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Sample records for ductility

  1. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  2. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  3. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.V.

    1983-04-19

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  4. Mechanical model for ductility loss

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.L.

    1980-02-11

    A mechanical model was constructed to probe into the mechanism of ductility loss. Fracture criterion based on critical localized deformation was undertaken. Two microstructure variables were considered in the model. Namely, the strength ratio of grain boundary affected area to the matrix, ..cap omega.., and the linear fraction, x, of grain boundary affected area. A parametrical study was carried out. The study shows that the ductility is very sensitive to those microstructure parameters. The functional dependence of ductility to temperature as well as strain-rate, suggested by the model, is demonstrated to be consistent with the observation.

  5. Ductility Loss in Ductile Cast Iron with Internal Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Hisao; Usuda, Teruki; Yanase, Keiji; Endo, Masahiro

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen-induced ductility loss in ductile cast iron (DCI) was studied by conducting a series of tensile tests with three different crosshead speeds. By utilizing the thermal desorption spectroscopy and the hydrogen microprint technique, it was found that most of the solute hydrogen was diffusive and mainly segregated at the graphite, graphite/matrix interface zone, and the cementite of pearlite in the matrix. The fracture process of the non-charged specimen was dominated by the ductile dimple fracture, whereas that of the hydrogen-charged specimen became less ductile because of the accompanying interconnecting cracks between the adjacent graphite nodules. Inside the hydrogen-charged specimen, the interspaces generated by the interfacial debonding between graphite and matrix are filled with hydrogen gas in the early stage of the fracture process. In the subsequent fracture process, such a local hydrogen gas atmosphere coupled with a stress-induced diffusion attracts hydrogen to the crack tip, which results in a time-dependent ductility loss.

  6. Erosion mechanism in ductile metals

    SciTech Connect

    Bellman, Robert; Levy, Alan

    1981-07-15

    The removal of material from the surface of a ductile metal by small impacting particles is a design consideration to the builders of synthetic fuels plants that utilize pulverized coal to produce gaseous forms of fuel. In this paper, a series of room temperature experiments was conducted to determine the mechanism of material removal when an erosive particle stream impacted on a ductile metal surface. Al 1100-0 metal and Al 7075-T6 alloy were used for the target and 600 μm SiC particles moving at a velocity of 100 ft s-1 in air were used for the eroding stream. It was found that a combined forgingextrusion mechanism which produces small highly distressed platelets of target material that are knocked off the surface by succeeding particle impacts is responsible for erosion at both low and high impingement angles. The large strains that produce the platelets occur in a thin surface region which is heated near to or to the annealing temperature of the metal as a result of adiabatic shear deformation. Beneath the soft surface layer there is a region that has been cold worked by impact-particle-induced plastic deformation. This hard subsurface layer, once formed, increases the efficiency of platelet formation at the surface and the erosion rate increases to a constant level. Finally, this proposed mechanism is a significant departure from the previously accepted micromachining mechanism of ductile metal erosion.

  7. Wear resistance of ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Y. S.

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the wear resistance of different grades of ductile iron as alterna-tives to high- tensile- strength alloyed and inoculated gray irons and bronzes for machine- tool and high-pressure hydraulic components. Special test methods were employed to simulate typical conditions of reciprocating sliding wear with and without abrasive- contaminated lubricant for machine and press guideways. Quantitative relationships were established among wear rate, microstructure and micro-hardness of structural constituents, and nodule size of ductile iron. The frictional wear resistance of duc-tile iron as a bearing material was tested with hardened steel shafts using standard test techniques under continuous rotating movement with lubricant. Lubricated sliding wear tests on specimens and compo-nents for hydraulic equipment and apparatus were carried out on a special rig with reciprocating motion, simulating the working conditions in a piston/cylinder unit in a pressure range from 5 to 32 MPa. Rig and field tests on machine- tool components and units and on hydraulic parts have confirmed the test data.

  8. Structure and ductility of TiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Imayev, R.; Salishchev, G.; Imayev, V.; Shagiev, M.; Kuznetzov, A.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of structural factors (grain size and grain boundary structure) and strain rate on the deformation mechanism and ductility of TiAl in the temperature range of brittle-to-ductile transition and at room temperature was systematically investigated. It has been established that it is possible to substantially affect the deformation mechanism and ductility of this intermetallic by controlling structural factors, particularly the grain size, and varying the strain rate.

  9. Improving the ductility of nanocrystalline bcc metals.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Diana; Hyde, Brian

    2005-12-01

    Nanocrystalline metals present extremely high yield strengths but limited ductility. Using atomistic simulations, we show that the fracture resistance of bcc nanocrystalline materials increases with decreasing grain size below a critical grain size. There appears to be a "most brittle" grain size corresponding to the "strongest size" that has been postulated. Impurities that strengthen the grain boundaries can improve ductility significantly for the relatively larger grain sizes, whereas ductility decreases for the smallest grain sizes.

  10. Transformation plasticity in ductile solids

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.B.

    1993-02-01

    Research has addressed the role of martensitic transformation plasticity in the enhancement of toughness in high-strength austenitic steels, and the enhancement of formability in multiphase low-alloy sheet steels. In the austenitic steels, optimal processing conditions have been established to achieve a significant increase in strength level, in order to investigate the interaction of strain-induced transformation with the microvoid nucleation and shear localization mechanisms operating at ultrahigh strength levels. The stress-state dependence of transformation and fracture mechanisms has been investigated in model alloys, comparing behavior in uniaxial tension and blunt-notch tension specimens. A numerical constitutive model for transformation plasticity has been reformulated to allow a more thorough analysis of transformation/fracture interactions. Processing of a new low alloy steel composition has been optimized to stabilize retained austenite by isothermal bainitic transformation after intercritical annealing. Preliminary results show a good correlation of uniform ductility with the austenite amount and stability.

  11. Ductile failure X-prize.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.; Wellman, Gerald William; Emery, John M.; Ostien, Jakob T.; Foster, John T.; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Mota, Alejandro; Bishop, Joseph E.; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Littlewood, David John; Foulk, James W., III; Dowding, Kevin J.; Dion, Kristin; Boyce, Brad Lee; Robbins, Joshua H.; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2011-09-01

    Fracture or tearing of ductile metals is a pervasive engineering concern, yet accurate prediction of the critical conditions of fracture remains elusive. Sandia National Laboratories has been developing and implementing several new modeling methodologies to address problems in fracture, including both new physical models and new numerical schemes. The present study provides a double-blind quantitative assessment of several computational capabilities including tearing parameters embedded in a conventional finite element code, localization elements, extended finite elements (XFEM), and peridynamics. For this assessment, each of four teams reported blind predictions for three challenge problems spanning crack initiation and crack propagation. After predictions had been reported, the predictions were compared to experimentally observed behavior. The metal alloys for these three problems were aluminum alloy 2024-T3 and precipitation hardened stainless steel PH13-8Mo H950. The predictive accuracies of the various methods are demonstrated, and the potential sources of error are discussed.

  12. "Work-Hardenable" ductile bulk metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Das, Jayanta; Tang, Mei Bo; Kim, Ki Buem; Theissmann, Ralf; Baier, Falko; Wang, Wei Hua; Eckert, Jürgen

    2005-05-27

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (< 1%) at room temperature. We present a new class of bulk metallic glass, which exhibits high strength of up to 2265 MPa together with extensive "work hardening" and large ductility of 18%. Significant increase in the flow stress was observed during deformation. The "work-hardening" capability and ductility of this class of metallic glass is attributed to a unique structure correlated with atomic-scale inhomogeneity, leading to an inherent capability of extensive shear band formation, interactions, and multiplication of shear bands.

  13. 'Work-Hardenable' Ductile Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayanta; Eckert, Juergen; Tang Meibo; Wang Weihua; Kim, Ki Buem; Baier, Falko; Theissmann, Ralf

    2005-05-27

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<1%) at room temperature. We present a new class of bulk metallic glass, which exhibits high strength of up to 2265 MPa together with extensive 'work hardening' and large ductility of 18%. Significant increase in the flow stress was observed during deformation. The 'work-hardening' capability and ductility of this class of metallic glass is attributed to a unique structure correlated with atomic-scale inhomogeneity, leading to an inherent capability of extensive shear band formation, interactions, and multiplication of shear bands.

  14. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe may...

  15. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping COAST... Materials § 56.60-15 Ductile iron. (a) Ductile cast iron components made of material conforming to ASTM A... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395...

  16. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe may...

  17. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe may...

  18. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe may...

  19. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping COAST... Materials § 56.60-15 Ductile iron. (a) Ductile cast iron components made of material conforming to ASTM A... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395...

  20. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping COAST... Materials § 56.60-15 Ductile iron. (a) Ductile cast iron components made of material conforming to ASTM A... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395...

  1. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe may...

  2. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping COAST... Materials § 56.60-15 Ductile iron. (a) Ductile cast iron components made of material conforming to ASTM A... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395...

  3. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping COAST... Materials § 56.60-15 Ductile iron. (a) Ductile cast iron components made of material conforming to ASTM A... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395...

  4. Weldable ductile molybdenum alloy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockeram, B. V.; Ohriner, E. K.; Byun, T. S.; Miller, M. K.; Snead, L. L.

    2008-12-01

    Molybdenum and its alloys are attractive structural materials for high-temperature applications. However, various practical issues have limited its use. One concern relates to the loss of ductility occurring in the heat-affected weld zone caused by segregation of oxygen to grain boundaries. In this study, a series of arc melted molybdenum alloys have been produced containing controlled additions of B, C, Zr, and Al. These alloys were characterized with respect to their tensile properties, smooth bend properties, and impact energy for both the base metal and welds. These alloys were compared with a very high purity low carbon arc cast molybdenum reference. For discussion purposes the alloys produced are separated into two categories: Mo-Al-B alloys, and Mo-Zr-B alloys. The properties of Mo-Zr-B alloy welds containing higher carbon levels exhibited slight improvement over unalloyed molybdenum, though the base-metal properties for all Mo-Zr-B alloys were somewhat inconsistent with properties better, or worse, than unalloyed molybdenum. A Mo-Al-B alloy exhibited the best DBTT values for welds, and the base metal properties were comparable to or slightly better than unalloyed molybdenum. The Mo-Al-B alloy contained a low volume fraction of second-phase particles, with segregation of boron and carbon to grain boundaries believed to displace oxygen resulting in improved weld properties. The volume fractions of second-phase particles are higher for the Mo-Zr-B alloys, and these alloys were prone to brittle fracture. It is also noted that these Mo-Zr-B alloys exhibited segregation of zirconium, boron and carbon to the grain boundaries.

  5. Prospects for Ductility and Toughness Enhancement of Nial by Ductile Phase Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Ritzert, F. J.; Misra, A.; Gibala, R.

    1991-01-01

    The use of NiAl as a structural material has been hindered by the fact that this ordered intermetallic does not exhibit significant tensile ductility or toughness at room temperature. A critical review of the operative flow and fracture mechanisms in monolithic NiAl has thus established the need for ductile phase toughening in this order system. Progress in ductile phase reinforced intermetallic systems in general and specifically NiAl-based materials has been reviewed. In addition, further clarification of the primary mechanisms involved in the flow and fracture of ductile phase reinforced alloys has evolved from ongoing investigations of several model NiAl-based materials. The mechanical behavior of these model directionally-solidified alloys (Ni-30Al and Ni-30Fe-20Al) are discussed. Finally, the prospects for developing a ductile phase toughened NiAl-based alloy and the shortcomings presently inherent in these systems are analyzed.

  6. Coupled thermal stress simulations of ductile tearing

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Dion, Kristin

    2016-03-01

    Predictions for ductile tearing of a geometrically complex Ti-6Al-4V plate were generated using a Unified Creep Plasticity Damage model in fully coupled thermal stress simulations. Uniaxial tension and butterfly shear tests performed at displacement rates of 0.0254 and 25.4 mm/s were also simulated. Results from these simulations revealed that the material temperature increase due to plastic work can have a dramatic effect on material ductility predictions in materials that exhibit little strain hardening. Furthermore, this occurs because the temperature increase causes the apparent hardening of the material to decrease which leads to the initiation of deformation localization and subsequent ductile tearing earlier in the loading process.

  7. Bend ductility of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwell, W.E.; Garnich, M.R.; Dudder, G.B.; Lavender, C.A.

    1992-11-01

    A bend ductility test is used to indicate the formability of tungsten heavy alloys sheet. The primary test bends a notchless Charpy impact specimen to a bend angle of approximately 100C. This can be augmented by a bend-completion test. Finite element modeling as well as strain-gaged bend specimens elucidate the strain distribution in the specimen as a function of material thickness and bend angle. The bend ductilities of 70%W, 807.W and 90%W alloys are characterized. As expected, decreasing thickness or tungsten content enhances bend ductility. Oxidation is not detrimental; therefore, controlled atmosphere is not required for cooling. The potentially detrimental effects of mechanical working (e.g., rolling, roller-leveling, grit blasting, and peening) and machining (e.g., cutting and sanding) are illustrated.

  8. Bend ductility of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwell, W.E.; Garnich, M.R.; Dudder, G.B.; Lavender, C.A.

    1992-11-01

    A bend ductility test is used to indicate the formability of tungsten heavy alloys sheet. The primary test bends a notchless Charpy impact specimen to a bend angle of approximately 100C. This can be augmented by a bend-completion test. Finite element modeling as well as strain-gaged bend specimens elucidate the strain distribution in the specimen as a function of material thickness and bend angle. The bend ductilities of 70%W, 807.W and 90%W alloys are characterized. As expected, decreasing thickness or tungsten content enhances bend ductility. Oxidation is not detrimental; therefore, controlled atmosphere is not required for cooling. The potentially detrimental effects of mechanical working (e.g., rolling, roller-leveling, grit blasting, and peening) and machining (e.g., cutting and sanding) are illustrated.

  9. Material Characterization for Ductile Fracture Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    The research summarized in this document provides valuable information for structural health evaluation of NASA infrastructure. Specifically, material properties are reported which will enable calibration of ductile fracture prediction methods for three high-toughness metallic materials and one aluminum alloy which can be found in various NASA facilities. The task of investigating these materials has also served to validate an overall methodology for ductile fracture prediction is currently being employed at NASA. In facilitating the ability to incorporate various materials into the prediction scheme, we have provided data to enable demonstration of the overall generality of the approach.

  10. A shear ductile fracture criterion for metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yanshan; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, an uncoupled shear ductile fracture criterion is developed for prediction of ductile fracture in sheet metal forming from shear to balanced biaxial tension. The ductile fracture criterion is calibrated by four tests of sheet metal: shear tests, uniaxial tension, plane strain tension and the Nakajima test. Specimens are designed for AA6082 T6 (t1.0) for the calibration of the proposed ductile fracture criterion. The calibrated ductile fracture criterion is then implemented into numerical simulation for the prediction of ductile fracture of the aluminum alloy. For the purpose of comparison, onset of ductile fracture is also estimated by MMC3, DF2012 and DF2014 criteria. The comparison indicates that the developed criterion can accurately predict onset of ductile fracture for all four loading conditions, but the other three criteria can only provide reasonable prediction for three tests. Accordingly, the newly developed ductile fracture criterion is suggested to be used in prediction of ductile fracture for sheet metal forming in wide loading condition from shear to the balanced biaxial tension. Discussion on calibration of this ductile fracture criterion also indicates that the ductile fracture criterion can be employed in estimation of ductile fracture for bulk metal forming processes with better predictability.

  11. OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S PATTERN REPAIR SHOP, SHOWING A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S PATTERN REPAIR SHOP, SHOWING A SPANISH-MADE FORADIA BORING MACHINE IN THE FOREGROUND. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  12. SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BACK SIDE OF FURNACE AND MOLDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BACK SIDE OF FURNACE AND MOLDING BUILDINGS SHOWING CONNECTIONS TO LOCAL POWER GRID, PRIMARILY FOR ELECTRIC FURNACES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Bessemer Foundry, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  13. Compaction of Ductile and Fragile Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creissac, S.; Pouliquen, O.; Dalloz-Dubrujeaud, B.

    2009-06-01

    The compaction of powders into tablets is widely used in several industries (cosmetics, food, pharmaceutics…). In all these industries, the composition of the initial powder is complex, and the behaviour under compaction is not well known, also the mechanical behaviour of the tablets. The aim of this paper is to understand the behaviour (pressure vs density) of a simplified media made of fragile and ductile powders, varying the relative ratio of each powder. Some compaction experiments were carried out with glass beads (fragile) and Polyethylen Glycol powder (ductile). We observe two typical behaviours, depending on the relative volumic fraction of each component. A transition is pointed out, observing the evolution of the slope of the curve pressure/density. This transition is explained by geometrical considerations during compaction. A model is proposed, based on the assumption that the studied media can be compare to a diphasic material with a continuous phase (the ductile powder) and a discrete phase (the fragile powder). The result of this model is compare to the experimental results of compaction, and give a good prediction of the behaviour of the different mixing, knowing the behaviour of the ductile and the fragile phase separately. These results were also interpreted in terms of Heckel parameter which characterizes the ability of the powder to deform plastically under compaction. Some mechanical tests were also performed to compare the mechanical resitance of the obtained tablets.

  14. Mechanisms by Which Humidity Alters Ductility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    corrosion envirornents, fatigue, cracking , fatigue properties, surface defects, crack initiation, aluminum alloys, of plastic strain. In the small strain...development of microplasticity at the surface during fatigue, accelerating crack initiation. The role of surface oxide in determining surface ductility is...results that internal hydrogen increases the rate of development of microplasticity at the surface during fatigue, accelerating crack initiation. The

  15. Mechanisms by Which Humidity Alters Ductility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    it MOR’I.48*Y and Idenetity by block number) Ductility, surface properties, corrosion environments, fatigue, cracking , fatigue properties, surface...Example Results and Discussion.,........,,,,,,,, .... 10 2.2 Effects of Ambient Water Vapor and Internal Hydrogen op Surface Microplasticity and Crack ...Hydrogen on Surface Local Microplastic Behavior ..... 00. ,00..... ..06...... 56 4.3 Relationship of Localized Plasticity to Crack Initiation and

  16. Ductile superconducting copper-base alloys.

    PubMed

    Tsuei, C C

    1973-04-06

    A new class of ductile superconductors has been prepared by casting and appropriate heat treatments. These alloys superconduct between 4 degrees and 18 degrees K and contain at least 90 atom percent copper and a superconducting phase such as Nb(3)Sn or niobium. They can be processed into wires by conventional metallurgical techniques.

  17. An analysis of ductile brittle fracture transition in layered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1996-12-31

    In this study the failure of the ductile layers in laminated composite systems was studied numerically. The results indicate that similar maximum stress values develop in the ductile layers as in the fracture test of the same ductile material if the crack tip in the brittle layer is already at the interface. For nondebonding interfaces brittle behavior of the ductile layers is dependent upon the extent of the cracks and the fracture characteristic of the brittle layers.

  18. OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S BESSEMER CORE ROOM SHOWING REDFORD, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S BESSEMER CORE ROOM SHOWING REDFORD, B&P, AND BEARDSLEY AND PIPER ROTOMOLD CORMATIC MOLDING MACHINES. OUT OF VIEW TO THE LEFT, SOUTHERN DUCTILE MAINTAINS AN AUTOMATED LAEMPE COLD BOX CORE MAKING MACHINE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Core Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Calculation Method of Lateral Strengths and Ductility Factors of Constructions with Shear Walls of Different Ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyoshi; Nakao, Masato; Murakami, Masahide; Miyazawa, Kenji

    2008-07-08

    For seismic design, ductility-related force modification factors are named R factor in Uniform Building Code of U.S, q factor in Euro Code 8 and Ds (inverse of R) factor in Japanese Building Code. These ductility-related force modification factors for each type of shear elements are appeared in those codes. Some constructions use various types of shear walls that have different ductility, especially for their retrofit or re-strengthening. In these cases, engineers puzzle the decision of force modification factors of the constructions. Solving this problem, new method to calculate lateral strengths of stories for simple shear wall systems is proposed and named 'Stiffness--Potential Energy Addition Method' in this paper. This method uses two design lateral strengths for each type of shear walls in damage limit state and safety limit state. Two lateral strengths of stories in both limit states are calculated from these two design lateral strengths for each type of shear walls in both limit states. Calculated strengths have the same quality as values obtained by strength addition method using many steps of load-deformation data of shear walls. The new method to calculate ductility factors is also proposed in this paper. This method is based on the new method to calculate lateral strengths of stories. This method can solve the problem to obtain ductility factors of stories with shear walls of different ductility.

  20. Ductility of a continuous fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    The transverse properties of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced by continuous alumina fibers have been investigated. The composite is subjected to both mechanical and cyclic thermal loading. The ductility can vary by an order of magnitude according to the operating conditions. For high mechanical and low thermal loading the ductility is small, for low mechanical and high thermal loading the ductility is an order of magnitude higher. Experiments on a beam in bending confirm that the ductility is strongly dependent on the loading conditions. The observations suggest a means of utilizing the inherent ductility of the matrix.

  1. Coupled thermal stress simulations of ductile tearing

    DOE PAGES

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Dion, Kristin

    2016-03-01

    Predictions for ductile tearing of a geometrically complex Ti-6Al-4V plate were generated using a Unified Creep Plasticity Damage model in fully coupled thermal stress simulations. Uniaxial tension and butterfly shear tests performed at displacement rates of 0.0254 and 25.4 mm/s were also simulated. Results from these simulations revealed that the material temperature increase due to plastic work can have a dramatic effect on material ductility predictions in materials that exhibit little strain hardening. Furthermore, this occurs because the temperature increase causes the apparent hardening of the material to decrease which leads to the initiation of deformation localization and subsequent ductilemore » tearing earlier in the loading process.« less

  2. Designing tensile ductility in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Sarac, Baran; Schroers, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of a second phase in metallic glass heterostructures to improve mechanical properties varies widely. Unfortunately, methods to fabricate such heterostructures like foams and composites do not allow controlled variation of structural features. Here we report a novel strategy, which allows us to vary heterostructural features independently, thereby enabling a systematic and quantitative study. Our approach reveals the optimal microstructural architecture for metallic glass heterostructures to achieve tensile ductility. Critical design aspect is a soft second phase, which is most effective when spacing between the second phase assumes the critical crack length of the metallic glass. This spacing should coincide with the second phase’s size, and beyond, the specific second phase morphology of the heterostructure is crucial. These toughening strategies are only effective in samples that are large compared with the spacing of the second phase. The identified design aspects provide guidance in designing tensile ductility into metallic glasses. PMID:23863967

  3. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  4. Designing tensile ductility in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarac, Baran; Schroers, Jan

    2013-07-01

    Effectiveness of a second phase in metallic glass heterostructures to improve mechanical properties varies widely. Unfortunately, methods to fabricate such heterostructures like foams and composites do not allow controlled variation of structural features. Here we report a novel strategy, which allows us to vary heterostructural features independently, thereby enabling a systematic and quantitative study. Our approach reveals the optimal microstructural architecture for metallic glass heterostructures to achieve tensile ductility. Critical design aspect is a soft second phase, which is most effective when spacing between the second phase assumes the critical crack length of the metallic glass. This spacing should coincide with the second phase’s size, and beyond, the specific second phase morphology of the heterostructure is crucial. These toughening strategies are only effective in samples that are large compared with the spacing of the second phase. The identified design aspects provide guidance in designing tensile ductility into metallic glasses.

  5. Towards mesh independent simulation of ductile fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Huei Eliot; Veilleux, Michael; Emery, John M.; Wellman, Gerald William; Foulk, James W., III

    2010-11-01

    Recent work at Sandia National Laboratories has focused on preparing strong predictive models for the simulation of ductile failure in metals. The focus of this talk is on the development of engineering-ready models that use a phenomenological approach to represent the ductile fracture processes. As such, an empirical tearing parameter that accounts for mean stress effects along the crack front is presented. A critical value of the tearing parameter is used in finite element calculations as the criterion for crack growth. Regularization is achieved with three different methods and the results are compared. In the first method, upon reaching the critical tearing, the stress within a solid element is decayed by uniformly shrinking the yield surface over a user specified amount of strain. This yields mesh-size dependent results. As a second method for regularization, cohesive surface elements are inserted using an automatic remeshing technique. In the third method, strain-localization elements are inserted with the automated remeshing.

  6. Effect of Strain Rate on Ductile Fracture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    follows: The effect of strain rate on ductile fracture is one of the least understood phenomena in modern fracture mechanics. At the same time...into three interrelated tasks: Hopkinson bar tensile fracture tests on small, flat specimens using a unique apparatus developed at IPPT; Drop tower...between IPPT and MIT where the funding for the work at MIT will come from GE Global Research Center and the funding for the IPPT will come from this

  7. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  8. Preparation of nanostructured materials having improved ductility

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yonghao; Zhu, Yuntian T.

    2010-04-20

    A method for preparing a nanostructured aluminum alloy involves heating an aluminum alloy workpiece at temperature sufficient to produce a single phase coarse grained aluminum alloy, then refining the grain size of the workpiece at a temperature at or below room temperature, and then aging the workpiece to precipitate second phase particles in the nanosized grains of the workpiece that increase the ductility without decreasing the strength of the workpiece.

  9. Microstructural Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to quantify the graphite particle phase in nodular ductile iron (NDI). This study provides the basis for initializing microstructure in direct numerical simulations, as part of developing microstructure-fracture response models. The work presented here is a subset of a PhD dissertation on spall fracture in NDI. NDI is an ideal material for studying the influence of microstructure on ductile fracture because it contains a readily identifiable second-phase particle population, embedded in a ductile metallic matrix, which serves as primary void nucleation sites. Nucleated voids grow and coalesce under continued tensile loading, as part of the micromechanisms of ductile fracture, and lead to macroscopic failure. For this study, we used 2D optical microscopy and quantitative metallography relationships to characterize the volume fraction, size distribution, nearest-neighbor distance, and other higher-order metrics of the graphite particle phase. We found that the volume fraction was {Phi} = 0.115, the average particle diameter was d{sub avg} = 25.9 {mu}m, the Weibull shape and scaling parameters were {beta} = 1.8 and {eta} = 29.1 {mu}m, respectively, the (first) nearest neighbor distance was L{sub nn} = 32.4 {mu}m, the exponential coefficients for volume fraction fluctuations was A{sub {Phi}} = 1.89 and B{sub {Phi}} = -0.59, respectively. Based on reaching a coefficient-of-variation (COV) of 0.01, the representative volume element (RVE) size was determined to be 8.9L{sub nn} (288 {mu}m).

  10. Rapid ductile afterslip from coseismic heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. D.; Meade, B. J.; Savage, H. M.; Rowe, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquakes are typically followed by months of afterslip, the total of which is generally an order of magnitude smaller than the seismic slip. The classic model for afterslip envisions seismic slip transferring stress to adjacent regions, driving accelerated stable sliding that expands the rupture area. However, a small proportion of earthquakes exhibit unusually large and rapid afterslip in the hours immediately following rupture. Here we present a new model that bridges the transition from seismic to postseismic deformation and may explain these observations of rapid afterslip. Seismic slip produces a significant temperature rise that slowly diffuses into the surrounding material following the cessation of seismic slip. Any process with strong temperature dependence is more sensitive to this heat transient than to the ambient temperatures present during the interseismic period. Coupling the temperature evolution of a fault to a ductile flow law we model postseismic deformation during the heat transient. Our idea of coseismic heating enhancing ductile flow is supported by field observations of micro-shear zones adjacent to psuedotachylyte veins. Enhanced ductility is largely confined to the zone that deformed seismically, making our model equivalent to rapid afterslip. Combining analytic and numerical methods we solve for the total afterslip in terms of the slip rate and fault strength during seismic slip and the ductile flow parameters. Our results are sensitive to the assumed rheology and deforming zone thickness, and while total afterslip is generally small some plausible parameter ranges predict afterslip comparable to or greater than the seismic slip developing over timescales shorter than an hour. We demonstrate that rapid afterslip can drive significant frictional heating, leading to a thermal runaway instability that produces a near total postseismic stress drop. To conclude we investigate the tsunami magnitude that rapid afterslip could produce.

  11. Mechanisms By Which Humidity Alters Ductility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    ductility$ of thesurfa ?Za’dlouvalt1 -rates of crack initiation, early growth and the relaxation op residual surface stresses dur~fati gue are all sensitive...15 Fig. 4 Ratio of closure stress to maximum tensile stress increases with increased distance (L) of crack tip to the next grain boundary. Here...orientations. Tmax is the maximum applied surface shear stress ........................ 23 Fiq. 8 Duration of incubation AN = N - N increases for cracks

  12. Weldability and hot ductility of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Ash, D.I.; Edwards, G.R. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); David, S.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The weldability of iron aluminide alloys is discussed. Although readily welded with electron beam (EB) and gas-tungsten arc (GTA) techniques, iron aluminides are sometimes susceptible to cracking during cooling when welded with the GTA welding process. Taken into account are the effects of microstructural instability (grain growth), weld heat input (cooling rate) and environment on the hot ductility of an iron aluminide alloy designated FA-129. 64 refs., 59 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. The effect of pearlite on the hydrogen-induced ductility loss in ductile cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, T.

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen energy systems, such as a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and a hydrogen station, are rapidly developing to solve global environmental problems and resource problems. The available structural materials used for hydrogen equipments have been limited to only a few relatively expensive metallic materials that are tolerant for hydrogen embrittlement. Therefore, for the realization of a hydrogen society, it is important to expand the range of materials available for hydrogen equipment and thereby to enable the use of inexpensive common materials. Therefore, ductile cast iron was, in this study, focused as a structural material that could contribute to cost reduction of hydrogen equipment, because it is a low-cost material having good mechanical property comparable to carbon steels in addition to good castability and machinability. The strength and ductility of common ductile cast irons with a ferritic-pearlitic matrix can be controlled by the volume fraction of pearlitic phase. In the case of carbon steels, the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement increases with increase in the pearlite fraction. Toward the development of ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron with reasonable strength for hydrogen equipment, it is necessary to figure out the effect of pearlite on the hydrogen embrittlement of this cast iron. In this study, the tensile tests were conducted using hydrogen-precharged specimens of three kinds of ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast irons, JIS-FCD400, JIS-FCD450 and JIS-FCD700. Based on the results, the role of pearlite in characterizing the hydrogen embrittlement of ductile cast iron was discussed.

  14. Ductile failure of a constrained metal foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varias, A. G.; Suo, Z.; Shih, C. F.

    A METAL foil bonded between stiff ceramic blocks may fail in a variety of ways, including de-adhesion of interfaces, cracking in the ceramics and ductile rupture of the metal. If the interface bond is strong enough to allow the foil to undergo substantial plastic deformation dimples are usually present on fracture surfaces and the nominal fracture energy is enhanced. Ductile fracture mechanisms responsible for such morphology include (i) growth of near-tip voids nucleated at second-phase particles and or interface pores, (ii) cavitation and (iii) interfacial debonding at the site of maximum stress which develops at distances of several foil thicknesses ahead of the crack tip. For a crack in a low to moderately hardening bulk metal, it is known that the maximum mean stress which develops at a distance of several crack openings ahead of the tip does not exceed about three times the yield stress. In contrast, the maximum mean stress that develops at several foil thicknesses ahead of the crack tip in a constrained metal foil can increase continuously with the applied load. Mean stress and interfacial traction of about four to six times the yield of the metal foil can trigger cavitation and/or interfacial debonding. The mechanical fields which bear on the competition between failure mechanisms are obtained by a large deformation finite element analysis. Effort is made to formulate predictive criteria indicating, for a given material system, which one of the several mechanisms operates and the relevant parameters that govern the nominal fracture work. The shielding of the crack tip in the context of ductile adhesive joints, due to the non-proportional deformation in a region of the order of the foil thickness, is also discussed.

  15. Hot ductility of steel 09G2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, N. A.

    2009-03-01

    Hot ductility of steel 09G2S is studied in a temperature range of 600 - 1000°C on the branch of cooling after heating to a high (1150°C) temperature. The causes of the nonmonotonic variation of the hot ductility are determined, and ways for removing the ductility dip are suggested. Recommendations are given for developing the modes of forming of sheet preforms.

  16. SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN OR CREATE PATTERNS USED IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN OR CREATE PATTERNS USED IN THEIR MOLDS. AS A JOBBING FOUNDRY MAKING CASTINGS ON AN CONTRACTUAL-ORDER BASIS, THEIR CUSTOMERS PROVIDE, OR CONTRACT FOR PATTERN CONSTRUCTION. SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES, HOWEVER, PROVIDE REPAIR SERVICES SHOWN AS JOHNNY TIDWELL PREPARES A PLATE, FORM -FITTING TO THEIR MOLDING MACHINES, THAT A PATTERN WILL BE AFFIXED TO. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Continuous-Discontinuous Model for Ductile Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Seabra, Mariana R. R.; Cesar de Sa, Jose M. A.

    2010-06-15

    In this contribution, a continuum-dicontinuum model for ductile failure is presented. The degradation of material properties trough deformation is described by Continuum Damage Mechanics in a non-local integral formulation to avoid mesh dependence. In the final stage of failure, the damaged zone is replaced by a cohesive macro crack and subsequent traction-free macro crack for a more realistic representation of the phenomenon. The inclusion of the discontinuity surfaces is performed by the XFEM and Level Set Method and avoids the spurious damage growth typical of this class of models.

  18. Ductile alloys for sealing modular component interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J.; Wessell, Brian J.; James, Allister W.; Marsh, Jan H.; Gear, Paul J.

    2017-08-08

    A vane assembly (10) having: an airfoil (12) and a shroud (14) held together without metallurgical bonding there between; a channel (22) disposed circumferentially about the airfoil (12), between the airfoil (12) and the shroud (14); and a seal (20) disposed in the channel (22), wherein during operation of a turbine engine having the vane assembly (10) the seal (20) has a sufficient ductility such that a force generated on the seal (20) resulting from relative movement of the airfoil (12) and the shroud (14) is sufficient to plastically deform the seal (20).

  19. Ductile Fracture Initiation of Anisotropic Metal Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; He, Ji

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the influence of material plastic anisotropy on ductile fracture in the strain space under the assumption of plane stress state for sheet metals. For convenient application, a simple expression is formulated by the method of total strain theory under the assumption of proportional loading. The Hill 1948 quadratic anisotropic yield model and isotropic hardening flow rule are adopted to describe the plastic response of the material. The Mohr-Coulomb model is revisited to describe the ductile fracture in the stress space. Besides, the fracture locus for DP590 in different loading directions is obtained by experiments. Four different types of tensile test specimens, including classical dog bone, flat with cutouts, flat with center holes and pure shear, are performed to fracture. All these specimens are prepared with their longitudinal axis inclined with the angle of 0°, 45°, and 90° to the rolling direction, respectively. A 3D digital image correlation system is used in this study to measure the anisotropy parameter r 0, r 45, r 90 and the equivalent strains to fracture for all the tests. The results show that the material plastic anisotropy has a remarkable influence on the fracture locus in the strain space and can be predicted accurately by the simple expression proposed in this study.

  20. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Y. S.; Kingsbury, G. R.

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  1. Ductile crustal flow in Europe's lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Burov, Evgene B.; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Cloetingh, Sierd A. P. L.

    2011-12-01

    Potential gravity theory (PGT) predicts the presence of significant gravity-induced horizontal stresses in the lithosphere associated with lateral variations in plate thickness and composition. New high resolution crustal thickness and density data provided by the EuCRUST-07 model are used to compute the associated lateral pressure gradients (LPG), which can drive horizontal ductile flow in the crust. Incorporation of these data in channel flow models allows us to use potential gravity theory to assess horizontal mass transfer and stress transmission within the European crust. We explore implications of the channel flow concept for a possible range of crustal strength, using end-member 'hard' and 'soft' crustal rheologies to estimate strain rates at the bottom of the ductile crustal layers. The models show that the effects of channel flow superimposed on the direct effects of plate tectonic forces might result in additional significant horizontal and vertical movements associated with zones of compression or extension. To investigate relationships between crustal and mantle lithospheric movements, we compare these results with the observed directions of mantle lithospheric anisotropy and GPS velocity vectors. We identify areas whose evolution could have been significantly affected by gravity-driven ductile crustal flow. Large values of the LPG are predicted perpendicular to the axes of European mountain belts, such as the Alps, Pyrenees-Cantabrian Mountains, Dinarides-Hellenic arc and Carpathians. In general, the crustal flow is directed away from orogens towards adjacent weaker areas. Gravitational forces directed from areas of high gravitational potential energy to subsiding basin areas can strongly reduce lithospheric extension in the latter, leading to a gradual late stage inversion of the entire system. Predicted pressure and strain rate gradients suggest that gravity driven flow may play an essential role in European intraplate tectonics. In particular, in a

  2. ALTHOUGH SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN PATTERNS, THEY ARE REQUIRED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ALTHOUGH SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN PATTERNS, THEY ARE REQUIRED TO STORE THEM AND KEEP THEM AVAILABLE FOR THEIR CUSTOMERS ORDERS. THE BARRET/DOUGLAS LIFTING TRUCK IS USED TO REACH AND TRANSPORT PATTERNS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Study made of ductility limitations of aluminum-silicon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, W. A.; Frederick, S. F.

    1967-01-01

    Study of the relation between microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum-silicon alloys determines the cause of the variations in properties resulting from differences in solidification rate. It was found that variations in strength are a consequence of variations in ductility and that ductility is inversely proportional to dendrite cell size.

  4. GRINDING ROOM AT SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BESSEMER FOUNDRY SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GRINDING ROOM AT SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BESSEMER FOUNDRY SHOWING WHEELABORATOR THAT IMPALE SHOT AT TUMBLING CASTINGS TO REMOVE EXCESS SURFACE METALS AND SAND; ANNEALING OVENS TO HEAT CERTAIN CASTINGS TO ACHIEVE A DESIRED CHARACTERISTIC; AND GRINDING WHEELS USED TO REMOVE GATES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Grinding & Shipping, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  5. Mechanisms to create high performance pseudo-ductile composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisnom, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    Current composites normally fail suddenly and catastrophically, which is an undesirable characteristic for many applications. This paper describes work as part of the High Performance Ductile Composite Technology programme (HiPerDuCT) on mechanisms to overcome this key limitation and introduce pseudo-ductility into the failure process.

  6. Thermodynamical Framework for Ductile Damage and Plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César de Sá, José M. A.; Andrade, Filipe X. C.; Andrade Pires, Francisco M.

    2010-05-01

    Many models employed for the prediction of plastic deformation rely exclusively on elastoplastic theories, disregarding significant effects of internal degradation [1]. Constitutive models based on the Continuum Damage Mechanics theory provide more realistic predictions since damage is taken into account as an internal variable. In the present contribution, Lemaire's model for ductile damage [2] is questioned under the assumption of the principle of maximum inelastic dissipation [3]. The model is enhanced with a nonlocal formulation where the damage variable is spatially averaged by means of an integral operator [4]. Thermodynamical admissibility of the nonlocal model is checked by applying the global version of the Clausius-Duhem inequality [5]. Results from numerical analysis show that the constitutive model is insensitive to spatial discretization.

  7. Brittle to ductile transition in cleavage fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Argon, A.S.; Berg, Q.

    1992-09-30

    The problem of interpretation of fracture transition from brittle to ductile or vice versa is the subject of study. An instrumented tapered double cantilever beam (TDCB) has been developed as a definitive tool in the study of the intrinsic mechanism in single crystalline samples. In this experiment, the crack velocity is directly proportional to actuator velocity. In experiments performed on TDCB shaped Si single crystals, oriented for cleavage on either [l brace]111[r brace] or [l brace]110[r brace] planes, a number of troubling features of jerky carck extension were encountered. Evidence suggests that nucleation of dislocation loops from crack tip is easier than moving these dislocations away from crack tip. 14 refs, 1 fig.

  8. Hot Ductility Behavior of an 8 Pct Cr Roller Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenhua; Sun, Shuhua; Shi, Zhongping; Wang, Bo; Fu, Wantang

    2015-04-01

    The hot ductility of an 8 pct Cr roller steel was determined between 1173 K and 1473 K (900 °C and 1200 °C) at strain rates of 0.01 to 10 s-1 through tensile testing. The fracture morphology was observed using scanning electron microscopy, and the microstructure was examined through optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The dependence of the hot ductility behavior on the deformation conditions, grain size, and precipitation was analyzed. The relationship between the reduction in area and the natural logarithm of the Zener-Hollomon parameter (ln Z) was found to be a second-order polynomial. When ln Z was greater than 40 s-1, the hot ductility was poor and fracture was mainly caused by incompatible deformation between the grains. When ln Z was between 32 and 40 s-1, the hot ductility was excellent and the main fracture mechanism was void linking. When ln Z was below 32 s-1, the hot ductility was poor and fracture was mainly caused by grain boundary sliding. A fine grain structure is beneficial for homogenous deformation and dynamic recrystallization, which induces better hot ductility. The effect of M7C3 carbide particles dispersed in the matrix on the hot ductility was small. The grain growth kinetics in the 8 pct Cr steel were obtained between 1373 K and 1473 K (1100 °C and 1200 °C). Finally, optimized preheating and forging procedures for 8 pct Cr steel rollers are provided.

  9. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  10. Creep deformation characteristics of ductile discontinuous fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1993-10-01

    Role of material parameters and geometric parameters of ductile reinforcing phase on the creep deformation behavior of 20% discontinuously reinforced composite was numerically investigated including debonding and pull-out mechanisms. Results indicate that for rigidly bonded interfaces, the creep rate of the composite is not significantly influenced by the material properties and geometric parameters of the ductile reinforcing phase due to development of large hydrostatic stress and constrained deformation in the reinforcement. For debonding interfaces, the geometric parameters of the reinforcing phase are important; however, event with very weak interfacial behavior low composite creep rates can be achieved by suitable selection of the geometric parameters of the ductile reinforcing phase.

  11. High-temperature ductility of electro-deposited nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dini, J. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Work done during the past several months on high temperature ductility of electrodeposited nickel is summarized. Data are presented which show that earlier measurements made at NASA-Langley erred on the low side, that strain rate has a marked influence on high temperature ductility, and that codeposition of a small amount of manganese helps to improve high temperature ductility. Influences of a number of other factors on nickel properties were also investigated. They included plating solution temperature, current density, agitation, and elimination of the wetting agent from the plating solution. Repair of a large nozzle section by nickel plating is described.

  12. Fluid migration in ductile shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusseis, Florian; Menegon, Luca

    2014-05-01

    Fluid migration in metamorphic environments depends on a dynamically evolving permeable pore space, which was rarely characterised in detail. The data-base behind our understanding of the 4-dimensional transport properties of metamorphic rocks is therefore fragmentary at best, which leaves conceptual models poorly supported. Generally, it seems established that deformation is a major driver of permeability generation during regional metamorphism, and evidence for metamorphic fluids being channelled in large scale shear zones has been found in all depth segments of the continental crust. When strain localizes in ductile shear zones, the microfabric is modified until a steady state mylonite is formed that supports large deformations. A dynamic porosity that evolves during mylonitisation controls the distinct transport pathways along which fluid interacts with the rock. This dynamic porosity is controlled by a limited number of mechanisms, which are intrinsically linked to the metamorphic evolution of the rock during its deformational overprint. Many mid- and lower-crustal mylonites comprise polyphase mixtures of micron-sized grains that show evidence for deformation by dissolution/precipitation-assisted viscous grain boundary sliding. The establishment of these mineral mixtures is a critical process, where monomineralic layers are dispersed and grain growth is inhibited by the heterogeneous nucleation of secondary mineral phases at triple junctions. Here we show evidence from three different mid- and lower-crustal shear zones indicating that heterogeneous nucleation occurs in creep cavities. Micro- and nanotomographic observations show that creep cavities provide the dominant form of porosity in these ultramylonites. They control a "granular fluid pump" that directs fluid migration and hence mass transport. The granular fluid pump operates on the grain scale driven by viscous grain boundary sliding, and requires only small amounts of fluid. The spatial arrangement of

  13. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  14. Fuel powder production from ductile uranium alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C. R.

    1998-10-23

    Metallic uranium alloys are candidate materials for use as the fuel phase in very-high-density LEU dispersion fuels. These ductile alloys cannot be converted to powder form by the processes routinely used for oxides or intermetallics. Three methods of powder production from uranium alloys have been investigated within the US-RERTR program. These processes are grinding, cryogenic milling, and hydride-dehydride. In addition, a gas atomization process was investigated using gold as a surrogate for uranium. Grinding was found to be inefficient and introduced impurities into the fuel. Cryogenic milling of machine chips in a steel vial was found to have similar shortcomings. The hydride-dehydride process has historically been used to produce very fine powder that may not be suitable for fuel fabrication. Uranium is made to form its hydride by heating in a hydrogen atmosphere. Subsequent heating under vacuum drives off hydrogen gas and returns the hydride to a metallic state. The volume change on hydride formation results in a fine powder upon dehydriding. The effects of alloying elements, partial hydriding, and subsequent milling treatments on particle size distribution are being explored. Inert gas atomization is used on an industrial scale to produce metal powder. Current designs are not suitable for use with uranium. A system was specifically designed for uranium atomization. A prototype was built and tested using gold as a surrogate for uranium. The system operates efficiently and can produce powder in a variety of size ranges by changing the atomization nozzle.

  15. Non-local models for ductile failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César de Sá, José; Azinpour, Erfan; Santos, Abel

    2016-08-01

    Ductile damage can be dealt with continuous descriptions of material, resorting, for example, to continuous damage mechanic descriptions or micromechanical constitutive models. When it comes to describe material behaviour near and beyond fracture these approaches are no longer sufficient or valid and continuous/discontinuous approaches can be adopted to track fracture initiation and propagation. Apart from more pragmatic solutions like element erosion or remeshing techniques more advanced approaches based on the X-FEM concept, in particular associated with non-local formulations, may be adopted to numerically model these problems. Nevertheless, very often, for practical reasons, some important aspects are somewhat left behind, specially energetic requirements to promote the necessary transition of energy release associated with material damage and fracture energy associated to a crack creation and evolution. Phase-field methods may combine advantages of regularised continuous models by providing a similar description to non-local thermodynamical continuous damage mechanics, as well as, a "continuous" approach to numerically follow crack evolution and branching

  16. Determining Ductile Fracture Toughness in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Manneschmidt, Eric T

    2014-01-01

    Ductile fracture toughness determination, such as the J-integral versus crack growth resistance (J-R) curve, is a useful tool for evaluating material structural integrity in the presence of pre-existing defects. The J-R curve represents a way to calculate the work (energy) per unit fracture surface area needed to drive the crack growth. A typical J-R curve is shown in Fig. 1 from which the material fracture toughness near the initiation of stable crack growth (Jq) can be derived. In addition, tearing modulus (TR), representing the material resistance to stable crack growth, can be calculated based on the slope of the J-R curve between two exclusion lines (red dashed lines in Fig. 1). Since the introduction of the J-R curve, extensive efforts have been continuously devoted to develop simplified and reliable methods for determining the material J-R curve. This article briefly reviews three widely-used J-R curve test methods in metals, i.e. elastic unloading compliance (EUC), normalization, and direct current potential drop (DCPD). The main difference in these methods relates to the determination of the crack size. More details of performing the J-R curve determination can be found in ASTM standard E1820-11.

  17. Alloy design for intrinsically ductile refractory high-entropy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, Saad; Shafeie, Samrand; Hu, Qiang; Ahlström, Johan; Persson, Christer; Veselý, Jaroslav; Zýka, Jiří; Klement, Uta; Guo, Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Refractory high-entropy alloys (RHEAs), comprising group IV (Ti, Zr, Hf), V (V, Nb, Ta), and VI (Cr, Mo, W) refractory elements, can be potentially new generation high-temperature materials. However, most existing RHEAs lack room-temperature ductility, similar to conventional refractory metals and alloys. Here, we propose an alloy design strategy to intrinsically ductilize RHEAs based on the electron theory and more specifically to decrease the number of valence electrons through controlled alloying. A new ductile RHEA, Hf0.5Nb0.5Ta0.5Ti1.5Zr, was developed as a proof of concept, with a fracture stress of close to 1 GPa and an elongation of near 20%. The findings here will shed light on the development of ductile RHEAs for ultrahigh-temperature applications in aerospace and power-generation industries.

  18. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST, AS OPERATOR WATCHES TO ENSURE QUALITY. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Finnemore, Douglas K.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Ostenson, Jerome E.

    1983-03-29

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and orientated dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritric particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  20. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Finnemore, D.K.; Gibson, E.D.; Ostenson, J.E.

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritic particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  1. Retention of ductility in high-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. R.; Zackay, V. F.

    1969-01-01

    To produce high strength alloy steel with retention of ductility, include tempering, cooling and subsequent tempering. Five parameters for optimum results are pretempering temperature, amount of strain, strain rate, temperature during strain, and retempering temperature.

  2. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, K.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.

    1999-05-18

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite. 2 figs.

  3. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the service...

  4. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the service...

  5. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the service...

  6. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the service...

  7. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the service...

  8. Influence of phosphorus on the creep ductility of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandström, Rolf; Wu, Rui

    2013-10-01

    Around 1990 it was discovered that pure copper could have extra low creep ductility in the temperature interval 180-250 °C. The material was intended for use in canisters for nuclear waste disposal. Although extra low creep ductility was not observed much below 180 °C and the temperature in the canister will never exceed 100 °C, it was feared that the creep ductility could reach low values at lower temperatures after long term exposure. If 50 ppm phosphorus was added to the copper the low creep ductility disappeared. A creep cavitation model is presented that can quantitatively describe the cavitation behaviour in uniaxial and multiaxial creep tests as well as the observed creep ductility for copper with and without phosphorus. A so-called double ledge model has been introduced that demonstrates why the nucleation rate of creep cavities is often proportional to the creep rate. The phosphorus agglomerates at the grain boundaries and limits their local deformation and thereby reduces the formation and growth of cavities. This explains why extra low creep ductility does not occur in phosphorus alloyed copper.

  9. From brittle to ductile: a structure dependent ductility of diamond nanothread.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Vincent B C; Cheng, Yuan; Bell, John M; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-06-07

    As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp(3) bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different mechanical responses than other 1D carbon allotropes. Analogously, the SW defects behave like a grain boundary that interrupts the consistency of the poly-benzene sections. For a DNT with a fixed length, the yield strength fluctuates in the vicinity of a certain value and is independent of the "grain size". On the other hand, both yield strength and yield strain show a clear dependence on the total length of DNT, which is due to the fact that the failure of the DNT is dominated by the SW defects. Its highly tunable ductility together with its ultra-light density and high Young's modulus makes diamond nanothread ideal for the creation of extremely strong three-dimensional nano-architectures.

  10. Ductile flow by water-assisted cataclasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Brok, Bas

    2003-04-01

    In the presence of water otherwise brittle materials may deform macroscopically ductile by water-assisted cataclastic creep. This is possible as long as (i) solubility is high enough, so that stress-corrosion can occur, and (ii) local stress is low enough, to that fracturing remains subcritical. Water-assisted cataclastic creep (WACC) may play an important role in the middle and lower continental crust where mineral solubilities are high and stresses low. WACC is a poorly understood deformation process. Experiments were performed on very soluble brittle salts (Na-chlorate; K-alum) to study microstructure development by WACC. The experiments were carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a small see-through vessel. In this way the cataclastic deformation process could be studied "in-situ" under the microscope. Crystals were loaded in the presence of saturated salt solution. It appeared that originally straight mineral surfaces were instable when kept under stress. Grooves (or channels) slowly developed in the surface by local dissolution. These grooves behave like so-called Grinfeld instabilities. They develop because the energy of a grooved surface under stress is lower than the energy of a straight surface under stress. The grooves may deepen and turn into subcritical cracks when local stress further increases. These cracks propagate slowly. They propagate parallel to sigma1 but also at an angle and even perpendicular to sigma1, often following crystallographically controlled directions. The fractures mostly change direction while propagating, locally making turns of more than 180 degrees. Irregular fracture fragments thus develop. The fractures may migrate sideways (as with grain bounday migration) probably by solution-redeposition driven by differences in stress between both sides of the fracture. Thus the shape of the fragments changes. The size of the fracture fragments seems to be controlled by the distance of the grooves, which decreases

  11. Mechanical Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to characterize the strength and fracture response of nodular ductile iron (NDI) and its underlying ferritic matrix phase. Quasistatic and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) compression tests were performed on NDI and a model material for the NDI matrix phase (Fe-Si alloy). Smooth and notch round bar (NRB) samples were loaded in tension until fracture to determine strain-at-failure with varying stress triaxiality. Multiple tests were performed on each small and large smooth bar samples to obtain fracture statistics with sample size. Fracture statistics are important for initializing simulations of fragmentation events. Johnson-Cook strength models were developed for the NDI and the Fe-Si alloy. NDI strength model parameters are: A = 525 MPa, B = 650 MPa, n = 0.6, and C = 0.0205. The average SHPB experimental strain-rate of 2312/s was used for the reference strain-rate in this model. Fe-Si alloy strength model parameters are: A=560 MPa, B = 625 MPa, n = 0.5, and C = 0.02. The average SHPB experimental strain-rate of 2850/s was used for the reference strain-rate in this model. A Johnson-Cook failure model was developed for NDI with model parameters: D{sub 1} = 0.029, D{sub 2} = 0.44, D{sub 3} = -1.5, and D{sub 4} = D{sub 5} = 0. An exponential relationship was developed for the elongation-at-failure statistics as a function of length-scale with model parameters: S{sub f1} = 0.108, S{sub f2} = -0.00169, and L{sub m} = 32.4 {mu}m. NDI strength and failure models, including failure statistics, will be used in continuum-scale simulations of explosively-driven ring fragmentation. The Fe-Si alloy strength model will be used in mesoscale simulations of spall fracture in NDI, where the NDI matrix phase is captured explicitly.

  12. From brittle to ductile: a structure dependent ductility of diamond nanothread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Vincent B. C.; Cheng, Yuan; Bell, John M.; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-05-01

    As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different mechanical responses than other 1D carbon allotropes. Analogously, the SW defects behave like a grain boundary that interrupts the consistency of the poly-benzene sections. For a DNT with a fixed length, the yield strength fluctuates in the vicinity of a certain value and is independent of the ``grain size''. On the other hand, both yield strength and yield strain show a clear dependence on the total length of DNT, which is due to the fact that the failure of the DNT is dominated by the SW defects. Its highly tunable ductility together with its ultra-light density and high Young's modulus makes diamond nanothread ideal for the creation of extremely strong three-dimensional nano-architectures.As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different

  13. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Chris; Auton, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the high-pressure injection of fluid into the bulk of the rock. The goal is to initiate and propagate fractures that will provide hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir, enabling gas or oil to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We first consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We use this model to show that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. We then complement these results with laboratory experiments in an analogue system, and with numerical simulations based on the discrete element method (DEM), both of which suggest that ductile failure can indeed dramatically change the resulting deformation pattern. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from models that assume purely elastic mechanical behavior.

