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Sample records for ductile transplutonium metal

  1. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  2. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  3. 'Work-Hardenable' Ductile Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayanta; Eckert, Juergen; Tang Meibo; Wang Weihua; Kim, Ki Buem; Baier, Falko; Theissmann, Ralf

    2005-05-27

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<1%) at room temperature. We present a new class of bulk metallic glass, which exhibits high strength of up to 2265 MPa together with extensive 'work hardening' and large ductility of 18%. Significant increase in the flow stress was observed during deformation. The 'work-hardening' capability and ductility of this class of metallic glass is attributed to a unique structure correlated with atomic-scale inhomogeneity, leading to an inherent capability of extensive shear band formation, interactions, and multiplication of shear bands.

  4. Designing tensile ductility in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Sarac, Baran; Schroers, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of a second phase in metallic glass heterostructures to improve mechanical properties varies widely. Unfortunately, methods to fabricate such heterostructures like foams and composites do not allow controlled variation of structural features. Here we report a novel strategy, which allows us to vary heterostructural features independently, thereby enabling a systematic and quantitative study. Our approach reveals the optimal microstructural architecture for metallic glass heterostructures to achieve tensile ductility. Critical design aspect is a soft second phase, which is most effective when spacing between the second phase assumes the critical crack length of the metallic glass. This spacing should coincide with the second phase’s size, and beyond, the specific second phase morphology of the heterostructure is crucial. These toughening strategies are only effective in samples that are large compared with the spacing of the second phase. The identified design aspects provide guidance in designing tensile ductility into metallic glasses. PMID:23863967

  5. Tunable Tensile Ductility in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Magagnosc, D. J.; Ehrbar, R.; Kumar, G.; He, M. R.; Schroers, J.; Gianola, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread adoption of metallic glasses (MGs) in applications motivated by high strength and elasticity combined with plastic-like processing has been stymied by their lack of tensile ductility. One emerging strategy to couple the attractive properties of MGs with resistance to failure by shear localization is to employ sub-micron sample or feature length scales, although conflicting results shroud an atomistic understanding of the responsible mechanisms in uncertainty. Here, we report in situ deformation experiments of directly moulded Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 MG nanowires, which show tunable tensile ductility. Initially brittle as-moulded nanowires can be coerced to a distinct glassy state upon irradiation with Ga+ ions, leading to tensile ductility and quasi-homogeneous plastic flow. This behaviour is reversible and the glass returns to a brittle state upon subsequent annealing. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for homogenous plastic flow in nano-scaled MGs and strategies for circumventing the poor damage tolerance that has long plagued MGs.

  6. Shifted homologous relationships between the transplutonium and early rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of the late actinide metals americium through einsteinium are compared with their rare-earth counterparts. Localization of the 5f electrons beginning at americium signals the appearance of true rare-earth-like properties, but the homologous relationship is shifted to place americium below praseodymium, einsteinium then below europium. The comparison of crystal structure, phase transitions, vapor pressures and heats of vaporization reveals remarkable similarities, especially for Sm-Cf and Eu-Es, where the stability of the divalent metal becomes established and divalent chemistry then follows. There is of course a major perturbation at the half-filled shell at curium, and it may be argued that americium is the anomaly in the so-called second rare-earth series. However, the response of americium, berkelium and californium under pressure reveals the true perturbation to be a thermodynamic one, occurring at curium.

  7. Determining Ductile Fracture Toughness in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Manneschmidt, Eric T

    2014-01-01

    Ductile fracture toughness determination, such as the J-integral versus crack growth resistance (J-R) curve, is a useful tool for evaluating material structural integrity in the presence of pre-existing defects. The J-R curve represents a way to calculate the work (energy) per unit fracture surface area needed to drive the crack growth. A typical J-R curve is shown in Fig. 1 from which the material fracture toughness near the initiation of stable crack growth (Jq) can be derived. In addition, tearing modulus (TR), representing the material resistance to stable crack growth, can be calculated based on the slope of the J-R curve between two exclusion lines (red dashed lines in Fig. 1). Since the introduction of the J-R curve, extensive efforts have been continuously devoted to develop simplified and reliable methods for determining the material J-R curve. This article briefly reviews three widely-used J-R curve test methods in metals, i.e. elastic unloading compliance (EUC), normalization, and direct current potential drop (DCPD). The main difference in these methods relates to the determination of the crack size. More details of performing the J-R curve determination can be found in ASTM standard E1820-11.

  8. Experimental research on ductile fracture criterion in metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Song; Feng, Weiming

    2011-09-01

    Ductile fracture criterion is key limitation parameter in material forming. Accuracy predicting surface and internal failure in plastic deformation process affects on the technology design of workpiece and die greatly. Tension, compression, torsion and shearing test on 45# steel are utilized for providing the experimental values of the critical values at fracture, and 11 widely used ductile fracture criterion are selected to simulate the physical experiments and their relative accuracy for predicting and quantifying fracture initiation sites are investigated. The comparing results show that metal forming process under high triaxiality can be estimated successively using both Normalized Cockcroft-latham and the Brozzo ductile fracture criteria, but the Ayada and general Rice-Tracey model work very well for the low triaxiality cases.

  9. Flash Joule heating for ductilization of metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Okulov, I. V.; Soldatov, I. V.; Sarmanova, M. F.; Kaban, I.; Gemming, T.; Edström, K.; Eckert, J.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) inherit their amorphous structure from the liquid state, which predetermines their ability to withstand high loads approaching the theoretical limit. However, the absence of slip systems makes them very sensitive to the type of loading and extremely brittle in tension. The latter can be improved by precipitation of ductile crystals, which suppress a catastrophic propagation of shear bands in a glassy matrix. Here we report a novel approach to obtain MG-matrix composites with tensile ductility by flash Joule heating applied to Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 (at.%) metallic glass. This homogeneous, volumetric and controllable rapid heat treatment allows achieving uniformly distributed metastable B2 CuZr crystals in the glassy matrix. It results in a significant tensile strain of 6.8±0.5%. Moreover, optimized adjustment of the heat-treatment conditions enables tuning of microstructure to achieve desired mechanical properties. PMID:26219864

  10. Ductile damage prediction in sheet and bulk metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badreddine, Houssem; Labergère, Carl; Saanouni, Khemais

    2016-04-01

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation of an advanced 3D numerical methodology for virtual sheet and/or bulk metal forming simulation to predict the anisotropic ductile defects occurrence. First, the detailed formulation of thermodynamically-consistent fully coupled and fully anisotropic constitutive equations is given. The proposed constitutive equations account for the main material nonlinearities as the anisotropic plastic flow, the mixed isotropic and kinematic hardening and the anisotropic ductile damage under large inelastic strains. Second, the related numerical aspects required to solve the initial and boundary value problem (IBVP) are very briefly presented in the framework of the 3D finite element method. The global resolution schemes as well as the local integration schemes of the fully coupled constitutive equations are briefly discussed. Finally, some typical examples of sheet and bulk metal forming processes are numerically simulated using the proposed numerical methodology.

  11. Design of ductile bulk metallic glasses by adding ''soft'' atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, N.; Pauly, S.; Calin, M.; Gemming, T.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.; Eckert, J.

    2012-04-02

    We propose a strategy for the design of ductile bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) through minor substitution using relatively large atoms, which make the bonding nature become more metallic and with it less shear resistant. Such a locally modified structure results in topological heterogeneity, which appears to be crucial for achieving enhanced plasticity. This strategy is verified for Ti-Zr-Cu-Pd glassy alloys, in which Cu was replaced by In, and seems to be extendable to other BMG systems. The atomic-scale heterogeneity in BMGs is somewhat analog to defects in crystalline alloys and helps to improve the overall plasticity of BMGs.

  12. Ductilizing Bulk Metallic Glass Composite by Tailoring Stacking Fault Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Zhou, D. Q.; Song, W. L.; Wang, H.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Ma, D.; Wang, X. L.; Lu, Z. P.

    2012-12-01

    Martensitic transformation was successfully introduced to bulk metallic glasses as the reinforcement micromechanism. In this Letter, it was found that the twinning property of the reinforcing crystals can be dramatically improved by reducing the stacking fault energy through microalloying, which effectively alters the electron charge density redistribution on the slipping plane. The enhanced twinning propensity promotes the martensitic transformation of the reinforcing austenite and, consequently, improves plastic stability and the macroscopic tensile ductility. In addition, a general rule to identify effective microalloying elements based on their electronegativity and atomic size was proposed.

  13. A model for ductile metal friction at high velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerberg, J. E.; Ravelo, R. J.; Germann, T. C.

    We describe a meso-macro scale model for the frictional force at ductile metal interfaces for high velocities and large compressions. The model incorporates the micro-mesoscopic growth and refinement of material microstructure in a highly strained region at the sliding interface and incorporates both rate dependent plasticity and thermal conduction. The model compares favorably with recent large scale (1.8 billion atom) simulations to 50 ns of 3-dimensional polycrystalline 13-50 nm grain size Al-Al interfaces at pressures of 15 GPa using the SPaSM NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulation code. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. The support of the LANL ASC-PEM program is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Transplutonium elements processed from rock debris of underground detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. A. A.; Harvey, H. W.; Hoh, J. C.; Horwitz, E. P.

    1969-01-01

    Six-step chemical processing method extracts minute quantities of transplutonium elements found in rock debris following a nuclear detonation. The process consists of dissolution of rock, feed preparation, liquid-liquid extraction, final purification of transplutonium elements and plutonium, and separation of the transplutonium elements.

  15. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2004-03-23

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  16. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2007-07-17

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  17. Ultrahigh strength and ductility of metallic nanolayered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, Nathan Allan; Bhattacharyya, Dhriti; Dickerson, Pat; Hoagland, Richard; Misra, Amit

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the high strength of nanomaterials has gathered much interest in the materials community. Nanomaterials (polycrystalline and composites) have already been used, largely by the semiconductor community, as critical length scales for chip design have decreased to tens of nanometers. However, to ensure reliability of nanomaterials in almost any application, the mechanisms underlying their structural integrity must be well understood. For these materials to be put into service on a broader scale, not only should their strength be considered, but also ductility, toughness, formability, and fatigue resistance. While some progress has been made into constructing models for the deformation mechanisms governing these behaviors, the body of experimental knowledge is still limited, especially when length scales drop below 10 nanometers. This work produces stress-strain curves for nanolaminate composites with individual layer thickness of 40 nm and 5 run. Nanolaminate composites fabricated via magnetron sputtering comprised of alternating 5 nm thick Cu and Nb multilayers (two relatively soft metals) exhibit strengths on par with hardened tool steel and deformability in compression in excess of 25% [1]. The deformability of nanoscale composites is found to be limited by the onset of geometric instability, rather than due to intrinsic material behavior.

  18. An investigation into the role of adhesion in the erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Existing theories of erosion of ductile metals based on cutting and deformation mechanisms predict no material removal at normal incidence which is contradictory to experience. Thus, other mechanisms may be involved. The possible role of adhesive material transfer during erosion is investigated by both single-particle impingement experiments and erosion by streams of particles. Examination of the rebounding particles as well as the eroded surfaces yields evidence of a significant adhesive mechanism for the ductile metals investigated.

  19. An investigation into the role of adhesion in the erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Existing theories of erosion of ductile metals based on cutting and deformation mechanisms predict no material removal at normal incidence which is contradictory to experience. Thus, other mechanisms may be involved. The possible role of adhesive material transfer during erosion is investigated by both single particle impingement experiments and erosion by streams of particles. Examination of the rebounding particles as well as the eroded surface yields evidence of a significant adhesive mechanism for the ductile metals investigated.

  20. Steady crack growth through ductile metals: Computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, James C.

    This thesis examines the crack-front response during sustained ductile tearing in structural metals at quasistatic rates using high resolution finite element computations. At load levels approaching the steady-growth regime, well-established computational methods that model material damage break down numerically as vanishingly small load increments produce increasingly large amounts of crack extension. The computational model adopted here determines the deformation history of a steadily advancing crack directly without the need for a priori (transient) analysis that considers blunting of the pre-existing stationary crack and subsequent growth through the associated initial plastic zone. Crack extension occurs at the remotely applied, fixed loading without the need for a local growth criteria. This numerical scheme utilizes a streamline integration technique to determine the elastic-plastic fields, generalized from a two-dimensional to a fully three-dimensional setting and implemented within mixed Matlab/C++/F-90 based software. Modifications of the conventional finite element formulation lead to an efficient procedure -- readily parallelized -- and determine the invariant near-front fields, representative of steady-state growth, on a fixed mesh in a boundary-layer framework. In the small-scale yielding regime, the crack front does not sense the existence of remote boundaries, and computational results retain a strong transferability among various geometric configurations where near-front, plastic deformation remains entirely enclosed by the surrounding linear-elastic material. The global stress intensity factor (KI ) and imposed T-stress fully specify displacement constraints along the far-field boundary, and in a three-dimensional setting, the panel thickness reflects the only natural length scale. The initial studies in this work consider steady crack advance within the small-scale yielding context under plane-strain conditions and mode I loading. These analyses

  1. Shear-driven damage of ductile metals induced by indentation load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunyu; Xiao, Wenkang

    2015-08-01

    Although indentation does not induce apparent cracking in ductile materials, degradation of elastic stiffness of ductile metals has been found in micro-/macro- indentation tests. After comparing the predicted degradation by extended damaged-plasticity models with that measured by experimental testing, it is found that the softening caused by distortion of existing voids is inadequate to cause the notable degradation of elasticity. It is suggested that an independent damage-nucleation mechanism arising from shear deformation may exist. Although attractive in practical applications for its non-destructive nature, the damage-based indentation technique for estimating the fracture properties of ductile materials needs further investigation.

  2. Alternating brittle and ductile response of coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Tanushree; Kulkarni, Yashashree

    2014-11-14

    Nanotwinned metals have opened exciting avenues for the design of high strength and high ductility materials. In this work, we investigate crack propagation along coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals using molecular dynamics. Our simulations reveal that alternating twin boundaries exhibit intrinsic brittleness and ductility owing to the opposite crystallographic orientations of the adjoining twins. This is a startling consequence of the directional anisotropy of an atomically sharp crack along a twin boundary that favors cleavage in one direction and dislocation emission from the crack tip in the opposite direction. We further find that a blunt crack exhibits ductility in all cases albeit with very distinct deformation mechanisms and yield strength associated with intrinsically brittle and ductile coherent twin boundaries.

  3. High-strength and high-ductility nanostructured and amorphous metallic materials.

    PubMed

    Kou, Hongning; Lu, Jian; Li, Ying

    2014-08-20

    The development of materials with dual properties of high strength and high ductility has been a constant challenge since the foundation of the materials science discipline. The rapid progress of nanotechnology in recent decades has further brought this challenge to a new era. This Research News highlights a few newly developed strategies to optimize advanced nanomaterials and metallic glasses with exceptional dual mechanical properties of high strength and high ductility. A general concept of strain non-localization is presented to describe the role of multiscale (i.e., macroscale, microscale, nanoscale, and atomic scale) heterogeneities in the ductility enhancement of materials reputed to be intrinsically brittle, such as nanostructured metallic materials and bulk metallic glasses. These nanomaterials clearly form a new group of materials that display an extraordinary relationship between yield strength and the uniform elongation with the same chemical composition. Several other examples of nanomaterials such as those reinforced by nanoprecipitates will also be described.

  4. Neutron multiplicities for the transplutonium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Zucker, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper continues, with respect to the transplutonium nuclides, earlier efforts to collate and evaluate data from the scientific literature on the prompt neutron multiplicity distribution from fission and its first moment = ..sigma..nuPnu. The isotopes considered here for which P/sub nu/ and or data (or both) were found in the literature are of americium (Am), curium (Cm), berkelium (Bk), californium (Cf), einsteinium (Es), fermium (Fm), and nobelium (No).

  5. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    PubMed Central

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  6. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating.

    PubMed

    Sun, B A; Chen, S H; Lu, Y M; Zhu, Z G; Zhao, Y L; Yang, Y; Chan, K C; Liu, C T

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  7. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability.

  8. Ductility and work hardening in nano-sized metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D. Z.; Gu, X. W.; An, Q.; Goddard, W. A.; Greer, J. R.

    2015-02-09

    In-situ nano-tensile experiments on 70 nm-diameter free-standing electroplated NiP metallic glass nanostructures reveal tensile true strains of ∼18%, an amount comparable to compositionally identical 100 nm-diameter focused ion beam samples and ∼3 times greater than 100 nm-diameter electroplated samples. Simultaneous in-situ observations and stress-strain data during post-elastic deformation reveal necking and work hardening, features uncharacteristic for metallic glasses. The evolution of free volume within molecular dynamics-simulated samples suggests a free surface-mediated relaxation mechanism in nano-sized metallic glasses.

  9. Ductility and work hardening in nano-sized metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. Z.; Gu, X. W.; An, Q.; Goddard, W. A.; Greer, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    In-situ nano-tensile experiments on 70 nm-diameter free-standing electroplated NiP metallic glass nanostructures reveal tensile true strains of ˜18%, an amount comparable to compositionally identical 100 nm-diameter focused ion beam samples and ˜3 times greater than 100 nm-diameter electroplated samples. Simultaneous in-situ observations and stress-strain data during post-elastic deformation reveal necking and work hardening, features uncharacteristic for metallic glasses. The evolution of free volume within molecular dynamics-simulated samples suggests a free surface-mediated relaxation mechanism in nano-sized metallic glasses.

  10. Superior Tensile Ductility in Bulk Metallic Glass with Gradient Amorphous Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Liu, C. T.; Ruan, H. H.; Lu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Over centuries, structural glasses have been deemed as a strong yet inherently ‘brittle’ material due to their lack of tensile ductility. However, here we report bulk metallic glasses exhibiting both a high strength of ~2 GPa and an unprecedented tensile elongation of 2–4% at room temperature. Our experiments have demonstrated that intense structural evolution can be triggered in theses glasses by the carefully controlled surface mechanical attrition treatment, leading to the formation of gradient amorphous microstructures across the sample thickness. As a result, the engineered amorphous microstructures effectively promote multiple shear banding while delay cavitation in the bulk metallic glass, thus resulting in superior tensile ductility. The outcome of our research uncovers an unusual work-hardening mechanism in monolithic bulk metallic glasses and demonstrates a promising yet low-cost strategy suitable for producing large-sized, ultra-strong and stretchable structural glasses. PMID:24755683

  11. Non-Local Ductile Damage Formulations for Sheet Bulk Metal Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beese, Steffen; Loehnert, Stefan; Wriggers, Peter

    2016-08-01

    A ductile damage model for sheet bulk metal forming processes and its efficient and accurate treatment in the context of the Finite Element Method is presented. The damage is introduced as a non-local field to overcome pathological mesh dependency. Since standard elements tend to show volumetric locking in the bulk forming process a mixed formulation is implemented in the commercial software simufact.forming to obtain better results.

  12. Modeling Dynamic Ductility: An Equation of State for Porous Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J

    2007-07-27

    Enhanced heating from shock compression of a porous material can potentially suppress or delay cracking of the material on subsequent expansion. In this paper we quantify the expected enhanced heating in an experiment in which a sector of a thin cylindrical shell is driven from the inside surface by SEMTEX high explosive ({approx}1 {micro}s FWHM pressure pulse with peak pressure {approx}21.5 GPa). We first derive an analytical equation of state (EOS) for porous metals, then discuss the coupling of this EOS with material elastic-plastic response in a 2D hydrocode, and then discuss the modeling of the HE experiment with both fully dense and 10% porous Ta and a Bi/Ta composite. Finally, we compare our modeling with some recent experimental data.

  13. Microstructural Origins of Dynamic Fracture in Ductile Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Belak, J; Campbell, G

    2002-12-16

    From the formation of microscopic cracks in the fuel pipe liner of the space shuttle to the safety of roadway bridges, the fracture of materials has enormous implications throughout our society. The ability to assess and design safe engineering structures requires a detailed knowledge of this failure process. The fracture process depends on both the loading history and the detailed microscopic structure (microstructure) of the material. Weak points, such as inclusions and grain boundary junctions, are the locations from which microscopic fractures (voids and cracks) originate. Once nucleated, these fractures quickly link together to form a macroscopic crack. Despite this qualitative understanding, little is known about voids nucleation, plastic deformation in the surrounding material, and the mechanisms of linking. Central to Stockpile Stewardship is an understanding of shock loading of materials. During the passage of a shock wave, the material is compressed at a very high rate. This compression produces a high density of dislocation defects and other changes to the microstructure that are poorly understood. When the shock wave reflects from a free surface, the compression is rapidly released and extreme tension is produced inside the material. If this tension exceeds the internal rupture strength, microscopic fractures form and link up to create a spallation scab--a thin scab that separates from the bulk of the material. In this project, we use the LLNL gas gun facility to produce a planar stress pulse with controlled duration and amplitude. The sample is carefully captured in soft foam while measuring the free surface velocity profile. The amount of change in the surface velocity during release is related to the spallation strength. We study light metals (Al, V, Ti, Cu) with known initial microstructure: single crystal, polycrystalline, and single crystal with engineered inclusions. Light metals enable direct measurement of the three dimensional distribution of

  14. Computer simulation of strength and ductility of nanotwin-strengthened coarse-grained metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Ji, R.; Weng, G. J.; Zhu, L. L.; Lu, J.

    2014-10-01

    The superior strength-ductility combination in nanotwin (NT)-strengthened metals has provided a new potential for optimizing the mechanical properties of coarse-grained (CG) metals. In this paper computer simulations based on the mechanism-based strain gradient plasticity and the Johnson-Cook failure criterion have been carried out to uncover the critical factors that serve to provide this dual function. Our results indicate that both the distribution characteristics of the NT regions and the constitutive relations of the NT phase can have a significant impact on the strength and ductility of the CG Cu strengthened by the NT regions. In particular, twin spacing, distribution characteristics such as arrangement, shape and orientation, together with volume fraction of the NT regions, can all have significant effects. Along the way, we also discovered that microcrack initiation, coalescence and deflection constituted the entire failure process. Significant insights into the morphology of NT regions that could deliver superior strength and ductility combination for CG metals have been established.

  15. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K. C.; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19′ phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:24931632

  16. Unusual room temperature ductility of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass containing nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J. B.; Zhang, W.; Xie, G. Q.; Inoue, A.

    2007-06-04

    Highly ductile Zr{sub 65}Al{sub 7.5}Cu{sub 27.5} bulk metallic glass (BMG) containing nanometer scaled fcc phase was obtained by copper mold casting. Room temperature compression tests revealed superior mechanical properties of the alloy: yielding stress of 1670 MPa, Young's modulus of 90 GPa, elastic strain of 2%, and especially a remarkable plasticity of over 50%. The marginal BMG is a useful model system to examine the nanocrystal coalescence model and the shear-transformation-zone model proposed for large scale plastic deformations of metallic glasses.

  17. Designing metallic glass matrix composites with high toughness and tensile ductility.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Wiest, Aaron; Duan, Gang; Lind, Mary-Laura; Demetriou, Marios D; Johnson, William L

    2008-02-28

    The selection and design of modern high-performance structural engineering materials is driven by optimizing combinations of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, toughness, elasticity and requirements for predictable and graceful (non-catastrophic) failure in service. Highly processable bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are a new class of engineering materials and have attracted significant technological interest. Although many BMGs exhibit high strength and show substantial fracture toughness, they lack ductility and fail in an apparently brittle manner in unconstrained loading geometries. For instance, some BMGs exhibit significant plastic deformation in compression or bending tests, but all exhibit negligible plasticity (<0.5% strain) in uniaxial tension. To overcome brittle failure in tension, BMG-matrix composites have been introduced. The inhomogeneous microstructure with isolated dendrites in a BMG matrix stabilizes the glass against the catastrophic failure associated with unlimited extension of a shear band and results in enhanced global plasticity and more graceful failure. Tensile strengths of approximately 1 GPa, tensile ductility of approximately 2-3 per cent, and an enhanced mode I fracture toughness of K(1C) approximately 40 MPa m(1/2) were reported. Building on this approach, we have developed 'designed composites' by matching fundamental mechanical and microstructural length scales. Here, we report titanium-zirconium-based BMG composites with room-temperature tensile ductility exceeding 10 per cent, yield strengths of 1.2-1.5 GPa, K(1C) up to approximately 170 MPa m(1/2), and fracture energies for crack propagation as high as G(1C) approximately 340 kJ m(-2). The K(1C) and G(1C) values equal or surpass those achievable in the toughest titanium or steel alloys, placing BMG composites among the toughest known materials. PMID:18305540

  18. High velocity properties of the dynamic frictional force between ductile metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James Edward; Hollan, Brad L; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J

    2010-01-01

    The high velocity properties of the tangential frictional force between ductile metal interfaces seen in large-scale NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are characterized by interesting scaling behavior. In many cases a power law decrease in the frictional force with increasing velocity is observed at high velocities. We discuss the velocity dependence of the high velocity branch of the tangential force in terms of structural transformation and ultimate transition, at the highest velocities, to confined fluid behavior characterized by a critical strain rate. The particular case of an Al/Al interface is discussed.

  19. Understanding the changes in ductility and Poisson's ratio of metallic glasses during annealing from microscopic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Ngai, K. L.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-07-21

    In the paper K. L. Ngai et al., [J. Chem. 140, 044511 (2014)], the empirical correlation of ductility with the Poisson's ratio, ν{sub Poisson}, found in metallic glasses was theoretically explained by microscopic dynamic processes which link on the one hand ductility, and on the other hand the Poisson's ratio. Specifically, the dynamic processes are the primitive relaxation in the Coupling Model which is the precursor of the Johari–Goldstein β-relaxation, and the caged atoms dynamics characterized by the effective Debye–Waller factor f{sub 0} or equivalently the nearly constant loss (NCL) in susceptibility. All these processes and the parameters characterizing them are accessible experimentally except f{sub 0} or the NCL of caged atoms; thus, so far, the experimental verification of the explanation of the correlation between ductility and Poisson's ratio is incomplete. In the experimental part of this paper, we report dynamic mechanical measurement of the NCL of the metallic glass La{sub 60}Ni{sub 15}Al{sub 25} as-cast, and the changes by annealing at temperature below T{sub g}. The observed monotonic decrease of the NCL with aging time, reflecting the corresponding increase of f{sub 0}, correlates with the decrease of ν{sub Poisson}. This is important observation because such measurements, not made before, provide the missing link in confirming by experiment the explanation of the correlation of ductility with ν{sub Poisson}. On aging the metallic glass, also observed in the isochronal loss spectra is the shift of the β-relaxation to higher temperatures and reduction of the relaxation strength. These concomitant changes of the β-relaxation and NCL are the root cause of embrittlement by aging the metallic glass. The NCL of caged atoms is terminated by the onset of the primitive relaxation in the Coupling Model, which is generally supported by experiments. From this relation, the monotonic decrease of the NCL with aging time is caused by the slowing down

  20. Dislocation creation and void nucleation in FCC ductile metals under tensile loading: a general microscopic picture.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-11-10

    Numerous theoretical and experimental efforts have been paid to describe and understand the dislocation and void nucleation processes that are fundamental for dynamic fracture modeling of strained metals. To date an essential physical picture on the self-organized atomic collective motions during dislocation creation, as well as the essential mechanisms for the void nucleation obscured by the extreme diversity in structural configurations around the void nucleation core, is still severely lacking in literature. Here, we depict the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation during uniaxial high strain rate tensile processes in face-centered-cubic (FCC) ductile metals. We find that the dislocations are created through three distinguished stages: (i) Flattened octahedral structures (FOSs) are randomly activated by thermal fluctuations; (ii) The double-layer defect clusters are formed by self-organized stacking of FOSs on the close-packed plane; (iii) The stacking faults are formed and the Shockley partial dislocations are created from the double-layer defect clusters. Whereas, the void nucleation is shown to follow a two-stage description. We demonstrate that our findings on the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation are universal for a variety of FCC ductile metals with low stacking fault energies.

  1. Microstructural percolation assisted breakthrough of trade-off between strength and ductility in CuZr-based metallic glass composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Liu, G; Qu, R T; Zhang, Z F; Wu, S J; Zhang, T

    2014-01-01

    As two important mechanical properties, strength and ductility generally tend to be muturally exclusive in conventional engineering materials. The breakthrough of such a trade-off has been potentiated by the recently developed CuZr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites ductilized by a shape memory CuZr(B2) phase. Here the microstructural dependences of tensile properties for the CuZr-based BMG composites were elucidated qualitatively and modeled quantitatively, and the underlying mechanisms were unraveled. Through the microstructural percolation induced by matching the length scales of particle size and interparticle spacing, a notable breakthrough was achieved in the composites that the general conflicts between strength and ductility can be defeated. This study is expected to greatly aid in the microstructural design and tailoring for improved properties of BMG composites. It also has implications for the development of strong and ductile materials in the future.

  2. Microstructural percolation assisted breakthrough of trade-off between strength and ductility in CuZr-based metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z. Q.; Liu, G.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.; Wu, S. J.; Zhang, T.

    2014-01-01

    As two important mechanical properties, strength and ductility generally tend to be muturally exclusive in conventional engineering materials. The breakthrough of such a trade-off has been potentiated by the recently developed CuZr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites ductilized by a shape memory CuZr(B2) phase. Here the microstructural dependences of tensile properties for the CuZr-based BMG composites were elucidated qualitatively and modeled quantitatively, and the underlying mechanisms were unraveled. Through the microstructural percolation induced by matching the length scales of particle size and interparticle spacing, a notable breakthrough was achieved in the composites that the general conflicts between strength and ductility can be defeated. This study is expected to greatly aid in the microstructural design and tailoring for improved properties of BMG composites. It also has implications for the development of strong and ductile materials in the future. PMID:24566737

  3. Micromechanical and macroscopic models of ductile fracture in particle reinforced metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chao; Bai, Jie; Ghosh, Somnath

    2007-06-01

    This paper is aimed at developing two modules contributing to the overall framework of multi-scale modelling of ductile fracture of particle reinforced metallic materials. The first module is for detailed micromechanical analysis of particle fragmentation and matrix cracking of heterogeneous microstructures. The Voronoi cell FEM for particle fragmentation is extended in this paper to incorporate ductile failure through matrix cracking in the form of void growth and coalescence using a non-local Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model. In the resulting enriched Voronoi cell finite element model (VCFEM) or E-VCFEM, the assumed stress-based hybrid VCFEM formulation is overlaid with narrow bands of displacement based elements to accommodate strain softening in the constitutive behaviour. The second module develops an anisotropic plasticity-damage model in the form of the GTN model for macroscopic analysis in the multi-scale material model. Parameters in this model are calibrated from results of homogenization of microstructural variables obtained by E-VCFEM analysis of microstructural representative volume element. Numerical examples conducted yield satisfactory results.

  4. Numerical simulation of systems of shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plohr, JeeYeon N.; Plohr, Bradley J.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a method for numerical simulations of high strain-rate loading of mesoscale samples of ductile metal with inclusions. Because of its small-scale inhomogeneity, the composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). This method employs the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. 127-139, 1992] to ensure that the micro mechanical behavior of the metal and inclusions is reflected properly in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To find the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, we extend and apply the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands of Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996]. Our tests of the method focus on the stress/strain response in uniaxial-strain flow, both compressive and tensile, of depleted uranium metal containing silicon carbide inclusions. We use the Preston-Tonks-Wallace viscoplasticity model [J. Appl. Phys., vol. 93, pp. 211-220, 2003], which applies to the high strain-rate regime of an isotropic viscoplastic solid. In results, we verify the elevated temperature and thermal softening at shear bands in our simulations of pure DU and DU/SiC composites. We also note that in composites, due the asymmetry caused by the inclusions, shear band form at different times in different subcells. In particular, in the subcells near inclusions, shear band form much earlier than they do in pure DU.

  5. Ductile damage prediction in metal forming processes: Advanced modeling and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saanouni, K.

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the needs required in modern virtual metal forming including both sheet and bulk metal forming of mechanical components. These concern the advanced modeling of thermo-mechanical behavior including the multiphysical phenomena and their interaction or strong coupling, as well as the associated numerical aspects using fully adaptive simulation strategies. First a survey of advanced constitutive equations accounting for the main thermomechanical phenomena as the thermo-elasto-plastic finite strains with isotropic and kinematic hardenings fully coupled with ductile damage will be presented. Only the macroscopic phenomenological approach with state variables (monoscale approach) will be discussed in the general framework of the rational thermodynamics for generalized micromorphic continua. The micro-macro (multi-scales approach) in the framework of polycrystalline inelasticity is not presented here for the sake of shortness but will be presented during the oral presentation. The main numerical aspects related to the resolution of the associated initial and boundary value problem will be outlined. A fully adaptive numerical methodology will be briefly described and some numerical examples will be given in order to show the high predictive capabilities of this adaptive methodology for virtual metal forming simulations.

  6. Deformation of microstructures due to low-velocity particulate erosion of ductile metals by spherical particles

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, P.S.; Banerjee, D.; Williams, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    A simple cumulative damage model has been developed for the low-velocity, normal-incidence, erosion of ductile metals by spherical particles. The model correlates the computed plastic-strain distribution for different impact velocities and materials with the experimentally measured erosion rates. This paper describes the surface and sub-surface changes which occur in Cu and Cu-6 wt % Al specimens during erosion testing. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy have been used to study these changes in order to determine whether the deformed microstructures are consistent with the predictions of the model. Because the deformation due to the impact of a 50/sup 0/m-diameter spherical particle occurs at high strain rates (10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/) and is also highly localized, the deformation mechanisms differ slightly from bulk deformation which has been reported for low strain rates. The contribution of strain localization (adiabatic shear) and twinning is discussed in light of the microstructural observations. 7 figures.

  7. Improved ductility of Cu64Zr36 metallic glass/Cu nanocomposites via phase and grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, W. R.; Wang, L.; Li, B.; Yao, X. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate tensile deformation of metallic glass/crystalline interpenetrating phase nanocomposites as regards the effects of specific area of amorphous/crystalline phase interfaces, and grain boundaries. As an illustrative case, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed on Cu64Zr36 metallic glass/Cu nanocomposites with different specific interface areas and grain boundary characteristics. Plastic deformation is achieved via shear bands, shear transformation zones, and crystal plasticity. Three-dimensional amorphous/crystalline interfaces serve as effective barriers to the propagation of shear transformation zones and shear bands if formed, diffuse strain localizations, and give rise to improved ductility. Ductility increases with increasing specific interface area. In addition, introducing grain boundaries into the second phase facilitates crystal plasticity, which helps reduce or eliminate mature shear bands in the glass matrix.

  8. Work-Hardening Induced Tensile Ductility of Bulk Metallic Glasses via High-Pressure Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Pi, Dong-Hai; Setyawan, Albertus Deny Heri; Kato, Hidemi; Janecek, Milos; Kim, Yong Chan; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2015-04-01

    The mechanical properties of engineering materials are key for ensuring safety and reliability. However, the plastic deformation of BMGs is confined to narrow regions in shear bands, which usually result in limited ductilities and catastrophic failures at low homologous temperatures. The quasi-brittle failure and lack of tensile ductility undercut the potential applications of BMGs. In this report, we present clear tensile ductility in a Zr-based BMG via a high-pressure torsion (HPT) process. Enhanced tensile ductility and work-hardening behavior after the HPT process were investigated, focusing on the microstructure, particularly the changed free volume, which affects deformation mechanisms (i.e., initiation, propagation, and obstruction of shear bands). Our results provide insights into the basic functions of hydrostatic pressure and shear strain in the microstructure and mechanical properties of HPT-processed BMGs.

  9. Work-hardening induced tensile ductility of bulk metallic glasses via high-pressure torsion.

    PubMed

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Pi, Dong-Hai; Setyawan, Albertus Deny Heri; Kato, Hidemi; Janecek, Milos; Kim, Yong Chan; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2015-04-23

    The mechanical properties of engineering materials are key for ensuring safety and reliability. However, the plastic deformation of BMGs is confined to narrow regions in shear bands, which usually result in limited ductilities and catastrophic failures at low homologous temperatures. The quasi-brittle failure and lack of tensile ductility undercut the potential applications of BMGs. In this report, we present clear tensile ductility in a Zr-based BMG via a high-pressure torsion (HPT) process. Enhanced tensile ductility and work-hardening behavior after the HPT process were investigated, focusing on the microstructure, particularly the changed free volume, which affects deformation mechanisms (i.e., initiation, propagation, and obstruction of shear bands). Our results provide insights into the basic functions of hydrostatic pressure and shear strain in the microstructure and mechanical properties of HPT-processed BMGs.

  10. Development of tough, low-density titanium-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites with tensile ductility

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Wiest, Aaron; Lind, Mary-Laura; Demetriou, Marios D.; Johnson, William L.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and their composites have been under intense investigation for many years, owing to their unique combination of high strength and elastic limit. However, because of their highly localized deformation mechanism, BMGs are typically considered to be brittle materials and are not suitable for structural applications. Recently, highly-toughened BMG composites have been created in a Zr–Ti-based system with mechanical properties comparable with high-performance crystalline alloys. In this work, we present a series of low-density, Ti-based BMG composites with combinations of high strength, tensile ductility, and excellent fracture toughness. PMID:19074287

  11. Modeling ductile metals under large strain, pressure and high strain rates incorporating damage and microstructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannitti, Gianluca; Bonora, Nicola; Ruggiero, Andrew; Dichiaro, Simone

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a constitutive modeling that couples plasticity, grain size evolution (due to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization) and ductile damage has been developed. The effect of grain size on the material yield stress (Hall-Petch) and on the melting temperature has been considered. The model has been used to investigate computationally the behaviour of high purity copper in dynamic tensile extrusion test (DTE). An extensive numerical simulation work, using implicit finite element code with direct integration, has been performed and the results have been compared with available experimental data. The major finding is that the proposed model is capable to predict most of the observed features such as the increase of material ductility with the decreasing average grain size, the overall number and size of fragments and the average grain size distribution in the fragment trapped into the dime.

  12. Modeling ductile metals under large strain, pressure and high strain rate incorporating damage and microstructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannitti, Gianluca; Bonora, Nicola; Ruggiero, Andrew; Dichiaro, Simone

    2012-03-01

    In this work, a constitutive modeling that couples plasticity, grain size evolution (due to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization) and ductile damage has been developed. The effect of grain size on the material yield stress (Hall-Petch) and on the melting temperature has been considered. The model has been used to investigate computationally the behavior of high purity copper in dynamic tensile extrusion test (DTE). An extensive numerical simulation work, using implicit finite element code with direct integration, has been performed and the results have been compared with available experimental data. The major finding is that the proposed model is capable to predict most of the observed features such as the increase of material ductility with the decreasing average grain size, the overall number and size of fragments and the average grain size distribution in the fragment trapped into the dime.

  13. Redox reactions and complex formation of transplutonium elements in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives a brief analysis of the kinetics and mechanism of a number of redox processes and the complex formation of transplutonium elements in unusual oxidation states. The composition and strength of complexes of TPE with various addends have been determined. The new experimental data on the oxidation potentials of americium and berkelium ions in solutions are cited in abbreviated form. It follows from the data that in phosphoric acid solutions, when the H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ concentration is increased from 10 to 15 M, the oxidation potential of the couple Am(IV)-Am(III) decreases. The oxidation potentials of the couples Am(VI)-Am(V), Cm(V)-Cm(IV), and Bk(IV)Bk(III) are also presented.

  14. Production of transplutonium elements in the high flux isotope reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, J.E.; Corbett, B.L.; King, L.J.; McGuire, S.C.; Sims, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques described here have been demonstrated to predict the contents of transplutonium element production targets, at least for isotopes of mass 253 or less. The HFIR irradiation model is a workhorse for planning the TRU processing campaigns, for certifying the heat evolution rate of targets prior to insertion in the reactor, for predicting future production capabilities over a multi-year period, and for making optimization studies. Practical considerations, however, may limit the range of available options so that optimum operation is not always achievable. We do intend, however, to keep fine-tuning the constants which define the cross sections as time permits. We need to do more work on optimizing the production of /sup 250/Cm, /sup 254/Es, /sup 255/Es, and ultimately /sup 257/Fm, since researchers are interested in obtaining larger quantities of these rare and difficult-to-produce nuclides. 7 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Numerical Study of the Effect of the Sample Aspect Ratio on the Ductility of Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) Under Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunpeng

    2016-05-01

    In this article, a systematic numerical study was conducted to study the detailed shear banding evolution in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with various sample aspect ratios under uniaxial compression, and whereby the effect of the sample aspect ratio on the compressive ductility was elucidated. A finite strain viscoelastic model was employed to describe the shear banding nucleation, growth, and coalescence in BMG samples with the help of Anand and Su's theory, which was incorporated into the ABAQUS finite element method code as a user material subroutine VUMAT. The present numerical method was first verified by comparing with the corresponding experimental results, and then parameter analysis was performed to discuss the impact of microstructure parameters on the predicted results. The present modeling will shed some light on enhancing the toughness of BMG structures in the engineering applications.

  16. Synthesis of nanoparticles from malleable and ductile metals using powder-free, reactant-assisted mechanical attrition.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Brandon W; Perez, Jesus Paulo L; Yu, Jiang; Boatz, Jerry A; Anderson, Scott L

    2014-11-26

    A reactant-assisted mechanochemical method was used to produce copious nanoparticles from malleable/ductile metals, demonstrated here for aluminum, iron, and copper. The milling media is intentionally degraded via a reactant-accelerated wear process, where the reactant aids particle production by binding to the metal surfaces, enhancing particle production, and reducing the tendency toward mechanochemical (cold) welding. The mechanism is explored by comparing the effects of different types of solvents and solvent mixtures on the amount and type of particles produced. Particles were functionalized with oleic acid to aid in particle size separation, enhance dispersion in hydrocarbon solvents, and protect the particles from oxidation. For aluminum and iron, the result is air-stable particles, but for copper, the suspended particles are found to dissolve when exposed to air. Characterization was performed using electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Density functional theory was used to examine the nature of carboxylic acid binding to the aluminum surface, confirming the dominance of bridging bidentate binding. PMID:25343708

  17. Experimental and numerical study of single and multiple impacts of angular particles on ductile metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaffoli, Mahdi

    multi-particle erosion tests, with good agreement. An investigation of the simulated trajectory of the impacting particles revealed various erosion mechanisms such as the micromachining of chips, the ploughing of craters, and the formation, forging and knocking off crater lips which were consistent with previously noted ductile solid particle erosion mechanisms in the literature.

  18. A quantitatively accurate theory of stable crack growth in single phase ductile metal alloys under the influence of cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Peter oel

    Although fatigue has been a well studied phenomenon over the past century and a half, there has yet to be found a quantitative link between fatigue crack growth rates and materials properties. This work serves to establish that link, in the case of well behaved, single phase, ductile metals. The primary mechanisms of fatigue crack growth are identified in general terms, followed by a description of the dependence of the stress intensity factor range on those mechanisms. A method is presented for calculating the crack growth rate for an ideal, linear elastic, non-brittle material, which is assumed to be similar to the crack growth rate for a real material at very small crack growth rate values. The threshold stress intensity factor is discussed as a consequence of "crack tip healing". Residual stresses are accounted for in the form of an approximated residual stress intensity factor. The results of these calculations are compared to data available in the literature. It is concluded that this work presents a new way to consider crack growth with respect to cyclic loading which is quantitatively accurate, and introduces a new way to consider fracture mechanics with respect to the relatively small, cyclic loads, normally associated with fatigue.

  19. Large-size ultrahigh strength Ni-based bulk metallic glassy matrix composites with enhanced ductility fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Guoqiang; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa; Wakai, Fumihiro

    2008-03-24

    Ni-based bulk glassy alloy composites (GACs) simultaneously with ultrahigh strength and enhanced ductility and satisfying large-size requirements were fabricated by spark plasma sintering of gas-atomized Ni{sub 52.5}Nb{sub 10}Zr{sub 15}Ti{sub 15}Pt{sub 7.5} glassy alloy powder blend with ceramic or metal powders. No crystallization of metallic glassy matrix and good bonding state between the particles are responsible for good mechanical properties of the fabricated bulk GACs. The improvement of plastic ductility of the fabricated bulk GACs originates from the structural inhomogeneity caused by the particles inclusion. The additional particulates act as a resisting media causing deviation, branching, and multiplication of shear bands.

  20. Large-size ultrahigh strength Ni-based bulk metallic glassy matrix composites with enhanced ductility fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guoqiang; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa; Wakai, Fumihiro

    2008-03-01

    Ni-based bulk glassy alloy composites (GACs) simultaneously with ultrahigh strength and enhanced ductility and satisfying large-size requirements were fabricated by spark plasma sintering of gas-atomized Ni52.5Nb10Zr15Ti15Pt7.5 glassy alloy powder blend with ceramic or metal powders. No crystallization of metallic glassy matrix and good bonding state between the particles are responsible for good mechanical properties of the fabricated bulk GACs. The improvement of plastic ductility of the fabricated bulk GACs originates from the structural inhomogeneity caused by the particles inclusion. The additional particulates act as a resisting media causing deviation, branching, and multiplication of shear bands.

  1. Characterization of solid particle erosion resistance of ductile metals based on their properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results pertaining to spherical glass bead and angular crushed glass particle impingement. A concept of energy absorption to explain the failure of material is proposed and is correlated with the erosion characteristics of several pure metals. Analyses of extensive erosion data indicate that the properties - surface energy, specific melting energy, strain energy, melting point, bulk modulus, hardness, atomic volume - and the product of the parameters - linear coefficient of thermal expansion x bulk modulus x temperature rise required for melting, and ultimate resilience x hardness - exhibit the best correlations. The properties of surface energy and atomic volume are suggested for the first time for correlation purposes and are found to correlate well with erosion rates at different angles of impingement. It further appears that both energy and thermal properties contribute to the total erosion.

  2. Solid impingement erosion mechanisms and characterization of erosion resistance of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, V. P.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results pertaining to spherical glass bead and angular crushed glass particle impingement are presented. A concept of energy adsorption to explain the failure of material is proposed. The erosion characteristics of several pure metals were correlated with the proposed energy parameters and with other properties. Correlations of erosion and material properties were also carried out with these materials to study the effect of the angle of impingement. Analyses of extensive erosion data indicate that surface energy, strain energy, melting point, bulk modulus, hardness, ultimate resilience, atomic volume and product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion, bulk modulus, and temperature rise required for melting, and ultimate resilience, and hardness exhibit the best correlations. It appears that both energy and thermal properties contribute to the total erosion.

  3. Effects of Non-metallic Inclusions on Hot Ductility of High Manganese TWIP Steels Containing Different Aluminum Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Nan; Yang, Jian; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Xin, Xiu-Ling; Xu, Long-Yun

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of inclusions in Fe-16Mn- xAl-0.6C ( x = 0.002, 0.033, 0.54, 2.10 mass pct) steels have been investigated and their effects on hot ductility of the high manganese TWIP steels have been discussed. Ductility is very poor in the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, which is lower than 20 pct in the temperature range of 873 K to 1473 K (600 °C to 1200 °C). For the steels containing 0.002 and 2.10 mass pct aluminum, ductility is higher than 40 pct in the same temperature range. The hot ductility of steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum is higher than 30 pct throughout the temperature range under examination. With increasing aluminum content, the main inclusions in the steels change along the route of MnO/(MnO + MnS) → MnS/(Al2O3 + MnS) → AlN/(Al2O3 + MnS)/(MgAl2O4 + MnS) → AlN. The thermodynamic results of inclusion types calculated with FactSage software are in agreement with the experimental observation results. The inclusions in the steels containing 0.002 mass pct aluminum do not deteriorate the hot ductility. MnS inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 1.12 μm, 15.62 mm-2, and 2.51 × 10-6 in the steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum reduce the ductility. In the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, AlN inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 0.878 μm, 16.28 mm-2 and 2.82 × 10-6 can precipitate at the austenite grain boundaries, prevent dynamic recrystallization and deteriorate the hot ductility. On the contrary, in the steel containing 2.10 mass pct aluminum, the average size, number density and volume ratio of AlN inclusions change to 2.418 μm, 35.95 mm-2, and 2.55 × 10-5. They precipitate in the matrix, which do not inhibit dynamic recrystallization and thereby do not lead to poor hot ductility.

  4. Chromatographic cation exchange separation of decigram quantities of californium and other transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Orr, P.B.; Ross, R.G.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Decigram quantities of highly radioactive transplutonium elements are routinely partitioned at TRU by chromatographic elution from cation resin using AHIB eluents. Batch runs containing up to 200 mg of /sup 252/Cf can be made in about 5 h (2 h to load the feed and 3 h for the elution), with two high-pressure ion exchange columns, a small one for the initial loading of the feed and a large one for the elution. The separations achieved in the column are preserved by routing the column effluent through an alpha detector and using the response from the detector to select appropriate product fractions. The high-pressure ion exchange process has been reliable and relatively easy to operate; therefore it will continue to be used for partitioning transplutonium elements at TRU. 3 figures, 1 table.

  5. Chromatographic cation exchange separation of decigram quantities of californium and other transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Orr, P.B.; Ross, R.G.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Decigram quantities of highly radioactive transplutonium elements are routinely partitioned at TRU by chromatographic elution from cation resin using AHIB eluent. By using two high-pressure ion exchange columns, a small one for the initial loading of the feed and a large one for the elution, batch runs containing up to 200 mg of /sup 252/Cf can be made in about 5 hours (2 hours to load the feed and 3 hours for the elution). The number of effluent product fractions and the amount of actinides that must be collected in intermediate fractions are minimized by monitoring response from a flow-through alpha-detector. This process has been reliable and relatively easy to operate, and will continue to be used for partitioning transplutonium elements at TRU.

  6. Ductile crystalline–amorphous nanolaminates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinmin; Li, Ju; Hamza, Alex V.; Barbee, Troy W.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that the room-temperature plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses is compromised by strain softening and shear localization, resulting in near-zero tensile ductility. The incorporation of metallic glasses into engineering materials, therefore, is often accompanied by complete brittleness or an apparent loss of useful tensile ductility. Here we report the observation of an exceptional tensile ductility in crystalline copper/copper–zirconium glass nanolaminates. These nanocrystalline–amorphous nanolaminates exhibit a high flow stress of 1.09 ± 0.02 GPa, a nearly elastic-perfectly plastic behavior without necking, and a tensile elongation to failure of 13.8 ± 1.7%, which is six to eight times higher than that typically observed in conventional crystalline–crystalline nanolaminates (<2%) and most other nanocrystalline materials. Transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations demonstrate that shear banding instability no longer afflicts the 5- to 10-nm-thick nanolaminate glassy layers during tensile deformation, which also act as high-capacity sinks for dislocations, enabling absorption of free volume and free energy transported by the dislocations; the amorphous–crystal interfaces exhibit unique inelastic shear (slip) transfer characteristics, fundamentally different from those of grain boundaries. Nanoscale metallic glass layers therefore may offer great benefits in engineering the plasticity of crystalline materials and opening new avenues for improving their strength and ductility. PMID:17592136

  7. Austempered Ductile Iron Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Šajgalík, Michal; Holubják, Jozef; Piešová, Marianna; Zaušková, Lucia; Babík, Ondrej; Kuždák, Viktor; Rákoci, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article deals with the machining of cast iron. In industrial practice, Austempered Ductile Iron began to be used relatively recently. ADI is ductile iron that has gone through austempering to get improved properties, among which we can include strength, wear resistance or noise damping. This specific material is defined also by other properties, such as high elasticity, ductility and endurance against tenigue, which are the properties, that considerably make the tooling characteristic worse.

  8. Mathematical modeling and remote monitoring of ion-exchange separation of transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Tselishchev, I.V.; Elesin, A.A.

    1988-07-01

    A mathematical model and calculational algorithms for the elution curves for ion-exchange separation of transplutonium elements (TPE) and the limits of optimal fractionation of the substances being separated, based on indicators of the process (yield, purification), are presented. The calculational programs are part of the programming provision of a small informational-calculational system based on the microcomputer Elektronika DZ-28, intended for remote monitoring of TPE separation. The elaborated programs can be implemented in the preliminary choice of necessary conditions of the TPE separation process, and also during and after the separation process for comparison of calculated results with the results of continuous, on-line remote monitoring and with the results of laboratory sample analysis. The possible application of the programs has been checked in the instance of the separation of curium and americium, and einsteinium and californium, the results of which are in satisfactory agreement with the results of remote and laboratory-analytical monitoring.

  9. A study of the nature of solid particle impact and shape on the erosion morphology of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Impulsive versus steady jet impingement of spherical glass bead particles on metal surfaces was studied using a gas gun facility and a commercial sand blasting apparatus. Crushed glass particles were also used in the sand blasting apparatus as well as glass beads. Comparisons of the different types of erosion patterns were made. Scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis were used to characterize erosion patterns. The nature of the wear can be divided into cutting and deformation, each with its own characteristic features. Surface chemistry analysis indicates the possibility of complex chemical and/or mechanical interactions between erodants and target materials.

  10. GRINDING ROOM AT SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BESSEMER FOUNDRY SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GRINDING ROOM AT SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BESSEMER FOUNDRY SHOWING WHEELABORATOR THAT IMPALE SHOT AT TUMBLING CASTINGS TO REMOVE EXCESS SURFACE METALS AND SAND; ANNEALING OVENS TO HEAT CERTAIN CASTINGS TO ACHIEVE A DESIRED CHARACTERISTIC; AND GRINDING WHEELS USED TO REMOVE GATES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Grinding & Shipping, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Ductile failure X-prize.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.; Wellman, Gerald William; Emery, John M.; Ostien, Jakob T.; Foster, John T.; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Mota, Alejandro; Bishop, Joseph E.; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Littlewood, David John; Foulk, James W., III; Dowding, Kevin J.; Dion, Kristin; Boyce, Brad Lee; Robbins, Joshua H.; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2011-09-01

    Fracture or tearing of ductile metals is a pervasive engineering concern, yet accurate prediction of the critical conditions of fracture remains elusive. Sandia National Laboratories has been developing and implementing several new modeling methodologies to address problems in fracture, including both new physical models and new numerical schemes. The present study provides a double-blind quantitative assessment of several computational capabilities including tearing parameters embedded in a conventional finite element code, localization elements, extended finite elements (XFEM), and peridynamics. For this assessment, each of four teams reported blind predictions for three challenge problems spanning crack initiation and crack propagation. After predictions had been reported, the predictions were compared to experimentally observed behavior. The metal alloys for these three problems were aluminum alloy 2024-T3 and precipitation hardened stainless steel PH13-8Mo H950. The predictive accuracies of the various methods are demonstrated, and the potential sources of error are discussed.

  12. Material Characterization for Ductile Fracture Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    The research summarized in this document provides valuable information for structural health evaluation of NASA infrastructure. Specifically, material properties are reported which will enable calibration of ductile fracture prediction methods for three high-toughness metallic materials and one aluminum alloy which can be found in various NASA facilities. The task of investigating these materials has also served to validate an overall methodology for ductile fracture prediction is currently being employed at NASA. In facilitating the ability to incorporate various materials into the prediction scheme, we have provided data to enable demonstration of the overall generality of the approach.

