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Sample records for duck hepatitis virus

  1. [Overview on duck virus hepatitis A].

    PubMed

    Ren, Liqian; Li, Jing; Bi, Yuhai; Chen, Can; Zhang, Dabing; Liu, Wenjun

    2012-07-01

    This article describes the nomenclature, history and genetic evolution of duck hepatitis A virus, and updates the epidemiology, clinical symptom and surveillances of duck virus hepatitis A. It also summarizes the present status and progress of duck virus hepatitis A and illustrated the necessity and urgency of its research, which provides rationale for the control of duck hepatitis A virus disease in China.

  2. Genetic characterization of Duck Hepatitis A Viruses isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Bi, Yuhai; Chen, Can; Yang, Limin; Ding, Chan; Liu, Wenjun

    2013-12-26

    In recent years, the spread of Duck Hepatitis A Viruses (DHAVs) has represented a serious threat and significant economic impact in duck industry of China. The sixteen reported DHAV isolates (15 DHAV-1 strains and one DHAV-3) were identified from infected ducks with clinical symptoms in China between 2009 and 2012. In the present study, the virulence of these viruses and complete sequences of the virion protein 1 (VP1) genes of the 16 DHAVs were characterized. The median embryonic lethal doses (ELD50) of the second generation duck embryo allantoic fluid of the 16 DHAV isolates were calculated on duck and chicken embryos. The results demonstrated that the various DHAV-1 strains have shown different pathogenic ability in embryos, and duck eggs were more susceptible to DHAV than chicken eggs. The histopathological examination revealed significant signs of virus infection, severe vacuolation, and hepatocyte necrosis. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the 15 DHAV-1 viruses display significant correlation in their geographic distribution. The DHAV-1 strains isolated from Shandong Province were more evolutionarily divergent than the JX strains. There were two hypervariable regions in the VP1 protein, which may determine the virulence of DHAV-1 isolates in chicken eggs but not virulence in duck eggs. These results demonstrate the genetic and biological diversity of DHAVs in China and aid in understanding the epidemiology and evolution of DHAVs.

  3. Suramin prevents duck hepatitis B virus infection in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Offensperger, W B; Offensperger, S; Walter, E; Blum, H E; Gerok, W

    1993-01-01

    The effect of suramin on duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infection was investigated in vivo. Suramin pretreatment of Pekin ducklings completely prevented DHBV infection. In contrast, suramin given at the time of or after inoculation with DHBV did not inhibit viral infection, replication, or gene expression. These data indicate that suramin effectively blocks the early stages of DHBV infection in vivo. Images PMID:8363388

  4. Sulfated polyanions do not inhibit duck hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Offensperger, W B; Offensperger, S; Walter, E; Blum, H E; Gerok, W

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of the antiviral action of sulfated polyanions in human immunodeficiency virus and other viral infections, we studied the effect of dextran sulfate and heparin on duck hepatitis B virus infection. These agents do not affect viral uptake and replication in liver cells in vitro or in vivo. Sulfated polyanions, therefore, appear to have no potential for the treatment of hepadnavirus infections. Images PMID:1804020

  5. Apoptosis induction in duck tissues during duck hepatitis A virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Sheng, X D; Zhang, W P; Zhang, Q R; Gu, C Q; Hu, X Y; Cheng, G F

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the role of apoptosis in duck viral hepatitis pathogenesis, 4- and 21-d-old ducks were inoculated with duck hepatitis A virus serotype 1 and killed at 2, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h postinfection. TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling was used to detect apoptosis cells. Expression profiles of apoptosis-related genes including caspase-3, -8, -9, and Bcl-2 in spleen, bursa of Fabricius, liver, and the quantity of virus in blood were examined using real-time PCR. The TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling analysis indicated there was a significant difference of apoptotic cells between treatments and controls. The same difference also appeared in virus amount variation in blood during infection. Gene expression analysis revealed that the apoptosis-related gene expression profile was different in the 2 groups, and also different between various organs. This study suggested that apoptosis may play an important role in duck hepatitis A virus serotype 1 infection, and apoptosis suppression might facilitate virus multiplication, resulting in the highest virus concentration in the host.

  6. Replication cycle of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 in duck embryonic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fangke; Chen, Yun; Shi, Jintong; Ming, Ke; Liu, Jiaguo; Xiong, Wen; Song, Meiyun; Du, Hongxu; Wang, Yixuan; Zhang, Shuaibin; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang

    2016-04-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) is an important agent of duck viral hepatitis. Until recently, the replication cycle of DHAV-1 is still unknown. Here duck embryonic hepatocytes infected with DHAV-1 were collected at different time points, and dynamic changes of the relative DHAV-1 gene expression during replication were detected by real-time PCR. And the morphology of hepatocytes infected with DHAV was evaluated by electron microscope. The result suggested that the adsorption of DHAV-1 saturated at 90 min post-infection, and the virus particles with size of about 50 nm including more than 20 nm of vacuum drying gold were observed on the infected cells surface. What's more, the replication lasted around 13 h after the early protein synthesis for about 5h, and the release of DHAV-1 was in steady state after 32 h. The replication cycle will enrich the data for DVH control and provide the foundation for future studies.

  7. Epidemiology and molecular characterisation of duck hepatitis A virus from different duck breeds in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Erfan, Ahmed M; Selim, Abdullah A; Moursi, Mohamed K; Nasef, Soad A; Abdelwhab, E M

    2015-06-12

    Duck hepatitis virus (DHV) is an acute highly contagious disease of ducklings caused by three distinct serotypes of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), a member of the RNA family Picornaviridae, where serotype 1 is the most widespread serotype worldwide. To date, little if any is known about the prevalence and genetic characterisation of DHAV outside Asia. The current study describes surveillance on DHV in 46 commercial duck farms in Egypt with a history of high mortality in young ducklings from 3 to 15 day-old from 2012 to 2014. Clinical samples were examined by generic RT-PCR assays followed by partial sequence analysis of the 5'UTR, VP1 and 3D genes of the vaccine strain and 15 field viruses. The overall positive rate was 37% (n=17/46). All duck breeds (Pekin, Muscovy, Mallard and Green Winged) were susceptible to the disease with mortality ranged from 15% to 96.7%. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Egyptian strains cluster in the DHAV serotype 1 with Asian viruses and distinguishable from the vaccine strains. So far, this is the first report on the genetic characterisation of DHAV in Egypt. This study may be useful to better understand the epidemiology and evolution of DHAV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sequence of events in natural infection of Pekin duck embryos with duck hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, M K; O'Connell, A P; London, W T

    1985-01-01

    The major mode of natural infection of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) in Pekin ducks is vertical transmission, with 95 to 100% of the embryos from DHBV-infected dams eventually becoming infected. Maternally transmitted virus is present in large quantities in the yolk of unincubated eggs and is taken up by the embryo during early development. Synthesis of DHBV DNA in the embryo begins at about 6 days of incubation and coincides with the formation of the liver. DHBV DNA synthesis is incomplete, however, until 8 to 10 days of incubation, as shown by comparing the electrophoretic patterns of DHBV-specific nucleic acid species from embryonic livers at successive stages of development. From 8 days of incubation and continuing throughout embryonic development, subviral particles, which resemble viral replication intermediates isolated from infected livers of post-hatch ducklings, appear in the circulation. These particles contain a polymerase activity that utilizes an RNA template to synthesize viral DNA. Our results suggest that certain host functions, which appear during embryonic development, may be required for DHBV replication and assembly. It is possible that in mammals a similar developmental process occurs. The failure to find human hepatitis B virus in the circulation of most babies, born to hepatitis B virus carrier women, in the first few weeks after birth may reflect such a process. Images PMID:4009791

  9. Live Attenuated Vaccine Based on Duck Enteritis Virus against Duck Hepatitis A Virus Types 1 and 3

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhong; Ma, Ji; Huang, Kun; Chen, Huanchun; Liu, Ziduo; Jin, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    As causative agents of duck viral hepatitis, duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) and type 3 (DHAV-3) causes significant economic losses in the duck industry. However, a licensed commercial vaccine that simultaneously controls both pathogens is currently unavailable. Here, we generated duck enteritis virus recombinants (rC-KCE-2VP1) containing both VP1 from DHAV-1 (VP1/DHAV-1) and VP1 from DHAV-3 (VP1/DHAV-3) between UL27 and UL26. A self-cleaving 2A-element of FMDV was inserted between the two different types of VP1, allowing production of both proteins from a single open reading frame. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis results demonstrated that both VP1 proteins were robustly expressed in rC-KCE-2VP1-infected chicken embryo fibroblasts. Ducks that received a single dose of rC-KCE-2VP1 showed potent humoral and cellular immune responses and were completely protected against challenges of both pathogenic DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 strains. The protection was rapid, achieved as early as 3 days after vaccination. Moreover, viral replication was fully blocked in vaccinated ducks as early as 1 week post-vaccination. These results demonstrated, for the first time, that recombinant rC-KCE-2VP1 is potential fast-acting vaccine against DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. PMID:27777571

  10. Replication cycle of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 in duck embryonic hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Fangke; Chen, Yun; Shi, Jintong; Ming, Ke; Liu, Jiaguo Xiong, Wen; Song, Meiyun; Du, Hongxu; Wang, Yixuan; Zhang, Shuaibin; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang

    2016-04-15

    Duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) is an important agent of duck viral hepatitis. Until recently, the replication cycle of DHAV-1 is still unknown. Here duck embryonic hepatocytes infected with DHAV-1 were collected at different time points, and dynamic changes of the relative DHAV-1 gene expression during replication were detected by real-time PCR. And the morphology of hepatocytes infected with DHAV was evaluated by electron microscope. The result suggested that the adsorption of DHAV-1 saturated at 90 min post-infection, and the virus particles with size of about 50 nm including more than 20 nm of vacuum drying gold were observed on the infected cells surface. What's more, the replication lasted around 13 h after the early protein synthesis for about 5 h, and the release of DHAV-1 was in steady state after 32 h. The replication cycle will enrich the data for DVH control and provide the foundation for future studies. - Highlights: • This is the first description of the replication cycle of DHAV-1. • Firstly find that DHAV-1 adsorption saturated at 90 min post-infection. • The replication lasted around 13 h after early protein synthesis for about 5 h. • The release of DHAV-1 was in steady state after 32 h.

  11. The prevalence of duck hepatitis A virus types 1 and 3 on Korean duck farms.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Mahmoud; Alfajaro, Mia Madel; Lee, Min-Hee; Jeong, Young-Ju; Kim, Deok-Song; Son, Kyu-Yeol; Kwon, Joseph; Choi, Jong-Soon; Lim, Jong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Sung; Lee, Tae-Uk; Cho, Kyoung-Oh; Kang, Mun-Il

    2015-02-01

    This study reports the prevalence of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) types 1 and 3 on Korean duck farms. By RT-nested PCR assays specific for DHAV-1 or DHAV-3, DHAV-1 was detected in 9 of 157 liver samples (5.7 %) from 2 of 30 farms (6.7 %), and DHAV-3 was positive in 104 of 157 liver samples (66.2 %) from 23 of 30 farms (76.7 %). Dual infections with DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 were detected in 23 of 157 samples (14.6 %) from 5 of 30 farms (16.7 %). The data indicate that DHAV-3 infections are prevalent and that DHAV-1 reemerged in Korea, resulting in dual infections on several farms. Our data will help to establish a vaccination policy against DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 in Korea.

  12. Regulatory sequences of duck hepatitis B virus C gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, R; Will, H

    1991-01-01

    The regulatory elements involved in transcription of the C gene of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) were investigated. Several DHBV DNA fragments were assayed for C gene promoter, enhancer, and silencer activity by using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene and transfection of established liver and nonliver cell lines. A major transcript initiating at nucleotide positions 2532 and 2533 and three minor transcripts initiating at positions 2453/2454 and 2461 were identified in cells containing these constructs. These positions correspond to the 5' end of the C mRNA and were close to that of the pre-C mRNAs, respectively, found in infected livers. The pre-C mRNAs were only detected when sequences located between the initiation sites of the pre-C and C mRNAs were deleted. These sequences downregulated, in an orientation-independent fashion, a heterologous promoter and were found to contain a consensus motif common to negative transcriptional regulatory elements previously characterized in other cellular and viral genes. C gene promoter activity was only observed in highly differentiated liver cells and was dependent on a short DHBV DNA fragment containing an enhancer core consensus motif. These data indicate that transcription of the DHBV C gene is regulated by positive, negative, and differentiation factor-responsive elements. Images PMID:1920612

  13. Complete genome sequence of the novel duck hepatitis B virus strain SCP01 from Sichuan Cherry Valley duck.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingqing; Jia, Renyong; Liu, Siyang; Wang, Mingshu; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Liu, Mafeng; Yin, Zhongqiong; Jing, Bo; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    The duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) strain, designated SCP01, was isolated and identified from a Sichuan Cherry Valley duck in Southwestern China. To determine the origination and evolution of this isolated strain, we carried out complete genome sequencing of this strain. Sequencing of the nucleotide sequence of DHBV strain SCP01 revealed a genome size of 3021 bp that contained three open reading frames, designated as C, S, and P, which were consistent with those of other duck hepatitis B viruses nucleotide sequences available in the GenBank of NCBI. Sequence comparisons based on the full-length genomic sequences showed that the DHBV SCP01 strain had the highest similarity (99.64 %) with the sequence of strain DHBV-XY, but had a lower similarity (90.04 %) with the sequence of strain DHBV CH5 isolated from Southwestern China. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the DHBV-XY and DHBV SCP01 formed a branch that was clearly distinct from the other strains. This study show that the DHBV SCP01 strain from Sichuan belonged to "Western" isolates, while the DHBV CH5 from Sichuan belonged to "Chinese" isolates. These data will promote further research into the evolutionary biology, epidemiology and pathobiology of hepadnavirus infections. In addition, continuing duck hepatitis B virus surveillance in poultry is critical to understand the patterns of DHBV infection, and to find further animal infection models to study HBV infection.

  14. Complete genome sequence of a novel duck hepatitis A virus discovered in southern China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chun-ya; Su, Shuo; Huang, Zhen; Zhu, Wan-jun; Chen, Ji-dang; Zhao, Fu-rong; Wang, Yan-jing; Xie, Jie-xiong; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Guihong

    2012-09-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of a novel duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) isolated from mixed infections with DHAV type 1 (DHAV-1) and DHAV-3 in ducklings in Southern China. The whole nucleotide sequence had the highest homology with the sequence of DHAV-3 (GenBank accession number DQ812093) (96.2%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of gene rearrangement between DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, and it will help to understand the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of duck hepatitis A virus in Southern China.

  15. Enrichment of a Precore-Minus Mutant of Duck Hepatitis B Virus in Experimental Mixed Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Yuan; Summers, Jesse

    1999-01-01

    A precore-deficient mutant of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) produced by site-directed mutagenesis was tested for its ability to compete with wild-type virus in a mixed infection of 3-day-old ducklings. The mutation was shown to produce a cis-acting defect, resulting in a replication rate that was about one-half that of wild-type virus. Accordingly, wild-type virus was rapidly selected during the spread of infection. During the chronic phase of the infection, however, two selection patterns were seen. In 4 of 10 ducks, the wild-type virus slowly replaced the precore mutant. In another four ducks, the precore mutant virus slowly replaced the wild-type virus. In the remaining two ducklings, ratios of wild-type and precore mutant virus fluctuated, with wild-type virus slowly predominating. The replacement of wild-type virus was not due to the emergence of a rapidly replicating variant of the precore mutant, since genomes cloned from the infected ducks retained their original replication defect. Replacement of wild-type virus, however, correlated with elevated anti-core antibody titers, which continued to increase with time. The selection of a precore-negative strain of DHBV may be analogous to the selection for precore mutants of HBV during chronic hepatitis in humans. PMID:10196253

  16. Viral nucleic acid synthesis and antigen accumulation in pancreas and kidney of Pekin ducks infected with duck hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, M S; England, J M; Deery, D T; Petcu, D J; Mason, W S; Molnar-Kimber, K L

    1983-01-01

    Liver, pancreas, and kidney from Pekin ducks infected with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) were assayed for the presence of both viral antigen and replication-specific forms of viral nucleic acid. In young congenitally infected ducks, antigen was detectable in hepatocytes and bile duct epithelia, in kidney glomeruli and tubular epithelia, and in cells localized to pancreatic acini. In older experimentally infected ducks, antigen was detectable in hepatocytes, in glomeruli and tubular epithelia, and in cells localized to presumptive pancreatic alpha-islets. All but the glomeruli-associated viral antigen appeared to be localized to the cytoplasm of antigen-positive cells. Much of the glomeruli-associated antigen appeared to be extracellular and was detected in glomeruli that were positive for the accumulation of immunoglobulin, observations suggestive of the deposition of viral antigen-antibody complexes. As analyzed with bulk tissue, replication-specific forms of viral nucleic acid were detectable in liver and pancreas from the young congenitally infected ducks and in liver and kidney from the older experimentally infected ducks. Images PMID:6576362

  17. [Molecular characteristic of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 causing pancreatitis ].

    PubMed

    Fu, Guanghua; Huang, Yu; Fu, Qiuling; Cheng, Longfei; Wan, Chunhe; Shi, Shaohua; Chen, Hongmei; Lin, Jiansheng; Lin, Fang

    2014-09-04

    [OBJECTIVE] We studied the molecular characteristics of the full-length genome of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 causing pancreatitis in Muscovy ducklings. [METHODS] We determined the entire genomic sequence of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 strain MPZJ1206 using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay and analyzed the bioinformatics of the viral genome sequence. [ RESULTS] The genome length of strain MPZJ1206 comprised 7703 bases, with a G + C content of 43.05%. The genome of MPZJ1206 contains a single, long open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 2249 amino acids, with a genomic orgariization similar to those of other isolates of duck hepatitis A virus type 1. MPZJ1206 is identical with previously isolates by 93. 5% - 99. 6% in nucleotide sequence and 97. 9% - 99. 6% in amino acid sequence and shares genetic distance no more than 7%. Phylogenetic analysis based on genome sequence indicates that MPZJ1206 shares a close genetic relationship with two strains isolated in 2011. [CONCLUSION] Although pathotype caused by MPZJ1206 strain is significantly distinct from those induced by classical isolates of duck hepatitis A virus type 1, the genome of MPZJ1206 shares high homology with those of previous isolates. The change of pathotype may result from an alteration in viral tissue tropism of MPZJ1206.

  18. RAW REHMANNIA RADIX POLYSACCHARIDE CAN EFFECTIVELY RELEASE PEROXIDATIVE INJURY INDUCED BY DUCK HEPATITIS A VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Song, Meiyun; Chen, Yun; Du, Hongxu; Zhang, Shuaibing; Wang, Yixuan; Zeng, Ling; Yang, Jingjing; Shi, Jintong; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Duck viral hepatitis (DVH), caused by duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), is a fatal contagious infectious disease which spreads rapidly with high morbidity and high mortality, and there is no effective clinical drug against DVH. Materials and Methods: Raw Rehmannia Radix Polysaccharide (RRRP), Lycii Fructus polysaccharides and Astragalus Radix polysaccharides were experimented in vitro and in vivo. Mortality rate, livers change, liver lesion scoring, peroxidative injury evaluation indexes in vitro and in vivo, and hepatic injury evaluation indexes of optimal one were detected and observed in this experiment. Results: RRRP could reduce mortality with the protection rate about 20.0% compared with that of the viral control (VC) group, finding that RRRP was the most effective against DHAV. The average liver scoring of the VC, blank control (BC), RRRP groups were 3.5, 0, 2.1. Significant difference (P<0.05) appeared between any two groups, demonstrating that it can alleviate liver pathological change. RRRP could make the hepatic injury evaluation indexes similar to BC group while the levels of the VC group were higher than other two groups in general. The levels of SOD, GSH-Px, CAT of RRRP group showed significant higher than that of VC group while the levels of NOS and MDA showed the opposite tendency, thus, RRRP could release peroxidative injury. Conclusion: RRRP was the most effective against duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV). RRRP could reduce mortality, alleviate liver pathological change, down-regulate liver lesion score, release peroxidative injury and hepatic injury. The antiviral and peroxidative injury releasing activity of RRRP for DHAV provided a platform to test novel drug strategies for hepatitis A virus in human beings. PMID:28638862

  19. Duck Hepatitis B Virus Replication in Primary Bile Duct Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jia-Yee; Culvenor, Janetta G.; Angus, Peter; Smallwood, Richard; Nicoll, Amanda; Locarnini, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Primary cultures of intrahepatic bile duct epithelial (IBDE) cells isolated from duckling livers were successfully grown for studies of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). The primary IBDE cells were characterized by immunohistochemistry using CAM 5.2, a cytokeratin marker which was shown to react specifically to IBDE cells in duck liver tissue sections and in primary cultures of total duck liver cells. Immunofluorescence assay using anti-duck albumin, a marker for hepatocytes, revealed that these IBDE cultures did not appear to contain hepatocytes. A striking feature of these cultures was the duct-like structures present within each cell colony of multilayered IBDE cells. Normal duck serum in the growth medium was found to be essential for the development of these cells into duct-like structures. When the primary cultures of duck IBDE cells were acutely infected with DHBV, dual-labeled confocal microscopy using a combination of anti-DHBV core proteins and CAM 5.2 or a combination of anti-pre-S1 proteins and CAM 5.2 revealed that the IBDE cell colonies contained DHBV proteins. Immunoblot analysis of these cells showed that the DHBV pre-S1 and core proteins were similar to their counterparts in infected primary duck hepatocyte cultures. Southern blot analysis of infected IBDE preparations using a digoxigenin-labeled positive-sense DHBV riboprobe revealed the presence of hepadnavirus covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA, minus-sense single-stranded (SS) DNA , double-stranded linear DNA, and relaxed circular DNA. The presence of minus-sense SS DNA in the acutely infected IBDE cultures is indicative of DHBV reverse transcriptase activity, while the establishment of a pool of viral CCC DNA reveals the ability of these cells to maintain persistent infection. Taken collectively, the results from this study demonstrated that primary duck IBDE cells supported hepadnavirus replication as shown by the de novo synthesis of DHBV proteins and DNA replicative intermediates. PMID

  20. Duck hepatitis B virus replication in primary bile duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Culvenor, J G; Angus, P; Smallwood, R; Nicoll, A; Locarnini, S

    2001-08-01

    Primary cultures of intrahepatic bile duct epithelial (IBDE) cells isolated from duckling livers were successfully grown for studies of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). The primary IBDE cells were characterized by immunohistochemistry using CAM 5.2, a cytokeratin marker which was shown to react specifically to IBDE cells in duck liver tissue sections and in primary cultures of total duck liver cells. Immunofluorescence assay using anti-duck albumin, a marker for hepatocytes, revealed that these IBDE cultures did not appear to contain hepatocytes. A striking feature of these cultures was the duct-like structures present within each cell colony of multilayered IBDE cells. Normal duck serum in the growth medium was found to be essential for the development of these cells into duct-like structures. When the primary cultures of duck IBDE cells were acutely infected with DHBV, dual-labeled confocal microscopy using a combination of anti-DHBV core proteins and CAM 5.2 or a combination of anti-pre-S1 proteins and CAM 5.2 revealed that the IBDE cell colonies contained DHBV proteins. Immunoblot analysis of these cells showed that the DHBV pre-S1 and core proteins were similar to their counterparts in infected primary duck hepatocyte cultures. Southern blot analysis of infected IBDE preparations using a digoxigenin-labeled positive-sense DHBV riboprobe revealed the presence of hepadnavirus covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA, minus-sense single-stranded (SS) DNA, double-stranded linear DNA, and relaxed circular DNA. The presence of minus-sense SS DNA in the acutely infected IBDE cultures is indicative of DHBV reverse transcriptase activity, while the establishment of a pool of viral CCC DNA reveals the ability of these cells to maintain persistent infection. Taken collectively, the results from this study demonstrated that primary duck IBDE cells supported hepadnavirus replication as shown by the de novo synthesis of DHBV proteins and DNA replicative intermediates.

  1. Treatment effect of a flavonoid prescription on duck virus hepatitis by its hepatoprotective and antioxidative ability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Zeng, Ling; Lu, Yu; Yang, Yulan; Xu, Meiyun; Wang, Yixuan; Liu, Jiaguo

    2017-12-01

    Duck virus hepatitis (DVH) caused by duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) is an acute and lethal disease of young ducklings. However, there is still no effective drug to treat DVH. This study assessed the curative effect on DVH of a flavonoid prescription baicalin-linarin-icariin-notoginsenoside R1 (BLIN) as well as the hepatoprotective and antioxidative effects of BLIN. MTT method was used to test the anti-DHAV-1 ability of BLIN in vitro. We then treated ducklings by BLIN (3 mg per duckling, once a day for 5 days) to evaluate the in vivo efficacy. To study the hepatoprotective and antioxidative roles of BLIN in its curative effect on DVH, we investigated the hepatic injury evaluation biomarkers and the oxidative stress evaluation indices of the ducklings. On duck embryonic hepatocytes, DHAV-1 inhibitory rate of BLIN at 20 μg/mL was 69.3%. The survival rate of ducklings treated by BLIN was about 35.5%, which was significantly higher than that of virus control (0.0%). After the treatment of BLIN, both the hepatic injury and the oxidative stress of infected ducklings alleviated. At the same time, a significant positive correlation (p < 0.05) existed between the hepatic injury indices and the oxidative stress indices. BLIN showed a significant curative effect on DVH. The antioxidative and hepatoprotective effects of BLIN made great contributions to the treatment of DVH. Furthermore, BLIN is expected to be exploited as a new drug for the clinical treatment of DVH.

  2. Development of viral disinfectant assays for duck hepatitis B virus using cell culture/PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Young J; Giambrone, Joseph J; Smith, Bruce F

    2002-10-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a worldwide public health problem with chronic carriers at risk for developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Accidental nosocomial infections from inadequately disinfected equipment or exposure to blood and body fluids from patients are major routes. To solve such problems, disinfectants to inactivate HBV must be validated. Duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is accepted as a surrogate for HBV, due to their similar sensitivities to disinfectants and its safety. Ducklings are used for disinfectant efficacy assays; however, the same virus titer is obtained using duck embryonic hepatocytes. Viral titration in disinfectant efficacy assay is conducted using Southern hybridization of infected duck serum. However, this test requires radioisotopes. Therefore, disinfectant assessment protocols were developed using duck embryonic hepatocytes with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or nested PCR. The ease of handling, lowered cost and enhanced sensitivity make PCR desirable. Chicken embryonic hepatocytes were applied to DHBV disinfectant efficacy assay. Results were consistent and could be used under certain conditions. The virucidal activities of two quaternary ammonium chloride disinfectants, n-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (10C-12C) were compared and effective concentrations were 1200 and 1800 ppm, respectively. Efficacies of these disinfectants were validated using real-time quantitative PCR. Results confirmed that the efficacy of n-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride was higher than alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (10C-12C). This assay was useful for rapid discrimination of killing potentials of disinfectants. In conclusion, these assays can be applied to other viruses that are unable to cause CPE in cell cultures and broadened the utility of DHBV as animal model for HBV.

  3. Duck hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA appears to survive hepatocyte mitosis in the growing liver

    SciTech Connect

    Reaiche-Miller, Georget Y.; Thorpe, Michael; Low, Huey Chi; Qiao, Qiao; Scougall, Catherine A.; Mason, William S.; Litwin, Samuel; Jilbert, Allison R.

    2013-11-15

    Nucleos(t)ide analogues that inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA replication are typically used as monotherapy for chronically infected patients. Treatment with a nucleos(t)ide analogue eliminates most HBV DNA replication intermediates and produces a gradual decline in levels of covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for viral RNA synthesis. It remains uncertain if levels of cccDNA decline primarily through hepatocyte death, or if loss also occurs during hepatocyte mitosis. To determine if cccDNA survives mitosis, growing ducklings infected with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) were treated with the nucleoside analogue, Entecavir. Viremia was suppressed at least 10{sup 5}-fold, during a period when average liver mass increased 23-fold. Analysis of the data suggested that if cccDNA synthesis was completely inhibited, at least 49% of cccDNA survived hepatocyte mitosis. However, there was a large duck-to-duck variation in cccDNA levels, suggesting that low level cccDNA synthesis may contribute to this apparent survival through mitosis. - Highlights: • The hepatitis B virus nuclear template is covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). • cccDNA was studied during liver growth in duck hepatitis B virus infected ducks. • Virus DNA replication and new cccDNA synthesis were inhibited with Entecavir. • At least 49% of cccDNA appeared to survive hepatocyte mitosis. • Low level virus DNA synthesis may contribute to survival of cccDNA through mitosis.

  4. Vaccination of ducks with a whole-cell vaccine expressing duck hepatitis B virus core antigen elicits antiviral immune responses that enable rapid resolution of de novo infection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Darren S; Halpern, Michael; Kotlarski, Ieva; Jilbert, Allison R

    2006-05-10

    As a first step in developing immuno-therapeutic vaccines for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection, we examined the ability of a whole-cell vaccine, expressing the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core antigen (DHBcAg), to target infected cells leading to the resolution of de novo DHBV infections. Three separate experiments were performed. In each experiment, ducks were vaccinated at 7 and 14 days of age with primary duck embryonic fibroblasts (PDEF) that had been transfected 48 h earlier with plasmid DNA expressing DHBcAg with and without the addition of anti-DHBcAg (anti-DHBc) antibodies. Control ducks were injected with either 0.7% NaCl or non-transfected PDEF. The ducks were then challenged at 18 days of age by intravenous inoculation with DHBV (5 x 10(8) viral genome equivalents). Liver biopsies obtained on day 4 post-challenge demonstrated that vaccination did not prevent infection of the liver as similar numbers of infected hepatocytes were detected in all vaccinated and control ducks. However, analysis of liver tissue obtained 9 or more days post-challenge revealed that 9 out of 11 of the PDEF-DHBcAg vaccinated ducks and 8 out of 11 ducks vaccinated with PDEF-DHBcAg plus anti-DHBc antibodies had rapidly resolved the DHBV infection with clearance of infected cells. In contrast, 10 out of 11 of the control unvaccinated ducks developed chronic DHBV infection. In conclusion, vaccination of ducks with a whole-cell PDEF vaccine expressing DHBcAg elicited immune responses that induced a rapid resolution of DHBV infection. The results establish that chronic infection can be prevented via the vaccine-mediated induction of a core-antigen-specific immune response.

  5. Rapid detection of duck hepatitis virus type-1 by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Song, Cuiping; Wan, Hongquan; Yu, Shengqing; Han, Xiangan; Qiu, Xusheng; Hu, Qinghai; Tan, Lei; Ding, Chan

    2012-06-01

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for the detection of duck hepatitis virus type-1 (DHV-1) was established. Using primers specific to the highly conserved 3D gene of DHV-1, the developed RT-LAMP assay detected the viral RNA of DHV-1 extracted from both allantoic fluid and liver samples of infected ducks. The assay is as sensitive as RT-PCR, and shows no cross-reaction with other common avian viral and bacterial pathogens. In addition to detection via ethidium bromide staining following gel electrophoresis, naked-eye observation after staining with SYBR Green I dye can be used to detect RT-LAMP products; this enables field application of this assay. The findings demonstrate that RT-LAMP can serve as a helpful tool for the detection and surveillance of DHV-1 in the poultry industry.

  6. Residues Critical for Duck Hepatitis B Virus Neutralization Are Involved in Host Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Sunyach, Claire; Rollier, Christine; Robaczewska, Magdalena; Borel, Christelle; Barraud, Luc; Kay, Alan; Trépo, Christian; Will, Hans; Cova, Lucyna

    1999-01-01

    To date, no detailed analysis of the neutralization properties of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) has been reported, and it is not clear whether any of the known neutralization epitopes correspond to the viral receptor binding site or to sequences involved in the cell entry pathway. We demonstrate here that antibodies directed against two overlapping peptides (amino acids 83 to 97 and 93 to 107), covering the sequences of most DHBV pre-S neutralizing epitopes, both inhibit virus binding to primary duck hepatocytes and neutralize virus infectivity. An extensive mutagenesis of the motif 88WTP90, which is the shortest sequence of the epitope recognized by the virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) 900 was performed in order to define the amino acids involved in these interactions. Single point mutations within this epitope affected neither virus replication nor infectivity but abolished virus neutralization by MAb 900 completely. Interestingly, mutants with two and three consecutive residue replacements (SIP and SIH) within this epitope retained replication competence but were no longer infectious. The loss of infectivity of SIH and SIP mutant particles was associated with significantly reduced binding to primary duck hepatocytes and could be rescued by trans complementation with wild-type pre-S protein. Taken together, these results indicate that each amino acid of the DHBV pre-S sequence 88WTP90 is critical for recognition by the neutralizing MAb 900 and that replacement of the first two or all three residues strongly reduces virus interaction with hepatocytes and abrogates infectivity. These data imply that the motif 88WTP90 contains key residues which are critical for interaction with both the neutralizing MAb and the host cell. PMID:10074101

  7. Development of a Real-Time Quantitative PCR for Detecting Duck Hepatitis A Virus Genotype C

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiuxue; Yue, Hua; Zhang, Bin; Nie, Peiting

    2012-01-01

    Recently, duck hepatitis A virus genotype C (DHAV-C), a causative agent of duck viral hepatitis, has been responsible for increasing economic losses in the duck industry in China and South Korea. In this study, a real-time PCR assay targeting the 2C gene for detecting DHAV-C was developed. The assay was confirmed to be specific and sensitive, and the minimum detection limit was 3.36 × 103 copies per reaction, making this assay suitable for rapid diagnosis of DHAV-C infection from clinical samples. In addition, the dynamics of the viral loads in tissues of specific-pathogen-free (SPF) ducklings infected with DHAV-C were investigated using this method. The DHAV-C could be detected earliest in the liver within 12 h postinfection. Moreover, high viral loads were identified in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, thymus, pancreas, brain, and small intestine after 24 h postinfection. Taking the data collectively, the study described in this report is the first to have developed a real-time PCR method for detection of DHAV-C and thus contributes to pathogenicity research. PMID:22855514

  8. Development of a real-time quantitative PCR for detecting duck hepatitis a virus genotype C.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuxue; Yue, Hua; Zhang, Bin; Nie, Peiting; Tang, Cheng

    2012-10-01

    Recently, duck hepatitis A virus genotype C (DHAV-C), a causative agent of duck viral hepatitis, has been responsible for increasing economic losses in the duck industry in China and South Korea. In this study, a real-time PCR assay targeting the 2C gene for detecting DHAV-C was developed. The assay was confirmed to be specific and sensitive, and the minimum detection limit was 3.36 × 10(3) copies per reaction, making this assay suitable for rapid diagnosis of DHAV-C infection from clinical samples. In addition, the dynamics of the viral loads in tissues of specific-pathogen-free (SPF) ducklings infected with DHAV-C were investigated using this method. The DHAV-C could be detected earliest in the liver within 12 h postinfection. Moreover, high viral loads were identified in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, thymus, pancreas, brain, and small intestine after 24 h postinfection. Taking the data collectively, the study described in this report is the first to have developed a real-time PCR method for detection of DHAV-C and thus contributes to pathogenicity research.

  9. Recombinant VP1 protein of duck hepatitis virus 1 expressed in Pichia pastoris and its immunogenicity in ducks.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Li, X K; Wu, T C; Wang, Y; Zhang, C J; Cheng, X C; Chen, P Y

    2014-01-01

    The VP1 gene of duck hepatitis virus type 1 (DHV-1) strain VJ09 was amplified by reverse transcription PCR from the liver of a duckling with clinical symptoms of viral hepatitis. The resulting VP1 cDNA was 720 bp in length and encoded a 240-amino-acid protein. In VP1 gene-based phylogenetic analysis, the VJ09 strain grouped with DHV-1 genotype C. The VP1 gene was inserted into the expression vector pPICZαA and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The expressed VP1 protein was purified and identified by western blot analysis. To evaluate the recombinant VP1's immunogenic potential in ducklings, the antibodies raised in the immunized ducklings were titrated by ELISA, and lymphocyte proliferation and virus neutralization assays were performed. The results show that the recombinant VP1 protein induced a significant immune response in ducklings and this could be a candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine against DHV-1 genotype C.

  10. Duck Hepatitis A virus possesses a distinct type IV internal ribosome entry site element of picornavirus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Meng; Yang, Xiaorong; Zhou, Lei; Ge, Xinna; Guo, Xin; Liu, Jinhua; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Hanchun

    2012-01-01

    Sequence analysis of duck hepatitis virus type 1 (DHV-1) led to its classification as the only member of a new genus, Avihepatovirus, of the family Picornaviridae, and so was renamed duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV). The 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) plays an important role in translation initiation and RNA synthesis of the picornavirus. Here, we provide evidence that the 651-nucleotide (nt)-long 5' UTR of DHAV genome contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element that functions efficiently in vitro and within BHK cells. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the 3' part of the DHAV 5' UTR is similar to the porcine teschovirus 1 (PTV-1) IRES in sequence and predicted secondary structure. Further mutational analyses of the predicted domain IIId, domain IIIe, and pseudoknot structure at the 3' end of the DHAV IRES support our predicted secondary structure. However, unlike the case for the PTV-1 IRES element, analysis of various deletion mutants demonstrated that the optimally functional DHAV IRES element with a size of approximately 420 nt is larger than that of PTV-1 and contains other peripheral domains (Id and Ie) that do not exist within the type IV IRES elements. The domain Ie, however, could be removed without significant loss of activity. Surprisingly, like the hepatitis A virus (HAV) IRES element, the activity of DHAV IRES could be eliminated by expression of enterovirus 2A protease. These findings indicate that the DHAV IRES shares common features with type IV picornavirus IRES elements, whereas it exhibits significant differences from type IV IRESs. Therefore, we propose that DHAV possesses a distinct type IV IRES element of picornavirus.

  11. Molecular detection and typing of duck hepatitis A virus directly from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Pan, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yongliang; Yang, Hanchun; Zhang, Dabing

    2008-10-15

    To develop a new approach for the detection and typing of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), a pair of non-degenerate primers was designed to amplify a approximately 250-bp genomic region in the 5'UTR. 3 reference strains and 6 duck embryo-derived isolates from various regions in China, involving 2 serotypes, were successfully amplified with the primer set. By determining the nucleotide sequence of the amplicon, a molecular typing method was developed. If isolate sequences were compared to DHAV 5'UTR sequences available in public databases, nucleotide identity was > or =94% with homologous serotype and < or =73% with heterologous serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed monophyletic clustering of 5'UTR sequences of a homologous serotype, confirming the new classification of DHAV (serotype 1 and the two new serotypes recently described in Taiwan and South Korea, respectively) into three genotypes (A, B and C) defined by the capsid coding region. Analysis of the results showed that the primer pair should aid in the detection of DHAV, and that the amplicon sequence contains type-specific information and can be used for effective and rapid molecular typing. The molecular methods proved their utility through the detection and typing of DHAV directly from 28 liver specimens collected from dead ducklings during duck viral hepatitis outbreaks in different regions of China between 2001 and 2007. The results confirmed the presence of DHAV in all of the 28 samples and demonstrated that genotypes A (13/28) and C (15/28) of DHAV are co-circulating in China.

  12. Comparison of the anti-duck hepatitis A virus activities of phosphorylated and sulfated Astragalus polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixuan; Chen, Yun; Du, Hongxu; Yang, Jingjing; Ming, Ke; Song, Meiyun; Liu, Jiaguo

    2017-02-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) (Picornaviridae) causes an infectious disease in ducks which results in severe losses in duck industry. However, the proper antiviral supportive drugs for this disease have not been discovered. Polysaccharide is the main ingredient of Astragalus that has been demonstrated to directly and indirectly inhibit RNA of viruses replication. In this study, the antiviral activities of Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) and its derivatives against DHAV were evaluated and compared. APS was modified via the sodium trimetaphosphate and sodium tripolyphosphate (STMP-STPP) method and chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine method to obtain its phosphate (pAPS) and sulfate (sAPS), respectively. The infrared structures of APS, pAPS, and sAPS were analyzed with the potassium bromide disc method. Additionally, the antiviral activities were evaluated with the MTT ((4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) method in vitro and the artificial inoculation method in vivo. The clinical therapy effects were evaluated by mortality rate, liver function-related biochemical indicators, and visual changes in pathological anatomy. The anti-DHAV proliferation effects of APS, pAPS, and sAPS on the viral multiplication process in cell and blood were observed with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. The results revealed that pAPS inhibited DHAV proliferation more efficiently in the entire process of viral multiplication than APS and sAPS. Moreover, only pAPS significantly improved the survival rate to 33.5% and reduced the DHAV particle titer in the blood as well as liver lesions in clinical trials. The results indicated that pAPS exhibited greater anti-DHAV activity than APS and sAPS both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Comparison of the anti-duck hepatitis A virus activities of phosphorylated and sulfated Astragalus polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixuan; Chen, Yun; Du, Hongxu; Yang, Jingjing; Ming, Ke; Song, Meiyun

    2016-01-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) (Picornaviridae) causes an infectious disease in ducks which results in severe losses in duck industry. However, the proper antiviral supportive drugs for this disease have not been discovered. Polysaccharide is the main ingredient of Astragalus that has been demonstrated to directly and indirectly inhibit RNA of viruses replication. In this study, the antiviral activities of Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) and its derivatives against DHAV were evaluated and compared. APS was modified via the sodium trimetaphosphate and sodium tripolyphosphate (STMP-STPP) method and chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine method to obtain its phosphate (pAPS) and sulfate (sAPS), respectively. The infrared structures of APS, pAPS, and sAPS were analyzed with the potassium bromide disc method. Additionally, the antiviral activities were evaluated with the MTT ((4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) method in vitro and the artificial inoculation method in vivo. The clinical therapy effects were evaluated by mortality rate, liver function-related biochemical indicators, and visual changes in pathological anatomy. The anti-DHAV proliferation effects of APS, pAPS, and sAPS on the viral multiplication process in cell and blood were observed with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. The results revealed that pAPS inhibited DHAV proliferation more efficiently in the entire process of viral multiplication than APS and sAPS. Moreover, only pAPS significantly improved the survival rate to 33.5% and reduced the DHAV particle titer in the blood as well as liver lesions in clinical trials. The results indicated that pAPS exhibited greater anti-DHAV activity than APS and sAPS both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27703041

  14. Duck hepatitis B virus infection of hepatocytes is not dependent on low pH.

    PubMed Central

    Rigg, R J; Schaller, H

    1992-01-01

    The pH dependency for initiation of infection by the hepadnavirus duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) was investigated in primary duck hepatocytes. First, an infection assay was developed using a radioimmunoblot to measure DHBV e antigen secreted into tissue culture fluid from infected hepatocytes. The quantity of this viral marker was proportional to the duration of inoculation and the amount of DHBV used as inoculum. The role of pH in initiation of DHBV infection was investigated by using this assay, but no dependence on low pH was found. DHBV was able to infect hepatocytes in the presence of NH4Cl and monensin, agents that raise the pH in intracellular vesicles and prevent penetration of viruses dependent on low pH in endosomes. In control experiments, infection by Semliki Forest virus, which is low pH dependent, was inhibited, whereas herpes simplex virus type 1 infection, which is pH independent, occurred. Attempts to trigger DHBV-cell fusion by exposure of DHBV prebound to hepatocytes to mildly acidic pH were unsuccessful. In these experiments, it was also observed that internalization of DHBV occurred only between pH 6.8 and 8.0. Additionally, in the absence of cells, infectivity of DHBV was stable at pH 4.6 to 4.8, which is lower than the pH encountered in endosomes (pH 5 to 6.6). Thus, no evidence for a role for mildly acidic pH in the initiation of DHBV infection was found. Therefore, we propose that the infection route followed by DHBV resembles that of the group of enveloped viruses, including herpesviruses, that fuse with their host cells at neutral pH. Images PMID:1560528

  15. A novel transcriptional element in circular DNA monomers of the duck hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Beckel-Mitchener, A; Summers, J

    1997-01-01

    We report the presence of two elements, pet and net, that are required for proper transcription of the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). These regions were previously identified by using plasmid clones of the virus in transient expression assays (M. Huang and J. Summers, J. Virol. 68:1564-1572, 1994). In this study, we further analyzed these regions by using in vitro-synthesized circular DHBV DNA monomers to mimic the authentic transcriptional template. We observed that pet was required for pregenome transcription from circular viral monomers, and in the absence of pet-dependent transcription, expression of the viral envelope genes was increased. We found that deletion of net in circularized DNA monomers led to the production of abnormally long transcripts due to a failure to form 3' ends during transcription. In addition, we report the presence of a net-like region in the mammalian hepadnavirus woodchuck hepatitis virus. These results are consistent with a model that net is a region involved in transcription termination and that in DHBV, pet is required for transcription complexes to read through this region during the first pass through net. PMID:9311882

  16. Efficient inhibition of duck hepatitis B virus DNA by the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qingfen; Bai, Li; Zheng, Sujun; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Jinyan; Wang, Ting; Xu, Zhongwei; Chen, Yu; Li, Jiansheng; Duan, Zhongping

    2017-09-19

    Current therapeutic strategies cannot eradicate hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA (HBV cccDNA), which accounts for the persistence of HBV infection. Very recently, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR‑associated protein 9 (Cas9) system has been used as an efficient and powerful tool for viral genome editing. Given that the primary duck hepatocyte (PDH) infected with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) has been widely used to study human HBV infection in vitro, the present study aimed to demonstrate the targeted inhibition of DHBV DNA, especially cccDNA, by the CRISPR/Cas9 system using this model. We designed six single‑guide RNAs (sgRNA1‑6) targeting the DHBV genome. The sgRNA/Cas9 plasmid was transfected into DHBV‑infected PDHs, and then DHBV total DNA (in culture medium and PDHs) and cccDNA were quantified by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The combined inhibition of CRISPR/Cas9 system and entecavir (ETV) was also assessed. Two sgRNAs, sgRNA4 and sgRNA6, exhibited efficient inhibition on DHBV total DNA (77.23 and 86.51%, respectively), cccDNA (75.67 and 85.34%, respectively) in PDHs, as well as DHBV total DNA in the culture medium (62.17 and 59.52%, respectively). The inhibition remained or enhanced from day 5 to day 9 following transfection. The combination of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and ETV further increased the inhibitory effect on DHBV total DNA in PDHs and culture medium, but not cccDNA. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has the potential to be a useful tool for the suppression of DHBV DNA.

  17. Effects of Chrysanthemum indicum polysaccharide and its phosphate on anti-duck hepatitis a virus and alleviating hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ming, Ke; Chen, Yun; Shi, Jintong; Yang, Jingjing; Yao, Fangke; Du, Hongu; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Jingying; Liu, Jiaguo; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang; Wu, Yi

    2017-09-01

    To explore new effective anti-duck hepatitis A virus drugs, Chrysanthemum indicum polysaccharide (CIPS) was phosphorylation modified using STMP-STPP method, and phosphorylated Chrysanthemum indicum polysaccharide (pCIPS) was obtained. Characteristic absorption peaks were observed in pCIPS using IR spectrum, suggested that CIPS was successfully modified. In addition, field emission scanning electron micro-scope (FE-SEM) was used to observe the polysaccharides' surface features. In vitro, we found that the survival rate of DHAV-infected hepatocytes increased after the two drugs treatment, indicated that the two drugs possess good anti-DHAV activity. The results of real-time PCR showed that pCIPS inhibited the virus gene replication more effectively than CIPS. Reed-Muench assay was used to observe the changes of the virulence, and the expression level of IFN-β was observed to verify the changes of virulence. In vivo experiment, the blood virus content reduced after CIPS and pCIPS treatment. To evaluate the ducklings' hepatic injury, the serum ALT, AST, TP and ALB levels were detected. Results showed that both CIPS and pCIPS could alleviate the hepatic injury of ducklings infected DHAV, especially for pCIPS. All the results above mentioned demonstrated that the anti-DHAV activity of CIPS was enhanced after phosphorylation modification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Normal phosphorylation of duck hepatitis B virus L protein is dispensable for infectivity.

    PubMed

    Grgacic, E V; Lin, B; Gazina, E V; Snooks, M J; Anderson, D A

    1998-11-01

    A fraction of the large surface protein (L) of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is phosphorylated at serine or threonine residues (E. Grgacic & D. Anderson, Journal of Virology 68, 7344-7350, 1994). We now report the identification of phosphorylation sites in DHBV L protein. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified serine-118 (S118) as the major phosphorylation site, accepting approximately 64% of the total phosphate groups incorporated in L, and resulting in retarded migration of phosphorylated L in SDS-PAGE. Proline-119 is indispensable for S118 phosphorylation. Mutation of other serine/threonine residues which are followed by prolines (T79, T89, S117 and T155) together with S118 further reduced phosphorylation to around 19% of wild-type. Non-equilibrium pH gel electrophoresis (NEPHGE) and SDS-PAGE of 33P-labelled L protein revealed two phosphorylated L species, while protein with the S118 to alanine mutation was detected as only one labelled species, consistent with multiple phosphorylations in wild-type L. Together, these results demonstrate that serine 118 is the major phosphorylation site for a proline-directed kinase, and that a proportion of L molecules are additionally phosphorylated at one of a number of secondary sites. DHBV mutants encoding L proteins with minimal phosphorylation (alanine mutants) or mimicking constitutive phosphorylation (aspartic acid mutants) remained infectious both in cell culture and in ducks, demonstrating that L phosphorylation may play only a minor role in DHBV replication.

  19. Development of duck hepatitis A virus type 3 vaccine and its use to protect ducklings against infections.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Chul; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Lindberg, A Michael; Joh, Seong-Joon; Kwon, Hyuk-Man; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Kwon, Jun-Hun

    2009-11-12

    A variant type of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), DHAV-3 was recently discovered in South Korea and China. Sequence analyses verified that the variant is genetically or serologically different from the DHAV-1 and DHAV-2 types. Duck hepatitis had been reported in South Korea since 1985 and an attenuated DHAV-1 vaccine had efficiently prevented epidemics of DHAV-1 until 2002. Despite the DHAV-1 based vaccine in use the novel DHAV-3 circulating in South Korea remains to be a threat to duckling farming. To develop a live attenuated vaccine against DHAV-3, a representative isolate, AP-04203, was therefore attenuated by repeated passages in SPF chicken embryos 100 times. The 100th passaged virus, AP-04203P100, did not cause clinical sign and mortality in 1-day-old ducklings as well as reversion of virulence capacity. The ducklings vaccinated with AP-04203P100 virus (10(3.0)ELD(50)/0.2ml) on 1-day-old age via the intramuscular injection were well protected from 2 days after challenge with pathogenic AP04203P1 virus via the intramuscular route. In addition, the vaccine candidate also exhibited complete protection against currently circulating pathogenic DHAV-3 isolates. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the live attenuated virus, AP-04203P100, is a promising vaccine candidate facilitating the prevention of duck hepatitis caused by DHAV-3 around East Asia including South Korea.

  20. Multiple functions of capsid protein phosphorylation in duck hepatitis B virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, M; Summers, J

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the role of phosphorylation of the capsid protein of the avian hepadnavirus duck hepatitis B virus in viral replication. We found previously that three serines and one threonine in the C-terminal 24 amino acids of the capsid protein serve as phosphorylation sites and that the pattern of phosphorylation at these sites in intracellular viral capsids is complex. In this study, we present evidence that the phosphorylation state of three of these residues affects distinct steps in viral replication. By substituting these residues with alanine in order to mimic serine, or with aspartic acid in order to mimic phosphoserine, and assaying the effects of these substitutions on various steps in virus replication, we were able to make the following inferences. (i) The presence of phosphoserines at residues 245 and 259 stimulates DNA synthesis within viral nucleocapsids. (ii) The absence of phosphoserine at residue 257 and at residues 257 and 259 stimulates covalently closed circular DNA synthesis and virus production, respectively. (iii) The presence of phosphoserine at position 259 is required for initiation of infection. The results implied that both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated capsid proteins were necessary for a nucleocapsid particle to carry out all its functions in virus replication, explaining why differential phosphorylation of the capsid protein occurs in hepadnaviruses. Whether these differentially phosphorylated proteins coexist on the same nucleocapsid, or whether the nucleocapsid acquires sequential functions through selective phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, is discussed. Images PMID:8207809

  1. Cloning, expression and purification of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core protein and its use in the development of an indirect ELISA for serologic detection of DHBV infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Jia, Renyong; Wang, Mingshu; Huang, Juan; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Yin, Zhongqiong; Wang, Yin; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2014-05-01

    Infecting ducks with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is widely accepted as a relevant model for studying aspects of human HBV infection. However, efficient and sensitive diagnostic methods for the various infection models are limited. In order to provide a more simple and convenient method for serologic diagnosis, we improved the production of recombinant DHBV viral capsid protein (core protein) and then used it to develop an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting anti-DHBc antibodies (DHBcAg ELISA) in DHBV-infected ducks. Given the positive/negative cut-off value, the maximum dilution of duck sera in which anti-DHBc antibodies could be detected was 1:12,800. In addition, the DHBcAg ELISA displayed no cross reactivity with duck antisera against duck circovirus (DuCV), duck plague virus (DPV), duck hepatitis virus (DHV), duck swollen head septicemia virus (DSHSV), avian influenza virus (AIV), Riemerella anatipestifer, Salmonella anatum, or Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the coefficients of variation (CVs) of inter-assay and intra-assay experiments were both below than 10 %. When compared to PCR for accuracy on clinical samples from cases of suspected DHBV infection, the DHBcAg showed 95.45 % coincidence with PCR. In conclusion, recombinant DHBc was readily produced and used to establish a simple DHBcAg ELISA that provided a highly specific and sensitive method for analysis of clinical samples.

  2. Glucagon Treatment Interferes with an Early Step of Duck Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hild, Marc; Weber, Olaf; Schaller, Heinz

    1998-01-01

    The effect of glucagon on the establishment of hepadnavirus infection was studied in vitro with the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) model. The presence of the peptide hormone throughout infection or starting up to 8 h after virus uptake resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the levels of intra- and extracellular viral gene products and of secreted virions. Treatment with forskolin or dibutyryl-cyclic AMP, two drugs that also stimulate the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal transduction pathway, resulted in comparable inhibition, suggesting that the inhibitor effect is related to changes in the activity of protein kinase A. In persistently infected hepatocytes, only a slight, but continuous, decrease in viral replication was observed upon prolonged drug treatment. Time course analysis, including detection of DHBV covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA templates, revealed that glucagon acts late during the establishment of infection, at a time when the virus is already internalized, but before detectable ccc DNA accumulation in the nucleus. These data suggest that nuclear import (and reimport) of DHBV DNA genomes from cytosolic capsids is subject to cAMP-mediated regulation by cellular factors responding to changes in the state of the host cell. PMID:9525576

  3. Isolation and characterization of a low pathogenic duck hepatitis A virus 3 from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cha, Se-Yeoun; Roh, Jae-Hee; Kang, Min; Kim, Bumseok; Jang, Hyung-Kwan

    2013-02-22

    The D11-JW-018 strain of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) was isolated from 7-day-old ducklings in Kyeonggi province, South Korea with no clinical signs of typical hepatitis. Phylogenetic analyzed of whole genome showed that D11-JW-018 strain was belonged to DHAV-3 genotype. The pathogenicity of the D11-JW-018 strain in 1-, 7-, 14-, and 21-day-old ducklings was examined. Mortality of D11-JW-018 strain was lower than DRL-62 (DHAV-1) age-dependent but incubation period was longer in 1-day-old ducklings. Unlike DRL-62 strain infection, D11-JW-018 strain induced only liver discoloration without hemorrhagic mottling and lymphocyte infiltration and bile duct hyperplasia in histological lesion. The D11-JW-018 strain was detected only in the heart, liver, spleen, gall bladder, pancreas, and kidney among 12 organs in infected 1-day-old ducklings. Serum biochemical analyses revealed a significant difference in aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase between the D11-JW-018 strain-infected ducklings and those infected with the DRL-62 strain (P<0.05). We identified the D11-JW-018 strain in South Korean ducklings and provide the characteristics of DHAV-3.

  4. An experimental study of the pathogenicity of a duck hepatitis A virus genotype C isolate in specific pathogen free ducklings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanrong; Pi, JinKui; Tang, Cheng; Yue, Hua; Yang, Falong

    2012-12-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus genotype C (DHAV-C), recognized recently, is one of the pathogens causing fatal duck viral hepatitis in ducklings, especially in Asia. To demonstrate the pathogenesis of the DHAV-C isolate, 3-day-old specific pathogen free ducklings were inoculated subcutaneously with a DHAV-C isolate and the clinical signs were observed. Virus distribution, histological and apoptotic morphological changes of various tissues were examined at different times post inoculation. The serial, characteristic changes included haemorrhage and swelling of the liver. Apoptotic cells and virus antigen staining were found in all of the tissues examined. Where more virus antigen staining was detected, there were more severe histopathological and apoptotic changes. The amount of virus antigen and the histological and apoptotic morphological changes agreed with each other and became increasingly severe with length of time after infection. Apoptotic cells were ubiquitously distributed, especially among lymphocytes, macrophages and monocytes in immune organs such as the bursa of Fabricius, thymus and spleen, and in liver, kidney and cerebral cells. Necrosis was also observed within 72 h post inoculation in all organs examined, except the cerebrum, and was characterized by cell swelling and collapsed plasma membrane. These results suggest that the recent outbreak of disease caused by DHAV-C virus is pantropic, causing apoptosis and necrosis of different organs. The apoptosis and necrosis caused by the DHAV-C field strain in this study is associated with pathogenesis and DHAV-C-induced lesions.

  5. Virulent and attenuated strains of duck hepatitis A virus elicit discordant innate immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Song, Cuiping; Liao, Ying; Gao, Wei; Yu, Shengqing; Sun, Yingjie; Qiu, Xvsheng; Tan, Lei; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Ma, Zhiyong; Ding, Chan

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies of duck hepatitis A virus infection have focused only on the pathogenicity and host response of one strain. Here, we show that the virulent SH strain and the attenuated FC64 strain induced varied pathogenicity, apoptosis and immune responses in the livers of 1-day-old ducklings. SH infection caused apoptosis and visible lesions in the liver; serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyltransferase and total bilirubin activities were markedly upregulated; and ducklings died at 36 h post-infection (p.i.). However, FC64 infection did not induce significant symptoms or impair liver function, and all of the infected ducklings remained healthy. In addition, both virus strains replicated well in the liver, spleen and intestine, whilst the SH strain replicated more efficiently than FC64. IFN-γ, IL-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide were strongly induced by SH infection, and may be associated with the pathogenicity of the SH strain. IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-stimulated transmembrane protein 1, IFN-stimulated gene 12, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase-like and IL-6 were moderately induced by SH infection at 24 h p.i., and dramatically induced by FC64 infection at 36 h p.i. The intensive induction of cytokines by FC64 may be involved in restriction of virus replication and stimulation of adaptive immune responses. Ducklings inoculated with FC64 produced high levels of antiviral antibodies within 45 days p.i. The low virulence and strong immune response of FC64 rendered this strain a good vaccine candidate, as confirmed by a protective assay in this study.

  6. Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) genotype definition: comment on the article by Cha et al.

    PubMed

    Wen, Huiqiang; Han, Lingxia; Zhang, Xiaona; Lian, Chuanjiang; Zhao, Lili; Si, Changde; Chen, Hongyan

    2014-06-04

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is genetically divided into three different genotypes: the original type DHAV-1, a type recently isolated in Taiwan (DHAV-2), and a recently described type isolated in South Korea and China (DHAV-3). Recently, Cha et al. (2013) concluded that the existence that both DHAV-1 and DHAV-2 had been classified into one branch, with DHAV genotype 3 (DHAV-3) in another, and that the phylogenetic distance unit showed was 0.5, a tremendous value. However, there might be some concerns on the methodology application to define the genotypes of DHAV. Based on 110 genomic and 100 amino acid sequences of DHAV which included all the sequences from Cha et al. (2013) respectively, phylogenetic analysis in the present study showed a distinct and proposed DHAV genotype definition, that both DHAV-2 and DHAV-3 were clustered in one branch while DHAV-1 in another branch only, and that the phylogenetic distance unit of 0.02 was confirmed, which was much smaller than the value 0.5. Taking into account the genotype definition of DHAV, we also conducted the pairwise sequence comparisons (PASC) analysis of 110 genomic sequences, and proposed that the distance genotype definition threshold was 0.045.

  7. Duck Hepatitis B Virus cccDNA Amplification Efficiency in Natural Infection Is Regulated by Virus Secretion Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Previous mutation based studies showed that ablating synthesis of viral envelope proteins led to elevated hepadnaviral covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) amplification, but it remains unknown how cccDNA amplification is regulated in natural hepadnaviral infection because of a lack of research system. In this study we report a simple procedure to prepare two identical duck hepatitis B virus inocula, but they possess 10-100-fold difference in cccDNA amplification in infected cell culture. We demonstrate that the infected cells with higher cccDNA amplification significantly reduce the virus secretion efficiency that results in higher accumulation of relaxed circular DNA (rcDNA) and DHBsAg in the cells. The infected cells with lower cccDNA amplification significantly increase the virus secretion efficiency that leads to lower intracellular rcDNA and DHBsAg accumulation. In contrast with the findings generated in the mutation based experimental system, the regulation of cccDNA amplification in natural hepadnaviral infection bypasses direct regulation of the cellular envelope proteins concentration, instead it modulates virus secretion efficiency that ultimately impacts the intracellular rcDNA concentration, an important factor determining the destination of the synthesized rcDNA in infected cells. PMID:26713436

  8. Replication of hepatitis B virus in primary duck hepatocytes transfected with linear viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yun-Qing; Zhang, Ding-Feng; Tang, Ni; Huang, Ai-Long; Zou, Xiao-Yi; Xiao, Jiang-Feng; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Ren, Hong; Liu, Qi; Guo, Shu-Hua

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression and replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in primary duck hepatocytes (PDHs). METHODS: Complete HBV genome was transfected into PDHs by electroporation (transfected group, 1.19×1012 copies of linear HBV DNA/1×107 PDHs). After 1-5 d of transfection, HBsAg and HBeAg in the supernatant and lysate of PDHs were measured with the IMX System. Meanwhile, replicative intermediates of HBV DNA were analyzed by Southern blotting and Dot blotting. PDHs electroporated were used as control group. RESULTS: HBsAg in the hepatocyte lysates of transfected group was 15.24 (1 d), 14.55 (3 d) and 5.13 (5 d; P/N values, positive≥2.1) respectively. HBeAg was negative (<2.1). Both HBsAg and HBeAg were negative in the supernatant of transfected group. Dot blotting revealed that HBV DNA was strongly positive in the transfected group and negative in the control group. Southern blot analysis of intracellular total DNA indicated that there were relaxed circular (rc DNA), covalently closed circular (ccc DNA), and single-stranded (ss DNA) HBV DNA replicative intermediates in the transfected group, there was no integrated HBV DNA in the cellular genome. These parameters were negative in control group. CONCLUSION: Expression and replication of HBV genes can occur in hepatocytes from non-mammalian species. HBV replication has no critical species-specificity, and yet hepatic-specific regulating factors in hepatocytes may be essential for viral replication. PMID:16124057

  9. Duck hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA appears to survive hepatocyte mitosis in the growing liver.

    PubMed

    Reaiche-Miller, Georget Y; Thorpe, Michael; Low, Huey Chi; Qiao, Qiao; Scougall, Catherine A; Mason, William S; Litwin, Samuel; Jilbert, Allison R

    2013-11-01

    Nucleos(t)ide analogues that inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA replication are typically used as monotherapy for chronically infected patients. Treatment with a nucleos(t)ide analogue eliminates most HBV DNA replication intermediates and produces a gradual decline in levels of covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for viral RNA synthesis. It remains uncertain if levels of cccDNA decline primarily through hepatocyte death, or if loss also occurs during hepatocyte mitosis. To determine if cccDNA survives mitosis, growing ducklings infected with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) were treated with the nucleoside analogue, Entecavir. Viremia was suppressed at least 10(5)-fold, during a period when average liver mass increased 23-fold. Analysis of the data suggested that if cccDNA synthesis was completely inhibited, at least 49% of cccDNA survived hepatocyte mitosis. However, there was a large duck-to-duck variation in cccDNA levels, suggesting that low level cccDNA synthesis may contribute to this apparent survival through mitosis.

  10. Recovery of duck hepatitis A virus 3 from a stable full-length infectious cDNA clone.

    PubMed

    Pan, Meng; Yang, Xiaorong; Du, Jige; Zhou, Lei; Ge, Xinna; Guo, Xin; Liu, Jinhua; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Hanchun

    2011-09-01

    Recently, duck hepatitis A virus 3 (DHAV-3) with genetically distinct characteristics from DHAV-1 and DHAV-2 was recognized in South Korea and China. In this short communication, we successfully constructed a stable full-length infectious cDNA clone derived from DHAV-3 by solving instability of cloned full-length cDNA in Escherichia coli (E. coli). The cDNA fragments amplified from the genome of DHAV-3 were assembled and inserted into a low-copy-number plasmid. Finally, a full-length cDNA clone containing an engineered SacII site that served as a genetic marker was obtained. The cDNA clone showed stable by serial passages in E. coli when propagated at 25°C under low level of antibiotic selection. BHK-21 cells were transfected with transcribed RNA from the full-length cDNA clone; infectious viral particles were rescued, showing its fatality to 10-day-old duck embryos. The results indicated that the constructed full-length cDNA clone of DHAV-3 is infectious. By various virological assays, our results indicated that the rescued virus exhibited similar biological properties with the parental virus. Animal experiments revealed that the rescued virus retained the high pathogenicity to 1-day-old ducklings and could induce a fatal hepatitis indistinguishable from its parental virus. Our present studies provide a useful tool for future research on genomic functions and molecular pathogenesis of DHAV-3.

  11. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on duck hepatitis A type 1 virus VP1 protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoying; Li, Xiaojun; Zhang, Qingshan; Wulin, Shaozhou; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Yue; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in ducks; however, B-cell epitopes on the VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A genotype 1 virus (DHAV-1) have not been characterized. To characterize B-cell epitopes on VP1, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2D10 against Escherichia coli-expressed VP1 of DHAV-1. In vitro, mAb 2D10 neutralized DHAV-1 virus. By using an array of overlapping 12-mer peptides, we found that mAb 2D10 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif LPAPTS. Sequence alignment showed that the epitope 173LPAPTS178 is highly conserved among the DHAV-1 genotypes. Moreover, the six amino acid peptide LPAPTS was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with maximal binding activity to mAb 2D10. DHAV-1-positive duck serum reacted with the epitope in dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of the six amino acids of the epitope for antibody-epitope binding. Competitive inhibition assays of mAb 2D10 binding to synthetic LPAPTS peptides and truncated VP1 protein fragments, detected by Western blotting, also verify that LPAPTS was the VP1 epitope. We identified LPAPTS as a VP1-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb 2D10. Our findings have potential applications in the development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against DHAV-1.