  14. Ductile electroactive biodegradable hyperbranched polylactide copolymers enhancing myoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Meihua; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Y. Eugene; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    Myotube formation is crucial to restoring muscular functions, and biomaterials that enhance the myoblast differentiation into myotubes are highly desirable for muscular repair. Here, we report the synthesis of electroactive, ductile, and degradable copolymers and their application in enhancing the differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes. A hyperbranched ductile polylactide (HPLA) was synthesized and then copolymerized with aniline tetramer (AT) to produce a series of electroactive, ductile and degradable copolymers (HPLAAT). The HPLA and HPLAAT showed excellent ductility with strain to failure from 158.9% to 42.7% and modulus from 265.2 to 758.2 MPa. The high electroactivity of the HPLAAT was confirmed by UV spectrometer and cyclic voltammogram measurements. These HPLAAT polymers also showed improved thermal stability and controlled biodegradation rate compared to HPLA. Importantly, when applying these polymers for myotube formation, the HPLAAT significantly improved the proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts in vitro compared to HPLA. Furthermore, these polymers greatly promoted myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells as measured by quantitative analysis of myotube number, length, diameter, maturation index, and gene expression of MyoD and TNNT. Together, our study shows that these electroactive, ductile and degradable HPLAAT copolymers represent significantly improved biomaterials for muscle tissue engineering compared to HPLA. PMID:26335860

  15. Ductile electroactive biodegradable hyperbranched polylactide copolymers enhancing myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meihua; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-01

    Myotube formation is crucial to restoring muscular functions, and biomaterials that enhance the myoblast differentiation into myotubes are highly desirable for muscular repair. Here, we report the synthesis of electroactive, ductile, and degradable copolymers and their application in enhancing the differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes. A hyperbranched ductile polylactide (HPLA) was synthesized and then copolymerized with aniline tetramer (AT) to produce a series of electroactive, ductile and degradable copolymers (HPLAAT). The HPLA and HPLAAT showed excellent ductility with strain to failure from 158.9% to 42.7% and modulus from 265.2 to 758.2 MPa. The high electroactivity of the HPLAAT was confirmed by UV spectrometer and cyclic voltammogram measurements. These HPLAAT polymers also showed improved thermal stability and controlled biodegradation rate compared to HPLA. Importantly, when applying these polymers for myotube formation, the HPLAAT significantly improved the proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts in vitro compared to HPLA. Furthermore, these polymers greatly promoted myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells as measured by quantitative analysis of myotube number, length, diameter, maturation index, and gene expression of MyoD and TNNT. Together, our study shows that these electroactive, ductile and degradable HPLAAT copolymers represent significantly improved biomaterials for muscle tissue engineering compared to HPLA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 °C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  17. Representing ductile damage with the dual domain material point method

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C. C.; Zhang, D. Z.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, III, G. T.

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we incorporate a ductile damage material model into a computational framework based on the Dual Domain Material Point (DDMP) method. As an example, simulations of a flyer plate experiment involving ductile void growth and material failure are performed. The results are compared with experiments performed on high purity tantalum. We also compare the numerical results obtained from the DDMP method with those obtained from the traditional Material Point Method (MPM). Effects of an overstress model, artificial viscosity, and physical viscosity are investigated. Our results show that a physical bulk viscosity and overstress model are important in this impact and failure problem, while physical shear viscosity and artificial shock viscosity have negligible effects. A simple numerical procedure with guaranteed convergence is introduced to solve for the equilibrium plastic state from the ductile damage model.

  18. Representing ductile damage with the dual domain material point method

    DOE PAGES

    Long, C. C.; Zhang, D. Z.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; ...

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we incorporate a ductile damage material model into a computational framework based on the Dual Domain Material Point (DDMP) method. As an example, simulations of a flyer plate experiment involving ductile void growth and material failure are performed. The results are compared with experiments performed on high purity tantalum. We also compare the numerical results obtained from the DDMP method with those obtained from the traditional Material Point Method (MPM). Effects of an overstress model, artificial viscosity, and physical viscosity are investigated. Our results show that a physical bulk viscosity and overstress model are important in thismore » impact and failure problem, while physical shear viscosity and artificial shock viscosity have negligible effects. A simple numerical procedure with guaranteed convergence is introduced to solve for the equilibrium plastic state from the ductile damage model.« less

  19. Engineered Cooling Process for High Strength Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekakh, Simon N.; Mikhailov, Anthony; Kramer, Joseph

    Professor Stefanescu contributed fundamentally to the science of solidification and microstructural evolutions in ductile irons. In this article, the possibility of development of high strength ductile iron by applying an engineered cooling process after casting early shake out from the sand mold was explored. The structures in industrial ductile iron were experimentally simulated using a computer controlled heating/cooling device. CFD modeling was used for process simulation and an experimental bench scale system was developed. The process concept was experimentally verified by producing cast plates with 25 mm wall thickness. The tensile strength was increased from 550 MPa to 1000 MPa in as-cast condition without the need for alloying and heat treatment. The possible practical applications were discussed.

  20. Brittle and ductile friction and the physics of tectonic tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daub, E.G.; Shelly, D.R.; Guyer, R.A.; Johnson, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of nonvolcanic tremor provide a unique window into the mechanisms of deformation and failure in the lower crust. At increasing depths, rock deformation gradually transitions from brittle, where earthquakes occur, to ductile, with tremor occurring in the transitional region. The physics of deformation in the transition region remain poorly constrained, limiting our basic understanding of tremor and its relation to earthquakes. We combine field and laboratory observations with a physical friction model comprised of brittle and ductile components, and use the model to provide constraints on the friction and stress state in the lower crust. A phase diagram is constructed that characterizes under what conditions all faulting behaviors occur, including earthquakes, tremor, silent transient slip, and steady sliding. Our results show that tremor occurs over a range of ductile and brittle frictional strengths, and advances our understanding of the physical conditions at which tremor and earthquakes take place. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Ductile fracture theories for pressurised pipes and containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Two mechanisms of fracture are distinguished. Plane strain fractures occur in materials which do not undergo large-scale plastic deformations prior to and during a possible fracture deformation. Plane stress or high energy fractures are generally accompanied by large inelastic deformations. Theories for analyzing plane stress are based on the concepts of critical crack opening stretch, K(R) characterization, J-integral, and plastic instability. This last is considered in some detail. The ductile fracture process involves fracture initiation followed by a stable crack growth and the onset of unstable fracture propagation. The ductile fracture propagation process may be characterized by either a multiparameter (discrete) model, or some type of a resistance curve which may be considered as a continuous model expressed graphically. These models are studied and an alternative model is also proposed for ductile fractures which cannot be modeled as progressive crack growth phenomena.

  2. Mapping the ductile-brittle transition of magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallee, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    During volcanic unrest, eruptive activity can switch rapidly from effusive to explosive. Explosive eruptions require the fragmentation of magma, in which, if deformation rate is too fast to be relaxed, magma undergoes a transition in deformation mechanism from viscous and/or ductile to brittle. Our knowledge of the deformation mechanisms of magma ascent and eruption remains, to date, poor. Many studies have constrained the glass transition (Tg) of the interstitial melt phase; yet the effect of crystals and bubbles are unresolved. During ascent, magma undergoes P-T changes which induce crystallization, thereby inducing a transition from viscous to ductile and, in some cases, to brittle deformation. Here, we explore the deformation mechanisms of magma involved in the dome-building eruptions and explosions that occurred at Volcán de Colima (Mexico) since 1998. For this purpose, we investigated the rheology of dome lavas, containing 10-45 vol.% rhyolitic interstitial melt, 55-90 vol.% crystals and 5-20 vol.% bubbles. The interstitial glass is characterized by electron microprobe and Tg is characterized using a differential scanning calorimeter and a dilatometer. The population of crystals (fraction, shape and size distribution) is described optically and quantified using ImageJ and AMOCADO. The rheological effects of crystals on the deformation of magmas are constrained via acoustic emission (AE) and uniaxial deformation experiments at temperature above Tg (900-980 °C) and at varied applied stresses (and strain rates: 10-6 to 10-2 s-1). The ratio of ductile to brittle deformation across the ductile-brittle transition is quantified using the output AE energy and optical and SEM analysis. We find that individual dome lava sample types have different mechanical responses, yielding a significant range of measured strain rates under a given temperature and applied stress. Optical analysis suggests that at low strain rates, ductile deformation is mainly controlled by the

  3. Ductile Faults Control Seismogenic Movement on Oceanic Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, G. S.; Tkalcic, H.; Forster, M. A.; McClusky, S.

    2014-12-01

    Structural Geology is about 3D geometry and the symphony of kinematically-coordinated movement. In this case we discuss patterns of violent relative displacement inferred from focal plane data for earthquakes. Systematic stereographic analysis of centroid moment tensor data often shows well-defined orientation groups in scatterplots of fault plane normals and associated slip line vectors. These allow important geodynamic inferences, e.g., we can show that ductile faults control the geometry of oceanic transforms, and that normal fault earthquakes on spreading ridges are usually skewed with respect to adjacent transform faults. To explain this asymmetry requires finite rock strength, but it also means that it is not brittle failure that controls the orientation of oceanic transforms. This asymmetry also requires formation of tilt block geometries reminiscent of Basin-and-Range-style continental extension, systematic offset of earthquake hypocentres from the spreading ridge, and a general complexity in magma-fault interactions that is far beyond what might be expected if ocean-floor spreading is the result of dilating tension-mode fractures in dyke swarms. The role of ductile faulting should be given special mention because mostly it is argued that brittle faults are responsible for earthquakes. Yet many other examples of ductile faults in operation can be inferred, e.g., ductile faults associated with slab drop-off, where slab boudinage leads to extensional ductile faults and seismic activity driven by the pulling away of a relict slab, e.g., beneath the Hindu Kush. Another example might be found by close examination of the tectonic significance of the lowermost of the double (or paired) seismic zones such as can be seen in cross-sections of the subducting slab beneath Japan. The lowermost of the paired seismic zones may mark the locus of aseismic ductile shears or detachments formed by slumping of gigantic sheets of rock attempting to slide down the face of

  4. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, CENTERVILLE FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, CENTERVILLE FOUNDRY SHOWING MOLD MAKING WITH PNEWMATIC JOLT SQUEEZE COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINES THAT INDIVIDUALLY MADE EITHER A COPE OR DRAG AND A SMALL WHEELED MATCHPLATE JOLT-SQUEEZE MACHINE THAT COMPRESSED AN ENTIRE MOLD AT A SINGLE TIME USING A DOUBLE-SIDED PATTERN (MATCHPLATE). ALSO SHOWN ARE RAILED PALLET CAR CONVEYORS THAT CARRIED COMPLETED MOLDS FROM MOLDING MACHINES TO POURING AREAS WHERE WORKERS USED SMALL OVERHEAD CRANE TO LIFT JACKETS AND WEIGHTS ONTO THE MOLDS TO HOLD THEM TOGETHER WHILE POURING. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  5. Displacement-length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-11-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement-distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow.

  6. High-strength tungsten alloy with improved ductility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopp, W. D.; Raffo, P. L.; Rubenstein, L. S.; Witzke, W. R.

    1967-01-01

    Alloy combines superior strength at elevated temperatures with improved ductility at lower temperatures relative to unalloyed tungsten. Composed of tungsten, rhenium, hafnium, and carbon, the alloy is prepared by consumable electrode vacuum arc-melting and can be fabricated into rod, plate, and sheet.

  7. DUCTILE URANIUM FUEL FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS AND METHOD OF MAKING

    DOEpatents

    Zegler, S.T.

    1963-11-01

    The fabrication process for a ductile nuclear fuel alloy consisting of uranium, fissium, and from 0.25 to 1.0 wt% of silicon or aluminum or from 0.25 to 2 wt% of titanium or yttrium is presented. (AEC)

  8. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    PubMed Central

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  9. Heat treatment procedure to increase ductility of degraded nickel alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, M.

    1968-01-01

    Tests demonstrate the room temperature ductility of degraded Rene 41 can be increased to acceptable values by solution heat treatment at a temperature of 2050 degrees to 2150 degrees F /1 to 2 hours/ and cooling through a controlled temperature range followed by normal aging in air /16 hours at 1400 degrees F/.

  10. Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Metallic Glass Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Şopu, D; Foroughi, A; Stoica, M; Eckert, J

    2016-07-13

    When reducing the size of metallic glass samples down to the nanoscale regime, experimental studies on the plasticity under uniaxial tension show a wide range of failure modes ranging from brittle to ductile ones. Simulations on the deformation behavior of nanoscaled metallic glasses report an unusual extended strain softening and are not able to reproduce the brittle-like fracture deformation as found in experiments. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations we provide an atomistic understanding of the deformation mechanisms of metallic glass nanowires and differentiate the extrinsic size effects and aspect ratio contribution to plasticity. A model for predicting the critical nanowire aspect ratio for the ductile-to-brittle transition is developed. Furthermore, the structure of brittle nanowires can be tuned to a softer phase characterized by a defective short-range order and an excess free volume upon systematic structural rejuvenation, leading to enhanced tensile ductility. The presented results shed light on the fundamental deformation mechanisms of nanoscaled metallic glasses and demarcate ductile and catastrophic failure.

  11. IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE MOVING DOWN TRACK IN PREPARATION FOR DISTRIBUTION TO DE LAVAUD MACHINES. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  12. IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE MOVING DOWN TRACK IN PREPARATION FOR DISTRIBUTION TO DE LAVAUD MACHINES, LADLE TRANSFER CRANE ON FAR LEFT. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  13. Wear Performance of Cu-Alloyed Austempered Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Uma; Batra, Nimish; Sharma, J. D.

    2013-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of structural and mechanical properties on wear behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI). Ductile iron (DI) samples were austenitized at 900 °C for 60 min and subsequently austempered for 60 min at three temperatures: 270, 330, and 380 °C. Microstructures of the as-cast DI and ADIs were characterized using optical and scanning microscopy, respectively. The structural parameters, volume fraction of austenite, carbon content of austenite, and ferrite particle size were determined using x-ray diffraction technique. Mechanical properties including Vicker's hardness, 0.2% proof strength, ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and strain hardening coefficient were determined. Wear tests were carried out under dry sliding conditions using pin-on-disk machine with a linear speed of 2.4 m/s. Normal load and sliding distance were 45 N and 1.7 × 104 m, respectively. ADI developed at higher austempering temperature has large amounts of austenite, which contribute toward improvement in the wear resistance through stress-induced martensitic transformation, and strain hardening of austenite. Wear rate was found to depend on 0.2% proof strength, ductility, austenite content, and its carbon content. Study of worn surfaces and nature of wear debris revealed that the fine ausferrite structure in ADIs undergoes oxidational wear, but the coarse ausferrite structure undergoes adhesion, delamination, and mild abrasion too.

  14. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auton, Lucy; MacMinn, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the injection of fluid at high pressure. This creates fractures in the rock, providing hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir and enabling gas to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We solve the model semi-analytically at steady state, and numerically in general. We find that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from purely elastic models.

  15. An interatomic pair potential with tunable intrinsic ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, V. P.; Warner, D. H.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    A family of interatomic potentials is constructed for which the intrinsic ductility can be tuned systematically. Specifically, the elastic constants and critical energy release rate for Griffith cleavage, {{G}\\text{Ic}} , are held constant, while the critical energy release rate for dislocation emission, {{G}\\text{Ie}} , can be varied. This behavior is achieved by modifying a standard near-neighbor pair potential; the new potential is applicable to either 2D (hexagonal lattice) or 3D (FCC/HCP). Analytical expressions are provided for {{G}\\text{Ie}} and {{G}\\text{Ic}} , enabling a potential with a desired intrinsic ductility to be easily developed. Direct atomistic simulations are used to demonstrate that the new potentials control the intrinsic material ductility, i.e. crack tip dislocation emission versus brittle cleavage, under quasi-static loading. For the 2D potential, the mode I crack tip behavior can be tuned from brittle to ductile; for the 3D potential, such tuning is only possible for certain crack orientations. More generally, the new potentials are expected to be useful in a wide range of physical problems in which behavior is controlled by the ability of the material to nucleate dislocations, including problems involving crack tips, grain boundaries, contact and friction, and bi-material interfaces.

  16. Thermo-Mechanical Processing and Properties of a Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, R.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-07-14

    Thermo-mechanical processing of ductile irons is a potential method for enhancing their mechanical properties. A ductile cast iron containing 3.6% C, 2.6% Si and 0.045% Mg was continuously hot-and-warm rolled or one-step press-forged from a temperature in the austenite range (900{degrees}C-1100{degrees}C) to a temperature below the A, temperature. Various amounts of reduction were used (from 60% to more than 90%) followed by a short heat ent at 600`C. The heat ent lead to a structure of fine graphite in a matrix of ferrite and carbides. The hot-and- warm worked materials developed a pearlitic microstructure while the press-forged material developed a spheroidite-like carbide microstructure in the matrix. Cementite-denuded ferrite zones were developed around graphite stringers in the hot-and-warm worked materials, but such zones were absent in the press-forged material. Tensile properties including tensile strength and total elongation were measured along the direction parallel and transverse to the rolling direction and along the direction transverse to the press-forging direction. The tensile ductility and strength both increased with a decrease in the amount of hot-and-warm working. The press- forged materials showed higher strength (645 MPa) than the hot-and-warrn worked materials (575 MPa) when compared at the same ductility level (22% elongation).

  17. Ductile-regime turning of germanium and silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Peter N.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    1989-01-01

    Single-point diamond turning of silicon and germanium was investigated in order to clarify the role of cutting depth in coaxing a ductile chip formation in normally brittle substances. Experiments based on the rapid withdrawal of the tool from the workpiece have shown that microfracture damage is a function of the effective depth of cut (as opposed to the nominal cutting depth). In essence, damage created by the leading edge of the tool is removed several revolutions later by lower sections of the tool edge, where the effective cutting depth is less. It appears that a truly ductile cutting response can be achieved only when the effective cutting depth, or critical chip thickness, is less than about 20 nm. Factors such as tool rake angle are significant in that they will affect the actual value of the critical chip thickness for transition from brittle to ductile response. It is concluded that the critical chip thickness is an excellent parameter for measuring the effects of machining conditions on the ductility of the cut and for designing tool-workpiece geometry in both turning and grinding.

  18. How plasticizer makes a ductile polymer glass brittle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Li, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Shi-Qing

    During uniaxial extension, a polymer glass of high molecular weight is ductile at high temperatures (still below Tg) and turns brittle when the temperature is sufficiently lowered. Incorporation of small-molecular additives to polymer glasses can speed up segmental relaxation considerably. The effect of such plasticization should be to make the polymers more ductile. We examined the effect of blending a few weight percent of either triphenyl phosphate (TPP) or a mineral oil to a commercial-grade PS and PMMA. Our Instron tests show that the plasticized PS is less ductile. Specifically, at 70 oC, the original PS is ductile at an extensional rate of 0.02 s-1 whereas the PS with 4 wt. % TPP turns brittle. Mechanical spectroscopic measurements show that the alpha relaxation time is shortened by more than two orders of magnitude with 4 wt. % TPP. On the other hand, such anomalous behavior did not occur in PMMA. We need to go beyond the conventional description to rationalize these results This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859).

  19. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to a...

  20. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to a...

  1. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to a...

  2. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to a...

  3. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to a...

  4. Ductile mode material removal of ceramics and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindra, Deepak

    Ceramics and semiconductors are hard, strong, inert and lightweight. They also have good optical properties, wide energy bandgap and high maximum current density. This combination of properties makes them ideal candidates for tribological, semiconductor, MEMS and optoelectronic applications respectively. Manufacturing these materials without causing surface and subsurface damage is extremely challenging due to their high hardness, brittle characteristics and poor machinability. However, ductile regime machining of these materials is possible due to the high-pressure phase transformation occurring in the material caused by the high compressive stresses induced by the single point diamond tool tip. In this study, to further augment the ductile response of the machined material, single point scratch tests are coupled with a micro-laser assisted machining (micro-LAM) technique. The high pressure phase is preferentially heated and thermally softened by using concentrated energy sources (i.e. laser beams) to enhance the ductile response of the material. The focus here is to develop an efficient manufacturing technique to improve the surface quality of ceramics and semiconductors to be used as optical devices (mirrors and windows). Machining parameters such as the depth of cut, feed, cutting speed and laser power are optimized in order to make the manufacturing process more time and cost effective. Also, the science behind the thermal softening effect during the formation of high-pressure phases is experimentally studied by isolating the temperature and pressure effect. Micro-laser assisted scratch tests successfully demonstrate the enhanced thermal softening in silicon (Si), silicon carbide (SiC) and sapphire resulting in greater depths of cuts (when compared to similar applied loads for cuts with no laser), greater ductile-to-brittle transition depths and smaller cutting forces. Imaging and characterization techniques such as optical microscopy, light interferometry

  5. Metallurgical investigation into ductility dip cracking in nickel based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noecker, Fredrick F., II

    A690 is a Ni-Cr-Fe alloy with excellent resistance to general corrosion, localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. However, the companion filler metal for A690, EN52, has been shown by several researchers to be susceptible to ductility dip cracking (DDC), which limits its widespread use in joining applications. The Gleeble hot ductility test was used to evaluate the DDC susceptibility of A600 and A690, along with their filler metals, EN82H and EN52, throughout the heating and cooling portions of a simulated weld reheat thermal cycle. Both macroscopic mechanical measures and microscopic measures of DDC were quantified and compared. Water quenching was conducted at select temperatures for subsequent microstructural characterization. Microstructural and microchemical characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques. The greatest resistance to DDC was observed in A600 and A690 during heating, where no DDC cracks formed even when the samples were fractured. Both A690 and EN52 were found to form an intermediate on-cooling dip in ductility and UTS, which corresponded to an increase in ductility dip crack length. The hot ductility and cracking resistance of EN82H remained high throughout the entire thermal cycle. DDC susceptibility in both EN52 and EN82H decreased when the thermal cycle was modified to promote coarsening/precipitation of intergranular carbides prior to straining. AEM analysis did not reveal any sulfur or phosphorous intergranular segregation in EN52 at 1600°F on-heating, on-cooling or after a 60 second hold. The ductility dip cracks were preferentially oriented at a 45° to the tensile axis and were of a wedge type appearance, both of which are characteristic of grain boundary sliding (GBS). Samples with microstructures that consisted of coarsened carbides and/or serrated grain boundaries, which are expected to decrease GBS, were found to be

  6. Strong, Ductile, and Thermally Stable bcc-Mg Nanolaminates

    DOE PAGES

    Pathak, Siddhartha; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Baldwin, Jon Kevin Scott; ...

    2017-08-15

    Magnesium has attracted attention worldwide because it is the lightest structural metal. However, a high strength-to-weight ratio remains its only attribute, since an intrinsic lack of strength, ductility and low melting temperature severely restricts practical applications of Mg. Through interface strains, the crystal structure of Mg can be transformed and stabilized from a simple hexagonal (hexagonal close packed hcp) to body center cubic (bcc) crystal structure at ambient pressures. Here, we demonstrate that when introduced into a nanocomposite bcc Mg is far more ductile, 50% stronger, and retains its strength after extended exposure to 200°C, which is 0.5 times itsmore » homologous temperature. These findings reveal an alternative solution to obtaining lightweight metals critically needed for future energy efficiency and fuel savings.« less

  7. Ductile Regime Single Point Diamond Turning of Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindra, Deepak; Patten, John

    2011-01-01

    Quartz (fused silica) is one of the advanced engineered ceramic materials designed to operate in extreme environments. The mechanics of material removal in glass (Quartz) can be classified in two categories; brittle fracture and ductile plastic deformation. Good optical quality surfaces can be achieved by removing the material in a ductile manner. The strength, hardness and fracture toughness of the work piece material are the governing factors that control the extent of brittle fracture. The main goal of the subject research is to improve the surface quality of Quartz to be used as an optic device (mirrors and windows) via single point diamond turning (SPDT). Surface roughness (Ra) values of less than 50 nm without sub surface damage were obtained.

  8. Prediction of Microstructure in High-Strength Ductile Forging Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, M.; Back, A.; Hirt, G.; Keul, C.; Bleck, W.

    2010-06-15

    Governmental, environmental and economic demands call for lighter, stiffer and at the same time cheaper products in the vehicle industry. Especially safety relevant parts have to be stiff and at the same time ductile. The strategy of this project was to improve the mechanical properties of forging steel alloys by employing a high-strength and ductile bainitic microstructure in the parts while maintaining cost effective process chains to reach these goals for high stressed forged parts. Therefore, a new steel alloy combined with an optimized process chain has been developed. To optimize the process chain with a minimum of expensive experiments, a numerical approach was developed to predict the microstructure of the steel alloy after the process chain based on FEM simulations of the forging and cooling combined with deformation-time-temperature-transformation-diagrams.

  9. Ductile fracture by cavity nucleation between larger voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1982-08-01

    A MECHANISM of ductile fracture involving the interaction of relatively large voids with small-scale voids is studied by a computational model. The larger voids are described as circular cylindrical holes arranged in a doubly periodic array in the initial state. In the matrix material between these voids the nucleation and growth of much smaller voids is accounted for by using approximate constitutive equations for a ductile, porous medium. The computations show bands of highly localized straining and void growth, initiating at the surfaces of larger voids and growing into the matrix material, until the bands connect two neighbouring voids. The materials are analysed both under plane strain conditions and under conditions approximating those in a round tensile bar. The failure strains obtained under different principal stress ratios show rather good agreement when plotted against a measure of the stress-triaxiality.

  10. Ductility of nonmetallic hybrid fiber composite reinforcement for concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepfers, R.; Tamužs, V.; Apinis, R.; Vilks, U.; Modniks, J.

    1996-03-01

    Reinforcing units, FRP, of unidirectional fiber composites for concrete have elastic behavior up to tensile failure. For safety reasons an elongation of 3% at maximum load is usually required for the reinforcement. Ductile behavior with the necessary elongation and stress hardening could be obtained with braided fiber strands around a core of foam plastic, thin glass fiber cylindrical shell, or unidirectional carbon fibers. Braids around a porous core reveal the ductility when epoxy resin breaks up and collapse of core enables the braids to rotate. The same seems to happen at that cross section, where carbon fiber core breaks in tension. The best result is obtained using a cylindrical glass fiber reinforced core shell surrounded with aramid fiber braid.

  11. Enhancement of Strength and Ductility in Bulk Nanocrystalline Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T; Schuh, C A; Caturla, M J; Hodge, A M

    2004-02-17

    The purpose of this project is to develop a robust scientific and technological framework for the design of high-strength and -ductility nanocrystalline materials for applications of technical importance to the Laboratory. The project couples theory and experiments with an emphasis on materials of macroscopic dimensions (mm to cm) that are composed of nanoscale (<100 nm) grains. There are four major tasks: (1) synthesize nanocrystalline materials with grain size in the 5- to 100-nm range; (2) conduct experimental studies to probe mechanisms of mechanical deformation and failure; (3) use large-scale simulation modeling technologies to provide insight to deformation mechanisms that may not be observable experimentally; and (4) check the results obtained from modeling, comparing experimental observations with results obtained from atomistic and dislocation-based simulations. This project supports efforts within the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) to understand and predict properties of metals such as strength and ductility.

  12. A Study of Solder Alloy Ductility for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Shapiro, A. A.; Suh, J-O.; Minor, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    For aerospace applications it is important to understand the mechanical performance of components at the extreme temperature conditions seen in service. For solder alloys used in microelectronics, cryogenic temperatures can prove problematic. At low temperatures Sn-based solders undergo a ductile to brittle transition that leads to brittle cracks, which can result in catastrophic failure of electronic components, assemblies and spacecraft payloads. As industrial processes begin to move away from Pb-Sn solder, it is even more critical to characterize the behavior of alternative Sn-based solders. Here we report on initial investigations using a modified Charpy test apparatus to characterize the ductile to brittle transformation temperature of nine different solder systems.

  13. Polystyrene glasses under compression: Ductile and brittle behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jianning; Lin, Panpan; Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Weiyu; Mays, Jimmy W.; Wang, Shi -Qing

    2015-09-09

    Polystyrene of different molecular weights and their binary mixtures are studied in terms of their various mechanical responses to uniaxial compression at different temperatures. PS of Mw = 25 kg/mol is completely brittle until it is above its glass transition temperature Tg. In contrast, upon incorporation of a high molecular weight component, PS mixtures turn from barely ductile a few degrees below its Tg to ductile over 40° below Tg. In the upper limit, a PS of Mw = 319 kg/mol yields and undergoes plastic flow, even at T = –70° C. Furthermore, the observed dependence of mechanical responses on molecular weight and molecular weight distribution can be adequately rationalized by the idea that yielding and plastic compression are caused by chain networking.

  14. The effect of yield strength and ductility to fatigue damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    The cumulative damage of aluminium alloys with different yield strength and various ductility due to seismic loads was studied. The responses of an idealized beam with a centered mass at one end and fixed at the other end to El Centro's and Taft's earthquakes are computed by assuming that the alloys are perfectly elastoplastic materials and by using numerical technique. Consequently, the corresponding residual plastic strain can be obtained from the stress-strain relationship. The revised Palmgren-Miner cumulative damage theorem is utilized to calculate the fatigue damage. The numerical results show that in certain cases, the high ductility materials are more resistant to seismic loads than the high yield strength materials. The results also show that if a structure collapse during the earthquake, the collapse always occurs in the very early stage.

  15. A Study of Solder Alloy Ductility for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Shapiro, A. A.; Suh, J-O.; Minor, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    For aerospace applications it is important to understand the mechanical performance of components at the extreme temperature conditions seen in service. For solder alloys used in microelectronics, cryogenic temperatures can prove problematic. At low temperatures Sn-based solders undergo a ductile to brittle transition that leads to brittle cracks, which can result in catastrophic failure of electronic components, assemblies and spacecraft payloads. As industrial processes begin to move away from Pb-Sn solder, it is even more critical to characterize the behavior of alternative Sn-based solders. Here we report on initial investigations using a modified Charpy test apparatus to characterize the ductile to brittle transformation temperature of nine different solder systems.

  16. Flash Joule heating for ductilization of metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Okulov, I V; Soldatov, I V; Sarmanova, M F; Kaban, I; Gemming, T; Edström, K; Eckert, J

    2015-07-29

    Metallic glasses (MGs) inherit their amorphous structure from the liquid state, which predetermines their ability to withstand high loads approaching the theoretical limit. However, the absence of slip systems makes them very sensitive to the type of loading and extremely brittle in tension. The latter can be improved by precipitation of ductile crystals, which suppress a catastrophic propagation of shear bands in a glassy matrix. Here we report a novel approach to obtain MG-matrix composites with tensile ductility by flash Joule heating applied to Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 (at.%) metallic glass. This homogeneous, volumetric and controllable rapid heat treatment allows achieving uniformly distributed metastable B2 CuZr crystals in the glassy matrix. It results in a significant tensile strain of 6.8±0.5%. Moreover, optimized adjustment of the heat-treatment conditions enables tuning of microstructure to achieve desired mechanical properties.

  17. Tensile Fracture of Ductile Materials. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    For brittle materials, circular voids play an important role relative to fracture, intensifing both tensile and compressive stresses. A maximum intensified tensile stress failure criterion applies quite well to brittle materials. An attempt was made to explore the possibility of extending the approach to the tensile fracture of ductile materials. The three dimensional voids that exist in reality are modelled by circular holes in sheet metal. Mathematical relationships are sought between the shape and size of the hole, after the material is plastically deformed, and the amount of deformation induced. Then, the effect of hole shape, size and orientation on the mechanical properties is considered experimentally. The presence of the voids does not affect the ultimate tensile strength of the ductile materials because plastic flow wipes out the stress intensification caused by them. However, the shape and orientation of the defect is found to play an important role in affecting the strain at fracture.

  18. Simulations of ductile flow in brittle material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Luh, M.H.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research is continuing on the effects of thermal properties of the cutting tool and workpiece on the overall temperature distribution. Using an Eulerian finite element model, diamond and steel tools cutting aluminum have been simulated at various, speeds, and depths of cut. The relative magnitude of the thermal conductivity of the tool and the workpiece is believed to be a primary factor in the resulting temperature distribution in the workpiece. This effect is demonstrated in the change of maximum surface temperatures for diamond on aluminum vs. steel on aluminum. As a preliminary step toward the study of ductile flow in brittle materials, the relative thermal conductivities of diamond on polycarbonate is simulated. In this case, the maximum temperature shifts from the rake face of the tool to the surface of the machined workpiece, thus promoting ductile flow in the workpiece surface.

  19. Modeling the strength and ductility of magnesium alloys containing nanotwins

    SciTech Connect

    Gorti, Sarma B; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been receiving much attention recently as potential lightweight alternatives to steel for automotive and other applications, but the poor formability of these alloys at low temperatures has limited their widespread adoption for automotive applications. Recent work with face centered cubic (FCC) materials has shown that introduction of twins at the nanometer scale in ultra-fine grained FCC polycrystals can provide significant increase in strength with a simultaneous improvement in ductility. This objective of this work is to explore the feasibility of extending this concept to hexagonal close packed (HCP) materials, with particular focus on using this approach to increase both strength and ductility of magnesium alloys. A crystal plasticity based finite element (CPFE) model is used to study the effect of varying the crystallographic texture and the spacing between the nanoscale twins on the strength and ductility of HCP polycrystals. Deformation of the material is assumed to occur by crystallographic slip, and in addition to the basal and prismatic slip systems, slip is also assumed to occur on the {1 0 -1 1} planes that are associated with compression twins in these materials. The slip system strength of the pyramidal systems containing the nanotwins is assumed to be much lower than the strength of the other systems, which is assumed to scale with the spacing between the nanotwins. The CPFE model is used to compute the stress-strain response for different microstrucrutral parameters, and a criterion based on a critical slip system shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress is used to compute the limiting strength and ductility, with the ultimate goal of identifying the texture and nanotwin spacing that can lead to the optimum values for these parameters.

  20. Potentially exploitable supercritical geothermal resources in the ductile crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watanabe, Noriaki; Numakura, Tatsuya; Sakaguchi, Kiyotoshi; Saishu, Hanae; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis that the brittle–ductile transition (BDT) drastically reduces permeability implies that potentially exploitable geothermal resources (permeability >10−16 m2) consisting of supercritical water could occur only in rocks with unusually high transition temperatures such as basalt. However, tensile fracturing is possible even in ductile rocks, and some permeability–depth relations proposed for the continental crust show no drastic permeability reduction at the BDT. Here we present experimental results suggesting that the BDT is not the first-order control on rock permeability, and that potentially exploitable resources may occur in rocks with much lower BDT temperatures, such as the granitic rocks that comprise the bulk of the continental crust. We find that permeability behaviour for fractured granite samples at 350–500 °C under effective confining stress is characterized by a transition from a weakly stress-dependent and reversible behaviour to a strongly stress-dependent and irreversible behaviour at a specific, temperature-dependent effective confining stress level. This transition is induced by onset of plastic normal deformation of the fracture surface (elastic–plastic transition) and, importantly, causes no ‘jump’ in the permeability. Empirical equations for this permeability behaviour suggest that potentially exploitable resources exceeding 450 °C may form at depths of 2–6 km even in the nominally ductile crust.

  1. Nano-modification to improve the ductility of cementitious composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yeşilmen, Seda; Al-Najjar, Yazin; Balav, Mohammad Hatam; Şahmaran, Mustafa; Yıldırım, Gürkan; Lachemi, Mohamed

    2015-10-15

    Effect of nano-sized mineral additions on ductility of engineered cementitious composites (ECC) containing high volumes of fly ash was investigated at different hydration degrees. Various properties of ECC mixtures with different mineral additions were compared in terms of microstructural properties of matrix, fiber-matrix interface, and fiber surface to assess improvements in ductility. Microstructural characterization was made by measuring pore size distributions through mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). Hydration characteristics were assessed using thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), and fiber-matrix interface and fiber surface characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) through a period of 90 days. Moreover, compressive and flexural strength developments were monitored for the same period. Test results confirmed that mineral additions could significantly improve both flexural strength and ductility of ECC, especially at early ages. Cheaper Nano-CaCO{sub 3} was more effective compared to nano-silica. However, the crystal structure of CaCO{sub 3} played a very important role in the range of expected improvements.

  2. Structure and ductility of eutectic type iron-carbon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizhnikovskaya, P. F.

    1984-09-01

    The ductility of iron-carbon alloys of the eutectic type is governed by the structure of eutectic carbides and it may be increased by two methods. The first envisages formation during prior heat treatment of dislocations in eutectic carbides and creation of subgrain boundaries along which during deformation there is carbide fragmentation. This method, as a result of the specific effect of the metal base on formation of dislocations in carbides and prevention of carbide failure under the action of compressive stresses from the surrounding solid solution, may only be used for alloys in which the carbide phase reinforces a metal matrix. The second method involves a marked increase in carbide ductility as a result of transformation occurring in them under the action of deformation [10]. This method may be used to increase the ductility of cast irons around the eutectic composition with eutectics whose matrix phase is carbide. In this way forming may be accomplished by rolling in the range of rates used in metallurgical production practice.

  3. The role of boron in ductilizing Ni3Al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedula, K.; Shabel, B. S.; Khadkikar, P. S.

    1987-01-01

    Ductilization of Ni3Al at room temperature by microalloying with boron has been primarily attributed to the increased grain boundary cohesion in the presence of boron. However, another aspect of the role played by boron in ductilizing Ni3Al is revealed when the Hall-Petch relationships for Ni3Al and B-doped Ni3Al are compared. A shallower slope for the B-doped Ni3Al compared to that for Ni3Al indicates a reduced resistance to slip propagation across grain boundaries, and therefore reduced stress concentration at boundaries, in the presence of boron. This comparison of Hall-Petch relationships was carried out by generating data for powder processed B-doped Ni3Al at various grain sizes and by compiling data for Ni3Al from the literature. In addition, the room temperature fracture of B-doped Ni3Al has been shown to initiate along certain grain boundaries. The fracture eventually occurs by transgranular ductile tearing.

  4. Dynamic ductile tearing in high strength pipeline steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rivalin, F.; Iung, T.; Di Fant, M.; Pineau, A.

    1996-12-31

    The study of rapid ductile crack propagation and crack arrest is a central point if one wants to reach a higher safety level in pipelines. Correlations between Charpy tests and full scale burst tests proved to be unsuccessful in predicting pipe burst for recent high strength steels. This paper presents an experiment which allows to test large SENT specimens under dynamic loading, and to characterize steel resistance against rapid ductile crack propagation by a classical energetic parameter, called the crack propagation energy, R, proposed by Turner. The R parameter proved to be characteristic of the rapid crack propagation in the material, for a given specimen and loading configuration. Failure of the specimen under dynamic conditions occurs by shearing fracture which is the same as in a full scale burst test. An example is given for an X65 ferritic-pearlitic steel loaded under static and dynamic conditions. A fracture mode transition is shown following the loading rate. From a metallurgical point of view, shearing fracture occurs by nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids, as for classical ductile fracture.

  5. Potentially exploitable supercritical geothermal resources in the ductile crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Noriaki; Numakura, Tatsuya; Sakaguchi, Kiyotoshi; Saishu, Hanae; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis that the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) drastically reduces permeability implies that potentially exploitable geothermal resources (permeability >10-16 m2) consisting of supercritical water could occur only in rocks with unusually high transition temperatures such as basalt. However, tensile fracturing is possible even in ductile rocks, and some permeability-depth relations proposed for the continental crust show no drastic permeability reduction at the BDT. Here we present experimental results suggesting that the BDT is not the first-order control on rock permeability, and that potentially exploitable resources may occur in rocks with much lower BDT temperatures, such as the granitic rocks that comprise the bulk of the continental crust. We find that permeability behaviour for fractured granite samples at 350-500 °C under effective confining stress is characterized by a transition from a weakly stress-dependent and reversible behaviour to a strongly stress-dependent and irreversible behaviour at a specific, temperature-dependent effective confining stress level. This transition is induced by onset of plastic normal deformation of the fracture surface (elastic-plastic transition) and, importantly, causes no `jump' in the permeability. Empirical equations for this permeability behaviour suggest that potentially exploitable resources exceeding 450 °C may form at depths of 2-6 km even in the nominally ductile crust.

  6. Nanodomained Nickel Unite Nanocrystal Strength with Coarse-Grain Ductility

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Fuping; Yang, Muxin; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Chuanxin; Chen, Liu; Wei, Yueguang; Ma, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Conventional metals are routinely hardened by grain refinement or by cold working with the expense of their ductility. Recent nanostructuring strategies have attempted to evade this strength versus ductility trade-off, but the paradox persists. It has never been possible to combine the strength reachable in nanocrystalline metals with the large uniform tensile elongation characteristic of coarse-grained metals. Here a defect engineering strategy on the nanoscale is architected to approach this ultimate combination. For Nickel, spread-out nanoscale domains (average 7 nm in diameter) were produced during electrodeposition, occupying only ~2.4% of the total volume. Yet the resulting Ni achieves a yield strength approaching 1.3 GPa, on par with the strength for nanocrystalline Ni with uniform grains. Simultaneously, the material exhibits a uniform elongation as large as ~30%, at the same level of ductile face-centered-cubic metals. Electron microscopy observations and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the nanoscale domains effectively block dislocations, akin to the role of precipitates for Orowan hardening. In the meantime, the abundant domain boundaries provide dislocation sources and trapping sites of running dislocations for dislocation multiplication, and the ample space in the grain interior allows dislocation storage; a pronounced strain-hardening rate is therefore sustained to enable large uniform elongation. PMID:26122728

  7. Predictive Process Optimization for Fracture Ductility in Automotive TRIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiadong

    In light of the emerging challenges in the automotive industry of meeting new energy-saving and environment-friendly requirements imposed by both the government and the society, the auto makers have been working relentlessly to reduce the weight of automobiles. While steel makers pushed out a variety of novel Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) to serve this market with new needs, TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels is one of the most promising materials for auto-body due to its exceptional combination of strength and formability. However, current commercial automotive TRIP steels demonstrate relatively low hole-expansion (HE) capability, which is critical in stretch forming of various auto parts. This shortcoming on ductility has been causing fracture issues in the forming process and limits the wider applications of this steel. The kinetic theory of martensitic transformations and associated transformation plasticity is applied to the optimization of transformation stability for enhanced mechanical properties in a class of high strength galvannealed TRIP steel. This research leverages newly developed characterization and simulation capabilities, supporting computational design of high-performance steels exploiting optimized transformation plasticity for desired mechanical behaviors, especially for the hole-expansion ductility. The microstructure of the automotive TRIP sheet steels was investigated, using advanced tomographic characterization including nanoscale Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP) microanalysis. The microstructural basis of austenite stability, the austenite carbon concentration in particular, was quantified and correlated with measured fracture ductility through transformation plasticity constitutive laws. Plastic flow stability for enhanced local fracture ductility at high strength is sought to maintain high hole-expansion ductility, through quantifying the optimal stability and the heat-treatment process to achieve it. An additional

  8. An Exploratory Investigation of Some Factors Influencing the Room-Temperature Ductility of Tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1960-01-01

    Specimens having an initial diameter of 0.125 inch were cut from commercially pure sintered and swaged tungsten rods. The effect of various surface treatments on the ductility of tungsten was evaluated by the use of a bend test. The criterion used to determine the relative ductilities was the final bend angle of the specimens. Results showed that the bend ductility of the tungsten specimens increased with increasing depths of the surface removed by electropolishing. When specimens electropolished to a depth sufficient to produce a marked increase in the ductility over that of the as-received surface condition were subsequently scratched with emery paper, the ductility achieved by electropolishing was greatly reduced. Removal of similar depths of the surface by grinding as were removed by electropolishing did not produce any appreciable increase in the ductility of the specimens. The ductility of specimens tested in the as-received surface condition and those having an electropolished surface exhibited a great sensitivity to deflection rate, the electropolished specimens being more ductile over the range of deflection rates tested. These exploratory results illustrated qualitatively the importance of surface condition on the room-temperature ductility of tungsten and indicated the importance of relatively fine scratches on the ductility of tungsten.

  9. The elastic behavior of ductile and compacted graphite cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzloff, Kyle Eric

    The elastic modulus of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron is difficult to measure due to a non-linear stress/strain relationship. The elastic region of the stress/strain diagram may not be linear as in Hooke's law, though the specimen exhibits pure elasticity. The curvature in the stress-strain relationship is caused by energy loss in the complex interaction between the graphite nodule and the matrix. The non-linear nature of the stress strain diagram of ductile and compacted graphite iron is explained by the mechanism of solid friction, which has been developed for gray cast iron. A method for accurately determining the zero modulus is proposed, investigated, and correlated to the microstructure. Multi-factor linear regression analysis was used to correlate microstructure, physical, and chemical properties to the elastic modulus; therefore, the elastic modulus can be predicted from microstructural, physical, and chemical data. The significant factors in the regression equation were density, nodularity percentage, and copper content. The effect of copper was found to play a role in determining the elastic modulus and this is contrary to the literature available. The exact mechanism by which the modulus is decreased is not fully understood, but the elastic modulus of the iron was lowered by up to 1 x 106 psi due to the effect of copper. The hysteresis loop of the stress/strain diagram was studied for tension-compression relationships considering the microstructure, stress level, and heat treatment. The surface area in contact with the nodule/matrix interface is proportional to the hysteresis width and this in turn is proportional to the damping capacity of the iron. The data supported the solid friction mechanism for the non-linear stress/strain relationship of ductile and compacted graphite iron. The effects of heat treatment on the density and the nodule/matrix interface were studied in detail. When normalizing ductile or compacted graphite iron the transfer

  10. Localized ductile deformation in the Rieserferner Pluton (Eastern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccato, Alberto; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    In the Rieserferner Pluton (Eastern Alps, 32±0.2 Ma, Romer et al., 2003) the post-magmatic cooling and exhumation stages were accompanied by a series of solid-state deformations including jointing, quartz veining, dyke emplacement, localized (cm-dm) ductile shearing and brittle-ductile faulting. The earliest stage of post-magmatic deformation includes the formation of pervasive steeply-dipping joints mainly arranged in two "conjugate" sets striking respectively E-W and NW-SE. These joints were extensively intruded by synkinematic aplite-pegmatite dykes and by quartz veins. Joints, veins and (locally) dikes were exploited as strike-slip ductile shear zones consistently with a WNW-ESE shortening. The mylonitized quartz veins are relatively coarse grained (mm-grain size) and show dominant dynamic recrystallization by grain boundary migration. A later set of joints is shallowly dipping E and is also commonly filled with quartz (and local epidote) veins. Ductile shearing of these vein-filled joints resulted in localized tonalite mylonites and quartz mylonites with a top-to-east kinematics. The quartz mylonites are fine grained (10-20 μm grain size) and resulted from dominant subgrain rotation recrystallization. The foliation of associated tonalite mylonites is marked by biotite+plagioclase+white mica+epidote±sphene±garnet. The "high-temperature" mylonites are crosscut by swarms of steeply-dipping fractures and faults striking N-S and showing a characteristic anastomosing-irregular pattern. These fractures are clustered in zones as large as 10 m and are associated with veins filled with calcite+white mica and with basic dykes (dated at 26 Ma: Steenken et al., 2000). Fluid-rock interactions along these fractures induced weakening and development of local low-temperature mylonites, where deformation mechanisms included pressure-solution and low-temperature plasticity of quartz. The orientation and kinematics of E-dipping mylonites and later low-temperature mylonites

  11. Achieving large uniform tensile ductility in nanocrystalline metals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y M; Ott, R T; Hamza, A V; Besser, M F; Almer, J; Kramer, M J

    2010-11-19

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy revealed the origin of different strain hardening behaviors (and dissimilar tensile ductility) in nanocrystalline Ni and nanocrystalline Co. Planar defect accumulations and texture evolution were observed in Co but not in Ni, suggesting that interfacial defects are an effective passage to promote strain hardening in truly nanograins. Twinning becomes less significant in Co when grain sizes reduce to below ~15 nm. This study offers insights into achieving excellent mechanical properties in nanocrystalline materials.

  12. Microstructure and fracture of alloyed austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Eric, Olivera; Rajnovic, Dragan; Zec, Slavica; Sidjanin, Leposava; Jovanovic, Milan T. . E-mail: tmsj@ptt.yu

    2006-12-15

    An investigation has been conducted on two austempered ductile irons alloyed with Cu and Cu + Ni, austenitized at 900 deg. C and austempered at 350 deg. C. The microstructure and fracture mode developed through these treatments have been identified by means of light and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Impact energy measurements were performed on un-notched Charpy specimens. The maximum value of retained austenite volume fraction observed in the material alloyed with Cu + Ni was higher than in that alloyed with Cu austenitized and austempered under the same conditions. This led to the material alloyed with Cu + Ni having higher impact energy and substantial plastic deformation.

  13. Ductile damage modeling based on void coalescence and percolation theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    A general model for ductile damage in metals is presented. It includes damage induced by shear stress as well as damage caused by volumetric tension. Spallation is included as a special case. Strain induced damage is also treated. Void nucleation and growth are included, and give rise to strain rate effects. Strain rate effects also arise in the model through elastic release wave propagation between damage centers. The underlying physics of the model is the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids in a plastically flowing solid. The model is intended for hydrocode based computer simulation. An experimental program is underway to validate the model.

  14. Modeling ductile dynamic fracture with ABAQUS/explicit

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.; Turner, C.

    1996-05-01

    This paper illustrates the use of advanced constitutive models in ABAQUS/Explicit together with highly focused finite element meshes to simulate the propagation of a fracture in a ductile medium. A double edge-cracked specimen under far field dynamic tensile loading is analyzed, and shows both rectilinear motion or unstable oscillatory motion of the crack depending on the material property constraints. Results are also presented for a simulation of ASTM`s standard fracture test E399. Comparisons of ABAQUS/Explicit results with experiments or other analytical/numerical results are made.

  15. On Key Factors Influencing Ductile Fractures of Dual Phase (DP) Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Liu, Wenning N.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-11-25

    In this paper, we examine the key factors influencing ductile failure of various grades of dual phase (DP) steels using the microstructure-based modeling approach. Various microstructure-based finite element models are generated based on the actual microstructures of DP steels with different martensite volume fractions. These models are, then, used to investigate the influence of ductility of the constituent ferrite phase and also the influence of voids introduced in the ferrite phase on the overall ductility of DP steels. It is found that with volume fraction of martensite in the microstructure less than 15%, the overall ductility of the DP steels strongly depends on the ductility of the ferrite matrix, hence pre-existing micro voids in the microstructure significantly reduce the overall ductility of the steel. When the volume fraction of martensite is above 15%, the preexisting voids in the ferrite matrix does not significantly reduce the overall ductility of the DP steels, and the overall ductility is more influenced by the mechanical property disparity between the two phases. The applicability of the phase inhomogeneity driven ductile failure of DP steels is then discussed based on the obtained computational results for various grades of DP steels, and the experimentally obtained scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures of the corresponding grades of DP steels near fracture surface are used as evidence for result validations.

  16. Nitrogen Impurity Gettering in Oxide Dispersion Ductilized Chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Anderson, Ian M; Weaver, Mark; Meyer III, Harry M; Walker, Larry R; Miller, Michael K; Larson, David James; Wright, Ian G; Sikka, Vinod K; Rar, Andrei; Pharr, George Mathews; Keiser, James R; Walls, Claudia Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    Work by Scruggs in the 1960s demonstrated that tensile ductility could be achieved at room temperature in powder metallurgically-produced Cr alloyed with MgO. During consolidation, much of the MgO converted to the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase, which was hypothesized to getter nitrogen from the Cr, rendering it ductile. We have duplicated this effect, achieving room temperature tensile elongations of 4% for hot-pressed Cr-6MgO-(0-1)Ti (wt.%) and 10% for hot-pressed and extruded Cr-6MgO-0.75Ti. Direct incorporation of nitrogen into the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase was not detected; however, impurities, particularly nitrogen and sulfur, were observed to segregate to and/or precipitate at interfaces between the MgO/MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases and the Cr matrix. Exploratory studies of other non-spinel forming oxide dispersions (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) showed a similar pattern of impurity segregation/precipitation, suggesting that there is nothing unique about spinel dispersions in Cr with regards to impurities. However, none of these other dispersions resulted in similar levels of tensile elongation.

  17. Effect of crack meandering on dynamic, ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, V.; Needleman, A.

    DYNAMIC crack growth is analyzed numerically for a plane strain edge cracked specimen subject to impulsive tensile loading at one end. An elastic—viscoplastic constitutive relation for a porous plastic solid is used to model ductile fracture by the nucleation and subsequent growth of voids to coalescence. Two populations of second-phase particles are represented: large inclusions with low strength, which result in large voids near the crack tip at an early stage, and small second-phase particles, which require large strains before cavities nucleate. Adiabatic heating due to plastic dissipation and the resulting thermal softening are accounted for in the analyses. Various two-dimensional distributions of the larger inclusions in front of the crack tip are considered, while the small second-phase particles are taken to be uniformly distributed. It is found that in most cases cracks grow in a zig-zag manner, dependent on the distribution of larger inclusions. Predictions for the dynamic crack growth behavior and for the time variation of crack tip characterizing parameters are obtained for each case analyzed. The computed crack growth paths and speeds are entirely based on the ductile failure predictions of the material model, so that the present study is free from ad hoc assumptions regarding appropriate dynamic crack growth criteria.

  18. Ductile damage parameters identification for cold metal forming applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Pierre-Olivier; Gachet, Jean-Marie; Roux, Emile

    2011-05-01

    Ductile damage mechanics is essential to predict failure during cold metal forming applications. Several damage models can be found in the literature. These damage models are coupled with the mechanical behavior so as to model the progressive softening of the material due to damage growth. However, the identification of damage parameters remains an issue. In this paper, an inverse analysis approach is set-up to identify ductile damage parameters, based on different kind of mechanical tests and observables. The Lemaitre damage model is used and damage is coupled with the material behavior. The Efficient Global Optimization (EGO) method is used in a parallel environment. This global algorithm based on kriging meta-model enables the identification of a set of damage parameters based on experimental observables. Global and local observables are used to identify these parameters and a special attention is paid to the computation of the cost function. Finally, an identification procedure based on displacement field measurements is presented and applied for damage parameters identification.

  19. Significance of grain sliding mechanisms for ductile deformation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, A.; Bourcier, M.; Gaye, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J.; Ludwig, W.

    2013-12-01

    Ductile shear zones at depth present polyphase and heterogeneous rocks and multi-scale strain localization patterns. Most strain concentrates in ultramylonitic layers, which exhibit microstructural signatures of several concomitant deformation mechanisms. The latter are either active in volume (dislocation creep), or in the vicinity and along interfaces (grain sliding and solution mass transfer). Because their chronology of appearance and interactions are unclear, inference of the overall rheology seems illusory. We have therefore characterized over a decade the rheology of synthetic lower crustal materials with different compositions and fluid contents, and for various microstructures. Non-Newtonian flow clearly related to dominant dislocation creep. Conversely, Newtonian behavior involved grain sliding mechanisms, but crystal plasticity could be identified as well. In order to clarify the respective roles of these mechanisms we underwent a multi-scale investigation of the ductile deformation of rock analog synthetic halite with controlled microstructures. The mechanical tests were combined with in-situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X ray computed tomography, allowing for digital image correlation (DIC) techniques and retrieval of full strain field. Crystal plasticity dominated, as evidenced by physical slip lines and DIC computed slip bands. Crystal orientation mapping allowed to identify strongly active easy glide {110} <110> systems. But, all other slip systems were observed as well, and especially near interfaces, where their activity is necessary to accommodate for the plastic strain incompatibilities between neighboring grains. We also evidenced grain boundary sliding (GBS), which clearly occurred as a secondary, but necessary, accommodation mechanism. The DIC technique allowed the quantification of the relative contribution of each mechanism. The amount of GBS clearly increased with decreasing grain size. Finite element (FE) modeling

  20. Ductile-Phase-Toughened Tungsten for Plasma-Facing Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Kevin Hawkins

    A variety of processing approaches were employed to fabricate ductile-phase-toughened (DPT) tungsten (W) composites. Mechanical testing and analytical modeling were used to guide composite development. This work provides a basis for further development of W composites to be used in structural divertor components of future fusion reactors. W wire was tested in tension, showing significant ductility and strength. Coatings of copper (Cu) or tungsten carbide (WC) were applied to the W wire via electrodeposition and carburization, respectively. Composites were fabricated using spark plasma sintering (SPS) to consolidate W powders together with each type of coated W wire. DPT behavior, e.g. crack arrest and crack bridging, was not observed in three-point bend testing of the sintered composites. A laminate was fabricated by hot pressing W and Cu foils together with W wires, and subsequently tested in tension. This laminate was bonded via hot pressing to thick W plate as a reinforcing layer, and the composite was tested in three-point bending. Crack arrest was observed along with some fiber pullout, but significant transverse cracking in the W plate confounded further fracture toughness analysis. The fracture toughness of thin W plate was measured in three-point bending. W plates were brazed with Cu foils to form a laminate. Crack arrest and crack bridging were observed in three-point bend tests of the laminate, and fracture resistance curves were successfully calculated for this DPT composite. An analytical model of crack bridging was developed using the basis described by Chao in previous work by the group. The model uses the specimen geometry, matrix properties, and the stress-displacement function of a ductile reinforcement ("bridging law") to calculate the fracture resistance curve (R-curve) and load-displacement curve (P-D curve) for any test specimen geometry. The code was also implemented to estimate the bridging law of an arbitrary composite using R-curve data

  1. Microstructural evolution in the HAZ of Inconel 718 and correlation with the hot ductility test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.; Genculu, S.