  13. Hydrothermal syntheses, structural, Raman, and luminescence studies of Cm[M(CN)2]3 3H2O and Pr[M(CN)2]3 3H2O (M Ag, Au) 2. Hetero-bimetallic coordination polymers consisting of trans-plutonium and transition metal elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Assefa, Zerihun; Haire, Richard {Dick} G; Sykora, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    We have prepared Cm[Au(CN)2]3 3H2O and Cm[Ag(CN)2]3 3H2O as a part of our continuing investigations into the chemistry of the 5f-elements dicyanometallates. Single crystals of Cm[Au(CN)2]3 3H2O were obtained from the reaction of CmCl3 and KAu(CN)2 under mild hydrothermal conditions. Due to similarities in size, the related praseodymium compounds were also synthesized and characterized for comparison with the actinide systems. The compounds crystallize in the hexagonal space group P63/mcm, where the curium and the transition metals interconnect through cyanide bridging. Crystallographic data (Mo Ka, l 0.71073 A ): Cm[Au(CN)2]3 3H2O (1), a 6.6614(5) A , c 18.3135(13) A , V 703.77(9), Z 2; Pr[Au(CN)2]3 3H2O (3), a 6.6662(8) A , c 18.497(3) A , V 711.83(17), Z 2; Pr[Ag(CN)2]3 3H2O (4), a 6.7186(8) A , c 18.678(2) A , V 730.18(14), Z 2. The Cm3+ and/or Pr3+ ions are coordinated to six N-bound CN- groups resulting in a trigonal prismatic arrangement. Three oxygen atoms of coordinated water molecules tricap the trigonal prismatic arrangement providing a coordination number of nine for the f-elements. The curium ions in both compounds exhibit a strong red emission corresponding to the 6D7/2-8S7/2 transition. This transition is observed at 16,780 cm-1, with shoulders at 17,080 and 16,840 cm-1 for the Ag complex, while the emission is red shifted by -100 cm-1 in the corresponding gold complex. The Pr systems also provide well-resolved emissions upon f f excitation.

  14. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, Kevin; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite.

  15. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, K.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.

    1999-05-18

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite. 2 figs.

  16. Recovery of transplutonium elements from aqueous and water-ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid and their separation from other actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, and other actinides, as well as Zr, on anion and cation exchangers in aqueous and water-ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid as a function of the various components of the solution has been investigated. It has been discovered that the presence of ethanol in sulfuric acid solutions causes an increase in the distribution coefficients both on cation exchangers and on anion exchangers. The possibility of the use of ion exchangers for the preconcentration and separation of transplutonium elements from U, Np, Pu, Zr, and other elements which form strong complexes with sulfate ions over a broad range of concentrations of sulfuric acid has been demonstrated.

  17. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements on ion exchange resins in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    Th behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in a mixture with PbO/sub 2/ was investigated in sulfuric acid solutions. A substantial difference was detected in the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium and rare earth elements, on the other, associated with oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state. Methods are proposed for the concentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare earth elements on an anion exchange resin in solution of 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and a cation exchange resin in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  18. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare-earth elements on ion exchangers in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on anion exchangers and cation exchangers mixed with PbO/sub 2/ in solutions of sulfuric acid has been investigated. A significant difference between the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium elements and rare-earth elements, on the other hand, which has been attributed to the oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state, has been discovered. Methods for the preconcentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare-earth element son anion exchangers in 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions and on cation exchangers in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions have been proposed.

  19. Ductile Damage Evolution and Strain Path Dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasan, C. C.; Hoefnagels, J. M. P.; Peerlings, R. H. J.; Geers, M. G. D.; ten Horn, C. H. L. J.; Vegter, H.

    2007-04-01

    Forming limit diagrams are commonly used in sheet metal industry to define the safe forming regions. These diagrams are built to define the necking strains of sheet metals. However, with the rise in the popularity of advance high strength steels, ductile fracture through damage evolution has also emerged as an important parameter in the determination of limit strains. In this work, damage evolution in two different steels used in the automotive industry is examined to observe the relationship between damage evolution and the strain path that is followed during the forming operation.

  20. Mechanical model for ductility loss

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.L.

    1980-02-11

    A mechanical model was constructed to probe into the mechanism of ductility loss. Fracture criterion based on critical localized deformation was undertaken. Two microstructure variables were considered in the model. Namely, the strength ratio of grain boundary affected area to the matrix, ..cap omega.., and the linear fraction, x, of grain boundary affected area. A parametrical study was carried out. The study shows that the ductility is very sensitive to those microstructure parameters. The functional dependence of ductility to temperature as well as strain-rate, suggested by the model, is demonstrated to be consistent with the observation.

  1. Microstructural Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to quantify the graphite particle phase in nodular ductile iron (NDI). This study provides the basis for initializing microstructure in direct numerical simulations, as part of developing microstructure-fracture response models. The work presented here is a subset of a PhD dissertation on spall fracture in NDI. NDI is an ideal material for studying the influence of microstructure on ductile fracture because it contains a readily identifiable second-phase particle population, embedded in a ductile metallic matrix, which serves as primary void nucleation sites. Nucleated voids grow and coalesce under continued tensile loading, as part of the micromechanisms of ductile fracture, and lead to macroscopic failure. For this study, we used 2D optical microscopy and quantitative metallography relationships to characterize the volume fraction, size distribution, nearest-neighbor distance, and other higher-order metrics of the graphite particle phase. We found that the volume fraction was {Phi} = 0.115, the average particle diameter was d{sub avg} = 25.9 {mu}m, the Weibull shape and scaling parameters were {beta} = 1.8 and {eta} = 29.1 {mu}m, respectively, the (first) nearest neighbor distance was L{sub nn} = 32.4 {mu}m, the exponential coefficients for volume fraction fluctuations was A{sub {Phi}} = 1.89 and B{sub {Phi}} = -0.59, respectively. Based on reaching a coefficient-of-variation (COV) of 0.01, the representative volume element (RVE) size was determined to be 8.9L{sub nn} (288 {mu}m).

  2. A new insight into ductile fracture of ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hailiang; Tieu, A. Kiet; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Xiong; Liu, Mao; Godbole, Ajit; Kong, Charlie; Qin, Qinghua

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that when coarse-grained metals undergo severe plastic deformation to be transformed into nano-grained metals, their ductility is reduced. However, there are no ductile fracture criteria developed based on grain refinement. In this paper, we propose a new relationship between ductile fracture and grain refinement during deformation, considering factors besides void nucleation and growth. Ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloy sheets were fabricated using different rolling techniques at room and cryogenic temperatures. It is proposed for the first time that features of the microstructure near the fracture surface can be used to explain the ductile fracture post necking directly. We found that as grains are refined to a nano size which approaches the theoretical minimum achievable value, the material becomes brittle at the shear band zone. This may explain the tendency for ductile fracture in metals under plastic deformation.

  3. A new insight into ductile fracture of ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloys

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hailiang; Tieu, A. Kiet; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Xiong; Liu, Mao; Godbole, Ajit; Kong, Charlie; Qin, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that when coarse-grained metals undergo severe plastic deformation to be transformed into nano-grained metals, their ductility is reduced. However, there are no ductile fracture criteria developed based on grain refinement. In this paper, we propose a new relationship between ductile fracture and grain refinement during deformation, considering factors besides void nucleation and growth. Ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloy sheets were fabricated using different rolling techniques at room and cryogenic temperatures. It is proposed for the first time that features of the microstructure near the fracture surface can be used to explain the ductile fracture post necking directly. We found that as grains are refined to a nano size which approaches the theoretical minimum achievable value, the material becomes brittle at the shear band zone. This may explain the tendency for ductile fracture in metals under plastic deformation. PMID:25851228

  4. Separation of berkelium (IV) from trivalent transplutonium elements on ion-exchangers in solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The dependences of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf and Es behavior on anion- and cation-exchangers in solutions of 0.1-8.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ on acid concentration and oxidant content in solution (KBrO/sub 3/) or in resin (PbO/sub 2/) have been studied. Significant differences in distribution coefficients of Bk and other transplutonium elements (TPE) have been found that can be explained by Bk oxidation to the tetravalent state. A simple and effective method of Bk (IV) separation from trivalent TPE has been developed. The method was applied to the isolation of isotopes Bk-249 and Bk-250; the purification factor of Bk (IV) from other TPE is 10/sup 4/-10/sub 6/ per cycle. The possibility of Bk separation from bromate and phosphate ions by its sorption on a cation-exchanger from diluted H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ solutions with subsequent desorption by the mineral acid has been shown. 20 references, 8 figures.

  5. Increased ductility in high velocity electromagnetic ring expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altynova, Marina; Hu, Xiaoyu; Daehn, Glenn S.

    1996-07-01

    Thin rings have been rapidly expanded using large, transient magnetic fields to study the effect of deformation velocity on strains to failure of ductile metals. A classical electrodynamics analysis similar to one developed previously by Gourdin was employed to estimate sample velocities. Within expansion velocities studied (50 to 300 m/s), the experimental results show that ductility of Al 6061 and OFHC Cu increases monotonically with increasing velocity. In each case, sample strain at failure is almost twice as great at 300 m/s as in the static condition. Comparison to a one-dimensional rigid-viscoplastic dynamic finite element method analysis suggests that inertial effects are mainly responsible for enhanced ductility over a wide range of velocity.

  6. NEMD simulations for ductile metal sliding

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James E; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J; Holian, Brad L

    2011-01-31

    We have studied the sliding behavior for a 19 M Al(110)/Al(110) defective crystal at 15 GPa as a function of relative sliding velocity. The general features are qualitatively similar to smaller scale (1.4 M) atom simulations for Al(111)/Al(110) nondefective single crystal sliding. The critical velocity, v{sub c}, is approximately the same for the defective crystal as the size scaled v{sub c}. The lower velocity tangential force is depressed relative to the perfect crystal. The critical temperature, T*, is depressed relative to the perfect crystal. These conclusions are consistent with a lower value for f{sub c} for the defective crystal. The detailed features of structural transformation and the high velocity regime remain to be mapped.

  7. Nanodomained Nickel Unite Nanocrystal Strength with Coarse-Grain Ductility

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Fuping; Yang, Muxin; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Chuanxin; Chen, Liu; Wei, Yueguang; Ma, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Conventional metals are routinely hardened by grain refinement or by cold working with the expense of their ductility. Recent nanostructuring strategies have attempted to evade this strength versus ductility trade-off, but the paradox persists. It has never been possible to combine the strength reachable in nanocrystalline metals with the large uniform tensile elongation characteristic of coarse-grained metals. Here a defect engineering strategy on the nanoscale is architected to approach this ultimate combination. For Nickel, spread-out nanoscale domains (average 7 nm in diameter) were produced during electrodeposition, occupying only ~2.4% of the total volume. Yet the resulting Ni achieves a yield strength approaching 1.3 GPa, on par with the strength for nanocrystalline Ni with uniform grains. Simultaneously, the material exhibits a uniform elongation as large as ~30%, at the same level of ductile face-centered-cubic metals. Electron microscopy observations and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the nanoscale domains effectively block dislocations, akin to the role of precipitates for Orowan hardening. In the meantime, the abundant domain boundaries provide dislocation sources and trapping sites of running dislocations for dislocation multiplication, and the ample space in the grain interior allows dislocation storage; a pronounced strain-hardening rate is therefore sustained to enable large uniform elongation. PMID:26122728

  8. Nanodomained Nickel Unite Nanocrystal Strength with Coarse-Grain Ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Fuping; Yang, Muxin; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Chuanxin; Chen, Liu; Wei, Yueguang; Ma, Evan

    2015-06-01

    Conventional metals are routinely hardened by grain refinement or by cold working with the expense of their ductility. Recent nanostructuring strategies have attempted to evade this strength versus ductility trade-off, but the paradox persists. It has never been possible to combine the strength reachable in nanocrystalline metals with the large uniform tensile elongation characteristic of coarse-grained metals. Here a defect engineering strategy on the nanoscale is architected to approach this ultimate combination. For Nickel, spread-out nanoscale domains (average 7 nm in diameter) were produced during electrodeposition, occupying only ~2.4% of the total volume. Yet the resulting Ni achieves a yield strength approaching 1.3 GPa, on par with the strength for nanocrystalline Ni with uniform grains. Simultaneously, the material exhibits a uniform elongation as large as ~30%, at the same level of ductile face-centered-cubic metals. Electron microscopy observations and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the nanoscale domains effectively block dislocations, akin to the role of precipitates for Orowan hardening. In the meantime, the abundant domain boundaries provide dislocation sources and trapping sites of running dislocations for dislocation multiplication, and the ample space in the grain interior allows dislocation storage; a pronounced strain-hardening rate is therefore sustained to enable large uniform elongation.

  9. Nanodomained Nickel Unite Nanocrystal Strength with Coarse-Grain Ductility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Fuping; Yang, Muxin; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Chuanxin; Chen, Liu; Wei, Yueguang; Ma, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Conventional metals are routinely hardened by grain refinement or by cold working with the expense of their ductility. Recent nanostructuring strategies have attempted to evade this strength versus ductility trade-off, but the paradox persists. It has never been possible to combine the strength reachable in nanocrystalline metals with the large uniform tensile elongation characteristic of coarse-grained metals. Here a defect engineering strategy on the nanoscale is architected to approach this ultimate combination. For Nickel, spread-out nanoscale domains (average 7 nm in diameter) were produced during electrodeposition, occupying only ~2.4% of the total volume. Yet the resulting Ni achieves a yield strength approaching 1.3 GPa, on par with the strength for nanocrystalline Ni with uniform grains. Simultaneously, the material exhibits a uniform elongation as large as ~30%, at the same level of ductile face-centered-cubic metals. Electron microscopy observations and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the nanoscale domains effectively block dislocations, akin to the role of precipitates for Orowan hardening. In the meantime, the abundant domain boundaries provide dislocation sources and trapping sites of running dislocations for dislocation multiplication, and the ample space in the grain interior allows dislocation storage; a pronounced strain-hardening rate is therefore sustained to enable large uniform elongation. PMID:26122728

  10. The origins of high hardening and low ductility in magnesium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaoxuan; Curtin, W A

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium is a lightweight structural metal but it exhibits low ductility-connected with unusual, mechanistically unexplained, dislocation and plasticity phenomena-which makes it difficult to form and use in energy-saving lightweight structures. We employ long-time molecular dynamics simulations utilizing a density-functional-theory-validated interatomic potential, and reveal the fundamental origins of the previously unexplained phenomena. Here we show that the key 〈c + a〉 dislocation (where 〈c + a〉 indicates the magnitude and direction of slip) is metastable on easy-glide pyramidal II planes; we find that it undergoes a thermally activated, stress-dependent transition to one of three lower-energy, basal-dissociated immobile dislocation structures, which cannot contribute to plastic straining and that serve as strong obstacles to the motion of all other dislocations. This transition is intrinsic to magnesium, driven by reduction in dislocation energy and predicted to occur at very high frequency at room temperature, thus eliminating all major dislocation slip systems able to contribute to c-axis strain and leading to the high hardening and low ductility of magnesium. Enhanced ductility can thus be achieved by increasing the time and temperature at which the transition from the easy-glide metastable dislocation to the immobile basal-dissociated structures occurs. Our results provide the underlying insights needed to guide the design of ductile magnesium alloys.

  11. Isolation and separation of transplutonium elements from other actinides on ion exchange resins from aqueous and aqueous ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, and other actinides, as well as Zr, on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in aqueous and aqueous alcohol solutions of sulfuric acid was investigated as a function of the concentration of various components of the solution. It was found that the presence of alcohol in sulfuric acid solutions leads to an increase in the distribution coefficients both on cation exchange resins and on anion exchange resins. The possibility of using ion exchange resins for the concentration and separation of transplutonium elements from U, Np, Pu, Zr, and other elements that form strong complexes with sulfate ions in a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations was demonstrated.

  12. Optimal scaling in ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokoua Djodom, Landry

    This work is concerned with the derivation of optimal scaling laws, in the sense of matching lower and upper bounds on the energy, for a solid undergoing ductile fracture. The specific problem considered concerns a material sample in the form of an infinite slab of finite thickness subjected to prescribed opening displacements on its two surfaces. The solid is assumed to obey deformation-theory of plasticity and, in order to further simplify the analysis, we assume isotropic rigid-plastic deformations with zero plastic spin. When hardening exponents are given values consistent with observation, the energy is found to exhibit sublinear growth. We regularize the energy through the addition of nonlocal energy terms of the strain-gradient plasticity type. This nonlocal regularization has the effect of introducing an intrinsic length scale into the energy. We also put forth a physical argument that identifies the intrinsic length and suggests a linear growth of the nonlocal energy. Under these assumptions, ductile fracture emerges as the net result of two competing effects: whereas the sublinear growth of the local energy promotes localization of deformation to failure planes, the nonlocal regularization stabilizes this process, thus resulting in an orderly progression towards failure and a well-defined specific fracture energy. The optimal scaling laws derived here show that ductile fracture results from localization of deformations to void sheets, and that it requires a well-defined energy per unit fracture area. In particular, fractal modes of fracture are ruled out under the assumptions of the analysis. The optimal scaling laws additionally show that ductile fracture is cohesive in nature, i.e., it obeys a well-defined relation between tractions and opening displacements. Finally, the scaling laws supply a link between micromechanical properties and macroscopic fracture properties. In particular, they reveal the relative roles that surface energy and microplasticity

  13. Austempered ductile iron process development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, C. D.; Keough, J. R.; Pramstaller, D. M.

    1986-11-01

    Pressure from imports and material substitution has severly affected demand for domestic iron industry products. It is estimated that the potential market for Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) is as large as the market for carburized and/or through hardened forgings. The primary interest in ADI is generated by the economics of process. Improved machinability and reduced processing costs as well as interesting physical properties has created an enormous interest in all metalworking industries towards ADI. The development of gas-fired austempering processes and resoluton of technical and economic uncertainities concerning the process will help improve the outlook for iron founderies.

  14. Extraction of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Muscatello, A.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

    1981-05-01

    The extraction behavior of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions from nitrate solution was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data obtained for Am(III) and Eu(III) using DHDECMP were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)) and in certain cases with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP). It was found that both the nitrate and extractant concentration dependencies were third power. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) and for Eu(III) measured from low acid LiNO/sub 3/ solutions were similar for DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP), thus giving no evidence for any significant chelation effect for DHDECMP. Significant differences among DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP) are found for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP (and to a lesser extent, DHDECEP) to buffer itself against HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) through Fm(III) and for La(III) through Lu(III) measured from LiNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3/ using DHDECMP show a definite tetrad effect when plotted as a function of Z. The K/sub d/'s for the lanthanides generally decrease with Z whereas the K/sub d/'s for the transplutonium elements change very little with Z.

  15. Heterogeneous lamella structure unites ultrafine-grain strength with coarse-grain ductility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yang, Muxin; Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Guilin; Wei, Yujie; Huang, Xiaoxu; Zhu, Yuntian

    2015-11-24

    Grain refinement can make conventional metals several times stronger, but this comes at dramatic loss of ductility. Here we report a heterogeneous lamella structure in Ti produced by asymmetric rolling and partial recrystallization that can produce an unprecedented property combination: as strong as ultrafine-grained metal and at the same time as ductile as conventional coarse-grained metal. It also has higher strain hardening than coarse-grained Ti, which was hitherto believed impossible. The heterogeneous lamella structure is characterized with soft micrograined lamellae embedded in hard ultrafine-grained lamella matrix. The unusual high strength is obtained with the assistance of high back stress developed from heterogeneous yielding, whereas the high ductility is attributed to back-stress hardening and dislocation hardening. The process discovered here is amenable to large-scale industrial production at low cost, and might be applicable to other metal systems. PMID:26554017

  16. Heterogeneous lamella structure unites ultrafine-grain strength with coarse-grain ductility

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yang, Muxin; Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Guilin; Wei, Yujie; Huang, Xiaoxu; Zhu, Yuntian

    2015-01-01

    Grain refinement can make conventional metals several times stronger, but this comes at dramatic loss of ductility. Here we report a heterogeneous lamella structure in Ti produced by asymmetric rolling and partial recrystallization that can produce an unprecedented property combination: as strong as ultrafine-grained metal and at the same time as ductile as conventional coarse-grained metal. It also has higher strain hardening than coarse-grained Ti, which was hitherto believed impossible. The heterogeneous lamella structure is characterized with soft micrograined lamellae embedded in hard ultrafine-grained lamella matrix. The unusual high strength is obtained with the assistance of high back stress developed from heterogeneous yielding, whereas the high ductility is attributed to back-stress hardening and dislocation hardening. The process discovered here is amenable to large-scale industrial production at low cost, and might be applicable to other metal systems. PMID:26554017

  17. Tensile Fracture of Ductile Materials. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    For brittle materials, circular voids play an important role relative to fracture, intensifing both tensile and compressive stresses. A maximum intensified tensile stress failure criterion applies quite well to brittle materials. An attempt was made to explore the possibility of extending the approach to the tensile fracture of ductile materials. The three dimensional voids that exist in reality are modelled by circular holes in sheet metal. Mathematical relationships are sought between the shape and size of the hole, after the material is plastically deformed, and the amount of deformation induced. Then, the effect of hole shape, size and orientation on the mechanical properties is considered experimentally. The presence of the voids does not affect the ultimate tensile strength of the ductile materials because plastic flow wipes out the stress intensification caused by them. However, the shape and orientation of the defect is found to play an important role in affecting the strain at fracture.

  18. Meshfree Simulations of Ductile Crack Propagations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaofan; Simonsen, Cerup B.

    2005-03-01

    In this work, a meshfree method is used to simulate ductile crack growth and propagation under finite deformation and large scale yielding conditions. A so-called parametric visibility condition and its related particle splitting procedure have been developed to automatically adapt the evolving strong continuity or fracture configuration due to an arbitrary crack growth in ductile materials. It is shown that the proposed meshfree crack adaption and re-interpolation procedure is versatile in numerical simulations, and it can capture some essential features of ductile fracture and ductile crack surface morphology, such as the rough zig-zag pattern of crack surface and the ductile crack front damage zone, which have been difficult to capture in previous numerical simulations.

  19. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  20. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  1. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  2. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  3. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  4. Ductile compaction in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    Silicic magmas typically outgas through connected pore and crack networks with a high gas permeability without the need for decoupled movement of pores in the melt. It is the efficiency with which this process can occur which governs the pressure in the pore network. However, such a connected coupled network is generally mechanically unstable and will relax until volume equilibrium when the pores become smaller and isolated. Consequently, gas permeability can be reduced during densification. Cycles of outgassing events recorded in gas monitoring data show that permeable flow of volatiles is often transient, which is interpreted to reflect magma densification and the closing of pore-networks. Understanding the timescale over which this densification process occurs is critical to refining conduit models that seek to predict the pressure evolution in a pore-network leading to eruptions. We conduct uniaxial compaction experiments to parameterize non-linear creep and relaxation processes that occur in magmas with total pore fractions 0.2-0.85. We analyze our results by applying both viscous sintering and viscoelastic deformation theory to test the applicability of currently accepted models to flow dynamics in the uppermost conduit involving highly porous magmas. We show that purely ductile compaction can occur rapidly and that pore networks can close over timescales analogous to the inter-eruptive periods observed during classic cyclic eruptions such as those at Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat, in 1997. At upper-conduit axial stresses (0.1-5 MPa) and magmatic temperatures (830-900 oC), we show that magmas can evolve to porosities analogous to dome lavas erupted at the same volcano. Such dramatic densification events over relatively short timescales and in the absence of brittle deformation show that permeable flow will be inhibited at upper conduit levels. We therefore propose that outgassing is a key feature at many silicic volcanoes and should be incorporated into

  5. Rapid method of separating Am(VI) from transplutonium and rare-earth elements on a cation exchanger in phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirova, G.S.; Guseva, L.I.

    1988-07-01

    Measurements have been made on cation-exchanger sorption of americium, other actinoids, and certain rare-earth elements from 0.1-2.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ when the elements have been oxidized with ammonium persulfate alone or mixed with silver phosphate. There are considerable differences in behavior between the americium and the other elements on account of its being oxidized to a higher valency state. Measurements have been made on the effects of acid and oxidant concentrations and of the oxidation and elution conditions on the americium yield when the exchanger is treated with H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Optimum oxidation conditions have been chosen, and a rapid method has been devised for separating americium(VI) from other transplutonium elements and REE on Dowex 50 /times/ 8, where the eluent is 0.1-1.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ plus 0.05 M (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/.

  6. Ductility Enhancement of Molybdenum Phase by Nano-sizedd Oxide Dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Kang

    2008-07-31

    The present research is focused on ductility enhancement of molybdenum (Mo) alloys by adding nano-sized oxide particles to the alloy system. The research approach includes: (1) determination of microscopic mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic ductility enhancement effects through atomistic modeling of the metal-ceramic interface; (2) subsequent computer simulation-aided optimization of composition and nanoparticle size of the dispersion for improved performance; (3) synthesis and characterization of nanoparticle dispersion following the guidance from atomistic computational modeling analyses (e.g., by processing a small sample of Mo alloy for evaluation); and (4) experimental testing of the mechanical properties to determine optimal ductility enhancement.Through atomistic modeling and electronic structure analysis using full-potential linearized muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) techniques, research to date has been performed on a number of selected chromium (Cr) systems containing nitrogen (N) and/or magnesium oxide (MgO) impurities. The emphasis has been on determining the properties of the valence electrons and the characteristics of the chemical bonds they formed. It was found that the brittle/ductile behavior of this transitional metal system is controlled by the relative population of valence charges: bonds formed by s valence electrons yield metallic, ductile behavior, whereas bonds formed by d valence electrons lead to covalent, brittle behavior. The presence of valence bands from impurities also affects the metal bonding, thereby explaining the detrimental and beneficial effects induced by the inclusion of N impurities and MgO dispersions. These understandings are useful for optimizing ductility enhancement effects on the dispersion materials.

  7. Analytical prediction of the location of ductility dip cracking in the trans-varestraint test

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, I.; Kroenke, W.; Cola, M.

    1997-05-01

    Some NiCrFe weld metals exhibit decreased ductility over a temperature range known as the {open_quotes}ductility dip{close_quotes} temperature (DDT) range. Ductility dip cracking (DDT) is a phenomenon which occurs in a zone bounded by the DDT range on its sides and a threshold plastic strain on its bottom as shown in figure 1. Figure 1 illustrates how ductility varies as weld metal cools from the solidus temperature for materials with and without a ductility dip. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the ability to predict the location of the DDC in a Trans-Varestraint Test (TVT) for a specimen machined from a weld deposited EN52 plate. The DDC predictions require a combination of Trans-Varestraint testing and finite element analysis. The test provides the threshold value of externally applied nominal strain below which DDC does not occur. The analysis provides the corresponding threshold local or peak strain. The threshold local plastic strain level and the DDT range are used to predict the location of the DDC. The ultimate purpose of this work is to evaluate susceptibility of highly constrained, component welds to DDC. Test results for Trans-Varestraint Testing for a weld deposited EN52 plate are reported in reference. The ability to predict the location of the DDC in the Trans-Varestraint Test using the techniques reported herein is demonstrated by showing good comparison between the analytical results and the test data.

  8. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DUCTILE-PHASE-TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN LAMINATES FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Kevin; Odette, G Robert; Fields, Kirk A.; Gragg, David; Yamamoto, Takuya; Zok, Frank W.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.

    2015-09-23

    A promising approach to increasing the fracture toughness of W-alloys is ductile-phase toughening (DPT). A ductile phase reinforcement in a brittle matrix increases toughness primarily by crack bridging. A W-Cu laminate was fabricated and the properties of the constituent metals were characterized along with those for the composite. Development of a design model for large-scale crack bridging continued.

  9. Prospects for Ductility and Toughness Enhancement of Nial by Ductile Phase Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Ritzert, F. J.; Misra, A.; Gibala, R.

    1991-01-01

    The use of NiAl as a structural material has been hindered by the fact that this ordered intermetallic does not exhibit significant tensile ductility or toughness at room temperature. A critical review of the operative flow and fracture mechanisms in monolithic NiAl has thus established the need for ductile phase toughening in this order system. Progress in ductile phase reinforced intermetallic systems in general and specifically NiAl-based materials has been reviewed. In addition, further clarification of the primary mechanisms involved in the flow and fracture of ductile phase reinforced alloys has evolved from ongoing investigations of several model NiAl-based materials. The mechanical behavior of these model directionally-solidified alloys (Ni-30Al and Ni-30Fe-20Al) are discussed. Finally, the prospects for developing a ductile phase toughened NiAl-based alloy and the shortcomings presently inherent in these systems are analyzed.

  10. Bend ductility of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwell, W.E.; Garnich, M.R.; Dudder, G.B.; Lavender, C.A.

    1992-11-01

    A bend ductility test is used to indicate the formability of tungsten heavy alloys sheet. The primary test bends a notchless Charpy impact specimen to a bend angle of approximately 100C. This can be augmented by a bend-completion test. Finite element modeling as well as strain-gaged bend specimens elucidate the strain distribution in the specimen as a function of material thickness and bend angle. The bend ductilities of 70%W, 807.W and 90%W alloys are characterized. As expected, decreasing thickness or tungsten content enhances bend ductility. Oxidation is not detrimental; therefore, controlled atmosphere is not required for cooling. The potentially detrimental effects of mechanical working (e.g., rolling, roller-leveling, grit blasting, and peening) and machining (e.g., cutting and sanding) are illustrated.

  11. Ductility Enhancement of Molybdenum Phase by Nano-sized Oxide Dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Bruce

    2008-07-18

    The objective of this research is to understand and to remedy the impurity effects for room-temperature ductility enhancement of molybdenum (Mo) based alloys by the inclusion of nano-sized metal oxide dispersions. This research combines theoretical, computational, and experimental efforts. The results will help to formulate systematic strategies in searching for better composed Mo-based alloys with optimal mechanical properties. For this project, majority of the research effort was directed to atomistic modeling to identify the mechanisms responsible for the oxygen embrittling and ductility enhancement based on fundamental electronic structure analysis. Through first principles molecular dynamics simulations, it was found that the embrittling impurity species were attracted to the metal oxide interface, consistent with previous experiments. Further investigation on the electronic structures reveals that the presence of embrittling species degrades the quality of the metallic chemical bonds in the hosting matrix in a number of ways, the latter providing the source of ductility. For example, the spatial flexibility of the bonds is reduced, and localization of the impurity states occurs to pin the dislocation flow. Rice’s criterion has been invoked to explain the connections of electronic structure and mechanical properties. It was also found that when impurity species become attracted to the metal oxide interface, some of the detrimental effects are alleviated, thus explaining the observed ductility enhancement effects. These understandings help to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of Mo and other high temperature alloys (e.g. ODS alloys) for fossil energy materials applications. Based on the theoretical and computational studies, the experimental work includes the preparation of Mo powders mixed with candidate nano-sized metal oxides, which were then vacuum hot-pressed to make the Mo alloys. Several powder mixing methods

  12. Compaction of Ductile and Fragile Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creissac, S.; Pouliquen, O.; Dalloz-Dubrujeaud, B.

    2009-06-01

    The compaction of powders into tablets is widely used in several industries (cosmetics, food, pharmaceutics…). In all these industries, the composition of the initial powder is complex, and the behaviour under compaction is not well known, also the mechanical behaviour of the tablets. The aim of this paper is to understand the behaviour (pressure vs density) of a simplified media made of fragile and ductile powders, varying the relative ratio of each powder. Some compaction experiments were carried out with glass beads (fragile) and Polyethylen Glycol powder (ductile). We observe two typical behaviours, depending on the relative volumic fraction of each component. A transition is pointed out, observing the evolution of the slope of the curve pressure/density. This transition is explained by geometrical considerations during compaction. A model is proposed, based on the assumption that the studied media can be compare to a diphasic material with a continuous phase (the ductile powder) and a discrete phase (the fragile powder). The result of this model is compare to the experimental results of compaction, and give a good prediction of the behaviour of the different mixing, knowing the behaviour of the ductile and the fragile phase separately. These results were also interpreted in terms of Heckel parameter which characterizes the ability of the powder to deform plastically under compaction. Some mechanical tests were also performed to compare the mechanical resitance of the obtained tablets.

  13. Fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, M.N.; Komatsu, S.

    1995-12-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature, austempering temperature and austempering time on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron have been presented and discussed in this paper. Statistical design of experiments with a 2{sup 3} matrix was used to determine the effect of the individual variables and their interactions. The desirable combination of the three variables is suggested based on the analysis.

  14. Some Mechanical Properties of Austempered Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waanders, F. B.; Vorster, S. W.; Vorster, M. J.

    1998-12-01

    In the present investigation the influence of the microstructure, obtained after an austempering treatment in a "process window", on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile iron has been investigated. These properties include tensile strength, elongation and hardness. Conversion electron Mössbauer spectra (CEMS) were measured, after heat treatment.

  15. OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S PATTERN REPAIR SHOP, SHOWING A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S PATTERN REPAIR SHOP, SHOWING A SPANISH-MADE FORADIA BORING MACHINE IN THE FOREGROUND. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Calculation Method of Lateral Strengths and Ductility Factors of Constructions with Shear Walls of Different Ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyoshi; Nakao, Masato; Murakami, Masahide; Miyazawa, Kenji

    2008-07-08

    For seismic design, ductility-related force modification factors are named R factor in Uniform Building Code of U.S, q factor in Euro Code 8 and Ds (inverse of R) factor in Japanese Building Code. These ductility-related force modification factors for each type of shear elements are appeared in those codes. Some constructions use various types of shear walls that have different ductility, especially for their retrofit or re-strengthening. In these cases, engineers puzzle the decision of force modification factors of the constructions. Solving this problem, new method to calculate lateral strengths of stories for simple shear wall systems is proposed and named 'Stiffness--Potential Energy Addition Method' in this paper. This method uses two design lateral strengths for each type of shear walls in damage limit state and safety limit state. Two lateral strengths of stories in both limit states are calculated from these two design lateral strengths for each type of shear walls in both limit states. Calculated strengths have the same quality as values obtained by strength addition method using many steps of load-deformation data of shear walls. The new method to calculate ductility factors is also proposed in this paper. This method is based on the new method to calculate lateral strengths of stories. This method can solve the problem to obtain ductility factors of stories with shear walls of different ductility.

  17. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... Materials § 56.60-15 Ductile iron. (a) Ductile cast iron components made of material conforming to ASTM A 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions...

  18. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... Materials § 56.60-15 Ductile iron. (a) Ductile cast iron components made of material conforming to ASTM A 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions...

  19. OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S BESSEMER CORE ROOM SHOWING REDFORD, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S BESSEMER CORE ROOM SHOWING REDFORD, B&P, AND BEARDSLEY AND PIPER ROTOMOLD CORMATIC MOLDING MACHINES. OUT OF VIEW TO THE LEFT, SOUTHERN DUCTILE MAINTAINS AN AUTOMATED LAEMPE COLD BOX CORE MAKING MACHINE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Core Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Metallic glass composition

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; Koch, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  1. Strength and ductility of microscale brass-steel multilayer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, K.S.; Sahay, S.S.; Byrne, J.G.

    1996-11-15

    Multilayer composites or laminates show potential for structural applications due to a good combination of strength and toughness. For the first time, the authors have successfully fabricated metallic multilayer sheets with layer thicknesses in the nanometer range, while maintaining good layer discreteness, using brass and steel as components. This paves the way for the economic manufacture of laminates with very high specific strength levels. Depending on layer thickness and components, high strength in the laminates can arise from composite strengthening, Hall-Petch type boundary-induced strengthening as well as strengthening due to dislocation density and texture. However, there has been no study of strengthening in microscale laminates made by rolling. In the present work, strength and ductility of rolled microlaminates having alternating layers of brass and steel were investigated. Strength levels are correlated to layer thicknesses and the mechanisms of strengthening are discussed.

  2. Development of New Cryocooler Regenerator Materials-Ductile Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Gschneidner; A.O. Pecharsky; V.K. Pecharsky

    2004-09-30

    The volumetric heat capacities of a number of binary and ternary Er- and Tm-based intermetallic compounds, which exhibited substantial ductilities, were measured from {approx}3 to {approx}350 K. They have the RM stoichiometry (where R = Er or Tm, and M is a main group or transition metal) and crystallize in the CsCl-type structure. The heat capacities of the Tm-based compounds are in general larger than the corresponding Er-based materials. Many of them have heat capacities which are significantly larger than those of the low temperature (<15 K) prototype cryocooler regenerator materials HoCu{sub 2}, Er{sub 3}Ni and ErNi. Utilization of the new materials as regenerators in the various cryocoolers should improve the performance of these refrigeration units for cooling below 15 K.

  3. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  4. Coupled thermal stress simulations of ductile tearing

    DOE PAGES

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Dion, Kristin

    2016-03-01

    Predictions for ductile tearing of a geometrically complex Ti-6Al-4V plate were generated using a Unified Creep Plasticity Damage model in fully coupled thermal stress simulations. Uniaxial tension and butterfly shear tests performed at displacement rates of 0.0254 and 25.4 mm/s were also simulated. Results from these simulations revealed that the material temperature increase due to plastic work can have a dramatic effect on material ductility predictions in materials that exhibit little strain hardening. Furthermore, this occurs because the temperature increase causes the apparent hardening of the material to decrease which leads to the initiation of deformation localization and subsequent ductilemore » tearing earlier in the loading process.« less

  5. Preparation of nanostructured materials having improved ductility

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yonghao; Zhu, Yuntian T.

    2010-04-20

    A method for preparing a nanostructured aluminum alloy involves heating an aluminum alloy workpiece at temperature sufficient to produce a single phase coarse grained aluminum alloy, then refining the grain size of the workpiece at a temperature at or below room temperature, and then aging the workpiece to precipitate second phase particles in the nanosized grains of the workpiece that increase the ductility without decreasing the strength of the workpiece.

  6. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  7. Strong, Ductile Rotor For Cryogenic Flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royals, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    Improved magnetic flowmeter rotor resists cracking at cryogenic temperatures, yet provides adequate signal to magnetic pickup outside flowmeter housing. Consists mostly of stainless-steel alloy 347, which is ductile and strong at low temperatures. Small bead of stainless-steel alloy 410 welded in groove around circumference of round bar of stainless-steel alloy 347; then rotor machined from bar. Tips of rotor blades contain small amounts of magnetic alloy, and passage of tips detected.

  8. Stacking faults in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hermida, J.D.

    1996-06-01

    During last decade, Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) has been successfully used as an acceptable replacement material for steel in many applications, due to the relatively high strength and reasonable ductility obtained. These properties are the result of the special microstructure exhibited by this material at the end of the upper bainite reaction: ferrite platelets surrounded by high carbon stabilized austenite. However, at the beginning of the austempering treatment, the existence of interdendritic low carbon austenite is revealed by its transformation to martensite when cooling the sample or during subsequent deformation. The completion of the upper bainite reaction is of decisive importance to mechanical properties because the remaining martensite reduces ductility. It was observed that the rate of the upper bainite reaction is governed by the carbon content difference between the low and high carbon austenites. The carbon content is obtained by the lattice parameter measurement, because there exists a known expression that relates both magnitudes. Several works have used X-ray diffraction to measure the lattice parameter and phase concentrations as a function of austempering time. In these works, the lattice parameters were obtained directly from the {l_brace}220{r_brace} and {l_brace}311{r_brace} peaks position. The purpose of this work is to show more precise lattice parameters measurement and, very closely related to this, the existence of stacking faults in austenite, even at times within the processing window.

  9. Manipulating the interfacial structure of nanomaterials to achieve a unique combination of strength and ductility

    PubMed Central

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Pan, Zhiliang; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The control of interfaces in engineered nanostructured materials has met limited success compared with that which has evolved in natural materials, where hierarchical structures with distinct interfacial states are often found. Such interface control could mitigate common limitations of engineering nanomaterials. For example, nanostructured metals exhibit extremely high strength, but this benefit comes at the expense of other important properties like ductility. Here, we report a technique for combining nanostructuring with recent advances capable of tuning interface structure, a complementary materials design strategy that allows for unprecedented property combinations. Copper-based alloys with both grain sizes in the nanometre range and distinct grain boundary structural features are created, using segregating dopants and a processing route that favours the formation of amorphous intergranular films. The mechanical behaviour of these alloys shows that the trade-off between strength and ductility typically observed for metallic materials is successfully avoided here. PMID:26887444

  10. Optimal scaling laws for ductile fracture derived from strain-gradient microplasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokoua, Landry; Conti, Sergio; Ortiz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We perform an optimal-scaling analysis of ductile fracture in metals. We specifically consider the deformation up to failure of a slab of finite thickness subject to monotonically increasing normal opening displacements on its surfaces. We show that ductile fracture emerges as the net outcome of two competing effects: the sublinear growth characteristic of the hardening of metals and strain-gradient plasticity. We also put forth physical arguments that identify the intrinsic length of strain-gradient plasticity and the critical opening displacement for fracture. We show that, when Jc is renormalized in a manner suggested by the optimal scaling laws, the experimental data tends to cluster—with allowances made for experimental scatter—within bounds dependent on the hardening exponent but otherwise material independent.

  11. Manipulating the interfacial structure of nanomaterials to achieve a unique combination of strength and ductility.

    PubMed

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Pan, Zhiliang; Rupert, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The control of interfaces in engineered nanostructured materials has met limited success compared with that which has evolved in natural materials, where hierarchical structures with distinct interfacial states are often found. Such interface control could mitigate common limitations of engineering nanomaterials. For example, nanostructured metals exhibit extremely high strength, but this benefit comes at the expense of other important properties like ductility. Here, we report a technique for combining nanostructuring with recent advances capable of tuning interface structure, a complementary materials design strategy that allows for unprecedented property combinations. Copper-based alloys with both grain sizes in the nanometre range and distinct grain boundary structural features are created, using segregating dopants and a processing route that favours the formation of amorphous intergranular films. The mechanical behaviour of these alloys shows that the trade-off between strength and ductility typically observed for metallic materials is successfully avoided here. PMID:26887444

  12. Ductile Titanium Alloy with Low Poisson's Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y. L.; Li, S. J.; Sun, B. B.; Sui, M. L.; Yang, R.

    2007-05-25

    We report a ductile {beta}-type titanium alloy with body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure having a low Poisson's ratio of 0.14. The almost identical ultralow bulk and shear moduli of {approx}24 GPa combined with an ultrahigh strength of {approx}0.9 GPa contribute to easy crystal distortion due to much-weakened chemical bonding of atoms in the crystal, leading to significant elastic softening in tension and elastic hardening in compression. The peculiar elastic and plastic deformation behaviors of the alloy are interpreted as a result of approaching the elastic limit of the bcc crystal under applied stress.

  13. SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN OR CREATE PATTERNS USED IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN OR CREATE PATTERNS USED IN THEIR MOLDS. AS A JOBBING FOUNDRY MAKING CASTINGS ON AN CONTRACTUAL-ORDER BASIS, THEIR CUSTOMERS PROVIDE, OR CONTRACT FOR PATTERN CONSTRUCTION. SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES, HOWEVER, PROVIDE REPAIR SERVICES SHOWN AS JOHNNY TIDWELL PREPARES A PLATE, FORM -FITTING TO THEIR MOLDING MACHINES, THAT A PATTERN WILL BE AFFIXED TO. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  14. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp(2) carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes. PMID:25404788

  15. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Jeffrey M.; Martin, Heidi B.

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp2 carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes. PMID:25404788

  16. Ductile intermetallic toughened carbide matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.; Menchhofer, P.A.

    1996-08-01

    Ductile Ni{sub 3}Al alloys have been used as binder phase for fabrication of TiC and WC matrix composites. Ni{sub 3}Al has good corrosion resistance to aqueous acidic environments, and its yield strength increases with temperature to a max at 700-800 C; this combined with high tensile ductilities (up to 50% strain) make Ni{sub 3}Al attractive for replacing Co in cemented carbides. Materials have been fabricated by both hot pressing and vacuum sintering, with Ni{sub 3}Al contents of 15 to 95 vol%. Vacuum sintering cycles, similar to those used for WC/Co and TiC/Ni (1450-1600 C), resulted in sintered densities >95% theoretical. WC/Ni{sub 3}Al materials showed an order of magnitude improvement in corrosion resistance over WC/Co, in sulfuric/nitric acid. These materials also had improved high temperature strength retention compared to WC/Co cermets, though initial RT strengths were lower. Fracture toughness varied between 8 and 25 MPa.m{sup 1/2} and depended primarily on Ni{sub 3}Al content and composition.

  17. Metastable high-entropy dual-phase alloys overcome the strength-ductility trade-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiming; Pradeep, Konda Gokuldoss; Deng, Yun; Raabe, Dierk; Tasan, Cemal Cem

    2016-06-01

    Metals have been mankind’s most essential materials for thousands of years; however, their use is affected by ecological and economical concerns. Alloys with higher strength and ductility could alleviate some of these concerns by reducing weight and improving energy efficiency. However, most metallurgical mechanisms for increasing strength lead to ductility loss, an effect referred to as the strength-ductility trade-off. Here we present a metastability-engineering strategy in which we design nanostructured, bulk high-entropy alloys with multiple compositionally equivalent high-entropy phases. High-entropy alloys were originally proposed to benefit from phase stabilization through entropy maximization. Yet here, motivated by recent work that relaxes the strict restrictions on high-entropy alloy compositions by demonstrating the weakness of this connection, the concept is overturned. We decrease phase stability to achieve two key benefits: interface hardening due to a dual-phase microstructure (resulting from reduced thermal stability of the high-temperature phase); and transformation-induced hardening (resulting from the reduced mechanical stability of the room-temperature phase). This combines the best of two worlds: extensive hardening due to the decreased phase stability known from advanced steels and massive solid-solution strengthening of high-entropy alloys. In our transformation-induced plasticity-assisted, dual-phase high-entropy alloy (TRIP-DP-HEA), these two contributions lead respectively to enhanced trans-grain and inter-grain slip resistance, and hence, increased strength. Moreover, the increased strain hardening capacity that is enabled by dislocation hardening of the stable phase and transformation-induced hardening of the metastable phase produces increased ductility. This combined increase in strength and ductility distinguishes the TRIP-DP-HEA alloy from other recently developed structural materials. This metastability-engineering strategy should

  18. Metastable high-entropy dual-phase alloys overcome the strength–ductility trade-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiming; Pradeep, Konda Gokuldoss; Deng, Yun; Raabe, Dierk; Tasan, Cemal Cem

    2016-06-01

    Metals have been mankind’s most essential materials for thousands of years; however, their use is affected by ecological and economical concerns. Alloys with higher strength and ductility could alleviate some of these concerns by reducing weight and improving energy efficiency. However, most metallurgical mechanisms for increasing strength lead to ductility loss, an effect referred to as the strength–ductility trade-off. Here we present a metastability-engineering strategy in which we design nanostructured, bulk high-entropy alloys with multiple compositionally equivalent high-entropy phases. High-entropy alloys were originally proposed to benefit from phase stabilization through entropy maximization. Yet here, motivated by recent work that relaxes the strict restrictions on high-entropy alloy compositions by demonstrating the weakness of this connection, the concept is overturned. We decrease phase stability to achieve two key benefits: interface hardening due to a dual-phase microstructure (resulting from reduced thermal stability of the high-temperature phase); and transformation-induced hardening (resulting from the reduced mechanical stability of the room-temperature phase). This combines the best of two worlds: extensive hardening due to the decreased phase stability known from advanced steels and massive solid-solution strengthening of high-entropy alloys. In our transformation-induced plasticity-assisted, dual-phase high-entropy alloy (TRIP-DP-HEA), these two contributions lead respectively to enhanced trans-grain and inter-grain slip resistance, and hence, increased strength. Moreover, the increased strain hardening capacity that is enabled by dislocation hardening of the stable phase and transformation-induced hardening of the metastable phase produces increased ductility. This combined increase in strength and ductility distinguishes the TRIP-DP-HEA alloy from other recently developed structural materials. This metastability-engineering strategy

  19. Metastable high-entropy dual-phase alloys overcome the strength-ductility trade-off.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiming; Pradeep, Konda Gokuldoss; Deng, Yun; Raabe, Dierk; Tasan, Cemal Cem

    2016-06-01

    Metals have been mankind's most essential materials for thousands of years; however, their use is affected by ecological and economical concerns. Alloys with higher strength and ductility could alleviate some of these concerns by reducing weight and improving energy efficiency. However, most metallurgical mechanisms for increasing strength lead to ductility loss, an effect referred to as the strength-ductility trade-off. Here we present a metastability-engineering strategy in which we design nanostructured, bulk high-entropy alloys with multiple compositionally equivalent high-entropy phases. High-entropy alloys were originally proposed to benefit from phase stabilization through entropy maximization. Yet here, motivated by recent work that relaxes the strict restrictions on high-entropy alloy compositions by demonstrating the weakness of this connection, the concept is overturned. We decrease phase stability to achieve two key benefits: interface hardening due to a dual-phase microstructure (resulting from reduced thermal stability of the high-temperature phase); and transformation-induced hardening (resulting from the reduced mechanical stability of the room-temperature phase). This combines the best of two worlds: extensive hardening due to the decreased phase stability known from advanced steels and massive solid-solution strengthening of high-entropy alloys. In our transformation-induced plasticity-assisted, dual-phase high-entropy alloy (TRIP-DP-HEA), these two contributions lead respectively to enhanced trans-grain and inter-grain slip resistance, and hence, increased strength. Moreover, the increased strain hardening capacity that is enabled by dislocation hardening of the stable phase and transformation-induced hardening of the metastable phase produces increased ductility. This combined increase in strength and ductility distinguishes the TRIP-DP-HEA alloy from other recently developed structural materials. This metastability-engineering strategy should

  20. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF DUCTILE-PHASE TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS: W-Ni-Fe COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Stevens, Erica L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Nyberg, Eric A.; Lavender, Curt A.; Odette, G Robert; Cunningham, Kevin; Zok, Frank W.

    2015-06-30

    A promising approach to increasing fracture toughness and decreasing the DBTT of a W-alloy is by ductile-phase toughening (DPT). In this method, a ductile phase is included in a brittle matrix to prevent fracture propagation by crack bridging or crack deflection. Liquid-phase sintered W-Ni-Fe alloys consisting of nearly spherical W-particles embedded within a Ni-Fe-W ductile matrix are being manipulated by hot-rolling to create lamellar W/Fe-Ni-W composites with anisotropic fracture properties. The rolled W-Ni-Fe alloy becomes a lamellar alloy consisting of W lamellae separated by ductile-phase regions. The W-rich lamellae are strong but brittle, while the ductile-phase metallic regions have a thin, plate-like morphology to provide a ductile bridging region. This rolled material is oriented with the W-rich lamellae parallel to principal stresses so that surface cracking is normal to the ductile-phase bridging regions.

  1. Rapid vertical tectonics in ductile continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearse, Jillian

    Research over the past two decades has shown that in regions of moderately high heat flow, the lower continental crust is ductile enough to flow on geological timescales. Vertical motions taking place within continental interiors produce localized features such as intracratonic basins and domes, and the results of this thesis indicate that ductile crustal flow can contribute significantly to the formation of these otherwise enigmatic features. A major goal of this thesis has been to analyze, quantitatively, the behaviour of loaded continental crust where a ductile layer is present. Specifically, I examine the long-term effects of sublithospheric heating events on crust with embedded density loads. Density anomalies within the crust can be initially supported by elastic stresses but sag appreciably if the elastic crust is thinned modestly. Beginning with a semi-analytic approach, I estimate the additional subsidence that would result from thermal reactivation, and introduce the previously unmodelled phenomenon of thermal annealing of stresses at the base of the elastic crust. In basins caused by intracrustal density loads, reactivated subsidence can be significant (of the order of 1 km, enough to account for about one quarter of the total Michigan basin subsidence). If the crust is sufficiently weakened, the long-term result is detachment of the load followed by rebound and inversion of the basin to form a dome. To model this phenomenon I use a full thermal and viscoelastic finite-element model, and find that such load detachment can occur for geologically reasonable load densities in high heat flow regions. Strikingly, the total upward displacement of material from depth during rebound can be as much as 10 km, enough to exhume the basin completely and expose basement rocks to some depth. Exhumation is rapid, lasting only about 5 to 10 million years. This raises the interesting question of what field evidence might support such a history for a dome: the results of

  2. High strength and high ductility behavior of 6061-T6 alloy after laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencalp Irizalp, Simge; Saklakoglu, Nursen

    2016-02-01

    The plastic deformation behavior of 6061-T6 alloy which was subjected to severe plastic deformation (SPD) at high strain rates during laser shock processing (LSP) was researched. In LSP-treated materials, the near surface microstructural change was examined by TEM and fracture surfaces after tensile testing were examined by SEM. An increase in strength of metallic materials brings about the decrease in ductility. In this study, the results showed that LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy exhibited both high strength and high ductility. TEM observation showed that stacking fault (SF) ribbon enlarged, deformation twins formed and twin boundary increased in LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy. This observation was an indication of stacking fault energy (SFE) decrease. Work hardening capability was recovered after LSP impacts.

  3. Energy balance during underwater implosion of ductile metallic cylinders.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Ryan E; Guzas, Emily L; Ambrico, Joseph M

    2014-11-01

    Energy-based metrics are developed and applied to a numerical test case of implosion of an underwater pressure vessel. The energy metrics provide estimates of the initial energy in the system (potential energy), the energy released into the fluid as a pressure pulse, the energy absorbed by the imploding structure, and the energy absorbed by air trapped within the imploding structure. The primary test case considered is the implosion of an aluminum cylinder [diameter: 2.54 cm (1 in.), length: 27.46 cm (10.81 in.)] that collapses flat in a mode-2 shape with minimal fracture. The test case indicates that the structure absorbs the majority (92%) of the initial energy in the system. Consequently, the energy emitted as a pressure pulse into the fluid is a small fraction, approximately 5%, of the initial energy. The energy absorbed by the structure and the energy emitted into the fluid are calculated for additional simulations of underwater pressure vessel implosions. For all cases investigated, there is minimal fracture in the collapse, the structure absorbs more than 80% of the initial energy of the system, and the released pressure pulse carries away less than 6% of the initial energy.

  4. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  5. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  6. Mechanisms to create high performance pseudo-ductile composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisnom, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    Current composites normally fail suddenly and catastrophically, which is an undesirable characteristic for many applications. This paper describes work as part of the High Performance Ductile Composite Technology programme (HiPerDuCT) on mechanisms to overcome this key limitation and introduce pseudo-ductility into the failure process.

  7. ALTHOUGH SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN PATTERNS, THEY ARE REQUIRED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ALTHOUGH SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN PATTERNS, THEY ARE REQUIRED TO STORE THEM AND KEEP THEM AVAILABLE FOR THEIR CUSTOMERS ORDERS. THE BARRET/DOUGLAS LIFTING TRUCK IS USED TO REACH AND TRANSPORT PATTERNS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Post Quench Ductility Evaluation of Zircaloy-4 and Select Iron Alloys under Design Basis and Extended LOCA Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yong; Keiser, James R; Terrani, Kurt A; Bell, Gary L; Snead, Lance

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted at 1200 C in flowing steam with tubing specimens of Zircaloy-4, 317, 347 stainless steels, and the commercial FeCrAl alloy APMT. The purpose was to determine the oxidation behavior and post quench ductility of these alloys under postulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The parabolic rate constant for Zircaloy-4 tubing samples at 1200 were determined to be k = 2.173 107 g2/cm4/s C, in excellent agreement with the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. The APMT alloy experienced the slowest oxidation rate among all materials examined in this work. The ductility of post quenched samples was evaluated by ring compression tests at 135 C. For Zircaloy-4, the ductile to brittle transition occurs at an equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) of 19.3%. SS-347 was still ductile after being oxidized for 2400 s (CP-ECR 50%), but the maximum load was reduced significantly owing to the metal layer thickness reduction. No ductility decrease was observed for the post-quenched APMT samples oxidized up to four hours.