  12. Identification of a Conserved B-Cell Epitope on Duck Hepatitis A Type 1 Virus VP1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoying; Li, Xiaojun; Zhang, Qingshan; Wulin, Shaozhou; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Yue; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background The VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in ducks; however, B-cell epitopes on the VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A genotype 1 virus (DHAV-1) have not been characterized. Methods and Results To characterize B-cell epitopes on VP1, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2D10 against Escherichia coli-expressed VP1 of DHAV-1. In vitro, mAb 2D10 neutralized DHAV-1 virus. By using an array of overlapping 12-mer peptides, we found that mAb 2D10 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif LPAPTS. Sequence alignment showed that the epitope 173LPAPTS178 is highly conserved among the DHAV-1 genotypes. Moreover, the six amino acid peptide LPAPTS was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with maximal binding activity to mAb 2D10. DHAV-1–positive duck serum reacted with the epitope in dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of the six amino acids of the epitope for antibody-epitope binding. Competitive inhibition assays of mAb 2D10 binding to synthetic LPAPTS peptides and truncated VP1 protein fragments, detected by Western blotting, also verify that LPAPTS was the VP1 epitope. Conclusions and Significance We identified LPAPTS as a VP1-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb 2D10. Our findings have potential applications in the development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against DHAV-1. PMID:25706372

  13. Merocyanine 540 and Photofrin II as photosensitizers for in vitro killing of duck hepatitis B virus and human hepatoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Shien, Yong-Shau; Kao, Ming-Chien

    1994-03-01

    The feasibility of using merocyanine 540 (MC 540) and Photofrin II (PII) as effective photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents for killing hepatoma cells and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) in vitro was investigated. Cultured duck hepatocytes infected with DHBV and hepatoma cells, Hep 3B and HCC 36, were used as models. MC 540 and PII effectively inhibits the DHBV growth by 90 - 99% in a dose- and light-dependent manner. Photodynamic killing of MC 540 in the two hepatoma cell lines results in 94 - 99% growth inhibition. However, both photosensitizers exhibit dark cytotoxicity (37 - 56%). The present results suggest that MC 540 and PII could be promising and effective photodynamic agents for killing HBV and hepatoma cells.

  14. Assessment of a Flavone-Polysaccharide Based Prescription for Treating Duck Virus Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongxu; Zhang, Shuaibing; Song, Meiyun; Wang, Yixuan; Zeng, Ling; Chen, Yun; Xiong, Wen; Yang, Jingjing; Yao, Fangke; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo

    2016-01-01

    Because polysaccharide and flavone ingredients display good antiviral activity, we developed a flavone/polysaccharide-containing prescription that would be effective against duck viral hepatitis (DVH) and investigated its hepatoprotective effects. Flavones were derived from Hypericum japonicum (HJF) (entire herb of Hypericum japonicum Thunb) and Salvia plebeia (SPF) (entire herb of Salvia plebeia R. Br.), and polysaccharides were derived from Radix Rehmanniae Recens (RRRP) (dried root of Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch). This prescription combination was based on the theory of syndrome differentiation and treatment in traditional Chinese veterinary medicine. In vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted using the three single ingredients compared to the combined HRS prescription to determine their anti-duck hepatitis A viral (anti-DHAV) activity. The results showed that all experimental conditions displayed anti-DHAV activity, but the HRS prescription presented the best effect. To further investigate the hepatoprotective effect of the HRS prescription on DHAV-induced hepatic injury, we tested the mortality rate, the hepatic pathological severity score, plasma biochemical indexes of hepatic function, blood DHAV gene expression levels and peroxidation damage evaluation indexes and then analyzed correlations among these indexes. The results demonstrated that the HRS prescription significantly decreased the mortality rate, reduced the severity of hepatic injury, decreased the hepatic pathological severity score, depressed blood DHAV gene expression levels, and returned the indexes of hepatic function and peroxidation almost to a normal level. These results indicate that the HRS prescription confers an outstanding hepatoprotective effect, and we expect that it will be developed into a new candidate anti-DHAV drug. PMID:26731101

  15. Therapeutic Antiviral Effect of the Nucleic Acid Polymer REP 2055 against Persistent Duck Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Noordeen, Faseeha; Scougall, Catherine A.; Grosse, Arend; Qiao, Qiao; Ajilian, Behzad B.; Reaiche-Miller, Georget; Finnie, John; Werner, Melanie; Broering, Ruth; Schlaak, Joerg F.; Vaillant, Andrew; Jilbert, Allison R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that nucleic acid polymers (NAPs) have both entry and post-entry inhibitory activity against duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infection. The inhibitory activity exhibited by NAPs prevented DHBV infection of primary duck hepatocytes in vitro and protected ducks from DHBV infection in vivo and did not result from direct activation of the immune response. In the current study treatment of primary human hepatocytes with NAP REP 2055 did not induce expression of the TNF, IL6, IL10, IFNA4 or IFNB1 genes, confirming the lack of direct immunostimulation by REP 2055. Ducks with persistent DHBV infection were treated with NAP 2055 to determine if the post-entry inhibitory activity exhibited by NAPs could provide a therapeutic effect against established DHBV infection in vivo. In all REP 2055-treated ducks, 28 days of treatment lead to initial rapid reductions in serum DHBsAg and DHBV DNA and increases in anti-DHBs antibodies. After treatment, 6/11 ducks experienced a sustained virologic response: DHBsAg and DHBV DNA remained at low or undetectable levels in the serum and no DHBsAg or DHBV core antigen positive hepatocytes and only trace amounts of DHBV total and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) were detected in the liver at 9 or 16 weeks of follow-up. In the remaining 5/11 REP 2055-treated ducks, all markers of DHBV infection rapidly rebounded after treatment withdrawal: At 9 and 16 weeks of follow-up, levels of DHBsAg and DHBcAg and DHBV total and cccDNA in the liver had rebounded and matched levels observed in the control ducks treated with normal saline which remained persistently infected with DHBV. These data demonstrate that treatment with the NAP REP 2055 can lead to sustained control of persistent DHBV infection. These effects may be related to the unique ability of REP 2055 to block release of DHBsAg from infected hepatocytes. PMID:26560490

  16. Therapeutic Antiviral Effect of the Nucleic Acid Polymer REP 2055 against Persistent Duck Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Noordeen, Faseeha; Scougall, Catherine A; Grosse, Arend; Qiao, Qiao; Ajilian, Behzad B; Reaiche-Miller, Georget; Finnie, John; Werner, Melanie; Broering, Ruth; Schlaak, Joerg F; Vaillant, Andrew; Jilbert, Allison R

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that nucleic acid polymers (NAPs) have both entry and post-entry inhibitory activity against duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infection. The inhibitory activity exhibited by NAPs prevented DHBV infection of primary duck hepatocytes in vitro and protected ducks from DHBV infection in vivo and did not result from direct activation of the immune response. In the current study treatment of primary human hepatocytes with NAP REP 2055 did not induce expression of the TNF, IL6, IL10, IFNA4 or IFNB1 genes, confirming the lack of direct immunostimulation by REP 2055. Ducks with persistent DHBV infection were treated with NAP 2055 to determine if the post-entry inhibitory activity exhibited by NAPs could provide a therapeutic effect against established DHBV infection in vivo. In all REP 2055-treated ducks, 28 days of treatment lead to initial rapid reductions in serum DHBsAg and DHBV DNA and increases in anti-DHBs antibodies. After treatment, 6/11 ducks experienced a sustained virologic response: DHBsAg and DHBV DNA remained at low or undetectable levels in the serum and no DHBsAg or DHBV core antigen positive hepatocytes and only trace amounts of DHBV total and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) were detected in the liver at 9 or 16 weeks of follow-up. In the remaining 5/11 REP 2055-treated ducks, all markers of DHBV infection rapidly rebounded after treatment withdrawal: At 9 and 16 weeks of follow-up, levels of DHBsAg and DHBcAg and DHBV total and cccDNA in the liver had rebounded and matched levels observed in the control ducks treated with normal saline which remained persistently infected with DHBV. These data demonstrate that treatment with the NAP REP 2055 can lead to sustained control of persistent DHBV infection. These effects may be related to the unique ability of REP 2055 to block release of DHBsAg from infected hepatocytes.

  17. DNA vaccines expressing the duck hepatitis B virus surface proteins lead to reduced numbers of infected hepatocytes and protect ducks against the development of chronic infection in a virus dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Miller, Darren S; Kotlarski, Ieva; Jilbert, Allison R

    2006-07-20

    We tested the efficacy of DNA vaccines expressing the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) pre-surface (pre-S/S) and surface (S) proteins in modifying the outcome of infection in 14-day-old ducks. In two experiments, Pekin Aylesbury ducks were vaccinated on days 4 and 14 of age with plasmid DNA vaccines expressing either the DHBV pre-S/S or S proteins, or the control plasmid vector, pcDNA1.1Amp. All ducks were then challenged intravenously on day 14 of age with 5 x 10(7) or 5 x 10(8) DHBV genomes. Levels of initial DHBV infection were assessed using liver biopsy tissue collected at day 4 post-challenge (p.c.) followed and immunostained for DHBV surface antigen to determine the percentage of infected hepatocytes. All vector vaccinated ducks challenged with 5 x 10(7) and 5 x 10(8) DHBV genomes had an average of 3.21% and 20.1% of DHBV-positive hepatocytes respectively at day 4 p.c. and 16 out of 16 ducks developed chronic DHBV infection. In contrast, pre-S/S and S vaccinated ducks challenged with 5 x 10(7) DHBV genomes had reduced levels of initial infection with an average of 1.38% and 1.93% of DHBV-positive hepatocytes at day 4 p.c. respectively and 10 of 18 ducks were protected against chronic infection. The pre-S/S and the S DNA vaccinated ducks challenged with 5 x 10(8) DHBV genomes had an average of 31.5% and 9.2% of DHBV-positive hepatocytes on day 4 p.c. respectively and only 4 of the 18 vaccinated ducks were protected against chronic infection. There was no statistically significant difference in the efficacy of the DHBV pre-S/S or S DNA vaccines. In conclusion, vaccination of young ducks with DNA vaccines expressing the DHBV pre-S/S and S proteins induced rapid immune responses that reduced the extent of initial DHBV infection in the liver and prevented the development of chronic infection in a virus dose-dependent manner.

  18. Three novel Anas platyrhynchos avian β-defensins, upregulated by duck hepatitis virus, with antibacterial and antiviral activities.

    PubMed

    Ma, Deying; Lin, Lijuan; Zhang, Kexin; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Shengwang

    2011-10-01

    Three novel Anas platyrhynchos avian β-defensins (Apl_AvBDs), Apl_AvBD4, 7 and 12, were identified successfully and characterized in tissues from Peking ducks in the present study. The cDNA fragment of Apl_AvBD4 contained 171 bp, and encoded 56 amino acids. The complete nucleotide sequences of Apl_AvBD7 and 12 contained 204 bp and 198 bp open reading frames, which encoded 67 and 65 amino acids, respectively. Both recombinant and synthetic forms of the three Apl_AvBDs showed antibacterial activity against most of the bacteria investigated, including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, except for Salmonella choleraesuis. In addition, the antibacterial activity of all the three Apl_AvBDs decreased significantly in 150 mM NaCl. Significant antiviral activity of the three Apl_AvBDs was shown against duck hepatitis virus (DHV). However, none of the Apl_AvBDs showed significant hemolytic activity. Additionally, the expressions of the three Apl_AvBDs in response to DHV infection was highly variable, and significant upregulation of Apl_AvBD7 in liver was found in response to infection at different time points. Expression of Apl_AvBD4 in thymus, and of Apl_AvBD7 in bone marrow was induced in a time-dependent fashion by DHV infection. In contrast, expression of Apl_AvBD12 was found to be significantly decreased, and was hard to detect in cecal tonsil, spleen, bursa of Fabricius, and thymus of ducks at some time points after DHV infection. The present results demonstrate that Apl_AvBDs play vital roles in the immune response of ducks against bacterial and viral pathogens.

  19. Antiviral therapy with entecavir combined with post-exposure "prime-boost" vaccination eliminates duck hepatitis B virus-infected hepatocytes and prevents the development of persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Miller, D S; Boyle, D; Feng, F; Reaiche, G Y; Kotlarski, I; Colonno, R; Jilbert, A R

    2008-04-10

    Short-term antiviral therapy with the nucleoside analogue entecavir (ETV), given at an early stage of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infection, restricts virus spread and leads to clearance of DHBV-infected hepatocytes in approximately 50% of ETV-treated ducks, whereas widespread and persistent DHBV infection develops in 100% of untreated ducks. To increase the treatment response rate, ETV treatment was combined in the current study with a post-exposure "prime-boost" vaccination protocol. Four groups of 14-day-old ducks were inoculated intravenously with a dose of DHBV previously shown to induce persistent DHBV infection. One hour post-infection (p.i.), ducks were primed with DNA vaccines that expressed DHBV core (DHBc) and surface (pre-S/S and S) antigens (Groups A, B) or the DNA vector alone (Groups C, D). ETV (Groups A, C) or water (Groups B, D) was simultaneously administered by gavage and continued for 14 days. Ducks were boosted 7 days p.i. with recombinant fowlpoxvirus (rFPV) strains also expressing DHBc and pre-S/S antigens (Groups A, B) or the FPV-M3 vector (Groups C, D). DHBV-infected hepatocytes were observed in the liver of all ducks at day 4 p.i. with reduced numbers in the ETV-treated ducks. Ducks treated with ETV plus the control vectors showed restricted spread of DHBV infection during ETV treatment, but in 60% of cases, infection became widespread after ETV was stopped. In contrast, at 14 and 67 days p.i., 100% of ducks treated with ETV and "prime-boost" vaccination had no detectable DHBV-infected hepatocytes and had cleared the DHBV infection. These findings suggest that ETV treatment combined with post-exposure "prime-boost" vaccination induced immune responses that eliminated DHBV-infected hepatocytes and prevented the development of persistent DHBV infection.

  20. Rapid detection of duck hepatitis A virus genotype C using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Meng, Chunchun; Liu, Guangqing

    2014-02-01

    A one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was used and optimized to develop a rapid and sensitive detection system for duck hepatitis A virus genotype C (DHAV-C) RNA. A set of four specific primers was designed against highly conserved sequences located within the 3D gene from DHAV (strain GX1201). Under optimal reaction conditions, the sensitivity of DHAV-C-specific RT-LAMP was 100-fold higher than that of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), with a detection limit of 0.3pg (6.59×10(4) copies) per reaction. No cross-reactivity was observed from the samples of other duck viruses, which is in good accordance with RT-PCR. Furthermore, a positive reaction can be visually inspected by observing turbidity or color change after the addition of SYBR green I dye. The DHAV-C-specific RT-LAMP assay was applied to the samples and compared with RT-PCR. The positive-sample ratios were 26.7% (12 of 45) by RT-LAMP and 20% (9 of 45) by RT-PCR. Therefore, the newly developed RT-LAMP assay is a rapid, specific, sensitive, and cost-effective method of DHAV-C detection. This assay has potential applications in both clinical diagnosis and field surveillance of DHAV-C infection.

  1. Duck hepatitis A virus serotype 1 minigenome: a model for studying the viral 3'UTR effect on viral translation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ruiying; Li, Chuanfeng; Jin, Hongyan; Meng, Chunchun; Chen, Zongyan; Zhu, Jie; Miao, Qiuhong; Ding, Chan; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-12-01

    To date, the genetic replication and translation mechanisms as well as the pathogenesis of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) have not been adequately characterized due to the lack of a reliable and efficient cell culture system. Although the full-length infections clone system is the best platform to manipulate the virus, it is relatively difficult to assemble this system due to the lack of a suitable cell line. It has been proven that the minigenome system an efficient reverse genetics system for the study of RNA viruses. In some cases, it can be used to displace the infectious clone of RNA viruses. Here, we generated a minigenome for DHAV-1 with two luciferase reporter genes, firefly luciferase (Fluc) and Renilla luciferase (Rluc). The Rluc gene was used as a reference gene for the normalization of the Fluc gene expression in transfected cells, which provided a platform for studying the regulatory mechanisms of DHAV-1. Furthermore, to investigate the role of DHAV-3'UTR in the regulation of viral protein translation, deletions in the 3'UTR were introduced into the DHAV-1 minigenome. Luciferase activity, an indicator of virus translation, was then determined. These results showed that a minigenome system for DHAV-1 was successfully constructed for the first time and that the complete or partial deletion of the DHAV-3'UTR did not affect the expression level of the reporter gene, indicating that DHAV-1 translation may not be modulated by the viral genomic 3'UTR sequence.

  2. Enzymatic treatment of duck hepatitis B virus: Topology of the surface proteins for virions and noninfectious subviral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Claudia; Matschl, Urte; Bruns, Michael . E-mail: mbruns@hpi.uni-hamburg.de

    2007-03-01

    The large surface antigen L of duck hepatitis B virus exhibits a mixed topology with the preS domains of the protein alternatively exposed to the particles' interior or exterior. After separating virions from subviral particles (SVPs), we compared their L topologies and showed that both particle types exhibit the same amount of L with the following differences: 1-preS of intact virions was enzymatically digested with chymotrypsin, whereas in SVPs only half of preS was accessible, 2-phosphorylation of L at S118 was completely removed by phosphatase treatment only in virions, 3-iodine-125 labeling disclosed a higher ratio of exposed preS to S domains in virions compared to SVPs. These data point towards different surface architectures of virions and SVPs. Because the preS domain acts in binding to a cellular receptor of hepatocytes, our findings implicate the exclusion of SVPs as competitors for the receptor binding and entry of virions.

  3. Circulation and in vivo distribution of duck hepatitis A virus types 1 and 3 in infected ducklings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao-Li; Cong, Ri-Chao; Zhang, Rui-Hua; Chen, Jun-Hao; Xia, Lin-Lin; Xie, Zhi-Jing; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Shi-Jin

    2016-02-01

    The circulation of duck hepatitis A virus types 1 (DHAV-1) and 3 (DHAV-3) in Southeast Asia has resulted in a continuously changing epidemiological scenario. In this study, a duplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous quantitative detection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 was established, and 200 liver samples from dead ducklings collected from 31 different flocks in Shandong province, China, were tested. Fifty-eight (29.0 %) samples from 13 flocks were positive for DHAV-1 single infection, 113 (56.5 %) samples from 13 other flocks were positive for DHAV-3 single infection, and 24 samples (12.0 %) from four flocks were positive for both viruses. DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 were detected with high viral loads in all of the organs tested (liver, spleen, pancreas, kidney, heart, thymus, bursa of Fabricius and brain). No significant difference in DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 viral loads was found between singly infected and coinfected samples, and there was no correlation between the viral loads of the two viruses and the age of dead ducklings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about the in vivo distribution of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 in clinically infected ducklings.

  4. The persistence in the liver of residual duck hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA is not dependent upon new viral DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Reaiche, Georget Y; Le Mire, Marc F; Mason, William S; Jilbert, Allison R

    2010-10-25

    Residual hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA can be detected following the resolution of acute HBV infection. Our previous work using duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infected ducks, indicated that ~80% of residual DHBV DNA in the liver is in the covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) form, suggesting that viral DNA synthesis is suppressed. The current study asked more directly if maintenance of residual DHBV cccDNA is dependent upon ongoing viral DNA synthesis. Ducks that recovered from acute DHBV infection were divided into 2 groups and treated with the antiviral drug, Entecavir (ETV), or placebo. No major differences in the stability of cccDNA or levels of residual cccDNA were observed in liver biopsy tissues taken 95 days apart from ETV treated and placebo control ducks. The data suggest that residual DHBV cccDNA is highly stable and present in a cell population with a rate of turnover similar to normal, uninfected hepatocytes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of a conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope in the VP1 proteins of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihua; Zhou, Guomei; Xin, Yinghao; Chen, Junhao; Lin, Shaoli; Tian, Ye; Xie, Zhijing; Jiang, Shijin

    2015-11-18

    Duck virus hepatitis (DVH), mainly caused by duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), is a severe disease threaten to duck industry and has worldwide distribution. As the major structural protein, the VP1 protein of DHAV is able to induce neutralizing antibody in ducks. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4F8 against the intact DHAV-1 particles was used to identify the possible epitope in the three serotypes of DHAV. The mAb 4F8 had weak neutralizing activities to both DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, and reacted with the conserved linear B-cell epitopes of (75)GEIILT(80) in DHAV-1 VP1 and (75)GEVILT(80) in DHAV-3 VP1 protein, respectively, while not with DHAV-2 VP1. This was the first report about identification of the common conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which will facilitate understanding of the antigenic structure of VP1 and the serologic diagnosis of DHAV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhancement of neutralizing humoral response of DNA vaccine against duck hepatitis B virus envelope protein by co-delivery of cytokine genes.

    PubMed

    Saade, Fadi; Buronfosse, Thierry; Pradat, Pierre; Abdul, Fabien; Cova, Lucyna

    2008-09-19

    We explored in the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) model the impact of duck interferon gamma (Du-IFNgamma) or interleukin 2 (Du-IL2) co-delivery on humoral neutralizing response induced by DNA-based vaccine encoding DHBV preS/S large envelope protein. Co-delivery of either Du-IL2 or Du-IFNgamma encoding plasmids considerably increased the magnitude of anti-preS humoral response. Moreover, co-administration of cytokine genes led to a significant (p<0.001) enhancement of neutralizing anti-DHBV antibody response, which was more pronounced for Du-IFNgamma. Our data suggest that co-delivery of cytokine and envelope protein encoding plasmids will be a valuable approach for the development of a potent therapeutic DNA vaccine against chronic hepatitis B.

  7. A multiplex PCR for detection of six viruses in ducks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjuan; Zhu, Shanyuan; Hong, Weiming; Wang, Anping; Zuo, Weiyong

    2017-10-01

    In this study, six pairs of specific primers that can amplify DNA fragments of different sizes were designed and synthesized according to viral protein gene sequences published in GenBank. Then, a multiplex PCR method was established for rapid detection of duck hepatitis virus 1, duck plague virus, duck Tembusu virus, muscovy duck parvovirus, muscovy duck reovirus, and duck H9N2 avian influenza virus, and achieve simple and rapid detection of viral diseases in ducks. Single PCR was used to confirm primer specificity, and PCR conditions were optimized to construct a multiplex PCR system. Specificity and sensitivity assays were also developed. The multiplex PCR was used to detect duck embryos infected with mixed viruses and those with clinically suspected diseases to verify the feasibility of the multiplex PCR. Results show that the primers can specifically amplify target fragments, without any cross-amplification with other viruses. The multiplex PCR system can amplify six DNA fragments from the pooled viral genomes and specifically detect nucleic acids of the six duck susceptible viruses when the template amount is 10(2) copies/μl. In addition, the system can be used to detect viral nucleic acids in duck embryos infected with the six common viruses. The detection results for clinical samples are consistent with those detected by single PCR. Therefore, the established multiplex PCR method can perform specific, sensitive, and high-throughput detection of six duck-infecting viruses and can be applied to clinical identification and diagnosis of viral infection in ducks. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. gp180, a host cell glycoprotein that binds duck hepatitis B virus particles, is encoded by a member of the carboxypeptidase gene family.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, K; Eng, F; Ishikawa, T; Turck, C; Harada, F; Ganem, D

    1995-06-23

    Duck hepatitis B virus particles bearing the L and S envelope proteins bind a cellular glycoprotein of 180 kDa (gp180) with high affinity and specificity. Binding is mediated by the pre-S region of the L protein and is blocked by neutralizing but not by non-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to the virus. These and other properties have suggested that gp180 may be a component of the viral entry machinery. Here we report the purification of gp180 from duck liver and the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding it. DNA sequence analysis of this cDNA indicates that gp180 is a novel member of the basic carboxypeptidase gene family.

  9. Duck Hepatitis B Virus Expresses a Regulatory HBx-Like Protein from a Hidden Open Reading Frame

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shau-Feng; Netter, Hans Jürgen; Hildt, Eberhard; Schuster, Ralph; Schaefer, Stephan; Hsu, Yin-Chen; Rang, Andreas; Will, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Duck hepatitis B viruses (DHBV), unlike mammalian hepadnaviruses, are thought to lack X genes, which encode transcription-regulatory proteins believed to contribute to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. A lack of association of chronic DHBV infection with hepatocellular carcinoma development supports this belief. Here, we demonstrate that DHBV genomes have a hidden open reading frame from which a transcription-regulatory protein, designated DHBx, is expressed both in vitro and in vivo. We show that DHBx enhances neither viral protein expression, intracellular DNA synthesis, nor virion production when assayed in the full-length genome context in LMH cells. However, similar to mammalian hepadnavirus X proteins, DHBx activates cellular and viral promoters via the Raf–mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and localizes primarily in the cytoplasm. The functional similarities as well as the weak sequence homologies of DHBx and the X proteins of mammalian hepadnaviruses strongly suggest a common ancestry of ortho- and avihepadnavirus X genes. In addition, our data disclose similar intracellular localization and transcription regulatory functions of the corresponding proteins, raise new questions as to their presumed role in hepatocarcinogenesis, and imply unique opportunities for deciphering of their still-enigmatic in vivo functions. PMID:11119585

  10. The 2A2 protein of Duck hepatitis A virus type 1 induces apoptosis in primary cell culture.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jingyu; Ou, Xumin; Zhu, Dekang; Ma, Guangpeng; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Jia, Renyong; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2016-12-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus type 1, (DHAV-1) 2A2(pro), is one of the most highly conserved viral proteins within the DHAV serotypes. However, its effect on host cells is unclear. We predicted that DHAV-1 2A2(pro) was a GTPase-like protein based on the results of multiple sequence alignment and homologous modeling analysis. Upon transfection of a recombinant plasmid expressing DHAV-1 2A2, cells displayed fragmented nuclei, chromatin condensation, oligonucleosome-sized DNA ladder, and positive terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling staining; hence, cell death has the characteristics of apoptosis. By staining cells with fluorescein Annexin V-FITC and PI, it is possible to distinguish and quantitatively analyze nonapoptotic cells, early apoptotic cells, late apoptotic/necrotic cells, and dead cells through flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The percentage of apoptotic cells gradually increased and reached a maximum after 48 h of transfection. In conclusion, apoptosis induced by this GTPase-like protein may contribute to DHAV-1 pathogenesis.

  11. The development of persistent duck hepatitis B virus infection can be prevented using antiviral therapy combined with DNA or recombinant fowlpoxvirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feng; Teoh, Chee Quin; Qiao, Qiao; Boyle, David; Jilbert, Allison R

    2010-10-28

    We recently reported the development of a successful post-exposure combination antiviral and "prime-boost" vaccination strategy using the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) model of human hepatitis B virus infection. The current study aimed to simplify the vaccination strategy and to test the post-exposure efficacy of combination therapy with the Bristol-Myers Squibb antiviral drug, entecavir (ETV) and either a single dose of DHBV DNA vaccines on day 0 post-infection (p.i.) or a single dose of recombinant fowlpoxvirus (rFPV-DHBV) vaccines on day 7 p.i. Whilst untreated control ducks infected with an equal dose of DHBV all developed persistent and wide spread DHBV infection of the liver, ducks treated with ETV combined with either the DHBV DNA vaccines on day 0 p.i. or the rFPV-DHBV vaccines on day 7 p.i. had no detectable DHBV-infected hepatocytes by day 14 p.i. and were protected from the development of persistent DHBV infection.

  12. Detection, differentiation, and VP1 sequencing of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and type 3 by a 1-step duplex reverse-transcription PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Wen, X J; Cheng, A C; Wang, M S; Jia, R Y; Zhu, D K; Chen, S; Liu, M F; Liu, F; Chen, X Y

    2014-09-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is an infectious pathogen causing fatal duck viral hepatitis in ducklings. Although both the inactivated vaccines and live attenuated vaccines have been used to protect ducklings, DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 still cause significant serious damage to the duck industry in China and South Korea. For rapid detection, differentiation, and epidemic investigation of DHAV in China, a genotype-specific 1-step duplex reverse-transcription (RT) PCR assay was established in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of the developed RT-PCR assay was evaluated with nucleic acids extracted from 2 DHAV reference strains, and 9 other infectious viruses and bacteria. The genotype-specific primers amplified different size DNA fragments encompassing the complete VP1 gene of the DHAV-1 or DHAV-3. The assay detected the liver samples collected from experimentally infected ducklings and dead ducklings collected from different regions of China. Sequence analysis of these DNA fragments indicated that VP1 sequences of DHAV-1 can be used to distinguish wild type and vaccine strains. The phylogenetic analysis of VP1 sequences indicated that the developed RT-PCR assay can be used for epidemic investigation of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. The developed RT-PCR assay can be used as a specific molecular tool for simultaneous detection, differentiation, and sequencing the VP1 gene of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which can be used for understanding the epidemiology and evolution of DHAV. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  13. A one-step duplex rRT-PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of duck hepatitis A virus genotypes 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qin; Zhu, Dekang; Ma, Guangpeng; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Jia, Renyong; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2016-10-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is a highly infectious pathogen that causes significant bleeding lesions in the viscera of ducklings less than 3 weeks old. There are three serotypes of DHAV: serotype 1 (DHAV-1), serotype 2 (DHAV-2) and serotype 3 (DHAV-3). These serotypes have no cross-antigenicity with each other. To establish an rRT-PCR assay for the rapid detection of a mixed infection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, two pairs of primers and a pair of matching TaqMan probes were designed based on conserved regions of DHAV-1 VP0 and DHAV-3 VP3. Finally, we established a one-step duplex rRT-PCR assay with high specificity and sensitivity for the simultaneous detection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. This method showed no cross-antigenicity with the other pathogens tested, including duck plague virus, Muscovy duck parvovirus, Riemerella anatipestifer, and pathogenic E. coli from ducks. Sensitivity tests identified the minimum detection limits of this method as 98 (DHAV-1) and 10 (DHAV-3) copies/reaction. To validate the method, thirty-eight clinical samples and thirty artificially infected samples collected from dead duck embryos were studied. Thirty-seven samples were positive for DHAV-1, seventeen samples were positive for DHAV-3, and fourteen samples were positive for a mixed infection using the duplex rRT-PCR method. The method established in this study is specific, sensitive, convenient and timesaving and is a powerful tool for detecting DHAV-1, DHAV-3, and their mixed infection and for conducting surveys of pandemic virus strains.

  14. Development and application of a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid detection of Duck hepatitis A virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Limin; Li, Jing; Bi, Yuhai; Xu, Lei; Liu, Wenjun

    2012-12-01

    We developed and evaluated a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for detecting Duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1). The amplification could be finished in 1 h under isothermal conditions at 63 °C by employing a set of four primers targeting the 2C gene of DHAV-1. The RT-LAMP assay showed higher sensitivity than the RT-PCR with a detection limit of 0.1 ELD(50) 0.1 ml(-1) of DHAV-1. The RT-LAMP assay was highly specific; no cross-reactivity was observed from the samples of other related viruses, bacteria, allantoic fluid of normal chicken embryos, or the livers of uninfected ducks. Thirty clinical samples were subjected to detection by RT-LAMP, RT-PCR, and virus isolation, which obtained completely consistent, positive results. As a simple, rapid, and accurate detection method, this RT-LAMP assay has important potential applications in the clinical diagnosis of DHAV-1.

  15. Genetic variation of the VP1 gene of the virulent duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) isolates in Shandong province of China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiming; Chen, Junhao; Si, Xingkui; Xie, Zhijing; Zhu, Yanli; Zhang, Xingxiao; Wang, Shujing; Jiang, Shijin

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the relationship of the variation of virulence and the external capsid proteins of the pandemic duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) isolates, the virulence, cross neutralization assays and the complete sequence of the virion protein 1 (VP1) gene of nine virulent DHAV-1 strains, which were isolated from infected ducklings with clinical symptoms in Shandong province of China in 2007-2008, were tested. The fifth generation duck embryo allantoic liquids of the 9 isolates were tested on 12-day-old duck embryos and on 7-day-old ducklings for the median embryonal lethal doses (ELD(50)s) and the median lethal doses (LD(50)s), respectively. The results showed that the ELD(50)s of embryonic duck eggs of the 9 DHAV-1 isolates were between 1.9 × 10(6)/mL to 1.44 × 10(7)/mL, while the LD(50)s were 2.39 × 10(5)/mL to 6.15 × 10(6)/mL. Cross-neutralization tests revealed that the 9 DHAV-1 isolates were completely neutralized by the standard serum and the hyperimmune sera against the 9 DHAV-1 isolates, respectively. Compared with other virulent, moderate virulent, attenuated vaccine and mild strains, the VP1 genes of the 9 strains shared 89.8%-99.7% similarity at the nucleotide level and 92.4%-99.6% at amino acid level with other DHAV-1 strains. There were three hypervariable regions at the C-terminus (aa 158-160, 180-193 and 205-219) and other variable points in VP1 protein, but which didn't cause virulence of DHAV-1 change.

  16. Molecular Evolution and Genetic Analysis of the Major Capsid Protein VP1 of Duck Hepatitis A Viruses: Implications for Antigenic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiuli; Sheng, Zizhang; Huang, Bing; Qi, Lihong; Li, Yufeng; Yu, Kexiang; Liu, Cunxia; Qin, Zhuoming; Wang, Dan; Song, Minxun; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), a member of the family Picornaviridae, is the major cause of outbreaks with high mortality rates in young ducklings. It has three distinctive serotypes and among them, serotypes 1 (DHAV-1) and 3 (DHAV-3) were recognized in China. To investigate evolutionary and antigenic properties of the major capsid protein VP1 of these two serotypes, a primary target of neutralizing antibodies, we determined the VP1 coding sequences of 19 DHAV-1 (spanning 2000-2012) and 11 DHAV-3 isolates (spanning 2008-2014) associated with disease outbreaks. By bioinformatics analysis of VP1 sequences of these isolates and other DHAV strains reported previously, we demonstrated that DHAV-1 viruses evolved into two genetic lineages, while DHAV-3 viruses exhibited three distinct lineages. The rate of nucleotide substitution for DHAV-1 VP1 genes was estimated to be 5.57 x 10-4 per site per year, which was about one-third times slower than that for DHAV-3 VP1 genes. The population dynamics analysis showed an upward trend for infection of DHAV-1 viruses over time with little change observed for DHAV-3 viruses. Antigenic study of representative DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 strains covering all observed major lineages revealed no detectable changes in viral neutralization properties within the serotype, despite the lack of cross-neutralization between serotypes 1 and 3 strains. Structural analysis identified VP1 mutations in DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 viruses that underpin the observed antigenic phenotypes. Results of our experiments described here shall give novel insights into evolution and antigenicity of duck picornaviruses. PMID:26173145

  17. Molecular Evolution and Genetic Analysis of the Major Capsid Protein VP1 of Duck Hepatitis A Viruses: Implications for Antigenic Stability.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiuli; Sheng, Zizhang; Huang, Bing; Qi, Lihong; Li, Yufeng; Yu, Kexiang; Liu, Cunxia; Qin, Zhuoming; Wang, Dan; Song, Minxun; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), a member of the family Picornaviridae, is the major cause of outbreaks with high mortality rates in young ducklings. It has three distinctive serotypes and among them, serotypes 1 (DHAV-1) and 3 (DHAV-3) were recognized in China. To investigate evolutionary and antigenic properties of the major capsid protein VP1 of these two serotypes, a primary target of neutralizing antibodies, we determined the VP1 coding sequences of 19 DHAV-1 (spanning 2000-2012) and 11 DHAV-3 isolates (spanning 2008-2014) associated with disease outbreaks. By bioinformatics analysis of VP1 sequences of these isolates and other DHAV strains reported previously, we demonstrated that DHAV-1 viruses evolved into two genetic lineages, while DHAV-3 viruses exhibited three distinct lineages. The rate of nucleotide substitution for DHAV-1 VP1 genes was estimated to be 5.57 x 10(-4) per site per year, which was about one-third times slower than that for DHAV-3 VP1 genes. The population dynamics analysis showed an upward trend for infection of DHAV-1 viruses over time with little change observed for DHAV-3 viruses. Antigenic study of representative DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 strains covering all observed major lineages revealed no detectable changes in viral neutralization properties within the serotype, despite the lack of cross-neutralization between serotypes 1 and 3 strains. Structural analysis identified VP1 mutations in DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 viruses that underpin the observed antigenic phenotypes. Results of our experiments described here shall give novel insights into evolution and antigenicity of duck picornaviruses.

  18. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  19. Mortality from duck plague virus in immunosuppressed adult mallard ducks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, D.R.; Yuill, T.M.; Burgess, E.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Environmental contaminants contain chemicals that, if ingested, could affect the immunological status of wild birds, and in particular, their resistance to infectious disease. Immunosuppression caused by environmental contaminants, could have a major impact on waterfowl populations, resulting in increased susceptibility to contagious disease agents. Duck plague virus has caused repeated outbreaks in waterfowl resulting in mortality. In this study, several doses of cyclophosphamide (CY), a known immunosuppressant, were administered to adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) to determine if a resultant decrease in resistance to a normally sub-lethal strain of duck plague virus would occur, and induce mortality in these birds. Death occurred in birds given CY only, and in birds given virus and CY, but not in those given virus only. There was significantly greater mortality and more rapid deaths in the duck plague virus-infected groups than in groups receiving only the immunosuppressant. A positively correlated dose-response effect was observed with CY mortalities, irrespective of virus exposure. A fuel oil and a crude oil, common environmental contaminants with immunosuppressive capabilities, were tested to determine if they could produce an effect similar to that of CY. Following 28 days of oral oil administration, the birds were challenged with a sub-lethal dose of duck plague virus. No alteration in resistance to the virus (as measured by mortality) was observed, except in the positive CY control group.

  20. Mortality from duck plague virus in immunosuppressed adult mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, D.R.; Yuill, Thomas M.; Burgess, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental contaminants contain chemicals that, if ingested, could affect the immunological status of wild birds, and in particular, their resistance to infectious disease. Immunosuppression caused by environmental contaminants, could have a major impact on waterfowl populations, resulting in increased susceptibility to contagious disease agents. Duck plague virus has caused repeated outbreaks in waterfowl resulting in mortality. In this study, several doses of cyclophosphamide (CY), a known immunosuppressant, were administered to adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) to determine if a resultant decrease in resistance to a normally sub-lethal strain of duck plague virus would occur, and induce mortality in these birds. Death occurred in birds given CY only, and in birds given virus and CY, but not in those given virus only. There was significantly greater mortality and more rapid deaths in the duck plague virus-infected groups than in groups receiving only the immunosuppressant. A positively correlated dose-response effect was observed with CY mortalities, irrespective of virus exposure. A fuel oil and a crude oil, common environmental contaminants with immunosuppressive capabilities, were tested to determine if they could produce an effect similar to that of CY. Following 28 days of oral oil administration, the birds were challenged with a sub-lethal dose of duck plague virus. No alteration in resistance to the virus (as measured by mortality) was observed, except in the positive CY control group.

  1. Genetic diversity of the VP1 gene of duck hepatitis virus type I (DHV-I) isolates from southeast China is related to isolate attenuation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangqing; Wang, Fei; Ni, Zheng; Yun, Tao; Yu, Bin; Huang, Jionggang; Chen, Jianping

    2008-10-01

    The complete sequence of an isolate (ZJ-V) of Duck hepatitis virus I (DHV-I), originally taken from the field in southeast China was determined. It was 7691 nucleotides long and had 5'- and 3'-terminal non-coding regions of 626 and 315 nucleotides, respectively. The poly(A) tail contained at least 22 residues and the single open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 2249 amino acids. The VP1 gene was also sequenced from nine southeast China field isolates and three attenuated DHV-I vaccine strains. In phylogenetic analysis of the isolates and other published sequences, attenuated and tissue-adapted isolates (including ZJ-V) clustered as genotypes significantly different from the field isolates that had not been passaged in chicken/duck embryos. There were two consistent amino acid substitutions (E(129)-->V(129) and A(142)-->S(142)) between all the field isolates and all the tissue-adapted ones. The carboxyl terminal region was generally the most variable and here the four attenuated Chinese isolates showed six consistent differences from the field isolates (S(181)-->L(181), H(183)K(184)-->R(183)G(1841), N(193)-->D(193), E(205)-->K(205), R(217)-->K(217), N(235)-->D(235)). It seems likely that at least some of these differences result from mutations leading to isolate attenuation.

  2. Improved duplex RT-PCR assay for differential diagnosis of mixed infection of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and type 3 in ducklings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin-Lin; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Rui-Hua; Yang, Lei; Li, Jing-Xin; Xie, Zhi-Jing; Zhu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Shi-Jin; Si, Xing-Kui

    2013-09-01

    Infection with duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) causes an acute, rapidly spreading, and fatal disease of young ducklings. DHAV type 1 (DHAV-1) and type 3 (DHAV-3) have been identified in China. In this study, a duplex RT-PCR assay was developed to identify DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 with mixed infection. The method was shown to be high specificity and sensitivity. The minimum detection limit of the method has been determined to be 10pg total RNA templates extracted from duck liver samples or 10² copies viral RNA of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 respectively. Using the method, from 60 clinical liver samples of 26 duckling flocks in Shandong, Guangdong, Sichuan and Henan provinces of China, 15 (57.7%) flocks were identified as mixed infection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, and 9 (34.6%) flocks were DHAV-1 or DHAV-3 single infection. Among them, 38.3% (23/60) of duckling samples were detected as mixed infection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, and 48.3% (29/60) of samples were DHAV-1 or DHAV-3 single infection. These results indicated that the improved duplex RT-PCR method provides a rapid and cost-effective laboratory differential diagnosis for mixed infection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 in ducklings.

  3. Development and evaluation of indirect ELISAs for the detection of IgG, IgM and IgA1 against duck hepatitis A virus 1.

    PubMed

    Mao, Sai; Ou, XuMin; Zhu, DeKang; Chen, Shun; Ma, GuangPeng; Wang, MingShu; Jia, RenYong; Liu, MaFeng; Sun, KunFeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, XiaoYue; Cheng, AnChun

    2016-11-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus 1 (DHAV-1) is the principal pathogen that causes duck viral hepatitis (DHV), a highly fatal infectious disease in ducklings. Given the importance of the humoral immune response in the clearance of DHAV-1, indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (I-ELISAs) to detect immune indices, including IgG, IgM and IgA1, were developed and evaluated in this study. The optimal concentrations of coating-antigen were 1.79μg/ml, 2.23μg/ml and 2.23μg/ml for IgG, IgM and IgA1, respectively. Meanwhile, the optimal dilutions of sera were 1:80, 1:40 and 1:40, respectively; and of the conjugates were 1:300, 1:1800 and 1:800, respectively. Based on these conditions, three linear regression equations, y=1.363+1.954x (r(2)=0.983), y=1.141+2.228x (r(2)=0.970) and y=1.103+1.559x (r(2)=0.995) were derived for IgG, IgM and IgA1, respectively. Analytical sensitivities of the new methods were 1:2560, 1:1280 and 1:640 for IgG, IgM and IgA1, respectively. The concordances between the I-ELISAs and serum-neutralization were 95.2% for IgG and IgA1, and 75% for IgM. Although there was a weak cross-reaction with DHAV-3 positive serum for the IgG and IgA1 tests, it didn't affect the ability to detect DHAV-1 specific antibodies. Thus, these new I-ELISAs were shown to be potentially convenient methods to survey the status of humoral immune response to DHAV-1.

  4. [Sequence analysis of VP1 gene of the duck hepatitis A virus type 3 strains isolated from Shandong Province of China in 2012].

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Chen, Lin-lin; Zhang, Rui-hua; Yang, Lei; Xie, Zhi-jing; Zhu, Yan-li; Jiang, Shi-jin; Si, Xing-kui

    2013-09-01

    To reveal the genetic variation of the viral protein 1 (VP1) gene of the duck hepatitis A virus type 3 (DHAV-3), the VP1 gene of 13 virulent DHAV-3 strains isolated from Shandong province of China in 2012 were amplified by RT-PCR, sequenced and analyzed. The results showed that all the VP1 genes of the 13 isolates contained 720 nucleotides encoding 240 amino acids, and shared with nucleotide identities of 94. 6%-99.9% and amino acid identities of 95.0%-100%. The nucleotide and amino acid sequence homologies between the 13 DHAV-3 isolates and other 31 DHAV-3 reference strains were 92.5%-100% and 90. 8%-100%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the VP1 gene of DHAV-3 had distinct geographical characteristics. Distribution of genotypes of the 44 DHAV-3 strains was as follows: except the vaccine strain B63, all the other Chinese isolates belonged to genotype I (GI), Vietnamese wild isolates mainly belonged to subtype 1 (S1) of genotype II (GII), and all Korean isolates belonged to subtype 2 (S2) of GII.

  5. Double-Stranded Linear Duck Hepatitis B Virus (DHBV) Stably Integrates at a Higher Frequency than Wild-Type DHBV in LMH Chicken Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shih S.; Jensen, Anne D.; Chang, C. J.; Rogler, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Integration of hepadnavirus DNAs into host chromosomes can have oncogenic consequences. Analysis of host-viral DNA junctions of DHBV identified the terminally duplicated r region of the viral genome as a hotspot for integration. Since the r region is present on the 5′ and 3′ ends of double-stranded linear (DSL) hepadnavirus DNAs, these molecules have been implicated as integration precursors. We have produced a LMH chicken hepatoma cell line (LMH 66-1 DSL) which replicates exclusively DSL duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) DNA. To test whether linear DHBV DNAs integrate more frequently than the wild type open circular DHBV DNAs, we have characterized the integration frequency in LMH 66-1 DSL cells by using a subcloning approach. This approach revealed that 83% of the LMH 66-1 DSL subclones contained new integrations, compared to only 16% of subclones from LMH-D2 cells replicating wild-type open circular DHBV DNA. Also, a higher percentage of the LMH 66-1 DSL subclones contained two or more new integrations. Mathematical analysis suggests that the DSL DHBV DNAs integrated stably once every three generations during subcloning whereas wild-type DHBV integrated only once every four to five generations. Cloning and sequencing of new integrations confirmed the r region as a preferred integration site for linear DHBV DNA molecules. One DHBV integrant was associated with a small deletion of chromosomal DNA, and another DHBV integrant occurred in a telomeric repeat sequence. PMID:9882355

  6. Efficient strategy for constructing duck enteritis virus-based live attenuated vaccine against homologous and heterologous H5N1 avian influenza virus and duck enteritis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhong; Hu, Yong; Liu, Zhigang; Zhong, Wei; Cao, Hangzhou; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin

    2015-04-16

    Duck is susceptible to many pathogens, such as duck hepatitis virus, duck enteritis virus (DEV), duck tembusu virus, H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) in particular. With the significant role of duck in the evolution of H5N1 HPAIV, control and eradication of H5N1 HPAIV in duck through vaccine immunization is considered an effective method in minimizing the threat of a pandemic outbreak. Consequently, a practical strategy to construct a vaccine against these pathogens should be determined. In this study, the DEV was examined as a candidate vaccine vector to deliver the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of H5N1, and its potential as a polyvalent vaccine was evaluated. A modified mini-F vector was inserted into the gB and UL26 gene junction of the attenuated DEV vaccine strain C-KCE genome to generate an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) of C-KCE (vBAC-C-KCE). The HA gene of A/duck/Hubei/xn/2007 (H5N1) was inserted into the C-KCE genome via the mating-assisted genetically integrated cloning (MAGIC) to generate the recombinant vector pBAC-C-KCE-HA. A bivalent vaccine C-KCE-HA was developed by eliminating the BAC backbone. Ducks immunized with C-KCE-HA induced both the cross-reactive antibodies and T cell response against H5. Moreover, C-KCE-HA-immunized ducks provided rapid and long-lasting protection against homologous and heterologous HPAIV H5N1 and DEV clinical signs, death, and primary viral replication. In conclusion, our BAC-C-KCE is a promising platform for developing a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine.

  7. Development of an indirect ELISA method based on the VP3 protein of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) for dual detection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shen, Youlin; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA) based on the recombinant VP3 protein of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) was developed and evaluated in this study. The optimal antigen, serum and enzyme-labeled antibody dilutions were 1:160 (0.94μg), 1:160 and 1:2000, respectively. The optimal blocking buffer was 1% gelatin. The cutoff value was determined to be 0.332, and the analytical sensitivity was 1:1280 (OD450-630=0.37). The results of the specificity evaluation showed that no cross-reactivity existed between DHAV-1 antiserum and other common duck-sensitive pathogens, except for duck hepatitis A virus type 3 (DHAV-3), suggesting that this could be a common approach for the simultaneous detection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 antibodies. The coefficients of variation (CVs) for all of the tested samples were lower than 10%. The concordance between the I-ELISA based on the VP3 subunit of DHAV-1 and that based on the whole DHAV-1 particle was 96%. These results indicate that the VP3-based I-ELISA method has high sensitivity, specificity, and repeatability and is as effective as the DHAV-1-based I-ELISA method for sero-surveillance. Thus, it may be a convenient and novel method for DHAV antibody detection and epidemiological surveillance of DHAV prevalence.

  8. Identification of duck plague virus by polymerase chain reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, W.R.; Brown, Sean E.; Nashold, S.W.; Knudson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detecting duck plague virus. A 765-bp EcoRI fragment cloned from the genome of the duck plague vaccine (DP-VAC) virus was sequenced for PCR primer development. The fragment sequence was found by GenBank alignment searches to be similar to the 3a?? ends of an undefined open reading frame and the gene for DNA polymerase protein in other herpesviruses. Three of four primer sets were found to be specific for the DP-VAC virus and 100% (7/7) of field isolates but did not amplify DNA from inclusion body disease of cranes virus. The specificity of one primer set was tested with genome templates from other avian herpesviruses, including those from a golden eagle, bald eagle, great horned owl, snowy owl, peregrine falcon, prairie falcon, pigeon, psittacine, and chicken (infectious laryngotracheitis), but amplicons were not produced. Hence, this PCR test is highly specific for duck plague virus DNA. Two primer sets were able to detect 1 fg of DNA from the duck plague vaccine strain, equivalent to five genome copies. In addition, the ratio of tissue culture infectious doses to genome copies of duck plague vaccine virus from infected duck embryo cells was determined to be 1:100, making the PCR assay 20 times more sensitive than tissue culture for detecting duck plague virus. The speed, sensitivity, and specificity of this PCR provide a greatly improved diagnostic and research tool for studying the epizootiology of duck plague. /// Se desarroll?? una prueba de reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa para detectar el virus de la peste del pato. Un fragmento EcoRI de 765 pares de bases clonado del genoma del virus vacunal de la peste del pato fue secuenciado para la obtenci??n de los iniciadores de la prueba de la reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa. En investigaciones de alineaci??n en el banco de genes ('GenBank') se encontr?? que la secuencia del fragmento era similar a los extremos 3a?? de un marco de lectura abierto

  9. Cryptic protein priming sites in two different domains of duck hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase for initiating DNA synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boregowda, Rajeev K; Lin, Li; Zhu, Qin; Tian, Fang; Hu, Jianming

    2011-08-01

    Initiation of reverse transcription in hepadnaviruses is accomplished by a unique protein-priming mechanism whereby a specific Y residue in the terminal protein (TP) domain of the viral reverse transcriptase (RT) acts as a primer to initiate DNA synthesis, which is carried out by the RT domain of the same protein. When separate TP and RT domains from the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) RT protein were tested in a trans-complementation assay in vitro, the RT domain could also serve, unexpectedly, as a protein primer for DNA synthesis, as could a TP mutant lacking the authentic primer Y (Y96) residue. Priming at these other, so-called cryptic, priming sites in both the RT and TP domains shared the same requirements as those at Y96. A mini RT protein with both the TP and RT domains linked in cis, as well as the full-length RT protein, could also initiate DNA synthesis using cryptic priming sites. The cryptic priming site(s) in TP was found to be S/T, while those in the RT domain were Y and S/T. As with the authentic TP Y96 priming site, the cryptic priming sites in the TP and RT domains could support DNA polymerization subsequent to the initial covalent linkage of the first nucleotide to the priming amino acid residue. These results provide new insights into the complex mechanisms of protein priming in hepadnaviruses, including the selection of the primer residue and the interactions between the TP and RT domains that is essential for protein priming.

  10. Cryptic Protein Priming Sites in Two Different Domains of Duck Hepatitis B Virus Reverse Transcriptase for Initiating DNA Synthesis In Vitro▿

    PubMed Central

    Boregowda, Rajeev K.; Lin, Li; Zhu, Qin; Tian, Fang; Hu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Initiation of reverse transcription in hepadnaviruses is accomplished by a unique protein-priming mechanism whereby a specific Y residue in the terminal protein (TP) domain of the viral reverse transcriptase (RT) acts as a primer to initiate DNA synthesis, which is carried out by the RT domain of the same protein. When separate TP and RT domains from the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) RT protein were tested in a trans-complementation assay in vitro, the RT domain could also serve, unexpectedly, as a protein primer for DNA synthesis, as could a TP mutant lacking the authentic primer Y (Y96) residue. Priming at these other, so-called cryptic, priming sites in both the RT and TP domains shared the same requirements as those at Y96. A mini RT protein with both the TP and RT domains linked in cis, as well as the full-length RT protein, could also initiate DNA synthesis using cryptic priming sites. The cryptic priming site(s) in TP was found to be S/T, while those in the RT domain were Y and S/T. As with the authentic TP Y96 priming site, the cryptic priming sites in the TP and RT domains could support DNA polymerization subsequent to the initial covalent linkage of the first nucleotide to the priming amino acid residue. These results provide new insights into the complex mechanisms of protein priming in hepadnaviruses, including the selection of the primer residue and the interactions between the TP and RT domains that is essential for protein priming. PMID:21593164

  11. TP-RT Domain Interactions of Duck Hepatitis B Virus Reverse Transcriptase in cis and in trans during Protein-Primed Initiation of DNA Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Boregowda, Rajeev K.; Adams, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The hepadnavirus reverse transcriptase (RT) has the unique ability to initiate viral DNA synthesis using RT itself as a protein primer. Protein priming requires complex interactions between the N-terminal TP (terminal protein) domain, where the primer (a specific Y residue) resides, and the central RT domain, which harbors the polymerase active site. While it normally utilizes the cis-linked TP to prime DNA synthesis (cis-priming), we found that the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) RT domain, in the context of the full-length RT protein or a mini-RT construct containing only truncated TP and RT domains, could additionally use a separate TP or RT domain in trans as a primer (trans-priming). trans interaction could also be demonstrated by the inhibitory effect (trans-inhibition) on cis-priming by TP and RT domain sequences provided in trans. Protein priming was further shown to induce RT conformational changes that resulted in TP-RT domain dissociation, altered priming site selection, and a gain of sensitivity to a pyrophosphate analog inhibitor. trans-priming, trans-inhibition, and trans-complementation, which requires separate TP and RT domains to reconstitute a functional RT protein, were employed to define the sequences in the TP and RT domains that could mediate physical or functional inter- and intradomain interactions. These results provide new insights into TP-RT domain interactions and conformational dynamics during protein priming and suggest novel means to inhibit protein priming by targeting these interactions and the associated conformational transitions. PMID:22514346

  12. Does limited virucidal activity of biocides include duck hepatitis B virucidal action?

    PubMed

    Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schacke, Michael; Glück, Brigitte; Bust, Uwe; Rabenau, Holger F; Wutzler, Peter

    2012-10-30

    There is agreement that the infectivity assay with the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is a suitable surrogate test to validate disinfectants for hepatitis B virucidal activity. However, since this test is not widely used, information is necessary whether disinfectants with limited virucidal activity also inactivate DHBV. In general, disinfectants with limited virucidal activity are used for skin and sensitive surfaces while agents with full activity are more aggressive. The present study compares the activity of five different biocides against DHBV and the classical test virus for limited virucidal activity, the vaccinia virus strain Lister Elstree (VACV) or the modified vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA). Virucidal assay was performed as suspension test according to the German DVV/RKI guideline. Duck hepatitis B virus obtained from congenitally infected Peking ducks was propagated in primary duck embryonic hepatocytes and was detected by indirect immunofluorescent antigen staining. The DHBV was inactivated by the use of 40% ethanol within 1-min and 30% isopropanol within 2-min exposure. In comparison, 40% ethanol within 2-min and 40% isopropanol within 1-min exposure were effective against VACV/MVA. These alcohols only have limited virucidal activity, while the following agents have full activity. 0.01% peracetic acid inactivated DHBV within 2 min and a concentration of 0.005% had virucidal efficacy against VACV/MVA within 1 min. After 2-min exposure, 0.05% glutardialdehyde showed a comparable activity against DHBV and VACV/MVA. This is also the case for 0.7% formaldehyde after a contact time of 30 min. Duck hepatitis B virus is at least as sensitive to limited virucidal activity as VACV/MVA. Peracetic acid is less effective against DHBV, while the alcohols are less effective against VACV/MVA. It can be expected that in absence of more direct tests the results may be extrapolated to HBV.

  13. Anti-hepatitis B virus activities of α-DDB-FNC, a novel nucleoside-biphenyldicarboxylate compound in cells and ducks, and its anti-immunological liver injury effect in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinghua; Zhao, Xuejie; Zang, Limin; Fang, Xianzhen; Zhao, Jing; Yang, Xiaorui; Wang, Qingduan; Zheng, Liyun; Chang, Junbiao

    2012-12-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to be a major global cause of acute and chronic liver disease with high mortality. Herein, we examined both the anti-HBV and hepatoprotective activity of α-DDB-FNC. In human HBV-transfected liver cell line HepG2.2.15, α-DDB-FNC effectively suppressed the secretion of HBV antigens in a time and dose-dependent manner with 25.11% inhibition on HBeAg and 43.68% on HBsAg at 2.5 μM on day 9. Consistent with the HBV antigen reduction, α-DDB-FNC (2.5 μM) also reduced HBV DNA level by 77.74% extracellularly and 78.94% intracellularly on day 9. In the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infected ducks, after α-DDB-FNC was given once daily for 10 days, the serum and liver DHBV DNA levels were reduced markedly with 96.81% and 97.21% at 10 mgkg(-1) on day 10, respectively. In Con A-induced immunological liver-injury mice, α-DDB-FNC significantly inhibited the elevation of serum ALT, AST, TBiL and liver MDA, NO levels. Furthermore, significant improvement of the liver was observed after α-DDB-FNC treatment both in ducks and mice, as evaluated by the histopathological analysis. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that α-DDB-FNC possesses both antiviral activity against HBV and hepatoprotective effect to Con A-induced liver-injury mice.

  14. Effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on hepatic function in the duck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, J.F.; Dieter, M.P.

    1980-01-01

    1. The indocyanine green dye clearance test for hepatic function was determined in mallard ducks before and during the chronic ingestion (7 months) of representative paraffinic or aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons (PH).2. No mortality or visible symptoms of toxicity occured in any of the tests. Ingestion of 4000 ppm aromatic PH produced significant increases in liver (25%), plasma clearance of indocyanine green (33%) and hepatic blood flow (30%).3. Although the aromatics elicited a greater hepatic stress response than the paraffins, the ducks tolerated high concentrations of PH for extended periods.

  15. Effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on hepatic function in the duck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, J.F.; Dieter, M.P.

    1980-01-01

    1. The indocyanine green dye clearance test for hepatic function was determined in mallard ducks before and during the chronic ingestion (7 months) of representative paraffinic or aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons (PH). 2. No mortality or visible symptoms of toxicity occured in any of the tests. Ingestion of 4000 ppm aromatic PH produced significant increases in liver (25%), plasma clearance of indocyanine green (33%) and hepatic blood flow (30%). 3. Although the aromatics elicited a greater hepatic stress response than the paraffins, the ducks tolerated high concentrations of PH for extended periods.

  16. Methodological approaches to disinfection of human hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Prince, D L; Prince, H N; Thraenhart, O; Muchmore, E; Bonder, E; Pugh, J

    1993-01-01

    Three commercial disinfectants (two quaternary formulations and one phenolic) were tested against human hepatitis B virus (HHBV). The treated virus was assayed for infectivity by the chimpanzee assay and for morphological alteration by the Morphological Alteration and Disintegration Test. The same agents were tested against duck hepatitis B virus in a duck hepatocyte infectivity assay. It is apparent that human and duck hepatitis viruses were relatively susceptible to disinfection, becoming noninfectious after < or = 10 min of contact with the disinfectant. The Morphological Alteration and Disintegration Test accurately predicted activity in the two infectivity tests. The anti-human hepatitis B virus effect of the low-level quaternary ammonium germicides is a novel finding and suggest that members of the family Hepadnaviridae are relatively susceptible to chemical agents. Images PMID:8308123

  17. An outbreak of duck virus enteritis (duck plague) in a captive flock of mixed waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, R.D.; Stein, G.; Novilla, M.N.; Hurley, Sarah S.; Fink, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    An outbreak of duck virus enteritis occurred in a flock of captive waterfowl composed of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), black ducks (Anas rubripes), and Canada geese (Branta canadensis). Although all three species were housed together, morbidity and mortality were confined to the 227 black ducks and Canada geese, of which 180 died and the rest were left in a weakened condition. Lesions are given for 20 black ducks and 4 Canada geese dying from DVE. In addition, both horizontal and vertical transmission are discussed as possible sources of the virus that caused this outbreak.

  18. Effect of age on the pathogenesis of duck tembusu virus in Cherry Valley ducks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Lv, Chuanwei; Yue, Ruichao; Shi, Ying; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie; Liu, Sidang

    2015-01-01

    The effect of host age on the outcome of duck tembusu virus (DTMUV) infection was studied in ducks. Three groups of Cherry Valley ducks at 1, 3, and 7 weeks of age were intramuscularly infected with DTMUV to systematically observe the clinical symptoms, pathological changes, tissue viral loads, and immune responses. Severe clinical symptoms and neurological dysfunction were observed in 1-week-old ducks as early as 2 days post infection (dpi) and some died at 5–7 dpi. Three weeks-old ducks showed similar but milder symptoms and no deaths. However, 7-weeks-old ducks showed only transient loss of appetite. Gross lesions gradually reduced in severity as ducks matured. One-week-old ducks showed endocardial hemorrhage, splenomegaly, swelling in the lymph follicles of the ileum, liver, and kidney swelling with degeneration, and meningeal hyperemia. Three-weeks-old ducks showed only mild pathological lesions. No visible lesions were observed in 7-weeks-old ducks. However, pathological histology analysis demonstrated all infected ducks displayed viral encephalitis. DTMUV could be detected in the brains of 1-week-old ducks as early as 1 dpi and virus titers of most organs in 1-week-old ducks were significantly higher than that of 3- and 7-weeks-old ducks at 3–5 dpi. The patterns of IFN-γ, IL-2, and serum neutralizing antibodies were similar, and there were significant difference between the youngest ducks and the older ducks at early infection stage (P < 0.05). More important is that although the antibody titers of all infected ducks were similar from 9 to 17 dpi, reduced clearance of virus was observed in the youngest groups comparing with the other two groups, indicating that immune system maturity was more important than the presence of neutralizing antibody. In summary, this study demonstrates that viral pathogenesis is strongest in 1-week-old ducks and the age-related immune response plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DTMUV in ducks. PMID:26106382

  19. Effect of age on the pathogenesis of duck tembusu virus in Cherry Valley ducks.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Lv, Chuanwei; Yue, Ruichao; Shi, Ying; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie; Liu, Sidang

    2015-01-01

    The effect of host age on the outcome of duck tembusu virus (DTMUV) infection was studied in ducks. Three groups of Cherry Valley ducks at 1, 3, and 7 weeks of age were intramuscularly infected with DTMUV to systematically observe the clinical symptoms, pathological changes, tissue viral loads, and immune responses. Severe clinical symptoms and neurological dysfunction were observed in 1-week-old ducks as early as 2 days post infection (dpi) and some died at 5-7 dpi. Three weeks-old ducks showed similar but milder symptoms and no deaths. However, 7-weeks-old ducks showed only transient loss of appetite. Gross lesions gradually reduced in severity as ducks matured. One-week-old ducks showed endocardial hemorrhage, splenomegaly, swelling in the lymph follicles of the ileum, liver, and kidney swelling with degeneration, and meningeal hyperemia. Three-weeks-old ducks showed only mild pathological lesions. No visible lesions were observed in 7-weeks-old ducks. However, pathological histology analysis demonstrated all infected ducks displayed viral encephalitis. DTMUV could be detected in the brains of 1-week-old ducks as early as 1 dpi and virus titers of most organs in 1-week-old ducks were significantly higher than that of 3- and 7-weeks-old ducks at 3-5 dpi. The patterns of IFN-γ, IL-2, and serum neutralizing antibodies were similar, and there were significant difference between the youngest ducks and the older ducks at early infection stage (P < 0.05). More important is that although the antibody titers of all infected ducks were similar from 9 to 17 dpi, reduced clearance of virus was observed in the youngest groups comparing with the other two groups, indicating that immune system maturity was more important than the presence of neutralizing antibody. In summary, this study demonstrates that viral pathogenesis is strongest in 1-week-old ducks and the age-related immune response plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DTMUV in ducks.

  20. A survey of North American migratory waterfowl for duck plague (duck virus enteritis) virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, Christopher J.; Docherty, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of migratory waterfowl for duck plague (DP) virus was conducted in the Mississippi and Central flyways during 1982 and in the Atlantic and Pacific flyways during 1983. Cloacal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from 3,169 migratory waterfowl in these four flyways, principally mallards (Anas platyrhynchos L.), black ducks (Anas rubripes Brewster), and pintails (Anas acuta L). In addition 1,033 birds were sampled from areas of recurrent DP outbreaks among nonmigratory and captive waterfowl, and 590 from Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, the site of the only known major DP outbreak in migratory waterfowl. Duck plague virus was not found in any of the samples. Results support the hypothesis that DP is not established in North American migratory waterfowl as an enzootic disease.