    1983-01-01

    The nickel-base alloy 718 was evaluated to study the role of preweld heat treatment in reducing or eliminating heat-affected zone hot cracking. Three heat treatments were studied using the Gleeble hot ductility test. A modified hot ductility test was also used to follow the evolution of microstructure during simulated welding thermal cycles. The microstructural evolution was correlated with the hot ductility data in order to evaluate the mechanism of hot cracking in alloy 718. The correlation of hot ductility with microstructure showed that recrystallization, grain growth, and dissolution of precipitates did not in themselves cause any loss of ductility during cooling. Ductility loss during cooling was not initiated until the constitutional liquation of NbC particles was observed in the microstructure. Laves-type phases were found precipitated in the solidified grain boundaries but were not found to correlate with any ductility loss parameter. Mechanisms are reviewed which help to explain how heat treatment controls the hot crack susceptibility of alloy 718 as measured in the hot ductility test.

  2. Microstructural evolution in the HAZ of Inconel 718 and correlation with the hot ductility test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.; Genculu, S.

    1983-01-01

    The nickel-base alloy 718 was evaluated to study the role of preweld heat treatment in reducing or eliminating heat-affected zone hot cracking. Three heat treatments were studied using the Gleeble hot ductility test. A modified hot ductility test was also used to follow the evolution of microstructure during simulated welding thermal cycles. The microstructural evolution was correlated with the hot ductility data in order to evaluate the mechanism of hot cracking in alloy 718. The correlation of hot ductility with microstructure showed that recrystallization, grain growth, and dissolution of precipitates did not in themselves cause any loss of ductility during cooling. Ductility loss during cooling was not initiated until the constitutional liquation of NbC particles was observed in the microstructure. Laves-type phases were found precipitated in the solidified grain boundaries but were not found to correlate with any ductility loss parameter. Mechanisms are reviewed which help to explain how heat treatment controls the hot crack susceptibility of alloy 718 as measured in the hot ductility test.

  3. High post-irradiation ductility thermomechanical treatment for precipitation strengthened austenitic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Laidler, James J.; Borisch, Ronald R.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1982-01-01

    A method for improving the post-irradiation ductility is described which prises a solution heat treatment following which the materials are cold worked. They are included to demonstrate the beneficial effect of this treatment on the swelling resistance and the ductility of these austenitic precipitation hardenable alloys.

  4. Formability Prediction of Advanced High Strength Steel with a New Ductile Fracture Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yanshan; Lim, Sungjun; Huh, Jeehyang; Huh, Hoon

    2011-08-01

    A ductile fracture criterion is newly proposed to accurately predict forming limit diagrams (FLD) of sheet metals. The new ductile fracture criterion is based on the effect of the non-dimensional stress triaxiality, the stress concentration factor and the effective plastic strain on the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids. The new ductile fracture criterion has been applied to estimate the formability of four kind advanced high strength steels (AHSS): DP780, DP980, TRIP590, and TWIP980. FLDs predicted are compared with experimental results and those predicted by other ductile fracture criteria. The comparison demonstrates that FLDs predicted by the new ductile fracture criterion are in better agreement with experimental FLDs than those predicted by other ductile fracture criteria. The better agreement of FLDs predicted by the new ductile fracture criterion is because conventional ductile fracture criteria were proposed for fracture prediction in bulk metal forming while the new one is proposed to predict the onset of fracture in sheet metal forming processes.

  5. Ductile Binder Phase For Use With Almgb14 And Other Hard Ceramic Materials

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Bruce A.; Russell, Alan; Harringa, Joel

    2005-07-26

    This invention relates to a ductile binder phase for use with AlMgB14 and other hard materials. The ductile binder phase, a cobalt-manganese alloy, is used in appropriate quantities to tailor good hardness and reasonable fracture toughness for hard materials so they can be used suitably in industrial machining and grinding applications.

  6. Highly ductile UV-shielding polymer composites with boron nitride nanospheres as fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuqiao; Huang, Yan; Meng, Wenjun; Wang, Zifeng; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-03-01

    Polymer composites with enhanced mechanical, thermal or optical performance usually suffer from poor ductility induced by confined mobility of polymer chains. Herein, highly ductile UV-shielding polymer composites are successfully fabricated. Boron nitride (BN) materials, with a wide band gap of around ∼6.0 eV, are used as fillers to achieve the remarkably improved UV-shielding performance of a polymer matrix. In addition, it is found that spherical morphology BN as a filler can keep the excellent ductility of the composites. For a comparison, it is demonstrated that traditional fillers, including conventional BN powders can achieve the similar UV-shielding performance but dramatically decrease the composite ductility. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is believed to be lubricant effects of BN nanospheres for sliding of polymer chains, which is in consistent with the thermal analyses. This study provides a new design to fabricate UV-shielding composite films with well-preserved ductility.

  7. Highly ductile UV-shielding polymer composites with boron nitride nanospheres as fillers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuqiao; Huang, Yan; Meng, Wenjun; Wang, Zifeng; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-03-20

    Polymer composites with enhanced mechanical, thermal or optical performance usually suffer from poor ductility induced by confined mobility of polymer chains. Herein, highly ductile UV-shielding polymer composites are successfully fabricated. Boron nitride (BN) materials, with a wide band gap of around ∼6.0 eV, are used as fillers to achieve the remarkably improved UV-shielding performance of a polymer matrix. In addition, it is found that spherical morphology BN as a filler can keep the excellent ductility of the composites. For a comparison, it is demonstrated that traditional fillers, including conventional BN powders can achieve the similar UV-shielding performance but dramatically decrease the composite ductility. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is believed to be lubricant effects of BN nanospheres for sliding of polymer chains, which is in consistent with the thermal analyses. This study provides a new design to fabricate UV-shielding composite films with well-preserved ductility.

  8. A new insight into ductile fracture of ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloys

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hailiang; Tieu, A. Kiet; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Xiong; Liu, Mao; Godbole, Ajit; Kong, Charlie; Qin, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that when coarse-grained metals undergo severe plastic deformation to be transformed into nano-grained metals, their ductility is reduced. However, there are no ductile fracture criteria developed based on grain refinement. In this paper, we propose a new relationship between ductile fracture and grain refinement during deformation, considering factors besides void nucleation and growth. Ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloy sheets were fabricated using different rolling techniques at room and cryogenic temperatures. It is proposed for the first time that features of the microstructure near the fracture surface can be used to explain the ductile fracture post necking directly. We found that as grains are refined to a nano size which approaches the theoretical minimum achievable value, the material becomes brittle at the shear band zone. This may explain the tendency for ductile fracture in metals under plastic deformation. PMID:25851228

  9. Experimental strain of isothermal remanent magnetization in ductile sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Mothersill, John S.

    A macroscopically ductile sandstone, to which a homogeneous isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) was applied, has been deformed at 150 MPa confining pressure and constant strain rate of 10 -5 s -1. Hydrostatic compaction does not produce a deflection of the IRM vector although it is reduced in intensity. Pure shear producing shortening in the range 2 to 35% steadily reduces the intensity of magnetization but also homogeneously rotates the remanence vector toward the plane of flattening. The amount of rotation is slightly less than that expected for a non-material line undergoing homogeneous strain. Deformation selectively removes weakly coercive components of remanence, as revealed by alternating field (AF) demagnetization. During deformation a weak deformational viscous remanent magnetization (DVRM) is acquired from the pressure vessel. This is different from a conventional viscous remanent magnetization (VRM) in that it is not acquired when the specimen is subject to hydrostatic confining pressure alone, even for periods three times longer than the longest deformation test.

  10. Development of New Cryocooler Regenerator Materials-Ductile Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Gschneidner; A.O. Pecharsky; V.K. Pecharsky

    2004-09-30

    The volumetric heat capacities of a number of binary and ternary Er- and Tm-based intermetallic compounds, which exhibited substantial ductilities, were measured from {approx}3 to {approx}350 K. They have the RM stoichiometry (where R = Er or Tm, and M is a main group or transition metal) and crystallize in the CsCl-type structure. The heat capacities of the Tm-based compounds are in general larger than the corresponding Er-based materials. Many of them have heat capacities which are significantly larger than those of the low temperature (<15 K) prototype cryocooler regenerator materials HoCu{sub 2}, Er{sub 3}Ni and ErNi. Utilization of the new materials as regenerators in the various cryocoolers should improve the performance of these refrigeration units for cooling below 15 K.

  11. A Microscale Model for Ausferritic Transformation of Austempered Ductile Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardo, Adrián D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new metallurgical model for the ausferritic transformation of ductile cast iron. The model allows predicting the evolution of phases in terms of the chemical composition, austenitization and austempering temperatures, graphite nodule count, and distribution of graphite nodule size. The ferrite evolution is predicted according to the displacive growth mechanism. A representative volume element is employed at the microscale to consider the phase distributions, the inhomogeneous austenite carbon content, and the nucleation of ferrite subunits at the graphite nodule surface and at the tips of existing ferrite subunits. The performance of the model is evaluated by comparison with experimental results. The results indicate that the increment of the ausferritic transformation rate, which is caused by increments of austempering temperature and graphite nodule count, is adequately represented by this model.

  12. Ductile-to-brittle transition in spallation of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Ling, Z.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-10-14

    In this paper, the spallation behavior of a binary metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. With increasing the impact velocity, micro-voids induced by tensile pulses become smaller and more concentrated. The phenomenon suggests a ductile-to-brittle transition during the spallation process. Further investigation indicates that the transition is controlled by the interaction between void nucleation and growth, which can be regarded as a competition between tension transformation zones (TTZs) and shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale. As impact velocities become higher, the stress amplitude and temperature rise in the spall region increase and micro-structures of the material become more unstable. Therefore, TTZs are prone to activation in metallic glasses, leading to a brittle behavior during the spallation process.

  13. Ductile tungsten-nickel alloy and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Jr., William B.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a ductile, high-density tungsten-nickel alloy which possesses a tensile strength in the range of 100,000 to 140,000 psi and a tensile elongation of 3.1 to 16.5 percent in 1 inch at 25.degree.C. This alloy is prepared by the steps of liquid phase sintering a mixture of tungsten-0.5 to 10.0 weight percent nickel, heat treating the alloy at a temperature above the ordering temperature of approximately 970.degree.C. to stabilize the matrix phase, and thereafter rapidly quenching the alloy in a suitable liquid to maintain the matrix phase in a metastable, face-centered cubic, solid- solution of tungsten in nickel.

  14. The Brittle-Ductile Transition - A Self-Consistent Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, B.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Ord, A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in the Earth is commonly viewed as a switch between two different constitutive behaviors, plastic and viscous, and is represented in models by various formulations. We show that thermal-mechanical coupling leads to a self consistent view where the BDT emerges naturally within one constitutive framework once a critical temperature is attained. Viscous folding occurs above this temperature and brittle fracturing below. Seismic activity is maximised at the BDT. Orogenesis emerges as a thermal-mechanical decoupling near the BDT during flexing of the lithosphere with the development of "crocodile" -like structures, fold-nappe systems and far-travelled thrust sheets. For quartz- feldspar composite materials this transition lies in a critical range of 500 K to 580 K.

  15. Tensile properties of austempered ductile iron under thermomechanical treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Achary, J.

    2000-02-01

    A new processing method was investigated for improving the strength and elongation of austempered ductile iron (ADI) by grain refinement of parent austenite using thermomechanical treatment. The material was deformed at the austenitization temperature by single and multipass rolling before the austempering treatment. The effects of the amount of deformation, austenitization temperature, austempering temperatures, reaustenitization, and secondary deformation on the tensile properties were studied. The properties obtained using the method were compared with those of the ASTM standards. The effect of deformation on the graphite shape was also studied. Tensile strength/yield strength/elongation values were found to increase with increasing austenite deformation up to 40% and then to start decreasing. Tensile strength/yield strength and elongation values of 1,700 MPa/1,300 MPa/5% and 1,350 MPa/920 MPa/15% can be achieved with this method in the ranges of variables studied.

  16. A stereological analysis of ductile fracture by microvoid coalescence

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, J.H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A stereological analysis for ductile fracture by microvoid coalescence is presented based upon the model of Widgery and Knott which postulates that microvoids link with a propagating crack if they lie within a certain interaction distance of its plane. A 3- dimensional analytical expression for dimple density and shape is developed from this model using projected image relationships for a thin slab. Void nucleation and growth are incorporated into the analysis using numerical integration of the Rice-Tracey growth equation over the appropriate strain range. An evaluation of the stereological approach is given using tensile data from a spheroidized 1045 steel to predict the effect of hydrostatic pressure upon the dimple density. The analysis, which is consistent with observed correlations between dimple density and second phase particle density, is shown to provide an estimate of dimple size and microroughness parameter used in local stain models for microvoid coalescence. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Bending Fatigue Strength of Austempered Ductile Iron Spur Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Masashi; Tamura, Ryo; Inoue, Katsumi; Narita, Yukihito

    This paper deals with an experimental evaluation of bending fatigue strength for austempered ductile iron (ADI) spur gears. The module is 2.5 and the number of teeth is 26 in the test gears. The material of the test gears corresponds to Japan Industrial Standard (JIS) FCAD1100-15. Some gears are processed by one of two types of fine particle bombarding (FPB). The surface roughness is slightly increased by FPB. The obtained strengths are 623 MPa for the as-austempered gears, and 1011 and 1085 MPa for the gears after FPB. The strength is expressed by the fillet stress level, which is calculated by FEM. The strength of a gear with the same dimensions made of carburized SCr420H alloy steel is 1205 MPa, and the strength of the ADI gear is approximately half that of the carburized steel gear. The FPB process has a significant effect on the ADI gear, improving its strength by 62-74%.

  18. Boudinage and folding as an energy instability in ductile deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Herwegh, Marco; Paesold, Martin K.; Poulet, Thomas; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Veveakis, Manolis

    2016-05-01

    We present a theory for the onset of localization in layered rate- and temperature-sensitive rocks, in which energy-related mechanical bifurcations lead to localized dissipation patterns in the transient deformation regime. The implementation of the coupled thermomechanical 2-D finite element model comprises an elastic and rate-dependent von Mises plastic rheology. The underlying system of equations is solved in a three-layer pure shear box, for constant velocity and isothermal boundary conditions. To examine the transition from stable to localized creep, we study how material instabilities are related to energy bifurcations, which arise independently of the sign of the stress conditions imposed on opposite boundaries, whether in compression or extension. The onset of localization is controlled by a critical amount of dissipation, termed Gruntfest number, when dissipative work by temperature-sensitive creep translated into heat overcomes the diffusive capacity of the layer. Through an additional mathematical bifurcation analysis using constant stress boundary conditions, we verify that boudinage and folding develop at the same critical Gruntfest number. Since the critical material parameters and boundary conditions for both structures to develop are found to coincide, the initiation of localized deformation in strong layered media within a weaker matrix can be captured by a unified theory for localization in ductile materials. In this energy framework, neither intrinsic nor extrinsic material weaknesses are required, because the nucleation process of strain localization arises out of steady state conditions. This finding allows us to describe boudinage and folding structures as the same energy attractor of ductile deformation.

  19. Fracture mechanisms in multilayer phosphorene assemblies: from brittle to ductile.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Zeng, Xiaowei; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2017-05-24

    The outstanding mechanical performance of nacre has stimulated numerous studies on the design of artificial nacres. Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material, has a crystalline in-plane structure and non-bonded interaction between adjacent flakes. Therefore, multi-layer phosphorene assemblies (MLPs), in which phosphorene flakes are piled up in a staggered manner, may exhibit outstanding mechanical performance, especially exceptional toughness. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the dependence of the mechanical properties on the overlap distance between adjacent phosphorene layers and the number of phosphorene flakes per layer. The results indicate that when the flake number is equal to 1, a transition of fracture patterns is observed by increasing the overlap distance, from a ductile failure controlled by interfacial friction to a brittle failure dominated by the breakage of covalent bonds inside phosphorene flakes. Moreover, the failure pattern can be tuned by changing the number of flakes in each phosphorene layer. The results imply that the ultimate strength follows a power law with the exponent -0.5 in terms of the flake number, which is in good agreement with our analytical model. Furthermore, the flake number in each phosphorene layer is optimized as 2 when the temperature is 1 K in order to potentially achieve both high toughness and strength. Moreover, our results regarding the relations between mechanical performance and overlap distance can be explained well using a shear-lag model. However, it should be pointed out that increasing the temperature of MLPs could cause the transition of fracture patterns from ductile to brittle. Therefore, the optimal flake number depends heavily on temperature to achieve both its outstanding strength and toughness. Overall, our findings unveil the fundamental mechanism at the nanoscale for MLPs as well as provide a method to design phosphorene-based structures with targeted properties

  20. A multi-surface plasticity model for ductile fracture simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keralavarma, Shyam M.

    2017-06-01

    The growth and coalescence of micro-voids in a material undergoing ductile fracture depends strongly on the loading path. Void growth occurs by diffuse plasticity in the material and is sensitive to the hydrostatic stress, while void coalescence occurs by the localization of plastic deformation in the inter-void ligaments under a combination of normal and shear stresses on the localization plane. In this paper, a micromechanics-based plasticity model is developed for an isotropic porous material, accounting for both diffuse and localized modes of plasticity at the micro-scale. A multi-surface approach is adopted, and two existing plasticity models that separately account for the two modes of yielding, above, are synthesized to propose an effective isotropic yield criterion and associated state evolution equations. The yield criterion is validated by comparison with quasi-exact numerical yield loci computed using a finite elements based limit analysis procedure. It is shown that the new criterion is in better agreement with the numerical loci than the Gurson model, particularly for large values of the porosity for which the loading path dependence of the yield stress is well predicted by the new model. Even at small porosities, it is shown that the new model predicts marginally lower yield stresses under low triaxiality shear dominated loadings compared to the Gurson model, in agreement with the numerical limit analysis data. Predictions for the strains to the onset of coalescence under proportional loading, obtained by numerically integrating the model, indicate that void coalescence tends to occur at relatively small plastic strain and porosity levels under shear dominated loadings. Implications on the prediction of ductility using the new model in fracture simulations are discussed.

  1. Development of ductile high-strength chromium alloys, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippi, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Strength and ductility were evaluated for chromium alloys dispersion hardened with the putative TaC, TaB, CbC, and CbB compounds. TaC and TaB proved to be the most potent strengtheners, but when combined, their effect far outweighed that produced individually. Tests at 1422 K (2100 F) on an alloy containing these two compounds at the combined level of 0.5 m/o revealed a 495 MN/sq m (70 ksi) tensile strength for wrought material, and a 100 hour rupture strength of 208 MN/sq m (30 ksi) when solution annealed and aged to maximize creep resistance. These levels of high temperature strength greatly exceed that reported for any other chromium-base alloy. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the two phase strengthened alloy occurred at approximately 588 K (600 F) when heat treated to optimize creep strength and was not improved by fabrication to produce a wrought and recovered microstructure. The lowest DBTT measured on any of the alloys investigated was 422 K (300 F). Strengthening phases actually formed in Cr-Ta-B and Cr-Cb-B compositions are probable M2CrB2 (M=Ta or Cb) compounds of tetragonal crystal structure. The likely habit relationship between these compounds and chromium is postulated. Cube habit coherency was identified for TaC precipitation in chromium by electron microscopy. In another study, the maximum solubility of carbon in chromium was indicated to lie between 3/4 and 1 a/o and that of boron to be 1/2 a/o.

  2. An experimental investigation of a limited-ductility intermetallic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David Alan

    The need for efficient testing to collect both greater quantities of data and data that are more useful is argued. This need arises from the many degrees-of-freedom typical in modern, stochastic, multi-scale, nonlinear, physics-based modeling. Novel techniques developed to acquire full-field displacement and strain fields are presented, building on previous work in this area. The two main areas of this experimental-mechanics effort concerned the development of techniques for (1) scanning across a region-of-interest (ROI) of a solid for better resolution of displacements and strains over a large area and (2) studying nonlinear behavior through the analysis of multiple images of the same ROI under different loading conditions. The application of the concepts and the experimental techniques discussed above to a representative alloy of an important class of materials, intermetallics, is presented. The limited ductility of this class of materials has been a hindrance to their wide applicability, but it is hoped that through the knowledge gained through this and similar efforts, a practical design system for these materials, heretofore elusive, can be developed. Efforts to model the behavior of these materials have been severely hampered by the lack of data previously available for verifying and calibrating the complex models that have been developed. Discussion of the utility of the concepts and techniques developed and their application to limited-ductility intermetallics are presented. A semi-empirical method for applying the results of this application to design is presented. In addition, it is argued that the concepts and techniques presented here are applicable to a wide variety of material systems. It is hoped that the general philosophy presented in the thesis and supported by its specific application to a significant class of materials will be an important model for the close integration of modeling and experimentation in the future.

  3. Neoarchean ductile deformation in the Northeastern North China Craton: The Shuangshanzi ductile shear zone in Qinglong area, eastern Heibei, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boran; Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Junlai; Jin, Wei; Li, Weimin; Liang, Chenyue

    2017-04-01

    Archean granitic gneiss domes and greenstone belts are well-preserved in eastern NCC, one of the oldest Archean terrains in the world. The Shuangshanzi ductile shear zone in Qinglong, eastern Hebei Province is located between an Archean granitic gneiss dome and a greenstone belt within an uplift in eastern NCC. Supracrustal rocks from the Neoarchean Shuangshanzi and Zhuzhangzi Groups were sheared, but some Archean granitic gneisses were also involved in the shearing along the eastern margin. In the southern part, the narrow NE-trending shear zone dips NW with dip angles of 40-60° and, in the northern part, the shear zone dips NWN with dip angles of 70-85°. Microstructural and EBSD fabric analyses suggest that the shear zone was developed at upper greenschist facies to lower amphibolite facies conditions with deformation temperatures of 400 to 550°C.LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages of mylonitized granitic rocks and undeformed quartz diorite cutting the shear zone suggest that the Shuangshanzi ductile shear zone was formed between 2550 Ma and 2452 Ma. Detailed kinematic studies of the shear zone show a clear sinistral shear sense with a slightly oblique-slip component in the northern part and a sinistral transtensional slip component in the southern part. It is therefore suggested that the shear zone was formed during the Anziling doming with respect to the down-slipping Neoarchean Shuangshanzi and Zhuzhangzi Groups. The difference in kinematics along the southern and the northern sections is interpreted to be caused by the doming with an uneven clockwise spiral rotation. The BIF-rich supracrustal rocks have higher density than their neighboring granitic gneisses, and therefore can easily sink to form synclines by sagduction processes. The sagduction is mainly triggered by gravitational inversion of high density supracrustal rocks with respect to relatively light granitic gneisses within the dome. As a result, the gneisses synchronously moved upward. A shear zone was

  4. Deformation twinning in ordered alloys transformation induced ductility in intermetallics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goo, E.

    1992-09-01

    Intermetallics, which are ordered alloys, have excellent high temperature strength. Unfortunately a universal problem facing intermetallics is the lack of ductility. This program attempted to look at some novel solutions for enhancing ductility in intermetallics. Deformation twinning has been demonstrated in TiNi to be responsible for its ductility. This was a surprising result since twinning was not believed to occur readily in ordered alloys. Furthermore the twinning occurred on a (114) plane which had not been previously observed. Research into determining the mechanisms for twinning in ordered alloy and understanding how twinning enhances the ductility of intermetallic was studied. Martensitic transformations in many intermetallics also provides a possible means of enhancing ductility. The detwinning of martensite twins or transformation induced martensite provides a mechanism for accommodating large strains. It is known that a metastable martensitic phase may be created by quenching a non-stoichiometric NiAl alloy. This presents the potential of substantial ductility in NiAl. Investigation of the martensitic phase transformation and its effect on the ductility of NiAl alloys was investigated.

  5. Deformation twinning in ordered alloys transformation induced ductility in intermetallics. [TiNi; NiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Goo, E.

    1992-09-01

    Intermetallics, which are ordered alloys, have excellent high temperature strength. Unfortunately a universal problem facing intermetallics is the lack of ductility. This program attempted to look at some novel solutions for enhancing ductility in intermetallics. Deformation twinning has been demonstrated in TiNi to be responsible for its ductility. This was a surprising result since twinning was not believed to occur readily in ordered alloys. Furthermore the twinning occurred on a (114) plane which had not been previously observed. Research into determining the mechanisms for twinning in ordered alloy and understanding how twinning enhances the ductility of intermetallic was studied. Martensitic transformations in many intermetallics also provides a possible means of enhancing ductility. The detwinning of martensite twins or transformation induced martensite provides a mechanism for accommodating large strains. It is known that a metastable martensitic phase may be created by quenching a non-stoichiometric NiAl alloy. This presents the potential of substantial ductility in NiAl. Investigation of the martensitic phase transformation and its effect on the ductility of NiAl alloys was investigated.

  6. Ductility demands on buckling-restrained braced frames under earthquake loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, Larry A.; Sause, Richard; Ricles, James M.; Lu, Le-Wu

    2003-12-01

    Accurate estimates of ductility demands on buckling-restrained braced frames (BRBFs) are crucial to performance-based design of BRBFs. An analytical study on the seismic behavior of BRBFs has been conducted at the ATLSS Center, Lehigh University to prepare for an upcoming experimental program. The analysis program DRAIN-2DX was used to model a one-bay, four-story prototype BRBF including material and geometric nonlinearities. The buckling-restrained brace (BRB) model incorporates both isotropic and kinematic hardening. Nonlinear static pushover and time-history analyses were performed on the prototype BRBF. Performance objectives for the BRBs were defined and used to evaluate the time-history analysis results. Particular emphasis was placed on global ductility demands and ductility demands on the BRBs. These demands were compared with anticipated ductility capacities. The analysis results, along with results from similar previous studies, are used to evaluate the BRBF design provisions that have been recommended for codification in the United States. The results show that BRB maximum ductility demands can be as high as 20 to 25. These demands significantly exceed those anticipated by the BRBF recommended provisions. Results from the static pushover and time-history analyses are used to demonstrate why the ductility demands exceed those anticipated by the recommended provisions. The BRB qualification testing protocol contained in the BRBF recommended provisions is shown to be inadequate because it requires only a maximum ductility demand of at most 7.5. Modifications to the testing protocol are recommended.

  7. Hot Ductility Behavior of Boron Containing Microalloyed Steels with Varying Manganese Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Tobias; Senk, Dieter; Walpot, Raphael; Steenken, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The hot ductility is measured for six different steel grades with different microalloying elements and with varying manganese contents using the hot tensile test machine with melting/solidification unit at the Department of Ferrous Metallurgy RWTH Aachen University. To identify the influence of manganese on hot ductility, tests are performed with varying the manganese content from 0.7 to 18.2 wt pct, a high manganese steel. Additionally, the effect of different cooling and strain rates is analyzed by changing the particular rate for selected samples in the minima. To investigate and detect the cause of cracking during testing, the fracture surfaces in the ductility minima are considered with scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thermodynamic modeling is conducted on basis of the commercial software ThermoCalc©. A sharp decrease of the hot ductility is recognizable at 1398 K (1125 °C), at only 0.7 wt pct manganese because of the low manganese to sulfur ratio. The grades with a Mn content up to 1.9 wt pct show a good ductility with minimal ductility loss. In comparison, the steel grade with 18.2 wt pct has a poor hot ductility. Because of the formation of complex precipitates, where several alloying elements are involved, the influence of boron on hot ductility is not fully clarified. By increasing the cooling rate, the reduction of area values are shifted to smaller values. For high test temperatures, these measured values are decreased for lower strain rates. Thereby, an early drop of the ductility is noticeable for the high temperatures around 1373 K (1100 °C).

  8. Heterogeneous multi-layered IF steel with simultaneous high strength and good ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Jiang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yuhui; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Yonghong; Huang, Tianlin; Wu, Guilin

    2017-07-01

    Multi-layered IF steel samples were designed and fabricated by hot compression followed by cold forging of an alternating stack of cold-rolled and annealed IF steel sheets, with an aim to improve the strength of the material without losing much ductility. A very good combination of strength and ductility was achieved by proper annealing after deformation. Microstructural analysis by electron back-scatter diffraction revealed that the good combination of strength and ductility is related to a characteristic hierarchical structure that is characterized by layered and lamella structures with different length scales.

  9. Tuning ideal tensile strengths and intrinsic ductility of bcc refractory alloys.

    PubMed

    Qi, Liang; Chrzan, D C

    2014-03-21

    An important theoretical ductility criterion for group V and VI metal-based refractory alloys in body-centered cubic (bcc) lattices is the mechanical failure mode of their perfect crystals under tension along the weakest direction [100]. Pure Mo and W fail by cleavage and are deemed intrinsically brittle. However, first-principles calculations show that alloying with group IV or V transition metals can transform these materials into ones that display intrinsically ductile behavior, failing in shear under [100] tension. Remarkably, this transition can be understood as an electron filling effect with the intrinsically ductile response the manifestation of a Jahn-Teller distortion.

  10. Quantification of damage evolution for a micromechanical model of ductile fracture in spallation of tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.; Tonks, D.L.; Hixon, R.; Addessio, F.

    1997-05-01

    The authors present quantification of micromechanical features such as voids that comprise the ductile fracture obtained under uniaxial strain condition in a spall test of commercial purity tantalum. Two evolutionary parameters of ductile fracture void formation are quantified: (i) the void volume fraction (porosity) and its distribution with respect to the distance from the main spall fracture plane, and (ii) void diameter distribution. The results complement the discussion of the implications of void clustering and linking for micromechanical modeling of ductile fracture as presented in a paper by D. L. Tonks et al. in this volume.

  11. Ductile Deformation of Dehydrating Serpentinite Evidenced by Acoustic Signal Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasc, J.; Hilairet, N.; Wang, Y.; Schubnel, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentinite dehydration is believed to be responsible for triggering earthquakes at intermediate depths (i.e., 60-300 km) in subduction zones. Based on experimental results, some authors have proposed mechanisms that explain how brittle deformation can occur despite high pressure and temperature conditions [1]. However, reproducing microseismicity in the laboratory associated with the deformation of dehydrating serpentinite remains challenging. A recent study showed that, even for fast dehydration kinetics, ductile deformation could take place rather than brittle faulting in the sample [2]. This latter study was conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus without the ability to control differential stress during dehydration. We have since conducted controlled deformation experiments in the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) on natural serpentinite samples at sector 13 (GSECARS) of the APS. Monochromatic radiation was used with both a 2D MAR-CCD detector and a CCD camera to determine the stress and the strain of the sample during the deformation process [3]. In addition, an Acoustic Emission (AE) recording setup was used to monitor the microseismicity from the sample, using piezo-ceramic transducers glued on the basal truncation of the anvils. The use of six independent transducers allows locating the AEs and calculating the corresponding focal mechanisms. The samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-5-10-4 s-1 under confining pressures of 3-5 GPa. Dehydration was triggered during the deformation by heating the samples at rates ranging from 5 to 60 K/min. Before the onset of the dehydration, X-ray diffraction data showed that the serpentinite sustained ~1 GPa of stress which plummeted when dehydration occurred. Although AEs were recorded during the compression and decompression stages, no AEs ever accompanied this stress drop, suggesting ductile deformation of the samples. Hence, unlike many previous studies, no evidence for fluid embrittlement and anticrack generation was found

  12. Quantifying Damage Accumulation During Ductile Plastic Deformation Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Robert M.; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2015-08-15

    Under this grant, we have developed and demonstrated the ability of near-field High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (nf-HEDM) to map crystal orientation fields over three dimensions in deformed polycrystalline materials. Experimental work was performed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at beamline 1-ID. Applications of this new capability to ductile deformation of copper and zirconium samples were demonstrated as was the comparison of the experimental observations to computational plasticity models using a fast Fourier transform based algorithm that is able to handle the large experimental data sets. No such spatially resolved, direct comparison between measured and computed microstructure evolutions had previously been possible. The impact of this work is reflected in numerous publications and presentations as well as in the investments by DOE and DOD laboratories of millions of dollars in applying the technique, developing sophisticated new hardware that allows the technique to be applied to a wide variety of materials and materials problems, and in the use of the technique by other researchers. In essence, the grant facilitated the development of a new form of three dimensional microscopy and its application to technologically critical states of polycrystalline materials that are used throughout the U.S. and world economies. On-going collaborative work is further optimizing experimental and computational facilities at the APS and is pursuing expanded facilities.

  13. Fracture toughness in Mode I (GIC) for ductile adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, P.; Carbas, RJC; Campilho, RDSG; Abenojar, J.; Martínez, MA; Silva LFM, da

    2017-05-01

    Works carried out in this publication belong to a project that seeks the replacement of welded joints by adhesive joints at stress concentration nodes in bus structures. Fracture toughness in Mode I (GIC) has been measured for two different ductile adhesives, SikaTack Drive and SikaForce 7720. SikaTack Drive is a single-component polyurethane adhesive with high viscoelasticity (more than 100%), whose main use is the car-glass joining and SikaForce 7720 is double-component structural polyurethane adhesive. Experimental works have been carried out from the test called Double Cantilever Beam (DCB), using two steel beams as adherents and an adhesive thickness according to the problem posed in the Project, of 2 and 3 mm for SikaForce 7720 and SikaTack Drive, respectively. Three different methods have been used for measuring the fracture toughness in mode I (GIC) from the values obtained in the experimental DCB procedure for each adhesive: Corrected Beam Theory (CBT), Compliance Calibration Method (CCM) and Compliance Based Beam Method (CBBM). Four DCB specimens have been tested for each adhesive. Dispersion of each GIC calculation method for each adhesive has been studied. Likewise variations between the three different methods have been also studied for each adhesive.

  14. Review on symmetric structures in ductile shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumyajit

    2017-07-01

    Symmetric structures in ductile shear zones range widely in shapes and geneses. Matrix rheology, its flow pattern, its competency contrast with the clast, degree of slip of the clast, shear intensity and its variation across shear zone and deformation temperature, and degree of confinement of clast in shear zones affects (independently) the degree of symmetry of objects. Kinematic vorticity number is one of the parameters that govern tail geometry across clasts. For example, symmetric and nearly straight tails develop if the clast-matrix system underwent dominantly a pure shear/compression. Prolonged deformation and concomitant recrystallization can significantly change the degree of symmetry of clasts. Angular relation between two shear zones or between a shear zone and anisotropy determines fundamentally the degree of symmetry of lozenges. Symmetry of boudinaged clasts too depends on competency contrast between the matrix and clast in some cases, and on the degrees of slip of inter-boudin surfaces and pure shear. Parasitic folds and post-tectonic veins are usually symmetric.

  15. Ultrahigh strength and ductility of metallic nanolayered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, Nathan Allan; Bhattacharyya, Dhriti; Dickerson, Pat; Hoagland, Richard; Misra, Amit

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the high strength of nanomaterials has gathered much interest in the materials community. Nanomaterials (polycrystalline and composites) have already been used, largely by the semiconductor community, as critical length scales for chip design have decreased to tens of nanometers. However, to ensure reliability of nanomaterials in almost any application, the mechanisms underlying their structural integrity must be well understood. For these materials to be put into service on a broader scale, not only should their strength be considered, but also ductility, toughness, formability, and fatigue resistance. While some progress has been made into constructing models for the deformation mechanisms governing these behaviors, the body of experimental knowledge is still limited, especially when length scales drop below 10 nanometers. This work produces stress-strain curves for nanolaminate composites with individual layer thickness of 40 nm and 5 run. Nanolaminate composites fabricated via magnetron sputtering comprised of alternating 5 nm thick Cu and Nb multilayers (two relatively soft metals) exhibit strengths on par with hardened tool steel and deformability in compression in excess of 25% [1]. The deformability of nanoscale composites is found to be limited by the onset of geometric instability, rather than due to intrinsic material behavior.

  16. Novel compaction resistant and ductile nanocomposite nanofibrous microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Homaeigohar, Seyed Shahin; Elbahri, Mady

    2012-04-15

    Despite promising filtration abilities, low mechanical properties of extraordinary porous electrospun nanofibrous membranes could be a major challenge in their industrial development. In addition, such kind of membranes are usually hydrophobic and non-wettable. To reinforce an electrospun nanofibrous membrane made of polyethersulfone (PES) mechanically and chemically (to improve wettability), zirconia nanoparticles as a novel nanofiller in membrane technology were added to the nanofibers. The compressive and tensile results obtained through nanoindentation and tensile tests, respectively, implied an optimum mechanical properties after incorporation of zirconia nanoparticles. Especially compaction resistance of the electrospun nanofibrous membranes improved significantly as long as no agglomeration of the nanoparticles occurred and the electrospun nanocomposite membranes showed a higher tensile properties without any brittleness i.e. a high ductility. Noteworthy, for the first time the compaction level was quantified through a nanoindentation test. In addition to obtaining a desired mechanical performance, the hydrophobicity declined. Combination of promising properties of optimum mechanical and surface chemical properties led to a considerably high water permeability also retention efficiency of the nanocomposite PES nanofibrous membranes. Such finding implies a longer life span and lower energy consumption for a water filtration process.

  17. Thermomechanical Fatigue of Ductile Cast Iron and Its Life Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; MacNeil, Ryan; Zhang, Zhong; Liu, Xiaoyang; Sloss, Clayton

    2015-06-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) behaviors of ductile cast iron (DCI) were investigated under out-of-phase (OP), in-phase (IP), and constrained strain-control conditions with temperature hold in various temperature ranges: 573 K to 1073 K, 723 K to 1073 K, and 433 K to 873 K (300 °C to 800 °C, 450 °C to 800 °C, and 160 °C to 600 °C). The integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT) model was incorporated into the finite element method to simulate the hysteresis behavior and predict the TMF life of DCI under those test conditions. With the consideration of four deformation/damage mechanisms: (i) plasticity-induced fatigue, (ii) intergranular embrittlement, (iii) creep, and (iv) oxidation, as revealed from the previous study on low cycle fatigue of the material, the model delineates the contributions of these physical mechanisms in the asymmetrical hysteresis behavior and the damage accumulation process leading to final TMF failure. This study shows that the ICFT model can simulate the stress-strain response and life of DCI under complex TMF loading profiles (OP and IP, and constrained with temperature hold).

  18. Mechanisms for Ductile Rupture - FY16 ESC Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, Brad L.; Carroll, Jay D.; Noell, Phillip; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Clark, Blythe G.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett C.

    2017-01-01

    Ductile rupture in metals is generally a multi-step process of void nucleation, growth, and coalescence. Particle decohesion and particle fracture are generally invoked as the primary microstructural mechanisms for room-temperature void nucleation. However, because high-purity materials also fail by void nucleation and coalescence, other microstructural features must also act as sites for void nucleation. Early studies of void initiation in high-purity materials, which included post-mortem fracture surface characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-voltage electron microscopy (HVEM) and in-situ HVEM observations of fracture, established the presence of dislocation cell walls as void initiation sites in high-purity materials. Direct experimental evidence for this contention was obtained during in-situ HVEM tensile tests of Be single crystals. Voids between 0.2 and 1 μm long appeared suddenly along dislocation cell walls during tensile straining. However, subsequent attempts to replicate these results in other materials, particularly α -Fe single crystals, were unsuccessful because of the small size of the dislocation cells, and these remain the only published in-situ HVEM observations of void nucleation at dislocation cell walls in the absence of a growing macrocrack. Despite this challenge, other approaches to studying void nucleation in high-purity metals also indicate that dislocation cell walls are nucleation sites for voids.

  19. Theoretical and natural strain patterns in ductile simple shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingles, Jacques

    1985-06-01

    A simple empirical model representing the variation of shear strain throughout a simple shear zone allows us to determine the evolution of finite strain as well as the progressive shape changes of passive markers. Theoretical strain patterns (intensity and orientation of finite strain trajectories, deformed shapes of initially planar, equidimensional and non-equidimensional passive markers) compare remarkably well with patterns observed in natural and experimental zones of ductile simple shear (intensity and orientation of schistosity, shape changes of markers, foliation developed by deformation of markers). The deformed shapes of initially equidimensional and non-equidimensional passive markers is controlled by a coefficient P, the product of (1) the ratio between marker size and shear zone thickness (2) the shear gradient across the zone. For small values of P (approximately P < 2), the original markers change nearly into ellipses, while large values of P lead to " retort" shaped markers. This theoretical study also allows us to predict, throughout a simple shear zone, various relationships between the principal finite strain trajectory, planar passive markers and foliations developed by deformation of initially equidimensional passive markers.

  20. Neoarchean ductile deformation of the Northeastern North China Craton: The Shuangshanzi ductile shear zone in Qinglong, eastern Hebei, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boran; Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Junlai; Jin, Wei; Li, Weimin; Liang, Chenyue

    2017-05-01

    Archean granitic gneiss domes and greenstone belts are well-preserved in eastern North China Craton (NCC), one of the oldest Archean terrains in the world. The Shuangshanzi ductile shear zone in Qinglong, eastern Hebei Province is located between an Archean granitic gneiss dome and a greenstone belt within an uplift in eastern NCC. Supracrustal rocks from the Neoarchean Shuangshanzi and Zhuzhangzi Groups, and some Archean granitic gneisses were involved in the shearing along the eastern margin. In the southern part, the narrow NE-trending shear zone dips NW with dip angles of 40-60° and, in the northern part, the shear zone dips NWN with dip angles of 70-85°. Microstructural and EBSD fabric analyses suggest that the shear zone was developed at upper greenschist facies to lower amphibolite facies conditions with deformation temperatures of 400-550 °C. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating of mylonitized granitic rocks and undeformed quartz diorite cutting the shear zone suggest that the Shuangshanzi ductile shear zone was formed between 2550 Ma and 2452 Ma. Detailed kinematic studies of the shear zone show a clear sinistral shear sense with a slightly oblique-slip component in the northern part and a sinistral transtensional slip component in the southern part. It is therefore suggested that the shear zone was formed during the Anziling doming with respect to the down-slipping Neoarchean Shuangshanzi and Zhuzhangzi Groups. The difference in kinematics along the southern and the northern sections is interpreted to be caused by the doming with an uneven clockwise spiral rotation. The BIF-rich supracrustal rocks have higher density than their neighboring granitic gneisses, and therefore can easily sink to form synclines by sagduction processes. The sagduction is mainly triggered by gravitational inversion of high density supracrustal rocks with respect to relatively light granitic gneisses within the dome. As a result, the gneisses synchronously moved upward. A shear zone

  1. Work-Hardening Induced Tensile Ductility of Bulk Metallic Glasses via High-Pressure Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Pi, Dong-Hai; Setyawan, Albertus Deny Heri; Kato, Hidemi; Janecek, Milos; Kim, Yong Chan; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2015-04-01

    The mechanical properties of engineering materials are key for ensuring safety and reliability. However, the plastic deformation of BMGs is confined to narrow regions in shear bands, which usually result in limited ductilities and catastrophic failures at low homologous temperatures. The quasi-brittle failure and lack of tensile ductility undercut the potential applications of BMGs. In this report, we present clear tensile ductility in a Zr-based BMG via a high-pressure torsion (HPT) process. Enhanced tensile ductility and work-hardening behavior after the HPT process were investigated, focusing on the microstructure, particularly the changed free volume, which affects deformation mechanisms (i.e., initiation, propagation, and obstruction of shear bands). Our results provide insights into the basic functions of hydrostatic pressure and shear strain in the microstructure and mechanical properties of HPT-processed BMGs.

  2. Ductility behaviour of cubic titanium niobium nitride ternary alloy: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arockiasamy, M. L. S.; Sundareswari, M.; Rajagopalan, M.

    2016-02-01

    The ductility and hardness behaviour of NbxTi1-xN ( x = 0, .25, .5, .75 and 1) ternary alloy has been studied. Bulk modulus, Young's modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio and anisotropy energy have been calculated. Analysis of G/B and Cauchy's pressure shows that TiN is brittle in nature in good agreement with other theoretical results. Systematic addition of Nb with TiN shows that Nb.75Ti.25N is ductile. The charge density plot shows weak directional contours that enclose Ti and N due to the ductile behaviour of the alloy, namely Nb.75Ti.25N. The estimated hardness of Nb.75Ti.25N is 19.78 GPa, which is 70 % of hardness value of TiN (29.4 GPa) and thus addition of niobium enhances the ductility of TiN. The Debye temperature of the present alloy system is also reported.

  3. The effects of composition and thermal path on hot ductility of forging steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Brendan M.

    This work examines the effects of composition and thermal path on the hot ductility of several forging steels with varied aluminum and nitrogen content. The primary mechanisms and controlling factors related to hot ductility are identified with a focus on the role of precipitates and segregation. The unique thermal paths and solidification structures of large cross-section forging ingots are discussed. Hot ductility testing is performed in a manner that approximates industrial conditions experienced by large cross-section forging ingots. A computer model for precipitation of aluminum nitride and vanadium nitride in austenite is presented. Industrial material is examined for comparison to experimental findings. It is found that increased aluminum and nitrogen content coarsens the as-solidified structure. The combined effects of microsegregation and uphill diffusion during deformation allow for carbide precipitation at prior austenite grain boundaries which reduces the hot ductility.

  4. Alternating brittle and ductile response of coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Tanushree; Kulkarni, Yashashree

    2014-11-14

    Nanotwinned metals have opened exciting avenues for the design of high strength and high ductility materials. In this work, we investigate crack propagation along coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals using molecular dynamics. Our simulations reveal that alternating twin boundaries exhibit intrinsic brittleness and ductility owing to the opposite crystallographic orientations of the adjoining twins. This is a startling consequence of the directional anisotropy of an atomically sharp crack along a twin boundary that favors cleavage in one direction and dislocation emission from the crack tip in the opposite direction. We further find that a blunt crack exhibits ductility in all cases albeit with very distinct deformation mechanisms and yield strength associated with intrinsically brittle and ductile coherent twin boundaries.

  5. Ductile electroless Ni-P coating onto flexible printed circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenchang; Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Yurong; Mitsuzak, Naotoshi; Chen, Zhidong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a ductile electroless Ni-P coating on the flexible printed circuit board (FPCB) was prepared in an acidic nickel plating bath. The addition of dipropylamine (DPA) in electroless plating not only improves the ductility of the Ni-P coating, but also enhances the corrosion resistance. The further analysis reveals that the ductility improvement and enhancement of corrosion resistance for the Ni-P coating may be due to the fact that the addition of DPA significantly refines the volume of columnar nodule and reduce the porosity, thus leading to the released internal stress. In addition, it was found that the nodule within the Ni-P coating grew into a columnar structure, which may be also contribute to the improvement of ductility.

  6. Restoration of the ductility of thermally embrittled amorphous alloys under neutron-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerling, R.; Schimansky, F.P.; Wagner, R.

    1987-05-01

    The ductility of amorphous alloys which have been thermally embrittled at low temperatures can be completely regained after subsequent irradiation. These changes in the mechanical behaviour are strongly correlated with changes in the density. Using ribbons of amorphous FeNiB, FeNiP and CuTi exposed to different kinds of irradiation, it is shown that the ductility can be restored in all the glassy alloys studied regardless of the nature of the damaging projectiles employed. However, the damage-level required for restoration of the ductility depends on the state of embrittlement prior to the irradiation, and is strongly correlated with the type of irradiation. Experiments with specimens alternatively thermally embrittled and irradiated to become ductile again, revealed a high degree of reversibility of both processes.

  7. Effects of ductile phase additions on the fracture behavior and toughness of DRA composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, L.Y.; Lewandowski, J.J.; Hunt, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) composites have been processed to contain discrete regions of unreinforced aluminum with the objective of enhancing the damage tolerance. The effects of changes in the ductile phase size, shape and strength as well as the SiC{sub p} reinforcement distribution on the toughness were studied. The incorporation of the ductile phase can increase the crack growth resistance of the DRA composite. In such cases, stable crack propagation (i.e., R curve behavior) is observed in contrast to the behavior of the conventional DRA composite which fails catastrophically under the conditions tested. The level of toughening is affected by the size and mechanical properties of the ductile phase as well as the orientation and shape of the ductile regions with respect to the test geometry (i.e., crack arrestor vs crack divider).

  8. The effect of high temperature deformation on the hot ductility of niobium-microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarandi, Faramarz Mh

    Low hot ductility at the straightening stage of the steel continuous casting process, where the surface temperature ranges from 600 to 1200°C, is associated with transverse cracking on the billet surface. This is attributed to various microalloying elements, which are essential for the mechanical characteristics of the final products. Thermomechanical processing is a new approach to alleviate this problem. In this work, two grades of Nb-containing steel, one modified with B, were examined. In order to simulate the key parameters of continuous casting, specimens were melted in situ and subjected to thermal conditions similar to that occurring in a continuous casting mill. They were also deformed at different stages of the thermal schedule. Finally, the hot ductility was evaluated at the end of the thermal schedule, corresponding to the straightening stage in continuous casting at which the hot ductility problem occurs in the continuous casting process. The results showed that the presence of B is noticeably beneficial to the hot ductility. Failure mode analysis was performed and the mechanism of fracture was elaborated. As well, the potential mechanisms under which B can improve the hot ductility were proposed. Deformation during solidification (i.e. in the liquid + solid two phase region) led to a significant loss of hot ductility in both steels. By contrast, deformation in the delta-ferrite region, after solidification, was either detrimental or beneficial depending on the deformation start temperature. The hot ductility was considerably improved in the steel without B when deformation was applied during the delta → gamma transformation. The effect of such deformation on the other steel grade was not significant. Examination of the microstructure revealed that such improvement is related to a grain refinement in austenite. Therefore, the effect of deformation parameters was studied in detail and the optimum condition leading to the greatest improvement in the

  9. An investigation into the role of adhesion in the erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Existing theories of erosion of ductile metals based on cutting and deformation mechanisms predict no material removal at normal incidence which is contradictory to experience. Thus, other mechanisms may be involved. The possible role of adhesive material transfer during erosion is investigated by both single particle impingement experiments and erosion by streams of particles. Examination of the rebounding particles as well as the eroded surface yields evidence of a significant adhesive mechanism for the ductile metals investigated.

  10. Pin-On-Disc Characterization of Brass/Ferritic and Pearlitic Ductile Iron Rubbing Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, Melik

    2011-04-01

    Wear behaviour of special brass produced through two different methods (centrifugal and sand casting) was investigated. The wear tests were carried out at sliding velocities of 0.2 ms-1, 0.3 ms-1, 0.4 ms-1 and 0.5 ms-1 and under 10 N, 20 N, and 40 N variable loads. The sliding distance was 600 m for all the tests. A pin-on-disc device with round specimen inserts was used to conduct friction and wear tests in which the friction coefficient, the contact temperature and the linear wear of the tribo-pairs were continuously recorded against sliding distance. Two different materials were used as the counterparts, namely ferritic ductile iron equivalent to GGG40 and pearlitic ductile iron equivalent to GGG60. The microstructures and wear scars of the brass specimens were examined by optical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray microanalyses by EDAX. A correlation between hardness and wear volume rate was established for the investigated centrifugally cast and sand cast brass specimens. The volume rate of specimens produced by sand casting method was generally found to be higher than those of centrifugally cast specimens. Ferritic ductile counterpart led to higher wear volume rate than pearlitic ductile counterpart for the both specimens. Severe abrasive wear scars were observed for the sand cast specimens/ferritic ductile iron pair. However, severe adhesive wear took place for the centrifugally cast specimen/pearlitic ductile iron pair.

  11. Post-yield Strength and Dilatancy Evolution Across the Brittle-Ductile Transition in Indiana Limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, G.; Hedayat, A.; Kim, E.; Labrie, D.

    2017-07-01

    An extensive uniaxial and triaxial compression testing programme was performed on Indiana Limestone to assess its behaviour across the brittle-ductile transition. Particular attention has been paid to the post-yield evolution of strength and dilatancy. Specimens tested at σ 3 = 30 MPa displayed a fully ductile failure mechanism, whereas specimens tested at σ 3 = 15 MPa and σ 3 = 20 MPa displayed transitional mechanisms, which were neither fully brittle nor fully ductile. Based on an examination of failure localization and dilatancy characteristics, the stress at which crack volumetric strain begins to increase was found to be an indicator of individual specimen ductility. In contrast to less porous rocks, the reversal of total volumetric strain did not coincide with the onset of axial strain nonlinearity under unconfined conditions. With respect to post-yield strength, a major change in the rate of friction mobilization relative to plastic shear strain was observed across the brittle-ductile transition. The dilatancy of the specimens was also found to undergo a major change, with the plastic shear strains to mobilization of peak dilatancy in the ductile regime being approximately one order of magnitude higher than in the brittle regime.

  12. Effect of sulfur and magnesium on hot ductility and pitting corrosion for Inconel 690 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, S.; Zhu, Z.

    1995-12-31

    A series of hot tensile tests has been performed to study the effect of sulfur and magnesium on hot ductility of Inconel 690 alloy. The hot ductility has been evaluated from the reduction of area in hot tensile tests using a Gleeble testing machine. The value of reduction in area decreased with increasing sulfur content in the temperature range from 900 C to 1,200 C. When sulfur content was larger than 0.0025%, a ductility dip appeared, and the greater the sulfur content, the deeper and wider the ductility dip. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analyses showed that the fracture appearances changed gradually from transgranular to intergranular with increasing sulfur content, meanwhile sulfur and titanium segregation were observed at grain boundaries. The ductility dip of 690 alloy with relatively higher sulfur content could be inhibited by adding appropriate amount of magnesium. However, excessive addition led to magnesium precipitation, which was detrimental to hot ductility. The pitting test has also been conducted and the results showed that pitting rate obviously increased with increasing sulfur content.