  9. Post-quench ductility evaluation of Zircaloy-4 and select iron alloys under design basis and extended LOCA conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y.; Keiser, J. R.; Terrani, K. A.; Bell, G. L.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-05-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted at 1200 °C in flowing steam with tubing specimens of Zircaloy-4, 317, 347 stainless steels, and the commercial FeCrAl alloy APMT. The purpose was to determine the oxidation behavior and post-quench ductility under postulated and extended LOCA conditions. The parabolic rate constant for Zircaloy-4 tubing samples at 1200 °C was determined to be k = 2.173 × 107 g2/cm4/s, in excellent agreement with the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. The APMT alloy experienced the slowest oxidation rate among all materials examined in this work. The ductility of post-quenched samples was evaluated by ring compression tests at 135 °C. For Zircaloy-4, the ductile to brittle transition occurs at an equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) of 19.3%. SS-347 was still ductile after being oxidized for 2400 s (CP-ECR ≈ 50%), but the maximum load was reduced significantly owing to the metal layer thickness reduction. No ductility decrease was observed for the post-quenched APMT samples oxidized up to 4 h.

  10. Three Dimensional Forming Simulation of the Shielded Slot Plate for the MCFC Using a Ductile Fracture Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Yang, D. Y.; Lee, S. R.; Chang, I. G.; Lee, T. W.

    2011-08-01

    The shielded slot plate, which has a sheared corrugated trapezoidal pattern, is a component of the metallic bipolar plate for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). In order to increase the efficiency of the fuel cell, the unit cell of the shielded slot plate should have a relatively large upper area. Additionally, defects from the forming process should be minimized. In order to simulate the slitting process, whereby sheared corrugated patterns are formed, ductile fracture criteria based on the histories of stress and strain are employed. The user material subroutine VUMAT is employed for implementation of the material and ductile fracture criteria in the commercial FEM software ABAQUS. The variables of the ductile fracture criteria were determined by comparing the simulation results and the experimental results of the tension test and the shearing test. Parametric studies were conducted to determine the critical value of the ductile fracture criterion. Employing these ductile fracture criteria, the three dimensional forming process of the shielded slot plate was numerically simulated. The effects of the slitting process in the forming process of the shielded slot plate were analyzed through a FEM simulation and experimental studies. Finally, experiments involving microscopic and macroscopic observations were conducted to verify the numerical simulations of the 3-step forming process.

  11. Evaluation of Varying Ductile Fracture Criteria for 42CrMo Steel by Compressions at Different Temperatures and Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s−1 are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC) and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture. PMID:24592175

  12. Evaluation of varying ductile fracture criteria for 42CrMo steel by compressions at different temperatures and strain rates.

    PubMed

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s(-1) are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC) and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture. PMID:24592175

  13. Evaluation of varying ductile fracture criteria for 42CrMo steel by compressions at different temperatures and strain rates.

    PubMed

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s(-1) are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC) and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture.

  14. Enhanced ductility in round tensile bars produced by cladding a ductile ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. X.; Wu, P. D.; Embury, J. D.; Huang, Y.

    2010-03-01

    The effect of cladding a ductile ring on necking and fracture in round bars under tension is studied numerically using the finite element method based on the Gurson damage model. It is demonstrated that the cladding increases both the necking strain and the fracture strain. The effects of topological arrangement of cladding ring on necking and fracture are numerically investigated. It is indicated that while a topological arrangement of cladding has no noticeable effect on necking, it significantly influences the fracture strain. For a given volume fraction of cladding, the fracture strain could increase about 11% if the ductile ring is moved from the outmost to the innermost. It is also found that the subtle appearance of fracture surface due to cladding displays strong mesh sensitivity and may even be an artefact of the mesh.

  15. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, TOWARDS CUPOLA WHERE SCRAP METAL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, TOWARDS CUPOLA WHERE SCRAP METAL AND OTHER COMPONENTS ARE MELTED TO CREATE DUCTILE IRON. BRIGHT FLASH IN BACKGROUND RESULTS FROM MOLTEN METAL (DUCTILE IRON) BEING POURED FROM CUPOLA INTO TRANSFER LADLE - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Fluid migration in ductile shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusseis, Florian; Menegon, Luca

    2014-05-01

    Fluid migration in metamorphic environments depends on a dynamically evolving permeable pore space, which was rarely characterised in detail. The data-base behind our understanding of the 4-dimensional transport properties of metamorphic rocks is therefore fragmentary at best, which leaves conceptual models poorly supported. Generally, it seems established that deformation is a major driver of permeability generation during regional metamorphism, and evidence for metamorphic fluids being channelled in large scale shear zones has been found in all depth segments of the continental crust. When strain localizes in ductile shear zones, the microfabric is modified until a steady state mylonite is formed that supports large deformations. A dynamic porosity that evolves during mylonitisation controls the distinct transport pathways along which fluid interacts with the rock. This dynamic porosity is controlled by a limited number of mechanisms, which are intrinsically linked to the metamorphic evolution of the rock during its deformational overprint. Many mid- and lower-crustal mylonites comprise polyphase mixtures of micron-sized grains that show evidence for deformation by dissolution/precipitation-assisted viscous grain boundary sliding. The establishment of these mineral mixtures is a critical process, where monomineralic layers are dispersed and grain growth is inhibited by the heterogeneous nucleation of secondary mineral phases at triple junctions. Here we show evidence from three different mid- and lower-crustal shear zones indicating that heterogeneous nucleation occurs in creep cavities. Micro- and nanotomographic observations show that creep cavities provide the dominant form of porosity in these ultramylonites. They control a "granular fluid pump" that directs fluid migration and hence mass transport. The granular fluid pump operates on the grain scale driven by viscous grain boundary sliding, and requires only small amounts of fluid. The spatial arrangement of

  17. High-temperature ductility of electro-deposited nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dini, J. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Work done during the past several months on high temperature ductility of electrodeposited nickel is summarized. Data are presented which show that earlier measurements made at NASA-Langley erred on the low side, that strain rate has a marked influence on high temperature ductility, and that codeposition of a small amount of manganese helps to improve high temperature ductility. Influences of a number of other factors on nickel properties were also investigated. They included plating solution temperature, current density, agitation, and elimination of the wetting agent from the plating solution. Repair of a large nozzle section by nickel plating is described.

  18. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  19. Ru/Al Multilayers Integrate Maximum Energy Density and Ductility for Reactive Materials.

    PubMed

    Woll, K; Bergamaschi, A; Avchachov, K; Djurabekova, F; Gier, S; Pauly, C; Leibenguth, P; Wagner, C; Nordlund, K; Mücklich, F

    2016-01-01

    Established and already commercialized energetic materials, such as those based on Ni/Al for joining, lack the adequate combination of high energy density and ductile reaction products. To join components, this combination is required for mechanically reliable bonds. In addition to the improvement of existing technologies, expansion into new fields of application can also be anticipated which triggers the search for improved materials. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the key parameters that enables us to classify the Ru/Al system as new reactive material among other energetic systems. We finally found that Ru/Al exhibits the unusual integration of high energy density and ductility. For example, we measured reaction front velocities up to 10.9 (± 0.33) ms(-1) and peak reaction temperatures of about 2000 °C indicating the elevated energy density. To our knowledge, such high temperatures have never been reported in experiments for metallic multilayers. In situ experiments show the synthesis of a single-phase B2-RuAl microstructure ensuring improved ductility. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the transformation behavior to RuAl. This study fundamentally characterizes a Ru/Al system and demonstrates its enhanced properties fulfilling the identification requirements of a novel nanoscaled energetic material.

  20. Specimen preparation by ion beam slope cutting for characterization of ductile damage by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Gerstein, Gregory; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate ductile damage in parts made by cold sheet-bulk metal forming a suited specimen preparation is required to observe the microstructure and defects such as voids by electron microscopy. By means of ion beam slope cutting both a targeted material removal can be applied and mechanical or thermal influences during preparation avoided. In combination with scanning electron microscopy this method allows to examine voids in the submicron range and thus to analyze early stages of ductile damage. In addition, a relief structure is formed by the selectivity of the ion bombardment, which depends on grain orientation and microstructural defects. The formation of these relief structures is studied using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction and the use of this side effect to interpret the microstructural mechanisms of voids formation by plastic deformation is discussed. A comprehensive investigation of the suitability of ion beam milling to analyze ductile damage is given at the examples of a ferritic deep drawing steel and a dual phase steel. PMID:26854331

  1. Dislocation Strengthening without Ductility Trade-off in Metastable Austenitic Steels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiabin; Jin, Yongbin; Fang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chenxu; Feng, Qiong; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Yuzeng; Suo, Tao; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Tianlin; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xi; Fang, Youtong; Wei, Yujie; Meng, Liang; Lu, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Strength and ductility are mutually exclusive if they are manifested as consequence of the coupling between strengthening and toughening mechanisms. One notable example is dislocation strengthening in metals, which invariably leads to reduced ductility. However, this trend is averted in metastable austenitic steels. A one-step thermal mechanical treatment (TMT), i.e. hot rolling, can effectively enhance the yielding strength of the metastable austenitic steel from 322 ± 18 MPa to 675 ± 15 MPa, while retaining both the formability and hardenability. It is noted that no boundaries are introduced in the optimized TMT process and all strengthening effect originates from dislocations with inherited thermal stability. The success of this method relies on the decoupled strengthening and toughening mechanisms in metastable austenitic steels, in which yield strength is controlled by initial dislocation density while ductility is retained by the capability to nucleate new dislocations to carry plastic deformation. Especially, the simplicity in processing enables scaling and industrial applications to meet the challenging requirements of emissions reduction. On the other hand, the complexity in the underlying mechanism of dislocation strengthening in this case may shed light on a different route of material strengthening by stimulating dislocation activities, rather than impeding motion of dislocations. PMID:27739481

  2. Dislocation Strengthening without Ductility Trade-off in Metastable Austenitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiabin; Jin, Yongbin; Fang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chenxu; Feng, Qiong; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Yuzeng; Suo, Tao; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Tianlin; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xi; Fang, Youtong; Wei, Yujie; Meng, Liang; Lu, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Strength and ductility are mutually exclusive if they are manifested as consequence of the coupling between strengthening and toughening mechanisms. One notable example is dislocation strengthening in metals, which invariably leads to reduced ductility. However, this trend is averted in metastable austenitic steels. A one-step thermal mechanical treatment (TMT), i.e. hot rolling, can effectively enhance the yielding strength of the metastable austenitic steel from 322 ± 18 MPa to 675 ± 15 MPa, while retaining both the formability and hardenability. It is noted that no boundaries are introduced in the optimized TMT process and all strengthening effect originates from dislocations with inherited thermal stability. The success of this method relies on the decoupled strengthening and toughening mechanisms in metastable austenitic steels, in which yield strength is controlled by initial dislocation density while ductility is retained by the capability to nucleate new dislocations to carry plastic deformation. Especially, the simplicity in processing enables scaling and industrial applications to meet the challenging requirements of emissions reduction. On the other hand, the complexity in the underlying mechanism of dislocation strengthening in this case may shed light on a different route of material strengthening by stimulating dislocation activities, rather than impeding motion of dislocations.

  3. Ru/Al Multilayers Integrate Maximum Energy Density and Ductility for Reactive Materials

    PubMed Central

    Woll, K.; Bergamaschi, A.; Avchachov, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Gier, S.; Pauly, C.; Leibenguth, P.; Wagner, C.; Nordlund, K.; Mücklich, F.

    2016-01-01

    Established and already commercialized energetic materials, such as those based on Ni/Al for joining, lack the adequate combination of high energy density and ductile reaction products. To join components, this combination is required for mechanically reliable bonds. In addition to the improvement of existing technologies, expansion into new fields of application can also be anticipated which triggers the search for improved materials. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the key parameters that enables us to classify the Ru/Al system as new reactive material among other energetic systems. We finally found that Ru/Al exhibits the unusual integration of high energy density and ductility. For example, we measured reaction front velocities up to 10.9 (±0.33) ms−1 and peak reaction temperatures of about 2000 °C indicating the elevated energy density. To our knowledge, such high temperatures have never been reported in experiments for metallic multilayers. In situ experiments show the synthesis of a single-phase B2-RuAl microstructure ensuring improved ductility. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the transformation behavior to RuAl. This study fundamentally characterizes a Ru/Al system and demonstrates its enhanced properties fulfilling the identification requirements of a novel nanoscaled energetic material. PMID:26822309

  4. Study of mechanical, physical, and corrosion behavior of 0.5% cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Ramli, Abdullah; Izham, Mohd Faizul

    2009-12-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of 0.5% Co-DI before and after heat treatment and compare with commercial ductile iron. Methods: Molten metal of newly developed ductile iron which alloyed with 0.5% Cobalt produced through CO2 sand casting method. The specimens then performed preheat to 500°C in an hour then oil quenched. Specimens then performed annealing to 900°C in half an hour before oil quenched again. 500°C, 600°C and 700°C austempering temperature had been selected subjected to the specimens in half an hour before cooled to room temperature. The tests involved are microstructure analysis which included nodule count and phase analysis, polarization test, spectrometer test, density test, tensile test (ASTM E 8M), hardness test and impact test (ASTM A327) on as cast and austempered specimen. Results: 0.5% Cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron with 500°C austempered temperature is the optimum temperature for 0.5% Co-ADI. It's not only increase the nodule count in the content, but also improve the mechanical properties such as impact toughness and tensile strength. Corrosion rate of 0.5% Co-DI also improved compare to unalloyed DI.

  5. Study of mechanical, physical, and corrosion behavior of 0.5% cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Ramli, Abdullah; Izham, Mohd Faizul

    2010-03-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of 0.5% Co-DI before and after heat treatment and compare with commercial ductile iron. Methods: Molten metal of newly developed ductile iron which alloyed with 0.5% Cobalt produced through CO2 sand casting method. The specimens then performed preheat to 500°C in an hour then oil quenched. Specimens then performed annealing to 900°C in half an hour before oil quenched again. 500°C, 600°C and 700°C austempering temperature had been selected subjected to the specimens in half an hour before cooled to room temperature. The tests involved are microstructure analysis which included nodule count and phase analysis, polarization test, spectrometer test, density test, tensile test (ASTM E 8M), hardness test and impact test (ASTM A327) on as cast and austempered specimen. Results: 0.5% Cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron with 500°C austempered temperature is the optimum temperature for 0.5% Co-ADI. It's not only increase the nodule count in the content, but also improve the mechanical properties such as impact toughness and tensile strength. Corrosion rate of 0.5% Co-DI also improved compare to unalloyed DI.

  6. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  7. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  8. Non-local models for ductile failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César de Sá, José; Azinpour, Erfan; Santos, Abel

    2016-08-01

    Ductile damage can be dealt with continuous descriptions of material, resorting, for example, to continuous damage mechanic descriptions or micromechanical constitutive models. When it comes to describe material behaviour near and beyond fracture these approaches are no longer sufficient or valid and continuous/discontinuous approaches can be adopted to track fracture initiation and propagation. Apart from more pragmatic solutions like element erosion or remeshing techniques more advanced approaches based on the X-FEM concept, in particular associated with non-local formulations, may be adopted to numerically model these problems. Nevertheless, very often, for practical reasons, some important aspects are somewhat left behind, specially energetic requirements to promote the necessary transition of energy release associated with material damage and fracture energy associated to a crack creation and evolution. Phase-field methods may combine advantages of regularised continuous models by providing a similar description to non-local thermodynamical continuous damage mechanics, as well as, a "continuous" approach to numerically follow crack evolution and branching

  9. Homogenization-based continuum plasticity-damage model for ductile failure of materials containing heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Bai, Jie; Paquet, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    This paper develops an accurate and computationally efficient homogenization-based continuum plasticity-damage (HCPD) model for macroscopic analysis of ductile failure in porous ductile materials containing brittle inclusions. Example of these materials are cast alloys such as aluminum and metal matrix composites. The overall framework of the HCPD model follows the structure of the anisotropic Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) type elasto-plasticity model for porous ductile materials. The HCPD model is assumed to be orthotropic in an evolving material principal coordinate system throughout the deformation history. The GTN model parameters are calibrated from homogenization of evolving variables in representative volume elements (RVE) of the microstructure containing inclusions and voids. Micromechanical analyses for this purpose are conducted by the locally enriched Voronoi cell finite element model (LE-VCFEM) [Hu, C., Ghosh, S., 2008. Locally enhanced Voronoi cell finite element model (LE-VCFEM) for simulating evolving fracture in ductile microstructures containing inclusions. Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. 76(12), 1955-1992]. The model also introduces a novel void nucleation criterion from micromechanical damage evolution due to combined inclusion and matrix cracking. The paper discusses methods for estimating RVE length scales in microstructures with non-uniform dispersions, as well as macroscopic characteristic length scales for non-local constitutive models. Comparison of results from the anisotropic HCPD model with homogenized micromechanics shows excellent agreement. The HCPD model has a huge efficiency advantage over micromechanics models. Hence, it is a very effective tool in predicting macroscopic damage in structures with direct reference to microstructural composition.

  10. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Finnemore, D.K.; Gibson, E.D.; Ostenson, J.E.

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritic particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  11. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Finnemore, Douglas K.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Ostenson, Jerome E.

    1983-03-29

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and orientated dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritric particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  12. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST, AS OPERATOR WATCHES TO ENSURE QUALITY. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. Microalloying Boron Carbide with Silicon to Achieve Dramatically Improved Ductility.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2014-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a hard material whose value for extended engineering applications such as body armor; is limited by its brittleness under impact. To improve the ductility while retaining hardness, we used density functional theory to examine modifying B4C ductility through microalloying. We found that replacing the CBC chain in B4C with Si-Si, denoted as (B11Cp)-Si2, dramatically improves the ductility, allowing a continuous shear to a large strain of 0.802 (about twice of B4C failure strain) without brittle failure. Moreover, (B11C)-Si2 retains low density and high hardness. This ductility improvement arises because the Si-Si linkages enable the icosahedra accommodate additional shear by rotating instead of breaking bonds.

  14. INTERIOR VIEW OF CASTING MACHINE WITH 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF CASTING MACHINE WITH 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING WEIGHED ON SCALES AT CASTING MACHINE. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4" DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4" DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING EXTRACTED FROM CASTING MACHINE - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Nonlinear Behavior of RC Dual Ductility Mode Shear Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labafzadeh, M. S. R.; Ziyaeifar, M.

    2008-07-01

    Shear walls are among the most common lateral load resisting systems in medium height buildings. This is due, mostly, to their ability in providing the required level of lateral stiffness and strength for the structure (with simplicity and ease). However, shear walls are not considered as efficient structural component if ductility is the major concern. The fact is, in a tall shear wall, formation of plastic hinge happen only in a fraction of the height of the wall and ductility resources of the rest of the wall remains, mostly, untapped. The experiences with coupled shear walls have shown the potential of dispersion of inelastic behavior over the height of the wall, causing more desirable ductile behavior and a better crack pattern for the whole system. Intuitively, the same concept can be extended to the shear walls with openings. In such cases, both flexural and shear ductility capacity of the system over the height of the wall can be efficiently used to provide us with a dual ductility mode shear wall. This study focuses on the role of openings in ductile behavior of shear walls. The objective of this paper is comparing the nonlinear behavior of ordinary reinforced concrete shear wall with the ones with openings. To this end, the TNO DIANA finite element software is used to show the potential of dual ductility mode of behavior in shear walls with openings. In this regards a series of inelastic static analysis on a variety of shear walls have been carried out. The results of study in a wide variety of shear walls indicate that the potential of openings in the enhancement of ductility modes of such walls in comparison with those without openings.

  17. Numerical modeling of ductile tearing effects on cleavage fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.; Tang, M.; Anderson, T.L.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate a significant effect of specimen size, a/W ratio and prior ductile tearing on cleavage fracture toughness values (J{sub c}) measured in the ductile-to-brittle transition region of ferritic materials. In the lower-transition region, cleavage fracture often occurs under conditions of large-scale yielding but without prior ductile crack extension. The increased toughness develops when plastic zones formed at the crack tip interact with nearby specimen surfaces which relaxes crack-tip constraint (stress triaxiality). In the mid-to-upper transition region, small amounts of ductile crack extension (often < 1-2 mm) routinely precede termination of the J-{Delta}a curve by brittle fracture. Large-scale yielding, coupled with small amounts of ductile tearing, magnifies the impact of small variations in microscale material properties on the macroscopic fracture toughness which contributes to the large amount scatter observed in measured J{sub c}-values. Previous work by the authors described a micromechanics fracture model to correct measured J{sub c}-values for the mechanistic effects of large-scale yielding. This new work extends the model to also include the influence of ductile crack extension prior to cleavage. The paper explores development of the new model, provides necessary graphs and procedures for its application and demonstrates the effects of the model on fracture data sets for two pressure vessel steels (A533B and A515).

  18. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  19. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  20. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  1. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  2. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  3. Welding of nickel-base superalloys having a nil-ductility range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An article made of a nickel-base superalloy having a nil-ductility range from the solidus temperature of the alloy to about 600.degree. F. below the solidus temperature is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, adjusting the temperature of the article to a welding temperature of from about 1800.degree. F. to about 2100.degree. F., welding a preselected area in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected area so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected area, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the nickel-based superalloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  4. A mechanism-based approach to modeling ductile fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Hammi, Youssef; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Klein, Patrick A.; Foulk, James W., III; McFadden, Sam X.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile fracture in metals has been observed to result from the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids. The evolution of this damage is inherently history dependent, affected by how time-varying stresses drive the formation of defect structures in the material. At some critically damaged state, the softening response of the material leads to strain localization across a surface that, under continued loading, becomes the faces of a crack in the material. Modeling localization of strain requires introduction of a length scale to make the energy dissipated in the localized zone well-defined. In this work, a cohesive zone approach is used to describe the post-bifurcation evolution of material within the localized zone. The relations are developed within a thermodynamically consistent framework that incorporates temperature and rate-dependent evolution relationships motivated by dislocation mechanics. As such, we do not prescribe the evolution of tractions with opening displacements across the localized zone a priori. The evolution of tractions is itself an outcome of the solution of particular, initial boundary value problems. The stress and internal state of the material at the point of bifurcation provides the initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of the cohesive zone. The models we develop are motivated by in-situ scanning electron microscopy of three-point bending experiments using 6061-T6 aluminum and 304L stainless steel, The in situ observations of the initiation and evolution of fracture zones reveal the scale over which the failure mechanisms act. In addition, these observations are essential for motivating the micromechanically-based models of the decohesion process that incorporate the effects of loading mode mixity, temperature, and loading rate. The response of these new cohesive zone relations is demonstrated by modeling the three-point bending configuration used for the experiments. In addition, we survey other methods with the potential

  5. Improvement in Abrasion Wear Resistance and Microstructural Changes with Deep Cryogenic Treatment of Austempered Ductile Cast Iron (ADI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolić, Sanja; Godec, Matjaž; Schauperl, Zdravko; Donik, Črtomir

    2016-10-01

    The application of a deep cryogenic treatment during the heat-treatment processes for different types of steels has demonstrated a significant influence on their mechanical and tribological properties. A great deal of research was conducted on steels, as well as on other kinds of materials, such as hard metal, gray cast iron, aluminum, aluminum alloys, etc., but not on austempered ductile iron (ADI). In this research the influence of a deep cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and abrasive wear resistance of austempered ductile iron was investigated. The ductile cast iron was austempered at the upper ausferritic temperature, deep cryogenically treated, and afterwards tempered at two different temperatures. The abrasion wear resistance was tested using the standard ASTM G65 method. The microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, and X-ray diffraction in order to define the microstructural changes that influenced the properties of the ADI. The obtained results show that the deep cryogenic treatment, in combination with different tempering temperatures, affects the matrix microstructure of the austempered ductile iron, which leads to an increase in both the abrasion wear resistance and the hardness.

  6. The effect of manganese on the onset of the stage 2 reaction in an austempered ductile iron matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, K. N.

    1990-02-01

    Austempered ductile irons (ADIs) possess a unique combination of toughness and ductility plus high strength which make them attractive alternatives to other metal castings. ADIs can have tensile strengths up to 230 ksi with a 1% elongation and high hardness for wear resistant applications, or tensile strengths of approximately 150 ksi and elongations of 14% where a large amount of ductility is required. Austempering is a two step process: complete transformation to the austenite ({gamma}) phase; and a quench and hold in the temperature range of 270--420{degree}C for some time followed by cooling to room temperature. This quench must be sufficiently rapid to avoid formation of pearlite or ferrite if the best mechanical properties are to be obtained. This thesis presents the results of a number of experiments aimed at determining the effect of Mn on the length of the Stage 1 reaction. (austenite decomposes into bainitie ferrite and high carbon austenite). A basic knowledge of the effects of Mn will yield a more complete understanding of the austempering process for the normal case and also when microsegregation is present. The onset time for Stage 2 (high carbon austenite decomposes into bainitic ferrite plus carbides) in ductile irons is a critical parameter because of the associated degradation of the mechanical properties which result from carbide formation.

  7. Mechanical Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to characterize the strength and fracture response of nodular ductile iron (NDI) and its underlying ferritic matrix phase. Quasistatic and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) compression tests were performed on NDI and a model material for the NDI matrix phase (Fe-Si alloy). Smooth and notch round bar (NRB) samples were loaded in tension until fracture to determine strain-at-failure with varying stress triaxiality. Multiple tests were performed on each small and large smooth bar samples to obtain fracture statistics with sample size. Fracture statistics are important for initializing simulations of fragmentation events. Johnson-Cook strength models were developed for the NDI and the Fe-Si alloy. NDI strength model parameters are: A = 525 MPa, B = 650 MPa, n = 0.6, and C = 0.0205. The average SHPB experimental strain-rate of 2312/s was used for the reference strain-rate in this model. Fe-Si alloy strength model parameters are: A=560 MPa, B = 625 MPa, n = 0.5, and C = 0.02. The average SHPB experimental strain-rate of 2850/s was used for the reference strain-rate in this model. A Johnson-Cook failure model was developed for NDI with model parameters: D{sub 1} = 0.029, D{sub 2} = 0.44, D{sub 3} = -1.5, and D{sub 4} = D{sub 5} = 0. An exponential relationship was developed for the elongation-at-failure statistics as a function of length-scale with model parameters: S{sub f1} = 0.108, S{sub f2} = -0.00169, and L{sub m} = 32.4 {mu}m. NDI strength and failure models, including failure statistics, will be used in continuum-scale simulations of explosively-driven ring fragmentation. The Fe-Si alloy strength model will be used in mesoscale simulations of spall fracture in NDI, where the NDI matrix phase is captured explicitly.

  8. From brittle to ductile: a structure dependent ductility of diamond nanothread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Vincent B. C.; Cheng, Yuan; Bell, John M.; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-05-01

    As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different mechanical responses than other 1D carbon allotropes. Analogously, the SW defects behave like a grain boundary that interrupts the consistency of the poly-benzene sections. For a DNT with a fixed length, the yield strength fluctuates in the vicinity of a certain value and is independent of the ``grain size''. On the other hand, both yield strength and yield strain show a clear dependence on the total length of DNT, which is due to the fact that the failure of the DNT is dominated by the SW defects. Its highly tunable ductility together with its ultra-light density and high Young's modulus makes diamond nanothread ideal for the creation of extremely strong three-dimensional nano-architectures.As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different

  9. Radiation-Induced Helium Nanobubbles Enhance Ductility in Submicron-Sized Single-Crystalline Copper.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming-Shuai; Du, Jun-Ping; Wan, Liang; Ogata, Shigenobu; Tian, Lin; Ma, Evan; Han, Wei-Zhong; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhi-Wei

    2016-07-13

    The workability and ductility of metals usually degrade with exposure to irradiation, hence the phrase "radiation damage". Here, we found that helium (He) radiation can actually enhance the room-temperature deformability of submicron-sized copper. In particular, Cu single crystals with diameter of 100-300 nm and containing numerous pressurized sub-10 nm He bubbles become stronger, more stable in plastic flow and ductile in tension, compared to fully dense samples of the same dimensions that tend to display plastic instability (strain bursts). The sub-10 nm He bubbles are seen to be dislocation sources as well as shearable obstacles, which promote dislocation storage and reduce dislocation mean free path, thus contributing to more homogeneous and stable plasticity. Failure happens abruptly only after significant bubble coalescence. The current findings can be explained in light of Weibull statistics of failure and the beneficial effects of bubbles on plasticity. These results shed light on plasticity and damage developments in metals and could open new avenues for making mechanically robust nano- and microstructures by ion beam processing and He bubble engineering.

  10. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Chris; Auton, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the high-pressure injection of fluid into the bulk of the rock. The goal is to initiate and propagate fractures that will provide hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir, enabling gas or oil to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We first consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We use this model to show that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. We then complement these results with laboratory experiments in an analogue system, and with numerical simulations based on the discrete element method (DEM), both of which suggest that ductile failure can indeed dramatically change the resulting deformation pattern. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from models that assume purely elastic mechanical behavior.

  11. Brittle and ductile friction and the physics of tectonic tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daub, E.G.; Shelly, D.R.; Guyer, R.A.; Johnson, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of nonvolcanic tremor provide a unique window into the mechanisms of deformation and failure in the lower crust. At increasing depths, rock deformation gradually transitions from brittle, where earthquakes occur, to ductile, with tremor occurring in the transitional region. The physics of deformation in the transition region remain poorly constrained, limiting our basic understanding of tremor and its relation to earthquakes. We combine field and laboratory observations with a physical friction model comprised of brittle and ductile components, and use the model to provide constraints on the friction and stress state in the lower crust. A phase diagram is constructed that characterizes under what conditions all faulting behaviors occur, including earthquakes, tremor, silent transient slip, and steady sliding. Our results show that tremor occurs over a range of ductile and brittle frictional strengths, and advances our understanding of the physical conditions at which tremor and earthquakes take place. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Representing ductile damage with the dual domain material point method

    DOE PAGES

    Long, C. C.; Zhang, D. Z.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, III, G. T.

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we incorporate a ductile damage material model into a computational framework based on the Dual Domain Material Point (DDMP) method. As an example, simulations of a flyer plate experiment involving ductile void growth and material failure are performed. The results are compared with experiments performed on high purity tantalum. We also compare the numerical results obtained from the DDMP method with those obtained from the traditional Material Point Method (MPM). Effects of an overstress model, artificial viscosity, and physical viscosity are investigated. Our results show that a physical bulk viscosity and overstress model are important in thismore » impact and failure problem, while physical shear viscosity and artificial shock viscosity have negligible effects. A simple numerical procedure with guaranteed convergence is introduced to solve for the equilibrium plastic state from the ductile damage model.« less

  13. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 °C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  14. Representing ductile damage with the dual domain material point method

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C. C.; Zhang, D. Z.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, III, G. T.

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we incorporate a ductile damage material model into a computational framework based on the Dual Domain Material Point (DDMP) method. As an example, simulations of a flyer plate experiment involving ductile void growth and material failure are performed. The results are compared with experiments performed on high purity tantalum. We also compare the numerical results obtained from the DDMP method with those obtained from the traditional Material Point Method (MPM). Effects of an overstress model, artificial viscosity, and physical viscosity are investigated. Our results show that a physical bulk viscosity and overstress model are important in this impact and failure problem, while physical shear viscosity and artificial shock viscosity have negligible effects. A simple numerical procedure with guaranteed convergence is introduced to solve for the equilibrium plastic state from the ductile damage model.

  15. Assessment of Corrosion Behavior of Ductile Irons by Factorial Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surendranathan, A. O.; Narayan Prabhu, K.; Sudhaker Nayak, H. V.

    2009-12-01

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed and alloyed ductile irons (as cast, annealed, and cold worked) in sea water, dilute sulfuric acid, and dilute sodium hydroxide solutions was assessed. Specimen history had a significant effect on the corrosion potential except in ductile iron alloyed with Ni. When the specimens were subjected to different levels of cold working, the corrosion rate was influenced by both the history and the medium. Temperature had a significant effect on the corrosion rate except in the case of unalloyed ductile iron. Factorial experiments indicated that the cold-worked samples were more sensitive to the effect of temperature and composition on the corrosion rate as compared to annealed and as-cast samples. The medium had a significant effect on the corrosion rate in all the cases.

  16. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, CENTERVILLE FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, CENTERVILLE FOUNDRY SHOWING MOLD MAKING WITH PNEWMATIC JOLT SQUEEZE COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINES THAT INDIVIDUALLY MADE EITHER A COPE OR DRAG AND A SMALL WHEELED MATCHPLATE JOLT-SQUEEZE MACHINE THAT COMPRESSED AN ENTIRE MOLD AT A SINGLE TIME USING A DOUBLE-SIDED PATTERN (MATCHPLATE). ALSO SHOWN ARE RAILED PALLET CAR CONVEYORS THAT CARRIED COMPLETED MOLDS FROM MOLDING MACHINES TO POURING AREAS WHERE WORKERS USED SMALL OVERHEAD CRANE TO LIFT JACKETS AND WEIGHTS ONTO THE MOLDS TO HOLD THEM TOGETHER WHILE POURING. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  17. Ductile Faults Control Seismogenic Movement on Oceanic Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, G. S.; Tkalcic, H.; Forster, M. A.; McClusky, S.

    2014-12-01

    Structural Geology is about 3D geometry and the symphony of kinematically-coordinated movement. In this case we discuss patterns of violent relative displacement inferred from focal plane data for earthquakes. Systematic stereographic analysis of centroid moment tensor data often shows well-defined orientation groups in scatterplots of fault plane normals and associated slip line vectors. These allow important geodynamic inferences, e.g., we can show that ductile faults control the geometry of oceanic transforms, and that normal fault earthquakes on spreading ridges are usually skewed with respect to adjacent transform faults. To explain this asymmetry requires finite rock strength, but it also means that it is not brittle failure that controls the orientation of oceanic transforms. This asymmetry also requires formation of tilt block geometries reminiscent of Basin-and-Range-style continental extension, systematic offset of earthquake hypocentres from the spreading ridge, and a general complexity in magma-fault interactions that is far beyond what might be expected if ocean-floor spreading is the result of dilating tension-mode fractures in dyke swarms. The role of ductile faulting should be given special mention because mostly it is argued that brittle faults are responsible for earthquakes. Yet many other examples of ductile faults in operation can be inferred, e.g., ductile faults associated with slab drop-off, where slab boudinage leads to extensional ductile faults and seismic activity driven by the pulling away of a relict slab, e.g., beneath the Hindu Kush. Another example might be found by close examination of the tectonic significance of the lowermost of the double (or paired) seismic zones such as can be seen in cross-sections of the subducting slab beneath Japan. The lowermost of the paired seismic zones may mark the locus of aseismic ductile shears or detachments formed by slumping of gigantic sheets of rock attempting to slide down the face of

  18. Brittle intermetallic compound makes ultrastrong low-density steel with large ductility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Nack J

    2015-02-01

    Although steel has been the workhorse of the automotive industry since the 1920s, the share by weight of steel and iron in an average light vehicle is now gradually decreasing, from 68.1 per cent in 1995 to 60.1 per cent in 2011 (refs 1, 2). This has been driven by the low strength-to-weight ratio (specific strength) of iron and steel, and the desire to improve such mechanical properties with other materials. Recently, high-aluminium low-density steels have been actively studied as a means of increasing the specific strength of an alloy by reducing its density. But with increasing aluminium content a problem is encountered: brittle intermetallic compounds can form in the resulting alloys, leading to poor ductility. Here we show that an FeAl-type brittle but hard intermetallic compound (B2) can be effectively used as a strengthening second phase in high-aluminium low-density steel, while alleviating its harmful effect on ductility by controlling its morphology and dispersion. The specific tensile strength and ductility of the developed steel improve on those of the lightest and strongest metallic materials known, titanium alloys. We found that alloying of nickel catalyses the precipitation of nanometre-sized B2 particles in the face-centred cubic matrix of high-aluminium low-density steel during heat treatment of cold-rolled sheet steel. Our results demonstrate how intermetallic compounds can be harnessed in the alloy design of lightweight steels for structural applications and others.

  19. Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Carciello, Neal R.

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80.degree. C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5-5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150.degree. C. to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2.times.10.sup.5 gave improved ductility modulus effect.

  20. Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Carciello, N.R.

    1987-04-21

    This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80 C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5--5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150 C to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2 [times] 10[sup 5] gave improved ductility modulus effect. 5 figs.

  1. DUCTILE URANIUM FUEL FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS AND METHOD OF MAKING

    DOEpatents

    Zegler, S.T.

    1963-11-01

    The fabrication process for a ductile nuclear fuel alloy consisting of uranium, fissium, and from 0.25 to 1.0 wt% of silicon or aluminum or from 0.25 to 2 wt% of titanium or yttrium is presented. (AEC)

  2. Wear Performance of Cu-Alloyed Austempered Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Uma; Batra, Nimish; Sharma, J. D.

    2013-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of structural and mechanical properties on wear behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI). Ductile iron (DI) samples were austenitized at 900 °C for 60 min and subsequently austempered for 60 min at three temperatures: 270, 330, and 380 °C. Microstructures of the as-cast DI and ADIs were characterized using optical and scanning microscopy, respectively. The structural parameters, volume fraction of austenite, carbon content of austenite, and ferrite particle size were determined using x-ray diffraction technique. Mechanical properties including Vicker's hardness, 0.2% proof strength, ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and strain hardening coefficient were determined. Wear tests were carried out under dry sliding conditions using pin-on-disk machine with a linear speed of 2.4 m/s. Normal load and sliding distance were 45 N and 1.7 × 104 m, respectively. ADI developed at higher austempering temperature has large amounts of austenite, which contribute toward improvement in the wear resistance through stress-induced martensitic transformation, and strain hardening of austenite. Wear rate was found to depend on 0.2% proof strength, ductility, austenite content, and its carbon content. Study of worn surfaces and nature of wear debris revealed that the fine ausferrite structure in ADIs undergoes oxidational wear, but the coarse ausferrite structure undergoes adhesion, delamination, and mild abrasion too.

  3. Heat treatment procedure to increase ductility of degraded nickel alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, M.

    1968-01-01

    Tests demonstrate the room temperature ductility of degraded Rene 41 can be increased to acceptable values by solution heat treatment at a temperature of 2050 degrees to 2150 degrees F /1 to 2 hours/ and cooling through a controlled temperature range followed by normal aging in air /16 hours at 1400 degrees F/.

  4. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auton, Lucy; MacMinn, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the injection of fluid at high pressure. This creates fractures in the rock, providing hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir and enabling gas to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We solve the model semi-analytically at steady state, and numerically in general. We find that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from purely elastic models.

  5. An interatomic pair potential with tunable intrinsic ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, V. P.; Warner, D. H.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    A family of interatomic potentials is constructed for which the intrinsic ductility can be tuned systematically. Specifically, the elastic constants and critical energy release rate for Griffith cleavage, {{G}\\text{Ic}} , are held constant, while the critical energy release rate for dislocation emission, {{G}\\text{Ie}} , can be varied. This behavior is achieved by modifying a standard near-neighbor pair potential; the new potential is applicable to either 2D (hexagonal lattice) or 3D (FCC/HCP). Analytical expressions are provided for {{G}\\text{Ie}} and {{G}\\text{Ic}} , enabling a potential with a desired intrinsic ductility to be easily developed. Direct atomistic simulations are used to demonstrate that the new potentials control the intrinsic material ductility, i.e. crack tip dislocation emission versus brittle cleavage, under quasi-static loading. For the 2D potential, the mode I crack tip behavior can be tuned from brittle to ductile; for the 3D potential, such tuning is only possible for certain crack orientations. More generally, the new potentials are expected to be useful in a wide range of physical problems in which behavior is controlled by the ability of the material to nucleate dislocations, including problems involving crack tips, grain boundaries, contact and friction, and bi-material interfaces.

  6. Modeling of ductile and brittle/brittle laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.P.

    1996-02-01

    A micro-mechanical ``spring``-network model was used to simulate the deformation and fracture behaviors of ductile/brittle and brittle/brittle laminates. Effects of interfacial cohesion, moduli, grain boundary cohesion, yield stress are presented and compared with available experiments. We found that composites with higher yield stress and lower interfacial cohesion are tougher.

  7. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... kilopascals (1000 pounds per square inch) gage, provided the following: (1) The castings receive a ferritizing... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A...

  8. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    PubMed Central

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  9. Thermo-Mechanical Processing and Properties of a Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, R.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-07-14

    Thermo-mechanical processing of ductile irons is a potential method for enhancing their mechanical properties. A ductile cast iron containing 3.6% C, 2.6% Si and 0.045% Mg was continuously hot-and-warm rolled or one-step press-forged from a temperature in the austenite range (900{degrees}C-1100{degrees}C) to a temperature below the A, temperature. Various amounts of reduction were used (from 60% to more than 90%) followed by a short heat ent at 600`C. The heat ent lead to a structure of fine graphite in a matrix of ferrite and carbides. The hot-and- warm worked materials developed a pearlitic microstructure while the press-forged material developed a spheroidite-like carbide microstructure in the matrix. Cementite-denuded ferrite zones were developed around graphite stringers in the hot-and-warm worked materials, but such zones were absent in the press-forged material. Tensile properties including tensile strength and total elongation were measured along the direction parallel and transverse to the rolling direction and along the direction transverse to the press-forging direction. The tensile ductility and strength both increased with a decrease in the amount of hot-and-warm working. The press- forged materials showed higher strength (645 MPa) than the hot-and-warrn worked materials (575 MPa) when compared at the same ductility level (22% elongation).

  10. Micromechanics based simulation of ductile fracture in structural steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellavajjala, Ravi Kiran

    The broader aim of this research is to develop fundamental understanding of ductile fracture process in structural steels, propose robust computational models to quantify the associated damage, and provide numerical tools to simplify the implementation of these computational models into general finite element framework. Mechanical testing on different geometries of test specimens made of ASTM A992 steels is conducted to experimentally characterize the ductile fracture at different stress states under monotonic and ultra-low cycle fatigue (ULCF) loading. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the fractured surfaces is conducted to decipher the underlying microscopic damage mechanisms that cause fracture in ASTM A992 steels. Detailed micromechanical analyses for monotonic and cyclic loading are conducted to understand the influence of stress triaxiality and Lode parameter on the void growth phase of ductile fracture. Based on monotonic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanical void growth model is proposed to predict ductile fracture. This model is then incorporated in to finite element program as a weakly coupled model to simulate the loss of load carrying capacity in the post microvoid coalescence regime for high triaxialities. Based on the cyclic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanics based cyclic void growth model is developed to predict the ULCF life of ASTM A992 steels subjected to high stress triaxialities. Furthermore, a computational fracture locus for ASTM A992 steels is developed and incorporated in to finite element program as an uncoupled ductile fracture model. This model can be used to predict the ductile fracture initiation under monotonic loading in a wide range of triaxiality and Lode parameters. Finally, a coupled microvoid elongation and dilation based continuum damage model is proposed, implemented, calibrated and validated. This model is capable of simulating the local softening caused by the various phases of ductile fracture process under

  11. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Aiying; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Jian; Wang, Y. Morris

    2016-04-23

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility,more » leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Furthermore, our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.« less

  12. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. (a) Each service line connected to a cast iron or ductile iron main must be...

  13. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. (a) Each service line connected to a cast iron or ductile iron main must be...

  14. A nonlinear CDM model for ductile failure analysis of steel bridge columns under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Van Do, Vuong; Lee, Chin-Hyung; Chang, Kyong-Ho

    2014-06-01

    A nonlinear cyclic plasticity damage model for ductile metals, which is able to take large deformation effects into consideration, has been developed using a new damage dissipation potential formulation in order to predict the cyclic inelastic behavior of steel bridge piers. The cyclic constitutive equations that employ the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening rule for plastic deformation is incorporated into the damage mechanics in conjunction with the large strain formulation. The damage growth law is based on the experimental observations that the evolution of microvoids results in nonlinear damage accumulation with plastic deformation. The damage model parameters and the procedure for their identification are presented. The proposed model has been validated and successfully applied to thin-walled steel bridge tubular columns subjected to alternating lateral displacements to evaluate the seismic performance.

  15. Extra-electron induced covalent strengthening and generalization of intrinsic ductile-to-brittle criterion

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Haiyang; Chen, Xing-Qiu; Liu, Peitao; Xing, Weiwei; Cheng, Xiyue; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2012-01-01

    Traditional strengthening ways, such as strain, precipitation, and solid-solution, come into effect by pinning the motion of dislocation. Here, through first-principles calculations we report on an extra-electron induced covalent strengthening mechanism, which alters chemical bonding upon the introduction of extra-valence electrons in the matrix of parent materials. It is responsible for the brittle and high-strength properties of Al12W-type compounds featured by the typical fivefold icosahedral cages, which are common for quasicrystals and bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). In combination with this mechanism, we generalize ductile-to-brittle criterion in a universal hyperbolic form by integrating the classical Pettifor's Cauchy pressure with Pugh's modulus ratio for a wide variety of materials with cubic lattices. This study provides compelling evidence to correlate Pugh's modulus ratio with hardness of materials and may have implication for understanding the intrinsic brittleness of quasicrystals and BMGs. PMID:23056910

  16. Simulations of ductile flow in brittle material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Luh, M.H.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research is continuing on the effects of thermal properties of the cutting tool and workpiece on the overall temperature distribution. Using an Eulerian finite element model, diamond and steel tools cutting aluminum have been simulated at various, speeds, and depths of cut. The relative magnitude of the thermal conductivity of the tool and the workpiece is believed to be a primary factor in the resulting temperature distribution in the workpiece. This effect is demonstrated in the change of maximum surface temperatures for diamond on aluminum vs. steel on aluminum. As a preliminary step toward the study of ductile flow in brittle materials, the relative thermal conductivities of diamond on polycarbonate is simulated. In this case, the maximum temperature shifts from the rake face of the tool to the surface of the machined workpiece, thus promoting ductile flow in the workpiece surface.

  17. Prediction of Microstructure in High-Strength Ductile Forging Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, M.; Back, A.; Hirt, G.; Keul, C.; Bleck, W.

    2010-06-15

    Governmental, environmental and economic demands call for lighter, stiffer and at the same time cheaper products in the vehicle industry. Especially safety relevant parts have to be stiff and at the same time ductile. The strategy of this project was to improve the mechanical properties of forging steel alloys by employing a high-strength and ductile bainitic microstructure in the parts while maintaining cost effective process chains to reach these goals for high stressed forged parts. Therefore, a new steel alloy combined with an optimized process chain has been developed. To optimize the process chain with a minimum of expensive experiments, a numerical approach was developed to predict the microstructure of the steel alloy after the process chain based on FEM simulations of the forging and cooling combined with deformation-time-temperature-transformation-diagrams.

  18. A Study of Solder Alloy Ductility for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Shapiro, A. A.; Suh, J-O.; Minor, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    For aerospace applications it is important to understand the mechanical performance of components at the extreme temperature conditions seen in service. For solder alloys used in microelectronics, cryogenic temperatures can prove problematic. At low temperatures Sn-based solders undergo a ductile to brittle transition that leads to brittle cracks, which can result in catastrophic failure of electronic components, assemblies and spacecraft payloads. As industrial processes begin to move away from Pb-Sn solder, it is even more critical to characterize the behavior of alternative Sn-based solders. Here we report on initial investigations using a modified Charpy test apparatus to characterize the ductile to brittle transformation temperature of nine different solder systems.

  19. The effect of yield strength and ductility to fatigue damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    The cumulative damage of aluminium alloys with different yield strength and various ductility due to seismic loads was studied. The responses of an idealized beam with a centered mass at one end and fixed at the other end to El Centro's and Taft's earthquakes are computed by assuming that the alloys are perfectly elastoplastic materials and by using numerical technique. Consequently, the corresponding residual plastic strain can be obtained from the stress-strain relationship. The revised Palmgren-Miner cumulative damage theorem is utilized to calculate the fatigue damage. The numerical results show that in certain cases, the high ductility materials are more resistant to seismic loads than the high yield strength materials. The results also show that if a structure collapse during the earthquake, the collapse always occurs in the very early stage.

  20. High temperature ductility loss in titanium alloys -- A review

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, B.B.; Imam, M.A.; Damkroger, B.K.; Edwards, G.R.

    1994-02-01

    It is well known that two phase titanium alloy systems suffer from an abrupt drop in ductility at elevated temperatures in the range of 1,000 to 1,150 K. This loss of ductility is manifested by easy decohesion of polycrystalline aggregates along the grain boundaries of the high temperature beta phase. If the alloy is in a state of tensile stress at the aforementioned temperatures, cracks initiate at the grain boundaries and propagate readily through the alloy, leading to premature failure. This phenomenon is a cause of major concern in titanium alloy fabrication and welding. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain high temperature crack nucleation and growth along the boundaries. A critical review of the phenomenon and possible mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior will be discussed.

  1. Ductile mode electrochemical oxidation assisted micromachining for glassy carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Eunseok; Lee, Chan-Young; Jun, Martin B. G.; Min, Byung-Kwon

    2015-04-01

    Recently, a new mechanical machining process using electrochemical oxidation was reported. Electrochemical oxidation assisted micromachining was applied to the machining of glassy carbon. The material removal process of the electrochemical oxidation assisted micromachining consists of repeated cycles of oxidation followed by removal of the oxide layer. In this paper, we experimentally investigate and compare the critical chip thickness for ductile mode cutting in mechanical machining and electrochemical oxidation assisted micromachining of glassy carbon. The theoretical critical chip thickness is calculated for mechanical machining of glassy carbon and experimentally verified. The effect of electrochemical oxidation on the critical chip thickness for ductile mode micromachining is also studied for glassy carbon. It is found that the critical chip thickness is increased for the electrochemical oxidation assisted micromachining.

  2. WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ELECTRIC FURNACE AFTER ADDING A CHEMICAL COAGULANT TO FORCE IT TO THE SURFACE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Melting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Probabilistic assessment of machine parts from Kymenite, austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, I.; Galperin, M.; Alimov, M.; Jokipii, K.

    1992-07-01

    The fatigue properties of Kymenite, austempered ductile iron, were investigated on the basis of the statistical theory of fatigue failure similarity. The fatigue tests were carried out on plain and notched specimens. The S-N curves for a given failure probability and the dependencies of similarity equation parameters on the number of cycles were obtained. These data allow to take into consideration the influence of design factors in the fatigue strength.

  4. Modeling the strength and ductility of magnesium alloys containing nanotwins

    SciTech Connect

    Gorti, Sarma B; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been receiving much attention recently as potential lightweight alternatives to steel for automotive and other applications, but the poor formability of these alloys at low temperatures has limited their widespread adoption for automotive applications. Recent work with face centered cubic (FCC) materials has shown that introduction of twins at the nanometer scale in ultra-fine grained FCC polycrystals can provide significant increase in strength with a simultaneous improvement in ductility. This objective of this work is to explore the feasibility of extending this concept to hexagonal close packed (HCP) materials, with particular focus on using this approach to increase both strength and ductility of magnesium alloys. A crystal plasticity based finite element (CPFE) model is used to study the effect of varying the crystallographic texture and the spacing between the nanoscale twins on the strength and ductility of HCP polycrystals. Deformation of the material is assumed to occur by crystallographic slip, and in addition to the basal and prismatic slip systems, slip is also assumed to occur on the {1 0 -1 1} planes that are associated with compression twins in these materials. The slip system strength of the pyramidal systems containing the nanotwins is assumed to be much lower than the strength of the other systems, which is assumed to scale with the spacing between the nanotwins. The CPFE model is used to compute the stress-strain response for different microstrucrutral parameters, and a criterion based on a critical slip system shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress is used to compute the limiting strength and ductility, with the ultimate goal of identifying the texture and nanotwin spacing that can lead to the optimum values for these parameters.

  5. Block-slider model for ductile instabilities in subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M. R.

    2003-04-01

    It has been suggested that the occurence of ductile (or plastic) instabilities in the deeper portion of subducting slabs is the dominating mechanism for the generation of intermediate-depth and deep-focus earthquakes. Heat generated during viscous deformation provides a positive feedback to creep and eventually faulting under high pressure. Recent detailed receiver function images of the structure of the Japan subduction zone seem to provide support for this notion. First, there is no indication of an existing metastable olivine wedge. Second, the intermediate-depth seismicity seems to be located in the strong and colder portions of the downgoing slab, about 30 km below the oceanic Moho. This suggests that instead of dehydration or phase transformation triggered events, ductile faulting is its predominating cause. In a recent paper, we have discussed the necessary conditions for ductile instabilities to develop in the bended subducting mantle lithosphere, based on the available experimental data on viscous creep of olivine resp. spinel (*). The present paper aims at a numerical study of the time evolution of a nucleated instability. For this purpose, we develop a cellular block-slider model for ductile instabilities in the mantle lithosphere, in analogy to the frequently used and highly successful block-slider models for brittle fracture of the crust. The block-slider approach is numerically much less demanding than solutions based on the corresponding, thermal-mechanically coupled continuum equations. Furthermore, it allows a straightforward inclusion of possible non-equilibrium effects associated with mineral phase transformations in a subducting slab (kinetic overshoot, grainsize reduction). The obtained numerical results are compared with seismological observation. It is shown, e.g., that the existence of metastable olivine in the deeper portion of a slab (below 500 km) is not a necessary condition for the generation of deep-focus earthquakes. (*) S. Karato, M

  6. Superior austempered ductile iron (ADI) properties achieved by prior hot isostatic pressing (HIP)

    SciTech Connect

    LaGoy, J.L.; Widmer, R.; Zick, D.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ductile iron obtained from different foundries and cast by dissimilar methods has been successfully hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) before austempering to achieve substantially higher ductilities, without significant detriment to other properties, than those reached by austempering along. HIP was attempted to solve different mechanical deficiencies in austempered ductile iron (ADI) such as the lack of ductility in higher strength grades, inconsistent mechanical properties, and service life limitations. A variety of HIP temperatures were analyzed from near the austenitizing region up to within 56 C (100 F) of the melting point of ductile iron. Microporosity was eliminated by HIP at all temperatures, and subsequent austempering revealed a uniform ADI microstructure. HIP proved successful with both unencapsulated castings and those enclosed within steel canisters. Additional benefits caused by HIP processing of ductile iron castings without the austempering treatment include a significant decrease in mechanical property data scatter, high hardness at reasonable ductility levels, and a substantially reduced scrap rate.

  7. The role of boron in ductilizing Ni3Al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedula, K.; Shabel, B. S.; Khadkikar, P. S.

    1987-01-01

    Ductilization of Ni3Al at room temperature by microalloying with boron has been primarily attributed to the increased grain boundary cohesion in the presence of boron. However, another aspect of the role played by boron in ductilizing Ni3Al is revealed when the Hall-Petch relationships for Ni3Al and B-doped Ni3Al are compared. A shallower slope for the B-doped Ni3Al compared to that for Ni3Al indicates a reduced resistance to slip propagation across grain boundaries, and therefore reduced stress concentration at boundaries, in the presence of boron. This comparison of Hall-Petch relationships was carried out by generating data for powder processed B-doped Ni3Al at various grain sizes and by compiling data for Ni3Al from the literature. In addition, the room temperature fracture of B-doped Ni3Al has been shown to initiate along certain grain boundaries. The fracture eventually occurs by transgranular ductile tearing.

  8. Nano-modification to improve the ductility of cementitious composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yeşilmen, Seda; Al-Najjar, Yazin; Balav, Mohammad Hatam; Şahmaran, Mustafa; Yıldırım, Gürkan; Lachemi, Mohamed

    2015-10-15

    Effect of nano-sized mineral additions on ductility of engineered cementitious composites (ECC) containing high volumes of fly ash was investigated at different hydration degrees. Various properties of ECC mixtures with different mineral additions were compared in terms of microstructural properties of matrix, fiber-matrix interface, and fiber surface to assess improvements in ductility. Microstructural characterization was made by measuring pore size distributions through mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). Hydration characteristics were assessed using thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), and fiber-matrix interface and fiber surface characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) through a period of 90 days. Moreover, compressive and flexural strength developments were monitored for the same period. Test results confirmed that mineral additions could significantly improve both flexural strength and ductility of ECC, especially at early ages. Cheaper Nano-CaCO{sub 3} was more effective compared to nano-silica. However, the crystal structure of CaCO{sub 3} played a very important role in the range of expected improvements.