  1. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  2. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  3. Experimental infection of duck origin virulent Newcastle disease virus strain in ducks.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yabin; Cheng, Xu; Liu, Mei; Shen, Xinyue; Li, Jianmei; Yu, Shengqing; Zou, Jianmin; Ding, Chan

    2014-07-17

    Newcastle disease (ND) caused by virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an acute, highly contagious and fatal viral disease affecting most species of birds. Ducks are generally considered to be natural reservoirs or carriers of NDV while being resistant to NDV strains, even those most virulent for chickens; however, natural ND cases in ducks have been gradually increasing in recent years. In the present study, ducks of different breeds and ages were experimentally infected with duck origin virulent NDV strain duck/Jiangsu/JSD0812/2008 (JSD0812) by various routes to investigate the pathogenicity of NDV in ducks. Six breeds (mallard, Gaoyou, Shaoxing, Jinding, Shanma, and Pekin ducks) were infected intramuscularly (IM) with JSD0812 strain at the dose of 5 × 108 ELD50. Susceptibility to NDV infection among breeds varied, per morbidity and mortality. Mallard ducks were the most susceptible, and Pekin ducks the most resistant. Fifteen-, 30-, 45-, 60-, and 110-day-old Gaoyou ducks were infected with JSD0812 strain at the dose of 5 × 108 ELD50 either IM or intranasally (IN) and intraocularly (IO), and their disease development, viral shedding, and virus tissue distribution were determined. The susceptibility of ducks to NDV infection decreased with age. Most deaths occurred in 15- and 30-day-old ducklings infected IM. Ducks infected IN and IO sometimes exhibited clinical signs, but seldom died. Clinical signs were primarily neurologic. Infected ducks could excrete infectious virus from the pharynx and/or cloaca for a short period, which varied with bird age or inoculation route; the longest period was about 7 days. The rate of virus isolation in tissues from infected ducks was generally low, even in those from dead birds, and it appeared to be unrelated to bird age and infection route. The results confirmed that some of the naturally occurring NDV virulent strains can cause the disease in ducks, and that ducks play an important role in the epidemiology of ND. The

  4. Experimental infection of duck origin virulent Newcastle disease virus strain in ducks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Newcastle disease (ND) caused by virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an acute, highly contagious and fatal viral disease affecting most species of birds. Ducks are generally considered to be natural reservoirs or carriers of NDV while being resistant to NDV strains, even those most virulent for chickens; however, natural ND cases in ducks have been gradually increasing in recent years. In the present study, ducks of different breeds and ages were experimentally infected with duck origin virulent NDV strain duck/Jiangsu/JSD0812/2008 (JSD0812) by various routes to investigate the pathogenicity of NDV in ducks. Results Six breeds (mallard, Gaoyou, Shaoxing, Jinding, Shanma, and Pekin ducks) were infected intramuscularly (IM) with JSD0812 strain at the dose of 5 × 108 ELD50. Susceptibility to NDV infection among breeds varied, per morbidity and mortality. Mallard ducks were the most susceptible, and Pekin ducks the most resistant. Fifteen-, 30-, 45-, 60-, and 110-day-old Gaoyou ducks were infected with JSD0812 strain at the dose of 5 × 108 ELD50 either IM or intranasally (IN) and intraocularly (IO), and their disease development, viral shedding, and virus tissue distribution were determined. The susceptibility of ducks to NDV infection decreased with age. Most deaths occurred in 15- and 30-day-old ducklings infected IM. Ducks infected IN and IO sometimes exhibited clinical signs, but seldom died. Clinical signs were primarily neurologic. Infected ducks could excrete infectious virus from the pharynx and/or cloaca for a short period, which varied with bird age or inoculation route; the longest period was about 7 days. The rate of virus isolation in tissues from infected ducks was generally low, even in those from dead birds, and it appeared to be unrelated to bird age and infection route. Conclusions The results confirmed that some of the naturally occurring NDV virulent strains can cause the disease in ducks, and that ducks play an important

  5. Cygnet River virus, a novel orthomyxovirus from ducks, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kessell, Allan; Hyatt, Alex; Lehmann, Debra; Shan, Songhua; Crameri, Sandra; Holmes, Clare; Marsh, Glenn; Williams, Catherine; Tachedjian, Mary; Yu, Meng; Bingham, John; Payne, Jean; Lowther, Sue; Wang, Jianning; Wang, Lin-Fa; Smith, Ina

    2012-12-01

    A novel virus, designated Cygnet River virus (CyRV), was isolated in embryonated eggs from Muscovy ducks in South Australia. CyRV morphologically resembles arenaviruses; however, sequencing identified CyRV as an orthomyxovirus. The high mortality rate among ducks co-infected with salmonellae suggests that CyRV may be pathogenic, either alone or in concert with other infections.

  6. Identification of duck plague virus by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hansen, W R; Brown, S E; Nashold, S W; Knudson, D L

    1999-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detecting duck plague virus. A 765-bp EcoRI fragment cloned from the genome of the duck plague vaccine (DP-VAC) virus was sequenced for PCR primer development. The fragment sequence was found by GenBank alignment searches to be similar to the 3' ends of an undefined open reading frame and the gene for DNA polymerase protein in other herpesviruses. Three of four primers sets were found to be specific for the DP-VAC virus and 100% (7/7) of field isolates but did not amplify DNA from inclusion body disease of cranes virus. The specificity of one primer set was tested with genome templates from other avian herpesviruses, including those from a golden eagle, bald eagle, great horned owl, snowy owl, peregrine falcon, prairie falcon, pigeon, psittacine, and chicken (infectious laryngotracheitis), but amplicons were not produced. Hence, this PCR test is highly specific for duck plague virus DNA. Two primer sets were able to detect 1 fg of DNA from the duck plague vaccine strain, equivalent to five genome copies. In addition, the ratio of tissue culture infectious doses to genome copies of duck plague vaccine virus from infected duck embryo cells was determined to be 1:100, making the PCR assay 20 times more sensitive than tissue culture for detecting duck plague virus. The speed, sensitivity, and specificity of this PCR provide a greatly improved diagnostic and research tool for studying the epizootiology of duck plague.

  7. Complete genome sequence of duck Tembusu virus, isolated from Muscovy ducks in southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wanjun; Chen, Jidang; Wei, Chunya; Wang, Heng; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Minze; Tang, Fengfeng; Xie, Jiexiong; Liang, Huanbin; Zhang, Guihong; Su, Shuo

    2012-12-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of the duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) WJ-1 strain, isolated from Muscovy ducks. This is the first complete genome sequence of DTMUV reported in southern China. Compared with the other strains (TA, GH-2, YY5, and ZJ-407) that were previously found in eastern China, WJ-1 bears a few differences in the nucleotide and amino acid sequences. We found that there are 47 mutations of amino acids encoded by the whole open reading frame (ORF) among these five strains. The whole-genome sequence of DTMUV will help in understanding the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of duck Tembusu virus in southern China.

  8. Different outcomes of infection of chickens and ducks with a duck-origin H9N2 influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Li, C C; Diao, Y X; Sun, X Y; Hao, D M; Liu, X; Ge, P P

    2014-01-01

    As the major aquatic and terrestrial hosts for avian influenza viruses (AIVs), ducks and chickens play a critical role in the evolution and spread of the H9N2 virus. However, the outcomes of infection of ducks and chickens with the H9N2 virus are not sufficiently documented. In this study, we compared the outcomes of infection of chickens and Peking ducks with a duck-origin H9N2 virus. The results showed that this virus caused more pronounced clinical signs and histological lesions in chickens. As for the virus shedding, chickens shed more virus in the trachea and less virus in the cloaca in levels of interferon (IFN) γ were found in the trachea of ducks compared with chickens, while comparison with ducks. As for cytokines, namely IFNs and interleukins (IL), higher higher levels of IFN-β, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-6 were observed in the ileum of chickens compared with ducks. Eventually, serum hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibody titers were higher in chickens than in ducks. Taken together, ducks and chickens use different strategies in response to the H9N2 virus infection in tissues representing main replication sites of low-pathogenic AIVs. Given the different outcomes of the H9N2 virus infection in ducks and chickens, different measures should be taken in vaccination and treatment.

  9. The Sequential Tissue Distribution of Duck Tembusu Virus in Adult Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Jiang, Yongping; Ding, Leilei; Lin, Yuan; Li, Qimeng; He, Xijun; Chen, Qiusheng; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a novel Tembusu virus (TMUV) that caused a severe decrease in the egg production of ducks was isolated in southeast China. Given the novelty of this duck pathogen, little information is available regarding its pathogenesis. Here, we systematically investigated the replication kinetics of TMUV PTD2010 in adult male and female ducks. We found that PTD2010 was detectable in most of the parenchymatous organs as well as the oviduct and intestinal tract from days 1 to 7 after inoculation. Viral titers were maintained at high levels for at least 9 days in the spleen, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, brain, and ovary. No virus was detected in any of these organs or tissues at 18 days after inoculation. PTD2010, thus, causes systemic infections in male and female ducks; its replication kinetics show similar patterns in most organs, with the exception of the ovaries and testes. PMID:25215289

  10. The sequential tissue distribution of duck Tembusu virus in adult ducks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Jiang, Yongping; Ding, Leilei; Lin, Yuan; Li, Qimeng; He, Xijun; Chen, Qiusheng; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a novel Tembusu virus (TMUV) that caused a severe decrease in the egg production of ducks was isolated in southeast China. Given the novelty of this duck pathogen, little information is available regarding its pathogenesis. Here, we systematically investigated the replication kinetics of TMUV PTD2010 in adult male and female ducks. We found that PTD2010 was detectable in most of the parenchymatous organs as well as the oviduct and intestinal tract from days 1 to 7 after inoculation. Viral titers were maintained at high levels for at least 9 days in the spleen, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, brain, and ovary. No virus was detected in any of these organs or tissues at 18 days after inoculation. PTD2010, thus, causes systemic infections in male and female ducks; its replication kinetics show similar patterns in most organs, with the exception of the ovaries and testes.

  11. Hydropericardium Hepatitis Syndrome Emerged in Cherry Valley Ducks in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Dou, Y; Zheng, X; Tang, Y; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Wang, Z; Diao, Y

    2017-08-01

    Since June 2015, a highly pathogenic disease occurred in duck flocks in China, causing pericardial effusion, enlarged discoloured liver, renal enlargement and haemorrhagic lung with a mortality ranging from 5% to 20%. Previous study confirmed that Fowl adenovirus group C (FAdV-C) and some field FAdVs isolates had been identified as causative agents of hydropericardium hepatitis syndrome (HHS) in chickens and geese world widely. In this study, we firstly report the isolation of FAdV-C from ducks with HHS. The two isolates, designated as SDSX and SDJX, were separated from liver samples using 9-day-old SPF chicken embryos and could cause severe cytopathic effects in duck and chicken embryonic kidney cells. The entire ORF sequences of hexon gene of the two isolates were amplified, sequenced and analysed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Phylogenetic analysis of loop 1 sequences of hexon gene of FAdVs revealed that the two isolates were closely related to FAdV-C isolates, which could cause HHS in chickens. Experimental infection indicated that the isolate was high pathogenicity to 20-day-old ducks. Our study shows that the recently emerged HHS in ducks was caused by FAdV-C and may possess a potential risk to other poultry flocks. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Evidence of possible vertical transmission of Tembusu virus in ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Xiuli; Chen, Hao; Ti, Jinfeng; Yang, Guoping; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Yunjian; Diao, Youxiang

    2015-09-30

    In 2013, Tembusu virus (TMUV) infection was successively observed on several breeding duck farms in Shandong province, China. Affected ducks showed consistently acute anorexia, diarrhea and egg production drop. 125 hatching eggs produced by TMUV infected breeding ducks from four duck farms were collected. Among them, 35 hatching eggs were selected randomly from all before incubation for vitelline membrane samples collection. The rest of 90 hatching eggs were incubated routinely. As a result, 16 hatching eggs were found non-embryonated, 28 duck embryos died during incubation and 46 newly hatched ducklings were obtained. Vitelline membranes of non-embryonated hatching eggs, vitelline membrane, brain or liver samples of dead embryos and brain samples of newly hatched ducklings were collected for virus detection. Samples collected from one egg, embryo or duckling were treated as one. Consequently, 18 of 35 (51.43%) hatching eggs, 2 of 16 (12.50%) non-embryonated duck eggs, 17 of 28 (60.71%) dead duck embryos and 5 of 46 (10.87%) newly hatched ducklings were detected positive for TMUV using NS3-based RT-PCR. Overall, 42 of 125 (33.6%) eggs were positive for TMUV. A virus strain, designated as TMUV-SDDE, was isolated from one of these dead duck embryos which were detected TMUV positive. The results of phylogenetic analysis showed that E gene of TMUV-SDDE virus was closely related to other TMUV strains isolated in China during 2010-2013. Pathogenicity studies showed that TMUV-SDDE strain was virulent to ducklings. This is the first report that TMUV is isolated from duck embryos. The findings provide evidence of possible vertical transmission of TMUV from breeding ducks to ducklings.

  13. Cygnet River Virus, a Novel Orthomyxovirus from Ducks, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Kessell, Allan; Hyatt, Alex; Lehmann, Debra; Shan, Songhua; Crameri, Sandra; Holmes, Clare; Marsh, Glenn; Williams, Catherine; Tachedjian, Mary; Yu, Meng; Bingham, John; Payne, Jean; Lowther, Sue; Wang, Jianning; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-01-01

    A novel virus, designated Cygnet River virus (CyRV), was isolated in embryonated eggs from Muscovy ducks in South Australia. CyRV morphologically resembles arenaviruses; however, sequencing identified CyRV as an orthomyxovirus. The high mortality rate among ducks co-infected with salmonellae suggests that CyRV may be pathogenic, either alone or in concert with other infections. PMID:23171630

  14. Post-epizootic surveys of waterfowl for duck plague (duck virus enteritis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, C.J.; Docherty, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Surviving birds from nine duck plague outbreaks in urban and confined waterfowl were sampled for duck plague (DP) virus and DP antibody during 1979-86. Duck plague virus was found in combined oral and cloacal swabs of birds from three outbreaks, and DP-neutralizing antibody was demonstrated in some birds from all nine outbreaks. Greater prevalence of DP antibody and higher titers were found in survivors from confined populations than from free-flying urban populations. Free-flying waterfowl from within 52 km of four DP outbreak sites were also sampled; virus was not found in any birds, but DP antibody was found in urban waterfowl in the vicinity of an outbreak in Potterville, Michigan. No evidence of exposure to or shedding of DP virus in migratory waterfowl was found in two regions where DP appears enzootic in urban and confined waterfowl (Eastern Shore of Maryland and the vicinity of Sacramento, California).

  15. Pathogenicity of duck plague and innate immune responses of the Cherry Valley ducks to duck plague virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Guo, Mengjiao; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Jiyuan; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-08-24

    Duck plague caused by duck plague virus (DPV) is an acute and contagious disease. To better understand the pathogenic mechanism of duck plague virus in ducklings, an infection experiment was performed. Our results showed that typical symptoms were observed in the infected ducklings. DPV could replicate quickly in many tissues, leading to pathological lesions, especially on the spleen. Real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that expression of many innate immune-related genes was mostly up-regulated in the brain, and the antiviral innate immune response was established, but not sufficient to restrict viral replication. In contrast, although the expression of many major pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) increased in the spleen, the expression of most cytokines was declined. Our study indicates that DPV is a pantropic virus that can replicate rapidly in tissues, causing serious pathological lesions but the immune responses are different in the spleen and brain. To our knowledge, this is the first report to systematically explore the expression profiles of the immune genes in the DPV-infected ducks. Our data provide a foundation for further study of the pathogenicity of duck plague.

  16. Enteric hepatitis viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tahaei, Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis viruses are infectious agents that can infect liver and cause inflammation. The infection triggers immune response against infected cells that leads to the destruction of hepatic cells. This destruction has two consequences: leaking ALT and AST liver enzymes which increases during the course of disease and accumulation of bilirubin- a red pigmented compound released from dead red cells- which causes the yellow coloration of eyes and skin. These viruses transmit through diverse routes i.e. blood transfusion, sexual contacts and consuming water or food contaminated by feces. Enteric hepatitis viruses use the latter route for transmission; hence their outbreaks are more common in underdeveloped countries. There are currently two distinguished enteric hepatitis viruses, hepatitis A and hepatitis E. These viruses belong to different family of viruses and their epidemiological characteristics are different. These infections can be diagnosed by an ELISA for IgM antibody. A vaccine has been developed in last decade of twentieth century for hepatitis A virus, which is administered mostly in the developed world i.e. U.S and Japan. Treatment for these infections is mostly supportive; however, in the case of fulminant hepatitis the liver transplantation might be necessary. PMID:24834192

  17. Enteric hepatitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Tahaei, Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis viruses are infectious agents that can infect liver and cause inflammation. The infection triggers immune response against infected cells that leads to the destruction of hepatic cells. This destruction has two consequences: leaking ALT and AST liver enzymes which increases during the course of disease and accumulation of bilirubin- a red pigmented compound released from dead red cells- which causes the yellow coloration of eyes and skin. These viruses transmit through diverse routes i.e. blood transfusion, sexual contacts and consuming water or food contaminated by feces. Enteric hepatitis viruses use the latter route for transmission; hence their outbreaks are more common in underdeveloped countries. There are currently two distinguished enteric hepatitis viruses, hepatitis A and hepatitis E. These viruses belong to different family of viruses and their epidemiological characteristics are different. These infections can be diagnosed by an ELISA for IgM antibody. A vaccine has been developed in last decade of twentieth century for hepatitis A virus, which is administered mostly in the developed world i.e. U.S and Japan. Treatment for these infections is mostly supportive; however, in the case of fulminant hepatitis the liver transplantation might be necessary.

  18. Liposomes containing recombinant E protein vaccine against duck Tembusu virus in ducks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tengfei; Liu, Yongxia; Cheng, Jia; Liu, Yanhan; Fan, Wentao; Cheng, Ziqiang; Niu, Xudong; Liu, Jianzhu

    2016-04-27

    To obtain an effective vaccine candidate against duck Tembusu viral (DTMUV) disease which causes egg-drop and great economical loss in the Chinese duck industry, liposome vaccines containing recombinant E protein were prepared and assessed in this study. The recombinant plasmid (PET28a-E) was constructed and transformed into BL21 (DE3) cells to produce E proteins. The recombinant E proteins were purified and entrapped by liposomes through reverse-phase evaporation. Eighty-four cherry valley ducks were randomly divided into seven groups and inoculated intramuscularly at one- or seven-day-old with liposomes-E protein or Freund's adjuvant-E protein vaccine. Blood samples were collected from the first week to the tenth week for serum antibody, plasma for viremia, as well as oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs for virus shedding analyses after being challenged with a 10(2.4) 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) of duck Tembusu virus. Results showed that serum antibody level of the liposomes vaccine was higher than the Freund's adjuvant vaccine, and inoculating twice was superior to once; furthermore, the viremia and virus shedding tests also proved that the liposomes vaccine can provide complete protection against DTMUV challenge. These results demonstrated that the liposomes-E protein vaccine could be used as a potential candidate vaccine to prevent DTMUV infection in ducks.

  19. Pathogenicity of two Egyptian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in domestic ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Domestic ducks have been implicated in the dissemination and evolution of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. Interestingly, the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in domestic ducks has increased over time with some viruses producing 100% mortality in ducks. These changes in vir...

  20. Possible origins and evolution of the hepatitis B virus (HBV).

    PubMed

    Locarnini, Stephen; Littlejohn, Margaret; Aziz, Muhammad Nazri; Yuen, Lilly

    2013-12-01

    All members of the family Hepadnaviridae are primarily viruses which contain double-stranded DNA genomes that are replicated via reverse transcription of a pregenomic RNA template. There are two subgroups within this family: mammalian and avian. The avian member's include the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), heron hepatitis B virus, Ross goose hepatitis B virus, stork hepatitis B virus and the recently identified parrot hepatitis B virus. More recently, the detection of endogenous avian hepadnavirus DNA integrated into the genomes of zebra finches has revealed a deep evolutionary origin of hepadnaviruses that was not previously recognised, dating back over 40 million years ago. The non-primate mammalian members of the Hepadnaviridae include the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), the ground squirrel hepatitis virus and arctic squirrel virus, as well as the recently described bat hepatitis virus. The identification of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in higher primates such as chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbons that cluster with the human genotypes further implies a more complex origin of this virus. By studying the molecular epidemiology of HBV in indigenous and relict populations in Asia-Pacific we propose a model for the origin and evolution of HBV that involves multiple cross-species transmissions and subsequent recombination events on a background of genotype C HBV infection. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Duck Tembusu virus exhibits neurovirulence in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Lijiao; Wang, Yongyue; Yu, Xiuling; Tian, Kegong; Su, Wenliang; Han, Bo; Su, Jingliang

    2013-08-14

    Duck Tembusu virus is a member of the Ntaya group in the genus Flavivirus. The virus has been responsible for severe duck egg-drop syndrome in China since 2010. Its emergence and rapid spread have caused great economic loss for the poultry industry. The epidemiology of the virus infection and the potential threat to public health is of great concern because of the infective and zoonotic nature of flaviviruses. In this study, the pathogenicity of duck Tembusu virus in BALB/c mice was investigated. Infected mice developed clinical signs, including loss of appetite, ruffled hair, weight loss, disorientation, blindness and paralysis of hind limbs from six days post- infection following intracerebral inoculation. Morbidity was 100%, with mortality ranging from 20 to 80% in three- to eight-week-old mice. High virus titers were recovered from the brain, and the virus was distributed in several organs. Histologically, there was widespread non-suppurative encephalitis in the brain. Lymphocyte depletion in the spleen was observed, along with fatty degeneration in the liver and kidney. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that duck Tembusu virus is highly neurovirulent in BALB/c mice. The mouse model used in this work was able to produce Tembusu virus infection and could be useful for elucidating some of the aspects of the pathophysiology of other flavivirus infections.

  2. Pathogenicity and genetic characterization of a duck Tembusu virus associated with egg-dropping in Muscovy ducks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Qin; Lin, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Zhan-Xin; Zhang, Kai; Yan, Zhuan-Qiang; Zhou, Qing-Feng; Qin, Jian-Ping; Xie, Qing-Mei; Bi, Ying-Zuo; Chen, Feng

    2016-09-02

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) has spread to the major duck-farming region in China, causing acute egg-production drop in Chinese duck population. In this study, we characterized a DTMUV strain (named GD2014) isolated from an egg-production drop duck farm in Guangdong province, South China. The virus was pathogenic to Muscovy duck embryos and caused severe egg production drop for laying Muscovy ducks. The genome sequence of GD2014 shared 97-99% homologies with other waterfowl-origin Tembusu viruses, and shared 89% identities with MM1775 strain isolated from mosquito. Phylogenetic analysis of entire open reading frame (ORF), E gene and NS5 gene indicated that GD2014 belonged to Ntaya group. These results have implications for understanding the orgin, emergence and pathogenicity of DTMUV as well as for the development of vaccines and diagnostics based on epidemiological data.

  3. Extensive Mutagenesis of the Conserved Box E Motif in Duck Hepatitis B Virus P Protein Reveals Multiple Functions in Replication and a Common Structure with the Primer Grip in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Xiang; Luo, Cheng; Zhao, Dan; Beck, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses, including the pathogenic hepatitis B virus (HBV), replicate their small DNA genomes through protein-primed reverse transcription, mediated by the terminal protein (TP) domain in their P proteins and an RNA stem-loop, ϵ, on the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). No direct structural data are available for P proteins, but their reverse transcriptase (RT) domains contain motifs that are conserved in all RTs (box A to box G), implying a similar architecture; however, experimental support for this notion is limited. Exploiting assays available for duck HBV (DHBV) but not the HBV P protein, we assessed the functional consequences of numerous mutations in box E, which forms the DNA primer grip in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RT. This substructure coordinates primer 3′-end positioning and RT subdomain movements during the polymerization cycle and is a prime target for nonnucleosidic RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) of HIV-1 RT. Box E was indeed critical for DHBV replication, with the mutations affecting the folding, ϵ RNA interactions, and polymerase activity of the P protein in a position- and amino acid side chain-dependent fashion similar to that of HIV-1 RT. Structural similarity to HIV-1 RT was underlined by molecular modeling and was confirmed by the replication activity of chimeric P proteins carrying box E, or even box C to box E, from HIV-1 RT. Hence, box E in the DHBV P protein and likely the HBV P protein forms a primer grip-like structure that may provide a new target for anti-HBV NNRTIs. PMID:22514339

  4. Complete genome sequence of a novel flavivirus, duck tembusu virus, isolated from ducks and geese in china.

    PubMed

    Yun, Tao; Zhang, Dabing; Ma, Xuejun; Cao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Liu; Ni, Zheng; Ye, Weicheng; Yu, Bin; Hua, Jionggang; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Cun

    2012-03-01

    Duck tembusu virus (DTMUV) is an emerging agent that causes a severe disease in ducks. We report herein the first complete genome sequences of duck tembusu virus strains YY5, ZJ-407, and GH-2, isolated from Shaoxing ducks, breeder ducks, and geese, respectively, in China. The genomes of YY5, ZJ-407, and GH-2 are all 10,990 nucleotides (nt) in length and encode a putative polyprotein of 3,426 amino acids. It is flanked by a 5' and a 3' noncoding region (NCR) of 94 and 618 nt, respectively. Knowledge of the whole sequence of DTMUV will be useful for further studies of the mechanisms of virus replication and pathogenesis.

  5. Case report: epithelial intracytoplasmic herpes viral inclusions associated with an outbreak of duck virus enteritis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, B.C.; Jessup, David A.; Docherty, Douglas E.; Lownestine, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Several muscovy ducks from a free-roaming flock of 65 muscovy and mallard ducks died over a 3-week period. Three muscovy ducks were necropsied. Gross and microscopic changes were compatible with duck virus enteritis, and the virus was isolated. In addition to intranuclear viral inclusion bodies in several tissues, intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were present in esophageal and cloacal epithelium, By electron microscopy, the membrane-bound intracytoplasmic inclusions were found to contain enveloped herpesvirus, and nuclei contained herpes viral nucleocapsids.

  6. Effects of influenza A virus infection on migrating mallard ducks.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Munster, Vincent J; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Elmberg, Johan; Olsen, Björn; Wallensten, Anders; Haemig, Paul D; Fransson, Thord; Brudin, Lars; Waldenström, Jonas

    2009-03-22

    The natural reservoir of influenza A virus is waterfowl, particularly dabbling ducks (genus Anas). Although it has long been assumed that waterfowl are asymptomatic carriers of the virus, a recent study found that low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) infection in Bewick's swans (Cygnus columbianus bewickii) negatively affected stopover time, body mass and feeding behaviour. In the present study, we investigated whether LPAI infection incurred ecological or physiological costs to migratory mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in terms of body mass loss and staging time, and whether such costs could influence the likelihood for long-distance dispersal of the avian influenza virus by individual ducks. During the autumn migrations of 2002-2007, we collected faecal samples (n=10918) and biometric data from mallards captured and banded at Ottenby, a major staging site in a flyway connecting breeding and wintering areas of European waterfowl. Body mass was significantly lower in infected ducks than in uninfected ducks (mean difference almost 20 g over all groups), and the amount of virus shed by infected juveniles was negatively correlated with body mass. There was no general effect of infection on staging time, except for juveniles in September, in which birds that shed fewer viruses stayed shorter than birds that shed more viruses. LPAI infection did not affect speed or distance of subsequent migration. The data from recaptured individuals showed that the maximum duration of infection was on average 8.3 days (s.e. 0.5), with a mean minimum duration of virus shedding of only 3.1 days (s.e. 0.1). Shedding time decreased during the season, suggesting that mallards acquire transient immunity for LPAI infection. In conclusion, deteriorated body mass following infection was detected, but it remains to be seen whether this has more long-term fitness effects. The short virus shedding time suggests that individual mallards are less likely to spread the virus at continental or

  7. Expression and distribution of the duck enteritis virus UL51 protein in experimentally infected ducks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chanjuan; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Xu, Chao; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Xiaoyue; Zhu, Dekang; Luo, Qihui; Cui, Hengmin; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Yin; Xu, Zhiwen; Chen, Zhengli; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2010-06-01

    To determine the expression and distribution of tegument proteins encoded by duck enteritis virus (DEV) UL51 gene in tissues of experimentally infected ducks, for the first time, an immunoperoxidase staining method to detect UL51 protein (UL51p) in paraffin-embedded tissues is reported. A rabbit anti-UL51 polyclonal serum, raised against a recombinant 6-His-UL51 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli, was prepared, purified, and used as primary antibodies. Fifty-eight 30-day-old DEV-free ducks were intramuscularly inoculated with the pathogenic DEV CHv strain as infection group, and two ducks were selected as preinfection group. The tissues were collected at sequential time points between 2 and 480 hr postinoculation (PI) and prepared for immunoperoxidase staining. DEV UL51p was first found in the spleen and liver at 8 hr PI; in the bursa of Fabricius and thymus at 12 hr PI; in the Harders glands, esophagus, small intestine (including the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum), and large intestine (including the caecum and rectum) at 24 hr PI; in the glandularis ventriculus at 48 hr PI; and in the pancreas, cerebrum, kidney, lung, and myocardium at 72 hr PI. Throughout the infection process, the UL51p was not seen in the muscle. Furthermore, the intensity of positive staining of DEV UL51p antigen in various tissues increased sharply from 8 to 96 hr PI, peaked during 120-144 hr PI, and then decreased steadily from 216 to 480 hr PI, suggesting that the expressional levels of DEV UL51p in systemic organs have a close correlation with the progression of duck virus enteritis (DVE) disease. A number of DEV UL51p was distributed in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen, liver, esophagus, small intestine, and large intestine of DEV-infected ducks, whereas less DEV UL51p was distributed in the Harders glands, glandularis ventriculus, cerebrum, kidney, lung, pancreas, and myocardium of DEV-infected ducks. Moreover, DEV UL51p can be expressed in the cytoplasm of various types

  8. Expression and immunohistochemical distribution of duck plague virus glycoprotein gE in infected ducks.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Xiang, Jun; Xie, Wei; Shen, Fuxiao; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Luo, Qihui; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2011-03-01

    To determine the distribution of duck plague virus (DPV) gE protein in paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of experimentally DPV-infected ducks, an indirect immunoperoxidase assay was established to detect glycoprotein E (gE) protein for the first time. The rabbit anti-His-gE serum, raised against the recombinant His-gE fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), was prepared and purified. Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence analysis showed that the anti-His-gE serum had a high level of reactivity and specificity and could be used as the first antibody for further experiments to study the distribution of DPV gE protein in DPV-infected tissues. A number of DPV gE proteins were distributed in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen, liver, esophagus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and kidney of DPV-infected ducks and a few DPV gE were distributed in the Harders glands, myocardium, cerebrum, and lung, whereas the gE was not seen in the skin, muscle, and pancreas. Moreover, DPV gE was expressed abundantly in the cytoplasm of lymphocytes, reticulum cells, macrophages, epithelial cells, and hepatocytes. The present study may be useful not only for describing the characteristics of gE expression and distribution in infected ducks but also for understanding the pathogenesis of DPV.

  9. Genes involved in the establishment of hepatic steatosis in Muscovy, Pekin and mule ducks.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, Annabelle; Davail, Stéphane; Ricaud, Karine; Bernadet, Marie-Dominique; Gontier, Karine

    2017-01-01

    Our main objectives were to determine the genes involved in the establishment of hepatic steatosis in three genotypes of palmipeds. To respond to this question, we have compared Muscovy ducks, Pekin ducks and their crossbreed the mule duck fed ad libitum or overfed. We have shown a hepatic overexpression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and di-acyl glycerol acyl transferase 2 (DGAT2) in overfed individuals, where DGAT2 seemed to be more regulated. This increase in lipogenesis genes is associated with a decrease of lipoprotein formation in Muscovy and mule ducks, especially apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein (MTTP), leading to lipid accumulation in liver. In Pekin ducks, MTTP expression is upregulated suggesting a better hepatic lipids exportation. Regarding lipids re-uptake, fatty acid-binding protein 4 and very-low-density-lipoprotein receptor are overexpressed in liver of mule ducks at the end of the overfeeding period. This phenomenon puts light on a mechanism unknown until today. In fact, mule can incorporate more lipids in liver than the two other genotypes leading to an intensified hepatic steatosis. To conclude, our results confirmed the genotype variability to overfeeding. Furthermore, similar observations are already described in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in human, and ask if ducks could be an animal model to study hepatic triglyceride accumulation.

  10. [Isolation of the influenza virus from ducks in the Aral Sea region].

    PubMed

    Chernetsov, Iu V; Slepushkin, A N; L'vov, D K; Miasnikova, I A; Khrokov, V V

    1980-01-01

    Influenza A/duck/Aralsk/1/78 virus was isolated from ducks in southwestern Kazakhstan. Typing of this virus neuraminidase indicated its appurtenance to the 2nd avian type. Hemagglutinin of A/duck/Aralsk/1/78 virus typed by the HI test showed no relationship with any one of the strains used in the test including H0, H1, H2, H3, Hsw1, Heq1, Heq2, viruses and strains with all 10 avian hemagglutinins. This suggests that hemagglutinin of A/duck/Aralsk/1/78 virus (Hav?Nav2) belongs to a new, hitherto unknown type.

  11. Hepatitis B Virus Biology

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Christoph; Mason, William S.

    2000-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses (hepatitis B viruses) cause transient and chronic infections of the liver. Transient infections run a course of several months, and chronic infections are often lifelong. Chronic infections can lead to liver failure with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The replication strategy of these viruses has been described in great detail, but virus-host interactions leading to acute and chronic disease are still poorly understood. Studies on how the virus evades the immune response to cause prolonged transient infections with high-titer viremia and lifelong infections with an ongoing inflammation of the liver are still at an early stage, and the role of the virus in liver cancer is still elusive. The state of knowledge in this very active field is therefore reviewed with an emphasis on past accomplishments as well as goals for the future. PMID:10704474

  12. Determinants of pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ducks have been implicated in the dissemination and evolution of the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. The pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in domestic ducks has increased over time with some viruses producing 100% mortality in very short time. The determinants of pathogenic...

  13. Avian influenza virus-induced regulation of duck fibroblast gene expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses have been non-pathogenic in ducks causing no disease or mild respiratory infections. However, in 2002, new viruses emerged causing systemic disease and death. To better understand the differences in pathogenicity of HPAI viruses in ducks, we in...

  14. Gene expression responses to highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus infections in ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Differences in host response to infection with avian influenza (AI) viruses were investigated by identifying genes differentially expressed in tissues of infected ducks. Clear differences in pathogenicity were observed among ducks inoculated with five H5N1 HPAI viruses. Virus titers in tissues cor...

  15. Pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses from Vietnam in chickens and ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ducks and other wild aquatic birds are the natural reservoir of influenza type A viruses, and influenza viruses in these species normally is an asymptomatic infection. Even the viruses that are highly pathogenic for chickens typically can infect but do not cause disease in domestic ducks. However,...

  16. Epitope Identification and Application for Diagnosis of Duck Tembusu Virus Infections in Ducks.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Junyan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Qingshan; Hua, Ronghong; Liu, Jyung-Hurng; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-11-10

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) causes substantial egg drop disease. DTMUV was first identified in China and rapidly spread to Malaysia and Thailand. The antigenicity of the DTMUV E protein has not yet been characterized. Here, we investigated antigenic sites on the E protein using the non-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 1F3 and 1A5. Two minimal epitopes were mapped to (221)LD/NLPW(225) and (87)YAEYI(91) by using phage display and mutagenesis. DTMUV-positive duck sera reacted with the epitopes, thus indicating the importance of the minimal amino acids of the epitopes for antibody-epitope binding. The performance of the dot blotting assay with the corresponding positive sera indicated that YAEYI was DTMUV type-specific, whereas (221)LD/NLPW(225) was a cross-reactive epitope for West Nile virus (WNV), dengue virus (DENV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and corresponded to conserved and variable amino acid sequences among these strains. The structure model of the E protein revealed that YAEYI and LD/NLPW were located on domain (D) II, which confirmed that DII might contain a type-specific non-neutralizing epitope. The YAEYI epitope-based antigen demonstrated its diagnostic potential by reacting with high specificity to serum samples obtained from DTMUV-infected ducks. Based on these observations, a YAEYI-based serological test could be used for DTMUV surveillance and could differentiate DTMUV infections from JEV or WNV infections. These findings provide new insights into the organization of epitopes on flavivirus E proteins that might be valuable for the development of epitope-based serological diagnostic tests for DTMUV.

  17. Epitope Identification and Application for Diagnosis of Duck Tembusu Virus Infections in Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Junyan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Qingshan; Hua, Ronghong; Liu, Jyung-Hurng; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) causes substantial egg drop disease. DTMUV was first identified in China and rapidly spread to Malaysia and Thailand. The antigenicity of the DTMUV E protein has not yet been characterized. Here, we investigated antigenic sites on the E protein using the non-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 1F3 and 1A5. Two minimal epitopes were mapped to 221LD/NLPW225 and 87YAEYI91 by using phage display and mutagenesis. DTMUV-positive duck sera reacted with the epitopes, thus indicating the importance of the minimal amino acids of the epitopes for antibody-epitope binding. The performance of the dot blotting assay with the corresponding positive sera indicated that YAEYI was DTMUV type-specific, whereas 221LD/NLPW225 was a cross-reactive epitope for West Nile virus (WNV), dengue virus (DENV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and corresponded to conserved and variable amino acid sequences among these strains. The structure model of the E protein revealed that YAEYI and LD/NLPW were located on domain (D) II, which confirmed that DII might contain a type-specific non-neutralizing epitope. The YAEYI epitope-based antigen demonstrated its diagnostic potential by reacting with high specificity to serum samples obtained from DTMUV-infected ducks. Based on these observations, a YAEYI-based serological test could be used for DTMUV surveillance and could differentiate DTMUV infections from JEV or WNV infections. These findings provide new insights into the organization of epitopes on flavivirus E proteins that might be valuable for the development of epitope-based serological diagnostic tests for DTMUV. PMID:27834908

  18. Establishment of an in-use testing method for evaluating disinfection of surgical instruments using the duck hepatitis B model.

    PubMed

    Deva, A K; Vickery, K; Zou, J; West, R H; Harris, J P; Cossart, Y E

    1996-06-01

    Nosocomial transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV), associated with interventional procedures, has been attributed to its survival on improperly decontaminated instruments. To date, guidelines for chemical disinfection of potentially contaminated heat-sensitive instruments have been based largely on extrapolation of data from in-vitro disinfectant testing. Direct infectivity testing has not been possible for HBV because of the lack of a practical culture assay or susceptible experimental animal model. In this study the related duck hepadnavirus was used to simulate in-vivo transmission of a HBV during surgery, and to evaluate the effectiveness of 2% glutaraldehyde disinfection of surgical laparoscopes. Multiple laparoscopic liver biopsies were performed on 'biohazardous' duck hepatitis B (DHBV) positive ducks. Laparoscopes were then subjected to different disinfection regimes using 2% glutaraldehyde, and residual infectivity tested by placing their tips into the peritoneal cavities of uninfected four-day-old ducklings. Direct transmission of DHBV occurred in all ducks when laparoscopes were not washed. Rinsing with water lowered the transmission rate to 64% and no infection transmission occurred after 5 min of contact time with the disinfectant. In contrast, previous in-vitro studies had shown complete viral inactivation after a shorter period of disinfection. It is postulated that the longer inactivation time observed in our study may be a result of surface interactions of virus and instrument, interfering with disinfectant access or activity. Tests of instrument surface samples for viral DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) did not correlate with transmission of virus infection in vivo. PCR is an inappropriate test for evaluating the efficacy of disinfectant action despite its sensitivity. This in use method will allow testing of other decontamination procedures and their effectiveness on more complex surgical instruments.

  19. The vaccine efficacy of recombinant duck enteritis virus expressing secreted E with or without PrM proteins of duck tembusu virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pucheng; Liu, Jinxiong; Jiang, Yongping; Zhao, Yuhui; Li, Qimeng; Wu, Li; He, Xijun; Chen, Hualan

    2014-09-15

    A newly emerged tembusu virus that causes egg-drop has been affecting ducks in China since 2010. Currently, no vaccine is available for this disease. A live attenuated duck enteritis virus (DEV; a herpesvirus) vaccine has been used routinely to control lethal DEV in ducks since the 1960s. Here, we constructed two recombinant DEVs by transfecting overlapping fosmid DNAs. One virus, rDEV-TE, expresses the truncated form of the envelope glycoprotein (TE) of duck tembusu virus (DTMUV), and the other virus, rDEV-PrM/TE, expresses both the TE and pre-membrane proteins (PrM). Animal study demonstrated that both recombinant viruses induced measurable anti-DTMUV neutralizing antibodies in ducks. After two doses of recombinant virus, rDEV-PrM/TE completely protected ducks from DTMUV challenge, whereas rDEV-TE only conferred partial protection. These results demonstrate that recombinant DEV expressing the TE and pre-membrane proteins is protective and can serve as a potential candidate vaccine to prevent DTMUV infection in ducks.

  20. Genetic characterization of an H5N1 avian influenza virus with neurovirulence in ducks.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Yu, Zhengjun; Zhou, Hongbo; Tu, Jiagang; Jin, Meilin

    2009-04-01

    In this report, an H5N1 avian influenza virus, A/duck/Hubei/hangmei01/2006, which could lead to acute disease including neurovirulence and mortality in ducks, was isolated in brains of domestic ducks in spring of 2006. Molecular characterization of the genes revealed that this virus harbored the common characteristics of a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that this virus was a member of the Fujian-like virus sublineage. All eight genes except NA and PB2 had the closest genetic relatives to the human influenza virus A/China/GD01/2006. It might indicate that the virus A/duck/Hubei/hangmei01/2006 originated from southern China, resulting from the wild bird migration or poultry transportation, and indicate that more surveillance upon evolution and transmission of influenza viruses in ducks was urgent.

  1. Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Arthur

    2016-09-06

    This issue provides a clinical overview of hepatitis C virus, focusing on transmission, prevention, screening, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  2. Characterization of duck H5N1 influenza viruses with differing pathogenicity in mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducks.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yinghua; Wu, Peipei; Peng, Daxin; Wang, Xiaobo; Wan, Hongquan; Zhang, Pinghu; Long, Jinxue; Zhang, Wenjun; Li, Yanfang; Wang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiaorong; Liu, Xiufan

    2009-12-01

    A number of H5N1 influenza outbreaks have occurred in aquatic birds in Asia. As aquatic birds are the natural reservoir of influenza A viruses and do not usually show clinical disease upon infection, the repeated H5N1 outbreaks have highlighted the importance of continuous surveillance on H5N1 viruses in aquatic birds. In the present study we characterized the biological properties of four H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which had been isolated from ducks, in different animal models. In specific pathogen free (SPF) chickens, all four isolates were highly pathogenic. In SPF mice, the S and Y isolates were moderately pathogenic. However, in mallard ducks, two isolates had low pathogenicity, while the other two were highly pathogenic and caused lethal infection. A representative isolate with high pathogenicity in ducks caused systemic infection and replicated effectively in all 10 organs tested in challenged ducks, whereas a representative isolate with low pathogenicity in ducks was only detected in some organs in a few challenged ducks. Comparison of complete genomic sequences from the four isolates showed that the same amino acid residues that have been reported to be associated with virulence and host adaption/restriction of influenza viruses were present in the PB2, HA, NA, M and NS genes, while the amino acid residues at the HA cleavage site were diverse. From these results it appeared that the virulence of H5N1 avian influenza viruses was increased for ducks and that amino acid substitutions at the HA cleavage site might have contributed to the differing pathogenicity of these isolates in mallards. A procedure for the intravenous pathogenicity index test in a mallard model for assessing the virulence of H5/H7 subtype avian influenza viruses in waterfowl is described.

  3. The role of NS protein in the pathogenicity of HPAI H5N1 viruses in ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Until 2002, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses caused no disease or only mild respiratory infections in ducks. Since then, new viruses have emerged that cause systemic disease and high mortality in ducks and other waterfowl. Studies on HPAI virus pathogenicity in ducks have been...

  4. The effect of NS1 gene exchange on the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Until 2002, H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses caused only mild respiratory infections in ducks. Since then, new viruses have emerged that cause systemic disease and high mortality in ducks and other waterfowl. Studies on HPAI virus pathogenicity in ducks have been limited and t...

  5. Duck egg-drop syndrome caused by BYD virus, a new Tembusu-related flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingliang; Li, Shuang; Hu, Xudong; Yu, Xiuling; Wang, Yongyue; Liu, Peipei; Lu, Xishan; Zhang, Guozhong; Hu, Xueying; Liu, Di; Li, Xiaoxia; Su, Wenliang; Lu, Hao; Mok, Ngai Shing; Wang, Peiyi; Wang, Ming; Tian, Kegong; Gao, George F

    2011-03-24

    Since April 2010, a severe outbreak of duck viral infection, with egg drop, feed uptake decline and ovary-oviduct disease, has spread around the major duck-producing regions in China. A new virus, named BYD virus, was isolated in different areas, and a similar disease was reproduced in healthy egg-producing ducks, infecting with the isolated virus. The virus was re-isolated from the affected ducks and replicated well in primary duck embryo fibroblasts and Vero cells, causing the cytopathic effect. The virus was identified as an enveloped positive-stranded RNA virus with a size of approximately 55 nm in diameter. Genomic sequencing of the isolated virus revealed that it is closely related to Tembusu virus (a mosquito-borne Ntaya group flavivirus), with 87-91% nucleotide identity of the partial E (envelope) proteins to that of Tembusu virus and 72% of the entire genome coding sequence with Bagaza virus, the most closely related flavivirus with an entirely sequenced genome. Collectively our systematic studies fulfill Koch's postulates, and therefore, the causative agent of the duck egg drop syndrome occurring in China is a new flavivirus. Flavivirus is an emerging and re-emerging zoonotic pathogen and BYD virus that causes severe egg-drop, could be disastrous for the duck industry. More importantly its public health concerns should also be evaluated, and its epidemiology should be closely watched due to the zoonotic nature of flaviviruses.

  6. Possible waterborne transmission and maintenance of influenza viruses in domestic ducks.

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, D D; Shortridge, K F

    1982-01-01

    Two duck farms in Hong Kong were examined monthly for 1 year for the occurrence and persistence of influenza viruses within the duck communities. The predominant virus in one community was H3N2, a virus antigenically related to the pandemic Hong Kong strain. This virus was isolated monthly throughout the year from feces or pond water or both, indicating a cycle of waterborne transmission. Viruses of the same antigenic combination were isolated 1 and 2 years after the last sampling occasion, implying persistence in the community. Infection was asymptomatic. Maintenance of virus appeared to be dependent upon the continual introduction of ducklings susceptible to infection onto virus-contaminated water; the feces of ducks 70 to 80 days old were generally free of detectable virus despite the exposure of the ducks to virus in pond water. In the second community, in which ducklings were not introduced after the initial sampling, the prevailing viruses, H7N1 and H7N2, also present asymptomatically, ceased to be detected once the ducks were 70 to 80 days old. The normal practice of raising ducks of different ages on the same farm, wherein the water supplies are shared, as typified by the first community, appears to be instrumental in maintaining a large reservoir of influenza viruses in the duck population of southern China. PMID:7055370

  7. Duck Enteritis Virus Glycoprotein D and B DNA Vaccines Induce Immune Responses and Immunoprotection in Pekin Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Cao, Yongsheng; Cui, Lihong; Ma, Bo; Mu, Xiaoyu; Li, Yanwei; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Dan; Wei, Wei; Gao, Mingchun; Wang, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccine is a promising strategy for protection against virus infection. However, little is known on the efficacy of vaccination with two plasmids for expressing the glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) of duck enteritis virus (DEV) in inducing immune response and immunoprotection against virulent virus infection in Pekin ducks. In this study, two eukaryotic expressing plasmids of pcDNA3.1-gB and pcDNA3.1-gD were constructed. Following transfection, the gB and gD expressions in DF1 cells were detected. Groups of ducks were vaccinated with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, and boosted with the same vaccine on day 14 post primary vaccination. We found that intramuscular vaccinations with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, but not control plasmid, stimulated a high frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in Pekin ducks, particularly with both plasmids. Similarly, vaccination with these plasmids, particularly with both plasmids, promoted higher levels of neutralization antibodies against DEV in Pekin ducks. More importantly, vaccination with both plasmids significantly reduced the virulent DEV-induced mortality in Pekin ducks. Our data indicated that vaccination with plasmids for expressing both gB and gD induced potent cellular and humoral immunity against DEV in Pekin ducks. Therefore, this vaccination strategy may be used for the prevention of DEV infection in Pekin ducks. PMID:24736466

  8. Duck enteritis virus glycoprotein D and B DNA vaccines induce immune responses and immunoprotection in Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Cao, Yongsheng; Cui, Lihong; Ma, Bo; Mu, Xiaoyu; Li, Yanwei; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Dan; Wei, Wei; Gao, Mingchun; Wang, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccine is a promising strategy for protection against virus infection. However, little is known on the efficacy of vaccination with two plasmids for expressing the glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) of duck enteritis virus (DEV) in inducing immune response and immunoprotection against virulent virus infection in Pekin ducks. In this study, two eukaryotic expressing plasmids of pcDNA3.1-gB and pcDNA3.1-gD were constructed. Following transfection, the gB and gD expressions in DF1 cells were detected. Groups of ducks were vaccinated with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, and boosted with the same vaccine on day 14 post primary vaccination. We found that intramuscular vaccinations with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, but not control plasmid, stimulated a high frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in Pekin ducks, particularly with both plasmids. Similarly, vaccination with these plasmids, particularly with both plasmids, promoted higher levels of neutralization antibodies against DEV in Pekin ducks. More importantly, vaccination with both plasmids significantly reduced the virulent DEV-induced mortality in Pekin ducks. Our data indicated that vaccination with plasmids for expressing both gB and gD induced potent cellular and humoral immunity against DEV in Pekin ducks. Therefore, this vaccination strategy may be used for the prevention of DEV infection in Pekin ducks.

  9. The pathogenesis of duck virus enteritis in experimentally infected ducks: a quantitative time-course study using TaqMan polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xuefeng, Qi; Xiaoyan, Yang; Anchun, Cheng; Mingshu, Wang; Dekang, Zhu; Renyong, Jia

    2008-06-01

    Duck virus enteritis is an acute and contagious herpesvirus infection of duck, geese and swans with high morbidity and mortality. The kinetics of viral DNA loads and immunohistochemical localization of virulent duck enteritis virus, as well as histopathological examination in various tissues of ducks following oral infection, were investigated. The time course for the appearance of viral antigen and tissue lesions in various tissues was coincident with the levels of duck enteritis virus at the various sites, suggesting that the levels of duck enteritis virus in systemic organs have a close correlation with the progression of disease. The abundance of target epithelial and lymphoid cells may contribute to the high levels of virus infection and replication in lymphoid and intestinal tissues.

  10. Pathogenicity of reassortant H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in domestic ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks has increased over time. These changes in virulence have been reported with viruses from countries with high population of domestic ducks, including Egypt. In order to understand which viral genes are contri...

  11. Increased virulence in ducks of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses from Egypt

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks has increased over time. These changes in virulence have been reported with viruses from countries with high population of domestic ducks. Since 2006, H5N1 HPAI outbreaks in Egypt have been occurring in po...

  12. Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Harry R.; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. An improved understanding of the natural history of HEV infection has been achieved within the last decade. Several reservoirs and transmission modes have been identified. Hepatitis E is an underdiagnosed disease, in part due to the use of serological assays with low sensitivity. However, diagnostic tools, including nucleic acid-based tests, have been improved. The epidemiology and clinical features of hepatitis E differ between developing and developed countries. HEV infection is usually an acute self-limiting disease, but in developed countries it causes chronic infection with rapidly progressive cirrhosis in organ transplant recipients, patients with hematological malignancy requiring chemotherapy, and individuals with HIV. HEV also causes extrahepatic manifestations, including a number of neurological syndromes and renal injury. Acute infection usually requires no treatment, but chronic infection should be treated by reducing immunosuppression in transplant patients and/or the use of antiviral therapy. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge about the virus itself, as well as the epidemiology, diagnostics, natural history, and management of HEV infection in developing and developed countries. PMID:24396139

  13. Studies on vertical and horizontal transmission of duck plague virus in apparently healthy waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burgess, Elizabeth C.

    1978-01-01

    Healthy waterfowl were found to be carriers of duck plague (DP) virus. Black ducks (Anas rubripes) and Canada geese (Branta canadensis) surviving a natural outbreak of DP at Coloma, Wisconsin, in 1973 yielded DP virus in cloacal swabs taken four years postinfection. Experimental infection of previously unexposed mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynochos) with the Coloma strain of DP virus CO-WI (73) also produced cloacal virus shedding for up to four years after infection. A second DP virus strain, LA-SD (73) from the Lake Andes, South Dakota, epornitic, was detected from cloacal swabs of pintail ducks (Anas acuta), gadwall ducks (Anas strepera), wood ducks (Aix sponsa), and Canada geese infected experimentally one year before. The frequency of swabs positive for DP virus varied between individuals within each of the tested species. The amount of detectable DP virus shed was about 100 plaqueforming units of virus percloacal swab. Oral erosions were present in all species tested except Canada geese and gadwall ducks. Erosions occurred at the openings of the sublingual salivary gland ducts. DP virus was isolated from erosions. All ducks with lesions proved to shed DP virus, although not necessarily at the time they had the lesion. Three pintail ducks treated with dexamethasone for ten days, shed DP virus daily for 19 days after the first day of treatment. These birds also shed DP virus the one time they were tested prior to dexamethosone treatment. An acute lethal outbreak occurred in CO-WI (73) carrier birds. Both DP virus and specific lesions were found in dead birds. The deaths coincided with a change in housing and with the simultaneous introduction of co-housed LA-SD (73) infected ducklings. DP virus was isolated from the chorio-allantoic (CA) fluid of a fourteen day pekin embryo and from five of ten infertile pekin eggs laid by DP carrier birds.

  14. A Duck Enteritis Virus-Vectored Bivalent Live Vaccine Provides Fast and Complete Protection against H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Infection in Ducks ▿ † §

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Jiang, Yongping; Wu, Li; Zeng, Xianying; Tian, Guobin; Ge, Jinying; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Bu, Zhigao; Chen, Hualan

    2011-01-01

    Ducks play an important role in the maintenance of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in nature, and the successful control of AIVs in ducks has important implications for the eradication of the disease in poultry and its prevention in humans. The inactivated influenza vaccine is expensive, labor-intensive, and usually needs 2 to 3 weeks to induce protective immunity in ducks. Live attenuated duck enteritis virus (DEV; a herpesvirus) vaccine is used routinely to control lethal DEV infections in many duck-producing areas. Here, we first established a system to generate the DEV vaccine strain by using the transfection of overlapping fosmid DNAs. Using this system, we constructed two recombinant viruses, rDEV-ul41HA and rDEV-us78HA, in which the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the H5N1 virus A/duck/Anhui/1/06 was inserted and stably maintained within the ul41 gene or between the us7 and us8 genes of the DEV genome. Duck studies indicated that rDEV-us78HA had protective efficacy similar to that of the live DEV vaccine against lethal DEV challenge; importantly, a single dose of 106 PFU of rDEV-us78HA induced complete protection against a lethal H5N1 virus challenge in as little as 3 days postvaccination. The protective efficacy against both lethal DEV and H5N1 challenge provided by rDEV-ul41HA inoculation in ducks was slightly weaker than that provided by rDEV-us78HA. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that recombinant DEV is suitable for use as a bivalent live attenuated vaccine, providing rapid protection against both DEV and H5N1 virus infection in ducks. PMID:21865383

  15. A duck enteritis virus-vectored bivalent live vaccine provides fast and complete protection against H5N1 avian influenza virus infection in ducks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Jiang, Yongping; Wu, Li; Zeng, Xianying; Tian, Guobin; Ge, Jinying; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Bu, Zhigao; Chen, Hualan

    2011-11-01

    Ducks play an important role in the maintenance of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in nature, and the successful control of AIVs in ducks has important implications for the eradication of the disease in poultry and its prevention in humans. The inactivated influenza vaccine is expensive, labor-intensive, and usually needs 2 to 3 weeks to induce protective immunity in ducks. Live attenuated duck enteritis virus (DEV; a herpesvirus) vaccine is used routinely to control lethal DEV infections in many duck-producing areas. Here, we first established a system to generate the DEV vaccine strain by using the transfection of overlapping fosmid DNAs. Using this system, we constructed two recombinant viruses, rDEV-ul41HA and rDEV-us78HA, in which the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the H5N1 virus A/duck/Anhui/1/06 was inserted and stably maintained within the ul41 gene or between the us7 and us8 genes of the DEV genome. Duck studies indicated that rDEV-us78HA had protective efficacy similar to that of the live DEV vaccine against lethal DEV challenge; importantly, a single dose of 10(6) PFU of rDEV-us78HA induced complete protection against a lethal H5N1 virus challenge in as little as 3 days postvaccination. The protective efficacy against both lethal DEV and H5N1 challenge provided by rDEV-ul41HA inoculation in ducks was slightly weaker than that provided by rDEV-us78HA. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that recombinant DEV is suitable for use as a bivalent live attenuated vaccine, providing rapid protection against both DEV and H5N1 virus infection in ducks.

  16. Hepatitis B Virus Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Jennifer H.; Cowie, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is geographically diverse, with population prevalence, age and mode of acquisition, and likelihood of progression to chronic infection mutually interdependent. The burden of chronic HBV infection is increasingly being recognized, with cirrhosis and liver cancer attributable to HBV continuing to increase. The outcomes of chronic HBV infection are affected by a range of factors, including viral genotype, the presence of coinfections with other blood-borne viruses, and the impact of other causes of liver disease. The increased recognition of HBV infection as a leading cause of death globally has resulted in the development of new structures and policies at the international level; immediate attention to implementing these strategies is now required. PMID:25934461

  17. Efficacy assessment of an inactivated Tembusu virus vaccine candidate in ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijiao; Li, Zhanhong; Zhang, Qingshui; Sun, Mengxu; Li, Shuang; Su, Wenliang; Hu, Xueying; He, Weiyong; Su, Jingliang

    2017-02-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a recently identified pathogen that causes severe egg drop and neurological disease in domestic duck and goose flocks. The infection has spread across the China mainland since its outbreak in 2010. Effective vaccines are needed to fight the disease. In this work, we describe the development and laboratory assessment of a cell culture-derived, inactivated duck TMUV vaccine. The TMUV-JXSP strain was successfully propagated on a baby hamster kidney cell line (BHK-21), inactivated with beta-propiolactone (BPL) and emulsified with mineral oil. The efficacy of different vaccination schedules was assessed in laying ducks and table ducks using virus challenge experiments. Two doses of vaccine provided efficient protection against the virus challenge to avoid the egg production drop in laying ducks. An ELISA demonstrated that 97% (39/40) of ducks seroconverted on day 21 after one dose of the inactivated vaccine and that significant increases in antibody titers against the virus were induced after the second immunization. For table ducks, a single dose of vaccine immunization resulted in a protection index of 87% and significant reduction of viral loads in tissues. Sterilizing immunity can be attained after second immunization. Our results demonstrate that BHK-21 cell culture is suitable for duck TMUV propagation and that BPL-inactivated TMUV vaccine can provide a high level of protection from virus challenge in laying ducks and table ducks. These data provide a scientific basis for the development of an inactivated vaccine for the prevention of duck TMUV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transmission dynamics of the recently-identified BYD virus causing duck egg-drop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Naveen K; Wang, Feng-bin; Zou, Xingfu; Wahl, Lindi M

    2012-01-01

    Baiyangdian (BYD) virus is a recently-identified mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes severe disease in ducks, with extremely rapid transmission, up to 15% mortality within 10 days and 90% reduction in egg production on duck farms within 5 days of infection. Because of the zoonotic nature of flaviviruses, the characterization of BYD virus and its epidemiology are important public health concerns. Here, we develop a mathematical model for the transmission dynamics of this novel virus. We validate the model against BYD outbreak data collected from duck farms in Southeast China, as well as experimental data obtained from an animal facility. Based on our model, the basic reproductive number of BYD virus is high (R(0) = 21) indicating that this virus is highly transmissible, consistent with the dramatic epidemiology observed in BYDV-affected duck farms. Our results indicate that younger ducks are more vulnerable to BYD disease and that ducks infected with BYD virus reduce egg production (to about 33% on average) for about 3 days post-infection; after 3 days infected ducks are no longer able to produce eggs. Using our model, we predict that control measures which reduce contact between mosquitoes and ducks such as mosquito nets are more effective than insecticides.

  19. Transmission Dynamics of the Recently-Identified BYD Virus Causing Duck Egg-Drop Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Naveen K.; Wang, Feng-bin; Zou, Xingfu; Wahl, Lindi M.

    2012-01-01

    Baiyangdian (BYD) virus is a recently-identified mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes severe disease in ducks, with extremely rapid transmission, up to 15% mortality within 10 days and 90% reduction in egg production on duck farms within 5 days of infection. Because of the zoonotic nature of flaviviruses, the characterization of BYD virus and its epidemiology are important public health concerns. Here, we develop a mathematical model for the transmission dynamics of this novel virus. We validate the model against BYD outbreak data collected from duck farms in Southeast China, as well as experimental data obtained from an animal facility. Based on our model, the basic reproductive number of BYD virus is high (R0 = 21) indicating that this virus is highly transmissible, consistent with the dramatic epidemiology observed in BYDV-affected duck farms. Our results indicate that younger ducks are more vulnerable to BYD disease and that ducks infected with BYD virus reduce egg production (to about 33% on average) for about 3 days post-infection; after 3 days infected ducks are no longer able to produce eggs. Using our model, we predict that control measures which reduce contact between mosquitoes and ducks such as mosquito nets are more effective than insecticides. PMID:22529985

  20. Survey for West Nile virus antibodies in wild ducks, 2004-06, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofmeister, Erik K.; Jankowski, Mark D.; Goldberg, Diana R.; Franson, J. Christian

    2016-01-01

    Detection of West Nile virus (WNV) in ducks has been reported in North America in isolated cases of mortality in wild waterbirds and following outbreaks in farmed ducks. Although the virus has been noted as an apparent incidental finding in several species of ducks, little is known about the prevalence of exposure or the outcome of infection with WNV in wild ducks in North America. From 2004–06, we collected sera from 1,406 wild-caught American Wigeon (Anas americana), Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) ducks at national wildlife refuges (NWRs) in North Dakota and Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) at NWRs in South Carolina and Tennessee. We measured the prevalence of previous exposure to WNV in these ducks by measuring WNV antibodies and evaluated variation in exposure among species, age, and year. Additionally, we evaluated the performance of a commercial antibody to wild bird immunoglobulin in duck species that varied in their phylogenetic relatedness to the bird species the antibody was directed against. As determined by a screening immunoassay and a confirmatory plaque reduction neutralization assay, the prevalence of WNV antibody was 10%. In light of experimental studies that show ducks to be relatively resistant to mortality caused by WNV, the antibody prevalence we detected suggests that wild ducks may be less-frequently exposed to WNV than expected for birds inhabiting wetlands where they may acquire infection from mosquitoes.

  1. SURVEY FOR WEST NILE VIRUS ANTIBODIES IN WILD DUCKS, 2004-06, USA.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik K; Jankowski, Mark D; Goldberg, Diana; Franson, J Christian

    2016-04-28

    Detection of West Nile virus (WNV) in ducks has been reported in North America in isolated cases of mortality in wild waterbirds and following outbreaks in farmed ducks. Although the virus has been noted as an apparent incidental finding in several species of ducks, little is known about the prevalence of exposure or the outcome of infection with WNV in wild ducks in North America. From 2004-06, we collected sera from 1,406 wild-caught American Wigeon ( Anas americana ), Mallard ( Anas platyrhynchos ), and Northern Pintail ( Anas acuta ) ducks at national wildlife refuges (NWRs) in North Dakota and Wood Ducks ( Aix sponsa ) at NWRs in South Carolina and Tennessee. We measured the prevalence of previous exposure to WNV in these ducks by measuring WNV antibodies and evaluated variation in exposure among species, age, and year. Additionally, we evaluated the performance of a commercial antibody to wild bird immunoglobulin in duck species that varied in their phylogenetic relatedness to the bird species the antibody was directed against. As determined by a screening immunoassay and a confirmatory plaque reduction neutralization assay, the prevalence of WNV antibody was 10%. In light of experimental studies that show ducks to be relatively resistant to mortality caused by WNV, the antibody prevalence we detected suggests that wild ducks may be less-frequently exposed to WNV than expected for birds inhabiting wetlands where they may acquire infection from mosquitoes.

  2. Hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Manns, Michael P; Buti, Maria; Gane, Ed; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Razavi, Homie; Terrault, Norah; Younossi, Zobair

    2017-03-02

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepatotropic RNA virus that causes progressive liver damage, which might result in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Globally, between 64 and 103 million people are chronically infected. Major risk factors for this blood-borne virus infection are unsafe injection drug use and unsterile medical procedures (iatrogenic infections) in countries with high HCV prevalence. Diagnostic procedures include serum HCV antibody testing, HCV RNA measurement, viral genotype and subtype determination and, lately, assessment of resistance-associated substitutions. Various direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have become available, which target three proteins involved in crucial steps of the HCV life cycle: the NS3/4A protease, the NS5A protein and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B protein. Combination of two or three of these DAAs can cure (defined as a sustained virological response 12 weeks after treatment) HCV infection in >90% of patients, including populations that have been difficult to treat in the past. As long as a prophylactic vaccine is not available, the HCV pandemic has to be controlled by treatment-as-prevention strategies, effective screening programmes and global access to treatment.

  3. Experimental susceptibility of Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) for West Nile virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofmeister, Erik K.; Porter, Robert E.; Franson, J. Christian

    2015-01-01

    Detection of West Nile virus (WNV) has been reported in a variety of wild ducks in the US, but little is known about the pathogenesis and outcome of exposure of the disease in these species. Previous experimental studies of WNV in ducks either have challenged a small number of ducks with WNV or have tested domesticated ducks. To determine susceptibility and immune response, we challenged 7-wk-old Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) with a 1999 American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) isolate of WNV. Wood Ducks were susceptible to infection with the virus, and, although clinical signs or mortality were not observed, microscopic lesions were noted, particularly in the heart and brain. West Nile virus viremia peaked on day 2 postinfection (pi) at 104.54 plaque-forming units (PFU) of virus/mL serum and WNV was shed orally (between 102and 102.9 PFU per swab) and cloacally. Specific anti-WNV antibody response was rapid, with anti-WNV IgM detected on day 3 pi followed on day 5 pi by anti-WNV IgG. Neutralizing antibodies were detected by plaque-reduction neutralization assay in one duck on day 4 pi, and in all sampled ducks on day 5. These results indicate that Wood Ducks are susceptible to WNV, but it is unlikely that significant WNV mortality events occur in Wood Ducks or that ducks play a significant role in transmission. However, WNV viremia was sufficient, in theory, to infect mosquitoes, and oral and cloacal shedding of the virus may increase the risk of infection to other waterbirds.

