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Sample records for dumbfounded affects myoblast

  1. The intracellular domain of Dumbfounded affects myoblast fusion efficiency and interacts with Rolling pebbles and Loner.

    PubMed

    Bulchand, Sarada; Menon, Sree Devi; George, Simi Elizabeth; Chia, William

    2010-02-23

    Drosophila body wall muscles are multinucleated syncytia formed by successive fusions between a founder myoblast and several fusion competent myoblasts. Initial fusion gives rise to a bi/trinucleate precursor followed by more fusion cycles forming a mature muscle. This process requires the functions of various molecules including the transmembrane myoblast attractants Dumbfounded (Duf) and its paralogue Roughest (Rst), a scaffold protein Rolling pebbles (Rols) and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor Loner. Fusion completely fails in a duf, rst mutant, and is blocked at the bi/trinucleate stage in rols and loner single mutants. We analysed the transmembrane and intracellular domains of Duf, by mutating conserved putative signaling sites and serially deleting the intracellular domain. These were tested for their ability to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner and to rescue the fusion defect in duf, rst mutant embryos. Studying combinations of double mutants, further tested the function of Rols, Loner and other fusion molecules. Here we show that serial truncations of the Duf intracellular domain successively compromise its function to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner in addition to affecting myoblast fusion efficiency in embryos. Putative phosphorylation sites function additively while the extreme C terminus including a PDZ binding domain is dispensable for its function. We also show that fusion is completely blocked in a rols, loner double mutant and is compromised in other double mutants. These results suggest an additive function of the intracellular domain of Duf and an early function of Rols and Loner which is independent of Duf.

  2. Micropatterning topology on soft substrates affects myoblast proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zatti, Susi; Zoso, Alice; Serena, Elena; Luni, Camilla; Cimetta, Elisa; Elvassore, Nicola

    2012-02-01

    Micropatterning techniques and substrate engineering are becoming useful tools to investigate several aspects of cell-cell interaction biology. In this work, we rationally study how different micropatterning geometries can affect myoblast behavior in the early stage of in vitro myogenesis. Soft hydrogels with physiological elastic modulus (E = 15 kPa) were micropatterned in parallel lanes (100, 300, and 500 μm width) resulting in different local and global myoblast densities. Proliferation and differentiation into multinucleated myotubes were evaluated for murine and human myoblasts. Wider lanes showed a decrease in murine myoblast proliferation: (69 ± 8)% in 100 μm wide lanes compared to (39 ± 7)% in 500 μm lanes. Conversely, fusion index increased in wider lanes: from (46 ± 7)% to (66 ± 7)% for murine myoblasts, and from (15 ± 3)% to (36 ± 2)% for human primary myoblasts, using a patterning width of 100 and 500 μm, respectively. These results are consistent with both computational modeling data and conditioned medium experiments, which demonstrated that wider lanes favor the accumulation of endogenous secreted factors. Interestingly, human primary myoblast proliferation is not affected by patterning width, which may be because the high serum content of their culture medium overrides the effect of secreted factors. These data highlight the role of micropatterning in shaping the cellular niche through secreted factor accumulation, and are of paramount importance in rationally understanding myogenesis in vitro for the correct design of in vitro skeletal muscle models.

  3. Substrate stiffness affects skeletal myoblast differentiation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanazzo, Sara; Forte, Giancarlo; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Uto, Koichiro; Pagliari, Stefania; Aoyagi, Takao; Traversa, Enrico; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

    2012-12-01

    To maximize the therapeutic efficacy of cardiac muscle constructs produced by stem cells and tissue engineering protocols, suitable scaffolds should be designed to recapitulate all the characteristics of native muscle and mimic the microenvironment encountered by cells in vivo. Moreover, so not to interfere with cardiac contractility, the scaffold should be deformable enough to withstand muscle contraction. Recently, it was suggested that the mechanical properties of scaffolds can interfere with stem/progenitor cell functions, and thus careful consideration is required when choosing polymers for targeted applications. In this study, cross-linked poly-ɛ-caprolactone membranes having similar chemical composition and controlled stiffness in a supra-physiological range were challenged with two sources of myoblasts to evaluate the suitability of substrates with different stiffness for cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, muscle-specific and non-related feeder layers were prepared on stiff surfaces to reveal the contribution of biological and mechanical cues to skeletal muscle progenitor differentiation. We demonstrated that substrate stiffness does affect myogenic differentiation, meaning that softer substrates can promote differentiation and that a muscle-specific feeder layer can improve the degree of maturation in skeletal muscle stem cells.

  4. Culture Conditions Affect Expression of DUX4 in FSHD Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sachchida Nand; Khawaja, Hunain; Chen, Yi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is believed to be caused by aberrant expression of double homeobox 4 (DUX4) due to epigenetic changes of the D4Z4 region at chromosome 4q35. Detecting DUX4 is challenging due to its stochastic expression pattern and low transcription level. In this study, we examined different cDNA synthesis strategies and the sensitivity for DUX4 detection. In addition, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone and knockout serum replacement (KOSR) on DUX4 expression in culture. Our data showed that DUX4 was consistently detected in cDNA samples synthesized using Superscript III. The sensitivity of DUX4 detection was higher in the samples synthesized using oligo(dT) primers compared to random hexamers. Adding dexamethasone to the culture media significantly suppressed DUX4 expression in immortalized (1.3 fold, p < 0.01) and primary (4.7 fold, p < 0.01) FSHD myoblasts, respectively. Culture medium with KOSR increased DUX4 expression and the response is concentration dependent. The findings suggest that detection strategies and culture conditions should be carefully considered when studying DUX4 in cultured cells. PMID:26007167

  5. Thermal manipulation during embryogenesis affects myoblast proliferation and skeletal muscle growth in meat-type chickens.

    PubMed

    Piestun, Yogev; Yahav, Shlomo; Halevy, Orna

    2015-10-01

    Thermal manipulation (TM) of 39.5°C applied during mid-embryogenesis (embryonic d 7 to 16) has been proven to promote muscle development and enhance muscle growth and meat production in meat-type chickens. This study aimed to elucidate the cellular basis for this effect. Continuous TM or intermittent TM (for 12 h/d) increased myoblast proliferation manifested by higher (25 to 48%) myoblast number in the pectoral muscles during embryonic development but also during the first week posthatch. Proliferation ability of the pectoral-muscle-derived myoblasts in vitro was significantly higher in the TM treatments until embryonic d 15 (intermittent TM) or 13 (continuous TM) compared to that of controls, suggesting increased myogenic progeny reservoir in the muscle. However, the proliferation ability of myoblasts was lower in the TM treatments vs. control during the last days of incubation. This coincided with higher levels of myogenin expression in the muscle, indicating enhanced cell differentiation in the TM muscle. A similar pattern was observed posthatch: Myoblast proliferation was significantly higher in the TM chicks relative to controls during the peak of posthatch cell proliferation until d 6, followed by lower cell number 2 wk posthatch as myoblast number sharply decreases. Higher myogenin expression was observed in the TM chicks on d 6. This resulted in increased muscle growth, manifested by significantly higher relative weight of breast muscle in the embryo and posthatch. It can be concluded that temperature elevation during mid-term embryogenesis promotes myoblast proliferation, thus increasing myogenic progeny reservoir in the muscle, resulting in enhanced muscle growth in the embryo and posthatch.

  6. A new level of plasticity: Drosophila smooth-like testes muscles compensate failure of myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Kuckwa, Jessica; Fritzen, Katharina; Buttgereit, Detlev; Rothenbusch-Fender, Silke; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2016-01-15

    The testis of Drosophila resembles an individual testis tubule of mammals. Both are surrounded by a sheath of smooth muscles, which in Drosophila are multinuclear and originate from a pool of myoblasts that are set aside in the embryo and accumulate on the genital disc later in development. These muscle stem cells start to differentiate early during metamorphosis and give rise to all muscles of the inner male reproductive system. Shortly before the genital disc and the developing testes connect, multinuclear nascent myotubes appear on the anterior tips of the seminal vesicles. Here, we show that adhesion molecules are distinctly localized on the seminal vesicles; founder cell (FC)-like myoblasts express Dumbfounded (Duf) and Roughest (Rst), and fusion-competent myoblast (FCM)-like cells mainly express Sticks and stones (Sns). The smooth but multinuclear myotubes of the testes arose by myoblast fusion. RNAi-mediated attenuation of Sns or both Duf and Rst severely reduced the number of nuclei in the testes muscles. Duf and Rst probably act independently in this context. Despite reduced fusion in all of these RNAi-treated animals, myotubes migrated onto the testes, testes were shaped and coiled, muscle filaments were arranged as in the wild type and spermatogenesis proceeded normally. Hence, the testes muscles compensate for fusion defects so that the myofibres encircling the adult testes are indistinguishable from those of the wild type and male fertility is guaranteed. PMID:26657767

  7. A new level of plasticity: Drosophila smooth-like testes muscles compensate failure of myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kuckwa, Jessica; Fritzen, Katharina; Buttgereit, Detlev; Rothenbusch-Fender, Silke; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2016-01-01