  9. Strain rate influence on fracture development in experimental ductile multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Griera, Albert

    2011-04-01

    The far-field strain rate is a crucial parameter that controls the transition between brittle and ductile deformation. We have used analogue experiments to study the strain rate influence on the development of brittle fractures in a ductile composite material. Plasticine multilayer models were deformed under coaxial boundary conditions at three different strain rates to analyse the transition from non-localised deformation to the development of a brittle fracture network that accommodates part of the deformation. The results show that tension cracks and voids are the first macroscopic structures that nucleate after an early stage of ductile deformation. Coalescence and collapse of these structures lead to the development of brittle shear fractures. The evolution of fracture orientations, lengths and displacements was systematically analysed. The ratio of the accumulated fracture displacement vs. fracture length ( dmax/ L) depends not only on the total deformation, but also on the strain rate at which the system is deformed. The accumulated displacement with respect to fracture length increases with strain rate.

  10. Metallic glass composition. [That does not embrittle upon annealing

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, D.M.; Koch, C.C.

    1984-09-14

    This patent pertains to a metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon, carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility-enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  11. Intercritical heat treatments in ductile iron and steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristizabal, Ricardo E.

    Materials such as dual phase (DP) steels, transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels and dual phase ductile irons are produced by intercritical heat treatments. These materials can provide significant weight savings in the automotive industry. The goal of this dissertation is to study intercritical heat treatments in ductile iron and steel to optimize the production parameters. Three different aspects were addressed. First, common steels were intercritically austenitized and austempered (intercritically austempered) under a variety conditions. The results showed that common grade steels that were intercritically austempered exhibited tensile properties in the same range as DP and TRIP steels. The second study consisted of determining the effect of heat treatment conditions on the tensile properties of intercritically austenitized, quenched and tempered ductile iron (IAQ&TDI). The results showed that (1) ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and yield strength (YS) were determined by the volume fraction of martensite, (2) tempering improved the elongation 1.7-2.5 times with only a slight decrease in strength, (3) the carbon in austenite formed during the intercritical heat treatment of ductile iron with a ferritic-pearlitic matrix came from the carbon available in the matrix and that carbon diffusion from the graphite nodules was restricted, and (4) limited segregation of substitutional elements occurred during intercritical austenitizing. Finally, intercritically austempered ductile iron (IADI) alloyed with different amounts of manganese and nickel was produced. Tensile properties and microstructure were determined. Also, the stability of the austenite during deformation and the lattice strains of the ferrite and the austenite phases were determined using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and neutron diffraction. The results indicated that: 1) high manganese concentrations produced materials with large blocky, low carbon austenite particles at the intercellular boundaries

  12. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  13. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  14. Predictive Process Optimization for Fracture Ductility in Automotive TRIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiadong

    In light of the emerging challenges in the automotive industry of meeting new energy-saving and environment-friendly requirements imposed by both the government and the society, the auto makers have been working relentlessly to reduce the weight of automobiles. While steel makers pushed out a variety of novel Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) to serve this market with new needs, TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels is one of the most promising materials for auto-body due to its exceptional combination of strength and formability. However, current commercial automotive TRIP steels demonstrate relatively low hole-expansion (HE) capability, which is critical in stretch forming of various auto parts. This shortcoming on ductility has been causing fracture issues in the forming process and limits the wider applications of this steel. The kinetic theory of martensitic transformations and associated transformation plasticity is applied to the optimization of transformation stability for enhanced mechanical properties in a class of high strength galvannealed TRIP steel. This research leverages newly developed characterization and simulation capabilities, supporting computational design of high-performance steels exploiting optimized transformation plasticity for desired mechanical behaviors, especially for the hole-expansion ductility. The microstructure of the automotive TRIP sheet steels was investigated, using advanced tomographic characterization including nanoscale Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP) microanalysis. The microstructural basis of austenite stability, the austenite carbon concentration in particular, was quantified and correlated with measured fracture ductility through transformation plasticity constitutive laws. Plastic flow stability for enhanced local fracture ductility at high strength is sought to maintain high hole-expansion ductility, through quantifying the optimal stability and the heat-treatment process to achieve it. An additional

  15. An Exploratory Investigation of Some Factors Influencing the Room-Temperature Ductility of Tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1960-01-01

    Specimens having an initial diameter of 0.125 inch were cut from commercially pure sintered and swaged tungsten rods. The effect of various surface treatments on the ductility of tungsten was evaluated by the use of a bend test. The criterion used to determine the relative ductilities was the final bend angle of the specimens. Results showed that the bend ductility of the tungsten specimens increased with increasing depths of the surface removed by electropolishing. When specimens electropolished to a depth sufficient to produce a marked increase in the ductility over that of the as-received surface condition were subsequently scratched with emery paper, the ductility achieved by electropolishing was greatly reduced. Removal of similar depths of the surface by grinding as were removed by electropolishing did not produce any appreciable increase in the ductility of the specimens. The ductility of specimens tested in the as-received surface condition and those having an electropolished surface exhibited a great sensitivity to deflection rate, the electropolished specimens being more ductile over the range of deflection rates tested. These exploratory results illustrated qualitatively the importance of surface condition on the room-temperature ductility of tungsten and indicated the importance of relatively fine scratches on the ductility of tungsten.

  16. Response and representation of ductile damage under varying shock loading conditions in tantalum

    DOE PAGES

    Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, III, G. T.; Addessio, F. L.; Livescu, V.; Bourne, N. K.; MacDonald, S. A.; Withers, P. J.

    2016-02-25

    The response of polycrystalline metals, which possess adequate mechanisms for plastic deformation under extreme loading conditions, is often accompanied by the formation of pores within the structure of the material. This large deformation process is broadly identified as progressive with nucleation, growth, coalescence, and failure the physical path taken over very short periods of time. These are well known to be complex processes strongly influenced by microstructure, loading path, and the loading profile, which remains a significant challenge to represent and predict numerically. In the current study, the influence of loading path on the damage evolution in high-purity tantalum ismore » presented. Tantalum samples were shock loaded to three different peak shock stresses using both symmetric impact, and two different composite flyer plate configurations such that upon unloading the three samples displayed nearly identical “pull-back” signals as measured via rear-surface velocimetry. While the “pull-back” signals observed were found to be similar in magnitude, the sample loaded to the highest peak stress nucleated a connected field of ductile fracture which resulted in complete separation, while the two lower peak stresses resulted in incipient damage. The damage evolution in the “soft” recovered tantalum samples was quantified using optical metallography, electron-back-scatter diffraction, and tomography. These experiments are examined numerically through the use of a model for shock-induced porosity evolution during damage. The model is shown to describe the response of the tantalum reasonably well under strongly loaded conditions but less well in the nucleation dominated regime. As a result, numerical results are also presented as a function of computational mesh density and discussed in the context of improved representation of the influence of material structure upon macro-scale models of ductile damage.« less

  17. Reformation Capability of Short-Range Order and Their Medium-Range Connections Regulates Deformability of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Congling; Wei, Yujie; Shi, Xinghua

    2015-07-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) typically have high yield strength while low ductility, and the latter is commonly considered as the Achilles’ heel of MGs. Elucidate the mechanism for such low ductility becomes the research focus of this field. With molecular level simulations, we show the degree of short-range order (SRO) of atomic structure for brittle Fe-based glass decreases dramatically during the stretch, while mild change occurs in ductile Zr-based glass. The reformation capability for SRO and their medium-range connections is found to be the primary characteristics to differentiate the deformability between the two metallic glasses. We suspect that, in addition to the strength of networks formed by SRO structure, the reformation capability to reform SRO networks also plays the key role in regulating the ductility in metallic glasses. Our study provides important insights into the understanding about the mechanisms accounting for ductility or brittleness of bulk metallic glasses.

  18. Experimental study of the thermal stability of austempered ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, M. J.; Cisneros, M. M.; Valdés, E.; Mancha, H.; Calderón, H. A.; Campos, R. E.

    2002-10-01

    A nonisothermal annealing was applied to austempered Ni-Cu-Mo alloyed and unalloyed ductile irons to determine the thermal stability of the ausferritic structure. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) results were used to build the corresponding stability diagrams. The transformation starting temperature of the high carbon austenite was found to be strongly dependent on the austempering temperature, the heating rate, and the chemical composition of the iron. The Ni-Cu-Mo alloying elements and high austempering temperature increased the stability. The transformation of the austenite to ferrite and cementite is achieved via the precipitation of transition carbides identified as silico-carbides of triclinic structure.

  19. Ductility normalized-strain-range partitioning life relations for creep-fatigue life predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Saltsman, J. F.; Hirschberg, M. H.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques utilizing strainrange partitioning may be used to estimate the effects of the environment on the high-temperature, low-cycle, creep-fatigue resistance of alloys. Three levels of ductility-normalized strainrange-partitioning life relations are discussed: (1) strainrange partitioning relations from ductility data, (2) strainrange partitioning relations scaled by ductility ratios, and (3) strainrange partitioning life relations with measured PP lines. The procedures have demonstrated good agreement with available creep-fatigue data.

  20. Comparative Study on Failure Prediction in Warm Forming Processes of Mg Alloy Sheet by the FEM and Ductile Fracture Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Young-Seon

    2014-04-01

    An important concern in metal forming is whether the desired deformation can be accomplished without any failure of the material, even at elevated temperatures. This paper describes the utilization of ductile fracture criteria in conjunction with the finite element (FE) method for predicting the onset of fracture in warm metal working processes of magnesium alloy sheets. The uniaxial tensile tests of AZ31 alloy sheets with a thickness of 3 mm and FE simulations were performed to calculate the critical damage values for three kinds of ductile fracture criteria. The critical damage values for each criterion were expressed as the function of strain rate at various temperatures. In order to find out the best criterion for failure prediction, Erichsen cupping tests under isothermal conditions were carried out at various temperatures and punch velocities. Based on the plastic deformation histories obtained from FE analysis of the Erichsen cupping tests and the critical damage value curves, the initiation time and location of fracture were predicted under bi-axial tensile conditions. As a result, Cockcroft-Latham's criterion showed good agreement with the experiments.

  1. On Key Factors Influencing Ductile Fractures of Dual Phase (DP) Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Liu, Wenning N.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-11-25

    In this paper, we examine the key factors influencing ductile failure of various grades of dual phase (DP) steels using the microstructure-based modeling approach. Various microstructure-based finite element models are generated based on the actual microstructures of DP steels with different martensite volume fractions. These models are, then, used to investigate the influence of ductility of the constituent ferrite phase and also the influence of voids introduced in the ferrite phase on the overall ductility of DP steels. It is found that with volume fraction of martensite in the microstructure less than 15%, the overall ductility of the DP steels strongly depends on the ductility of the ferrite matrix, hence pre-existing micro voids in the microstructure significantly reduce the overall ductility of the steel. When the volume fraction of martensite is above 15%, the preexisting voids in the ferrite matrix does not significantly reduce the overall ductility of the DP steels, and the overall ductility is more influenced by the mechanical property disparity between the two phases. The applicability of the phase inhomogeneity driven ductile failure of DP steels is then discussed based on the obtained computational results for various grades of DP steels, and the experimentally obtained scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures of the corresponding grades of DP steels near fracture surface are used as evidence for result validations.

  2. Fracturing of ductile anisotropic multilayers: influence of material strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rivas, E.; Griera, A.; Llorens, M.-G.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures in rocks deformed under dominant ductile conditions typically form simultaneously with viscous flow. Material strength plays a fundamental role on fracture development in such cases, since fracture propagation can be strongly reduced by the high energy absorption of the material. Additionally, the degree and nature of anisotropy can influence the orientation and type of resulting fractures. In this study, four plasticine multilayer models have been deformed under coaxial boundary conditions to investigate the influence of strength and anisotropy on the formation of fracture networks. The experiments were made of different mixtures and presented two types of anisotropy: composite and composite-intrinsic. The transition from non-localised deformation to systems where fracture networks control deformation accommodation is determined by the ability of the material to dissipate the external work and relax the elastic strain during loading, either by viscous flow or by coeval flow and failure. Tension cracks grow in experiments with composite anisotropy, giving rise to a network of shear fractures when they collapse and coalesce with progressive deformation. The presence of an additional intrinsic anisotropy enhances the direct nucleation of shear fractures, whose propagation and final length depend on the rigidity of the medium. Material strength increases the fracture maximum displacement (dmax) to fracture length (L) ratio, and the resulting values are significantly higher than those from fractures in elastic-brittle rocks. This is associated with the low propagation rates of fractures in rocks undergoing ductile deformation.

  3. Fracturing of ductile anisotropic multilayers: influence of material strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rivas, E.; Griera, A.; Llorens, M.-G.

    2015-05-01

    Fractures in rocks deformed under dominant ductile conditions typically form simultaneously with viscous flow. Material strength plays a fundamental role during fracture development in such systems, since fracture propagation can be strongly reduced if the material accommodates most of the deformation by viscous flow. Additionally, the degree and nature of anisotropy can influence the orientation and type of resulting fractures. In this study, four plasticine multilayer models have been deformed under coaxial boundary conditions to investigate the influence of strength and anisotropy on the formation of fracture networks. The experiments were made of different mixtures and had two types of anisotropy: composite and composite-intrinsic. The transition from non-localised deformation to systems where fracture networks control deformation accommodation is determined by the ability of the material to dissipate the external work and relax the elastic strain during loading either by viscous flow or by coeval flow and failure. Tension cracks grow in experiments with composite anisotropy, giving rise to a network of shear fractures when they collapse and coalesce with progressive deformation. The presence of an additional intrinsic anisotropy enhances the direct nucleation of shear fractures, the propagation and final length of which depend on the rigidity of the medium. Material strength increases the fracture maximum displacement (dmax) to fracture length (L) ratio, and the resulting values are significantly higher than those from fractures in elastic-brittle rocks. This can be related to the low propagation rates of fractures in rocks undergoing ductile deformation.

  4. Significance of grain sliding mechanisms for ductile deformation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, A.; Bourcier, M.; Gaye, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J.; Ludwig, W.

    2013-12-01

    Ductile shear zones at depth present polyphase and heterogeneous rocks and multi-scale strain localization patterns. Most strain concentrates in ultramylonitic layers, which exhibit microstructural signatures of several concomitant deformation mechanisms. The latter are either active in volume (dislocation creep), or in the vicinity and along interfaces (grain sliding and solution mass transfer). Because their chronology of appearance and interactions are unclear, inference of the overall rheology seems illusory. We have therefore characterized over a decade the rheology of synthetic lower crustal materials with different compositions and fluid contents, and for various microstructures. Non-Newtonian flow clearly related to dominant dislocation creep. Conversely, Newtonian behavior involved grain sliding mechanisms, but crystal plasticity could be identified as well. In order to clarify the respective roles of these mechanisms we underwent a multi-scale investigation of the ductile deformation of rock analog synthetic halite with controlled microstructures. The mechanical tests were combined with in-situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X ray computed tomography, allowing for digital image correlation (DIC) techniques and retrieval of full strain field. Crystal plasticity dominated, as evidenced by physical slip lines and DIC computed slip bands. Crystal orientation mapping allowed to identify strongly active easy glide {110} <110> systems. But, all other slip systems were observed as well, and especially near interfaces, where their activity is necessary to accommodate for the plastic strain incompatibilities between neighboring grains. We also evidenced grain boundary sliding (GBS), which clearly occurred as a secondary, but necessary, accommodation mechanism. The DIC technique allowed the quantification of the relative contribution of each mechanism. The amount of GBS clearly increased with decreasing grain size. Finite element (FE) modeling

  5. Ductile-Phase-Toughened Tungsten for Plasma-Facing Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Kevin Hawkins

    A variety of processing approaches were employed to fabricate ductile-phase-toughened (DPT) tungsten (W) composites. Mechanical testing and analytical modeling were used to guide composite development. This work provides a basis for further development of W composites to be used in structural divertor components of future fusion reactors. W wire was tested in tension, showing significant ductility and strength. Coatings of copper (Cu) or tungsten carbide (WC) were applied to the W wire via electrodeposition and carburization, respectively. Composites were fabricated using spark plasma sintering (SPS) to consolidate W powders together with each type of coated W wire. DPT behavior, e.g. crack arrest and crack bridging, was not observed in three-point bend testing of the sintered composites. A laminate was fabricated by hot pressing W and Cu foils together with W wires, and subsequently tested in tension. This laminate was bonded via hot pressing to thick W plate as a reinforcing layer, and the composite was tested in three-point bending. Crack arrest was observed along with some fiber pullout, but significant transverse cracking in the W plate confounded further fracture toughness analysis. The fracture toughness of thin W plate was measured in three-point bending. W plates were brazed with Cu foils to form a laminate. Crack arrest and crack bridging were observed in three-point bend tests of the laminate, and fracture resistance curves were successfully calculated for this DPT composite. An analytical model of crack bridging was developed using the basis described by Chao in previous work by the group. The model uses the specimen geometry, matrix properties, and the stress-displacement function of a ductile reinforcement ("bridging law") to calculate the fracture resistance curve (R-curve) and load-displacement curve (P-D curve) for any test specimen geometry. The code was also implemented to estimate the bridging law of an arbitrary composite using R-curve data

  6. Weld bead reinforcement removal: A method of improving the strength and ductility of peaked welds in 2219-T87 aluminum alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study to determine the degree to which the ductility and tensile properties of peaked welds could be enhanced by removing the reinforcing bead and fairing the weld nugget into the adjacent parent metal are presented. The study employed 2219-T87 aluminum alloy plate, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and 2319 filler wire. The study concluded that significant improvements in peak weld, ultimate strength, and ductility can be obtained through removal and fairing of the weld reinforcing bead. The specimens so treated and tested in this program exhibited ultimate strength improvements of 2 to 3 percent for peak angles of 5.8 to 10 degrees and 10 to 22 percent for welds with peak angles of 11.7 to 16.9 degrees. It was also determined that removal of the weld bead enhanced the ability of peaked welds to straighten when exposed to cyclic loading at stress levels above the yield strength.

  7. Ductility Characterization of U-6Nb and Ta-W Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T; Cervantes, O

    2006-09-15

    We have previously evaluated the ductility behaviors of U-6Nb and pure Ta. One important observation was that both alloys have very stable necking ductility independent of test conditions. In contrast, uniform ductility varied significantly depending upon strain rates and temperatures. In general, higher strain rate and lower temperature reduce the uniform ductility. Using literature data, we have developed two dynamic ductility models to predict the ductility behaviors of pure-Ta and water-quenched U-6Nb respectively under extreme conditions. In this study we further evaluate the aging effect on U-6Nb and the W-addition effect on Ta. For U-6Nb, the objective is to determine whether or not the ductility degradation by low-temperature aging mostly measured in quasi-static condition can still be observed under dynamic loading (high strain rate) condition. For Ta-W alloys, the focus is to identify the key control parameter so that the optimal condition of high-strength/high-ductility of Ta-10W can be achieved for certain defense-related applications.

  8. Ductile Binder Phase For Use With Almgb14 And Other Hard Ceramic Materials

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Bruce A.; Russell, Alan; Harringa, Joel

    2005-07-26

    This invention relates to a ductile binder phase for use with AlMgB14 and other hard materials. The ductile binder phase, a cobalt-manganese alloy, is used in appropriate quantities to tailor good hardness and reasonable fracture toughness for hard materials so they can be used suitably in industrial machining and grinding applications.

  9. High post-irradiation ductility thermomechanical treatment for precipitation strengthened austenitic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Laidler, James J.; Borisch, Ronald R.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1982-01-01

    A method for improving the post-irradiation ductility is described which prises a solution heat treatment following which the materials are cold worked. They are included to demonstrate the beneficial effect of this treatment on the swelling resistance and the ductility of these austenitic precipitation hardenable alloys.

  10. Ductile tungsten-nickel alloy and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Jr., William B.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a ductile, high-density tungsten-nickel alloy which possesses a tensile strength in the range of 100,000 to 140,000 psi and a tensile elongation of 3.1 to 16.5 percent in 1 inch at 25.degree.C. This alloy is prepared by the steps of liquid phase sintering a mixture of tungsten-0.5 to 10.0 weight percent nickel, heat treating the alloy at a temperature above the ordering temperature of approximately 970.degree.C. to stabilize the matrix phase, and thereafter rapidly quenching the alloy in a suitable liquid to maintain the matrix phase in a metastable, face-centered cubic, solid- solution of tungsten in nickel.

  11. The Brittle-Ductile Transition - A Self-Consistent Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, B.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Ord, A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in the Earth is commonly viewed as a switch between two different constitutive behaviors, plastic and viscous, and is represented in models by various formulations. We show that thermal-mechanical coupling leads to a self consistent view where the BDT emerges naturally within one constitutive framework once a critical temperature is attained. Viscous folding occurs above this temperature and brittle fracturing below. Seismic activity is maximised at the BDT. Orogenesis emerges as a thermal-mechanical decoupling near the BDT during flexing of the lithosphere with the development of "crocodile" -like structures, fold-nappe systems and far-travelled thrust sheets. For quartz- feldspar composite materials this transition lies in a critical range of 500 K to 580 K.

  12. Ductile damage of porous materials with two populations of voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Pierre-Guy; Monerie, Yann; Suquet, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    This study is devoted to the modelling of ductile damage in uranium dioxide. This polycrystalline material contains two populations of voids of well separated size. The problem addressed here is the prediction of the effective flow surface of a Gurson material containing randomly oriented oblate voids. The case of spherical voids is considered first and the variational approach of Gurson is generalized by adding a compressible component to his original velocity field. The case of aligned oblate voids is then considered and a suitable generalization of a velocity field due to Gologanu et al. (ASME J. Engrg. Mater. Technol. 116 (1994) 290-297) is proposed. The extension to randomly oriented voids is achieved by averaging over all orientations. In each case, rigorous upper bounds and approximate estimates are derived and compared (in the case of spherical voids) with Finite Element simulations. To cite this article: P.-G. Vincent et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  13. Tensile properties of austempered ductile iron under thermomechanical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achary, J.

    2000-02-01

    A new processing method was investigated for improving the strength and elongation of austempered ductile iron (ADI) by grain refinement of parent austenite using thermomechanical treatment. The material was deformed at the austenitization temperature by single and multipass rolling before the austempering treatment. The effects of the amount of deformation, austenitization temperature, austempering temperatures, reaustenitization, and secondary deformation on the tensile properties were studied. The properties obtained using the method were compared with those of the ASTM standards. The effect of deformation on the graphite shape was also studied. Tensile strength/yield strength/elongation values were found to increase with increasing austenite deformation up to 40% and then to start decreasing. Tensile strength/yield strength and elongation values of 1700 MPa/1300 MPa/5% and 1350 MPa/920 MPa/15% can be achieved with this method in the ranges of variables studied.

  14. Tensile properties of austempered ductile iron under thermomechanical treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Achary, J.

    2000-02-01

    A new processing method was investigated for improving the strength and elongation of austempered ductile iron (ADI) by grain refinement of parent austenite using thermomechanical treatment. The material was deformed at the austenitization temperature by single and multipass rolling before the austempering treatment. The effects of the amount of deformation, austenitization temperature, austempering temperatures, reaustenitization, and secondary deformation on the tensile properties were studied. The properties obtained using the method were compared with those of the ASTM standards. The effect of deformation on the graphite shape was also studied. Tensile strength/yield strength/elongation values were found to increase with increasing austenite deformation up to 40% and then to start decreasing. Tensile strength/yield strength and elongation values of 1,700 MPa/1,300 MPa/5% and 1,350 MPa/920 MPa/15% can be achieved with this method in the ranges of variables studied.

  15. Development of ductile high-strength chromium alloys, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippi, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Strength and ductility were evaluated for chromium alloys dispersion hardened with the putative TaC, TaB, CbC, and CbB compounds. TaC and TaB proved to be the most potent strengtheners, but when combined, their effect far outweighed that produced individually. Tests at 1422 K (2100 F) on an alloy containing these two compounds at the combined level of 0.5 m/o revealed a 495 MN/sq m (70 ksi) tensile strength for wrought material, and a 100 hour rupture strength of 208 MN/sq m (30 ksi) when solution annealed and aged to maximize creep resistance. These levels of high temperature strength greatly exceed that reported for any other chromium-base alloy. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the two phase strengthened alloy occurred at approximately 588 K (600 F) when heat treated to optimize creep strength and was not improved by fabrication to produce a wrought and recovered microstructure. The lowest DBTT measured on any of the alloys investigated was 422 K (300 F). Strengthening phases actually formed in Cr-Ta-B and Cr-Cb-B compositions are probable M2CrB2 (M=Ta or Cb) compounds of tetragonal crystal structure. The likely habit relationship between these compounds and chromium is postulated. Cube habit coherency was identified for TaC precipitation in chromium by electron microscopy. In another study, the maximum solubility of carbon in chromium was indicated to lie between 3/4 and 1 a/o and that of boron to be 1/2 a/o.

  16. Boudinage and folding as an energy instability in ductile deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Herwegh, Marco; Paesold, Martin K.; Poulet, Thomas; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Veveakis, Manolis

    2016-05-01

    We present a theory for the onset of localization in layered rate- and temperature-sensitive rocks, in which energy-related mechanical bifurcations lead to localized dissipation patterns in the transient deformation regime. The implementation of the coupled thermomechanical 2-D finite element model comprises an elastic and rate-dependent von Mises plastic rheology. The underlying system of equations is solved in a three-layer pure shear box, for constant velocity and isothermal boundary conditions. To examine the transition from stable to localized creep, we study how material instabilities are related to energy bifurcations, which arise independently of the sign of the stress conditions imposed on opposite boundaries, whether in compression or extension. The onset of localization is controlled by a critical amount of dissipation, termed Gruntfest number, when dissipative work by temperature-sensitive creep translated into heat overcomes the diffusive capacity of the layer. Through an additional mathematical bifurcation analysis using constant stress boundary conditions, we verify that boudinage and folding develop at the same critical Gruntfest number. Since the critical material parameters and boundary conditions for both structures to develop are found to coincide, the initiation of localized deformation in strong layered media within a weaker matrix can be captured by a unified theory for localization in ductile materials. In this energy framework, neither intrinsic nor extrinsic material weaknesses are required, because the nucleation process of strain localization arises out of steady state conditions. This finding allows us to describe boudinage and folding structures as the same energy attractor of ductile deformation.

  17. Kinetic Ductility and Force-Spike Resistance of Proteins from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cossio, Pilar; Hummer, Gerhard; Szabo, Attila

    2016-08-23

    Ductile materials can absorb spikes in mechanical force, whereas brittle ones fail catastrophically. Here we develop a theory to quantify the kinetic ductility of single molecules from force spectroscopy experiments, relating force-spike resistance to the differential responses of the intact protein and the unfolding transition state to an applied mechanical force. We introduce a class of unistable one-dimensional potential surfaces that encompass previous models as special cases and continuously cover the entire range from ductile to brittle. Compact analytic expressions for force-dependent rates and rupture-force distributions allow us to analyze force-clamp and force-ramp pulling experiments. We find that the force-transmitting protein domains of filamin and titin are kinetically ductile when pulled from their two termini, making them resistant to force spikes. For the mechanostable muscle protein titin, a highly ductile model reconciles data over 10 orders of magnitude in force loading rate from experiment and simulation.

  18. Kinetic Ductility and Force-Spike Resistance of Proteins from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cossio, Pilar; Hummer, Gerhard; Szabo, Attila

    2016-08-23

    Ductile materials can absorb spikes in mechanical force, whereas brittle ones fail catastrophically. Here we develop a theory to quantify the kinetic ductility of single molecules from force spectroscopy experiments, relating force-spike resistance to the differential responses of the intact protein and the unfolding transition state to an applied mechanical force. We introduce a class of unistable one-dimensional potential surfaces that encompass previous models as special cases and continuously cover the entire range from ductile to brittle. Compact analytic expressions for force-dependent rates and rupture-force distributions allow us to analyze force-clamp and force-ramp pulling experiments. We find that the force-transmitting protein domains of filamin and titin are kinetically ductile when pulled from their two termini, making them resistant to force spikes. For the mechanostable muscle protein titin, a highly ductile model reconciles data over 10 orders of magnitude in force loading rate from experiment and simulation. PMID:27558726

  19. Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, L.E.; Carciello, N.R.

    1985-11-05

    This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80/sup 0/C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5 to 5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150/sup 0/C to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2 x 10/sup 5/ gave improved ductility modulus effect.

  20. Thermal activation of crack-tip plasticity: The brittle or ductile response of a stationary crack loaded to failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmaier, Alexander; Gumbsch, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Metals with a body centered cubic crystal structure, like tungsten, exhibit a pronounced semibrittle regime at intermediate temperatures. In this regime their fracture toughness strongly depends on loading rate and temperature. Crack-tip plasticity has been studied with two-dimensional numerical simulations on different length scales. The method of discrete dislocation dynamics has been employed to test various assumptions made on the deformation mechanisms and the origin of the strong loading rate and temperature dependence of fracture toughness in this regime. A continuum elasticity-viscoplasticity model capable of describing larger plastic deformations yields complementary information with respect to the discrete dislocation method. Despite of their fundamental differences, both simulations consistently show that crack-tip plasticity can be described as a time-dependent microplastic deformation with well-defined activation energy and that the blunting of the crack tip plays an important role for the transition from semibrittle to ductile behavior. Based on general findings of the numerical simulations an Arrheniuslike relation between loading rate and temperature at points of constant fracture toughness is derived. This scaling relation shows the dominance of dislocation mobility as the rate limiting factor for fracture toughness and for the brittle-to-ductile transition itself. The results of our simulations are also consistent with experimental data gathered on tungsten single crystals. Thus, the proposed scaling relation can be used to predict fracture toughnesses in a wide range of temperatures and loading rates, based on only a small number of experiments.

  1. Prompt neutron multiplicities for the transplutonium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Zucker, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The direct determination of the average prompt neutron emission values is reviewed, and a method of comparing different sites of neutron emission multiplicity distribution values is described. Measured and recommended values are tabulated for these nuclides: /sup 241/Am, /sup 242/Am, /sup 242/Cm, /sup 243/Cm, /sup 244/Cm, /sup 246/Cm, /sup 247/Cm, /sup 248/Cm, /sup 250/Cm, /sup 245/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 246/Cf, /sup 249/Cf, /sup 250/Cf, /sup 252/Cf, /sup 254/Cf, /sup 251/Cf, /sup 253/Es, /sup 254/Es, /sup 244/Fm, /sup 246/Fm, /sup 255/Fm, /sup 252/No, /sup 254/Fm, /sup 256/Fm, /sup 257/Fm. 59 refs., 24 tabs. (LEW)

  2. Spectroscopy of trans-plutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, E.F.; Conway, J.G.; Blaise, J.

    1993-12-31

    Investigations of the emission spectra of the neutral and singly ionized atoms of the heavy actinides have been in progress since the early 1960`s in an association that used instrumentation and heavy element facilities from five laboratories. The level analyses have led to considerable understanding of the electronic structure of the elements Am to Es. When combined with the structure of the lighter actinides, a picture of the 5f{sup n}7s{sup 2} configuration increased stability as the series is ascended arises when the lowest level of known electronic configurations is plotted versus atomic number. A similar plot including the lanthanides shows how the actinides become more lanthanide in nature before the center of the series. Actinide chemical and physical properties have shown this before spectroscopic determination of the electronic configurations relative energies was accomplished. L. Brewer has used this knowledge to estimate relative energies of electronic configurations where spectroscopic values were not available.

  3. The second Sandia Fracture Challenge. Predictions of ductile failure under quasi-static and moderate-rate dynamic loading

    DOE PAGES

    Boyce, B. L.; Kramer, S. L. B.; Bosiljevac, T. R.; Corona, E.; Moore, J. A.; Elkhodary, K.; Simha, C. H. M.; Williams, B. W.; Cerrone, A. R.; Nonn, A.; et al

    2016-03-14

    Ductile failure of structural metals is relevant to a wide range of engineering scenarios. Computational methods are employed to anticipate the critical conditions of failure, yet they sometimes provide inaccurate and misleading predictions. Challenge scenarios, such as the one presented in the current work, provide an opportunity to assess the blind, quantitative predictive ability of simulation methods against a previously unseen failure problem. Instead of evaluating the predictions of a single simulation approach, the Sandia Fracture Challenge relied on numerous volunteer teams with expertise in computational mechanics to apply a broad range of computational methods, numerical algorithms, and constitutive modelsmore » to the challenge. This exercise is intended to evaluate the state of health of technologies available for failure prediction. In the first Sandia Fracture Challenge, a wide range of issues were raised in ductile failure modeling, including a lack of consistency in failure models, the importance of shear calibration data, and difficulties in quantifying the uncertainty of prediction [see Boyce et al. (Int J Fract 186:5–68, 2014) for details of these observations]. This second Sandia Fracture Challenge investigated the ductile rupture of a Ti–6Al–4V sheet under both quasi-static and modest-rate dynamic loading (failure in ~ 0.1 s). Like the previous challenge, the sheet had an unusual arrangement of notches and holes that added geometric complexity and fostered a competition between tensile- and shear-dominated failure modes. The teams were asked to predict the fracture path and quantitative far-field failure metrics such as the peak force and displacement to cause crack initiation. Fourteen teams contributed blind predictions, and the experimental outcomes were quantified in three independent test labs. In addition, shortcomings were revealed in this second challenge such as inconsistency in the application of appropriate boundary

  4. Ceramic composites with a ductile Ni{sub 3}Al binder phase

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B.; Plucknett, K.P.; Menchhofer, P.A.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1995-06-01

    Composites using B-doped ductile Ni{sub 3}Al alloys were produced with both non-oxide (WC, TiC) and oxide (Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}) ceramic powders. Typical powder processing techniques were used to fabricate materials with ceramic contents from 0-95 vol. %. The microstructural morphology of the composites depends primarily on the wetting behavior between the alloys and the ceramic powders. The non-oxide ceramic powders wet well and the Ni{sub 3}Al alloys form a semi-continuous intergranular phase. On the other hand, the Ni{sub 3}Al alloys do not wet the oxide powders well and tend to form discrete ``islands`` of the metallic phase. Wetting in these materials can be improved by the addition of non-oxide particles, such as TiC. Results on the mechanical properties showed ambient temperature flexural strength similar to other Ni-based hardmetals. In contrast to the WC-Co materials, the flexural strength is retained to temperatures of at least 800 C. The fracture toughness and hardness were found to be equal or higher than comparable Co-based hardmetal systems. Initial corrosion tests showed excellent resistance to acid solutions.

  5. Hot Ductility Behavior of Boron Containing Microalloyed Steels with Varying Manganese Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Tobias; Senk, Dieter; Walpot, Raphael; Steenken, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The hot ductility is measured for six different steel grades with different microalloying elements and with varying manganese contents using the hot tensile test machine with melting/solidification unit at the Department of Ferrous Metallurgy RWTH Aachen University. To identify the influence of manganese on hot ductility, tests are performed with varying the manganese content from 0.7 to 18.2 wt pct, a high manganese steel. Additionally, the effect of different cooling and strain rates is analyzed by changing the particular rate for selected samples in the minima. To investigate and detect the cause of cracking during testing, the fracture surfaces in the ductility minima are considered with scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thermodynamic modeling is conducted on basis of the commercial software ThermoCalc©. A sharp decrease of the hot ductility is recognizable at 1398 K (1125 °C), at only 0.7 wt pct manganese because of the low manganese to sulfur ratio. The grades with a Mn content up to 1.9 wt pct show a good ductility with minimal ductility loss. In comparison, the steel grade with 18.2 wt pct has a poor hot ductility. Because of the formation of complex precipitates, where several alloying elements are involved, the influence of boron on hot ductility is not fully clarified. By increasing the cooling rate, the reduction of area values are shifted to smaller values. For high test temperatures, these measured values are decreased for lower strain rates. Thereby, an early drop of the ductility is noticeable for the high temperatures around 1373 K (1100 °C).

  6. Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) for Development of EGS Reservoirs in Ductile Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, H.; Muraoka, H.; Tsuchiya, N.; Ito, H.

    2012-12-01

    EGS (Enhanced Geothermal System) geothermal has been identified as a most promising method of geothermal development because of its potential applicability to a much wider range of sites, many of which have previously been considered to be unsuitable for geothermal development. Meanwhile, some critical problems with EGS technologies have been experimentally identified, such as low recovery of injected water, difficulties in establishing universal design/development methodologies, and the occurrence of induced seismicity, suggesting that there may be limitations in realizing EGS in earthquake-prone compression tectonic zones. We propose a new concept of engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile basement. This potentially has a number of advantages including: (a) simpler design and control of the reservoir, (b) nearly full recovery of injected water, (c) sustainable production, (d) lower cost when developed in relatively shallower ductile zones in compression tectonic settings, (e) large potential quantities of energy extraction from widely distributed ductile zones, (f) the establishment of a universal design/development methodology, and (g) suppression of felt earthquakes from/around the reservoirs. To further assess the potential of EGS reservoir development in ductile zones we have initiated the "Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP)". It is intended that the first few years of the JBBP will be spent in basic scientific investigation and necessary technology development, including studies on rock mechanics in the brittle/ductile regime, characterization of ductile rock masses, development of modeling methodologies/technologies, and investigations of induced/triggered earthquakes. We expect to drill a deep experimental borehole that will penetrate the ductile zone in northeast Japan after basic studies are completed. The feasibility of EGS reservoir development in the ductile zone will then be assessed through observations and

  7. Ductile Deformation of Dehydrating Serpentinite Evidenced by Acoustic Signal Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasc, J.; Hilairet, N.; Wang, Y.; Schubnel, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentinite dehydration is believed to be responsible for triggering earthquakes at intermediate depths (i.e., 60-300 km) in subduction zones. Based on experimental results, some authors have proposed mechanisms that explain how brittle deformation can occur despite high pressure and temperature conditions [1]. However, reproducing microseismicity in the laboratory associated with the deformation of dehydrating serpentinite remains challenging. A recent study showed that, even for fast dehydration kinetics, ductile deformation could take place rather than brittle faulting in the sample [2]. This latter study was conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus without the ability to control differential stress during dehydration. We have since conducted controlled deformation experiments in the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) on natural serpentinite samples at sector 13 (GSECARS) of the APS. Monochromatic radiation was used with both a 2D MAR-CCD detector and a CCD camera to determine the stress and the strain of the sample during the deformation process [3]. In addition, an Acoustic Emission (AE) recording setup was used to monitor the microseismicity from the sample, using piezo-ceramic transducers glued on the basal truncation of the anvils. The use of six independent transducers allows locating the AEs and calculating the corresponding focal mechanisms. The samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-5-10-4 s-1 under confining pressures of 3-5 GPa. Dehydration was triggered during the deformation by heating the samples at rates ranging from 5 to 60 K/min. Before the onset of the dehydration, X-ray diffraction data showed that the serpentinite sustained ~1 GPa of stress which plummeted when dehydration occurred. Although AEs were recorded during the compression and decompression stages, no AEs ever accompanied this stress drop, suggesting ductile deformation of the samples. Hence, unlike many previous studies, no evidence for fluid embrittlement and anticrack generation was found

  8. Quantifying Damage Accumulation During Ductile Plastic Deformation Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Robert M.; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2015-08-15

    Under this grant, we have developed and demonstrated the ability of near-field High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (nf-HEDM) to map crystal orientation fields over three dimensions in deformed polycrystalline materials. Experimental work was performed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at beamline 1-ID. Applications of this new capability to ductile deformation of copper and zirconium samples were demonstrated as was the comparison of the experimental observations to computational plasticity models using a fast Fourier transform based algorithm that is able to handle the large experimental data sets. No such spatially resolved, direct comparison between measured and computed microstructure evolutions had previously been possible. The impact of this work is reflected in numerous publications and presentations as well as in the investments by DOE and DOD laboratories of millions of dollars in applying the technique, developing sophisticated new hardware that allows the technique to be applied to a wide variety of materials and materials problems, and in the use of the technique by other researchers. In essence, the grant facilitated the development of a new form of three dimensional microscopy and its application to technologically critical states of polycrystalline materials that are used throughout the U.S. and world economies. On-going collaborative work is further optimizing experimental and computational facilities at the APS and is pursuing expanded facilities.

  9. Thermomechanical Fatigue of Ductile Cast Iron and Its Life Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; MacNeil, Ryan; Zhang, Zhong; Liu, Xiaoyang; Sloss, Clayton

    2015-06-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) behaviors of ductile cast iron (DCI) were investigated under out-of-phase (OP), in-phase (IP), and constrained strain-control conditions with temperature hold in various temperature ranges: 573 K to 1073 K, 723 K to 1073 K, and 433 K to 873 K (300 °C to 800 °C, 450 °C to 800 °C, and 160 °C to 600 °C). The integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT) model was incorporated into the finite element method to simulate the hysteresis behavior and predict the TMF life of DCI under those test conditions. With the consideration of four deformation/damage mechanisms: (i) plasticity-induced fatigue, (ii) intergranular embrittlement, (iii) creep, and (iv) oxidation, as revealed from the previous study on low cycle fatigue of the material, the model delineates the contributions of these physical mechanisms in the asymmetrical hysteresis behavior and the damage accumulation process leading to final TMF failure. This study shows that the ICFT model can simulate the stress-strain response and life of DCI under complex TMF loading profiles (OP and IP, and constrained with temperature hold).

  10. Review on symmetric structures in ductile shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumyajit

    2016-07-01

    Symmetric structures in ductile shear zones range widely in shapes and geneses. Matrix rheology, its flow pattern, its competency contrast with the clast, degree of slip of the clast, shear intensity and its variation across shear zone and deformation temperature, and degree of confinement of clast in shear zones affects (independently) the degree of symmetry of objects. Kinematic vorticity number is one of the parameters that govern tail geometry across clasts. For example, symmetric and nearly straight tails develop if the clast-matrix system underwent dominantly a pure shear/compression. Prolonged deformation and concomitant recrystallization can significantly change the degree of symmetry of clasts. Angular relation between two shear zones or between a shear zone and anisotropy determines fundamentally the degree of symmetry of lozenges. Symmetry of boudinaged clasts too depends on competency contrast between the matrix and clast in some cases, and on the degrees of slip of inter-boudin surfaces and pure shear. Parasitic folds and post-tectonic veins are usually symmetric.

  11. Thermoelastic-plastic flow and ductile fracture in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    The main aim of these lectures is to develop the theory of elastic-plastic flow in solids, with application to a particular class of processes, namely those in which the dissipation of plastic work cannot be neglected. Examples of such processes are highspeed impact phenomena and cratering, shock compression, often shock release as well, and explosive deformation and welding. An important part of the development is to include the anisotropic elastic properties of a solid, and for this reason the theory applies to solids in general. On the other hand, it is possible that some of the results will have limited validity for nonmetals. The secondary aim of the lectures is to develop a general framework for ductile fracture, and describe the current practice in the field. Our theory is incremental in nature and suitable for integrating along a process in small timesteps as is done in ''hydrodynamic'' computer programs. A notational conflict arose, because in continuum mechanics the extensive quantities are taken per unit mass, while in thermodynamics they are usually per unit volume. The continuum mechanics normalization, i.e., per unit mass, is used throughout, with the result that uncommon factors of density show up in the thermodynamic equations.

  12. Experiments on oblique rifting in brittle-ductile systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tron, Virginie; Brun, Jean-Pierre

    1991-03-01

    Oblique rifting arises when the bulk extension direction is not perpendicular to the boundaries of a deforming zone. Several scale experiments of oblique rifting acting on a brittle-ductile system are here presented. Models are two-layer slabs of sand and silicone. Uniaxial stretching is applied oblique to the external boundaries ( α = 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°). Resulting fault patterns are analysed on both the free surface and serial cross-sections. In the experiments oblique rifting is characterized by en-echelon fault patterns, mean fault trends not perpendicular to the stretching vector, and mean initial fault dips higher than for dip-slip normal faults. For low obliquity rifting (α ⩾ 45°) curved faults are frequent, displacement along them varying from dip-slip to dominantly strike-slip. For high obliquity rifting (α < 45°) motion is partitioned amongst distinct families of oblique-slip faults and strike-slip faults.

  13. Effects of microscale inertia on dynamic ductile crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, N.; Mercier, S.; Molinari, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of microscale inertia in dynamic ductile crack growth. A constitutive model for porous solids that accounts for dynamic effects due to void growth is proposed. The model has been implemented in a finite element code and simulations of crack growth in a notched bar and in an edge cracked specimen have been performed. Results are compared to predictions obtained via the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model where micro-inertia effects are not accounted for. It is found that microscale inertia has a significant influence on the crack growth. In particular, it is shown that micro-inertia plays an important role during the strain localisation process by impeding void growth. Therefore, the resulting damage accumulation occurs in a more progressive manner. For this reason, simulations based on the proposed modelling exhibit much less mesh sensitivity than those based on the viscoplastic GTN model. Microscale inertia is also found to lead to lower crack speeds. Effects of micro-inertia on fracture toughness are evaluated.

  14. Integrated modeling and heat treatment simulation of austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepp, E.; Hurevich, V.; Schäfer, W.

    2012-07-01

    The integrated modeling and simulation of the casting and heat treatment processes for producing austempered ductile iron (ADI) castings is presented. The focus is on describing different models to simulate the austenitization, quenching and austempering steps during ADI heat treatment. The starting point for the heat treatment simulation is the simulated microstructure after solidification and cooling. The austenitization model considers the transformation of the initial ferrite-pearlite matrix into austenite as well as the dissolution of graphite in austenite to attain a uniform carbon distribution. The quenching model is based on measured CCT diagrams. Measurements have been carried out to obtain these diagrams for different alloys with varying Cu, Ni and Mo contents. The austempering model includes nucleation and growth kinetics of the ADI matrix. The model of ADI nucleation is based on experimental measurements made for varied Cu, Ni, Mo contents and austempering temperatures. The ADI kinetic model uses a diffusion controlled approach to model the growth. The models have been integrated in a tool for casting process simulation. Results are shown for the optimization of the heat treatment process of a planetary carrier casting.

  15. A Brittle-Ductile Transition Preserved in the Sierra Crest Shear Zone, Sierra Nevada, CA: a Natural Laboratory for Examining Rheologically-Controlled Brittle and Ductile Deformation Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, S.; Paterson, S. R.; Hartman, S. M.; Jiang, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Sierra Crest shear zone (SCSZ), an ~300 km long Late Cretaceous dextral transpressive ductile-brittle shear system in the eastern central Sierra Nevada, CA partitioned tectonic boundary conditions during a fundamental rheological transition in the upper crust from ductile to brittle deformation due to the exhumation and cooling of the arc. The SCSZ represents a well-exposed and data-rich 'natural laboratory' to study the mechanisms driving evolving strain partitioning and rheology. The SCSZ transitioned from a broad swath of partitioned ductile shear zones, comprised of anastomosing simple shear dominated zones separated by pure shear dominated domains, to a complex partitioned brittle fault system, expressed as brittle slip, veining, brecciation, and pseudotachylyte formation along discrete structures, as arc magmatism shut down, the arc cooled, and exhumation rates increased. Previous studies have documented evolving deformation partitioning in the ductile system indicated by variable fabric development ranging from preserved bedding to mylonites, the spread of lineation orientations, and variable kinematics. Multi-generational brittle fabrics that are variably ductilely deformed and the orientation of 1st and 2nd order brittle structures, both concordant and discordant with ductile shears, indicate that partitioning also evolved during the complex rheological transition. Structural, strain, P-T-t, geochronologic, and field data provide controls on parameters (e.g. lithology, fluids, strain, preexisting structure, timing, P-T conditions) needed to model the development of the SCSZ in anisotropic crust undergoing a transition in rheology and tectonic boundary conditions. As rheological heterogeneity will lead to deformation partitioning throughout intervening scales, it is unrealistic to apply single scale models to this investigation. Thus, we propose to compare the above observations to predictions made by a model (MOPLA; Jiang, 2014) of progressive

  16. Ductility enhancement in NiAl (B2)-base alloys by microstructural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, K.; Kainuma, R.; Ueno, N.; Nishizawa, T.

    1991-02-01

    An attempt to improve ductility of NiAl (B2)-base alloys has been made by the addition of alloying elements and the control of microstructure. It has been found that a small amount of fcc γ phase formed by the addition of Fe, Co, and Cr has a drastic effect not only on the hot workability but also on the tensile ductility at room temperature. The enhancement in ductility is mainly due to the modification of Β-phase grains by the coexistence of γ phase. The effect of alloying elements on the hot forming ability is strongly related to the phase equilibria and partition behavior among γ, γ' (L12 structure), and Β phases in the Ni-Al-X alloy systems. The ductility-enhancement method shows promise for expanding the practical application of nickel aluminide.

  17. Ductile electroless Ni-P coating onto flexible printed circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenchang; Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Yurong; Mitsuzak, Naotoshi; Chen, Zhidong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a ductile electroless Ni-P coating on the flexible printed circuit board (FPCB) was prepared in an acidic nickel plating bath. The addition of dipropylamine (DPA) in electroless plating not only improves the ductility of the Ni-P coating, but also enhances the corrosion resistance. The further analysis reveals that the ductility improvement and enhancement of corrosion resistance for the Ni-P coating may be due to the fact that the addition of DPA significantly refines the volume of columnar nodule and reduce the porosity, thus leading to the released internal stress. In addition, it was found that the nodule within the Ni-P coating grew into a columnar structure, which may be also contribute to the improvement of ductility.

  18. Evidence for lower crustal ductile strain localization in southern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.D.; Prescott, W.H.; Krueger, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Historic triangulation data have been analysed to determine whether intraplate seismicity is associated with ongoing ductile deformation in the lower crust. The model we have attempted to test is basically analogous to strain accumulation and release along plate-boundary strike-slip faults like the San Andreas Fault in California. That is, beneath an elastic-seismogenic upper crust ???20 km thick, strain is preferentially localized within ductile shear zones in the lower crust due to broad-scale plate driving forces. The localized lower-crustal ductile strain causes stress and strain to accumulate elastically in the brittle crust which is eventually released in crustal earthquakes. At greater depths, this localized shear deformation probably develops into pervasive ductile flow. Numerous geodetic measurements along the San Andreas Fault confirm that earthquakes in the brittle upper crust are produced by the release of elastic strain that results from ongoing ductile shear or slip in the lower crust1,2. We have found evidence of high rates of crustal deformation in southern New York which suggest that localized ductile shear is occurring in the lower crust. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  19. Effects of Pore Distributions on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) Magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility. The results in this study show that the ductility monotonically decreases as the pore volume fraction increases and that the effect of ‘skin region’ on the ductility is noticeable under the condition of same local pore volume fraction in the center region of the sample and its existence can be beneficial for the improvement of ductility. The further synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element analyses are planned to investigate the effects of pore size and pore size distribution.

  20. Effect of foundation flexibility on ductility reduction factors for R/C stack-like structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabian, Amir M.; Kabiri, Shabnam

    2011-06-01

    The most important parameter used to determine force reduction factors in force-based design procedures adopted in the current seismic codes is the structural ductility. For a structure supported on a flexible foundation, the ductility factor could be affected by foundation compliances. The ductility factors given in the current codes are mostly assigned ignoring the effect of SSI and therefore the objective of this research is to assess the significance of SSI phenomenon on ductility factors of stack-like structures. The deformed configuration of stack-like structures is idealized as an assemblage of beam elements considering nonlinear moment-curvature relations, while a linear sway-rocking model was implemented to model the supporting soil. Using a set of artificial records, repeated linear and nonlinear analyses were performed by gradually increasing the intensity of acceleration to a level where the first yielding of steel in linear and nonlinear analyses is observed and a level corresponding to the stack collapse in the nonlinear analysis. The difference between inelastic and elastic resistance in terms of displacement ductility factors has been quantified. The results indicate that foundation flexibility can decrease the ductility of the system and neglecting this phenomenon may lead to erroneous conclusions in the prediction of the seismic performance of flexibly-supported R/C stack-like structures.

  1. The effect of alloy elements on the microstructure and properties of austempered ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, B.Y.; Chen, E.T.; Lei, T.S.

    1995-05-01

    Ductile cast iron has already demonstrated excellent mechanical properties. If given proper austempering, it can exhibit even more outstanding characteristics. The process of austempering for ductile cast iron is similar to steel, and requires an adequate completely, and then rapidly quenching the austenitizing temperature allowing the matrix of ductile iron to be austenitized completely, and then rapidly quenching the austenitized ductile iron down to 300 C--400 C. Caution is required to prevent austenite from transforming into proeutectoid ferrite or pearlite. Finally, the ductile iron must be kept in an isothermal condition for a proper length of time. Many kinds of experimental techniques such as quantitative metallography, magnetic change, dilatometry, X-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity change etc., may be used to measure the phase transformation during the austempering of ductile irons. However, the method of measuring the change of electrical resistivity, not only provides continuous and complete data, but also the time to start and to finish for both stages of the reaction can be significantly determined. In this paper, the effect of alloy elements on the microstructure and property of ADI was investigated. First, the specimens containing Mn, Cu, Ni and Mo were made separately, then a PC-controlled vacuum heat treating system was used for the heat treatments.

  2. Effect of inclusion density on ductile fracture toughness and roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Ponson, L.; Osovski, S.; Bouchaud, E.; Tvergaard, V.; Needleman, A.

    2014-02-01

    Three dimensional calculations of ductile fracture under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitating solid with two populations of void nucleating second phase particles. Larger inclusions that result in void nucleation at an early stage are modeled discretely while smaller particles that require large strains to nucleate voids are homogeneously distributed. Full field solutions are obtained for eight volume fractions, ranging from 1% to 19%, of randomly distributed larger inclusions. For each volume fraction calculations are carried out for seven random distributions of inclusion centers. Crack growth resistance curves and fracture surface roughness statistics are calculated using standard procedures. The crack growth resistance is characterized in terms of both JIC and the tearing modulus TR. For all volume fractions considered, the computed fracture surfaces are self-affine over a size range of nearly two orders of magnitude with a microstructure independent roughness exponent of 0.53 with a standard error of 0.0023. The cut-off length of the scale invariant regime is found to depend on the inclusion volume fraction. Consideration of the full statistics of the fracture surface roughness revealed other parameters that vary with inclusion volume fraction. For smaller values of the discretely modeled inclusion volume fraction (≤7%), there is a linear correlation between several measures of fracture surface roughness and both JIC and TR. In this regime crack growth is dominated by a void-by-void process. For greater values of the discretely modeled inclusion volume fraction, crack growth mainly involves multiple void interactions and no such correlation is found.

  3. Design of engineered cementitious composites for ductile seismic resistant elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Tetsushi

    This dissertation focuses on designing Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) to achieve high performance seismic resistant elements. To attain this goal, three major tasks have been accomplished. Task 1 aims at achieving new ECCs involving low cost fiber, which often involve fiber rupture in crack bridging, thus named as "Fiber Rupture Type ECC". Achieving the new ECC requires a new practical and comprehensive composite design theory. For this theory, single fiber behavior was first investigated. Specifically, fiber rupture in composite and chemical bond in fiber/matrix interface were experimentally examined and mathematically modeled. Then this model for single fiber behavior was implemented into a proposed bridging law, a theoretical model for relationship between fiber bridging stress of composite and Crack Opening Displacement (COD). This new bridging law was finally employed to establish a new composite design theory. Task 2 was initiated to facilitate structural interpretation of ECC's material behavior investigated in Task 1. For this purpose, uniaxial tensile behavior, one of the most important ECC's properties, was theoretically characterized with stress-strain relation from micromechanics view point. As a result, a theory is proposed to express ECC's tensile stress-strain relation in terms of micromechanics parameters of composites, such as bond strengths. Task 3 primarily demonstrates an integrated design scheme for ductile seismic elements that covers from micromechanics in single fiber level to structural design tool, such as with non-linear FEM analysis. The significance of this design scheme is that the influences of ECC's microstructure on element's structural performance is quantitatively captured. This means that a powerful tool is obtained for tailoring constitutive micromechanics parameters in order to maximize structural performance of elements. While the tool is still preliminary, completing this tool in future studies will enable one to

  4. Kinetic Study of the Austempering Reactions in Ductile Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, M. J.; Cisneros, M. M.; Almanza, E.; Haro, S.