  13. Evidence for lower crustal ductile strain localization in southern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.D.; Prescott, W.H.; Krueger, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Historic triangulation data have been analysed to determine whether intraplate seismicity is associated with ongoing ductile deformation in the lower crust. The model we have attempted to test is basically analogous to strain accumulation and release along plate-boundary strike-slip faults like the San Andreas Fault in California. That is, beneath an elastic-seismogenic upper crust ???20 km thick, strain is preferentially localized within ductile shear zones in the lower crust due to broad-scale plate driving forces. The localized lower-crustal ductile strain causes stress and strain to accumulate elastically in the brittle crust which is eventually released in crustal earthquakes. At greater depths, this localized shear deformation probably develops into pervasive ductile flow. Numerous geodetic measurements along the San Andreas Fault confirm that earthquakes in the brittle upper crust are produced by the release of elastic strain that results from ongoing ductile shear or slip in the lower crust1,2. We have found evidence of high rates of crustal deformation in southern New York which suggest that localized ductile shear is occurring in the lower crust. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Effects of Pore Distributions on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) Magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility. The results in this study show that the ductility monotonically decreases as the pore volume fraction increases and that the effect of ‘skin region’ on the ductility is noticeable under the condition of same local pore volume fraction in the center region of the sample and its existence can be beneficial for the improvement of ductility. The further synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element analyses are planned to investigate the effects of pore size and pore size distribution.

  15. Mapping the brittle-ductile transition in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Marone, C.; Elsworth, D.; Saffer, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Marcellus shale is the lowest unit of Devonian age in the Hamilton Group. It is an organic-rich shale located in the Appalachian Basin and contains an estimated ~1.4 trillion cubic meters of natural gas. The majority of gas is held in matrix pore space, with vertical fractures providing additional storage and acting as primary flow pathways. However, commercial production of the gas requires the use of directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing to generate additional permeable pathways. Understanding the response of the Marcellus to stresses created by horizontal drilling and more importantly by hydraulic fracturing is critical for wide-scale commercialization of the resource. We investigated the mechanical behavior of shales from the Marcellus formation, with an emphasis on understanding controls on its rheology and brittle-ductile behavior. Although black shale is the dominant lithology of the Marcellus, interbeds of low-density organic-rich shale and limestone are also present. We conducted experiments on three lithologies: 1) true “paper shale” (fissile, finely layered) with density ρ≈2.5 g/cm3 and porosity φ=6.3%, 2) a low density (ρ≈1.45 g/cm3) organic rich shale with porosity φ=39.2% (organic subunit 1), and 3) a lower density (ρ≈1.05 g/cm3) organic rich lithology with porosity φ=50.8% (organic subunit 2). We performed experiments on cylindrical samples 25-mm in diameter and 50-mm in length in a triaxial configuration (σ1≠σ2=σ3). Samples were deformed using both gas and water as pore fluid, using a displacement rate boundary condition (velocity of 0.1 to 10 μm/s corresponding to axial strain rates of 2.07e-4 s-1 to 1.63e-2 s-1), and under confining pressures ranging from 0 to 50 MPa. Additionally, we conducted permeability experiments with water (flow through) and helium gas (pulse) at an effective confining pressure of 10 MPa. Our experiments show brittle behavior for the fissile shale unit, including a peak in differential

  16. Design of engineered cementitious composites for ductile seismic resistant elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Tetsushi

    This dissertation focuses on designing Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) to achieve high performance seismic resistant elements. To attain this goal, three major tasks have been accomplished. Task 1 aims at achieving new ECCs involving low cost fiber, which often involve fiber rupture in crack bridging, thus named as "Fiber Rupture Type ECC". Achieving the new ECC requires a new practical and comprehensive composite design theory. For this theory, single fiber behavior was first investigated. Specifically, fiber rupture in composite and chemical bond in fiber/matrix interface were experimentally examined and mathematically modeled. Then this model for single fiber behavior was implemented into a proposed bridging law, a theoretical model for relationship between fiber bridging stress of composite and Crack Opening Displacement (COD). This new bridging law was finally employed to establish a new composite design theory. Task 2 was initiated to facilitate structural interpretation of ECC's material behavior investigated in Task 1. For this purpose, uniaxial tensile behavior, one of the most important ECC's properties, was theoretically characterized with stress-strain relation from micromechanics view point. As a result, a theory is proposed to express ECC's tensile stress-strain relation in terms of micromechanics parameters of composites, such as bond strengths. Task 3 primarily demonstrates an integrated design scheme for ductile seismic elements that covers from micromechanics in single fiber level to structural design tool, such as with non-linear FEM analysis. The significance of this design scheme is that the influences of ECC's microstructure on element's structural performance is quantitatively captured. This means that a powerful tool is obtained for tailoring constitutive micromechanics parameters in order to maximize structural performance of elements. While the tool is still preliminary, completing this tool in future studies will enable one to

  17. A mechanism-based approach to modeling ductile fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Hammi, Youssef; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Klein, Patrick A.; Foulk, James W., III; McFadden, Sam X.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile fracture in metals has been observed to result from the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids. The evolution of this damage is inherently history dependent, affected by how time-varying stresses drive the formation of defect structures in the material. At some critically damaged state, the softening response of the material leads to strain localization across a surface that, under continued loading, becomes the faces of a crack in the material. Modeling localization of strain requires introduction of a length scale to make the energy dissipated in the localized zone well-defined. In this work, a cohesive zone approach is used to describe the post-bifurcation evolution of material within the localized zone. The relations are developed within a thermodynamically consistent framework that incorporates temperature and rate-dependent evolution relationships motivated by dislocation mechanics. As such, we do not prescribe the evolution of tractions with opening displacements across the localized zone a priori. The evolution of tractions is itself an outcome of the solution of particular, initial boundary value problems. The stress and internal state of the material at the point of bifurcation provides the initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of the cohesive zone. The models we develop are motivated by in-situ scanning electron microscopy of three-point bending experiments using 6061-T6 aluminum and 304L stainless steel, The in situ observations of the initiation and evolution of fracture zones reveal the scale over which the failure mechanisms act. In addition, these observations are essential for motivating the micromechanically-based models of the decohesion process that incorporate the effects of loading mode mixity, temperature, and loading rate. The response of these new cohesive zone relations is demonstrated by modeling the three-point bending configuration used for the experiments. In addition, we survey other methods with the potential

  18. Steady crack growth through ductile metals: Computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, James C.

    This thesis examines the crack-front response during sustained ductile tearing in structural metals at quasistatic rates using high resolution finite element computations. At load levels approaching the steady-growth regime, well-established computational methods that model material damage break down numerically as vanishingly small load increments produce increasingly large amounts of crack extension. The computational model adopted here determines the deformation history of a steadily advancing crack directly without the need for a priori (transient) analysis that considers blunting of the pre-existing stationary crack and subsequent growth through the associated initial plastic zone. Crack extension occurs at the remotely applied, fixed loading without the need for a local growth criteria. This numerical scheme utilizes a streamline integration technique to determine the elastic-plastic fields, generalized from a two-dimensional to a fully three-dimensional setting and implemented within mixed Matlab/C++/F-90 based software. Modifications of the conventional finite element formulation lead to an efficient procedure -- readily parallelized -- and determine the invariant near-front fields, representative of steady-state growth, on a fixed mesh in a boundary-layer framework. In the small-scale yielding regime, the crack front does not sense the existence of remote boundaries, and computational results retain a strong transferability among various geometric configurations where near-front, plastic deformation remains entirely enclosed by the surrounding linear-elastic material. The global stress intensity factor (KI ) and imposed T-stress fully specify displacement constraints along the far-field boundary, and in a three-dimensional setting, the panel thickness reflects the only natural length scale. The initial studies in this work consider steady crack advance within the small-scale yielding context under plane-strain conditions and mode I loading. These analyses

  19. Hot Ductility Characterization of Sanicro-28 Super-Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, A.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Abedi, H. R.

    2016-05-01

    The hot ductility behavior of a super-austenitic stainless steel has been studied using tensile testing method in the temperature range from 1073 K to 1373 K (800 °C to 1100 °C) under the strain rates of 0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 s-1. The hot compression tests were also performed at the same deformation condition to identify the activated restoration mechanisms. At lower temperatures [ i.e., 1073 K and 1173 K (800 °C and 900 °C)], the serration of initial grain boundaries confirms the occurrence of dynamic recovery as the predominant restoration process. However, in the course of applied deformation, the initial microstructure is recrystallized at higher temperatures [ i.e., 1273 K and 1373 K (1000 °C and 1100 °C)]. In this respect, annealing the twin boundaries could well stimulate the recrystallization kinetic through initiation new annealing twins on prior annealing twin boundaries. The hot tensile results show that there is a general trend of increasing ductility by temperature. However, two regions of ductility drop are recognized at 1273 K and 1373 K (1000°C)/0.1s-1 and (1100°C)/0.01s-1. The ductility variations at different conditions of temperature and strain rate are discussed in terms of simultaneous activation of grain boundary sliding and restoration processes. The observed ductility troughs are attributed to the occurrence of grain boundary sliding and the resulting R-type and W-type cracks. The occurrence of dynamic recrystallization is also considered as the main factor increasing the ductility at higher temperatures. The enhanced ductility is primarily originated from the post-uniform elongation behavior, which is directly associated with the strain rate sensitivity of the experimental material.

  20. Two brittle ductile transitions in subduction wedges, as revealed by topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, C.; Brandon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction wedges contain two brittle ductile transitions. One transition occurs within the wedge interior, and a second transition occurs along the decollement. The decollement typically has faster strain rates, which suggests that the brittle ductile transition along the decollement will be more rearward (deeper) than the transition within the interior. However, the presence of distinct rheologies or other factors such as pore fluid pressure along the decollement may reverse the order of the brittle-ductile transitions. We adopt a solution by Williams et al., (1994) to invert for these brittle ductile transitions using the wedge surface topography. At present, this model does not include an s point or sediment loading atop the wedge. The Hellenic wedge, however, as exposed in Crete presents an ideal setting to test these ideas. We find that the broad high of the Mediterranean ridge represents the coulomb frictional part of the Hellenic wedge. The rollover in topography north of the ridge results from curvature of the down going plate, creating a negative alpha depression in the vicinity of the Strabo, Pliny, and Ionian 'troughs' south of Crete. A steep topographic rise out of these troughs and subsequent flattening reflects the brittle ductile transition at depth in both the decollement and the wedge interior. Crete exposes the high-pressure viscous core of the wedge, and pressure solution textures provide additional evidence for viscous deformation in the rearward part of the wedge. The location of the decollement brittle ductile transition has been previously poorly constrained, and Crete has never experienced a subduction zone earthquake in recorded history. Williams, C. A., et al., (1994). Effect of the brittle ductile transition on the topography of compressive mountain belts on Earth and Venus. Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth

  1. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of a Wear-Resistant Alloyed Ductile Iron Austempered at Various Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Junjun; Chen, Liqing

    2015-08-01

    To further improve the mechanical performance of a new type of alloyed bainitic wear-resistant ductile iron, the effects of the various austempering temperatures have been investigated on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of alloyed ductile iron Fe-3.50C-1.95Si-3.58Ni-0.71Cu-0.92Mo-0.65Cr-0.36Mn (in weight percent). This alloyed ductile iron were firstly austenitized at 1123 K (850 °C) for 1 hour and then austempered in a salt bath at 548 K, 573 K, and 598 K (275 °C, 300 °C, and 325 °C) for 2 hours according to time-temperature-transformation diagram calculated by JMatPro software. The microstructures of austempered wear-resistant ductile irons consist of matrix of dark needle-like ferrite plus bright etching austenite and some amount of martensite and some dispersed graphite nodules. With increasing the austempering temperature, the amount of ferrite decreases in austempered ductile iron, while the amount of austenite and carbon content of austenite increases. There is a gradual decrease in hardness and increase in compressive strength with increasing austempering temperature. The increased austenite content and coarsened austenite and ferrite can lead to a hardness decrease as austempering temperature is increased. The increased compressive strength can be attributed to a decreased amount of martensitic transformation. The alloyed ductile iron behaves rather well wear resistance when the austempering is carried out at 598 K (325 °C) for 2 hours. Under the condition of wear test by dry sand/rubber wheel, the wear mechanisms of austempered ductile irons are both micro-cutting and plastic deformation.

  2. Effects of Copper and Austempering on Corrosion Behavior of Ductile Iron in 3.5 Pct Sodium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Kuan-Ting

    2013-10-01

    Although alloying and heat treatments are common industrial practices to obtain ductile irons with desired mechanical properties, related information on how the two practices affect corrosion behavior is scarce. In this study, two ductile irons—with and without 1 wt pct copper addition—were austempered to obtain austempered ductile irons (ADIs). Polarization tests and salt spray tests were conducted to explore how both copper-alloying and austempering heat treatments influenced the corrosion behavior of ductile irons. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of 1 wt pct copper-alloyed ductile iron was better than that of the unalloyed one, while ADI had improved corrosion resistance compared with the as-cast. In particular, the ductile iron combined with the copper-alloying and austempering treatments increased the corrosion inhibition efficiency up to 84 pct as tested in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution.

  3. Evaluation of Zinc-Coated Ductile Iron Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Shipilov, Sergei A.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2016-09-30

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) received $1m in funding from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation in order to evaluate the performance of zinc-coated ductile iron pipe (DIP) in highly- and severely-corrosive soils. The project started in May 2016 and a final report will be issued March 31, 2017. The project is being led by the Corrosion Science and Technology Group in the Materials Science and Technology Division at ORNL. This interim report is based on the work performed by an ORNL multidisciplinary team in the last two months. The project has been broken down into four tasks. The first task is to characterize commercially available DIP. Specimens from the three major U.S. DIP manufacturers were purchased for this study via third party vendors and are being characterized. The second task is to evaluate available data on DIP corrosion in soils. The largest data set was collected by the National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) from 1910-1952 and included 95 different kinds of soil at 128 sites across the country. Because of the large amount of data and limited agreement on what defines “corrosive” soil, staff from the Computational Sciences and Engineering Division have been consulted and are currently analyzing the data using existing algorithms to look for trends between the corrosion rates and the various soil characteristics such as resistivity and pH. The third task is to develop a long-term test plan to evaluate DIP and the fourth task is to develop an accelerated test procedure to reduce the time required to evaluate soil corrosion by 1-2 orders of magnitude. By developing a better understanding of what makes a soil corrosive, including the chemical and physical properties, it may be possible to model the long-term behavior of DIP. A full report on the work will be submitted by the March 2017 deadline. It appears that a sustained, multi-year effort in this area would be of great benefit to the Bureau of Reclamation, to the DIP industry and to the country

  4. The development of a ductility-based aging model for low temperature aged U-6Nb alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, B

    2005-03-24

    This study focuses on the ductility evaluation of low-temperature (100 and 200 C) aged U-6Nb alloy. The objective is to develop a ductility-based aging model to improve lifetime prediction for weapon components in the stockpile environment. Literature review shows that the work hardening n-value and the strain-rate hardening mvalue are the two most important metallurgical factors for the uniform and the post-uniform (necking) ductility control, respectively. Unfortunately, both n and m values of the U-6Nb alloy are lacking. The study shows that the total ductility of U-6Nb is dominated by the uniform ductility, which deteriorates in both 100 C and 200 C aging. Further analysis shows that the uniform ductility correlates well with the work hardening n-value of the later stage deformation in which dislocation-slip is the mechanism. The kinetics of the loss of uniform ductility and the associated reduction in work-hardening n-value in low temperature aging will be used for the development of a ductility-based aging model. The necking ductility appears to be a minor but significant factor in the total ductility of U-6Nb. It does not show a clear trend due to large data scatter. The uncertain nature of necking failure may always hinder a reliable measurement of necking ductility. Consequently, a precise measurement of strain-rate hardening m-value could be a viable alternative to model the metallurgical contribution to the necking ductility. The conventional strain rate step-change method and the ABI (Automated-Ball-Indentation) test both show promising result in m-value measurement.

  5. Evading the strength–ductility trade-off dilemma in steel through gradient hierarchical nanotwins

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yujie; Li, Yongqiang; Zhu, Lianchun; Liu, Yao; Lei, Xianqi; Wang, Gang; Wu, Yanxin; Mi, Zhenli; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Huajian

    2014-01-01

    The strength–ductility trade-off has been a long-standing dilemma in materials science. This has limited the potential of many structural materials, steels in particular. Here we report a way of enhancing the strength of twinning-induced plasticity steel at no ductility trade-off. After applying torsion to cylindrical twinning-induced plasticity steel samples to generate a gradient nanotwinned structure along the radial direction, we find that the yielding strength of the material can be doubled at no reduction in ductility. It is shown that this evasion of strength–ductility trade-off is due to the formation of a gradient hierarchical nanotwinned structure during pre-torsion and subsequent tensile deformation. A series of finite element simulations based on crystal plasticity are performed to understand why the gradient twin structure can cause strengthening and ductility retention, and how sequential torsion and tension lead to the observed hierarchical nanotwinned structure through activation of different twinning systems. PMID:24686581

  6. Microtopography for Ductile Fracture Process Characterization - Part 1: Theory and Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Wilson Randolph

    2003-02-01

    The mechanics of ductile fracture is receiving increased focus as the importance of integrity of structures constructed from ductile materials is increasing. The non-linear, irreversible mechanical response of ductile materials makes generalized models of ductile cracking very difficult to develop. Therefore, research and testing of ductile fracture have taken a path leading to deformation-based parameters such as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) and crack tip opening angle (CTOA). Constrained by conventional test techniques and instrumentation, physical values (e.g. crack mouth opening displacement, CMOD, and CTOA angles) are measured on the test specimen exterior and a single through-thickness "average" interior value is inferred. Because of three-dimensional issues such as crack curvature, constraint variation, and material inhomogeneity, inference of average parameter values may introduce errors. The microtopography methodology described here measures and maps three-dimensional fracture surfaces. The analyses of these data provide direct extraction of the parameters of interest at any location within the specimen interior, and at any desired increment of crack opening or extension. A single test specimen can provide all necessary information for the analysis of a particular material and geometry combination.

  7. Prediction of Fracture in Deep Drawing Process, Using Ductile Damage Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejatbakhsh, Hassan; Khataei, Mohamad; Poursina, Mehrdad

    2011-08-01

    In the deep drawing process, determination of the drawing depth and prediction of the time and the place that fracture occurs has been one of the important case studies which engineers tend to take into account. Because of a drastic reduction in design and manufacturing expenditures, numerical methods are extended to calculate the drawing depth during the process. In this paper, ductile damage model in which the stress triaxiality and equivalent strain are the most effective parameters on the damage growth and fracture of the material is used to predict fracture. For prediction the place and time of ductile fracture, according to ductile damage criteria, the fracture strain for various stress triaxiality values should be determined. To obtain the parameters of ductile damage model for St12 steel, some tensile tests have been performed on the notched specimens. Numerical simulation of deep drawing was performed using commercial finite element ABAQUS. Results obtained from simulation are in good agreement with the experimental ones and emphasize that using ductile damage model is appropriate to anticipate the place and time of the fracture during the deep drawing process.

  8. Kinetic Ductility and Force-Spike Resistance of Proteins from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cossio, Pilar; Hummer, Gerhard; Szabo, Attila

    2016-08-23

    Ductile materials can absorb spikes in mechanical force, whereas brittle ones fail catastrophically. Here we develop a theory to quantify the kinetic ductility of single molecules from force spectroscopy experiments, relating force-spike resistance to the differential responses of the intact protein and the unfolding transition state to an applied mechanical force. We introduce a class of unistable one-dimensional potential surfaces that encompass previous models as special cases and continuously cover the entire range from ductile to brittle. Compact analytic expressions for force-dependent rates and rupture-force distributions allow us to analyze force-clamp and force-ramp pulling experiments. We find that the force-transmitting protein domains of filamin and titin are kinetically ductile when pulled from their two termini, making them resistant to force spikes. For the mechanostable muscle protein titin, a highly ductile model reconciles data over 10 orders of magnitude in force loading rate from experiment and simulation. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Ductile and High Strength White Cast Iron of Ultrafine Interconnected Network Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. M.; Kui, H. W.

    2011-12-01

    Fe100- x C x melts ( x = 18 to 24) can be cast under B2O3 flux into solids of interconnected network morphology, with a wavelength in the submicron range. There are two major constituent subnetworks, which are a brittle Fe3C subnetwork and a ductile αFe subnetwork. The Fe100- x C x network alloys, therefore, are white cast iron of novel microstructure. Fe100- x C x specimens of x = 18 to 21 are ductile and the yield strength can be as large as ~3200 MPa. Fe100- x C x specimens of x = 22 to 24 are in the regime of a ductile-to-brittle transition. The compressive strength is high, at ~2700 MPa. Microstructural analysis indicates that the ultrafine network morphology and the ductile αFe subnetwork are responsible for the ductility exhibited in Fe100- x C x network alloys of x = 17 to 21. They are also responsible for the high compressive strength in Fe100- x C x network alloys of x = 22 to 24.

  10. Analytical prediction of the location of ductility dip cracking in the trans-varestraint test

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, I.; Kroenke, W.; Cola, M.

    1997-05-01

    Some NiCrFe weld metals exhibit decreased ductility over a temperature range known as the {open_quotes}ductility dip{close_quotes} temperature (DDT) range. Ductility dip cracking (DDT) is a phenomenon which occurs in a zone bounded by the DDT range on its sides and a threshold plastic strain on its bottom as shown in figure 1. Figure 1 illustrates how ductility varies as weld metal cools from the solidus temperature for materials with and without a ductility dip. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the ability to predict the location of the DDC in a Trans-Varestraint Test (TVT) for a specimen machined from a weld deposited EN52 plate. The DDC predictions require a combination of Trans-Varestraint testing and finite element analysis. The test provides the threshold value of externally applied nominal strain below which DDC does not occur. The analysis provides the corresponding threshold local or peak strain. The threshold local plastic strain level and the DDT range are used to predict the location of the DDC. The ultimate purpose of this work is to evaluate susceptibility of highly constrained, component welds to DDC. Test results for Trans-Varestraint Testing for a weld deposited EN52 plate are reported in reference. The ability to predict the location of the DDC in the Trans-Varestraint Test using the techniques reported herein is demonstrated by showing good comparison between the analytical results and the test data.

  11. Ductile grinding of silicon carbide as a production method for reflective optics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, W.K.

    1993-11-01

    Ductile regime grinding or shear-mode grinding is an enabling technology that is finding application in the optics manufacturing industry. By definition, ductile removal occurs when the scale of machining is conducted below a material-dependent critical dimension or chip size. Much of the interest in ductile grinding resides in manufacturing glass optics, which experience brittle-ductile transition at {approximately}10 nm. Silicon carbide has a critical dimension that is on the order of 100--200 nm, making it a more attractive candidate for the technology. Preliminary results from an on-axis chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC sphere (f/14) indicate 317 {Angstrom} surface roughness and 0.96 wave P-V figure were achieved with this manufacturing method. Surface finish, interferometric measured figure and BRDF scatter results are presented from ductile regime grinding of 40 and 75 mm flats of CVD silicon carbide, bare reaction bonded SiC (RBSiC) and uniaxial hot-pressed SiC (HPSiC).

  12. The influence of grain size on the ductility of micro-scale stainless steel stent struts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B P; Cuddy, H; Harewood, F J; Connolley, T; McHugh, P E

    2006-01-01

    Vascular stents are used to restore blood flow in stenotic arteries, and at present the implantation of a stent is the preferred revascularisation method for treating coronary artery disease, as the introduction of drug eluting stents (DESs) has lead to a significant improvement in the clinical outcome of coronary stenting. However the mechanical limits of stents are being tested when they are deployed in severe cases. In this study we aimed to show (by a combination of experimental tests and crystal plasticity finite element models) that the ductility of stainless steel stent struts can be increased by optimising the grain structure within micro-scale stainless steel stent struts. The results of the study show that within the specimen size range 55 to 190 microm ductility was not dependent on the size of the stent strut when the grain size maximised. For values of the ratio of cross sectional area to characteristic grain length less than 1,000, ductility was at a minimum irrespective of specimen size. However, when the ratio of cross sectional area to characteristic grain length becomes greater than 1,000 an improvement in ductility occurs, reaching a plateau when the ratio approaches a value characteristic of bulk material properties. In conclusion the ductility of micro-scale stainless steel stent struts is sensitive to microstructure and can be improved by reducing the grain size.

  13. Investigation on grain size effect in high strain rate ductility of 1100 pure aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, N.; Bourne, N.; Ruggiero, A.; Iannitti, G.; Testa, G.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the initial grain size on the material ductility at high strain rates in 1100 pure aluminum was investigated. Dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests, at different impact velocities, were performed. Samples have been annealed at 350°C for different exposure times to induce grain growth. Extruded fragments were soft-recovered and the overall length of the extruded jets was used as a measure of material ductility at high strain rates. Numerical simulation of DTE test at different velocity was performed using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko constitutive model. Results indicates that, as reported for pure copper, the overall ductility of the aluminum increases when grain size decreases. Numerical simulation results were in quite good agreement with experimental data.

  14. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  15. Phase-Transformation Ductilization of Brittle High-Entropy Alloys via Metastability Engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Hailong; Wu, Yuan; He, Junyang; ...

    2017-06-07

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) in which interesting physical, chemical, and structural properties are being continuously revealed have recently attracted extensive attention. Body-centered cubic (bcc) HEAs, particularly those based on refractory elements are promising for high-temperature application but generally fail by early cracking with limited plasticity at room temperature, which limits their malleability and widespread uses. In this paper, the “metastability-engineering” strategy is exploited in brittle bcc HEAs via tailoring the stability of the constituent phases, and transformation-induced ductility and work-hardening capability are successfully achieved. Finally, this not only sheds new insights on the development of HEAs with excellent combination of strengthmore » and ductility, but also has great implications on overcoming the long-standing strength–ductility tradeoff of metallic materials in general.« less

  16. Ductility and Strength Reduction Factors for Degrading Structures Considering Cumulative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bojórquez, Edén; Ruiz, Sonia E.; Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of cumulative damage on the strength requirements of degrading structures is assessed through the evaluation of the target ductility and corresponding strength reduction factors of simple degrading structures. While the reduction on ductility is established through the use of Park and Ang index, the suggestions given by Bojórquez and Rivera are used to model the degradation of the structural properties of the simple systems. Target ductilities and their corresponding reduced strength reduction factors are established for five sets of ground motions; most of them are recorded in California. The results given in this paper provide insight into all relevant parameters that should be considered during seismic design of earthquake-resistant structures. Finally, some recommendations to evaluate the effect of cumulative damage on seismic design are suggested. PMID:24883410

  17. Strength and ductility improvement of ultrafine-grained tungsten produced by equal-channel angular pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, T.; Fan, Z. Q.; Zhang, T.; Luo, G. N.; Wang, X. P.; Liu, C. S.; Fang, Q. F.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) was employed to refine the grain size of tungsten at relatively low temperatures. The small punch (SP) test results show that the ultrafine-grained tungsten appears an evident improvement in both strength and ductility compared with primary coarse-grained tungsten. The analysis results from SP test data indicate that the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the ultrafine-grained tungsten decrease to 386 °C and 322 °C due to the ECAP processing at 800 °C and 950 °C, respectively. The reason of the improvement in both strength and ductility of the ultrafine-grained tungsten produced by ECAP is discussed.

  18. Phase-Transformation Ductilization of Brittle High-Entropy Alloys via Metastability Engineering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hailong; Wu, Yuan; He, Junyang; Wang, Hui; Liu, Xiongjun; An, Ke; Wu, Wei; Lu, Zhaoping

    2017-08-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) in which interesting physical, chemical, and structural properties are being continuously revealed have recently attracted extensive attention. Body-centered cubic (bcc) HEAs, particularly those based on refractory elements are promising for high-temperature application but generally fail by early cracking with limited plasticity at room temperature, which limits their malleability and widespread uses. Here, the "metastability-engineering" strategy is exploited in brittle bcc HEAs via tailoring the stability of the constituent phases, and transformation-induced ductility and work-hardening capability are successfully achieved. This not only sheds new insights on the development of HEAs with excellent combination of strength and ductility, but also has great implications on overcoming the long-standing strength-ductility tradeoff of metallic materials in general. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Ductility and impact resistance of P/M molybdenum-rhenium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leichtfried, Gerhard; Schneibel, Joachim H; Heilmaier, M.

    2006-01-01

    Mo-Re alloys containing between 5 and 47.5 wt pct Re were fabricated from Mo and Mo-Re powders by sintering and hot radial forging. The mechanical properties of as-forged, stress-relieved, and recrystallized specimens were examined. Up to a concentration of 41 wt pct Re, the Charpy ductile-to-brittle transition temperature decreased monotonically with increasing rhenium concentration. Consistent with this, bend angles for fracture at T = -100 C increased monotonically with increasing rhenium concentration. Between 10 and 41 wt pct rhenium, the room-temperature tensile ductility of recrystallized Mo-Re remained nearly constant with values on the order of 35 to 45 pct. This result differs from the low ductility values observed previously by Lundberg (1997) for compositions on either side of Mo-13 wt pct Re.

  20. Metallurgical evaluation of factors influencing the ductility of aged T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The metallurgical factors influencing the ductility of T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) alloy following long-time exposures of GTA welds and tubing in the temperature range 982 C (1800 F) through 1316 C (2400 F) were evaluated by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron emission spectroscopy, and optical metallographic procedures. No classical aging response occurs in the alloy over the temperature range studied. The ductility impairment implied by previous investigations is not the result of microstructural response of the alloy to thermal exposures. Intergranular failure in the GTA sheet welds appears the result of random contamination by silicon, potassium, and/or fluorine at the grain boundaries of the fusion zones. Exposure to lithium at high temperatures had no adverse effects on the ductility of T-111 tubing. These materials were, however, sensitive to post-age handling and testing procedures.

  1. Ductility and strength reduction factors for degrading structures considering cumulative damage.

    PubMed

    Bojórquez, Edén; Ruiz, Sonia E; Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of cumulative damage on the strength requirements of degrading structures is assessed through the evaluation of the target ductility and corresponding strength reduction factors of simple degrading structures. While the reduction on ductility is established through the use of Park and Ang index, the suggestions given by Bojórquez and Rivera are used to model the degradation of the structural properties of the simple systems. Target ductilities and their corresponding reduced strength reduction factors are established for five sets of ground motions; most of them are recorded in California. The results given in this paper provide insight into all relevant parameters that should be considered during seismic design of earthquake-resistant structures. Finally, some recommendations to evaluate the effect of cumulative damage on seismic design are suggested.

  2. Numerical simulations of creep in ductile-phase toughened intermetallic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.; Strum, M.J.

    1994-04-07

    Analytical and finite element method (FEM) simulations of creep in idealized ductile-phase toughened intermetallic composites are described. For these strong-matrix materials, the two types of analyses predict similar time-independent composite creep rates if each phase individually exhibits only steady-state creep. The composite creep rate becomes increasingly higher than that of the monolithic intermetallic as the stress exponent of the intermetallic and the volume fraction and creep rate of the ductile phase increase. FEM analysis shows that the shape of the ductile phase does not affect the creep rate but may affect the internal stress and strain distributions, and thus damage accumulation rates. If primary creep occurs in one or both of the individual phases, the composite also exhibits primary creep. In this case, there can be significant deviations in the creep curves computed by the analytical and FEM models. The model predictions are compared with data for the Nb5Si3/Nb system.

  3. Modeling the Hot Ductility of AA6061 Aluminum Alloy After Severe Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamei, A. A.; Dehghani, K.; Mahmudi, R.

    2015-05-01

    Solutionized AA6061 aluminum alloy was processed by equal-channel angular pressing followed by cold rolling. The hot ductility of the material was studied after severe plastic deformation. The hot tensile tests were carried out in the temperature range of 300-500°C and at the strain rates of 0.0005-0.01 s-1. Depending on the temperature and strain rate, the applied strain level exhibited significant effects on the hot ductility, strain-rate sensitivity, and activation energy. It can be suggested that the possible mechanism dominated the hot deformation during tensile testing is dynamic recovery and dislocation creep. Constitutive equations were developed to model the hot ductility of the severe plastic deformed AA6061 alloy.

  4. Heterogeneous lamella structure unites ultrafine-grain strength with coarse-grain ductility

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yang, Muxin; Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Guilin; Wei, Yujie; Huang, Xiaoxu; Zhu, Yuntian

    2015-01-01

    Grain refinement can make conventional metals several times stronger, but this comes at dramatic loss of ductility. Here we report a heterogeneous lamella structure in Ti produced by asymmetric rolling and partial recrystallization that can produce an unprecedented property combination: as strong as ultrafine-grained metal and at the same time as ductile as conventional coarse-grained metal. It also has higher strain hardening than coarse-grained Ti, which was hitherto believed impossible. The heterogeneous lamella structure is characterized with soft micrograined lamellae embedded in hard ultrafine-grained lamella matrix. The unusual high strength is obtained with the assistance of high back stress developed from heterogeneous yielding, whereas the high ductility is attributed to back-stress hardening and dislocation hardening. The process discovered here is amenable to large-scale industrial production at low cost, and might be applicable to other metal systems. PMID:26554017

  5. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  6. Size-Dependent Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Silica Glass Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junhang; Wang, Jiangwei; Bitzek, Erik; Huang, Jian Yu; Zheng, He; Tong, Limin; Yang, Qing; Li, Ju; Mao, Scott X

    2016-01-13

    Silica (SiO2) glass, an essential material in human civilization, possesses excellent formability near its glass-transition temperature (Tg > 1100 °C). However, bulk SiO2 glass is very brittle at room temperature. Here we show a surprising brittle-to-ductile transition of SiO2 glass nanofibers at room temperature as its diameter reduces below 18 nm, accompanied by ultrahigh fracture strength. Large tensile plastic elongation up to 18% can be achieved at low strain rate. The unexpected ductility is due to a free surface affected zone in the nanofibers, with enhanced ionic mobility compared to the bulk that improves ductility by producing more bond-switching events per irreversible bond loss under tensile stress. Our discovery is fundamentally important for understanding the damage tolerance of small-scale amorphous structures.

  7. A Study on Fracture Locus of St12 Steel And Implementation Ductile Damage Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khataei, Mohammad; Poursina, Mehrdad; Kadkhodaei, Mahmoud

    2010-06-01

    In a metal forming process, the state of stress is one of the most important parameters on forming and behavior of the material. According to ductile damage criteria, the magnitudes of fracture strain for various stress triaxiality values should be determined for prediction of the place and time of ductile fracture. In this paper, the magnitudes of fracture strain of St12 steel is measured using several tensile tests on notched samples. Johnson-Cook equation for fracture strain as a function of stress triaxiality is calibrated for St12 steel, using the obtained experimental data. The accuracy of this function is achieved by comparison of the FEM results with experimental data which are achieved during simple tension and Erichsen tests. The simulation results have shown that the ductile damage model is a suitable criterion for prediction of fracture in St12 steel. In addition, notched samples tensile tests are suitable for calibration of Johnson-Cook equation for St12 steel.

  8. A constitutive model for layer development in shear zones near the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montési, Laurent G. J.

    2007-04-01

    The microstructure of ductile shear zones differs from that of surrounding wall rocks. In particular, compositional layering is a hallmark of shear zones. As layered rocks are weaker than their isotropic protolith when loaded in simple shear, layering may hold the key to explain localization of ductile deformation onto ductile shear zones. I propose here a constitutive model for layer development. A two-level mixing theory allows the strength of the aggregate to be estimated at intermediate degrees of layering. A probabilistic failure model is introduced to control how layers develop in a deforming aggregate. This model captures one of the initial mechanism of phase interconnection identified experimentally by Holyoke and Tullis (2006a, 2006b), fracturing of load bearing grains. This model reproduces the strength evolution of these experiments and can now be applied to tectonic modeling.

  9. High-strength and high-ductility nanostructured and amorphous metallic materials.

    PubMed

    Kou, Hongning; Lu, Jian; Li, Ying

    2014-08-20

    The development of materials with dual properties of high strength and high ductility has been a constant challenge since the foundation of the materials science discipline. The rapid progress of nanotechnology in recent decades has further brought this challenge to a new era. This Research News highlights a few newly developed strategies to optimize advanced nanomaterials and metallic glasses with exceptional dual mechanical properties of high strength and high ductility. A general concept of strain non-localization is presented to describe the role of multiscale (i.e., macroscale, microscale, nanoscale, and atomic scale) heterogeneities in the ductility enhancement of materials reputed to be intrinsically brittle, such as nanostructured metallic materials and bulk metallic glasses. These nanomaterials clearly form a new group of materials that display an extraordinary relationship between yield strength and the uniform elongation with the same chemical composition. Several other examples of nanomaterials such as those reinforced by nanoprecipitates will also be described.

  10. Room temperature ductility of NiAl-strengthened ferritic steels: Effects of precipitate microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Z.K.; Liu, C.T.; Miller, M.K.; Ghosh, G.; Kenik, E.A.; Huang, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    2012-04-11

    The effects of precipitate microstructure on the room temperature ductility of a series of carefully designed Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo steels were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS), and atom probe tomography (APT) were conducted to quantify the nano-scaled precipitates. The accuracy of the characterization results was verified by a numerical analysis. Three point bending tests results demonstrated that ductility was a function of the precipitate volume fraction and the Al and Ni concentrations in the Fe matrix, these relationships were discussed in terms of possible mechanisms. The ductility was also found to be independent of the precipitate size and inter-particle spacing in the studied range, which was validated by a theoretical model.

  11. Variation of depth to the brittle-ductile transition due to cooling of a midcrustal intrusion.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The depth to the brittle-ductile transition in the crust is often defined by the intersection of a shear resistance relation in the brittle upper crust that increases linearly with depth and a power law relation for ductile flow in the lower crust that depends strongly on T. Transient variation of this depth caused by a magmatic intrusion at a depth near the regional transition can be modelled by a heat conduction model for a rectangular parallelepiped superimposed on a linear geothermal gradient. When parameters appropriate for the southeastern US are used, a moderate-sized intrusion is found to decrease the transition depth by as much as 7 km; significant variations last approx 10 m.y. Since the base of the seismogenic zone is identified with the brittle-ductile transition, these results imply that intrusions of late Tertiary age or younger could be important sources of clustered seismicity. -A.W.H.

  12. Heterogeneous lamella structure unites ultrafine-grain strength with coarse-grain ductility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yang, Muxin; Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Guilin; Wei, Yujie; Huang, Xiaoxu; Zhu, Yuntian

    2015-11-24

    Grain refinement can make conventional metals several times stronger, but this comes at dramatic loss of ductility. Here we report a heterogeneous lamella structure in Ti produced by asymmetric rolling and partial recrystallization that can produce an unprecedented property combination: as strong as ultrafine-grained metal and at the same time as ductile as conventional coarse-grained metal. It also has higher strain hardening than coarse-grained Ti, which was hitherto believed impossible. The heterogeneous lamella structure is characterized with soft micrograined lamellae embedded in hard ultrafine-grained lamella matrix. The unusual high strength is obtained with the assistance of high back stress developed from heterogeneous yielding, whereas the high ductility is attributed to back-stress hardening and dislocation hardening. The process discovered here is amenable to large-scale industrial production at low cost, and might be applicable to other metal systems.

  13. A coupled ductile fracture phase-field model for crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez Padilla, Carlos Alberto; Markert, Bernd

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays crack initiation and evolution play a key role in the design of mechanical components. In the past few decades, several numerical approaches have been developed with the objective to predict these phenomena. The objective of this work is to present a simplified, nonetheless representative phenomenological model to predict the crack evolution of ductile fracture in single crystals. The proposed numerical approach is carried out by merging a conventional elasto-plastic crystal plasticity model and a phase-field model modified to predict ductile fracture. A two-dimensional initial boundary value problem of ductile fracture is introduced considering a single-crystal setup and Nickel-base superalloy material properties. The model is implemented into the finite element context subjected to a quasi-static uniaxial tension test. The results are then qualitatively analyzed and briefly compared to current benchmark results in the literature.

  14. Modeling of ductile deformation in anisotropic rocks with slip surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    Flanking structures and sheath folds can develop in layered rocks due to flow perturbation around slip surfaces in shear zones (Exner and Dabrowski, 2010; Reber et al., submitted). Mechanical anisotropy of the host rock has been shown to play a major role in determining the slip rate and the flow pattern around it (Kocher and Mancktelow, 2006; Fletcher, 2011). In addition, anisotropic fluids such as ductile foliated rocks have a 'memory' of deformation due to evolving microstructure. For example, the rotation of a rigid circular inclusion embedded in a layered host in layer-parallel shear results in the structural reorganization around it, which leads to the modification of the flow pattern in the host and in consequence to a massive reduction of the inclusion rotation rate (Dabrowski and Schmid, 2011). Willis (1964) derived an analytical elastic solution for an elliptical inclusion in a homogeneous anisotropic matrix subject to a uniform load in the far field. The solution can be reduced to the case of an incompressible viscous medium. The case of an arbitrarily oriented inviscid slit under shear parallel to the principal axis of anisotropy can be obtained by reducing it even further. Although derived for the initial state of homogeneous planar anisotropy, the solution provides useful insights into the large deformation behavior of the system. In this study, I will use different models and numerical modeling techniques to assess the impact of mechanical anisotropy and structural development on the perturbing flow around an inviscid slit (slip surface) embedded in a host comprising discrete isotropic layers in layer-parallel simple shear. In the limit of thin layers (the number of layers intercepting the slit tends to infinity), the host is modeled as an anisotropic fluid. The anisotropic viscosity is determined by the bulk anisotropic viscosity of the layered system. The layering is initially planar or equivalently the anisotropy is initially homogeneous. Both non

  15. Ductility Enhancement of Molybdenum Phase by Nano-sizedd Oxide Dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Kang

    2008-07-31

    The present research is focused on ductility enhancement of molybdenum (Mo) alloys by adding nano-sized oxide particles to the alloy system. The research approach includes: (1) determination of microscopic mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic ductility enhancement effects through atomistic modeling of the metal-ceramic interface; (2) subsequent computer simulation-aided optimization of composition and nanoparticle size of the dispersion for improved performance; (3) synthesis and characterization of nanoparticle dispersion following the guidance from atomistic computational modeling analyses (e.g., by processing a small sample of Mo alloy for evaluation); and (4) experimental testing of the mechanical properties to determine optimal ductility enhancement.Through atomistic modeling and electronic structure analysis using full-potential linearized muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) techniques, research to date has been performed on a number of selected chromium (Cr) systems containing nitrogen (N) and/or magnesium oxide (MgO) impurities. The emphasis has been on determining the properties of the valence electrons and the characteristics of the chemical bonds they formed. It was found that the brittle/ductile behavior of this transitional metal system is controlled by the relative population of valence charges: bonds formed by s valence electrons yield metallic, ductile behavior, whereas bonds formed by d valence electrons lead to covalent, brittle behavior. The presence of valence bands from impurities also affects the metal bonding, thereby explaining the detrimental and beneficial effects induced by the inclusion of N impurities and MgO dispersions. These understandings are useful for optimizing ductility enhancement effects on the dispersion materials.

  16. An energy criterion for the stress-induced martensitic transformation in a ductile system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Weng, G. J.

    1994-11-01

    An energy criterion is developed to calculate the stress-strain behavior of a ductile system involving martensitic transformation under the application of stress. The martensitic inclusions are taken to develop from the ductile austenitic matrix due to the reduction in the Gibbs free energy, which consists of the chemical free energy and the surface energy of the parent and product phases, and the mechanical potential energy of the nonlinear system. The inclusions thus formed are assumed to be thin spheroidal platelets, randomly oriented in the matrix, each possessing a normal and shear component of transformation strain. A micromechanical theory is established to determine the nonlinear potential energy and the change in Gibbs free energy of the two-phase system at a given stage of transformation. It is found that the stressstrain behavior of the metastable system is the outcome of two competing effects, one from the ductility due to the plastic deformation of the ductile matrix and the phase transformation strain of the martensite inclusions, and the other from the stiffness due to the purely elastic response of the transformed martensites. While the ductility prevails in the early stage of deformation the stiffening effect later becomes more dominant with increasing amount of transformation. The resulting stress-strain curve then exhibits the familiar sigmoidal shape, characteristically different from that of an ordinary ductile phase. The theory does not assume any a priori law for the evolving volume fraction of the martensite ; it is calculated incrementally based on the change of Gibbs free energy between the current and the transformed state. Nor does the theory assume any a priori flow rule for the transformation strains, which are calculated strictly from the lattice parameters of the parent and transformed phase. Comparison with some available experimental data for the stress-strain behavior of a TRIP steel and the corresponding evolution of the

  17. How melt stretching affect the brittle-ductile transition temperature of polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2013-03-01

    Upon increasing temperature a brittle polymer glass can turn ductile. PMMA is a good example. For a while this brittle-ductile transition (BDT) was thought to be determined by the emergence of a secondary relaxation....1-3 On the other hand, it has been known for a long time...4-6 that predeformation in the melt state (e.g., melt stretching) can also make brittle glasses behave in a ductile manner. This transformation has recently received a satisfactory explanation based on a picture of structural hybrid for polymer glasses....7 It appears that BDT is dictated by the relative mechanical characteristics of the primary structure (due to the van der Waals bonds) and the chain network. The present work, based on conventional Instron tensile extension tests and DMA tests, shows that melt stretching does not alter the secondary relaxation behavior of PMMA and PC yet can turn them the brittle PMMA ductile and the ductile PC brittle. Moreover, sufficient melt stretching makes the brittle PS ductile although it does not produce any secondary relaxation process..1. Monnerie, L.; Laupretre, F.; Halary, J. L. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 35-213. 2. Monnerie, L.; Halary, J. L.; Kausch, H. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 215-364. 3. Wu, S. J. Appl. Polym. Sci.1992, 46, (4), 619-624. 4. Vincent, P. I. Polymer1960, 1, (0), 425-444. 5. Harris, J. S.; Ward, I. M. J. Mater. Sci.1970, 5, (7), 573-579. 6. Ender, D. H.; Andrews, R. D. J. Appl. Phys.1965, 36, (10), 3057-3062. 7. Zartman, G. D.; Cheng, S.; Li, X.; Lin, F.; Becker, M. L.; Wang, S.-Q. Macromolecules2012, 45, (16), 6719-6732.

  18. Trace element effects on ductility and fracture of Ni-Cr-Ce alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosandey, F.; Kandra, J.

    1987-07-01

    The effect of trace additions of Ce, ranging from Oto 180 at. ppm, on the tensile behavior of a Ni-20Cr alloy is presented. For alloys without Ce a transition from ductile transgranular to brittle intergranular fracture mode is observed at high temperatures and for low strain-rate tests. Additions of Ce suppress this transition with a resulting increase in ductility. Maximum effects are observed for temperature and strain rate values where fracture in Ce-free alloys occurs via grain boundary cavitation. The reduced cavitation rate of Ce-containing alloys is suggested to be the result of an increase in both interfacial energy and grain boundary mobility.

  19. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  20. Ductility normalized-strainrange partitioning life relations for creep-fatigue life predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Saltsman, J. F.; Hirschberg, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures based on Strainrange Partitioning (SRP) are presented for estimating the effects of environment and other influences on the high temperature, low cycle, creep fatigue resistance of alloys. It is proposed that the plastic and creep, ductilities determined from conventional tensile and creep rupture tests conducted in the environment of interest be used in a set of ductility normalized equations for making a first order approximation of the four SRP inelastic strainrange life relations. Different levels of sophistication in the application of the procedures are presented by means of illustrative examples with several high temperature alloys. Predictions of cyclic lives generally agree with observed lives within factors of three.

  1. Fatigue Life Prediction of Ductile Iron Based on DE-SVM Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiqun, Ma; Xiaoping, Wang; lun, An

    the model, predicting fatigue life of ductile iron, based on SVM (Support Vector Machine, SVM) has been established. For it is easy to fall into local optimum during parameter optimization of SVM, DE (Differential Evolution algorithm, DE) algorithm was adopted to optimize to improve prediction precision. Fatigue life of ductile iron is predicted combining with concrete examples, and simulation experiment to optimize SVM is conducted adopting GA (Genetic Algorithm), ACO (Ant Colony Optimization) and POS (Partial Swarm Optimization). Results reveal that DE-SVM algorithm is of a better prediction performance.

  2. Ultrahigh Ductile Gels Developed by Inter Cross-linking Network (ICN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Go; Hidema, Ruri; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    Gels have low frictional properties, permeability and biocompatibility due to high water content. In the last decade, several high-strength gels have been developed, which are promising for extending the application of gels as industrial materials. In this study, ultrahigh ductile gels are proposed by developing Inter Cross-linking Network (ICN), which is the novel internal structure of gels. The ICN gels can achieve more than 67.9% increase in the ductility in comparison with normal poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) gels, only by adding a little amount of fiber, hydroxypropyl cellulose, which is known as lyotropic crystalline polymer, while containing 97wt% water.

  3. Transformation plasticity in ductile solids. Final report, August 1, 1988--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.B.

    1996-09-01

    Throughout history, the development of stronger materials has enabled the realization of countless technological advances. Unfortunately, any increase in strength is rarely achieved without concomitant decreases in toughness and ductility: a fact which severely limits the utility of materials such as ultrahigh-strength alloy steels. Typical precipitation-strengthened stainless steels have very little toughness at high strength levels. In the last decade, however, several investigators have reported exceptionally large fracture toughness values in high-strength precipitation-hardened metastable austenitic steels. This remarkable achievement is directly attributable to the process of transformation toughening. This report describes studies on tranformations and enhancement of plane-strain ductility in high strength steels.

  4. Excess vibrational density of states and the brittle to ductile transition in crystalline and amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Babu, Jeetu S; Mondal, Chandana; Sengupta, Surajit; Karmakar, Smarajit

    2016-01-28

    The conditions which determine whether a material behaves in a brittle or ductile fashion on mechanical loading are still elusive and comprise a topic of active research among materials physicists and engineers. In this study, we present the results of in silico mechanical deformation experiments from two very different model solids in two and three dimensions. The first consists of particles interacting with isotropic potentials and the other has strongly direction dependent interactions. We show that in both cases, the excess vibrational density of states is one of the fundamental quantities which characterizes the ductility of the material. Our results can be checked using careful experiments on colloidal solids.

  5. A rate-dependent Hosford-Coulomb model for predicting ductile fracture at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcadet, Stephane J.; Roth, Christian C.; Erice, Borja; Mohr, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The Hosford-Coulomb model incorporates the important effect of the Lode angle parameter in addition to the stress triaxiality to predict the initiation of ductile fracture. A strain-rate dependent extension of the Hosford-Coulomb model is presented to describe the results from low, intermediate and high strain rate fracture experiments on advanced high strength steels (DP590 and TRIP780). The model predictions agree well with the experimental observation of an increase in ductility as function of strain rate for stress states ranging from uniaxial to equi-biaxial tension.

  6. Development and Testing of a Linear Polarization Resistance Corrosion Rate Probe for Ductile Iron Pipe (Web Report 4361)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North American water and wastewater community has hundreds of millions of feet of ductile iron pipe in service. Only a portion of the inventory has any form of external corrosion control. Ductile iron pipe, in certain environments, is subject to external corrosion.Linear Pola...

  7. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.487 Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe. Corrosion...

  8. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.487 Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe. Corrosion...

  9. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.487 Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe. Corrosion pitting...

  10. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.487 Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe. Corrosion pitting...

  11. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.487 Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe. Corrosion pitting...

  12. Development and Testing of a Linear Polarization Resistance Corrosion Rate Probe for Ductile Iron Pipe (Web Report 4361)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North American water and wastewater community has hundreds of millions of feet of ductile iron pipe in service. Only a portion of the inventory has any form of external corrosion control. Ductile iron pipe, in certain environments, is subject to external corrosion.Linear Pola...

  13. An investigation of the effects of ductile-layer thickness on the fracture behavior of nickel aluminide microlaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Soboyejo, W.O.

    2000-05-01

    This article presents the results of a combined experimental and analytical study of the effects of ductile-layer thickness on the initiation toughness and resistance-curve behavior of nickel aluminide composites that are reinforced with ductile V and Nb-15Al-40Ti layers. The initiation toughness and specimen-independent steady-state toughness values are shown to increase with increasing layer thickness. Stable crack growth and toughening in the crack-arrestor orientation are also attributed to crack bridging and the interactions of crack tips with the ductile layers. The overall toughening in the microlaminates is modeled by superposing the shielding contributions due to crack bridging on the stress-intensity factor required to promote renucleation ahead of the first ductile layer ahead of the precrack. The implications of the results are also discussed for the design of ductile phase-toughened microlaminates.

  14. Atomistic simulations on ductile-brittle transition in ⟨111⟩ BCC Fe nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainath, G.; Choudhary, B. K.

    2017-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to understand the influence of temperature on the tensile deformation and fracture behavior of ⟨111⟩ BCC Fe nanowires. The simulations have been carried out at different temperatures in the range 10-1000 K employing a constant strain rate of 1 × 108 s-1. The results indicate that at low temperatures (10-375 K), the nanowires yield through the nucleation of a sharp crack and fails in brittle manner. On the other hand, nucleation of multiple 1/2⟨111⟩ dislocations at yielding followed by significant plastic deformation leading to ductile failure has been observed at high temperatures in the range 450-1000 K. At 400 K, the nanowire yields through nucleation of crack associated with many mobile 1/2⟨111⟩ and immobile ⟨100⟩ dislocations at the crack tip and fails in ductile manner. The ductile-brittle transition observed in ⟨111⟩ BCC Fe nanowires is appropriately reflected in the stress-strain behavior and plastic strain at failure. The ductile-brittle transition increases with increasing nanowire size. The change in fracture behavior has been discussed in terms of the relative variations in yield and fracture stresses and change in slip behavior with respect to temperature. Further, the dislocation multiplication mechanism assisted by the kink nucleation from the nanowire surface observed at high temperatures has been presented.

  15. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron or...

  16. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron or...

  17. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron or...

  18. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron or...

  19. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron or...

  20. Prediction of Ductile Fracture Behaviors for 42CrMo Steel at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Liu, Yan-Xing; Liu, Ge; Chen, Ming-Song; Huang, Yuan-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The ductile fracture behaviors of 42CrMo steel are studied by hot tensile tests with the deformation temperature range of 1123-1373 K and strain rate range of 0.0001-0.1 s-1. Effects of deformation temperature and strain rate on the flow stress and fracture strain of the studied steel are discussed in detail. Based on the experimental results, a ductile damage model is established to describe the combined effects of deformation temperature and strain rate on the ductile fracture behaviors of 42CrMo steel. It is found that the flow stress first increases to a peak value and then decreases, showing an obvious dynamic softening. This is mainly attributed to the dynamic recrystallization and material intrinsic damage during the hot tensile deformation. The established damage model is verified by hot forging experiments and finite element simulations. Comparisons between the predicted and experimental results indicate that the established ductile damage model is capable of predicting the fracture behaviors of 42CrMo steel during hot forging.

  1. Atomistic aspects of ductile responses of cubic silicon carbide during nanometric cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Saurav; Luo, Xichun; Reuben, Robert L.; Rashid, Waleed Bin

    2011-11-01

    Cubic silicon carbide (SiC) is an extremely hard and brittle material having unique blend of material properties which makes it suitable candidate for microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems applications. Although, SiC can be machined in ductile regime at nanoscale through single-point diamond turning process, the root cause of the ductile response of SiC has not been understood yet which impedes significant exploitation of this ceramic material. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to investigate the atomistic aspects of ductile response of SiC during nanometric cutting process. Simulation results show that cubic SiC undergoes sp 3 -sp 2 order-disorder transition resulting in the formation of SiC-graphene-like substance with a growth rate dependent on the cutting conditions. The disorder transition of SiC causes the ductile response during its nanometric cutting operations. It was further found out that the continuous abrasive action between the diamond tool and SiC causes simultaneous sp 3 -sp 2 order-disorder transition of diamond tool which results in graphitization of diamond and consequent tool wear.