  4. Differential channelling of liver lipids in relation to susceptibility to hepatic steatosis in two species of ducks.

    PubMed

    Hermier, Dominique; Guy, Gérard; Guillaumin, Solange; Davail, Stéphane; André, Jean-Marc; Hoo-Paris, Robert

    2003-08-01

    In the human, hepatic steatosis can be associated with an imbalance between synthesis, secretion and storage of hepatic lipids, and exhibits a genetic susceptibility. The effect of overfeeding on hepatic lipid channelling was investigated in two genotypes of ducks that differ in their susceptibility to fatty liver, i.e. the common duck, Anas platyrhynchos, and the Muscovy duck, Cairina moschata. Before overfeeeding, the Muscovy duck exhibited a lower subcutaneous adiposity and a higher muscular development, whereas hepatic composition was similar in both genotypes (>5% lipids and triglycerides accounting for 6-10% lipids). In the plasma lipoprotein profile, HDL predominated (5.5-7.8 g/l) over VLDL (0.09-0.25 g/l) and LDL (0.65-1.06 g/l). All lipid and lipoprotein concentrations were lower in the Muscovy duck. In response to overfeeding, the Muscovy duck exhibited a higher degree of hepatic steatosis (62 vs. 50% lipids), and a lower increase in adiposity and in the concentration of plasma triglycerides (6-fold vs. 10-fold) and VLDL (23-fold vs. 34-fold). Thus, certain genotypes may be more responsive to the dietary induction of fatty liver because of a less efficient channelling of hepatic lipids towards secretion into plasma and adipose storage, and the duck may represent a suitable model in which to study the development of hepatic steatosis and its pathogenesis.

  5. Construction of a recombinant duck enteritis virus vaccine expressing hemagglutinin of H9N2 avian influenza virus and evaluation of its efficacy in ducks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Yang, Chenghuai; Li, Junping; Li, Ling; Cao, Minghui; Li, Qihong; Li, Huijiao

    2017-01-01

    H9 subtype avian influenza viruses (AIVs) remain a significant burden in the poultry industry and are considered to be one of the most likely causes of any new influenza pandemic in humans. As ducks play an important role in the maintenance of H9 viruses in nature, successful control of the spread of H9 AIVs in ducks will have significant beneficial effects on public health. Duck enteritis virus (DEV) may be a promising candidate viral vector for aquatic poultry vaccination. In this study, we constructed a recombinant DEV, rDEV-∆UL2-HA, inserting the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from duck-origin H9N2 AIV into the UL2 gene by homologous recombination. One-step growth analyses showed that the HA gene insertion had no effect on viral replication and suggested that the UL2 gene was nonessential for virus growth in vitro. In vivo tests further showed that the insertion of the HA gene in place of the UL2 gene did not affect the immunogenicity of the virus. Moreover, a single dose of 10(3) TCID50 of rDEV-∆UL2-HA induced solid protection against lethal DEV challenge and completely prevented H9N2 AIV viral shedding. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a DEV-vectored vaccine providing robust protection against both DEV and H9N2 AIV virus infections in ducks.

  6. The effect of Tembusu virus infection in different week-old Cherry Valley breeding ducks.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjian; Dou, Yanguo; Ti, Jinfeng; Wang, Aihua; Cheng, Binghua; Zhang, Xin; Diao, Youxiang

    2016-08-30

    To study the effect of Tembusu virus (TMUV) infection on Cherry Valley Breeding ducks of different ages, 350 five-week-old ducks were divided into 14 groups. Ducks in seven experimental group were respectively infected with 1.265×10(5) mean embryo lethal dose (ELD50) of TMUV-AHQY strain (in 4.2mL) by intravenous route. Ducks in control groups were inoculated with Phosphate-buffered Saline (PBS) in the same way. Clinical symptoms, gross and microscopic lesions, viral loads and serum antibodies were detected and recorded for 20days after infection. Some ducks infected at 7 and 21 week s of age showed severe clinical symptoms including depression and inappetence, and no obvious clinical symptoms were seen in other week-old infected ducks. Severe gross lesions including hepatomegaly, meningeal congestion, myocardial hemorrhage, intestinal, myocardial and pulmonary edema were observed in ducks infected at 7, 18 and 21 weeks of age. No or mild gross lesions were observed in ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age. The main microscopic lesions including hyperaemia, degeneration and necrosis of different cells and inflammatory cellular infiltration mainly consisting of mononuclear cells or lymphocytes were observed in ducks infected at 7 and 21 week of age. But relatively intact structures and rare lymphocytic infiltration were presented in ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age. Viral antigen was more frequently observed in organ slices collected from 7 week-old infected ducks and few positive staining was found in 14 and 16 week-old infected ducks. Less viral loads in different tissues and swabs were detected by a quantitative real-time PCR assay. The level of viral loads in the tissues of ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age was very lower than that of ducks infected at 7 and 21 weeks of age. Meanwhile, less viral copy numbers were detected in swab samples collected from 14 and 16 week-old infected ducks. Ducks infected at 14-week-old developed significantly

  7. Experimental susceptibility of wood ducks (Aix sponsa) for West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik; Porter, Robert E; Franson, J Christian

    2015-04-01

    Detection of West Nile virus (WNV) has been reported in a variety of wild ducks in the US, but little is known about the pathogenesis and outcome of exposure of the disease in these species. Previous experimental studies of WNV in ducks either have challenged a small number of ducks with WNV or have tested domesticated ducks. To determine susceptibility and immune response, we challenged 7-wk-old Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) with a 1999 American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) isolate of WNV. Wood Ducks were susceptible to infection with the virus, and, although clinical signs or mortality were not observed, microscopic lesions were noted, particularly in the heart and brain. West Nile virus viremia peaked on day 2 postinfection (pi) at 10(4.54) plaque-forming units (PFU) of virus/mL serum and WNV was shed orally (between 10(2) and 10(2.9) PFU per swab) and cloacally. Specific anti-WNV antibody response was rapid, with anti-WNV IgM detected on day 3 pi followed on day 5 pi by anti-WNV IgG. Neutralizing antibodies were detected by plaque-reduction neutralization assay in one duck on day 4 pi, and in all sampled ducks on day 5. These results indicate that Wood Ducks are susceptible to WNV, but it is unlikely that significant WNV mortality events occur in Wood Ducks or that they play a significant role in transmission. However, WNV viremia was sufficient, in theory, to infect mosquitoes, and oral and cloacal shedding of the virus may increase the risk of infection to other waterbirds.

  8. Adaptation and transmission of a duck-origin avian influenza virus in poultry species.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinling; zu Dohna, Heinrich; Anchell, Nichole L; Adams, Sean C; Dao, Nguyet T; Xing, Zheng; Cardona, Carol J

    2010-01-01

    A duck-origin avian influenza virus (AIV) was used to study viral adaptation and transmission patterns in chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus). Inoculated birds were housed with naïve birds of the same species and all birds were monitored for infection. The inoculating duck virus was transmitted effectively by contact in both species. Viruses recovered from infected birds showed mutations as early as 1 or 3 days after inoculation in chickens and ducks, respectively. Amino acid substitutions in hemagglutinin (HA) or deletions in neuraminidase (NA) stalk regions were identified in chicken isolates, but only substitutions in HA were identified in duck isolates. HA substitution-containing viruses replicated more efficiently than those with NA stalk deletions. NA deletion mutants were not recovered from contact chickens, suggesting inefficient transmission. Amino acid substitutions in HA proteins appeared in pairs in chickens, but were independent in ducks, indicating adaptation in chickens. In addition, our findings showed that a duck-origin virus can rapidly adapt to chickens, suggesting that the emergence of new epidemic AIV can be rapid.

  9. Protective efficacy of an inactivated vaccine against H9N2 avian influenza virus in ducks.

    PubMed

    Teng, Qiaoyang; Shen, Weixia; Liu, Qinfang; Rong, Guangyu; Chen, Lin; Li, Xuesong; Chen, Hongjun; Yang, Jianmei; Li, Zejun

    2015-09-17

    Wild ducks play an important role in the evolution of avian influenza viruses (AIVs). Domestic ducks in China are known to carry and spread H9N2 AIVs that are thought to have contributed internal genes for the recent outbreak of zoonotic H7N9 virus. In order to protect animal and public health, an effective vaccine is urgently needed to block and prevent the spread of H9N2 virus in ducks. We developed an inactivated H9N2 vaccine (with adjuvant Montanide ISA 70VG) based on an endemic H9N2 AIV and evaluated this vaccine in ducks. The results showed that the inactivated H9N2 vaccine was able to induce a strong and fast humoral immune response in vaccinated ducks. The hemagglutination inhibition titer in the sera increased fast, and reached its peak of 12.3 log2 at 5 weeks post-vaccination in immunized birds and remained at a high level for at least 37 weeks post-vaccination. Moreover, viral shedding was completely blocked in vaccinated ducks after challenge with a homologous H9N2 AIV at both 3 and 37 weeks post-vaccination. The results of this study indicate that the inactivated H9N2 vaccine induces high and prolonged immune response in vaccinated ducks and are efficacious in protecting ducks from H9N2 infection.

  10. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Duck Ovarian Follicles Infected with Duck Tembusu Virus by Label-Free LC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kaikai; Zhao, Dongmin; Liu, Yuzhuo; Liu, Qingtao; Huang, Xinmei; Yang, Jing; An, Fengjiao; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) is a newly emerging pathogenic flavivirus that has caused massive economic losses to the duck industry in China. DTMUV infection mainly results in significant decreases in egg production in egg-laying ducks within 1–2 weeks post infection. However, information on the comparative protein expression of host tissues in response to DTMUV infection is limited. In the present study, the cellular protein response to DTMUV infection in duck ovarian follicles was analyzed using nano-flow high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed 131 differentially expressed proteins, among which 53 were up regulated and 78 were down regulated. The identified proteins were involved in the regulation of essential processes such as cellular structure and integrity, RNA processing, protein biosynthesis and modification, vesicle transport, signal transduction, and mitochondrial pathway. Some selected proteins that were found to be regulated in DTMUV-infected tissues were screened by quantitative real-time PCR to examine their regulation at the transcriptional level, western blot analysis was used to validate the changes of some selected proteins on translational level. To our knowledge, this study is the first to analyze the proteomic changes in duck ovarian follicles following DTMUV infection. The protein-related information obtained in this study may be useful to understand the host response to DTMUV infection and the inherent mechanism of DTMUV replication and pathogenicity. PMID:27066001

  11. Use of muscovy duck embryo fibroblasts for the isolation of viruses from wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Slota, Paul G.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques are described for the preparation, cryopreservation, and inoculation of Muscovy duck embryo cell cultures. The procedure yields a susceptible reproducible cell culture system for the isolation and cultivation of viruses from wild birds.

  12. Effect of age on pathogenesis and innate immune responses in Pekin ducks infected with different H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks varies between different viruses and is affected by the age of the ducks, with younger ducks presenting more severe disease. In order to better understand the pathobiology of H5N1 HPAI in ducks, including t...

  13. The pathobiology of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza virus in Ruddy ducks and Lesser Scaup

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The susceptibility and pathogenesis of avian influenza virus (AIV) has not been characterized in numerous duck species, especially diving ducks, some of which migrate across the continental U.S. The pathobiology of highly pathogenic (HP) H5N2 AIV was characterized in two diving duck species, Ruddy ...

  14. Sentinel model for influenza A virus monitoring in free-grazing ducks in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Boonyapisitsopa, Supanat; Chaiyawong, Supassama; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Jairak, Waleemas; Prakairungnamthip, Duangduean; Bunpapong, Napawan; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) can cause influenza in birds and mammals. In Thailand, free-grazing ducks are known IAV reservoirs and can spread viruses through frequent movements in habitats they share with wild birds. In this study, the sentinel model for IAV monitoring was conducted over 4 months in two free-grazing duck flocks. IAV subtypes H4N6 (n=1) and H3N8 (n=5) were isolated from sentinel ducks at the ages of 13 and 15 weeks. Clinical signs of depression and ocular discharge were observed in the infected ducks. Phylogenetic analysis and genetic characterization of the isolated IAVs indicated that all Thai IAVs were clustered in the Eurasian lineage and pose low pathogenic avian influenza characteristics. Serological analysis found that antibodies against IAVs could be detected in the ducks since 9-weeks-old. In summary, our results indicate that the sentinel model can be used for IAV monitoring in free-grazing duck flocks. Since free-grazing ducks are potential reservoirs and transmitters of IAVs, routine IAV surveillance in free-grazing duck flocks can be beneficial for influenza prevention and control strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidemiology of egg drop syndrome virus in ducks from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cha, S-Y; Kang, M; Park, C-K; Choi, K-S; Jang, H-K

    2013-07-01

    Egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) is an important pathogen of poultry that decreases egg production in chickens and causes respiratory disease in goslings. In 2011, we obtained serum samples from 139 domestic Pekin ducks, 416 one-day-old Pekin ducklings, and 75 wild ducks (67 mallards and 8 pintails) to survey their exposure to EDSV. A total of 123 of 139 sera (88.5%) from Pekin ducks, 396 of the ducklings (95.2%), and 16 of 67 mallards (23.9%) were positive. Field cases of EDSV in wild and domestic ducks were investigated. Six cases from domestic Pekin ducks were identified by PCR detection and were used for virus isolation and molecular analysis. Phylogenetic analyses of the partial hexon and full fiber genes showed that the D11-JW-012 and D11-JW-017 strains among 6 isolates belonged to different clusters compared with other known strains including the 127 strain. We assessed cell growth efficiency by hemagglutination (HA) titers and cytopathic effects in duck embryo liver cells and chicken embryo liver (CEL) cells to investigate host adaptation. The D11-JW-017 strain propagated more in chicken embryo liver than the D11-JW-012 strain and the field isolate from chickens. Our results demonstrate the high prevalence of EDSV in wild and domestic ducks in South Korea and provide information on EDSV from ducks that showed variable adaptability in chickens.

  16. Hepatitis virus vaccines: present status.

    PubMed Central

    Krugman, S.

    1982-01-01

    During the past decade there has been extraordinary progress toward the development of vaccines for the prevention of type A and type B hepatitis. The successful propagation of hepatitis A virus in cell culture in 1979 was followed by the preparation of experimental live attenuated hepatitis A vaccines that have been shown to induce antibody in marmosets and chimpanzees and protect immunized marmosets against challenge with hepatitis A virus. The first human immunization trials will begin in mid-1982. An inactivated hepatitis B vaccine that was licensed in the United States in November 1981 has been shown to be safe, immunogenic, and effective. When this vaccine becomes available for use in July 1982, it will be recommended for persons who are considered to be at increased risk of contracting hepatitis B infection. Future generations of hepatitis B vaccines may be prepared from hepatitis B surface antigen derived from DNA recombinant technology or by in vitro synthesis of HBs Ag determinants by chemical means. PMID:6295013

  17. Hepatitis E virus coinfection with hepatotropic viruses in Egyptian children.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed; Salama, Osama Saad; Mansour, Fathy Awaad; Hossein, Shaimaa

    2008-06-01

    Major hepatotropic viruses continue to be important causes of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries. This work was carried out to detect the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) markers in children with acute viral hepatitis due to hepatotropic viruses (A, B and C) and non-A, non-B, non-C acute hepatitis, and to ascertain the influence of HEV superinfection in individuals infected with hepatitis viruses (A, B and C). We studied prospectively 162 children with sporadic acute hepatitis who reported to our hospital. Thirteen healthy controls were also included in the study. Laboratory investigations were performed, including complete liver function tests. Complete serological profiles for hepatitis viruses A, B, C and E were evaluated. HEV immunoglobulin G was detected with highest percentage among patients with hepatitis B (56.7%), followed by patients with hepatitis C virus (52.0%), hepatitis A virus (34.1%) and combined hepatitis B and C viruses (30.0%). The detection rate among patients with non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis was 7.1%. HEV immunoglobulin M was found in 4.5% of hepatitis A virus patients and in 3.3% of hepatitis B patients. The prevalence of HEV immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M correlated with the levels of hepatic aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in patients with dual markers of infection with hepatitis E and other viruses compared to patients with acute hepatitis due to A and C viruses. HEV serological markers are common among children with acute viral hepatitis, especially from hepatitis C and B viruses. There may be increased sensitivity to HEV coinfection in association with hepatitis B and C infections. Dual infection with HEV and other hepatotropic viruses was associated with greater elevation of aspartate and alanine aminotransferases.

  18. Interferons and hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Heim, Markus H

    2012-05-09

    Interferons are not only the first line of defence against viral infections such as hepatitis C virus infections, but they also have important roles during the chronic phase of viral infections. For over 20 years now, recombinant interferon alpha has been used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. The molecular mechanisms responsible for non-response to interferon are still not completely understood, but systematic analysis of liver biopsies revealed that the spontaneous activation of the endogenous interferon system in the liver of patients with chronic hepatitis C prevented response to interferon-based therapies. Moreover, recent genomewide association studies found a highly significant and strong association between genetic variants near the IFNλ3 gene, designated the IL28B genotype, with spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus as well as with response to treatment of chronic hepatitis C with pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin. The molecular pathways that link the IL28B genotype with antiviral effector systems of the innate and adaptive immune system are not known. However, substantial progress has been made in basic understanding of the induction of interferons through toll-like receptor and RIG-I/MDA5 pathways, and of interferon-induced signalling pathways and antiviral effector systems. Over the last two decades, hepatitis C virus has been an important tool for study of the fundamental aspects of host-virus interactions in a chronic viral infection. Further insights into the viral escape strategies that allow hepatitis C virus to persist for decades despite an ongoing innate and adaptive immune response will eventually allow the rational development of preventive vaccines.

  19. Isolation of influenza A viruses from wild ducks and feathers in Minnesota (2010-2011).

    PubMed

    Lebarbenchon, Camille; Poulson, Rebecca; Shannon, Kelly; Slagter, Jeremiah; Slusher, Morgan J; Wilcox, Benjamin R; Berdeen, James; Knutsen, Gregory A; Cardona, Carol J; Stallknecht, David E

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the feasibility of testing feathers as a complementary approach to detect low pathogenic influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild duck populations. Feathers on the ground were collected at four duck capture sites during 2010 and 2011, in Minnesota, U. S. A. IAVs were isolated from both feathers and cloacal swabs sampled from ducks at the time of capture. Although virus isolation rates from feather and cloacal swabs were inconsistent between collections, the overall rate of isolation was greatest from the feather samples. Viruses isolated from feathers also reflected the subtype diversity observed in cloacal swab isolates but resulted in many more isolates that contained more than one virus. Our study suggests that testing feathers may represent an alternative noninvasive approach to recover viruses and estimate subtype abundance and diversity.

  20. Hepatitis E: the forgotten virus.

    PubMed

    Freshwater, Dennis A

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has a long military association being first discovered during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan in the 1980s after an outbreak of unexplained hepatitis at a military camp. HEV is now endemic in the UK, and should be considered in all cases of jaundice. The prevalence is high in certain operational areas (28.5% in Afghanistan), and maintenance of integrity of food and water supplies together with scrupulous attention to environmental hygiene remains paramount. Pregnancy confers a much higher risk of fulminant hepatitis, with a mortality rate of up to 25%. Management is usually symptomatic, but ribavirin can be considered in non-pregnant patients with fulminant hepatitis. This narrative review examines the presentations and management of Hepatitis E in military populations.

  1. Surveillance of avian influenza virus type A in semi-scavenging ducks in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Amina; Giasuddin, Mohammed; Islam, Kazi Mehetazul; Khanom, Sazeda; Samad, Mohammed Abdus; Islam, Mohammad Rafiqul; Noor, Monira; Bhuiyan, Jamal Uddin; Kim, Won-Il; Eo, Seong Kug; Rahman, Md Masudur

    2013-10-07

    Ducks are the natural reservoir of influenza A virus and the central host for highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1), while domestic ducks rearing in semi-scavenging system could serve as re-assortment vessels for re-emerging new subtypes of influenza viruses between birds to human. Avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance in Bangladesh has been passive, relying on poultry farmers to report suspected outbreaks of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza. Here, the results of an active surveillance effort focusing on the semi-scavenging ducks are presented. A total of 2100 cloacal swabs and 2100 sera were collected from semi-scavenging ducks from three wintering-sites of Bangladesh during three successive winter seasons, December through February in the years between 2009 and 2012. Virus isolation and identification were carried out from the cloacal swabs by virus propagation in embryonated hen eggs followed by amplification of viral RNA using Avian influenza virus (AIV) specific RT-PCR. The overall prevalence of avian influenza type A was 22.05% for swab samples and 39.76% ducks were sero-positive for avian influenza type A antibody. Extremely low sero-prevalence (0.09%) of AIV H5N1 was detected. Based on our surveillance results, we conclude that semi-scavenging ducks in Bangladesh might play important role in transmitting Avian Influenza virus (AIV) type A. However, the current risk of infection for humans from domestic ducks in Bangladesh is negligible. We believe that this relatively large dataset over three winters in Bangladesh might create a strong foundation for future studies of AIV prevalence, evolution, and ecology in wintering sites around the globe.

  2. Surveillance of avian influenza virus type A in semi-scavenging ducks in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ducks are the natural reservoir of influenza A virus and the central host for highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1), while domestic ducks rearing in semi-scavenging system could serve as re-assortment vessels for re-emerging new subtypes of influenza viruses between birds to human. Avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance in Bangladesh has been passive, relying on poultry farmers to report suspected outbreaks of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza. Here, the results of an active surveillance effort focusing on the semi-scavenging ducks are presented. Result A total of 2100 cloacal swabs and 2100 sera were collected from semi-scavenging ducks from three wintering-sites of Bangladesh during three successive winter seasons, December through February in the years between 2009 and 2012. Virus isolation and identification were carried out from the cloacal swabs by virus propagation in embryonated hen eggs followed by amplification of viral RNA using Avian influenza virus (AIV) specific RT-PCR. The overall prevalence of avian influenza type A was 22.05% for swab samples and 39.76% ducks were sero-positive for avian influenza type A antibody. Extremely low sero-prevalence (0.09%) of AIV H5N1 was detected. Conclusions Based on our surveillance results, we conclude that semi-scavenging ducks in Bangladesh might play important role in transmitting Avian Influenza virus (AIV) type A. However, the current risk of infection for humans from domestic ducks in Bangladesh is negligible. We believe that this relatively large dataset over three winters in Bangladesh might create a strong foundation for future studies of AIV prevalence, evolution, and ecology in wintering sites around the globe. PMID:24099526

  3. Detection and molecular characterization of J subgroup avian leukosis virus in wild ducks in China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangwei; Liu, Lanlan; Hao, Ruijun; Han, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    To assess the status of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) in wild ducks in China, we examined samples from 528 wild ducks, representing 17 species, which were collected in China over the past 3 years. Virus isolation and PCR showed that 7 ALV-J strains were isolated from wild ducks. The env genes and the 3'UTRs from these isolates were cloned and sequenced. The env genes of all 7 wild duck isolates were significantly different from those in the prototype strain HPRS-103, American strains, broiler ALV-J isolates and Chinese local chicken isolates, but showed close homology with those found in some layer chicken ALV-J isolates and belonged to the same group. The 3'UTRs of 7 ALV-J wild ducks isolates showed close homology with the prototype strain HPRS-103 and no obvious deletion was found in the 3'UTR except for a 1 bp deletion in the E element that introduced a binding site for c-Ets-1. Our study demonstrated the presence of ALV-J in wild ducks and investigated the molecular characterization of ALV-J in wild ducks isolates.

  4. RNA-seq comparative analysis of Peking ducks spleen gene expression 24 h post-infected with duck plague virulent or attenuated virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Liu, Mafeng; Zhao, XinXin; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2017-09-13

    Duck plague virus (DPV), a member of alphaherpesvirus sub-family, can cause significant economic losses on duck farms in China. DPV Chinese virulent strain (CHv) is highly pathogenic and could induce massive ducks death. Attenuated DPV vaccines (CHa) have been put into service against duck plague with billions of doses in China each year. Researches on DPV have been development for many years, however, a comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenicity of CHv strain and protection of CHa strain to ducks is still blank. In present study, we performed RNA-seq technology to analyze transcriptome profiling of duck spleens for the first time to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with the infection of CHv and CHa at 24 h. Comparison of gene expression with mock ducks revealed 748 DEGs and 484 DEGs after CHv and CHa infection, respectively. Gene pathway analysis of DEGs highlighted valuable biological processes involved in host immune response, cell apoptosis and viral invasion. Genes expressed in those pathways were different in CHv infected duck spleens and CHa vaccinated duck spleens. The results may provide valuable information for us to explore the reasons of pathogenicity caused by CHv strain and protection activated by CHa strain.

  5. Genetic Structure of Avian Influenza Viruses from Ducks of the Atlantic Flyway of North America

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanyan; Wille, Michelle; Dobbin, Ashley; Walzthöni, Natasha M.; Robertson, Gregory J.; Ojkic, Davor; Whitney, Hugh; Lang, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    Wild birds, including waterfowl such as ducks, are reservoir hosts of influenza A viruses. Despite the increased number of avian influenza virus (AIV) genome sequences available, our understanding of AIV genetic structure and transmission through space and time in waterfowl in North America is still limited. In particular, AIVs in ducks of the Atlantic flyway of North America have not been thoroughly investigated. To begin to address this gap, we analyzed 109 AIV genome sequences from ducks in the Atlantic flyway to determine their genetic structure and to document the extent of gene flow in the context of sequences from other locations and other avian and mammalian host groups. The analyses included 25 AIVs from ducks from Newfoundland, Canada, from 2008–2011 and 84 available reference duck AIVs from the Atlantic flyway from 2006–2011. A vast diversity of viral genes and genomes was identified in the 109 viruses. The genetic structure differed amongst the 8 viral segments with predominant single lineages found for the PB2, PB1 and M segments, increased diversity found for the PA, NP and NS segments (2, 3 and 3 lineages, respectively), and the highest diversity found for the HA and NA segments (12 and 9 lineages, respectively). Identification of inter-hemispheric transmissions was rare with only 2% of the genes of Eurasian origin. Virus transmission between ducks and other bird groups was investigated, with 57.3% of the genes having highly similar (≥99% nucleotide identity) genes detected in birds other than ducks. Transmission between North American flyways has been frequent and 75.8% of the genes were highly similar to genes found in other North American flyways. However, the duck AIV genes did display spatial distribution bias, which was demonstrated by the different population sizes of specific viral genes in one or two neighbouring flyways compared to more distant flyways. PMID:24498009

  6. Genetic structure of avian influenza viruses from ducks of the Atlantic flyway of North America.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyan; Wille, Michelle; Dobbin, Ashley; Walzthöni, Natasha M; Robertson, Gregory J; Ojkic, Davor; Whitney, Hugh; Lang, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    Wild birds, including waterfowl such as ducks, are reservoir hosts of influenza A viruses. Despite the increased number of avian influenza virus (AIV) genome sequences available, our understanding of AIV genetic structure and transmission through space and time in waterfowl in North America is still limited. In particular, AIVs in ducks of the Atlantic flyway of North America have not been thoroughly investigated. To begin to address this gap, we analyzed 109 AIV genome sequences from ducks in the Atlantic flyway to determine their genetic structure and to document the extent of gene flow in the context of sequences from other locations and other avian and mammalian host groups. The analyses included 25 AIVs from ducks from Newfoundland, Canada, from 2008-2011 and 84 available reference duck AIVs from the Atlantic flyway from 2006-2011. A vast diversity of viral genes and genomes was identified in the 109 viruses. The genetic structure differed amongst the 8 viral segments with predominant single lineages found for the PB2, PB1 and M segments, increased diversity found for the PA, NP and NS segments (2, 3 and 3 lineages, respectively), and the highest diversity found for the HA and NA segments (12 and 9 lineages, respectively). Identification of inter-hemispheric transmissions was rare with only 2% of the genes of Eurasian origin. Virus transmission between ducks and other bird groups was investigated, with 57.3% of the genes having highly similar (≥99% nucleotide identity) genes detected in birds other than ducks. Transmission between North American flyways has been frequent and 75.8% of the genes were highly similar to genes found in other North American flyways. However, the duck AIV genes did display spatial distribution bias, which was demonstrated by the different population sizes of specific viral genes in one or two neighbouring flyways compared to more distant flyways.

  7. Genetic relationship of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks and wild birds in Korea and their pathogenic potential in chickens and ducks.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Gu; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Min-Chul; Paek, Mi-Ra; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Kim, Bang-Sil; Kwon, Jun-Hun; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2012-03-23

    The H3 subtype avian influenza virus (AIV) is one of the most frequently isolated subtypes in domestic ducks, live poultry markets, and wild birds in Korea. In 2002-2009, a total of 45 H3 subtype AIVs were isolated from the feces of clinically normal domestic ducks (n=28) and wild birds (n=17). The most prevalent subtypes in domestic ducks were H3N2 (35.7%), H3N6 (35.7%), H3N8 (25.0%), and H3N1 (3.6%, novel subtype in domestic duck in Korea). In contrast, H3N8 (70.6%) is the most prevalent subtype in wild birds in Korea. In the phylogenetic analysis, HA genes of the Korean H3 AIVs were divided into 3 groups (Korean duck, wild bird 1, and wild bird 2) and all viruses of duck origin except one were clustered in a single group. However, other genes showed extensive diversity and at least 17 genotypes were circulating in domestic ducks in Korea. When the analysis expanded to viruses of wild bird origin, the genetic diversity of Korean H3 AIVs became more complicated. Extensive reassortments may have occurred in H3 subtype influenza viruses in Korea. When we inoculated chickens and ducks with six selected viruses, some of the viruses replicated efficiently without pre-adaptation and shed a significant amount of viruses through oropharyngeal and cloacal routes. This raised concerns that H3 subtype AIV could be a new subtype in chickens in Korea. Continuous surveillance is needed to prepare the advent of a novel subtype AIV in Korea. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Differences in pathogenicity of A/Duck/Vietnam/201/05 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus reassortants in ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order to understand which viral genes contribute to the high virulence of A/Dk/Vietnam/201/05 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus in ducks, we used reverse genetics to generate single-gene reassortant viruses with genes from A/Ck/Indonesia/7/03, a virus that produces mild disease ...

  9. Tembusu virus infection in Cherry Valley ducks: the effect of age at infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, X Y; Diao, Y X; Wang, J; Liu, X; Lu, A L; Zhang, L; Ge, P P; Hao, D M

    2014-01-10

    Three groups of Cherry Valley ducks at 5 day, 2 week and 5 week of age were intranasally infected with the WFCL strain of Tembusu virus (TMUV) to investigate the effect of host age on the outcome of TMUV infection. For each age group, clinical signs, gross and microscopic lesions, viral copy numbers in tissues and serum neutralizing antibody titers were recorded. Age-related differences in the resistance to TMUV infection were observed with younger ducks being more susceptible. Some ducks infected at 5 day and 2 week of age developed severe clinical signs, including severe neurological dysfunction and death. However, subclinical signs and no mortality were observed in ducks infected at 5 week of age. A decline in the severity of gross and microscopic lesions was observed as ducks mature. Systemic infections were established in the three age groups post challenge. Higher viral copy numbers in the tissues, especially in vital organs such as the brain and the heart, were developed in the ducks infected at 5 day of age than older ducks, correlating with the severity of clinical signs and lesions in the tissues. Furthermore, ducks infected at 5 week of age developed significantly higher serum neutralizing antibody titers than ducks infected at 5 day of age as determined by serum neutralization test. Therefore, age-related differences in the resistance to TMUV infection should be considered when studying the pathogenicity, pathogenesis, formulation of the vaccination and therapy strategies of TMUV infection in ducks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of the pathogenicity of different H5N1 HPAI viruses in chickens and ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Contrary to what is observed in chickens where infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses produce fatal disease, the Asian H5N1 HPAI viruses have changed from producing mild respiratory infections in ducks to some strains causing systemic disease and death. In order to further ...

  11. Experimental infection of mallard ducks with different subtype H5 and H7 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV’s) remain a threat to poultry worldwide. Avian influenza viruses, including HPAIV, are usually non-pathogenic for ducks and other wild aquatic birds, with the exception of some Asian lineage H5N1 HPAIVs which can cause severe disease in ducks. With ...

  12. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques; Dalton, Harry R

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus can cause acute, fulminant and chronic hepatitis and has been associated with a range of extrahepatic manifestations. Guillain-Barré syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy and encephalitis are the main neurological manifestations associated with acute and chronic hepatitis E virus infection. Renal injuries have been also reported, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with or without cryoglobulinemia and membranous glomerulonephritis. Acute pancreatitis, haematological disorders and other autoimmune extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus, such as myocarditis and thyroiditis, have been also reported. In this comprehensive article, we review all published reports describing hepatitisvirus-associated extrahepatic manifestations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Different routes of inoculation impact infectivity and pathogenesis of H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus infection in chickens and domestic ducks.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Y K; Swayne, D E

    2010-12-01

    The H5N1 type A influenza viruses classified as Qinghai-like virus (clade 2.2) are a unique lineage of type A influenza viruses with the capacity to produce significant disease and mortality in gallinaceous and anseriform birds, including domestic and wild ducks. The objective of this study was to determine the susceptibility and pathogenesis of chickens and domestic ducks to A/Whooper Swan/Mongolia/224/05 (H5N1) high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus when administered through respiratory or alimentary routes of exposure. The chickens and ducks were more susceptible to the H5N1 HPAI virus, as evidenced by low infectious and lethal viral doses, when exposed by intranasal as compared to alimentary routes of inoculation (intragastric or oral-fed infected chicken meat). In the alimentary exposure pathogenesis study, pathologic changes included hemorrhage, necrosis, and inflammation in association with virus detection. These changes were generally observed in most of the visceral organs of chickens, between 2 and 4 days postinoculation (DPI), and are similar to lesions and virus localization seen in birds in natural cases or in experimental studies using the intranasal route. Alimentary exposure to the virus caused systemic infection in the ducks, characterized by moderate lymphocytic encephalitis, necrotized hepatitis, and pancreatitis with a corresponding demonstration of virus within the lesions. In both chickens and ducks with alimentary exposure, lesions, virus, or both were first demonstrated in the upper alimentary tract on 1 DPI, suggesting that the alimentary tract was the initial site affected upon consumption of infected meat or on gavage of virus in liquid medium. However, as demonstrated in the infectivity study in chickens, alimentary infection required higher exposure doses to produce infection as compared to intranasal exposure in chickens. These data suggest that upper respiratory exposure to H5N1 HPAI virus in birds is more likely to result in

  14. Development of a highly immunogenic Newcastle disease virus chicken vaccine strain of duck origin.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Kye, S J; Lee, H J; Gaikwad, S; Lee, H S; Jung, S C; Choi, K S

    2016-04-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain NDRL0901 was developed as a live vaccine candidate for control of Newcastle disease. NDV isolate KR/duck/13/07 (DK1307) of duck origin was used as the selected vaccine strain. DK1307 was passaged 6 times in chickens. Then a single clone from the chicken-adapted virus (DK1307C) was finally selected, and the vaccine strain was named NDRL0901. DK1307C and the clone NDRL0901 viruses showed enhanced immunogenicity compared to the DK1307 virus. Principal component analysis based on fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase genes revealed the codon usage pattern in the dataset is distinct separating duck viral sequences and avian sequences, and passage of the duck origin virus into the chicken host causes deviation in the codon usage pattern. The NDRL0901 virus was avirulent and did not acquire viral virulence even after 7 back passages in chickens. When day-old chicks were vaccinated with the NDRL0901 virus via spray, eye drops, and drinking water, the vaccinated birds showed no clinical signs and had significant protection efficacy (>80%) against very virulent NDV (Kr005 strain) infection regardless of the administration route employed. The results indicate that the NDRL0901 strain is safe in chickens and can offer protective immunity.

  15. The duck genome and transcriptome provide insight into an avian influenza virus reservoir species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hualan; Zhang, Yong; Qian, Wubin; Kim, Heebal; Gan, Shangquan; Zhao, Yiqiang; Li, Jianwen; Yi, Kang; Feng, Huapeng; Zhu, Pengyang; Li, Bo; Liu, Qiuyue; Fairley, Suan; Magor, Katharine E; Du, Zhenlin; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Goodman, Laurie; Tafer, Hakim; Vignal, Alain; Lee, Taeheon; Kim, Kyu-Won; Sheng, Zheya; An, Yang; Searle, Steve; Herrero, Javier; Groenen, Martien A M; Crooijmans, Richard P M A; Faraut, Thomas; Cai, Qingle; Webster, Robert G; Aldridge, Jerry R; Warren, Wesley C; Bartschat, Sebastian; Kehr, Stephanie; Marz, Manja; Stadler, Peter F; Smith, Jacqueline; Kraus, Robert H S; Zhao, Yaofeng; Ren, Liming; Fei, Jing; Morisson, Mireille; Kaiser, Pete; Griffin, Darren K; Rao, Man; Pitel, Frederique; Wang, Jun; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The duck (Anas platyrhynchos) is one of the principal natural hosts of influenza A viruses. We present the duck genome sequence and perform deep transcriptome analyses to investigate immune-related genes. Our data indicate that the duck possesses a contractive immune gene repertoire, as in chicken and zebra finch, and this repertoire has been shaped through lineage-specific duplications. We identify genes that are responsive to influenza A viruses using the lung transcriptomes of control ducks and ones that were infected with either a highly pathogenic (A/duck/Hubei/49/05) or a weakly pathogenic (A/goose/Hubei/65/05) H5N1 virus. Further, we show how the duck’s defense mechanisms against influenza infection have been optimized through the diversification of its β-defensin and butyrophilin-like repertoires. These analyses, in combination with the genomic and transcriptomic data, provide a resource for characterizing the interaction between host and influenza viruses. PMID:23749191

  16. Effect of species, breed and route of virus inoculation on the pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses continue to be a threat to poultry in many regions of the world. Domestic ducks have been recognized as one of the primary factors in the spread of H5N1 HPAI. In this study we examined the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in different species and breeds of domestic ducks and the effect of route of virus inoculation on the outcome of infection. We determined that the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses varies between the two common farmed duck species, with Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata) presenting more severe disease than various breeds of Anas platyrhynchos var. domestica ducks including Pekin, Mallard-type, Black Runners, Rouen, and Khaki Campbell ducks. We also found that Pekin and Muscovy ducks inoculated with two H5N1 HPAI viruses of different virulence, given by any one of three routes (intranasal, intracloacal, or intraocular), became infected with the viruses. Regardless of the route of inoculation, the outcome of infection was similar for each species but depended on the virulence of the virus used. Muscovy ducks showed more severe clinical signs and higher mortality than the Pekin ducks. In conclusion, domestic ducks are susceptible to H5N1 HPAI virus infection by different routes of exposure, but the presentation of the disease varied by virus strain and duck species. This information helps support the planning and implementation of H5N1 HPAI surveillance and control measures in countries with large domestic duck populations. PMID:23876184

  17. Effect of species, breed and route of virus inoculation on the pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks.

    PubMed

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Swayne, David E; Smith, Diane; Shepherd, Eric

    2013-07-22

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses continue to be a threat to poultry in many regions of the world. Domestic ducks have been recognized as one of the primary factors in the spread of H5N1 HPAI. In this study we examined the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in different species and breeds of domestic ducks and the effect of route of virus inoculation on the outcome of infection. We determined that the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses varies between the two common farmed duck species, with Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata) presenting more severe disease than various breeds of Anas platyrhynchos var. domestica ducks including Pekin, Mallard-type, Black Runners, Rouen, and Khaki Campbell ducks. We also found that Pekin and Muscovy ducks inoculated with two H5N1 HPAI viruses of different virulence, given by any one of three routes (intranasal, intracloacal, or intraocular), became infected with the viruses. Regardless of the route of inoculation, the outcome of infection was similar for each species but depended on the virulence of the virus used. Muscovy ducks showed more severe clinical signs and higher mortality than the Pekin ducks. In conclusion, domestic ducks are susceptible to H5N1 HPAI virus infection by different routes of exposure, but the presentation of the disease varied by virus strain and duck species. This information helps support the planning and implementation of H5N1 HPAI surveillance and control measures in countries with large domestic duck populations.

  18. Susceptibility of wood ducks to H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin D; Stallknecht, David E; Valeika, Steve; Swayne, David E

    2007-10-01

    Since 2002, H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have caused mortality in numerous species of wild birds; this is atypical for avian influenza virus (AIV) infections in these avian species, especially for species within the order Anseriformes. Although these infections document the susceptibility of wild birds to H5N1 HPAI viruses and the spillover of these viruses from infected domestic birds to wild birds, it is unknown whether H5N1 HPAI viruses can persist in free-living avian populations. In a previous study, we established that wood ducks (Aix sponsa) are highly susceptible to infection with H5N1 HPAI viruses. To quantify this susceptibility and further evaluate the likelihood of H5N1 HPAI viral maintenance in a wild bird population, we determined the concentration of virus required to produce infection in wood ducks. To accomplish this, 25 wood ducks were inoculated intranasally at 12-16 wk of age with decreasing concentrations of a H5N1 HPAI virus (A/Whooper Swan/Mongolia/244/05 [H5N1]). The median infectious dose and the lethal dose of H5N1 HPAI virus in wood ducks were very low (10(0.95) and 10(1.71) median embryo infectious dose [EID(50)]/ml, respectively) and less than that of chickens (10(2.80) and 10(2.80) EID(50)/ml). These results confirm that wood ducks are highly susceptible to infection with H5N1 HPAI virus. The data from this study, combined with what is known experimentally about H5N1 HPAI virus infection in wood ducks and viral persistence in aquatic environments, suggest that the wood duck would represent a sensitive indicator species for H5N1 HPAI. Results also suggest that the potential for decreased transmission efficiency associated with reduced viral shedding (especially from the cloaca) and a loss of environmental fitness (in water), may be offset by the ability of this virus to be transmitted through a very low infectious dose.

  19. Antiviral efficacy against hepatitis B virus replication of oleuropein isolated from Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guiqin; Yin, Zhifeng; Dong, Junxing

    2009-09-07

    Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum (JOG) is a folk medicine used for the treatment of hepatitis in south of China. Phytochemical studies showed that secoiridoid glycosides are the typical constituents of this plant. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of oleuropein (Ole) derived from the flowers of JOG on hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication in HepG2 2.2.15 cell line in vitro and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) replication in ducklings in vivo. The extracellular hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) concentrations in cell culture medium were determined by ELISA. DHBV in duck serum was analyzed by dot blot. Ole blocks effectively HBsAg secretion in HepG2 2.2.15 cells in a dose-dependent manner (IC(50)=23.2 microg/ml). Ole (80 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, twice daily) also reduced viremia in DHBV-infected ducks. Ole therefore warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for HBV infection.

  20. Experimental co-infections of domestic ducks with a virulent Newcastle disease virus and low or highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Miller, Patti J.; Afonso, Claudio L.; Spackman, Erica; Kapczynski, Darrell; Shepherd, Eric; Smith, Diane; Swayne, David

    2015-01-01

    Infections with avian influenza viruses (AIV) of low and high pathogenicity (LP and HP) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are commonly reported in domestic ducks in many parts of the world. However, it’s not clear if co-infections with these viruses affect the severity of the diseases they produce, the amount of virus shed, and transmission of the viruses. In this study we infected domestic ducks with a virulent NDV virus (vNDV) and either a LPAIV or a HPAIV by giving the viruses individually, simultaneously, or sequentially two days apart. No clinical signs were observed in ducks infected or co-infected with vNDV and LPAIV, but co-infection decreased the number of ducks shedding vNDV and the amount of virus shed (P <0.01) at 4 days post inoculation (dpi). Co-infection didn’t affect the number of birds shedding LPAIV, but more LPAIV was shed at 2 dpi (P <0.0001) from ducks inoculated with only LPAIV compared to ducks co-infected with vNDV. Ducks that received the HPAIV with the vNDV simultaneously survived fewer days (P <0.05) compared to the ducks that received the vNDV two days before the HPAIV. Co-infection also reduced transmission of vNDV to naïve contact ducks housed with the inoculated ducks. In conclusion, domestic ducks can become co-infected with vNDV and LPAIV with no effect on clinical signs but with reduction of virus shedding and transmission. These findings indicate that infection with one virus can interfere with replication of another, modifying the pathogenesis and transmission of the viruses. PMID:25759292

  1. Experimental co-infections of domestic ducks with a virulent Newcastle disease virus and low or highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L; Spackman, Erica; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Shepherd, Eric; Smith, Diane; Swayne, David E

    2015-05-15

    Infections with avian influenza viruses (AIV) of low and high pathogenicity (LP and HP) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are commonly reported in domestic ducks in many parts of the world. However, it is not clear if co-infections with these viruses affect the severity of the diseases they produce, the amount of virus shed, and transmission of the viruses. In this study we infected domestic ducks with a virulent NDV virus (vNDV) and either a LPAIV or a HPAIV by giving the viruses individually, simultaneously, or sequentially two days apart. No clinical signs were observed in ducks infected or co-infected with vNDV and LPAIV, but co-infection decreased the number of ducks shedding vNDV and the amount of virus shed (P<0.01) at 4 days post inoculation (dpi). Co-infection did not affect the number of birds shedding LPAIV, but more LPAIV was shed at 2 dpi (P<0.0001) from ducks inoculated with only LPAIV compared to ducks co-infected with vNDV. Ducks that received the HPAIV with the vNDV simultaneously survived fewer days (P<0.05) compared to the ducks that received the vNDV two days before the HPAIV. Co-infection also reduced transmission of vNDV to naïve contact ducks housed with the inoculated ducks. In conclusion, domestic ducks can become co-infected with vNDV and LPAIV with no effect on clinical signs but with reduction of virus shedding and transmission. These findings indicate that infection with one virus can interfere with replication of another, modifying the pathogenesis and transmission of the viruses. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. An infectious full-length cDNA clone of duck Tembusu virus, a newly emerging flavivirus causing duck egg drop syndrome in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Zhang, Lijiao; Wang, Yongyue; Wang, Shuxia; Sun, Haigang; Su, Wenliang; He, Weiyong; Han, Bo; Su, Jingliang

    2013-01-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a recently identified pathogenic flavivirus that causes severe egg drop and encephalitis in Chinese ducks and geese. It has been found to be most closely related to the mosquito-origin Tembusu virus and chicken Sitiawan virus reported in Malaysia. However, the ecological characteristics and the pathogenesis of duck TMUV are largely unknown. We report the construction of full-length cDNA clone of duck TMUV strain JXSP. The virus genome was reverse transcribed, amplified as seven overlapping fragments and successively ligated into the low copy number vector pWSK29 under the control of a T7 promoter. Transfection of BHK-21 cells with the transcribed RNA from the full-length cDNA clone resulted in production of highly infectious progeny virus. In vitro growth characteristics in BHK-21 cells and virulence in ducklings and BALB/c mice were similar for the rescued and parental viruses. This stable infectious cDNA clone will be a valuable tool for studying the genetic determinants of duck TMUV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Reassortant influenza A viruses in wild duck populations: effects on viral shedding and persistence in water.

    PubMed

    Lebarbenchon, Camille; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Lefèvre, Thierry; Yang, My; Ramakrishnan, Muthannan A; Brown, Justin D; Stallknecht, David E

    2012-10-07

    Wild ducks of the genus Anas represent the natural hosts for a large genetic diversity of influenza A viruses. In these hosts, co-infections with different virus genotypes are frequent and result in high rates of genetic reassortment. Recent genomic data have provided information regarding the pattern and frequency of these reassortant viruses in duck populations; however, potential consequences on viral shedding and maintenance in the environment have not been investigated. On the basis of full-genome sequencing, we identified five virus genotypes, in a wild duck population in northwestern Minnesota (USA), that naturally arose from genetic reassortments. We investigated the effects of influenza A virus genotype on the viral shedding pattern in Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and the duration of infectivity in water, under different temperature regimens. Overall, we found that variation in the viral genome composition of these isolates had limited effects on duration, extent and pattern of viral shedding, as well as on the reduction of infectivity in water over time. These results support that, in wild ducks, functionally equivalent gene segments could be maintained in virus populations with no fitness costs when genetic reassortments occur.

  4. Hepatic metabolism of glucose and linoleic acid varies in relation to susceptibility to fatty liver in ad libitum-fed Muscovy and Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Saez, Gladys; Baéza, Elisabeth; Davail, Stéphane; Durand, Denys; Bauchart, Dominique; Gruffat, Dominique

    2009-02-01

    The susceptibility to develop hepatic steatosis is known to differ between duck species, especially between Muscovy and Pekin ducks. This difference could be explained by either differential responses of species to overfeeding or genetic differences in hepatic lipid metabolism. The aim of the present study was to compare the intensities of the different hepatic pathways (oxidation, lipogenesis, esterification, secretion, etc.) of the two main nutrients (glucose and linoleic acid (LA)) reaching the liver of ad libitum-fed Muscovy (n 6) and Pekin (n 6) ducks using the ex vivo method of liver slices incubated for 16 h with [U-14C]glucose, [1-14C]LA and [35S]methionine added to the survival medium. In such experimental conditions, the lipogenesis pathway from glucose was 2-fold higher (P<0.05) in the liver of the Muscovy duck than in that of the Pekin duck. Furthermore, the hepatic uptake of LA was 2-fold higher (P<0.05) in the Muscovy duck than in the Pekin duck leading to a 2-fold higher (P<0.05) esterification of this fatty acid in the liver of the Muscovy duck. The hepatic secretion of VLDL was higher (P<0.01) in the Muscovy duck than in the Pekin duck but insufficient to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver of the Muscovy duck. In conclusion, these results show the influence of the species on the hepatic metabolism of ducks in relation to their susceptibility to develop fatty liver. These results should shed light on the metabolic regulations that might underlie susceptibility to hepatic steatosis in the the human liver.

  5. Wild ducks as long-distance vectors of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1).

    PubMed

    Keawcharoen, Juthatip; van Riel, Debby; van Amerongen, Geert; Bestebroer, Theo; Beyer, Walter E; van Lavieren, Rob; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Kuiken, Thijs

    2008-04-01

    Wild birds have been implicated in the expansion of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) outbreaks across Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Africa (in addition to traditional transmission by infected poultry, contaminated equipment, and people). Such a role would require wild birds to excrete virus in the absence of debilitating disease. By experimentally infecting wild ducks, we found that tufted ducks, Eurasian pochards, and mallards excreted significantly more virus than common teals, Eurasian wigeons, and gadwalls; yet only tufted ducks and, to a lesser degree, pochards became ill or died. These findings suggest that some wild duck species, particularly mallards, can potentially be long-distance vectors of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) and that others, particularly tufted ducks, are more likely to act as sentinels.

  6. Wild Ducks as Long-Distance Vectors of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1)

    PubMed Central

    Keawcharoen, Juthatip; van Riel, Debby; van Amerongen, Geert; Bestebroer, Theo; Beyer, Walter E.; van Lavieren, Rob; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Fouchier, Ron A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Wild birds have been implicated in the expansion of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) outbreaks across Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Africa (in addition to traditional transmission by infected poultry, contaminated equipment, and people). Such a role would require wild birds to excrete virus in the absence of debilitating disease. By experimentally infecting wild ducks, we found that tufted ducks, Eurasian pochards, and mallards excreted significantly more virus than common teals, Eurasian wigeons, and gadwalls; yet only tufted ducks and, to a lesser degree, pochards became ill or died. These findings suggest that some wild duck species, particularly mallards, can potentially be long-distance vectors of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) and that others, particularly tufted ducks, are more likely to act as sentinels. PMID:18394278

  7. Origin of hepatitis δ virus

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John; Pelchat, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses some of the questions relating to how hepatitis δ virus (HDV), an agent so far unique in the animal world, might have arisen. HDV was discovered in patients infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). It generally makes HBV infections more damaging to the liver. It is a subviral satellite agent that depends upon HBV envelope proteins for its assembly and ability to infect new cells. In other aspects of replication, HDV is both independent of and very different from HBV. In addition, the small single-stranded circular RNA genome of HDV, and its mechanism of replication, demonstrate an increasing number of similarities to the viroids – a large family of helper-independent subviral agents that cause pathogenesis in plants. PMID:20210550

  8. Tropism and infectivity of duck-derived egg drop syndrome virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min; Cha, Se-Yeoun; Jang, Hyung-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    Egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) can markedly decrease egg production in laying hens. Duck is the natural host of EDSV. EDSV derived from ducks abrogate egg drop in laying hens. We have previously confirmed that duck-derived EDSVs have a variety of replication activities in chick embryo liver (CEL) cells. However, it is currently unclear whether duck-derived EDSV could display tropism and adaptation in laying hens. This study assessed whether duck-derived EDSV can adapt to laying hens, and estimated the inducing factors. Complete genome sequences of duck-derived EDSVs (D11-JW-012, D11-JW-017, and D11-JW-032 isolates) with various replication efficiency in CEL cells and C10-GY-001 isolate causing disease in laying hens were analyzed to find their differences. Phylogenetic analysis of complete genome sequence revealed that C10-GY-001, D11-JW-032, and strain 127 virus as vaccine were clustered into the same group, with D11-JW-012 and D11-JW-017 clustered in another group. Comparison between D11-JW-012 isolate that poorly replicated and D11-JW-017 isolate that replicated well in CEL cells in same cluster revealed six amino acid differences on IVa2, DNA polymerase, endopeptidase, and DNA-binding protein. These amino acids might be key candidates enhancing cellular tropism in chicken. When the pathogenicities of these isolates in laying hens were compared, D11-JW-032 showed severe signs similar to 127 virus, D11-JW-017 showed intermediate signs, while D11-JW-012 showed almost no sign. Eleven amino acids differed between D11-JW-032 and D11-JW-017, and 17 amino acids were different between D11-JW-032 and D11-JW-012. These results suggest that EDSVs derived from ducks have various pathogenicities in laying hens. Key amino acid candidates might have altered their affinity to tropism of laying hens, causing difference pathogenicities.

  9. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Subgenotype 1b Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated from Sansui Sheldrake Ducks in Guizhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Ji, Xinqin; Zhao, Jiafu; Xu, Houqiang; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Xiufan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two Newcastle disease viruses, Sheldrake duck/China/Guizhou/01/2016 and Sheldrake duck/China/Guizhou/02/2016, isolated from Sansui Sheldrake ducks in Guizhou Province, China. The genome of the isolates is 15,198 nucleotides in length. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates are clustered into subgenotype 1b in class I. PMID:27932647

  10. Protective effects of recombinant glycoprotein D based prime boost approach against duck enteritis virus in mice model.

    PubMed

    Aravind, S; Kamble, Nitin Machindra; Gaikwad, Satish S; Shukla, Sanjeev Kumar; Saravanan, R; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan

    2015-11-01

    Duck virus enteritis, also known as duck plague, is an acute herpes viral infection of ducks caused by duck enteritis virus (DEV). The method of repeated immunization with a live attenuated vaccine has been used for the prevention and control of duck enteritis virus (DEV). However, the incidence of the disease in vaccinated flocks and latency reactivation are the major constraints in the present vaccination programme. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy afforded by intramuscular inoculation of plasmid DNA encoding DEV glycoprotein D (pCDNA-gD) followed by DEV gD expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisia (rgD) was assessed in a murine model. Compared with mice inoculated with DNA (pCDNA-gD) or protein (rgD) only, mice inoculated with the combination of gD DNA and protein had enhanced ELISA antibody titers to DEV and had accelerated clearance of virus following challenge infection. Furthermore, the highest levels of lymphocyte proliferation response, IL-4, IL-12 and IFN-γ production were induced following priming with the DNA vaccine and boosting with the rgD protein. For instance, the specially designed recombinant DEV vector vaccine would be the best choice to use in ducks. It offers an excellent solution to the low vaccination coverage rate in ducks. We expect that the application of this novel vaccine in the near future will greatly decrease the virus load in the environment and reduce outbreaks of DEV in ducks.

  11. Occult hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Sun; Kim, Yoon Jun

    2014-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) refers to the presence of HBV DNA in the absence of detectable hepatitis B surface antigen. Since OBI was first described in the late 1970s, there has been increasing interest in this topic. The prevalence of OBI varies according to the different endemicity of HBV infection, cohort characteristics, and sensitivity and specificity of the methods used for detection. Although the exact mechanism of OBI has not been proved, intra-hepatic persistence of viral covalently closed circular DNA under the host’s strong immune suppression of HBV replication and gene expression seems to be a cause. OBI has important clinical significance in several conditions. First, OBI can be transmitted through transfusion, organ transplantation including orthotopic liver transplantation, or hemodialysis. Donor screening before blood transfusion, prophylaxis for high-risk organ transplantation recipients, and dialysis-specific infection-control programs should be considered to reduce the risk of transmission. Second, OBI may reactivate and cause acute hepatitis in immunocompromised patients or those receiving chemotherapy. Close HBV DNA monitoring and timely antiviral treatment can prevent HBV reactivation and consequent clinical deterioration. Third, OBI may contribute to the progression of hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease including hepatitis C. Finally, OBI seems to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma by its direct proto-oncogenic effect and by indirectly causing persistent hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. However, this needs further investigation. We review published reports in the literature to gain an overview of the status of OBI and emphasize the clinical importance of OBI. PMID:25544873

  12. Role of domestic ducks in the propagation and biological evolution of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Hulse-Post, D. J.; Sturm-Ramirez, K. M.; Humberd, J.; Seiler, P.; Govorkova, E. A.; Krauss, S.; Scholtissek, C.; Puthavathana, P.; Buranathai, C.; Nguyen, T. D.; Long, H. T.; Naipospos, T. S. P.; Chen, H.; Ellis, T. M.; Guan, Y.; Peiris, J. S. M.; Webster, R. G.

    2005-01-01

    Wild waterfowl, including ducks, are natural hosts of influenza A viruses. These viruses rarely caused disease in ducks until 2002, when some H5N1 strains became highly pathogenic. Here we show that these H5N1 viruses are reverting to nonpathogenicity in ducks. Ducks experimentally infected with viruses isolated between 2003 and 2004 shed virus for an extended time (up to 17 days), during which variant viruses with low pathogenicity were selected. These results suggest that the duck has become the “Trojan horse” of Asian H5N1 influenza viruses. The ducks that are unaffected by infection with these viruses continue to circulate these viruses, presenting a pandemic threat. PMID:16030144

  13. [Newly discovered hepatitis viruses--do they cause hepatitis indeed?].

    PubMed

    Takács, Mária; Lengyel, Anna; Dencs, Agnes; Berencsi, György

    2003-08-10

    The paper reviews the available information on the newly discovered viruses originally supposed to cause post-transfusion hepatitis. GBV-C/Hepatitis G virus belongs to the Flaviviridae family, and can be transmitted parenterally like Hepatitis C virus. Its role in causing hepatitis or other diseases has not been proved yet. The other newly discovered viruses contain single-stranded circular DNA, with a wide range of sequence divergence. These viruses can be transmitted not only with blood and blood products but via fecal-oral route as well. They are unique among enterally transmitted viruses in the sense that the virus persists for years in the human body, therefore their genomes may be detected in the blood of the healthy population in high percentage. One of the genotypes of TTV is suspected to cause hepatitis. High TT virus load was found as an independent factor associated with the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma among patients with hepatitis C virus-related chronic liver disease. It is not clear yet, whether TTV-like minivirus and SEN virus cause any illnesses.

  14. Precursor genes of future pandemic influenza viruses are perpetuated in ducks nesting in Siberia.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, K; Takada, A; Ito, T; Imai, M; Takakuwa, H; Hatta, M; Ozaki, H; Tanizaki, T; Nagano, T; Ninomiya, A; Demenev, V A; Tyaptirganov, M M; Karatayeva, T D; Yamnikova, S S; Lvov, D K; Kida, H

    2000-01-01

    Influenza A viruses of different subtypes were isolated from fecal samples of ducks in their nesting areas in Siberia in summer from 1996 to 1998. Phylogenetic analysis of the NP genes of the isolates in Siberia and those in Hokkaido, Japan on their flyway of migration from Siberia to the south in autumn revealed that they belong to the Eurasian lineage of avian influenza viruses. It is noted that the genes of the isolates in Siberia are closely related to those of H5N1 influenza virus strains isolated from chickens and humans in Hong Kong in 1997 as well as to those of isolates from domestic birds in southern China. The results indicate that influenza viruses perpetuated in ducks nesting in Siberia should have contributed genes in the emergence of the H5N1 virus in Hong Kong. Vaccine prepared from avirulent A/duck/Hokkaido/4/96 (H5N3) influenza virus was potent enough to protect mice from challenge with lethal dose of the pathogenic H5N1 virus [19]. Intensive surveillance study of aquatic birds especially in Siberia is, therefore, stressed to provide information on the future pandemic influenza virus strains and for vaccine preparation.

  15. Viroids and hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Serra, Pedro

    2012-08-01

    There is a subviral world, whose most prominent representatives are viroids. Despite being solely composed by a circular, highly structured RNA of ~250 to 400 nucleotides without protein-coding ability (all viruses code for one or more proteins), viroids can infect and incite specific diseases in higher plants. The RNA of human hepatitis delta virus (HDV), the smallest genome of an animal virus, displays striking similarities with viroids: It is circular, folds into a rodlike secondary structure, and replicates through a rolling-circle mechanism catalyzed by host enzymes and cis-acting ribozymes. However, HDV RNA is larger (~1700 nucleotides), encodes a protein in its antigenomic polarity (the ∂ antigen), and depends for transmission on hepatitis B virus. The presence of ribozymes in some viroids and in HDV RNA, along with their structural simplicity, makes them candidates for being molecular fossils of the RNA world that presumably preceded our extant world based on DNA and proteins. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Xenotransplantation and Hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using pig cells, tissues and organs may be associated with the transmission of porcine microorganisms to the human recipient. Some of these microorganisms may induce a zoonosis, that is an infectious disease induced by microorganisms transmitted from another species. With exception of the porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs), which are integrated in the genome of all pigs, the transmission of all other microorganisms can be prevented by specified or designated pathogen-free (spf or dpf, respectively) production of the animals. However, it is becoming clear in the last years that the hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the viruses which are difficult to eliminate. It is important to note that there are differences between HEV of genotypes (gt) 1 and gt2 on one hand and HEV of gt3 and gt4 on the other. HEV gt1 and gt2 are human viruses, and they induce hepatitis and in the worst case fatal infections in pregnant women. In contrast, HEV gt3 and gt4 are viruses of pigs, and they may infect humans, induce commonly only mild diseases, if any, and are harmless for pregnant women. The goal of this review was to evaluate the risk posed by HEV gt3 and gt4 for xenotransplantation and to indicate ways of their elimination from pigs in order to prevent transmission to the human recipient.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships and pathogenicity variation of two Newcastle disease viruses isolated from domestic ducks in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yinfeng; Li, Yanling; Yuan, Runyu; Li, Xianwei; Sun, Minhua; Wang, Zhaoxiong; Feng, Minsha; Jiao, Peirong; Ren, Tao

    2014-08-12

    Newcastle disease (ND) is an OIE listed disease caused by virulent avian paramyxovirus type 1 (APMV-1) strains, which is enzootic and causes large economic losses in the poultry sector. Genotype VII and genotype IX NDV viruses were the predominant circulating genotype in China, which may possibly be responsible for disease outbreaks in chicken flocks in recent years. While ducks and geese usually have exhibited inapparent infections. In the present study, we investigate the complete genome sequence, the clinicopathological characterization and transmission of two virulent Newcastle disease viruses, SS-10 and NH-10, isolated from domestic ducks in Southern China in 2010. F, and the complete gene sequences based on phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that SS-10 (genotype VII) and NH-10 (genotype IX) belongs to class II. The deduced amino acid sequence was (112)R-R-Q-K/R-R-F(117) at the fusion protein cleavage site. Animal experiment results showed that the SS-10 virus isolated from ducks was highly pathogenic for chickens and geese, but low pathogenic for ducks. It could be detected from spleen, lung, kidney, trachea, small intestine, bursa of fabricius, thymus, pancreas and cecal tonsils, oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs, and could transmit to the naive contact birds. Moreover, it could transmit to chickens, ducks and geese by naive contact. However, the NH-10 virus isolated from ducks could infect some chickens, ducks and geese, but only caused chickens to die. Additionally, it could transmit to the naive contact chickens, ducks, and geese. The two NDV isolates exhibited different biological properties with respect to pathogenicity and transmission in chickens, ducks and geese. Therefore, no species-preference exists for chicken, duck or goose viruses and more attention should be paid to the trans-species transmission of VII NDVs between ducks, geese and chickens for the control and eradication of ND.

  18. Development and evaluation of an immunochromatographic strip test based on the recombinant UL51 protein for detecting antibody against duck enteritis virus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Duck enteritis virus (DEV) infection causes substantial economic losses to the worldwide duck-producing areas. The monitoring of DEV-specific antibodies is a key to evaluate the effect of DEV vaccine and develop rational immunization programs. Thus, in this study, an immunochromatographic strip (ICS) test was developed for detecting DEV serum antibodies. Results The ICS test is based on membrane chromatography, and uses both the purified recombinant UL51 protein conjugated with colloidal gold and goat anti-rabbit IgG conjugated with colloidal gold as tracers, the purified recombinant UL51 protein as the capture reagent at the test line, and rabbit IgG as the capture reagent at the control line. The specificity of the ICS was evaluated by sera against DEV, Duck hepatitis virus (DHV), Riemerella anatipestifer (RA), Duck E. coli, Muscovy duck parvovirus (MPV), or Duck Influenza viruses (DIV). Only sera against DEV showed the strong positive results. In order to determine the sensitivity of the ICS, anti-DEV serum diluted serially was tested, and the minimum detection limit of 1:128 was obtained. The ICS components, which are provided in a sealed package, require no refrigeration and are stable for 12 months. To evaluate the effect of the ICS, 110 duck serum samples collected from several non-immune duck flocks were simultaneously tested by the ICS test, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization test (NT). The results showed that the sensitivity of the ICS test was almost consistent with ELISA and much higher than NT, has low cost, and is rapid (15 min) and easy to perform with no requirement of specialized equipment, reagent or technicians. Conclusions In this work, we successfully developed a simple and rapid ICS test for detecting DEV serum antibodies for the first time. The ICS test was high specific and sensitive for the rapid detection of anti-DEV antibodies, and has great potential to be used for the serological surveillance of DEV

  19. Development and application of an indirect immunoperoxidase assay for the detection of Duck swollen head hemorrhagic disease virus antigen in Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanfeng; Shen, Chanjuan; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Zhang, Na; Zhou, Yi; Zhu, Dekang; Jia, Renyong; Luo, Qihui; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2010-01-01

    An improved indirect immunoperoxidase assay (IPA) was developed to detect antigens of Duck swollen head hemorrhagic disease virus (DSHDV) in paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). This technique used an indirect streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase labeling system with polyclonal antiserum developed against purified DSHDV antigens. Specimens from the experimentally inoculated Pekin ducks with DSHDV and archived paraffin-embedded tissues from natural cases of Duck viral swollen head hemorrhagic disease (DVSHD) were examined by clinical and histological criteria. Positive staining was most widely observed in the cytoplasm of the following organs: immune, digestive, and urinary organs, heart, lung, and trachea, which corresponded to the intracellular distribution of reovirus. The DSHDV antigens were first detected at 4 hr postinoculation in the bursa of Fabricius of infected ducks. Therefore, this method was suitable for the early diagnosis of DVSHD. Immunoperoxidase staining was not present in tissues and organs of sham-inoculated ducks (negative control). The IPA developed in the current study is a convenient, sensitive, and specific means of detecting DSHDV and is applicable to routine diagnosis, retrospective studies, and prospective studies of DSHDV infection in ducks.