    The testis of Drosophila resembles an individual testis tubule of mammals. Both are surrounded by a sheath of smooth muscles, which in Drosophila are multinuclear and originate from a pool of myoblasts that are set aside in the embryo and accumulate on the genital disc later in development. These muscle stem cells start to differentiate early during metamorphosis and give rise to all muscles of the inner male reproductive system. Shortly before the genital disc and the developing testes connect, multinuclear nascent myotubes appear on the anterior tips of the seminal vesicles. Here, we show that adhesion molecules are distinctly localized on the seminal vesicles; founder cell (FC)-like myoblasts express Dumbfounded (Duf) and Roughest (Rst), and fusion-competent myoblast (FCM)-like cells mainly express Sticks and stones (Sns). The smooth but multinuclear myotubes of the testes arose by myoblast fusion. RNAi-mediated attenuation of Sns or both Duf and Rst severely reduced the number of nuclei in the testes muscles. Duf and Rst probably act independently in this context. Despite reduced fusion in all of these RNAi-treated animals, myotubes migrated onto the testes, testes were shaped and coiled, muscle filaments were arranged as in the wild type and spermatogenesis proceeded normally. Hence, the testes muscles compensate for fusion defects so that the myofibres encircling the adult testes are indistinguishable from those of the wild type and male fertility is guaranteed. PMID:26657767

  8. The Complex Spatio-Temporal Regulation of the Drosophila Myoblast Attractant Gene duf/kirre

    PubMed Central

    Guruharsha, K. G.; Ruiz-Gomez, Mar; Ranganath, H. A.; Siddharthan, Rahul; VijayRaghavan, K.

    2009-01-01

    A key early player in the regulation of myoblast fusion is the gene dumbfounded (duf, also known as kirre). Duf must be expressed, and function, in founder cells (FCs). A fixed number of FCs are chosen from a pool of equivalent myoblasts and serve to attract fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs) to fuse with them to form a multinucleate muscle-fibre. The spatial and temporal regulation of duf expression and function are important and play a deciding role in choice of fibre number, location and perhaps size. We have used a combination of bioinformatics and functional enhancer deletion approaches to understand the regulation of duf. By transgenic enhancer-reporter deletion analysis of the duf regulatory region, we found that several distinct enhancer modules regulate duf expression in specific muscle founders of the embryo and the adult. In addition to existing bioinformatics tools, we used a new program for analysis of regulatory sequence, PhyloGibbs-MP, whose development was largely motivated by the requirements of this work. The results complement our deletion analysis by identifying transcription factors whose predicted binding regions match with our deletion constructs. Experimental evidence for the relevance of some of these TF binding sites comes from available ChIP-on-chip from the literature, and from our analysis of localization of myogenic transcription factors with duf enhancer reporter gene expression. Our results demonstrate the complex regulation in each founder cell of a gene that is expressed in all founder cells. They provide evidence for transcriptional control—both activation and repression—as an important player in the regulation of myoblast fusion. The set of enhancer constructs generated will be valuable in identifying novel trans-acting factor-binding sites and chromatin regulation during myoblast fusion in Drosophila. Our results and the bioinformatics tools developed provide a basis for the study of the transcriptional regulation of other

  9. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  10. Skeletal myoblasts for cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Durrani, Shazia; Konoplyannikov, Mikhail; Ashraf, Muhammad; Haider, Khawaja Husnain

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells provide an alternative curative intervention for the infarcted heart by compensating for the cardiomyocyte loss subsequent to myocardial injury. The presence of resident stem and progenitor cell populations in the heart, and nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells with genetic induction of pluripotency markers are the emerging new developments in stem cell-based regenerative medicine. However, until safety and feasibility of these cells are established by extensive experimentation in in vitro and in vivo experimental models, skeletal muscle-derived myoblasts, and bone marrow cells remain the most well-studied donor cell types for myocardial regeneration and repair. This article provides a critical review of skeletal myoblasts as donor cells for transplantation in the light of published experimental and clinical data, and indepth discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of skeletal myoblast-based therapeutic intervention for augmentation of myocardial function in the infarcted heart. Furthermore, strategies to overcome the problems of arrhythmogenicity and failure of the transplanted skeletal myoblasts to integrate with the host cardiomyocytes are discussed. PMID:21082891

  11. Engineering skeletal myoblasts: roles of three-dimensional culture and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pedrotty, Dawn M; Koh, Jennifer; Davis, Bryce H; Taylor, Doris A; Wolf, Patrick; Niklason, Laura E

    2005-04-01

    Immature skeletal muscle cells, or myoblasts, have been used in cellular cardiomyoplasty in attempts to regenerate cardiac muscle tissue by injection of cells into damaged myocardium. In some studies, muscle tissue within myoblast implant sites may be morphologically similar to cardiac muscle. We hypothesized that identifiable aspects of the cardiac milieu may contribute to growth and development of implanted myoblasts in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we designed a novel in vitro system to mimic some aspects of the electrical and biochemical environment of native myocardium. This system enabled us to separate the three-dimensional (3-D) electrical and biochemical signals that may be involved in myoblast proliferation and plasticity. Myoblasts were grown on 3-D polyglycolic acid mesh scaffolds under control conditions, in the presence of cardiac-like electrical current fluxes, or in the presence of culture medium that had been conditioned by mature cardiomyocytes. Cardiac-like electrical current fluxes caused increased myoblast number in 3-D culture, as determined by DNA assay. The increase in cell number was due to increased cellular proliferation and not differences in apoptosis, as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling. Cardiomyocyte-conditioned medium also significantly increased myoblast proliferation. Expression of transcription factors governing differentiation along skeletal or cardiac lineages was evaluated by immunoblotting. Although these assays are qualitative, no changes in differentiation state along skeletal or cardiac lineages were observed in response to electrical current fluxes. Furthermore, from these experiments, conditioned medium did not appear to alter the differentiation state of skeletal myoblasts. Hence, cardiac milieu appears to stimulate proliferation but does not affect differentiation of skeletal myoblasts.

  12. LKB1 Destabilizes Microtubules in Myoblasts and Contributes to Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dole, Neha; Gilberti, Renée M.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Tirnauer, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle myoblast differentiation and fusion into multinucleate myotubes is associated with dramatic cytoskeletal changes. We find that microtubules in differentiated myotubes are highly stabilized, but premature microtubule stabilization blocks differentiation. Factors responsible for microtubule destabilization in myoblasts have not been identified. Findings We find that a transient decrease in microtubule stabilization early during myoblast differentiation precedes the ultimate microtubule stabilization seen in differentiated myotubes. We report a role for the serine-threonine kinase LKB1 in both microtubule destabilization and myoblast differentiation. LKB1 overexpression reduced microtubule elongation in a Nocodazole washout assay, and LKB1 RNAi increased it, showing LKB1 destabilizes microtubule assembly in myoblasts. LKB1 levels and activity increased during myoblast differentiation, along with activation of the known LKB1 substrates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and microtubule affinity regulating kinases (MARKs). LKB1 overexpression accelerated differentiation, whereas RNAi impaired it. Conclusions Reduced microtubule stability precedes myoblast differentiation and the associated ultimate microtubule stabilization seen in myotubes. LKB1 plays a positive role in microtubule destabilization in myoblasts and in myoblast differentiation. This work suggests a model by which LKB1-induced microtubule destabilization facilitates the cytoskeletal changes required for differentiation. Transient destabilization of microtubules might be a useful strategy for enhancing and/or synchronizing myoblast differentiation. PMID:22348111

  13. Visualizing new dimensions in Drosophila myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Brian; Beckett, Karen; Baylies, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Summary Over several years, genetic studies in the model system, Drosophila melanogastor, have uncovered genes that when mutated, lead to a block in myoblast fusion. Analyses of these gene products have suggested that Arp2/3-mediated regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is crucial to myoblast fusion in the fly. Recent advances in imaging in Drosophila embryos, both in fixed and live preparations, have led to a new appreciation of both the three-dimensional organization of the somatic mesoderm and the cell biology underlying myoblast fusion. PMID:18404690

  14. [Fibrillary structures in tumor myoblasts].

    PubMed

    Chernina, L A; Shvemberger, I N

    1976-07-01

    An electron microscope study was made of fibrillar structures in various types of cell elements in mice rhabdomyosarcoma. Different stages of myofibril development were followed in such differentiated cell elements as large spindle cells, large round cells and middle spindle cells. In the former two cells, the evolution has riched a stage of bundles of myofibrills with Z-like bands. The highest degree of myofibril maturation occurs in multinuclear myosymplasts. The occurrence of myofibrils being at different stages of evolution within the same cells is characteristic of tumor myoblasts in addition to an excentric unipolarity of cell differentiation and atypical structure of Z-brands. Cytotypical differentiation (myofibrillogenesis in uninuclear cells) may be the case only in those types of rhabdomyosarcoma cell elements which are able to undergo histottypical differentiation (fussion and formation of multinuclear myosymplasts).

