, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), the causative agent of B-type hepatitis in humans, is a hepatotropic DNA-containing virus that replicates via reverse transcription. Because of its narrow host range, there is as yet no practical small-animal system for HBV infection. The hosts of the few related animal viruses, including woodchuck hepatitis B virus and duck hepatitis B virus, are either difficult to keep or only distantly related to humans. Some evidence suggests that tree shrews (tupaias) may be susceptible to infection with human HBV, albeit with low efficiency. Infection efficiency depends on interactions of the virus with factors on the surface and inside the host cell. To bypass restrictions during the initial entry phase, we used recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors, either with or without a green fluorescent protein marker gene, to deliver complete HBV genomes into primary tupaia hepatocytes. Here we show that these cells, like the human hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Huh7, are efficiently transduced by the vectors and produce all HBV gene products required to generate the secretory antigens HBsAg and HBeAg, replication-competent nucleocapsids, and enveloped virions. We further demonstrate that covalently closed circular HBV DNA is formed. Therefore, primary tupaia hepatocytes support all steps of HBV replication following deposition of the genome in the nucleus, including the intracellular amplification cycle. These data provide a rational basis for in vivo experiments aimed at developing tupaias into a useful experimental animal system for HBV infection. PMID:11152483

  11. Influenza-A Viruses in Ducks in Northwestern Minnesota: Fine Scale Spatial and Temporal Variation in Prevalence and Subtype Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Knutsen, Gregory A.; Berdeen, James; Goekjian, Virginia; Poulson, Rebecca; Goyal, Sagar; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Cardona, Carol; Berghaus, Roy D.; Swayne, David E.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Waterfowl from northwestern Minnesota were sampled by cloacal swabbing for Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) from July – October in 2007 and 2008. AIV was detected in 222 (9.1%) of 2,441 ducks in 2007 and in 438 (17.9%) of 2,452 ducks in 2008. Prevalence of AIV peaked in late summer. We detected 27 AIV subtypes during 2007 and 31 during 2008. Ten hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes were detected each year (i.e., H1, 3–8, and 10–12 during 2007; H1-8, 10 and 11 during 2008). All neuraminidase (NA) subtypes were detected during each year of the study. Subtype diversity varied between years and increased with prevalence into September. Predominant subtypes during 2007 (comprising ≥5% of subtype diversity) included H1N1, H3N6, H3N8, H4N6, H7N3, H10N7, and H11N9. Predominant subtypes during 2008 included H3N6, H3N8, H4N6, H4N8, H6N1, and H10N7. Additionally, within each HA subtype, the same predominant HA/NA subtype combinations were detected each year and included H1N1, H3N8, H4N6, H5N2, H6N1, H7N3, H8N4, H10N7, and H11N9. The H2N3 and H12N5 viruses also predominated within the H2 and H12 subtypes, respectively, but only were detected during a single year (H2 and H12 viruses were not detected during 2007 and 2008, respectively). Mallards were the predominant species sampled (63.7% of the total), and 531 AIV were isolated from this species (80.5% of the total isolates). Mallard data collected during both years adequately described the observed temporal and spatial prevalence from the total sample and also adequately represented subtype diversity. Juvenile mallards also were adequate in describing the temporal and spatial prevalence of AIV as well as subtype diversity. PMID:21931636

  12. Protective Efficacy of Recombinant Turkey Herpes Virus (rHVT-H5) and Inactivated H5N1 Vaccines in Commercial Mulard Ducks against the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 Clade 2.2.1 Virus.

    PubMed

    Kilany, Walid H; Safwat, Marwa; Mohammed, Samy M; Salim, Abdullah; Fasina, Folorunso Oludayo; Fasanmi, Olubunmi G; Shalaby, Azhar G; Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Hassan, Mohammed K; Lubroth, Juan; Jobre, Yilma M

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt, ducks kept for commercial purposes constitute the second highest poultry population, at 150 million ducks/year. Hence, ducks play an important role in the introduction and transmission of avian influenza (AI) in the Egyptian poultry population. Attempts to control outbreaks include the use of vaccines, which have varying levels of efficacy and failure. To date, the effects of vaccine efficacy has rarely been determined in ducks. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of a live recombinant vector vaccine based on a turkey Herpes Virus (HVT) expressing the H5 gene from a clade 2.2 H5N1 HPAIV strain (A/Swan/Hungary/499/2006) (rHVT-H5) and a bivalent inactivated H5N1 vaccine prepared from clade 2.2.1 and 2.2.1.1 H5N1 seeds in Mulard ducks. A 0.3ml/dose subcutaneous injection of rHVT-H5 vaccine was administered to one-day-old ducklings (D1) and another 0.5ml/dose subcutaneous injection of the inactivated MEFLUVAC was administered at 7 days (D7). Four separate challenge experiments were conducted at Days 21, 28, 35 and 42, in which all the vaccinated ducks were challenged with 106EID50/duck of H5N1 HPAI virus (A/chicken/Egypt/128s/2012(H5N1) (clade 2.2.1) via intranasal inoculation. Maternal-derived antibody regression and post-vaccination antibody immune responses were monitored weekly. Ducks vaccinated at 21, 28, 35 and 42 days with the rHVT-H5 and MEFLUVAC vaccines were protected against mortality (80%, 80%, 90% and 90%) and (50%, 70%, 80% and 90%) respectively, against challenges with the H5N1 HPAI virus. The amount of viral shedding and shedding rates were lower in the rHVT-H5 vaccine groups than in the MEFLUVAC groups only in the first two challenge experiments. However, the non-vaccinated groups shed significantly more of the virus than the vaccinated groups. Both rHVT-H5 and MEFLUVAC provide early protection, and rHVT-H5 vaccine in particular provides protection against HPAI challenge. PMID:27304069

  13. Protective Efficacy of Recombinant Turkey Herpes Virus (rHVT-H5) and Inactivated H5N1 Vaccines in Commercial Mulard Ducks against the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 Clade 2.2.1 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kilany, Walid H.; Safwat, Marwa; Mohammed, Samy M.; Salim, Abdullah; Fasina, Folorunso Oludayo; Fasanmi, Olubunmi G.; Shalaby, Azhar G.; Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Hassan, Mohammed K.; Lubroth, Juan; Jobre, Yilma M.