  20. Quantitative transmission characteristics of different H5 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in Muscovy ducks.

    PubMed

    Niqueux, Éric; Picault, Jean-Paul; Amelot, Michel; Allée, Chantal; Lamandé, Josiane; Guillemoto, Carole; Pierre, Isabelle; Massin, Pascale; Blot, Guillaume; Briand, François-Xavier; Rose, Nicolas; Jestin, Véronique

    2014-01-10

    EU annual serosurveillance programs show that domestic duck flocks have the highest seroprevalence of H5 antibodies, demonstrating the circulation of notifiable avian influenza virus (AIV) according to OIE, likely low pathogenic (LP). Therefore, transmission characteristics of LPAIV within these flocks can help to understand virus circulation and possible risk of propagation. This study aimed at estimating transmission parameters of four H5 LPAIV (three field strains from French poultry and decoy ducks, and one clonal reverse-genetics strain derived from one of the former), using a SIR model to analyze data from experimental infections in SPF Muscovy ducks. The design was set up to accommodate rearing on wood shavings with a low density of 1.6 ducks/m(2): 10 inoculated ducks were housed together with 15 contact-exposed ducks. Infection was monitored by RNA detection on oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs using real-time RT-PCR with a cutoff corresponding to 2-7 EID50. Depending on the strain, the basic reproduction number (R0) varied from 5.5 to 42.7, confirming LPAIV could easily be transmitted to susceptible Muscovy ducks. The lowest R0 estimate was obtained for a H5N3 field strain, due to lower values of transmission rate and duration of infectious period, whereas reverse-genetics derived H5N1 strain had the highest R0. Frequency and intensity of clinical signs were also variable between strains, but apparently not associated with longer infectious periods. Further comparisons of quantitative transmission parameters may help to identify relevant viral genetic markers for early detection of potentially more virulent strains during surveillance of LPAIV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Trade patterns facilitating highly pathogenic avian influenza virus dissemination in the free-grazing layer duck system in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A; Dinh, T X; Han, T A; Do, D V; Nhu, T V; Pham, L T; Nguyen, T T T; Newman, S; Häsler, B; Pfeiffer, D U; Vergne, T

    2017-08-16

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses continue to threaten smallholder poultry producers in several South-east Asian countries, including Vietnam. In particular, the free-grazing duck system has been repeatedly highlighted as a major risk factor for HPAI outbreaks. Free-grazing ducks, which scavenge on rice paddies after the harvest, account for a large proportion of the duck population in Vietnam and the wider South-east Asian region. However, the structure and dynamics of the free-grazing duck production from farm to consumption has not been described for Vietnam. In this study, we used a value chain approach to provide a complete picture of the actors involved in the production and marketing of free-grazing duck eggs and spent layer ducks, as well as to investigate the governance structure of this food system. Group interviews and key informant interviews were conducted in two provinces located in the Mekong River Delta (MRD) and the Red River Delta (RRD). The results presented here highlight similarities and differences in farming and trade practices between the two provinces. The trade of spent layer ducks involved large volumes of live ducks being sent to China and Cambodia for consumption, generating a substantial risk of transboundary spread of pathogens, including HPAI viruses. We describe the major role of "duck yards", which act as hubs in the northbound trade of spent layer ducks. These yards should be considered as essential links in the value chain of spent layer ducks when considering HPAI surveillance and control. The veterinary authorities are only marginally involved in the value chain activities, and their influence could be strengthened by increasing surveillance activities for instance in duck yards. Last, we discuss the dynamics of the duck value chain and further implications for future HPAI management policies. © 2017 The Authors. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Genome Sequence of a Virulent Genotype III Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from Laying Ducks in China

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Guoyuan; Wang, Min; Wang, Honglin; Li, Lintao; Luo, Qingping; Zhang, Tengfei

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain HN1007, isolated from diseased duck flocks in Henan, China, in 2010. The isolate has a genome length of 15,186 nucleotides, and was classified as a member of genotype III of class II. PMID:28034854

  3. Cytokine Signatures Discriminate Highly Frequent Acute Hepatitis a Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Coinfections from Monoinfections in Mexican Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Realpe-Quintero, Mauricio; Copado-Villagrana, Edgar Daniel; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge Luis; Alvarez, Angel Hilario; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora Alma

    2017-07-01

    The frequency of hepatitis A virus and hepatitis E virus infections and their cytokine profiles were analyzed in Mexican pediatric patients with acute hepatitis. A high frequency of coinfections was found. Significant overexpression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-12, IL-13 and interferon-gamma during hepatitis A virus monoinfections and limited secretion of cytokines in hepatitis E virus infections were observed.

  4. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Newcastle Disease Virus Strains Isolated from a Wild Duck and a Pigeon in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Alikina, Tatyana Y.; Yurchenko, Kseniya S.; Glushchenko, Alexandra V.; Gunbin, Konstantin V.; Shestopalov, Alexander M.; Gubanova, Natalya V.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates, Adygea/duck/12/2008, from a wild duck in Russia, and Altai/pigeon/777/2010, from a pigeon in Russia. Based on comparative sequence analysis of the F gene, these strains were classified as NDV class II, genotypes VIId and VIb/2, respectively. PMID:27932648

  5. Complete genome sequence of a genotype XVII Newcastle disease virus, isolated from an apparently healthy domestic duck in Nigeria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) of genotype XVII is described here. A velogenic strain (duck/Nigeria/903/KUDU-113/1992) was isolated from an apparently healthy free-roaming domestic duck sampled in Kuru, Nigeria, in 1992. Phylogenetic analysis of the f...

  6. Influenza-A viruses in ducks in northwestern Minnesota: fine scale spatial and temporal variation in prevalence and subtype diversity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Waterfowl from northwestern Minnesota were sampled by cloacal swabbing for Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) from July – October in 2007 and 2008. AIV was detected in 222 (9.1%) of 2,441 ducks in 2007 and in 438 (17.9%) of 2,452 ducks in 2008. Prevalence of AIV peaked in late summer. We detected 27 A...

  7. Genetic parameters of product quality and hepatic metabolism in fattened mule ducks.

    PubMed

    Marie-Etancelin, C; Basso, B; Davail, S; Gontier, K; Fernandez, X; Vitezica, Z G; Bastianelli, D; Baéza, E; Bernadet, M-D; Guy, G; Brun, J-M; Legarra, A

    2011-03-01

    Genetic parameters of traits related to hepatic lipid metabolism, carcass composition, and product quality of overfed mule ducks were estimated on both parental lines of this hybrid: the common duck line for the maternal side and the Muscovy line for the paternal side. The originality of the statistical model was to include simultaneously the additive genetic effect of the common ducks and that of the Muscovy ducks, revealing a greater genetic determinism in common than in Muscovy. Plasma metabolic indicators (glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol contents) were heritable, in particular at the end of the overfeeding period, and heritabilities increased with the overfeeding stage. Carcass composition traits were highly heritable in the common line, with values ranging from 0.15 for liver weight, 0.21 for carcass weight, and 0.25 for abdominal fat weight to 0.32 for breast muscle weight. Heritabilities of technological outputs were greater for the fatty liver (0.19 and 0.08, respectively, on common and Muscovy sides for liver melting rate) than for the pectoralis major muscle (between 0.02 and 0.05 on both parental sides for cooking losses). Fortunately, the processing industry is mainly facing problems in liver quality, such as too high of a melting rate, than in meat quality. The meat quality appraisal criteria (such as texture and cooking losses), usually dependent on pH and the rate of decline of pH, were also very lowly heritable. This study demonstrated that genetic determinism of meat quality and ability of overfeeding is not similar in the common population and in the Muscovy population; traits related to fattening, muscle development, and BW have heritability values from 2 to 4 times greater on the common line than on the Muscovy line, which is relevant for considering different selection strategies.

  8. Hepatitis B virus taxonomy and hepatitis B virus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Stephan

    2007-01-07

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a member of the hepadnavirus family. Hepadnaviruses can be found in both mammals (orthohepadnaviruses) and birds (avihepadnaviruses). The genetic variability of HBV is very high. There are eight genotypes of HBV and three clades of HBV isolates from apes that appear to be additional genotypes of HBV. Most genotypes are now divided into subgenotypes with distinct virological and epidemiological properties. In addition, recombination among HBV genotypes increases the variability of HBV. This review summarises current knowledge of the epidemiology of genetic variability in hepadnaviruses and, due to rapid progress in the field, updates several recent reviews on HBV genotypes and subgenotypes.

  9. Hepatitis virus C infection, adipokines and hepatic steato-fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ciurtin, Coziana; Stoica, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C viral infection is accompanied by various serum alterations that could explain its molecular impact on hepatic structure and metabolic homeostasis. Recently it has been shown that adipocytokines play a pivotal role in development of hepatic steato-fibrosis, different studies giving a support of the hypothesis that the balance of adipocytokine expression is a key regulator for the progression of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. The association between insulin resistance and hepatitis C virus genotypes and liver fibrosis stage foreshadowed that virus-induced insulin resistance may be a mechanism for fibrogenesis in chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The main importance of adipocytokine profile detection consists in the prediction of steatosis induction that has clinical relevance, being associated with advanced fibrosis and hyporesponsiveness to antiviral therapy.

  10. [Hepatitis E virus].

    PubMed

    Izopet, Jacques; Lhomme, Sébastien; Abravanel, Florence; Roque, Anne-Marie; Kamar, Nassim

    2015-03-01

    HEV is a small non-enveloped RNA virus that is associated to lipids in the blood of infected individuals. The genera Orthohepevirus recently proposed includes the zoonotic mammals strains. The other strains of the family Hepeviridae are not transmissible to humans. The diagnosis of HEV infection should be considered in any patient with serum ALT elevation. The diagnosis of HEV infection in immunocompetent patients relies on detecting IgM antibodies in the blood. The diagnosis of HEV infection in immunosuppressed patients relies on detecting IgM antibodies and HEV RNA in the blood. Ribavirin inhibits HEV replication via a mechanism of action that is still unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a hepatitis B virus endemic in herons.

    PubMed

    Sprengel, R; Kaleta, E F; Will, H

    1988-10-01

    A new hepadnavirus (designated heron hepatitis B virus [HHBV]) has been isolated; this virus is endemic in grey herons (Ardea cinerea) in Germany and closely related to duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) by morphology of viral particles and size of the genome and of the major viral envelope and core proteins. Despite its striking similarities to DHBV, HHBV cannot be transmitted to ducks by infection or by transfection with cloned viral DNA. After the viral genome was cloned and sequenced, a comparative sequence analysis revealed an identical genome organization of HHBV and DHBV (pre-C/C-, pre-S/S-, and pol-ORFs). An open reading frame, designated X in mammalian hepadnaviruses, is not present in DHBV. DHBV and HHBV differ by 21.6% base exchanges, and thus they are less closely related than the two known rodent hepatitis B viruses (16.4%). The nucleocapsid protein and the 17-kilodalton envelope protein sequences of DHBV and HHBV are well conserved. In contrast, the pre-S part of the 34-kilodalton envelope protein which is believed to mediate virus attachment to the cell is highly divergent (less than 50% homology). The availability of two closely related avian hepadnaviruses will now allow us to test recombinant viruses in vivo and in vitro for host specificity-determining sequences.

  12. [Present data on influenza virus isolated from ducks and chickens, and influenza virus C. Anti-influenza drugs].

    PubMed

    Fernández del Campo, José Antonio Cabezas

    2004-01-01

    Present data on influenza virus isolated from ducks and chickens, and influenza virus C. Anti-influenza drugs. Within the broad field of Glycopathology and Glycotherapeutics, research on influenza virus types A, B and C from humans and several bird species (particularly migratory birds such as ducks, since they are reservoirs for viruses), as well as the search for improved drugs designed for the prevention or treatment of epidemics/pandemics produced by most of those viruses are issues of relevant interest not only from a scientific point of view but also for repercussions on health and the important economical consequences. The research work begun by the author and collaborators at the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Salamanca (Spain) in the middle of the 1970's, developed later in close cooperation with the "(Unité d'Ecologie Virale" of the Pasteur Institute of Paris (Prof. Claude Hannoun and collaborators), has been published in about twenty papers that mainly focus on the theoretic-experimental study of: The sialidase (neuraminidase) activity of human influenza viruses types A and B. The acetylesterase activity of type C virus from humans and dogs. The sialidase activity of type A virus from ducks and pigs, in comparison with that of humans. Certain sialidase inhibitors as useful anti-influenza drugs, especially in the case of possible future influenza pandemics of avian origin.

  13. Coinfection of hepatitis E virus and other hepatitis virus in Colombia and its genotypic characterization.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Dioselina; Martínez-Vargas, Daniel; Escalante-Mora, Martha; Palacios-Vivero, Mariel; Contreras-Gómez, Lady

    2015-12-04

    Hepatitis E virus has emerged as a public health problem, particularly in developing countries. The four genotypes identified in mammals include the G3 found in indigenous hepatitis in countries and regions with high porcine population, and the G1, associated with maternal deaths.  To determine coinfection by hepatitis E virus and the circulating genotypes in Colombia in 1,097 samples using serological markers for hepatitis A, B and C.  Serum samples of 1,097 patients from different regions of Colombia stored at the Laboratorio de Virología of the Instituto Nacional de Salud were selected to detect IgG and IgM anti-hepatitis E virus antibodies. The viral genomes of positive samples were amplified by RT-PCR, and the products were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed by comparing ORF2 sequences deposited in the GenBank.  IgG anti-hepatitis E virus antibodies were found in 278 samples, IgM in 62, and both markers in 64. Hepatitis E virus and hepatitis A virus coinfection determined by IgG anti-hepatitis E virus was 33.6% and 16.1% by IgM; hepatitis E virus and hepatitis B virus coinfection was 23.4% and 8.1%, and hepatitis E virus and hepatitis C virus coinfection was 35.4% and 5.83%, respectively. Among the 52 positive samples by PCR nine were sequenced and grouped within genotype 3A of the American porcine strain.  The highest seropositivity was observed for hepatitis A and E. The incidence of hepatitis E virus coinfection with other hepatotropic viruses indicated that this pathogen is more frequent than expected. The circulation of genotype 3A implies that this disease may occur in outbreaks and as zoonosis in Colombia.

  14. High prevalence of influenza A virus in ducks caught during spring migration through Sweden.

    PubMed

    Wallensten, Anders; Munster, Vincent J; Karlsson, Malin; Lundkvist, Ake; Brytting, Mia; Stervander, Martin; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Olsen, Björn

    2006-11-10

    As part of our ongoing screening of wild birds in Northern Europe, 358 mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and 203 shelducks (Tadorna tadorna) were caught in southern Sweden during the spring 2003. Faecal samples were analyzed by real time RT-PCR for the presence of influenza A virus. In contrast to what has been found in North American studies; Eurasian spring migrating ducks passing through Sweden had a relatively high prevalence of influenza A virus.

  15. Hepatitis G virus infection in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sampietro, M; Badalamenti, S; Graziani, G; Como, G; Buccianti, G; Corbetta, N; Ticozzi, A; Archenti, A; Lunghi, G; Penso, D; Pizzuti, A; Fiorelli, G; Ponticelli, C

    1997-01-01

    The increased risk of hemodialysis patients for infections sustained by hepatitis viruses is likely to extend to a newly discovered parenterally transmitted virus, HGBV-C/HGV, able to cause acute and chronic hepatitis. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and clinical relevance of this infection in Italian hemodialysis patients. Nineteen of 100 patients (19%) on maintenance hemodialysis were viremic for HGBV-C/HGV, and all of them were infected with a HGV-like genotype. Eight of these patients were coinfected by hepatitis B or hepatitis C viruses. A clinical picture of chronic hepatitis was not appreciable in patients with isolated HGV infection and the presence of HGV did not appear to modify the clinical course of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections.

  16. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus dual infection

    PubMed Central

    Caccamo, Gaia; Saffioti, Francesca; Raimondo, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) share common mode of transmission and both are able to induce a chronic infection. Dual HBV/HCV chronic coinfection is a fairly frequent occurrence, especially in high endemic areas and among individuals at high risk of parenterally transmitted infections. The intracellular interplay between HBV and HCV has not yet been sufficiently clarified, also due to the lack of a proper in vitro cellular model. Longitudinal evaluation of serum HBV DNA and HCV RNA amounts has revealed that complex virological profiles may be present in coinfected patients. Dual HBV/HCV infection has been associated to a severe course of the liver disease and to a high risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the clinical importance, solid evidence and clear guidelines for treatment of this special population are still lacking. This review summarizes the available data on the virological and clinical features as well as the therapeutic options of the dual HBV/HCV infection, and highlights the aspects that need to be better clarified. PMID:25356020

  17. Genetic characterization and evolutionary analysis of Newcastle disease virus isolated from domestic duck in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Satish; Kim, Ji-Ye; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Jung, Suk Chan; Choi, Kang-Seuk

    2016-03-15

    Domestic ducks are considered a potential reservoir of Newcastle disease virus. In the study, a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from a domestic duck during surveillance in South Korea was characterized. The complete genome of the NDV isolate was sequenced, and the phylogenetic relationship to reference strains was studied. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strain clustered in genotype I of Class II ND viruses, has highly phylogenetic similarity to NDV strains isolated from waterfowl in China, but was distant from the viruses isolated in chickens and vaccine strains used in South Korea. Pathogenicity experiment in chickens revealed it to be a lentogenic virus. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cleavage site of the fusion (F) protein confirmed that the isolate contained the avirulent motif (112)GKQGRL(117) at the cleavage site and caused no apparent disease in chickens and ducks. With phylogeographic analysis based on fusion gene, we estimate the origin of an ancestral virus of the isolate and its sister strain located in China around 1998. It highlights the need of continuous surveillance to enhance current understanding of the molecular epidemiology and evolution of the pathogenic strains.

  18. Virology of hepatitis D virus.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John M

    2012-08-01

    Although much of the current understanding of the replication of hepatitis D virus (HDV) has been gained from ex vivo rather than in vivo studies, many seemingly unique aspects have been discovered. These include the ultra-small size and circular conformation of the RNA genome, the presence on the viral RNAs of two ribozymes, the role of RNA-directed RNA transcription by redirection of host enzymes, the requirement of site-specific, posttranscriptional RNA-editing, and more. This review addresses recent insights, remaining controversies, and just plain deficits in our understanding of HDV replication. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Hepatitis E Virus in Indonesia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    SAD-A284017 \\ITATION PAGE ""i. *to at. e .. ic. .ewo 1O’ U * p . 21s .ffens. - I. AGENCY USE ONLY tLeav blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES...COVERED 1. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Hepatitis E virus in Indonesia / PE - 62787A PR -ool .Ol 6.AUTHOR(S) Jennings GB; Lubis 1...Listiyaningsih E ; Burans JP; Hyams KC TA- ENX 1AJ - 1438 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMiNG ORGANIZATIONNaval Medical Research

  20. Biologic characterization of chicken-derived H6N2 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in chickens and ducks.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Mark W; Suarez, David L; Hilt, Deborah; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Spackman, Erica; Woolcock, Peter; Cardona, Carol

    2010-03-01

    Low pathogenic avian influenza H6N2 viruses were biologically characterized by infecting chickens and ducks in order to compare adaptation of these viruses in these species. We examined the clinical signs, virus shedding, and immune response to infection in 4-wk-old white leghorn chickens and in 2-wk-old Pekin ducks. Five H6N2 viruses isolated between 2000 and 2004 from chickens in California, and one H6N2 virus isolated from chickens in New York in 1998, were given intrachoanally at a dose of 1 x 10(6) 50% embryo infectious dose per bird. Oral-pharyngeal and cloacal swabs were taken at 2, 4, and 7 days postinoculation (PI) and tested by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for presence of virus. Serum was collected at 7, 14, and 21 days PI and examined for avian influenza virus antibodies by commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) testing. Virus shedding for all of the viruses was detected in the oral-pharyngeal swabs from chickens at 2 and 4 days PI, but only three of the five viruses were detected at 7 days PI. Only two viruses were detected in the cloacal swabs from the chickens. Virus shedding for four of the five viruses was detected in the oral-pharyngeal cavity of the ducks, and fecal shedding was detected for three of the viruses (including the virus not shed by the oral-pharyngeal route) in ducks at 4 and 7 days PI. All other fecal swabs from the ducks were negative. Fewer ducks shed virus compared to chickens. Both the chickens and the ducks developed antibodies, as evidenced by HI and ELISA titers. The data indicate that the H6N2 viruses can infect both chickens and ducks, but based on the number of birds shedding virus and on histopathology, the viruses appear to be more adapted to chickens. Virus shedding, which could go unnoticed in the absence of clinical signs in commercial chickens, can lead to transmission of the virus among poultry. However, the viruses isolated in 2004 did

  1. Differential immune response of mallard duck peripheral blood mononuclear cells to two highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses with distinct pathogenicity in mallard ducks.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhu; Hu, Jiao; He, Liang; Li, Qunhui; Gu, Min; Wang, Xiaoquan; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Huimou; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Xiufan

    2014-02-01

    CK10 and GS10 are two H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza viruses of similar genetic background but differ in their pathogenicity in mallard ducks. CK10 is highly pathogenic whereas GS10 is low pathogenic. In this study, strong inflammatory response in terms of the expression level of several cytokines was observed in mallard duck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) infected with CK10 while mild response was triggered in those by GS10 infection. Two remarkable and intense peaks of immune response were induced by CK10 infection within 24 hours (at 8 and 24 hours post infection, respectively) without reducing the virus replication. Our observations indicated that sustained and intense innate immune responses may be central to the high pathogenicity caused by CK10 in ducks.

  2. Reemerging H5N1 Influenza Viruses in Hong Kong in 2002 Are Highly Pathogenic to Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine M.; Ellis, Trevor; Bousfield, Barry; Bissett, Lucy; Dyrting, Kitman; Rehg, Jerold E.; Poon, Leo; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Malik; Webster, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    Waterfowl are the natural reservoir of all influenza A viruses, which are usually nonpathogenic in wild aquatic birds. However, in late 2002, outbreaks of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus caused deaths among wild migratory birds and resident waterfowl, including ducks, in two Hong Kong parks. In February 2003, an avian H5N1 virus closely related to one of these viruses was isolated from two humans with acute respiratory distress, one of whom died. Antigenic analysis of the new avian isolates showed a reactivity pattern different from that of H5N1 viruses isolated in 1997 and 2001. This finding suggests that significant antigenic variation has recently occurred among H5N1 viruses. We inoculated mallards with antigenically different H5N1 influenza viruses isolated between 1997 and 2003. The new 2002 avian isolates caused systemic infection in the ducks, with high virus titers and pathology in multiple organs, particularly the brain. Ducks developed acute disease, including severe neurological dysfunction and death. Virus was also isolated at high titers from the birds' drinking water and from contact birds, demonstrating efficient transmission. In contrast, H5N1 isolates from 1997 and 2001 were not consistently transmitted efficiently among ducks and did not cause significant disease. Despite a high level of genomic homology, the human isolate showed striking biological differences from its avian homologue in a duck model. This is the first reported case of lethal influenza virus infection in wild aquatic birds since 1961. PMID:15078970

  3. Recombination in Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    González-Candelas, Fernando; López-Labrador, F. Xavier; Bracho, María Alma

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a Flavivirus with a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of about 9,600 nucleotides. It is a major cause of liver disease, infecting almost 200 million people all over the world. Similarly to most RNA viruses, HCV displays very high levels of genetic diversity which have been used to differentiate six major genotypes and about 80 subtypes. Although the different genotypes and subtypes share basic biological and pathogenic features they differ in clinical outcomes, response to treatment and epidemiology. The first HCV recombinant strain, in which different genome segments derived from parentals of different genotypes, was described in St. Petersburg (Russia) in 2002. Since then, there have been only a few more than a dozen reports including descriptions of HCV recombinants at all levels: between genotypes, between subtypes of the same genotype and even between strains of the same subtype. Here, we review the literature considering the reasons underlying the difficulties for unequivocally establishing recombination in this virus along with the analytical methods necessary to do it. Finally, we analyze the potential consequences, especially in clinical practice, of HCV recombination in light of the coming new therapeutic approaches against this virus. PMID:22069526

  4. Recombination in hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    González-Candelas, Fernando; López-Labrador, F Xavier; Bracho, María Alma

    2011-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a Flavivirus with a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of about 9,600 nucleotides. It is a major cause of liver disease, infecting almost 200 million people all over the world. Similarly to most RNA viruses, HCV displays very high levels of genetic diversity which have been used to differentiate six major genotypes and about 80 subtypes. Although the different genotypes and subtypes share basic biological and pathogenic features they differ in clinical outcomes, response to treatment and epidemiology. The first HCV recombinant strain, in which different genome segments derived from parentals of different genotypes, was described in St. Petersburg (Russia) in 2002. Since then, there have been only a few more than a dozen reports including descriptions of HCV recombinants at all levels: between genotypes, between subtypes of the same genotype and even between strains of the same subtype. Here, we review the literature considering the reasons underlying the difficulties for unequivocally establishing recombination in this virus along with the analytical methods necessary to do it. Finally, we analyze the potential consequences, especially in clinical practice, of HCV recombination in light of the coming new therapeutic approaches against this virus.

  5. Replication of 2 subtypes of low-pathogenicity avian influenza virus of duck and gull origins in experimentally infected Mallard ducks.

    PubMed

    Daoust, P-Y; van de Bildt, M; van Riel, D; van Amerongen, G; Bestebroer, T; Vanderstichel, R; Fouchier, R A M; Kuiken, T

    2013-05-01

    Many subtypes of low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus circulate in wild bird reservoirs, but their prevalence may vary among species. We aimed to compare by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, virus isolation, histology, and immunohistochemistry the distribution and pathogenicity of 2 such subtypes of markedly different origins in Mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos): H2N3 isolated from a Mallard duck and H13N6 isolated from a Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis). Following intratracheal and intraesophageal inoculation, neither virus caused detectable clinical signs, although H2N3 virus infection was associated with a significantly decreased body weight gain during the period of virus shedding. Both viruses replicated in the lungs and air sacs until approximately day 3 after inoculation and were associated with a locally extensive interstitial, exudative, and proliferative pneumonia. Subtype H2N3, but not subtype H13N6, went on to infect the epithelia of the intestinal mucosa and cloacal bursa, where it replicated without causing lesions until approximately day 5 after inoculation. Larger quantities of subtype H2N3 virus were detected in cloacal swabs than in pharyngeal swabs. The possible clinical significance of LPAI virus-associated pulmonary lesions and intestinal tract infection in ducks deserves further evaluation.

  6. [Occult hepatitis C virus infection].

    PubMed

    Carreño García, Vicente; Nebreda, Javier Bartolomé; Aguilar, Inmaculada Castillo; Quiroga Estévez, Juan Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by the detection of HCV-RNA in liver in the absence of anti-HCV and serum HCV-RNA determined by conventional techniques. The development of a new enzyme immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against a conserved epitope in the HCV core protein, together with the detection of HCV-RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in serum after concentrating the viral particles by ultracentrifugation, allow diagnosis of more than 90% of patients with occult HCV without the need to perform a liver biopsy. Histological damage in occult HCV infection ranges from minimal changes to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, although in general this disease is less severe than classical chronic hepatitis C. A significant prevalence of occult HCV infection has been identified in risk groups such as hemodialysis patients and the family members of patients with occult hepatitis C. This occult HCV infection can also be found in subjects without clinical or biochemical evidence of liver disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. [Hepatitis E virus: zoonotic implications].

    PubMed

    Jiménez de Oya, Nereida; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Blázquez, Ana Belén; Saiz, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is transmitted primarily by the feco-oral route throughout contaminated water and/or food, and is one of the main causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. Hepatitis E shows a high mobility but a low mortality rate, except in pregnant women, where it can be as high as 30%. HEV causes sporadic cases and epidemic outbreaks, mainly in Africa, Asia and Central America. In Europe, there is an increase in the number of reported autochthonous cases no related with travel to endemic areas. In addition, HEV also infects animals, including pigs, and its zoonotic potential has been recently demonstrated. In fact, porcine and human strains of the same area are genetically more closely related to each other than to strains of the same species but a different geographical region, and there are data suggesting that people in close contact with pigs presents a higher prevalence of specific anti-HEV antibodies. All together, these data have drove to an increase interest in determining the incidence of the disease in animals, its possible zoonotic risk, and its implications for human health. In the present article we revised the current knowledge about HEV, with special emphasis in the possible consequences of its zoonotic potential.

  8. A simulation model for low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses in dabbling ducks in Europe.

    PubMed

    Guberti, V; Scremin, M; Busani, L; Bonfanti, L; Terregino, C

    2007-03-01

    Anseriformes are the reservoir of low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (LPAIV). Studies have shown a high LPAIV prevalence associated with low antibody detection in a wild duck population in northern European countries, whereas in winter areas (Mediterranean basin), low viral detection and high seroprevalence were observed. In order to gain insight into the role played by both population recruitment and migration on AIV persistence, an epidemiological model was developed. A susceptible, infectious and removed (immune or dead)-individuals model coupling population and infection dynamics was developed to simulate LPAIV circulation in dabbling ducks throughout the entire year. The transmission coefficient (beta) was calculated using the original dataset of published works, whereas dabbling duck demographic parameters were obtained from the literature. The estimated host density threshold for virus persistence is 380 susceptible individuals per day whereas the critical community size needed for maintaining the virus throughout the winter has been estimated to be about 1200 individuals. The model showed peaks of viral prevalence after nesting and during the moult period because of population recruitment and high host density, respectively. During the winter and spring periods, the viruses reach the minimal endemic level and local extinction is highly probable because of stochastic phenomena, respectively 80% and 90% of probabilities. The most sensitive parameters of the model are the recruitment rate of young susceptible animals and the duration of virus shedding.

  9. Development of a PCR-Based Reverse Genetics System for an Attenuated Duck Tembusu Virus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaogang; Shi, Ying; Yan, Dawei; Li, Xuesong; Yan, Pixi; Gao, Xuyuan; Zhang, Yuee; Yu, Lei; Ren, Chaochao; Li, Guoxin; Yan, Liping; Teng, Qiaoyang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    The infectious disease caused by the duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) has resulted in massive economic losses to the Chinese duck industry in China since 2010. Research on the molecular basis of DTMUV pathogenicity has been hampered by the lack of a reliable reverse genetics system for this virus. Here we developed a PCR-based reverse genetics system with high fidelity for the attenuated DTMUV strain FX2010-180P. The rescued virus was characterized by using both indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA) and whole genome sequencing. The rescued virus (rFX2010-180P) grew to similar titers as compared with the wild-type virus in DF-1 cells, and had similar replication and immunogenicity properties in ducks. To determine whether exogenous proteins could be expressed from DTMUV, both an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene were introduced between the NS5 gene and the 3' non-coding sequence of FX2010-180P. A recombinant DTMUV expressing eGFP was rescued, but eGFP expression was unstable after 4 passages in DF-1 cells due to a deletion of 1,294 nucleotides. The establishment of a reliable reverse genetics system for FX2010-180P provides a foundation for future studies of DTMUV. PMID:27248497

  10. Adaptation and growth kinetics study of an Indian isolate of virulent duck enteritis virus in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Aravind, S; Kamble, Nitin M; Gaikwad, Satish S; Shukla, Sanjeev Kumar; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan

    2015-01-01

    Duck virus enteritis, also known as duck plague, is a viral infection of ducks caused by duck enteritis virus (DEV). The control of the disease is mainly done by vaccination with chicken embryo adapted live virus that is known to be poorly immunogenic and elicits only partial protection. Further, the embryo propagated vaccine virus pose a threat of harboring other infectious agents. Seeing these limitations, the present study reports for the first time regarding propagation and adaptation of a virulent Indian isolate of duck enteritis virus in Vero cell line. In this study isolation of an outbreak virus from Kerala state was done in chicken embryo fibroblast cell culture (CEF). Then adapted the DEV isolate in the Vero cell line. The characteristic cytopathic effects (CPE) of clumping and fusion of Vero cells were observed starting from the 7th passage onwards. The presence of the virus and its multiplication in Vero cells was confirmed by detection of viral specific DNA and antigen by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect immuno fluorescent assay (IIFA), respectively. PCR detection of DEV using self designed primers for US4 (gD) and UL30 (DNA Polymerase) gene has been reported for the in the present study. The kinetics of DEV in Vero cells revealed a maximum infectivity titer of 10(5.6) TCID 50/ml after 48hr of viral infection. Compared to chicken embryo adapted DVE vaccine virus, the Vero cell culture system is free from other infectious agents. So it will be a good candidate for cultivation and propagation of duck enteritis virus vaccine strain. Further research studies are suggested to explore the feasibility of utilizing this Vero cell culture adapted DEV isolate for developing an attenuated vaccine virus against duck virus enteritis.

  11. HEPATITIS VIRUS C INFECTION, ADIPOKINES AND HEPATIC STEATO–FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ciurtin, C

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C viral infection is accompanied by various serum alterations that could explain its molecular impact on hepatic structure and metabolic homeostasis. Recently it has been shown that adipocytokines play a pivotal role in development of hepatic steato–fibrosis, different studies giving a support of the hypothesis that the balance of adipocytokine expression is a key regulator for the progression of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. The association between insulin resistance and hepatitis C virus genotypes and liver fibrosis stage foreshadowed that virus–induced insulin resistance may be a mechanism for fibrogenesis in chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The main importance of adipocytokine profile detection consists in the prediction of steatosis induction that has clinical relevance, being associated with advanced fibrosis and hyporesponsiveness to antiviral therapy. PMID:20108479

  12. Corneal Opacity in Domestic Ducks Experimentally Infected With H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Nakamura, K; Yamada, M; Mase, M

    2016-01-01

    Domestic ducks can be a key factor in the regional spread of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus in Asia. The authors performed experimental infections to examine the relationship between corneal opacity and H5N1 HPAI virus infection in domestic ducks (Anas platyrhyncha var domestica). A total of 99 domestic ducks, including 3 control birds, were used in the study. In experiment 1, when domestic ducks were inoculated intranasally with 2 H5N1 HPAI viruses, corneal opacity appeared more frequently than neurologic signs and mortality. Corneal ulceration and exophthalmos were rare findings. Histopathologic examinations of the eyes of domestic ducks in experiment 2 revealed that corneal opacity was due to the loss of corneal endothelial cells and subsequent keratitis with edema. Influenza viral antigen was detected in corneal endothelial cells and some other ocular cells by immunohistochemistry. Results suggest that corneal opacity is a characteristic and frequent finding in domestic ducks infected with the H5N1 HPAI virus. Confirming this ocular change may improve the detection rate of infected domestic ducks in the field. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Characteristics of hepatitis viruses among Egyptian children with acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Ahmed; Yano, Yoshihiko; El-Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Utsumi, Takako; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis viral infection is hyperendemic in Egypt, western Asia and Africa. However, little is known about the status of hepatitis viruses among rural Egyptian children. Therefore, this study sought to examine the prevalence and characteristics of hepatitis viruses among symptomatic Egyptian children. Serological and molecular analyses of hepatitis viral infection were conducted in 33 children hospitalised at Mansoura University with symptomatic hepatic dysfunction (mean ± standard deviation age, 9.7±3.4 years; alanine aminotransferase level, 130±68 IU/ml). Eleven children (33%) were positive for anti-haemagglutination-IgM and were diagnosed with acute hepatitis A. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti‑hepatitis C virus (HCV) were detected in 9 (27%) and 7 (21%) children, respectively, indicating acute-on-chronic infection with hepatitis viruses. None of the children was positive for anti‑hepatitis B core antigen-IgM. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that all HBVs belonged to genotype D (subgenotype D1) and that HCV belonged to genotypes 4a and 1g. HBV-DNA was detected in 9 children (27%) in the pre-S/S region and in 16 children (48%) in the core promoter/precore region. The Y134F amino acid mutation in the 'α' determinant region was detected in all of the patients. The A1762T/G1764A double mutation, and the T1846A and G1896A single mutations were common in children with occult HBV infection. In conclusion, hepatitis viral infection, including acute-on-chronic infection with HCV and HBV, is common in Egyptian children hospitalised with acute hepatitis.

  14. Adrenocortical function and hepatic naphthalene metabolism in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) consuming petroleum distillates

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsline, J.; Holmes, W.N.

    1982-06-01

    The reductions in plasma corticosterone concentration and the increase in hepatic naphthalene-metabolizing activity that occur when mallard ducks are acutely exposed to petroleum-contaminated food are each caused by distinct molecular-size classes of compounds in the whole crude oil. The decrease in plasma corticosterone concentration only occurred in birds given food contaminated with proportionate volumes of distillation fractions with boiling point ranges of X to 205/sup 0/C and 205 to 399/sup 0/C. Significant increases in total hepatic naphthalene-metabolizing activity, however, were only induced when birds were given food containing distillation fractions with boiling point ranges of 2.5 to 399/sup 0/C and 399 to 482/sup 0/C. The residual material containing compounds with boiling points in excess of 482/sup 0/C had no effect on either plasma corticosterone concentration or hepatic naphthalene metabolism. Although the combined effects of the two distillation fractions that affected plasma corticosterone were approximately equal to that of the whole crude oil, the combined effects of the fractions that induced increases in hepatic naphthalene metabolism were almost twice that of the crude oil. Also, the relative abundances of the four distillation fractions were not the same and differences between their potencies were identified with respect to both physiological parameters.

  15. Differences in pathogenicity and response to vaccination between Pekin and Muscovy ducks infected with H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ducks have been implicated in the dissemination and evolution of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. Vaccination of domestic ducks against H5N1 HPAI is being conducted as a method of control but with mixed results. One of the observations from the field is that Muscovy ducks (Cair...

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of H9N2 viruses isolated from migratory ducks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Hua; Okazaki, Katsunori; Shi, Wei-Min; Kida, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    Genetic analysis indicated that the pandemic influenza strains derived from wild aquatic birds harbor viruses of 15 hemagglutinin (HA) and 9 neuraminidase (NA) antigenic subtypes. Surveillance studies have shown that H9N2 subtype viruses are worldwide in domestic poultry and could infect mammalian species, including humans. Here, we genetically analyzed the HA and NA genes of five H9N2 viruses isolated from the migratory ducks in Hokkaido, Japan, the flyway of migration from Siberia during 1997-2000. The results showed that HA and NA genes of these viruses belong to the same lineages, respectively. Compared with those of A/quail/Hong Kong/G1/97-like and A/duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97-like viruses, HA and NA of the migratory duck isolates had a close relationship with those of H9N2 viruses isolated from the chicken in Korea, indicating that the Korea H9N2 viruses might be derived from the migratory ducks. The NA genes of the five isolates were located in the same cluster as those of N2 viruses, which had caused a human pandemic in 1968, indicating that the NA genes of the previous pandemic strains are still circulating in waterfowl reservoirs. The present results further emphasize the importance of carrying out molecular epidemiological surveillance of H9N2 viruses in wild ducks to obtain more information for the future human influenza pandemics preparedness.

  17. Duck lymphocytes. VIII. T-lymphoblastoid cell lines from reticuloendotheliosis virus-induced tumours.

    PubMed

    Chan, S W; Bando, Y; Warr, G W; Middleton, D L; Higgins, D A

    1999-04-01

    The T strain of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV-T) obtained, along with the helper chicken syncytia virus (CSV), from the CSO4 cell line was highly oncogenic and rapidly fatal in ducks. Tumours were mainly seen in spleen, but neoplastic cells were observed microscopically in many organs. In vitro REV transformation of duck lymphocytes failed to yield stable cell lines, so cells from organs (blood, bone marrow, spleen, lymph node, bursa of Fabricius) of infected birds were used to establish cell lines. Some of these cell lines have been cloned. The success rates of establishment and cloning were increased if cells were cultured in a range of media containing different supplements; however, medium containing 5% foetal calf serum (FCS) and 5% duck serum was generally most efficacious for initial establishment, while spent medium from the parental line supplemented with a further 20% FCS gave best results for cloning. Cloned cell lines had the morphology of lymphoblastoid cells, with irregular nuclei and diffuse chromatin. Analysis of mRNA extracted from these cell lines showed that the uncloned lines were strongly expressing the β chain of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and weakly expressing immunoglobulin (Ig) polypeptides [λ light chain and μ, υ, υ (ΔFc) and α heavy chains in various proportions], suggesting the presence of T and B cells. The cloned cell lines that could be classified were TCR β+ ve T cells. This is the first report of the establishment, cloning and partial characterization of duck lymphoblastoid cell lines.

  18. Host immune responses of ducks infected with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of different pathogenicities.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liangmeng; Jiao, Peirong; Song, Yafen; Cao, Lan; Yuan, Runyu; Gong, Lang; Cui, Jin; Zhang, Shuo; Qi, Wenbao; Yang, Su; Liao, Ming

    2013-10-25

    Our previous studies have illustrated three strains of duck-origin H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) had varying levels of pathogenicity in ducks (Sun et al., 2011). However, the host immune response of ducks infected with those of H5N1 HPAIVs was unclear. Here, we compared viral distribution and mRNA expression of immune-related genes in ducks following infection with the two HPAIV (A/Duck/Guangdong/212/2004, DK212 and A/Duck/Guangdong/383/2008, DK383). DK383 could replicate in the tested tissue of ducks (brain, spleen, lungs, cloacal bursa, kidney, and pancreas) more rapid and efficiently than DK212 at 1 and 2 days post-inoculation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of TLR3, IL-6, IL-8, and MHC class II in brains were higher than those of respective genes in lungs during the early stage of post infection. Furthermore, the expression levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in the brain of ducks following infection with DK383 were remarkably higher than those of ducks infected with DK212, respectively. Our results suggest that the shift in the H5N1 HPAIVs to increased virulence in ducks may be associated with efficient and rapid replication of the virus, accompanied by early destruction of host immune responses. These data are helpful to understand the underlying mechanism of the different outcome of H5N1 HPAIVs infection in ducks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dietary α-ketoglutarate supplementation improves hepatic and intestinal energy status and anti-oxidative capacity of Cherry Valley ducks.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuangshuang; Duan, Rui; Wang, Lei; Hou, Yongqing; Tan, Linglin; Cheng, Qiang; Liao, Man; Ding, Binying

    2017-06-08

    α-Ketoglutarate (AKG) is an extensively used dietary supplement in human and animal nutrition. The aim of the present study was to investigate effects of dietary AKG supplementation on the energy status and anti-oxidative capacity in liver and intestinal mucosa of Cherry Valley ducks. A total of 80 1-day-old ducks were randomly assigned into four groups, in which ducks were fed basal diets supplemented with 0% (control), 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% AKG, respectively. Graded doses of AKG supplementation linearly decreased the ratio of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the liver, but increased ATP content and adenylate energy charge (AEC) in a quadratic and linear manner, respectively (P < 0.05). Increasing dietary AKG supplemental levels produced linear positive responses in ATP content and AEC, and negative responses in AMP concentration, the ratio of AMP to ATP and total adenine nucleotide in the ileal mucosa (P < 0.05). All levels of dietary AKG reduced the production of jejunal hydrogen peroxide and hepatic malondialdehyde (P < 0.05). Hepatic and ileal messenger RNA expression of AMP kinase α-1 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α were linearly up-regulated as dietary AKG supplemental levels increased (P < 0.05). In conclusion, dietary AKG supplementation linearly or quadratically enhanced hepatic and intestinal energy storage and anti-oxidative capacity of Cherry Valley ducks. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  20. Respiratory tract versus cloacal sampling of migratory ducks for influenza A viruses: are both ends relevant?

    PubMed

    Krauss, Scott; Pryor, Sydney Paul; Raven, Garnet; Danner, Angela; Kayali, Ghazi; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    Early studies in dabbling ducks showed that cloacal swabs yielded a larger number of avian influenza virus (AIV) isolates than did respiratory tract swabs. Historically, AIV surveillance has been performed by collecting cloacal or environmental fecal samples only. Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus emerged in 1996 and replicated to higher titers in the respiratory rather than the gastrointestinal tract of ducks, prompting the collection of respiratory samples in addition to cloacal swabs from wild birds. Studies confirmed that some virus subtypes, especially H9 and highly pathogenic H5, are shed primarily through the respiratory tract and may not be detected in cloacal swabs. To examine prevalence and subtype differences for AIV isolates from cloacal or respiratory swabs of wild ducks and to determine whether individual respiratory tract samples should be included in AIV surveillance studies in wild birds. Individual respiratory tract and cloacal swabs were collected from each of 1036 wild ducks in Alberta, Canada, during the month of August from 2007 to 2010 in an ongoing surveillance study. Virus isolation in eggs and subtype identification by antigenic and molecular methods were performed. Respiratory tract and cloacal swabs yielded ten influenza virus HA subtypes representing 28 HA-NA combinations. Three HA-NA subtype combinations were found exclusively in respiratory tract samples. Only four HA subtypes (H1, H3, H4, and H7) were recovered from respiratory samples, but respiratory shedding was associated with the dominance of 1 year's subtype. Might respiratory shedding provide a risk assessment indicator? © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Characterization of Recombinant H9N2 Influenza Viruses Isolated from Wild Ducks in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guangjian; Wang, Renjie; Xuan, Fujun; Daszak, Peter; Anthony, Simon J.; Zhang, Shuyi; Zhang, Libiao; He, Guimei

    2013-01-01

    Wild birds are considered to be the natural reservoirs for avian influenza A viruses (AIV). During active influenza surveillance in Poyang Lake of southeast China, we isolated and characterized eleven H9N2 viruses from two species of wild ducks. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the eleven isolates were almost identical with 99.3% to 100% nucleotide homology in their entire genome, and they all closely related in whole eight genes (95.6-99.4% homology) to human H9N2 isolates (HK/33982/2009) and clustered in the same sublineage. The isolates belonged to triple reassortant H9N2 genotype viruses containing Ck/Bei-like NA genes, Y439-like PA genes and six other G1-like genes. We also found that the subtype of virus replicated efficiently in the lungs and tracheas of BALB/c mice and caused mortality in 20-40% of infected groups after 3-6 days, which indicates that the subtype of virus is capable of establishing lethal mammalian infections. However, whether or not the virus has features transmittable from wild ducks to humans is not known. This study showed that the subtype of virus was detected for the first time in wild birds, and also suggested that wild birds may carry the virus for a long time and spread it over long distances along migratory routes, so more attention should be paid to the continued surveillance of wild birds. PMID:23830774

  2. Characterization of recombinant H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from wild ducks in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangjian; Wang, Renjie; Xuan, Fujun; Daszak, Peter; Anthony, Simon J; Zhang, Shuyi; Zhang, Libiao; He, Guimei

    2013-10-25

    Wild birds are considered to be the natural reservoirs for avian influenza A viruses (AIV). During active influenza surveillance in Poyang Lake of southeast China, we isolated and characterized 11 H9N2 viruses from two species of wild ducks. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the 11 isolates were almost identical with 99.3-100% nucleotide homology in their entire genome, and they all closely related in whole eight genes (95.6-99.4% homology) to human H9N2 isolates (HK/33982/2009) and clustered in the same sublineage. The isolates belonged to triple reassortant H9N2 genotype viruses containing Ck/Bei-like NA genes, Y439-like PA genes and six other G1-like genes. We also found that the subtype of virus replicated efficiently in the lungs and tracheas of BALB/c mice and caused mortality in 20-40% of infected groups after 3-6 days, which indicates that the subtype of virus is capable of establishing lethal mammalian infections. However, whether or not the virus has features transmittable from wild ducks to humans is not known. This study showed H9N2 subtype avian influenza virus for the first time in wild birds, and suggests that wild birds may carry the virus along migratory routes, highlighting the need for continued surveillance of wild birds.

  3. Structural, Antigenic, and Evolutionary Characterizations of the Envelope Protein of Newly Emerging Duck Tembusu Virus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bing; Ma, Xiuli; Li, Yufeng; Yuan, Xiaoyuan; Qin, Zhuoming; Wang, Dan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Li, Feng; Song, Minxun; Sun, Huaichang

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reported cases of ducks infected with a previously unknown flavivirus in eastern China in April 2010, the virus, provisionally designated Duck Tembusu Virus (DTMUV), has spread widely in domestic ducks in China and caused significant economic losses to poultry industry. In this study, we examined in detail structural, antigenic, and evolutionary properties of envelope (E) proteins of six DTMUV isolates spanning 2010–2012, each being isolated from individual farms with different geographical locations where disease outbreaks were documented. Structural analysis showed that E proteins of DTMUV and its closely related flavivirus (Japanese Encephalitis Virus) shared a conserved array of predicted functional domains and motifs. Among the six DTMUV strains, mutations were observed only at thirteen amino acid positions across three separate domains of the E protein. Interestingly, these genetic polymorphisms resulted in no detectable change in viral neutralization properties as demonstrated in a serum neutralization assay. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the E proteins showed that viruses evolved into two distinct genotypes, termed as DTMUV.I and DTMUV.II, with II emerging as the dominant genotype. New findings described here shall give insights into the antigenicity and evolution of this new pathogen and provide guidance for further functional studies of the E protein for which no effective vaccine has yet been developed. PMID:23990944

  4. Biologic characterization of chicken-derived H6N2 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in chickens and ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we biologically characterized H6N2 low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) viruses by infecting chickens and ducks in order to compare adaptation of these viruses in these species. We examined the clinical signs, virus shedding, and immune response to infection in 4-week old white le...

  5. Novel Reassortant Influenza A(H5N8) Viruses among Inoculated Domestic and Wild Ducks, South Korea, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Eun-Kyoung; Song, Byung-Min; Jeong, Jipseol; Choi, Jun-Gu; Jeong, Joojin; Moon, Oun-Kyong; Yoon, Hachung; Cho, Youngmi; Kang, Young-Myong; Lee, Hee-Soo

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza, caused by a novel reassortant influenza A (H5N8) virus, occurred among poultry and wild birds in South Korea in 2014. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathogenesis in and mode of transmission of this virus among domestic and wild ducks. Three of the viruses had similar pathogenicity among infected domestic ducks: the H5N8 viruses were moderately pathogenic (0%–20% mortality rate); in wild mallard ducks, the H5N8 and H5N1 viruses did not cause severe illness or death; viral replication and shedding were greater in H5N8-infected mallards than in H5N1-infected mallards. Identification of H5N8 viruses in birds exposed to infected domestic ducks and mallards indicated that the viruses could spread by contact. We propose active surveillance to support prevention of the spread of this virus among wild birds and poultry, especially domestic ducks. PMID:25625281

  6. Serological and virological surveillance of avian influenza virus in domestic ducks of the north-east region of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Rahul Deb; Giasuddin, Mohammad; Chowdhury, Emdadul Haque; Islam, Mohammad Rafiqul

    2017-06-17

    Wild waterfowl are considered as the natural reservoir for avian influenza (AI) viruses. Bangladesh has been experiencing highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreaks since 2007, mostly in chickens and occasionally in ducks. Ducks play an important role in the persistence and genetic recombination of AI viruses. This paper presents the results of serological and virological monitoring of AI in domestic ducks in 2013 in the north-east region of Bangladesh. A total of 871 and 662 serum samples and 909 and 302 pairs of cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs from domestic ducks of Mymensingh and Sylhet division, respectively, were analysed. Antibodies to type A influenza virus were detected by blocking ELISA in 60.73 and 47.73% serum samples of Mymensingh and Sylhet division, respectively. On haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test 17.5% of ELISA positive serum samples were found to be seropositive to H5 avian influenza virus. Five cloacal swabs and one oropharyngeal swab were positive for M gene of type A influenza virus by real time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR), but all of them were negative for H5 influenza virus. Three of the six viruses were successfully characterized as H1N5, H2N5 and H7N5 subtype of AI virus, the other three remained uncharacterized. On sequencing and phylogenetic analysis the HA and NA genes were found to be of Eurasian avian lineage. The H7 virus had cleavage site motif of low pathogenic virus. Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses were detected from apparently healthy domestic ducks. A small proportion of domestic ducks were found seropositive to H5 AI virus.

  7. Duck egg drop syndrome virus: an emerging Tembusu-related flavivirus in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, PeiPei; Lu, Hao; Li, Shuang; Wu, Ying; Gao, George Fu; Su, JingLiang

    2013-08-01

    Duck egg drop syndrome virus (DEDSV) is a newly emerging pathogenic flavivirus isolated from ducks in China. DEDSV infection mainly results in severe egg drop syndrome in domestic poultry, which leads to huge economic losses. Thus, the discovery of ways and means to combat DEDSV is urgent. Since 2010, a remarkable amount of progress concerning DEDSV research has been achieved. Here, we review current knowledge on the epidemiology, symptomatology, and pathology of DEDSV. A detailed dissection of the viral genome and polyprotein sequences, comparative analysis of viral antigenicity and the corresponding potential immunity against the virus are also summarized. Current findings indicate that DEDSV should be a distinct species from Tembusu virus. Moreover, the adaption of DEDSV in wildlife and its high homology to pathogenic flaviviruses (e.g., West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and dengue virus), illustrate its reemergence and potential to become a zoonotic pathogen that should not be overlooked. Detailed insight into the antigenicity and corresponding immunity against the virus is of clear significance for the development of vaccines and antiviral drugs specific for DEDSV.

  8. From DCPD to NTCP: the long journey towards identifying a functional hepatitis B virus receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jisu; Tong, Shuping

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the prototype of hepatotropic DNA viruses (hepadnaviruses) infecting a wide range of human and non-human hosts. Previous studies with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) identified duck carboxypeptidase D (dCPD) as a host specific binding partner for full-length large envelope protein, and p120 as a binding partner for several truncated versions of the large envelope protein. p120 is the P protein of duck glycine decarboxylase (dGLDC) with restricted expression in DHBV infectible tissues. Several lines of evidence suggest the importance of dCPD, and especially p120, in productive DHBV infection, although neither dCPD nor p120 cDNA could confer susceptibility to DHBV infection in any cell line. Recently, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been identified as a binding partner for the N-terminus of HBV large envelope protein. Importantly, knock down and reconstitution experiments unequivocally demonstrated that NTCP is both necessary and sufficient for in vitro infection by HBV and hepatitis delta virus (HDV), an RNA virus using HBV envelope proteins for its transmission. What remains unclear is whether NTCP is the major HBV receptor in vivo. The fact that some HBV patients are homozygous with an NTCP mutation known to abolish its receptor function suggests the existence of NTCP-independent pathways of HBV entry. Also, NTCP very likely mediates just one step of the HBV entry process, with additional co-factors for productive HBV infection still to be discovered. NTCP offers a novel therapeutic target for the control of chronic HBV infection.

  9. Molecular and antigenic characteristics of Newcastle disease virus isolates from domestic ducks in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Liu, Huairan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Zongxi; Jiang, Yanyu; Xu, Qianqian; Shao, Yuhao; Li, Huixin; Kong, Xiangang; Chen, Hongyan; Liu, Shengwang

    2015-06-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is one of the most devastating diseases to the poultry industry. The causative agents of ND are virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), which are members of the genus Avulavirus within the family Paramyxoviridae. Waterfowl, such as ducks and geese, are generally considered potential reservoirs of NDV and may show few or no clinical signs when infected with viruses that are obviously virulent in chickens. However, ND outbreaks in domestic waterfowl have been frequently reported in many countries in the past decade. In this study, 18 NDV strains isolated from domestic ducks in southern and eastern China, between 2005 and 2013, were genetically and phylogenetically characterized. The complete genomes of these strains were sequenced, and they exhibited genome sizes of 15,186 nucleotides (nt), 15,192 nt, and 15,198 nt, which follow the "rule of six" that is required for the replication of NDV strains. Based on the cleavage site of the F protein and pathogenicity tests in chickens, 17 of our NDV isolates were categorized as lentogenic viruses, and one was characterized as a velogenic virus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the partial sequences of the F gene and the complete genome sequences showed that there are at least four genotypes of NDV circulating in domestic ducks; GD1, AH224, and AH209 belong to genotypes VIId, Ib, and II of class II NDVs, respectively, and the remaining 15 isolates belong to genotype 1b of class I NDVs. Cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition tests demonstrated that the antigenic relatedness between NDV strains may be associated with their genotypes, rather than their hosts. These results suggest that though those NDV isolates were from duck, they still don't form a phylogenetic group because they came from the same species; however, they may play an important role in promoting the evolution of NDVs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Virulence of six strains of duck plague virus in eight waterfowl species.

    PubMed

    Spieker, J O; Yuill, T M; Burgess, E C

    1996-07-01

    Susceptibility of New World waterfowl to the Lake Andes strain of duck plague virus (DPV) was assessed by intramuscular inoculation of adult muscovies (Cairina moschata), mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), Canada geese (Branta canadensis), wood ducks (Aix sponsa), redheads (Aythya americana), gadwalls (Anas strepera), blue-winged teal (Anas discors), and pintails (Anas acuta). The relative virulence of DPV strains isolated from five United States and one Canadian location was established in muscovies, mallards, and Canada geese. Differences in DPV strain virulence were detected by formation of plaques in cell culture. Two strains that consistently formed plaques killed adult mallards while non-plaque forming strains killed hatchling but not adult mallards. Based on mortality after exposure to the Lake Andes strain, blue-winged teal, then wood ducks and redheads were highly susceptible, muscovies and gadwalls moderately susceptible, mallards and Canada geese less susceptible, and pintails the least susceptible. Mean death times were significantly (P < 0.01) different between adult muscovies (4.5 days) versus mallards and Canada geese (5.8 days each). Mean death time of the virulent Lake Andes and Minnesota strains were shorter (P < 0.05) than for the other four, less virulent DPV strains. Four of the less virulent strains killed hatchling but not adult mallards. Susceptibility to mortality was dependent upon age and route of inoculation. The intramuscular route of inoculation required the least amount of virus to kill mallard and muscovy ducks, the intranasal and conjunctival routes required more virus, and the oral route the most virus. This study was conducted from 1974 to 1977 between the months of September and April, with the exception of two titrations conducted in early May at the University of Wisconsin Department of Veterinary Science and the Charmany research facility of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  11. Pathogenicity of an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus isolated in the 2010-2011 winter in Japan to mandarin ducks.

    PubMed

    Soda, Kosuke; Usui, Tatsufumi; Uno, Yukiko; Yoneda, Kumiko; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Widespread outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) caused by H5N1 viruses occurred in wild birds in Japan from 2010-2011. Forty out of 63 deceased wild birds belonged to the order Anseriformes, and mandarin duck was one of the dominant species. To estimate the risk of mandarin ducks as a source of virus infection in the environment, we examined the pathogenicity of a causal H5N1 HPAI virus to mandarin ducks. About half of the mandarin ducks died by inoculation with 10(7.0)TCID50 of A/mandarin duck/Miyazaki/22M807-1/2011 (H5N1). Viruses were mainly recovered from the trachea of the ducks sacrificed at three days post inoculation (d.p.i.). Viruses were recovered from the laryngopharyngeal swabs of the observation group until 5 d.p.i. In ducks that died at the late phase of infection, viruses were detected in the systemic organs, such as lung, kidney and colon. Together, these results showed that the H5N1 HPAI viruses, which belonged to clade 2.3.2.1 and are mainly circulating in East Asia, were lethal to mandarin ducks, indicating that mandarin ducks have the potential to disseminate the virus to other bird species. Therefore, wild birds should be kept out of poultry farms to prevent HPAI outbreaks in the future.

  12. Dietary L-arginine supplement alleviates hepatic heat stress and improves feed conversion ratio of Pekin ducks exposed to high environmental temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Jiang, W; Wu, L Y

    2014-12-01

    The current intensive indoor production system of commercial Pekin ducks never allows adequate water for swimming or wetting. Therefore, heat stress is a key factor affecting health and growth of ducks in the hot regions and season. Experiment 1 was conducted to study whether heat stress was deleterious to certain organs of ducks. Forty-one-day-old mixed-sex Pekin ducks were randomly allocated to four electrically heated battery brooders comprised of 10 ducks each. Ducks were suddenly exposed to 37 °C ambient temperature for 3 h and then slaughtered, in one brooder at 21 days and in another brooder at 49 days of age. The results showed that body weight and weight of immune organs, particularly liver markedly decreased in acute heat stress ducks compared with the control. Experiment 2 was carried out to investigate the influences of dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplement on weight and compositions of certain lymphoid organs, and growth performance in Pekin ducks, under daily cyclic hot temperature environment. A total of 151-day-old mixed-sex Pekin ducks were randomly divided into one negative control and two treatment groups, fed experimental diets supplemented with 0, 5, and 10 g L-Arginine (L-Arg)/kg to the basal diet respectively. Ducks were exposed to cyclic high temperature simulating natural summer season. The results showed that the addition of L-Arg improves feed conversion ratio (FCR) during a period of 7-week trial, as well as increases hepatic weight relative to body weight at 21 days, while decreases the hepatic water content at 49 days of age. This study indicated that the liver was more sensitive to acute heat stress, and the hepatic relative weight and chemical composition could be regulated by dietary L-Arg supplementation in Pekin ducks being reared at high ambient temperature. These beneficial effects of Arg on liver might be a cause of improved FCR.

  13. Hepatitis C virus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Mona R; Honegger, Jonathan R

    2013-02-01

    Despite recent advances in the pathogenesis, treatment, and public health response to hepatitis C virus (HCV), HCV as it specifically relates to pregnancy has been a neglected condition. HCV-monoinfected pregnant women have a 2-8% risk of viral transmission to their infant, but the mechanism and timing of mother to child transmission (MTCT) are not fully understood, nor is the natural history of the illness in pregnant women and their offspring. Recognition of HCV-infected pregnant women is relevant because of the long-term health implications for the mother, potential adverse effects of infection on pregnancy outcomes, and the possibility of transmission to their infants. Certain risk factors for MTCT of HCV appear similar to those for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); however, unlike HIV, effective methods for prevention of HCV vertical transmission have not been developed. It is possible that a better understanding of HCV MTCT and pathogenesis in pregnancy will guide development of useful prevention strategies, particularly as we enter an era where interferon-free drug cocktails may emerge as viable treatment options for HCV.

  14. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) in Frozen Duck Carcasses, Germany, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Timm C.; Teuffert, Jürgen; Starick, Elke; Gethmann, Jörn; Grund, Christian; Fereidouni, Sasan; Durban, Markus; Bogner, Karl-Heinz; Neubauer-Juric, Antonie; Repper, Reinhard; Hlinak, Andreas; Engelhardt, Andreas; Nöckler, Axel; Smietanka, Krzysztof; Minta, Zenon; Kramer, Matthias; Globig, Anja; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Conraths, Franz J.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted phylogenetic and epidemiologic analyses to determine sources of outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), subtype H5N1, in poultry holdings in 2007 in Germany, and a suspected incursion of HPAIV into the food chain through contaminated deep-frozen duck carcasses. In summer 2007, HPAIV (H5N1) outbreaks in 3 poultry holdings in Germany were temporally, spatially, and phylogenetically linked to outbreaks in wild aquatic birds. Detection of HPAIV (H5N1) in frozen duck carcass samples of retained slaughter batches of 1 farm indicated that silent infection had occurred for some time before the incidental detection. Phylogenetic analysis established a direct epidemiologic link between HPAIV isolated from duck meat and strains isolated from 3 further outbreaks in December 2007 in backyard chickens that had access to uncooked offal from commercial deep-frozen duck carcasses. Measures that will prevent such undetected introduction of HPAIV (H5N1) into the food chain are urgently required. PMID:19193272

  15. [Prevention of virus hepatitis A to E].

    PubMed

    Cornberg, M; Manns, M P

    2011-03-01

    Infection with hepatitis viruses can lead to acute hepatitis with the risk of developing liver failure. Chronic viral hepatitis may evolve into liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, prevention of viral hepatitis and its sequels is essential. Vaccination against hepatitis A is successful in almost all individuals. Protective antibodies maintain for at least 20 years. Booster vaccinations are not necessary. Since the introduction of hepatitis A vaccines, the incidence of new HAV-infections has declined significantly. Hepatitis B vaccines are safe and highly effective. Special populations such as dialysis patients or immunocompromised patients require special vaccine schedules. New vaccines with improved adjuvants are currently being tested in clinical trials. So far there is no hepatitis C vaccine on the horizon. Prophylaxis of HCV-infections relies primarily on hygiene measures. Early therapy of acute hepatitis C can prevent chronic hepatitis C. HDV-infection can only be established if HBsAg is present. Thus, prevention of hepatitis B or elimination of HBsAg means prevention of hepatitis delta. Hepatitis E vaccines have been evaluated in phase III studies. The development of HEV vaccines becomes more relevant since chronic HEV infections have been reported in immunosuppressed individuals.

  16. Characterizations of H4 avian influenza viruses isolated from ducks in live poultry markets and farm in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ying; Cui, Hongrui; Wang, Junheng; Chi, Qiuyan; Li, Xuesong; Teng, Qiaoyang; Chen, Hongjun; Yang, Jianmei; Liu, Qinfang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    H4 avian influenza virus is one of the most prevalent influenza virus subtypes in birds. The evolution and pathogenicity of H4 AIV in domestic birds of China remain largely unclear. In the present study, a total of eight H4 AIV strains isolated in duck farm and live poultry markets (LPM) were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these strains are divided into two groups in the Eurasian lineage. Eight genes of MH-2/H4N6 isolated from a duck farm were closely related to three H4N6 viruses from LPM, suggesting a potential AIV link between farms and LPMs. Additionally, the HA, NA, PB2, NP, and NS genes of two other H4N6 viruses isolated in LPM clustered with that of MH-2/H4N6. However, the remaining genes were more closely related to other sublineages, suggesting that MH-2/H4N6-originated viruses reassorted with other viruses in LPM. All H4 viruses replicated in mouse lungs without prior adaptation and all viruses replicated and transmitted among ducks. 29-1/H4N2, MH-2/H4N6, and 420-2/H4N6 viruses caused systemic infection in infected ducks. However, most of the viruses were not adapted in chickens. The present results indicate a potential correlation of AIV between LPMs and farms and suggest that active surveillance of AIV in LPM is warranted in China. PMID:27897216

  17. Study of influenza A virus in wild boars living in a major duck wintering site.

    PubMed

    Vittecoq, Marion; Grandhomme, Viviane; Simon, Gaëlle; Herve, Séverine; Blanchon, Thomas; Renaud, François; Thomas, Frédéric; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; van der Werf, Sylvie

    2012-03-01

    Wild birds, which are reservoirs of influenza viruses, are believed to be the original source of new influenza viruses-including highly pathogenic ones-that can be transmitted to domestic animals as well as humans and represent a potential epizootic and/or pandemic threat. Despite increasing knowledge on influenza A virus dynamics in wild birds, the viral circulation in wild boars remains largely unknown. This is of particular interest since pigs can be infected with both human and avian viruses; upon co-infection, they can act as a mixing vessel through reassortment, a mechanism that resulted in the emergence of the pandemic H1N1 virus in 2009. The Camargue (Southern France) appears as an ideal study area to investigate inter-species transmission of influenza A viruses from wild birds and possibly humans to wild boars. Indeed, the important local wild boar population shares wetland use with humans and the largest concentration of wintering ducks in France, that are both susceptible to infection by influenza A viruses. Additionally, wild boars occasionally prey on ducks. We conducted a virological and serological survey on wild boars in the Camargue (Southern France) between September 2009 and November 2010. No influenza A virus was detected in the collected nasal swabs (n=315) and no influenza specific antibodies were observed in the serological samples (n=20). As the study was mainly focused on viral excretion, which is limited in time, we cannot exclude that low or occasional influenza A virus circulation took place during the study period. Although, wild boars did not seem to be a key element in the dynamics of influenza A virus circulation in the Camargue, wild boar influenza A virus infections should be more widely studied to determine if the pattern observed here represents the normal situation or an exceptional one.