  15. Myoblasts and myoblast-conditioned medium attract the earliest spinal neurites from frog embryos.

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, C D

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of the capacity of newly segmented somites, unsegmented mesoderm and medium conditioned by each of these tissues to attract the growth of the earliest spinal neurites from the neural tube of Xenopus laevis in tissue culture. When presented with segmented somitic myoblasts or sheets of skin, spinal neurites grew selectively towards the somitic myoblasts. Neurites were not attracted specifically to somitic myoblasts from their own rostrocaudal level. A variable proportion of myoblasts from unsegmented caudal mesoderm differentiated and elongated in co-culture with neural tube and skin. These myoblasts also attracted neural outgrowths, but only if present in sufficient numbers. An agar slab containing medium conditioned by the presence of segmented myoblasts for 1 day attracted neurite outgrowths. A source of medium conditioned by the presence of undifferentiated, unsegmented myotomal mesoderm alone did not attract neurite outgrowths. Nerve growth factor (NGF) at a range of concentrations in the agar source (500-10,000 ng/ml) did not attract the earliest neurite outgrowths. It is concluded that the earliest skeletal myoblasts from Xenopus laevis embryos may attract neural outgrowths by releasing a soluble factor. Myoblasts may have to develop to the stage of somite segmentation before secretion of such an agent begins. The release of a myoblast-derived factor so early in development may assist directed nerve growth in vivo. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:3795063

  16. Monoamine oxidase inhibition prevents mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in myoblasts from patients with collagen VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Sorato, E; Menazza, S; Zulian, A; Sabatelli, P; Gualandi, F; Merlini, L; Bonaldo, P; Canton, M; Bernardi, P; Di Lisa, F

    2014-10-01

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been proposed to play a crucial role in several types of muscular dystrophy (MD), whether a causal link between these two alterations exists remains an open question. We have documented that mitochondrial dysfunction through opening of the permeability transition pore plays a key role in myoblasts from patients as well as in mouse models of MD, and that oxidative stress caused by monoamine oxidases (MAO) is involved in myofiber damage. In the present study we have tested whether MAO-dependent oxidative stress is a causal determinant of mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in myoblasts from patients affected by collagen VI myopathies. We find that upon incubation with hydrogen peroxide or the MAO substrate tyramine myoblasts from patients upregulate MAO-B expression and display a significant rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, with concomitant mitochondrial depolarization. MAO inhibition by pargyline significantly reduced both ROS accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction, and normalized the increased incidence of apoptosis in myoblasts from patients. Thus, MAO-dependent oxidative stress is causally related to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in myoblasts from patients affected by collagen VI myopathies, and inhibition of MAO should be explored as a potential treatment for these diseases.

  17. Overexpression of calpastatin inhibits L8 myoblast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnoy, Sivia; E-mail: sivia@post.tau.ac.il; Maki, Masatoshi; Kosower, Nechama S.

    2005-07-08

    The formation of skeletal muscle fibers involves cessation of myoblast division, myoblast alignment, and fusion to multinucleated myofibers. Calpain is one of the factors shown to be involved in myoblast fusion. Using L8 rat myoblasts, we found that calpain levels did not change significantly during myoblast differentiation, whereas calpastatin diminished prior to myoblast fusion and reappeared after fusion. The transient diminution in calpastatin allows the Ca{sup 2+}-promoted activation of calpain and calpain-induced membrane proteolysis, which is required for myoblast fusion. Here we show that calpastatin overexpression in L8 myoblasts does not inhibit cell proliferation and alignment, but prevents myoblast fusion and fusion-associated protein degradation. In addition, calpastatin appears to modulate myogenic gene expression, as indicated by the lack of myogenin (a transcription factor expressed in differentiating myoblasts) in myoblasts overexpressing calpastatin. These results suggest that, in addition to the role in membrane disorganization in the fusing myoblasts, the calpain-calpastatin system may also modulate the levels of factors required for myoblast differentiation.

  18. The pesticide methoxychlor decreases myotube formation in cell culture by slowing myoblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Bradley W; Batia, Lyn M; Baarson, Chad J; Choi, Chang-Kun Charles; Grow, Wade A

    2007-08-01

    We studied the effect of the estrogenic pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) on skeletal muscle development using C2C12 cell culture. Myoblast cultures were exposed to various concentrations of MXC at various times during the process of myoblast fusion into myotubes. We observed that MXC exposure decreased myotube formation. In addition, we observed myoblasts with cytoplasmic vacuoles in cultures exposed to MXC. Because cytoplasmic vacuoles can be characteristic of cell death, apoptosis assays and trypan blue exclusion assays were performed. We found no difference in the frequency of apoptosis or in the frequency of cell death for cultures exposed to MXC and untreated cultures. Collectively, these results indicate that MXC exposure decreases myotube formation without causing cell death. In contrast, when cell proliferation was assessed, untreated cultures had a myoblast proliferation rate 50% greater than cultures exposed to MXC. We conclude that MXC decreases myotube formation at least in part by slowing myoblast proliferation. Furthermore, we suggest that direct exposure to MXC could affect skeletal muscle development in animals or humans, in addition to the defects in reproductive development that have previously been reported.

  19. Correction of the FSHD myoblast differentiation defect by fusion with healthy myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Dib, Carla; Bou Saada, Yara; Dmitriev, Petr; Richon, Catherine; Dessen, Philippe; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Carnac, Gilles; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a neuromuscular disease with a prevalence that could reach 1 in 8,000 characterized by progressive asymmetric muscle weakness. Myoblasts isolated from FSHD muscles exhibit morphological differentiation defects and show a distinct transcription profile. These abnormalities may be linked to the muscle weakness in FSHD patients. We have tested whether fusion of FSHD myoblasts with primary myoblasts isolated from healthy individuals could correct the differentiation defects. Our results show that the number of hybrid myotubes with normal phenotype increased with the percentage of normal myoblasts initially cultured. We demonstrated that a minimum of 50% of normal nuclei is required for a phenotypic correction of the FSHD phenotype. Moreover, transcriptomic profiles of phenotypically corrected hybrid myotubes showed that the expression of deregulated genes in FSHD myotubes became almost normal. The number of deregulated pathways also decreased from 39 in FSHD myotubes to one in hybrid myotubes formed with 40% FSHD and 60% normal myoblasts. We thus propose that while phenotypical and functional correction of FSHD is feasible, it requires more than 50% of normal myoblasts, it creates limitations for cell therapy in the FSHD context. PMID:26218298

  20. Proliferation of Human Primary Myoblasts Is Associated with Altered Energy Metabolism in Dependence on Ageing In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Piirsoo, Andres; Peet, Nadežda; Laada, Liidia; Kadaja, Lumme; Roosimaa, Mart; Märtson, Aare; Seppet, Enn; Paju, Kalju

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ageing is associated with suppressed regenerative potential of muscle precursor cells due to decrease of satellite cells and suppressive intramuscular milieu on their activation, associated with ageing-related low-grade inflammation. The aim of the study was to characterize the function of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), glycolysis, adenylate kinase (AK), and creatine kinase (CK) mediated systems in young and older individuals. Materials and Methods. Myoblasts were cultivated from biopsies taken by transcutaneous conchotomy from vastus lateralis muscle in young (20–29 yrs, n = 7) and older (70–79 yrs, n = 7) subjects. Energy metabolism was assessed in passages 2 to 6 by oxygraphy and enzyme analysis. Results. In myoblasts of young and older subjects the rate of OXPHOS decreased during proliferation from passages 2 to 6. The total activities of CK and AK decreased. Myoblasts of passage 2 cultivated from young muscle showed higher rate of OXPHOS and activities of CK and AK compared to myoblasts from older subjects while hexokinase and pyruvate kinase were not affected by ageing. Conclusions. Proliferation of myoblasts in vitro is associated with downregulation of OXPHOS and energy storage and transfer systems. Ageing in vivo exerts an impact on satellite cells which results in altered metabolic profile in favour of the prevalence of glycolytic pathways over mitochondrial OXPHOS of myoblasts. PMID:26881042

  1. miR-411 is up-regulated in FSHD myoblasts and suppresses myogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant muscle disorder, which is linked to the contraction of the D4Z4 array at chromosome 4q35. Recent studies suggest that this shortening of the D4Z4 array leads to aberrant expression of double homeobox protein 4 (DUX4) and causes FSHD. In addition, misregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been reported in muscular dystrophies including FSHD. In this study, we identified a miRNA that is differentially expressed in FSHD myoblasts and investigated its function. Methods To identify misregulated miRNAs and their potential targets in FSHD myoblasts, we performed expression profiling of both miRNA and mRNA using TaqMan Human MicroRNA Arrays and Affymetrix Human Genome U133A plus 2.0 microarrays, respectively. In addition, we over-expressed miR-411 in C2C12 cells to determine the effect of miR-411 on myogenic markers. Results Using miRNA and mRNA expression profiling, we identified 8 miRNAs and 1,502 transcripts that were differentially expressed in FSHD myoblasts during cell proliferation. One of the 8 differentially expressed miRNAs, miR-411, was validated by quantitative RT-PCR in both primary (2.1 fold, p<0.01) and immortalized (2.7 fold, p<0.01) myoblasts. In situ hybridization showed cytoplasmic localization of miR-411 in FSHD myoblasts. By analyzing both miRNA and mRNA data using Partek Genomics Suite, we identified 4 mRNAs potentially regulated by miR-411 including YY1 associated factor 2 (YAF2). The down-regulation of YAF2 in immortalized myoblasts was validated by immunoblotting (−3.7 fold, p<0.01). C2C12 cells were transfected with miR-411 to determine whether miR-411 affects YAF2 expression in myoblasts. The results showed that over-expression of miR-411 reduced YAF2 mRNA expression. In addition, expression of myogenic markers including Myod, myogenin, and myosin heavy chain 1 (Myh1) were suppressed by miR-411. Conclusions The study demonstrated that miR-411 was differentially