    2012-11-01

    Kinetics of the reaction that occur during the austempering heat treatment in unalloyed and alloyed ductile irons with 1Cu-0.25Mo, 1Ni-0.25Mo, and 0.7Cu-1Ni-0.25Mo, was studied. The austenitization and austempering cycles were achieved by isothermal dilatometry in cylindrical samples of 2 mm in diameter and 12 mm in length. The specimens were austenitized at 870 °C for 120 min, followed by isothermal holding for 300 min at temperatures between 270 and 420 °C. Kinetic parameters such as the order of reaction " n" and the rate of reaction " k" were calculated using the Johnson-Mehl equation while the empirical activation energy was calculated by means of the Arrhenius equation. It was found that the values of " k" decreased with the addition of Cu, Ni, and Mo as well as with the reduction of the isothermal temperature. The activation energy changes with the austempering temperature, in the range 30,348-58,250 J/mol when the heat treatment was carried out between 370 and 420 °C and 10,336-26,683 J/mol when the temperature varied from 270 to 350 °C. The microstructures in samples austempered at 370 and 315 °C were observed by transmission electron microscopy. No carbides precipitation was observed on samples heat treated at 370 °C for less than 120 min, while at 315 °C carbides of hexagonal structure ɛ(Fe2.4C) were found from the beginning of the transformation. The smallest value of activation energy and a slower kinetic transformation seem to be related with the presence of a carbide phase. Additionally, the time results obtained for transformation fractions of 0.05 and 0.95 by the dilatometry analysis were used to build the temperature-time-transformation diagrams for the irons.

  5. Possible transient creep events in a brittle-ductile continental crust: observations, experiments and potential models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavier, Luc

    2016-04-01

    In a given tectonic province and over thousands to millions of years, slip on faults is believed to be constant and approximately equal to the local tectonic rate in agreement with rigid plate tectonic theory. In this model the ductile lower crust flows in response to this steady plate motion. Moreover brittle and ductile behaviors interact only at a sharp boundary defined as the brittle ductile transition (BDT). However in the continental lithosphere brittle and ductile behavior may coexist over a large range of pressure and temperature conditions for different mineral compositions. This generates heterogeneities in the brittle and ductile crust that are often ignored in models of shear zones. We hypothesize that the interaction between brittle (elastic) and ductile (viscous) behavior may cause deviations from steady-state slip and generates transient creep events on shear zones that release many meters of creep over years to thousands of years marked by a single period of tectonic activity followed by quiescence. We present a set of numerical and analytical models, analogue experiments as well as some observations in nature that may support this hypothesis. In this presentation we extend an analytic formulation to model creep events within shear zones at the transition between brittle and ductile behavior in the crust. We assume that creep events are triggered by a set of interconnected fractures modeled as propagating dislocations. The amount of connectivity controls the nature and the intensity of the transient creep events. The shear zone behaves as a forced damped oscillator that can release strain accumulated during jammed/locked periods. The creep can be over-, critically-, or under-damped. The time scale of the events may vary between seconds to thousands of years depending on the viscous, elastic and plastic (fractures) properties of the shear zone.

  6. Hot Ductility Characterization of Sanicro-28 Super-Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, A.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Abedi, H. R.

    2016-05-01

    The hot ductility behavior of a super-austenitic stainless steel has been studied using tensile testing method in the temperature range from 1073 K to 1373 K (800 °C to 1100 °C) under the strain rates of 0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 s-1. The hot compression tests were also performed at the same deformation condition to identify the activated restoration mechanisms. At lower temperatures [ i.e., 1073 K and 1173 K (800 °C and 900 °C)], the serration of initial grain boundaries confirms the occurrence of dynamic recovery as the predominant restoration process. However, in the course of applied deformation, the initial microstructure is recrystallized at higher temperatures [ i.e., 1273 K and 1373 K (1000 °C and 1100 °C)]. In this respect, annealing the twin boundaries could well stimulate the recrystallization kinetic through initiation new annealing twins on prior annealing twin boundaries. The hot tensile results show that there is a general trend of increasing ductility by temperature. However, two regions of ductility drop are recognized at 1273 K and 1373 K (1000°C)/0.1s-1 and (1100°C)/0.01s-1. The ductility variations at different conditions of temperature and strain rate are discussed in terms of simultaneous activation of grain boundary sliding and restoration processes. The observed ductility troughs are attributed to the occurrence of grain boundary sliding and the resulting R-type and W-type cracks. The occurrence of dynamic recrystallization is also considered as the main factor increasing the ductility at higher temperatures. The enhanced ductility is primarily originated from the post-uniform elongation behavior, which is directly associated with the strain rate sensitivity of the experimental material.

  7. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of a Wear-Resistant Alloyed Ductile Iron Austempered at Various Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Junjun; Chen, Liqing

    2015-08-01

    To further improve the mechanical performance of a new type of alloyed bainitic wear-resistant ductile iron, the effects of the various austempering temperatures have been investigated on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of alloyed ductile iron Fe-3.50C-1.95Si-3.58Ni-0.71Cu-0.92Mo-0.65Cr-0.36Mn (in weight percent). This alloyed ductile iron were firstly austenitized at 1123 K (850 °C) for 1 hour and then austempered in a salt bath at 548 K, 573 K, and 598 K (275 °C, 300 °C, and 325 °C) for 2 hours according to time-temperature-transformation diagram calculated by JMatPro software. The microstructures of austempered wear-resistant ductile irons consist of matrix of dark needle-like ferrite plus bright etching austenite and some amount of martensite and some dispersed graphite nodules. With increasing the austempering temperature, the amount of ferrite decreases in austempered ductile iron, while the amount of austenite and carbon content of austenite increases. There is a gradual decrease in hardness and increase in compressive strength with increasing austempering temperature. The increased austenite content and coarsened austenite and ferrite can lead to a hardness decrease as austempering temperature is increased. The increased compressive strength can be attributed to a decreased amount of martensitic transformation. The alloyed ductile iron behaves rather well wear resistance when the austempering is carried out at 598 K (325 °C) for 2 hours. Under the condition of wear test by dry sand/rubber wheel, the wear mechanisms of austempered ductile irons are both micro-cutting and plastic deformation.

  8. Effects of Copper and Austempering on Corrosion Behavior of Ductile Iron in 3.5 Pct Sodium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Kuan-Ting

    2013-10-01

    Although alloying and heat treatments are common industrial practices to obtain ductile irons with desired mechanical properties, related information on how the two practices affect corrosion behavior is scarce. In this study, two ductile irons—with and without 1 wt pct copper addition—were austempered to obtain austempered ductile irons (ADIs). Polarization tests and salt spray tests were conducted to explore how both copper-alloying and austempering heat treatments influenced the corrosion behavior of ductile irons. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of 1 wt pct copper-alloyed ductile iron was better than that of the unalloyed one, while ADI had improved corrosion resistance compared with the as-cast. In particular, the ductile iron combined with the copper-alloying and austempering treatments increased the corrosion inhibition efficiency up to 84 pct as tested in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution.

  9. Scanning-electron-microscope study of normal-impingement erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the erosion of annealed copper and aluminum surfaces produced by both single- and multiple-particle impacts. Macroscopic 3.2 mm diameter steel balls and microscopic, brittle erodant particles were projected by a gas gun system so as to impact at normal incidence at speeds up to 140 m/sec. During the impacts by the brittle erodant particles, at lower speeds the erosion behavior was similar to that observed for the larger steel balls. At higher velocities, particle fragmentation and the subsequent cutting by the radial wash of debris created a marked change in the erosion mechanism.

  10. Ductile grinding of silicon carbide as a production method for reflective optics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, W.K.

    1993-11-01

    Ductile regime grinding or shear-mode grinding is an enabling technology that is finding application in the optics manufacturing industry. By definition, ductile removal occurs when the scale of machining is conducted below a material-dependent critical dimension or chip size. Much of the interest in ductile grinding resides in manufacturing glass optics, which experience brittle-ductile transition at {approximately}10 nm. Silicon carbide has a critical dimension that is on the order of 100--200 nm, making it a more attractive candidate for the technology. Preliminary results from an on-axis chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC sphere (f/14) indicate 317 {Angstrom} surface roughness and 0.96 wave P-V figure were achieved with this manufacturing method. Surface finish, interferometric measured figure and BRDF scatter results are presented from ductile regime grinding of 40 and 75 mm flats of CVD silicon carbide, bare reaction bonded SiC (RBSiC) and uniaxial hot-pressed SiC (HPSiC).

  11. Evading the strength–ductility trade-off dilemma in steel through gradient hierarchical nanotwins

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yujie; Li, Yongqiang; Zhu, Lianchun; Liu, Yao; Lei, Xianqi; Wang, Gang; Wu, Yanxin; Mi, Zhenli; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Huajian

    2014-01-01

    The strength–ductility trade-off has been a long-standing dilemma in materials science. This has limited the potential of many structural materials, steels in particular. Here we report a way of enhancing the strength of twinning-induced plasticity steel at no ductility trade-off. After applying torsion to cylindrical twinning-induced plasticity steel samples to generate a gradient nanotwinned structure along the radial direction, we find that the yielding strength of the material can be doubled at no reduction in ductility. It is shown that this evasion of strength–ductility trade-off is due to the formation of a gradient hierarchical nanotwinned structure during pre-torsion and subsequent tensile deformation. A series of finite element simulations based on crystal plasticity are performed to understand why the gradient twin structure can cause strengthening and ductility retention, and how sequential torsion and tension lead to the observed hierarchical nanotwinned structure through activation of different twinning systems. PMID:24686581

  12. Microtopography for Ductile Fracture Process Characterization - Part 1: Theory and Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Wilson Randolph

    2003-02-01

    The mechanics of ductile fracture is receiving increased focus as the importance of integrity of structures constructed from ductile materials is increasing. The non-linear, irreversible mechanical response of ductile materials makes generalized models of ductile cracking very difficult to develop. Therefore, research and testing of ductile fracture have taken a path leading to deformation-based parameters such as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) and crack tip opening angle (CTOA). Constrained by conventional test techniques and instrumentation, physical values (e.g. crack mouth opening displacement, CMOD, and CTOA angles) are measured on the test specimen exterior and a single through-thickness "average" interior value is inferred. Because of three-dimensional issues such as crack curvature, constraint variation, and material inhomogeneity, inference of average parameter values may introduce errors. The microtopography methodology described here measures and maps three-dimensional fracture surfaces. The analyses of these data provide direct extraction of the parameters of interest at any location within the specimen interior, and at any desired increment of crack opening or extension. A single test specimen can provide all necessary information for the analysis of a particular material and geometry combination.

  13. Evading the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in steel through gradient hierarchical nanotwins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yujie; Li, Yongqiang; Zhu, Lianchun; Liu, Yao; Lei, Xianqi; Wang, Gang; Wu, Yanxin; Mi, Zhenli; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Huajian

    2014-04-01

    The strength-ductility trade-off has been a long-standing dilemma in materials science. This has limited the potential of many structural materials, steels in particular. Here we report a way of enhancing the strength of twinning-induced plasticity steel at no ductility trade-off. After applying torsion to cylindrical twinning-induced plasticity steel samples to generate a gradient nanotwinned structure along the radial direction, we find that the yielding strength of the material can be doubled at no reduction in ductility. It is shown that this evasion of strength-ductility trade-off is due to the formation of a gradient hierarchical nanotwinned structure during pre-torsion and subsequent tensile deformation. A series of finite element simulations based on crystal plasticity are performed to understand why the gradient twin structure can cause strengthening and ductility retention, and how sequential torsion and tension lead to the observed hierarchical nanotwinned structure through activation of different twinning systems.

  14. Evading the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in steel through gradient hierarchical nanotwins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yujie; Li, Yongqiang; Zhu, Lianchun; Liu, Yao; Lei, Xianqi; Wang, Gang; Wu, Yanxin; Mi, Zhenli; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Huajian

    2014-04-01

    The strength-ductility trade-off has been a long-standing dilemma in materials science. This has limited the potential of many structural materials, steels in particular. Here we report a way of enhancing the strength of twinning-induced plasticity steel at no ductility trade-off. After applying torsion to cylindrical twinning-induced plasticity steel samples to generate a gradient nanotwinned structure along the radial direction, we find that the yielding strength of the material can be doubled at no reduction in ductility. It is shown that this evasion of strength-ductility trade-off is due to the formation of a gradient hierarchical nanotwinned structure during pre-torsion and subsequent tensile deformation. A series of finite element simulations based on crystal plasticity are performed to understand why the gradient twin structure can cause strengthening and ductility retention, and how sequential torsion and tension lead to the observed hierarchical nanotwinned structure through activation of different twinning systems.

  15. The influence of grain size on the ductility of micro-scale stainless steel stent struts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B P; Cuddy, H; Harewood, F J; Connolley, T; McHugh, P E

    2006-01-01

    Vascular stents are used to restore blood flow in stenotic arteries, and at present the implantation of a stent is the preferred revascularisation method for treating coronary artery disease, as the introduction of drug eluting stents (DESs) has lead to a significant improvement in the clinical outcome of coronary stenting. However the mechanical limits of stents are being tested when they are deployed in severe cases. In this study we aimed to show (by a combination of experimental tests and crystal plasticity finite element models) that the ductility of stainless steel stent struts can be increased by optimising the grain structure within micro-scale stainless steel stent struts. The results of the study show that within the specimen size range 55 to 190 microm ductility was not dependent on the size of the stent strut when the grain size maximised. For values of the ratio of cross sectional area to characteristic grain length less than 1,000, ductility was at a minimum irrespective of specimen size. However, when the ratio of cross sectional area to characteristic grain length becomes greater than 1,000 an improvement in ductility occurs, reaching a plateau when the ratio approaches a value characteristic of bulk material properties. In conclusion the ductility of micro-scale stainless steel stent struts is sensitive to microstructure and can be improved by reducing the grain size.

  16. Evaluation of the environmentally induced fracture resistance of ductile nickel aluminide. Technical report number 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ricker, R.E.; Bertocci, U.; Fink, J.L.; Stoudt, M.R.

    1991-07-01

    Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and electrochemical experiments were performed in different aqueous solutions on ductile nickel aluminide, Ni{sub 3}Al+B, in order to evaluate the possibility of environmentally induced fracture of this material in neutral pH solutions as a result of hydrogen absorption. Two different processes were postulated that could lead to hydrogen absorption and embrittlement: (1) local acidification due to hydrolysis of the corrosion reaction products and (2) hydrogen reduction during the potential transient that accompanies film rupture and repair. Experiments were designed to evaluate each of these possibilities. First, slow strain rate tests were conducted in solutions with varying concentrations of metal ions and pH to determine the critical metal ion concentration and pH that result in hydrogen absorption and embrittlement of this material. Second, the potential transient that follows the mechanical rupture of the protective surface film in different solutions was measured and the minimum potential during the transient was compared to the potential that results in a hydrogen fugacity large enough to cause cracking. The results indicate that hydrogen reduction, absorption, and embrittlement are not to be expected in neutral solutions as a result of local acidification during crevice corrosion or film rupture during crack propagation or cyclic loading.

  17. METHOD OF PRODUCING NIOBIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Stevens, E.R.

    1960-05-24

    A process is given for preparing ductile niobium metal by the reduction of niobium pentoxide with carbon. The invention resides in the addition, to the reaction mass, of from 0.05 to 0.4 atom of titanium (in the form of metallic titanium, titanium carbide, and/or titanium oxide) per one mole of niobium pentoxide. The mixture is heated under subatmospheric pressure to above 1300 deg C but below the melting point of niobium, and the carbon- and oxygen-free niobium sponge obtained is cooled under reduced pressure.

  18. Ductile tungsten-nickel-alloy and method for manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    The tensile elongation of a tungsten-nickel-iron alloy containing essentially 95 weight percent reprocessed tungsten, 3.5 weight percent nickel, and 1.5 weight percent iron is increased from a value of less than about 1 percent up to about 23 percent by the addition of less than 0.5 weight percent of a reactive metal consisting of niobium and zirconium.

  19. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  20. Variation of depth to the brittle-ductile transition due to cooling of a midcrustal intrusion.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The depth to the brittle-ductile transition in the crust is often defined by the intersection of a shear resistance relation in the brittle upper crust that increases linearly with depth and a power law relation for ductile flow in the lower crust that depends strongly on T. Transient variation of this depth caused by a magmatic intrusion at a depth near the regional transition can be modelled by a heat conduction model for a rectangular parallelepiped superimposed on a linear geothermal gradient. When parameters appropriate for the southeastern US are used, a moderate-sized intrusion is found to decrease the transition depth by as much as 7 km; significant variations last approx 10 m.y. Since the base of the seismogenic zone is identified with the brittle-ductile transition, these results imply that intrusions of late Tertiary age or younger could be important sources of clustered seismicity. -A.W.H.

  1. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  2. Texture Modification and Ductility Enhancement in Mg Alloy Through Friction Stir Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Choo, Hahn; Vogel, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between friction stir processing parameters, i.e., rotation and travel rates of the processing tool, the texture modification and ductility enhancement of an Mg alloy AZ31B was investigated. With the systematic changes in processing parameters as represented by a Zener-Hollomon parameter input, a transition of different crystallographic texture was observed through neutron diffraction measurement, which correlated well with the changes in deformation and recrystallization mechanism activated during the FSP. The variation in the texture leads to dramatic changes in the strength and ductility in the stir zone of the processed Mg plate. A maximum of three-fold increase in the ductility was achieved in the Mg alloy through FSP when the Zener-Hollomon parameter exceeds a critical value, which is associated with low rotation speed and high travel speed processing conditions.

  3. Ductility and Strength Reduction Factors for Degrading Structures Considering Cumulative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bojórquez, Edén; Ruiz, Sonia E.; Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of cumulative damage on the strength requirements of degrading structures is assessed through the evaluation of the target ductility and corresponding strength reduction factors of simple degrading structures. While the reduction on ductility is established through the use of Park and Ang index, the suggestions given by Bojórquez and Rivera are used to model the degradation of the structural properties of the simple systems. Target ductilities and their corresponding reduced strength reduction factors are established for five sets of ground motions; most of them are recorded in California. The results given in this paper provide insight into all relevant parameters that should be considered during seismic design of earthquake-resistant structures. Finally, some recommendations to evaluate the effect of cumulative damage on seismic design are suggested. PMID:24883410

  4. Ductility and strength reduction factors for degrading structures considering cumulative damage.

    PubMed

    Bojórquez, Edén; Ruiz, Sonia E; Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of cumulative damage on the strength requirements of degrading structures is assessed through the evaluation of the target ductility and corresponding strength reduction factors of simple degrading structures. While the reduction on ductility is established through the use of Park and Ang index, the suggestions given by Bojórquez and Rivera are used to model the degradation of the structural properties of the simple systems. Target ductilities and their corresponding reduced strength reduction factors are established for five sets of ground motions; most of them are recorded in California. The results given in this paper provide insight into all relevant parameters that should be considered during seismic design of earthquake-resistant structures. Finally, some recommendations to evaluate the effect of cumulative damage on seismic design are suggested.

  5. Metallurgical evaluation of factors influencing the ductility of aged T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The metallurgical factors influencing the ductility of T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) alloy following long-time exposures of GTA welds and tubing in the temperature range 982 C (1800 F) through 1316 C (2400 F) were evaluated by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron emission spectroscopy, and optical metallographic procedures. No classical aging response occurs in the alloy over the temperature range studied. The ductility impairment implied by previous investigations is not the result of microstructural response of the alloy to thermal exposures. Intergranular failure in the GTA sheet welds appears the result of random contamination by silicon, potassium, and/or fluorine at the grain boundaries of the fusion zones. Exposure to lithium at high temperatures had no adverse effects on the ductility of T-111 tubing. These materials were, however, sensitive to post-age handling and testing procedures.

  6. Strength, fracture, and fatigue behavior of advanced high-temperature intermetallics reinforced with ductile phases

    SciTech Connect

    Soboyejo, W.O. ); Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O. ); Sastry, S.M.L. )

    1993-03-01

    The results of recent studies on the fatigue and fracture behavior of extruded Ti-48Al + 20 vol pct TiNb and hot-isostatically pressed ('hipped') MoSi[sub 2] + 20 vol pct Nb are presented (compositions in atomic percent unless stated otherwise). The effects of ductile phase reinforcement of Ti-48Al and MoSi[sub 2] on the micromechanisms of fracture under monotonic and cyclic loading are elucidated. Micromechanics models are applied to the prediction of crack-tip shielding components, and the effects of temperature on tensile/compressive/flexure strengths are discussed. Ductile phase toughening under monotonic loading conditions is shown to be associated with lower fatigue crack growth resistance. The lower fatigue resistance is attributed to the absence of crack-tip shielding, higher crack opening displacements, and the effects of inelastic strains that are developed in ductile phase-reinforced composites under cyclic loading conditions.

  7. Tensile properties of copper alloyed austempered ductile iron: Effect of austempering parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, U.; Ray, S.; Prabhakar, S. R.

    2004-10-01

    A ductile iron containing 0.6% copper as the main alloying element was austenitized at 850 °C for 120 min and was subsequently austempered for 60 min at austempering temperatures of 270, 330, and 380 °C. The samples were also austempered at 330 °C for austempering times of 30 150 min. The structural parameters for the austempered alloy austenite (X γ ), average carbon content (C γ ), the product X γ C γ , and the size of the bainitic ferrite needle (d α ) were determined using x-ray diffraction. The effect of austempering temperature and time has been studied with respect to tensile properties such as 0.2% proof stress, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), percentage of elongation, and quality index. These properties have been correlated with the structural parameters of the austempered ductile iron microstructure. Fracture studies have been carried out on the tensile fracture surfaces of the austempered ductile iron (ADI).

  8. How melt stretching affect the brittle-ductile transition temperature of polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2013-03-01

    Upon increasing temperature a brittle polymer glass can turn ductile. PMMA is a good example. For a while this brittle-ductile transition (BDT) was thought to be determined by the emergence of a secondary relaxation....1-3 On the other hand, it has been known for a long time...4-6 that predeformation in the melt state (e.g., melt stretching) can also make brittle glasses behave in a ductile manner. This transformation has recently received a satisfactory explanation based on a picture of structural hybrid for polymer glasses....7 It appears that BDT is dictated by the relative mechanical characteristics of the primary structure (due to the van der Waals bonds) and the chain network. The present work, based on conventional Instron tensile extension tests and DMA tests, shows that melt stretching does not alter the secondary relaxation behavior of PMMA and PC yet can turn them the brittle PMMA ductile and the ductile PC brittle. Moreover, sufficient melt stretching makes the brittle PS ductile although it does not produce any secondary relaxation process..1. Monnerie, L.; Laupretre, F.; Halary, J. L. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 35-213. 2. Monnerie, L.; Halary, J. L.; Kausch, H. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 215-364. 3. Wu, S. J. Appl. Polym. Sci.1992, 46, (4), 619-624. 4. Vincent, P. I. Polymer1960, 1, (0), 425-444. 5. Harris, J. S.; Ward, I. M. J. Mater. Sci.1970, 5, (7), 573-579. 6. Ender, D. H.; Andrews, R. D. J. Appl. Phys.1965, 36, (10), 3057-3062. 7. Zartman, G. D.; Cheng, S.; Li, X.; Lin, F.; Becker, M. L.; Wang, S.-Q. Macromolecules2012, 45, (16), 6719-6732.

  9. The Nature of the Tensile Fracture in Austempered Ductile Iron with Dual Matrix Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicli, Volkan; Erdogan, Mehmet

    2010-02-01

    The tensile fracture characteristics of austempered ductile irons with dual matrix structures and different ausferrite volume fractions have been studied for an unalloyed ductile cast iron containing (in wt.%) 3.50 C, 2.63 Si, 0.318 Mn, and 0.047 Mg. Specimens were intercritically austenitized (partially austenitized) in two phase region (α + γ) at various temperatures for 20 min and then quenched into a salt bath held at austempering temperature of 365 °C for various times and then air cooled to room temperature to obtain various ausferrite volume fractions. Conventionally austempered specimens with fully ausferritic matrix and unalloyed as-cast specimens having fully ferritic structures were also tested for comparison. In dual matrix structures, results showed that the volume fraction of proeutectoid ferrite, new (epitaxial) ferrite, and ausferrite [bainitic ferrite + high-carbon austenite (stabilized or transformed austenite)] can be controlled to influence the strength and ductility. Generally, microvoids nucleation is initiated at the interface between the graphite nodules and the surrounding ferritic structure and at the grain boundary junctions in the fully ferritic microstructure. Debonding of the graphite nodules from the surrounding matrix structure was evident. The continuity of the ausferritic structure along the intercellular boundaries plays an important role in determining the fracture behavior of austempered ductile iron with different ausferrite volume fractions. The different fracture mechanisms correspond to the different levels of ausferrite volume fractions. With increasing continuity of the ausferritic structure, fracture pattern changed from ductile to moderate ductile nature. On the other hand, in the conventionally austempered samples with a fully ausferritic structure, the fracture mode was a mixture of quasi-cleavage and a dimple pattern. Microvoid coalescence was the dominant form of fracture in all structures.

  10. Influence of hydrostatic pressure on the ductility of copper as a function of its initial state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure in the interval 0-250 MPa on the deformation properties of copper versus its initial state is studied. After liquid nitrogen storage, the torsion strain to fracture is found to increase when the pressure rises to 200 MPa. As the pressure rises further and reaches 250 MPa, the torsion strain to fracture drops. Preliminary torsion to a strain of 5% in opposition to torsion under pressure makes the pressure dependence of the ultimate strain linear. If the prestrain equals 25%, a rise in the pressure to 150MPa increases the ductility of the material. A further increase in the pressure to 250 MPa changes the ductility insignificantly.

  11. Effect of Cu, Mo, Si on the content of retained austenite of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Y.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the effects of Cu, Mo, Si contents on the volume fraction of retained austenite of austempered ductile iron (ADI) are analyzed exactly by X-ray diffraction, and the fracture modes of test samples with different volume fraction of retained austenite are investigated by SEM. It is shown that the retained austenite content increases with the content of copper, decreases with the content of molybdenum, and reaches the maximum with a certain content of silicon. When the retained austenite content decreases, the fracture modes of test samples change from ductile fracture to cleavage fracture.

  12. Demonstration of ultraprecision ductile-mode cutting for lithium niobate microring waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takigawa, Ryo; Higurashi, Eiji; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Asano, Tanemasa

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the application of the ultraprecision ductile-mode cutting method to the fabrication of microring waveguides in lithium niobate crystal was investigated. Although it was difficult to apply a mechanical cutting method to the fabrication of microring waveguides with smooth sidewalls, it was confirmed that no harmful cutting traces on the machined surface occur with the appropriate movement of the cutting tool. The root-mean-square surface roughness of the resulting sidewall was 6.1 nm, which is sufficiently small to suppress the scattering loss of the circulating light. In addition, the conditions for the ductile-mode cutting of lithium niobate crystal were investigated.

  13. Ductility normalized-strainrange partitioning life relations for creep-fatigue life predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Saltsman, J. F.; Hirschberg, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures based on Strainrange Partitioning (SRP) are presented for estimating the effects of environment and other influences on the high temperature, low cycle, creep fatigue resistance of alloys. It is proposed that the plastic and creep, ductilities determined from conventional tensile and creep rupture tests conducted in the environment of interest be used in a set of ductility normalized equations for making a first order approximation of the four SRP inelastic strainrange life relations. Different levels of sophistication in the application of the procedures are presented by means of illustrative examples with several high temperature alloys. Predictions of cyclic lives generally agree with observed lives within factors of three.

  14. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  15. Transformation plasticity in ductile solids. Final report, August 1, 1988--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.B.

    1996-09-01

    Throughout history, the development of stronger materials has enabled the realization of countless technological advances. Unfortunately, any increase in strength is rarely achieved without concomitant decreases in toughness and ductility: a fact which severely limits the utility of materials such as ultrahigh-strength alloy steels. Typical precipitation-strengthened stainless steels have very little toughness at high strength levels. In the last decade, however, several investigators have reported exceptionally large fracture toughness values in high-strength precipitation-hardened metastable austenitic steels. This remarkable achievement is directly attributable to the process of transformation toughening. This report describes studies on tranformations and enhancement of plane-strain ductility in high strength steels.

  16. Fatigue Life Prediction of Ductile Iron Based on DE-SVM Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiqun, Ma; Xiaoping, Wang; lun, An

    the model, predicting fatigue life of ductile iron, based on SVM (Support Vector Machine, SVM) has been established. For it is easy to fall into local optimum during parameter optimization of SVM, DE (Differential Evolution algorithm, DE) algorithm was adopted to optimize to improve prediction precision. Fatigue life of ductile iron is predicted combining with concrete examples, and simulation experiment to optimize SVM is conducted adopting GA (Genetic Algorithm), ACO (Ant Colony Optimization) and POS (Partial Swarm Optimization). Results reveal that DE-SVM algorithm is of a better prediction performance.

  17. Ductile-to-Brittle transition in <111> hadfield steel single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, E. G.; Chumlyakov, Yu. I.

    2010-10-01

    The deformation mechanism and the character of fracture of <111> austenitic Hadfield steel single crystals are studied during tension in the temperature range 77-673 K by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that a change in the fracture mechanism from ductile to brittle fracture according to the fractography criterion takes place at a higher temperature than that determined from a change in the elongation to failure of the single crystals. The ductile-to-brittle transition in the Hadfield steel single crystals is shown to be related to a high level of deforming stresses induced by solid-solution hardening and to mechanical twinning.

  18. Ductile film delamination from compliant substrates using hard overlayers

    PubMed Central

    Cordill, M.J.; Marx, V.M.; Kirchlechner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible electronic devices call for copper and gold metal films to adhere well to polymer substrates. Measuring the interfacial adhesion of these material systems is often challenging, requiring the formulation of different techniques and models. Presented here is a strategy to induce well defined areas of delamination to measure the adhesion of copper films on polyimide substrates. The technique utilizes a stressed overlayer and tensile straining to cause buckle formation. The described method allows one to examine the effects of thin adhesion layers used to improve the adhesion of flexible systems. PMID:25641995

  19. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.487 Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe. Corrosion...

  20. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.487 Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe. Corrosion...

  1. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.487 Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe. Corrosion...

  2. Development and Testing of a Linear Polarization Resistance Corrosion Rate Probe for Ductile Iron Pipe (Web Report 4361)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North American water and wastewater community has hundreds of millions of feet of ductile iron pipe in service. Only a portion of the inventory has any form of external corrosion control. Ductile iron pipe, in certain environments, is subject to external corrosion.Linear Pola...

  3. Bulk metallic glasses and their composites: Composition optimization, thermal stability, and microstructural tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Hesham Ezzat

    A design protocol utilizing common elements for bulk metallic glass formation has been employed to develop novel, low cost Fe-, and Ti- based bulk metallic glasses. A critical obstacle that was successfully overcome in this work is the omission of beryllium in these alloys. Beryllium is of vital importance in many bulk metallic glass forming systems, but it is expensive and poses considerable health risks. Bulk metallic glasses in these novel Fe-, and Ti-based systems exhibit extremely high mechanical strength and excellent thermal stability. Devitrification and cooling rate experiments were used to identify crystalline phase formation and assess activation energy for crystallization, as well as to explore and develop ductile BMG composites. To better control microstructure in these BMG composites, a novel processing technique, called semi-solid forging was developed, wherein the alloy melt is heated to above the melt temperature of the glass, but below the melt temperature of the ductile crystalline phase. Such an approach permits the maintenance of a glassy, or nanocrystalline matrix phase, while simultaneously coarsening and homogenizing the ductile, secondary phase. This processing approach leads to enhanced ductility in the alloys, which, to this point, has not been observed using conventional casting methods. The combination of novel, low-cost, alloy compositions with semi-solid forging has been successfully utilized to develop new high strength structural materials with enhanced ductility and toughness. Microstrutural and mechanical properties of these novel, toughened, BMG composites are presented. A comprehensive analysis of the relationship between deformation mechanisms and microstructure reveals that enhanced ductility is predicated on matching fundamental mechanical and microstructural length scales in a Ti-Ni-Si-Mo BMG composite. Under optimized microstructural conditions, a maximum compressive strength exceeding 2400 MPa with ˜ 30% total strain to

  4. Acoustic Emission Patterns and the Transition to Ductility in Sub-Micron Scale Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, H.; Xia, K.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    We report observation of a transition from the brittle to ductile regime in precursor events from different rock materials (Granite, Sandstone, Basalt, and Gypsum) and Polymers (PMMA, PTFE and CR-39). Acoustic emission patterns associated with sub-micron scale laboratory earthquakes are mapped into network parameter spaces (functional damage networks). The sub-classes hold nearly constant timescales, indicating dependency of the sub-phases on the mechanism governing the previous evolutionary phase, i.e., deformation and failure of asperities. Based on our findings, we propose that the signature of the non-linear elastic zone around a crack tip is mapped into the details of the evolutionary phases, supporting the formation of a strongly weak zone in the vicinity of crack tips. Moreover, we recognize sub-micron to micron ruptures with signatures of 'stiffening' in the deformation phase of acoustic-waveforms. We propose that the latter rupture fronts carry critical rupture extensions, including possible dislocations faster than the shear wave speed. Using 'template super-shear waveforms' and their network characteristics, we show that the acoustic emission signals are possible super-shear or intersonic events. Ref. [1] Ghaffari, H. O., and R. P. Young. "Acoustic-Friction Networks and the Evolution of Precursor Rupture Fronts in Laboratory Earthquakes." Nature Scientific reports 3 (2013). [2] Xia, Kaiwen, Ares J. Rosakis, and Hiroo Kanamori. "Laboratory earthquakes: The sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear rupture transition." Science 303.5665 (2004): 1859-1861. [3] Mello, M., et al. "Identifying the unique ground motion signatures of supershear earthquakes: Theory and experiments." Tectonophysics 493.3 (2010): 297-326. [4] Gumbsch, Peter, and Huajian Gao. "Dislocations faster than the speed of sound." Science 283.5404 (1999): 965-968. [5] Livne, Ariel, et al. "The near-tip fields of fast cracks." Science 327.5971 (2010): 1359-1363. [6] Rycroft, Chris H., and Eran Bouchbinder

  5. A meshfree continuous-discontinuous approach for the ductile fracture modeling in explicit dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ma, N.; Takada, K.; Okada, H.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a combined continuous-discontinuous modeling technique for the dynamic ductile fracture analysis using an interactive particle enrichment algorithm and a strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree method. The strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree method is a nodel-integrated meshfree method which was recently proposed for the analysis of elastic-damage induced strain localization problems. In this paper, the strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree formulation is extended to the elastic-plastic-damage materials for the ductile fracture analysis. When the ductile material is fully degraded, the interactive particle enrichment scheme is introduced in the strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree formulation that permits a continuous-to-discontinuous failure modeling. The essence of the interactive particle enrichment algorithm is a particle insertion-deletion scheme that produces a visibility criterion for the description of a traction-free crack and leads to a better presentation of the ductile fracture process. Several numerical benchmarks are examined using the explicit dynamics analysis to demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method.

  6. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  7. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  8. Significantly Increasing the Ductility of High Performance Polymer Semiconductors through Polymer Blending.

    PubMed

    Scott, Joshua I; Xue, Xiao; Wang, Ming; Kline, R Joseph; Hoffman, Benjamin C; Dougherty, Daniel; Zhou, Chuanzhen; Bazan, Guillermo; O'Connor, Brendan T

    2016-06-01

    Polymer semiconductors based on donor-acceptor monomers have recently resulted in significant gains in field effect mobility in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). These polymers incorporate fused aromatic rings and have been designed to have stiff planar backbones, resulting in strong intermolecular interactions, which subsequently result in stiff and brittle films. The complex synthesis typically required for these materials may also result in increased production costs. Thus, the development of methods to improve mechanical plasticity while lowering material consumption during fabrication will significantly improve opportunities for adoption in flexible and stretchable electronics. To achieve these goals, we consider blending a brittle donor-acceptor polymer, poly[4-(4,4-dihexadecyl-4H-cyclopenta[1,2-b:5,4-b']dithiophen-2-yl)-alt-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine] (PCDTPT), with ductile poly(3-hexylthiophene). We found that the ductility of the blend films is significantly improved compared to that of neat PCDTPT films, and when the blend film is employed in an OTFT, the performance is largely maintained. The ability to maintain charge transport character is due to vertical segregation within the blend, while the improved ductility is due to intermixing of the polymers throughout the film thickness. Importantly, the application of large strains to the ductile films is shown to orient both polymers, which further increases charge carrier mobility. These results highlight a processing approach to achieve high performance polymer OTFTs that are electrically and mechanically optimized. PMID:27200458

  9. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  10. Experimental Study on the Ultraprecision Ductile Machinability of Single-Crystal Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiwang; Maekawa, Kouki; Tamaki, Jun'ichi; Kubo, Akihiko

    Single-crystal germanium is an important infrared optical material. In the present work, single-point diamond turning experiments on single-crystal germanium (100), (110) and (111) planes were conducted in order to examine their ultraprecision machining characteristics. Three kinds of surface textures and chip morphologies were observed during the brittle-ductile transition of the machining mode. The brittle-ductile boundary changed significantly with the crystal orientations of the workpieces. Due to the crystallographic anisotropy, micro-fractures were generated on the workpiece surface in a radial pattern from the rotation center. However, it was possible to produce completely ductile-cut surfaces on all crystal orientations by using undeformed chip thicknesses smaller than a critical value, namely, the minimum critical undeformed chip thickness, which was approximately 60nm under the present conditions. Compared to wet cutting, dry cutting was beneficial for ductile machining on a few specific crystal orientations. The findings in this study provide criterions for determining process parameters for the fabrication of aspherical and diffraction infrared optics using single-crystal germanium.

  11. The effect of ductile innerlayers on the mechanical performance of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Meng-Bor.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of ductile innerlayers on the mechanical behavior of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites were studied. Two fiber systems were used as the reinforcement; a monofilament system and a roving system. The ductile innerlayer materials were applied on fiber surfaces using coating equipment that was first designed for monofilament coating. For composites reinforced by rovings, problems such as nonuniform fiber distribution and resin starvation in spaces between closely packed filaments arise from the coating process. Even with these problems, improvement in transverse tensile strength, longitudinal compressive strength, flexural fatigue resistance, and fatigue endurance limit were achieved. For monofilament systems, properties such as flexural strength, interlaminar shear strength, and transverse tensile strength are improved by the application of ductile innerlayers. Three mechanisms were shown to be responsible for the improvements: by acting as a spacer and preventing fiber-fiber contact; local ductility is provided near the fiber-matrix interface and lowering stress concentrations; and healing surface flaws in large diameter fiber systems, thus increasing fiber strength.

  12. Brittle versus ductile deformation as the main control of the deep fluid circulation in continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violay, Marie; Madonna, Claudio; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) and the Taupo Volcanic Zone-Deep geothermal drilling project in New Zealand (TVZ-DGDP) proposed a new concept of engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile rocks. This system has several advantages including (1) a simpler design and control of the reservoir due to homogeneous rock properties and stress states in the ductile domain ,(2) possible extraction of supercritical fluids (3) less probability for induced earthquakes. However, it is at present unknwon what and how porosity and permeability can be engineered in such environments. It has been proposed that the magmatic chamber is surrounded by a hot and ductile carapace through which heat transfer is conductive because the plastic behaviour of the rock will close possible fluid pathways. Further outward, as temperature declines, the rock will encounter the brittle-ductile transition with a concomitant increase in porosity and permeability. The thickness of the conduction-dominated, ductile boundary zone between the magmatic chamber and the convecting geothermal fluid directly determines the rate of heat transfer. To examine the brittle to ductile transition in the context of the Japanese crust, we conducted deformation experiments on very-fine-grain granite in conventional servocontrolled, gas-medium triaxial apparatus (from Paterson instrument). Temperature ranged from 600° C to 1100° C and effective confining pressure from 100 to 150 MPa. Dilatancy was measured during deformation. The method consisted in monitoring the volume of pore fluid that flows into or out of the sample at constant pore pressure. Permeability was measured under static conditions by transient pressure pulse method. Mechanical and micro-structural observations at experimental constant strain rate of 10‑5 s‑1 indicated that the granite was brittle and dilatant up to 900 ° C. At higher temperatures the deformation mode becomes macroscopically ductile, i

  13. Brittle versus ductile deformation as the main control of the deep fluid circulation in continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violay, Marie; Madonna, Claudio; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) and the Taupo Volcanic Zone-Deep geothermal drilling project in New Zealand (TVZ-DGDP) proposed a new concept of engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile rocks. This system has several advantages including (1) a simpler design and control of the reservoir due to homogeneous rock properties and stress states in the ductile domain ,(2) possible extraction of supercritical fluids (3) less probability for induced earthquakes. However, it is at present unknwon what and how porosity and permeability can be engineered in such environments. It has been proposed that the magmatic chamber is surrounded by a hot and ductile carapace through which heat transfer is conductive because the plastic behaviour of the rock will close possible fluid pathways. Further outward, as temperature declines, the rock will encounter the brittle-ductile transition with a concomitant increase in porosity and permeability. The thickness of the conduction-dominated, ductile boundary zone between the magmatic chamber and the convecting geothermal fluid directly determines the rate of heat transfer. To examine the brittle to ductile transition in the context of the Japanese crust, we conducted deformation experiments on very-fine-grain granite in conventional servocontrolled, gas-medium triaxial apparatus (from Paterson instrument). Temperature ranged from 600° C to 1100° C and effective confining pressure from 100 to 150 MPa. Dilatancy was measured during deformation. The method consisted in monitoring the volume of pore fluid that flows into or out of the sample at constant pore pressure. Permeability was measured under static conditions by transient pressure pulse method. Mechanical and micro-structural observations at experimental constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1 indicated that the granite was brittle and dilatant up to 900 ° C. At higher temperatures the deformation mode becomes macroscopically ductile, i

  14. Ductility contrast induced by silicification in pelitic schist of the Ryoke metamorphic belt, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateen, Tayyaba; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Rehman, Hafiz Ur; Terabayashi, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    Contrasting ductility is recognized in the rocks of Cretaceous Ryoke metamorphic belt in Iwakuni area, southwest Japan. Pelitic schist is ubiquitous in the region and differences in mineral assemblages mark increase in metamorphic grade. The area has been graded as chlorite-biotite zone in the north progressing into biotite- and muscovite-cordierite zones in the south. Pelitic schist near the boundary between the biotite- and muscovite-cordierite zones has undergone partial silicification to form whitish silicified schist layers which contain two types of quartz veins: those parallel to foliation in the host rock are called schistosity-concordant veins, and those inclined to host rock foliation, schistosity-discordant veins. In this study we examined the quartz structure in the silicified schist and in both types of veins to understand the ductility contrast induced by the silicification process. Crystallographic orientations of quartz in the veins and silicified schist rocks were studied using the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) based Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) technique. Quartz c-axis orientations in the silicified schist are nearly random, demonstrating an absence of post-silicification ductile deformation. Quartz grains in the schistosity-concordant veins have preferred c-axis orientations perpendicular to the schistosity indicating ductile shortening. In contrast, schistosity-discordant veins display distinct quartz c-axis fabric than that found in the schistosity-concordant veins. This is because the two types of host rocks exhibit a difference in ductility during deformation. The presence of deformed quartz veins in the undeformed silicified schist indicates transformation of the ductile pelitic schist into the brittle silicified schist at mid-crustal levels where these rocks originate, hence forming contrasting rock layers. Schistosity-concordant veins in the biotite-rich pelitic schist deformed with its host rock in a ductile manner while

  15. INTERIOR VIEW WITH STORAGE BINS FOR COLLECTING METAL SHAVINGS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH STORAGE BINS FOR COLLECTING METAL SHAVINGS FROM THE TAPPING MACHINES AS THEY CUT SCREW THREADS INTO PIPE FITTINGS. SHAVINGS TRAVEL ON CONVEYORS UNDER THE PLATFORM, ARE THEN ELEVATED TO SMALL LEVER-RELEASED BINS, WHICH HOLD SCRAP WHILE THE LARGER BINS ARE BEING EMPTIED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Ductile Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. 49 CFR 178.705 - Standards for metal IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... made of ductile metal materials. Welds must be made so as to maintain design type integrity of the... minimum of 20 percent; where Rm = minimum tensile strength of the steel to be used, in N/mm2; if U.S. Standard units of psi are used for tensile strength then the ratio becomes 10,000 × (145/Rm). (B)...

  17. 49 CFR 178.705 - Standards for metal IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS IBC... follows: (1) Body. The body must be made of ductile metal materials. Welds must be made so as to maintain... less than 10,000/Rm with a minimum of 20 percent; where Rm = minimum tensile strength of the steel...

  18. Ductile shear zones can induce hydraulically over-pressured fractures in deep hot-dry rock reservoirs: a new target for geothermal exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, C. E.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is notoriously difficult to create and maintain permeability in deep hot-dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs with engineering strategies. However, we predict that long-lived, slowly deforming HDR reservoirs likely contain hydraulically conductive, over-pressured fracture systems, provided that (a) the underlying lower crust and/or mantle are not entirely depleted of fluids and (b) the fracture system has not been drained into highly permeable overlying rocks. Such fracture systems could be targeted for the extraction of geothermal energy. Our prediction hinges on the notion that polycrystalline creep through matter transfer by a liquid phase (dissolution-precipitation creep) is a widespread mechanism for extracting fluids from the lower crust and mantle. Such processes - where creep cavities form during the slow, high-temperature deformation of crystalline solids, e.g., ceramics, metals, and rocks - entail the formation of (intergranular) fluid-assisted creep fractures. They constitute micron-scale voids formed along grain boundaries due to incompatibilities arising from diffusion or dislocation creep. Field and laboratory evidence suggest that the process leading to creep fractures may generate a dynamic permeability in the ductile crust, thus extracting fluids from this domain. We employed an elasto-visco-plastic material model that simulates creep fractures with continuum damage mechanics to model the slow contraction of high-heat-producing granites overlain by sedimentary rocks in 2D. The models suggest that deformation always leads to the initiation of a horizontal creep-damage front in the lower crust. This front propagates upwards towards the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) during protracted deformation where it collapses into highly damaged brittle-ductile shear zones. If the BDT is sufficiently shallow or finite strain sufficiently large, these shear zones trigger brittle faults emerging from their tips, which connect to the sub-horizontal damage

  19. Mechanical behavior and brittle-ductile transition of high-chromium martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odnobokova, M. V.; Kipelova, A. Yu.; Belyakov, A. N.; Kaibyshev, R. O.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents data on the static tensile tests and dynamic impact-toughness tests of a highchromium martensitic 10Kh9V1M1FBR steel (0.12 wt % C, 9.8 wt % Cr, 0.93 wt % W, 1.01 wt % Mo, 0.2 wt % V, 0.05 wt % Nb, 0.05 wt % N, 0.003 wt % B, 0.36 wt % Mn, 0.2 wt % Ni, 0.06 wt % Si, 0.01 wt % P, 0.008 wt % S, 0.02 wt % Cu, 0.1 wt % Co, 0.015 wt % Al, and the remainder is Fe) in the temperature range from 20 to-196°C. In the case of static loading, a reduction in the temperature leads to an increase in the strength characteristics; upon a drop in the temperature from 20 to-100°C, the plasticity also increases. This is connected with the fact that the ductile fracture remains the basic mechanism down to cryogenic temperatures. The brittle-ductile transition related to the transition from ductile intragranular fracture to quasibrittle one is observed at-45°C. The steel exhibits high impact toughness to the temperature of-60°C ( KCV -60 = 95 J/cm2), at which the fraction of the ductile component in fracture is equal to 20%. At 80°C, the impact toughness decreases down to critical values (30 J/cm2), which correlates with the decrease in the fraction of the ductile component on the fracture surface down to 1%. The further decrease in the impact toughness down to 10 J/cm2 at-196°C is related to the transition from intragranular to intergranular brittle fracture.

  20. Metal Preferences and Metallation*

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew W.; Osman, Deenah; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2014-01-01

    The metal binding preferences of most metalloproteins do not match their metal requirements. Thus, metallation of an estimated 30% of metalloenzymes is aided by metal delivery systems, with ∼25% acquiring preassembled metal cofactors. The remaining ∼70% are presumed to compete for metals from buffered metal pools. Metallation is further aided by maintaining the relative concentrations of these pools as an inverse function of the stabilities of the respective metal complexes. For example, magnesium enzymes always prefer to bind zinc, and these metals dominate the metalloenzymes without metal delivery systems. Therefore, the buffered concentration of zinc is held at least a million-fold below magnesium inside most cells. PMID:25160626

  1. Integrated Modelling of Damage and Fracture in Sheet Metal Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerlings, R. H. J.; Mediavilla, J.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2007-05-01

    A framework for finite element simulations of ductile damage development and ductile fracture during metal forming is presented. The damage evolution is described by a phenomenological continuum damage model. Crack growth and fracture are treated as the ultimate consequences of the damage process. Computationally, the initiation and growth of cracks is traced by an adaptive remeshing strategy, thereby allowing for opening crack faces. The application of the method to the fabrication of food-can lids demonstrates its capabilities, but also some of its limitations.

  2. Parametric study of irradiation effects on the ductile damage and flow stress behavior in ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are currently being considered as structural materials in fusion and Gen-IV nuclear reactors. These materials are expected to experience high dose radiation, which can increase their ductile to brittle transition temperature and susceptibility to failure during operation. Hence, to estimate the safe operational life of the reactors, precise evaluation of the ductile to brittle transition temperatures of ferritic-martensitic steels is necessary. Owing to the scarcity of irradiated samples, particularly at high dose levels, micro-mechanistic models are being employed to predict the shifts in the ductile to brittle transition temperatures. These models consider the ductile damage evolution, in the form of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids; and the brittle fracture, in the form of probabilistic cleavage initiation, to estimate the influence of irradiation on the ductile to brittle transition temperature. However, the assessment of irradiation dependent material parameters is challenging and influences the accuracy of these models. In the present study, the effects of irradiation on the overall flow stress and ductile damage behavior of two ferritic-martensitic steels is parametrically investigated. The results indicate that the ductile damage model parameters are mostly insensitive to irradiation levels at higher dose levels though the resulting flow stress behavior varies significantly.

  3. Progressive deformation structures associated with ductile thrusts in the Moine Nappe, Sutherland, N. Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, Robert E.

    In the deeper parts of mountain belts, polyphase structural sequences observed at outcrop-scale can arise due either to overprinting of regionally distinct deformation phases (e.g. reworking, changes in orogenic boundary conditions), or to localized controls that bring about transient changes in the patterns of ductile flow. These are unlikely to be mutually exclusive processes, and examples from Scotland demonstrate that, once regionally separate events are delimited using radiometric evidence, it is possible to isolate complex deformation sequences arising due to local controls. In the western Moine Nappe of Sutherland, the dominant structures were formed during Caledonian ductile thrusting towards the WNW, whilst earlier (?Precambrian) phases are relatively minor in importance. Two groups of Caledonian folds and fabrics are recognized in many exposures: main phase ( D2) structures which are broadly contemporaneous with ductile thrust fabrics, and later secondary phase ( F3) folds. The latter can be divided into two geometric groups: sheath-fold types which formed initially as WNW-overturned buckles subsequently modified by ductile shearing; and asymmetric types, which are commonly open folds apparently formed with axes close or sub-parallel to the thrust transport direction. Secondary structures show a close spatial association with high strain zones along ductile thrusts, and can be shown to have formed during the later stages of thrusting in certain critical exposures. I propose that they may form due to strain perturbations resulting from variations in the relative rates of ductile flow within the mylonites. Where differential shearing occurs due to flow-normal perturbations, wrench-related asymmetric fold types may form. In contrast, secondary sheath-fold structures may result from localized compression phases caused by flow-parallel perturbations. Local flow-perturbation models may be appropriate in situations where the distribution of later structures is

  4. Assessment of Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior of Localized Microstructural Regions in a Friction-Stir Welded X80 Pipeline Steel with Miniaturized Charpy V-Notch Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Julian A.; Lucon, Enrico; Sowards, Jeffrey; Mei, Paulo Roberto; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2016-06-01

    Friction-stir welding (FSW) is an alternative welding process for pipelines. This technology offers sound welds, good repeatability, and excellent mechanical properties. However, it is of paramount importance to determine the toughness of the welds at low temperatures in order to establish the limits of this technology. Ductile-to-brittle transition curves were generated in the present study by using a small-scale instrumented Charpy machine and miniaturized V-notch specimens (Kleinstprobe, KLST); notches were located in base metal, heat-affected, stirred, and hard zones within a FSW joint of API-5L X80 Pipeline Steel. Specimens were tested at temperatures between 77 K (-196 °C) and 298 K (25 °C). Based on the results obtained, the transition temperatures for the base material and heat-affected zone were below 173 K (-100 °C); conversely, for the stirred and hard zones, it was located around 213 K (-60 °C). Fracture surfaces were characterized and showed a ductile fracture mechanism at high impact energies and a mixture of ductile and brittle mechanisms at low impact energies.

  5. Antiformal closure in ductile and brittle-ductile in fold-and-thrust belt tranverse zones, Moine Thrust Belt, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, G.; Krabbendam, M.

    2009-04-01

    Abrupt lateral changes in thrust geometry occur in many mountain-building fold-and-thrust belts. Such changes in architecture are referred to as so-called transverse zones, and are commonly thought to be related to kinematic responses to irregularities generated across pre-existing, sometimes re-activated, basement faults. In many cases however the causative structure is concealed, either by distal parts of the thrust belt or the foreland basin. Sharp lateral changes in the structural geometry of ductile thrust stacks are less widely studied and reported. In NW Scotland, the classic Caledonian WNW-vergent Moine Thrust Belt exposes excellent examples of the structural architecture in such transverse zones, both in kilometre-scale thick monolithic (meta-)sandstone packages subject to ductile deformation, and in much thinner heterolithic packages subject to brittle-ductile deformation. In both cases the amplitude of the antiformal disturbance associated with the transverse zone is much greater than amplitude of any irregularity identified in the basement below. In Neoproterozoic Moine rocks in the hanging wall of the Moine Thrust, a large-scale lateral culmination wall forms a component part of the Oykel Transverse Zone (OTZ), a kilometre-scale thick constrictional ductile shear zone striking sub-parallel to the WNW-directed thrust transport direction. The OTZ forms the SW limit of the Cassley Culmination. ESE-plunging mullions are an integral part of the fabric of the transverse zone and were generated by constriction sub-parallel to the WNW-directed thrust transport direction. Main folds and fabrics in the transverse zone hanging-wall are folded by main folds and fabrics in the footwall, demonstrating the overall foreland-propagating record of ductile deformation as the Cassley Culmination grew. Constriction and mullion development are attributed to differential, transtensional movement across the transverse zone during the later stages of culmination development

  6. Production and Machining of Thin Wall Gray and Ductile Cast Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, E.H.; Li, H.; Griffin, R.; Bates, C.E.; Eleftheriou, E.

    2000-11-03

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham, in cooperation with the American Foundry Society, companies across North America, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a project to develop an understanding of the factors that control the machinability of cast gray and ductile iron. Differences of as much as 500% have been found in machinability have been observed at the same strength. The most machinable irons were those with a high cell counts and few carbonitride inclusions. Additions of tin and copper can be added to both gray and ductile iron to stabilize the pearlite, but excessive additions (above those required to produce the desired pearlite content) degrade the machinability.