  18. Prevalence of hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis D virus and hepatitis E virus as causes of acute viral hepatitis in North India: a hospital based study.

    PubMed

    Jain, P; Prakash, S; Gupta, S; Singh, K P; Shrivastava, S; Singh, D D; Singh, J; Jain, A

    2013-01-01

    Acute viral hepatitis (AVH) is a major public health problem and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present study is to determine the prevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) as causes of AVH in a tertiary care hospital of North India. Blood samples and clinical information was collected from cases of AVH referred to the Grade I viral diagnostic laboratory over a 1-year period. Samples were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV total antibodies, anti-HAV immunoglobulin M (IgM) and anti-HEV IgM by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PCR for nucleic acid detection of HBV and HCV was also carried out. Those positive for HBV infection were tested for anti-HDV antibodies. Fisher's exact test was used and a P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Of the 267 viral hepatitis cases, 62 (23.22%) patients presented as acute hepatic failure. HAV (26.96%) was identified as the most common cause of acute hepatitis followed by HEV (17.97%), HBV (16.10%) and HCV (11.98%). Co-infections with more than one virus were present in 34 cases; HAV-HEV co-infection being the most common. HEV was the most important cause of acute hepatic failure followed by co-infection with HAV and HEV. An indication towards epidemiological shift of HAV infection from children to adults with a rise in HAV prevalence was seen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report indicating epidemiological shift of HAV in Uttar Pradesh.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a Genotype XVII Newcastle Disease Virus, Isolated from an Apparently Healthy Domestic Duck in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Shittu, Ismaila; Sharma, Poonam; Joannis, Tony M.; Volkening, Jeremy D.; Odaibo, Georgina N.; Olaleye, David O.; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Solomon, Ponman; Abolnik, Celia; Miller, Patti J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.

    2016-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) of genotype XVII is described here. A velogenic strain (duck/Nigeria/903/KUDU-113/1992) was isolated from an apparently healthy free-roaming domestic duck sampled in Kuru, Nigeria, in 1992. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion protein gene and complete genome classified the isolate as a member of NDV class II, genotype XVII. PMID:26847901

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a Genotype XVII Newcastle Disease Virus, Isolated from an Apparently Healthy Domestic Duck in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Shittu, Ismaila; Sharma, Poonam; Joannis, Tony M; Volkening, Jeremy D; Odaibo, Georgina N; Olaleye, David O; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Solomon, Ponman; Abolnik, Celia; Miller, Patti J; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-02-04

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) of genotype XVII is described here. A velogenic strain (duck/Nigeria/903/KUDU-113/1992) was isolated from an apparently healthy free-roaming domestic duck sampled in Kuru, Nigeria, in 1992. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion protein gene and complete genome classified the isolate as a member of NDV class II, genotype XVII. Copyright © 2016 Shittu et al.

  1. Experimental co-infections of domestic ducks with a virulent Newcastle disease virus and low or highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infections with Avian influenza viruses (AIV) of low and high pathogenicity (LP and HP), and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are commonly reported in domestic ducks in parts of the world. However, it’s not clear if co-infections with these viruses affect the severity of the diseases they produce, the ...

  2. The Pathogenesis of Clade 2.3.4.4 H5 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses in Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis) and Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis).

    PubMed

    Spackman, Erica; Prosser, Diann J; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Berlin, Alicia M; Stephens, Christopher B

    2017-05-17

    Waterfowl are the natural hosts of avian influenza virus (AIV) and disseminate the virus worldwide through migration. Historically, surveillance and research efforts for AIV in waterfowl have focused on dabbling ducks. The role of diving ducks in AIV ecology has not been well characterized. In this study, we examined the relative susceptibility and pathogenicity of clade 2.3.4.4 H5 highly pathogenic (HP) AIV (HPAIV) in two species of diving ducks. Juvenile and adult Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis) and juvenile Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) were intranasally inoculated with A/Northern Pintail/WA/40964/2014 H5N2 HPAIV. Additional groups of juvenile Lesser Scaups were inoculated with A/Gyrfalcon/WA/41088/2014 H5N8 HPAIV. The approximate 50% bird infectious doses (BID50) of the H5N2 isolate for adult Ruddy Ducks was <10(2) 50% egg infectious doses (EID50) and for the juvenile Lesser Scaups it was <10(4) EID50. There were insufficient juvenile Ruddy Ducks to calculate the BID50. The BID50 for the juvenile Lesser Scaups inoculated with the H5N8 isolate was 10(3) EID50. Clinical disease was not observed in any group; however, mortality occurred in the juvenile Ruddy Ducks inoculated with the H5N2 virus (three of five ducks), and staining for AIV antigen was observed in numerous tissues from these ducks. One adult Ruddy Duck also died and although it was infected with AIV (the duck was positive for virus shedding and AIV antigen was detected in tissues), it was also infected with coccidiosis. The proportion of ducks shedding virus was related to the dose administered, but the titers were similar among dose groups. The group with the fewest ducks shedding virus was the adult Ruddy Ducks. There was a trend for the Lesser Scaups to shed higher titers of virus than the Ruddy Ducks. No virus shedding was detected after 7 d postinoculation in any group. Similar to dabbling ducks, Lesser Scaups and Ruddy Ducks are susceptible to infection with this H5 HPAIV lineage, although they

  3. Risk factors for exposure to influenza a viruses, including subtype H5 viruses, in Thai free-grazing ducks.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, A L; Kitikoon, P; Schreiner, P J; Singer, R S; Sasipreeyajan, J; Amonsin, A; Gramer, M R; Pakinsee, S; Bender, J B

    2014-08-01

    Free-grazing ducks (FGD) have been associated with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 outbreaks and may be a viral reservoir. In July-August 2010, we assessed influenza exposure of Thai FGD and risk factors thereof. Serum from 6254 ducks was analysed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antibodies to influenza A nucleoprotein (NP), and haemagglutinin H5 protein. Eighty-five per cent (5305 ducks) were seropositive for influenza A. Of the NP-seropositive sera tested with H5 assays (n = 1423), 553 (39%) were H5 ELISA positive and 57 (4%) suspect. Twelve per cent (74 of 610) of H5 ELISA-positive/suspect ducks had H5 titres ≥ 1 : 20 by haemagglutination inhibition. Risk factors for influenza A seropositivity include older age, poultry contact, flock visitors and older purchase age. Study flocks had H5 virus exposure as recently as March 2010, but no HPAI H5N1 outbreaks have been identified in Thailand since 2008, highlighting a need for rigorous FGD surveillance. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. [Progress in research of occult hepatitis B virus infection].

    PubMed

    Huang, X Y; Shi, Q F; Huang, T

    2017-05-10

    Occult hepatitis B virus infection is a worldwide public health problem, which seriously affects the clinical diagnosis of hepatitis B and threatens the safety of blood transfusion. The concept of occult hepatitis B virus infection, the pathogenesis of occult hepatitis B virus infection, the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection in different groups, including healthy population and different patients, and the possibility of transmission were summarized. The prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection was found in healthy population and different patients, and there is possibility of occult hepatitis B virus infection to be transmitted through blood transfusion. The paper provides a comprehensive introduction of the pathogenesis and prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection. More attention should be paid to occult hepatitis B virus infection.

  5. The pathogenesis of clade 2.3.4.4 H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in Ruddy Ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) and Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Waterfowl are the natural hosts of avian influenza virus (AIV) and disseminate the virus worldwide through migration. Historically, surveillance and research efforts for AIV in waterfowl have focused on dabbling ducks. The role of diving ducks in AIV ecology has not been well characterized. In this ...

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a Virulent Newcastle Disease Virus Strain Isolated from a Clinically Healthy Duck (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus) in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Wajid, Abdul; Rehmani, Shafqat F.; Wasim, Muhammad; Basharat, Asma; Bibi, Tasra; Arif, Saima; Dimitrov, Kiril M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a virulent Newcastle disease virus (vNDV) strain, duck/Pakistan/Lahore/AW-123/2015, isolated from apparently healthy laying ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus) from the province of Punjab, Pakistan. The virus has a genome length of 15,192 nucleotides and is classified as member of subgenotype VIIi, class II. PMID:27469959

  7. Immune Response in Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Anthony; Koh, Sarene; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) can replicate within hepatocytes without causing direct cell damage. The host immune response is, therefore, not only essential to control the spread of virus infection, but it is also responsible for the inflammatory events causing liver pathologies. In this review, we discuss how HBV deals with host immunity and how we can harness it to achieve virus control and suppress liver damage. PMID:26134480

  8. Evaluation of a high-pathogenicity H5N1 avian influenza A virus isolated from duck meat.

    PubMed

    Tumpey, T M; Suarez, D L; Perkins, L E L; Senne, D A; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Mo, I P; Sung, H W; Swayne, D E

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of an influenza A virus possessing a novel hemagglutinin (HA) into an immunologically naive human population has the potential to cause severe disease and death. Such was the case in 1997 in Hong Kong, where H5N1 influenza was transmitted to humans from infected poultry. Because H5N1 viruses are still isolated from domestic poultry in southern China, there needs to be continued surveillance of poultry and characterization of virus subtypes and variants. This study provides molecular characterization and evaluation of pathogenesis of a recent H5N1 virus isolated from duck meat that had been imported to South Korea from China. The HA gene of A/Duck/Anyang/AVL-1/01 (H5N1) isolate was found to be closely related to the Hong Kong/97 H5N1 viruses. This virus also contained multiple basic amino acids adjacent to the cleavage site between HA1 and HA2, characteristic of high-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (HPAI). The pathogenesis of this virus was characterized in chickens, ducks, and mice. The DK/Anyang/AVL-1/01 isolate replicated well in all species and resulted in 100% and 22% lethality for chickens and mice, respectively. No clinical signs of disease were observed in DK/Anyang/AVL-1/01-inoculated ducks, but high titers of infectious virus could be detected in multiple tissues and oropharyngeal swabs. The presence of an H5N1 influenza virus in ducks bearing a HA gene that is highly similar to those of the pathogenic 1997 human/poultry H5N1 viruses raises the possibility of reintroduction of HPAI to chickens and humans.

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Antigenic Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Campo, David S.; Dimitrova, Zoya; Yokosawa, Jonny; Hoang, Duc; Perez, Nestor O.; Ramachandran, Sumathi; Khudyakov, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine development against hepatitis C virus (HCV) is hindered by poor understanding of factors defining cross-immunoreactivity among heterogeneous epitopes. Using synthetic peptides and mouse immunization as a model, we conducted a quantitative analysis of cross-immunoreactivity among variants of the HCV hypervariable region 1 (HVR1). Analysis of 26,883 immunological reactions among pairs of peptides showed that the distribution of cross-immunoreactivity among HVR1 variants was skewed, with antibodies against a few variants reacting with all tested peptides. The HVR1 cross-immunoreactivity was accurately modeled based on amino acid sequence alone. The tested peptides were mapped in the HVR1 sequence space, which was visualized as a network of 11,319 sequences. The HVR1 variants with a greater network centrality showed a broader cross-immunoreactivity. The entire sequence space is explored by each HCV genotype and subtype. These findings indicate that HVR1 antigenic diversity is extensively convergent and effectively limited, suggesting significant implications for vaccine development. PMID:22355779

  10. Hepatitis C Virus and Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Larry; Foont, Julie; Wands, Jack R.

    2010-01-01

    This review will focus on the prevalence of hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection in alcoholics with and without liver disease. Evidence will be presented to demonstrate that ethanol and chronic HCV infection synergistically accelerate liver injury. Some of the major postulated mechanisms responsible for disease progression include high rates of apoptosis, lipid peroxidation, and generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species with reduced antioxidant capacity of the liver. Acquisition and persistence of HCV infection may be due to the adverse effects of ethanol on humoral and cellular immune responses to HCV. Dendritic cells (DC) appear to be one of the major targets for ethanol’s action and DC dysfunction impairs the ability of the host to generate viral specific cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4+) and cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8+) immune responses. There is a relationship between increased alcohol intake and decreased response to interferon (IFN) therapy, which may be reversed by abstinence. Clinical studies are needed to optimize treatment responses in alcoholic patients with chronic HCV infection. PMID:19387918

  11. [Exposure to avian influenza virus and the infection status of virus among people breeding or butchering ducks in the suburb of Beijing].

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun-na; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Li, Hai-yue; Zhang, Li; Li, Li-li; Li, Chao; Yang, Yu-song; Chen, He; Zhang, Song-jian; Liu, Xiu-jun; Wang, Quan-yi

    2012-04-01

    To understand the exposure and the infection status of virus among people engaging in breeding or butchering ducks in the suburb of Beijing. People from six districts (Daxing, Fangshan, Huairou, Miyun, Shunyi, Tongzhou) who engaged in breeding or butchering ducks were studied and the status of infecting avian influenza virus was obtained by testing antibody level in serum. Information on demographic characteristics, status of regular exposure and exposure to sick or dead poultry were collected through a self-designed questionnaire. 1741 people were involved in this study in which 313 (18.0%) were workers in duck-breeding enterprise, 562 (32.3%) were workers in duck slaughterhouse, 261 (15.0%) farmers were in individual small-scale duck farms, 605 (34.7%) were farmers raising duck in backyard. Among farmers raising duck in backyard, the percentage of people whose ducks ever contacted with wild birds was higher than the other three groups (66.8%) (P<0.05). Among farmers who bred their ducks in the backyard (35.2%) and those abattoir workers (31.3%), the percentage of people who had contacted ducks but not been vaccinated with avian influenza vaccine was higher than the other two groups (P<0.05). Regarding the status on cleaning and disinfection among the studied farmers who had bred their ducks in the backyard, the percentage of people who had closer contact with ducks would clean the settings more than 4 times per month (8.8%) and disinfected those places more than 12 times per year (27.3%) but still lower than the other three groups (P<0.05). Among those farmers who bred ducks in the backyard, the percentage of people who had ever touched duck with their hands was high (34.4%) (P<0.05). Regarding exposure to sick or dead poultry, higher proportion was found among those who had ever closely contacted sick or dead poultry commercial duck raisers (36.1%) and individuals who raise large amount of ducks (36.0%). 70.8% of the individual duck raisers had never taken any

  12. Low-pathogenic influenza A viruses in North American diving ducks contribute to the emergence of a novel highly pathogenic influenza A(H7N8) virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Yifei; Ramey, Andrew M.; Bowman, Andrew S; DeLiberto, Thomas J.; Killian, Mary Lea; Krauss, Scott; Nolting, Jacqueline M.; Torchetti, Mia Kim; Reeves, Andrew B.; Webby, Richard J.; Stallknecht, David E.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Introductions of low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses of subtypes H5 and H7 into poultry from wild birds have the potential to mutate to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, but such viruses' origins are often unclear. In January 2016, a novel H7N8 HPAI virus caused an outbreak in turkeys in Indiana, USA. To determine the virus's origin, we sequenced the genomes of 441 wild-bird origin influenza A viruses (IAVs) from North America and subjected them to evolutionary analyses. The results showed that the H7N8 LPAI virus most likely circulated among diving ducks in the Mississippi flyway during autumn 2015 and was subsequently introduced to Indiana turkeys, in which it evolved high pathogenicity. Preceding the outbreak, an isolate with six gene segments (PB2, PB1, PA, HA, NA, and NS) sharing >99% sequence identity with those of H7N8 turkey isolates was recovered from a diving duck sampled in Kentucky, USA. H4N8 IAVs from other diving ducks possessed five H7N8-like gene segments (PB2, PB1, NA, MP, and NS; >98% sequence identity). Our findings suggest that viral gene constellations circulating among diving ducks can contribute to the emergence of IAVs that affect poultry. Therefore, diving ducks may serve an important and understudied role in the maintenance, diversification, and transmission of IAVs in the wild-bird reservoir.

  13. Effects of petroleum on adrenocortical activity and on hepatic naphthalene-metabolizing activity in mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorsline, J.; Holmes, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    Unstressed mallard ducks (Anas platyrhychos), given uncontaminated food and maintained on a short photoperiod, show two daily maxima in plasma corticosterone concentration ([B]); one occurring early in the light phase and a second just before the onset of darkness. After one week of exposure to food containing 3% (v/w) South Louisiana crude oil, plasma [B] were significantly lowered throughout the day. Similar abrupt declines in plasma [B] also occurred during the first 10 days of exposure to food containing 1% and 0.5% crude oil. Although the plasma [B] in birds consuming food contaminated with 0.5% crude oil increased between 10 and 50 days of exposure, the concentration after 50 days was still lower than normal. During the same interval, normal plasma [B] were restored in birds consuming food containing 1% and 3% crude oil. Significant increases occurred in the naphthalene-metabolizing properties of hepatic microsomes prepared from birds acutely exposed to all levels of petroleum-contaminated food and elevated levels were sustained throughout the first 50 days of exposure. Birds given food containing 3% crude oil for more than 50 days, however, showed steady declines in hepatic naphthalene-metabolizing activity. After 500 days, the activity was similar to that found in contemporaneous controls. During the same interval, the plasma [B] increased until the levels were higher than normal after 500 days of exposure; at this time, an inverse relationship, similar to that seen during the first week of exposure to contaminated food, was once more established between plasma [B] and the concomitant hepatic naphthalene-metabolizing activity.

  14. Evaluation of hepatocyteprotective and anti-hepatitis B virus properties of Cichoric acid from Cichorium intybus leaves in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Li; Dai, Ling-Hao; Wu, Yi-Hang; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Yong-Yong; Guan, Rong-Fa; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B is the most common serious liver infection in the world. To date, there is still no complete cure for chronic hepatitis B. Natural caffeic acid analogues possess prominent antiviral activity, especially anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) and anti-human immunodeficiency virus effects. Cichoric acid is a caffeic acid derivative from Cichorium intybus. In the study, the anti-hepatitis B property of cichoric acid was evaluated by the D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-induced normal human HL-7702 hepatocyte injury model, the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV)-infected duck fetal hepatocytes and the HBV-transfected cell line HepG2.2.15 cells, respectively. The results showed that cichoric acid attenuated significantly D-GalN-induced HL-7702 hepatocyte injury at 10-100 µg/mL and produced a maximum protection rate of 56.26%. Moreover, cichoric acid at 1-100 µg/mL inhibited markedly DHBV DNA replication in infected duck fetal hepatocytes. Also, cichoric acid at 10-100 µg/mL reduced significantly the hepatitis B surface and envelope antigen levels in HepG2.2.15 cells and produced the maximum inhibition rates of 79.94% and 76.41%, respectively. Meanwhile, test compound at 50-100 µg/mL inhibited markedly HBV DNA replication. In conclusion, this study verifies the anti-hepatitis B effect of cichoric acid from Cichorium intybus leaves. In addition, cichoric acid could be used to design the antiviral agents.

  15. New avian influenza A virus subtype combination H5N7 identified in Danish mallard ducks.

    PubMed

    Bragstad, K; Jørgensen, P H; Handberg, K J; Mellergaard, S; Corbet, S; Fomsgaard, A

    2005-05-01

    During the past years increasing incidences of influenza A zoonosis have made it of uppermost importance to possess methods for rapid and precise identification and characterisation of influenza A viruses. We present here a convenient one-step RT-PCR method that will amplify full-length haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) directly from clinical samples and from all known subtypes of influenza A. We applied the method on samples collected in September 2003 from a Danish flock of mallards with general health problems and by this a previously undescribed influenza A subtype combination, H5N7, was identified. The HA gene showed great sequence similarity to the highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (HPAIV) A/Chicken/Italy/312/97 (H5N2); however, the cleavage site sequence between HA1 and HA2 had a motif typical for low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV). The full-length NA sequence was most closely related to the HPAIV A/Chicken/Netherlands/01/03 (H7N7) that infected chickens and humans in the Netherlands in 2003. Ten persons with direct or indirect contact with the Danish mallard ducks showed signs of influenza-like illness 2-3 days following the killing of the ducks, but no evidence of influence infections was detected. To our knowledge this is the first report of an H5N7 influenza A virus.

  16. Genomic Characterizations of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from Ducks in Live Bird Markets in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Dongxia; Zhao, Yunling; Castellan, David; Liu, Hualei; Wang, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    One class I Newcastle disease virus (NDV), designated as duck/Guangxi/1261/2015 (GX1261), was isolated from asymptomatic ducks in live bird markets (LBM) from southern China during the national active surveillance for NDVs in 2015. The complete genome length of GX1261 isolate was 15,198 nucleotides with the gene order of 3'-NP-P-M-F-HN-L-5'. The motif at the cleavage site of F protein was 112ERQER/L117, which was typical of low virulence NDV. Several mutations were identified in the functional domains of F and HN proteins, including fusion peptide, heptad repeat region, transmembrane domains and neutralizing epitopes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete F gene revealed that the isolate was clustered into sub-genotype 1c in class I, and showed a high level of similarity with the strains isolated from waterfowl in the United States of America. This is the first report of this kind of virus in the mainland of China. These results demonstrated that GX1261-like viruses might exist in asymptomatic waterfowl, and remain undetected or unidentified. Thus, more investigation needs to be done in order to identify the source of the virus. This study revealed the genetic and phylogenetic characteristics of GX1261 isolate and could help us to better understand the epidemiological context of class I NDV in China.

  17. Genomic Characterizations of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from Ducks in Live Bird Markets in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Dongxia; Zhao, Yunling; Castellan, David; Liu, Hualei; Wang, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    One class I Newcastle disease virus (NDV), designated as duck/Guangxi/1261/2015 (GX1261), was isolated from asymptomatic ducks in live bird markets (LBM) from southern China during the national active surveillance for NDVs in 2015. The complete genome length of GX1261 isolate was 15,198 nucleotides with the gene order of 3’-NP-P-M-F-HN-L-5’. The motif at the cleavage site of F protein was 112ERQER/L117, which was typical of low virulence NDV. Several mutations were identified in the functional domains of F and HN proteins, including fusion peptide, heptad repeat region, transmembrane domains and neutralizing epitopes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete F gene revealed that the isolate was clustered into sub-genotype 1c in class I, and showed a high level of similarity with the strains isolated from waterfowl in the United States of America. This is the first report of this kind of virus in the mainland of China. These results demonstrated that GX1261-like viruses might exist in asymptomatic waterfowl, and remain undetected or unidentified. Thus, more investigation needs to be done in order to identify the source of the virus. This study revealed the genetic and phylogenetic characteristics of GX1261 isolate and could help us to better understand the epidemiological context of class I NDV in China. PMID:27391305

  18. Experimental infection of mandarin duck with highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N8 and H5N1) viruses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Eun-Kyoung; Song, Byung-Min; Heo, Gyeong-Beom; Jung, Joojin; Jang, Il; Bae, You-Chan; Jung, Suk Chan; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2017-01-01

    A highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N8 virus was first detected in poultry and wild birds in South Korea in January 2014. Here, we determined the pathogenicity and transmissibility of three different clades of H5 viruses in mandarin ducks to examine the potential for wild bird infection. H5N8 (clade 2.3.4.4) replicated more efficiently in the upper and lower respiratory tract of mandarin ducks than two previously identified H5N1 virus clades (clades 2.2 and 2.3.2.1). However, none of the mandarin ducks infected with H5N8 and H5N1 viruses showed severe clinical signs or mortality, and gross lesions were only observed in a few tissues. Viral replication and shedding were greater in H5N8-infected ducks than in H5N1-infected ducks. Recovery of all viruses from control duck in contact with infected ducks indicated that the highly pathogenic H5 viruses spread horizontally through contact. Taken together, these results suggest that H5N8 viruses spread efficiently in mandarin ducks. Further studies of pathogenicity in wild birds are required to examine possible long-distance dissemination via migration routes.

  19. A novel reassortant H3N8 influenza virus isolated from drinking water for duck in a domestic duck farm in Poyang Lake area.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bei Bei; Xu, Cui Ling; Dong, Li Bo; Cheng, Hui Jian; Yang, Lei; Zou, Shu Mei; Chen, Min; Bai, Tian; Zhang, Ye; Gao, Rong Bao; Li, Xiao Dan; Shi, Jing Hong; Yuan, Hui; Yang, Jing; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Yun; Xiong, Ying; Yang, Shuai; Shu, Yue Long

    2013-07-01

    To conduct a full genome sequence analysis for genetic characterization of an H3N8 influenza virus isolated from drinking water of a domestic duck farm in Poyang Lake area in 2011. The virus was cultivated by specific pathogen free (SPF) chicken embryo eggs and was subtyped into hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) by real-time PCR method. Eight gene segments were sequenced and phylogenetic analysis was conducted. The NA gene of this virus belongs to North American lineage; other seven genes belong to Eurasian lineage. Compared with the viruses containing NA gene, the PB2 and PB1 gene came from different clades. And this indicates that the virus was a novel reassortant genotype. The HA receptor binding preference was avian-like and the cleavage site sequence showed a low pathogenic feature. There was no drug resistance mutation of M2 protein. The mutations of Asn30Asp, and Thr215Ala of the M1 protein implied the potential of pathogenicity increase in mice. The finding of novel genotype of H3N8 virus in drinking water in this duck farm near Poyang Lake highlighted the importance of strengthening the surveillance of avian influenza in this region, which could contribute to pinpointing the influenza ecological relations among avian, swine, and human. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  20. [Zoonotic potential of the hepatitis E virus].

    PubMed

    Vasícková, Petra; Pavlík, Ivo

    2010-02-01

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causative agent of hepatitis E, is a non-enveloped RNA virus. The HEV genome is formed by a nonsegmented positive-sense RNA chain with a 3'-terminal polyadenylated tail and a 5'-terminal cap. According to the currently accepted taxonomy, HEV is classified in the genus Hepevirus, the sole member of the family Hepeviridae. Hepatitis E is usually transmitted by the faecal-oral route due to poor sanitation and contamination of drinking water or water for industrial purposes. This has been reported in developing countries of Asia, Africa, South and Central America. In countries with sporadic hepatitis E, the reported cases have been associated with travelling to the above countries. Recently, zoonotic and foodborne transmission of HEV has been widely discussed.

  1. Hepatitis C virus associated glomerulopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ozkok, Abdullah; Yildiz, Alaattin

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a systemic disorder which is often associated with a number of extrahepatic manifestations including glomerulopathies. Patients with HCV infection were found to have a higher risk of end-stage renal disease. HCV positivity has also been linked to lower graft and patient survivals after kidney transplantation. Various histological types of renal diseases are reported in association with HCV infection including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), membranous nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, fibrillary glomerulonephritis, immunotactoid glomerulopathy, IgA nephropathy, renal thrombotic microangiopathy, vasculitic renal involvement and interstitial nephritis. The most common type of HCV associated glomerulopathy is type I MPGN associated with type II mixed cryoglobulinemia. Clinically, typical renal manifestations in HCV-infected patients include proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, hypertension, acute nephritis and nephrotic syndrome. Three approaches may be suggested for the treatment of HCV-associated glomerulopathies and cryoglobulinemic renal disease: (1) antiviral therapy to prevent the further direct damage of HCV on kidneys and synthesis of immune-complexes; (2) B-cell depletion therapy to prevent formation of immune-complexes and cryoglobulins; and (3) nonspecific immunosuppressive therapy targeting inflammatory cells to prevent the synthesis of immune-complexes and to treat cryoglobulin associated vasculitis. In patients with moderate proteinuria and stable renal functions, anti-HCV therapy is advised to be started as pegylated interferon-α plus ribavirin. However in patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria and/or progressive kidney injury and other serious extra-renal manifestations, immunosuppressive therapy with cyclophosphamide, rituximab, steroid pulses and plasmapheresis should be administrated. PMID:24976695

  2. Substitution rates in hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Krushkal, J; Li, W H

    1995-12-01

    Substitution rates were estimated for the coding and noncoding regions of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV). The estimated rates of synonymous substitution in HDV were lower than the rates of substitution at non-synonymous sites and in the noncoding region. HDV has lower synonymous substitution rates than the hepatitis C virus, though both are RNA viruses. The relatively low rate of synonymous substitution in HDV may be due to a strong preference of G and C nucleotides at third codon positions. Variation in substitution rate among HDV lineages may be correlated with the clinical development of the HDV-induced hepatitis. The phylogenetic tree inferred for 24 HDV strains reveals similarities between lineages isolated from the same geographic region.

  3. Reassessing Immune Control of Hepatitis A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher M.; Feng, Zongdi; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    There is renewed interest in hepatitis A virus (HAV) pathogenesis and immunity after 2–3 decades of limited progress. From a public health perspective, the average age at infection has increased in developing countries, resulting in more severe hepatitis that is poorly understood mechanistically. More fundamentally, there is interest in comparing immunity to HAV and hepatitis C virus (HCV): small, positive-strand RNA viruses with very different infection outcomes. Here, we review evidence that circulating HAV virions are cloaked in membranes, with consequences for induction of innate immunity and antibody-mediated neutralization. We also consider the contribution of CD4+ helper versus CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to antiviral immunity and liver injury, and present a model of non-cytotoxic immune control of HAV infection. PMID:25617494

  4. Reassessing immune control of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher M; Feng, Zongdi; Lemon, Stanley M

    2015-04-01

    There is renewed interest in hepatitis A virus (HAV) pathogenesis and immunity after 2-3 decades of limited progress. From a public health perspective, the average age at infection has increased in developing countries, resulting in more severe hepatitis that is poorly understood mechanistically. More fundamentally, there is interest in comparing immunity to HAV and hepatitis C virus (HCV): small, positive-strand RNA viruses with very different infection outcomes. Here, we review evidence that circulating HAV virions are cloaked in membranes, with consequences for induction of innate immunity and antibody-mediated neutralization. We also consider the contribution of CD4+ helper versus CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to antiviral immunity and liver injury, and present a model of non-cytotoxic immune control of HAV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Whole genome sequencing and biological characterization of Duck/JS/10, a new lentogenic class I Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chunchun; Qiu, Xvsheng; Jin, Shiqiang; Yu, Shengqing; Chen, Hongjun; Ding, Chan

    2012-05-01

    A lentogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV), Duck/JS/10 (JS10), was isolated from an unvaccinated duck in China. The complete genome of the virus contained 15,198 nucleotides. Based on length of the genome and a partial sequence of the F gene, the virus was classified as a class I genotype 4 NDV. The antigenicity of the virus was compared with that of NDV strain La Sota via hemagglutination inhibition (HI), virus neutralization (VN) assay and animal experiments. Our results show that JS10 generates higher HI and VN titers than La Sota against both class I and II virulent NDV strains. Experiments on animals demonstrate that virus shedding from chickens vaccinated with JS10 is significantly reduced when compared to those vaccinated with La Sota. Overall, this study strongly suggests that JS10 may qualify as a new vaccine candidate against Newcastle disease.

  6. The Low-pH Resistance of Neuraminidase Is Essential for the Replication of Influenza A Virus in Duck Intestine following Infection via the Oral Route.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yoshikazu; Ito, Hiroshi; Ono, Etsuro; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Ito, Toshihiro

    2016-04-01

    Influenza A viruses are known to primarily replicate in duck intestine following infection via the oral route, but the specific role of neuraminidase (NA) for the intestinal tropism of influenza A viruses has been unclear. A reassortant virus (Dk78/Eng62N2) did not propagate in ducks infected via the oral route. To generate variant viruses that grow well in ducks via the oral route, we isolated viruses that effectively replicate in intestinal mucosal cells by passaging Dk78/Eng62N2 in duck via rectal-route infection. This procedure led to the isolation of a variant virus from the duck intestine. This virus was propagated using embryonated chicken eggs and inoculated into a duck via the oral route, which led to the isolation of Dk-rec6 from the duck intestine. Experimental infections with mutant viruses generated by using reverse genetics indicated that the paired mutation of residues 356 and 431 in NA was necessary for the viral replication in duck intestine. The NA assay revealed that the activity of Dk78/Eng62N2 almost disappeared after pH 3 treatment, whereas that of Dk-rec6 was maintained. Furthermore, to identify the amino acid residues associated with the low-pH resistance, we measured the activities of mutant NA proteins transiently expressed in 293 cells after pH 3 treatment. All mutant NA proteins that possessed proline at position 431 showed higher activities than NA proteins that possessed glutamine at this position. These findings indicate that the low-pH resistance of NA plays an important role in the ability of influenza A virus to replicate in duck intestine. Neuraminidase (NA) activity facilitates the release of viruses from cells and, as such, is important for the replicative efficiency of influenza A virus. Ducks are believed to serve as the principal natural reservoir for influenza A virus; however, the key properties of NA for viral infection in duck are not well understood. In this study, we identify amino acid residues in NA that contribute to

  7. Molecular and epidemiological characterization of avian influenza viruses from gulls and dabbling ducks in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wild aquatic birds constitute the natural reservoir for avian influenza viruses (AIVs). Separate Eurasian and American AIV gene pools exist. Here, the prevalence and diversity of AIVs in gulls and dabbling ducks in Norway were described. The influence of host species and temporal changes on AIV prevalence was examined. Five AIVs from Norway, including three from common gull (Larus canus), were analyzed along with 10 available AIV genomes from gulls in Eurasia to search for evidence of intracontinental and intercontinental reassortment of gene segments encoding the internal viral proteins. Methods Swabs collected from 2417 dabbling ducks and gulls in the south-west of Norway during five ordinary hunting seasons (August-December) in the period 2005–2010 were analyzed for presence of AIV. Multivariate linear regression was used to identify associations between AIV prevalence, host species and sampling time. Five AIVs from mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) (H3N8, H9N2) and common gull (H6N8, H13N2, H16N3) were full-length characterized and phylogenetically analyzed together with GenBank reference sequences. Results Low pathogenic AIVs were detected in 15.5% (CI: 14.1–17.0) of the samples. The overall AIV prevalence was lower in December compared to that found in August to November (p = 0.003). AIV was detected in 18.7% (CI: 16.8–20.6) of the dabbling ducks. A high AIV prevalence of 7.8% (CI; 5.9–10.0) was found in gulls. A similar temporal pattern in AIV prevalence was found in both bird groups. Thirteen hemagglutinin and eight neuraminidase subtypes were detected. No evidence of intercontinental reassortment was found. Eurasian avian (non H13 and H16) PB2 or PA genes were identified in five reference Eurasian gull (H13 and H16) AIV genomes from GenBank. The NA gene from the Norwegian H13N2 gull isolate was of Eurasian avian origin. Conclusions The similar temporal pattern in AIV prevalence found in dabbling ducks and gulls, the relatively high virus

  8. Molecular and epidemiological characterization of avian influenza viruses from gulls and dabbling ducks in Norway.

    PubMed

    Tønnessen, Ragnhild; Kristoffersen, Anja B; Jonassen, Christine M; Hjortaas, Monika J; Hansen, Elisabeth F; Rimstad, Espen; Hauge, Anna G

    2013-04-10

    Wild aquatic birds constitute the natural reservoir for avian influenza viruses (AIVs). Separate Eurasian and American AIV gene pools exist. Here, the prevalence and diversity of AIVs in gulls and dabbling ducks in Norway were described. The influence of host species and temporal changes on AIV prevalence was examined. Five AIVs from Norway, including three from common gull (Larus canus), were analyzed along with 10 available AIV genomes from gulls in Eurasia to search for evidence of intracontinental and intercontinental reassortment of gene segments encoding the internal viral proteins. Swabs collected from 2417 dabbling ducks and gulls in the south-west of Norway during five ordinary hunting seasons (August-December) in the period 2005-2010 were analyzed for presence of AIV. Multivariate linear regression was used to identify associations between AIV prevalence, host species and sampling time. Five AIVs from mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) (H3N8, H9N2) and common gull (H6N8, H13N2, H16N3) were full-length characterized and phylogenetically analyzed together with GenBank reference sequences. Low pathogenic AIVs were detected in 15.5% (CI: 14.1-17.0) of the samples. The overall AIV prevalence was lower in December compared to that found in August to November (p = 0.003). AIV was detected in 18.7% (CI: 16.8-20.6) of the dabbling ducks. A high AIV prevalence of 7.8% (CI; 5.9-10.0) was found in gulls. A similar temporal pattern in AIV prevalence was found in both bird groups. Thirteen hemagglutinin and eight neuraminidase subtypes were detected. No evidence of intercontinental reassortment was found. Eurasian avian (non H13 and H16) PB2 or PA genes were identified in five reference Eurasian gull (H13 and H16) AIV genomes from GenBank. The NA gene from the Norwegian H13N2 gull isolate was of Eurasian avian origin. The similar temporal pattern in AIV prevalence found in dabbling ducks and gulls, the relatively high virus prevalence detected in gulls and the evidence of

  9. Effect of age on the pathogenesis and innate immune responses in Pekin ducks infected with different H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Smith, Diane M; Wasilenko, Jamie L; Cagle, Caran; Shepherd, Eric; Sarmento, Luciana; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Afonso, Claudio L

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks varies between different viruses and is affected by the age of the ducks, with younger ducks presenting a more severe disease. In order to better understand the pathobiology of H5N1 HPAI in ducks including the role of host responses, 2 and 5-week-old Pekin ducks were infected with three different H5N1 HPAI viruses. Virus-induced pathology ranged from no clinical signs to severe disease and mortality, with the 2-week-old ducks being more severely affected by the more virulent viruses. However, these more virulent viruses induced higher body temperatures in the 5-week-old ducks than in the 2-week-old ducks indicating possible differences in innate immune responses. To analyze the ducks host responses to H5N1 HPAI virus infection, expression of innate immune-related genes was measured in the spleens and lungs of infected ducks at the peak of virus infection. IFN-α, RIG-I, and IL-6 RNA levels were increased in spleens regardless of the virus given and the age of the ducks, however differences were observed in the levels of up-regulation of IFN-α and RIG-I between the 2 and the 5-week-old ducks with the more virulent virus. Differences in IL-2 gene expression were also observed. In the lungs, the levels of expression of innate immune-related genes were lower than in the spleen, with mostly up-regulation of RIG-I and IL-6 and down-regulation of IFN-α and IL-2; no significant difference in expression was found between the 2 and the 5-week-old ducks. The differences observed in the innate immune responses to infection with H5N1 HPAI viruses could explain in part the differences in pathogenicity found between the 2 and 5-week-old ducks, however earlier time points after infection and additional innate immune-related genes should be examined. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Development of a nano-particle-assisted PCR assay for detection of duck tembusu virus.

    PubMed

    Wanzhe, Y; Jianuan, L; Peng, L; Jiguo, S; Ligong, C; Juxiang, L

    2016-01-01

    Duck tembusu virus (DTMUV) has caused significant economic losses to the poultry industry in China since the spring of 2010. In this study, a nano-PCR assay targeting E gene of DTMUV was developed and their sensitivities and specificities were investigated. Under the optimized conditions of nano-PCR assay for detection of DTMUV, the nano-PCR assay was 10-fold more sensitive than a conventional PCR assay. The lower detection limit of the nano-PCR assay was 1·8 × 10(2)  copies μl(-1) of DTMUV RNA, as no cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. This is the first report to demonstrate the application of a nano-PCR assay for the detection of DTMUV. The sensitive, and specific nano-PCR assay developed in this study can be applied widely in clinical diagnosis and field surveillance of DTMUV-infection. A nanoparticle-assisted polymerase chain reaction (nano-PCR) assay was developed in this study for the rapid detection of duck tembusu virus (DTMUV) with high sensitivity and specificity. This technique has potential application in both clinical diagnosis and field surveillance of DTMUV-infection. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. An attenuated duck plague virus (DPV) vaccine induces both systemic and mucosal immune responses to protect ducks against virulent DPV infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Juan; Jia, Renyong; Wang, Mingshu; Shu, Bing; Yu, Xia; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Yin, Zhongqiong; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2014-04-01

    Duck plague (DP) is a severe disease caused by DP virus (DPV). Control of the disease is recognized as one of the biggest challenges in avian medicine. Vaccination is an efficient way to control DPV, and an attenuated vaccine is the main routine vaccine. The attenuated DPV vaccine strain CHa is a modified live vaccine, but the systemic and mucosal immune responses induced by this vaccine have been poorly understood. In this study, the immunogenicity and efficacy of the vaccine were evaluated after subcutaneous immunization of ducks. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were counted by flow cytometry, and humoral and mucosal Ig antibodies were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed that high levels of T cells and Ig antibodies were present postimmunization and that there were more CD4(+) T cells than CD8(+) T cells. Titers of humoral IgG were higher than those of humoral IgA. Local IgA was found in each sample, whereas local IgG was found only in the spleen, thymus, bursa of Fabricius, harderian gland, liver, bile, and lung. In a protection assay, the attenuated DPV vaccine completely protected ducks against 1,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of the lethal DPV strain CHv via oral infection. These data suggest that this subcutaneous vaccine elicits sufficient systemic and mucosal immune responses against lethal DPV challenge to be protective in ducks. This study provides broad insights into understanding the immune responses to the attenuated DPV vaccine strain CHa through subcutaneous immunization in ducks.

  12. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein and Hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuaichen; Koh, Samantha S. Y.; Lee, Caroline G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the most associated factors in hepatocarcinogenesis. HBV is able to integrate into the host genome and encode the multi-functional hepatitis B virus x protein (HBx). Although the mechanism between HBx and carcinogenesis is still elusive, recent studies have shown that HBx was able to influence various signaling pathways, as well as epigenetic and genetic processes. This review will examine and summarize recent literature about HBx’s role in these various processes. PMID:27314335

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection in nephrology patients.

    PubMed

    Rostaing, Lionel; Izopet, Jacques; Kamar, Nassim

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to chronic liver disease, but also to extra-hepatic manifestations. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Herein, we provide an overview of renal diseases related to HCV and their therapies, as well as the treatment options available for HCV (+)/RNA (+) dialysis patients. We will not mention, however, HCV infection-related complications in the post-kidney transplantation setting. Extra-hepatic manifestations of HCV infection include mixed cryoglobulinemia, lymphoproliferative disorders, and renal disease. HCV infection has been reported in association with distinct histological patterns of glomerulonephritis in native kidneys.

  14. Clinical and virological improvement of hepatitis B virus-related or hepatitis C virus-related chronic hepatitis with concomitant hepatitis A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Evangelista; Coppola, Nicola; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Pisapia, Raffaella; Onofrio, Mirella; Sagnelli, Caterina; Catuogno, Antonio; Scolastico, Carlo; Piccinino, Felice; Filippini, Pietro

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the clinical and virological characteristics of hepatitis A virus infection in persons concomitantly infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV). We enrolled 21 patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis with no sign of liver cirrhosis, 13 patients who were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (case B group), 8 patients who were anti-HCV positive (case C group), and 21 patients with acute hepatitis A without a preexisting liver disease (control A group). Two control groups of patients with chronic hepatitis B (control B group) or C (control C group) were also chosen. All control groups were pair-matched by age and sex with the corresponding case group. Fulminant hepatitis A was never observed, and hepatitis A had a severe course in 1 patient in the case B group and in 1 patient in the control A group. Both patients recovered. On admission, HBV DNA was detected in 1 patient in the case B group (7.7%) and in 13 patients (50%) in the control B group; HCV RNA was found in no patient in the case C group and in 16 patients (81.2%) in the control C group. Of 9 patients in the case B group who were followed up for 6 months, 3 became negative for hepatitis B surface antigen and positive for hepatitis B surface antibody, 2 remained positive for hepatitis B surface antigen and negative for HBV DNA, and 4 became positive for HBV DNA with a low viral load [corrected] Of 6 patients in the case C group who were followed up for 6 months, 3 remained negative for HCV RNA, and 3 had persistently low viral loads. Concomitant hepatitis A was always self-limited, associated with a marked inhibition of HBV and HCV genomes, and possibly had a good prognosis for the underlying chronic hepatitis.

  15. Hepatitis B and hepatitis delta virus infection in South America.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, J R

    1996-01-01

    About 100,000 cases of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occur annually in South America. The overall prevalence of HBV infection in low risk populations ranges from 6.7% to 41%, while hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) rates range from 0.4% to 13%. In high endemicity aboriginal or rural populations, perinatal transmission may play a major part in the spread of HBV. In urban populations, however, horizontal transmission, probably by sexual contact, is the predominant mode of spread, with higher rates of HBV positivity in lower socioeconomic groups. High risk populations such as health care workers and haemodialysis patients show higher rates of HBV infection than comparable populations elsewhere. The risk of posttransfusion hepatitis B remains high in some areas. Concomitant HBV infection may accelerate the chronic liver disease seen in decompensated hepatosplenic schistosomiasis. In the north, the prevalence of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection ranks among the highest in the world. In the south, the problem appears negligible although it is increasing within high risk urban communities. HDV superinfection has been the cause of large outbreaks of fulminant hepatitis. The cost of comprehensive or mass vaccination programmes remains unaffordable for most South American countries. Less expensive alternatives such as low dose intradermal schedules of immunisation have been used with success in selected adult subjects. PMID:8786054

  16. Nucleotide sequence of a cloned woodchuck hepatitis virus genome: comparison with the hepatitis B virus sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Galibert, F; Chen, T N; Mandart, E

    1982-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a woodchuck hepatitis virus genome cloned in Escherichia coli was determined by the method of Maxam and Gilbert. This sequence was found to be 3,308 nucleotides long. Potential ATG initiator triplets and nonsense codons were identified and used to locate regions with a substantial coding capacity. A striking similarity was observed between the organization of human hepatitis B virus and woodchuck hepatitis virus. Nucleotide sequences of these open regions in the woodchuck virus were compared with corresponding regions present in hepatitis B virus. This allowed the location of four viral genes on the L strand and indicated the absence of protein coded by the S strand. Evolution rates of the various parts of the genome as well as of the four different proteins coded by hepatitis B virus and woodchuck hepatitis virus were compared. These results indicated that: (i) the core protein has evolved slightly less rapidly than the other proteins; and (ii) when a region of DNA codes for two different proteins, there is less freedom for the DNA to evolve and, moreover, one of the proteins can evolve more rapidly than the other. A hairpin structure, very well conserved in the two genomes, was located in the only region devoid of coding function, suggesting the location of the origin of replication of the viral DNA. Images PMID:7086958

  17. Low-Pathogenic Influenza A Viruses in North American Diving Ducks Contribute to the Emergence of a Novel Highly Pathogenic Influenza A(H7N8) Virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifei; Ramey, Andrew M; Bowman, Andrew S; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Killian, Mary L; Krauss, Scott; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Torchetti, Mia Kim; Reeves, Andrew B; Webby, Richard J; Stallknecht, David E; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2017-05-01

    Introductions of low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses of subtypes H5 and H7 into poultry from wild birds have the potential to mutate to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, but such viruses' origins are often unclear. In January 2016, a novel H7N8 HPAI virus caused an outbreak in turkeys in Indiana, USA. To determine the virus's origin, we sequenced the genomes of 441 wild-bird origin influenza A viruses (IAVs) from North America and subjected them to evolutionary analyses. The results showed that the H7N8 LPAI virus most likely circulated among diving ducks in the Mississippi flyway during autumn 2015 and was subsequently introduced to Indiana turkeys, in which it evolved high pathogenicity. Preceding the outbreak, an isolate with six gene segments (PB2, PB1, PA, HA, NA, and NS) sharing >99% sequence identity with those of H7N8 turkey isolates was recovered from a diving duck sampled in Kentucky, USA. H4N8 IAVs from other diving ducks possessed five H7N8-like gene segments (PB2, PB1, NA, MP, and NS; >98% sequence identity). Our findings suggest that viral gene constellations circulating among diving ducks can contribute to the emergence of IAVs that affect poultry. Therefore, diving ducks may serve an important and understudied role in the maintenance, diversification, and transmission of IAVs in the wild-bird reservoir.IMPORTANCE In January 2016, a novel H7N8 HPAI virus caused a disease outbreak in turkeys in Indiana, USA. To determine the origin of this virus, we sequenced and analyzed 441 wild-bird origin influenza virus strains isolated from wild birds inhabiting North America. We found that the H7N8 LPAI virus most likely circulated among diving ducks in the Mississippi flyway during autumn 2015 and was subsequently introduced to Indiana turkeys, in which it evolved high pathogenicity. Our results suggest that viral gene constellations circulating among diving ducks can contribute to the emergence of IAVs that affect poultry. Therefore

  18. Seroepidemiology of hepatitis A and hepatitis B virus in Luxembourg.

    PubMed

    Mossong, J; Putz, L; Patiny, S; Schneider, F

    2006-08-01

    A prospective seroepidemiological survey was carried out in Luxembourg in 2000-2001 to determine the antibody status of the Luxembourg population against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). One of the objectives of this survey was to assess the impact of the hepatitis B vaccination programme, which started in May 1996 and included a catch-up campaign for all adolescents aged 12-15 years. Venous blood from 2679 individuals was screened for the presence of antibodies to HAV antigen and antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) using an enzyme immunoassay. Samples positive for anti-HBs were tested for antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) using a chemiluminiscent microparticle immunoassay to distinguish between individuals with past exposure to vaccine or natural infection. The estimated age-standardized anti-HAV seroprevalence was 42.0% [95% confidence interval (CI) 39.8-44.1] in the population >4 years of age. Seroprevalence was age-dependent and highest in adult immigrants from Portugal and the former Yugoslavia. The age-standardized prevalence of anti-HBs and anti-HBc was estimated at 19.7% (95% CI 18.1-21.3) and 3.16% (95% CI 2.2-4.1) respectively. Anti-HBs seroprevalence exceeding 50% was found in the cohorts targeted by the routine hepatitis B vaccination programme, which started in 1996. Our study illustrates that most young people in Luxembourg are susceptible to HAV infection and that the hepatitis B vaccination programme is having a substantial impact on population immunity in children and teenagers.

  19. Serological evidence of widespread West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus infection in native domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var domesticus) in Kuttanad region, Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Kalaiyarasu, Semmannan; Mishra, Niranjan; Khetan, Rohit Kumar; Singh, Vijendra Pal

    2016-10-01

    Birds can act as reservoirs of West Nile virus (WNV) with a key role in its epidemiology. WNV lineage 1 associated fatal cases of human encephalitis in 2011 and acute flaccid paralysis in 2013 were reported in Alappuzha district, Kerala, India. But no information is available on WNV circulation in domestic ducks, which are abundant, cohabit with humans and occupy wetlands and water bodies in the region. To determine the extent of WNV infection, we investigated 209 sera, 250 oral and 350 cloacal swab samples from local Chara and Chemballi domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var domesticus) in the districts of Alappuzha, Kottayam, Kollam and Pathanamthitta collected during January and March 2015. The serum samples were tested for WNV antibodies first by a competition ELISA and then by a micro virus neutralization test (micro-VNT), while oral and cloacal swabs were subjected to WNV real-time RT-PCR. Ninety five ducks showed evidence of flavivirus antibodies by ELISA. End point neutralizing antibody titre against WNV and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) revealed WNV specific antibodies in 24 (11.5%) ducks in 3 districts, JEV specific antibodies in 21 (10%) ducks in 2 districts and flavivirus specific antibodies in 19 (9%) ducks. However, no WNV genomic RNA could be detected. The results of this study demonstrate evidence of widespread WNV and JEV infection in domestic ducks in Kuttanad region, Kerala with a higher seroprevalence to WNV than JEV. Additionally, it highlights the utility of domestic ducks as a surveillance tool to detect WNV/JEV circulation in a region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel Hepatitis E Virus Genotype in Norway Rats, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Johne, Reimar; Heckel, Gerald; Plenge-Bönig, Anita; Kindler, Eveline; Maresch, Christina; Reetz, Jochen; Schielke, Anika

    2010-01-01

    Human hepatitis E virus infections may be caused by zoonotic transmission of virus genotypes 3 and 4. To determine whether rodents are a reservoir, we analyzed the complete nucleotide sequence of a hepatitis E–like virus from 2 Norway rats in Germany. The sequence suggests a separate genotype for this hepatotropic virus. PMID:20735931

  1. Advances and challenges in the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines against hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cova, Lucyna

    2014-01-01

    Despite the existence of an effective prophylactic vaccine, chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem. Because very weak and functionally impaired virus-specific immune responses play a key role in the persistence of HBV infection, the stimulation of these responses appears to be of particular importance for virus clearance. In this regard DNA-based vaccination has emerged as novel, promising therapeutic approach for chronic hepatitis B. This review provides an update of preclinical studies in animal models (mouse, chimpanzee, duck, woodchuck), which evaluated the ability of DNA vaccines targeting hepadnaviral proteins to induce potent and sustained immune responses in naïve animals and to enhance virus clearance and break immune tolerance in chronic virus-carriers. Different strategies have been developed and evaluated in these models to optimize DNA vaccine including genetic adjuvants, combination with antiviral drugs, prime-boost regimens and plasmid delivery. The delivery of DNA by in vivo electroporation appears to be of particular interest for increase of vaccine potency in both small and large animal models. Based on the promising results generated in preclinical studies, first clinical trials of DNA vaccines have been initiated, although effective therapy of chronic hepatitis B awaits further improvements in vaccine efficacy.

  2. A 4-year study of avian influenza virus prevalence and subtype diversity in ducks of Newfoundland, Canada.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyan; Wille, Michelle; Dobbin, Ashley; Robertson, Gregory J; Ryan, Pierre; Ojkic, Davor; Whitney, Hugh; Lang, Andrew S

    2013-10-01

    The island of Newfoundland, Canada, is at the eastern edge of North America and has migratory bird connections with the continental mainland as well as across the North Atlantic Ocean. Here, we report a 4-year avian influenza virus (AIV) epidemiological study in ducks in the St. John's region of Newfoundland. The overall prevalence of AIV detection in ducks during this study was 7.2%, with American Black Ducks contributing the vast majority of the collected samples and the AIV positives. The juvenile ducks showed a significantly higher AIV detection rate (10.6%) compared with adults (3.4%). Seasonally, AIV prevalence rates were higher in the autumn (8.4%), but positives were still detected in the winter (4.6%). Preliminary serology tests showed a high incidence of previous AIV infection (20/38, 52.6%). A total of 43 viruses were characterized for their HA-NA or HA subtypes, which revealed a large diversity of AIV subtypes and little recurrence of subtypes from year to year. Investigation of the movement patterns of ducks in this region showed that it is a largely non-migratory duck population, which may contribute to the observed pattern of high AIV subtype turnover. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 H1N1 and one H5N4 AIVs showed these viruses were highly similar to other low pathogenic AIV sequences from waterfowl in North America and assigned all gene segments into American-avian clades. Notably, the H1N1 viruses, which were identified in consecutive years, possessed homologous genomes. Such detection of homologous AIV genomes across years is rare, but indicates the role of the environmental reservoir in viral perpetuation.

  3. Hepatitis E Virus and Related Viruses in Animals.

    PubMed

    Thiry, D; Mauroy, A; Pavio, N; Purdy, M A; Rose, N; Thiry, E; de Oliveira-Filho, E F

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis E is an acute human liver disease in healthy individuals which may eventually become chronic. It is caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV) and can have a zoonotic origin. Nearly 57,000 people die yearly from hepatitis E-related conditions. The disease is endemic in both developing and developed countries with distinct epidemiologic profiles. In developing countries, the disease is associated with inadequate water treatment, while in developed countries, transmission is associated with animal contact and the ingestion of raw or uncooked meat, especially liver. All human HEV are grouped into at least four genotypes, while HEV or HEV-related viruses have been identified in an increasing number of domestic and wild animal species. Despite a high genetic diversity, only one single HEV serotype has been described to date for HEV genotypes 1-4. The discovery of new HEV or HEV-related viruses leads to a continuing increase in the number of genotypes. In addition, the genome organization of all these viruses is variable with overlapping open reading frames (ORF) and differences in the location of ORF3. In spite of the role of some domestic and wild animals as reservoir, the origin of HEV and HEV-related viruses in humans and animals is still unclear. This review discusses aspects of the detection, molecular virology, zoonotic transmission and origin of HEV and HEV-related viruses in the context of 'One Health' and establishes a link between the previous and the new taxonomy of this growing virus family.

  4. Replication strategy of human hepatitis B virus

    SciTech Connect

    Will, H.; Reiser, W.; Weimer, T.; Pfaff, E.; Buescher, M.; Sprengel, R.; Cattaneo, R.; Schaller, H.

    1987-03-01

    To study the replication strategy of the human hepatitis B virus, the 5' end of the RNA pregenome and the initiation sites of DNA plus and minus strands have been mapped. The RNA pregenome was found to be terminally redundant by 120 nucleotides; it is initiated within the pre-C region and may also function as mRNA for synthesis of the major core protein and the hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase. The hepatitis B virus DNA minus strand is initiated within the direct repeat sequence DR1, it contains a terminal redundancy of up to eight nucleotides, and its synthesis does not require any template switch. The DNA plus strand is primed by a short oligoribonucleotide probably derived from the 5' end of the RNA pregenome, and its synthesis is initiated close to the direct repeat sequence DR2. For its elongation to pass the discontinuity in the DNA minus strand an intramolecular template switch occurs using the terminal redundancy of this template. Thus, the route of reverse transcription and DNA replication of hepatitis B viruses is fundamentally different from that of retroviruses.

  5. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens. PMID:27784846

  6. An update on the hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Sclair, Seth N; Schiff, Eugene R

    2013-02-01

    There have been recent key advances in the understanding of hepatitis E virus infection. Since the early 1980s, when the virus was first discovered, hepatitis E has been described as a disease that is endemic only in the African and Asian subcontinents, a disease that is transmitted via the fecal-oral route, and a disease that causes an acute illness that typically resolves, with the exception of the third trimester of pregnancy, when infection can be deadly. We now know that genotype 3 is likely a porcine zoonotic disease that is quite prevalent in certain industrialized nations. Hepatitis E carries high morbidity and mortality in patients with underlying liver disease and can become a chronic infection that causes fibrosis in immunocompromised hosts. Lastly, two vaccines have been developed and studied in clinical trials, with excellent results.

  7. Genome-wide gene expression pattern underlying differential host response to high or low pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus in ducks.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Vijayakumar, P; Gandhale, P N; Ranaware, P B; Kumar, H; Kulkarni, D D; Raut, A A; Mishra, A

    The differences in the influenza viral pathogenesis observed between different pathogenic strains are associated with distinct properties of virus strains and the host immune responses. In order to determine the differences in the duck immune response against two different pathogenic strains, we studied genome-wide host immune gene response of ducks infected with A/duck/India/02CA10/2011 and A/duck/Tripura/103597/2008 H5N1 viruses using custom-designed microarray. A/duck/India/02CA10/2011 is highly pathogenic virus (HP) to ducks, whereas A/duck/Tripura/103597/2008 is a low pathogenic (LP) virus strain. Comparative lung tissue transcriptome analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed that 686 genes were commonly expressed, 880 and 1556 genes are expressed uniquely to infection with HP and LP virus, respectively. The up-regulation of chemokines (CCL4 and CXCR4) and IFN-stimulated genes (IFITM2, STAT3, TGFB1 and TGFB3) was observed in the lung tissues of ducks infected with HP virus. The up-regulation of other immune genes (IL17, OAS, SOCS3, MHC I and MHC II) was observed in both infection conditions. The expression of important antiviral immune genes MX, IFIT5, IFITM5, ISG12, β-defensins, RSAD2, EIF2AK2, TRIM23 and SLC16A3 was observed in LP virus infection, but not in HP virus infection. Several immune-related gene ontology terms and pathways activated by both the viruses were qualitatively similar but quantitatively different. Based on these findings, the differences in the host immune response might explain a part of the difference observed in the viral pathogenesis of high and low pathogenic influenza strains in ducks.

  8. Recombinant egg drop syndrome subunit vaccine offers an alternative to virus propagation in duck eggs.

    PubMed

    Gutter, B; Fingerut, E; Gallili, G; Eliahu, D; Perelman, B; Finger, A; Pitcovski, J

    2008-02-01

    Egg drop syndrome (EDS) virus vaccines are routinely produced in embryonated duck eggs (Solyom et al., 1982). This procedure poses the risk of dissemination of pathogens, such as avian influenza virus, as the eggs used are not from specific pathogen free birds. To address this problem, the knob and part of the shaft domain of the fibre protein of the EDS virus (termed knob-s) were expressed in Escherichia coli and assessed as a subunit vaccine. A single vaccination with the recombinant protein induced the production of anti-EDS virus antibodies, as detected by haemagglutination inhibition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization tests, for at least 20 weeks. A positive correlation was demonstrated between these three assays. A dose-response assessment showed that the vaccine was effective over the range of 2 to 64 microg protein per dose. Two vaccinations with the recombinant protein, administered before the onset of lay, induced high haemagglutination inhibition antibody titres, comparable with those induced by an inactivated whole-virus vaccine. The vaccine did not have any adverse effects on egg production, quality or weight. The present study has shown that two vaccinations with the recombinant knob-s protein elicited high neutralizing antibody titres that persisted for more than 50 weeks of lay.

  9. Infectious bursal disease virus antibodies in eider ducks and Herring Gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmen, T.; Franson, J. Christian; Docherty, Douglas E.; Kilpi, Mikael; Hario, Martti; Creekmore, Lynn H.; Petersen, Margaret R.

    2000-01-01

    We measured antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) in blood of nesting Common Eider (Somateria mollissima) females and immature Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) in the Baltic Sea, and in blood of Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri) females nesting in a remote area of western Alaska. Positive (??? 1:16) IBDV titers occurred in 75% of the eiders and 45% of the Herring Gull chicks. In eiders, the prevalence of positive titers differed among locations. We found no evidence that IBDV exposure impaired the immune function of Herring Gull chicks, based on their response to inoculation of sheep red blood cells. We suggest that eider ducks and Herring Gulls have been exposed to IBDV, even in locations where contact with poultry is unlikely. The presence of this virus in wild bird populations is of concern because it causes mortality of up to 30% in susceptible poultry.

  10. Differences in innate immune responses to H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection between Pekin, Muscovy and Mallard ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ducks have been implicated in the dissemination and evolution of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. However, differences in pathogenicity and response to vaccination have been observed between different duck species. In this study we examined the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viru...

  11. Experimentally Infected Domestic Ducks Show Efficient Transmission of Indonesian H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus, but Lack Persistent Viral Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Wibawa, Hendra; Bingham, John; Nuradji, Harimurti; Lowther, Sue; Payne, Jean; Harper, Jenni; Junaidi, Akhmad; Middleton, Deborah; Meers, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Ducks are important maintenance hosts for avian influenza, including H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. A previous study indicated that persistence of H5N1 viruses in ducks after the development of humoral immunity may drive viral evolution following immune selection. As H5N1 HPAI is endemic in Indonesia, this mechanism may be important in understanding H5N1 evolution in that region. To determine the capability of domestic ducks to maintain prolonged shedding of Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 virus, two groups of Pekin ducks were inoculated through the eyes, nostrils and oropharynx and viral shedding and transmission investigated. Inoculated ducks (n = 15), which were mostly asymptomatic, shed infectious virus from the oral route from 1 to 8 days post inoculation, and from the cloacal route from 2–8 dpi. Viral ribonucleic acid was detected from 1–15 days post inoculation from the oral route and 1–24 days post inoculation from the cloacal route (cycle threshold <40). Most ducks seroconverted in a range of serological tests by 15 days post inoculation. Virus was efficiently transmitted during acute infection (5 inoculation-infected to all 5 contact ducks). However, no evidence for transmission, as determined by seroconversion and viral shedding, was found between an inoculation-infected group (n = 10) and contact ducks (n = 9) when the two groups only had contact after 10 days post inoculation. Clinical disease was more frequent and more severe in contact-infected (2 of 5) than inoculation-infected ducks (1 of 15). We conclude that Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus does not persist in individual ducks after acute infection. PMID:24392085

  12. Experimentally infected domestic ducks show efficient transmission of Indonesian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, but lack persistent viral shedding.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, Hendra; Bingham, John; Nuradji, Harimurti; Lowther, Sue; Payne, Jean; Harper, Jenni; Junaidi, Akhmad; Middleton, Deborah; Meers, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Ducks are important maintenance hosts for avian influenza, including H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. A previous study indicated that persistence of H5N1 viruses in ducks after the development of humoral immunity may drive viral evolution following immune selection. As H5N1 HPAI is endemic in Indonesia, this mechanism may be important in understanding H5N1 evolution in that region. To determine the capability of domestic ducks to maintain prolonged shedding of Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 virus, two groups of Pekin ducks were inoculated through the eyes, nostrils and oropharynx and viral shedding and transmission investigated. Inoculated ducks (n = 15), which were mostly asymptomatic, shed infectious virus from the oral route from 1 to 8 days post inoculation, and from the cloacal route from 2-8 dpi. Viral ribonucleic acid was detected from 1-15 days post inoculation from the oral route and 1-24 days post inoculation from the cloacal route (cycle threshold <40). Most ducks seroconverted in a range of serological tests by 15 days post inoculation. Virus was efficiently transmitted during acute infection (5 inoculation-infected to all 5 contact ducks). However, no evidence for transmission, as determined by seroconversion and viral shedding, was found between an inoculation-infected group (n = 10) and contact ducks (n = 9) when the two groups only had contact after 10 days post inoculation. Clinical disease was more frequent and more severe in contact-infected (2 of 5) than inoculation-infected ducks (1 of 15). We conclude that Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus does not persist in individual ducks after acute infection.

  13. Interregional transmission of the internal protein genes of H2 influenza virus in migratory ducks from North America to Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Hua; Okazaki, Katsunori; Bai, Gui-Rong; Shi, Wei-Min; Mweene, Aaron; Kida, Hiroshi

    2004-08-01

    H2 influenza virus caused a pandemic in 1957 and has the possibility to cause outbreaks in the future. To assess the evolutionary characteristics of H2 influenza viruses isolated from migratory ducks that congregate in Hokkaido, Japan, on their flyway of migration from Siberia in 2001, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships among these viruses and avian and human viruses described previously. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the PB2 gene of Dk/Hokkaido/107/01 (H2N3) and the PA gene of Dk/Hokkaido/95/01 (H2N2) belonged to the American lineage of avian virus and that the other genes of the isolates belonged to the Eurasian lineage. These results indicate that the internal protein genes might be transmitted from American to Eurasian avian host. Thus, it is further confirmed that interregional transmission of influenza viruses occurred between the North American and Eurasian birds. The fact that reassortants could be generated in the migratory ducks between North American and Eurasian avian virus lineage further stresses the importance of global surveillance among the migratory ducks.