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt, ducks kept for commercial purposes constitute the second highest poultry population, at 150 million ducks/year. Hence, ducks play an important role in the introduction and transmission of avian influenza (AI) in the Egyptian poultry population. Attempts to control outbreaks include the use of vaccines, which have varying levels of efficacy and failure. To date, the effects of vaccine efficacy has rarely been determined in ducks. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of a live recombinant vector vaccine based on a turkey Herpes Virus (HVT) expressing the H5 gene from a clade 2.2 H5N1 HPAIV strain (A/Swan/Hungary/499/2006) (rHVT-H5) and a bivalent inactivated H5N1 vaccine prepared from clade 2.2.1 and 2.2.1.1 H5N1 seeds in Mulard ducks. A 0.3ml/dose subcutaneous injection of rHVT-H5 vaccine was administered to one-day-old ducklings (D1) and another 0.5ml/dose subcutaneous injection of the inactivated MEFLUVAC was administered at 7 days (D7). Four separate challenge experiments were conducted at Days 21, 28, 35 and 42, in which all the vaccinated ducks were challenged with 106EID50/duck of H5N1 HPAI virus (A/chicken/Egypt/128s/2012(H5N1) (clade 2.2.1) via intranasal inoculation. Maternal-derived antibody regression and post-vaccination antibody immune responses were monitored weekly. Ducks vaccinated at 21, 28, 35 and 42 days with the rHVT-H5 and MEFLUVAC vaccines were protected against mortality (80%, 80%, 90% and 90%) and (50%, 70%, 80% and 90%) respectively, against challenges with the H5N1 HPAI virus. The amount of viral shedding and shedding rates were lower in the rHVT-H5 vaccine groups than in the MEFLUVAC groups only in the first two challenge experiments. However, the non-vaccinated groups shed significantly more of the virus than the vaccinated groups. Both rHVT-H5 and MEFLUVAC provide early protection, and rHVT-H5 vaccine in particular provides protection against HPAI challenge. PMID:27304069

  14. Experimental co-infection studies with avian influenza viruses and Newcastle Disease viruses in chickens, turkeys and domestic ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Co-infections of poultry with Newcastle Disease viruses (NDVs) and Avian Influenza viruses (AIVs) present a problem both from the clinical point of view and the diagnosis of these viruses. Little has been done to understand the interactions between these two viruses when infecting poultry. Exposur...

  15. Postoperative hepatitis B virus reactivation in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma patients with hepatitis B virus DNA levels <500 copies/mL

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhi-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Fu, De-Liang; Zhong, Jian-Hong; Yang, Xia-Wei; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma have the risk of postoperative hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation (PHR). Antiviral therapy was given to patients with detectable HBV DNA levels but not to patients with undetectable HBV DNA levels. Methods In this retrospective study, 258 patients were enrolled (HBV DNA levels <500 copies/mL group, n=159, and HBV DNA levels >500 copies/mL group, n=99). Results A total of 50 patients (19.4%) had PHR. The following significant factors related to PHR were found: without antiviral therapy (hazard ratio [HR] =0.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.031–0.911), hepatitis B e antigen positivity (HR =5.20, 95% CI 1.931–14.007), hepatitis B core antigen S1 positivity (HR =2.54, 95% CI 1.116–5.762), preoperative HBV DNA levels ≥500 copies/mL (HR =1.28, 95% CI 1.085–2.884), hepatic inflow occlusion (HR =3.60, 95% CI 1.402–9.277), moderate liver cirrhosis or more (HR =2.26, 95% CI 1.001–5.121), and blood transfusion (HR =2.89, 95% CI 0.836–10.041). Recurrence-free survival time was significantly shorter in patients with PHR (23.06±2.46 months) than in patients without PHR (29.30±1.27 months). Conclusion Antiviral therapy could efficiently decrease the incidence of PHR. Patients with HBV DNA levels <500 copies/mL still have the risk of PHR. PHR remained as a prognostic risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and recurrence-free survival. PMID:27524913

  16. The CD8α gene in duck (Anatidae): cloning, characterization, and expression during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Chen, Yang; Zhao, Wen Ming; Huang, Zheng Yang; Duan, Xiu Jun; Tong, Yi Yu; Zhang, Yang; Li, Xiu; Chang, Guo Bin; Chen, Guo Hong

    2015-02-01

    Cluster of differentiation 8 alpha (CD8α) is critical for cell-mediated immune defense and T-cell development. Although CD8α sequences have been reported for several species, very little is known about CD8α in ducks. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in the innate and adaptive immune responses of ducks, we cloned CD8α coding sequences from domestic, Muscovy, Mallard, and Spotbill ducks using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Each sequence consisted of 714 nucleotides and encoded a signal peptide, an IgV-like domain, a stalk region, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tail. We identified 58 nucleotide differences and 37 amino acid differences among the four types of duck; of these, 53 nucleotide and 33 amino acid differences were between Muscovy ducks and the other duck species. The CD8α cDNA sequence from domestic duck consisted of a 61-nucleotide 5' untranslated region (UTR), a 714-nucleotide open reading frame, and an 849-nucleotide 3' UTR. Multiple sequence alignments showed that the amino acid sequence of CD8α is conserved in vertebrates. RT-PCR revealed that expression of CD8α mRNA of domestic ducks was highest in the thymus and very low in the kidney, cerebrum, cerebellum, and muscle. Immunohistochemical analyses detected CD8α on the splenic corpuscle and periarterial lymphatic sheath of the spleen. CD8α mRNA in domestic ducklings was initially up-regulated, and then down-regulated, in the thymus, spleen, and liver after treatment with duck hepatitis virus type I (DHV-1) or the immunostimulant polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C).

  17. Links between human LINE-1 retrotransposons and hepatitis virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for approximately 80% of liver cancers, the third most frequent cause of cancer mortality. The most prevalent risk factors for HCC are infections by hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus. Findings suggest that hepatitis virus-related HCC might be a cancer in which LINE-1 retrotransposons, often termed L1, activity plays a potential role. Firstly, hepatitis viruses can suppress host defense factors that also control L1 mobilization. Secondly, many recent studies also have indicated that hypomethylation of L1 affects the prognosis of HCC patients. Thirdly, endogenous L1 retrotransposition was demonstrated to activate oncogenic pathways in HCC. Fourthly, several L1 chimeric transcripts with host or viral genes are found in hepatitis virus-related HCC. Such lines of evidence suggest a linkage between L1 retrotransposons and hepatitis virus-related HCC. Here, I briefly summarize current understandings of the association between hepatitis virus-related HCC and L1. Then, I discuss potential mechanisms of how hepatitis viruses drive the development of HCC via L1 retrotransposons. An increased understanding of the contribution of L1 to hepatitis virus-related HCC may provide unique insights related to the development of novel therapeutics for this disease.