  2. Abl promotes cadherin-dependent adhesion and signaling in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Krauss, Robert S

    2010-07-15

    Cell-cell contact promotes myogenic differentiation but the mechanisms that regulate this phenomenon are not well understood. Cdo (also known as Cdon), an Ig superfamily member, functions as a component of cell surface complexes to promote myogenic differentiation through activation of p38alpha/beta MAP kinase. We recently showed that N-cadherin ligation activated p38alpha/beta in a Cdo-dependent manner, whereas N-cadherin ligation-dependent activation of ERK MAP kinase was not affected by loss of Cdo. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abl associates with Cdo during myoblast differentiation and is necessary for full activition of p38alpha/beta during this process. The Abl SH3 domain binds to a PxxP motif in the Cdo intracellular domain, and both these motifs are required for their promyogenic activity. Here we show that Abl is necessary for p38alpha/beta activation initiated by N-cadherin ligation, but in contrast to Cdo, Abl is also required for N-cadherin-dependent ERK activation. Moreover, Abl is required for efficient cadherin-mediated myoblast aggregation via modulation of RhoA-ROCK signaling. Therefore, Abl regulates N-cadherin-mediated p38alpha/beta activation by multiple mechanisms, more generally through regulation of cell-cell adhesion and specifically as a component of Cdo-containing complexes. The role of Cdo as a multifunctional coreceptor with roles in several pathways is also discussed.

  3. Low Oxygen Tension Enhances Expression of Myogenic Genes When Human Myoblasts Are Activated from G0 Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sellathurai, Jeeva; Nielsen, Joachim; Hejbøl, Eva Kildall; Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Most cell culture studies have been performed at atmospheric oxygen tension of 21%, however the physiological oxygen tension is much lower and is a factor that may affect skeletal muscle myoblasts. In this study we have compared activation of G0 arrested myoblasts in 21% O2 and in 1% O2 in order to see how oxygen tension affects activation and proliferation of human myoblasts. Materials and Methods Human myoblasts were isolated from skeletal muscle tissue and G0 arrested in vitro followed by reactivation at 21% O2 and 1% O2. The effect was assesses by Real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and western blot. Results and Conclusions We found an increase in proliferation rate of myoblasts when activated at a low oxygen tension (1% O2) compared to 21% O2. In addition, the gene expression studies showed up regulation of the myogenesis related genes PAX3, PAX7, MYOD, MYOG (myogenin), MET, NCAM, DES (desmin), MEF2A, MEF2C and CDH15 (M-cadherin), however, the fraction of DES and MYOD positive cells was not increased by low oxygen tension, indicating that 1% O2 may not have a functional effect on the myogenic response. Furthermore, the expression of genes involved in the TGFβ, Notch and Wnt signaling pathways were also up regulated in low oxygen tension. The differences in gene expression were most pronounced at day one after activation from G0-arrest, thus the initial activation of myoblasts seemed most sensitive to changes in oxygen tension. Protein expression of HES1 and β-catenin indicated that notch signaling may be induced in 21% O2, while the canonical Wnt signaling may be induced in 1% O2 during activation and proliferation of myoblasts. PMID:27442119

  4. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    PubMed

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells.

  5. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    PubMed

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells. PMID:26886589

  6. Adhesion Proteins - An Impact on Skeletal Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Przewoźniak, Marta; Czaplicka, Iwona; Czerwińska, Areta M.; Markowska-Zagrajek, Agnieszka; Moraczewski, Jerzy; Stremińska, Władysława; Jańczyk-Ilach, Katarzyna; Ciemerych, Maria A.; Brzoska, Edyta

    2013-01-01

    Formation of mammalian skeletal muscle myofibers, that takes place during embryogenesis, muscle growth or regeneration, requires precise regulation of myoblast adhesion and fusion. There are few evidences showing that adhesion proteins play important role in both processes. To follow the function of these molecules in myoblast differentiation we analysed integrin alpha3, integrin beta1, ADAM12, CD9, CD81, M-cadherin, and VCAM-1 during muscle regeneration. We showed that increase in the expression of these proteins accompanies myoblast fusion and myotube formation in vivo. We also showed that during myoblast fusion in vitro integrin alpha3 associates with integrin beta1 and ADAM12, and also CD9 and CD81, but not with M-cadherin or VCAM-1. Moreover, we documented that experimental modification in the expression of integrin alpha3 lead to the modification of myoblast fusion in vitro. Underexpression of integrin alpha3 decreased myoblasts' ability to fuse. This phenomenon was not related to the modifications in the expression of other adhesion proteins, i.e. integrin beta1, CD9, CD81, ADAM12, M-cadherin, or VCAM-1. Apparently, aberrant expression only of one partner of multiprotein adhesion complexes necessary for myoblast fusion, in this case integrin alpha3, prevents its proper function. Summarizing, we demonstrated the importance of analysed adhesion proteins in myoblast fusion both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23671573

  7. Systemic delivery of recombinant proteins by genetically modified myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, E.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1991-12-06

    The ability to stably deliver recombinant proteins to the systemic circulation would facilitate the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited diseases. To explore the feasibility of the use of genetically engineered myoblasts as a recombinant protein delivery system, stable transfectants of the murine C2C12 myoblast cell line were produced that synthesize and secrete high levels of human growth hormone (hGH) in vitro. Mice injected with hGH-transfected myoblasts had significant levels of hGH in both muscle and serum that were stable for at least 3 weeks after injection. Histological examination of muscles injected with {beta}-galactosidase-expressing C2C12 myoblasts demonstrated that many of the injected cells had fused to form multinucleated myotubes. Thus, genetically engineered myoblasts can be used for the stable delivery of recombinant proteins into the circulation.

  8. M & M's: Mechanosensitivity and Mechanotransduction in Myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    The effect of external mechanical stimulation of muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) during exercise is a crucial step in myogenesis. This effect takes place many hours later while muscles are in a resting state; however it remains unclear to what extent the role of force application has on the promotion of myogenesis. Here, we combine Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to directly measure the magnitude of generated cellular traction forces (CTFs) in myoblasts, as a result of controlled mechanical loading. Precise nanonewton forces (1 & 10 nN) were applied to live cells with the AFM tip while simultaneous TFM measurements were performed. The experiment was performed on substrates ranging in elastic moduli (E), (16-89 kPa) mimicking resting and active muscle tissue, respectively. The results of this analysis demonstrated that the magnitude of CTFs was dependent on substrate E, as expected. However, CTFs only increased in response to applied force (compared to controls) on substrates with E greater than 62 kPa. Our results suggest that muscle precursor cells are most sensitive to mechanical force when the surrounding muscle tissue is stiff and contracted, whereas myogenesis itself proceeds optimally on softer, resting tissue.

  9. A genomic approach to myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Beatriz; Michelson, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We have developed an integrated genetic, genomic and computational approach to identify and characterize genes involved in myoblast fusion in Drosophila. We first used fluorescence activated cell sorting to purify mesodermal cells both from wild-type embryos and from twelve variant genotypes in which muscle development is perturbed in known ways. Then, we obtained gene expression profiles for the purified cells by hybridizing isolated mesodermal RNA to Affymetrix GeneChip arrays. These data were subsequently compounded into a statistical meta-analysis that predicts myoblast subtype-specific gene expression signatures that were later validated by in situ hybridization experiments. Finally, we analyzed the myogenic functions of a subset of these myoblast genes using a double-stranded RNA interference assay in living embryos expressing green fluorescent protein under control of a muscle-specific promoter. This experimental strategy led to the identification of several previously uncharacterized genes required for myoblast fusion in Drosophila. PMID:18979251

  10. CaMKK2 Suppresses Muscle Regeneration through the Inhibition of Myoblast Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Cheng; Zhang, Duo; Zhao, Lei; Li, Yan; Yao, Xiaohan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Shengjie; Liu, Wei; Cao, Hongchao; Yu, Shuxian; Wang, Yucheng; Jiang, Jingjing; Wang, Hui; Li, Xihua; Ying, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a major role in locomotion and muscle disorders are associated with poor regenerative efficiency. Therefore, a deeper understanding of muscle regeneration is needed to provide a new insight for new therapies. CaMKK2 plays a role in the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase cascade; however, its role in skeletal muscle remains unknown. Here, we found that CaMKK2 expression levels were altered under physiological and pathological conditions including postnatal myogensis, freeze or cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Overexpression of CaMKK2 suppressed C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation, while inhibition of CaMKK2 had opposite effect. We also found that CaMKK2 is able to activate AMPK in C2C12 myocytes. Inhibition of AMPK could attenuate the effect of CaMKK2 overexpression, while AMPK agonist could abrogate the effect of CaMKK2 knockdown on C2C12 cell differentiation and proliferation. These results suggest that CaMKK2 functions as an AMPK kinase in muscle cells and AMPK mediates the effect of CaMKK2 on myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Our data also indicate that CaMKK2 might inhibit myoblast proliferation through AMPK-mediated cell cycle arrest by inducing cdc2-Tyr15 phosphorylation and repress differentiation through affecting PGC1α transcription. Lastly, we show that overexpressing CaMKK2 in the muscle of mice via electroporation impaired the muscle regeneration during freeze-induced injury, indicating that CaMKK2 could serve as a potential target to treat patients with muscle injury or myopathies. Together, our study reveals a new role for CaMKK2 as a negative regulator of myoblast differentiation and proliferation and sheds new light on the molecular regulation of muscle regeneration. PMID:27783047