  14. Pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kohla, M; Bonacini, M

    2006-06-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a single stranded RNA virus. In 60-80% of patients, it is able to escape innate and adaptive immune surveillance. Thus it establishes itself as an agent of chronic hepatitis. Cytotoxic lymphocytes then contribute to liver injury in an attempt to eradicate the virus. On the other hand, strong multispecific T-lymphocyte reaction against HCV proteins is associated with viral clearance. Both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte functions are important to effect this outcome. In chronic infection, genetic and environmental factors determine the progression of inflammation and fibrosis in individual patients. Of these factors, age, gender, race and alcohol use are the most established ones. The development of hepatocellular carcinoma is mainly restricted to patients with cirrhosis.

  15. Tissue tropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in naturally infected mute swans (Cygnus Olor ), domestic geese (Aser Anser var. domestica), pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) and mulard ducks ( Cairina moschata x anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Szeredi, Levente; Dán, Adám; Pálmai, Nimród; Ursu, Krisztina; Bálint, Adám; Szeleczky, Zsófia; Ivanics, Eva; Erdélyi, Károly; Rigó, Dóra; Tekes, Lajos; Glávits, Róbert

    2010-03-01

    The 2006 epidemic due to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) subtype H5N1 in Hungary caused the most severe losses in waterfowl which were, according to the literature at the time, supposed to be the most resistant to this pathogen. The presence of pathological lesions and the amount of viral antigen were quantified by gross pathology, histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the organs of four waterfowl species [mute swans (n = 10), domestic geese (n = 6), mulard ducks (n = 6) and Pekin ducks (n = 5)] collected during the epidemic. H5N1 subtype HPAIV was isolated from all birds examined. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRRT-PCR) was also applied on a subset of samples [domestic geese (n = 3), mulard (n = 4) and Pekin duck (n = 4)] in order to compare its sensitivity with IHC. Viral antigen was detected by IHC in all cases. However, the overall presence of viral antigen in tissue samples was quite variable: virus antigen was present in 56/81 (69%) swan, 22/38 (58%) goose, 28/46 (61%) mulard duck and 5/43 (12%) Pekin duck tissue samples. HPAIV subtype H5N1 was detected by qRRT-PCR in all birds examined, in 19/19 (100%) goose, 7/28 (25%) mulard duck and 12/28 (43%) Pekin duck tissue samples. As compared to qRRTPCR, the IHC was less sensitive in geese and Pekin ducks but more sensitive in mulard ducks. The IHC was consistently positive above 4.31 log10 copies/reaction but it gave very variable results below that level. Neurotropism of the isolated virus strains was demonstrated by finding the largest amount of viral antigen and the highest average RNA load in the brain in all four waterfowl species examined.

  16. Epidemiology of mammalian hepatitis E virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Mamadou; Moal, Valérie; Gérolami, René; Colson, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian hepatitis E virus (HEV), the etiological agent of hepatitis E in humans, is a recently discovered infectious agent. It was identified for the first time in 1983 using electron microscopy on a faecal specimen of a person infected with non-A, non-B enterically-transmitted hepatitis. Based on retrospective and prospective studies, HEV was long described as one of the leading causes of acute viral hepatitis in tropical and subtropical countries, whereas in developed countries hepatitis E was considered an imported disease from HEV hyperendemic countries. Data from studies conducted during the past decade have greatly shifted our knowledge on the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of HEV. Recently, it has been shown that contrary to previous beliefs, hepatitis E is also an endemic disease in several developed countries, particularly in Japan and in Europe, as evidenced by reports of high anti-HEV immunoglobulin G prevalence in healthy individuals and an increasing number of non-travel-related acute hepatitis E cases. Moreover, a porcine reservoir and growing evidence of zoonotic transmission have been reported in these countries. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the epidemiology and prevention of transmission of mammalian HEV. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that express hepatitis B virus surface antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Mackett, Michael; Moss, Bernard

    1983-04-01

    Potential live vaccines against hepatitis B virus have been produced. The coding sequence for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) has been inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under control of vaccinia virus early promoters. Cells infected with these vaccinia virus recombinants synthesize and excrete HBsAg and vaccinated rabbits rapidly produce antibodies to HBsAg.

  18. Hepatitis E virus: the current scenario.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Subrat; Subhadra, Subhra; Singh, Bhupinder; Panda, B K

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis E infection, caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV), is a common cause of acute hepatitis in developing countries with poor sanitation and hygiene. The virus is classified into four genotypes (1-4) with one serotype. Genotypes 1 and 2 exclusively infect humans, whereas genotypes 3 and 4 also infect other animals, particularly pigs. In endemic areas, large outbreaks of acute hepatitis caused by viruses of genotype 1 or 2 frequently occur due to fecal-oral transmission, usually through contamination of drinking water. With a high attack rate in young adults (aged 15-45 years), the disease is particularly severe among pregnant women (20-30% mortality). HEV appears to be a zoonotic disease, with transmission from pigs, wild boars, and deer, or foodborne. Chronic infections are rare, except in immunosuppressed persons, such as organ transplant recipients. A subunit vaccine has been shown to be effective in preventing the clinical disease, but is not yet commercially available. Our understanding of HEV has undergone major changes in recent years and in this article we review the currently available information with regard to the molecular biology, pathobiology, and epidemiology of HEV infection. We also review the current therapeutic interventions and strategies being used to control HEV infection, with emphasis on possible approaches that could be used to develop an effective vaccine against HEV. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Noninvasive Monitoring of Hepatic Damage from Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alavez-Ramírez, J.; Fuentes-Allen, J. L.; López-Estrada, J.

    2011-01-01

    The mathematical model for the dynamics of the hepatitis C proposed in Avendaño et al. (2002), with four populations (healthy and unhealthy hepatocytes, the viral load of the hepatitis C virus, and T killer cells), is revised. Showing that the reduced model obtained by considering only the first three of these populations, known as basic model, has two possible equilibrium states: the uninfected one where viruses are not present in the individual, and the endemic one where viruses and infected cells are present. A threshold parameter (the basic reproductive virus number) is introduced, and in terms of it, the global stability of both two possible equilibrium states is established. Other central result consists in showing, by model numerical simulations, the feasibility of monitoring liver damage caused by HCV, avoiding unnecessary biopsies and the undesirable related inconveniences/imponderables to the patient; another result gives a mathematical modelling basis to recently developed techniques for the disease assessment based essentially on viral load measurements. PMID:21331263

  20. Hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus coinfections.

    PubMed

    Dodig, M; Tavill, A S

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is estimated that 30% to 50% of patients with HIV are coinfected with HCV. Advances in antiretroviral therapy and improved life expectancy of HIV patients have resulted in an emergence of HCV-induced liver disease as a leading cause of significant morbidity and death in this population. Clinically, hepatitis C is a more severe disease in HIV-infected individuals, characterized by rapid progression toward end-stage liver disease. Highly active antiretroviral therapy is the mainstay of current acquired immunodeficiency syndrome management. One of the limiting side effects of combination therapy for HIV is hepatotoxicity, which is more common and often more serious in patients with underlying liver disease. Management of coinfected patients has no strict guidelines, but it is generally accepted that HIV infection needs to be treated before HCV. Hepatitis C in coinfected individuals is probably best treated using combination therapy (interferon alpha and ribavirin). It appears that combination therapy can safely be administered to this population and that previous concerns about ribavirin/zidovudine antagonism are unsubstantiated in clinical practice. Although initial results using only interferon alpha showed poor results in HIV coinfected patients, combination therapy seems to be as effective as in the general population. All HIV-HCV coinfected patients should be vaccinated against hepatitis B and hepatitis A; vaccines are safe and effective.

  1. A plant-derived edible vaccine against hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, J; Modelska, A; Figlerowicz, M; Pniewski, T; Letellier, M; Lisowa, O; Yusibov, V; Koprowski, H; Plucienniczak, A; Legocki, A B

    1999-10-01

    The infectious hepatitis B virus represents 42 nm spherical double-shelled particles. However, analysis of blood from hepatitis B virus carriers revealed the presence of smaller 22 nm particles consisting of a viral envelope surface protein. These particles are highly immunogenic and have been used in the design of hepatitis B virus vaccine produced in yeast. Upon expression in yeast, these proteins form virus-like particles that are used for parenteral immunization. Therefore, the DNA fragment encoding hepatitis B virus surface antigen was introduced into Agrobacterium tumerifacience LBA4404 and used to obtain transgenic lupin (Lupinus luteus L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cv. Burpee Bibb expressing envelope surface protein. Mice that were fed the transgenic lupin tissue developed significant levels of hepatitis B virus-specific antibodies. Human volunteers, fed with transgenic lettuce plants expressing hepatitis B virus surface antigen, developed specific serum-IgG response to plant produced protein.

  2. Autoimmune diseases co-existing with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Jadali, Zohreh; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed

    2010-12-01

    Autoimmunity and viral infections are closely associated fields, and viruses have been proposed as a likely aetiological, contributory or triggering factors of systemic autoimmune diseases. Hepatitis C virus seems to be the virus usually associated with the appearance of autoimmune diseases, and the relationship between chronic hepatitis C virus infection and some autoimmune disease has been studied. For some of these disorders their association with hepatitis C virus infection is well recognized while for others it remains probable or weak. Examples of autoimmune phenomena observed in chronic hepatitis C virus infection include rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, cryoglobulinaemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, systemic lupus erythematosus and sjogren syndrome. To date, the etiological role and the pathogenetic involvement of the hepatitis C infection remains unknown.The aim of this study is to assess the presence of different autoimmune manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection reported in literature.

  3. The ecology of avian influenza viruses in wild dabbling ducks (Anas spp.) in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Zsuzsanna; Clark, Robert G.; Parmley, E. Jane; Leighton, Frederick A.; Waldner, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) occurrence and transmission remain important wildlife and human health issues in much of the world, including in North America. Through Canada’s Inter-Agency Wild Bird Influenza Survey, close to 20,000 apparently healthy, wild dabbling ducks (of seven species) were tested for AIV between 2005 and 2011. We used these data to identify and evaluate ecological and demographic correlates of infection with low pathogenic AIVs in wild dabbling ducks (Anas spp.) across Canada. Generalized linear mixed effects model analyses revealed that risk of AIV infection was higher in hatch-year birds compared to adults, and was positively associated with a high proportion of hatch-year birds in the population. Males were more likely to be infected than females in British Columbia and in Eastern Provinces of Canada, but more complex relationships among age and sex cohorts were found in the Prairie Provinces. A species effect was apparent in Eastern Canada and British Columbia, where teal (A. discors and/or A. carolinensis) were less likely to be infected than mallards (A. platyrhynchos). Risk of AIV infection increased with the density of the breeding population, in both Eastern Canada and the Prairie Provinces, and lower temperatures preceding sampling were associated with a higher probability of AIV infection in Eastern Canada. Our results provide new insights into the ecological and demographic factors associated with AIV infection in waterfowl. PMID:28475626

  4. The ecology of avian influenza viruses in wild dabbling ducks (Anas spp.) in Canada.

    PubMed

    Papp, Zsuzsanna; Clark, Robert G; Parmley, E Jane; Leighton, Frederick A; Waldner, Cheryl; Soos, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) occurrence and transmission remain important wildlife and human health issues in much of the world, including in North America. Through Canada's Inter-Agency Wild Bird Influenza Survey, close to 20,000 apparently healthy, wild dabbling ducks (of seven species) were tested for AIV between 2005 and 2011. We used these data to identify and evaluate ecological and demographic correlates of infection with low pathogenic AIVs in wild dabbling ducks (Anas spp.) across Canada. Generalized linear mixed effects model analyses revealed that risk of AIV infection was higher in hatch-year birds compared to adults, and was positively associated with a high proportion of hatch-year birds in the population. Males were more likely to be infected than females in British Columbia and in Eastern Provinces of Canada, but more complex relationships among age and sex cohorts were found in the Prairie Provinces. A species effect was apparent in Eastern Canada and British Columbia, where teal (A. discors and/or A. carolinensis) were less likely to be infected than mallards (A. platyrhynchos). Risk of AIV infection increased with the density of the breeding population, in both Eastern Canada and the Prairie Provinces, and lower temperatures preceding sampling were associated with a higher probability of AIV infection in Eastern Canada. Our results provide new insights into the ecological and demographic factors associated with AIV infection in waterfowl.

  5. Natural reservoirs for homologs of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Pfaender, Stephanie; Brown, Richard Jp; Pietschmann, Thomas; Steinmann, Eike

    2014-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus is considered a major public health problem, infecting 2%-3% of the human population. Hepatitis C virus infection causes acute and chronic liver disease, including chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In fact, hepatitis C virus infection is the most frequent indication for liver transplantation and a vaccine is not available. Hepatitis C virus displays a narrow host species tropism, naturally infecting only humans, although chimpanzees are also susceptible to experimental infection. To date, there is no evidence for an animal reservoir of viruses closely related to hepatitis C virus which may have crossed the species barrier to cause disease in humans and resulted in the current pandemic. In fact, due to this restricted host range, a robust immunocompetent small animal model is still lacking, hampering mechanistic analysis of virus pathogenesis, immune control and prophylactic vaccine development. Recently, several studies discovered new viruses related to hepatitis C virus, belonging to the hepaci- and pegivirus genera, in small wild mammals (rodents and bats) and domesticated animals which live in close contact with humans (dogs and horses). Genetic and biological characterization of these newly discovered hepatitis C virus-like viruses infecting different mammals will contribute to our understanding of the origins of hepatitis C virus in humans and enhance our ability to study pathogenesis and immune responses using tractable animal models. In this review article, we start with an introduction on the genetic diversity of hepatitis C virus and then focus on the newly discovered viruses closely related to hepatitis C virus. Finally, we discuss possible theories about the origin of this important viral human pathogen.

  6. In-house quantitative real-time PCR for the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infections.

    PubMed

    Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Menezes, Carla Lisandre Paula de; Oliveira, Cristiane Lommez de; Mateo, Elvis Cristian Cueva; Ferreira, Alessandro Clayton de Souza

    The quantification of viral nucleic acids in serum by real-time PCR plays an important role in diagnosing hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection. In this study, we developed an assay using specific primers and probes to quantify hepatitis B virus DNA or hepatitis C virus RNA in serum from infected patients. For standardization and validation of the assay, an international panel of hepatitis B virus/hepatitis C virus and standard plasmids was used. A correlation coefficient of 0.983 and 0.963 for hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus, respectively, was obtained based on cycle threshold values and concentrations of DNA or RNA. The standard curve showed a linear relationship from 19IU/mL to 1.9×10(9)IU/mL of serum, with a coefficient of determination (r(2)) of 0.99. In sera from patients infected with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus viral loads (19IU/mL and 1.9×10(9)IU/mL), we quantified viral loads with a detection limit of 1.9×10(2)IU/mL. The real-time quantitative PCR assay developed in this study provides an ideal system for routine diagnosis and confirmation of indeterminate serological results, especially in immunosuppressed patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  7. Occult hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infections.

    PubMed

    Carreño, Vicente; Bartolomé, Javier; Castillo, Inmaculada; Quiroga, Juan Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Occult HBV infection is a well-recognised clinical entity characterised by the detection of HBV-DNA in serum and/or in liver in the absence of detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Occult HBV infection has been described not only in patients who have resolved an acute or chronic HBV infection but also in patients without any serological markers of a past HBV infection. Occult HBV infection in patients with chronic HCV infection may induce more severe liver disease and lower response rate to interferon treatment. The existence of occult HCV infections has been also reported more recently. Occult HCV infection is characterised by the presence of HCV-RNA in liver and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the absence of detectable serum HCV-RNA. Occult HCV infection may occur under two different clinical situations: in hepatitis C antibody-(anti-HCV) negative and serum HCV-RNA-negative patients with abnormal liver function tests and in anti-HCV-positive patients who have no detectable serum HCV-RNA and who have normal liver enzymes. The clinical relevance of occult HCV infections is still under investigation. 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  8. Egg drop syndrome virus enters duck embryonic fibroblast cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingjing; Tan, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Caihong; Xu, Jiamin; Wang, Jingyu

    2015-12-02

    Previous studies of egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) is restricted to serological surveys, disease diagnostics, and complete viral genome analysis. Consequently, the infection characteristics and entry routes of EDSV are poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to explore the entry pathway of EDSV into duck embryonic fibroblast (DEF) cells as well as the infection characteristics and proliferation of EDSV in primary DEF and primary chicken embryo liver (CEL) cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the virus triggered DEF cell membrane invagination as early as 10 min post-infection and that integrated endocytic vesicles formed at 20 min post-infection. The virus yield in EDSV-infected DEF cells treated with chlorpromazine (CPZ), sucrose, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), or NH4Cl was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Compared with the mock treatment, CPZ and sucrose greatly inhibited the production of viral progeny in a dose-dependent manner, while MβCD treatment did not result in a significant difference. Furthermore, NH4Cl had a strong inhibitory effect on the production of EDSV progeny. In addition, indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated that virus particles clustered on the surface of DEF cells treated with CPZ or sucrose. These results indicate that EDSV enters DEF cells through clathrin-mediated endocytosis followed by a pH-dependent step, which is similar to the mechanism of entry of human adenovirus types 2 and 5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular Virology of Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Holla, R. Prasida; Jameel, Shahid

    2011-01-01

    This review details the molecular virology of the hepatitis E virus (HEV). While replicons and in vitro infection systems have recently become available, a lot of information on HEV has been generated through comparisons with better-studied positive-strand RNA viruses and through subgenomic expression of viral open reading frames. These models are now being verified with replicon and infection systems. We provide here the current knowledge on the HEV genome and its constituent proteins - ORF1, ORF2 and ORF3. Based on the available information, we also modify the existing model of the HEV life cycle. PMID:21345356

  10. An investigation of duck circovirus and co-infection in Cherry Valley ducks in Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingxiao; Jiang, Shijin; Wu, Jiaqiang; Zhao, Qin; Sun, Yani; Kong, Yibo; Li, Xiaoxia; Yao, Meiling; Chai, Tongjie

    2009-01-13

    The co-infection of duck circovirus (DuCV) with Riemerella anatipestifer (RA) or/and Escherichia coli (E. coli) or/and duck hepatitis virus I (DHV-I) in Cherry Valley ducks in China's Shandong Province was investigated by using polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR)-based methods. For this study, 742 ducks sampled at random from 70 duck farms during 2006-2007 were examined using PCR and dot-blot hybridisation (DBH) tests. Overall the DuCV infection rate was 33.29%. Compared with those at 2 weeks of age, the ducks at 3-4 weeks of age were more susceptible to DuCV infection. Compared with the DuCV-negative ones, the DuCV-positive ducks had a higher rate of infection by DHV-I (25.5% vs. 7.475%), RA (23.48% vs. 8.28%) and E. coli (16.19% vs. 4.85%). This investigation shows that DuCV infection is common in Cherry Valley ducks on some farms in Shandong Province.

  11. Hepatitis C virus: virology and life cycle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Wook; Chang, Kyong-Mi

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flaviviridae family. It causes acute hepatitis with a high propensity for chronic infection. Chronic HCV infection can progress to severe liver disease including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the last decade, our basic understanding of HCV virology and life cycle has advanced greatly with the development of HCV cell culture and replication systems. Our ability to treat HCV infection has also been improved with the combined use of interferon, ribavirin and small molecule inhibitors of the virally encoded NS3/4A protease, although better therapeutic options are needed with greater antiviral efficacy and less toxicity. In this article, we review various aspects of HCV life cycle including viral attachment, entry, fusion, viral RNA translation, posttranslational processing, HCV replication, viral assembly and release. Each of these steps provides potential targets for novel antiviral therapeutics to cure HCV infection and prevent the adverse consequences of progressive liver disease.

  12. Immunological alterations in hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Calvaruso, Vincenza; Craxì, Antonio

    2013-12-21

    A higher prevalence of immunological processes has recently been reported in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, focusing the attention of physicians and researchers on the close association between HCV and immune disorders. HCV lymphotropism represents the most important step in the pathogenesis of virus-related immunological diseases and experimental, virologic, and clinical evidence has demonstrated a trigger role for HCV both in systemic autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, hemolytic anemia and severe thrombocytopenia, and in organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune hepatitis, thyroid disorders and diabetes. This review will outline the principal aspects of such HCV-induced immunological alterations, focusing on the prevalence of these less characterized HCV extrahepatic manifestations.

  13. [Hepatitis C virus infection and alcohol].

    PubMed

    Campollo, Octavio

    2002-10-01

    It was thought that HCV infection was very frequent among alcoholics; some even though that this disease affected nearly 35% of this group. Now there seems to be a consensus among the main investigator groups that the correlation of hepatitis C and alcohol increases the risk of complications, cirrhosis and liver cancer included. Moreover, it's now certain that among patients with HCV infection, alcohol consumption increases the risk of death from live diseases during the first 10 years of the disease. Alcoholism is also considered a predisposing factor for HCV infection, but not for hepatitis B virus infection. Prospective studies about post-transfusional hepatitis C showed the risk of cirrhosis increases from 7.8 to 31.1 times if the patient consumed significant amounts of alcohol (> 80 g a day). One of the recommendations for every patient with HCV infection is to abstain from drinking alcohol.

  14. Hepatitis C virus infection in nephrology patients

    PubMed Central

    Rostaing, Lionel; Izopet, Jacques; Kamar, Nassim

    2013-01-01

    Context: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to chronic liver disease, but also to extra-hepatic manifestations. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Results: Herein, we provide an overview of renal diseases related to HCV and their therapies, as well as the treatment options available for HCV (+)/RNA (+) dialysis patients. We will not mention, however, HCV infection-related complications in the post-kidney transplantation setting. Conclusions: Extra-hepatic manifestations of HCV infection include mixed cryoglobulinemia, lymphoproliferative disorders, and renal disease. HCV infection has been reported in association with distinct histological patterns of glomerulonephritis in native kidneys. PMID:24475454

  15. Hepatitis B virus burden in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Zampino, Rosa; Boemio, Adriana; Sagnelli, Caterina; Alessio, Loredana; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio; Sagnelli, Evangelista; Coppola, Nicola

    2015-11-14

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has shown an intermediate or high endemicity level in low-income countries over the last five decades. In recent years, however, the incidence of acute hepatitis B and the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen chronic carriers have decreased in several countries because of the HBV universal vaccination programs started in the nineties. Some countries, however, are still unable to implement these programs, particularly in their hyperendemic rural areas. The diffusion of HBV infection is still wide in several low-income countries where the prevention, management and treatment of HBV infection are a heavy burden for the governments and healthcare authorities. Of note, the information on the HBV epidemiology is scanty in numerous eastern European and Latin-American countries. The studies on molecular epidemiology performed in some countries provide an important contribution for a more comprehensive knowledge of HBV epidemiology, and phylogenetic studies provide information on the impact of recent and older migratory flows.

  16. Hepatitis B virus infection in multitransfused haemophiliacs.

    PubMed Central

    Nebbia, G; Moroni, G A; Simoni, L; Belli, M; Carnelli, V

    1986-01-01

    A longitudinal study of 44 haemophilic children, all in a treatment programme with factor concentrates, was undertaken to evaluate the occurrence, characteristics, and evolution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Twenty four children (55%) (group I) showed signs of HBV infection, while 20 (45%) (group II) did not. Age at onset of treatment, number of infusions, and total amount of concentrate received did not show significant differences between the two groups. In group I only four children (16%) had symptomatic acute hepatitis. Chronic liver disease was present in nine patients (38% of infected children). The early age of infection would seem to be an important factor for predicting chronic evolution. Evidence of delta infection in three children with severe liver disease seemed to confirm the high pathogenicity of this agent. Because of the risks associated with chronic HBV infection a careful follow up of patients positive for hepatitis B surface antigen is mandatory. PMID:3089179

  17. Update on occult hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Makvandi, Manoochehr

    2016-10-21

    The event of mutations in the surface antigen gene of hepatitis B virus (HBV) results in undetectable hepatitis B surface antigen with positive/negative anti-hepatitis B core (anti-HBc) antibody status in serum and this phenomenon is named occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). The presence of anti-HBc antibody in serum is an important key for OBI tracking, although about 20% of OBI cases are negative for anti-HBc antibody. The diagnosis of OBI is mainly based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR assays. However, real-time PCR is a more reliable method than PCR. OBI is a great issue for the public health problem and a challenge for the clinical entity worldwide. The persistence of OBI may lead to the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. With regard to OBI complications, the screening of HBV DNA by the highly sensitive molecular means should be implemented for: (1) patients with a previous history of chronic or acute HBV infection; (2) patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus/human immunodeficiency virus; (3) patients undergoing chemotherapy or anti-CD20 therapy; (4) recipients of organ transplant; (5) blood donors; (6) organ transplant donors; (7) thalassemia and hemophilia patients; (8) health care workers; (9) patients with liver related disease (cryptogenic); (10) hemodialysis patients; (11) patients undergoing lamivudine or interferon therapy; and (12) children in time of HBV vaccination especially in highly endemic areas of HBV. Active HBV vaccination should be implemented for the close relatives of patients who are negative for OBI markers. Thus, the goal of this review is to evaluate the rate of OBI with a focus on status of high risk groups in different regions of the world.

  18. Update on occult hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Makvandi, Manoochehr

    2016-01-01

    The event of mutations in the surface antigen gene of hepatitis B virus (HBV) results in undetectable hepatitis B surface antigen with positive/negative anti-hepatitis B core (anti-HBc) antibody status in serum and this phenomenon is named occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). The presence of anti-HBc antibody in serum is an important key for OBI tracking, although about 20% of OBI cases are negative for anti-HBc antibody. The diagnosis of OBI is mainly based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR assays. However, real-time PCR is a more reliable method than PCR. OBI is a great issue for the public health problem and a challenge for the clinical entity worldwide. The persistence of OBI may lead to the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. With regard to OBI complications, the screening of HBV DNA by the highly sensitive molecular means should be implemented for: (1) patients with a previous history of chronic or acute HBV infection; (2) patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus/human immunodeficiency virus; (3) patients undergoing chemotherapy or anti-CD20 therapy; (4) recipients of organ transplant; (5) blood donors; (6) organ transplant donors; (7) thalassemia and hemophilia patients; (8) health care workers; (9) patients with liver related disease (cryptogenic); (10) hemodialysis patients; (11) patients undergoing lamivudine or interferon therapy; and (12) children in time of HBV vaccination especially in highly endemic areas of HBV. Active HBV vaccination should be implemented for the close relatives of patients who are negative for OBI markers. Thus, the goal of this review is to evaluate the rate of OBI with a focus on status of high risk groups in different regions of the world. PMID:27818588

  19. Sexual transmission of hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, G.; Gilson, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the cause of almost all cases of parenterally transmitted non-A, non-B viral hepatitis (NANBH). HCV is an RNA virus, unrelated to the hepatitis viruses, A, B, D, or E; it was first identified in 1989. Although most infections become chronic, and it may lead to chronic liver disease, most patients with HCV infection are asymptomatic. The predominant modes of transmission are by blood, blood products, or other parenteral exposure, particularly injecting drug use. More contentious is the role of sexual transmission, although evidence for this was provided by studies of NANBH. OBJECTIVE: This review considers the evidence for sexual transmission, and the types of studies used to estimate the rate of transmission and the factors that may influence it. METHOD: A Medline search using the keywords hepatitis C, sex, transmission, and prevalence in MeSH and free text. References in papers were searched, and some unpublished data identified. References were further selected to illustrate different methodologies. FINDINGS: Evidence for sexual transmission is provided by several types of study including prevalence studies in groups at risk of other STDs, investigation of cases identified from surveillance reports, and cross sectional and longitudinal partner studies. Many studies are limited by their small size, the sensitivity and specificity of early assays, lack of controls, or the difficulty of excluding other routes of transmission. One prospective cohort study reported an incidence of 12 per 1000 person years in the sexual partners of HCV infected patients. 1-3% of partners of HCV infected patients are found to be infected in cross sectional studies. Co-infection with HIV, duration of the relationship, or chronic liver disease may be independent cofactors increasing the risk of transmission. A meta-analysis of selected studies may be informative, and further larger prospective studies are required. There is a small but definite risk

  20. Experimental infection of Muscovy ducks with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) belonging to clade 2.2.

    PubMed

    Guionie, Olivier; Guillou-Cloarec, Cécile; Courtois, David; Bougeard, B Stéphanie; Amelot, Michel; Jestin, Véronique

    2010-03-01

    Highly pathogenic (HP) H5N1 avian influenza (AI) is enzootic in several countries of Asia and Africa and constitutes a major threat, at the world level, for both animal and public health. Ducks play an important role in the epidemiology of AI, including HP H5N1 AI. Although vaccination can be a useful tool to control AI, duck vaccination has not proved very efficient in the field, indicating a need to develop new vaccines and a challenge model to evaluate the protection for duck species. Although Muscovy duck is the duck species most often reared in France, the primary duck-producing country in Europe, and is also produced in Asia, it is rarely studied. Our team recently demonstrated a good cross-reactivity with hemagglutinin from clade 2.2 and inferred that this could be a good vaccine candidate for ducks. Two challenges using two French H5N1 HP strains, 1) A/mute swan/France/06299/06 (Swan/06299), clade 2.2.1, and 2) A/mute swan/France/070203/07 (Swan/070203), clade 2.2 (but different from subclade 2.2.1), were performed (each) on 20 Muscovy ducks (including five contacts) inoculated by oculo-nasal route (6 log10 median egg infectious doses per duck). Clinical signs were recorded daily, and cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs were collected throughout the assay. Autopsies were done on all dead ducks, and organs were taken for analyses. Virus was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR based on the M gene AI virus. Ducks presented severe nervous signs in both challenges. Swan/070203 strain led to 80% morbidity (12/15 sick ducks) and 73% mortality (11/15 ducks) at 13.5 days postinfection (dpi), whereas Swan/06299 strain produced 100% mortality at 6.5 dpi. Viral RNA load was significantly lower via the cloacal route than via the oropharyngeal route in both trials, presenting a peak in the first challenge at 3.5 dpi and being more stable in the second challenge. The brain was the organ containing the highest viral RNA load in both challenges. Viral RNA load in

  1. [The molecular biology of hepatitis C virus].

    PubMed

    Koutsoudakis, George; Forns, Xavier; Pérez-Del-Pulgar, Sofía

    2013-04-01

    Since the discovery of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), a plethora of experimental models have evolved, allowing the virus's life cycle and the pathogenesis of associated liver diseases to be investigated. These models range from inoculation of cultured cells with serum from patients with hepatitis C to the use of surrogate models for the study of specific stages of the HCV life cycle: retroviral pseudoparticles for the study of HCV entry, replicons for the study of HCV replication, and the HCV cell culture model, which reproduces the entire life cycle (replication and production of infectious particles). The use of these tools has been and remains crucial to identify potential therapeutic targets in the different stages of the virus's life cycle and to screen new antiviral drugs. A clear example is the recent approval of two viral protease inhibitors (boceprevir and telaprevir) in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. This review analyzes the advances made in the molecular biology of HCV and highlights possible candidates as therapeutic targets for the treatment of HCV infection.

  2. Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2016-06-14

    Iran is known as an endemic country for hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, while there are variations in the epidemiology of HEV infection throughout the country. The available epidemiological studies in different regions of Iran show HEV seroprevalence of 1.1%-14.2% among general population, 4.5% -14.3% among blood donors, 6.1%-22.8% among injecting drug users, 6.3%-28.3% among hemodialysis patients, 1.6%-11.3% among patients infected with other hepatitis viruses, 27.5% among patients with chronic liver disease, 30.8% among kidney transplant recipient patients, and 10%-16.4% among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. These variations reflect differences in the status of public health and hygiene, risk factors, and routes of transmission in different regions and groups. Therefore, it is necessary to review the epidemiology of HEV infection to determine the most prevalent risk factors and routes of transmission, and to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive strategies employed in the public health services of the country. Moreover, the other epidemiological aspects of HEV, including the genotypic pattern, extra hepatic manifestations, and incidence of chronic infection need to be investigated among Iranian population to expand the current knowledge on the epidemiology of HEV and to clarify the real burden of HEV infection. Therefore, this review was performed to provide a general overview regarding the epidemiology of HEV in Iran.

  3. Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Iran is known as an endemic country for hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, while there are variations in the epidemiology of HEV infection throughout the country. The available epidemiological studies in different regions of Iran show HEV seroprevalence of 1.1%-14.2% among general population, 4.5% -14.3% among blood donors, 6.1%-22.8% among injecting drug users, 6.3%-28.3% among hemodialysis patients, 1.6%-11.3% among patients infected with other hepatitis viruses, 27.5% among patients with chronic liver disease, 30.8% among kidney transplant recipient patients, and 10%-16.4% among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. These variations reflect differences in the status of public health and hygiene, risk factors, and routes of transmission in different regions and groups. Therefore, it is necessary to review the epidemiology of HEV infection to determine the most prevalent risk factors and routes of transmission, and to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive strategies employed in the public health services of the country. Moreover, the other epidemiological aspects of HEV, including the genotypic pattern, extra hepatic manifestations, and incidence of chronic infection need to be investigated among Iranian population to expand the current knowledge on the epidemiology of HEV and to clarify the real burden of HEV infection. Therefore, this review was performed to provide a general overview regarding the epidemiology of HEV in Iran. PMID:27298557

  4. Inconclusive Hepatitis C Virus Antibody Results in African Sera

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Include Security Classification) Inconclusive hepatitis C virus antibody results in African sera 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Hyams KC, Okoth FA, Tukei PM...exhausted. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS P All other editions are obsolete. UNCLASS I F I ED 254 CORRESPONDENCE 93-13564 Inconclusive Hepatitis C Virus ...outpatients living on the eastern coast of Kenya were evaluated. Colleagues-in Africa, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus anti- Sera and epidemiologic data

  5. Hepatitis viruses exploitation of host DNA methyltransferases functions.

    PubMed

    Pazienza, Valerio; Panebianco, Concetta; Andriulli, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Delta (HDV) infections are a global health burden. With different routes of infection and biology, HBV, HCV and HDV are capable to induce liver cirrhosis and cancer by impinging on epigenetic mechanisms altering host cell's pathways. In the present manuscript, we reviewed the published studies taking into account the relationship between the hepatitis viruses and the DNA methyltransferases proteins.

  6. [Culture of hepatitis virus B].

    PubMed

    Panouse-Perrin, J; Couroucé-Pauty, A M; Rachman, F

    1975-01-01

    For the last 25 years, numerous attempts have been made to isolate the HBV agent responsible for hepatitis B by means of cultures 'in vitro'. We have undertaken longterm cultures of children's hepatic tissue (C.H.), conjunctive tissue (human adult H.A.F. and human embryonic fibroblasts H.E.F.) and KB cells; these were put in the presence of 7 sera HB + rich in Dane particles. These cells were trypsinized twice a week for almost 3 months and did not present any cytopathogenic effects. Electromicroscopy revealed, 15 days after infection, the presence of icosahedral particles (25 to 27 nm in diameter), free or in dense clusters, but more often empty (20 nm in diameter). These structures seemed to be made up of an assembly of capsomers approximately 5 nm in diameter, joined together in fours to form a ridge. Older cultures revealed clusters of icosahedrons some of which degenerated spontaneously; others were surrounded by proteinic structure having a fringed aspect. Certain rare particles of 35 to 45 nm in diameter are similar to full Dane particles. EID immunological results were positive in the case of sera of patients convalescent from hepatitis B, containing anti-HBc antibodies, on C.H. cells the 27th and 40th days, and negative with anti-HBs antibodies. By immunofluorescence we observed 12 to 20 days after infection of the cells, a clear fluorescence at first nuclear, then essentially cytoplasmic, by means of fluorescent anti-HBc sera of human or animal origin. With the fluorescent anti-HBs antibodies, the reaction is weak and solely cytoplasmic although in DRI, with H.E.F. and KB cells, we obtained from time to time weakly positive results in HBs. The relations between the morphological structures and the immunological results observed are discussed.

  7. Effect of species, breed and route of virus inoculation on the pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza (HPAI) viruses in domestic ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses continue to be a threat to poultry in many regions of the world. Domestic ducks have been recognized as one of the primary factors in the spread of H5N1 HPAI. To improve the control of this disease it’s necessary to better understand the pathog...

  8. Low pathogenic H7 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in South Korea and the close association with isolates of wild birds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Park, Choi-Kyu; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Oem, Jae-Ku; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Choi, Jun-Gu; Lee, O-Soo; Bae, You-Chan

    2012-06-01

    We characterized low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses of the H7 subtype that were isolated from domestic ducks and wild birds in South Korea from 2008 to 2011. A total of 20 H7 viruses were collected from live-bird markets (LBMs), duck farms and wild-bird habitats using avian influenza (AI) surveillance and epidemiological approaches. A phylogenetic analysis of the H7 viruses that were isolated from domestic ducks and wild birds demonstrated that they were separated into 12 genotypes (A-D and Wb-1-8, respectively), indicating genetic diversity. These H7 viruses were related to the recently isolated Eurasian LPAI H7 viruses and various influenza viruses that are circulating in Asia, including southern China and South Korea. The same genotype was not found between domestic poultry and wild-bird isolates; however, most of the H7 viruses in poultry (genotypes B and C) were closely related to the H7 virus isolated from a wild bird (genotype Wb-3). Animal-challenge studies revealed that certain H7 AI viruses replicated well only in chickens or ducks depending on the genotype, indicating that the pathogenicity of H7 viruses has the potential to be altered due to multiple reassortments, and these viruses can potentially expand their host range. Our results are evidence of abundant and frequent reassortment between H7 viruses in poultry and wild birds and emphasize the continuing need to monitor the evolutionary genetics of the influenza virus in poultry and wild birds.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus/hepatitis B virus co-infection in Southern Brazil: clinical and epidemiological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Raboni, Sonia Mara; Tuon, Felipe Francisco; Beloto, Nayara Carvalho Polido; Demeneck, Henrique; Oliveira, Andre; Largura, Denis; Sagrado, Andressa Gervasoni; Lima, Bárbara Perdonsini; Franzoni, João Paulo; Pedroso, Maria Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus share a similar transmission pathway and are often diagnosed in the same patient. These patients tend to have a faster progression of hepatic fibrosis. This cross-sectional study describes the demographic features and clinical profile of human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis co-infected patients in Paraná, Southern Brazil. A total of 93 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients attending a tertiary care academic hospital in Southern Brazil were included. Clinical, demographic and epidemiological data were evaluated. Hepatitis B virus and/or hepatitis C virus positive serology was found in 6.6% of patients. The anti-hepatitis C virus serum test was positive in 85% (79/93) of patients, and the infection was confirmed in 72% of the cases. Eighteen patients (19%) were human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis B virus positive (detectable HBsAg). Among co-infected patients, there was a high frequency of drug use, and investigations for the detection of co-infection were conducted late. A low number of patients were eligible for treatment and, although the response to antiretroviral therapy was good, there was a very poor response to hepatitis therapy. Our preliminary findings indicate the need for protocols aimed at systematic investigation of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, thus allowing for early detection and treatment of co-infected patients.

  10. Acute sporadic hepatitis E virus infection in southern China.

    PubMed

    Tan, D; Im, S W; Yao, J L; Ng, M H

    1995-09-01

    The hepatitis E virus is responsible for epidemic and sporadic hepatitis in northwestern China, but its role as a cause of acute sporadic hepatitis in southern China has not been reported. We applied the most practical current methods for diagnosis of hepatitis E virus infection, IgM and IgG anti-HEV detection by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis E virus infection among acute sporadic hepatitis. Anti-HEV IgM was found in 1 of 26 (3.8%), 4 of 20 (20.0%), 4 of 19 (21.1%), and 51 of 142 (35.9%), with acute hepatitis A, B, C and non-ABC, respectively. Anti-HEV IgM was not detectable in healthy subjects, while IgG anti-HEV was found in 14 of 77 healthy subjects (18.2%) and was long-lasting. Ninety-one cases without any evidence of hepatitis A, B or C infections and anti-HEV IgM were tentatively classified as non-A, B, C, D, E (non-ABCDE) hepatitis. By comparison with non-ABCDE, cases with hepatitis E were more frequently icteric and exhibited higher alanine aminotransferase levels (92.2% vs. 45.1%, 770 iu/l vs 377 iu/l, respectively, p < 0.005). Chronic cases were not observed in hepatitis E virus infections. However, 14 of 91 (15.4%) cases with non-ABCDE developed to chronicity (p < 0.005). Hepatitis E virus infection is sporadic as well as endemic in southern China. Only IgM anti-HEV but not IgG anti-HEV can be used as an appropriate marker of acute hepatitis E virus infection. Superinfection of hepatitis E virus with other types of hepatitis viruses is frequent in this area. While the disease was associated with more severe clinical manifestations, patients usually recovered completely.

  11. Is there a relationship between the kinetics of lipoprotein lipase activity after a meal and the susceptibility to hepatic steatosis development in ducks?

    PubMed

    Saez, G; Baéza, E; Bernadet, M D; Davail, S

    2010-11-01

    The difference in the ability of Pekin and Muscovy ducks to develop hepatic steatosis could result from a different peripheral lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, which hydrolyses triacylglycerol secreted by the liver. We studied the kinetics of plasma LPL activity in response to a meal at different ages in Pekin and Muscovy ducks. For that purpose, blood samples were taken at 5, 9, 12, 13, and 14 wk of age just before and 1, 2, 4, and 8 h after a meal. To release LPL into general circulation, an i.v. injection of heparin (400 IU/kg of BW) was administered 10 min before blood collection. For that reason, different ducks per genotype were used for each point of measurement (n = 6). Plasma LPL activity measured before the meal was negatively correlated with the weight of the fatty liver measured in the same ducks at 14 wk of age (r = -0.58, P < 0.001). Plasma triacylglycerol level measured before the meal was negatively correlated with plasma LPL activity measured in the same ducks (r = -0.31, P = 0.025) and was negatively correlated with plasma LPL activity measured in the same ducks for each age and each timing (r = -0.39, P < 0.001). At 14 wk of age for Muscovy and Pekin ducks, we observed that a high plasma LPL activity (>200 IU/L of plasma) corresponded to a relatively low development of fatty liver (190 g) induced by overfeeding, whereas a low plasma LPL activity (<150 IU/L of plasma) corresponded to a high propensity to develop fatty liver (470 g). In conclusion, plasma LPL activity measured just before the meal during the rearing period could be used as a marker of hepatic steatosis development during the overfeeding period.

  12. High prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Inmaculada; Bartolomé, Javier; Quiroga, Juan Antonio; Carreño, Vicente

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the absence of detectable antibodies against HCV and of viral RNA in serum is called occult HCV infection. Its prevalence and clinical significance in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is unknown. HCV RNA was tested for in the liver samples of 52 patients with chronic HBV infection and 21 (40 %) of them were positive for viral RNA (occult HCV infection). Liver fibrosis was found more frequently and the fibrosis score was significantly higher in patients with occult HCV than in negative ones, suggesting that occult HCV infection may have an impact on the clinical course of HBV infection.

  13. Different routes of inoculation impact infectivity and pathogenesis of H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus infection in chickens and domestic ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The H5N1 type A influenza viruses classified as Qinghai-like virus (clade 2.2) are a unique lineage of type A influenza viruses with the capacity to produce significant disease and mortality in gallinaceous birds and water fowl including ducks. The objective of this study was to determine the suscep...

  14. Cell entry of hepatitis C virus

    SciTech Connect

    Bartosch, Birke . E-mail: Birke.Bartosch@ens-lyon.fr; Cosset, Francois-Loic . E-mail: Francois-Loic.Cosset@ens-lyon.fr

    2006-04-25

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), an important human pathogen, is an enveloped, positive-stranded RNA virus classified in the hepacivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. Cell attachment of flaviviruses generally leads to endocytosis of bound virions. Systems that support HCV replication and particle formation in vitro are emerging only now, 16 years after the discovery of the virus. Albeit this limitation, the route of HCV cell entry as well as 'capture' molecules involved in low-affinity interactions for the initial contact of HCV with target cells and potential high-affinity receptor candidates that may mediate HCV trafficking and fusion has been described. The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of different HCV model systems to our current knowledge about structure of the HCV GPs E1 and E2 and their roles in cell entry comprising cell attachment, interactions with cellular receptors, endocytosis, and fusion.

  15. Nuclear Import of Hepatitis B Virus Capsids and Genome

    PubMed Central

    Gallucci, Lara; Kann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an enveloped pararetrovirus with a DNA genome, which is found in an up to 36 nm-measuring capsid. Replication of the genome occurs via an RNA intermediate, which is synthesized in the nucleus. The virus must have thus ways of transporting its DNA genome into this compartment. This review summarizes the data on hepatitis B virus genome transport and correlates the finding to those from other viruses. PMID:28117723

  16. An epidemiological study of avian influenza A (H5) virus in nomadic ducks and their raising practices in northeastern Bangladesh, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shamim; Khan, Salah Uddin; Mikolon, Andrea; Rahman, Mohammad Ziaur; Abedin, Jaynal; Zeidner, Nord; Sturm-Ramirez, Katherine; Luby, Stephen P

    2017-05-01

    In Bangladesh, nomadic duck flocks are groups of domestic ducks reared for egg production that are moved to access feeding sites beyond their owners' village boundaries and are housed overnight in portable enclosures in scavenging areas. The objectives of this study were to measure the prevalence of influenza A virus RNA and H5-specific antibodies in nomadic ducks and to characterize nomadic duck raising practices in northeastern Bangladesh. We tested duck egg yolk specimens by competitive ELISA to detect antibodies against avian influenza A (H5) and environmental fecal samples by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) to detect influenza A virus RNA and H5 subtype. The median age of the ducks was 24 months (range: 8-36 months) and the median flock size was 300 ducks (range: 105-1100). Of 1860 egg yolk samples, 556 (30%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 28-32) were positive for antibodies against H5 and 58 flocks (94%) had at least one egg with H5-specific antibodies. Of 496 fecal samples, 121 (24%, 95% CI: 22-29) had detectable influenza A RNA. Thirty-three flocks (53%) had at least one fecal sample positive for influenza A RNA. Nomadic ducks in Bangladesh are commonly infected with avian influenza A (H5) virus and may serve as a bridging host for transmission of avian influenza A (H5) virus or other avian influenza A viruses subtypes between wild waterfowl, backyard poultry, and humans in Bangladesh. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Hepatitis C virus core protein induces hepatic steatosis via Sirt1-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanhai; Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Hanlin; Liu, Shunai; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Jin, Wanzhu; Cheng, Jun

    2017-09-12

    Hepatic steatosis is a common feature of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Previous reports have shown that the overexpression of hepatitis C virus core-encoding sequences (hepatitis C virus genotypes 3a and 1b) significantly induces intracellular triglyceride accumulation. However, the underlying mechanism has not yet been revealed. To investigate whether Sirt1 is involved in hepatitis C virus-mediated hepatic steatosis, the overexpression of hepatitis C virus core 1b protein and Sirt1 and the knockdown of Sirt1 in HepG2 cells were performed. To confirm the results of the cellular experiment liver-specific Sirt1 KO mice with lentivirus-mediated hepatitis C virus core 1b overexpression were studied. Our results show that hepatitis C virus core 1b protein overexpression led to the accumulation of triglycerides in HepG2 cells. Notably the expression of PPARγ2 was dramatically increased at both the mRNA and protein levels by hepatitis C virus core 1b overexpression. The protein expression of Sirt1 is an upstream regulator of PPARγ2 and was also significantly increased after core 1b overexpression. In addition, the overexpression or knockdown of Sirt1 expression alone was sufficient to modulate p300-mediated PPARγ2 deacetylation. In vivo studies showed that hepatitis C virus core protein 1b-induced hepatic steatosis was attenuated in liver-specific Sirt1 KO mice by downregulation of PPARγ2 expression. Sirt1 mediates hepatitis C virus core protein 1b-induced hepatic steatosis by regulation of PPARγ2 expression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Hepatitis E virus: Blood transfusion implications].

    PubMed

    Gallian, P; Piquet, Y; Assal, A; Djoudi, R; Chiaroni, J; Izopet, J; Tiberghien, P

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a non-enveloped RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Autochthonous hepatitis E occurring in developed countries is caused by genotypes 3 and 4 and is a zoonotic infection. Humans are infected mostly after ingestion of undercooked meat from infected animals. Most HEV 3 and 4 infections are clinically inapparent. However, genotype 3 (HEV 3) can lead to chronic hepatitis in immuno-compromised patients such as organ-transplant recipients and patients with haematological malignancies. In Europe, HEV 3 is implicated in transfusion-transmitted HEV infection. In France, as observed in several European countries, prevalence of HEV RNA and specific IgG antibodies are high indicating that viral circulation is important. The systematic HEV NAT screening of blood donations used for preparation of solvent detergent plasma indicate that 1 to 2218 donation is infected by HEV RNA. The need or implementation's impacts of safety measures to prevent HEV transmission by blood transfusion are under reflexion by French's health authorities. The HEV NAT screening is the only available tool of prevention. Alternative strategies are under investigation including individual or mini pool NAT testing all or part of blood donations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of nested polymerase chain reaction-based diagnosis of duck enteritis virus and detection of DNA polymerase gene from non-descriptive duck breeds of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Partha Sarathi; Mukhopadhayay, Sunit Kumar; Pradhan, Saktipada; Mondal, Samiran; Jana, Chandrakanta; Patra, Nimai Chandra; Hansda, Rabindra Nath

    2017-03-01

    The study was undertaken to detect the clinical signs, postmortem lesions of embryonated duck plague (DP) infected eggs, and histopathological changes of chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in non-descriptive ducks of West Bengal with special reference to standardize nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After postmortem of suspected carcasses, samples were collected for virus isolation and identification through specific pathogen free (Khaki Campbell) embryonated duck eggs. PCR was also done as confirmatory test after doing postmortem of duck embryos. DP specific nested PCR was standardized for better confirmation of the disease. Sensitivity of nested primers was also tested for DP virus. Gross, postmortem and histopathological changes were prominent in dead embryos. First set of primer was able to detect 602 bp fragments of DNA polymerase gene of duck enteritis virus from infected CAM. Subsequently, a DP specific nested PCR which was very much sensitive for very small amount of viral genome was successfully standardized. After NCBI blast nucleotide sequence of nested PCR product (Accession No. HG425076) showed homology with the sequences data available in GenBank. The study concludes that PCR assay is very much helpful to diagnose DP disease and developed nested PCR is a double confirmatory diagnostic tool for DP.

  20. Development of nested polymerase chain reaction-based diagnosis of duck enteritis virus and detection of DNA polymerase gene from non-descriptive duck breeds of West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Partha Sarathi; Mukhopadhayay, Sunit Kumar; Pradhan, Saktipada; Mondal, Samiran; Jana, Chandrakanta; Patra, Nimai Chandra; Hansda, Rabindra Nath

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The study was undertaken to detect the clinical signs, postmortem lesions of embryonated duck plague (DP) infected eggs, and histopathological changes of chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in non-descriptive ducks of West Bengal with special reference to standardize nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: After postmortem of suspected carcasses, samples were collected for virus isolation and identification through specific pathogen free (Khaki Campbell) embryonated duck eggs. PCR was also done as confirmatory test after doing postmortem of duck embryos. DP specific nested PCR was standardized for better confirmation of the disease. Sensitivity of nested primers was also tested for DP virus. Results: Gross, postmortem and histopathological changes were prominent in dead embryos. First set of primer was able to detect 602 bp fragments of DNA polymerase gene of duck enteritis virus from infected CAM. Subsequently, a DP specific nested PCR which was very much sensitive for very small amount of viral genome was successfully standardized. After NCBI blast nucleotide sequence of nested PCR product (Accession No. HG425076) showed homology with the sequences data available in GenBank. Conclusion: The study concludes that PCR assay is very much helpful to diagnose DP disease and developed nested PCR is a double confirmatory diagnostic tool for DP. PMID:28435197

  1. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A if they've been vaccinated against it. Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a more serious infection. It may lead ... of which cause severe illness and even death. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted from person to person ...

  2. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem with the liver itself What Is Hepatitis A? Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is contagious, usually spreading to others ... objects contaminated by feces (poop) containing HAV. The hepatitis A vaccine has helped to make the infection rare ...

  3. Hepatitis B virus molecular biology and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lamontagne, R. Jason; Bagga, Sumedha; Bouchard, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses need a host cell to provide a milieu favorable to viral replication. Consequently, viruses often adopt mechanisms to subvert host cellular signaling processes. While beneficial for the viral replication cycle, virus-induced deregulation of host cellular signaling processes can be detrimental to host cell physiology and can lead to virus-associated pathogenesis, including, for oncogenic viruses, cell transformation and cancer progression. Included among these oncogenic viruses is the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Despite the availability of an HBV vaccine, 350–500 million people worldwide are chronically infected with HBV, and a significant number of these chronically infected individuals will develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Epidemiological studies indicate that chronic infection with HBV is the leading risk factor for the development of HCC. Globally, HCC is the second highest cause of cancer-associated deaths, underscoring the need for understanding mechanisms that regulate HBV replication and the development of HBV-associated HCC. HBV is the prototype member of the Hepadnaviridae family; members of this family of viruses have a narrow host range and predominately infect hepatocytes in their respective hosts. The extremely small and compact hepadnaviral genome, the unique arrangement of open reading frames, and a replication strategy utilizing reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate to generate the DNA genome are distinguishing features of the Hepadnaviridae. In this review, we provide a comprehensive description of HBV biology, summarize the model systems used for studying HBV infections, and highlight potential mechanisms that link a chronic HBV-infection to the development of HCC. For example, the HBV X protein (HBx), a key regulatory HBV protein that is important for HBV replication, is thought to play a cofactor role in the development of HBV-induced HCC, and we highlight the functions of HBx that may

  4. Hepatitis B virus infection in immigrant populations

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Alessio, Loredana; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Macera, Margherita; Sagnelli, Caterina; Zampino, Rosa; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common cause of hepatitis worldwide, with nearly 350 million people chronically infected and 600000 deaths per year due to acute liver failure occurring during acute hepatitis or, more frequently, in HBV-related liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Ongoing immigration from countries with a high HBV endemicity to those with a low HBV endemicity warrants particular attention to prevent the spread of HBV infection to the native population. This review article analyzes the epidemiology and virological and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in immigrant populations and in their host countries, and suggests prophylactic measures to prevent the spread of this infection. Among the immigrants from different geographical areas, those from South East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa show the highest prevalences of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers, in accordance with the high endemicity of the countries of origin. The molecular characteristics of HBV infection in immigrants reflect those of the geographical areas of origin: HBV genotype A and D predominate in immigrants from Eastern Europe, B and C in those from Asia and genotype E in those from Africa. The literature data on the clinical course and treatment of HBsAg-positive immigrants are scanty. The management of HBV infection in immigrant populations is difficult and requires expert personnel and dedicated structures for their assistance. The social services, voluntary operators and cultural mediators are essential to achieve optimized psychological and clinical intervention. PMID:26730274

  5. Outbreak of duck plague (duck herpesvirus enteritis) in numerous species of captive ducks and geese in temporal conjunction with enforced biosecurity (in-house keeping) due to the threat of avian influenza A virus of the subtype Asia H5N1.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Kuczka, A; Kühnhold, A; Bunzenthal, C; Bönner, B M; Hanka, K; Redmann, T; Yilmaz, A

    2007-01-01

    The continuing westward spread of avian influenza A virus of the subtype H5N1 in free-living and domestic birds forced the European Union and the German federal government to enhance all biosecurity measures including in-house keeping of all captive birds from October 20 to December 15, 2005. Movement of captive ducks and geese of many different species from a free-range system to tight enclosures and maintenance for prolonged times in such overcrowded sheds resulted in pronounced disturbance of natural behaviour, interruption of mating and breeding activities and possibly additional stress. Under these conditions the birds developed signs of severe disease and enhanced mortality twentyfour days later. A total of 17 out of 124 (14%) adult birds and 149 out of 184 year-old birds (81 %) died during the outbreak. A herpesvirus was isolated from many organs of succumbed ducks and geese that was identified as a duck plague herpesvirus by cross neutralization test using known antisera against duck plague virus. The published host range of duck plague comprises 34 species within the order Anseriformes. We report here on additional 14 species of this order that were found to be susceptible to duck plague virus. The exact source of the herpesvirus could not identified. However, low antibody titres in some ducks at day of vaccination indicate that at least some of the birds were latently infected with a duck plague herpesvirus. The remaining healthy appearing birds were subcutaneously vaccinated with a modified live duck plague vaccine (Intervet, Boxmeer, NL) that stopped losses and resulted in seroconversion in most of the vaccinated birds.

  6. Comparative hepatic cytochrome P450 activities and contaminant concentrations in caged carp and juvenile ducks

    SciTech Connect

    O`Keefe, P.; Gierthy, J.; Connor, S.; Bush, B.; Hong, C.S.; Wood, L.; Clayton, W.; Storm, R.

    1995-12-31

    Juvenile carp (Cyprinius carpio) weighing approx. 60 g were placed in cages located on the surface of sediments near an aluminum plant and an automobile parts plant in the Massena area of the St. Lawrence River. Fish were removed at weekly intervals over a 35 day exposure period and composited samples of liver tissue, cranial lipid, and fillet tissue were prepared for analysis of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs). Liver tissue was also stored at {minus}80 C for determination of microsomal Cytochrome P450 activity using the aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) assay. A control exposure was carried out upstream at an uncontaminated site. Juvenile pre-flight ducks (mallards, gadwalls, wood ducks and common mergansers) were collected in the contaminated areas on the St. Lawrence and on the Hudson River two to three months after hatching. Control pre-flight mallards, wood ducks and common mergansers were collected from remote lakes in the Addirondack State Park. Samples of subcutaneous fat and liver tissue were removed for analysis as described above for the carp. There was a three fold increase in AHH activity in the carp liver tissue at the end of the 35 day exposure period and there was a similar increase it activity for the mallards, common mergansers and wood ducks compared to controls. For each species the enzyme activity increases will be compared to the contaminant concentrations.

  7. [Hepatitis C virus genotypes circulating in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Santos, Óscar; Gómez, Alberto; Vizcaíno, Viviana; Casas, María Consuelo; Ramírez, María Del Pilar; Olaya, Patricia

    2017-01-24

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is a worldwide public health problem; it has been estimated that over 180 million people are infected with this virus worldwide. Its precise incidence and prevalence (i.e., epidemiology) and the most frequent circulating genotypes in Colombia are unknown. To describe the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and subtypes in infected Colombian patients. We recovered the data on 1,538 HCV isolates from 1,527 patients in two Colombian reference laboratories typed by PAGE or qPCR. Patients' mean age was 53 years; 70% of them were 40 to 70 years old, and 52%, females; 57% of all tests were ordered in Bogotá and 80% of cases were from Cundinamarca, Valle and Atlántico departments. Genotype 1 was detected in 88.6% of cases, distributed as follows: 70% subtype 1b, 13.5% subtype 1a and 5.1%, undetermined subtypes. Genotype 2 was found in 5.4% of the patients, genotype 3 in 2% and genotype 4 in 4%. Mixed genotypes were found in 0.8% of the samples. Genotype 1 is the most common HCV genotype circulating in Colombia, and subtype 1b the most frequent.

  8. Susceptibility of North American ducks and gulls to H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin D; Stallknecht, David E; Beck, Joan R; Suarez, David L; Swayne, David E

    2006-11-01

    Since 2002, H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPA1) viruses have been associated with deaths in numerous wild avian species throughout Eurasia. We assessed the clinical response and extent and duration of viral shedding in 5 species of North American ducks and laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) after intranasal challenge with 2 Asian H5N1 HPAI viruses. Birds were challenged at approximately equal to 10 to 16 weeks of age, consistent with temporal peaks in virus prevalence and fall migration. All species were infected, but only wood ducks (Aix sponsa) and laughing gulls exhibited illness or died. Viral titers were higher in oropharyngeal swabs than in cloacal swabs. Duration of viral shedding (1-10 days) increased with severity of clinical disease. Both the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) and agar gel precipitin (AGP) tests were able to detect postinoculation antibodies in surviving wood ducks and laughing gulls; the HI test was more sensitive than the AGP in the remaining 4 species.

  9. Susceptibility of North American Ducks and Gulls to H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Stallknecht, David E.; Beck, Joan R.; Suarez, David L.; Swayne, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Since 2002, H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have been associated with deaths in numerous wild avian species throughout Eurasia. We assessed the clinical response and extent and duration of viral shedding in 5 species of North American ducks and laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) after intranasal challenge with 2 Asian H5N1 HPAI viruses. Birds were challenged at ≈10 to 16 weeks of age, consistent with temporal peaks in virus prevalence and fall migration. All species were infected, but only wood ducks (Aix sponsa) and laughing gulls exhibited illness or died. Viral titers were higher in oropharyngeal swabs than in cloacal swabs. Duration of viral shedding (1–10 days) increased with severity of clinical disease. Both the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) and agar gel precipitin (AGP) tests were able to detect postinoculation antibodies in surviving wood ducks and laughing gulls; the HI test was more sensitive than the AGP in the remaining 4 species PMID:17283615

  10. Identification of a New Broadly Cross-reactive Epitope within Domain III of the Duck Tembusu Virus E Protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxi; Bai, Xiaofei; Meng, Runze; Shaozhou, Wulin; Zhang, Qingshan; Hua, Ronghong; Liu, Jyung-Hurng; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, a pathogenic flavivirus termed duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) caused widespread outbreak of egg-drop syndrome in domesticated ducks in China. Although the glycoprotein E of DTMUV is an important structural component of the virus, the B-cell epitopes of this protein remains uncharacterized. Using phage display and mutagenesis, we identified a minimal B-cell epitope, 374EXE/DPPFG380, that mediates binding to a nonneutralizing monoclonal antibody. DTMUV-positive duck serum reacted with the epitope, and amino acid substitutions revealed the specific amino acids that are essential for antibody binding. Dot-blot assays of various flavivirus-positive sera indicated that EXE/DPPFG is a cross-reactive epitope in most flaviviruses, including Zika, West Nile, Yellow fever, dengue, and Japanese encephalitis viruses. These findings indicate that the epitope sequence is conserved among many strains of mosquito-borne flavivirus. Protein structure modeling revealed that the epitope is located in domain III of the DTMUV E protein. Together, these results provide new insights on the broad cross-reactivity of a B-cell binding site of the E protein of flaviviruses, which can be exploited as a diagnostic or therapeutic target for identifying, studying, or treating DTMUV and other flavivirus infections. PMID:27824100

  11. Hepatitis C virus recurrence after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    BIZOLLON, T; DUCERF, C; TREPO, C; MUTIMER, D

    1999-01-01

    Hepatology and Liver Transplantation Unit,Hôtel-Dieu Croix-Rousse,Lyon,France D MUTIMER Cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) is now the most common indication of liver transplantation in Western Europe and the United States. In the absence of effective prophylaxis, recurrent HCV infection is almost inevitable. Though the natural history and intermediate term outcome of recurrent HCV are now better documented, those factors which may influence the recurrence of hepatitis and consequent progression of graft disease remain unclear. Interferon (IFN) as a sole agent for the treatment of recurrent infection has proved unsatisfactory. Early intervention with a combination of IFN and ribavirin seems promising, and this approach may prevent or delay progression of HCV related graft disease after liver transplantation. 

 PMID:10075968

  12. Respiratory disease due to current egg drop syndrome virus in Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Cha, Se-Yeoun; Kang, Min; Moon, Oun-Kyoung; Park, Choi-Kyu; Jang, Hyung-Kwan

    2013-08-30

    Severe acute respiratory symptoms with coughing, dyspnea, and gasping were reported in two flocks of 9-day-old Pekin ducklings from different provinces. Gross lesions, white exudate and mucous membrane congestion in the trachea as well as blue to purple color changes and sclerosis in lungs were observed. Histological lesions revealed that the trachea and bronchial epithelium were hyperplastic and infiltrated by neutrophil granulocytes. Egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) was differentially diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction, and the strains were isolated from tracheas and lungs by inoculation of 10-day-old embryonated duck eggs. The virus isolates were designated strain D11-JW-012 and D11-JW-017. The clinical and pathological signs were reproduced by intra-tracheal inoculation of the isolates in 3-day-old ducklings. Although the two isolates produced similar clinical signs, pathological lesions and ciliostasis, the D11-JW-017 strain resulted in more severe clinical signs with progressive symptoms compared to those of D11-JW-012 strain-infected ducklings. We suggest that different EDSV strains with mild or severe to moderate pathogenicity coexist and have potential risks in poultry. Hereby, we report an EDSV infection in ducklings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of Newcastle disease virus immunoassays for waterfowl using a monoclonal antibody specific for the duck immunoglobulin light chain.

    PubMed

    Kothlow, Sonja; Haüslaigner, Rafaela; Kaspers, Bernd; Grund, Christian

    2008-06-01

    In the present study a monoclonal antibody (mAb 14A3) was tested for its reactivity against serum immunoglobulin Y (IgY) of several waterfowl species, and subsequently for its applicability as anti-species antibody in common immunoassays. Western blot analyses demonstrated its broad cross-reactivity with the serum IgY light chain of different duck species: Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata), Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), white-winged wood duck (Asarcornis scutulatus), common pintail (Dafila acuta). Reactivity was also evident with IgY of two swan species--mute swan (Cygnus olor) and black-necked swan (Sthenelides melanocoryphus)--and two goose species--domestic goose (Anser anser var. domestica) and red-breasted goose (Rufibrenta ruficollis). Applying the mAb for Newcastle disease virus (avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 [APMV-1]) test systems, its functionality within indirect immunoassays was evaluated. Using APMV-1-positive sera of domestic geese and Muscovy ducks, mAb 14A3 facilitated specific staining of APMV-1-infected cells in an immunofluorescence test. In addition, it proved to be functional in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a western blot assay. Thus, the analysed mAb represents an attractive and versatile reagent that offers the opportunity to develop serological tests for waterfowl, allowing a high sample throughput using the ELISA technique or the fine analysis of humoral immune responses using the western blot.

  14. Putative novel genotype of avian hepatitis E virus, Hungary, 2010.

    PubMed

    Bányai, Krisztián; Tóth, Ádám György; Ivanics, Éva; Glávits, Róbert; Szentpáli-Gavallér, Katalin; Dán, Ádám

    2012-08-01

    To explore the genetic diversity of avian hepatitis E virus strains, we characterized the near-complete genome of a strain detected in 2010 in Hungary, uncovering moderate genome sequence similarity with reference strains. Public health implications related to consumption of eggs or meat contaminated by avian hepatitis E virus, or to poultry handling, require thorough investigation.