  18. Links between Human LINE-1 Retrotransposons and Hepatitis Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for approximately 80% of liver cancers, the third most frequent cause of cancer mortality. The most prevalent risk factors for HCC are infections by hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus. Findings suggest that hepatitis virus-related HCC might be a cancer in which LINE-1 retrotransposon, often termed L1, activity plays a potential role. Firstly, hepatitis viruses can suppress host defense factors that also control L1 mobilization. Secondly, many recent studies also have indicated that hypomethylation of L1 affects the prognosis of HCC patients. Thirdly, endogenous L1 retrotransposition was demonstrated to activate oncogenic pathways in HCC. Fourthly, several L1 chimeric transcripts with host or viral genes are found in hepatitis virus-related HCC. Such lines of evidence suggest a linkage between L1 retrotransposons and hepatitis virus-related HCC. Here, I briefly summarize current understandings of the association between hepatitis virus-related HCC and L1. Then, I discuss potential mechanisms of how hepatitis viruses drive the development of HCC via L1 retrotransposons. An increased understanding of the contribution of L1 to hepatitis virus-related HCC may provide unique insights related to the development of novel therapeutics for this disease. PMID:27242996

  19. Generation of an infectious clone of duck enteritis virus (DEV) and of a vectored DEV expressing hemagglutinin of H5N1 avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jichun; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2011-07-01

    We report on the generation of an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of duck enteritis virus (DEV) and a vectored DEV vaccine expressing hemagglutinin (H5) of high pathogenicity H5N1 avian influenza virus (AIV). For generation of the DEV BAC, we inserted mini-F vector sequences by homologous recombination in lieu of the UL44 (gC) gene of DEV isolate 2085. DNA of the resulting in recombinant virus v2085-GFPΔgC was electroporated into Escherichia coli and a full-length DEV BAC clone (p2085) was recovered. Transfection of p2085 into chicken embryo cells resulted in DEV-specific plaques exhibiting green autofluorescence. A gC-negative mutant, v2085ΔgC, was generated by deleting mini-F vector sequences by using Cre-Lox recombination, and a revertant virus v2085ΔgC-R was constructed by co-transfection of p2085 with UL44 sequences. Finally, AIV H5 was inserted into p2085, and high-level H5 expression of the v2085_H5 virus was detected by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. Plaque area measurements showed that v2085ΔgC plaques were significantly increased (12%) over those of parental 2085 virus or the v2085ΔgC-R revertant virus (ANOVA, P<0.05), while plaque areas of the H5- or GFP-expressing DEV mutants were significantly smaller. There was no significant difference between DEV with respect to virus titers determined after trypsinization titration of infected cells, while virus titers of infected-cell supernatants revealed significant reductions in case of the gC-negative viruses of more than 700-fold when compared to parental 2085 or v2085ΔgC-R. Cell-associated virus titers of gC-negative DEV also showed significant reduction of 50-500-fold (ANOVA, P<0.05). We conclude that (i) absence of DEV gC results in increased plaque sizes in vitro, (ii) gC plays a role in DEV egress, and (iii) generation of an infectious DEV clone allows rapid generation of vectored vaccines.

  20. Impact of hepatitis B virus infection on hepatic metabolic signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi-Xian; Huang, Chen-Jie; Yang, Zheng-Gang

    2016-09-28

    A growing body of epidemiologic research has demonstrated that metabolic derangement exists in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, indicating that there are clinical associations between HBV infection and host metabolism. In order to understand the complex interplay between HBV and hepatic metabolism in greater depth, we systematically reviewed these alterations in different metabolic signaling pathways due to HBV infection. HBV infection interfered with most aspects of hepatic metabolic responses, including glucose, lipid, nucleic acid, bile acid and vitamin metabolism. Glucose and lipid metabolism is a particular focus due to the significant promotion of gluconeogenesis, glucose aerobic oxidation, the pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid synthesis or oxidation, phospholipid and cholesterol biosynthesis affected by HBV. These altered metabolic pathways are involved in the pathological process of not only hepatitis B, but also metabolic disorders, increasing the occurrence of complications, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver steatosis. Thus, a clearer understanding of the hepatic metabolic pathways affected by HBV and its pathogenesis is necessary to develop more novel therapeutic strategies targeting viral eradication. PMID:27688657

  1. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Colombia: Survey in Patients with Clinical Diagnosis of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Julio; Hoyos, Maria Cristina; di Filippo, Diana; Cortes-Mancera, Fabian; Mantilla, Carolina; Velasquez, Maria Mercedes; Sepulveda, Maria Elsy; Restrepo, Juan Carlos; Jaramillo, Sergio; Arbelaez, Maria Patricia; Correa, Gonzalo; Navas, Maria-Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis E virus is a major cause of outbreaks as well as sporadic hepatitis cases worldwide. The epidemiology of this enterically transmitted infection differs between developing and developed countries. The aims of this study were to describe HEV infection in Colombian patients and to characterize the genotype. Methods A prospective study was carried out on 40 patients aged over 15 with a clinical diagnosis of viral hepatitis, recruited from five primary health units in the city of Medellin, Colombia. Fecal samples obtained from the 40 consecutives cases were analyzed for HEV RNA using nested reverse transcription PCR for both ORF1 and ORF2-3. The amplicons were sequenced for phylogenetic analyses. Results Nine (22.5%) cases of HEV infection were identified in the study population. Three HEV strains obtained from patients were classified as genotype 3. No significant association was found between cases of Hepatitis E and the variables water drinking source, garbage collection system and contact with pigs. Conclusions This is the first prospective study of hepatitis E in Colombian patients. The circulation of the genotype 3 in this population is predictable considering the reports of the region and the identification of this genotype from pigs in the state of Antioquia, of which Medellin is the capital. Further studies are necessary to establish whether zoonotic transmission of HEV is important in Colombia. PMID:26886728

  2. Impact of hepatitis B virus infection on hepatic metabolic signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi-Xian; Huang, Chen-Jie; Yang, Zheng-Gang

    2016-09-28

    A growing body of epidemiologic research has demonstrated that metabolic derangement exists in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, indicating that there are clinical associations between HBV infection and host metabolism. In order to understand the complex interplay between HBV and hepatic metabolism in greater depth, we systematically reviewed these alterations in different metabolic signaling pathways due to HBV infection. HBV infection interfered with most aspects of hepatic metabolic responses, including glucose, lipid, nucleic acid, bile acid and vitamin metabolism. Glucose and lipid metabolism is a particular focus due to the significant promotion of gluconeogenesis, glucose aerobic oxidation, the pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid synthesis or oxidation, phospholipid and cholesterol biosynthesis affected by HBV. These altered metabolic pathways are involved in the pathological process of not only hepatitis B, but also metabolic disorders, increasing the occurrence of complications, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver steatosis. Thus, a clearer understanding of the hepatic metabolic pathways affected by HBV and its pathogenesis is necessary to develop more novel therapeutic strategies targeting viral eradication.