  11. Reversal of Myoblast Aging by Tocotrienol Rich Fraction Posttreatment

    PubMed Central

    Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mouly, Vincent; Abdul Karim, Norwahidah

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are heavily involved in the regeneration of skeletal muscle in response to the aging-related deterioration of the skeletal muscle mass, strength, and regenerative capacity, termed as sarcopenia. This study focused on the effect of tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF) on regenerative capacity of myoblasts in stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). The myoblasts was grouped as young control, SIPS-induced, TRF control, TRF pretreatment, and TRF posttreatment. Optimum dose of TRF, morphological observation, activity of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-galactosidase), and cell proliferation were determined. 50 μg/mL TRF treatment exhibited the highest cell proliferation capacity. SIPS-induced myoblasts exhibit large flattened cells and prominent intermediate filaments (senescent-like morphology). The activity of SA-β-galactosidase was significantly increased, but the proliferation capacity was significantly reduced as compared to young control. The activity of SA-β-galactosidase was significantly reduced and cell proliferation was significantly increased in the posttreatment group whereas there was no significant difference in SA-β-galactosidase activity and proliferation capacity of pretreatment group as compared to SIPS-induced myoblasts. Based on the data, we hypothesized that TRF may reverse the myoblasts aging through replenishing the regenerative capacity of the cells. However, further investigation on the mechanism of TRF in reversing the myoblast aging is needed. PMID:24349615

  12. Drosophila Kette coordinates myoblast junction dissolution and the ratio of Scar-to-WASp during myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Hamp, Julia; Löwer, Andreas; Dottermusch-Heidel, Christine; Beck, Lothar; Moussian, Bernard; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2016-09-15

    The fusion of founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs) is crucial for muscle formation in Drosophila Characteristic events of myoblast fusion include the recognition and adhesion of myoblasts, and the formation of branched F-actin by the Arp2/3 complex at the site of cell-cell contact. At the ultrastructural level, these events are reflected by the appearance of finger-like protrusions and electron-dense plaques that appear prior to fusion. Severe defects in myoblast fusion are caused by the loss of Kette (a homolog of Nap1 and Hem-2, also known as NCKAP1 and NCKAP1L, respectively), a member of the regulatory complex formed by Scar or WAVE proteins (represented by the single protein, Scar, in flies). kette mutants form finger-like protrusions, but the electron-dense plaques are extended. Here, we show that the electron-dense plaques in wild-type and kette mutant myoblasts resemble other electron-dense structures that are known to function as cellular junctions. Furthermore, analysis of double mutants and attempts to rescue the kette mutant phenotype with N-cadherin, wasp and genes of members of the regulatory Scar complex revealed that Kette has two functions during myoblast fusion. First, Kette controls the dissolution of electron-dense plaques. Second, Kette controls the ratio of the Arp2/3 activators Scar and WASp in FCMs. PMID:27521427

  13. Drosophila Kette coordinates myoblast junction dissolution and the ratio of Scar-to-WASp during myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hamp, Julia; Löwer, Andreas; Dottermusch-Heidel, Christine; Beck, Lothar; Moussian, Bernard; Flötenmeyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fusion of founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs) is crucial for muscle formation in Drosophila. Characteristic events of myoblast fusion include the recognition and adhesion of myoblasts, and the formation of branched F-actin by the Arp2/3 complex at the site of cell–cell contact. At the ultrastructural level, these events are reflected by the appearance of finger-like protrusions and electron-dense plaques that appear prior to fusion. Severe defects in myoblast fusion are caused by the loss of Kette (a homolog of Nap1 and Hem-2, also known as NCKAP1 and NCKAP1L, respectively), a member of the regulatory complex formed by Scar or WAVE proteins (represented by the single protein, Scar, in flies). kette mutants form finger-like protrusions, but the electron-dense plaques are extended. Here, we show that the electron-dense plaques in wild-type and kette mutant myoblasts resemble other electron-dense structures that are known to function as cellular junctions. Furthermore, analysis of double mutants and attempts to rescue the kette mutant phenotype with N-cadherin, wasp and genes of members of the regulatory Scar complex revealed that Kette has two functions during myoblast fusion. First, Kette controls the dissolution of electron-dense plaques. Second, Kette controls the ratio of the Arp2/3 activators Scar and WASp in FCMs. PMID:27521427

  14. Drosophila Kette coordinates myoblast junction dissolution and the ratio of Scar-to-WASp during myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Hamp, Julia; Löwer, Andreas; Dottermusch-Heidel, Christine; Beck, Lothar; Moussian, Bernard; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2016-09-15

    The fusion of founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs) is crucial for muscle formation in Drosophila Characteristic events of myoblast fusion include the recognition and adhesion of myoblasts, and the formation of branched F-actin by the Arp2/3 complex at the site of cell-cell contact. At the ultrastructural level, these events are reflected by the appearance of finger-like protrusions and electron-dense plaques that appear prior to fusion. Severe defects in myoblast fusion are caused by the loss of Kette (a homolog of Nap1 and Hem-2, also known as NCKAP1 and NCKAP1L, respectively), a member of the regulatory complex formed by Scar or WAVE proteins (represented by the single protein, Scar, in flies). kette mutants form finger-like protrusions, but the electron-dense plaques are extended. Here, we show that the electron-dense plaques in wild-type and kette mutant myoblasts resemble other electron-dense structures that are known to function as cellular junctions. Furthermore, analysis of double mutants and attempts to rescue the kette mutant phenotype with N-cadherin, wasp and genes of members of the regulatory Scar complex revealed that Kette has two functions during myoblast fusion. First, Kette controls the dissolution of electron-dense plaques. Second, Kette controls the ratio of the Arp2/3 activators Scar and WASp in FCMs.

  15. Identification of singles bar as a direct transcriptional target of Drosophila Myocyte enhancer factor-2 and a regulator of adult myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Tonya M; Fremin, Brayon J; Cripps, Richard M

    2015-05-15

    In Drosophila, myoblast fusion is a conserved process in which founder cells (FCs) and fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fuse to form a syncytial muscle fiber. Mutants for the myogenic regulator Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) show a failure of myoblast fusion, indicating that MEF2 regulates the fusion process. Indeed, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show that several genes involved in myoblast fusion are bound by MEF2 during embryogenesis. Of these, the MARVEL domain gene singles bar (sing), is down-regulated in MEF2 knockdown pupae, and has five consensus MEF2 binding sites within a 9000-bp region. To determine if MEF2 is an essential and direct regulator of sing during pupal muscle development, we identified a 315-bp myoblast enhancer of sing. This enhancer was active during myoblast fusion, and mutation of two MEF2 sites significantly decreased enhancer activity. We show that lack of sing expression resulted in adult lethality and muscle loss, due to a failure of fusion during the pupal stage. Additionally, we sought to determine if sing was required in either FCs or FCMs to support fusion. Interestingly, knockdown of sing in either population did not significantly affect fusion, however, knockdown in both FCs and FCMs resulted in muscles with significantly reduced nuclei numbers, provisionally indicating that sing function is required in either cell type, but not both. Finally, we found that MEF2 regulated sing expression at the embryonic stage through the same 315-bp enhancer, indicating that sing is a MEF2 target at both critical stages of myoblast fusion. Our studies define for the first time how MEF2 directly controls fusion at multiple stages of the life cycle, and provide further evidence that the mechanisms of fusion characterized in Drosophila embryos is also used in the formation of the more complex adult muscles.

  16. Change in viability of C2C12 myoblasts under compression, shear and oxidative challenges.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ye; Yao, Yifei; Wong, Singwan; Bian, Liming; Mak, Arthur F T

    2016-05-24

    Skeletal and epidermal loadings can damage muscle cells and contribute to the development of deep tissue injury (DTI) - a severe kind of pressure ulcers affecting many people with disability. Important predisposing factors include the multiaxial stress and strain fields in the internal tissues, particularly the vulnerable muscles around bony prominences. A careful study of the mechanical damage thresholds for muscle cell death is critical not only to the understanding of the formation of DTI, but also to the design of various body support surfaces for prevention. In this paper, we measured the mechanical damage thresholds of C2C12 myoblasts under prescribed compressive strains (15% and 30%) and shear strains (from 0% to 100%), and studied how oxidative stress, as caused potentially by reperfusion or inflammation, may affect such damage thresholds. A flat plate was used to apply a uniform compressive strain and a radially increasing shear strain on disks of Gelatin-methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel with myoblasts encapsulated within. The percentages of cell death were estimated with propidium iodide (PI) and calcein AM staining. Results suggested that cell death depended on both the level and duration of the applied strain. There seemed to be a non-linear coupling between compression and shear. Muscle cells often need to function biomechanically in challenging oxidative environments. To study how oxidative stress may affect the mechanical damage thresholds of myoblasts, cell viability under compressive and shear strains was also studied after the cells were pre-treated for different durations (1h and 20h) with different concentrations (0.1mM and 0.5mM) of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress can either compromise or enhance the cellular resistance to shear damage, depending on the level and duration of the oxidative exposure.