  15. [Genome organization and life cycle of the hepatitis c virus].

    PubMed

    Kalinina, O V; Dmitriev, A V

    2015-01-01

    The review summarizes the current data about the hepatitis C viral genome and polyprotein organization. The functional role of the structural and non-structural viral proteins including their interaction with cellular regulatory proteins and cell structural elements is discussed. Specific peculiarities of the life cycle of the hepatitis C virus important for the understanding of the viral hepatitis C pathogenesis are summarized.

  16. Hepatitis E virus: Western Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Richie G; Wallace, Sebastian; Sonderup, Mark; Korsman, Stephen; Chivese, Tawanda; Gavine, Bronwyn; Edem, Aniefiok; Govender, Roxy; English, Nathan; Kaiyamo, Christy; Lutchman, Odelia; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Pas, Suzan D; Webb, Glynn W; Palmer, Joanne; Goddard, Elizabeth; Wasserman, Sean; Dalton, Harry R; Spearman, C Wendy

    2016-01-01

    AIM To conduct a prospective assessment of anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) IgG seroprevalence in the Western Cape Province of South Africa in conjunction with evaluating risk factors for exposure. METHODS Consenting participants attending clinics and wards of Groote Schuur, Red Cross Children’s Hospital and their affiliated teaching hospitals in Cape Town, South Africa, were sampled. Healthy adults attending blood donor clinics were also recruited. Patients with known liver disease were excluded and all major ethnic/race groups were included to broadly represent local demographics. Relevant demographic data was captured at the time of sampling using an interviewer-administered confidential questionnaire. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status was self-disclosed. HEV IgG testing was performed using the Wantai® assay. RESULTS HEV is endemic in the region with a seroprevalence of 27.9% (n = 324/1161) 95%CI: 25.3%-30.5% (21.9% when age-adjusted) with no significant differences between ethnic groups or HIV status. Seroprevalence in children is low but rapidly increases in early adulthood. With univariate analysis, age ≥ 30 years old, pork and bacon/ham consumption suggested risk. In the multivariate analysis, the highest risk factor for HEV IgG seropositivity (OR = 7.679, 95%CI: 5.38-10.96, P < 0.001) was being 30 years or older followed by pork consumption (OR = 2.052, 95%CI: 1.39-3.03, P < 0.001). A recent clinical case demonstrates that HEV genotype 3 may be currently circulating in the Western Cape. CONCLUSION Hepatitis E seroprevalence was considerably higher than previously thought suggesting that hepatitis E warrants consideration in any patient presenting with an unexplained hepatitis in the Western Cape, irrespective of travel history, age or ethnicity. PMID:27956810

  17. Hepatitis E virus: Western Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Madden, Richie G; Wallace, Sebastian; Sonderup, Mark; Korsman, Stephen; Chivese, Tawanda; Gavine, Bronwyn; Edem, Aniefiok; Govender, Roxy; English, Nathan; Kaiyamo, Christy; Lutchman, Odelia; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Pas, Suzan D; Webb, Glynn W; Palmer, Joanne; Goddard, Elizabeth; Wasserman, Sean; Dalton, Harry R; Spearman, C Wendy

    2016-11-28

    To conduct a prospective assessment of anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) IgG seroprevalence in the Western Cape Province of South Africa in conjunction with evaluating risk factors for exposure. Consenting participants attending clinics and wards of Groote Schuur, Red Cross Children's Hospital and their affiliated teaching hospitals in Cape Town, South Africa, were sampled. Healthy adults attending blood donor clinics were also recruited. Patients with known liver disease were excluded and all major ethnic/race groups were included to broadly represent local demographics. Relevant demographic data was captured at the time of sampling using an interviewer-administered confidential questionnaire. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status was self-disclosed. HEV IgG testing was performed using the Wantai(®) assay. HEV is endemic in the region with a seroprevalence of 27.9% (n = 324/1161) 95%CI: 25.3%-30.5% (21.9% when age-adjusted) with no significant differences between ethnic groups or HIV status. Seroprevalence in children is low but rapidly increases in early adulthood. With univariate analysis, age ≥ 30 years old, pork and bacon/ham consumption suggested risk. In the multivariate analysis, the highest risk factor for HEV IgG seropositivity (OR = 7.679, 95%CI: 5.38-10.96, P < 0.001) was being 30 years or older followed by pork consumption (OR = 2.052, 95%CI: 1.39-3.03, P < 0.001). A recent clinical case demonstrates that HEV genotype 3 may be currently circulating in the Western Cape. Hepatitis E seroprevalence was considerably higher than previously thought suggesting that hepatitis E warrants consideration in any patient presenting with an unexplained hepatitis in the Western Cape, irrespective of travel history, age or ethnicity.

  18. [Appearance of hepatitis C virus replication and increase of aminotransferase activity after corticoid treatment of presumed autoimmune hepatitis. 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Béchade, D; Oui, B; Mayet, F; Trouette, H; Schouler, L; Jouglen, J; Raymond, J M; Couzigou, P

    1996-01-01

    Autoimmune-related and hepatitis C virus-related chronic hepatitis are sometimes difficult to differentiate. We report two cases of chronic hepatitis with high levels of serum anti-smooth muscle antibodies, positive hepatitis C virus serology, and negative serum RNA, which were first treated with corticotherapy. Both patients responded with marked increases in aminotransferase levels, and positive RNA. The first case may have been type 1 autoimmune hepatitis with hepatitis C virus infection, and the second chronic hepatitis C with positive serum auto-antibodies. The increase in viral antigen expression on the surface of the hepatocytes following corticosteroid treatment may have favoured a direct cytopathogenic effect of hepatitis C virus.

  19. Biosensors for hepatitis B virus detection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chun-Yan; Fu, Wei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    A biosensor is an analytical device used for the detection of analytes, which combines a biological component with a physicochemical detector. Recently, an increasing number of biosensors have been used in clinical research, for example, the blood glucose biosensor. This review focuses on the current state of biosensor research with respect to efficient, specific and rapid detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV). The biosensors developed based on different techniques, including optical methods (e.g., surface plasmon resonance), acoustic wave technologies (e.g., quartz crystal microbalance), electrochemistry (amperometry, voltammetry and impedance) and novel nanotechnology, are also discussed. PMID:25253948

  20. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bellentani, S; Miglioli, L; Bedogni, G; Crocè, L S; Tiribelli, C

    2005-03-01

    Although a lot of novel information and data on the epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are available worldwide, the majority of these information are often fragmentary and sometimes contradictory. This review tries to highlight all the data available on the prevalence (i.e. the number of cases present in a known population), the risk factors, the natural history and the incidence (i.e. the number of new cases that occur every year) of HCV infection in the world, and particularly in Italy.

  1. Silymarin for hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Polyak, Stephen J; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Dahari, Harel; Ferenci, Peter; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Silymarin, an extract of milk thistle seeds, and silymarin-derived compounds have been considered hepatoprotective since the plant was first described in ancient times. Hepatoprotection is defined as several non-mutually exclusive biological activities including antiviral, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory functions. Despite clear evidence for silymarin-induced hepatoprotection in cell culture and animal models, evidence for beneficial effects in humans has been equivocal. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge on silymarin in the context of hepatitis C virus infection. The information was collated from a recent workshop on silibinin in Germany. PMID:23011959

  2. Seroepidemiology of hepatitis A virus in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalidi, Jameela; Alenezi, Bader; Al-mufti, Seham; Hussain, Entisar; Askar, Haifa; Kemmer, Nyingi; Neff, Guy W

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To find the current seroepidemiology of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Kuwait. METHODS: A total of 2851 Kuwaitis applying for new jobs were screened. RESULTS: HAV-positive cases were 28.8%; 59% were males and 41% were females. The highest prevalence was in the Ahmadi area. High prevalence was among the group of non-educated rather than educated parents. This is the first study in Kuwait demonstrating the shifting epidemiology of HAV. CONCLUSION: This study reflects the need of the Kuwaiti population for an HAV vaccine. PMID:19115474

  3. Ferret hepatitis E virus infection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yonemitsu, Kenzo; Terada, Yutaka; Takeda, Naokazu; Takaji, Wakita; Maeda, Ken

    2015-01-01

    We examined 85 fecal samples from pet ferrets in 10 animal hospitals in Japan for the detection of ferret hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA. We found that 6 (7.1%) of the samples were positive for ferret HEV RNA. Phylogenetic analysis based on the partial ORF1 indicated that these ferret HEV strains were clearly separated from the Netherlands strains and were divided into 2 distinct clusters. These results suggest that ferret HEV is genetically diverse, and since ferrets are not indigenous to Japan, ferret HEV has been introduced into Japan through importation.

  4. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells.

  5. Protective efficacy of a single dose of baculovirus hemagglutinin-based vaccine in chickens and ducks against homologous and heterologous H5N1 virus infections.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Hye; Song, Byung Min; Yum, Jung; Kim, Ji An; Oh, Seung Kyoo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Cho, Gil Jae; Seo, Sang Heui

    2014-11-01

    Outbreaks of the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus in poultry and humans are ongoing. Vaccination is an efficient method for prevention of H5N1 infection. Using chickens and ducks, we assessed the efficacy of a vaccine comprising H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA) protein produced in a baculovirus expression system. The immunized chickens and ducks were protected against lethal infection by H5N1 in an antigen dose-dependent manner. Complete protection against homologous challenge and partial protection against heterologous challenge were achieved in chickens immunized with 5 μg HA protein and in ducks immunized with 10 μg HA protein. The IgG antibody subtype was mainly detected in the sera and tissues, including the lungs. The neuraminidase (NA) inhibition assay was negative in immunized chickens and ducks. Our results indicated that the expressed HA protein by baculovirus was immunogenic to both chickens and ducks, and the immunized chickens and ducks were protected from the lethal infections of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, though ducks required more HA protein than chickens to be protected. Also, baculovirus HA-vaccinated poultry can be differentiated from infected poultry by NA inhibition assay.

  6. Protective Efficacy of a Single Dose of Baculovirus Hemagglutinin-Based Vaccine in Chickens and Ducks Against Homologous and Heterologous H5N1 Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Hye; Song, Byung Min; Yum, Jung; Kim, Ji An; Oh, Seung Kyoo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Cho, Gil Jae

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Outbreaks of the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus in poultry and humans are ongoing. Vaccination is an efficient method for prevention of H5N1 infection. Using chickens and ducks, we assessed the efficacy of a vaccine comprising H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA) protein produced in a baculovirus expression system. The immunized chickens and ducks were protected against lethal infection by H5N1 in an antigen dose-dependent manner. Complete protection against homologous challenge and partial protection against heterologous challenge were achieved in chickens immunized with 5 μg HA protein and in ducks immunized with 10 μg HA protein. The IgG antibody subtype was mainly detected in the sera and tissues, including the lungs. The neuraminidase (NA) inhibition assay was negative in immunized chickens and ducks. Our results indicated that the expressed HA protein by baculovirus was immunogenic to both chickens and ducks, and the immunized chickens and ducks were protected from the lethal infections of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, though ducks required more HA protein than chickens to be protected. Also, baculovirus HA-vaccinated poultry can be differentiated from infected poultry by NA inhibition assay. PMID:25211640

  7. Recent advances in Hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Meng, X J

    2010-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causative agent of hepatitis E, belongs to the family Hepeviridae. At least four major genotypes of HEV have been recognized: genotypes 1 and 2 are restricted to humans and associated with epidemics in developing countries, whereas genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic and infect humans and several other animals in both developing and industrialized countries. Besides humans, strains of HEV have been genetically identified from swine, chickens, sika deer, mongeese, and rabbits. The genome of HEV consists of three open reading frames (ORFs): ORF1 codes for nonstructural proteins, ORF2 codes for capsid protein, and ORF3 codes for a small multifunctional protein. The ORF2 and ORF3 proteins are translated from a single bicistronic mRNA and overlap each other but neither overlaps ORF1. The recent determination of the 3D crystal structure of the HEV capsid protein should facilitate the development of vaccines and antivirals. The identification and characterization of animal strains of HEV from pigs and chickens and the demonstrated ability of cross-species infection by swine HEV raise public health concerns for zoonosis. Accumulating evidence indicated that hepatitis E is a zoonotic disease and pigs and more likely other animal species are reservoirs for HEV. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hepatitis E and its causative agent, including nomenclature and genomic organization, gene expression and functions, 3D structure of the virions, changing perspectives on higher mortality during pregnancy and chronic hepatitis E, animal reservoirs, zoonotic risk, food safety, and novel animal models.

  8. Genotyping of occult hepatitis B virus infection in Egyptian hemodialysis patients without hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Esmail, Mona A; Mahdi, Wafaa K M; Khairy, Rasha M; Abdalla, Nilly H

    2016-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B viral infection is the presence of hepatitis B viral nucleic acids in the serum and/or liver in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection among hepatitis C virus-negative hemodialysis patients and to identify their genotypes. of 144 patients on maintenance hemodialysis, 50 hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis C virus nucleic acid-negative patients were selected according to strict inclusion criteria to avoid the effect of confounding variables. The following investigations were done: serum AST and ALT; HBsAg; HBcAb; HCV-Ab; HCV-RNA; and HBV-DNA. Positive hepatitis B viral nucleic acid was confirmed in 12/144 (8.3%) hemodialysis patients and 12/50 (24%) in our study group (occult infection). Mean hemodialysis periods for negative patients and occult hepatitis B virus patients were 27.3±18.8 and 38.4±8.14 months, respectively, and this difference was significant (p-value=0.02). Mean alanine transaminase levels were 20.27±5.5IU/L and 25.3±9.6 in negative patients and occult infection patients, respectively. This difference was non-significant. Aspartate transaminase levels were 21.4±10.2IU/L and 27.3±4.6IU/L, respectively, in negative patients and infected patients; this difference was significant (p-value=0.03). Half (6/12) of the positive samples belonged to genotype 'B', 33.3% (4/12) to 'C', and 16.6% (2/12) to genotype 'D'. OBI is likely among hemodialysis patients even without HCV coinfection (24%). Genotype D cannot be the only genotype distributed in Upper Egypt, as the current study reported relatively new results that 50% of the patients with occult B carry genotype B, 33.3% carry genotype C and only 16.6% carry genotype D. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Control of Hepatitis B Virus by Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yuchen; Protzer, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem worldwide with more than 240 million individuals chronically infected. Current treatments can control HBV replication to a large extent, but cannot eliminate HBV infection. Cytokines have been shown to control HBV replication and contribute to HBV cure in different models. Cytokines play an important role in limiting acute HBV infection in patients and mediate a non-cytolytic clearance of the virus. In this review, we summarize the effects of cytokines and cytokine-induced cellular signaling pathways on different steps of the HBV life cycle, and discuss possible strategies that may contribute to the eradication of HBV through innate immune activation. PMID:28117695

  10. Effect of age on the pathogenesis of DHV-1 in Pekin ducks and on the innate immune responses of ducks to infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Cuiping; Yu, Shengqing; Duan, Yunbing; Hu, Yue; Qiu, Xvsheng; Tan, Lei; Sun, Yingjie; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun; Ding, Chan

    2014-05-01

    Duck hepatitis virus (DHV) affects 1-week-old but not 3-week-old ducks, and it causes a more severe disease in the younger ducks. These differences may be partially due to the host response to DHV infection. In order to understand this difference, we characterized the pathobiology of and innate immune response to DHV infection in 1-day-old (1D) and 3-week-old (3 W) ducks. Viral RNA was detected in duck livers at 24, 36 and 72 h after inoculation with DHV at a dose of 10(3) LD50. Virus-induced pathology ranged from no clinical signs to severe disease and death, and it was more severe in the 1D ducks. Infection with DHV induced up-regulation of gene expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7, TLR3, retinoic-acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5), interleukin (IL)-6, interferon (IFN)-α, interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1), interferon-stimulated gene 12 (ISG12), and 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like gene (OASL) in the livers of 3 W ducks. Of these, IL-6, OASL and ISG12 mRNA levels were more than 100-fold higher in infected 3 W ducks than in mock-infected ducks of the same age. These genes were induced much less in infected 1D ducklings. We present evidence that a lower level of viral replication in the hepatocytes of 3 W ducks, whose basal level of cytokines is higher than that in 1D ducklings, may be related to the strong innate immunity induced. From our data, we conclude that duck age plays an important role in the pathogenicity of and innate immune responses to DHV.

  11. Animal model for study of human hepatitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Chayama, Kazuaki; Hayes, C Nelson; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Abe, Hiromi; Tsuge, Masataka; Imamura, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect only chimpanzees and humans. Analysis of both viruses has long been hampered by the absence of a small animal model. The recent development of human hepatocyte chimeric mice has enabled us to carry out studies on viral replication and cellular changes induced by replication of human hepatitis viruses. Various therapeutic agents have also been tested using this model. In the present review, we summarize published studies using chimeric mice and discuss the merits and shortcomings of this model.

  12. Effects of dietary gossypol concentration on growth performance, blood profiles, and hepatic histopathology in meat ducks.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q F; Yang, G L; Liu, G N; Wang, J P; Bai, S P; Ding, X M; Luo, Y H; Zhang, K Y

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of gossypol from cottonseed meal (CSM) on growth performance, blood biochemical profiles, and liver histopathology of ducks. A total of 900 1-d-old ducks were randomly allocated to 5 treatments with 12 pens/treatment and 15 ducks/pen. The 5 experimental diets were formulated in such a way that 0% (a corn-soybean meal basal diet, diet 1), 25% (diet 2), 50% (diet 3), 75% (diet 4), and 100% (diet 5) of protein from soybean meal were replaced with that from CSM. All diets were formulated on a digestible amino acid basis. The experiment included 2 phases, the starter phase (1 to 3 wk) where the test diets contained graded levels of CSM and the growth phase (4 to 5 wk) where birds were fed a corn-soybean basal diet to examine the recovery of ducks after CSM withdrawal. Dietary CSM and gossypol linearly (P < 0.01) and quadratically (P < 0.01) decreased ADG and ADFI during d 1 to 14. The threshold of daily total gossypol (TG) and free gossypol (FG) intake based on ADG on d 1 to 7 and d 7 to 14 were 32.20 and 2.64 mg/d, and 92.12 and 9.62 mg/d, respectively. Serum alanine aminotransferase increased (P < 0.05) linearly with increasing level of gossypol in the diets (d 7), whereas aspartate aminotransferase increased (P < 0.05) linearly and quadratically (d 14). Serum albumin concentration decreased (P < 0.05) quadratically with increasing dietary CSM concentrations on d 21. The degree of damage to the liver increased markedly with increasing dietary CSM and gossypol content and the length of CSM and gossypol intake. On d 35, there was no difference on BW and blood profiles of ducks among all treatments. These results suggest that meat ducks' dietary TG and FG concentration should be lower than 928.9 and 77.2 mg/kg, respectively, during d 1 to 21 of age and that a 2-wk withdrawal of diets containing gossypol should be considered. © Poultry Science Association Inc.

  13. Chaperones in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Khachatoorian, Ronik; French, Samuel W

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects approximately 3% of the world population or more than 185 million people worldwide. Each year, an estimated 350000-500000 deaths occur worldwide due to HCV-associated diseases including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is the most common indication for liver transplantation in patients with cirrhosis worldwide. HCV is an enveloped RNA virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the Flaviviridae family. The HCV viral life cycle in a cell can be divided into six phases: (1) binding and internalization; (2) cytoplasmic release and uncoating; (3) viral polyprotein translation and processing; (4) RNA genome replication; (5) encapsidation (packaging) and assembly; and (6) virus morphogenesis (maturation) and secretion. Many host factors are involved in the HCV life cycle. Chaperones are an important group of host cytoprotective molecules that coordinate numerous cellular processes including protein folding, multimeric protein assembly, protein trafficking, and protein degradation. All phases of the viral life cycle require chaperone activity and the interaction of viral proteins with chaperones. This review will present our current knowledge and understanding of the role of chaperones in the HCV life cycle. Analysis of chaperones in HCV infection will provide further insights into viral/host interactions and potential therapeutic targets for both HCV and other viruses. PMID:26783419

  14. Differential cellular gene expression in duck trachea infected with a highly or low pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Avian influenza A (AI) viruses of subtypes H5 can cause serious disease outbreaks in poultry including panzootic due to H5N1 highly pathogenic (HP) viruses. These viruses are a threat not only for animal health but also public health due to their zoonotic potential. The domestic duck plays a major role in the epidemiological cycle of influenza virus subtypes H5 but little is known concerning host/pathogen interactions during influenza infection in duck species. In this study, a subtracted library from duck trachea (a primary site of influenza virus infection) was constructed to analyse and compare the host response after a highly or low pathogenic (LP) H5N1-infection. Results Here, we show that more than 200 different genes were differentially expressed in infected duck trachea to a significant degree. In addition, significant differentially expressed genes between LPAI- and HPAI-infected tracheas were observed. Gene ontology annotation was used and specific signalling pathways were identified. These pathways were different for LPAI and HPAI-infected tracheas, except for the CXCR4 signalling pathway which is implicated in immune response. A different modulation of genes in the CXCR4 signalling pathway and TRIM33 was induced in duck tracheas infected with a HPAI- or a LPAI-H5N1. Conclusion First, this study indicates that Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) is an alternative approach to gain insights into the pathogenesis of influenza infection in ducks. Secondly, the results indicate that cellular gene expression in the duck trachea was differently modulated after infection with a LPAI-H5N1 or after infection with a HPAI-H5N1 virus. Such difference found in infected trachea, a primary infection site, could precede continuation of infection and could explain appearance of respiratory symptoms or not. PMID:24015922

  15. Characterization of duck enteritis virus UL53 gene and glycoprotein K

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most of the previous research work had focused on the epidemiology and prevention of duck enteritis virus (DEV). Whilst with the development of protocols in molecular biology, nowadays more and more information about the genes of DEV was reported. But little information about DEV UL53 gene and glycoprotein K(gK) was known except our reported data. Results In our paper, the fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR(FQ-RT-PCR) assay and nucleic acid inhibition test were used to study the transcription characteristic of the DEV UL53 gene. Except detecting the mRNA of DEV UL53 gene, the product gK encoded by UL53 gene was detected through the expression kinetics of UL53 gene by the purified rabbit anti-UL53 protein polyclonal antibodies. Western-blotting and indirect immunofluorescence assays were used to detect gK. From the results of these experiments, the UL53 gene and gK were respectively identified as a late gene and a really late protein. On the other hand, the indirect immunofluorescence assay provided another information that the intracellular localization of DEV gK was mainly distributed in cytoplasm. Conclusions By way of conclusions, we conceded that DEV UL53 gene is a really late gene, which is coincident with properties of UL53 homologs from other herpesvirus, such as ILTV(Infectious Laryngotracheitis virus) and HSV-1(Herpes simplex virus type 1). The properties of intracellular localization about gK protein provided a foundation for further functional analysis and further studies will be focused on constructing of the UL53 gene DEV mutant. PMID:21586146

  16. The PB2, PA, HA, NP, and NS genes of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus A/whooper swan/Mongolia/3/2005 (H5N1) are responsible for pathogenicity in ducks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wild ducks are the natural hosts of influenza A viruses. Duck influenza, therefore, has been believed inapparent infection with influenza A viruses, including highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) in chickens. In fact, ducks experimentally infected with an HPAIV strain, A/Hong Kong/483/1997 (H5N1) (HK483), did not show any clinical signs. Another HPAIV strain, A/whooper swan/Mongolia/3/2005 (H5N1) (MON3) isolated from a dead swan, however, caused neurological dysfunction and death in ducks. Method To understand the mechanism whereby MON3 shows high pathogenicity in ducks, HK483, MON3, and twenty-four reassortants generated between these two H5N1 viruses were compared for their pathogenicity in domestic ducks. Results None of the ducks infected with MON3-based single-gene reassortants bearing the PB2, NP, or NS gene segment of HK483 died, and HK483-based single-gene reassortants bearing PB2, NP, or NS genes of MON3 were not pathogenic in ducks, suggesting that multiple gene segments contribute to the pathogenicity of MON3 in ducks. All the ducks infected with the reassortant bearing PB2, PA, HA, NP, and NS gene segments of MON3 died within five days post-inoculation, as did those infected with MON3. Each of the viruses was assessed for replication in ducks three days post-inoculation. MON3 and multi-gene reassortants pathogenic in ducks were recovered from all of the tissues examined and replicated with high titers in the brains and lungs. Conclusion The present results indicate that multigenic factors are responsible for efficient replication of MON3 in ducks. In particular, virus growth in the brain might correlate with neurological dysfunction and the disease severity. PMID:23374292

  17. Transcriptome analysis reveals the molecular mechanism of hepatic fat metabolism disorder caused by Muscovy duck reovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanxi; Liu, Mengxi; Xu, Lihui; Wu, Yijian; Huang, Yifan

    2017-10-10

    The aim of this work was to clarify the molecular mechanism underlying the fatty degeneration of livers infected with Muscovy duck reovirus (MDRV), which produces obvious white necrotic foci in the liver. Transcriptome data for MDRV-infected Muscovy duck livers and control livers were sequenced, assembled, and annotated with Illumina(®) HiSeq 2000. The differentially expressed genes were screened and their functions were analysed. We also determined and confirmed the molecular mechanism of the hepatic fat metabolism disorder caused by MDRV infection. The expression of 4190 genes was higher in the infected livers than in the control livers, and the expression of 1113 genes was reduced. A Gene Ontology analysis showed that these genes were involved in 48 biological functions, and were significantly enriched in 237 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. The free fatty acid content was significantly higher in the livers of infected Muscovy ducks than in the control livers (P < 0.01). The KEGG analysis showed that MDRV infection inhibited the cholesterol efflux from hepatic cells and reduced the expression of key enzymes involved in fatty acid degradation (scavenger receptor class b type 1, ABCG8, and APOA4), leading to the accumulation of fatty acids and cholesterol in the liver cells. In this study, we have identified the genes differentially expressed in livers infected by MDRV, from which we inferred the genes associated with lipodystrophia, and elucidated the molecular mechanism of the hepatic steatosis induced by MDRV. ABC: ATP binding cassette transport; ACADVL: acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain; ACAT: mitochondrial-like acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase A; ACAT2: acetyl-CoA acyltransferase 2; ACNAT2: acyl-coenzyme A amino acid N-acyltransferase 2-like; ACOT1: acyl-CoA thioesterase 1; ACOT7: acyl-CoA thioesterase 7; ACOX1: acyl-CoA oxidase 1, palmitoyl; ACSBG2: acyl-CoA synthetase bubblegum family member 2; ACSL1: acyl-CoA synthetase long

  18. Coxsackie A10 Virus Infection Among Infectious Hepatitis Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Embil, J. A.; Van Rooyen, C. E.; Nagler, F. P.

    1965-01-01

    During an outbreak of infectious hepatitis at a housing development, Coxsackie A10 virus was recovered from the stools of 45 different contacts and from the blood of four others. Caution should be exercised in attributing an etiological role to any given isolate of a Group A Coxsackie virus in view of the widespread distribution of these organisms. Nevertheless, the recovery of Coxsackie A10 viruses from the blood and stools of contacts with hepatitis cases appears to warrant record. PMID:5829398

  19. Hepatitis C virus infection after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Romero, E; Galindo, P; Bravo, J A; Osorio, J M; Pérez, A; Baca, Y; Ferreira, C; Asensio, C; Osuna, A

    2008-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the main cause of liver disease after renal transplantation. Most patients have seroconverted on dialysis to positive RNA. The viral load increases during immunosuppressive therapy. The risk of developing chronic liver disease is related to the histopathologic findings, duration and severity of the disease, immunosuppression, and transplantation time. Hepatitis C virus infection can predict onset, of proteinuria and diabetes. We studied 868 patients who received renal transplants between (1987 and 2006), of whom 18.7% were seropositive for HCV. We observed a higher rate of HCV-seropositive patients related to the duration of hemodialysis therapy. Of the HCV seropositive patients, 77% had received renal allografts before 1998. There was no difference between the sexes; however, the HCV positive patients were younger. Polymerase chain reaction tests results were positive in 91.6% of the patients with HCV antibodies. The prevalence of diabetes was greater among HCV positive patients, as was as the persistence of proteinuria. Cryoglobulins were positive in 30.8%. The incidence of acute rejection episodes in the first year was similar between groups. Of the HCV-positive patients, 80.2% were treated with cyclosporine, most patients continued this therapy throughout the study. We observed no significant difference in mortality end graft survival rate between the two groups. However, renal function differed significantly at some points during the evolution of the clinical course. Renal transplantation is still the best treatment option in patients with chronic renal disease.

  20. Hepatitis C virus and neurological damage

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammed; Ibrahim, Sara M; Iqbal, Waqas; Rauff, Bisma; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection exhibits a wide range of extrahepatic complications, affecting various organs in the human body. Numerous HCV patients suffer neurological manifestations, ranging from cognitive impairment to peripheral neuropathy. Overexpression of the host immune response leads to the production of immune complexes, cryoglobulins, as well as autoantibodies, which is a major pathogenic mechanism responsible for nervous system dysfunction. Alternatively circulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and HCV replication in neurons is another factor that severely affects the nervous system. Furthermore, HCV infection causes both sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy in the mixed cryoglobulinemia as well as known as an important risk aspect for stroke. These extrahepatic manifestations are the reason behind underlying hepatic encephalopathy and chronic liver disease. The brain is an apt location for HCV replication, where the HCV virus may directly wield neurotoxicity. Other mechanisms that takes place by chronic HCV infection due the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders includes derangement of metabolic pathways of infected cells, autoimmune disorders, systemic or cerebral inflammation and alterations in neurotransmitter circuits. HCV and its pathogenic role is suggested by enhancement of psychiatric and neurological symptoms in patients attaining a sustained virologic response followed by treatment with interferon; however, further studies are required to fully assess the impact of HCV infection and its specific antiviral targets associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27134702

  1. Oral manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Carrozzo, Marco; Scally, Kara

    2014-01-01

    Extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect a variety of organ systems with significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most frequently reported EHM of HCV infection, involve the oral region predominantly or exclusively. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is potentially malignant and represents cell-mediated reaction to a variety of extrinsic antigens, altered self-antigens, or super antigens. Robust epidemiological evidence support the link between OLP and HCV. As the virus may replicate in the oral mucosa and attract HCV-specific T lymphocytes, HCV may be implicated in OLP pathogenesis. Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy, characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes and a multitude of other systemic signs and symptoms. SjS patients have also an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with chronic hepatitis C do frequently have histological signs of Sjögren-like sialadenitis with mild or even absent clinical symptoms. However, it is still unclear if HCV may cause a disease mimicking SjS or it is directly responsible for the development of SjS in a specific subset of patients. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral malignant tumour and at least in some part of the world could be linked to HCV. PMID:24976694

  2. Management of hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeok; Park, Wanju; Yang, Jin Hyang; You, Kwang Soo

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 2 million people are living with chronic hepatitis B virus (CHBV) in the United States and are at risk for long-term consequences such as cirrhosis, liver decompensation, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Less than 10 years ago, there was no treatment of CHBV infection, but now, new drugs have recently been approved and there is considerable new knowledge about the treatment of CHBV infection. Recently, consensus guidelines for the management of hepatitis B virus infection have been released by the National Institutes of Health and the American Medical Association, addressing the selection of patients and drugs for treatments. Determining what constitutes best practices to manage patients with CHBV is challenging and requires nurses and nurse practitioners to acquire and maintain up-to-date knowledge to understand recently approved drugs and disease management. Nurses and nurse practitioners should know how to identify patients who need treatment and how to educate, counsel, and monitor treatment adherence and side effects; these skills are crucially important. The goal of this article is to provide nurses with the most current consensus guidelines for the management of CHBV infection and their application in nursing practice to optimize treatment to enhance patient outcomes.

  3. Hepatitis B virus burden in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Zampino, Rosa; Boemio, Adriana; Sagnelli, Caterina; Alessio, Loredana; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio; Sagnelli, Evangelista; Coppola, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has shown an intermediate or high endemicity level in low-income countries over the last five decades. In recent years, however, the incidence of acute hepatitis B and the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen chronic carriers have decreased in several countries because of the HBV universal vaccination programs started in the nineties. Some countries, however, are still unable to implement these programs, particularly in their hyperendemic rural areas. The diffusion of HBV infection is still wide in several low-income countries where the prevention, management and treatment of HBV infection are a heavy burden for the governments and healthcare authorities. Of note, the information on the HBV epidemiology is scanty in numerous eastern European and Latin-American countries. The studies on molecular epidemiology performed in some countries provide an important contribution for a more comprehensive knowledge of HBV epidemiology, and phylogenetic studies provide information on the impact of recent and older migratory flows. PMID:26576083

  4. A rat model for hepatitis E virus

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Niraj; Verbeken, Erik; Ramaekers, Kaat; Dallmeier, Kai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the prime causes of acute viral hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis E is increasingly recognized as an important problem in the transplant setting. Nevertheless, the fundamental understanding of the biology of HEV replication is limited and there are few therapeutic options. The development of such therapies is partially hindered by the lack of a robust and convenient animal model. We propose the infection of athymic nude rats with the rat HEV strain LA-B350 as such a model. A cDNA clone, pLA-B350, was constructed and the infectivity of its capped RNA transcripts was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a subgenomic replicon, pLA-B350/luc, was constructed and validated for in vitro antiviral studies. Interestingly, rat HEV proved to be less sensitive to the antiviral activity of α-interferon, ribavirin and mycophenolic acid than genotype 3 HEV (a strain that infects humans). As a proof-of-concept, part of the C-terminal polymerase sequence of pLA-B350/luc was swapped with its genotype 3 HEV counterpart: the resulting chimeric replicon replicated with comparable efficiency as the wild-type construct, confirming that LA-B350 strain is amenable to humanization (replacement of certain sequences or motifs by their counterparts from human HEV strains). Finally, ribavirin effectively inhibited LA-B350 replication in athymic nude rats, confirming the suitability of the rat model for antiviral studies. PMID:27483350

  5. [Hepatitis C virus and pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Paolo; Salaffi, Fausto; Pesci, Alberto

    2002-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic inflammatory interstitial lung disease characterized by an accumulation of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in the lower respiratory tract, parenchymal injury, and interstitial fibrosis. Although the etiology of IPF is unknown, it has been suggested that viral agents, among which hepatitis C virus (HCV), may be involved in inducing the disease. In patients with chronic hepatitis HCV+ and in those with mixed cryoglobulinemia HCV-associated, HCV may trigger a subclinical lymphocyte alveolitis. Furthermore, pulmonary fibrosis associated with a variety of rheumatic disorders has been reported in 8/300 patients with active chronic hepatitis HCV+. Bronchoalveolar lavage, carried out in 4/8 patients, showed an increased percentage of neutrophils in all of them and a mild increase of lymphocytes in 2 patients. Thoracoscopic lung biopsy was carried out in 2 patients and showed a desquamative interstitial pneumonia; in one case HCV-RNA was found in the pulmonary parenchyma. Although the above observations seem indicate a role for HCV in IFP, further studies are required to define its true importance in the etiopathogenesis of the interstitial lung disease.

  6. Neuralgic amyotrophy and hepatitis E virus infection

    PubMed Central

    van Eijk, Jeroen J.J.; Madden, Richie G.; van der Eijk, Annemiek A.; Hunter, Jeremy G.; Reimerink, Johan H.J.; Bendall, Richard P.; Pas, Suzan D.; Ellis, Vic; van Alfen, Nens; Beynon, Laura; Southwell, Lucy; McLean, Brendan; Jacobs, Bart C.; van Engelen, Baziel G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is an association between an acute preceding hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection and neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), and if so, whether patients with HEV-related NA differ from patients without an associated HEV infection. Methods: HEV testing was conducted in a retrospective cohort of 28 Cornish patients with NA (2011–2013) and a prospective cohort of 38 consecutive Dutch patients with NA (2004–2007). Acute-phase serum samples were analyzed for the presence of anti-HEV immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG and HEV RNA (quantitative real-time PCR). Results: Five cases (10.6%) of acute hepatitis E infection were identified in a total group of 47 patients with NA of whom serum samples were available. In 4 patients, HEV RNA was detected in serum samples taken at presentation. All patients with HEV-associated NA had clinical and electrophysiologic evidence of bilateral brachial plexus involvement. Anti-HEV IgM positivity was not related to age, sex, disease severity, disease course, or outcome. Conclusions: Acute hepatitis E is found in 10% of patients with NA from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. Further research is required to investigate the role of HEV in NA in other geographical locations and to determine pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:24401685

  7. Attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium delivery of a novel DNA vaccine induces immune responses and provides protection against duck enteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueyan; Liu, Qing; Xiao, Kangpeng; Li, Pei; Liu, Qiong; Zhao, Xinxin; Kong, Qingke

    2016-04-15

    DNA vaccines are widely used to prevent and treat infectious diseases, cancer and autoimmune diseases; however, their relatively low immunogenicity is an obstacle to their use. In this study, we constructed a novel and universal DNA vaccine vector (pSS898) that can be used to build DNA vaccines against duck enteritis virus (DEV) and other viruses that require DNA vaccines to provide protection. This vaccine vector has many advantages, including innate immunogenicity, efficient nuclear trafficking and resistance to attack from nucleases. UL24 and tgB from DEV were chosen as the antigens, and the heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) from Escherichia coli and the IL-2 gene (DuIL-2) from duck were used as adjuvants for the construction of DNA vaccine plasmids. Ducklings that were orally immunized with S739 (Salmonella Typhimurium Δasd-66 Δcrp-24 Δcya-25) and harboring these DEV DNA vaccines produced strong mucosal and systemic immune responses, and they resisted an otherwise lethal DEV challenge. More importantly, S739 (UL24-LTB) provided 90% protection after a priming-boost immunization. This study shows that our novel and universal DNA vaccine vector can be used efficiently in practical applications and may provide a promising method of orally inoculating ducks with a DEV DNA vaccine delivered by attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium for prevention of DVE.

  8. Type A influenza virus surveillance in free-flying, nonmigratory ducks residing on the eastern shore of Maryland.

    PubMed

    Slemons, R D; Hansen, W R; Converse, K A; Senne, D A

    2003-01-01

    Virus surveillance in free-flying, nonmigratory ducks living on the eastern shore of Maryland indicated that influenza A viruses were introduced into the area or that the prevalence of endemic infections increased between July 15 and August 27, 1998. Cloacal swabs collected between May 28 and July 15, 1998, were negative for influenza A virus recovery (0/233), whereas 13.9% (29/209) of swabs collected between August 27 and September 2, 1998, were positive for influenza A virus recovery. Five hemagglutinin subtypes (H2, H3, H6, H9, and H12), six neuraminidase subtypes (N1, N2, N4, N5, N6, and N8), and nine HA-NA combinations were identified among 29 influenza A isolates. Interestingly, 18 of the 29 isolates initially appeared to contain two or more HA and/or NA subtypes. The free-flying, nonmigratory ducks served as excellent sentinels for the early detection of type A influenza viruses in the southern half of the Atlantic Migratory Waterfowl Flyway during the earliest phase of the yearly southern migration.

  9. Type A influenza virus surveillance in free-flying, nonmigratory ducks residing on the eastern shore of Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slemons, R.D.; Hansen, W.R.; Converse, K.A.; Senne, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Virus surveillance in free-flying, nonmigratory ducks living on the eastern shore of Maryland indicated that influenza A viruses were introduced into the area or that the prevalence of endemic infections increased between July 15 and August 27, 1998. Cloacal swabs collected between May 28 and July 15, 1998, were negative for influenza A virus recovery (0/233), whereas 13.9% (29/209) of swabs collected between August 27 and September 2, 1998, were positive for influenza A virus recovery. Five hemagglutinin subtypes (H2, H3, H6, H9, and H12), six neuraminidase subtypes (N1, N2, N4, N5, N6, and N8), and nine HA-NA combinations were identified among 29 influenza A isolates. Interestingly, 18 of the 29 isolates initially appeared to contain two or more HA and/or NA subtypes. The free-flying, nonmigratory ducks served as excellent sentinels for the early detection of type A influenza viruses in the southern half of the Atlantic Migratory Waterfowl Flyway during the earliest phase of the yearly southern migration.

  10. Type a influenza virus surveillance in free-flying, nonmigratory ducks residing on the eastern shore of Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slemons, R.D.; Hansen, W.R.; Converse, K.A.; Senne, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Virus surveillance in free-flying, nonmigratory ducks living on the eastern shore of Maryland indicated that influenza A viruses were introduced into the area or that the prevalence of endemic infections increased between July 15 and August 27, 1998. Cloacal swabs collected between May 28 and July 15, 1998, were negative for influenza A virus recovery (0/233), whereas 13.9% (29/209) of swabs collected between August 27 and September 2, 1998, were positive for influenza A virus recovery. Five hemagglutinin subtypes (H2, H3, H6, H9, and H12), six neuraminidase subtypes (N1, N2, N4, N5, N6, and N8), and nine HA-NA combinations were identified among 29 influenza A isolates. Interestingly, 18 of the 29 isolates initially appeared to contain two or more HA and/or NA subtypes. The free-flying, nonmigratory ducks served as excellent sentinels for the early detection of type A influenza viruses in the southern half of the Atlantic Migratory Waterfowl Flyway during the earliest phase of the yearly southern migration.

  11. Prevalence of Hepatitis Virus Infections in an Institution for Persons with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Bradley A.; Vazquez, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 1,235 residents of Sonoma Developmental Center found 3 residents had hepatitis C virus infections, and 633 had past or current hepatitis B virus infections. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection rose rapidly with longer residence in institutions. Hepatitis A virus infection had occurred in 494 residents. (Contains…

  12. Prevalence of Hepatitis Virus Infections in an Institution for Persons with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Bradley A.; Vazquez, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 1,235 residents of Sonoma Developmental Center found 3 residents had hepatitis C virus infections, and 633 had past or current hepatitis B virus infections. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection rose rapidly with longer residence in institutions. Hepatitis A virus infection had occurred in 494 residents. (Contains…

  13. A molecular and antigenic survey of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus isolates from smallholder duck farms in Central Java, Indonesia during 2007-2008

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Indonesia is one of the countries most severely affected by H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus in terms of poultry and human health. However, there is little information on the diversity of H5N1 viruses circulating in backyard farms, where chickens and ducks often intermingle. In this study, H5N1 virus infection occurring in 96 smallholder duck farms in central Java, Indonesia from 2007-2008 was investigated and the molecular and antigenic characteristics of H5N1 viruses isolated from these farms were analysed. Results All 84 characterised viruses belonged to H5N1 clade 2.1 with three virus sublineages being identified: clade 2.1.1 (1), clade 2.1.3 (80), and IDN/6/05-like viruses (3) that did not belong to any of the present clades. All three clades were found in ducks, while only clade 2.1.3 was isolated from chickens. There were no significant amino acid mutations of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) sites of the viruses, including the receptor binding, glycosylation, antigenic and catalytic sites and NA inhibitor targets. All the viruses had polybasic amino acids at the HA cleavage site. No evidence of major antigenic variants was detected. Based on the HA gene, identical virus variants could be found on different farms across the study sites and multiple genetic variants could be isolated from HPAI outbreaks simultaneously or at different time points from single farms. HPAI virus was isolated from both ducks and chickens; however, the proportion of surviving duck cases was considerably higher than in chickens. Conclusions The 2.1.3 clade was the most common lineage found in this study. All the viruses had sequence characteristic of HPAI, but negligible variations in other recognized amino acids at the HA and NA proteins which determine virus phenotypes. Multiple genetic variants appeared to be circulating simultaneously within poultry communities. The high proportion of live duck cases compared to chickens over the study

  14. A molecular and antigenic survey of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus isolates from smallholder duck farms in Central Java, Indonesia during 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, Hendra; Henning, Joerg; Wong, Frank; Selleck, Paul; Junaidi, Akhmad; Bingham, John; Daniels, Peter; Meers, Joanne

    2011-09-07

    Indonesia is one of the countries most severely affected by H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus in terms of poultry and human health. However, there is little information on the diversity of H5N1 viruses circulating in backyard farms, where chickens and ducks often intermingle. In this study, H5N1 virus infection occurring in 96 smallholder duck farms in central Java, Indonesia from 2007-2008 was investigated and the molecular and antigenic characteristics of H5N1 viruses isolated from these farms were analysed. All 84 characterised viruses belonged to H5N1 clade 2.1 with three virus sublineages being identified: clade 2.1.1 (1), clade 2.1.3 (80), and IDN/6/05-like viruses (3) that did not belong to any of the present clades. All three clades were found in ducks, while only clade 2.1.3 was isolated from chickens. There were no significant amino acid mutations of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) sites of the viruses, including the receptor binding, glycosylation, antigenic and catalytic sites and NA inhibitor targets. All the viruses had polybasic amino acids at the HA cleavage site. No evidence of major antigenic variants was detected. Based on the HA gene, identical virus variants could be found on different farms across the study sites and multiple genetic variants could be isolated from HPAI outbreaks simultaneously or at different time points from single farms. HPAI virus was isolated from both ducks and chickens; however, the proportion of surviving duck cases was considerably higher than in chickens. The 2.1.3 clade was the most common lineage found in this study. All the viruses had sequence characteristic of HPAI, but negligible variations in other recognized amino acids at the HA and NA proteins which determine virus phenotypes. Multiple genetic variants appeared to be circulating simultaneously within poultry communities. The high proportion of live duck cases compared to chickens over the study period suggests that ducks are

  15. Use of genomic interspecies microarray hybridization to detect differentially expressed genes associated with H5N1 avian influenza virus infections in ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Asian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have changed from producing mild respiratory infections in ducks, to some strains producing severe disease and mortality. The objective of this study was to examine the differences in host response to infection with H5N1 HPAI viruses w...

  16. Transcriptional analysis of the innate immune response of ducks to different species-of-origin low pathogenic H7 avian influenza viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Ducks represent an important reservoir for avian influenza (AI) viruses and are partly responsible for the worldwide dissemination of AI. Due to the ability of some low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) of the hemagglutinin H7 subtype to mutate into a highly pathogenic form o...

  17. Hepatitis C Virus, Insulin Resistance, and Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kralj, Dominik; Jukić, Lucija Virović; Stojsavljević, Sanja; Duvnjak, Marko; Smolić, Martina; Čurčić, Ines Bilić

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the main causes of liver disease worldwide. Liver steatosis is a common finding in many hepatic and extrahepatic disorders, the most common being metabolic syndrome (MS). Over time, it has been shown that the frequent coexistence of these two conditions is not coincidental, since many epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies have indicated HCV to be strongly associated with liver steatosis and numerous metabolic derangements. Here, we present an overview of publications that provide clinical evidence of the metabolic effects of HCV and summarize the available data on the pathogenetic mechanisms of this association. It has been shown that HCV infection can induce insulin resistance (IR) in the liver and peripheral tissues through multiple mechanisms. Substantial research has suggested that HCV interferes with insulin signaling both directly and indirectly, inducing the production of several proinflammatory cytokines. HCV replication, assembly, and release from hepatocytes require close interactions with lipid droplets and host lipoproteins. This modulation of lipid metabolism in host cells can induce hepatic steatosis, which is more pronounced in patients with HCV genotype 3. The risk of steatosis depends on several viral factors (including genotype, viral load, and gene mutations) and host features (visceral obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, genetic predisposition, medication use, and alcohol consumption). HCV-related IR and steatosis have been shown to have a remarkable clinical impact on the prognosis of HCV infection and quality of life, due to their association with resistance to antiviral therapy, progression of hepatic fibrosis, and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, HCV-induced IR, oxidative stress, and changes in lipid and iron metabolism lead to glucose intolerance, arterial hypertension, hyperuricemia, and atherosclerosis, resulting in increased cardiovascular mortality. PMID:27047774

  18. Differences in pathogenicity, response to vaccination, and innate immune responses in different types of ducks infected with a virulent H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus from Vietnam

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wild ducks are reservoirs of avian influenza viruses in nature, and usually don’t show signs of disease. However, some Asian lineage H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses can cause disease and death in both wild and domestic ducks. The objective of this study was to compare the cli...

  19. Review: Occult hepatitis C virus infection: still remains a controversy.

    PubMed

    Vidimliski, Pavlina Dzekova; Nikolov, Igor; Geshkovska, Nadica Matevska; Dimovski, Aleksandar; Rostaing, Lionel; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2014-09-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by the presence of HCV RNA in the liver cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the patients whose serum samples test negative for HCV RNA, with or without presence of HCV antibodies. The present study reviews the existing literature on the persistence of occult hepatitis C virus infection, with description of the clinical characteristics and methods for identification of occult hepatitis C. Occult hepatitis C virus infection was detected in patients with abnormal results of liver function tests of unknown origin, with HCV antibodies and HCV RNA negativity in serum, and also in patients with spontaneous or treatment-induced recovery from hepatitis C. The viral replication in the liver cells and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells was present in all clinical presentations of occult hepatitis C. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells represent an extra-hepatic site of HCV replication. The reason why HCV RNA was not detectable in the serum of patients with occult hepatitis C, could be the low number of circulating viral particles not detectable by the diagnostic tests with low sensitivity. It is uncertain whether occult hepatitis C is a different clinical entity or just a form of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Data accumulated over the last decade demonstrated that an effective approach to the diagnosis of HCV infection would be the implementation of more sensitive HCV RNA diagnostic assays, and also, examination of the presence of viral particles in the cells of the immune system.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a waterborne emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Thus far, an HEV outbreak has not been reported in the U.S., although a swine variant of the virus is common in Midwestern hogs. Because viruses isolated from two ...

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a waterborne emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Thus far, an HEV outbreak has not been reported in the U.S., although a swine variant of the virus is common in Midwestern hogs. Because viruses isolated from two ...

  2. Viral (hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, HIV) persistence and immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Ying; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q; Jia, Zhan S

    2014-11-01

    Immune homeostasis is a host characteristic that maintains biological balance within a host. Humans have evolved many host defence mechanisms that ensure the survival of individuals upon encountering a pathogenic infection, with recovery or persistence from a viral infection being determined by both viral factors and host immunity. Chronic viral infections, such as hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and HIV, often result in chronic fluctuating viraemia in the face of host cellular and humoral immune responses, which are dysregulated by multi-faceted mechanisms that are incompletely understood. This review attempts to illuminate the mechanisms involved in this process, focusing on immune homeostasis in the setting of persistent viral infection from the aspects of host defence mechanism, including interferon-stimulated genes, apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 (APOBEC3), autophagy and interactions of various immune cells, cytokines and regulatory molecules.

  3. Hepatitis B virus and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Martín-Carbonero, Luz; Poveda, Eva

    2012-05-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV-) infected persons worldwide have chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV). The management of these patients merits special attention. They experience a faster progression to cirrhosis and more frequent liver-related death than HBV-monoinfected individuals. For this reason, therapy for both HIV and HBV is a priority in most cases. Some antivirals (i.e., tenofovir, lamivudine, emtricitabine) are active against both viruses and should be part of the antiretroviral treatment choice. However, drugs such as entecavir, telbivudine, or adefovir are active against HBV and may display some residual activity against HIV, occasionally leading to the selection of resistance mutations in the HIV polymerase, as is clearly shown with entecavir. Thus, they should be used only in the context of potent antiretroviral treatment. In this review, the authors will provide updated information on the natural history of HIV/HBV coinfected patients, when and which drugs should be used in treatment, and the concern about selection of drug resistance and vaccine escape mutants. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Innate immune responses to hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Schoggins, John W; Rice, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune response provides the first line of defense against invading viral pathogens. Incoming viruses are sensed by dedicated host factors that, when triggered, initiate multiple signal transduction pathways. Activation of these pathways leads to the induction of highly orchestrated transcriptional programs designed to limit virus replication and spread. In recent years, our understanding of innate immune responses targeting hepatitis C virus (HCV) has increased substantially, largely due to the development of new systems and methodologies to study HCV-host interactions in vitro and in vivo. However, significant gaps still remain. Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive view of the innate immune response to HCV, focusing primarily on knowledge gained from cell culture models of HCV infection, as well as data from human patients infected with HCV. While some paradigms of the host response to HCV revealed in cell culture translate to human infection in vivo, others are less clear. Further insight into the similarities and differences in these systems will not only reveal directions for future studies on HCV immunity, but may also guide the development of novel strategies to control HCV and other viral infections.

  5. Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Looking for Interferon Free Regimens

    PubMed Central

    González-Moreno, J.; Payeras-Cifre, A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments of new drugs' combinations are changing the treatment paradigm in hepatitis C virus infection. Due to the side effect profile of pegylated interferons, interferon-sparing regimens have become the main target in chronic hepatitis C treatment research. Recent proofs of concept studies have suggested that cure of chronic hepatitis C can be achieved without interferon. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the clinical results recently reported for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection with interferon-free regimens, focusing on the most promising new compounds and combinations. PMID:23710151

  6. Pathobiology of avian influenza in domestic ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Domestic ducks are an important source of food and income in many parts of the world. The susceptibility of domestic ducks to avian influenza (AI) viruses varies depending on many factors, including the species and the age of the ducks, the virus strain, and management practices. Although wild wat...

  7. Expression and characterization of duck enteritis virus gI gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background At present, alphaherpesviruses gI gene and its encoding protein have been extensively studied. It is likely that gI protein and its homolog play similar roles in virions direct cell-to-cell spread of alphaherpesviruses. But, little is known about the characteristics of DEV gI gene. In this study, we expressed and presented the basic properties of the DEV gI protein. Results The special 1221-bp fragment containing complete open reading frame(ORF) of duck enteritis virus(DEV) gI gene was extracted from plasmid pMD18-T-gI, and then cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET-32a(+), resulting in pET-32a(+)-gI. After being confirmed by PCR, restriction endonuclease digestion and sequencing, pET-32a(+)-gI was transformed into E.coli BL21(DE3) competent cells for overexpression. DEV gI gene was successfully expressed by the addition of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside(IPTG). SDS-PAGE showed that the recombinant protein His6-tagged gI molecular weight was about 61 kDa. Subsequently, the expressed product was applied to generate specific antibody against gI protein. The specificity of the rabbit immuneserum was confirmed by its ability to react with the recombinant protein His6-tagged gI. In addition, real time-PCR was used to determine the the levels of the mRNA transcripts of gI gene, the results showed that the DEV gI gene was transcribed most abundantly during the late phase of infection. Furthermore, indirect immunofluorescence(IIF) was established to study the gI protein expression and localization in DEV-infected duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs), the results confirmed that the protein was expressed and located in the cytoplasm of the infected cells, intensively. Conclusions The recombinant prokaryotic expression vector of DEV gI gene was constructed successfully. The gI protein was successfully expressed by E.coli BL21(DE3) and maintained its antigenicity very well. The basic information of the transcription and intracellular localization of gI gene

  8. Expression and characterization of UL16 gene from duck enteritis virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have indicated that the UL16 protein and its homologs from herpesvirus were conserved and played similar roles in viral DNA packaging, virion assembly, budding, and egress. However, there was no report on the UL16 gene product of duck enteritis virus (DEV). In this study, we analyzed the amino acid sequence of UL16 using bioinformatics tools and expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) induced by isopropy1-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The recombinant protein was produced, purified using a Ni-NTA column and used to generate the polyclonal antibody against UL16. The intracellular distribution of the DEV UL16 product was carried out using indirect immunofluorescence assay. Results In our study, UL16 gene of DEV was composed of 1089 nucleotides, which encoded 362 amino acids. Multiple sequence alignment suggested that the UL16 gene was highly conserved in herpesvirus family. The UL16 gene was cloned into a pET prokaryotic expression vector and transformed into Escherichia coli Rossetta (DE3) induced by IPTG. A 60kDa fusion protein band corresponding to the predicted size was produced on the SDS-PAGE, purified using a Ni-NTA column. Anti-UL16 polyclonal sera was prepared by immunizing rabbits, and reacted with a band in the IPTG induced cell lysates with an apparent molecular mass of 60 kDa. In vivo expression of the UL16 protein in DEV infected duck embryo fibroblast cells (DEFs) was localized mostly around perinuclear cytoplasmic area and in cytosol using indirect immunofluorescence assay. Conclusions The UL16 gene of DEV was successfully cloned, expressed and detected in DEV infected DEFs for the first time. The UL16 protein localized mostly around perinuclear cytoplasmic area and in cytosol in DEV infected DEFs. DEV UL16 shared high similarity with UL16 family members, indicating that DEV UL16 many has similar function with its homologs. All these results may provide some insight for further research about full characterizations

  9. Genetic characterization of an H5N1 avian influenza virus from a vaccinated duck flock in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bui, Vuong Nghia; Ogawa, Haruko; Trinh, Dai Quang; Nguyen, Tham Hong Thi; Pham, Nga Thi; Truong, Duc Anh; Bui, Anh Ngoc; Runstadler, Jonathan; Imai, Kunitoshi; Nguyen, Khong Viet

    2014-10-01

    This study reports the genetic characterization of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 isolated from a moribund domestic duck in central Vietnam during 2012. In the moribund duck's flock, within 6 days after vaccination with a commercial H5N1 vaccine (Re-5) to 59-day-old birds, 120 out of 2,000 ducks died. Genetic analysis revealed a substantial number of mutations in the HA gene of the isolate in comparison with the vaccine strains, Re-1 and Re-5. Similar mutations were also found in selected Vietnamese H5N1 strains isolated since 2009. Mutations in the HA gene involved positions at antigenic sites associated with antibody binding and also neutralizing epitopes, with some of the mutations resulting in the modification of N-linked glycosylation of the HA. Those mutations may be related to the escape of virus from antibody binding and the infection of poultry, interpretations which may be confirmed through a reverse genetics approach. The virus also carried an amino acid substitution in the M2, which conferred a reduced susceptibility to amantadine, but no neuraminidase inhibitor resistance markers were found in the viral NA gene. Additional information including vaccination history in the farm and the surrounding area is needed to fully understand the background of this outbreak. Such understanding and expanded monitoring of the H5N1 influenza viruses circulating in Vietnam is an urgent need to provide updated information to improve effective vaccine strain selection and vaccination protocols, aiding disease control, and biosecurity to prevent H5N1 infection in both poultry and humans.

  10. Breastmilk hepatitis A virus RNA in nursing mothers with acute hepatitis A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Daudi, Nili; Shouval, Daniel; Stein-Zamir, Chen; Ackerman, Zvi

    2012-08-01

    Breastmilk specimens from three women with acute hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection were studied. Anti-HAV immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies were detected in serum and breastmilk specimens of the three women. The three women also had serum HAV RNA. However, HAV RNA was detected only in two of the three breastmilk specimens. It is interesting that none of the three infants contracted clinical HAV infection. Furthermore, mothers with HAV infection should not be encouraged to discontinue breastfeeding.

  11. Influence of occult hepatitis B virus infection in chronic hepatitis C outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Conrado M; Gutierrez, Maria Luisa; Lledó, José Luis; Casas, Maria Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Persistence of hepatitis B virus-DNA in the sera, peripheral blood mononuclear cells or in the liver of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative patients with or without serological markers of previous exposure (antibodies to HBsAg and/or to HB-core antigen) defines the entity called occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). Co-infection with hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses is frequent in highly endemic areas. While this co-infection increases the risk of liver disease progression, development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and also increases the rate of therapeutic failure to interferon-based treatments than either virus alone, a potentially negative effect of OBI on clinical outcomes and of therapeutic response to current antiviral regimes of patients with chronic hepatitis C remains inconclusive. PMID:21472121

  12. Transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus in Pekin ducks is significantly reduced by a genetically distant H5N2 vaccine.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, Jeanet A; van Boven, Michiel; Stegeman, Arjan; van de Water, Sandra G P; de Jong, Mart C M; Koch, Guus

    2008-12-05

    Domestic ducks play an important role in the epidemiology of H5N1 avian influenza. Although it is known that vaccines that have a high homology with the challenge virus are able to prevent infection in ducks, little is yet known about the ability of genetically more distant vaccines in preventing infection, disease, and transmission. Here we study the effect of a widely used H5N2 vaccine (A/Chicken/Mexico/232/94/CPA) on the transmission of H5N1 virus (A/Chicken/China/1204/04) in ducks. The quantitative analyses show that despite the low level of homology between the virus and vaccine strain transmission was significantly reduced two weeks after a single or double vaccination. Mortality and disease rates were reduced markedly already one week after a single vaccination.

  13. Genetic characterization of a novel astrovirus in Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qinfeng; Liu, Ning; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Fumin; Zhang, Dabing

    2015-06-01

    Three divergent groups of duck astroviruses (DAstVs), namely DAstV-1, DAstV-2 (formerly duck hepatitis virus type 3) and DAstV-3 (isolate CPH), and other avastroviruses are known to infect domestic ducks. To provide more data regarding the molecular epidemiology of astroviruses in domestic ducks, we examined the prevalence of astroviruses in 136 domestic duck samples collected from four different provinces of China. Nineteen goose samples were also included. Using an astrovirus-specific reverse transcription-PCR assay, two groups of astroviruses were detected from our samples. A group of astroviruses detected from Pekin ducks, Shaoxing ducks and Landes geese were highly similar to the newly discovered DAstV-3. More interestingly, a novel group of avastroviruses, which we named DAstV-4, was detected in Pekin ducks. Following full-length sequencing and sequence analysis, the variation between DAstV-4 and other avastroviruses in terms of lengths of genome and internal component was highlighted. Sequence identity and phylogenetic analyses based on the amino acid sequences of the three open reading frames (ORFs) clearly demonstrated that DAstV-4 was highly divergent from all other avastroviruses. Further analyses showed that DAstV-4 shared low levels of genome identities (50-58%) and high levels of mean amino acid genetic distances in the ORF2 sequences (0.520-0.801) with other avastroviruses, suggesting DAstV-4 may represent an additional avastrovirus species although the taxonomic relationship of DAstV-4 to DAstV-3 remains to be resolved. The present works contribute to the understanding of epidemiology, ecology and taxonomy of astroviruses in ducks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation and characterization of H4N6 avian influenza viruses from mallard ducks in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junyi; Xu, Xinyi; Wang, Chenxi; Bing, Guoxia; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Yipeng

    2017-01-01

    The novel H7N9 influenza virus, which has caused severe disease in humans in China, is a reassortant with surface genes derived from influenza viruses in wild birds. This highlights the importance of monitoring influenza viruses in these hosts. However, surveillance of influenza virus in wild birds remains very limited in China. In this study, we isolated four H4N6 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) from mallard ducks in Beijing Wetland Park, which is located on the East Asia-Australasia migratory flyway. The gene segments of these Chinese H4N6 viruses were closest to AIVs in wild birds from Mongolia or the Republic of Georgia, indicating the interregional AIV gene flow among these countries. All of our isolates belonged to a novel genotype that was different from other H4N6 viruses isolated in China. We further evaluated the virulence and transmission of two representative H4N6 strains in mammalian models. We found that both of these H4N6 viruses replicated efficiently in mice without adaptation. Additionally, these two strains had a 100% transmission rate in guinea pigs via direct contact, but they had not acquired respiratory droplet transmissibility. These results reveal the potential threat to human health of H4N6 viruses in migratory birds and the need for enhanced surveillance of AIVs in wild birds.

  15. [Porphyrin excretion in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection].

    PubMed

    Armas-Merino, R; Wolff, C; Parraguez, A; Soto, J R

    1997-03-01

    The high prevalence of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda, specially in those without family history of the disease, suggests that this could be an acquired disease and one of the most frequent extra hepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection. To study the excretion of porphyrins and its precursors in cirrhotic patients with and without hepatitis C virus infection. Eighteen patients with cirrhosis Child-Pough A, eight infected with hepatitis C virus, were studied. Urinary excretion of [symbol see text] aminolevulinic acid, porphobilinogen, coproporphyrins, uroporphyrins and fecal excretion of coproporphyrins and protoporphyrins were measured. Red blood cell protoporphyrin was also measured. There were no differences in the measured parameters between patients with or without hepatitis C virus infection. No patient had uroporphyrin excretion values over the normal range. Some patients had slight elevations in some parameters, but always below the values observed in porphyrias. In these group of patients, hepatitis C virus infection of its associated liver disease, do not cause detectable alterations in porphyrin metabolism.

  16. Hepatitis C virus genetic variability and evolution.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Natalia; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Cristina, Juan; Moreno, Pilar

    2015-04-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has infected over 170 million people worldwide and creates a huge disease burden due to chronic, progressive liver disease. HCV is a single-stranded, positive sense, RNA virus, member of the Flaviviridae family. The high error rate of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and the pressure exerted by the host immune system, has driven the evolution of HCV into 7 different genotypes and more than 67 subtypes. HCV evolves by means of different mechanisms of genetic variation. On the one hand, its high mutation rates generate the production of a large number of different but closely related viral variants during infection, usually referred to as a quasispecies. The great quasispecies variability of HCV has also therapeutic implications since the continuous generation and selection of resistant or fitter variants within the quasispecies spectrum might allow viruses to escape control by antiviral drugs. On the other hand HCV exploits recombination to ensure its survival. This enormous viral diversity together with some host factors has made it difficult to control viral dispersal. Current treatment options involve pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin as dual therapy or in combination with a direct-acting antiviral drug, depending on the country. Despite all the efforts put into antiviral therapy studies, eradication of the virus or the development of a preventive vaccine has been unsuccessful so far. This review focuses on current available data reported to date on the genetic mechanisms driving the molecular evolution of HCV populations and its relation with the antiviral therapies designed to control HCV infection.

  17. Hepatitis C virus infection protein network.

    PubMed

    de Chassey, B; Navratil, V; Tafforeau, L; Hiet, M S; Aublin-Gex, A; Agaugué, S; Meiffren, G; Pradezynski, F; Faria, B F; Chantier, T; Le Breton, M; Pellet, J; Davoust, N; Mangeot, P E; Chaboud, A; Penin, F; Jacob, Y; Vidalain, P O; Vidal, M; André, P; Rabourdin-Combe, C; Lotteau, V

    2008-01-01

    A proteome-wide mapping of interactions between hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human proteins was performed to provide a comprehensive view of the cellular infection. A total of 314 protein-protein interactions between HCV and human proteins was identified by yeast two-hybrid and 170 by literature mining. Integration of this data set into a reconstructed human interactome showed that cellular proteins interacting with HCV are enriched in highly central and interconnected proteins. A global analysis on the basis of functional annotation highlighted the enrichment of cellular pathways targeted by HCV. A network of proteins associated with frequent clinical disorders of chronically infected patients was constructed by connecting the insulin, Jak/STAT and TGFbeta pathways with cellular proteins targeted by HCV. CORE protein appeared as a major perturbator of this network. Focal adhesion was identified a