  2. High Strain-Rate and Quasi-Static Ductile Failure Mechanisms in Porous Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    detailed understanding of the interrelated physical mechanisms that can result in ductile material failure in rate-dependent porous crystalline materials subjected...strains and slip-rates, and hydrostatic stresses on failure paths and ligament damage in face centered cubic (f.c.c.) crystalline materials have been

  3. Effect of Surface Topography on Room Temperature Tensile Ductility of TiAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bochao; Liu, Renci; Jia, Qing; Cui, Yuyou; Yang, Rui

    2017-08-01

    Room temperature tensile ductility of extruded Ti-47Al-1.5Nb-1Cr-1Mn-0.5B (at.%) with different surface topographies was investigated. Tensile specimens were subjected to grinding with sandpaper of different grits and electrolytic polishing to achieve different surface topographies. Surface morphology/topography and tensile ductility of different surface preparations were compared. Results show that for ground samples, when the mean amplitude deviation (Ra) exceeds 0.1 μm, initiation of tensile failure transits from the sample interior to surface, and tensile fracture strain decreases linearly with increasing Ra. Electrolytic polishing improves the surface topography of TiAl not only by reducing Ra, but also by modifying the amplitude shape and distribution of the surface, and it therefore increases ductility. The present work suggests that surface amplitude deviation (Ra), skewness (Rsk) and kurtosis (Rku) are appropriate parameters to evaluate the surface topography of intermetallic materials with limited ductility such as TiAl.

  4. Substantial tensile ductility in sputtered Zr-Ni-Al nano-sized metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Liontas, Rachel; Jafary-Zadeh, Mehdi; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Zhang, Yong -Wei; Mao, Wendy L.; Greer, Julia R.

    2016-08-04

    We investigate the mechanical behavior and atomic-level structure of glassy Zr-Ni-Al nano-tensile specimens with widths between 75 and 215 nm. We focus our studies on two different energy states: (1) as-sputtered and (2) sputtered then annealed below the glass transition temperature (Tg). In-situ tensile experiments conducted inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) reveal substantial tensile ductility in some cases reaching >10% engineering plastic strains, >150% true plastic strains, and necking down to a point during tensile straining in specimens as wide as ~150 nm. We found the extent of ductility depends on both the specimen size and the annealing conditions. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD), we explain the observed mechanical behavior through changes in free volume as well as short- and medium-range atomic-level order that occur upon annealing. This work demonstrates the importance of carefully choosing the metallic glass fabrication method and post-processing conditions for achieving a certain atomic-level structure and free volume within the metallic glass, which then determine the overall mechanical response. Lastly, an important implication is that sputter deposition may be a particularly promising technique for producing thin coatings of metallic glasses with significant ductility, due to the high level of disorder and excess free volume resulting from the sputtering process and to the suitability of sputtering for producing thin coatings that may exhibit enhanced size-induced ductility.

  5. Significantly Increasing the Ductility of High Performance Polymer Semiconductors through Polymer Blending.

    PubMed

    Scott, Joshua I; Xue, Xiao; Wang, Ming; Kline, R Joseph; Hoffman, Benjamin C; Dougherty, Daniel; Zhou, Chuanzhen; Bazan, Guillermo; O'Connor, Brendan T

    2016-06-08

    Polymer semiconductors based on donor-acceptor monomers have recently resulted in significant gains in field effect mobility in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). These polymers incorporate fused aromatic rings and have been designed to have stiff planar backbones, resulting in strong intermolecular interactions, which subsequently result in stiff and brittle films. The complex synthesis typically required for these materials may also result in increased production costs. Thus, the development of methods to improve mechanical plasticity while lowering material consumption during fabrication will significantly improve opportunities for adoption in flexible and stretchable electronics. To achieve these goals, we consider blending a brittle donor-acceptor polymer, poly[4-(4,4-dihexadecyl-4H-cyclopenta[1,2-b:5,4-b']dithiophen-2-yl)-alt-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine] (PCDTPT), with ductile poly(3-hexylthiophene). We found that the ductility of the blend films is significantly improved compared to that of neat PCDTPT films, and when the blend film is employed in an OTFT, the performance is largely maintained. The ability to maintain charge transport character is due to vertical segregation within the blend, while the improved ductility is due to intermixing of the polymers throughout the film thickness. Importantly, the application of large strains to the ductile films is shown to orient both polymers, which further increases charge carrier mobility. These results highlight a processing approach to achieve high performance polymer OTFTs that are electrically and mechanically optimized.

  6. A meshfree continuous-discontinuous approach for the ductile fracture modeling in explicit dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ma, N.; Takada, K.; Okada, H.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a combined continuous-discontinuous modeling technique for the dynamic ductile fracture analysis using an interactive particle enrichment algorithm and a strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree method. The strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree method is a nodel-integrated meshfree method which was recently proposed for the analysis of elastic-damage induced strain localization problems. In this paper, the strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree formulation is extended to the elastic-plastic-damage materials for the ductile fracture analysis. When the ductile material is fully degraded, the interactive particle enrichment scheme is introduced in the strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree formulation that permits a continuous-to-discontinuous failure modeling. The essence of the interactive particle enrichment algorithm is a particle insertion-deletion scheme that produces a visibility criterion for the description of a traction-free crack and leads to a better presentation of the ductile fracture process. Several numerical benchmarks are examined using the explicit dynamics analysis to demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method.

  7. Substantial tensile ductility in sputtered Zr-Ni-Al nano-sized metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Liontas, Rachel; Jafary-Zadeh, Mehdi; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Zhang, Yong -Wei; Mao, Wendy L.; Greer, Julia R.

    2016-08-04

    We investigate the mechanical behavior and atomic-level structure of glassy Zr-Ni-Al nano-tensile specimens with widths between 75 and 215 nm. We focus our studies on two different energy states: (1) as-sputtered and (2) sputtered then annealed below the glass transition temperature (Tg). In-situ tensile experiments conducted inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) reveal substantial tensile ductility in some cases reaching >10% engineering plastic strains, >150% true plastic strains, and necking down to a point during tensile straining in specimens as wide as ~150 nm. We found the extent of ductility depends on both the specimen size and the annealing conditions. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD), we explain the observed mechanical behavior through changes in free volume as well as short- and medium-range atomic-level order that occur upon annealing. This work demonstrates the importance of carefully choosing the metallic glass fabrication method and post-processing conditions for achieving a certain atomic-level structure and free volume within the metallic glass, which then determine the overall mechanical response. Lastly, an important implication is that sputter deposition may be a particularly promising technique for producing thin coatings of metallic glasses with significant ductility, due to the high level of disorder and excess free volume resulting from the sputtering process and to the suitability of sputtering for producing thin coatings that may exhibit enhanced size-induced ductility.

  8. Atomistic aspects of ductile responses of cubic silicon carbide during nanometric cutting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cubic silicon carbide (SiC) is an extremely hard and brittle material having unique blend of material properties which makes it suitable candidate for microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems applications. Although, SiC can be machined in ductile regime at nanoscale through single-point diamond turning process, the root cause of the ductile response of SiC has not been understood yet which impedes significant exploitation of this ceramic material. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to investigate the atomistic aspects of ductile response of SiC during nanometric cutting process. Simulation results show that cubic SiC undergoes sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition resulting in the formation of SiC-graphene-like substance with a growth rate dependent on the cutting conditions. The disorder transition of SiC causes the ductile response during its nanometric cutting operations. It was further found out that the continuous abrasive action between the diamond tool and SiC causes simultaneous sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition of diamond tool which results in graphitization of diamond and consequent tool wear. PMID:22078069

  9. Monosemousness of Thermal Plastic Strain on Thermal Fatigue Life in Ferrite Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Morihito; Mouri, Hayato

    In this study, the monosemous effect of thermal plastic strain on the thermal fatigue life is newly found on ferrite ductile cast iron around the alpha phase field. At first, the monosemousness is defined and its meaning described. Next, the monosemousness of thermal fatigue is demonstrated by its conditional equation and its existence is verified by the thermal fatigue test on ferrite ductile cast iron. By doing so, the feature on the thermal fatigue of ferrite ductile cast iron is clarified. Generally, it is considered that fatigue life in ferrite-matrix temperature range can be expressed at least by two or more different Arrhenius equations, namely there are two or more different activation mechanisms to govern the thermal fatigue life corresponding to various ferrite temperature ranges. In this case, for determining the life in any various ferrite temperature ranges, it must have at least four or more unknown quantities. If there is the presence of a general equation which is able to replace above described plural equations, then the life can be determined by simple one variable. Here, by introducing conditional equations, it is verified that the general equation is a Coffin and Manson's equation of low cycle fatigue and whole thermal fatigue life can be determined by a variable of thermal plastic strain occurred in thermal cycle. As a result, the law can apply to describe thermal fatigue phenomenon and predict thermal fatigue life monosemously from cyclic thermal plastic strain on ductile cast iron with ferrite matrix.

  10. Brittle versus ductile deformation as the main control of the deep fluid circulation in continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violay, Marie; Madonna, Claudio; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) and the Taupo Volcanic Zone-Deep geothermal drilling project in New Zealand (TVZ-DGDP) proposed a new concept of engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile rocks. This system has several advantages including (1) a simpler design and control of the reservoir due to homogeneous rock properties and stress states in the ductile domain ,(2) possible extraction of supercritical fluids (3) less probability for induced earthquakes. However, it is at present unknwon what and how porosity and permeability can be engineered in such environments. It has been proposed that the magmatic chamber is surrounded by a hot and ductile carapace through which heat transfer is conductive because the plastic behaviour of the rock will close possible fluid pathways. Further outward, as temperature declines, the rock will encounter the brittle-ductile transition with a concomitant increase in porosity and permeability. The thickness of the conduction-dominated, ductile boundary zone between the magmatic chamber and the convecting geothermal fluid directly determines the rate of heat transfer. To examine the brittle to ductile transition in the context of the Japanese crust, we conducted deformation experiments on very-fine-grain granite in conventional servocontrolled, gas-medium triaxial apparatus (from Paterson instrument). Temperature ranged from 600° C to 1100° C and effective confining pressure from 100 to 150 MPa. Dilatancy was measured during deformation. The method consisted in monitoring the volume of pore fluid that flows into or out of the sample at constant pore pressure. Permeability was measured under static conditions by transient pressure pulse method. Mechanical and micro-structural observations at experimental constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1 indicated that the granite was brittle and dilatant up to 900 ° C. At higher temperatures the deformation mode becomes macroscopically ductile, i

  11. Ductility Enhancement of Molybdenum Phase by Nano-sized Oxide Dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Bruce

    2008-07-18

    The objective of this research is to understand and to remedy the impurity effects for room-temperature ductility enhancement of molybdenum (Mo) based alloys by the inclusion of nano-sized metal oxide dispersions. This research combines theoretical, computational, and experimental efforts. The results will help to formulate systematic strategies in searching for better composed Mo-based alloys with optimal mechanical properties. For this project, majority of the research effort was directed to atomistic modeling to identify the mechanisms responsible for the oxygen embrittling and ductility enhancement based on fundamental electronic structure analysis. Through first principles molecular dynamics simulations, it was found that the embrittling impurity species were attracted to the metal oxide interface, consistent with previous experiments. Further investigation on the electronic structures reveals that the presence of embrittling species degrades the quality of the metallic chemical bonds in the hosting matrix in a number of ways, the latter providing the source of ductility. For example, the spatial flexibility of the bonds is reduced, and localization of the impurity states occurs to pin the dislocation flow. Rice’s criterion has been invoked to explain the connections of electronic structure and mechanical properties. It was also found that when impurity species become attracted to the metal oxide interface, some of the detrimental effects are alleviated, thus explaining the observed ductility enhancement effects. These understandings help to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of Mo and other high temperature alloys (e.g. ODS alloys) for fossil energy materials applications. Based on the theoretical and computational studies, the experimental work includes the preparation of Mo powders mixed with candidate nano-sized metal oxides, which were then vacuum hot-pressed to make the Mo alloys. Several powder mixing methods

  12. Slip transfer across fault discontinuities within granitic rock at the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevitt, J. M.; Pollard, D. D.; Warren, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Fault mechanics are strongly influenced by discontinuities in fault geometry and constitutive differences between the brittle and ductile regions of the lithosphere. This project uses field observations, laboratory analysis and numerical modeling to investigate deformational processes within a contractional step at the brittle-ductile transition, and in particular, how slip is transferred between faults via ductile deformation across the step. The Bear Creek field area (central Sierra Nevada, CA) is comprised of late Cretaceous biotite-hornblende granodiorite and experienced a period of faulting at the brittle-ductile transition. Abundant echelon faults in Bear Creek, some of which were seismically active, provide many textbook examples of contractional steps, which are characterized by well-developed ductile fabrics. The occurrence of hydrothermal alteration halos and hydrothermal minerals in fracture fill documents the presence of water, which we suggest played a weakening role in the constitutive behavior of the granodiorite. Furthermore, the mechanism that accomplishes slip transfer in contractional steps appears to be related to water-enhanced ductile deformation. We focus our investigation on Outcrop SG10, which features a 10cm thick aplite dike that is offset 0.45m through a contractional step between two sub-parallel left-lateral faults. Within the step, the aplite undergoes dramatic thinning (stretch ~1/10) and the granodiorite is characterized by a well-developed mylonitic foliation, in which quartz and biotite plastically flow around larger grains of feldspars, hornblende and opaque minerals. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis gives a more quantitative depiction of the active micromechanics and reveals how slip is accommodated at the crystal scale throughout the step. We use Abaqus, a commercial finite element software, to test several constitutive laws that may account for the deformation observed both macro- and microscopically throughout

  13. Metastable high-entropy dual-phase alloys overcome the strength-ductility trade-off.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiming; Pradeep, Konda Gokuldoss; Deng, Yun; Raabe, Dierk; Tasan, Cemal Cem

    2016-06-09

    Metals have been mankind's most essential materials for thousands of years; however, their use is affected by ecological and economical concerns. Alloys with higher strength and ductility could alleviate some of these concerns by reducing weight and improving energy efficiency. However, most metallurgical mechanisms for increasing strength lead to ductility loss, an effect referred to as the strength-ductility trade-off. Here we present a metastability-engineering strategy in which we design nanostructured, bulk high-entropy alloys with multiple compositionally equivalent high-entropy phases. High-entropy alloys were originally proposed to benefit from phase stabilization through entropy maximization. Yet here, motivated by recent work that relaxes the strict restrictions on high-entropy alloy compositions by demonstrating the weakness of this connection, the concept is overturned. We decrease phase stability to achieve two key benefits: interface hardening due to a dual-phase microstructure (resulting from reduced thermal stability of the high-temperature phase); and transformation-induced hardening (resulting from the reduced mechanical stability of the room-temperature phase). This combines the best of two worlds: extensive hardening due to the decreased phase stability known from advanced steels and massive solid-solution strengthening of high-entropy alloys. In our transformation-induced plasticity-assisted, dual-phase high-entropy alloy (TRIP-DP-HEA), these two contributions lead respectively to enhanced trans-grain and inter-grain slip resistance, and hence, increased strength. Moreover, the increased strain hardening capacity that is enabled by dislocation hardening of the stable phase and transformation-induced hardening of the metastable phase produces increased ductility. This combined increase in strength and ductility distinguishes the TRIP-DP-HEA alloy from other recently developed structural materials. This metastability-engineering strategy should

  14. Mechanical behavior and brittle-ductile transition of high-chromium martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odnobokova, M. V.; Kipelova, A. Yu.; Belyakov, A. N.; Kaibyshev, R. O.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents data on the static tensile tests and dynamic impact-toughness tests of a highchromium martensitic 10Kh9V1M1FBR steel (0.12 wt % C, 9.8 wt % Cr, 0.93 wt % W, 1.01 wt % Mo, 0.2 wt % V, 0.05 wt % Nb, 0.05 wt % N, 0.003 wt % B, 0.36 wt % Mn, 0.2 wt % Ni, 0.06 wt % Si, 0.01 wt % P, 0.008 wt % S, 0.02 wt % Cu, 0.1 wt % Co, 0.015 wt % Al, and the remainder is Fe) in the temperature range from 20 to-196°C. In the case of static loading, a reduction in the temperature leads to an increase in the strength characteristics; upon a drop in the temperature from 20 to-100°C, the plasticity also increases. This is connected with the fact that the ductile fracture remains the basic mechanism down to cryogenic temperatures. The brittle-ductile transition related to the transition from ductile intragranular fracture to quasibrittle one is observed at-45°C. The steel exhibits high impact toughness to the temperature of-60°C ( KCV -60 = 95 J/cm2), at which the fraction of the ductile component in fracture is equal to 20%. At 80°C, the impact toughness decreases down to critical values (30 J/cm2), which correlates with the decrease in the fraction of the ductile component on the fracture surface down to 1%. The further decrease in the impact toughness down to 10 J/cm2 at-196°C is related to the transition from intragranular to intergranular brittle fracture.

  15. Metastable high-entropy dual-phase alloys overcome the strength-ductility trade-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiming; Pradeep, Konda Gokuldoss; Deng, Yun; Raabe, Dierk; Tasan, Cemal Cem

    2016-06-01

    Metals have been mankind’s most essential materials for thousands of years; however, their use is affected by ecological and economical concerns. Alloys with higher strength and ductility could alleviate some of these concerns by reducing weight and improving energy efficiency. However, most metallurgical mechanisms for increasing strength lead to ductility loss, an effect referred to as the strength-ductility trade-off. Here we present a metastability-engineering strategy in which we design nanostructured, bulk high-entropy alloys with multiple compositionally equivalent high-entropy phases. High-entropy alloys were originally proposed to benefit from phase stabilization through entropy maximization. Yet here, motivated by recent work that relaxes the strict restrictions on high-entropy alloy compositions by demonstrating the weakness of this connection, the concept is overturned. We decrease phase stability to achieve two key benefits: interface hardening due to a dual-phase microstructure (resulting from reduced thermal stability of the high-temperature phase); and transformation-induced hardening (resulting from the reduced mechanical stability of the room-temperature phase). This combines the best of two worlds: extensive hardening due to the decreased phase stability known from advanced steels and massive solid-solution strengthening of high-entropy alloys. In our transformation-induced plasticity-assisted, dual-phase high-entropy alloy (TRIP-DP-HEA), these two contributions lead respectively to enhanced trans-grain and inter-grain slip resistance, and hence, increased strength. Moreover, the increased strain hardening capacity that is enabled by dislocation hardening of the stable phase and transformation-induced hardening of the metastable phase produces increased ductility. This combined increase in strength and ductility distinguishes the TRIP-DP-HEA alloy from other recently developed structural materials. This metastability-engineering strategy should

  16. Energy transport processes in a brittle ductile intrusive model of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, Graham J.

    1998-08-01

    The implications of the findings of recent GPS and micro-seismic studies in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, on models of processes transporting mass, heat and chemicals are discussed. It is argued that in addition to the well established process of groundwater convection extracting heat and chemicals by interacting with magmatic intrusives under the TVZ, that two other processes may be important. Firstly, the existence of a ductile layer with very low permeability between about 8 to 15 km depth will produce a region of `enhanced conduction' in which very high conductive fluxes of energy arise from a temperature distribution which varies exponentially with depth. Secondly, water may transport up through the ductile layer, as a result of extensional processes in the ductile region. If extension is occurring at about 8 mm/yr, then geothermal heat transfer in the TVZ of about 4200 MW is made up from about 1200 MW from the cooling of intrusives in the brittle region in the upper 8 km; of about an additional 1900 MW of conducted heat entering the brittle region from the ductile region; and about an additional 1100 MW from water transport through the ductile region. Provided this water flow has a chloride concentration similar to that emitted from nearby volcanoes, then the total chloride transport from the TVZ is about 3.5 kg/s, as suggested by average enthalpy to chloride ratios in the TVZ of about 1.2 MJ/g. The present high heat and mass transport processes in the TVZ are assumed to result from the passive filling of volume created from extensional processes under the TVZ, plus conductive and/or convective heating processes below 15 km depth.

  17. Room temperature tensile ductility in polycrystalline B2 NiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, K.H.; Vedula, K.

    1989-01-01

    The lack of tensile ductility in polycrystalline B2 NiAl has been attributed to the lack of five independent slip systems to satisfy von Mises' criterion for compatibility in polycrystalline deformation. Single crystal studies (4-10) show that the deformation of this alloy is highly anisotropic. The non-<100> oriented crystals (soft orientations) are much more ductile than the <100> oriented crystals (hard orientations) at low temperature. This is because the critical resolved shear stress required to activate primary slip of the <100> type is much less than that required to activate other slip systems as the <111> type. All orientations possess considerable ductility even when tested in tension at intermediate temperatures (>-- 673K). There is general agreement that for non-<100> oriented crystals, deformation involves (100) <001> and /l brace/110/r brace/ <100> slip systems at low as well as intermediate temperatures. The behavior of <100> oriented crystals is less clear and conflicting data exist: <111> slip direction with /l brace/123/right brace/ and /l brace/112/r brace/ slip planes have been observed at low temperatures; while <111>, <110> and <100> directions have been reported for high temperature deformation. The number of slip systems which operate if only the /l brace/110/r brace/<100> slip occurs is insufficient for von Mises's criterion for polycrystalline deformation. In compression, ductility is observed since there is no driving force to open cracks that must form at grain boundaries due to the lack of sufficient slip systems. In tension, however, the applied stress acts directly to open the crack and failure may occur before further deformation can take place. On the other hand, if <111> slip is possible (as in the case of disordered BCC alloys as well as some other compounds), there are enough slip systems of the type /l brace/110/r brace/ <111>, to satisfy von Mise's criterion and lead to polycrystalline tensile ductility.

  18. Parametric study of irradiation effects on the ductile damage and flow stress behavior in ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are currently being considered as structural materials in fusion and Gen-IV nuclear reactors. These materials are expected to experience high dose radiation, which can increase their ductile to brittle transition temperature and susceptibility to failure during operation. Hence, to estimate the safe operational life of the reactors, precise evaluation of the ductile to brittle transition temperatures of ferritic-martensitic steels is necessary. Owing to the scarcity of irradiated samples, particularly at high dose levels, micro-mechanistic models are being employed to predict the shifts in the ductile to brittle transition temperatures. These models consider the ductile damage evolution, in the form of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids; and the brittle fracture, in the form of probabilistic cleavage initiation, to estimate the influence of irradiation on the ductile to brittle transition temperature. However, the assessment of irradiation dependent material parameters is challenging and influences the accuracy of these models. In the present study, the effects of irradiation on the overall flow stress and ductile damage behavior of two ferritic-martensitic steels is parametrically investigated. The results indicate that the ductile damage model parameters are mostly insensitive to irradiation levels at higher dose levels though the resulting flow stress behavior varies significantly.

  19. Brittle-to-ductile transition of lithiated silicon electrodes: Crazing to stable nanopore growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haoran; Chew, Huck Beng; Wang, Xueju; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-14

    Using first principle calculations, we uncover the underlying mechanisms explaining the brittle-to-ductile transition of Li{sub x}Si electrodes in lithium ion batteries with increasing Li content. We show that plasticity initiates at x = ∼ 0.5 with the formation of a craze-like network of nanopores separated by Si–Si bonds, while subsequent failure is still brittle-like with the breaking of Si–Si bonds. Transition to ductile behavior occurs at x ⩾ 1 due to the increased density of highly stretchable Li–Li bonds, which delays nanopore formation and stabilizes nanopore growth. Collapse of the nanopores during unloading of the Li{sub x}Si alloys leads to significant strain recovery.

  20. High Strength and Retained Ductility Achieved in a Nitrided Strip Cast Nb-Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kelvin Y.; Shrestha, Sachin L.; Felfer, Peter J.; Cairney, Julie M.; Killmore, Chris R.; Carpenter, Kristin R.; Kaul, Harold R.; Ringer, Simon P.

    2013-02-01

    The current study investigates the strengthening of an Nb-microallyed CASTRIP® steel at 798 K (525 °C) by nitriding in a KNO3 salt bath. Nitriding up to 1 hour dramatically increased the yield strength of the steel by ~35 pct (from 475 to 645 MPa) with no sacrifice of ductility (~16 pct). Further nitriding led to brittle fracture. Hardness profiles of the nitrided steels through the thickness reveal hard surfaces and a relatively softer core. The hardening of the shell in the nitrided steels is thought to be the combined effect of solid solution strengthening from nitrogen and dispersion strengthening from clusters and precipitates. The retained ductility is attributed to the hard-shell-soft-core structure through nitriding.

  1. Production and Machining of Thin Wall Gray and Ductile Cast Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, E.H.; Li, H.; Griffin, R.; Bates, C.E.; Eleftheriou, E.

    2000-11-03

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham, in cooperation with the American Foundry Society, companies across North America, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a project to develop an understanding of the factors that control the machinability of cast gray and ductile iron. Differences of as much as 500% have been found in machinability have been observed at the same strength. The most machinable irons were those with a high cell counts and few carbonitride inclusions. Additions of tin and copper can be added to both gray and ductile iron to stabilize the pearlite, but excessive additions (above those required to produce the desired pearlite content) degrade the machinability.

  2. Cumulative-strain-damage model of ductile fracture: simulation and prediction of engineering fracture tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.L.; Streit, R.D.; Reaugh, J.E.

    1980-10-03

    A cumulative-strain-damage criterion is used to predict the initiation and propagation of fracture in ductile materials. The model is consistent with a model of ductile rupture that involves void growth and coalescence. Two- and three-dimensional finite difference computer codes, which use incremental-plasticity theory to describe large strains with rotation, are used to trace the history of damage in a material due to external forces. Fracture begins when the damage exceeds a critical value over a critical distance and proceeds as the critical-damage state is reached elsewhere. This unified approach to failure prediction can be applied to an arbitrary geometry if the material behavior has been adequately characterized. The damage function must be calibrated for a particular material using various material property tests. The fracture toughness of 6061-T651 aluminum is predicted.

  3. Numerical simulation of damage evolution for ductile materials and mechanical properties study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amri, A.; Hanafi, I.; Haddou, M. E. Y.; Khamlichi, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents results of a numerical modelling of ductile fracture and failure of elements made of 5182H111 aluminium alloys subjected to dynamic traction. The analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook model based on ABAQUS software. The modelling difficulty related to prediction of ductile fracture mainly arises because there is a tremendous span of length scales from the structural problem to the micro-mechanics problem governing the material separation process. This study has been used the experimental results to calibrate a simple crack propagation criteria for shell elements of which one has often been used in practical analyses. The performance of the proposed model is in general good and it is believed that the presented results and experimental-numerical calibration procedure can be of use in practical finite-element simulations.

  4. The Role of Phase Stability in Ductile, Ordered B2 Intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James R; Ye, Y. Y.; Krcmar, Maja; Fu, Chong Long

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the underlying atomistic mechanism for experimentally observed large tensile ductility in various strongly ordered B2 intermetallic compounds. First-principles calculations demonstrate that all of the compounds exhibit little energy differences between the B2, B27 and B33 phases. These calculations relate observations of ductility in YAg, YCu and ZrCo to shape-memory materials including NiTi. One transformation pathway between the B2 and B33 phases establishes a connection between this phase competition, and stacking faults on the {l_brace}011{r_brace}B2 plane. The low energy of such a stacking fault will lead to splitting of the b=<100> dislocations into b/2 partials, observed in ZrCo, TiCo, and in the B19' phase of NiTi. Calculations demonstrate that this pathway is competitive with the traditional pathway for NiTi.

  5. A Unified Cohesive Zone Approach to Model Ductile Brittle Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a unified cohesive zone model has been proposed to predict, Ductile to Brittle Transition, DBT, in Reactor Pressure Vessel, RPV, steels. A general procedure is described to obtain the Cohesive Zone Model, CZM, parameters for the different temperatures and fracture probabilities. In order to establish the full master-curve, the procedure requires three calibration points with one at the upper-shelf for ductile fracture and two for the fracture probabilities, Pf, of 5% and 95% at the lower-shelf. In the current study, these calibrations were carried out by utilizing the experimental fracture toughness values and flow curves. After the calibration procedure, the simulations of fracture behavior (ranging from completely unstable to stable crack extension behavior) in one inch thick compact tension specimens at different temperatures yielded values that were comparable to the experimental fracture toughness values, indicating the viability of such unified modeling approach.

  6. Theoretical investigation on improving the ductility of Rh{sub 3}V by ternary addition

    SciTech Connect

    Manjula, M.; Sundareswari, M. Jayalakshmi, D. S.; Viswanathan, E.

    2015-06-24

    The band structure calculations are performed on the intermetallic compounds Rh{sub 3}V and Rh{sub 3}V{sub x}(Al){sub 1-x} by Full Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Wave(FP-LAPW) method. Total energies are calculated as a function of volume and fitted to Birch-Murnaughan equation of state to find the lattice parameter and the other ground state properties. The ductility of these compounds has been analyzed using Cauchy’s Pressure, Pugh Rule and Poisson’s ratio. From this study we observed that Rh{sub 3}V is brittle while its alloy Rh{sub 3}V{sub 0.875}Al{sub 0.125} is ductile. Electron density plots are illustrated and compared.

  7. Linking Nanoscales and Dislocation Shielding to the Ductile-Brittle Transition of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintsala, Eric; Teresi, Claire; Gerberich, William W.

    2016-12-01

    The ductile-brittle transition of nano/microscale silicon is explored at low-temperature, high stress conditions. A pathway to eventual mechanism maps describing this ductile-brittle transition behavior using sample size, strain rate, and temperature is outlined. First, a discussion of variables controlling the BDT in silicon is given and discussed in the context of development of eventual modeling that could simultaneously incorporate all their effects. For description of energy dissipation by dislocation nucleation from a crack tip, three critical input parameters are identified: the effective stress, activation volume, and activation energy for dislocation motion. These are discussed individually relating to the controlling variables for the BDT. Lastly, possibilities for measuring these parameters experimentally are also described.

  8. Superior Tensile Ductility in Bulk Metallic Glass with Gradient Amorphous Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Liu, C. T.; Ruan, H. H.; Lu, J.

    2014-04-01

    Over centuries, structural glasses have been deemed as a strong yet inherently `brittle' material due to their lack of tensile ductility. However, here we report bulk metallic glasses exhibiting both a high strength of ~2 GPa and an unprecedented tensile elongation of 2-4% at room temperature. Our experiments have demonstrated that intense structural evolution can be triggered in theses glasses by the carefully controlled surface mechanical attrition treatment, leading to the formation of gradient amorphous microstructures across the sample thickness. As a result, the engineered amorphous microstructures effectively promote multiple shear banding while delay cavitation in the bulk metallic glass, thus resulting in superior tensile ductility. The outcome of our research uncovers an unusual work-hardening mechanism in monolithic bulk metallic glasses and demonstrates a promising yet low-cost strategy suitable for producing large-sized, ultra-strong and stretchable structural glasses.

  9. Hypersonic Velocities and Submicrocrack Formation in Ductile Polymers under Uniaxial Tensile Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shichijyo, Shiro; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Shirouzu, Shigenori; Matsushige, Kazumi; Takemura, Tetuo

    1984-07-01

    Longitudinal hypersonic sound velocities in two kinds of ductile polymer, polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), were examined by Brillouin scattering. These two materials exhibited a decrease in hypersonic sound velocity (the softening phenomenon) when stress was applied, but the amount of softening as well as its angular dependence with respect to the stress direction were much smaller than those for a typical brittle polymer, poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Furthermore, a correlation between these acoustic properties and the formation of submicrocracks was demonstrated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements. The difference in the anisotropies in the softening of sound velocity between ductile and brittle polymers is discussed from the viewpoint of the shape and density of the submicrocracks

  10. Superior Tensile Ductility in Bulk Metallic Glass with Gradient Amorphous Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Liu, C. T.; Ruan, H. H.; Lu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Over centuries, structural glasses have been deemed as a strong yet inherently ‘brittle’ material due to their lack of tensile ductility. However, here we report bulk metallic glasses exhibiting both a high strength of ~2 GPa and an unprecedented tensile elongation of 2–4% at room temperature. Our experiments have demonstrated that intense structural evolution can be triggered in theses glasses by the carefully controlled surface mechanical attrition treatment, leading to the formation of gradient amorphous microstructures across the sample thickness. As a result, the engineered amorphous microstructures effectively promote multiple shear banding while delay cavitation in the bulk metallic glass, thus resulting in superior tensile ductility. The outcome of our research uncovers an unusual work-hardening mechanism in monolithic bulk metallic glasses and demonstrates a promising yet low-cost strategy suitable for producing large-sized, ultra-strong and stretchable structural glasses. PMID:24755683

  11. Unnotched Charpy Impact Energy Transition Behavior of Austempered Engineering Grade Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisakurek, Sukru Ergin; Ozel, Ahmet

    2014-04-01

    Unnotched Charpy impact energy transition behavior of five different engineering grade ductile iron castings, as specified by EN 1563 Standards, were examined in as-cast, as well as in austempered states. ADIs were produced with the maximum impact energy values permissible for the grades. Austempering treatment detrimented the sub-zero impact properties of the ferritic castings, but considerably enhanced those of the pearlitic-ferritic irons. The impact energy transition behavior of the austempered states of all the grades examined were noted to be determined by the progressive transformation of the unavoidable carbon-unsaturated and untransformed regions of the austenite remaining in the matrix of the austempered ductile iron to martensite with decreasing temperature.

  12. Computer simulation of crack propagation in ductile materials under biaxial dynamic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.M.

    1980-07-29

    The finite-difference computer program HEMP is used to simulate the crack-propagation phenomenon in two-dimensional ductile materials under truly dynamic biaxial loads. A comulative strain-damage criterion for the initiation of ductile fracture is used. To simulate crack propagation numerically, the method of equivalent free-surface boundary conditions and the method of artifical velocity are used in the computation. Centrally cracked rectangular aluminum bars subjected to constant-velocity biaxial loads at the edges are considered. Tensile and compressive loads in the direction of crack length are found, respectively, to increase and decrease directional instability in crack propagation, where the directional instability is characterized by branching or bifurcation.

  13. Ductile Damage Prediction in Taylor Impact Cylinder Test Using CDM Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, A.; Bonora, N.

    2004-07-01

    Taylor cylinder impact test has been initially proposed as a potential testing technique to measure dynamic effect on material yield strength. Today, this technique represents an interesting benchmark case for constitutive and damage model performance verification. In this study, an extensive numerical investigation, using both finite element code and Lagrangian hydro-code, has been performed on standard Taylor impact cylinder configuration and Rod-on-Rod (ROR) test in OFHC and OFE copper. Here, material strength has been modeled using Johnson and Cook formulation which accounts both strain rate and temperature material sensibility. Ductile damage has been modeled using an advanced continuum damage mechanics model, as proposed by Bonora, which accounts for stress triaxiality effects on ductility, stress history at material point and where only a limited number of parameters is required. For both the test configuration investigated, both final calculated post test shape and damage pattern have been compared with experimental data available in literature.

  14. Smart fiber-reinforced polymer rods featuring improved ductility and health monitoring capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belarbi, Abdeldjelil; Watkins, Steve E.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Corra, Josh; Konz, Bethany

    2001-06-01

    The strain-measuring capability of fiber optic strain gages in fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) rebars was investigated for failure-inducing loads. Fiber optic interferometric sensors were embedded in a pultruded carbon fiber core and then another layer of carbon fibers were filament wound around the core to form a shell. Pultrusion and filament winding techniques protect the fiber optic strain gages from the concrete environment while providing a secure bond to the core and additional ductility to the overall FRP rebar. Tests of coupon FRP rebar and of FRP-rebar-reinforced concrete beams show that the fiber optic strain gages can read internal strain through failure and can duplicate data from conventional linear variable differential transformers and electrical resistance strain gages. Also, the shell of the FRP rebar inside the concrete beams failed before the rebar core providing pseudo-ductility.

  15. In-Situ Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Iron Using Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Druschitz, Alan; Aristizabal, Ricardo; Druschitz, Edward; Hubbard, Camden R; Watkins, Thomas R; Walker, Larry R; Ostrander, M

    2012-01-01

    Intercritically austempered ductile irons hold promise for applications requiring fatigue durability, excellent castability, low production energy requirements, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and excellent machinability. In the present study, four different ductile iron alloys, containing manganese and nickel as the primary austenite-stabilizing elements, were heat treated to obtain different quantities of austenite in the final microstructure. This paper reports the microstructures and phases present in these alloys. Further, lattice strains and diffraction elastic constants in various crystallographic directions and the transformation characteristics of the austenite as a function of applied stress were determined using in-situ loading with neutron diffraction at the second generation Neutron Residual Stress Facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  16. High strength and high ductility behavior of 6061-T6 alloy after laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencalp Irizalp, Simge; Saklakoglu, Nursen

    2016-02-01

    The plastic deformation behavior of 6061-T6 alloy which was subjected to severe plastic deformation (SPD) at high strain rates during laser shock processing (LSP) was researched. In LSP-treated materials, the near surface microstructural change was examined by TEM and fracture surfaces after tensile testing were examined by SEM. An increase in strength of metallic materials brings about the decrease in ductility. In this study, the results showed that LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy exhibited both high strength and high ductility. TEM observation showed that stacking fault (SF) ribbon enlarged, deformation twins formed and twin boundary increased in LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy. This observation was an indication of stacking fault energy (SFE) decrease. Work hardening capability was recovered after LSP impacts.

  17. Nonlinear creep and ductile creep rupture of perfectly elastoplastic rods under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. P.; Romanov, A. V.; Romanova, N. V.

    2008-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the problem of predicting nonlinear creep strains and time to ductile rupture of prismatic rods under constant tension. The material of the rod is assumed isotropic, homogeneous, and perfectly plastic. The problem is solved using models that take into account the change in the geometry of the rod during creep, the finiteness of the creep strains, and the effect of the initial and actual elastic strains. The conditions whereby the characteristic dimension of the rod tends to infinity and the accumulated and real strains in the viscous flow are limited are used as a failure criterion. The calculated results are compared with experimental data for a number of steels and alloys to formulate the conditions for the ductile rupture and embrittlement of metallic materials under uniaxial creep

  18. On the limit of surface integrity of alumina by ductile-mode grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Zarudi, I.; Zhang, L.C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates both experimentally and theoretically the subsurface damage in alumina by ductile-mode grinding. It was found that the distribution of the fractured area on a ground mirror surface, with the Rms roughness in the range from 30 nm to 90 nm, depends on not only the grinding conditions but also the pores in the bulk material. Surface pit formation is the result of interaction of abrasive grains of the grinding wheel with pores. Thus the surface quality achievable by ductile-mode grinding is limited by the initial microstructure of a material. The investigation shows that median and radial cracks do not appear and hence are not the cause of fracture as usually thought.

  19. Improving the strength and ductility of magnesium die-casting alloys via rare-earth addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, Per; Pettersen, Ketil; Westengen, Hakon

    2003-11-01

    The development of new die-casting alloys is a multifaceted task, where success depends upon the ability to control a chain of properties, and where the weakest link determines the outcome. Optimizing one property by alloying often comes at the expense of one or more other properties. A typical example is yield strength vs. ductility. In developing alloys for high-pressure die casting, the peculiar aspects of the process must be considered. High injection speeds, high metal pressures, and the lack of efficient thermal barriers lead to extremely high cooling rates. This makes high-pressure die casting unique since the resulting refined microstructure provides excellent mechanical properties. In this article, the influence of alloy composition on mechanical properties is investigated, with special emphasis on strength and ductility.

  20. Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: Heliumisotope trends

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B. Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2007-10-07

    Heat and mass are injected into the shallow crust when mantle fluids are able to flow through the ductile lower crust. Minimum 3He/4He ratios in surface fluids from the northern Basin and Range province, western North America increase systematically from low, crustal values in the east to high, mantle values in the west, a regional trend that correlates with the rates of active crustal deformation. The highest ratios occur where the extension and shear strain rates are greatest. The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active trans-tensional deformation indicates a deformation enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere in regions even where there is no significant magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local, high-{sup 3}He/{sup 4}He anomalies signifying hidden magmatic activity and/or deep fluid production with locally enhanced permeability, identifying zones with high resource potential, particularly for geothermal energy development.

  1. Manipulating the interfacial structure of nanomaterials to achieve a unique combination of strength and ductility

    PubMed Central

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Pan, Zhiliang; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The control of interfaces in engineered nanostructured materials has met limited success compared with that which has evolved in natural materials, where hierarchical structures with distinct interfacial states are often found. Such interface control could mitigate common limitations of engineering nanomaterials. For example, nanostructured metals exhibit extremely high strength, but this benefit comes at the expense of other important properties like ductility. Here, we report a technique for combining nanostructuring with recent advances capable of tuning interface structure, a complementary materials design strategy that allows for unprecedented property combinations. Copper-based alloys with both grain sizes in the nanometre range and distinct grain boundary structural features are created, using segregating dopants and a processing route that favours the formation of amorphous intergranular films. The mechanical behaviour of these alloys shows that the trade-off between strength and ductility typically observed for metallic materials is successfully avoided here. PMID:26887444

  2. Statistical model with two order parameters for ductile and soft fiber bundles in nanoscience and biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Traditional fiber bundles models (FBMs) have been an effective tool to understand brittle heterogeneous systems. However, fiber bundles in modern nano- and bioapplications demand a new generation of FBM capturing more complex deformation processes in addition to damage. In the context of loose bundle systems and with reference to time-independent plasticity and soft biomaterials, we formulate a generalized statistical model for ductile fracture and nonlinear elastic problems capable of handling more simultaneous deformation mechanisms by means of two order parameters (as opposed to one). As the first rational FBM for coupled damage problems, it may be the cornerstone for advanced statistical models of heterogeneous systems in nanoscience and materials design, especially to explore hierarchical and bio-inspired concepts in the arena of nanobiotechnology. Applicative examples are provided for illustrative purposes at last, discussing issues in inverse analysis (i.e., nonlinear elastic polymer fiber and ductile Cu submicron bars arrays) and direct design (i.e., strength prediction).

  3. The abrasion and impact-abrasion behavior of austempered ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Lerner, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    Austempering of ductile irons has led to a new class of irons, Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs), with improved mechanical strength and fracture toughness lacking in gray cast irons. Laboratory wear tests have been used to evaluate the abrasive and impact-abrasive wear behavior of a suite of ADIs. The use of high-stress, two-body abrasion, low-stress, three-body abrasion, and impact-abrasion tests provides a clear picture of the abrasive wear behavior of the ADIs and the mechanisms of material removal. When combined with hardness measurements, fracture toughness and a knowledge of the microstructure of the ADIs, the overall performance can be assessed relative to more wear resistant materials such as martensitic steels and high-chromium white cast irons

  4. Bifurcation and neck formation as a precursor to ductile fracture during high rate extension

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, L.B.; Soerensen, N.J.

    1997-12-31

    A block of ductile material, typically a segment of a plate or shell, being deformed homogeneously in simple plane strain extension commonly undergoes a bifurcation in deformation mode to nonuniform straining in the advanced stages of plastic flow. The focus here is on the influence of material inertia on the bifurcation process, particularly on the formation of diffuse necks as precursors to dynamic ductile fracture. The issue is considered from two points of view, first within the context of the theory of bifurcation of rate-independent, incrementally linear materials and then in terms of the complete numerical solution of a boundary value problem for an elastic-viscoplastic material. It is found that inertia favors the formation of relatively short wavelength necks as observed in shaped charge break-up and dynamic fragmentation.

  5. Manipulating the interfacial structure of nanomaterials to achieve a unique combination of strength and ductility.

    PubMed

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Pan, Zhiliang; Rupert, Timothy J

    2016-02-18

    The control of interfaces in engineered nanostructured materials has met limited success compared with that which has evolved in natural materials, where hierarchical structures with distinct interfacial states are often found. Such interface control could mitigate common limitations of engineering nanomaterials. For example, nanostructured metals exhibit extremely high strength, but this benefit comes at the expense of other important properties like ductility. Here, we report a technique for combining nanostructuring with recent advances capable of tuning interface structure, a complementary materials design strategy that allows for unprecedented property combinations. Copper-based alloys with both grain sizes in the nanometre range and distinct grain boundary structural features are created, using segregating dopants and a processing route that favours the formation of amorphous intergranular films. The mechanical behaviour of these alloys shows that the trade-off between strength and ductility typically observed for metallic materials is successfully avoided here.

  6. Manipulating the interfacial structure of nanomaterials to achieve a unique combination of strength and ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Pan, Zhiliang; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2016-02-01

    The control of interfaces in engineered nanostructured materials has met limited success compared with that which has evolved in natural materials, where hierarchical structures with distinct interfacial states are often found. Such interface control could mitigate common limitations of engineering nanomaterials. For example, nanostructured metals exhibit extremely high strength, but this benefit comes at the expense of other important properties like ductility. Here, we report a technique for combining nanostructuring with recent advances capable of tuning interface structure, a complementary materials design strategy that allows for unprecedented property combinations. Copper-based alloys with both grain sizes in the nanometre range and distinct grain boundary structural features are created, using segregating dopants and a processing route that favours the formation of amorphous intergranular films. The mechanical behaviour of these alloys shows that the trade-off between strength and ductility typically observed for metallic materials is successfully avoided here.

  7. Ductility of metal alloys with grain size distribution in a wide range of strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Skripnyak, Nataliya V.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.

    Ductility of ultrafine grained (UFG) metal alloys with a distribution of grain size was investigated in wide loading conditions by numerical simulation. The multiscale models with a unimodal and a bimodal grain size distributions were developed using the data of structure research of hexagonal close packed and face center cubic UFG alloys. Macroscopic fracture is considered as a result of the formation of percolation clusters of damage at the mesoscopic level. The critical fracture strain of UFG alloys on the mesoscale level depends on the relative volumes of coarse grains. The nucleation of damages at quasi-static and dynamic loading is associated with strain localization in UFG partial volumes with bimodal grain size distribution. The concentration of damages arise in the vicinity of the boundaries of coarse and ultrafine grains. The occurrence of a bimodal grain size distributions causes the increase of UFG alloys' ductility, but decrease of their tensile strength. Linkoping University, Sweden.

  8. Simulation of Ductile Crack Propagation for Pipe Structures Using X-FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Naoki; Nagashima, Toshio

    Conventional finite element method is continually used for the flaw evaluation of pipe structures to investigate the fitness-for-service for power plant components, however, it is generally time consuming to make a model of specific crack configuration. The consideration of a propagating surface crack is further accentuated since the crack propagation behavior along the crack front is implicitly affected by the distribution of the crack driving force along the crack front. The authors developed a system to conduct crack propagation analysis by use of the three-dimensional elastic-plastic extended finite element method. It was applied to simulate ductile crack propagation of circumferentially surface cracks in pipe structures and could realize the simultaneous calculation of the J-integral and the consequent ductile crack propagation. Both the crack extension and the possible change of crack shape were evaluated by the developed system.

  9. Investigation of High Temperature Ductility Losses in Alpha-Beta Titanium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    0 diffractometer was used, so the best extrapolation parameter was cos/ine. Based on this: Ad/d = cos e/ s ine Starting with Bragg’s law , nX = 2dsinB...Naval Research Laboratory Materials Science & Component Technology WahngoDC 20375-5000 D TICV ELECTE ____________JUNit 16 Ei oi April, 1988 S - AQ...colony microconstituent S and ductility was found to exist only at high temperature, indicating that the deformation characteristics of the material

  10. Multi-Objective Optimization of a Wrought Magnesium Alloy for High Strength and Ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Patton, Robert M; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2013-01-01

    An optimization technique is coupled with crystal plasticity based finite element (CPFE) computations to aid the microstructural design of a wrought magnesium alloy for improved strength and ductility. The initial microstructure consists of a collection of sub-micron sized grains containing deformation twins. The variables used in the simulations are crystallographic texture, and twin spacing within the grains. It is assumed that plastic deformation occurs mainly by dislocation slip on two sets of slip systems classified as hard and soft modes. The hard modes are those slip systems that are inclined to the twin planes and the soft mode consists of dislocation glide along the twin plane. The CPFE code calculates the stress-strain response of the microstructure as a function of the microstructural parameters and the length-scale of the features. A failure criterion based on a critical shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress is used to define ductility. The optimization is based on the sequential generation of an initial population defined by the texture and twin spacing variables. The CPFE code and the optimizer are coupled in parallel so that new generations are created and analyzed dynamically. In each successive generation, microstructures that satisfy at least 90% of the mean strength and mean ductility in the current generation are retained. Multiple generation runs based on the above procedure are carried out in order to obtain maximum strength-ductility combinations. The implications of the computations for the design of a wrought magnesium alloy are discussed. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  11. Homogenization-based continuum plasticity-damage model for ductile failure of materials containing heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Bai, Jie; Paquet, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    This paper develops an accurate and computationally efficient homogenization-based continuum plasticity-damage (HCPD) model for macroscopic analysis of ductile failure in porous ductile materials containing brittle inclusions. Example of these materials are cast alloys such as aluminum and metal matrix composites. The overall framework of the HCPD model follows the structure of the anisotropic Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) type elasto-plasticity model for porous ductile materials. The HCPD model is assumed to be orthotropic in an evolving material principal coordinate system throughout the deformation history. The GTN model parameters are calibrated from homogenization of evolving variables in representative volume elements (RVE) of the microstructure containing inclusions and voids. Micromechanical analyses for this purpose are conducted by the locally enriched Voronoi cell finite element model (LE-VCFEM) [Hu, C., Ghosh, S., 2008. Locally enhanced Voronoi cell finite element model (LE-VCFEM) for simulating evolving fracture in ductile microstructures containing inclusions. Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. 76(12), 1955-1992]. The model also introduces a novel void nucleation criterion from micromechanical damage evolution due to combined inclusion and matrix cracking. The paper discusses methods for estimating RVE length scales in microstructures with non-uniform dispersions, as well as macroscopic characteristic length scales for non-local constitutive models. Comparison of results from the anisotropic HCPD model with homogenized micromechanics shows excellent agreement. The HCPD model has a huge efficiency advantage over micromechanics models. Hence, it is a very effective tool in predicting macroscopic damage in structures with direct reference to microstructural composition.

  12. Processing, Mechanical Properties, and Ballistic Impact Effects of Austempered Ductile Iron

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    Optical Microscopy: 0.50-cal. APM2 vs. ADI .............. 22 5. Conclusions ....................................................... 29 6. R eferences...Fracture Profile: BCkne Fragment, Radial FracturegandfScabblingaShont ind TreFrcueinTninadShear. As Polished. 27crre~ r 1, Figure llc. Fracture...Strength Steels." Materials Forum, vol. 12, pp. 31-37, 1988. Gundlach, R . B., and J. F. Janowak. "A Review of Austempered Ductile Iron Metallurgy

  13. Machinable, Thin-Walled, Gray and Ductile Iron Casting Production, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bates; Hanjun Li; Robin Griffin

    2003-12-08

    This report presents the results of research conducted to determine the effects of normal and abnormal processing and compositional variations on machinability (tool wear rate) of gray and ductile iron. The procedures developed allow precise tool wear measurements to be made and interpreted in terms of microstructures and compositions. Accurate data allows the most efficient ways for improving machinability to be determined without sacrificing properties of the irons.

  14. Hot Ductility and Compression Deformation Behavior of TRIP980 at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei; Li, Haiyang; Gan, Bin; Zhao, Xue; Yao, Yi; Wang, Li

    2017-04-01

    The hot ductility tests of a kind of 980 MPa class Fe-0.31C (wt pct) TRIP steel (TRIP980) with the addition of Ti/V/Nb were conducted on a Gleeble-3500 thermomechanical simulator in the temperatures ranging from 873 K to 1573 K (600 °C to 1300 °C) at a constant strain rate of 0.001 s-1. It is found that the hot ductility trough ranges from 873 K to 1123 K (600 °C to 850 °C). The recommended straightening temperatures are from 1173 K to 1523 K (900 °C to 1250 °C). The isothermal hot compression deformation behavior was also studied by means of Gleeble-3500 in the temperatures ranging from 1173 K to 1373 K (900 °C to 1100 °C) at strain rates ranging from 0.01 s-1 to 10 s-1. The results show that the peak stress decreases with the increasing temperature and the decreasing strain rate. The deformation activation energy of the test steel is 436.7 kJ/mol. The hot deformation equation of the steel has been established, and the processing maps have been developed on the basis of experimental data and the principle of dynamic materials model (DMM). By analyzing the processing maps of strains of 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9, it is found that dynamic recrystallization occurs in the peak power dissipation efficiency domain, which is the optimal area of hot working. Finally, the factors influencing hot ductility and thermal activation energy of the test steel were investigated by means of microscopic analysis. It indicates that the additional microalloying elements play important roles both in the loss of hot ductility and in the enormous increase of deformation activation energy for the TRIP980 steel.

  15. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Jeffrey M.; Martin, Heidi B.

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp2 carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes. PMID:25404788

  16. Understanding the changes in ductility and Poisson's ratio of metallic glasses during annealing from microscopic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Ngai, K. L.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-07-01

    In the paper K. L. Ngai et al., [J. Chem. 140, 044511 (2014)], the empirical correlation of ductility with the Poisson's ratio, νPoisson, found in metallic glasses was theoretically explained by microscopic dynamic processes which link on the one hand ductility, and on the other hand the Poisson's ratio. Specifically, the dynamic processes are the primitive relaxation in the Coupling Model which is the precursor of the Johari-Goldstein β-relaxation, and the caged atoms dynamics characterized by the effective Debye-Waller factor f0 or equivalently the nearly constant loss (NCL) in susceptibility. All these processes and the parameters characterizing them are accessible experimentally except f0 or the NCL of caged atoms; thus, so far, the experimental verification of the explanation of the correlation between ductility and Poisson's ratio is incomplete. In the experimental part of this paper, we report dynamic mechanical measurement of the NCL of the metallic glass La60Ni15Al25 as-cast, and the changes by annealing at temperature below Tg. The observed monotonic decrease of the NCL with aging time, reflecting the corresponding increase of f0, correlates with the decrease of νPoisson. This is important observation because such measurements, not made before, provide the missing link in confirming by experiment the explanation of the correlation of ductility with νPoisson. On aging the metallic glass, also observed in the isochronal loss spectra is the shift of the β-relaxation to higher temperatures and reduction of the relaxation strength. These concomitant changes of the β-relaxation and NCL are the root cause of embrittlement by aging the metallic glass. The NCL of caged atoms is terminated by the onset of the primitive relaxation in the Coupling Model, which is generally supported by experiments. From this relation, the monotonic decrease of the NCL with aging time is caused by the slowing down of the primitive relaxation and β-relaxation on annealing, and

  17. Substantial tensile ductility in sputtered Zr-Ni-Al nano-sized metallic glass

    DOE PAGES

    Liontas, Rachel; Jafary-Zadeh, Mehdi; Zeng, Qiaoshi; ...

    2016-08-04

    We investigate the mechanical behavior and atomic-level structure of glassy Zr-Ni-Al nano-tensile specimens with widths between 75 and 215 nm. We focus our studies on two different energy states: (1) as-sputtered and (2) sputtered then annealed below the glass transition temperature (Tg). In-situ tensile experiments conducted inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) reveal substantial tensile ductility in some cases reaching >10% engineering plastic strains, >150% true plastic strains, and necking down to a point during tensile straining in specimens as wide as ~150 nm. We found the extent of ductility depends on both the specimen size and the annealing conditions.more » Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD), we explain the observed mechanical behavior through changes in free volume as well as short- and medium-range atomic-level order that occur upon annealing. This work demonstrates the importance of carefully choosing the metallic glass fabrication method and post-processing conditions for achieving a certain atomic-level structure and free volume within the metallic glass, which then determine the overall mechanical response. Lastly, an important implication is that sputter deposition may be a particularly promising technique for producing thin coatings of metallic glasses with significant ductility, due to the high level of disorder and excess free volume resulting from the sputtering process and to the suitability of sputtering for producing thin coatings that may exhibit enhanced size-induced ductility.« less

  18. Superplastic tensile ductility enhanced by grain size refinement in a zirconia-dispersed alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, K.; Suzuki, T.S.; Hiraga, K.; Sakka, Y.