  17. Stabilin-2 modulates the efficiency of myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Yun, Youngeun; Lim, Jung-Suk; Kim, Mi-Jin; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-San

    2016-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is essential for the formation of skeletal muscle myofibres. Studies have shown that phosphatidylserine is necessary for myoblast fusion, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here we show that the phosphatidylserine receptor stabilin-2 acts as a membrane protein for myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration. Stabilin-2 expression is induced during myogenic differentiation, and is regulated by calcineurin/NFAT signalling in myoblasts. Forced expression of stabilin-2 in myoblasts is associated with increased myotube formation, whereas deficiency of stabilin-2 results in the formation of small, thin myotubes. Stab2-deficient mice have myofibres with small cross-sectional area and few myonuclei and impaired muscle regeneration after injury. Importantly, myoblasts lacking stabilin-2 have reduced phosphatidylserine-dependent fusion. Collectively, our results show that stabilin-2 contributes to phosphatidylserine-dependent myoblast fusion and provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which phosphatidylserine mediates myoblast fusion during muscle growth and regeneration. PMID:26972991

  18. Stabilin-2 modulates the efficiency of myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Yun, Youngeun; Lim, Jung-Suk; Kim, Mi-Jin; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-San

    2016-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is essential for the formation of skeletal muscle myofibres. Studies have shown that phosphatidylserine is necessary for myoblast fusion, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here we show that the phosphatidylserine receptor stabilin-2 acts as a membrane protein for myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration. Stabilin-2 expression is induced during myogenic differentiation, and is regulated by calcineurin/NFAT signalling in myoblasts. Forced expression of stabilin-2 in myoblasts is associated with increased myotube formation, whereas deficiency of stabilin-2 results in the formation of small, thin myotubes. Stab2-deficient mice have myofibres with small cross-sectional area and few myonuclei and impaired muscle regeneration after injury. Importantly, myoblasts lacking stabilin-2 have reduced phosphatidylserine-dependent fusion. Collectively, our results show that stabilin-2 contributes to phosphatidylserine-dependent myoblast fusion and provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which phosphatidylserine mediates myoblast fusion during muscle growth and regeneration. PMID:26972991

  19. Tracing myoblast fusion in Drosophila embryos by fluorescent actin probes.

    PubMed

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Myoblast fusion in the Drosophila embryo is a highly elaborate process that is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs). It occurs through an asymmetric event in which actin foci assemble in the FCMs at points of cell-cell contact and direct the formation of membrane protrusions that drive fusion. Herein, we describe the approach that we have used to image in living embryos the highly dynamic actin foci and actin-rich projections that precede myoblast fusion. We discuss resources currently available for imaging actin and myogenesis, and our experience with these resources if available. This technical report is not intended to be comprehensive on providing instruction on standard microscopy practices or software utilization. However, we discuss microscope parameters that we have used in data collection, and our experience with image processing tools in data analysis.

  20. Iron release and oxidant damage in human myoblasts by divicine.

    PubMed

    Ninfali, P; Perini, M P; Bresolin, N; Aluigi, G; Cambiaggi, C; Ferrali, M; Pompella, A

    2000-01-01

    Divicine is an aglycone derived from vicine, a glucosidic compound contained in fava beans (Vicia faba major or broad beans). In this study, we investigated the effect of divicine on cultured human myoblasts from normal subjects, in order to see if the drug may induce signs of oxidant stress in these cells. Myoblasts incubated 24 hours in the presence of 1 mM divicine, showed an increase of carbonyl groups and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) bound to cell proteins, as well as a significant release of iron and lactate dehydrogenase in the culture medium. Desferrioxamine (DFO), an iron chelator, significantly prevented protein oxidation and formation 4-HNE adducts. Our results can be interpreted as indicating that divicine autooxidizes both at extracellular level and into myoblasts thus inducing the release of free iron, which initiates oxidation of cellular proteins and lipids. DFO protects the cells by subtracting the free iron both at intracellular and extracellular level. PMID:10794072

  1. The critical role of myostatin in differentiation of sheep myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenxi; Li, Wenrong; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhang, Ning; He, Sangang; Huang, Juncheng; Ge, Yubin; Liu, Mingjun

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of the effective and specific shRNA to knockdown MSTN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of MSTN reversibly suppressed myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knockdown of endogenous MSTN promoted ovine myoblast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSTN inhibits myogenic differentiation through down-regulation of MyoD and Myogenin and up-regulation of Smad3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provides a promise for the generation of transgenic sheep to improve meat productivity. -- Abstract: Myostatin [MSTN, also known as growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8)], is an inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth. Blockade of MSTN function has been reported to result in increased muscle mass in mice. However, its role in myoblast differentiation in farm animals has not been determined. In the present study, we sought to determine the role of MSTN in the differentiation of primary sheep myoblasts. We found that ectopic overexpression of MSTN resulted in lower fusion index in sheep myoblasts, which indicated the repression of myoblast differentiation. This phenotypic change was reversed by shRNA knockdown of the ectopically expressed MSTN in the cells. In contrast, shRNA knockdown of the endogenous MSTN resulted in induction of myogenic differentiation. Additional studies revealed that the induction of differentiation by knocking down the ectopically or endogenously expressed MSTN was accompanied by up-regulation of MyoD and myogenin, and down-regulation of Smad3. Our results demonstrate that MSTN plays critical role in myoblast differentiation in sheep, analogous to that in mice. This study also suggests that shRNA knockdown of MSTN could be a potentially promising approach to improve sheep muscle growth, so as to increase meat productivity.

  2. N-methyl D-aspartate receptor synaptonuclear signaling and neuronal migration factor (Nsmf) plays a novel role in myoblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyo Youl

    2015-01-01

    Myogenesis, the formation and regeneration of muscular tissue, is a fundamental factor in embryonic development. N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor synaptonuclear signaling and neuronal migration factor (Nsmf) mediates NMDA receptor endocytosis in GnRH neuronal cells. NMDA receptor is involved in myoblast differentiation by regulating Ca2 (+) dependent fusion of myocytes. In this study, we investigated the role of Nsmf in myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Quantitative-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry results showed that the Nsmf expression levels increased during both the differentiation and proliferation of myocytes. Knockdown of Nsmf in myocytes by siRNA did not affect the myocyte differentiation marker myogenin. However, flow cytometry showed that the proliferation rate of the Nsmf-knockdown cells was reduced compared to the control cells. Therefore, our results indicate that Nsmf is a novel myogenic factor that can enhance myoblast proliferation. Furthermore, Nsmf may be an important therapeutic target in diseases associated with aging, muscular dystrophy, or cachexia.

  3. [Transplantation of autologous skeletal myoblasts in ischemic cardiac insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Pouzet, B; Hagège, A A; Vilquin, J T; Desnos, M; Duboc, D; Marolleau, J P; Menashé, P

    2001-01-01

    Despite medical therapeutic advances, congestive heart failure (CHF), which is the common ultimate consequence of many primary cardiovascular diseases, remains a major and growing public health problem. Although orthotopic heart transplantation is the gold standard, there is now growing evidence that one therapeutic option could be cellular cardiomyoplasty. Autologous adult skeletal myoblast transplantation seems to be the most clinically relevant, compared with other cell types, in that it avoids immunosuppression therapy, availability and ethical issues. Previous experimental studies have documented the efficacy of myoblast transplantation in improving function of infarcted myocardium. Although the mechanisms involved in this improvement are not elucidated, it has been demonstrated convincingly enough to consider ripping to clinical trials.

  4. A conserved role for calpains during myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Buffolo, Marcio; Batista Possidonio, Ana Claudia; Mermelstein, Claudia; Araujo, Helena

    2015-07-01

    Myoblast fusion is a key step during skeletal muscle differentiation as it enables the formation of contractile fibers. Calpains have been implicated in some aspects of myogenesis in mammals, but whether they exert a conserved function during myoblast fusion has not been investigated. Here, we studied Calpain function in two models of myogenesis: in vitro analysis of chick myogenic cultures and in vivo analysis of Drosophila melanogaster muscle development. First we showed that Calpain A is important for fly muscle function. In addition, Calpain A knockdown reduced lateral body wall muscle length and width, as well as the number of nuclei in dorsal oblique muscles, consistent with fewer cells fusing to form fibers. Treatment of chick cultures with a selective Calpain inhibitor led to the formation of thinner myotubes containing a reduced number of nuclei, consistent with decreased myoblast fusion. Dynamic changes in IκBα labeling and transfection with a dominant-negative IκBα suggest a role for the NFκB pathway during chick myogenesis and a possible role of Calpains in attenuating NFκB signals that restrict myoblast fusion. Our data suggest that different model organisms may be used to study the role of Calpains in regular myogenesis and Calpain-related muscular degenerative disorders.