  7. On the limit of surface integrity of alumina by ductile-mode grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Zarudi, I.; Zhang, L.C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates both experimentally and theoretically the subsurface damage in alumina by ductile-mode grinding. It was found that the distribution of the fractured area on a ground mirror surface, with the Rms roughness in the range from 30 nm to 90 nm, depends on not only the grinding conditions but also the pores in the bulk material. Surface pit formation is the result of interaction of abrasive grains of the grinding wheel with pores. Thus the surface quality achievable by ductile-mode grinding is limited by the initial microstructure of a material. The investigation shows that median and radial cracks do not appear and hence are not the cause of fracture as usually thought.

  8. Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: Heliumisotope trends

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B. Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2007-10-07

    Heat and mass are injected into the shallow crust when mantle fluids are able to flow through the ductile lower crust. Minimum 3He/4He ratios in surface fluids from the northern Basin and Range province, western North America increase systematically from low, crustal values in the east to high, mantle values in the west, a regional trend that correlates with the rates of active crustal deformation. The highest ratios occur where the extension and shear strain rates are greatest. The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active trans-tensional deformation indicates a deformation enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere in regions even where there is no significant magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local, high-{sup 3}He/{sup 4}He anomalies signifying hidden magmatic activity and/or deep fluid production with locally enhanced permeability, identifying zones with high resource potential, particularly for geothermal energy development.

  9. Linking Nanoscales and Dislocation Shielding to the Ductile-Brittle Transition of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintsala, Eric; Teresi, Claire; Gerberich, William W.

    2016-06-01

    The ductile-brittle transition of nano/microscale silicon is explored at low-temperature, high stress conditions. A pathway to eventual mechanism maps describing this ductile-brittle transition behavior using sample size, strain rate, and temperature is outlined. First, a discussion of variables controlling the BDT in silicon is given and discussed in the context of development of eventual modeling that could simultaneously incorporate all their effects. For description of energy dissipation by dislocation nucleation from a crack tip, three critical input parameters are identified: the effective stress, activation volume, and activation energy for dislocation motion. These are discussed individually relating to the controlling variables for the BDT. Lastly, possibilities for measuring these parameters experimentally are also described.

  10. Effect of Reclamation on the Skin Layer of Ductile Iron Cast in Furan Molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dańko, R.; Holtzer, M.; Górny, M.; Żymankowska-Kumon, S.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations of the influence of the quality of molding sand with furan resin hardened by paratoluenesulfonic acid, on the formation of microstructure and surface quality of ductile iron castings. Within the studies different molding sands were used: molding sand prepared with fresh sand and molding sands prepared with reclaimed sands of a different purification degree, determined by the ignition loss value. Various concentrations of sulfur and nitrogen in the sand molds as a function of the ignition loss were shown in the paper. A series of experimental melts of ductile iron in molds made of molding sand characterized by different levels of surface-active elements (e.g., sulfur) and different gas evolution rates were performed. It was shown that there exists a significant effect of the quality of the sand on the formation of the graphite degeneration layer.

  11. Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: helium isotope trends.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, B Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C

    2007-11-30

    Heat and mass are injected into the shallow crust when mantle fluids are able to flow through the ductile lower crust. Minimum 3He/4He ratios in surface fluids from the northern Basin and Range Province, western North America, increase systematically from low crustal values in the east to high mantle values in the west, a regional trend that correlates with the rates of active crustal deformation. The highest ratios occur where the extension and shear strain rates are greatest. The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active transtensional deformation indicates a deformation-enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere, even in regions where there is no substantial magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local, high 3He/4He anomalies indicating hidden magmatic activity and/or deep fluid production with locally enhanced permeability, identifying zones with high resource potential, particularly for geothermal energy development. PMID:18048684

  12. Numerical simulation of damage evolution for ductile materials and mechanical properties study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amri, A.; Hanafi, I.; Haddou, M. E. Y.; Khamlichi, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents results of a numerical modelling of ductile fracture and failure of elements made of 5182H111 aluminium alloys subjected to dynamic traction. The analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook model based on ABAQUS software. The modelling difficulty related to prediction of ductile fracture mainly arises because there is a tremendous span of length scales from the structural problem to the micro-mechanics problem governing the material separation process. This study has been used the experimental results to calibrate a simple crack propagation criteria for shell elements of which one has often been used in practical analyses. The performance of the proposed model is in general good and it is believed that the presented results and experimental-numerical calibration procedure can be of use in practical finite-element simulations.

  13. Effect of alloying on electronic structure, strength and ductility characteristics of nickel aluminide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, A. I.; Barskaya, R. A.; Wainstein, D. L.

    2003-06-01

    The possibility of production of alloyed NiAl intermetallic compound having satisfactory processing ductility at room temperature has been investigated. The samples were made by extrusion of sintered powder blanks. The effect of Fe, Cr, Co, Mo, B and La doping on mechanical properties of nickel aluminide was investigated. Alloying has a beneficial effect on decrease of the ductile-brittle transition temperature and micro-mechanism of fracture. The doping of nickel aluminide by Fe (2 at.%), Mo (2 at.%) and Co(2 at.%) was studied by valence band XPS and plasmon losses electron spectroscopy. The shift of the Fermi level ( EF) and variation of density of conduction electrons - neff were found in doped NiAl. The results show good correlation between EFneff and micro-hardness of alloyed NiAl intermetallic.

  14. Ductile-brittle transition behavior of tungsten under shock loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Gray, G.T. III

    1993-02-01

    In an effort to characterize the ductile-brittle transition behavior of warm forged tungsten under shock loading conditions, we have performed shock/soft-recovery experiments at 22 and 4000 C. Results at 22 C indicate that shock (19 GPa) induced strains appear to be accommodated by fracture processes, i.e. there were no indications of shock induced plastic deformation and the test sample was reduced to rubble. At 400 C, the test sample was recovered intact and the shock induced plasticity caused deformation banding and an increase in the dislocation density of the material. For reasons unclear, almost no change in the post shock mechanical behavior was observed, despite the significant changes in the microstructure. The results of these experiments demonstrate the principal of a ductile-brittle transition behavior of tungsten under uniaxial shock loading conditions and indicate that explosively driven deformation of tungsten of this material will result in pulverization due to shock loading.

  15. In-Situ Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Iron Using Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Druschitz, Alan; Aristizabal, Ricardo; Druschitz, Edward; Hubbard, Camden R; Watkins, Thomas R; Walker, Larry R; Ostrander, M

    2012-01-01

    Intercritically austempered ductile irons hold promise for applications requiring fatigue durability, excellent castability, low production energy requirements, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and excellent machinability. In the present study, four different ductile iron alloys, containing manganese and nickel as the primary austenite-stabilizing elements, were heat treated to obtain different quantities of austenite in the final microstructure. This paper reports the microstructures and phases present in these alloys. Further, lattice strains and diffraction elastic constants in various crystallographic directions and the transformation characteristics of the austenite as a function of applied stress were determined using in-situ loading with neutron diffraction at the second generation Neutron Residual Stress Facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  16. Brittle-to-ductile transition of lithiated silicon electrodes: Crazing to stable nanopore growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haoran; Chew, Huck Beng; Wang, Xueju; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-14

    Using first principle calculations, we uncover the underlying mechanisms explaining the brittle-to-ductile transition of Li{sub x}Si electrodes in lithium ion batteries with increasing Li content. We show that plasticity initiates at x = ∼ 0.5 with the formation of a craze-like network of nanopores separated by Si–Si bonds, while subsequent failure is still brittle-like with the breaking of Si–Si bonds. Transition to ductile behavior occurs at x ⩾ 1 due to the increased density of highly stretchable Li–Li bonds, which delays nanopore formation and stabilizes nanopore growth. Collapse of the nanopores during unloading of the Li{sub x}Si alloys leads to significant strain recovery.

  17. Strength and ductility with {10͞11} - {10͞12} double twinning in a magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Lentz, M; Risse, M; Schaefer, N; Reimers, W; Beyerlein, I J

    2016-01-01

    Based on their high specific strength and stiffness, magnesium alloys are attractive for lightweight applications in aerospace and transportation, where weight saving is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. Unfortunately, the ductility of magnesium alloys is usually limited. It is thought that one reason for the lack of ductility is that the development of - double twins (DTW) cause premature failure of magnesium alloys. Here we show with a magnesium alloy containing 4 wt% lithium, that the same impressively large compression failure strains can be achieved with DTWs as without. The DTWs form stably across the microstructure and continuously throughout straining, forming three-dimensional intra-granular networks, a potential strengthening mechanism. We rationalize that relatively easier slip characteristic of this alloy plastically relaxed the localized stress concentrations that DTWs can generate. This result may provide key insight and an alternative perspective towards designing formable and strong magnesium alloys. PMID:27040648

  18. A Unified Cohesive Zone Approach to Model Ductile Brittle Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a unified cohesive zone model has been proposed to predict, Ductile to Brittle Transition, DBT, in Reactor Pressure Vessel, RPV, steels. A general procedure is described to obtain the Cohesive Zone Model, CZM, parameters for the different temperatures and fracture probabilities. In order to establish the full master-curve, the procedure requires three calibration points with one at the upper-shelf for ductile fracture and two for the fracture probabilities, Pf, of 5% and 95% at the lower-shelf. In the current study, these calibrations were carried out by utilizing the experimental fracture toughness values and flow curves. After the calibration procedure, the simulations of fracture behavior (ranging from completely unstable to stable crack extension behavior) in one inch thick compact tension specimens at different temperatures yielded values that were comparable to the experimental fracture toughness values, indicating the viability of such unified modeling approach.

  19. Computer simulation of crack propagation in ductile materials under biaxial dynamic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.M.

    1980-07-29

    The finite-difference computer program HEMP is used to simulate the crack-propagation phenomenon in two-dimensional ductile materials under truly dynamic biaxial loads. A comulative strain-damage criterion for the initiation of ductile fracture is used. To simulate crack propagation numerically, the method of equivalent free-surface boundary conditions and the method of artifical velocity are used in the computation. Centrally cracked rectangular aluminum bars subjected to constant-velocity biaxial loads at the edges are considered. Tensile and compressive loads in the direction of crack length are found, respectively, to increase and decrease directional instability in crack propagation, where the directional instability is characterized by branching or bifurcation.

  20. Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: helium isotope trends.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, B Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C

    2007-11-30

    Heat and mass are injected into the shallow crust when mantle fluids are able to flow through the ductile lower crust. Minimum 3He/4He ratios in surface fluids from the northern Basin and Range Province, western North America, increase systematically from low crustal values in the east to high mantle values in the west, a regional trend that correlates with the rates of active crustal deformation. The highest ratios occur where the extension and shear strain rates are greatest. The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active transtensional deformation indicates a deformation-enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere, even in regions where there is no substantial magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local, high 3He/4He anomalies indicating hidden magmatic activity and/or deep fluid production with locally enhanced permeability, identifying zones with high resource potential, particularly for geothermal energy development.

  1. Loss of Ductility Caused by AlN Precipitation in Hadfield Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radis, Rene; Schlacher, Christian; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Mayr, Peter; Enzinger, Norbert; Schröttner, Hartmuth; Sommitsch, Christof

    2012-04-01

    Two modified X120Mn12 Hadfield steels, differing in the amount of the alloying elements Al and N, are analyzed with respect to AlN precipitation and its effects on ductility. Charpy impact tests are performed, demonstrating the loss of ductility in the one grade containing a high density of AlN precipitates. The characterization of the precipitates is carried out by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). Depending on chemical composition, primary and secondary AlN precipitates are detected on prior austenite grain boundaries and within the bulk volume. The experimental observations are confirmed by thermokinetic simulations, using the software package MatCalc (Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria).

  2. Unnotched Charpy Impact Energy Transition Behavior of Austempered Engineering Grade Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisakurek, Sukru Ergin; Ozel, Ahmet

    2014-04-01

    Unnotched Charpy impact energy transition behavior of five different engineering grade ductile iron castings, as specified by EN 1563 Standards, were examined in as-cast, as well as in austempered states. ADIs were produced with the maximum impact energy values permissible for the grades. Austempering treatment detrimented the sub-zero impact properties of the ferritic castings, but considerably enhanced those of the pearlitic-ferritic irons. The impact energy transition behavior of the austempered states of all the grades examined were noted to be determined by the progressive transformation of the unavoidable carbon-unsaturated and untransformed regions of the austenite remaining in the matrix of the austempered ductile iron to martensite with decreasing temperature.

  3. Smart fiber-reinforced polymer rods featuring improved ductility and health monitoring capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belarbi, Abdeldjelil; Watkins, Steve E.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Corra, Josh; Konz, Bethany

    2001-06-01

    The strain-measuring capability of fiber optic strain gages in fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) rebars was investigated for failure-inducing loads. Fiber optic interferometric sensors were embedded in a pultruded carbon fiber core and then another layer of carbon fibers were filament wound around the core to form a shell. Pultrusion and filament winding techniques protect the fiber optic strain gages from the concrete environment while providing a secure bond to the core and additional ductility to the overall FRP rebar. Tests of coupon FRP rebar and of FRP-rebar-reinforced concrete beams show that the fiber optic strain gages can read internal strain through failure and can duplicate data from conventional linear variable differential transformers and electrical resistance strain gages. Also, the shell of the FRP rebar inside the concrete beams failed before the rebar core providing pseudo-ductility.

  4. Bifurcation and neck formation as a precursor to ductile fracture during high rate extension

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, L.B.; Soerensen, N.J.

    1997-12-31

    A block of ductile material, typically a segment of a plate or shell, being deformed homogeneously in simple plane strain extension commonly undergoes a bifurcation in deformation mode to nonuniform straining in the advanced stages of plastic flow. The focus here is on the influence of material inertia on the bifurcation process, particularly on the formation of diffuse necks as precursors to dynamic ductile fracture. The issue is considered from two points of view, first within the context of the theory of bifurcation of rate-independent, incrementally linear materials and then in terms of the complete numerical solution of a boundary value problem for an elastic-viscoplastic material. It is found that inertia favors the formation of relatively short wavelength necks as observed in shaped charge break-up and dynamic fragmentation.

  5. Influence of casting size and graphite nodule refinement on fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Hsu, C.H.; Chang, C.C.; Feng, H.P.

    1998-10-01

    Casting size affects the solidification cooling rate and microstructure of casting materials. Graphite nodules existing in the structure of ductile iron are an inherent and inert second phase that cannot be modified in subsequent heat-treatment processing. The matrix and the fineness of the second phase undoubtedly have some impact on the fracture toughness of the as-cast material, as does the subsequent heat treatment, as it alters the microstructure. This research applied austempering heat treatment to ductile iron of different section sizes and graphite nodule finenesses. The influence of these variables on the plane strain fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) of the castings so treated was compared to that of the as-cast state. Metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed to correlate the properties attained to the microstructural observation.

  6. Multi-Response Optimization of Carbidic Austempered Ductile Iron Production Parameters using Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanapal, P.; Mohamed Nazirudeen, S. S.; Chandrasekar, A.

    2012-04-01

    Carbide Austempered Ductile Iron (CADI) is the family of ductile iron containing wear resistance alloy carbides in the ausferrite matrix. This CADI is manufactured by selecting and characterizing the proper material composition through the melting route done. In an effort to arrive the optimal production parameters of multi responses, Taguchi method and Grey relational analysis have been applied. To analyze the effect of production parameters on the mechanical properties signal-to-noise ratio and Grey relational grade have been calculated based on the design of experiments. An analysis of variance was calculated to find the amount of contribution of factors on mechanical properties and their significance. The analytical results of Taguchi method were compared with the experimental values, and it shows that both are identical.

  7. The abrasion and impact-abrasion behavior of austempered ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Lerner, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    Austempering of ductile irons has led to a new class of irons, Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs), with improved mechanical strength and fracture toughness lacking in gray cast irons. Laboratory wear tests have been used to evaluate the abrasive and impact-abrasive wear behavior of a suite of ADIs. The use of high-stress, two-body abrasion, low-stress, three-body abrasion, and impact-abrasion tests provides a clear picture of the abrasive wear behavior of the ADIs and the mechanisms of material removal. When combined with hardness measurements, fracture toughness and a knowledge of the microstructure of the ADIs, the overall performance can be assessed relative to more wear resistant materials such as martensitic steels and high-chromium white cast irons

  8. Machinable, Thin-Walled, Gray and Ductile Iron Casting Production, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bates; Hanjun Li; Robin Griffin

    2003-12-08

    This report presents the results of research conducted to determine the effects of normal and abnormal processing and compositional variations on machinability (tool wear rate) of gray and ductile iron. The procedures developed allow precise tool wear measurements to be made and interpreted in terms of microstructures and compositions. Accurate data allows the most efficient ways for improving machinability to be determined without sacrificing properties of the irons.

  9. Origin of Extended Tensile Ductility of a Fe-28Mn-10Al-1C Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, J. D.; Hwang, S. W.; Park, K.-T.

    2009-07-01

    Fully austenitic Fe-28Mn-10Al-1.0C steel with high stacking fault energy exhibited exceptionally high uniform elongations (85 to 100 pct) and total elongations (100 to 110 pct) at room temperature. The origin of such exceptional room-temperature ductility was rationalized in terms of strain accommodation mechanisms of reduction of glide plane spacing in Taylor lattice (TL) formation at low strains and TL rotation forming domain boundaries (DBs) and microbands (MBs) at high strains.

  10. Evidence for fluid flow in ductile shear zones, Granite Wash Mountains, Maria fold and thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, B.A.; Mosher, S. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Synkinematic fluids that accompanied Mesozoic (D2) deformation in the Granite Wash Mountains, eastern Maria fold and thrust belt, had profound effects on the metamorphic mineralogy and deformation mechanisms of Paleozoic metsedimentary rocks. The D2 thrusts are discrete brittle faults that commonly bound highly sheared, ductilely deformed rocks. These low-angle faults cross cut a vertical section of Paleozoic and Mesozoic supracrustal rocks that were multiply repeated and upturned by earlier Mesozoic deformation, D1. Kinematic analysis of a series of these ductile shear zones has confirmed that the dominant sense of motion during thrusting was to the SW, however, some isolated kinematic indicators and indicators along the lowest zone suggest NE-thrusting. Microstructures in samples collected both within D2 ductile shear zones and outside D2 zones show fluids played an important role in D2 deformation. The abundant evidence for fluids along D2 ductile shear zones includes: quartz veins in the Kaibab Fm (a dolomitic marble), zones of metasomatic alteration ( bleached'' zones) within D2 zones, an increase in the abundance of metamorphic minerals within D2 zones, and the presence of synkinematic wollastonite in silicones limestones of the Redwall Fm. The most dramatic and significant effect of synkinematic fluids in on the style of deformation mechanisms operating during thrusting. Evidence for intracrystalline plastic deformation and rotational recrystallization is not well-developed: instead, microstructures are dominated by migrational recrystallization fabrics. In some samples, quartz grain boundaries have migrated over a preexisting foliation defined by aligned micas, indicating that grain boundaries were highly mobile. Fluid-enhanced grain boundary mobility has allowed internally deformed grains or parts of grains to be consumed rapidly with no or little record of the deformation left behind.

  11. Determination of the ductile-brittle transition temperature from the microplastic-strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. K.; Solntsev, Yu. P.

    2008-04-01

    The possibility of the determination of the tendency of cast and deformed steels to brittle fracture using the temperature dependence of the small-plastic-strain rate is studied. The temperature corresponding to the maximum in this curve is found to indicate an abrupt decrease in the steel plasticity, which makes it possible to interpret it as the ductile-brittle transition temperature depending only on the structure of a material.

  12. Optimal Scaling in Solids Undergoing Ductile Fracture by Void Sheet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokoua, Landry; Conti, Sergio; Ortiz, Michael

    2014-04-01

    This work is concerned with the derivation of optimal scaling laws, in the sense of matching lower and upper bounds on the energy, for a solid undergoing ductile fracture. The specific problem considered concerns a material sample in the form of an infinite slab of finite thickness subjected to prescribed opening displacements on its two surfaces. The solid is assumed to obey deformation-theory of plasticity and, in order to further simplify the analysis, we assume isotropic rigid-plastic deformations with zero plastic spin. When hardening exponents are given values consistent with observation, the energy is found to exhibit sublinear growth. We regularize the energy through the addition of nonlocal energy terms of the strain-gradient plasticity type. This nonlocal regularization has the effect of introducing an intrinsic length scale into the energy. Under these assumptions, ductile fracture emerges as the net result of two competing effects: whereas the sublinear growth of the local energy promotes localization of deformation to failure planes, the nonlocal regularization stabilizes this process, thus resulting in an orderly progression towards failure and a well-defined specific fracture energy. The optimal scaling laws derived here show that ductile fracture results from localization of deformations to void sheets, and that it requires a well-defined energy per unit fracture area. In particular, fractal modes of fracture are ruled out under the assumptions of the analysis. The optimal scaling laws additionally show that ductile fracture is cohesive in nature, that is, it obeys a well-defined relation between tractions and opening displacements. Finally, the scaling laws supply a link between micromechanical properties and macroscopic fracture properties. In particular, they reveal the relative roles that surface energy and microplasticity play as contributors to the specific fracture energy of the material.

  13. Experimental observation of dynamic ductile damage development under various triaxiality conditions - description of the principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillon, L.

    2012-08-01

    The Gurson model has been extended by Perrin to describe damage evolution in ductile viscoplastic materials. The so-called Gurson-Perrin model allows representing damage development with respect to strain-rate conditions. In order to fill a lack in current experimental procedures, we propose an experimental project able to test and validate the Gurson-Perrin model under various dynamic conditions and for different stress triaxiality levels.

  14. Multi-Objective Optimization of a Wrought Magnesium Alloy for High Strength and Ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Patton, Robert M; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2013-01-01

    An optimization technique is coupled with crystal plasticity based finite element (CPFE) computations to aid the microstructural design of a wrought magnesium alloy for improved strength and ductility. The initial microstructure consists of a collection of sub-micron sized grains containing deformation twins. The variables used in the simulations are crystallographic texture, and twin spacing within the grains. It is assumed that plastic deformation occurs mainly by dislocation slip on two sets of slip systems classified as hard and soft modes. The hard modes are those slip systems that are inclined to the twin planes and the soft mode consists of dislocation glide along the twin plane. The CPFE code calculates the stress-strain response of the microstructure as a function of the microstructural parameters and the length-scale of the features. A failure criterion based on a critical shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress is used to define ductility. The optimization is based on the sequential generation of an initial population defined by the texture and twin spacing variables. The CPFE code and the optimizer are coupled in parallel so that new generations are created and analyzed dynamically. In each successive generation, microstructures that satisfy at least 90% of the mean strength and mean ductility in the current generation are retained. Multiple generation runs based on the above procedure are carried out in order to obtain maximum strength-ductility combinations. The implications of the computations for the design of a wrought magnesium alloy are discussed. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  15. Effect of low temperatures on charpy impact toughness of austempered ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Mikhail V.; Lerner, Yury S.; Fahmy, Mohammed F.

    2002-10-01

    Impact properties of standard American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) grades of austempered ductile iron (ADI) were evaluated at subzero temperatures in unnotched and V-notched conditions and compared with ferritic and pearlitic grades of ductile irons (DIs). It was determined that there is a decrease in impact toughness for all ADI grades when there is a decrease in content of retained austenite and a decrease in test temperature, from room temperature (RT) to -60 °C. However, the difference in impact toughness values was not so noticeable for low retained austenite containing grade 5 ADI at both room and subzero temperatures as it was for ADI grade 1. Furthermore, the difference in impact toughness values of V-notched specimens of ADI grades 1 and 5 tested at -40 °C was minimal. The impact behaviors of ADI grade 5 and ferritic DI were found to be more stable than those of ADI grades 1, 2, 3, and 4 and pearlitic DI when the testing temperature was decreased. The impact toughness of ferritic DI was higher than that of ADI grades 1 and 2 at both -40 °C and -60 °C. The impact properties of ADI grades 4 and 5 were found to be higher than that of pearlitic DI at both -40 °C and -60 °C. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of fracture surfaces revealed mixed ductile and quasicleavage rupture morphology types in all ADI samples tested at both -40 °C and -60 °C. With decreasing content of retained austenite and ductility, the number of quasicleavage facets increased from ADI grade 1-5. It was also found that fracture morphology of ADI did not experience significant changes when the testing temperature decreased. Evaluation of the bending angle was used to support impact-testing data. Designers and users of ADI castings may use the data developed in this research as a reference.

  16. The Brittle-Ductile Transition in Crystal and Bubble-bearing Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricchi, L.; Pistone, M.; Cordonnier, B.; Tripoli, B.; Ulmer, P.; Reusser, E.; Marone, F.; Burlini, L.

    2011-12-01

    The strain response of magma is critically dependent upon its viscosity, the magnitude of the applied stress and the experimental time-scale. The brittle-ductile transition in pure silicate melts is expected for an applied stress approaching 108±0.5 Pa (Dingwell, 1997). However, magmas are mostly mixture of crystal and bubble-bearing silicate melts. To date, there are no data to constrain the ductile-brittle transition for three-phase magmas. Thus, we conducted consistent torsion experiments at high temperature (673-973 K) and high pressure (200 MPa), in the strain rate range 1*10-5-4*10-3 s-1, using a HT-HP internally-heated Paterson-type rock deformation apparatus. The samples are composed of hydrous haplogranitic glass, quartz crystals (24-65 vol%) and CO2-rich gas-pressurized bubbles (9-12 vol%). The applied strain rate was increased until brittle failure occurred; micro-fracturing and healing processes commonly occurred before sample macroscopic fracturing. The experimental results highlight a clear relationship between the effective viscosity of the three-phase magmas, strain rate, temperature and the onset of brittle-ductile behavior. Crystal- and bubble-free melts at high viscosity (1011-1011.6 Pa*s at 673 K) show brittle behavior in the strain rate range between 1*10-4 and 5*10-4 s-1. For comparable viscosities crystal and bubble-bearing magmas show a transition to brittle behavior at lower strain rates. Synchrotron-based 3D imaging of fractured samples, show the presence of fractures with an antithetic trend with respect to shear strain directions. The law found in this study expresses the transition from ductile to brittle behavior for real magmas and could significantly improve our understanding of the control of brittle processes on extrusion of high-viscosity magmas and degassing at silicic volcanoes.

  17. Effects of rolling on the ductility of 80% tungsten heavy alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, C.A.; Gurwell, W.E.

    1992-11-01

    Relations between transverse tensile ductility and rolling and annealing schedules were investigated for solid-state sintered and annealed 80%W8%Ni-2%Fe heavy alloy rolled at 900C or 1150C with varying reductions between anneals at either 1150C or 1400C. Final anneals and a solution heat treatment were employed prior to tensile testing. Metallographic and fractographic analyses were performed to determine relations between microstructure and physical properties. Multiple 1400C intermediate anneals with a maximum 60% rolling reduction produced higher transverse tensile elongations than rolled with a higher final reduction, 86%. Tensile elongation differences were attributed to the recrystallized intra-particle W grain sizes achieved during the final anneal. Materials given a maximum of 60% reduction before final anneal had fewer intra-particle W grains and therefore higher ductilities. For materials rolled at 900C or 1150C, no differences in transverse tensile elongation were observed. 1150C intermediate anneals had consistently lower ductility. 900C rolling produced slightly higher elongations than 1150C rolling, but only when the material was annealed at 1455C. Tensile yield and ultimate strengths did not vary greatly with rolling and intermediate annealing conditions. The edge cracking correlated with observed lateral spread and the material softness.

  18. Predicting Ductility and Failure Modes of TRIP Steels under Different Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-06-12

    We study the ultimate ductility and failure modes of a TRIP (TRansformation-Induced Plasticity) 800 steel under different loading conditions with an advanced micromechanics-based finite element analysis. The representative volume element (RVE) for the TRIP800 under examination is developed based on an actual microstructure obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The evolution of retained austenite during deformation process and the mechanical properties of the constituent phases of the TRIP800 steel are obtained from the synchrotron-based in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) experiments and a self-consistent (SC) model. The ductile failure of the TRIP800 under different loading conditions is predicted in the form of plastic strain localization without any prescribed failure criteria for the individual phases. Comparisons of the computational results with experimental measurements suggest that the microstructure-based finite element analysis can well capture the overall macroscopic behavior of the TRIP800 steel under different loading conditions. The methodology described in this study may be extended for studying the ultimate ductile failure mechanisms of TRIP steels as well as the effects of the various processing parameters on the macroscopic behaviors of TRIP steels.

  19. Effect of Ductile Agents on the Dynamic Behavior of SiC3D Network Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi; Fan, Qunbo

    2016-07-01

    Co-continuous SiC ceramic composites using pure aluminum, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU) as ductile agents were developed. The dynamic mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms were investigated experimentally using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method and computationally by finite element (FE) simulations. The results show that the SiC3D/Al composite has the best overall performance in comparison with SiC3D/epoxy and SiC3D/PU composites. FE simulations are generally consistent with experimental data. These simulations provide valuable help in predicting mechanical strength and in interpreting the experimental results and failure mechanisms. They may be combined with micrographs for fracture characterizations of the composites. We found that interactions between the SiC phase and ductile agents under dynamic compression in the SHPB method are complex, and that interfacial condition is an important parameter that determines the mechanical response of SiC3D composites with a characteristic interlocking structure during dynamic compression. However, the effect of the mechanical properties of ductile agents on dynamic behavior of the composites is a second consideration in the production of the composites.

  20. A cross-shear deformation for optimizing the strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Kotiba; Ko, Young Gun

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have recently attracted great interest due their lightweight and high specific strength. However, because of their hexagonal close-packed structure, they have few active slip systems, resulting in poor ductility and high mechanical anisotropy at room temperature. In the present work, we used a cross-shear deformation imposed by a differential speed rolling (DSR) technique to improve the room temperature strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. To introduce the cross-shear deformation, the sheets were rotated 180° around their longitudinal axis between the adjacent passes of DSR. The sheets of the AZ31 alloy subjected to the cross-shear deformation showed a uniform fine microstructure (1.2 ± 0.1 μm) with weak basal textures. The fabricated sheets showed a simultaneous high ultimate tensile strength and elongation-to-failure, i.e., ~333 MPa and ~21%, respectively. These were explained based on the structural features evolved due to the cross-shear deformation by DSR. The high strength was attributed to the uniform fine microstructure, whereas the high ductility was explained based on the basal texture weakening. PMID:27406685

  1. Towards an analysis of leak-before-break assessments in the ductile tearing regime

    SciTech Connect

    Parfitt, V.R.

    1991-12-31

    This paper presents the elastic-plastic fracture analysis of a typical semi-elliptical axial surface flaw growing to a thru-thickness flaw and assessing the leak-before break situation in a pressure vessel subject to pressure. The paper first discusses the semi-elliptical flaw J-integral solution and the thru-thickness flaw solution as modified herein. Then a review is presented of the three ductile tearing stability fracture analysis methods based on the fully plastic J-integral solution; (1) the crack driving force diagram, (2) the tearing modulus diagram, and (3) the failure assessment diagram. These methods are then used to determine the factors of safety to initiation of ductile tearing as the crack grows. Factors of safety based on either pressure alone or crack size alone are illustrated. An illustration is given of a leak-before-break solution discussing the semi-elliptical flaw growing to a thru-thickness flaw in the vessel. The paper concludes with a discussion of additional effort needed to better characterize leak-before-break solutions in the ductile tearing regime.

  2. Western Old Woman Mountains shear zone: Evidence for late ductile extension in the Cordilleran orogenic belt

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, B.S.; Miller, C.F. ); Foster, D.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Rocks within the 1-km-thick Western Old Woman Mountains shear zone (WSZ) contain ductilely deformed quartz and ductilely and brittlely deformed feldspars, indicating greenschist to lower amphibolite facies mylonitization. Foliation measured in 73 Ma mid-crustal granitoids within the zone generally dips west-southwest, and sense-of-shear indicators demonstrate top-to-the-west sense of movement parallel to gently southwest plunging lineation. The tip of the shear zone is not exposed, but 10 km to the west unmetamorphosed Late Cretaceous-age upper crust is present. The WSZ is thus most simply interpreted as a normal-sense low-angle shear zone. Timing of deformation is constrained to the interval 73 to ca. 65 Ma by the age of deformed granitoids and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar chronology. This interval coincides with a period of rapid cooling of rocks now exposed in the Old Woman Mountains that probably resulted from 4 to 8 km of unroofing. The authors suggest that movement along the WSZ is responsible for at least some of this unroofing. The proposed history involves tectonic denudation along a low-angle ductile shear zone and is similar to that demonstrated for Tertiary Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes.

  3. Improvement of pseudoelasticity and ductility of Beta III titanium alloy--application to orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Laheurte, P; Eberhardt, A; Philippe, Mj; Deblock, L

    2007-02-01

    The pseudoelasticity of metastable Beta III titanium alloy (TMAtrade mark) used for orthodontic applications is obtained by cold wiredrawing. This wire has higher rigidity than cold-drawn NiTi (Nitinoltrade mark, superelastic NiTi SE) and lower recoverable deformation. The low ductility value of Beta III is due to the deformation imposed by wiredrawing. The aim of this research was to improve the behaviour of this alloy by modifying the microstructural parameters to decrease the rigidity and increase the recoverable deformation and ductility of the alloy. The effects of second phase precipitate, grain size, and deformation on the wire mechanical properties were also examined. The isothermal precipitation of alpha (alpha) or omega (omega(isoth)) phases precludes the expression of the pseudoelastic effect. The presence of an omega(isoth) phase considerably increases fracture strength, whereas the alpha phase strongly decreases the ductility and adversely affects the strain recovery (epsilon(r)). To control the grain size, the growth of the recrystallized grains was studied by considering several parameters, which are known to have an influence on grain size, including the cold rolled strain, the temperature, the time of annealing, and the initial grain size. A structure with coarse grains, quenched from a temperature higher than the beta transus (T(beta)), associated with a plastic pre-deformation, contributed to an improved pseudoelastic behaviour, due to the presence of a reversible martensite phase (alpha'') induced by the pre-deformation. PMID:16954181

  4. A cross-shear deformation for optimizing the strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloys

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Kotiba; Ko, Young Gun

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have recently attracted great interest due their lightweight and high specific strength. However, because of their hexagonal close-packed structure, they have few active slip systems, resulting in poor ductility and high mechanical anisotropy at room temperature. In the present work, we used a cross-shear deformation imposed by a differential speed rolling (DSR) technique to improve the room temperature strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. To introduce the cross-shear deformation, the sheets were rotated 180° around their longitudinal axis between the adjacent passes of DSR. The sheets of the AZ31 alloy subjected to the cross-shear deformation showed a uniform fine microstructure (1.2 ± 0.1 μm) with weak basal textures. The fabricated sheets showed a simultaneous high ultimate tensile strength and elongation-to-failure, i.e., ~333 MPa and ~21%, respectively. These were explained based on the structural features evolved due to the cross-shear deformation by DSR. The high strength was attributed to the uniform fine microstructure, whereas the high ductility was explained based on the basal texture weakening. PMID:27406685

  5. Ductility Enhancement of Post-Northridge Connections by Multilongitudinal Voids in the Beam Web

    PubMed Central

    Celikag, Murude; Hedayat, Amir A.

    2013-01-01

    Since the earthquakes in Northridge and Kobe in 1994 and 1995, respectively, many investigations have been carried out towards improving the strength and ductility of steel beam to column pre- and post-Northridge connections. In order to achieve these objectives, recent researches are mainly focused on three principles: reducing the beam section to improve the beam ductility, adding different kinds of slit damper to beam and column flanges to absorb and dissipate the input earthquake energy in the connection and strengthening the connection area using additional elements such as rib plates, cover plates, and flange plates to keep the plastic hinges away from the column face. This paper presents a reduced beam section approach via the introduction of multilongitudinal voids (MLV) in the beam web for various beam depths varying from 450 mm to 912 mm. ANSYS finite element program was used to simulate the three different sizes of SAC sections: SAC3, SAC5, and SAC7. Results showed an improvement in the connection ductility since the input energy was dissipated uniformly along the beam length and the total rotation of the connection was over four percent radian. PMID:24311977

  6. Effect of Ductile Agents on the Dynamic Behavior of SiC3D Network Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi; Fan, Qunbo

    2016-10-01

    Co-continuous SiC ceramic composites using pure aluminum, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU) as ductile agents were developed. The dynamic mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms were investigated experimentally using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method and computationally by finite element (FE) simulations. The results show that the SiC3D/Al composite has the best overall performance in comparison with SiC3D/epoxy and SiC3D/PU composites. FE simulations are generally consistent with experimental data. These simulations provide valuable help in predicting mechanical strength and in interpreting the experimental results and failure mechanisms. They may be combined with micrographs for fracture characterizations of the composites. We found that interactions between the SiC phase and ductile agents under dynamic compression in the SHPB method are complex, and that interfacial condition is an important parameter that determines the mechanical response of SiC3D composites with a characteristic interlocking structure during dynamic compression. However, the effect of the mechanical properties of ductile agents on dynamic behavior of the composites is a second consideration in the production of the composites.

  7. Mechanical, physical, and corrosion characteristics of 2% vanadium alloyed ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Jaafar, Roseleena; Ramli, Abdullah; Faitullah, Ahmad

    2010-03-01

    This study was to investigate the effect of 2% vanadium alloyed austempered ductile iron on mechanical properties and microstructure and also to determine the desired austempering temperatures of vanadium alloyed ductile iron. In this study, specimens of 2%vanadium DI were produced by using the Y-block casting in the foundry lab. The specimen produced were machine according to the tensile and impact dimension followed the TSEN1002-1 and ASTM E23 standard. Then, austempering process was performed at the three different temperatures to the sample which are 500°, 600° and 700° in high temperature furnace. The specimens has been machine were undergoes the tensile, impact, density and hardness test. The microstructures were observed by using Olympus BX 41 M Microscopes image analysis system before and after etching by Nital 15%. Polarization test also were conduct between commercial DI and 2%V-DI. The results show that 2% vanadium alloyed ductile iron (2% V-DI) not only increases the nodule count and ferrite content in the microstructure, but also improves the mechanical properties such as tensile strength, impact toughness proportional to the austempered temperature as compared to unalloyed DI. The low corrosion rates also show for the 2% of vanadium alloyed compare to the commercial DI.

  8. Mechanical, physical, and corrosion characteristics of 2% vanadium alloyed ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Jaafar, Roseleena; Ramli, Abdullah; Faitullah, Ahmad

    2009-12-01

    This study was to investigate the effect of 2% vanadium alloyed austempered ductile iron on mechanical properties and microstructure and also to determine the desired austempering temperatures of vanadium alloyed ductile iron. In this study, specimens of 2%vanadium DI were produced by using the Y-block casting in the foundry lab. The specimen produced were machine according to the tensile and impact dimension followed the TSEN1002-1 and ASTM E23 standard. Then, austempering process was performed at the three different temperatures to the sample which are 500°, 600° and 700° in high temperature furnace. The specimens has been machine were undergoes the tensile, impact, density and hardness test. The microstructures were observed by using Olympus BX 41 M Microscopes image analysis system before and after etching by Nital 15%. Polarization test also were conduct between commercial DI and 2%V-DI. The results show that 2% vanadium alloyed ductile iron (2% V-DI) not only increases the nodule count and ferrite content in the microstructure, but also improves the mechanical properties such as tensile strength, impact toughness proportional to the austempered temperature as compared to unalloyed DI. The low corrosion rates also show for the 2% of vanadium alloyed compare to the commercial DI.

  9. The influence of strain rate and hydrogen on the plane-strain ductility of Zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Link, T.M.; Motta, A.T.; Koss, D.A.

    1998-03-01

    The authors studied the ductility of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding under loading conditions prototypical of those found in reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), i.e.: near plane-strain deformation in the hoop direction (transverse to the cladding axis) at room temperature and 300 C and high strain rates. To conduct these studies, they developed a specimen configuration in which near plane-strain deformation is achieved in the gage section, and a testing methodology that allows one to determine both the limit strain at the onset of localized necking and the fracture strain. The experiments indicate that there is little effect of strain rate (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) on the ductility of unhydrided Zircaloy tubing deformed under near plane-strain conditions at either room temperature or 300 C. Preliminary experiments on cladding containing 190 ppm hydrogen show only a small loss of fracture strain but no clear effect on limit strain. The experiments also indicate that there is a significant loss of Zircaloy ductility when surface flaws are present in the form of thickness imperfections.

  10. Quantum-to-continuum prediction of ductility loss in aluminium-magnesium alloys due to dynamic strain aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keralavarma, S. M.; Bower, A. F.; Curtin, W. A.

    2014-08-01

    Negative strain-rate sensitivity due to dynamic strain aging in Aluminium-5XXX alloys leads to reduced ductility and plastic instabilities at room temperature, inhibiting application of these alloys in many forming processes. Here a hierarchical multiscale model is presented that uses (i) quantum and atomic information on solute energies and motion around a dislocation core, (ii) dislocation models to predict the effects of solutes on dislocation motion through a dislocation forest, (iii) a thermo-kinetic constitutive model that faithfully includes the atomistic and dislocation scale mechanisms and (iv) a finite-element implementation, to predict the ductility as a function of temperature and strain rate in AA5182. The model, which contains no significant adjustable parameters, predicts the observed steep drop in ductility at room temperature, which can be directly attributed to the atomistic aging mechanism. On the basis of quantum inputs, this multiscale theory can be used in the future to design new alloys with higher ductility.

  11. Fabrication of a 2014Al-SiC/2014Al Sandwich Structure Composite with Good Tensile Strength and Ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xian; Zhao, Yu-Guang; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Wu, Min; Pei, Chang-hao; Chen, Chao; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2016-09-01

    A sandwich structure laminate composed of a ductile 2014Al inter-layer and two nanoscale SiC reinforced 2014Al (SiC/2014Al) composite outer layers was successfully fabricated through the combination of powder metallurgy and hot rolling. The ductile 2014Al inter-layer effectively improved the processability of the sandwiched laminates. Tensile test revealed that the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the sandwiched laminate were 287 and 470 MPa, respectively, compared with 235 and 425 MPa for monolithic 2014Al. The good performance of the sandwiched laminate results from the strong bonding between the SiC/2014Al composites layer and the ductile 2014Al layer. Thus, the sandwich structure with a composite surface and ductile core is effective for increasing the strength and toughness of composite laminates.

  12. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DUCTILE-PHASE-TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN COMPOSITES FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Kevin; Odette, G Robert; Fields, Kirk A.; Gragg, David; Zok, Frank W.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.

    2014-08-29

    A promising approach to increasing fracture toughness and decreasing the DBTT of a W-alloy is by ductile-phase toughening (DPT). In this method, a ductile phase is included in a brittle matrix to prevent crack propagation by bridging. Composite specimens were fabricated by two methods: 1) sintering W powders together with carburized W wires, and 2) hot pressing W and Cu foils together with W wires. These composites were tested in tension and three-point bending.

  13. Ductile and Compacted Graphite Iron Casting Skin -- Evaluation, Effect on Fatigue Strength and Elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonmee, Sarum

    Compacted graphite (CG) iron features a good combination of tensile strength, impact resistance, thermal conductivity and damping capacity. This combination makes CG iron a material of choice for various applications, especially for the automobile industry. The mechanical properties of CG iron listed in the standards (i.e. ASTM) are for machined specimens. However, since most iron castings retain the original casting surface (a.k.a. casting skin), the actual performance of the part could be significantly different from that of the machined specimens. Recent studies have shown the negative effect of the casting skin, but little quantification of its effect on mechanical properties is available. Further, the understanding of its mechanism of formation is at best incomplete. In this research, the effect of the casting skin on mechanical properties in CG and ductile irons (DI) is explored. The differences in tensile and fatigue properties between as-cast and machined samples were quantified and correlated to the casting skin features. It was found that the presence of the casting skin was accountable for 9% reduction of tensile strength and up to 32% reduction of fatigue strength (for CG iron with 40% nodularity). Several mechanisms of the casting skin formation are proposed in this research. The formation of ferritic and pearlitic rims is explained by decarburizing/carburizing reactions at the mold/metal interface. Mg depletion and solidification kinetics effect were identified as the formation mechanisms of the graphite degradation. A 2-D thermal diffusion model was formulated based on Mg depletion theory. The model can be used to predict the casting skin thickness when Mg depletion is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using the asymmetric Fe-Gr phase diagram, some instances of casting skin formation were explained based on solidification kinetics theory. The experimental microstructural evidence and the theoretical progress were conducive to the development of

  14. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transformation temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antolovich, Stephen D.; Saxena, Ashok; Cullers, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    One of the ongoing challenges of the aerospace industry is to develop more efficient turbine engines. Greater efficiency entails reduced specific strength and larger temperature gradients, the latter of which means higher operating temperatures and increased thermal conductivity. Continued development of nickel-based superalloys has provided steady increases in engine efficiency and the limits of superalloys have probably not been realized. However, other material systems are under intense investigation for possible use in high temperature engines. Ceramic, intermetallic, and various composite systems are being explored in an effort to exploit the much higher melting temperatures of these systems. NiAl is considered a potential alternative to conventional superalloys due to its excellent oxidation resistance, low density, and high melting temperature. The fact that NiAl is the most common coating for current superalloy turbine blades is a tribute to its oxidation resistance. Its density is one-third that of typical superalloys and in most temperature ranges its thermal conductivity is twice that of common superalloys. Despite these many advantages, NiAl requires more investigation before it is ready to be used in engines. Binary NiAl in general has poor high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. On-going research in alloy design continues to make improvements in the high-temperature strength of NiAl. The factors controlling low temperature ductility have been identified in the last few years. Small, but reproducible ductility can now be achieved at room temperature through careful control of chemical purity and processing. But the mechanisms controlling the transition from brittle to ductile behavior are not fully understood. Research in the area of fatigue deformation can aid the development of the NiAl system in two ways. Fatigue properties must be documented and optimized before NiAl can be applied to engineering systems. More importantly though

  15. Role of matrix/reinforcement interfaces in the fracture toughness of brittle materials toughened by ductile reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Abbaschian, R.

    1992-10-01

    Crack interactions with ductile reinforcements, especially behavior of a crack tip at the interface, have been studied using MoSi2 composites reinforced with Nb foils. Effects of fracture energy of interfaces on toughness of the composites have also been investigated. Variation of interfacial bonding was achieved by depositing an oxide coating or by the development of a reaction prod- uct layer between the reinforcement and matrix. Toughness was measured using bend tests on chevron-notched specimens. It has been established that as a crack interacts with a ductile re- inforcement, three mechanisms compcte: interfacial debonding, multiple matrix fracture, and direct crack propagation through the reinforcement. Decohesion length at the matrix/reinforcement interface depends on the predominant mechanism. Furthermore, the results add to the evidence that the extent to which interfacial bonding is conducive to toughness of the composites depends on the criterion used to describe the toughness and that ductility of the ductile reinforcement is also an important factor in controlling toughness of the composites. Loss of ductility of the ductile reinforcement due to inappropriate processing could result in little improvement in tough- ness of the composites.

  16. Prediction Of Formability In Sheet Metal Forming Processes Using A Local Damage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, P.; Santos, Abel; Cesar Sa, J.; Andrade Pires, F.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2007-05-17

    The formability in sheet metal forming processes is mainly conditioned by ductile fracture resulting from geometric instabilities due to necking and strain localization. The macroscopic collapse associated with ductile failure is a result of internal degradation described throughout metallographic observations by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids and micro-cracks. Damage influences and is influenced by plastic deformation and therefore these two dissipative phenomena should be coupled at the constitutive level. In this contribution, Lemaitre's ductile damage model is coupled with Hill's orthotropic plasticity criterion. The coupling between damaging and material behavior is accounted for within the framework of Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM). The resulting constitutive equations are implemented in the Abaqus/Explicit code, for the prediction of fracture onset in sheet metal forming processes. The damage evolution law takes into account the important effect of micro-crack closure, which dramatically decreases the rate of damage growth under compressive paths.

  17. Adhesion, friction, and wear behavior of clean metal-ceramic couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1995-01-01

    When a clean metal is brought into contact with a clean, harder ceramic in ultrahigh vacuum, strong bonds form between the two materials. The interfacial bond strength between the metal and ceramic surfaces in sliding contact is generally greater than the cohesive bond strength in the metal. Thus, fracture of the cohesive bonds in the metal results when shearing occurs. These strong interfacial bonds and the shearing fracture in the metal are the main causes of the observed wear behavior and the transfer of the metal to the ceramic. In the literature, the surface energy (bond energy) per unit area of the metal is shown to be related to the degree of interfacial bond strength per unit area. Because the two materials of a metal-ceramic couple have markedly different ductilities, contact can cause considerable plastic deformation of the softer metal. It is the ductility of the metal, then, that determines the real area of contact. In general, the less ductile the metal, the smaller the real area of contact. The coefficient of friction for clean surfaces of metal-ceramic couples correlates with the metals total surface energy in the real area of contact gamma A (which is the product of the surface energy per unit area of the metal gamma and the real area of contact (A)). The coefficient of friction increases as gamma A increases. Furthermore, gamma A is associated with the wear and transfer of the metal at the metal-ceramic interface: the higher the value of gamma A, the greater the wear and transfer of the metal.

  18. Effect of Surface Modification on Cumulative Tensile Ductility of AZ31 Magnesium Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad-korayem, Mahdi; Jain, Mukesh K.; Mishra, Raja K.

    2016-09-01

    Wire brushing and annealing (WBA) process was developed, optimized and utilized to modify the surface layer microstructure of AZ31 automotive magnesium sheet material. The process was carried out using softer brass wire brushes to mitigate the effect of wire brushing on surface quality and damage. The influence of modified surface grain structure and crystallographic texture was studied by continuous uniaxial tension test as well as by a newly proposed multi-step uniaxial stretching and annealing (MUSA) process to assess cumulative uniaxial tensile ductility of AZ31 sheet. A rotational speed of 2800 revolutions per minute for the wire brush with a near-zero depth of cut followed by annealing at 473 K (200 °C) for 60 minutes resulted in acceptable surface quality with a refined grain layer of depth 30 μm, and a modified crystallographic texture on the surface. Material flow behavior, grain microstructure, and texture evolution of WBA-processed material during subsequent MUSA process were analyzed to assess the role of wire brushing in enhancing the MUSA response of AZ31 sheet. Original fully annealed AZ31 sheet (in the non-WBA condition) was also subjected to identical MUSA process for comparison purposes. The results showed improvement in terminal uniaxial tensile ductility of WBA-MUSA-processed material compared to Standard-MUSA material. The ductility improvement is attributed to non-basal texture development and re-distribution of the texture, as well as to grain refinement within the highly deformed surface layer from the combination of WBA and MUSA processes.

  19. Role of fluid overpressures in crustal strength and the form of the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, J.

    2014-12-01

    The classic crustal strength-depth model of Brace and Kolhstedt (1980) (see figure) based on experimental rock mechanics depends in the brittle regime on the critical assumption of linearly increasing hydrostatic pore-fluid pressures. This leads to a predicted linearly increasing brittle strength that is well established based on deep borehole stress measurements in crystalline crust. In contrast, fluid overpressures are widely documented in orogenic belts based on borehole data, seismic velocity analysis and analysis of veins, in some cases showing complex fault-valve pressure fluctuations between lithostatic and hydrostatic. Typical observed overpressure-depth relationships predict a brittle crustal strength that is approximately constant with depth in contrast with the classic model. This constant-strength behavior below the fluid-retention depth (ZFRD in figure) has been confirmed using deep borehole stress and fluid-pressure measurements (Suppe, 2014). Recent ductile-plastic modeling of disequilibrium compaction suggests that pressure solution promotes further increases in overpressure and weakening, promoting a very prolonged low-strength brittle-ductile transition. Overpressured conditions can be inferred to exist over a substantial fraction of crustal thickness, spanning the brittle-ductile transition, in several tectonic environments, most straightforwardly in shale-rich clastic sedimentary basins built to sea level on oceanic or highly thinned continental crust such as the US Gulf Coast and Niger Delta. These thick accumulations commonly deform into shale-rich plate boundary mountain belts (e.g. Bangladesh/Miyanmar, Makran, Trinidad/Barbados, Gulf of Alaska, southern Taiwan and New Zealand). There is deep geophysical evidence for near lithostatic pore-fluid pressures existing to depths of 20-30km based on Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs and Q observations. We present active examples from Taiwan and New Zealand, combining borehole data and seismic tomography.

  20. Effect of initial microstructure on the activation energy of second stage during austempering of ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Campos-Cambranis, R.E.; Narvaez Hernandez, L.; Cisneros-Guerrero, M.M.; Perez-Lopez, M.J.

    1998-03-13

    The good balance among mechanical properties of austempered ductile irons (ADI) mainly depends on the matrix microstructure, which basically consists of acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. This structure is produced by isothermal transformation of the austenite over the temperature range of 523 to 673 K. It is well accepted that during the isothermal holding, the transformation takes place in two stages. In the first stage, the austenite decomposes into acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. When the austenite is transformed at temperatures higher than 623 K, the acicular ferrite is free of carbides; at temperatures below 623 K, besides the formation of the acicular ferrite and austenite, precipitation of carbides takes place over the plates of the acicular ferrite. The mixture of ferrite and austenite is known as ausferrite being the responsible for the good mechanical properties of ADI. In this work, the ausferrite obtained above and below 623 K will be termed high and low temperature ausferrite respectively. Although ausferrite does not transform at room temperature, it is not a thermodynamically stable structure. Consequently, if the isothermal holding is extended, or if ADI is heated at high temperatures (523 to 800 K), the second stage of the austempering reaction will occur. During this stage, the carbon rich austenite will decompose into ferrite and carbides. In order to establish the maximum working temperature of ADI, it is necessary to characterize the thermal stability of ausferrite microstructure, since once stage II takes place, the mechanical properties, in particular ductility and toughness, are adversely affected. In the present work the influence of previous ausferrite microstructure (that obtained during first stage) of an alloyed ductile iron (0.6%Ni, 0.15%Mo) on the empirical activation energy of stage II is studied.

  1. Late Cretaceous ductile deformation, metamorphism and plutonism in the Piute Mountains, eastern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.M.; Karlstrom, K.E. )

    1990-01-10

    Late Cretaceous deformation in the Piute Mountains involved ductile thrusting on a network of anastomosing northeast and southwest directed shear zones. The shear zones often separate Proterozoic lithologies with strong competency contrasts, suggesting that Proterozoic crustal anisotropies were important in controlling the geometry of the shear zone network. Shear zones now divide the crust into wedge- and lozenge-shaped blocks. The Piute Mountains can be separated into two kinematic domains, each characterized by a dominant sense of shear. Thrusting in the southwest directed kinematic domain ended at 85 {plus minus} 7 Ma, the age of the late synkinematic East Piute pluton. Thrusting in the northeast directed kinematic domain could have lasted until 74 {plus minus} 3 Ma, the age of the Lazy Daisy pluton. Postthrusting northwest-southeast shortening produced a second generation of upright open folds with a northeast striking subvertical crenulation cleavage. F{sub 2} strain increases toward the south and is concentrated around the margins of the Lazy Daisy pluton. This deformation was synchronous with pluton emplacement. Lake Cretaceous peak metamorphism outlasted all ductile deformation. Peak metamorphic grade increases from upper greenschist facies in the north to upper amphibolite facies as the Lazy Daisy pluton is approached. Temperature and pressure of approximately 450 C and 2.5-4.0 kbar were achieved during ductile thrusting. Temperatures of 500-540 C existed at the onset of upright open folding, and peak temperatures as high as 620 C near the Lazy Daisy pluton occurred after F{sub 2} upright folding. All penetrative deformation ended before 72-71 Ma, by which time the area had cooled to below 300 C.