  3. Impact of hepatitis B virus infection on hepatic metabolic signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi-Xian; Huang, Chen-Jie; Yang, Zheng-Gang

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of epidemiologic research has demonstrated that metabolic derangement exists in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, indicating that there are clinical associations between HBV infection and host metabolism. In order to understand the complex interplay between HBV and hepatic metabolism in greater depth, we systematically reviewed these alterations in different metabolic signaling pathways due to HBV infection. HBV infection interfered with most aspects of hepatic metabolic responses, including glucose, lipid, nucleic acid, bile acid and vitamin metabolism. Glucose and lipid metabolism is a particular focus due to the significant promotion of gluconeogenesis, glucose aerobic oxidation, the pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid synthesis or oxidation, phospholipid and cholesterol biosynthesis affected by HBV. These altered metabolic pathways are involved in the pathological process of not only hepatitis B, but also metabolic disorders, increasing the occurrence of complications, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver steatosis. Thus, a clearer understanding of the hepatic metabolic pathways affected by HBV and its pathogenesis is necessary to develop more novel therapeutic strategies targeting viral eradication. PMID:27688657

  4. Impact of hepatitis B virus infection on hepatic metabolic signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi-Xian; Huang, Chen-Jie; Yang, Zheng-Gang

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of epidemiologic research has demonstrated that metabolic derangement exists in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, indicating that there are clinical associations between HBV infection and host metabolism. In order to understand the complex interplay between HBV and hepatic metabolism in greater depth, we systematically reviewed these alterations in different metabolic signaling pathways due to HBV infection. HBV infection interfered with most aspects of hepatic metabolic responses, including glucose, lipid, nucleic acid, bile acid and vitamin metabolism. Glucose and lipid metabolism is a particular focus due to the significant promotion of gluconeogenesis, glucose aerobic oxidation, the pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid synthesis or oxidation, phospholipid and cholesterol biosynthesis affected by HBV. These altered metabolic pathways are involved in the pathological process of not only hepatitis B, but also metabolic disorders, increasing the occurrence of complications, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver steatosis. Thus, a clearer understanding of the hepatic metabolic pathways affected by HBV and its pathogenesis is necessary to develop more novel therapeutic strategies targeting viral eradication.

  5. Clinical implications of hepatitis B virus mutations: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Lazarevic, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of acute and chronic hepatitis, and of its long-term complications. It is the most variable among DNA viruses, mostly because of its unique life cycle which includes the activity of error-prone enzyme, reverse transcriptase, and the very high virion production per day. In last two decades, numerous research studies have shown that the speed of disease progression, reliability of diagnostic methods and the success of antiviral therapy and immunization are all influenced by genetic variability of this virus. It was shown that mutations in specific regions of HBV genome could be responsible for unwanted clinical outcomes or evasion of detection by diagnostic tools, thus making the monitoring for these mutations a necessity in proper evaluation of patients. The success of the vaccination programs has now been challenged by the discovery of mutant viruses showing amino acid substitutions in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), which may lead to evasion of vaccine-induced immunity. However, the emergence of these mutations has not yet raised concern since it was shown that they develop slowly. Investigations of HBV genetic variability and clinical implications of specific mutations have resulted in significant advances over the past decade, particularly in regard to management of resistance to antiviral drugs. In the era of drugs with high genetic barrier for resistance, on-going monitoring for possible resistance is still essential since prolonged therapy is often necessary. Understanding the frequencies and clinical implications of viral mutations may contribute to improvement of diagnostic procedures, more proper planning of immunization programs and creating the most efficient therapeutic protocols. PMID:24976703

  6. [Hepatitis B virus core antigen as a carrier for virus-like partical vaccine: a review].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing-Yu; Bo, Hong; Shu, Yue-Long

    2012-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) is a major viral nucleocapsid protein of HBV. It is a 21-22kD protein consisting of 183-185 amino acids. Because of its easy purification, strong immunogenicity, high expression level, and self-assembles into the virus-like particles (VLP), HBcAg could be an efficient and safe VLP carrier for developing vaccines for various pathogens. Up to now, HBcAg VLP carrier has been an important system to develop novel vaccines and many antigen epitope genes from viruses, bacteria and parasites were expressed successfully using the system.

  7. Factors in enhancing blood safety by nucleic acid technology testing for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Shyamala, Venkatakrishna

    2014-01-01

    In the last few decades through an awareness of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI), a majority of countries have mandated serology based blood screening assays for Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, despite improved serology assays, the transfusion transmission of HIV, HCV, and HBV continues, primarily due to release of serology negative units that are infectious because of the window period (WP) and occult HBV infections (OBI). Effective mode of nucleic acid technology (NAT) testing of the viruses can be used to minimize the risk of TTIs. This review compiles the examples of NAT testing failures for all three viruses; analyzes the causes for failure, and the suggestions from retrospective studies to minimize such failures. The results suggest the safest path to be individual donation testing (ID) format for highest sensitivity, and detection of multiple regions for rapidly mutating and recombining viruses. The role of blood screening in the context of the donation and transfusion practices in India, the donor population, and the epidemiology is also discussed. World wide, as the public awareness of TTIs increases, as the recipient rights for safe blood are legally upheld, as the possibility to manage diseases such as hepatitis through expensive and prolonged treatment becomes accessible, and the societal responsibility to shoulder the health costs as in the case for HIV becomes routine, there is much to gain by preventing infections than treating diseases. PMID:24678167