  5. Maduramicin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Myoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Gu, Ying; Singh, Karnika; Shang, Chaowei; Barzegar, Mansoureh; Jiang, Shanxiang; Huang, Shile

    2014-01-01

    Maduramicin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic derived from the bacterium Actinomadura yumaensis, is currently used as a feed additive against coccidiosis in poultry worldwide. It has been clinically observed that maduramicin can cause skeletal muscle and heart cell damage, resulting in skeletal muscle degeneration, heart failure, and even death in animals and humans, if improperly used. However, the mechanism of its toxic action in myoblasts is not well understood. Using mouse myoblasts (C2C12) and human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD and Rh30) cells as an experimental model for myoblasts, here we found that maduramicin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Further studies revealed that maduramicin induced accumulation of the cells at G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis in the cells. Concurrently, maduramicin downregulated protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6), and CDC25A, and upregulated expression of the CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), resulting in decreased phosphorylation of Rb. Maduramicin also induced expression of BAK, BAD, DR4, TRADD and TRAIL, leading to activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 as well as cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). Taken together, our results suggest that maduramicin executes its toxicity in myoblasts at least by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptotic cell death. PMID:25531367

  6. The cesium-induced delay in myoblast membrane fusion is accompanied by changes in cellular subfraction lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Santini, M T; Indovina, P L; Cantafora, A

    1991-11-18

    We have recently demonstrated that the delay in myoblast membrane fusion induced by cesium is accompanied by changes in isolated membrane lipids (Santini, M.T., Indovina, P.L., Cantafora, A. and Blotta, I. (1990) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1023, 298-304). In the present study, we have investigated changes in the lipid profile of total cell homogenates and microsomal membrane fractions during myoblast membrane fusion as well as the effects that addition of cesium may have on these lipid variations in order to try to understand the production and translocation of lipids during this myogenic process. The data presented here indicate that the lipid composition of cell homogenates and microsomes varies in a different manner from isolated plasma membranes during myogenic fusion. In addition, cesium affects, in a different manner, the normally-occurring lipid production and distribution which takes place in each subcellular fraction.

  7. Retardation of C2C12 myoblast cell proliferation by exposure to low-temperature atmospheric plasma.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Naoya; Fujita, Ryo; Kawano, Fuminori; Takahashi, Kazuo; Ohira, Takashi; Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Nakata, Ken; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2014-09-01

    As the first step in evaluating the possibility of low-temperature atmospheric plasma for clinical applications in the treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), we determined the effects of plasma exposure on C2C12 myoblasts. The low-temperature atmospheric plasma was generated through an electrical discharge in argon gas. One minute of plasma exposure every 24 h inhibited the cell proliferation, whereas myoblast differentiation was not affected. Plasma exposure increased the phosphorylation of ERK and JNK at 30 min after the exposure, but the phosphorylation of both was decreased to less than control levels at 1 and 4 h after the exposure. Plasma exposure increased the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase at 8 h after the exposure. In conclusion, plasma exposure retarded the proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts by G2/M arrest. Therefore, plasma exposure can be a possible treatment for the anti-proliferative effects of malignant tumors, such as RMS, without affecting differentiated skeletal muscle cells.

  8. Microfluidic analysis of extracellular matrix-bFGF crosstalk on primary human myoblast chemoproliferation, chemokinesis, and chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Meghaan M.; Dewi, Ruby E.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2015-01-01

    Exposing myoblasts to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which is released after muscle injury, results in receptor phosphorylation, faster migration, and increased proliferation. These effects occur on time scales that extend across three orders of magnitude (100 – 103 minutes). Finite element modeling of Transwell assays, which are traditionally used to assess chemotaxis, revealed that the bFGF gradient formed across the membrane pore is short-lived and diminishes 45% within the first minute. Thus, to evaluate bFGF-induced migration over 102 minutes, we employed a microfluidic assay capable of producing a stable, linear concentration gradient to perform single-cell analyses of chemokinesis and chemotaxis. We hypothesized that the composition of the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM) may affect the behavioral response of myoblasts to soluble bFGF, as previous work with other cell types has suggested crosstalk between integrin and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors. Consistent with this notion, we found that bFGF significantly reduced the doubling time of myoblasts cultured on laminin but not fibronectin or collagen. Laminin also promoted significantly faster migration speeds (13.4 μm/h) than either fibronectin (10.6 μm/h) or collagen (7.6 μm/h) without bFGF stimulation. Chemokinesis driven by bFGF further increased migration speed in a strictly additive manner, resulting in an average increase of 2.3 μm/h across all ECMs tested. We observed relatively mild chemoattraction (~ 67% of myoblast population) in response to bFGF gradients of 3.2 ng/mL/mm regardless of ECM identity. Thus, while ECM-bFGF crosstalk did impact chemoproliferation, it did not have a significant effect on chemokinesis or chemotaxis. These data suggest that the main physiological effect of bFGF on myoblast migration is chemokinesis and that changes in the surrounding ECM, resulting from aging and/or disease may impact muscle regeneration by altering myoblast migration and

  9. Three-dimensional Myoblast Aggregates--Effects of Modeled Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byerly, Diane; Sognier, M. A.; Marquette, M. L.

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of these studies is to elucidate the molecular and cellular alterations that contribute to muscle atrophy in astronauts caused by exposure to microgravity conditions in space. To accomplish this, a three-dimensional model test system was developed using mouse myoblast cells (C2C12). Myoblast cells were grown as three-dimensional aggregates (without scaffolding or other solid support structures) in both modeled microgravity (Rotary Cell Culture System, Synthecon, Inc.) and at unit gravity in coated Petri dishes. Evaluation of H&E stained thin sections of the aggregates revealed the absence of any necrosis. Confocal microscopy evaluations of cells stained with the Live/Dead assay (Molecular Probes) confirmed that viable cells were present throughout the aggregates with an average of only three dead cells observed per aggregate. Preliminary results from gene array analysis (Affymetrix chip U74Av2) showed that approximately 14% of the genes were down regulated (decreased more than 3 fold) and 4% were upregulated in cells exposed to modeled microgravity for 12 hours compared to unit gravity controls. Additional studies using fluorescent phallacidin revealed a decrease in F-actin in the cells exposed to modeled microgravity compared to unit gravity. Myoblast cells grown as aggregates in modeled microgravity exhibited spontaneous differentiation into syncitia while no differentiation was seen in the unit gravity controls. These studies show that 1)the model test system developed is suitable for assessing cellular and molecular alterations in myoblasts; 2) gene expression alterations occur rapidly (within 12 hours) following exposure to modeled microgravity; and 3) modeled microgravity conditions stimulated myoblast cell differentiation. Achieving a greater understanding of the molecular alterations leading to muscle atrophy will eventually enable the development of cell-based countermeasures, which may be valuable for treatment of muscle diseases on

  10. The Endocytic Recycling Protein EHD2 Interacts with Myoferlin to Regulate Myoblast Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Katherine R.; Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Wallace, Gregory Q.; Cave, Andrew; Posey, Avery D.; Heretis, Konstantina; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a multinucleated syncytium that develops and is maintained by the fusion of myoblasts to the syncytium. Myoblast fusion involves the regulated coalescence of two apposed membranes. Myoferlin is a membrane-anchored, multiple C2 domain-containing protein that is highly expressed in fusing myoblasts and required for efficient myoblast fusion to myotubes. We found that myoferlin binds directly to the eps15 homology domain protein, EHD2. Members of the EHD family have been previously implicated in endocytosis as well as endocytic recycling, a process where membrane proteins internalized by endocytosis are returned to the plasma membrane. EHD2 binds directly to the second C2 domain of myoferlin, and EHD2 is reduced in myoferlin null myoblasts. In contrast to normal myoblasts, myoferlin null myoblasts accumulate labeled transferrin and have delayed recycling. Introduction of dominant negative EHD2 into myoblasts leads to the sequestration of myoferlin and inhibition of myoblast fusion. The interaction of myoferlin with EHD2 identifies molecular overlap between the endocytic recycling pathway and the machinery that regulates myoblast membrane fusion. PMID:18502764

  11. Stretch-induced myoblast proliferation is dependent on the COX2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, Jeffrey S.; Burkholder, Thomas J.; Pavlath, Grace K. . E-mail: gpavlat@emory.edu

    2005-11-01

    Skeletal muscle increases in size due to weight bearing loads or passive stretch. This growth response is dependent in part upon myoblast proliferation. Although skeletal muscles are responsive to mechanical forces, the effect on myoblast proliferation remains unknown. To investigate the effects of mechanical stretch on myoblast proliferation, primary myoblasts isolated from Balb/c mice were subjected to 25% cyclical uniaxial stretch for 5 h at 0.5 Hz. Stretch stimulated myoblast proliferation by 32% and increased cell number by 41% 24 and 48 h after stretch, respectively. COX2 mRNA increased 3.5-fold immediately poststretch. Prostaglandin E2 and F{sub 2{alpha}} increased 2.4- and 1.6-fold 6 h after stretch, respectively. Because COX2 has been implicated in regulating muscle growth and regeneration, we hypothesized that stretched myoblasts may proliferate via a COX2-dependent mechanism. We employed two different models to disrupt COX2 activity: (1) treatment with a COX2-selective drug, and (2) transgenic mice null for COX2. Treating myoblasts with a COX2-specific inhibitor blocked stretch-induced proliferation. Likewise, stretched COX2{sup -/-} myoblasts failed to proliferate compared to controls. However, supplementing stretched, COX2{sup -/-} myoblasts with prostaglandin E2 or fluprostenol increased proliferation. These data suggest that the COX2 pathway is critical for myoblast proliferation in response to stretch.