  2. Effect of austempering time on mechanical properties of a low manganese austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Putatunda, S.K.; Gadicherla, P.K.

    2000-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of austempering time on the resultant microstructure and the room-temperature mechanical properties of an unalloyed and low manganese ductile cast iron with initially ferritic as-cast structure. The effect of austempering time on the plane strain fracture toughness of this material was also studied. Compact tension and round cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from unalloyed ductile cast iron with low manganese content and with a ferritic as-cast (solidified) structure. These specimens were then austempered in the upper (371 C) and lower (260 C) bainitic temperature ranges for different time periods, ranging from 30 min. to 3 h. Microstructural features such as type of bainite and the volume fraction of ferrite and austenite and its carbon content were evaluated by X-ray diffraction to examine the influence of microstructure on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of this material. The results of the present investigation indicate that for this low manganese austempered ductile iron (ADI), upper ausferritic microstructures exhibit higher fracture toughness than lower ausferritic microstructures. Yield and tensile strength of the material was found to increase with an increase in austempering time in a lower bainitic temperature range, whereas in the upper bainitic temperature range, time has no significant effect on the mechanical properties. A retained austenite content between 30 to 35% was found to provide optimum fracture toughness. Fracture toughness was found to increase with the parameter (X{gamma}C{gamma}/d){sup 1/2}, where X{gamma} is the volume fraction of austenite, C{gamma} is the carbon content of the austenite, and d is the mean free path of dislocation motion in ferrite.

  3. Effect of austempering time on mechanical properties of a low manganese austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putatunda, Susil K.; Gadicherla, Pavan K.

    2000-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of austempering time on the resultant microstructure and the room-temperature mechanical properties of an unalloyed and low manganese ductile cast iron with initially ferritic as-cast structure. The effect of austempering time on the plane strain fracture toughness of this material was also studied. Compact tension and round cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from unalloyed ductile cast iron with low manganese content and with a ferritic as-cast (solidified) structure. These specimens were then austempered in the upper (371 °C) and lower (260 °C) bainitic temperature ranges for different time periods, ranging from 30 min. to 4 h. Microstructural features such as type of bainite and the volume fraction of ferrite and austenite and its carbon content were evaluated by X-ray diffraction to examine the influence of microstructure on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of this material. The results of the present investigation indicate that for this low manganese austempered ductile iron (ADI), upper ausferritic microstructures exhibit higher fracture toughness than lower ausferritic microstructures. Yield and tensile strength of the material was found to increase with an increase in austempering time in a lower bainitic temperature range, whereas in the upper bainitic temperature range, time has no significant effect on the mechanical properties. A retained austenite content between 30 to 35% was found to provide optimum fracture toughness. Fracture toughness was found to increase with the parameter ( XγCγ/d)1/2, where Xγ is the volume fraction of austenite, Cγ is the carbon content of the austenite, and d is the mean free path of dislocation motion in ferrite.

  4. An investigation of the mineral in ductile and brittle cortical mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter, and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone's mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone's mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta model, oim(-/-) , mice have a defect in the collagen, which leads to brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants, Phospho1(-/-) , have ductile bone resulting from altered mineralization. Oim(-/-) and Phospho1(-/-) were compared with their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Results revealed that although both pathology models had extremely different whole-bone mechanics, they both had smaller apatite crystals, lower bulk mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. In contrast, the degree of mineralization of bone matrix was different for each strain: brittle oim(-/-) were hypermineralized, whereas ductile Phospho1(-/-) were hypomineralized. Despite differences in the mineralization, nanoscale alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results indicated that alterations from normal crystal size

  5. Strain localization in carbonate rocks experimentally deformed in the ductile field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.; Dresen, G.

    2012-04-01

    The deformation of rocks in the Earth's crust is often localized, varying from brittle fault gauges in shallow environments to mylonites in ductile shear zones at greater depth. A number of theoretical, experimental, and field studies focused on the evolution and extend of brittle fault zones, but little is known so far about initiation of ductile shear zones. Strain localization in rocks deforming at high temperature and pressure may be induced by several physical, chemical, or structurally-related mechanisms. We performed simple and pure shear deformation experiments on carbonate rocks containing structural inhomogenities in the ductile deformation regime. The results may help to gain insight into the evolution of high temperature shear zones. As starting material we used cylindrical samples of coarse-grained Carrara marble containing one or two 1 mm thin artificially prepared sheets of fine-grained Solnhofen limestone, which act as soft inclusions under the applied experimental conditions. Length and diameter of the investigated solid and hollow cylinders were 10-20 mm and 10-15 mm, respectively. Samples were deformed in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900° C temperature and confining pressures of 300 and 400 MPa. Three samples were deformed in axial compression at a bulk strain rate of 8x10-5 s-1to axial strains between 0.02 and 0.21 and 15 samples were twisted in torsion at a bulk shear strain rate of 2x10-4 s-1 to shear strains between 0.01 and 3.74. At low strain, specimens deformed axially and in torsion show minor strain hardening that is replaced by strain weakening at shear strains in excess of about 0.2. Peak shear stress at the imposed condition is about 20 MPa. Strain localized strongly within the weak inclusions as indicated by inhomogeneous bending of initially straight strain markers on sample jackets. Maximum strain concentration within inclusions with respect to the adjacent matrix was between 4 and 40, depending on total strain and

  6. Ultraprecision, high stiffness CNC grinding machines for ductile mode grinding of brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Patrick A.; Carlisle, Keith; Shore, Paul; Read, R. F.

    1990-10-01

    Under certain controlled conditions it is now possible to machine brittle materials such as glasses and ceramics using single or multi-point diamond tools (grinding), so that material is removed by plastic flow, leaving crack-free surfaces. This process is called 'shear' or 'ductile' mode grinding. It represents a major breakthrough in modern manufacturing engineering since it promises to enable: - complex optical components, both transmission and reflecting to be generated by advanced CNC machines with very little (or even zero) subsequent polishing. - complex shaped components such as turbine blades, nozzle guide vanes, etc. to be finish machined after near net shape forming, to high precision in advanced ceramics such as silicon nitride, without inducing micro-cracking and thus lowering ultimate rupture strength and fatigue life. Ductile mode "damage free" grinding occurs when the volume of materials stressed by each grit of the grinding wheel is small enough to yield rather than exhibit brittle fracture, i.e. cracking. In practice, this means maintaining the undeformed chip thickness to below the ductile-brittle transition value; this varies from material to material but is generally in the order of 0.1 pm or 100 nm, (hence the term "nanogrinding" is sometimes used) . Thus the critical factors for operating successfully in the ductile regime are machine system accuracy and dynamic stiffness between each grit and the workpiece. In detail this means: (i) High precision 'truing' of the diamond grits, together with dressing of the wheel bond to ensure adequate ' openness'; (ii) Design and build of the grinding wheel spindle with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, radial and axial, must be considerably less than 100 nfl. (iii) Design and build of the workpiece carriage motion system with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, linear or rotary, must be well within 100 nm. (iv) Smooth, rumble-free, high-stiffness servo-drives controlling the motions

  7. Simultaneous enhancement of toughness, ductility, and strength of nanocrystalline ceramics at high strain-rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mo Yifei; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2007-04-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations of tensile testing have been performed on nc-SiC. Reduction of grain size promotes simultaneous enhancement of ductility, toughness, and strength. nc-SiC fails by intergranular fracture preceded by atomic level necking. Conventionally, high strain-rate deformations of ceramics are limited by diffusion time scales, since diffusion prevents premature cavitation and failure. The authors report a nondiffusional mechanism for suppressing premature cavitation, which is based on unconstrained plastic flow at grain boundaries. Based on the composite's rule of mixture, they estimate Young's modulus of random high-angle grain boundaries in nc-SiC to be about 130 GPa.

  8. Some Remarks on the Choice of Ductility Class for Earthquake-Resistant Steel Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejčeková-Farhat, Miroslava; Ároch, Rudolf

    2013-09-01

    The implementation of the Eurocodes in current structural design practice has brought about a new emphasis on the design of earthquake-resistant structures. In some European countries, new earthquake zones have been defined; henceforth, the design requirements of many ongoing projects have changed as well. The choice of the ductility class of steel structures as one of the key design parameters, the consequences of this choice on design procedure, and some applications of the Eurocode 8 design criteria by comparing French and Slovak national practice are discussed, using a practical example of a structure.

  9. Lithospheric deformation and fault growth in brittle/ductile media under collision and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueller, S.; Davy, P.

    2003-04-01

    Lithosphere deformation styles (compression, extension and strike-slip) result from the interplay between various forces and rheologies. In this study, we attempt at determining the mechanical parameters that control deformation style in colliding systems. We especially point out the role of gravity and of brittle/ductile coupling on fault growth and deformation patterns. The results are obtained from a compilation of several tenths of laboratory experiments designed to be analogue to lithosphere deformation. A large diversity of geometry and dynamics are actually observed when varying model parameters (thickness of layers, viscosities, densities) and boundary conditions (boundary shape, compression velocity). For experiments, whose rheology is almost entirely brittle, deformation is strongly localized in a few large faults. On the contrary, if ductile layers are mechanically prevailing, deformation is diffuse with no large fault. This observation has been quantified by the localization parameter G (Bonnet, 1997). G expresses the strength ratio between brittle and ductile layers. The other main effect comes from gravity force, whose ratio with strength, determines the mode of deformation. In systems with large (small, resp.) gravity forces, extensive (compressive resp.) structures are prevailing. The Argand number Ar (England and McKenzie, 1982), which is the ratio between gravity forces and total strength, is a dimensionless quantification of this effect. Fifty analogue experiments (from bibliography or especially performed for this study) have been analyzed. All are of the same kind: uniaxial compression with one or two stress-free boundaries, brittle-sand/ductile-silicone layering overlying a very fluid honey bath that ensures isostatic force. Details of the experimental technique including governing equations, rheological parameters and lithosphere analogy are described in Davy and Cobbold (1991). All the experiments cover the range of admissible parameters

  10. Ductile-phase toughening and fatigue crack growth in Nb{sub 3}Al base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanamoorthy, R.; Hanada, S.; Kamata, K.

    1996-03-15

    Niobium aluminide (Nb{sub 3}Al) base intermetallic compounds exhibit good high-temperature strength and creep properties and potential for applications above 1,200 C provided their inadequately low room-temperature ductility, fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth behavior are improved. Addition of tantalum to Nb{sub 3}Al base materials improves the high-temperature strength significantly and seems to be a potential alloying element. In the present study, room temperature fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth behavior of tantalum alloyed Nb{sub 3}Al base alloy prepared by ingot metallurgy are investigated.

  11. Enhancement of Fatigue Properties of Ductile Irons by Successive Austempering Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangiri, M. R.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili; Farhangi, H.

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of austempering heat treatment on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and bending fatigue behavior of an alloyed ductile iron with chemical composition of 1.6 wt.% Ni, 0.47 wt.% manganese and 0.6 wt.% copper. Based on the results of tensile and impact tests, as well as metallographic studies, optimum heat-treating cycles were determined and applied on the standard fatigue specimens. The results showed that the fatigue strength of specimens austempered successively was practically comparable to those austempered at high temperatures and considerably greater than those austempered at low temperatures.

  12. Metal-metal laminar composites for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. A.; Weeton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A study was conducted to obtain indications of the potentialities of laminar metal-metal composites for elevated temperature use. Most of the composites consisted of multiple layers or laminae of tungsten alternated with laminae of Nichrome V, a ductile, weaker but oxidation-resistant alloy. Composites with 50 volume percent of each phase were tested in tension and stress rupture at temperatures of 871 and 1093 C (1600 and 2000 F) and in impact at 23 and 524 C (73 and 975 F). A tension and a short time stress-rupture test was conducted on specimens of 77 v/o W-Re-Hf-C/23 v/o Inconel alloy 600 at 1093 C (2000 F).

  13. Mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V specimens produced by shaped metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baufeld, Bernd; van der Biest, Omer

    2009-01-01

    Shaped metal deposition is a novel technique to build near net-shape components layer by layer by tungsten inert gas welding. Especially for complex shapes and small quantities, this technique can significantly lower the production cost of components by reducing the buy-to-fly ratio and lead time for production, diminishing final machining and preventing scrap. Tensile testing of Ti-6Al-4V components fabricated by shaped metal deposition shows that the mechanical properties are competitive to material fabricated by conventional techniques. The ultimate tensile strength is between 936 and 1014 MPa, depending on the orientation and location. Tensile testing vertical to the deposition layers reveals ductility between 14 and 21%, whereas testing parallel to the layers gives a ductility between 6 and 11%. Ultimate tensile strength and ductility are inversely related. Heat treatment within the α+β phase field does not change the mechanical properties, but heat treatment within the β phase field increases the ultimate tensile strength and decreases the ductility. The differences in ultimate tensile strength and ductility can be related to the α lath size and orientation of the elongated, prior β grains. The micro-hardness and Young's modulus are similar to conventional Ti-6Al-4V with low oxygen content.

  14. New Ferritic Steels with Combined Optimal Creep Resistance and Ductility by Coupling Thermodynamic Calculations with Focused Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Zhenke; Zhang, F; Miller, Michael K; Liu, Chain T; Huang, Shenyan; Chou, Y; Tien, R; Chang, Y A; Liaw, Peter K

    2012-01-01

    Two critical issues restricting the applications of NiAl precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels are their poor room temperature ductility and insufficient creep resistance at temperatures higher than 600 C. In this study, a thermodynamic modeling approach is integrated with experiments focused on investigating the ductility and creep resistance of steel alloys based on the Fe-Ni-Al-Cr-Mo multi-component system. The mechanical property studies showed that the creep resistance increases with increasing the volume fraction of B2-ordered precipitates, while the opposite trend was observed for the ductility. Low solubility of Al in the {alpha}-Fe matrix was found to favor a ductility increase. Thermodynamic calculations were used to predict the volume fraction of B2-ordered precipitate and the elemental partitioning to guide the selection of alloy compositions that might exhibit the balanced creep resistance and ductility. Key experiments were then conducted to validate the prediction. This integrated approach was found to be very effective in the alloy development.

  15. High-Temperature Low-Cycle Fatigue Property of Heat-Resistant Ductile-Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Jang, Ho; Oh, Yong-Jun

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the high-temperature degradation behavior of two types of heat-resistant Si-Mo ductile cast iron (Fe-3.4C-3.7Si-0.4Mo and Fe-3.1C-4.5Si-1.0Mo) with particular attention paid to the mechanical properties and overall oxidation resistance. Tension and low-cycle fatigue properties were examined at 600 °C and 800 °C. The mechanical tests and metallographic and fractographic analyses showed that cast iron containing higher Si and Mo contents had a higher tensile strength and longer fatigue life at both temperatures than cast iron with lower levels due to the phase transformations of pearlite and carbide. The Coffin-Manson type equation was used to assess the fatigue mechanism suggesting that the higher Si-Mo alloy was stronger but less ductile than the lower Si-Mo alloy at 600 °C. However, similar properties for both alloys were observed at 800 °C because of softening and oxidation effects. Analysis of the isothermal oxidation behavior at those temperatures showed that mixed Fe2SiO4 layers were formed and the resulting scaling kinetics was much faster for low Si-Mo containing iron. With increasing temperature, subsurface degradation such as decarburization, voids, and cracks played a significant role in the overall oxidation resistance.

  16. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  17. Influence of ethanol on stiffness, toughness, and ductility of femurs of rats.

    PubMed

    Kusy, R P; Hirsch, P F; Peng, T C

    1989-04-01

    Recently, we reported that the ingestion of alcohol in rats reduced the mechanical strength of femurs. Our results showed that, as the dose exceeded 0.012 g of ethanol per gram of body weight, a significant (p less than 0.001) loss of "strength" occurred that was independent of sex according to the relationship, Strength (N) = 140.4 - 6003 dose (g/g). In the present effort, the same flexure tests were reevaluated to include the parameters of stiffness, toughness, and ductility. These latest results confirm that the femurs of rats fed an ethanol liquid diet for 4 weeks are not only weaker but also more compliant and less energy absorbing. Although the femurs of rats fed ethanol are more ductile, the bones are more prone to fracture in fatigue and impact circumstances as well as under simple loading situations. The rat may be an appropriate model to study the mechanisms that lead to the higher incidence of fractures in the alcoholic human.

  18. Investigation of phase transformations in ductile cast iron of differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przeliorz, R.; Piątkowski, J.

    2011-05-01

    The effect of heating rate on phase transformations to austenite range in ductile cast iron of the EN-GJS-450-10 grade was investigated. For studies of phase transformations, the technique of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used. Micro structure was examined by optical microscopy. The calorimetric examinations have proved that on heating three transformations occur in this grade of ductile iron, viz. magnetic transformation at the Curie temperature, pearlite→austenite transformation and ferrite→austenite transformation. An increase in the heating rate shifts the pearlite→austenite and ferrite→austenite transformations to higher temperature range. At the heating rate of 5 and 15 °C min-1, local extrema have been observed to occur: for pearlite→austenite transformation at 784 °C and 795 °C, respectively, and for ferrite+ graphite →austenite transformation at 805 °C and 821 °C, respectively. The Curie temperature of magnetic transformation was extrapolated to a value of 740 °C. Each transformation is related with a specific thermal effect. The highest value of enthalpy is accompanying the ferrite→austenite transformation, the lowest occurs in the case of pearlite→austenite transformation.

  19. Development of ductile Fe{sub 3}Al-based aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1993-07-01

    Iron aluminides based on Fe{sub 3}Al are of interest because of their excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance, especially in sulfur-bearing atmospheres. Work at ORNL has centered on developing Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys with improved ambient temperature ductilities and increased strengths at temperatures of 600--700C. Ambient temperature brittleness in this system is not ``inherent,`` but is caused by atomic hydrogen which is produced by an environmental reaction between aluminum in the alloy and water vapor in the atmosphere. Great strides have been made in understanding this embrittlement Phenomenon, and the production of alloys with room temperature ductilities of over 10% and tensile yield strengths at 600C of as high as 500 MPa is now possible through modifications in alloy composition and control of thermomechanical processing techniques. Creep rupture lifes of over 200 h at 593C (1100{degrees}F) and 207 MPa (30 ksi) can also be produced through control of alloy composition and microstructure. This paper summarizes our present efforts to improve the tensile and creep rupture properties and gives the status of efforts to commercialize Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy compositions.

  20. Study on the cutting mechanism and the brittle ductile transition model of isotropic pyrolyric graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghai; Wang, Hujun; Liu, Zhonghai

    2010-12-01

    Isotropic pyrolyric graphite (IPG) is a new kind of brittle material, it can be used for sealing the aero-engine turbine shaft and the ethylene high-temperature equipment. It not only has the general advantages of ordinal carbonaceous materials such as high temperature resistance, lubrication and abrasion resistance, but also has the advantages of impermeability and machinability that carbon/carbon composite doesn't have. Therefore, it has broad prospects for development. Mechanism of brittle-ductile transition of IPG is the foundation of precision cutting while the plastic deformation of IPG is the essential and the most important mechanical behavior of precision cutting. Using the theory of strain gradient, the mechanism of this material removal during the precision cutting is analyzed. The critical cutting thickness of IPG is calculated for the first time. Furthermore, the cutting process parameters such as cutting depth, feed rate which corresponding to the scale of brittle-ductile transition deformation of IPG are calculated. In the end, based on the theory of micromechanics, the deformation behaviors of IPG such as brittle fracture, plastic deformation and mutual transformation process are all simulated under the Sih.G.C fracture criterion. The condition of the simulation is that the material under the pressure-shear loading conditions .The result shows that the best angle during the IPG precision cutting is -30°. The theoretical analysis and the simulation result are validated by precision cutting experiments.

  1. Study on the cutting mechanism and the brittle ductile transition model of isotropic pyrolyric graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghai; Wang, Hujun; Liu, Zhonghai

    2011-05-01

    Isotropic pyrolyric graphite (IPG) is a new kind of brittle material, it can be used for sealing the aero-engine turbine shaft and the ethylene high-temperature equipment. It not only has the general advantages of ordinal carbonaceous materials such as high temperature resistance, lubrication and abrasion resistance, but also has the advantages of impermeability and machinability that carbon/carbon composite doesn't have. Therefore, it has broad prospects for development. Mechanism of brittle-ductile transition of IPG is the foundation of precision cutting while the plastic deformation of IPG is the essential and the most important mechanical behavior of precision cutting. Using the theory of strain gradient, the mechanism of this material removal during the precision cutting is analyzed. The critical cutting thickness of IPG is calculated for the first time. Furthermore, the cutting process parameters such as cutting depth, feed rate which corresponding to the scale of brittle-ductile transition deformation of IPG are calculated. In the end, based on the theory of micromechanics, the deformation behaviors of IPG such as brittle fracture, plastic deformation and mutual transformation process are all simulated under the Sih.G.C fracture criterion. The condition of the simulation is that the material under the pressure-shear loading conditions .The result shows that the best angle during the IPG precision cutting is -30°. The theoretical analysis and the simulation result are validated by precision cutting experiments.

  2. Application of survival statistics to the impulsive fragmentation of ductile rings

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    The current study addressed the problem of predicting fragment size distributions resulting from the tensile fracture of impulsive loaded bodies. Theory was restricted to one-dimensional bodies subjected to uniform loading. A rigorous treatment of the statistics of dynamic fragmentation has been attempted using concepts of survival statistics and incorporated here through the relation derived by Johnson and Mehl and Avrami. Physical concepts are introduced through the assumption of a uniform nucleation rate of fracture and the propagation of stress-relief waves governed by the tensile response of an ideally ductile material. An analytic distribution curve was derived for ductile fracture and compared with the fragmentation data of Wesenberg and Sagartz on aluminum rings. The analytic expression was found to provide a good representation of the data although further experimental work in this area is strongly needed. The present analysis and resulting fragment size distribution expressions are fairly complex even for the very simple geometry and loading conditions considered. Direct application of the method to more complicated fragmentation events would probably be difficult. Perhaps the greatest value of the present type of analysis will be the insight that it provides on the statistical nature of impulse fragmentation - hopefully a source of fresh ideas for computational models currently under development.

  3. Burst Ductility of Zirconium Clads: The Defining Role of Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Gulshan; Kanjarla, A. K.; Lodh, Arijit; Singh, Jaiveer; Singh, Ramesh; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.; Saibaba, N.; Doherty, R. D.; Samajdar, Indradev

    2016-08-01

    Closed end burst tests, using room temperature water as pressurizing medium, were performed on a number of industrially produced zirconium (Zr) clads. A total of 31 samples were selected based on observed differences in burst ductility. The latter was represented as total circumferential elongation or TCE. The selected samples, with a range of TCE values (5 to 35 pct), did not show any correlation with mechanical properties along axial direction, microstructural parameters, crystallographic textures, and outer tube-surface normal ( σ 11) and shear ( τ 13) components of the residual stress matrix. TCEs, however, had a clear correlation with hydrostatic residual stress ( P h), as estimated from tri-axial stress analysis on the outer tube surface. Estimated P h also scaled with measured normal stress ( σ 33) at the tube cross section. An elastic-plastic finite element model with ductile damage failure criterion was developed to understand the burst mechanism of zirconium clads. Experimentally measured P h gradients were imposed on a solid element continuum finite element (FE) simulation to mimic the residual stresses present prior to pressurization. Trends in experimental TCEs were also brought out with computationally efficient shell element-based FE simulations imposing the outer tube-surface P h values. Suitable components of the residual stress matrix thus determined the burst performance of the Zr clads.

  4. The deformation behaviour of alloys comprising two ductile phases--II. Applications of the theory

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Z.; Miodownkik, A.P. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    True stress-true strain curves, the mean internal stresses and the in situ stress and plastic strain distribution have been calculated for [alpha]-[beta] titanium alloys, ferrite-martensite dual-phase steels and [alpha]-[gamma] stainless steels, using the theory developed in Part I. It is shown that the theoretical predictions are in very good agreement with the experimental results drawn from the literature. The effects of microstructural parameters and the effect of differences in the mechanical properties of the constituent phases on the deformation behaviour of these two-ductile-phase alloys are discussed in detail. In contrast to existing deformation theories, the present approach predicts that these are four deformation stages in the total deformation process of two-ductile-phase alloys, and that there should always be a drop in the flow stress after the onset of the plastic deformation in microstructural element III. This phenomenon has been explained in terms of internal stress changes and the balance of the elastic strain energy associated with prior plastic deformation in the three microstructural elements used to describe the overall deformation process.

  5. Brittle and Ductile Behavior in Deep-Seated Landslides: Learning from the Vajont Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paronuzzi, Paolo; Bolla, Alberto; Rigo, Elia

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyzes the mechanical behavior of the unstable Mt. Toc slope before the 1963 catastrophic collapse, considering both the measured data (surface displacements and microseismicity) and the updated geological model of the prehistoric rockslide. From February 1960 up to 9 October 1963, the unstable mass behaved as a brittle-ductile `mechanical system,' characterized by remarkable microseismicity as well as by considerable surface displacements (up to 4-5 m). Recorded microshocks were the result of progressive rock fracturing of distinct resisting stiff parts made up of intact rock (indentations, undulations, and rock bridges). The main resisting stiff part was a large rock indentation located at the NE extremity of the unstable mass that acted as a mechanical constraint during the whole 1960-1963 period, inducing a progressive rototranslation toward the NE. This large constraint failed in autumn 1960, when an overall slope failure took place, as emphasized by the occurrence of the large perimetrical crack in the upper slope. In this circumstance, the collapse was inhibited by a reblocking phenomenon of the unstable mass that had been previously destabilized by the first reservoir filling. Progressive failure of localized intact rock parts progressively propagated westwards as a consequence of the two further filling-drawdown cycles of the reservoir (1962 and 1963). The characteristic brittle-ductile behavior of the Vajont landslide was made possible by the presence of a very thick (40-50 m) and highly deformable shear zone underlying the upper rigid rock mass (100-120 m thick).

  6. Experimental observation of dynamic ductile damage development under various triaxiality conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillon, Laurianne; Adolf, Lise-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Fracture in ductile materials finds its origin in microscopic mechanisms: the nucleation of voids that grow and coalesce in order to form a crack. The most popular of these models, proposed by Gurson, aims at describing the damage development with respect to the plastic behavior of porous material. The Gurson model has been extended by Perrin to describe damage evolution in ductile viscoplastic porous materials. The Gurson-Perrin model (GPm) allows representing damage development with respect to the stress triaxiality and strain-rate conditions. We propose a new experimental design able to test and validate the GPm under various dynamic conditions and for different triaxiality levels. The experimental project will be detailed. A notch is drawn in the Cu cylindrical target where damage develops and the local failure occurs. A variation of the notch radius enables a variation in the triaxiality level. Three notch radii have been tested. Observations with numerical cameras allow following the shape of the notch, a characteristic of damage development. Several PDV measurements have been performed around the target. A first analysis of this experimental process will be shown and comparisons with numerical simulations will be presented.

  7. Masonry Infilling Effect On Seismic Vulnerability and Performance Level of High Ductility RC Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalehnovi, M.; Shahraki, H.

    2008-07-01

    In last years researchers preferred behavior-based design of structure to force-based one for designing and construction of the earthquake-resistance structures, this method is named performance based designing. The main goal of this method is designing of structure members for a certain performance or behavior. On the other hand in most of buildings, load bearing frames are infilled with masonry materials which leads to considerable changes in mechanical properties of frames. But usually infilling wall's effect has been ignored in nonlinear analysis of structures because of complication of the problem and lack of simple logical solution. As a result lateral stiffness, strength, ductility and performance of the structure will be computed with less accuracy. In this paper by use of Smooth hysteretic model for masonry infillings, some high ductile RC frames (4, 8 stories including 1, 2 and 3 spans) designed according to Iranian code are considered. They have been analyzed by nonlinear dynamic method in two states, with and without infilling. Then their performance has been determined with criteria of ATC 40 and compared with recommended performance in Iranian seismic code (standard No. 2800).

  8. On the spheroidal graphite growth and the austenite solidification in ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Jingjing

    Evolutions of austenite and nodular/spheroidal graphite particles during solidifications of ductile irons were experimentally investigated. Spheroidal graphite particle and austenite dendrite were found nucleated independently in liquid. Austenite dendrite engulfed the spheroidal graphite particles after contact and an austenite shell formed around a spheroidal graphite particle. The graphite diameter at which the austenite shell closed around nodule was determined. Statistically determined graphite size distributions indicated multiple graphite nucleation events during solidification. Structures in a graphite nodule varied depending on the growth stages of the nodule in ductile iron. Curved graphene layers appearing as faceted growth ledges swept circumferentially around the surface of a graphite nodule at early growth stages. Mismatches between the growth fronts created gaps which divided a nodule into radially oriented conical substructures (3-D). Columnar substructure was observed in the periphery of a nodule (formed during the intermediate growth stages) on its 2-D cross section. A columnar substructure consisted of parallel peripheral grains, with their c-axes approximately parallel. Graphene layers continued building up in individual conical substructure, and a graphite nodule increased its size accordingly. Method for characterizing the crystal structures of graphite based on the selected area diffraction pattern was developed. Both hexagonal structure and rhombohedral structure were found in the spheroidal graphite particles. Possible crystallographic defects associated with hexagonal-rhombohedral structure transition were discussed. Schematic models for introducing tilt angles to the graphite lattice with basal plane tilt boundaries were constructed.

  9. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, Cheryl L.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1993-01-01

    The intermetallic compound NiAl is one of many advanced materials which is being scrutinized for possible use in high temperature, structural applications. Stoichiometric NiAl has a high melting temperature, excellent oxidation resistance, and good thermal conductivity. Past research has concentrated on improving monotonic properties. The encouraging results obtained on binary and micro-alloyed NiAl over the past ten years have led to the broadening of NiAl experimental programs. The purpose of this research project was to determine the low cycle fatigue properties and dislocation mechanisms of stoichiometric NiAl at temperatures near the monotonic brittle-to-ductile transition. The fatigue properties were found to change only slightly in the temperature range of 600 to 700 K; a temperature range over which monotonic ductility and fracture strength increase markedly. The shape of the cyclic hardening curves coincided with the changes observed in the dislocation structures. The evolution of dislocation structures did not appear to change with temperature.

  10. Masonry Infilling Effect On Seismic Vulnerability and Performance Level of High Ductility RC Frames

    SciTech Connect

    Ghalehnovi, M.; Shahraki, H.

    2008-07-08

    In last years researchers preferred behavior-based design of structure to force-based one for designing and construction of the earthquake-resistance structures, this method is named performance based designing. The main goal of this method is designing of structure members for a certain performance or behavior. On the other hand in most of buildings, load bearing frames are infilled with masonry materials which leads to considerable changes in mechanical properties of frames. But usually infilling wall's effect has been ignored in nonlinear analysis of structures because of complication of the problem and lack of simple logical solution. As a result lateral stiffness, strength, ductility and performance of the structure will be computed with less accuracy. In this paper by use of Smooth hysteretic model for masonry infillings, some high ductile RC frames (4, 8 stories including 1, 2 and 3 spans) designed according to Iranian code are considered. They have been analyzed by nonlinear dynamic method in two states, with and without infilling. Then their performance has been determined with criteria of ATC 40 and compared with recommended performance in Iranian seismic code (standard No. 2800)

  11. Evolution of Microstructures During Austempering of Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar

    2013-03-01

    The influences of relatively high manganese (0.45 through 1.0 wt pct) and copper (0.56 through 1.13 wt pct) contents on microstructure development and phase transformation in three austempered ductile irons have been studied. The experimental ductile irons alloyed with copper and manganese are found to be practically free from intercellular manganese segregation. This suggests that the positive segregation of manganese is largely neutralized by the negative segregation of copper when these alloying elements are added in appropriate proportions. The drop in unreacted austenite volume (UAV) with increasing austempering temperature and time is quite significant in irons alloyed with copper and manganese. The ausferrite morphology also undergoes a transition from lenticular to feathery appearance of increasing coarseness with the increasing austempering temperature and time. SEM micrographs of the austempered samples from the base alloy containing manganese only, as well as copper plus manganese-alloyed irons, clearly reveal the presence of some martensite along with retained austenite and ferrite. X-ray diffraction analysis also confirms the presence of these phases. SEM examination further reveals the presence of twinned martensite in the copper plus manganese-alloyed samples. The possibility of strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite during austempering heat treatment is suggested.

  12. Simulation of seismic waves in the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) using a Burgers model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto, Flavio; Farina, Biancamaria; Carcione, José Maria

    2014-05-01

    The seismic characterization of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in the Earth's crust is of great importance for the study of high-enthalpy geothermal fields in the proximity of magmatic zones. It is well known that the BDT can be viewed as the transition between zones with viscoelastic and plastic behavior, i.e., the transition between the upper, cooler, brittle crustal zone, and the deeper ductile zone. Depending on stress and temperature conditions, the BDT behavior is basically determined by the viscosity of the crustal rocks, which acts as a key factor. In situ shear stress and temperature are related to shear viscosity and steady-state creep flow through the Arrhenius equation, and deviatory stress by octahedral stress criterion. We present a numerical approach to simulate the propagation of P-S and SH seismic waves in a 2D model of the heterogeneous Earth's crust. The full-waveform simulation code is based on a Burgers mechanical model (Carcione, 2007), which enables us to describe both the seismic attenuation effects and the steady-state creep flow (Carcione and Poletto, 2013; Carcione et al. 2013). The differential equations of motion are calculated for the Burgers model, and recast in the velocity-stress formulation. Equations are solved in the time domain using memory variables. The approach uses a direct method based on the Runge-Kutta technique, and the Fourier pseudo-spectral methods, for time integration and for spatial derivation, respectively. In this simulation we assume isotropic models. To test the code, the signals generated by the full-waveform simulation algorithm are compared with success to analytic solutions obtained with different shear viscosities. Moreover, synthetic results are calculated to simulate surface and VSP seismograms in a realistic rheological model with a dramatic temperature change, to study the observability of BDT by seismic reflection methods. The medium corresponds to a selected rheology of the Iceland scenario

  13. Naturally Constrained Profiles of the Strength of the Middle Crust Near the Brittle-Ductile Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, W. M.; Platt, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    We present a method in which paleopiezometry, Ti-in-quartz thermobarometry (Titani-Q), and simple 2-D thermal modeling can be used to construct naturally constrained profiles of crustal strength in areas of exhumed mid-crustal rocks. As an example, we examine the footwall of the Whipple Mountains metamorphic core complex (WMCC). Rocks in the WMCC were initially deformed at ~ 20 km depth by distributed ductile shear, and were then progressively overprinted by localized ductile shear zones and eventually by discrete brittle fracture as the footwall was cooled and exhumed toward the brittle-ductile transition (BDT). Increasing localization and cooling during exhumation allowed earlier microstructures to be preserved, and rocks in the WMCC therefore represent several ‘points’ in temperature-stress space (and by inference depth-stress space). We collected mylonitic granitoids from four transects near the Whipple detachment fault and applied the experimental piezometer of Stipp and Tullis (2003, GRL, vol. 30, no. 21), and the Titani-Q thermobarometer of Thomas et al. (submitted manuscript) to individual quartz-rich domains. To relate the temperature measurements from each sample with depth, we use a finite-element code to solve the 2D heat-transfer equation for the temperature distribution below the detachment, using published cooling rates and standard material parameters. Some samples have quartz ribbons with a consistent dynamically recrystallized grain size and uniform temperature distributions and thus represent a single point in stress-depth space. Others are ‘composite’ in that a progression from distributed high-T low-stress deformation to low-T high stress deformation can be tracked at the field and micro-scale. We distinguish different phases of this down-temperature progression based on 1) changes in dynamically recrystallized grain sizes and quartz crystallographic preferred orientation patterns measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD); and

  14. Ductile duplexing at a bend of a continental-scale strike-slip shear zone: example from NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Michel; Vauchez, Alain; Caby, Renaud

    1996-04-01

    During the Pan-African orogeny, the Borborema Province in NE Brazil developed a continental-scale shear-zone system that comprises NE- and EW-trending ductile strike-slip shear zones. Remote sensing and structural mapping has revealed a pattern of arcuate anastomosing strike-slip shear zones separating sigmoidal lenses of less deformed material, located at the western end of the EW-trending Patos shear zone, which is one of the largest shear zones of the Province. This structure of imbricate shear zones was initiated under high-temperature deformation conditions. It is interpreted as a ductile strike-slip duplex and may represent a kinematic pattern for strain accommodation in response to a bend of a ductile mega-shear zone.

  15. Investigation of Ductile Damage in DP980 Steel Sheets Using Mechanical Tests and X-ray Micro-Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A.; Leguen, C.; Thuillier, S.; Maire, E.

    2011-05-01

    This study is part of a broader research project on the prediction of formability limits in bending on radius of the order of the sheet thickness, based on ductile damage. As a first step, ductile damage in DP980 steel sheet was investigated by means of micro-tomography and mechanical testing, including tensile and simple shear tests. The local strain in tension was measured with a digital image correlation device up to rupture, on macroscopic samples of standard dimensions. Moreover, interrupted tensile tests on smaller specimen were also performed, in order to analyze the void distribution by X-ray micro-tomography. The final aim is to perform numerical simulation of the tests, with Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model, to take into account the influence of ductile damage on the mechanical behavior. A fair description of the void volume fraction was obtained as well as the stress level, in the case of small-size specimen.

  16. The role of microstructure on strength and ductility of hot-extruded mechanically alloyed NiAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollar, M.; Dymek, S.; Hwang, S. J.; Nash, P.

    1993-09-01

    Mechanical alloying followed by hot extrusion has been used to produce very fine-grained NiAl-based alloys containing oxide dispersoids. The dispersoids affect the progress of recrystallization during hot extrusion and contribute to the preservation of the <110> deformation fiber texture. The <110> texture enables the activation of <110> <100> and 110 <110> slip systems. The occurrence of <100> and <110> slip dislocations satisfies the von Mises criterion for general plasticity and is postulated to contribute to notable room-temperature compressive ductility of the mechanically alloyed (MA) materials. Another factor likely affecting the compressive ductility is the predominant occurrence of low-angle grain boundaries. The attractive dislocation — dispersoid interactions lead to a ductility trough observed at 800 K in the MA materials. The MA NiAl materials are strong at both ambient and elevated temperatures due to fine grain and the presence of dispersoids and interstitial atoms.

  17. Simultaneously Enhancing the Ductility and Strength in a Hierarchical and Multiphase Nanolaminated TiZrAlV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yindong; Wang, Lina; Wu, Chunxia

    2015-12-01

    High strength and ductility are the prerequisite for structural materials for wide applications. Here, a simultaneous enhancement of both the ductility and strength is reported in a hierarchical and multiphase nanolaminated (HMN) TiZrAlV prepared via thermomechanical processing treatments. An excellent combination of high ultimate tensile strength of σb ~ 1550 MPa and good elongation to failure of ɛf ~ 8.0% is obtained in an appropriate HMN structure that consists of nanoscale α″ martensites, submicroscale α plates, and large microscale primary αp grains, much better than that (σb ~ 1440 MPa, ɛf ~ 3.6%) of its coarse-laminated counterpart without primary αp grains. The present study is significant for the enhancement of strength and ductility of engineering materials via the design of hierarchical-laminated structure.

  18. Superplasticity in laminated metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; Sherby, O.; Syn, C.

    1998-10-20

    Several studies have shown the possibility of achieving superplastic behavior in laminated metal composites consisting of alternating layers of superplastic and non-superplastic materials. Achieving high rate sensitivity in such a laminate requires the appropriate choice of component materials and component volume fraction as well as deformation under appropriate conditions of strain rate and temperature. The first investigators to study this behavior were Snyder et al. [1], who demonstrated that a non-superplastic material (interstitial free iron) could be made superplastic by lamination with a superplastic material (fine-grained ultrahigh carbon steel (UHCS)). Other laminates in which superplasticity has been observed in a non-superplastic material include UHCS/stainless steel and UHCS/aluminum bronze. In these studies, tensile tests were conducted with the tensile axis parallel to the layers. High strain rate sensitivities were observed and are associated with high tensile ductilities. However, as observed by Tsai et al. [2], obtaining high strain rate sensitivity is a necessary but not sufficient condition for high elongations. Tsai et al. studied the UHCS/brass laminate and found that, despite a strain rate sensitivity exponent of 0.5, only about 60% elongation was obtained. The low tensile ductility resulted from brittle, intergranular fracture of the brass. Once cracking started in the brass, cracks penetrated into the UHCS and premature failure resulted. Thus high elongations requires achieving high strain rate sensitivity as well as avoiding brittle fracture in the less ductile layer. In addition to tension, other deformation modes, including compression [3] and co-extrusion [4], have been studied for deformation response under conditions of high strain rate s

  19. Elastic properties and atomic bonding character in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rouxel, T.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2015-07-28

    The elastic properties of glasses from different metallic systems were studied in the light of the atomic packing density and bonding character. We found that the electronegativity mismatch (Δe{sup −}) between the host- and the major solute-elements provides a plausible explanation to the large variation observed for Poisson's ratio (ν) among metallic glasses (MGs) (from 0.28 for Fe-based to 0.43 for Pd-based MGs), notwithstanding a similar atomic packing efficiency (C{sub g}). Besides, it is found that ductile MGs correspond to Δe{sup −} smaller than 0.5 and to a relatively steep atomic potential well. Ductility is, thus, favored in MGs exhibiting a weak bond directionality on average and opposing a strong resistance to volume change.

  20. Long range ordered alloys modified by group IV-B metals

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Inouye, Henry; Schaffhauser, Anthony C.

    1983-01-01

    Ductile long range ordered alloys having high critical ordering temperatures exist in the (V,M)(Fe,Ni,Co).sub.3 system having the composition comprising by weight 20.6%-22.6% V, 14-50% Fe, 0-64% Co, and 0-40% Ni, and 0.4-1.4% M, where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf, and their mixtures. These modified alloys have an electron density no greater than 8.00 and exhibit marked increases at elevated temperature in ductility and other mechanical properties over previously known ordered alloys.

  1. Mechanical behavior of low porosity carbonate rock: from brittle creep to ductile creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this experimental study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a low porosity (9%) white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite) at P-Q conditions beyond the elastic domain. It has been shown that in sandstones composed of quartz, cracks are developing under these conditions. However, in carbonates, calcite minerals can meanwhile also exhibit microplasticity. The samples were deformed in the triaxial cell of the Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris at effective confining pressures ranging from 35 MPa to 85 MPa and room temperature. Experiments were carried on dry and water saturated samples to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Time dependency was investigated by a creep steps methodology: at each step, differential stress was increased rapidly and kept constant for at least 24h. During these steps elastic wave velocities (P and S) and permeability were measured continuously. Our results show two different creep behaviors: (1) brittle creep is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile creep is observed at higher confining pressures. These two creep behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes. Indeed, in the brittle domain, the primary creep is associated with a decrease of elastic wave velocities and an increase of permeability, and no secondary creep is observed. In the ductile domain, the primary creep

  2. The role of fluids on the brittle-ductile transition in the crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Greg; Beeler, Nick

    2015-04-01

    To characterize stress and deformation style at the base of the seismogenic zone we investigate how the mechanical properties of fluid-rock systems respond to variations in temperature and strain rate. The role of fluids on the processes responsible for the brittle-ductile transition in quartz-rich rocks has not been explored at experimental conditions where the kinetic competition between microcracking and viscous flow is similar to that expected in the Earth. Our initial analysis of this competition suggests that the effective pressure law for sliding friction should not work as effectively near the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) as it does at shallow conditions. Our motivation comes from three observations. First, extrapolation of quartzite flow laws indicates the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) occurs at ~300 °C at geologic strain rates for conditions where fault strength is controlled by a coefficient of friction of ~0.6 with a hydrostatic pore-fluid pressure gradient. Second, we suggest that the preservation of relatively high stress microstructures indicates that the effective stress law must sometimes evolve rapidly near the BDT. There is abundant evidence for the presence of fluids during viscous deformation of mylonites (e.g., recrystallization and redistribution of micas, dissolution and reprecipitation of quartz). The relatively high viscous stresses inferred from these microstructures are incompatible with the standard effective stress relationship. A similar "paradox" is evident at experimental conditions where viscous creep is studied in the laboratory. In this case, the presence of fluid (which should produce low effective stress) does not promote localized brittle failure, even though these experiments are conducted under undrained conditions. Third, experiments on partially molten rocks illustrate viscous creep behavior during both drained compaction and undrained triaxial deformation tests, even though the melt pressure approaches or equals

  3. Fatigue of Austempered Ductile Iron with Two Strength Grades in Very High Cycle Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiwang; Li, Wei; Song, Qingpeng; Zhang, Ning; Lu, Liantao

    2016-03-01

    In this study, Austempered ductile irons (ADIs) with two different strength grades were produced and the fatigue properties were measured at 109 cycles. The results show that the S-N curves give a typical step-wise shape and there is no fatigue limit in the very high cycle fatigue regime. The two grades ADI have the similar fracture behaviors and fatigue failure can initiate from defects at specimen surface and subsurface zone. On the fracture surfaces of some specimens, the `granular-bright-facet' area with rich carbon distribution is observed in the vicinity of the defect. The microstructure affects the crack behaviors at the early propagation stage. The ADI with upper and lower bainite shows higher fatigue strength compared with the ADI with coarse upper bainite.

  4. RECENT PROGRESS OF CRACK BRIDGING MODELING OF DUCTILE-PHASE-TOUGHENED W-CU COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Henager, Charles H.; Wagner, Karla B.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, G Robert; Cunningham, Kevin; Zok, Frank W.

    2015-04-16

    A crack bridging model using calculated Cu stress-strain curves has been developed to study the toughening of W-Cu composites. A strengthening factor and necking parameters have been added to the model for the ductile-phase bridges to incorporate constraint effects at small bridge sizes. Parametric studies are performed to investigate the effect of these parameters. The calculated maximum applied stress intensity, aKmax, to induce a 1-mm stable crack is compared to the experimental stress intensity at peak load, Kpeak. Without bridge necking, increasing the strengthening factor improves the agreement between aKmax and Kpeak when plotted vs. logarithm of the displacement rate. Improvement can also be achieved by allowing necking with a larger failure strain. While the slope is better matched with this latter approach, the calculated value of aKmax is significantly larger than Kpeak.

  5. Prevention of non-ductile fracture in 6061-T6 aluminum nuclear pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G.T.

    1995-06-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee has approved rules for the use of 6061-T6 and 6061-T651 aluminum for the construction of Class 1 welded nuclear pressure vessels for temperatures not exceeding 149 C (300 F). Nuclear Code Case N-519 allows the use of this aluminum in the construction of low temperature research reactors such as the Advanced Neutron Source. The rules for protection against non-ductile fracture are discussed. The basis for a value of 25.3 MPa {radical}m (23 ksi {radical}in.) for the critical or reference stress intensity factor for use in the fracture analysis is presented. Requirements for consideration of the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness are discussed.

  6. Prediction of Burst Pressure Using a Decoupled Ductile Fracture Criterion for Tube Hydroforming of Aerospace Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboori, M.; Gholipour, J.; Champliaud, H.; Gakwaya, A.; Savoie, J.; Wanjara, P.

    2011-05-01

    One of the failure modes in tube hydroforming (THF) is bursting. To predict the burst pressure in the THF process, Brozzo's decoupled ductile fracture criterion was used in conjunction with a dynamic nonlinear commercial finite element software, Ls-Dyna, and the criterion was evaluated using the data obtained from the free expansion (tube bulging) tests performed on 0.9 mm and 1.2 mm thick stainless steel (SS) 321 tubes. The predicted burst pressures were compared with the experimental results for both thicknesses. The predicted burst failure of the tube bulging, based on the Brozzo's criterion, demonstrated a good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the present approach for predicting the burst failure for the tube bulging can be extended to predict formability limits in THF applications.

  7. Plasticity and an Inverse Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Strontium Titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Gumbsch, P.; Taeri-Baghbadrani, S.; Brunner, D.; Sigle, W.; Ruehle, M.

    2001-08-20

    The use of ceramic materials is often restricted by a transition from ductile behavior to brittle fracture with decreasing temperature. For example, strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3} ) is known to be extremely fragile and brittle below 1300 K. It is therefore surprising to find that SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals can be deformed in compression below 1050 K again. Extensive plastic deformation up to 7% strain at low yield stresses of the order of only 120 MPa is possible at room temperature. Low temperature plasticity is carried by the same <110>{l_brace}1{bar 1} 0{r_brace} dislocations as the high temperature deformation along the <001> axis. From this we conclude that these dislocations must exist in two different core configurations.

  8. A phase-field model for ductile fracture at finite strains and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambati, Marreddy; Kruse, Roland; De Lorenzis, Laura

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a phase-field model for ductile fracture previously proposed in the kinematically linear regime is extended to the three-dimensional finite strain setting, and its predictions are qualitatively and quantitatively compared with several experimental results, both from ad-hoc tests carried out by the authors and from the available literature. The proposed model is based on the physical assumption that fracture occurs when a scalar measure of the accumulated plastic strain reaches a critical value, and such assumption is introduced through the dependency of the phase-field degradation function on this scalar measure. The proposed model is able to capture the experimentally observed sequence of elasto-plastic deformation, necking and fracture phenomena in flat specimens; the occurrence of cup-and-cone fracture patterns in axisymmetric specimens; the role played by notches and by their size on the measured displacement at fracture; and the sequence of distinct cracking events observed in more complex specimens.

  9. Investigation of powdering ductile gamma U-10 wt%Mo alloy for dispersion fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal Neto, R. M.; Rocha, C. J.; Urano de Carvalho, E.; Riella, H. G.; Durazzo, M.

    2014-02-01

    This work forms part of the studies presently ongoing at Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN/CNEN-SP investigating the feasibility of powdering ductile U-10 wt%Mo alloy by hydriding-milling-dehydriding of the gamma phase (HMD). Hydriding was conducted at room temperature in a Sievert apparatus following heat treatment activation. Hydrided pieces were fragile enough to be hand milled to the desired particle size range. Hydrogen was removed by heating the samples under high vacuum. X-ray diffraction analysis of the hydrided material showed an amorphous-like pattern that is completely reversed following dehydriding. The hydrogen content of the hydrided samples corresponds to a trihydride, i.e. (U,Mo)H3. SEM analysis of HMD powder particles revealed equiaxial powder particles together with some plate-like particles. A hypothesis for the amorphous hydride phase formation is suggested.

  10. Assessing the elastic properties and ductility of Fe-Cr-Al alloys from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurmi, E.; Wang, G.; Kokko, K.; Vitos, L.

    2016-01-01

    Fe-Al is one of the best corrosion resistant alloys at high temperatures. The flip side of Al addition to Fe is the deterioration of the mechanical properties. This problem can be solved by adding a suitable amount of third alloying component. In the present work, we use ab initio calculations based on density functional theory to study the elastic properties of Fe?Cr?Al? alloys for Al and Cr contents up to 20 at.%. We assess the ductility as a function of chemistry by making use of the semi-empirical correlations between the elastic parameters and mechanical properties. In particular, we derive the bulk modulus to shear modulus ratio and the Cauchy pressure and monitor their trends in terms of chemical composition. The present findings are contrasted with the previously established oxidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Al alloys.

  11. Strength Development of High-Strength Ductile Concrete Incorporating Metakaolin and PVA Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Nuruddin, Muhammad Fadhil; Shafiq, Nasir

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of high-strength ductile concrete (HSDC) have been investigated using Metakaolin (MK) as the cement replacing material and PVA fibers. Total twenty-seven (27) mixes of concrete have been examined with varying content of MK and PVA fibers. It has been found that the coarser type PVA fibers provide strengths competitive to control or higher than control. Concrete with coarser type PVA fibers has also refined microstructure, but the microstructure has been undergone with the increase in aspect ratio of fibers. The microstructure of concrete with MK has also more refined and packing of material is much better with MK. PVA fibers not only give higher stiffness but also showed the deflection hardening response. Toughness Index of HSDC reflects the improvement in flexural toughness over the plain concrete and the maximum toughness indices have been observed with 10% MK and 2% volume fraction of PVA fibers. PMID:24707202

  12. Strength development of high-strength ductile concrete incorporating Metakaolin and PVA fibers.

    PubMed

    Nuruddin, Muhammad Fadhil; Khan, Sadaqat Ullah; Shafiq, Nasir; Ayub, Tehmina

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of high-strength ductile concrete (HSDC) have been investigated using Metakaolin (MK) as the cement replacing material and PVA fibers. Total twenty-seven (27) mixes of concrete have been examined with varying content of MK and PVA fibers. It has been found that the coarser type PVA fibers provide strengths competitive to control or higher than control. Concrete with coarser type PVA fibers has also refined microstructure, but the microstructure has been undergone with the increase in aspect ratio of fibers. The microstructure of concrete with MK has also more refined and packing of material is much better with MK. PVA fibers not only give higher stiffness but also showed the deflection hardening response. Toughness Index of HSDC reflects the improvement in flexural toughness over the plain concrete and the maximum toughness indices have been observed with 10% MK and 2% volume fraction of PVA fibers.

  13. Rate dependent response and failure of a ductile epoxy and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Rae, Philip J; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B

    2010-01-01

    An extensive characterization suite has been performed on the response and failure of a ductile epoxy 55A and uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite of IM7 fibers in 55A resin from the quasistatic to shock regime. The quasistatic and intermediate strain rate response, including elastic modulus, yield and failure have are characterized by quasistatic, SHPB, and DMA measurements as a function of fiber orientation and temperature. The high strain rate shock effect of fiber orientation in the composite and response of the pure resin are presented for plate impact experiments. It has previously been shown that at lower impact velocities the shock velocity is strongly dependent on fiber orientation but at higher impact velocity the in-plane and through thickness Hugoniots converge. The current results are compared with previous studies of the shock response of carbon fiber composites with more conventional brittle epoxy matrices. The spall response of the composite is measured and compared with quasistatic fracture toughness measurements.

  14. Metamorphic core complexes: Expression of crustal extension by ductile-brittle shearing of the geologic column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Metamorphic core complexes and detachment fault terranes in the American Southwest are products of stretching of continental crust in the Tertiary. The physical and geometric properties of the structures, fault rocks, and contact relationships that developed as a consequence of the extension are especially well displayed in southeastern Arizona. The structures and fault rocks, as a system, reflect a ductile-through-brittle continuum of deformation, with individual structures and faults rocks showing remarkably coordinated strain and displacement patterns. Careful mapping and analysis of the structural system has led to the realization that strain and displacement were partitioned across a host of structures, through a spectrum of scales, in rocks of progressively changing rheology. By integrating observations made in different parts of the extensional system, especially at different inferred depth levels, it has been possible to construct a descriptive/kinematic model of the progressive deformation that achieved continental crustal extension in general, and the development of metamorphic core complexes in particular.

  15. Anti-friction Coating for Drilling of Green Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, A.; El Mansori, M.; Ghidossi, P.; Mkaddem, A.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper the anti-friction performance of two types of coating, post-coated coating and PVD-TiAlN coating were investigated when drilling green austempered ductile iron (ADI) grade. The green ADI grade is produced by a new processing technology known as continuous casting-heat treatment process. The effect of coatings on tool wear and surface finish of the holes when drilling using coolant were reported. Results showed that the tool with post-coated coating has higher anti-friction properties as compared to PVD-TiAlN coating in terms of tool wear and surface roughness. Results also showed that there is a formation of preventive aluminum oxide layer during machining for both types of coating.

  16. An implicit algorithm for a rate-dependent ductile failure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Q. H.; Rice, Jeremy R.