  8. Epidemiology of hepatitis B virus infection in Albania

    PubMed Central

    Resuli, Bashkim; Prifti, Skerdi; Kraja, Bledar; Nurka, Tatjana; Basho, Mimoza; Sadiku, Edita

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence and socio-demographic distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Albania. METHODS: Blood samples from 410 unselected schoolboys, 666 students, 500 military personnel, 1286 casual blood donors, 378 voluntary blood donors and 640 pregnant women (total 3880 non-vaccinated residents of rural and metropolitan areas from all over Albania; 2354 (60.7%) male and 1526 (39.3%) female; mean age of 26.3 years) were tested during 2004-2006 for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibodies to hepatitis B virus (anti-HBs) by ELISA. RESULTS: The HBsAg and anti-HBs prevalence were 9.5% and 28.7%, respectively. The highest HBsAg prevalence was evident in the younger age group, such as in schoolchildren (11.8%) and the military (10.6%). Consequently, the anti-HBs prevalence increased with age, from 21.2% in schoolchildren (mean age: 15.7 years), to 36.3% in pregnant women (mean age: 26.3 years) and 29.7% in voluntary blood donors (mean age: 40.1 years). There were no significant differences between males and females. CONCLUSION: Despite the estimated two-fold reduction of HBsAg prevalence in the general population from about 18%-19% to 9.5%, Albania remains a highly endemic country (i.e. over 8% of HBsAg prevalence rate). PMID:19230046

  9. Therapeutic Targets for the Treatment of Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Scott P.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most common causes of acute viral hepatitis in the world with an estimated 20 million infections per year. Although the mortality rate is less than 1% among the general population, pregnant women can have a fatality rate of up to 30%. Additionally, chronic hepatitis E has increasingly become a significant clinical problem in immunocompromised individuals. Effective antivirals against HEV are needed. Areas covered This review article addresses the current state of knowledge of HEV infections with regard to animal and cell culture model systems that are important for antiviral discovery and testing, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus replication, our understanding of how each viral protein functions, and areas that can potentially be exploited as therapeutic targets. Expert opinion Lack of an efficient cell culture system for HEV propagation, the limited knowledge of HEV lifecycle, and the inherent self-limiting infection within the normal populace make the development of new therapeutic agents against HEV challenging. There are many promising therapeutic targets, and the tools for identifying and testing potential antivirals are rapidly evolving. The development of effective therapeutics against HEV in immunocompromised and pregnant patient populations is warranted. PMID:26073772

  10. Hepatitis B virus infection and metabolic syndrome: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Chi; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Although hepatitis C virus infection is known to be linked with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis, the relationship between hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and metabolic factors remains unclear. HBV infection is a health problem worldwide, especially in endemic regions such as Asia and Africa. It induces liver decompensation, cirrhosis, hepatocellualr carcinoma, and premature mortality. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome continues to increase in parallel with the epidemic of obesity, which is closely associated with the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or even cancer. The systemic review shows that chronic HBV infection protects against instead of promotes fatty liver. The mechanism is possibly due to a lower frequency of dyslipidemia profile in patients with chronic HBV infection. The association of HBV with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and the risk of arteriosclerosis is still inconclusive. In addition, obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome may accelerate the progression of liver disease in patients with chronic HBV infection and synergistically induce cirrhosis or even hepatocellualr carcinoma development. PMID:25092429

  11. Characterization of hepatitis B virus genotypes in chronically infected patients.

    PubMed

    Basaras, M; Arrese, E; Blanco, S; Sota, M; de las Heras, B; Cisterna, R

    2007-12-01

    Genomic mutations occurring during reverse transcription of hepatitis B virus (HBV) could explain its genetic diversity and account for 8 genetically distinct genotypes that are geographically distributed quite differently. The main objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus genotypes in patients with chronic hepatitis B and to see if there was a relationship between genotypes and risk factors for transmission based on HBeAg status. A total of 14 serum samples were analyzed using INNO-LIPA HBV genotyping assay. Genotype D was the most prevalent (64.3%) followed by genotype A (28.6%). There was one case of co-infection (D/E genotypes) that was confirmed by PCR sequencing. All patients except one were HBeAg-negative and anti-HBe-positive. The risk factors for HBV transmission were unknown in half of the cases; in the other half, sexual, transfusion, maternal or interfamilial transmission were observed. The results show that genotype D is the most prevalent genotype in our hospital, followed by genotype A. On the other hand, no relationship was found between HBeAg status and genotype.

  12. Thermal inactivation kinetics of hepatitis A virus in spinach.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Hayriye; Ye, Xiaofei; Harte, Federico; D'Souza, Doris H; Davidson, P Michael

    2015-01-16

    Leafy vegetables have been recognized as important vehicles for the transmission of foodborne viral pathogens. To control hepatitis A viral foodborne illness outbreaks associated with mildly heated (e.g., blanched) leafy vegetables such as spinach, generation of adequate thermal processes is important both for consumers and the food industry. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the thermal inactivation behavior of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in spinach, and provide insights on HAV inactivation in spinach for future studies and industrial applications. The D-values calculated from the first-order model (50-72 °C) ranged from 34.40 ± 4.08 to 0.91 ± 0.12 min with a z-value of 13.92 ± 0.87 °C. The calculated activation energy value was 162 ± 11 kJ/mol. Using the information generated in the present study and the thermal parameters of industrial blanching conditions for spinach as a basis (100 °C for 120-180 s), the blanching of spinach in water at 100 °C for 120-180 s under atmospheric conditions will provide greater than 6 log reduction of HAV. The results of this study may be useful to the frozen food industry in designing blanching conditions for spinach to inactivate or control hepatitis A virus outbreaks.

  13. Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV-infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Mark S.

    2001-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a spherical enveloped RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family, classified within the Hepacivirus genus. Since its discovery in 1989, HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic hepatitis and hepatic fibrosis that progresses in some patients to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the United States, approximately 4 million people have been infected with HCV, and 10,000 HCV-related deaths occur each year. Due to shared routes of transmission, HCV and HIV co-infection are common, affecting approximately one third of all HIV-infected persons in the United States. In addition, HIV co-infection is associated with higher HCV RNA viral load and a more rapid progression of HCV-related liver disease, leading to an increased risk of cirrhosis. HCV infection may also impact the course and management of HIV disease, particularly by increasing the risk of antiretroviral drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, chronic HCV infection acts as an opportunistic disease in HIV-infected persons because the incidence of infection is increased and the natural history of HCV infection is accelerated in co-infected persons. Strategies to prevent primary HCV infection and to modify the progression of HCV-related liver disease are urgently needed among HIV/HCV co-infected individuals.