    1997-12-18

    High-temperature tensile ductility in fine-grained pure alumina is limited to {approximately}20% in engineering strain owing to rapid dynamic grain growth accompanied by large strain hardening and resultant severe cavitation. Accordingly, many trials have been made to suppress the dynamic grain growth by use of an additive such as MgO or ZrO{sub 2}. The dynamic grain growth of MgO-doped alumina, however, is still active to limit the tensile ductility to {approximately}80% at 1,623--1,773 K. Although some additional improvement is possible by the codoping of CuO or NiO, the maximum tensile elongation has remained 140%. On the other hand, ZrO{sub 2}-particle dispersion is much more effective in suppressing grain growth and hence strain hardening, whereas the resultant tensile ductility stays up to 110% or less at 1,723--1,773 K. It has been attributed to the increment of flow stress caused inherently by ZrO{sub 2}-dispersion through the suppression of grain boundary sliding. Regardless of these preceding studies, the approach by ZrO{sub 2}-particle pinning has not been completed, because the initial grain sizes of alumina reached about 1 {micro}m already in earlier experiments under tension. A possibility remains to enhance the tensile ductility of ZrO{sub 2}-dispersed alumina by such a reduction in grain size as can compensate the increment of flow stress due to ZrO{sub 2}-addition. From this point of view, the present study examined the high-temperature tensile properties of a fine-grained, 10-vol%-ZrO{sub 2}-dispersed alumina prepared by colloidal processing. The results will demonstrate that large tensile elongation exceeding 500% can be obtained when the initial grain size is maintained below 0.5 {micro}m.

  19. Determination of the ductile-brittle transition temperature from the microplastic-strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. K.; Solntsev, Yu. P.

    2008-04-01

    The possibility of the determination of the tendency of cast and deformed steels to brittle fracture using the temperature dependence of the small-plastic-strain rate is studied. The temperature corresponding to the maximum in this curve is found to indicate an abrupt decrease in the steel plasticity, which makes it possible to interpret it as the ductile-brittle transition temperature depending only on the structure of a material.

  20. Three-dimensional failure envelopes and the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SchöPfer, Martin P. J.; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom

    2013-04-01

    Rocks deformed at low confining pressure are brittle, meaning that after peak stress the strength decreases to a residual value determined by frictional sliding. The difference between the peak and residual value is the stress drop. At high confining pressure, however, no stress drop occurs. The transition pressure at which no loss in strength occurs is a possible definition of the brittle-ductile transition. Here, we show, using numerical rock deformation, how this type of brittle-ductile transition emerges from a simple model in which rock is idealized as an assemblage of cemented spherical unbreakable grains. Three-dimensional failure and residual strength envelopes determined for this model material illustrate that the brittle-ductile transition is a smoothly varying, mean stress-dependent function in principal stress space. Neither the Mohr-Coulomb nor the Drucker-Prager failure criterion, which are the most commonly used empirical laws in rock and soil mechanics, respectively, adequately describes the dependence of peak strength and the brittle-ductile transition on the intermediate stress (or Lode angle). A semi-quantitative comparison between the modeled peak strength envelope with a selection of existing polyaxial rock data shows that the emergent intermediate stress dependence of strength in bonded particle models is comparable to that observed in rock. Deformation of particle models in which bond shear failure is inhibited illustrates that the non-linear pressure dependence of strength (concave failure envelopes) is, at high mean stress, the result of microscopic shear failure, a result consistent with earlier two-dimensional numerical multiple-crack simulations.

  1. Fundamental Understanding of the Intrinsic Ductility in Nickel-Base L1 sub 2 Type Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    tantalum and niobium modified ternary alloys as published in the literature (References 9 and 16), in both cases here the > orientation is observed to be...applied to a nickel-base Llz phase compound. Large single crystals of binary and tantalum -modified V. Ni3Al alloys with various stoichiometry were...ductility of the tantalum -modified ternary alloys shows a rather different 0. OISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21 ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  2. Effect of grain orientation on ductility in a nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongqi; Misra, Amit; Liaw, Peter K; Choo, Hahn

    2008-01-01

    The influence of columnar grain geometry on mechanical property was studied in an electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy. The compressive results show that the strength is independent of grain orientation. However, the plastic strain increased remarkably when the loading axis is parallel to the direction of grain columns, which is due to the enhanced grain boundary and dislocation activities. The significance of the current study is that a new strategy was developed to improve the ductility of nanocrystalline materials.

  3. Controlling factors for the brittle-to-ductile transition in tungsten single crystals

    PubMed

    Gumbsch; Riedle; Hartmaier; Fischmeister

    1998-11-13

    Materials performance in structural applications is often restricted by a transition from ductile response to brittle fracture with decreasing temperature. This transition is currently viewed as being controlled either by dislocation mobility or by the nucleation of dislocations. Fracture experiments on tungsten single crystals reported here provide evidence for the importance of dislocation nucleation for the fracture toughness in the semibrittle regime. However, it is shown that the transition itself, in general, is controlled by dislocation mobility rather than by nucleation.

  4. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp(2) carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes.

  5. Deformation of brittle-ductile thrust wedges in experiments and nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, J. H. W.; Brun, J. P.; Sokoutis, D.

    2003-10-01

    Even though the rheology of thrust wedges is mostly frictional, a basal ductile decollement is often involved. By comparison with purely frictional wedges, such brittle-ductile wedges generally display anomalous structures such as backward vergence, widely spaced thrust units, and nonfrontward sequences of thrust development. Laboratory experiments are used here to study the deformation of brittle-ductile thrust wedges. Results are compared with natural systems in the Jura Mountains and the northern Pakistan Salt Range and Potwar Plateau. Two series of three models are used to illustrate the effects of varying the basal wedge angle (β) and shortening rate (V). These two parameters directly control variations in relative strength between brittle and ductile layers (BD coupling). Wedges with strong BD coupling (low β and high V) give almost regular frontward sequences with closely spaced thrust units and, as such, are not significantly different from purely frictional wedges. Weak BD coupling (high β and low V) gives dominantly backward thrusting sequences. Intermediate BD coupling produces frontward-backward oscillating sequences. The spacing of thrust units increases as coupling decreases. Back thrusts develop in parts of a wedge where BD coupling is weak, regardless of the thrust sequence. Wedges with weak BD coupling need large amounts of bulk shortening (more than 30%) to attain a state of equilibrium, at which stable sliding along the base occurs. On this basis, we argue that a state of equilibrium has not yet been attained in at least some parts of the Jura Mountains and eastern Salt Range and Potwar Plateau thrust systems.

  6. Contact mechanics at nanometric scale using nanoindentation technique for brittle and ductile materials.

    PubMed

    Roa, J J; Rayon, E; Morales, M; Segarra, M

    2012-06-01

    In the last years, Nanoindentation or Instrumented Indentation Technique has become a powerful tool to study the mechanical properties at micro/nanometric scale (commonly known as hardness, elastic modulus and the stress-strain curve). In this review, the different contact mechanisms (elastic and elasto-plastic) are discussed, the recent patents for each mechanism (elastic and elasto-plastic) are summarized in detail, and the basic equations employed to know the mechanical behaviour for brittle and ductile materials are described.

  7. Fabrication of a 2014Al-SiC/2014Al Sandwich Structure Composite with Good Tensile Strength and Ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xian; Zhao, Yu-Guang; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Wu, Min; Pei, Chang-hao; Chen, Chao; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2016-11-01

    A sandwich structure laminate composed of a ductile 2014Al inter-layer and two nanoscale SiC reinforced 2014Al (SiC/2014Al) composite outer layers was successfully fabricated through the combination of powder metallurgy and hot rolling. The ductile 2014Al inter-layer effectively improved the processability of the sandwiched laminates. Tensile test revealed that the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the sandwiched laminate were 287 and 470 MPa, respectively, compared with 235 and 425 MPa for monolithic 2014Al. The good performance of the sandwiched laminate results from the strong bonding between the SiC/2014Al composites layer and the ductile 2014Al layer. Thus, the sandwich structure with a composite surface and ductile core is effective for increasing the strength and toughness of composite laminates.

  8. High Strength and Good Ductility in Cu-3Ag-0.5Zr Alloy by Cryo-Rolling and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, S. Chenna; Chawake, Niraj; Kottada, Ravi Sankar; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; Venkitakrishnan, P. V.

    2017-01-01

    A combination of high strength and good ductility was achieved in a precipitation hardenable Cu-3Ag-0.5Zr alloy through cryo-rolling (80% reduction in thickness) and aging in the temperature range (200-500 °C). The high-strength sheets produced by cryo-rolling showed a threefold increase in yield strength compared to that of the solution-treated and aged (220 MPa) sample, while retaining good ductility. An optimum combination of high strength (614 MPa) and ductility (8%) was achieved by 80% cryo-rolling and aging at 320 °C for 1 h. The high strength and good ductility obtained was attributed to various microstructural factors such as deformation twins, ultra-fine grains, high dislocation density and fine nano-sized silver precipitates.

  9. The ductile-brittle size transition of iron aluminide ligaments in an FeAl/TiC composite

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, R.; Schneibel, J.H.

    1998-08-10

    The fracture surfaces of FeAl/TiC composites containing 70 vol% TiC were investigated. Since thin iron aluminide ligaments in the composites fractured in a ductile manner, whereas thicker ones fractured by cleavage, a systematic correlation of the fracture mode to the ligament thickness was performed. The results clearly show that FeAl ligaments thicker than about 1--2 {micro}m fracture by cleavage and those smaller in size fracture predominantly in a ductile manner. The ductile failure mode is attributed to the limited dislocation pile-up distance available for very thin ligaments, which prevents high stresses from building up and eliminates cleavage fracture. It is also shown that the ductile-brittle transition size is controlled by alloying and/or heat treatment. No significant dependence of the fracture toughness on the fracture mode would be found.

  10. Predicting Ductility and Failure Modes of TRIP Steels under Different Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-06-12

    We study the ultimate ductility and failure modes of a TRIP (TRansformation-Induced Plasticity) 800 steel under different loading conditions with an advanced micromechanics-based finite element analysis. The representative volume element (RVE) for the TRIP800 under examination is developed based on an actual microstructure obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The evolution of retained austenite during deformation process and the mechanical properties of the constituent phases of the TRIP800 steel are obtained from the synchrotron-based in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) experiments and a self-consistent (SC) model. The ductile failure of the TRIP800 under different loading conditions is predicted in the form of plastic strain localization without any prescribed failure criteria for the individual phases. Comparisons of the computational results with experimental measurements suggest that the microstructure-based finite element analysis can well capture the overall macroscopic behavior of the TRIP800 steel under different loading conditions. The methodology described in this study may be extended for studying the ultimate ductile failure mechanisms of TRIP steels as well as the effects of the various processing parameters on the macroscopic behaviors of TRIP steels.

  11. Effect of Ductile Agents on the Dynamic Behavior of SiC3D Network Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi; Fan, Qunbo

    2016-10-01

    Co-continuous SiC ceramic composites using pure aluminum, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU) as ductile agents were developed. The dynamic mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms were investigated experimentally using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method and computationally by finite element (FE) simulations. The results show that the SiC3D/Al composite has the best overall performance in comparison with SiC3D/epoxy and SiC3D/PU composites. FE simulations are generally consistent with experimental data. These simulations provide valuable help in predicting mechanical strength and in interpreting the experimental results and failure mechanisms. They may be combined with micrographs for fracture characterizations of the composites. We found that interactions between the SiC phase and ductile agents under dynamic compression in the SHPB method are complex, and that interfacial condition is an important parameter that determines the mechanical response of SiC3D composites with a characteristic interlocking structure during dynamic compression. However, the effect of the mechanical properties of ductile agents on dynamic behavior of the composites is a second consideration in the production of the composites.

  12. Ru/Al Multilayers Integrate Maximum Energy Density and Ductility for Reactive Materials

    PubMed Central

    Woll, K.; Bergamaschi, A.; Avchachov, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Gier, S.; Pauly, C.; Leibenguth, P.; Wagner, C.; Nordlund, K.; Mücklich, F.

    2016-01-01

    Established and already commercialized energetic materials, such as those based on Ni/Al for joining, lack the adequate combination of high energy density and ductile reaction products. To join components, this combination is required for mechanically reliable bonds. In addition to the improvement of existing technologies, expansion into new fields of application can also be anticipated which triggers the search for improved materials. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the key parameters that enables us to classify the Ru/Al system as new reactive material among other energetic systems. We finally found that Ru/Al exhibits the unusual integration of high energy density and ductility. For example, we measured reaction front velocities up to 10.9 (±0.33) ms−1 and peak reaction temperatures of about 2000 °C indicating the elevated energy density. To our knowledge, such high temperatures have never been reported in experiments for metallic multilayers. In situ experiments show the synthesis of a single-phase B2-RuAl microstructure ensuring improved ductility. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the transformation behavior to RuAl. This study fundamentally characterizes a Ru/Al system and demonstrates its enhanced properties fulfilling the identification requirements of a novel nanoscaled energetic material. PMID:26822309

  13. Effects of chloride ions on corrosion of ductile iron and carbon steel in soil environments.

    PubMed

    Song, Yarong; Jiang, Guangming; Chen, Ying; Zhao, Peng; Tian, Yimei

    2017-07-31

    Chloride is reported to play a significant role in corrosion reactions, products and kinetics of ferrous metals. To enhance the understanding of the effects of soil environments, especially the saline soils with high levels of chloride, on the corrosion of ductile iron and carbon steel, a 3-month corrosion test was carried out by exposing ferrous metals to soils of six chloride concentrations. The surface morphology, rust compositions and corrosion kinetics were comprehensively studied by visual observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD), weight loss, pit depth measurement, linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. It showed that chloride ions influenced the characteristics and compositions of rust layers by diverting and participating in corrosion reactions. α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH and iron oxides were major corrosion products, while β-Fe8O8(OH)8Cl1.35 rather than β-FeOOH was formed when high chloride concentrations were provided. Chloride also suppressed the decreasing of corrosion rates, whereas increased the difficulty in the diffusion process by thickening the rust layers and transforming the rust compositions. Carbon steel is more susceptible to chloride attacks than ductile iron. The corrosion kinetics of ductile iron and carbon steel corresponded with the probabilistic and bilinear model respectively.

  14. Strain softening induced ductile flow in the Särv thrust sheet, Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilotti, Jane A.; Kumpulainen, Risto

    The external zone of the Scandinavian Caledonides is characterized by thrust sheets composed of sedimentary rocks derived from the continent Baltica. The Särv thrust sheet is unique amongst them because the 4.5-6 km thick, flat-lying Tossåsfjället Group clastics were intruded by a sub-vertical tholeiitic dike swarm prior to thrusting. The Särv thrust sheet is a large horse (100 km long and 80 km wide) with a classical ramp-flat geometry. The original intrusive relationships of the dikes are preserved throughout most of the thrust sheet and deformation is concentrated at the base in a mylonite zone several tens of meters thick. In this zone, meter-thick dikes rotate into parallelism with the basal thrust and concordant mylonites of both lithologies are intercalated on a centimeter to millimeter scale. The overall rigid block geometry of the Särv thrust sheet, and the intense strain gradient recorded by the rotation of the dike swarm and the concurrent development of mylonites in the thrust zone, suggest that thrust emplacement took place by ductile yield and on-going pseudoplastic flow. Continual strain softening localized ductile flow in this zone by means of grain-size reduction, reaction-enhanced ductility and grain-boundary sliding — processes inferred from the microstructures.

  15. Ductility enhancement of post-Northridge connections by multilongitudinal voids in the beam web.

    PubMed

    Naimi, Sepanta; Celikag, Murude; Hedayat, Amir A

    2013-01-01

    Since the earthquakes in Northridge and Kobe in 1994 and 1995, respectively, many investigations have been carried out towards improving the strength and ductility of steel beam to column pre- and post-Northridge connections. In order to achieve these objectives, recent researches are mainly focused on three principles: reducing the beam section to improve the beam ductility, adding different kinds of slit damper to beam and column flanges to absorb and dissipate the input earthquake energy in the connection and strengthening the connection area using additional elements such as rib plates, cover plates, and flange plates to keep the plastic hinges away from the column face. This paper presents a reduced beam section approach via the introduction of multilongitudinal voids (MLV) in the beam web for various beam depths varying from 450 mm to 912 mm. ANSYS finite element program was used to simulate the three different sizes of SAC sections: SAC3, SAC5, and SAC7. Results showed an improvement in the connection ductility since the input energy was dissipated uniformly along the beam length and the total rotation of the connection was over four percent radian.

  16. Improved Seismic Risk Assessment of Non-ductile Reinforced Concrete Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuselier, Blaine Jacob

    Existing reinforced concrete (RC) buildings built to non-ductile specifications are highly susceptible to damage given lateral loads induced from earthquake ground motions. To explore the effects of these ground motions, non-linear finite element analyses are being used in research and practice to model representations of non-ductile RC buildings as well as conduct probabilistic analyses of their seismic fragility in as-built and retrofitted conditions. This study examines the influence of modeling fidelity on the response and fragility of non-ductile RC buildings, testing the role of explicitly capturing local failure in the finite element model as well as providing new insight into the probability of component damage levels given system level failure. Also, a survey is presented to assess the tagging decisions made during post-earthquake rapid evaluations of reinforced concrete buildings and compare these results to empirical data from past earthquake reconnaissance reports. The results of this study will provide insight into several key issues in seismic performance assessment for RC buildings.

  17. Towards an analysis of leak-before-break assessments in the ductile tearing regime

    SciTech Connect

    Parfitt, V.R.

    1991-12-31

    This paper presents the elastic-plastic fracture analysis of a typical semi-elliptical axial surface flaw growing to a thru-thickness flaw and assessing the leak-before break situation in a pressure vessel subject to pressure. The paper first discusses the semi-elliptical flaw J-integral solution and the thru-thickness flaw solution as modified herein. Then a review is presented of the three ductile tearing stability fracture analysis methods based on the fully plastic J-integral solution; (1) the crack driving force diagram, (2) the tearing modulus diagram, and (3) the failure assessment diagram. These methods are then used to determine the factors of safety to initiation of ductile tearing as the crack grows. Factors of safety based on either pressure alone or crack size alone are illustrated. An illustration is given of a leak-before-break solution discussing the semi-elliptical flaw growing to a thru-thickness flaw in the vessel. The paper concludes with a discussion of additional effort needed to better characterize leak-before-break solutions in the ductile tearing regime.

  18. Dislocation Strengthening without Ductility Trade-off in Metastable Austenitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiabin; Jin, Yongbin; Fang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chenxu; Feng, Qiong; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Yuzeng; Suo, Tao; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Tianlin; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xi; Fang, Youtong; Wei, Yujie; Meng, Liang; Lu, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Strength and ductility are mutually exclusive if they are manifested as consequence of the coupling between strengthening and toughening mechanisms. One notable example is dislocation strengthening in metals, which invariably leads to reduced ductility. However, this trend is averted in metastable austenitic steels. A one-step thermal mechanical treatment (TMT), i.e. hot rolling, can effectively enhance the yielding strength of the metastable austenitic steel from 322 ± 18 MPa to 675 ± 15 MPa, while retaining both the formability and hardenability. It is noted that no boundaries are introduced in the optimized TMT process and all strengthening effect originates from dislocations with inherited thermal stability. The success of this method relies on the decoupled strengthening and toughening mechanisms in metastable austenitic steels, in which yield strength is controlled by initial dislocation density while ductility is retained by the capability to nucleate new dislocations to carry plastic deformation. Especially, the simplicity in processing enables scaling and industrial applications to meet the challenging requirements of emissions reduction. On the other hand, the complexity in the underlying mechanism of dislocation strengthening in this case may shed light on a different route of material strengthening by stimulating dislocation activities, rather than impeding motion of dislocations.

  19. A cross-shear deformation for optimizing the strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloys

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Kotiba; Ko, Young Gun

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have recently attracted great interest due their lightweight and high specific strength. However, because of their hexagonal close-packed structure, they have few active slip systems, resulting in poor ductility and high mechanical anisotropy at room temperature. In the present work, we used a cross-shear deformation imposed by a differential speed rolling (DSR) technique to improve the room temperature strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. To introduce the cross-shear deformation, the sheets were rotated 180° around their longitudinal axis between the adjacent passes of DSR. The sheets of the AZ31 alloy subjected to the cross-shear deformation showed a uniform fine microstructure (1.2 ± 0.1 μm) with weak basal textures. The fabricated sheets showed a simultaneous high ultimate tensile strength and elongation-to-failure, i.e., ~333 MPa and ~21%, respectively. These were explained based on the structural features evolved due to the cross-shear deformation by DSR. The high strength was attributed to the uniform fine microstructure, whereas the high ductility was explained based on the basal texture weakening. PMID:27406685

  20. A cross-shear deformation for optimizing the strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Kotiba; Ko, Young Gun

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium alloys have recently attracted great interest due their lightweight and high specific strength. However, because of their hexagonal close-packed structure, they have few active slip systems, resulting in poor ductility and high mechanical anisotropy at room temperature. In the present work, we used a cross-shear deformation imposed by a differential speed rolling (DSR) technique to improve the room temperature strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. To introduce the cross-shear deformation, the sheets were rotated 180° around their longitudinal axis between the adjacent passes of DSR. The sheets of the AZ31 alloy subjected to the cross-shear deformation showed a uniform fine microstructure (1.2 ± 0.1 μm) with weak basal textures. The fabricated sheets showed a simultaneous high ultimate tensile strength and elongation-to-failure, i.e., ~333 MPa and ~21%, respectively. These were explained based on the structural features evolved due to the cross-shear deformation by DSR. The high strength was attributed to the uniform fine microstructure, whereas the high ductility was explained based on the basal texture weakening.

  1. Development of branching brittle and ductile shear zones: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Sven Erik; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Passchier, Cees

    2017-06-01

    Continental collision zones are usually associated with large-scale strike-slip shear zones. In most cases, these shear zones are complex and consist of multiple strands, varying in width, length, and total displacement. Here we present 2-D numerical models to simulate the formation of such shear zones at different depth levels within the crust, under either brittle (frictional/plastic) or ductile conditions. Localization of shear zones is initiated by a material contrast (heterogeneity) of the material parameters. We systematically test the rate of strain weakening in brittle and in ductile regimes to understand its influence on the development of shear zone networks. Our simulations suggest that the development of antithetic faults in a brittle shear zone system is closely linked to a decrease in the angle of friction during deformation. In general, variation of the strain weakening also has a significant influence on ductile shear zones. Numerical results show that the geometry and thickness of the localized high strain zone are especially affected by weakening mechanisms during deformation. Furthermore, the interconnection and interaction of the shear strands lead to a more complex kinematic pattern, which lead to a local change in the maximum principal stress axis. These interaction of shear strands may explain the occurrence of shear-related structures (e.g., folds) or differing characteristics of shear zones, such as the thickness of shear zones or the orientation of the faults to the stress field, which are consistent with field observations.

  2. Ductility Enhancement of Post-Northridge Connections by Multilongitudinal Voids in the Beam Web

    PubMed Central

    Celikag, Murude; Hedayat, Amir A.

    2013-01-01

    Since the earthquakes in Northridge and Kobe in 1994 and 1995, respectively, many investigations have been carried out towards improving the strength and ductility of steel beam to column pre- and post-Northridge connections. In order to achieve these objectives, recent researches are mainly focused on three principles: reducing the beam section to improve the beam ductility, adding different kinds of slit damper to beam and column flanges to absorb and dissipate the input earthquake energy in the connection and strengthening the connection area using additional elements such as rib plates, cover plates, and flange plates to keep the plastic hinges away from the column face. This paper presents a reduced beam section approach via the introduction of multilongitudinal voids (MLV) in the beam web for various beam depths varying from 450 mm to 912 mm. ANSYS finite element program was used to simulate the three different sizes of SAC sections: SAC3, SAC5, and SAC7. Results showed an improvement in the connection ductility since the input energy was dissipated uniformly along the beam length and the total rotation of the connection was over four percent radian. PMID:24311977

  3. High ductility of bainite-based microstructure of middle carbon steel 42SiMn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučerová, L.; Bystrianský, M.; Jeníček, Š.

    2017-02-01

    Heat and thermo-mechanical treatments with various processing parameters were applied to middle carbon low alloyed 42SiMn steel. The aim of the treatment was to obtain multiphase microstructure typical for TRIP (Transformation induced plasticity) steel and to achieve the best combination of ultimate tensile strength and ductility. TRIP steels typically possess about 5-15% of metastable retained austenite, which can transform to martensite during plastic deformation. The gradual phase transformation during loading postpones the onset of necking, thus increasing ultimate tensile strength and ductility at the same time. Manganese and silicon, used as the main alloying elements of the experimental steel, are employed to increase austenite stability and to hinder cementite precipitation during the treatment. All proposed methods of heat and thermo-mechanical treatment contain bainitic hold at 400 °C or 425 °C. The final microstructures were very complex, consisting of bainite, ferrite, very small areas of extremely fine perlite lamellas, about 10% of retained austenite and M-A constituent (austenitic islands partially transformed to martensite). Even though pearlite and martensite are undesirable microstructure in TRIP steel, the tensile strength ranged from 850 to 1065 MPa and ductility A5mm from 26 to 47 %.

  4. Specimen preparation by ion beam slope cutting for characterization of ductile damage by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Gerstein, Gregory; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate ductile damage in parts made by cold sheet-bulk metal forming a suited specimen preparation is required to observe the microstructure and defects such as voids by electron microscopy. By means of ion beam slope cutting both a targeted material removal can be applied and mechanical or thermal influences during preparation avoided. In combination with scanning electron microscopy this method allows to examine voids in the submicron range and thus to analyze early stages of ductile damage. In addition, a relief structure is formed by the selectivity of the ion bombardment, which depends on grain orientation and microstructural defects. The formation of these relief structures is studied using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction and the use of this side effect to interpret the microstructural mechanisms of voids formation by plastic deformation is discussed. A comprehensive investigation of the suitability of ion beam milling to analyze ductile damage is given at the examples of a ferritic deep drawing steel and a dual phase steel. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Strong and Ductile Non-equiatomic High-Entropy Alloys: Design, Processing, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiming; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-08-01

    We present a brief overview on recent developments in the field of strong and ductile non-equiatomic high-entropy alloys (HEAs). The materials reviewed are mainly based on massive transition-metal solute solutions and exhibit a broad spectrum of microstructures and mechanical properties. Three relevant aspects of such non-equiatomic HEAs with excellent strength-ductility combination are addressed in detail, namely phase stability-guided design, controlled and inexpensive bulk metallurgical processing routes for appropriate microstructure and compositional homogeneity, and the resultant microstructure-property relations. In addition to the multiple principal substitutional elements used in these alloys, minor interstitial alloying elements are also considered. We show that various groups of strong and ductile HEAs can be obtained by shifting the alloy design strategy from single-phase equiatomic to dual- or multiphase non-equiatomic compositional configurations with carefully designed phase instability. This design direction provides ample possibilities for joint activation of a number of strengthening and toughening mechanisms. Some potential research efforts which can be conducted in the future are also proposed.

  6. Dislocation Strengthening without Ductility Trade-off in Metastable Austenitic Steels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiabin; Jin, Yongbin; Fang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chenxu; Feng, Qiong; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Yuzeng; Suo, Tao; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Tianlin; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xi; Fang, Youtong; Wei, Yujie; Meng, Liang; Lu, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Strength and ductility are mutually exclusive if they are manifested as consequence of the coupling between strengthening and toughening mechanisms. One notable example is dislocation strengthening in metals, which invariably leads to reduced ductility. However, this trend is averted in metastable austenitic steels. A one-step thermal mechanical treatment (TMT), i.e. hot rolling, can effectively enhance the yielding strength of the metastable austenitic steel from 322 ± 18 MPa to 675 ± 15 MPa, while retaining both the formability and hardenability. It is noted that no boundaries are introduced in the optimized TMT process and all strengthening effect originates from dislocations with inherited thermal stability. The success of this method relies on the decoupled strengthening and toughening mechanisms in metastable austenitic steels, in which yield strength is controlled by initial dislocation density while ductility is retained by the capability to nucleate new dislocations to carry plastic deformation. Especially, the simplicity in processing enables scaling and industrial applications to meet the challenging requirements of emissions reduction. On the other hand, the complexity in the underlying mechanism of dislocation strengthening in this case may shed light on a different route of material strengthening by stimulating dislocation activities, rather than impeding motion of dislocations. PMID:27739481

  7. Computer simulation of strength and ductility of nanotwin-strengthened coarse-grained metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Ji, R.; Weng, G. J.; Zhu, L. L.; Lu, J.

    2014-10-01

    The superior strength-ductility combination in nanotwin (NT)-strengthened metals has provided a new potential for optimizing the mechanical properties of coarse-grained (CG) metals. In this paper computer simulations based on the mechanism-based strain gradient plasticity and the Johnson-Cook failure criterion have been carried out to uncover the critical factors that serve to provide this dual function. Our results indicate that both the distribution characteristics of the NT regions and the constitutive relations of the NT phase can have a significant impact on the strength and ductility of the CG Cu strengthened by the NT regions. In particular, twin spacing, distribution characteristics such as arrangement, shape and orientation, together with volume fraction of the NT regions, can all have significant effects. Along the way, we also discovered that microcrack initiation, coalescence and deflection constituted the entire failure process. Significant insights into the morphology of NT regions that could deliver superior strength and ductility combination for CG metals have been established.

  8. The influence of strain rate and hydrogen on the plane-strain ductility of Zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Link, T.M.; Motta, A.T.; Koss, D.A.

    1998-03-01

    The authors studied the ductility of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding under loading conditions prototypical of those found in reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), i.e.: near plane-strain deformation in the hoop direction (transverse to the cladding axis) at room temperature and 300 C and high strain rates. To conduct these studies, they developed a specimen configuration in which near plane-strain deformation is achieved in the gage section, and a testing methodology that allows one to determine both the limit strain at the onset of localized necking and the fracture strain. The experiments indicate that there is little effect of strain rate (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) on the ductility of unhydrided Zircaloy tubing deformed under near plane-strain conditions at either room temperature or 300 C. Preliminary experiments on cladding containing 190 ppm hydrogen show only a small loss of fracture strain but no clear effect on limit strain. The experiments also indicate that there is a significant loss of Zircaloy ductility when surface flaws are present in the form of thickness imperfections.

  9. Ductile fracture model in the shearing process of zircaloy sheet for nuclear fuel spacer grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jaeyoon; Kim, Naksoo; Lee, Hyungyil

    2012-04-01

    Features of sheared edges are predicted based on material properties of Zircaloy obtained from the tensile test and ductile fracture model such as the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) and Johnson-Cook models. The sheared edges formations are numerically analyzed in each ductile model. An appropriate ductile fracture model is selected to study the relative depth of sheared edges with respect to process parameters. The tendency of failure parameters that are affected by sheared edges and fracture duration is investigated. We applied changes on parameters of failure models to show that the punch force curve and the ratio of characteristic lengths could be coincided, which led us to conclude that the GTN and Johnson-Cook models are equivalent. In the Johnson-Cook model, however, the characteristic length of the sheared edges does not change as each failure parameter reaches a critical value. Hence, the FE prediction model for forming defects is developed using the GTN failure model. Finally, the characteristic length of sheared edges have been measured using the FE prediction model for shearing process parameters such as punch velocities, clearance, and tool wear. Our results showed that the punch-die clearance is the most significant factor that affects forming defects when compared to other factors.

  10. Rolling Contact Fatigue Failure Mechanisms of Plasma-Nitrided Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollmann, D.; Soares, G. P. P. P.; Grabarski, M. I.; Weigert, N. B.; Escobar, J. A.; Pintaude, G.; Neves, J. C. K.

    2017-05-01

    Rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of a nitrided ductile cast iron was investigated. Flat washers machined from a pearlitic ductile cast iron bar were quenched and tempered to maximum hardness, ground, polished and divided into four groups: (1) specimens tested as quenched and tempered; (2) specimens plasma-nitrided for 8 h at 400 °C; (3) specimens plasma-nitrided and submitted to a diffusion process for 16 h at 400 °C; and (4) specimens submitted to a second tempering for 24 h at 400 °C. Hardness profiles, phase analyses and residual stress measurements by x-ray diffraction, surface roughness and scanning electron microscopy were applied to characterize the surfaces at each step of this work. Ball-on-flat washer tests were conducted with a maximum contact pressure of 3.6 GPa, under flood lubrication with a SAE 90 API GL-5 oil at 50 °C. Test ending criterion was the occurrence of a spalling. Weibull analysis was used to characterize RCF's lifetime data. Plasma-nitrided specimens exhibited a shorter RCF lifetime than those just quenched and tempered. The effects of nitriding on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the ductile cast iron are discussed in order to explain the shorter endurance of nitrided samples.

  11. A rare-earth free magnesium alloy with improved intrinsic ductility.

    PubMed

    Sandlöbes, S; Friák, M; Korte-Kerzel, S; Pei, Z; Neugebauer, J; Raabe, D

    2017-09-05

    Metals are the backbone of manufacturing owing to their strength and formability. Compared to polymers they have high mass density. There is, however, one exception: magnesium. It has a density of only 1.7 g/cm(3), making it the lightest structural material, 4.5 times lighter than steels, 1.7 times lighter than aluminum, and even slightly lighter than carbon fibers. Yet, the widespread use of magnesium is hampered by its intrinsic brittleness. While other metallic alloys have multiple dislocation slip systems, enabling their well-known ductility, the hexagonal lattice of magnesium offers insufficient modes of deformation, rendering it intrinsically brittle. We have developed a quantum-mechanically derived treasure map which screens solid solution combinations with electronic bonding, structure and volume descriptors for similarity to the ductile magnesium-rare earth alloys. Using this insight we synthesized a surprisingly simple, compositionally lean, low-cost and industry-compatible new alloy which is over 4 times more ductile and 40% stronger than pure magnesium. The alloy contains 1 wt.% aluminum and 0.1 wt.% calcium, two inexpensive elements which are compatible with downstream recycling constraints.

  12. Fatigue limit prediction of ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron considering stress ratio and notch size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, T.; Kim, H. J.; Ikeda, T.

    2017-05-01

    The mechanical behavior of ductile cast iron is governed by graphite particles and casting defects in the microstructures, which can significantly decrease the fatigue strength. In our previous study, the fatigue limit of ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron specimens with small defects ((\\sqrt{{area}}=80˜ 1500{{μ }}{{m}})) could successfully be predicted based on the \\sqrt{{area}} parameter model by using \\sqrt{{area}} as a geometrical parameter of defect as well as the tensile strength as a material parameter. In addition, the fatigue limit for larger defects could be predicted based on the conventional fracture mechanics approach. In this study, rotating bending and tension-compression fatigue tests with ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron containing circumferential sharp notches as well as smooth specimens were performed to investigate quantitatively the effects of defect. The notch depths ranged 10 ˜ 2500 μm and the notch root radii were 5 and 50 μm. The stress ratios were R = -1 and 0.1. The microscopic observation of crack propagation near fatigue limit revealed that the fatigue limit was determined by the threshold condition for propagation of a small crack emanating from graphite particles. The fatigue limit could be successfully predicted as a function of R using a method proposed in this study.

  13. Metallurgical control of the ductile-brittle transition in high-strength structural steels

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr. |

    1999-08-01

    The models that have been successfully used to control the ductile-brittle transition in high strength structural steels are qualitative in nature, and address the microstructural control of the mechanisms of brittle fracture. The basic idea is incorporated in the Yoffee diagram, which dates from the 1920`s and attributes the ductile-brittle transition to the competition between deformation and fracture; the more difficult brittle fracture becomes, the lower the temperature at which ductile processes dominate. There are two important brittle fracture modes: intergranular separation and transgranular cleavage. The intergranular mode is usually due to chemical contamination, and is addressed by eliminating or gettering the contaminating species. There are also examples of brittle fracture that is due to inherent grain boundary weakness. In this case the failure mode is overcome by adding beneficial species (glue) to the grain boundary. Transgranular cleavage is made more difficult by refining the effective grain size. In high strength steel this is done by refining the prior austenite grain size, by interspersing islands of metastable austenite that transform martensitically under plastic strain, or by disrupting the crystallographic alignment of ferrite grains or martensite laths. The latter mechanism offers intriguing possibilities for future steels with exceptional toughness.

  14. Size effect on brittle and ductile fracture of two-dimensional interlinked carbon nanotube network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yuhang; Aluru, N. R.

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical properties of two-dimensional (2D) interlinked carbon nanotube (CNT) network are investigated using ab initio calculation and molecular dynamics simulations (MD) with Reaxff force field. The simulation results show that bulk 2D interlinked CNT network has good mechanical properties along the axial direction which can be comparable to that of single-walled CNT and graphene, but has better ductility along the radial direction than single-walled CNT and graphene. In addition, the mechanical properties of 2D interlinked CNT network ribbon along the radial direction depend strongly on the size of the ribbon. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio decrease as the size increases while the fracture strain increases with the size increasing. By analyzing the atomic structural (both bond length and atomic von Mises stress) evolution of the ribbons, the mechanism of a brittle-to-ductile transition is revealed. The exploration of the mechanical properties of the 2D interlinked CNT network paves the way for application of the relevant devices that can benefit from the high Young's modulus, high tensile strength, and good ductility.

  15. Effects of rolling on the ductility of 80% tungsten heavy alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, C.A.; Gurwell, W.E.

    1992-11-01

    Relations between transverse tensile ductility and rolling and annealing schedules were investigated for solid-state sintered and annealed 80%W8%Ni-2%Fe heavy alloy rolled at 900C or 1150C with varying reductions between anneals at either 1150C or 1400C. Final anneals and a solution heat treatment were employed prior to tensile testing. Metallographic and fractographic analyses were performed to determine relations between microstructure and physical properties. Multiple 1400C intermediate anneals with a maximum 60% rolling reduction produced higher transverse tensile elongations than rolled with a higher final reduction, 86%. Tensile elongation differences were attributed to the recrystallized intra-particle W grain sizes achieved during the final anneal. Materials given a maximum of 60% reduction before final anneal had fewer intra-particle W grains and therefore higher ductilities. For materials rolled at 900C or 1150C, no differences in transverse tensile elongation were observed. 1150C intermediate anneals had consistently lower ductility. 900C rolling produced slightly higher elongations than 1150C rolling, but only when the material was annealed at 1455C. Tensile yield and ultimate strengths did not vary greatly with rolling and intermediate annealing conditions. The edge cracking correlated with observed lateral spread and the material softness.

  16. Continuum damage modeling for ductile metals under high strain rate deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, C.; Ahzi, S.; Daridon, L.; Courtine, T.

    2003-09-01

    The accuracy of the computational investigation on the response of ductile materials under dynamic condition depends on the capability of the constitutive model in accounting for strain rate, temperature and microstructural effects. In this work, we propose a damage evolution law, valid for a wide range of strain rates, based on the theory of continuum damage mechanics (CDM). This model implicitly accounts for the three stages of damage: the nucleation, the growth and the coalescence. This non-linear isotropic CDM model for ductile damage is developed by assuming the existence of a new ductile damage dissipation potential. The proposed damage law is coupled with an evolution law for the flow stress. Like in the mechanical threshold stress (M.T.S.) model, the flow stress is decomposed as the sum of an athermal component and a temperature and strain rate dependent component. Results from our motel are in agreement with the existing experimental results for stress-strain behavior and damage evolution in oxygen-free high-conducting (OFHC) copper under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions.

  17. Dislocation Strengthening without Ductility Trade-off in Metastable Austenitic Steels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiabin; Jin, Yongbin; Fang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chenxu; Feng, Qiong; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Yuzeng; Suo, Tao; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Tianlin; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xi; Fang, Youtong; Wei, Yujie; Meng, Liang; Lu, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-10-14

    Strength and ductility are mutually exclusive if they are manifested as consequence of the coupling between strengthening and toughening mechanisms. One notable example is dislocation strengthening in metals, which invariably leads to reduced ductility. However, this trend is averted in metastable austenitic steels. A one-step thermal mechanical treatment (TMT), i.e. hot rolling, can effectively enhance the yielding strength of the metastable austenitic steel from 322 ± 18 MPa to 675 ± 15 MPa, while retaining both the formability and hardenability. It is noted that no boundaries are introduced in the optimized TMT process and all strengthening effect originates from dislocations with inherited thermal stability. The success of this method relies on the decoupled strengthening and toughening mechanisms in metastable austenitic steels, in which yield strength is controlled by initial dislocation density while ductility is retained by the capability to nucleate new dislocations to carry plastic deformation. Especially, the simplicity in processing enables scaling and industrial applications to meet the challenging requirements of emissions reduction. On the other hand, the complexity in the underlying mechanism of dislocation strengthening in this case may shed light on a different route of material strengthening by stimulating dislocation activities, rather than impeding motion of dislocations.

  18. Influence of Ti on the Hot Ductility of High-manganese Austenitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Jianhua; Wu, Bowei; Su, Xiaofeng; Li, Shiqi; Ding, Hao

    2017-07-01

    The influence of Ti addition ( 0.10 wt%) on hot ductility of as-cast high-manganese austenitic steels has been examined over the temperature range 650-1,250 °C under a constant strain rate of 10-3 s-1 using Gleeble3500 thermal simulation testing machine. The fracture surfaces and particles precipitated at different tensile temperatures were characterized by means of scanning electron microscope and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS). Hot ductility as a function of reduction curves shows that adding 0.10 wt% Ti made the ductility worse in the almost entire range of testing temperatures. The phases' equilibrium diagrams of precipitates in Ti-bearing high-Mn austenitic steel were calculated by the Thermo-Calc software. The calculation result shows that 0.1 wt% Ti addition would cause Ti(C,N) precipitated at 1,499 °C, which is higher than the liquidus temperature of high-Mn austenitic steel. It indicated that Ti(C,N) particles start forming in the liquid high-Mn austenitic steel. The SEM-EDS results show that Ti(C,N) and TiC particles could be found along the austenite grain boundaries or at triple junction, and they would accelerate the extension of the cracks along the grain boundaries.

  19. Investigation on pseudo-ductility to improve mechanical behavior in glass-cellulose epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok; Uppin, Vinayak S.; Huddar, Deepak S.; Kodancha, Krishanaraj G.; Sridhar, I.; Shivakumar Gouda, P. S.

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays composite materials exhibit sudden and catastrophic failure, which is undesirable for several applications. A new class of hybrid laminates was prepared using semi-automated draw down coating method with varying surface coating densities on unidirectional (UD) Glass fiber. Cellulose particles were coated on UD Glass fiber to investigate the effect of pseudo-ductility to improve mechanical behavior. Glass Cellulose epoxy hybrid laminate was fabricated with 5%, 7.5% and 10% of cellulose. Coating with 5% Cellulose produces a coating density of 319.08 g/m2 and exhibits the appreciable pseudo ductile tensile stress-strain behavior with a non-linear variation at second part followed by linear variation at initial region. The response of tensile stress had shown 27% improvement in tensile modulus (330MPa) as compared to neat glass epoxy laminate with 0.04% of pseudo ductile strain. Further, flexural strength and inter-laminar shear strength of each specimen configuration were calculated and found good improvement in flexural strength with cellulose coated samples as compared to Glass-Epoxy laminate.

  20. Improvement of pseudoelasticity and ductility of Beta III titanium alloy--application to orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Laheurte, P; Eberhardt, A; Philippe, Mj; Deblock, L

    2007-02-01

    The pseudoelasticity of metastable Beta III titanium alloy (TMAtrade mark) used for orthodontic applications is obtained by cold wiredrawing. This wire has higher rigidity than cold-drawn NiTi (Nitinoltrade mark, superelastic NiTi SE) and lower recoverable deformation. The low ductility value of Beta III is due to the deformation imposed by wiredrawing. The aim of this research was to improve the behaviour of this alloy by modifying the microstructural parameters to decrease the rigidity and increase the recoverable deformation and ductility of the alloy. The effects of second phase precipitate, grain size, and deformation on the wire mechanical properties were also examined. The isothermal precipitation of alpha (alpha) or omega (omega(isoth)) phases precludes the expression of the pseudoelastic effect. The presence of an omega(isoth) phase considerably increases fracture strength, whereas the alpha phase strongly decreases the ductility and adversely affects the strain recovery (epsilon(r)). To control the grain size, the growth of the recrystallized grains was studied by considering several parameters, which are known to have an influence on grain size, including the cold rolled strain, the temperature, the time of annealing, and the initial grain size. A structure with coarse grains, quenched from a temperature higher than the beta transus (T(beta)), associated with a plastic pre-deformation, contributed to an improved pseudoelastic behaviour, due to the presence of a reversible martensite phase (alpha'') induced by the pre-deformation.

  1. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DUCTILE-PHASE-TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN LAMINATES FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Kevin; Odette, G Robert; Fields, Kirk A.; Gragg, David; Yamamoto, Takuya; Zok, Frank W.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.

    2015-09-23

    A promising approach to increasing the fracture toughness of W-alloys is ductile-phase toughening (DPT). A ductile phase reinforcement in a brittle matrix increases toughness primarily by crack bridging. A W-Cu laminate was fabricated and the properties of the constituent metals were characterized along with those for the composite. Development of a design model for large-scale crack bridging continued.

  2. Microstructural Features Controlling Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior in High-Strength, Martensitic Steel Weld Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Development Report Microstructural Features Controlling Ductile-to- Brittle Transition Behavior in High-Strength, Martensitic Steel Weld Metals C 0by...Martensitic Steel Weld Metals PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) .J. DeLoach, Jr. .TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 1S PAGE COUNT I...if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP High strength steel , Ductile-brittle transition Martensitic Mechanical proper ties

  3. Porosity evolution at the brittle-ductile transition in the continental crust: Implications for deep hydro-geothermal circulation.

    PubMed

    Violay, M; Heap, M J; Acosta, M; Madonna, C

    2017-08-09

    Recently, projects have been proposed to engineer deep geothermal reservoirs in the ductile crust. To examine their feasibility, we performed high-temperature (up to 1000 °C), high-pressure (130 MPa) triaxial experiments on granite (initially-intact and shock-cooled samples) in which we measured the evolution of porosity during deformation. Mechanical data and post-mortem microstuctural characterisation (X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy) indicate that (1) the failure mode was brittle up to 900 °C (shear fracture formation) but ductile at 1000 °C (no strain localisation); (2) only deformation up to 800 °C was dilatant; (3) deformation at 900 °C was brittle but associated with net compaction due to an increase in the efficiency of crystal plastic processes; (4) ductile deformation at 1000 °C was compactant; (5) thermally-shocking the granite did not influence strength or failure mode. Our data show that, while brittle behaviour increases porosity, porosity loss is associated with both ductile behaviour and transitional behaviour as the failure mode evolves from brittle to ductile. Extrapolating our data to geological strain rates suggests that the brittle-ductile transition occurs at a temperature of 400 ± 100 °C, and is associated with the limit of fluid circulation in the deep continental crust.

  4. Microstructure and Hot Oxidation Resistance of SiMo Ductile Cast Irons Containing Si-Mo-Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mervat M.; Nofal, Adel; Mourad, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    SiMo ductile cast irons are used as high-temperature materials in automotive components, because they are microstructurally stable at high operating temperatures. The effect of different amounts of Si and Mo as well as the addition of 3 wt pct Al on the microstructure, high-temperature oxidation, and mechanical properties of SiMo ductile cast iron was studied. Dilatometric measurements of SiMo ductile iron exhibited obvious differences in the transformation temperature A 1 due to presence of Al and the increase of Si. The microstructure of the SiMo alloys without Al addition showed outstanding nodularity and uniform nodule distribution. However, by adding 3 wt pct Al to low Si-SiMo ductile iron, some compacted graphite was observed. The results of oxidation experiments indicated that high Si-SiMo ductile iron containing 4 and 4.9 wt pct Si had superior resistance to lower Si-SiMo and SiMo ductile iron containing 3 wt pct Al. The results showed also that with increasing Si up to 4.9 wt pct or by replacing a part of Si with 3 wt pct Al, tensile strength increased while elongation and impact toughness decreased.

  5. Microstructure and Hot Oxidation Resistance of SiMo Ductile Cast Irons Containing Si-Mo-Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mervat M.; Nofal, Adel; Mourad, M. M.

    2017-04-01

    SiMo ductile cast irons are used as high-temperature materials in automotive components, because they are microstructurally stable at high operating temperatures. The effect of different amounts of Si and Mo as well as the addition of 3 wt pct Al on the microstructure, high-temperature oxidation, and mechanical properties of SiMo ductile cast iron was studied. Dilatometric measurements of SiMo ductile iron exhibited obvious differences in the transformation temperature A 1 due to presence of Al and the increase of Si. The microstructure of the SiMo alloys without Al addition showed outstanding nodularity and uniform nodule distribution. However, by adding 3 wt pct Al to low Si-SiMo ductile iron, some compacted graphite was observed. The results of oxidation experiments indicated that high Si-SiMo ductile iron containing 4 and 4.9 wt pct Si had superior resistance to lower Si-SiMo and SiMo ductile iron containing 3 wt pct Al. The results showed also that with increasing Si up to 4.9 wt pct or by replacing a part of Si with 3 wt pct Al, tensile strength increased while elongation and impact toughness decreased.

  6. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transformation temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antolovich, Stephen D.; Saxena, Ashok; Cullers, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    One of the ongoing challenges of the aerospace industry is to develop more efficient turbine engines. Greater efficiency entails reduced specific strength and larger temperature gradients, the latter of which means higher operating temperatures and increased thermal conductivity. Continued development of nickel-based superalloys has provided steady increases in engine efficiency and the limits of superalloys have probably not been realized. However, other material systems are under intense investigation for possible use in high temperature engines. Ceramic, intermetallic, and various composite systems are being explored in an effort to exploit the much higher melting temperatures of these systems. NiAl is considered a potential alternative to conventional superalloys due to its excellent oxidation resistance, low density, and high melting temperature. The fact that NiAl is the most common coating for current superalloy turbine blades is a tribute to its oxidation resistance. Its density is one-third that of typical superalloys and in most temperature ranges its thermal conductivity is twice that of common superalloys. Despite these many advantages, NiAl requires more investigation before it is ready to be used in engines. Binary NiAl in general has poor high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. On-going research in alloy design continues to make improvements in the high-temperature strength of NiAl. The factors controlling low temperature ductility have been identified in the last few years. Small, but reproducible ductility can now be achieved at room temperature through careful control of chemical purity and processing. But the mechanisms controlling the transition from brittle to ductile behavior are not fully understood. Research in the area of fatigue deformation can aid the development of the NiAl system in two ways. Fatigue properties must be documented and optimized before NiAl can be applied to engineering systems. More importantly though

  7. The Influence of the Induced Ferrite and Precipitates of Ti-bearing Steel on the Ductility of Continuous Casting Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Guoyu; Cheng, Guoguang; Hou, Zibing

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate the loss of the ductility of Ti-bearing ship plate steel under 1000 °C, where the ductility begins to reduce rapidly, so the hot ductility of Ti-bearing ship plate steel has been obtained using the Gleeble 1500 thermal-mechanical simulator and also the studies about the effect of grain boundary ferrite films and precipitates containing Ti on the ductility has been carried out. The result showed that the TiN particles precipitating at 950 °C with a larger size and smaller volume fraction cannot effectively suppress the occurrence of recrystallization and the ductility still retains at a high level, although R.A. value presents a certain degree of decline compared with 1000 °C. A large number of smaller Ti(C,N) particles precipitate at 900 °C and can induce the formation of a very small amount of fine grain boundary ferrite, which deteriorates the adhesion strength of the grain boundary, so the R.A. value rapidly reduces to less than 50%. When the temperature falls to close Ae3 (827 °C), the amount of the grain boundary ferrite films increase due to the ferrite phase transformation, but the ferrite film thickness becomes more uneven at the same time, which results in the increase of strain concentration and plays a leading role in causing the decrease of ductility, so the R.A. value has been kept less than 40% as the temperature cooling to 800 °C from 850 °C. When the temperature further decreases, the ductility starts to recover due to the increase of average ferrite film thickness to a greater degree which greatly reduces the strain concentration of the grain boundary.

  8. Quasi-ductile mechanisms in porous liquid-phase sintered alumina induced by Hertzian contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digiovanni, Anthony Albert

    Hertzian indentation has been effective in evaluating material response and deformation behavior through single and repeated contacts of a hard sphere into a representative bulk sample in laboratory conditions. Using this technique, the macroscopic and microscopic deformation characteristics of a commercial alumina substrate were evaluated. Significant 'quasi-ductile' behavior was observed, not unlike that observed for other advanced ceramic systems with heterogeneous microstructures. In pure dense alumina, quasi-ductility is controlled by twin fault formation where a transition from a fine grained to a coarse grained microstructure corresponds to a change from classical cone-crack behavior to a purely quasi-ductile indentation response. The quasi-ductility in the commercial alumina was unexpected because the average grain size was very small---well below the size where one should expect any contribution from a twin faulting mechanism. Subsequent work focused on reproducing the commercial microstructures and then altering the grain size, porosity, and presence of the glassy (liquid) phase. Macroscopic indentation revealed a quasi-ductile residual impression formed prior to the observation of ring crack formation in the porous liquid phase sintered materials. Furthermore, the glass containing samples produced a deeper residual impression for an equivalent load and porosity level. Fully dense samples with or without a glass phase remained completely brittle. Subsurface images corresponded to the macroscopic observations; porous liquid phase materials with a 5 mum grain size revealed greater microstructural damage with increasing loads over that of the pure material. A 2D theoretical treatment of the problem used finite element modeling and periodic boundary conditions to understand the magnifying effect of multiple pores on the stress around a given pore in a biaxial compressive stress state linked to the Hertzian stress at yield. A periodic pore structure was

  9. Improvements of J-integral criterion for ductile fracture characterized by a triaxiality parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tie-Jun

    1994-05-01

    It is now generally agreed that the applicability of the one-parameter J-based fracture approach is limited to so-called high-constraint crack geometries and the research of alternate methods is needed. This paper proposes to employ damage mechanics models for ductile fracture to correlate the variability of macroscopic fracture toughness values (J(sub 1c)) with crack tip constraint characterized by crack tip stress triaxiality (S(sub m)/S(sub e)). Firstly, a continuum damage mechanics model and an improved micromechanics model for ductile fracture proposed by the author are introduced briefly. Then the experimental results on the stress-state dependence of the critical J-value, denoted J(sub 1c), at crack initiation are reviewed, and the relationship between J(sub 1c) and the stress triaxiality factor, S(sub m)/S(sub e), in the crack tip region are derived on the basis of the two damage mechanics models. Finally, modified fracture parameters J(sub dc) and J(sub mc) and the associated two-parameter (J and S(sub m)/S(sub e)) criteria for ductile fracture are proposed, where the J-integral sets the deformation at the crack tip and the stress triaxiality S(sub m)/S(sub e) sets the crack tip constraint, which are the improvements on the one-parameter J-integral criterion. Experiments verified that the newly improved parameters J(sub dc) and J(sub mc) are material constants independent of stress state, i.e. specimen geometry and loading condition-independent constants.