    2008-10-01

    An implicit numerical algorithm has been developed for a rate-dependent model for damage and failure of ductile materials under high-rate dynamic loading [F. L. Addessio and J. N. Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 74, 1640 (1993)]. Over each time step, the algorithm first implicitly determines the equilibrium state on a Gurson surface, and then calculates the final state by solving viscous relaxation equations, also implicitly. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the key features of the algorithm. Compared to the explicit algorithm used previously, the current algorithm allows significantly larger time steps that can be used in the analysis. As the viscosity of the material vanishes, the results of the rate-dependent model are shown here to converge to that of the corresponding rate-independent model, a result not achieved with the explicit algorithm.

  17. Seismic demand evaluation of medium ductility RC moment frames using nonlinear procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarzadeh, Hosein; Talebian, Nima; Kohandel, Roya

    2013-09-01

    Performance-based earthquake engineering is a recent focus of research that has resulted in widely developed design methodologies due to its ability to realistically simulate structural response characteristics. Precise prediction of seismic demands is a key component of performance-based design methodologies. This paper presents a seismic demand evaluation of reinforced concrete moment frames with medium ductility. The accuracy of utilizing simplified nonlinear static analysis is assessed by comparison against the results of time history analysis on a number of frames. Displacement profiles, drift demand and maximum plastic rotation were computed to assess seismic demands. Estimated seismic demands were compared to acceptance criteria in FEMA 356. The results indicate that these frames have sufficient capacity to resist interstory drifts that are greater than the limit value.

  18. Effects of Antimony and Wall Thickness on Graphite Morphology in Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavas, Zoran; Strkalj, Anita; Maldini, Kresimir

    2016-08-01

    Effects of Sb additions on the graphite morphology of ductile iron castings in different wall thicknesses (3, 12, 25, 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm) were analyzed in this paper. In the wall thicknesses of 3, 12, and 25 mm, low contents of rare earth (RE) elements showed a beneficial effect on nodule count and nodularity. Nodularity >80 pct and a high nodule count were achieved without the addition of Sb. In the wall thicknesses of 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm, nodularity >80 pct was not achieved without the use of the chill or proper content of Sb. Excess of RE elements was neutralized with the addition of proper amount of Sb to the wall thickness. Addition of 0.01 wt pct Sb (ratio of RE/Sb = 0.34, ratio of RE/SE = 0.105) was sufficient to achieve nodularity >80 pct in the wall thicknesses of 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm.

  19. High-strength carbon nanotube fibre-like ribbon with high ductility and high electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, J N; Luo, X G; Wu, T; Chen, Y

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic fibres made up of carbon nanotubes exhibit properties far below theoretical predictions and even much lower than those for conventional carbon fibres. Here we report improvements of mechanical and electrical properties by more than one order of magnitude by pressurized rolling. Our carbon nanotubes self-assemble to a hollow macroscopic cylinder in a tube reactor operated at high temperature and then condense in water or ethanol to form a fibre, which is continually spooled in an open-air environment. This initial fibre is densified by rolling under pressure, leading to a combination of high tensile strength (3.76-5.53 GPa), high tensile ductility (8-13%) and high electrical conductivity ((1.82-2.24) × 10(4) S cm(-1)). Our study therefore demonstrates strategies for future performance maximization and the very considerable potential of carbon nanotube assemblies for high-end uses.

  20. Use of the Steinberg and Carroll-Holt Concepts in Ductile Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Lynn; Boustie, Michel; de Resseguier, Thibaut

    1997-07-01

    We have extended the SRI ductile fracture model (DFRACT) for spall behavior of aluminum and copper. The temperature computation procedure, thermal strength reduction function, work hardening, and Bauschinger effects from the Steinberg model ( D. J. Steinberg, S. G. Cochran, and M. W. Guinan, J. Appl. Phys. 51, 1498 (1980))were added. The threshold stress for void growth in the DFRACT model was equated to the stress for general yielding in the Carroll-Holt model (M. M. Carroll and A. C. Holt, J. Appl. Phys. 43, 1626 (1972)) for porous materials. With these modifications of DFRACT, we simulated a series of earlier SRI impacts in 1145 (commercially pure) aluminum in which partial spall had been reached. The revised model was able to represent the numbers, sizes, and locations of voids through the sample. The use of the Carroll-Holt and Steinberg model features allows the DFRACT model to reach larger void volumes in the simulations and therefore to better represent heavy damage.

  1. Superior room-temperature ductility of typically brittle quasicrystals at small sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yu; Kuczera, Pawel; Sologubenko, Alla; Sumigawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Steurer, Walter; Spolenak, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of quasicrystals three decades ago unveiled a class of matter that exhibits long-range order but lacks translational periodicity. Owing to their unique structures, quasicrystals possess many unusual properties. However, a well-known bottleneck that impedes their widespread application is their intrinsic brittleness: plastic deformation has been found to only be possible at high temperatures or under hydrostatic pressures, and their deformation mechanism at low temperatures is still unclear. Here, we report that typically brittle quasicrystals can exhibit remarkable ductility of over 50% strains and high strengths of ~4.5 GPa at room temperature and sub-micrometer scales. In contrast to the generally accepted dominant deformation mechanism in quasicrystals--dislocation climb, our observation suggests that dislocation glide may govern plasticity under high-stress and low-temperature conditions. The ability to plastically deform quasicrystals at room temperature should lead to an improved understanding of their deformation mechanism and application in small-scale devices.

  2. Coeval brittle and ductile structures associated with extreme deformation partitioning in a multilayer sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druguet, Elena; Alsop, G. Ian; Carreras, Jordi

    2009-05-01

    An investigation on the effects of a strong rheological contrast in the deformation of layered anisotropic rocks is presented. The study focuses on the geometric and kinematic analysis of complex structures developed within and adjacent to a thin marble-metapsammite multilayer unit from the Cap de Creus tectonometamorphic belt (NE Spain). Zones of high ductile strain localise in the marble layers, which exhibit complex folds, whereas metapsammites show mostly brittle (boudinage) structures. These structures strongly contrast with coeval retrogressive discrete shear zones developed in the surrounding migmatitic schists. The extreme strain partitioning is due to the rheological contrast between different lithological layers. In addition, the specific orientation of this multilayer unit induces a reversal of local kinematics with regard to bulk kinematics. Consequently, caution should be exercised when interpreting regional tectonics in highly partitioned domains associated with rheological heterogeneities.

  3. Growth of voids in porous ductile materials at high strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze-Ping

    1994-08-01

    A hollow-sphere model, with temperature-dependent viscoplastic material response, is developed to investigate the inertial and thermal effects on dynamic growth of voids in ductile materials. Theoretical analysis indicates that the inertial effect (kinetic energy of void growth) mainly dominates the behavoir of the void growth in temperature-dependent and high-strain-rate cases. Otherwise, the viscoplastic effect dominanes and the inertial effect can be negelcted. The rate of the dyanmic growth of voids increases when the thermal effect is considered. An expression of the threshold stress for the void growth is obtained, which depends on the initial porosity, the porosity, the yield strength, the density of surface energy of voids, the initial temperature, and the melting temperature.

  4. Strength development of high-strength ductile concrete incorporating Metakaolin and PVA fibers.

    PubMed

    Nuruddin, Muhammad Fadhil; Khan, Sadaqat Ullah; Shafiq, Nasir; Ayub, Tehmina

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of high-strength ductile concrete (HSDC) have been investigated using Metakaolin (MK) as the cement replacing material and PVA fibers. Total twenty-seven (27) mixes of concrete have been examined with varying content of MK and PVA fibers. It has been found that the coarser type PVA fibers provide strengths competitive to control or higher than control. Concrete with coarser type PVA fibers has also refined microstructure, but the microstructure has been undergone with the increase in aspect ratio of fibers. The microstructure of concrete with MK has also more refined and packing of material is much better with MK. PVA fibers not only give higher stiffness but also showed the deflection hardening response. Toughness Index of HSDC reflects the improvement in flexural toughness over the plain concrete and the maximum toughness indices have been observed with 10% MK and 2% volume fraction of PVA fibers. PMID:24707202

  5. Electron microstructure and mechanical properties of silicon and aluminum ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, L. . Dept. of Production Engineering); Smallman, R.E.; Young, J.M. . School of Metallurgy and Materials)

    1994-09-01

    Samples of unalloyed silicon and aluminum spheroidal graphite cast iron have been studied in the austempered condition. Austempering times of up to 3 h at 400 C for Al SG and 1 h at 350 C for Si SG gives a typical ADI microstructure consisting of carbide-free bainitic ferrite and stable, high carbon enriched, retained austenite. This has an attractive combination of elongation and strength. For longer austempering times transition carbides are precipitated in the bainitic ferrite, [eta]-carbide in the upper bainitic range, i.e. 400 C for Al SG and 350 C for Si SG, and [epsilon]-carbide in the lower bainite range. Increasing amounts of transition carbide reduce the ductility and produce a mixed mode of fracture. For longer austempering times [chi]-carbide is precipitated at the ferrite/austenite boundaries leading to a more brittle fracture mode.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Austempering Heat Treatment of a Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardo, Adrián D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.; Górny, Marcin; Tyrała, Edward

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a coupled thermo-mechanical-metallurgical formulation to predict the dimensional changes and microstructure of a ductile cast iron part as a consequence of an austempering heat process. To take into account the different complex phenomena which are present in the process, the stress-strain law and plastic evolution equations are defined within the context of the associate rate-independent thermo-plasticity theory. The metallurgical model considers the reverse eutectoid, ausferritic, and martensitic transformations using macro- and micro-models. The resulting model is solved using the finite element method. The performance of this model is evaluated by comparison with experimental results of a dilatometric test. The results indicate that both the experimental evolution of deformation and temperature are well represented by the numerical model.

  7. Recovery of transplutonium elements from nuclear reactor waste

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, David O.; Buxton, Samuel R.

    1977-05-24

    A method of separating actinide values from nitric acid waste solutions resulting from reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels comprises oxalate precipitation of the major portion of actinide and lanthanide values to provide a trivalent fraction suitable for subsequent actinide/lanthanide partition, exchange of actinide and lanthanide values in the supernate onto a suitable cation exchange resin to provide an intermediate-lived raffinate waste stream substantially free of actinides, and elution of the actinide values from the exchange resin. The eluate is then used to dissolve the trivalent oxalate fraction prior to actinide/lanthanide partition or may be combined with the reprocessing waste stream and recycled.

  8. The exponential flow law applied to necking and folding of a ductile layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Fletcher, Raymond C.

    2011-01-01

    The uniaxial exponential law, ?, has been applied to experimental results for steady-state creep, including that of wet and dry olivine, pyroxenite and carbonates, at a deviatoric stress greater than ˜100 MPa. Such stress levels likely occur in the upper-mantle lithosphere and middle crust. In a layered rock, in layer-parallel extension or shortening, high deviatoric stress can occur in the stiffest layers, for example, a dolomite layer in fine-grained marble. Under assumptions of isotropy and incompressibility, the uniaxial law yields ? where J2=sijsij/2 is an invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor, sij. Linearization about a homogeneous basic-state of flow yields equations identical in form to those obtained for the familiar power law. This establishes expressions for an effective viscosity, ? and stress exponent, ?, where ? is an invariant of the basic-state deformation rate, ?. These results allow application of existing analytical folding and necking solutions for a rock layer of power-law fluid to a rock layer with an exponential flow law. The effective stress exponent for the exponential flow law increases with decreasing temperature, through the dependence of C on the latter and, weakly, with increasing deformation rate. For dry olivine, effective stress exponents are between 10 and 30 for temperatures between 400 and 600°C with little dependence on deformation rate. Finite element simulations employing full non-linear forms of the flow laws show that large strain necking is nearly identical for power law and exponential flow laws. The results suggest that the instability in necking and folding in ductile rock layers can be considerably stronger than inferred from results based on flow laws representing diffusion and dislocation creep. The large values of the effective stress exponent, ne > ˜15, that may be attained for exponential flow laws can account for observed outcrop-scale ductile necking.

  9. Ductile all-cellulose nanocomposite films fabricated from core-shell structured cellulose nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Per A; Berglund, Lars A; Wågberg, Lars

    2014-06-01

    Cellulosic materials have many desirable properties such as high mechanical strength and low oxygen permeability and will be an important component in a sustainable biomaterial-based society, but unfortunately they often lack the ductility and formability offered by petroleum-based materials. This paper describes the fabrication and characterization of nanocomposite films made of core-shell modified cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) surrounded by a shell of ductile dialcohol cellulose, created by heterogeneous periodate oxidation followed by borohydride reduction of the native cellulose in the external parts of the individual fibrils. The oxidation with periodate selectively produces dialdehyde cellulose, and the process does not increase the charge density of the material. Yet the modified cellulose fibers could easily be homogenized to CNFs. Prior to film fabrication, the CNF was shown by atomic force microscopy to be 0.5-2 μm long and 4-10 nm wide. The films were fabricated by filtration, and besides uniaxial tensile testing at different relative humidities, they were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and oxygen permeability. The strength-at-break at 23 °C and 50% RH was 175 MPa, and the films could, before rupture, be strained, mainly by plastic deformation, to about 15% and 37% at 50% RH and 90% RH, respectively. This moisture plasticization was further utilized to form a demonstrator consisting of a double-curved structure with a nominal strain of 24% over the curvature. At a relative humidity of 80%, the films still acted as a good oxygen barrier, having an oxygen permeability of 5.5 mL·μL/(m(2)·24 h·kPa). These properties indicate that this new material has a potential for use as a barrier in complex-shaped structures and hence ultimately reduce the need for petroleum-based plastics.

  10. Optimization of strength and ductility in nanotwinned ultrafine grained Ag: twin density and grain orientations

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, R. T.; Geng, J.; Besser, M. F.; Kramer, M. J.; Wang, Y. M.; Park, E. S.; LeSar, R.; King, A. H.

    2015-06-27

    Nanotwinned ultrafine grained Ag thick films with different twin densities and orientations have been synthesized by magnetron sputtering with a wide-range of deposition rates. The twin boundary (TB) spacings and orientations as well as the grain size for the different deposition conditions have been characterized by both synchrotron X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Structural characterization combined with uniaxial tensile tests of the free-standing films reveals a large increase in the yield strength for films deposited at high deposition rates without any accompanying change in the TB spacing – a behavior that is in contrast with what has been reported in the literature. We find that films deposited at lower deposition rates exhibit more randomly oriented grains with a lower overall twin density (averaged over all the grains) than the more heavily twinned grains with strong <111> fiber texture in the films deposited at higher deposition rates. The TB spacing in the twinned grains, however, does not show any significant dependence on the deposition rate. The dependence of the strength and ductility on the twin density and orientations can be described by two different soft deformation modes: 1) untwinned grains and 2) nanowinned grains that are not oriented with <111> along the growth direction. The untwinned grains provide relatively low resistance to slip, and thus decreased strength, while the nanotwinned grains that are not oriented with <111> along the growth direction are softer than nanotwinned grains that are oriented with <111> along the growth direction. We reveal that an ultrafine-grained (150-200 nm) structure consisting of a mixture of nanotwinned (~ 8-12 nm spacing) and untwined grains yields the best combination of high strength and uniform tensile ductility.

  11. Rapid theory-guided prototyping of ductile Mg alloys: from binary to multi-component materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zongrui; Friák, Martin; Sandlöbes, Stefanie; Nazarov, Roman; Svendsen, Bob; Raabe, Dierk; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    In order to identify a method allowing for a fast solute assessment without lengthy ab initio calculations, we analyze correlations and anti-correlation between the {{{I}}}1 stacking fault energies ({{{I}}}1SFEs), which were shown to be related to the macroscopic ductility in Mg alloys, and five material parameters of 18 different elemental solutes. Our analysis reveals that the atomic volume V of pure solutes, their electronegativity ν and bulk modulus B are either linearly or logarithmically related to the {{{I}}}1 SFE. Comparing the impact of solutes with that of yttrium (that increases the ductility in Mg) we propose a single numerical quantity (called yttrium similarity index, YSI) that is based on these inter-relations. Subsequently, we evaluate this new figure of merit for 76 elements from the periodic table of elements in search for solutes reducing the {{{I}}}1 SFE. Limiting ourselves first to binary Mg alloys, we hardly find any alternative solutes providing similar {{{I}}}1{SFE} reduction as that due to rare-earth (RE) additions. Therefore, we extended our search to ternary Mg alloys. Assuming that the physical properties of solute combinations can be represented by their average values, 2850 solute combinations were checked and 133 solute pairs (not including any RE elements) have been found to have a YSI larger than 0.85. Quantum-mechanical calculations have been subsequently performed for 11 solute pairs with YSIs higher than 0.95 and they were all found to reduce the {{{I}}}1{SFE} in excellent agreement with the predictions based on the YSI.

  12. Optimization of strength and ductility in nanotwinned ultrafine grained Ag: twin density and grain orientations

    DOE PAGES

    Ott, R. T.; Geng, J.; Besser, M. F.; Kramer, M. J.; Wang, Y. M.; Park, E. S.; LeSar, R.; King, A. H.

    2015-06-27

    Nanotwinned ultrafine grained Ag thick films with different twin densities and orientations have been synthesized by magnetron sputtering with a wide-range of deposition rates. The twin boundary (TB) spacings and orientations as well as the grain size for the different deposition conditions have been characterized by both synchrotron X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Structural characterization combined with uniaxial tensile tests of the free-standing films reveals a large increase in the yield strength for films deposited at high deposition rates without any accompanying change in the TB spacing – a behavior that is in contrast with what has beenmore » reported in the literature. We find that films deposited at lower deposition rates exhibit more randomly oriented grains with a lower overall twin density (averaged over all the grains) than the more heavily twinned grains with strong <111> fiber texture in the films deposited at higher deposition rates. The TB spacing in the twinned grains, however, does not show any significant dependence on the deposition rate. The dependence of the strength and ductility on the twin density and orientations can be described by two different soft deformation modes: 1) untwinned grains and 2) nanowinned grains that are not oriented with <111> along the growth direction. The untwinned grains provide relatively low resistance to slip, and thus decreased strength, while the nanotwinned grains that are not oriented with <111> along the growth direction are softer than nanotwinned grains that are oriented with <111> along the growth direction. We reveal that an ultrafine-grained (150-200 nm) structure consisting of a mixture of nanotwinned (~ 8-12 nm spacing) and untwined grains yields the best combination of high strength and uniform tensile ductility.« less

  13. Secondary Al-Si-Mg High-pressure Die Casting Alloys with Enhanced Ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bösch, Dominik; Pogatscher, Stefan; Hummel, Marc; Fragner, Werner; Uggowitzer, Peter J.; Göken, Mathias; Höppel, Heinz Werner

    2015-03-01

    Al-Si-Mg-based secondary cast alloys are attractive candidates for thin-walled high-pressure die castings for applications in the transport industry. The present study investigates the effect of manganese additions at high cooling rates on microstructure, mechanical properties, and on the dominating fracture mechanisms of alloy AlSi10Mg with an elevated iron concentration. Systematic variations of the Mn content from 0.20 to 0.85 wt pct at a constant Fe content of 0.55 wt pct illustrate the key changes in type, phase fraction, and shape of the Fe-containing intermetallic phases, and the corresponding influence on the alloy's ductility. For high-pressure die casting (HPDC), an optimal range of the Mn content between 0.40 and 0.60 wt pct, equivalent to a Mn/Fe ratio of approximately 1, has been identified. At these Mn and Fe contents, the high cooling rates obtained in HPDC result in the formation of fine and homogeneously distributed α-Al15(Fe,Mn)3Si2 phase, and crack initiation is transferred from AlFeSi intermetallics to eutectic silicon. The study interprets the microstructure-property relationship in the light of thermodynamic calculations which reveal a significant increase in undercooling of the α-Al15(Fe,Mn)3Si2 phase with increased Mn content. It concludes that the interdependence of the well-defined Mn/Fe ratio and the high cooling rate in HPDC can generate superior ductility in secondary AlSi10Mg cast alloys.

  14. Strain localization in ductile rocks: A comparison of natural and simulated pinch-and-swell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    We study pinch-and-swell structures in order to uncover the onset of strain localization and the change of deformation mechanisms in layered ductile rocks. To this end, boudinaged monomineralic veins embedded in an ultramylonitic matrix are analyzed quantitatively. The swells are built up by relatively undeformed original calcite grains, showing twinning and minor subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR). Combined with progressive formation of high-angle misorientations between grains, indicative of SGR, severe grain size reduction defines the transition to the pinches. Accordingly, dynamically recrystallized grains have a strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Toward the necks, further grain size reduction, increasingly random misorientations, nucleation of new grains, and a loss of the CPO occur. We postulate that this microstructure marks the transition from dislocation to diffusion creep induced by strain localization. We confirm that the development of boudins is insensitive to original grain sizes and single-crystal orientations. In order to test these microstructural interpretations, a self-consistent numerical grain size evolution is implemented, based on thermo-mechanical principles, end-member flow laws and microphysical processes. Applying constant velocity and isothermal boundary conditions to a 3-layer finite element pure shear box, pinch-and-swell structures emerge out of the homogeneous layer through grain size softening at a critical state. Viscosity weakening due to elevated strain rates and dissipated heat from grain size reduction promotes strain rate weakening until a critical grain size is reached. At this point, a switch from dislocation to diffusion creep occurs. This state locks in at local steady states and is microstructurally expressed in pinches and swells, respectively. Thus, boudinage is identified as an energy attractor, identifying the high-energy steady state of an extending layered structure. We conclude from the

  15. An experimental and computational investigation of dynamic ductile fracture in stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothnur, Vasanth Srinivasa

    The high strain rate viscoplastic flow and fracture behavior of NITRONIC-50 and AL6XN stainless steel weldments are studied under dynamic loading conditions. The study is primarily motivated by interest in modeling the micromechanics of dynamic ductile failure in heterogeneous weldments. The high strain rate response of specimens machined from the parent, weld and heat-affected zones of NITRONIC-50 and AL6XN weldments is reported here on the basis of experiments conducted in a compression Kolsky bar configuration. The failure response of specimens prepared from the various material zones is investigated under high rate loading conditions in a tension Kolsky bar set-up. The microstructure of voided fracture process zones in these weldments is studied using X-ray Computed Microtomography. To model the preferential evolution of damage near the heat-affected zone, a finite deformation elastic-viscoplastic constitutive model for porous materials is developed. The evolution of the macroscopic flow response and the porous microstructure have been analysed in two distinctive regimes: pre-coalescence and post-coalescence. The onset of void coalescence is analyzed on the basis of upper-bound models to obtain the limit-loads needed to sustain a localized mode of plastic flow in the inter-void ligament. A finite element framework for the integration of the porous material response under high rate loading conditions is implemented as a user-subroutine in ABAQUS/Explicit. To address the effect of mesh sensitivity of numerical simulations of ductile fracture, a microstructural length scale is used to discretize finite element models of test specimens. Results from a detailed finite element study of the deformation and damage evolution in AL6XN weldments are compared with experimental observations.

  16. Creep deformation and rupture behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel weldments and its constituents (base metal, weld metal and simulated heat affected zones)

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Rao, K.B.S.; Mannan, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Microstructure across a weldment base metal through transformed heat-affected zone (HAZ) to cast weld metal. HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo weldment consists of coarse-grain bainite, fine-grain bainite and intercritical region. These HAZ microstructures were simulated by isothermal heat-treatments. Creep tests were carried out on base metal, weld metal, weldment and the simulated HAZ structures. Creep deformation and fracture behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo weldments has been assessed based on the properties of its constituents. Coarse-grain bainite with low ductility and intercritical structure with low strength are the critical components of HAZ determining performance of the weldments.

  17. Crack growth in a ductile-phase-toughened Nb/Nb[sub 3]Al in situ intermetallic composite under monotonic and cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Murugesh, L.; Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1993-10-15

    One approach to improving the ductility and toughness of brittle solids is to incorporate a ductile phase into the brittle matrix in order to impede the extension of incipient cracks. In this regard, recent word has shown that niobium can provide significant ductile-phase toughening in several intermetallic composites via crack bridging, plastic stretching and interfacial debonding mechanisms; however, under cyclic loading the role of the ductile phase appears to be less effective. Accordingly, the purpose of the current study is to examine the effect of the addition of ductile Nb phase on fracture and fatigue behavior in an equiaxed Nb/Nb[sub 3]Al in situ composite; results are compared with behavior in unreinforced Nb[sub 3]Al and Nb to determine possible mechanisms of crack propagation in Nb-toughened Nb[sub 3]Al intermetallic composites.

  18. Extraordinary high ductility/strength of the interface designed bulk W-ZrC alloy plate at relatively low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Z. M.; Liu, R.; Miao, S.; Yang, X. D.; Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.; Luo, G. N.; Lian, Y. Y.; Liu, X.

    2015-01-01

    The refractory tungsten alloys with high ductility/strength/plasticity are highly desirable for a wide range of critical applications. Here we report an interface design strategy that achieves 8.5 mm thick W-0.5 wt. %ZrC alloy plates with a flexural strength of 2.5 GPa and a strain of 3% at room temperature (RT) and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of about 100 °C. The tensile strength is about 991 MPa at RT and 582 MPa at 500 °C, as well as total elongation is about 1.1% at RT and as large as 41% at 500 °C, respectively. In addition, the W-ZrC alloy plate can sustain 3.3 MJ/m2 thermal load without any cracks. This processing route offers the special coherent interfaces of grain/phase boundaries (GB/PBs) and the diminishing O impurity at GBs, which significantly strengthens GB/PBs and thereby enhances the ductility/strength/plasticity of W alloy. The design thought can be used in the future to prepare new alloys with higher ductility/strength. PMID:26531172

  19. Extraordinary high ductility/strength of the interface designed bulk W-ZrC alloy plate at relatively low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z. M.; Liu, R.; Miao, S.; Yang, X. D.; Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.; Luo, G. N.; Lian, Y. Y.; Liu, X.

    2015-11-01

    The refractory tungsten alloys with high ductility/strength/plasticity are highly desirable for a wide range of critical applications. Here we report an interface design strategy that achieves 8.5 mm thick W-0.5 wt. %ZrC alloy plates with a flexural strength of 2.5 GPa and a strain of 3% at room temperature (RT) and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of about 100 °C. The tensile strength is about 991 MPa at RT and 582 MPa at 500 °C, as well as total elongation is about 1.1% at RT and as large as 41% at 500 °C, respectively. In addition, the W-ZrC alloy plate can sustain 3.3 MJ/m2 thermal load without any cracks. This processing route offers the special coherent interfaces of grain/phase boundaries (GB/PBs) and the diminishing O impurity at GBs, which significantly strengthens GB/PBs and thereby enhances the ductility/strength/plasticity of W alloy. The design thought can be used in the future to prepare new alloys with higher ductility/strength.

  20. Ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.J.; Busch, D.E.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of simultaneous displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on the ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti specimens irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE).

  1. Evaluation of the electrochemical behavior of ductile nickel aluminide and nickel in a pH 7.9 solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gram, D.M.; Bertocci, U.; Ricker, R.E.

    1991-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of ductile doped nickel aluminide has been examined in neutral solutions. Features observed in a certain potential range were characterized, and the potentiodynamic sweep parameters affecting them identified. Nickel aluminide behaves essentially as pure nickel; however, small differences were observed.

  2. Study of the isothermal transformation of ductile iron with 0.5% Cu by electrical resistance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, B.Y.; Chen, E.T.; Lei, T.S.

    1995-10-01

    A computer-controlled system for measuring electrical resistance has been developed and used to study the isothermal transformation of austenite in a ductile iron (3.31% C, 3.12% Si, 0.22% mn, 0.55% Cu). The ability of the technique to follow the isothermal decomposition of austenite was established by measurements on an AISI 4340 steel. The times at which the austenite decomposed to primary ferrite, pearlite, and bainite were accurately detected. In the ductile iron, the formation of pearlite and of bainite was easily detected, and an isothermal transformation diagram was constructed from the results. The temperature range for the formation of bainite is especially important in producing austempered ductile iron (ADI) and was mapped. An initial stage of decomposition of austenite to ferrite and high-carbon austenite is followed by a time delay; then the high-carbon austenite decomposes to bainite. The formation of ADI requires austempering to a structure of ferrite and high-carbon austenite, then quenching to retain this structure, thus avoiding the formation of bainite. This is achieved by isothermal transformation into the time-delay region. For the ductile iron studied here, this time region was about 2.6 h at 400 C and increased to 277 h at 300 C.

  3. Study of the isothermal transformation of ductile iron with 0.5% Cu by electrical resistance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B. Y.; Chen, E. T.; Lei, T. S.

    1995-10-01

    A computer-controlled system for measuring electrical resistance has been developed and used to study the isothermal transformation of austenite in a ductile iron (3.31 % C, 3.12 % Si, 0.22 % Mn, 0.55 % Cu). The ability of the technique to follow the isothermal decomposition of austenite was established by measurements on an AISI4340 steel. The times at which the austenite decomposed to primary ferrite, pearlite, and bainite were accurately detected. In the ductile iron, the formation of pearlite and of bainite was easily detected, and an isothermal transformation diagram was constructed from the results. The temperature range for the formation of bainite is especially important in producing austempered ductile iron (ADI) and was mapped. An initial stage of decomposition of austenite to ferrite and high-carbon austenite is followed by a time delay; then the high-carbon austenite decomposes to bainite. The formation of ADI requires austempering to a structure of ferrite and high-carbon austenite, then quenching to retain this structure, thus avoiding the formation of bainite. This is achieved by isothermal transformation into the time-delay region. For the ductile iron studied here, this time region was about 2.6 h at 400 °C and increased to 277 h at 300 °C.

  4. A brittle-ductile high- and low-angle fault related to the Kea extensional detachment (W Cyclades., Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockenschaub, M.; Grasemann, B.; Iglseder, C.; Rice, A. H. N.; Schneider, D.; Zamolyi, A.

    2010-05-01

    Roll-back of the African Plate within the Eurasian-African collision zone since the Oligocene/Miocene led to extension in the Cyclades along low-angle normal fault zones and exhumation of rocks from near the brittle-ductile transition zone. On the island of Kea (W Cyclades), which represents such a crustal scale low-angle fault zone with top-to-SSW kinematics, remote sensing analysis of brittle fault lineaments in the Pissis area (W Kea) demonstrates two dominant strike directions: ca. NE-SW and NW-SE. From the north of Pisses southwards, the angle between the two main fault directions changes gradually from a rhombohedral geometry (ca. 50°/130° angle between faults, with the acute angle facing westwards) to an orthogonal geometry. The aim of this study is the development of this fault system. We investigate, if this fault system is related to the Miocene extension or if it is related to a later overprinting event (e.g. the opening of the Corinth) Field observations revealed that the investigated lineaments are high-angle (50-90° dip) brittle/ductile conjugate, faults. Due to the lack of marker layers offsets could only rarely be estimated. Locally centimetre thick marble layers in the greenschists suggest a displacement gradient along the faults with a maximum offset of less than 60 cm. Large displacement gradients are associated with a pronounced ductile fault drag in the host rocks. In some instances, high-angle normal faults were observed to link kinematically with low-angle, top-to-SSW brittle/ductile shear bands. Both the high- and the low-angle faults have a component of ductile shear, which is overprinted by brittle deformation mechanisms. In thin-section, polyphase mode-2 cracks are filled mainly with calcite and quartz (ultra)cataclasites, sometimes followed by further opening with fluid-related iron-rich carbonate (ankeritic) precipitation. CL analysis reveals several generations of cements, indicating multiple phases of cataclastic deformation and

  5. Atomistic mechanisms of strain relaxation due to ductile void growth in ultrathin films of face-centered-cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gungor, M. Rauf; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2005-06-01

    A comprehensive computational analysis is reported of the atomistic mechanisms of strain relaxation and failure in free-standing Cu thin films under applied biaxial tensile strain for strain levels up to 6%. The analysis focuses on nanometer-scale-thick films with a preexisting void extending across the film thickness and the film plane oriented normal to the [111] crystallographic direction. Our computational study is based on isothermal-isostrain large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations within an embedded-atom-method parametrization for Cu. Our analysis has revealed various regimes in the film's mechanical response as the applied strain level increases. Within the considered strain range, after an elastic response at a low strain (<2%), void growth is the major strain relaxation mechanism mediated by the emission of perfect screw dislocation pairs from the void surface and subsequent dislocation propagation; as a result, a plastic zone forms around the void. Plastic deformation is accompanied by the glide motion of the dislocations emitted from the void surface, void surface morphological transitions, formation of a step pattern on the film's surfaces, dislocation jogging, vacancy generation due to gliding jogged dislocations, dislocation-vacancy interactions, vacancy pipe diffusion along dislocation cores, as well as dislocation-dislocation interactions. The increase in film surface roughness with increasing strain eventually leads to nucleation and propagation from the film surfaces of threading dislocation loops, which ultimately break up when they reach the opposite free surface of the thin film.

  6. Micromechanisms of monotonic and cyclic subcritical crack growth in advanced high-melting-point low-ductility intermetallics. Annual report No. 1, 15 Apr 90-14 Apr 91

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.T.; Murugesh, L.; DeJonghe, L.C.

    1991-05-01

    The next generation of high-performance jet engines will require markedly stiffer materials, operating at higher stress levels and capable of withstanding temperatures of up to 1650 C. Prime candidates for such applications include ordered intermetallics, ceramics and composites based on metal, intermetallic and ceramic or carbon matrices, all of which are currently of limited use due to their low ductility and fracture properties. Moreover, there is a lack of fundamental understanding on the micromechanisms influencing crack growth in these materials, particularly intermetallics. Accordingly, the present study is aimed at exploring the potential of intermetallic alloys and their composites as advanced structural materials by identifying the critical factors influencing the crack-propagation resistance under monotonic and cyclic loads. Attention is focused on the Nb{sub 3}Al and TiAl intermetallic systems. In both cases, the principal mechanism of toughening is to impede crack advance from crack bridging by ductile second phase particles. Reactive sintering and vacuum hot pressing techniques are successful is processing Nb{sub 3}Al intermetallics and duplex Nb/Nb{sub 3}Al microstructure with a stringy niobium phase can be achieved through thermal treatments. Characterization of mechanical properties will commence in the second year.

  7. The Border Ranges shear zone, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska: An example of an ancient brittle-ductile transition zone

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, K.J. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Border Ranges fault system in southern Alaska forms the tectonic boundary between the Peninsular-Alexander-Wrangellia (PAW) composite terrane and the Chugach terrane. In Glacier Bay National Park, the Border Ranges fault system is a north-northwest trending, 10 kilometer wide zone of ductile shear zones and brittle faults hereafter referred to as the Border Ranges shear zone. Three-dimensional strain analyses of plagioclase lathes in the foliated calc-alkaline plutons reveals a strong flattening fabric with the plane of maximum flattening (XY-plane) oriented northwest-southeast and dipping steeply to the southwest. The distribution and shapes of sub-elliptical mafic enclaves in the calc-alkaline plutons show a similarly oriented flattening fabric. Coeval brittle and ductile deformational processes are indicated by: (1) ductile shear zones narrowing to brittle faults at the outcrop scale; and (2) undulose quartz with subgrain development, kinked biotite, twinned and undulose feldspar, and fractured and twinned hornblende often within a single thin-section. Amphibole geobarometry indicates that two of the calc-alkaline plutons deformed by the shear zone crystallized at pressures of approximately 3 kilobars equivalent to 10 to 12 kilometers depth. Metamorphic mineral assemblages within the mylonites indicate deformation under lower greenschist facies conditions (300--400 C). The shear zone may represent a snapshot of the brittle-ductile transition of an ancient convergent-transform plate boundary. As such, this unique exposure may be an ancient analogue for the brittle-ductile transition of the present day San Andreas fault system.

  8. In-situ neutron diffraction analysis of deformation behavior of ductile rare-earth intermetallic yttrium-copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Scott H.

    Intermetallic compounds exhibit favorable properties for numerous diverse engineering applications. Many intermetallic compounds possess high strength and high stiffness at elevated temperature, excellent corrosion resistance, and low density, making them potentially useful in a wide range of applications. However, several drawbacks, limited ductility in particular, have prevented these compounds from achieving wide-spread application. In order to make full use of potential of intermetallic compounds, these limitations must be better understood and overcome. In the search for improved ductility in intermetallics, recent findings from an Ames Laboratory research group have uncovered an entire family of compounds possessing the B2 structure which exhibit room temperature tensile ductility. These materials do not require third-element additions, off-stoichiometric chemistry, disordering, or elaborate environmental testing conditions to enhance ductility. Previous studies have investigated various structural and physical properties of this family of compounds, yet the mechanisms for ductility remain uncertain. Low temperature phase transformations are known to occur in several of these compounds. Suggestions for possible mechanisms have included stress-induced phase transformation, as well as the deformation accommodated through crystallographic twinning. In-situ neutron diffraction allows for observations of structural changes and the relationship to macroscopic physical properties. Using this investigation technique, experiments have been conducted to examine rare-earth intermetallic YCu for evidence of phase transformation, twinning, or indications of other deformation behavior. Results give insight into the crystal structure of the compound, indicating a high degree of crystal lattice coherency, and resulting dynamical diffraction behavior not commonly observed in engineering materials.

  9. The Strain-Hardening Behavior of Partially Austenitized and the Austempered Ductile Irons with Dual Matrix Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicli, Volkan; Erdogan, Mehmet

    2008-04-01

    In the current study, an unalloyed ductile iron containing 3.50 C wt.%, 2.63 Si wt.%, 0.318 Mn wt.%, and 0.047 Mg wt.% was intercritically austenitized (partially austenitized) in two-phase regions (α + γ) at different temperatures for 20 min and then was quenched into salt bath held at austempering temperature of 365 °C for various times to obtain different ausferrite plus proeutectoid ferrite volume fractions. Fine and coarse dual matrix structures (DMS) were obtained from two different starting conditions. Some specimens were also conventionally austempered from 900 °C for comparison. The results showed that a structure having proeutectoid ferrite plus ausferrite (bainitic ferrite + high-carbon austenite (retained or stabilized austenite)) has been developed. Both of the specimens with ˜75% ausferrite volume fraction (coarse structure) and the specimen with ˜82% ausferrite volume fraction (fine structure) exhibited the best combination of high strength and ductility compared to the pearlitic grades, but their ductility is slightly lower than the ferritic grades. These materials also satisfy the requirements for the strength of the quenched and tempered grades and their ductility is superior to this grade. The correlation between the strain-hardening rates of the various austempered ductile iron (ADI) with DMS and conventionally heat-treated ADI microstructures as a function of strain was conducted by inspection of the respective tensile curves. For this purpose, the Crussard-Jaoul (C-J) analysis was employed. The test results also indicate that strain-hardening behavior of ADI with dual matrix is influenced by the variations in the volume fractions of the phases, and their morphologies, the degree of ausferrite connectivity and the interaction intensities between the carbon atoms and the dislocations in the matrix. The ADI with DMS generally exhibited low strain-hardening rates compared to the conventionally ADI.

  10. Deformation in metals after low temperature irradiation: Part II - Irradiation hardening, strain hardening, and stress ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Li, Meimei

    2008-03-01

    Effects of irradiation at temperatures 200oC on tensile stress parameters are analyzed for dozens of bcc, fcc, and hcp pure metals and alloys, focusing on irradiation hardening, strain hardening, and relationships between the true stress parameters. Similar irradiation-hardening rates are observed for all the metals irrespective of crystal type; typically, the irradiation-hardening rates are large, in the range 100 - 1000 GPa/dpa, at the lowest dose of <0.0001 dpa and decrease with dose to a few tens of MPa/dpa or less at about 10 dpa. However, average irradiation-hardening rates over the dose range of 0 dpa − (the dose to plastic instability at yield) are considerably lower for stainless steels due to their high uniform ductility. It is shown that whereas low temperature irradiation increases the yield stress, it does not significantly change the strain-hardening rate of metallic materials; it decreases the fracture stress only when non-ductile failure occurs. Such dose independence in strain hardening behavior results in strong linear relationships between the true stress parameters. Average ratios of plastic instability stress to unirradiated yield stress are about 1.4, 3.9, and 1.3 for bcc metals (and precipitation hardened IN718 alloy), annealed fcc metals (and pure Zr), and Zr-4 alloy, respectively. Ratios of fracture stress to plastic instability stress are calculated to be 2.2, 1.7, and 2.1, respectively. Comparison of these values confirms that the annealed fcc metals and other soft metals have larger uniform ductility but smaller necking ductility when compared to other materials.

  11. The effect of grain refinement on the room-temperature ductility of as-cast Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Andleigh, V.K.; McKamey, C.G.

    1995-08-01

    Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys exhibit poor room-temperature ductility in the as-cast condition. In this study, the effect of grain refinement of the as-cast alloy on room-temperature ductility was investigated. Small melts of Fe-28 at. % Al-5 at. % Cr were inoculated with various alloying additions and cast into a 50- x 30- x 30-mm graphite mold. The resulting ingots were examined metallographically for evidence of grain refinement, and three-point bend tests were conducted on samples to assess the effect on room-temperature ductility. Ductility was assumed to correlate with the strain corresponding to the maximum stress obtained in the bend test. The results showed that titanium was extremely effective in grain refinement, although it severely embrittled the alloy in contents exceeding 1%. Boron additions strengthened the alloy significantly, while carbon additions reduced both the strength and ductility. The best ductility was found in an alloy containing titanium, boron, and carbon. In order to verify the results of the grain refinement study, vacuum-induction melts of selected compositions were prepared and cast into a larger 25- x 150- x 100-mm graphite mold. Tensile specimens were machined from the ingots, and specimens were tested at room temperature. The results of the tensile tests agreed with the results of the grain refinement study; in addition, the addition of molybdenum was found to significantly increase room-temperature tensile ductility over that of the base alloy.

  12. The effect of segregation on the austemper transformation and toughness of ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B. Y.; Chen, E. T.; Lei, T. S.

    1998-06-01

    The effect of segregation of alloying elements on the phase transformation of ductile iron during austempering was investigated. Four heats, each containing 0.4%Mn, 1% Cu, 1.5% Ni, or 0.4% Mo (wt%) separately, were melted; then three different sizes of casting bars (3,15, and 75 mm diameter) were poured from each heat. The distribution and the degree of segregation of certain elements were quantitatively analyzed using an electron microprobe. A personal computer (PC)-controlled heat treating system was used to measure electrical resistivity, and the information on resistivity variations was used to analyze the effect of segregation on phase transformations during austempering. Also, Charpy impact and Rockwell hardness tests were performed to determine the effect of segregation on properties. Results of the electron microprobe analysis showed that the degree of segregation of alloy elements increases with an increase in diameter of the casting bars (i.e., an increase of solidification time of castings). The degree of segregation of alloy elements, represented by segregation ratio (SR) (the maximum concentration of element in cell divided by the minimum concentration of element in cell), varied linearly with the casting modulus (M) (volume of casting divided by surface area of casting). Regarding the segregating tendency among alloy elements, positive segregating elements Mn and Mo showed more segregation than the negative segregating elements Si, Cu, and Ni. In addition, segregation of Mo was more significant than Mn, and that for Cu was greater than Ni and Si. Between the time of finishing the first stage and beginning the second stage of bainite reaction in ductile irons, there is a significant “processing window,” At;, for austempering to obtain optimum mechanical properties. From the electrical resistivity data, it was observed that the austempering temperature plays a major role in the processing window. There was a narrow window at 400 ‡C but a larger

  13. The Relationship Between Constraint and Ductile Fracture Initiation as Defined by Micromechanical Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panontin, Tina L.; Sheppard, Sheri D.

    1994-01-01

    The use of small laboratory specimens to predict the integrity of large, complex structures relies on the validity of single parameter fracture mechanics. Unfortunately, the constraint loss associated with large scale yielding, whether in a laboratory specimen because of its small size or in a structure because it contains shallow flaws loaded in tension, can cause the breakdown of classical fracture mechanics and the loss of transferability of critical, global fracture parameters. Although the issue of constraint loss can be eliminated by testing actual structural configurations, such an approach can be prohibitively costly. Hence, a methodology that can correct global fracture parameters for constraint effects is desirable. This research uses micromechanical analyses to define the relationship between global, ductile fracture initiation parameters and constraint in two specimen geometries (SECT and SECB with varying a/w ratios) and one structural geometry (circumferentially cracked pipe). Two local fracture criteria corresponding to ductile fracture micromechanisms are evaluated: a constraint-modified, critical strain criterion for void coalescence proposed by Hancock and Cowling and a critical void ratio criterion for void growth based on the Rice and Tracey model. Crack initiation is assumed to occur when the critical value in each case is reached over some critical length. The primary material of interest is A516-70, a high-hardening pressure vessel steel sensitive to constraint; however, a low-hardening structural steel that is less sensitive to constraint is also being studied. Critical values of local fracture parameters are obtained by numerical analysis and experimental testing of circumferentially notched tensile specimens of varying constraint (e.g., notch radius). These parameters are then used in conjunction with large strain, large deformation, two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses of the geometries listed above to predict crack

  14. Development of ductile hybrid fiber reinforced polymer (D-H-FRP) reinforcement for concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somboonsong, Win

    The corrosion of steel rebars has been the major cause of the reinforced concrete deterioration in transportation structures and port facilities. Currently, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) spends annually $31 billion for maintaining and repairing highways and highway bridges. The study reported herein represents the work done in developing a new type of reinforcement called Ductile Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Polymer or D-H-FRP using non-corrosive fiber materials. Unlike the previous FRP reinforcements that fail in a brittle manner, the D-H-FRP bars exhibit the stress-strain curves that are suitable for concrete reinforcement. The D-H-FRP stress-strain curves are linearly elastic with a definite yield point followed by plastic deformation and strain hardening resembling that of mild steel. In addition, the D-H-FRP reinforcement has integrated ribs required for concrete bond. The desirable mechanical properties of D-H-FRP reinforcement are obtained from the integrated design based on the material hybrid and geometric hybrid concepts. Using these concepts, the properties can be tailored to meet the specific design requirements. An analytical model was developed to predict the D-H-FRP stress-strain curves with different combination of fiber materials and geometric configuration. This model was used to optimize the design of D-H-FRP bars. An in-line braiding-pultrusion manufacturing process was developed at Drexel University to produce high quality D-H-FRP reinforcement in diameters that can be used in concrete structures. A series of experiments were carried out to test D-H-FRP reinforcement as well as their individual components in monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. Using the results from the tensile tests and fracture analysis, the stress-strain behavior of the D-H-FRP reinforcement was fully characterized and explained. Two series of concrete beams reinforced with D-H-FRP bars were studied. The D-H-FRP beam test results were then compared with companion

  15. The effect of loading rate on ductile fracture toughness and fracture surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osovski, S.; Srivastava, A.; Ponson, L.; Bouchaud, E.; Tvergaard, V.; Ravi-Chandar, K.; Needleman, A.

    2015-03-01

    The variation of ductile crack growth resistance and fracture surface roughness with loading rate is modeled under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions. Three-dimensional calculations are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitating solid with two populations of void nucleating second phase particles. Larger inclusions that result in void nucleation at an early stage are modeled as discrete void nucleation sites while smaller particles that require large strains to nucleate voids are homogeneously distributed. The calculations are carried out for two values of density of the larger inclusions, 3.6% and 7.1%, and for prescribed loading rates K˙˙I ranging from 1 ×105 MPa√{ m }s-1 to 5 ×107 MPa√{ m }s-1. The ductile fracture mode is found to undergo a transition from one that can be regarded as growth of a dominant main crack at the lower loading rates to one dominated by damage nucleation and micro-cracking ahead of the main crack at the higher loading rates. The values of JIC, the tearing modulus, TR, the total plastic dissipation and the plastic dissipation in the fracture process region are all found to increase with increasing loading rate. However, the ratio of plastic dissipation in the fracture process region to total plastic dissipation decreases with increasing prescribed loading rate. The fracture surfaces are found to display two self-affine regimes, with a Hurst exponent β ≈ 0.60 at small length scales and with β ≈ 0.45 at larger length scales. The multi-fractal spectra indicate multi-affine behavior in most cases but a range of loading rates and length scales exhibiting mono-affine behavior is also found. Parameters characterizing the fracture surface statistics, including the length scale at which a transition from a power law tail to an exponential tail occurs, are related to the mode of crack growth/damage accumulation. A linear relation is found between the values of JIC

  16. Ductile fracture toughness of modified A 302 grade B plate materials. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Swain, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this work was to develop ductile fracture toughness data in the form of J-R curves for modified A 302 grade B plate materials typical of those used in fabricating reactor pressure vessels. A previous experimental study at Materials Engineering Associates (MEA) on one particular heat of A 302 grade B plate showed decreasing J-R curves with increased specimen thickness. This characteristic has not been observed in numerous tests made on the more recent production materials of A 533 grade B and A 508 class 2 pressure vessel steels. It was unknown if the departure from norm for the MEA material was a generic characteristic for all heats of A 302 grade B steels or just unique to that one particular plate. Seven heats of modified A 302 grade B steel and one heat of vintage A 533 grade B steel were provided to this project by the General Electric Company of San Jose, California. All plates were tested for chemical content, tensile properties, Charpy transition temperature curves, drop-weight nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature, and J-R curves. Tensile tests were made in the three principal orientations and at four temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 550{degrees}F (288{degrees}C). Charpy V-notch transition temperature curves were obtained in longitudinal, transverse, and short transverse orientations. J-R curves were made using four specimen sizes (1/2T, IT, 2T, and 4T). None of the seven heats of modified A 302 grade showed size effects of any consequence on the J-R curve behavior. Crack orientation effects were present, but none were severe enough to be reported as atypical. A test temperature increase from 180 to 550{degrees}F (82 to 288{degrees}C) produced the usual loss in J-R curve fracture toughness. Generic J-R curves and mathematical curve fits to the same were generated to represent each heat of material. This volume is a compilation of all data developed.

  17. Grain Growth Behavior, Tensile Impact Ductility, and Weldability of Cerium-Doped Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.

    2002-05-28

    An iridium alloy doped with small amounts of cerium and thorium is being developed as a potential replacement for the iridium-based DOP-26 alloy (doped with thorium only) that is currently used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the iridium-based alloy (designated as DOP-40) containing both cerium and thorium. Included within this report are data on grain growth of sheet material in vacuum and low-pressure oxygen environments, grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material, weldability, and the effect of grain size and test temperature on tensile properties. Where applicable, data for the DOP-26 alloy are included for comparison. Both grain size and grain-boundary cohesion affect the ductility of iridium alloys. In this study it was found that cerium and thorium, when added together, refine grain size more effectively than when thorium is added by itself (especially at high temperatures). In addition, the effect of cerium additions on grain-boundary cohesion is similar to that of thorium. Mechanical testing at both low ({approx} 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}) and high ({approx} 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}) strain rates showed that the Ce/Th-doped alloys have tensile ductilities that are as good or better than the DOP-26 alloy. The general conclusion from these studies is that cerium can be used to replace some of the radioactive thorium currently used in DOP-26 while maintaining or improving its metallurgical properties. The current DOP-26 alloy meets all requirements for cladding the radioactive fuel in the RTG heat source, but the

  18. Deriving strain from crystallographic preferred orientation for a ductile shear zone in north western Turkey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, K.; Lloyd, G. E. E.; Wallis, D.; Phillips, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the behaviour of active continental-scale fault zones at depth, and in particular how displacements observed at the Earth's surface are accommodated through the crust, is crucial to improving understanding of the earthquake cycle. This behaviour can be inferred by study of exhumed portions of ductile shear zones using methods such as recording strain profile(s) across the fault zone. However, due to the nature of mid-crustal rocks, strain markers tend to be rare and/or discontinuously distributed. The intensity (I) of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of deformed minerals provides a proxy for strain that is continuous across fault zones. CPO are collected via electron back scattered diffraction in the scanning electron microscope. The strength of the CPO can be quantified using eigenvalue-based intensity parameters. Calibration of intensity with strain is achieved via comparison with visco-plastic self-consistency models of CPO evolution, although the temperature-dependent critical resolved shear stresses of potential crystal slip systems must be known. As an example, we consider the dextral strike-slip Eskişehir shear zone, NW Turkey, which was active during the Oligocene and accommodated ~100km of displacement, including a component of late oblique-normal slip. An exhumed mid-crustal section of this fault zone is exposed in the Uludağ Massif, comprising of high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Uludağ Group, intruded by the Central and South Uludağ granites. Sample transects focussed on the pure calcic marbles that dominate the stratigraphy. Fortunately, the availability of experimental data for calcite crystal slip behaviour at different temperatures makes the application of the CPO intensity strain proxy method relatively straightforward. The Uludağ Massif and Eskişehir shear zone provide a field based analogue for the ductile shear zone beneath the currently active North Anatolian Fault. The results of our CPO intensity-based strain

  19. Ductile fracture toughness of modified A 302 Grade B Plate materials, data analysis. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Swain, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop ductile fracture toughness data in the form of J-R curves for modified A302 grade B plate materials typical of those used in reactor pressure vessels. A previous experimental study on one heat of A302 grade B plate showed decreasing J-R curves with increased specimen thickness. This characteristic has not been observed in tests made on recent production materials of A533 grade B and A508 class 2 pressure vessel steels. It was unknown if the departure from norm for the material was a generic characteristic for all heats of A302 grade B steels or unique to that particular plate. Seven heats of modified A302 grade B steel and one heat of vintage A533 grade B steel were tested for chemical content, tensile properties, Charpy transition temperature curves, drop-weight nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature, and J-R curves. Tensile tests were made in the three principal orientations and at four temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 550F. Charpy V-notch transition temperature curves were obtained in longitudinal, transverse, and short transverse orientations. J-R curves were made using four specimen sizes (1/2T, 1T, 2T, and 4T). The fracture mechanics-based evaluation method covered three test orientations and three test temperatures (80, 400, and 550F). However, the coverage of these variables was contingent upon the amount of material provided. Drop-weight NDT temperature was determined for the T-L orientation only. None of the heats of modified A302 grade B showed size effects of any consequence on the J-R curve behavior. Crack orientation effects were present, but none were severe enough to be reported as atypical. A test temperature increase from 180 to 550F produced the usual loss in J-R curve fracture toughness. Generic J-R curves and curve fits were generated to represent each heat of material. This volume deals with the evaluation of data and the discussion of technical findings. 8 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Ductile shear zones beneath strike-slip faults: Implications for the thermomechanics of the San Andreas fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; England, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out two-dimensional (2-D) numerical experiments on the bulk flow of a layer of fluid that is driven in a strike-slip sense by constant velocities applied at its boundaries. The fluid has the (linearized) conventional rheology assumed to apply to lower crust/upper mantle rocks. The temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of the fluid and the shear heating that accompanies deformation have been incorporated into the calculations, as has thermal conduction in an overlying crustal layer. Two end-member boundary conditions have been considered, corresponding to a strong upper crust driving a weaker ductile substrate and a strong ductile layer driving a passive, weak crust. In many cases of practical interest, shear heating is concentrated close to the axial plane of the shear zone for either boundary condition. For these cases, the resulting steady state temperature field is well approximated by a cylindrical heat source embedded in a conductive half-space at a depth corresponding to the top of the fluid layer. This approximation, along with the application of a theoretical result for one-dimensional shear zones, permits us to obtain simple analytical approximations to the thermal effects of 2-D ductile shear zones for a range of assumed rheologies and crustal geotherms, making complex numerical calculations unnecessary. Results are compared with observable effects on heat flux near the San Andreas fault using constraints on the slip distribution across the entire fault system. Ductile shearing in the lower crust or upper mantle can explain the observed increase in surface heat flux southeast of the Mendocino triple junction and match the amplitude of the regional heat flux anomaly in the California Coast Ranges. Because ductile dissipation depends only weakly on slip rate, faults moving only a few millimeters per year can be important heat sources, and the superposition of effects of localized ductile shearing on both currently active and now