  14. Hepatitis C virus infection in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Mark S

    2007-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a spherical enveloped RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family, classified within the Hepacivirus genus. Since its discovery in 1989, HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic hepatitis and hepatic fibrosis that progresses in some patients to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the United States, approximately 4 million people have been infected with HCV, and 10,000 HCVrelated deaths occur each year. Due to shared routes of transmission, HCV and HIV co-infection are common, affecting approximately one third of all HIV-infected persons in the United States. In addition, HIV co-infection is associated with higher HCV RNA viral load and a more rapid progression of HCV-related liver disease, leading to an increased risk of cirrhosis. HCV infection may also impact the course and management of HIV disease, particularly by increasing the risk of antiretroviral drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, chronic HCV infection acts as an opportunistic disease in HIV-infected persons because the incidence of infection is increased and the natural history of HCV infection is accelerated in co-infected persons. Strategies to prevent primary HCV infection and to modify the progression of HCV-related liver disease are urgently needed among HIV/HCV co-infected individuals.

  15. Animal Models of Chronic Hepatitis Delta Virus Infection Host–Virus Immunologic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aldabe, Rafael; Suárez-Amarán, Lester; Usai, Carla; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective RNA virus that has an absolute requirement for a virus belonging to the hepadnaviridae family like hepatitis B virus (HBV) for its replication and formation of new virions. HDV infection is usually associated with a worsening of HBV-induced liver pathogenesis, which leads to more frequent cirrhosis, increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and fulminant hepatitis. Importantly, no selective therapies are available for HDV infection. The mainstay of treatment for HDV infection is pegylated interferon alpha; however, response rates to this therapy are poor. A better knowledge of HDV–host cell interaction will help with the identification of novel therapeutic targets, which are urgently needed. Animal models like hepadnavirus-infected chimpanzees or the eastern woodchuck have been of great value for the characterization of HDV chronic infection. Recently, more practical animal models in which to perform a deeper study of host virus interactions and to evaluate new therapeutic strategies have been developed. Therefore, the main focus of this review is to discuss the current knowledge about HDV host interactions obtained from cell culture and animal models. PMID:25686091

  16. Screening for Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus at a Community Fair: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Garmen A.; Hill, Mary A.; de Medina, Maria D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite recommendations for screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), most individuals are still unaware of their infection status. The disparities in screening for HBV and HCV can be attributed to lack of awareness, language barriers, and difficulty in accessing healthcare. To address these issues, an exhibit booth was set up at an annual cultural festival to promote awareness about HBV and HCV and also provide free screening for a local Floridian community. Recruitment was conducted in various languages by physicians and nurses who specialize in hepatology. All materials associated with the screening process were sponsored by the Schiff Center for Liver Diseases, which is located at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida. In the first year of the screening initiative, 173 of 11,000 fair attendees were screened for HBV. Twenty-nine (17%) of those screened tested positive for antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and only 1 individual tested positive for chronic HBV, with positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Screening for HCV and an extended patient questionnaire were added to the screening program in the second year of the initiative. A total 231 of 9,000 fair attendees volunteered to be screened for both HBV and HCV. Twenty-nine (13%) of these people tested positive for anti-HBc, and 3 tested positive for HBsAg. Only 1 person tested positive for anti-HCV, but this individual had undetectable HCV RNA levels. Our single-center experience illustrates that, despite efforts to improve access to screening, only 2-3% of attendees at a cultural fair embraced the screening efforts. Other strategies will be required to enhance participation in screening programs for viral hepatitis. PMID:23943664

  17. Renal disease in patients infected with hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Jaryal, Ajay; Kumar, Vivek; Sharma, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can result in hepatic diseases which may include an asymptomatic non-replicative carrier state, immunotolerant phase characterized by high DNA levels without significant hepatic injury, immune-reactive phase characterized by occurrence of chronic hepatitis and fibrosis in the liver, or complications like cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Extrahepatic manifestations may also accompany HBV infection. These may include serum sickness syndrome, polyarthralgia, polyarthritis, dermatologic manifestations like pitted keratolysis, urticaria, purpura, oral lichen planus or Gianotti-Crosti syndrome-a childhood papular eruption. Renal involvement may occur with HBV infection and usually involves glomerular or vascular injury. Various morphologic forms of renal injury have been reported with HBV infection, the commonest being membranous glomerulonephritis. The manifestations may include swelling over face and body, pedal edema, and urinary abnormalities. Evaluation may detect proteinuria, hematuria and reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The management options include use of antiviral drugs targeting HBV infection with or without concomitant immunosuppressive medication. With availability of newer drugs like entecavir and tenofovir, these have become the first line agents as they have a high barrier to resistance. Sole use of immunosuppression is not recommended for lack of clear benefit and the possible risk of HBV reactivation or flare. PMID:27509699

  18. [Prevention of hepatitis C virus infection in drug users].

    PubMed

    Schulte, B; Stöver, H; Leicht, A; Schnackenberg, K; Reimer, J

    2008-10-01

    The high prevalence and incidence rates of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in drug users demonstrate the urgent necessity for a coordinated national prevention strategy. In the shadow of HIV/AIDS the necessary attention to the rapid spreading of the hepatitis C in drug users was started late, without being able to reach the public attention level of HIV/AIDS. The present efforts in the primary and secondary prevention of the hepatitis C in drug users are obviously not sufficient to reduce the prevalence with long-lasting results. Substitution treatment is of central relevance in the prevention of hepatitis C in opiate-dependent subjects, but requires, as current data of the HCV incidence of substituted opiate dependents illustrate, a stronger HCV-specific accentuation. Further settings, which are relevant for the group of intravenous drug users, have to be accessed and sensitized. Furthermore structural and political efforts are necessary, in order to develop a systematic and evidence-based answer to the challenge of the HCV spreading in drug users, in particular due to the fact that a German HCV strategy is still lacking.