  10. Late Cretaceous ductile deformation, metamorphism and plutonism in the Piute Mountains, eastern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.M.; Karlstrom, K.E. )

    1990-01-10

    Late Cretaceous deformation in the Piute Mountains involved ductile thrusting on a network of anastomosing northeast and southwest directed shear zones. The shear zones often separate Proterozoic lithologies with strong competency contrasts, suggesting that Proterozoic crustal anisotropies were important in controlling the geometry of the shear zone network. Shear zones now divide the crust into wedge- and lozenge-shaped blocks. The Piute Mountains can be separated into two kinematic domains, each characterized by a dominant sense of shear. Thrusting in the southwest directed kinematic domain ended at 85 {plus minus} 7 Ma, the age of the late synkinematic East Piute pluton. Thrusting in the northeast directed kinematic domain could have lasted until 74 {plus minus} 3 Ma, the age of the Lazy Daisy pluton. Postthrusting northwest-southeast shortening produced a second generation of upright open folds with a northeast striking subvertical crenulation cleavage. F{sub 2} strain increases toward the south and is concentrated around the margins of the Lazy Daisy pluton. This deformation was synchronous with pluton emplacement. Lake Cretaceous peak metamorphism outlasted all ductile deformation. Peak metamorphic grade increases from upper greenschist facies in the north to upper amphibolite facies as the Lazy Daisy pluton is approached. Temperature and pressure of approximately 450 C and 2.5-4.0 kbar were achieved during ductile thrusting. Temperatures of 500-540 C existed at the onset of upright open folding, and peak temperatures as high as 620 C near the Lazy Daisy pluton occurred after F{sub 2} upright folding. All penetrative deformation ended before 72-71 Ma, by which time the area had cooled to below 300 C.

  11. Linear Elastic and Cohesive Fracture Analysis to Model Hydraulic Fracture in Brittle and Ductile Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao

    2012-05-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology is being widely used within the oil and gas industry for both waste injection and unconventional gas production wells. It is essential to predict the behavior of hydraulic fractures accurately based on understanding the fundamental mechanism(s). The prevailing approach for hydraulic fracture modeling continues to rely on computational methods based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Generally, these methods give reasonable predictions for hard rock hydraulic fracture processes, but still have inherent limitations, especially when fluid injection is performed in soft rock/sand or other non-conventional formations. These methods typically give very conservative predictions on fracture geometry and inaccurate estimation of required fracture pressure. One of the reasons the LEFM-based methods fail to give accurate predictions for these materials is that the fracture process zone ahead of the crack tip and softening effect should not be neglected in ductile rock fracture analysis. A 3D pore pressure cohesive zone model has been developed and applied to predict hydraulic fracturing under fluid injection. The cohesive zone method is a numerical tool developed to model crack initiation and growth in quasi-brittle materials considering the material softening effect. The pore pressure cohesive zone model has been applied to investigate the hydraulic fracture with different rock properties. The hydraulic fracture predictions of a three-layer water injection case have been compared using the pore pressure cohesive zone model with revised parameters, LEFM-based pseudo 3D model, a Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) model, and an analytical solution. Based on the size of the fracture process zone and its effect on crack extension in ductile rock, the fundamental mechanical difference of LEFM and cohesive fracture mechanics-based methods is discussed. An effective fracture toughness method has been proposed to consider the fracture process zone

  12. Brittle intermetallic compound makes ultrastrong low-density steel with large ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Nack J.

    2015-02-01

    Although steel has been the workhorse of the automotive industry since the 1920s, the share by weight of steel and iron in an average light vehicle is now gradually decreasing, from 68.1 per cent in 1995 to 60.1 per cent in 2011 (refs 1, 2). This has been driven by the low strength-to-weight ratio (specific strength) of iron and steel, and the desire to improve such mechanical properties with other materials. Recently, high-aluminium low-density steels have been actively studied as a means of increasing the specific strength of an alloy by reducing its density. But with increasing aluminium content a problem is encountered: brittle intermetallic compounds can form in the resulting alloys, leading to poor ductility. Here we show that an FeAl-type brittle but hard intermetallic compound (B2) can be effectively used as a strengthening second phase in high-aluminium low-density steel, while alleviating its harmful effect on ductility by controlling its morphology and dispersion. The specific tensile strength and ductility of the developed steel improve on those of the lightest and strongest metallic materials known, titanium alloys. We found that alloying of nickel catalyses the precipitation of nanometre-sized B2 particles in the face-centred cubic matrix of high-aluminium low-density steel during heat treatment of cold-rolled sheet steel. Our results demonstrate how intermetallic compounds can be harnessed in the alloy design of lightweight steels for structural applications and others.

  13. Brittle intermetallic compound makes ultrastrong low-density steel with large ductility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Nack J

    2015-02-05

    Although steel has been the workhorse of the automotive industry since the 1920s, the share by weight of steel and iron in an average light vehicle is now gradually decreasing, from 68.1 per cent in 1995 to 60.1 per cent in 2011 (refs 1, 2). This has been driven by the low strength-to-weight ratio (specific strength) of iron and steel, and the desire to improve such mechanical properties with other materials. Recently, high-aluminium low-density steels have been actively studied as a means of increasing the specific strength of an alloy by reducing its density. But with increasing aluminium content a problem is encountered: brittle intermetallic compounds can form in the resulting alloys, leading to poor ductility. Here we show that an FeAl-type brittle but hard intermetallic compound (B2) can be effectively used as a strengthening second phase in high-aluminium low-density steel, while alleviating its harmful effect on ductility by controlling its morphology and dispersion. The specific tensile strength and ductility of the developed steel improve on those of the lightest and strongest metallic materials known, titanium alloys. We found that alloying of nickel catalyses the precipitation of nanometre-sized B2 particles in the face-centred cubic matrix of high-aluminium low-density steel during heat treatment of cold-rolled sheet steel. Our results demonstrate how intermetallic compounds can be harnessed in the alloy design of lightweight steels for structural applications and others.

  14. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement will be reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture. In addition to irradiation hardening, neutrons from the fusion reaction will produce large amounts of helium in the steels used to construct fusion power plant components. Tests to simulate the fusion environment indicate that helium can also affect the toughness. Steels are being developed for fusion applications that have a low DBTT prior to irradiation and then show only a small shift after irradiation. A martensitic 9Cr-2WVTa (nominally Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C) steel had a much lower DBTT than the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb steel prior to neutron irradiation and showed a much smaller increase in DBTT after irradiation. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. An investigation of the mineral in ductile and brittle cortical mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter, and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone's mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone's mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta model, oim(-/-) , mice have a defect in the collagen, which leads to brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants, Phospho1(-/-) , have ductile bone resulting from altered mineralization. Oim(-/-) and Phospho1(-/-) were compared with their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Results revealed that although both pathology models had extremely different whole-bone mechanics, they both had smaller apatite crystals, lower bulk mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. In contrast, the degree of mineralization of bone matrix was different for each strain: brittle oim(-/-) were hypermineralized, whereas ductile Phospho1(-/-) were hypomineralized. Despite differences in the mineralization, nanoscale alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results indicated that alterations from normal crystal size

  16. Effect of initial microstructure on the activation energy of second stage during austempering of ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Campos-Cambranis, R.E.; Narvaez Hernandez, L.; Cisneros-Guerrero, M.M.; Perez-Lopez, M.J.

    1998-03-13

    The good balance among mechanical properties of austempered ductile irons (ADI) mainly depends on the matrix microstructure, which basically consists of acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. This structure is produced by isothermal transformation of the austenite over the temperature range of 523 to 673 K. It is well accepted that during the isothermal holding, the transformation takes place in two stages. In the first stage, the austenite decomposes into acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. When the austenite is transformed at temperatures higher than 623 K, the acicular ferrite is free of carbides; at temperatures below 623 K, besides the formation of the acicular ferrite and austenite, precipitation of carbides takes place over the plates of the acicular ferrite. The mixture of ferrite and austenite is known as ausferrite being the responsible for the good mechanical properties of ADI. In this work, the ausferrite obtained above and below 623 K will be termed high and low temperature ausferrite respectively. Although ausferrite does not transform at room temperature, it is not a thermodynamically stable structure. Consequently, if the isothermal holding is extended, or if ADI is heated at high temperatures (523 to 800 K), the second stage of the austempering reaction will occur. During this stage, the carbon rich austenite will decompose into ferrite and carbides. In order to establish the maximum working temperature of ADI, it is necessary to characterize the thermal stability of ausferrite microstructure, since once stage II takes place, the mechanical properties, in particular ductility and toughness, are adversely affected. In the present work the influence of previous ausferrite microstructure (that obtained during first stage) of an alloyed ductile iron (0.6%Ni, 0.15%Mo) on the empirical activation energy of stage II is studied.

  17. Effect of Surface Modification on Cumulative Tensile Ductility of AZ31 Magnesium Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad-korayem, Mahdi; Jain, Mukesh K.; Mishra, Raja K.

    2016-12-01

    Wire brushing and annealing (WBA) process was developed, optimized and utilized to modify the surface layer microstructure of AZ31 automotive magnesium sheet material. The process was carried out using softer brass wire brushes to mitigate the effect of wire brushing on surface quality and damage. The influence of modified surface grain structure and crystallographic texture was studied by continuous uniaxial tension test as well as by a newly proposed multi-step uniaxial stretching and annealing (MUSA) process to assess cumulative uniaxial tensile ductility of AZ31 sheet. A rotational speed of 2800 revolutions per minute for the wire brush with a near-zero depth of cut followed by annealing at 473 K (200 °C) for 60 minutes resulted in acceptable surface quality with a refined grain layer of depth 30 μm, and a modified crystallographic texture on the surface. Material flow behavior, grain microstructure, and texture evolution of WBA-processed material during subsequent MUSA process were analyzed to assess the role of wire brushing in enhancing the MUSA response of AZ31 sheet. Original fully annealed AZ31 sheet (in the non-WBA condition) was also subjected to identical MUSA process for comparison purposes. The results showed improvement in terminal uniaxial tensile ductility of WBA-MUSA-processed material compared to Standard-MUSA material. The ductility improvement is attributed to non-basal texture development and re-distribution of the texture, as well as to grain refinement within the highly deformed surface layer from the combination of WBA and MUSA processes.

  18. Improving the low temperature ductility of NiAl. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guha, Sumit

    1992-01-01

    The intermetallic NiAl exhibits excellent potential as a structural material for application in air-breathing and single-stage-to-orbit engines. Unfortunately NiAl is brittle at ambient temperature, which is partly attributed to the lack of five independent slip systems as required by von Mises criterion for uniform, volume conserving deformation since the operative group of zone axes (100) slip offers only three independent slip systems. Isostructural FeAl, however, deforms by group of zone axes (111) slip at room temperature which provides five independent slip systems. Thus, it was decided to macroalloy NiAl with Fe to promote group of zone axes (111) slip thereby possibly improving the ductility. For Ni - 30 at. (percent) Al - 20 at. (percent) Fe having essentially bcc microstructure indicated up to 6 percent tensile elongation combined with high yield strength (about 800 MPa). The results compare favorably with those of stoichiometric Ni - 50 at. (percent) Al which, however, deforms by group of zone axes (100) slip at room temperature. The multi-phase alloy approach has proven even more successful for Ni - 20 at. (percent) Al - 30 at. (percent) Fe. The high temperature ductility of the multi-phase alloy was attributed to deformation transfer across interphase boundaries and the crack stopping action of the constituent gamma/gamma' phase. While the constituent phase became increasingly brittle, the beta' phase became more ductile at elevated temperatures. Thus the multi-phase alloy did not exhibit any elevated temperature embrittlement. Similarly, while the beta' phase became weak at high temperatures, the gamma/gamma' phase exhibited better strength retention leading to the improved elevated temperature strength of the multi-phase alloy. Thus, the multi-phase alloy benefits from both its constituent phases, with each phase alleviating the disadvantages associated with the other phase over any temperature range. The multi-phase alloy approach is suggested as a

  19. Role of fluid overpressures in crustal strength and the form of the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, J.

    2014-12-01

    The classic crustal strength-depth model of Brace and Kolhstedt (1980) (see figure) based on experimental rock mechanics depends in the brittle regime on the critical assumption of linearly increasing hydrostatic pore-fluid pressures. This leads to a predicted linearly increasing brittle strength that is well established based on deep borehole stress measurements in crystalline crust. In contrast, fluid overpressures are widely documented in orogenic belts based on borehole data, seismic velocity analysis and analysis of veins, in some cases showing complex fault-valve pressure fluctuations between lithostatic and hydrostatic. Typical observed overpressure-depth relationships predict a brittle crustal strength that is approximately constant with depth in contrast with the classic model. This constant-strength behavior below the fluid-retention depth (ZFRD in figure) has been confirmed using deep borehole stress and fluid-pressure measurements (Suppe, 2014). Recent ductile-plastic modeling of disequilibrium compaction suggests that pressure solution promotes further increases in overpressure and weakening, promoting a very prolonged low-strength brittle-ductile transition. Overpressured conditions can be inferred to exist over a substantial fraction of crustal thickness, spanning the brittle-ductile transition, in several tectonic environments, most straightforwardly in shale-rich clastic sedimentary basins built to sea level on oceanic or highly thinned continental crust such as the US Gulf Coast and Niger Delta. These thick accumulations commonly deform into shale-rich plate boundary mountain belts (e.g. Bangladesh/Miyanmar, Makran, Trinidad/Barbados, Gulf of Alaska, southern Taiwan and New Zealand). There is deep geophysical evidence for near lithostatic pore-fluid pressures existing to depths of 20-30km based on Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs and Q observations. We present active examples from Taiwan and New Zealand, combining borehole data and seismic tomography.

  20. Hot Ductility Behaviors in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of Nitrogen-Alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Hong, Hyun-Uk

    2015-04-01

    Hot ductility behaviors in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of nitrogen-alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn austenitic stainless steels with different nitrogen contents were evaluated through hot tension tests using Gleeble simulator. The results of Gleeble simulations indicated that hot ductility in the HAZs deteriorated due to the formation of δ-ferrite and intergranular Cr2N particles. In addition, the amount of hot ductility degradation was strongly affected by the fraction of δ-ferrite.

  1. Ductile to brittle transition in dynamic fracture of brittle bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Han, Y. N.; Han, B. S.; Wang, W. H.; Xu, X. H.; Ke, F. J.

    2008-05-01

    We report an unusual transition from a locally ductile to a pure brittle fracture in the dynamic fracture of brittle Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 20}Gd{sub 10} bulk metallic glass. The fractographic evolution from a dimple structure to a periodic corrugation pattern and then to the mirror zone along the crack propagation direction during the dynamic fracture process is discussed within the framework of the meniscus instability of the fracture process zone. This work might provide an important clue in understanding of the energy dissipation mechanism for dynamic crack propagation in brittle glassy materials.

  2. Understanding the changes in ductility and Poisson's ratio of metallic glasses during annealing from microscopic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Ngai, K. L.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-07-21

    In the paper K. L. Ngai et al., [J. Chem. 140, 044511 (2014)], the empirical correlation of ductility with the Poisson's ratio, ν{sub Poisson}, found in metallic glasses was theoretically explained by microscopic dynamic processes which link on the one hand ductility, and on the other hand the Poisson's ratio. Specifically, the dynamic processes are the primitive relaxation in the Coupling Model which is the precursor of the Johari–Goldstein β-relaxation, and the caged atoms dynamics characterized by the effective Debye–Waller factor f{sub 0} or equivalently the nearly constant loss (NCL) in susceptibility. All these processes and the parameters characterizing them are accessible experimentally except f{sub 0} or the NCL of caged atoms; thus, so far, the experimental verification of the explanation of the correlation between ductility and Poisson's ratio is incomplete. In the experimental part of this paper, we report dynamic mechanical measurement of the NCL of the metallic glass La{sub 60}Ni{sub 15}Al{sub 25} as-cast, and the changes by annealing at temperature below T{sub g}. The observed monotonic decrease of the NCL with aging time, reflecting the corresponding increase of f{sub 0}, correlates with the decrease of ν{sub Poisson}. This is important observation because such measurements, not made before, provide the missing link in confirming by experiment the explanation of the correlation of ductility with ν{sub Poisson}. On aging the metallic glass, also observed in the isochronal loss spectra is the shift of the β-relaxation to higher temperatures and reduction of the relaxation strength. These concomitant changes of the β-relaxation and NCL are the root cause of embrittlement by aging the metallic glass. The NCL of caged atoms is terminated by the onset of the primitive relaxation in the Coupling Model, which is generally supported by experiments. From this relation, the monotonic decrease of the NCL with aging time is caused by the slowing down

  3. High strength W/TiNi micro-laminated composite with transformation-mediated ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yang; Yu, Kaiyuan; Jiang, Daqiang; Yu, Cun; Ren, Yang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Guo, Fangmin; Cui, Lishan

    2016-06-06

    A laminated W/TiNi composite is fabricated by hot pressing under vacuum and subsequent forging. The W and TiNi constituents are about 250 μm and 80 μm respectively in thicknesses and their interfaces are chemically sharp with negligible intermixing. The material exhibits two yielding plateaus and excellent strength-ductility combination during compression tests. In situ X-ray technique is employed to demonstrate that the unusual yielding phenomenon is related to the reversible thermoelastic phase transformation of TiNi layers. Furthermore, such mechanisms also contribute to the damage tolerance of the materials by inhibiting crack propagation in W.

  4. High strength W/TiNi micro-laminated composite with transformation-mediated ductility

    DOE PAGES

    Shao, Yang; Yu, Kaiyuan; Jiang, Daqiang; ...

    2016-06-06

    A laminated W/TiNi composite is fabricated by hot pressing under vacuum and subsequent forging. The W and TiNi constituents are about 250 μm and 80 μm respectively in thicknesses and their interfaces are chemically sharp with negligible intermixing. The material exhibits two yielding plateaus and excellent strength-ductility combination during compression tests. In situ X-ray technique is employed to demonstrate that the unusual yielding phenomenon is related to the reversible thermoelastic phase transformation of TiNi layers. Furthermore, such mechanisms also contribute to the damage tolerance of the materials by inhibiting crack propagation in W.

  5. Simultaneous enhancement of toughness, ductility, and strength of nanocrystalline ceramics at high strain-rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mo Yifei; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2007-04-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations of tensile testing have been performed on nc-SiC. Reduction of grain size promotes simultaneous enhancement of ductility, toughness, and strength. nc-SiC fails by intergranular fracture preceded by atomic level necking. Conventionally, high strain-rate deformations of ceramics are limited by diffusion time scales, since diffusion prevents premature cavitation and failure. The authors report a nondiffusional mechanism for suppressing premature cavitation, which is based on unconstrained plastic flow at grain boundaries. Based on the composite's rule of mixture, they estimate Young's modulus of random high-angle grain boundaries in nc-SiC to be about 130 GPa.

  6. The Effects of the Brittle-Ductile Transition on the India-Asia Intracontinental Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, J. M.; Murphy, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The intracontinental subduction zone between India and Asia is termed the Main Himalayan thrust. Beneath the range front and Lesser Himalaya the subduction interface is locked and only ruptures during great earthquakes. However beneath the High Himalaya and southern Tibet a rheologic transition from brittle to ductile deformation along the subduction zone has been defined based on microseismicity, geodesy, and thermal modelling. Geodetic data suggests that the crust above the transition zone strains to accommodate much of India-Asia interseismic convergence as southern Tibet creeps toward the locked portion of the Main Himalayan thrust. We combine regional geology with stream profile analysis, thermal modelling, geodesy, and microseismicity to understand spatial and temporal characteristics of the intracontinental subduction in this region of the Himalaya. This continuous flux of material against the locked portion of the subduction zone stores elastic strain which drives great earthquakes that rupture the plate boundary from southern Tibet to the range front. While the brittle-ductile transition zone stores a significant amount of interseismic strain it has also been a locus of permanent shortening and crustal thickening as shown by the presence of the Dolpo and Manaslu folds in Nepal and Kakhtang thrust in Bhutan, which were all active in the Middle Miocene. The forelimb of the Dolpo fold, a 400 km long 50 km half wavelength gentle fold, coincides with a 200 km x 50 km swath of oversteepened river channels indicative of rapid rock uplift suggesting the fold is currently being uplifted and shortened. The Dolpo fold experienced persistent shortening and crustal thickening despite being located adjacent to, and active concurrently with the Gurla Mandhata core complex indicating simultaneous N-S shortening and E-W extension implying a constrictional train field since the Middle Miocene. We interpret the Dolpo fold to reflect an active antiformal duplex along the Main

  7. High velocity properties of the dynamic frictional force between ductile metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James Edward; Hollan, Brad L; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J

    2010-01-01

    The high velocity properties of the tangential frictional force between ductile metal interfaces seen in large-scale NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are characterized by interesting scaling behavior. In many cases a power law decrease in the frictional force with increasing velocity is observed at high velocities. We discuss the velocity dependence of the high velocity branch of the tangential force in terms of structural transformation and ultimate transition, at the highest velocities, to confined fluid behavior characterized by a critical strain rate. The particular case of an Al/Al interface is discussed.

  8. Behavior Of Austempered Ductile Irons (ADI) Subjected To Laser Surface Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. L.; Fagoaga, I.; Liceaga, J. F.; Sanz Justes, Pedro; Jasnowski, Kazie S.

    1989-03-01

    The near surface microstructure of 3 austempered ductile irons has been modified using laser surface melting (LSM). A white cast iron layer was produced to depths of up to 500 microns. The microstructure of this region varied depending upon the parameters used. A heat affected zone (HAZ) appeared at an abrupt transition between the LSM zone and the substrate. The size of the HAZ, which varied between 20 and 200 microns was predominately affected by the pass velocity in the range of energies used. The hardness profiles showed large variations in the Haz probably due to varing tempering effects from the subsequent passes.

  9. Novel alpha-zirconium phosphonates for the reinforcement of ductile thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Benjamin R.

    2007-12-01

    Ductile thermoplastics are useful additives for providing fracture toughness to brittle thermosetting polymers; however, this toughening is usually accompanied by a significant decrease in elastic modulus. Therefore, alpha-zirconium phosphonates (ZrP) were developed and investigated as reinforcing nano-scale fillers that increase the yield strength and elastic modulus of a polyester thermoplastic without causing a reduction in its ductility. ZrP materials are synthetic layered compounds that are imbued with targeted organic surface functionalities and whose structural development can be carefully controlled in the laboratory. Ether-terminal alkyl ZrP materials were designed and synthesized, using a conventional ZrF62--mediated preparation, with the intent of developing strong dipole-dipole interactions between the layer surfaces and polyester macromolecules. Additionally, a general method for using lamellar lyotropic liquid crystals (LLC's) as supramolecular templates for alkyl ZrP was evaluated, whose products showed promising similarity to the conventionally prepared materials. The LLC-forming characteristics of several organophosphonate preparations were determined, showing improved mesophase stability with mixed amphiphiles and preparation with R4N + counterions. A mixed-surface octyl/methoxyundecyl ZrP was produced and combined with polycaprolactone (PCL) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in concentrations up to 50% (w/w). The mechanical properties of the ZrP/PCL nanocomposite were evaluated by tensile, flexural, and dynamic mechanical testing methods. Nanocomposites containing 5% (w/w) ZrP showed significant increases in tensile yield stress and elastic modulus without suffering any loss of ductility versus the unfilled polymer. Layer delamination from the ZrP tactoids was minimal and did not occur through an intercalative mechanism. Higher ZrP loadings resulted in the agglomeration of tactoids, leading to defect structures and loss of strength and ductility

  10. Some Remarks on the Choice of Ductility Class for Earthquake-Resistant Steel Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejčeková-Farhat, Miroslava; Ároch, Rudolf

    2013-09-01

    The implementation of the Eurocodes in current structural design practice has brought about a new emphasis on the design of earthquake-resistant structures. In some European countries, new earthquake zones have been defined; henceforth, the design requirements of many ongoing projects have changed as well. The choice of the ductility class of steel structures as one of the key design parameters, the consequences of this choice on design procedure, and some applications of the Eurocode 8 design criteria by comparing French and Slovak national practice are discussed, using a practical example of a structure.

  11. Timescales of ductility in an extensional shear zone recorded as diffusion profiles in deformed quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachlas, William; Teyssier, Christian; Whitney, Donna

    2015-04-01

    We document rutile needles that were in the process of exsolving from quartz during ductile shearing, and we apply the Arrhenius parameters for Ti diffusion in quartz to extract the timescales over which diffusion transpired. By constraining temperature conditions of deformation using multiple independent thermometers in the same rocks (Ti-in-quartz, Zr-in-rutile, quartz fabrics and microstructures), we estimate the longevity of a ductile shear zone that accommodated extensional collapse in the North American Cordillera. Eocene exhumation of the Pioneer core complex, Idaho, USA, was accommodated by the brittle-ductile Wildhorse detachment system that localized in a zone of sheared metasediments and juxtaposes lower crustal migmatite gneisses with upper crustal Paleozoic sedimentary units. Deformation in the Wildhorse detachment was partly accommodated within a continuous sequence (~200 m) of quartzite mylonites, wherein quartz grains are densely rutilated with microscopic rutile needles that are pervasively oriented into the lineation direction. We apply high-resolution spectroscopic CL analysis to map the Ti concentration field in quartz surrounding rutile needles, revealing depletion halos that indicate exsolution as Ti unmixes from quartz. Linear transects through depletion halos show that concentration profiles exhibit a characteristic diffusion geometry. We apply an error-function diffusion model to fit the measured profiles to extract the temperature or time recorded in the profile. Assuming modest temperature estimates from our combined thermometry analysis, results of diffusion modeling suggest that the quartzite shear zone was deforming over an integrated 0.8 - 3.1 Myr. If samples are permitted to have deformed in discrete intervals, our results suggest deformation of individual samples for timescales as short as 100 kyr. By comparing samples from different levels of the shear zone, we find that deformation was sustained in higher levels of the shear zone

  12. Strain localization in carbonate rocks experimentally deformed in the ductile field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.; Dresen, G.

    2012-04-01

    The deformation of rocks in the Earth's crust is often localized, varying from brittle fault gauges in shallow environments to mylonites in ductile shear zones at greater depth. A number of theoretical, experimental, and field studies focused on the evolution and extend of brittle fault zones, but little is known so far about initiation of ductile shear zones. Strain localization in rocks deforming at high temperature and pressure may be induced by several physical, chemical, or structurally-related mechanisms. We performed simple and pure shear deformation experiments on carbonate rocks containing structural inhomogenities in the ductile deformation regime. The results may help to gain insight into the evolution of high temperature shear zones. As starting material we used cylindrical samples of coarse-grained Carrara marble containing one or two 1 mm thin artificially prepared sheets of fine-grained Solnhofen limestone, which act as soft inclusions under the applied experimental conditions. Length and diameter of the investigated solid and hollow cylinders were 10-20 mm and 10-15 mm, respectively. Samples were deformed in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900° C temperature and confining pressures of 300 and 400 MPa. Three samples were deformed in axial compression at a bulk strain rate of 8x10-5 s-1to axial strains between 0.02 and 0.21 and 15 samples were twisted in torsion at a bulk shear strain rate of 2x10-4 s-1 to shear strains between 0.01 and 3.74. At low strain, specimens deformed axially and in torsion show minor strain hardening that is replaced by strain weakening at shear strains in excess of about 0.2. Peak shear stress at the imposed condition is about 20 MPa. Strain localized strongly within the weak inclusions as indicated by inhomogeneous bending of initially straight strain markers on sample jackets. Maximum strain concentration within inclusions with respect to the adjacent matrix was between 4 and 40, depending on total strain and

  13. Effects of Lower Drying-Storage Temperature on the Ductility of High-Burnup PWR Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M. C.; Burtseva, T. A.

    2016-08-30

    The purpose of this research effort is to determine the effects of canister and/or cask drying and storage on radial hydride precipitation in, and potential embrittlement of, high-burnup (HBU) pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding alloys during cooling for a range of peak drying-storage temperatures (PCT) and hoop stresses. Extensive precipitation of radial hydrides could lower the failure hoop stresses and strains, relative to limits established for as-irradiated cladding from discharged fuel rods stored in pools, at temperatures below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  14. Fabrication and Investigation of Intermetallic Compound-Glassy Phase Composites having Tensile Ductility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-09

    with Mg-Y-Cu BGA, MgY phase also has a cP2 B2 structure), Mg-Y-Ag (AgMg phase also has a cP2 B2 structure and is ductile) and Y-Cu-Zn and some other...result were obtained is connected with cP2 TiNi phase which demonstrates martensitic transformations. Choice of alloys and sample preparation...1. The tentative compositions at which bulk glassy phase formation and possible formation of cP2 crystal-glassy composites are Cu-Y (starting from

  15. Post Quench Ductility Evaluation of Zircaloy-4 and Select Iron Alloys under Design Basis and Extended LOCA Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yong; Keiser, James R; Terrani, Kurt A; Bell, Gary L; Snead, Lance

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted at 1200 C in flowing steam with tubing specimens of Zircaloy-4, 317, 347 stainless steels, and the commercial FeCrAl alloy APMT. The purpose was to determine the oxidation behavior and post quench ductility of these alloys under postulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The parabolic rate constant for Zircaloy-4 tubing samples at 1200 were determined to be k = 2.173 107 g2/cm4/s C, in excellent agreement with the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. The APMT alloy experienced the slowest oxidation rate among all materials examined in this work. The ductility of post quenched samples was evaluated by ring compression tests at 135 C. For Zircaloy-4, the ductile to brittle transition occurs at an equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) of 19.3%. SS-347 was still ductile after being oxidized for 2400 s (CP-ECR 50%), but the maximum load was reduced significantly owing to the metal layer thickness reduction. No ductility decrease was observed for the post-quenched APMT samples oxidized up to four hours.

  16. Evaluation of varying ductile fracture criteria for 42CrMo steel by compressions at different temperatures and strain rates.

    PubMed

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s(-1) are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC) and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture.

  17. Effect of strain rate on twinning and room temperature ductility of TiAl with fine equiaxed microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Imayev, V.M.; Imayev, R.M.; Salishchev, G.A.; Shagiev, M.R.; Kuznetsov, A.V.; Povarova, K.B.

    1997-04-15

    It is known that as the strain rate rises, the room temperature ductility of intermetallics increases. This is usually associated with the influence of environment. But in {gamma}-titanium aluminides (TiAl) the non-monotonous strain-rate dependence of ductility with a maximum at the certain rate is observed and therefore it cannot be explained only by the influence of environment. Meanwhile, it is known that the ductility improvement observed in some metals with the increase of strain rate is caused by the involving new slip and twinning systems in course of deformation. As for TiAl, it should be taken into account that as the strain rate increases, resistance to dislocation moving increases and the twinning may become the most preferable deformation mode, since the value of the Burgerous vector for twinning dislocation is less than that for superdislocation. In this case, the development of twinning may determine to a great extent a plastic flow of the intermetallic. Reasoning from this, the aim of the present work is to study the effect of strain rate on the twinning development and the ductility of stoichiometric {gamma}-titanium aluminide with fine equiaxed microstructure which provides a transition from planar slip to homogeneous one and makes the greatest ductility available.

  18. Three Dimensional Forming Simulation of the Shielded Slot Plate for the MCFC Using a Ductile Fracture Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Yang, D. Y.; Lee, S. R.; Chang, I. G.; Lee, T. W.

    2011-08-01

    The shielded slot plate, which has a sheared corrugated trapezoidal pattern, is a component of the metallic bipolar plate for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). In order to increase the efficiency of the fuel cell, the unit cell of the shielded slot plate should have a relatively large upper area. Additionally, defects from the forming process should be minimized. In order to simulate the slitting process, whereby sheared corrugated patterns are formed, ductile fracture criteria based on the histories of stress and strain are employed. The user material subroutine VUMAT is employed for implementation of the material and ductile fracture criteria in the commercial FEM software ABAQUS. The variables of the ductile fracture criteria were determined by comparing the simulation results and the experimental results of the tension test and the shearing test. Parametric studies were conducted to determine the critical value of the ductile fracture criterion. Employing these ductile fracture criteria, the three dimensional forming process of the shielded slot plate was numerically simulated. The effects of the slitting process in the forming process of the shielded slot plate were analyzed through a FEM simulation and experimental studies. Finally, experiments involving microscopic and macroscopic observations were conducted to verify the numerical simulations of the 3-step forming process.

  19. Failure mode analysis and a mechanism for hot-ductility improvement in the Nb-microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarandi, Faramarz; Yue, Steven

    2004-12-01

    Loss of hot ductility at the straightening stage of the continuous casting of high-strength low-alloy steel is attributed to different microalloying elements, in particular, Nb. However, such elements are essential for the desired mechanical characteristics of the final product. Since the chemistry cannot be altered to alleviate the problem, thermomechanical processing was studied in order to improve the hot ductility. Two Nb-microalloyed steels, one also containing B, were examined. The thermal history occurring in the continuous casting process was taken into account as well. First, it was noticed that the steel with B has a higher hot ductility than the other after being subjected to in-situ melting followed by the thermal schedule. Grain boundary sliding was recognized as the failure mechanism. Then, the effect of deformation applied in the vicinity of the δ→ γ transformation, while the thermal schedule was being executed, was investigated. Such deformation appeared to improve the hot ductility remarkably. Finally, the mechanism of such improvement in the hot ductility was elaborated.

  20. Ductile Fracture Prediction in Rotational Incremental Forming for Magnesium Alloy Sheets Using Combined Kinematic/Isotropic Hardening Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc-Toan; Park, Jin-Gee; Kim, Young-Suk

    2010-08-01

    To predict the ductile fracture of a magnesium alloy sheet when using rotational incremental forming, a combined kinematic and isotropic hardening law is implemented and evaluated from the histories of the ductile fracture value ( I) using a finite element analysis. Here, the criterion for a ductile fracture, as developed by Oyane ( J. Mech. Work. Technol., 1980, vol. 4, pp. 65-81), is applied via a user material based on a finite element analysis. To simulate the effect of the large amount of heat generation at elements in the contact area due to the friction energy of the rotational tool-specimen interface on the equivalent stress-strain evolution in incremental forming, the Johnson-Cook (JC) model was applied and the results compared with equivalent stress-strain curves obtained from tensile tests at elevated temperatures. The finite element (FE) simulation results for a ductile fracture were compared with the experimental results for a (80 mm × 80 mm × 25 mm) square shape with a 45 and 60 deg wall angle, respectively, and a (80 mm × 80 mm × 20 mm) square shape with a 70 deg wall angle. The trends of the FE simulation results agreed quite well with the experimental results. Finally, the effects of the process parameters, i.e., the tool down-step and tool radius, on the ductile fracture value and FLC at fracture (FLCF) were also investigated using the FE simulation results.

  1. Ductile, Brittle Failure Characteristics as Determined by the State of the Material and the Imposed State of Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, R M

    2004-02-05

    A method is developed for determining whether a particular mode of failure is expected to be of ductile type or brittle type depending upon both the state of the material and the particular state of stressing the isotropic material to failure. The state of the material is determined by two specific failure properties and a newly formulated failure theory. The ductile versus brittle criterion then involves the state of the material specification and the mean normal stress part of the imposed stress state. Several examples are given for different stress states and a spectrum of materials types. Closely related to the failure mode types are the orientations of the associated failure surfaces. The resulting failure surface angle predictions are compared with those from the Coulomb-Mohr failure criterion. In uniaxial tension, only the present method correctly predicts the octahedral failure angle at the ductile limit, and also shows a distinct failure mode transition from ductile type to brittle type as the state of the material changes. The explicit D-B criterion and the related failure surface orientation methodology are intended to provide a refinement and generalization of the ductile-brittle transition viewed only as a state property to also include a dependence upon the type of stress state taken to failure.

  2. Effect of Rare Earth Yttrium on the Hot Ductility of Eco-friendly Bi-S Based Free Cutting Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Chen, Weiqing; Qi, Fengyou; Li, Wenying

    2014-09-01

    The hot ductility of eco-friendly Bi-S based free cutting steels micro-alloyed with and without yttrium was studied using a Gleeble-1500 thermal-mechanical simulator over the temperature range 850-1200 °C. The results showed that the addition of rare earth yttrium had a substantial improvement in the hot ductility of Bi-S based free-cutting steel, especially at 1000 °C. The beneficial effect of yttrium on the hot ductility of Bi-S based free-cutting steel at the temperature no less than 1000 °C was mainly associated to the refinement of austenite grain size, which could effectively reduce the segregation density of bismuth at the grain boundary, and the lowering of the DRX onset temperature by yttrium addition. At 850-950 °C, the improvement of the hot ductility in these steels by yttrium addition might be attributed to the reduction of the low melting point sulphides at grain boundary and the refinement of the austenite grain size. However, the hot ductility of these steels micro-alloyed with yttrium was still poor at 850-950 °C, which was mainly owning to the presence of pro-eutectoid ferrite films and the absence of dynamic recrystallization as well as the segregation of liquid bismuth films at austenite grain boundaries.

  3. Influence of mean stress on fatigue strength of ferritic-pearlite ductile cast iron with small defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, T.; Kim, H. J.; Ikeda, T.; Yanase, K.

    2017-05-01

    Because of their excellent mechanical properties, low cost and good workability, the application of ductile cast iron has been increased in various industries such as the automotive, construction and rail industries. For safety designing of the ductile cast iron component, it is necessary to understand the effect of stress ratio, R, on fatigue limit of ductile cast iron in the presence of small defects. Correspondingly in this study, rotating bending fatigue tests at R = -1 and tension-compression fatigue tests at R = -1 and 0.1 were performed by using a ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron. To study the effects of small defects, we introduced a small drilled hole at surface of a specimen. The diameter and depth of a drilled hole were 50, 200 and 500 μm, respectively. The non-propagating cracks emanating from graphite particles and holes edge were observed at fatigue limit, irrespective of the value of stress ratio. From the microscopic observation of crack propagation behavior, it can be concluded that the fatigue limit is determined by the threshold condition for propagation of a small crack. It was found that the effect of stress ratio on the fatigue limit of ductile cast iron with small defects can be successfully predicted based on \\sqrt {area} parameter model. Furthermore, a use of the tensile strength, σ B, instead of the Vickers hardness, HV, is effective for fatigue limit prediction.

  4. Evaluation of Varying Ductile Fracture Criteria for 42CrMo Steel by Compressions at Different Temperatures and Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s−1 are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC) and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture. PMID:24592175

  5. New Ferritic Steels with Combined Optimal Creep Resistance and Ductility by Coupling Thermodynamic Calculations with Focused Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Zhenke; Zhang, F; Miller, Michael K; Liu, Chain T; Huang, Shenyan; Chou, Y; Tien, R; Chang, Y A; Liaw, Peter K

    2012-01-01

    Two critical issues restricting the applications of NiAl precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels are their poor room temperature ductility and insufficient creep resistance at temperatures higher than 600 C. In this study, a thermodynamic modeling approach is integrated with experiments focused on investigating the ductility and creep resistance of steel alloys based on the Fe-Ni-Al-Cr-Mo multi-component system. The mechanical property studies showed that the creep resistance increases with increasing the volume fraction of B2-ordered precipitates, while the opposite trend was observed for the ductility. Low solubility of Al in the {alpha}-Fe matrix was found to favor a ductility increase. Thermodynamic calculations were used to predict the volume fraction of B2-ordered precipitate and the elemental partitioning to guide the selection of alloy compositions that might exhibit the balanced creep resistance and ductility. Key experiments were then conducted to validate the prediction. This integrated approach was found to be very effective in the alloy development.

  6. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Aiying; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; ...

    2016-04-23

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility,more » leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Furthermore, our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.« less

  7. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiying; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Jian; Wang, Y. Morris

    2016-04-23

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility, leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Furthermore, our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.

  8. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiying; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Jian; Wang, Y. Morris

    2016-04-23

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility, leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Furthermore, our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.

  9. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    PubMed Central

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  10. Effect of sulfur on the ductility of copper shaped-charge jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Chan, D.K.; King, W.E.; Schwartz, A.J.; Baker, E.L.

    1996-07-01

    We have observed that a change in bulk sulfur (S) content imposed by doping has a marked effect on ductility of copper shaped-charge jets as measured by breakup times and length-to-diameter ratios of the particulated jet. Baseline material was Oxygen-Free-Electronic (ofe) copper with a S concentration of 3-4 ppM. Several liners were doped using a Cu sulfide powder pack method to increase the S level up to 9 ppM, while keeping other impurities and microstructure unchanged. Using flash x-ray radiographs to record the formation of jets, both the length-to-diameter ratios of the jet particles and breakup times were measured. Increasing the bulk S content of ofe Cu to 9 ppM, the breakup times decreased from 186 to 147 {mu}s, while the length-to- diameter ratios observed at 260 {mu}s decreased from 8:1 to 5:1. Since the solubility of S in Cu at the processing temperatures is extremely low, we conclude that the bulk rise in S content is due to S segregating to the grain boundaries. Thus, the decrease in ductility of liners doped with S appears directly related to the S content at the grain boundaries.

  11. Stiff, light, strong and ductile: nano-structured High Modulus Steel.

    PubMed

    Springer, H; Baron, C; Szczepaniak, A; Uhlenwinkel, V; Raabe, D

    2017-06-05

    Structural material development for lightweight applications aims at improving the key parameters strength, stiffness and ductility at low density, but these properties are typically mutually exclusive. Here we present how we overcome this trade-off with a new class of nano-structured steel - TiB2 composites synthesised in-situ via bulk metallurgical spray-forming. Owing to the nano-sized dispersion of the TiB2 particles of extreme stiffness and low density - obtained by the in-situ formation with rapid solidification kinetics - the new material has the mechanical performance of advanced high strength steels, and a 25% higher stiffness/density ratio than any of the currently used high strength steels, aluminium, magnesium and titanium alloys. This renders this High Modulus Steel the first density-reduced, high stiffness, high strength and yet ductile material which can be produced on an industrial scale. Also ideally suited for 3D printing technology, this material addresses all key requirements for high performance and cost effective lightweight design.

  12. Reliability model for ductile hybrid FRP rebar using randomly dispersed chopped fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnam, Bashar Ramzi

    Fiber reinforced polymer composites or simply FRP composites have become more attractive to civil engineers in the last two decades due to their unique mechanical properties. However, there are many obstacles such as low elasticity modulus, non-ductile behavior, high cost of the fibers, high manufacturing costs, and absence of rigorous characterization of the uncertainties of the mechanical properties that restrict the use of these composites. However, when FRP composites are used to develop reinforcing rebars in concrete structural members to replace the conventional steel, a huge benefit can be achieved since FRP materials don't corrode. Two FRP rebar models are proposed that make use of multiple types of fibers to achieve ductility, and chopped fibers are used to reduce the manufacturing costs. In order to reach the most optimum fractional volume of each type of fiber, to minimize the cost of the proposed rebars, and to achieve a safe design by considering uncertainties in the materials and geometry of sections, appropriate material resistance factors have been developed, and a Reliability Based Design Optimization (RBDO), has been conducted for the proposed schemes.

  13. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, Cheryl L.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1993-01-01

    The intermetallic compound NiAl is one of many advanced materials which is being scrutinized for possible use in high temperature, structural applications. Stoichiometric NiAl has a high melting temperature, excellent oxidation resistance, and good thermal conductivity. Past research has concentrated on improving monotonic properties. The encouraging results obtained on binary and micro-alloyed NiAl over the past ten years have led to the broadening of NiAl experimental programs. The purpose of this research project was to determine the low cycle fatigue properties and dislocation mechanisms of stoichiometric NiAl at temperatures near the monotonic brittle-to-ductile transition. The fatigue properties were found to change only slightly in the temperature range of 600 to 700 K; a temperature range over which monotonic ductility and fracture strength increase markedly. The shape of the cyclic hardening curves coincided with the changes observed in the dislocation structures. The evolution of dislocation structures did not appear to change with temperature.

  14. 3D Quantitative Analysis of Graphite Morphology in Ductile Cast Iron by X-ray Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yajun; Tu, Zhixin; Zhou, Jianxin; Zhang, Dongqiao; Wang, Min; Guo, Zhao; Liu, Changchang; Chen, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    In this article, X-ray microtomography and color metallographic techniques have been used to perform three-dimensional quantitative characterization of graphite nodule morphology in a step-shaped ductile cast iron casting. Statistical analyses of the graphite nodule count, diameter, sphericity, and spatial distribution have been processed for three samples in detail. The results reveal that graphite nodules in ductile cast iron can be categorized into two categories. The first types are nodules located in eutectic cells (NIECs), and the other one refers to nodules located between the eutectic cells (NBECs). The NIECs possess a larger average diameter but smaller sphericity compared with the NBECs, and the sphericity decreases along with the increasing of diameter. The increasing casting thickness results in an increasing count and percentage of NBECs. In addition, most nodules are NIECs in thin walls instead of NBECs in thick walls. Nonuniform spatial distributions of graphite nodules caused by the existence of NBECs have been found to become more obvious along with the increase of cast thickness.

  15. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability.

  16. On the spheroidal graphite growth and the austenite solidification in ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Jingjing

    Evolutions of austenite and nodular/spheroidal graphite particles during solidifications of ductile irons were experimentally investigated. Spheroidal graphite particle and austenite dendrite were found nucleated independently in liquid. Austenite dendrite engulfed the spheroidal graphite particles after contact and an austenite shell formed around a spheroidal graphite particle. The graphite diameter at which the austenite shell closed around nodule was determined. Statistically determined graphite size distributions indicated multiple graphite nucleation events during solidification. Structures in a graphite nodule varied depending on the growth stages of the nodule in ductile iron. Curved graphene layers appearing as faceted growth ledges swept circumferentially around the surface of a graphite nodule at early growth stages. Mismatches between the growth fronts created gaps which divided a nodule into radially oriented conical substructures (3-D). Columnar substructure was observed in the periphery of a nodule (formed during the intermediate growth stages) on its 2-D cross section. A columnar substructure consisted of parallel peripheral grains, with their c-axes approximately parallel. Graphene layers continued building up in individual conical substructure, and a graphite nodule increased its size accordingly. Method for characterizing the crystal structures of graphite based on the selected area diffraction pattern was developed. Both hexagonal structure and rhombohedral structure were found in the spheroidal graphite particles. Possible crystallographic defects associated with hexagonal-rhombohedral structure transition were discussed. Schematic models for introducing tilt angles to the graphite lattice with basal plane tilt boundaries were constructed.

  17. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  18. Radiation-Induced Helium Nanobubbles Enhance Ductility in Submicron-Sized Single-Crystalline Copper.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming-Shuai; Du, Jun-Ping; Wan, Liang; Ogata, Shigenobu; Tian, Lin; Ma, Evan; Han, Wei-Zhong; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhi-Wei

    2016-07-13

    The workability and ductility of metals usually degrade with exposure to irradiation, hence the phrase "radiation damage". Here, we found that helium (He) radiation can actually enhance the room-temperature deformability of submicron-sized copper. In particular, Cu single crystals with diameter of 100-300 nm and containing numerous pressurized sub-10 nm He bubbles become stronger, more stable in plastic flow and ductile in tension, compared to fully dense samples of the same dimensions that tend to display plastic instability (strain bursts). The sub-10 nm He bubbles are seen to be dislocation sources as well as shearable obstacles, which promote dislocation storage and reduce dislocation mean free path, thus contributing to more homogeneous and stable plasticity. Failure happens abruptly only after significant bubble coalescence. The current findings can be explained in light of Weibull statistics of failure and the beneficial effects of bubbles on plasticity. These results shed light on plasticity and damage developments in metals and could open new avenues for making mechanically robust nano- and microstructures by ion beam processing and He bubble engineering.

  19. Masonry Infilling Effect On Seismic Vulnerability and Performance Level of High Ductility RC Frames

    SciTech Connect

    Ghalehnovi, M.; Shahraki, H.

    2008-07-08

    In last years researchers preferred behavior-based design of structure to force-based one for designing and construction of the earthquake-resistance structures, this method is named performance based designing. The main goal of this method is designing of structure members for a certain performance or behavior. On the other hand in most of buildings, load bearing frames are infilled with masonry materials which leads to considerable changes in mechanical properties of frames. But usually infilling wall's effect has been ignored in nonlinear analysis of structures because of complication of the problem and lack of simple logical solution. As a result lateral stiffness, strength, ductility and performance of the structure will be computed with less accuracy. In this paper by use of Smooth hysteretic model for masonry infillings, some high ductile RC frames (4, 8 stories including 1, 2 and 3 spans) designed according to Iranian code are considered. They have been analyzed by nonlinear dynamic method in two states, with and without infilling. Then their performance has been determined with criteria of ATC 40 and compared with recommended performance in Iranian seismic code (standard No. 2800)

  20. Strong, ductile, and thermally stable Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites

    PubMed Central

    Dusoe, Keith J.; Vijayan, Sriram; Bissell, Thomas R.; Chen, Jie; Morley, Jack E.; Valencia, Leopolodo; Dongare, Avinash M.; Aindow, Mark; Lee, Seok-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and nanocrystalline metals (NMs) have been extensively investigated due to their superior strengths and elastic limits. Despite these excellent mechanical properties, low ductility at room temperature and poor microstructural stability at elevated temperatures often limit their practical applications. Thus, there is a need for a metallic material system that can overcome these performance limits of BMGs and NMs. Here, we present novel Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites (MINCs), which exhibit high ultimate compressive strengths (over 2 GPa), high compressive failure strain (over 20%), and superior microstructural stability even at temperatures above the glass transition temperature of Cu-based BMGs. Rapid solidification produces a unique ultra-fine microstructure that contains a large volume fraction of Cu5Zr superlattice intermetallic compound; this contributes to the high strength and superior thermal stability. Mechanical and microstructural characterizations reveal that substantial accumulation of phase boundary sliding at metal/intermetallic interfaces accounts for the extensive ductility observed. PMID:28067334

  1. Effect of Mould Coating on Skin Formation and Nodule Characteristics of Thin Wall Ductile Iron Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaneswara, D.; Suharno, B.; Aprilio, A.; Ariobimo, R. D. S.; Sofyan, N.

    2017-05-01

    Thin wall ductile iron (TWDI) has the potential alternative for lightweight aluminium use in automotive parts. The main problem in TWDI, however, is the formation of skin during the casting, which may reduce its mechanical properties. This casting skin is formed by the decomposition of nodular graphite at the mould interface during the casting process. One of the ways to work around this problem is by using mould coating to control the cooling process. In this work, three variables of mould coatings were used, i.e. graphite, MgO, and MgO/graphite double layers. The results showed that the average casting skin thickness in double layer coating was the lowest (30.41 μm), 57% lower than that of in MgO (71.46 μm) and 60% lower than that of graphite (74.44 μm). The reduction of casting skin thickness increased the mechanical properties of TWDI (346 MPa), 69% higher than that of MgO (223 MPa) and 26% higher than that of graphite (297 MPa). The same is true for ductility (2.7%), which was higher than that of MgO (1.43%) and that of graphite (1.43%).

  2. Earthquake rupture below the brittle-ductile transition in continental lithospheric mantle

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Germán A.; Froment, Bérénice; Yu, Chunquan; Poli, Piero; Abercrombie, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes deep in the continental lithosphere are rare and hard to interpret in our current understanding of temperature control on brittle failure. The recent lithospheric mantle earthquake with a moment magnitude of 4.8 at a depth of ~75 km in the Wyoming Craton was exceptionally well recorded and thus enabled us to probe the cause of these unusual earthquakes. On the basis of complete earthquake energy balance estimates using broadband waveforms and temperature estimates using surface heat flow and shear wave velocities, we argue that this earthquake occurred in response to ductile deformation at temperatures above 750°C. The high stress drop, low rupture velocity, and low radiation efficiency are all consistent with a dissipative mechanism. Our results imply that earthquake nucleation in the lithospheric mantle is not exclusively limited to the brittle regime; weakening mechanisms in the ductile regime can allow earthquakes to initiate and propagate. This finding has significant implications for understanding deep earthquake rupture mechanics and rheology of the continental lithosphere. PMID:28345055

  3. Development of ductile Fe{sub 3}Al-based aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1993-07-01

    Iron aluminides based on Fe{sub 3}Al are of interest because of their excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance, especially in sulfur-bearing atmospheres. Work at ORNL has centered on developing Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys with improved ambient temperature ductilities and increased strengths at temperatures of 600--700C. Ambient temperature brittleness in this system is not ``inherent,`` but is caused by atomic hydrogen which is produced by an environmental reaction between aluminum in the alloy and water vapor in the atmosphere. Great strides have been made in understanding this embrittlement Phenomenon, and the production of alloys with room temperature ductilities of over 10% and tensile yield strengths at 600C of as high as 500 MPa is now possible through modifications in alloy composition and control of thermomechanical processing techniques. Creep rupture lifes of over 200 h at 593C (1100{degrees}F) and 207 MPa (30 ksi) can also be produced through control of alloy composition and microstructure. This paper summarizes our present efforts to improve the tensile and creep rupture properties and gives the status of efforts to commercialize Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy compositions.

  4. Lithospheric extension near Lake Mead, Nevada - A model for ductile flow in the lower crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Sarah; Mcnutt, Marcia; Phipps-Morgan, Jason; Royden, Leigh

    1991-01-01

    Small variations in gravity anomalies and topographic elevation observed in areas that have undergone highly variable amounts of upper crustal thinning can be satisfactorily explained by ductile flow of lower crustal material under the proper conditions. The boundary between the unextended Colorado Plateau and a strongly extended domain in the Basin and Range Province in the Lake Mead (Nevada) region is examined. Finite element modeling of Newtonian flow and power law creep shows that flow over the length scale of the eastern Basin and Range (500) km or more) corresponding to upper crustal extension by a factor of 1.4-3 over 10 million years requires effective viscosities less than 10 to the 18th - 10 to the 20th Pa s for ductile channels 10-25 km thick. Modeling suggests that these effective viscosities may be sustained by lower crustal material deforming at laboratory-derived power law creep rates. The longer-scale flow may require elevated crustal temperatures (more than 700 C), depending on the composition and material properties assumed. Under the boundary conditions assumed in this study the linear viscous flow models yield a satisfactory approximation to deformation by power law creep. This work suggests that flow in the lower crust may be a viable mechanism for producing small variations in total crustal thickness between strongly extended and less extended regions, and thereby explaining the relative uniformity in gravity and topography between such regions.

  5. Dislocation creation and void nucleation in FCC ductile metals under tensile loading: a general microscopic picture.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-11-10

    Numerous theoretical and experimental efforts have been paid to describe and understand the dislocation and void nucleation processes that are fundamental for dynamic fracture modeling of strained metals. To date an essential physical picture on the self-organized atomic collective motions during dislocation creation, as well as the essential mechanisms for the void nucleation obscured by the extreme diversity in structural configurations around the void nucleation core, is still severely lacking in literature. Here, we depict the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation during uniaxial high strain rate tensile processes in face-centered-cubic (FCC) ductile metals. We find that the dislocations are created through three distinguished stages: (i) Flattened octahedral structures (FOSs) are randomly activated by thermal fluctuations; (ii) The double-layer defect clusters are formed by self-organized stacking of FOSs on the close-packed plane; (iii) The stacking faults are formed and the Shockley partial dislocations are created from the double-layer defect clusters. Whereas, the void nucleation is shown to follow a two-stage description. We demonstrate that our findings on the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation are universal for a variety of FCC ductile metals with low stacking fault energies.