  19. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus Infections in Uttarakhand, India

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Garima; Gupta, Pratima; Gupta, Rohit; Ahuja, Vivek; Mittal, Manish; Dhar, Minakshi

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are a serious global public health problem affecting billions of people. A population based serological survey was conducted in Uttarakhand, India to determine the prevalence and risk factors of HBV and HCV infections. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted to achieve the primary objective of estimating the prevalence of HBsAg and anti-HCV seropositivity and to estimate the potential risk factors. Results A total of 495 volunteers completed the study questionnaire and underwent blood tests for HBsAg and anti-HCV serology. Of these, 339 (68.5%) were males and 156 (31.5%) were females. The mean age of the volunteers was 31 ± 4 years. The overall infection rate was 4.4% (n = 22) in the studied population. The seroprevalence of HBsAg was found to be 2.8% (n = 14) and of anti-HCV antibodies 1.8% (n = 9), whereas dual infection i.e. HBV and HCV infection was seen in 0.2% (n = 1). The overall analysis of risk factors of our data showed that persons who have received multiple blood transfusions, history of hepatitis among family members, visits to unregistered medical practitioners and uneducated people are at more risk for acquiring hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection. Conclusions The results indicate an intermediate level of endemicity of HBV and HCV infection in this geographical area of Uttarakhand. Some independent risk factors like blood transfusion, intra familial transmission, and visit to unregistered practitioners were identified. PMID:25755517

  20. Shedding of Hepatitis C Virus in Semen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Men

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Samuel S.; Gianella, Sara; Yip, Marcus J-S.; van Seggelen, Wouter O.; Gillies, Robert D.; Foster, Andrew L.; Barbati, Zachary R.; Smith, Davey M.; Fierer, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The epidemic of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) has been documented for over a decade. Despite this, there is no consensus as to the risk factors for sexual acquisition of HCV in these men. Methods. We obtained paired semen and blood samples at 2-week intervals from HIV-infected MSM with recent and chronic HCV infection and quantified HCV in semen. Results. Hepatitis C virus was quantified in 59 semen specimens from 33 men. Hepatitis C virus was shed in 16 (27%) of semen specimens from 11 (33%) of the men. Median HCV viral load (VL) in semen was 1.49 log10 IU/mL. Hepatitis C virus VL in blood was significantly higher at the time of HCV shedding in semen than when HCV shedding in semen was not detected (P = .002). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the HCV VL in blood and semen overall (rs = 0.41; P = .001), and in the subgroup with recent HCV infection (rs = 0.37; P = .02), but not in the subgroup with chronic HCV infection (rs = 0.34; P = .1). Conclusions. One third of HIV-infected MSM coinfected with HCV shed HCV into their semen. Based on the HCV VL in semen in this study, an average ejaculate would deliver up to 6630 IU of virus into the rectum of the receptive partner. Therefore, our data strongly support that condoms should be used during anal intercourse among MSM to prevent transmission of HCV. PMID:27186582

  1. Shedding of Hepatitis C Virus in Semen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Men.

    PubMed

    Turner, Samuel S; Gianella, Sara; Yip, Marcus J-S; van Seggelen, Wouter O; Gillies, Robert D; Foster, Andrew L; Barbati, Zachary R; Smith, Davey M; Fierer, Daniel S

    2016-03-01

    Background.  The epidemic of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) has been documented for over a decade. Despite this, there is no consensus as to the risk factors for sexual acquisition of HCV in these men. Methods.  We obtained paired semen and blood samples at 2-week intervals from HIV-infected MSM with recent and chronic HCV infection and quantified HCV in semen. Results.  Hepatitis C virus was quantified in 59 semen specimens from 33 men. Hepatitis C virus was shed in 16 (27%) of semen specimens from 11 (33%) of the men. Median HCV viral load (VL) in semen was 1.49 log10 IU/mL. Hepatitis C virus VL in blood was significantly higher at the time of HCV shedding in semen than when HCV shedding in semen was not detected (P = .002). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the HCV VL in blood and semen overall (rs = 0.41; P = .001), and in the subgroup with recent HCV infection (rs = 0.37; P = .02), but not in the subgroup with chronic HCV infection (rs = 0.34; P = .1). Conclusions.  One third of HIV-infected MSM coinfected with HCV shed HCV into their semen. Based on the HCV VL in semen in this study, an average ejaculate would deliver up to 6630 IU of virus into the rectum of the receptive partner. Therefore, our data strongly support that condoms should be used during anal intercourse among MSM to prevent transmission of HCV. PMID:27186582

  2. Environmental transmission of hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses within the hemodialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Cendoroglo Neto, M; Manzano, S I; Canziani, M E; Silva, A E; Cirenza, L F; Sesso, R de C; Ajzen, H; Draibe, S A

    1995-03-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be transmitted in the dialysis setting through blood transfusions and environmental surfaces. Transfusion related hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is very well known, but only recently the environmental transmission of this virus was postulated. In order to study the prevalence, mechanisms of transmission, and the ALT patterns of HBV and HCV infections in hemodialysis and CAPD patients before the implementation of HBV vaccination and HCV screening in the blood bank, we conducted a study from January 1987 to January 1990. Sera from 185 hemodialysis and 124 CAPD patients were stored in this period and later analyzed for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, and anti-HCV (second generation ELISA). The prevalence of any HBV marker was 55.7% (103/185) for hemodialysis patients and 31.5% (39/124) for CAPD patients (hemodialysis vs. CAPD, p < 0.001). The prevalence of positive anti-HCV was 35.1% (65/185) for hemodialysis and 33.9% (42/124) for CAPD patients (not significant). There was a significant association between HBV markers positivity and anti-HCV positivity. The multivariate analysis of risk factors revealed an association of the positivity of each virus with the duration of renal replacement therapy (RRT), number of previous blood transfusions, and past history of hemodialysis treatment. Thus, besides the transfusion-related transmission, hemodialysis environmental transmission may also occur for both viruses. The findings of a high prevalence of both viruses and evidence for environmental transmission in the dialysis setting are of major importance for the planning of future preventive measures. PMID:7539998

  3. [Epstein-Barr, hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infections and their oncogenic potentials].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, J; Brkić, S; Klasnja, B; Fabri, M