  6. Dislocation creation and void nucleation in FCC ductile metals under tensile loading: A general microscopic picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-11-01

    Numerous theoretical and experimental efforts have been paid to describe and understand the dislocation and void nucleation processes that are fundamental for dynamic fracture modeling of strained metals. To date an essential physical picture on the self-organized atomic collective motions during dislocation creation, as well as the essential mechanisms for the void nucleation obscured by the extreme diversity in structural configurations around the void nucleation core, is still severely lacking in literature. Here, we depict the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation during uniaxial high strain rate tensile processes in face-centered-cubic (FCC) ductile metals. We find that the dislocations are created through three distinguished stages: (i) Flattened octahedral structures (FOSs) are randomly activated by thermal fluctuations; (ii) The double-layer defect clusters are formed by self-organized stacking of FOSs on the close-packed plane; (iii) The stacking faults are formed and the Shockley partial dislocations are created from the double-layer defect clusters. Whereas, the void nucleation is shown to follow a two-stage description. We demonstrate that our findings on the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation are universal for a variety of FCC ductile metals with low stacking fault energies.

  7. Ideal strength and ductility in metals from second- and third-order elastic constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Maarten; Winter, Ian; Chrzan, D. C.; Asta, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Under tensile loading the ideal strength of a solid is governed by mechanical instabilities corresponding to failure in tension or shear, indicative of intrinsically brittle or ductile behavior, respectively. Ideal-strength first-principles calculations are performed in this work on several hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) and body-centered-cubic (bcc) metals. It is shown that some metals fail in tension under uniaxial loading, whereas others fail in shear. The observed behavior is rationalized with a simple analytical model based on second-order and third-order elastic constants. This formalism correctly predicts the failure mode of all but one of the metals studied in this work and leads to fundamental insights into why some classes of metals are intrinsically brittle or ductile. Further, for the transition metals, filling of the d bands is shown to correlate with the type of mechanical instability encountered, thus providing insights into the effect of alloying on the intrinsic mechanical behavior of hcp and bcc metals.

  8. On localization and void coalescence as a precursor to ductile fracture.

    PubMed

    Tekoğlu, C; Hutchinson, J W; Pardoen, T

    2015-03-28

    Two modes of plastic flow localization commonly occur in the ductile fracture of structural metals undergoing damage and failure by the mechanism involving void nucleation, growth and coalescence. The first mode consists of a macroscopic localization, usually linked to the softening effect of void nucleation and growth, in either a normal band or a shear band where the thickness of the band is comparable to void spacing. The second mode is coalescence with plastic strain localizing to the ligaments between voids by an internal necking process. The ductility of a material is tied to the strain at macroscopic localization, as this marks the limit of uniform straining at the macroscopic scale. The question addressed is whether macroscopic localization occurs prior to void coalescence or whether the two occur simultaneously. The relation between these two modes of localization is studied quantitatively in this paper using a three-dimensional elastic-plastic computational model representing a doubly periodic array of voids within a band confined between two semi-infinite outer blocks of the same material but without voids. At sufficiently high stress triaxiality, a clear separation exists between the two modes of localization. At lower stress triaxialities, the model predicts that the onset of macroscopic localization and coalescence occur simultaneously.

  9. Brittle and Ductile Behavior in Deep-Seated Landslides: Learning from the Vajont Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paronuzzi, Paolo; Bolla, Alberto; Rigo, Elia

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyzes the mechanical behavior of the unstable Mt. Toc slope before the 1963 catastrophic collapse, considering both the measured data (surface displacements and microseismicity) and the updated geological model of the prehistoric rockslide. From February 1960 up to 9 October 1963, the unstable mass behaved as a brittle-ductile `mechanical system,' characterized by remarkable microseismicity as well as by considerable surface displacements (up to 4-5 m). Recorded microshocks were the result of progressive rock fracturing of distinct resisting stiff parts made up of intact rock (indentations, undulations, and rock bridges). The main resisting stiff part was a large rock indentation located at the NE extremity of the unstable mass that acted as a mechanical constraint during the whole 1960-1963 period, inducing a progressive rototranslation toward the NE. This large constraint failed in autumn 1960, when an overall slope failure took place, as emphasized by the occurrence of the large perimetrical crack in the upper slope. In this circumstance, the collapse was inhibited by a reblocking phenomenon of the unstable mass that had been previously destabilized by the first reservoir filling. Progressive failure of localized intact rock parts progressively propagated westwards as a consequence of the two further filling-drawdown cycles of the reservoir (1962 and 1963). The characteristic brittle-ductile behavior of the Vajont landslide was made possible by the presence of a very thick (40-50 m) and highly deformable shear zone underlying the upper rigid rock mass (100-120 m thick).

  10. Micromechanical and macroscopic models of ductile fracture in particle reinforced metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chao; Bai, Jie; Ghosh, Somnath

    2007-06-01

    This paper is aimed at developing two modules contributing to the overall framework of multi-scale modelling of ductile fracture of particle reinforced metallic materials. The first module is for detailed micromechanical analysis of particle fragmentation and matrix cracking of heterogeneous microstructures. The Voronoi cell FEM for particle fragmentation is extended in this paper to incorporate ductile failure through matrix cracking in the form of void growth and coalescence using a non-local Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model. In the resulting enriched Voronoi cell finite element model (VCFEM) or E-VCFEM, the assumed stress-based hybrid VCFEM formulation is overlaid with narrow bands of displacement based elements to accommodate strain softening in the constitutive behaviour. The second module develops an anisotropic plasticity-damage model in the form of the GTN model for macroscopic analysis in the multi-scale material model. Parameters in this model are calibrated from results of homogenization of microstructural variables obtained by E-VCFEM analysis of microstructural representative volume element. Numerical examples conducted yield satisfactory results.

  11. Masonry Infilling Effect On Seismic Vulnerability and Performance Level of High Ductility RC Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalehnovi, M.; Shahraki, H.

    2008-07-01

    In last years researchers preferred behavior-based design of structure to force-based one for designing and construction of the earthquake-resistance structures, this method is named performance based designing. The main goal of this method is designing of structure members for a certain performance or behavior. On the other hand in most of buildings, load bearing frames are infilled with masonry materials which leads to considerable changes in mechanical properties of frames. But usually infilling wall's effect has been ignored in nonlinear analysis of structures because of complication of the problem and lack of simple logical solution. As a result lateral stiffness, strength, ductility and performance of the structure will be computed with less accuracy. In this paper by use of Smooth hysteretic model for masonry infillings, some high ductile RC frames (4, 8 stories including 1, 2 and 3 spans) designed according to Iranian code are considered. They have been analyzed by nonlinear dynamic method in two states, with and without infilling. Then their performance has been determined with criteria of ATC 40 and compared with recommended performance in Iranian seismic code (standard No. 2800).

  12. High-Temperature Low-Cycle Fatigue Property of Heat-Resistant Ductile-Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Jang, Ho; Oh, Yong-Jun

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the high-temperature degradation behavior of two types of heat-resistant Si-Mo ductile cast iron (Fe-3.4C-3.7Si-0.4Mo and Fe-3.1C-4.5Si-1.0Mo) with particular attention paid to the mechanical properties and overall oxidation resistance. Tension and low-cycle fatigue properties were examined at 600 °C and 800 °C. The mechanical tests and metallographic and fractographic analyses showed that cast iron containing higher Si and Mo contents had a higher tensile strength and longer fatigue life at both temperatures than cast iron with lower levels due to the phase transformations of pearlite and carbide. The Coffin-Manson type equation was used to assess the fatigue mechanism suggesting that the higher Si-Mo alloy was stronger but less ductile than the lower Si-Mo alloy at 600 °C. However, similar properties for both alloys were observed at 800 °C because of softening and oxidation effects. Analysis of the isothermal oxidation behavior at those temperatures showed that mixed Fe2SiO4 layers were formed and the resulting scaling kinetics was much faster for low Si-Mo containing iron. With increasing temperature, subsurface degradation such as decarburization, voids, and cracks played a significant role in the overall oxidation resistance.

  13. Ductilization of Mo-Si solid solutions manufactured by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Saage, H.; Krueger, M.; Sturm, D.; Heilmaier, M.; Schneibel, J H; George, Easo P; Heatherly Jr, Lee; Somsen, Ch.; Eggeler, G.; Yang, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Mo-1.5 at.% Si alloys with additions of either Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Zr were manufactured by mechanical alloying. The Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles reduced the grain size and increased the room temperature strength, but did not alleviate the brittleness of previously investigated Mo-1.5 at.% Si without Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Additions of Zr, on the other hand, resulted not only in a fine grain size and an extremely high bend strength ({approx}2 GPa), but also in limited bend ductility at room temperature. Zr additions are seen to be beneficial for three reasons. First, Zr reduces the grain size. Second, Zr getters detrimental oxygen by forming ZrO{sub 2} particles (which in turn help to pin the grain boundaries). Third, in situ Auger analysis shows that Zr reduces the concentration of Si segregated at the grain boundaries. This is thought to enhance the grain boundary cohesive strength and thus leads to the observed ductility.

  14. Strong, ductile, and thermally stable Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusoe, Keith J.; Vijayan, Sriram; Bissell, Thomas R.; Chen, Jie; Morley, Jack E.; Valencia, Leopolodo; Dongare, Avinash M.; Aindow, Mark; Lee, Seok-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and nanocrystalline metals (NMs) have been extensively investigated due to their superior strengths and elastic limits. Despite these excellent mechanical properties, low ductility at room temperature and poor microstructural stability at elevated temperatures often limit their practical applications. Thus, there is a need for a metallic material system that can overcome these performance limits of BMGs and NMs. Here, we present novel Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites (MINCs), which exhibit high ultimate compressive strengths (over 2 GPa), high compressive failure strain (over 20%), and superior microstructural stability even at temperatures above the glass transition temperature of Cu-based BMGs. Rapid solidification produces a unique ultra-fine microstructure that contains a large volume fraction of Cu5Zr superlattice intermetallic compound; this contributes to the high strength and superior thermal stability. Mechanical and microstructural characterizations reveal that substantial accumulation of phase boundary sliding at metal/intermetallic interfaces accounts for the extensive ductility observed.

  15. Earthquake rupture below the brittle-ductile transition in continental lithospheric mantle.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Germán A; Froment, Bérénice; Yu, Chunquan; Poli, Piero; Abercrombie, Rachel

    2017-03-01

    Earthquakes deep in the continental lithosphere are rare and hard to interpret in our current understanding of temperature control on brittle failure. The recent lithospheric mantle earthquake with a moment magnitude of 4.8 at a depth of ~75 km in the Wyoming Craton was exceptionally well recorded and thus enabled us to probe the cause of these unusual earthquakes. On the basis of complete earthquake energy balance estimates using broadband waveforms and temperature estimates using surface heat flow and shear wave velocities, we argue that this earthquake occurred in response to ductile deformation at temperatures above 750°C. The high stress drop, low rupture velocity, and low radiation efficiency are all consistent with a dissipative mechanism. Our results imply that earthquake nucleation in the lithospheric mantle is not exclusively limited to the brittle regime; weakening mechanisms in the ductile regime can allow earthquakes to initiate and propagate. This finding has significant implications for understanding deep earthquake rupture mechanics and rheology of the continental lithosphere.

  16. Residual Ductility and Microstructural Evolution in Continuous-Bending-under-Tension of AA-6022-T4

    PubMed Central

    Zecevic, Milovan; Roemer, Timothy J.; Knezevic, Marko; Korkolis, Yannis P.; Kinsey, Brad L.

    2016-01-01

    A ubiquitous experiment to characterize the formability of sheet metal is the simple tension test. Past research has shown that if the material is repeatedly bent and unbent during this test (i.e., Continuous-Bending-under-Tension, CBT), the percent elongation at failure can significantly increase. In this paper, this phenomenon is evaluated in detail for AA-6022-T4 sheets using a custom-built CBT device. In particular, the residual ductility of specimens that are subjected to CBT processing is investigated. This is achieved by subjecting a specimen to CBT processing and then creating subsize tensile test and microstructural samples from the specimens after varying numbers of CBT cycles. Interestingly, the engineering stress initially increases after CBT processing to a certain number of cycles, but then decreases with less elongation achieved for increasing numbers of CBT cycles. Additionally, a detailed microstructure and texture characterization are performed using standard scanning electron microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction imaging. The results show that the material under CBT preserves high integrity to large plastic strains due to a uniform distribution of damage formation and evolution in the material. The ability to delay ductile fracture during the CBT process to large plastic strains, results in formation of a strong <111> fiber texture throughout the material. PMID:28773257

  17. Evaluating the ductility characteristics of self-centering buckling-restrained shape memory alloy braces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Elfath, Hamdy

    2017-05-01

    Recently, self-centering earthquake resistant systems have attracted attention because of their promising potential in controlling the residual drifts and reducing repair costs after earthquake events. Considerable portion of self-centering research is based on using short-segment superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) braces as strengthening technique because of the lower modulus of elasticity of SMA in comparison with that of steel. The goal of this study is to investigate the ductility characteristics of these newly proposed short-segment SMA braces to evaluate their safety levels against fracture failures under earthquake loading. This goal has been achieved by selecting an appropriate seismic performance criterion for steel frames equipped with SMA braces, defining the level of strain capacity of SMA and calculating the strain demands in the SMA braces by conducting a series of pushover and earthquake time history analyzes on typical frame structure. The results obtained in this study indicated the inability of short-segment SMA designs to provide adequate ductility to the lateral resistant systems. An alternative approach is introduced by using hybrid steel-SMA braces that are capable of controlling the residual drifts and providing the structure with adequate lateral stiffness.

  18. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating.

    PubMed

    Sun, B A; Chen, S H; Lu, Y M; Zhu, Z G; Zhao, Y L; Yang, Y; Chan, K C; Liu, C T

    2016-06-08

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability.

  19. A New Ductility Exhaustion Model for High Temperature Low Cycle Fatigue Life Prediction of Turbine Disk Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shun-Peng; Huang, Hong-Zhong; Li, Haiqing; Sun, Rui; Zuo, Ming J.

    2011-06-01

    Based on ductility exhaustion theory and the generalized energy-based damage parameter, a new viscosity-based life prediction model is introduced to account for the mean strain/stress effects in the low cycle fatigue regime. The loading waveform parameters and cyclic hardening effects are also incorporated within this model. It is assumed that damage accrues by means of viscous flow and ductility consumption is only related to plastic strain and creep strain under high temperature low cycle fatigue conditions. In the developed model, dynamic viscosity is used to describe the flow behavior. This model provides a better prediction of Superalloy GH4133's fatigue behavior when compared to Goswami's ductility model and the generalized damage parameter. Under non-zero mean strain conditions, moreover, the proposed model provides more accurate predictions of Superalloy GH4133's fatigue behavior than that with zero mean strains.

  20. Room Temperature Ductility of NiAl-strengthened Ferritic Steels: Effects of Precipitate Microstructure and Hot Rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T; Miller, Michael K; Ghosh, Gautam; Kenik, Edward A; Huang, Shenyan; Liaw, Peter K

    2012-01-01

    The effects of precipitate microstructure on the room temperature ductility of a series of carefully designed Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo steels were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS), and atom probe tomography (APT) were conducted to quantify the nano-scaled precipitates. The accuracy of the characterization results was verified by a numerical analysis. Three point bending tests results demonstrated that ductility was a function of the precipitate volume fraction and the Al and Ni concentrations in the Fe matrix, these relationships were discussed in terms of possible mechanisms. The ductility was also found to be independent of the precipitate size and inter-particle spacing in the studied range, which was validated by a theoretical model.

  1. Highly ductile multilayered films by layer-by-layer assembly of oppositely charged polyurethanes for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Podsiadlo, Paul; Qin, Ming; Cuddihy, Meghan; Zhu, Jian; Critchley, Kevin; Kheng, Eugene; Kaushik, Amit K; Qi, Ying; Kim, Hyoung-Sug; Noh, Si-Tae; Arruda, Ellen M; Waas, Anthony M; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2009-12-15

    Multilayered thin films prepared with the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique are typically "brittle" composites, while many applications such as flexible electronics or biomedical devices would greatly benefit from ductile, and tough nanostructured coatings. Here we present the preparation of highly ductile multilayered films via LBL assembly of oppositely charged polyurethanes. Free-standing films were found to be robust, strong, and tough with ultimate strains as high as 680% and toughness of approximately 30 MJ/m(3). These results are at least 2 orders of magnitude greater than most LBL materials presented until today. In addition to enhanced ductility, the films showed first-order biocompatibility with animal and human cells. Multilayered structures incorporating polyurethanes open up a new research avenue into the preparation of multifunctional nanostructured films with great potential in biomedical applications.

  2. An Improved Approach to Fracture Toughness Assessment of Brittle Coating on Ductile Substrate Systems under Indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidova, Natalia V.

    Fracture toughness is an important material property that determines the structural integrity of a component with pre-existing or service-generated flaws. In the present research, an indentation-based method and the associated fracture mechanics model are proposed for fracture toughness assessment of brittle coating/ductile substrate systems. The proposed models consider well-developed radial/median cracks generated under sharp indentation, despite that the crack formation process may have gone through crack initiation and propagation phases. For generality, the geometry of a well-developed crack is assumed to be semi-elliptical in shape. The driving force of the crack is considered to stem from the residual plastic zone expansion under the indenter, as well as the far-field Boussinesq (elastic) stress. Three well-defined configurations are studied. For the first configuration, a crack with a depth of less than 7% of the coating thickness is considered. In this case, the problem is treated as the one for the monolithic material with the coating material properties. For the second configuration, a crack that runs deeper than 7% of the coating thickness but is still within the coating layer is analyzed. In this case, the composite hardness is introduced into the analysis to account for the influence of the substrate material properties; and furthermore, an interface correction factor is proposed to take into account the presence of the coating/substrate interface and its influence on the stress intensity factor of the well-developed elliptical cracks. For the third configuration, a crack penetrating into the substrate is considered. In this case, based on the condition of deformation compatibility across the coating/substrate interface, the bulk modulus for the coating/substrate system is introduced into the analysis. A series of indentation tests are conducted on a WC/10Co/4Cr coating/1080 low carbon steel substrate specimen, which is a brittle coating on a ductile

  3. Simulation of seismic waves in the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) using a Burgers model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto, Flavio; Farina, Biancamaria; Carcione, José Maria

    2014-05-01

    The seismic characterization of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in the Earth's crust is of great importance for the study of high-enthalpy geothermal fields in the proximity of magmatic zones. It is well known that the BDT can be viewed as the transition between zones with viscoelastic and plastic behavior, i.e., the transition between the upper, cooler, brittle crustal zone, and the deeper ductile zone. Depending on stress and temperature conditions, the BDT behavior is basically determined by the viscosity of the crustal rocks, which acts as a key factor. In situ shear stress and temperature are related to shear viscosity and steady-state creep flow through the Arrhenius equation, and deviatory stress by octahedral stress criterion. We present a numerical approach to simulate the propagation of P-S and SH seismic waves in a 2D model of the heterogeneous Earth's crust. The full-waveform simulation code is based on a Burgers mechanical model (Carcione, 2007), which enables us to describe both the seismic attenuation effects and the steady-state creep flow (Carcione and Poletto, 2013; Carcione et al. 2013). The differential equations of motion are calculated for the Burgers model, and recast in the velocity-stress formulation. Equations are solved in the time domain using memory variables. The approach uses a direct method based on the Runge-Kutta technique, and the Fourier pseudo-spectral methods, for time integration and for spatial derivation, respectively. In this simulation we assume isotropic models. To test the code, the signals generated by the full-waveform simulation algorithm are compared with success to analytic solutions obtained with different shear viscosities. Moreover, synthetic results are calculated to simulate surface and VSP seismograms in a realistic rheological model with a dramatic temperature change, to study the observability of BDT by seismic reflection methods. The medium corresponds to a selected rheology of the Iceland scenario

  4. Phase-field modelling of ductile fracture: a variational gradient-extended plasticity-damage theory and its micromorphic regularization.

    PubMed

    Miehe, C; Teichtmeister, S; Aldakheel, F

    2016-04-28

    This work outlines a novel variational-based theory for the phase-field modelling of ductile fracture in elastic-plastic solids undergoing large strains. The phase-field approach regularizes sharp crack surfaces within a pure continuum setting by a specific gradient damage modelling. It is linked to a formulation of gradient plasticity at finite strains. The framework includes two independent length scales which regularize both the plastic response as well as the crack discontinuities. This ensures that the damage zones of ductile fracture are inside of plastic zones, and guarantees on the computational side a mesh objectivity in post-critical ranges.

  5. Phase-field modelling of ductile fracture: a variational gradient-extended plasticity-damage theory and its micromorphic regularization

    PubMed Central

    Teichtmeister, S.; Aldakheel, F.

    2016-01-01

    This work outlines a novel variational-based theory for the phase-field modelling of ductile fracture in elastic–plastic solids undergoing large strains. The phase-field approach regularizes sharp crack surfaces within a pure continuum setting by a specific gradient damage modelling. It is linked to a formulation of gradient plasticity at finite strains. The framework includes two independent length scales which regularize both the plastic response as well as the crack discontinuities. This ensures that the damage zones of ductile fracture are inside of plastic zones, and guarantees on the computational side a mesh objectivity in post-critical ranges. PMID:27002069

  6. Effects of Non-metallic Inclusions on Hot Ductility of High Manganese TWIP Steels Containing Different Aluminum Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Nan; Yang, Jian; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Xin, Xiu-Ling; Xu, Long-Yun

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of inclusions in Fe-16Mn- xAl-0.6C ( x = 0.002, 0.033, 0.54, 2.10 mass pct) steels have been investigated and their effects on hot ductility of the high manganese TWIP steels have been discussed. Ductility is very poor in the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, which is lower than 20 pct in the temperature range of 873 K to 1473 K (600 °C to 1200 °C). For the steels containing 0.002 and 2.10 mass pct aluminum, ductility is higher than 40 pct in the same temperature range. The hot ductility of steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum is higher than 30 pct throughout the temperature range under examination. With increasing aluminum content, the main inclusions in the steels change along the route of MnO/(MnO + MnS) → MnS/(Al2O3 + MnS) → AlN/(Al2O3 + MnS)/(MgAl2O4 + MnS) → AlN. The thermodynamic results of inclusion types calculated with FactSage software are in agreement with the experimental observation results. The inclusions in the steels containing 0.002 mass pct aluminum do not deteriorate the hot ductility. MnS inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 1.12 μm, 15.62 mm-2, and 2.51 × 10-6 in the steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum reduce the ductility. In the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, AlN inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 0.878 μm, 16.28 mm-2 and 2.82 × 10-6 can precipitate at the austenite grain boundaries, prevent dynamic recrystallization and deteriorate the hot ductility. On the contrary, in the steel containing 2.10 mass pct aluminum, the average size, number density and volume ratio of AlN inclusions change to 2.418 μm, 35.95 mm-2, and 2.55 × 10-5. They precipitate in the matrix, which do not inhibit dynamic recrystallization and thereby do not lead to poor hot ductility.

  7. Mechanical behavior of limestone undergoing brittle-ductile transition: experiments and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Aurélien; Fortin, Jérôme; Verberne, Berend; Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Plümper, Oliver; Dimanov, Alexandre; Spiers, Christopher; Guéguen, Yves

    2017-04-01

    With increasing confining pressure, carbonate rocks can undergo the brittle-ductile transition at room temperature. In order to examine the brittle-ductile transition, we performed constant strain rate triaxial deformation and stress-stepping creep experiments on Tavel limestone (porosity 14.7%) under various conditions. The evolution of elastic wave velocities were recorded during each experiment and inverted to crack densities. The constant strain rate triaxial experiments were performed for varying confining pressure from 5 to 90 MPa. For Pc≤55 MPa our results show that the behavior is brittle. The latter is characterized by dilatancy due to crack propagation, leading to a stress drop at failure. For Pc≥70 MPa, the behavior is semi-brittle with elastic compaction followed by inelastic compaction, then leading to dilatancy and eventual failure. The semi-brittle behavior is characterized by diffuse deformation. Inelastic compaction is due to intra-crystalline plasticity (dislocation motions and twinning) and micro-cracking. Constant strain rates experiments were modelled taking into account (1) crack propagation from pre-existing flaws, (2) plastic pore collapse and (3) crack nucleation from dislocation pile-ups. The obtained model predictions are in good agreement with our experimental data. Stress stepping (creep) experiments were performed in a range of confining pressures crossing the brittle-ductile transition (from 20 to 85 MPa). In the brittle regime, the time-dependent axial deformation is coupled with dilatancy and a decrease of elastic wave velocities, which is characteristic of crack nucleation and/or propagation. In the semi-brittle regime, the first steps are inelastic compactant due to plastic pore collapse. All following stress steps are dilatant as a result of crack nucleation and/or propagation. In general, our results show that the axial strain rate is always controlled by plastic phenomena, until the last step, during which the axial strain

  8. Mechanical behavior of low porosity carbonate rock: from brittle creep to ductile creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this experimental study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a low porosity (9%) white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite) at P-Q conditions beyond the elastic domain. It has been shown that in sandstones composed of quartz, cracks are developing under these conditions. However, in carbonates, calcite minerals can meanwhile also exhibit microplasticity. The samples were deformed in the triaxial cell of the Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris at effective confining pressures ranging from 35 MPa to 85 MPa and room temperature. Experiments were carried on dry and water saturated samples to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Time dependency was investigated by a creep steps methodology: at each step, differential stress was increased rapidly and kept constant for at least 24h. During these steps elastic wave velocities (P and S) and permeability were measured continuously. Our results show two different creep behaviors: (1) brittle creep is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile creep is observed at higher confining pressures. These two creep behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes. Indeed, in the brittle domain, the primary creep is associated with a decrease of elastic wave velocities and an increase of permeability, and no secondary creep is observed. In the ductile domain, the primary creep

  9. Ductile deformation of garnet in mylonitic gneisses from the Münchberg Massif (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollbrecht, Axel; Pawlowski, Jan; Leiss, Bernd; Heinrichs, Till; Seidel, Madlen; Kronz, Andreas

    2006-12-01

    Mylonitic gneisses from the Münchberg Massif contain single grains (type I) and polycrystalline aggregates (type II) of garnet displaying a distinct elongation parallel to a macroscopic lineation which is interpreted as the result of ductile deformation. Lattice-preferred orientations of quartz (textures) symmetrical to the macroscopic foliation and lineation and the lack of rotational microfabrics indicate that the bulk deformation was pure shear at least during the latest strain increments. Garnet textures measured by EBSD together with microprobe analyses demonstrate that these two structural types of garnet can be related to two different processes of ductile deformation: (1) For the single grains stretching can be attributed to diffusion creep along grain boundary zones (Coble creep). The related mass transfer is indicated by the fact that primary growth zones are cut off at the long faces of the grains while the related strain shadow domains do not show comparable chemical zoning. Pressure solution and precipitation suitable to produce similar structures can be largely ruled out because retrogressive reactions pointing to the presence of free hydrous fluids are missing. (2) For the polycrystalline garnet aggregates consisting of cores grading into fine-grained mantles, dislocation creep and associated rotation recrystallization can be assumed. Continuous lattice rotation from the core to the outer polycrystalline rim allow a determination of the related dominant slip systems which are {100}<010> and equivalent systems according to the cubic lattice symmetry. The same holds for garnets which appear to be completely recrystallized. For this type of fine-grained aggregates an alternative nucleation model is discussed. Due to penetrative dislocation glide in connection with short range diffusion and the resulting lattice rotation, primary growth zones are strongly disturbed. Since for the considered rock unit of the Münchberg Massif peak metamorphic

  10. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE MINERAL IN DUCTILE AND BRITTLE CORTICAL MOUSE BONE

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J.; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone’s mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone’s mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta murine (oim−/−) mice were used to model brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants (Phospho1−/−) had ductile bone. They were compared to their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification, to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (qbSEM). Interestingly, the mineral of brittle oim−/− and ductile Phospho1−/− bones had many similar characteristics. Both pathology models had smaller apatite crystals, lower mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild-types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. The degree of mineralization of the bone matrix was different for each strain: oim−/− were hypermineralized, while Phospho1−/− were hypomineralized. However, alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results revealed that despite having extremely different whole bone mechanics, the mineral of oim−/− and Phospho1−/− has several similar trends at smaller length scales. This

  11. Effects of grain size and test temperature on ductility and fracture behavior of a b-doped Ni/sub 3/Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Takeyama, M.; Liu, C.T.

    1988-05-01

    Effect of grain size on ductility and fracture behavior of boron-doped Ni/sub 3/Al(Ni-23Al-0.5Hf, at.%) was studied by tensile tests using a strain rate of 3.3 x 10/sup -3/s/sup -1/ at temperatures to 1000/sup 0/C under a high vacuum of < 1 x 10/sup -4/ Pa. At temperatures below 700/sup 0/C, the alloy showed essentially ductile transgranular fracture with more than 30% elongation whereas it exhibited ductile grain-boundary fracture in the temperature range from 700 to 800/sup 0/C. In both cases, the ductility was insensitive to grain size. On the other hand, at room temperatures above 800/sup 0/C, the ductility decreased from about 17 to 0% with increasing grain size. The corresponding fracture mode changed from grain-boundary fracture with dynamic recrystallization to brittle grain-boundary fracture. The ductile transgranular fracture at lower temperatures is explained by stress concentration at the intersection of slip bands. The grain-size dependence of ductility is interpreted in terms of stress concentration at the grain boundaries. Finally, it is suggested that the temperature dependence of ductility in this alloy might be related to the thermal behavior of boron segregated to the grain boundaries.

  12. Fatigue of Austempered Ductile Iron with Two Strength Grades in Very High Cycle Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiwang; Li, Wei; Song, Qingpeng; Zhang, Ning; Lu, Liantao

    2016-03-01

    In this study, Austempered ductile irons (ADIs) with two different strength grades were produced and the fatigue properties were measured at 109 cycles. The results show that the S-N curves give a typical step-wise shape and there is no fatigue limit in the very high cycle fatigue regime. The two grades ADI have the similar fracture behaviors and fatigue failure can initiate from defects at specimen surface and subsurface zone. On the fracture surfaces of some specimens, the `granular-bright-facet' area with rich carbon distribution is observed in the vicinity of the defect. The microstructure affects the crack behaviors at the early propagation stage. The ADI with upper and lower bainite shows higher fatigue strength compared with the ADI with coarse upper bainite.

  13. Modelling of liquid sodium induced crack propagation in T91 martensitic steel: Competition with ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemery, Samuel; Berdin, Clotilde; Auger, Thierry; Bourhi, Mariem

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of T91 steel is numerically modeled by the finite element method to analyse experimental results in an axisymmetric notched geometry. The behavior of the material is identified from tensile tests then a crack with a constant crack velocity is introduced using the node release technique in order to simulate the brittle crack induced by LME. A good agreement between the simulated and the experimental macroscopic behavior is found: this suggests that the assumption of a constant crack velocity is correct. Mechanical fields during the embrittlement process are then extracted from the results of the finite element model. An analysis of the crack initiation and propagation stages: the ductile fracture probably breaks off the LME induced brittle fracture.

  14. Localization of ductile deformation in lithosphere and rocks: the role of grain boundary sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, Alexandre; Rahanel, Jean; Bornert, Michel; Bourcier, Mathieu; Gaye, Ag; Heripre, Eva; Ludwig, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Ductile strain of the lithosphere localizes in multi-scale shear zones, ranging from km to mm scales. The resulting mylonites/ultramylonites present microstructural signatures of several concomitant deformation mechanisms. Besides cataclastic features, crystal plasticity dominates in volume, but grain boundary sliding and diffusive/solution mass transport act along interfaces. Considering solely the inherited natural microstructures does not make clear the chronology of appearance and the interactions between these mechanisms. Therefore, inference of the overall mylonitic rheology seems illusory. We have therefore realized over the last decade a systematic rheological characterization of the high temperature flow of various synthetic anorthite - diopside mixtures. The data clearly suggest Newtonian type of rheology as best adapted to the materials representative of the lower crust mylonites. However, the post mortem microstructures undoubtedly evidenced the coexistence of both crystal plasticity and grain boundary sliding processes. Yet, the specific roles of each mechanism in the localization process remained unclear. In order to clarify these aspects we realized a multi-scale micromechanical in situ investigation of the ductile deformation of synthetic rock-salt. The mechanical tests were combined with in-situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography (MCT). Digital image correlation (DIC) techniques allowed for measurements and characterization of the multi-scale organization of 2D and 3D full strain fields. Macroscopic and mesoscopic shear bands appear at the sample and microstructure scales, respectively. DIC evidenced the development of discrete slip bands within individual grains, and hence of dominant crystal plasticity. Combination of DIC and EBSD allowed for identification of active slip systems. Conversely, DIC allowed for the identification and the precise quantification of minor activity (< 5% contribution) of grain boundary

  15. Investigating the Brittle Ductile Transition Zone Using Southern California Seismicity and the SCEC Community Fault Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Shearer, P.; Lin, G.

    2008-12-01

    The depth to the brittle-ductile transition zone depends on crustal parameters such as rock type, temperature, fluid pressure, and strain rate. We analyze the relocated background seismicity (1981-2005) in southern California to identify features that may be associated with rupture patterns near the brittle-ductile transition zone in past major earthquakes. The bulk of this seismicity is aftershocks that decay with time since the occurrence of the mainshock. We focus our analysis on the seismicity associated with the 1987 Mw6.6 Superstition Hills, 1992 Mw6.1 Joshua Tree, 1992 Mw7.3 Landers, 1994 Mw6.7 Northridge, and 1999 Mw7.1 Hector Mine earthquakes. Both observational and modeling studies suggest that the coseismic stress changes from major earthquakes should cause a sudden increase in the strain rate in the vicinity of the brittle-ductile transition zone at the time of the mainshock. For instance, the average depth of seismicity after the 1992 Mw7.3 Landers earthquake became ~2 km deeper as compared to before the mainshock. Apparently, the stress redistribution due to the mainshock faulting caused a strain-rate dependent downward displacement of the brittle-ductile transition. We have also determined the changes in the mean and maximum depths of seismicity for these southern California mainshocks. At the time of the mainshocks, the mean depth of seismicity exhibits a transient change of about 1 to 2 km by decaying to a new deeper depth, except for the Superstition Hills earthquake, where the seismicity depth remained unchanged. Similarly, the D95% (the depth above which 95% of the earthquakes occur) and D5% (the average depth of the deepest 5% of the earthquakes) behave like the mean depth, with a rapid transient and subsequent returning to the same depth or a slightly shallower depth. Only the thrust-faulting Northridge sequence exhibits a deep cluster that is separate from the main aftershock zone, which is predicted by geodynamic the thrust-fault models. We

  16. Seismic performance and global ductility of RC frames rehabilitated with retrofitted joints by CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakharifar, M.; Sharbatdar, M. K.; Lin, Z.; Dalvand, A.; Sivandi-Pour, A.; Chen, G.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a new FRP retrofitting scheme to strengthen local beam-column joints in reinforced concrete (RC) frames. The new retrofitting scheme was proposed following a preliminary study of four different existing retrofitting schemes. A numerical simulation was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of FRP-strengthened reinforced concrete frames by bridging behavior of local joints to the whole structure. Local confinement effects due to varying retrofitting schemes in the joints were simulated in the frame model. The seismic behavior factor was used to evaluate the seismic performance of the strengthened RC frames. The results demonstrated that the new proposed retrofitting scheme was robust and promising, and finite element analysis appropriately captured the strength and global ductility of the frame due to upgrading of the local joints.

  17. Welding of nickel-base superalloys having a nil-ductility range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An article made of a nickel-base superalloy having a nil-ductility range from the solidus temperature of the alloy to about 600.degree. F. below the solidus temperature is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, adjusting the temperature of the article to a welding temperature of from about 1800.degree. F. to about 2100.degree. F., welding a preselected area in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected area so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected area, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the nickel-based superalloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  18. Effects of Antimony and Wall Thickness on Graphite Morphology in Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavas, Zoran; Strkalj, Anita; Maldini, Kresimir

    2016-08-01

    Effects of Sb additions on the graphite morphology of ductile iron castings in different wall thicknesses (3, 12, 25, 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm) were analyzed in this paper. In the wall thicknesses of 3, 12, and 25 mm, low contents of rare earth (RE) elements showed a beneficial effect on nodule count and nodularity. Nodularity >80 pct and a high nodule count were achieved without the addition of Sb. In the wall thicknesses of 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm, nodularity >80 pct was not achieved without the use of the chill or proper content of Sb. Excess of RE elements was neutralized with the addition of proper amount of Sb to the wall thickness. Addition of 0.01 wt pct Sb (ratio of RE/Sb = 0.34, ratio of RE/SE = 0.105) was sufficient to achieve nodularity >80 pct in the wall thicknesses of 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm.

  19. Achieving High Strength and High Ductility in Friction Stir-Processed Cast Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Panigrahi, Sushanta K.; Mishra, Rajiv S.

    2013-08-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) is emerging as an effective tool for microstructural modification and property enhancement. As-cast AZ91 magnesium alloy was friction stir processed with one-pass and two-pass to examine the influence of processing conditions on microstructural evolution and corresponding mechanical properties. Grain refinement accompanied with development of strong basal texture was observed for both processing conditions. Ultrafine-grained (UFG) AZ91 was achieved under two-pass FSP with fine precipitates distributed on the grain boundary. The processed UFG AZ91 exhibited a high tensile strength of ~435 MPa (117 pct improvement) and tensile fracture elongation of ~23 pct. The promising combination of strength and ductility is attributed to the elimination of casting porosity, and high density of fine precipitates in an UFG structure with quite low dislocation density. The effects of grain size, precipitate, and texture on deformation behavior have been discussed.

  20. Transformation plasticity in ductile solids. Annual progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.B.

    1993-02-01

    Research has addressed the role of martensitic transformation plasticity in the enhancement of toughness in high-strength austenitic steels, and the enhancement of formability in multiphase low-alloy sheet steels. In the austenitic steels, optimal processing conditions have been established to achieve a significant increase in strength level, in order to investigate the interaction of strain-induced transformation with the microvoid nucleation and shear localization mechanisms operating at ultrahigh strength levels. The stress-state dependence of transformation and fracture mechanisms has been investigated in model alloys, comparing behavior in uniaxial tension and blunt-notch tension specimens. A numerical constitutive model for transformation plasticity has been reformulated to allow a more thorough analysis of transformation/fracture interactions. Processing of a new low alloy steel composition has been optimized to stabilize retained austenite by isothermal bainitic transformation after intercritical annealing. Preliminary results show a good correlation of uniform ductility with the austenite amount and stability.

  1. Influence of particle deformation on the plastic flow of ductile granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmoula, Nouha; Harthong, Barthélémy; Imbault, Didier; Dorémus, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    A multi-particle finite-element method was proposed to study the elastic-plastic behaviour of ductile powders composed of highly deformable elastic-plastic particles. The focus was put on the study of the uniqueness of the direction of plastic strain increment vectors for a given stress state on the plastic limit, which was assessed using a spherical stress-probing method. Results revealed a non-uniqueness of the direction of plastic flow in a small region of the stress space located in the vicinity of the loading point. The direction of plastic flow was almost unique elsewhere on the plastic limit. The non-uniqueness was explained using a combination of two distinct mechanisms for plastic deformation involving two very different plastic limits.

  2. A nonlinear CDM model for ductile failure analysis of steel bridge columns under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Van Do, Vuong; Lee, Chin-Hyung; Chang, Kyong-Ho

    2014-06-01

    A nonlinear cyclic plasticity damage model for ductile metals, which is able to take large deformation effects into consideration, has been developed using a new damage dissipation potential formulation in order to predict the cyclic inelastic behavior of steel bridge piers. The cyclic constitutive equations that employ the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening rule for plastic deformation is incorporated into the damage mechanics in conjunction with the large strain formulation. The damage growth law is based on the experimental observations that the evolution of microvoids results in nonlinear damage accumulation with plastic deformation. The damage model parameters and the procedure for their identification are presented. The proposed model has been validated and successfully applied to thin-walled steel bridge tubular columns subjected to alternating lateral displacements to evaluate the seismic performance.

  3. RECENT PROGRESS OF CRACK BRIDGING MODELING OF DUCTILE-PHASE-TOUGHENED W-CU COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Henager, Charles H.; Wagner, Karla B.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, G Robert; Cunningham, Kevin; Zok, Frank W.

    2015-04-16

    A crack bridging model using calculated Cu stress-strain curves has been developed to study the toughening of W-Cu composites. A strengthening factor and necking parameters have been added to the model for the ductile-phase bridges to incorporate constraint effects at small bridge sizes. Parametric studies are performed to investigate the effect of these parameters. The calculated maximum applied stress intensity, aKmax, to induce a 1-mm stable crack is compared to the experimental stress intensity at peak load, Kpeak. Without bridge necking, increasing the strengthening factor improves the agreement between aKmax and Kpeak when plotted vs. logarithm of the displacement rate. Improvement can also be achieved by allowing necking with a larger failure strain. While the slope is better matched with this latter approach, the calculated value of aKmax is significantly larger than Kpeak.

  4. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K C; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-06-16

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19' phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties.

  5. Numerical simulation of fine blanking process using fully coupled advanced constitutive equations with ductile damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labergere, C.; Saanouni, K.; Benafia, S.; Galmiche, J.; Sulaiman, H.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the modelling and adaptive numerical simulation of the fine blanking process. Thermodynamically-consistent constitutive equations, strongly coupled with ductile damage, together with specific boundary conditions (particular command of forces on blank holder and counterpunch) are presented. This model is implemented into ABAQUS/EXPLICIT using the Vumat user subroutine and connected with an adaptive 2D remeshing procedure. The different material parameters are identified for the steel S600MC using experimental tensile tests conducted until the final fracture. A parametric study aiming to examine the sensitivity of the process parameters (die radius, clearance die/punch) to the punch force and fracture surfaces topology (convex zone, sheared zone, fracture zone and the burr).

  6. High-strength carbon nanotube fibre-like ribbon with high ductility and high electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, J N; Luo, X G; Wu, T; Chen, Y

    2014-06-25

    Macroscopic fibres made up of carbon nanotubes exhibit properties far below theoretical predictions and even much lower than those for conventional carbon fibres. Here we report improvements of mechanical and electrical properties by more than one order of magnitude by pressurized rolling. Our carbon nanotubes self-assemble to a hollow macroscopic cylinder in a tube reactor operated at high temperature and then condense in water or ethanol to form a fibre, which is continually spooled in an open-air environment. This initial fibre is densified by rolling under pressure, leading to a combination of high tensile strength (3.76-5.53 GPa), high tensile ductility (8-13%) and high electrical conductivity ((1.82-2.24) × 10(4) S cm(-1)). Our study therefore demonstrates strategies for future performance maximization and the very considerable potential of carbon nanotube assemblies for high-end uses.

  7. Measuring Local Strain Rates In Ductile Shear Zones: A New Approach From Deformed Syntectonic Dykes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassier, C.; Leloup, P.; Rubatto, D.; Galland, O.; Yue, Y.; Ding, L.

    2006-12-01

    At the Earth surface, deformation is mostly localized in fault zones in between tectonic plates. In the upper crust, the deformation is brittle and the faults are narrow and produce earthquakes. In contrast, deformation in the lower ductile crust results in larger shear zones. While it is relatively easy to measure in situ deformation rates at the surface using for example GPS data, it is more difficult to determinate in situ values of strain rate in the ductile crust. Such strain rates can only be estimated in paleo-shear zones. Various methods have been used to assess paleo-strain rates in paleo-shear zones. For instance, cooling and/or decompression rates associated with assumptions on geothermic gradients and shear zone geometry can lead to such estimates. Another way to estimate strain rates is the integration of paleo-stress measurements in a power flow law. But these methods are indirect and imply strong assumptions. Dating of helicitic garnets or syntectonic fibres are more direct estimates. However these last techniques have been only applied in zones of low deformation and not in major shear zones. We propose a new direct method to measure local strain rates in major ductile shear zones from syntectonic dykes by coupling quantification of deformation and geochronology. We test our method in a major shear zone in a well constrained tectonic setting: the Ailao-Shan - Red River Shear Zone (ASRRsz) located in SE Asia. For this 10 km wide shear zone, large-scale fault rates, determined in three independent ways, imply strain rates between 1.17×10^{-13 s-1 and 1.52×10^{-13 s-1 between 35 and 16 Ma. Our study focused on one outcrop where different generations of syntectonic dykes are observed. First, we quantified the minimum shear strain γ for each dyke using several methods: (1) by measuring the stretching of dykes with a surface restoration method (2) by measuring the final angle of the dykes with respect to the shear direction and (3) by combining the two

  8. Progressive softening of brittle-ductile transition due to interplay between chemical and deformation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeřábek, Petr; Bukovská, Zita; Morales, Luiz F. G.

    2017-04-01

    The micro-scale shear zones (shear bands) in granitoids from the South Armorican Shear Zone reflect localization of deformation and progressive weakening in the conditions of brittle-ductile transition. We studied microstructures in the shear bands with the aim to establish their P-T conditions and to derive stress and strain rates for specific deformation mechanisms. The evolving microstructure within shear bands documents switches in deformation mechanisms related to positive feedbacks between deformation and chemical processes and imposes mechanical constraints on the evolution of the brittle-ductile transition in the continental transform fault domains. The metamorphic mineral assemblage present in the shear bands indicate their formation at 300-350 ˚ C and 100-400 MPa. Focusing on the early development of shear bands, we identified three stages of shear band evolution. The early stage I associated with initiation of shear bands occurs via formation of microcracks with possible yielding differential stress of up to 250 MPa (Diamond and Tarantola, 2015). Stage II is associated with subgrain rotation recrystallization and dislocation creep in quartz and coeval dissolution-precipitation creep of microcline. Recrystallized quartz grains in shear bands show continual increase in size, and decrease in stress and strain rates from 94 MPa to 17-26 MPa (Stipp and Tullis, 2003) and 3.8*10-12 s-1- 1.8*10-14 s-1 (Patterson and Luan, 1990) associated with deformation partitioning into weaker microcline layer and shear band widening. The quartz mechanical data allowed us to set some constrains for coeval dissolution-precipitation of microcline which at our estimated P-T conditions suggests creep at 17-26 MPa differential stress and 3.8*10-13 s-1 strain rate. Stage III is characterized by localized slip along interconnected white mica bands accommodated by dislocation creep at strain rate 3.8*10-12 s-1 and stress 9.36 MPa (Mares and Kronenberg, 1993). The studied example

  9. Cow-eye microstructure evolution of laser pulse processed for ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Fahai; Gan, Cuihua; Yu, Gang

    2003-04-01

    Pulsed laser beam with lattice distribution was used to modify surface processing for ductile iron. The microstructures around the graphite were observed using OM, and Nanoindentation and micro-hardness of that measured from surface to inner of sample. The result shows that the graphite ball has an important effect on cow-eye microstructure evolution either in light molten area or in phase change hardened are. It is not true that assuming the material is uniform during laser rapid heating and fast cooling for the graphite ball as a dependant composition phase. The microstructures of cow-eye is made up of fine remnant austenite in light molten area, and consisted of martensite and bainite in laser modified are. The cow-eye microstructure has a transformation from martensite and bainite to pearlite with the distance increasing from surfce. At last, the microstructure evolution of cow-eye has been discussed.

  10. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K. C.; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19′ phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:24931632

  11. Effects of long-term aging on ductility and microstructure of Cb and Mo alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine if aging embrittlement occurs in columbium-base alloys C-103, Cb-1Zr, and Cb-752 or in a molybdenum alloy, Mo-TZM. Results showed that aging embrittlement does not occur in C-103, Cb-1Zr, or Mo-TZM during long-term (1000 hour) aging at temperatures in the range of 700-1025 C. In comparison, aging embrittlement occurred in the Cb-752 alloy after similar aging at 900 C. A critical combination of the solute additions W and Zr led to Zr segregation at grain boundaries during long-term aging which subsequently resulted in embrittlement as indicated by an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature from below -196 C to about -150 C.

  12. Metamorphic core complexes: Expression of crustal extension by ductile-brittle shearing of the geologic column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Metamorphic core complexes and detachment fault terranes in the American Southwest are products of stretching of continental crust in the Tertiary. The physical and geometric properties of the structures, fault rocks, and contact relationships that developed as a consequence of the extension are especially well displayed in southeastern Arizona. The structures and fault rocks, as a system, reflect a ductile-through-brittle continuum of deformation, with individual structures and faults rocks showing remarkably coordinated strain and displacement patterns. Careful mapping and analysis of the structural system has led to the realization that strain and displacement were partitioned across a host of structures, through a spectrum of scales, in rocks of progressively changing rheology. By integrating observations made in different parts of the extensional system, especially at different inferred depth levels, it has been possible to construct a descriptive/kinematic model of the progressive deformation that achieved continental crustal extension in general, and the development of metamorphic core complexes in particular.

  13. Strength development of high-strength ductile concrete incorporating Metakaolin and PVA fibers.

    PubMed

    Nuruddin, Muhammad Fadhil; Khan, Sadaqat Ullah; Shafiq, Nasir; Ayub, Tehmina

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of high-strength ductile concrete (HSDC) have been investigated using Metakaolin (MK) as the cement replacing material and PVA fibers. Total twenty-seven (27) mixes of concrete have been examined with varying content of MK and PVA fibers. It has been found that the coarser type PVA fibers provide strengths competitive to control or higher than control. Concrete with coarser type PVA fibers has also refined microstructure, but the microstructure has been undergone with the increase in aspect ratio of fibers. The microstructure of concrete with MK has also more refined and packing of material is much better with MK. PVA fibers not only give higher stiffness but also showed the deflection hardening response. Toughness Index of HSDC reflects the improvement in flexural toughness over the plain concrete and the maximum toughness indices have been observed with 10% MK and 2% volume fraction of PVA fibers.

  14. Microstructural study of surface melted and chromium surface alloyed ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohi, M. Heydarzadeh; Ebrahimi, M.; Ghasemi, H. M.; Shahripour, A.

    2012-07-01

    In this study, ductile iron was surface melted and chromium surface alloyed via pre-placing of ferrochromium powder with different thicknesses and subsequently surface melting by tungsten inert gas (TIG) process. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as micro-hardness testing and X-ray diffraction analysis were used for characterization of the treated samples. Surface melting and chromium surface alloying resulted in formation of ledeburitic structure and high chromium white cast iron in the treated layers, respectively. It was also noticed that hardness of the treated layers was considerably higher than that of the base material. Increasing thickness of ferrochromium layer increased the amount of M7C3 carbides and hardness of the alloyed layer.

  15. Kinetics of the crack-tip-governed brittle to ductile transitions in intrinsically brittle solids

    SciTech Connect

    Argon, A.S.; Xu, G.; Ortiz, M.

    1997-12-31

    Brittle-to-ductile transitions in the fracture of intrinsically brittle solids manifest themselves in two fundamentally different forms. In the first type of solids exemplified by the BCC transition metals and some alkali halides in which dislocation mobility against the lattice resistance is governed by double kink nucleation, the corresponding fracture transition appears to be controlled by formation of dislocation embryos at crack tips. In the second type of solids exemplified by Si, and possibly all other compounds, dislocation mobility is governed not only by double kink nucleation but by kink mobility as well. In these solids the B-D transitions are known to be controlled by dislocation mobility. Here the authors report first on recent simulations of dislocation embryo formation from Mode I cracks in {alpha} {minus} Fe as generic cases of BCC transition metals, and then on a new model of the mobility controlled transitions, typically in Si. Both models find good experimental confirmation.

  16. Synchrotron measurements of local microstructure and residual strains in ductile cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. B.; Andriollo, T.; Fæster, S.; Liu, W.; Sturlason, A.; Barabash, R.

    2017-07-01

    The local microstructure and distribution of thermally induced residual strains in ferrite matrix grains around an individual spherical graphite nodule in ductile cast iron (DCI) were measured using a synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction technique. It is found that the matrix grains are deformed, containing dislocations and dislocation boundaries. Each of the residual strain components in the matrix grains exhibits a complex pattern along the circumferential direction of the nodule. Along the radial direction of the nodule, strain gradients from the interface to the grain interior are seen for some strain components, but only in some matrix grains. The observed residual strain patterns have been analysed by finite element modelling, and a comparison between the simulation and experiments is given. The present study of local residual stress by both experimental characterization and simulation provide much needed information for understanding the mechanical properties of DCI, and represent an important contribution for the microstructural design of new DCI materials.

  17. Seismic demand evaluation of medium ductility RC moment frames using nonlinear procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarzadeh, Hosein; Talebian, Nima; Kohandel, Roya

    2013-09-01

    Performance-based earthquake engineering is a recent focus of research that has resulted in widely developed design methodologies due to its ability to realistically simulate structural response characteristics. Precise prediction of seismic demands is a key component of performance-based design methodologies. This paper presents a seismic demand evaluation of reinforced concrete moment frames with medium ductility. The accuracy of utilizing simplified nonlinear static analysis is assessed by comparison against the results of time history analysis on a number of frames. Displacement profiles, drift demand and maximum plastic rotation were computed to assess seismic demands. Estimated seismic demands were compared to acceptance criteria in FEMA 356. The results indicate that these frames have sufficient capacity to resist interstory drifts that are greater than the limit value.

  18. Hydraulic fracturing and permeability enhancement in granite from subcritical/brittle to supercritical/ductile conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Noriaki; Egawa, Motoki; Sakaguchi, Kiyotoshi; Ishibashi, Takuya; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-06-01

    Hydraulic fracturing experiments were conducted at 200-450°C by injecting water into cylindrical granite samples containing a borehole at an initial effective confining pressure of 40 MPa. Intensive fracturing was observed at all temperatures, but the fracturing characteristics varied with temperature, perhaps due to differences in the water viscosity. At the lowest considered temperature (200°C), fewer fractures propagated linearly from the borehole, and the breakdown pressure was twice the confining pressure. However, these characteristics disappeared with increasing temperature; the fracture pattern shifted toward the formation of a greater number of shorter fractures over the entire body of the sample, and the breakdown pressure decreased greatly. Hydraulic fracturing significantly increased the permeability at all temperatures, and this permeability enhancement was likely to form a productive geothermal reservoir even at the highest considered temperature, which exceeded both the brittle-ductile transition temperature of granite and the critical temperature of water.

  19. Brittle to ductile transition in cleavage fracture. Final techical report, April 1, 1987--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Argon, A.S.; Berg, Q.

    1992-09-30

    The problem of interpretation of fracture transition from brittle to ductile or vice versa is the subject of study. An instrumented tapered double cantilever beam (TDCB) has been developed as a definitive tool in the study of the intrinsic mechanism in single crystalline samples. In this experiment, the crack velocity is directly proportional to actuator velocity. In experiments performed on TDCB shaped Si single crystals, oriented for cleavage on either {l_brace}111{r_brace} or {l_brace}110{r_brace} planes, a number of troubling features of jerky carck extension were encountered. Evidence suggests that nucleation of dislocation loops from crack tip is easier than moving these dislocations away from crack tip. 14 refs, 1 fig.

  20. Strength Development of High-Strength Ductile Concrete Incorporating Metakaolin and PVA Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Nuruddin, Muhammad Fadhil; Shafiq, Nasir

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of high-strength ductile concrete (HSDC) have been investigated using Metakaolin (MK) as the cement replacing material and PVA fibers. Total twenty-seven (27) mixes of concrete have been examined with varying content of MK and PVA fibers. It has been found that the coarser type PVA fibers provide strengths competitive to control or higher than control. Concrete with coarser type PVA fibers has also refined microstructure, but the microstructure has been undergone with the increase in aspect ratio of fibers. The microstructure of concrete with MK has also more refined and packing of material is much better with MK. PVA fibers not only give higher stiffness but also showed the deflection hardening response. Toughness Index of HSDC reflects the improvement in flexural toughness over the plain concrete and the maximum toughness indices have been observed with 10% MK and 2% volume fraction of PVA fibers. PMID:24707202