    1997-01-01

    There are two ways of connecting Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with the uncontrolled growth of EBV infected B lymphocytes: in case of evident immunosuppression when the control by cellular immunity is missing or in the case of pathological growth of malignant clone as a result of genetic translocations. Today, EBV is linked with the development of lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients, Hodgkin's and Burkitt's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The presence of EBV genome in these patients can be confirmed in malignant cells, in lower or higher percent, as well as the high titers of antibodies against specific virus antigens. Hepatitis B viral infection (HBVI) of specific chronic course and associated with intensified inflammation and mitotic activity is of one of the most important factors in the appearance of hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the integration of viral DNA in DNA of hepatocytes has been one of the possible preconditions for carcinogenesis, recently a great attention has been paid to the inactivation of p53 suppressor gene, being a transcriptive transactivator. Other possible cofactors of carcinogenesis imply long-lasting viral replication, coinfection with HVB, HCV or HDV, interaction with other chemical carcinogens (hormones, aflatoxin, alcohol and similar). In distinction from other human DNA viruses, Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a RNA virus which is not integrated in genome of hepatocyte and active replication of virus is maintained even when hepatocellular carcinoma is detected. It has been assumed that HCV inactivate or mutate the gene of tumor suppression p53 in an early stage of hepatocellular carcinoma development. PMID:9471511

  4. Simeprevir for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Laure; Helle, François; François, Catherine; Castelain, Sandrine; Duverlie, Gilles; Brochot, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Simeprevir (TMC435, Olysio™), a second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor, has been recently approved for the treatment of genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. This molecule has very different characteristics from first-generation protease inhibitors. Results from trials show that simeprevir is highly effective and safe, with few adverse events. We discuss the specific features of this new treatment option for HCV infection, in terms of in vitro data, pharmacological data, and clinical trials. We also discuss the impact of Q80K polymorphism at baseline. Studies evaluating interferon-free regimens with simeprevir are ongoing. Future combinations of two or more direct-acting antiviral agents, targeting different viral enzymes and with synergistic antiviral effects, will be approved, allowing treatment of pan-genotypic HCV with optimized sustained virologic responses. Simeprevir will undoubtedly be part of future treatment strategies. PMID:25206310

  5. Atypical serological profiles in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pondé, Robério A A

    2013-04-01

    During hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, at least four antigen-antibody systems are observed: HBsAg and anti-HBs; preS antigen and anti-preS antibody; HBcAg and anti-HBc; and HBeAg and anti-HBe. Through the examination of these antigen-antibody systems, hepatitis B infection is diagnosed and the course of the disorder may be observed. Although the serologic findings that allow both the diagnosis of HBV infection as well as assessing of its clinical course are already well established, the dynamics of viral proteins expression and of the antibodies production may vary during the infection natural course. This causes the HBV infection to be occasionally associated with the presence of uncommon serological profiles, which could lead to doubts in the interpretation of results or suspicion of a serological result being incorrect. This paper is dedicated to the discussion of some of these profiles and their significance.

  6. Rapid and quantitative detection of hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yue-Ping; Yao, Chun-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Despite availability of a universal vaccine, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has a huge impact on public health worldwide. Accurate and timely diagnosis of HBV infection is needed. Rapid developments have been made in the diagnostic and monitoring methods for HBV infection, including serological and molecular assays. In clinical practice, qualitative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) testing has long served as a diagnostic marker for individuals infected with HBV. More recently, HBsAg level has been used to predict treatment outcome when determined early during treatment or at baseline. However, identification of HBV DNA positive cases that do not have detectable HBsAg has encouraged the application of molecular tests. Hence, combination of quantitative detection of HBV DNA and HBsAg can be used to discriminate patients during the course of HBV infection and to monitor therapy. This article reviews the most commonly used quantitative methods for HBsAg and HBV DNA. PMID:26576084

  7. [Pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanqing; Guo, Jinsheng

    2016-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancer worldwide. Most of the HCC occur in developing countries. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is an important risk factor for HCC development. HBV induces immune-mediated chronic hepatitis, liver injury, regeneration and scar forming responses, leading to an inflammatory, fibrotic and immune deficient microenvironment. HBV may integrate into host genome, inducing genetic abnormality and altering the expression of HCC-related genes. HBV also expresses active proteins such as X (HBx) and S proteins, which may trans-activate HCC-related proteins expression, interact with intracellular specific proteins, activate a variety of signaling pathways, and induce aberrant epigenetic modifications. HBV mutation also has impact on HBV related HCC development. PMID:26983488

  8. Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Inhibitors: Current and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Currently, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is considered a serious health-care problem all over the world. A good number of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against HCV infection are in clinical progress including NS3-4A protease inhibitors, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors, and NS5A inhibitors as well as host targeted inhibitors. Two NS3-4A protease inhibitors (telaprevir and boceprevir) have been recently approved for the treatment of hepatitis C in combination with standard of care (pegylated interferon plus ribavirin). The new therapy has significantly improved sustained virologic response (SVR); however, the adverse effects associated with this therapy are still the main concern. In addition to the emergence of viral resistance, other targets must be continually developed. One such underdeveloped target is the helicase portion of the HCV NS3 protein. This review article summarizes our current understanding of HCV treatment, particularly with those of NS3 inhibitors. PMID:24282816

  9. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Envelope Glycoprotein Core Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Nieusma, Travis; Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Cogburn, Kristin E.; Hua, Yuanzi; Dai, Xiaoping; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun

    2014-08-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a Hepacivirus, is a major cause of viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 mediate fusion and entry into host cells and are the primary targets of the humoral immune response. The crystal structure of the E2 core bound to broadly neutralizing antibody AR3C at 2.65 angstroms reveals a compact architecture composed of a central immunoglobulin-fold β sandwich flanked by two additional protein layers. The CD81 receptor binding site was identified by electron microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis and overlaps with the AR3C epitope. The x-ray and electron microscopy E2 structures differ markedly from predictions of an extended, three-domain, class II fusion protein fold and therefore provide valuable information for HCV drug and vaccine design.

  10. A case of acute hepatitis B in a chronic hepatitis C patient after daclatasvir and asunaprevir combination therapy: hepatitis B virus reactivation or acute self-limited hepatitis?

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ishizu, Yoji; Kuzuya, Teiji; Honda, Takashi; Nishimura, Daisaku; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2016-08-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive patients treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy is well known. HBV reactivation in patients with HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection caused by direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy has also recently been reported. We report a case of acute hepatitis B in a patient with HCV infection after DAA therapy. An 83-year-old woman was referred for chronic hepatitis C. She was infected with HCV genotype 1b and negative for HBsAg at baseline. She received daclatasvir and asunaprevir therapy, and HCV became negative at 4 weeks and remained negative until 6 months after the end of DAA therapy. Acute hepatitis B de