  12. Effect of atrophy and contractions on myogenin mRNA concentration in chick and rat myoblast omega muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. M.; Denney, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The skeletal rat myoblast omega (RMo) cell line forms myotubes that exhibit spontaneous contractions under appropriate conditions in culture. We examined if the RMo cells would provide a model for studying atrophy and muscle contraction. To better understand how to obtain contractile cultures, we examined levels of contraction under different growing conditions. The proliferation medium and density of plating affected the subsequent proportion of spontaneously contracting myotubes. Using a ribonuclease protection assay, we found that exponentially growing RMo myoblasts contained no detectable myogenin or herculin mRNA, while differentiating myoblasts contained high levels of myogenin mRNA but no herculin mRNA. There was no increase in myogenin mRNA concentration in either primary chick or RMo myotubes whose contractions were inhibited by depolarizing concentrations of potassium (K+). Thus, altered myogenin mRNA concentrations are not involved in atrophy of chick myotubes. Depolarizing concentrations of potassium inhibited spontaneous contractions in both RMo cultures and primary chick myotube cultures. However, we found that the myosin concentration of 6-d-old contracting RMo cells fed medium plus AraC was 11 +/- 3 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA, not significantly different from 12 +/- 4 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA (n = 3), the myosin concentration of noncontracting RMo cells (treated with 12 mM K+ for 6 d). Resolving how RMo cells maintained their myosin content when contraction is inhibited may be important for understanding atrophy.

  13. Possible role of TIEG1 as a feedback regulator of myostatin and TGF-{beta} in myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Masato; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Iwasaki, Shunsuke; Chao, Guozheng; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Kouichi; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Aso, Hisashi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro

    2010-03-19

    Myostatin and TGF-{beta} negatively regulate skeletal muscle development and growth. Both factors signal through the Smad2/3 pathway. However, the regulatory mechanism of myostatin and TGF-{beta} signaling remains unclear. TGF-{beta} inducible early gene (TIEG) 1 is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and has been implicated in the modulation of TGF-{beta} signaling. These findings prompted us to investigate the effect of TIEG1 on myostatin and TGF-{beta} signaling using C2C12 myoblasts. Myostatin and TGF-{beta} induced the expression of TIEG1 and Smad7 mRNAs, but not TIEG2 mRNA, in proliferating C2C12 cells. When differentiating C2C12 myoblasts were stimulated by myostatin, TIEG1 mRNA was up-regulated at a late stage of differentiation. In contrast, TGF-{beta} enhanced TIEG1 expression at an early stage. Overexpression of TIEG1 prevented the transcriptional activation of Smad by myostatin and TGF-{beta} in both proliferating or differentiating C2C12 cells, but the expression of Smad2 and Smad7 mRNAs was not affected. Forced expression of TIEG1 inhibited myogenic differentiation but did not cause more inhibition than the empty vector in the presence of myostatin or TGF-{beta}. These results demonstrate that TIEG1 is one possible feedback regulator of myostatin and TGF-{beta} that prevents excess action in myoblasts.

  14. Biomechanical strain vehicles for fibroblast-directed skeletal myoblast differentiation and myotube functionality in a novel coculture.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Michael R; Cao, Thanh V; Standley, Paul R

    2014-10-15

    Skeletal muscle functionality is governed by multiple stimuli, including cytokines and biomechanical strain. Fibroblasts embedded within muscle connective tissue respond to biomechanical strain by secreting cytokines that induce myoblast differentiation and, we hypothesize, regulate myotube function. A coculture was established to allow cross talk between fibroblasts in Bioflex wells and myoblasts on nondeformable coverslips situated above Bioflex wells. Cyclic short-duration strain (CSDS) modeling repetitive stress/injury, acyclic long-duration strain (ALDS) modeling manipulative therapy, and combined strain paradigms (CSDS + ALDS) were applied to fibroblasts. Nonstrained myoblasts in uniculture and coculture served as controls. After fibroblasts had induced myoblast differentiation, myotube contraction was assessed by perfusion of ACh (10(-11)-10(-3) M). CSDS-treated fibroblasts increased myotube contractile sensitivity vs. uniculture (P < 0.05). As contraction is dependent on ACh binding, expression and clustering of nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs) were measured. CSDS-treated fibroblasts increased nAChR expression (P < 0.05), which correlated with myotube contraction. ALDS-treated fibroblasts did not significantly affect contraction or nAChR expression. Agrin-treated myotubes were then used to design a computer algorithm to identify α-bungarotoxin-stained nAChR clusters. ALDS-treated fibroblasts increased nAChR clustering (P < 0.05), while CSDS-treated fibroblasts disrupted cluster formation. CSDS-treated fibroblasts produced nAChRs preferentially located in nonclustered regions (P < 0.05). Strain-activated fibroblasts mediate myotube differentiation with multiple functional phenotypes. Similar to muscle injury, CSDS-treated fibroblasts disrupted nAChR clusters and hypersensitized myotube contraction, while ALDS-treated fibroblasts aggregated nAChRs in large clusters, which may have important clinical implications. Cellular strategies aimed at improving muscle

  15. Diaphanous regulates SCAR complex localization during Drosophila myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Deng, Su; Bothe, Ingo; Baylies, Mary

    2016-10-01

    From Drosophila to man, multinucleated muscle cells form through cell-cell fusion. Using Drosophila as a model system, researchers first identified, and then demonstrated, the importance of actin cytoskeletal rearrangements at the site of fusion. These actin rearrangements at the fusion site are regulated by SCAR and WASp mediated Arp2/3 activation, which nucleates branched actin networks. Loss of SCAR, WASp or both leads to defects in myoblast fusion. Recently, we have found that the actin regulator Diaphanous (Dia) also plays a role both in organizing actin and in regulating Arp2/3 activity at the fusion site. In this Extra View article, we provide additional data showing that the Abi-SCAR complex accumulates at the fusion site and that excessive SCAR activity impairs myoblast fusion. Using constitutively active Dia constructs, we provide additional evidence that Dia functions upstream of SCAR activity to regulate actin dynamics at the fusion site and to localize the Abi-SCAR complex.

  16. Utilization of an antibody specific for human dystrophin to follow myoblast transplantation in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Huard, J; Tremblay, G; Verreault, S; Labrecque, C; Tremblay, J P

    1993-01-01

    Human myoblasts were transplanted in nude mice. The efficacy of these transplantations was analyzed using a monoclonal antibody (NCLDys3) specific for human dystrophin. This antibody did not reveal any dystrophin in nude mice that did not receive a human myoblast transplantation. However, about 30 days after a human myoblast transplantation, dystrophin-positive muscle fibers were observed. They were not abundant, and were present either in small clusters or isolated. This technique follows the fate of myoblast transplantation in animals that already have dystrophin, and distinguishes between new dystrophin-positive fibers due to the transplantation and the revertant fibers in mdx mice. Moreover, this technique does not require any labelling of the myoblasts before transplantation. It can also be used to detect dystrophin produced following the fusion of myoblasts transfected with the human dystrophin gene.

  17. Human myostatin negatively regulates human myoblast growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Craig; Hui, Gu Zi; Amanda, Wong Zhi Wei; Lau, Hiu Yeung; Lokireddy, Sudarsanareddy; Xiaojia, Ge; Mouly, Vincent; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Gluckman, Peter D; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi

    2011-07-01

    Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, has been implicated in the potent negative regulation of myogenesis in murine models. However, little is known about the mechanism(s) through which human myostatin negatively regulates human skeletal muscle growth. Using human primary myoblasts and recombinant human myostatin protein, we show here that myostatin blocks human myoblast proliferation by regulating cell cycle progression through targeted upregulation of p21. We further show that myostatin regulates myogenic differentiation through the inhibition of key myogenic regulatory factors including MyoD, via canonical Smad signaling. In addition, we have for the first time demonstrated the capability of myostatin to regulate the Notch signaling pathway during inhibition of human myoblast differentiation. Treatment with myostatin results in the upregulation of Hes1, Hes5, and Hey1 expression during differentiation; moreover, when we interfere with Notch signaling, through treatment with the γ-secretase inhibitor L-685,458, we find enhanced myotube formation despite the presence of excess myostatin. Therefore, blockade of the Notch pathway relieves myostatin repression of differentiation, and myostatin upregulates Notch downstream target genes. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrate that myostatin treatment of myoblasts results in enhanced association of Notch1-intracellular domain with Smad3, providing an additional mechanism through which myostatin targets and represses the activity of the myogenic regulatory factor MyoD. On the basis of these results, we suggest that myostatin function and mechanism of action are very well conserved between species, and that myostatin regulation of postnatal myogenesis involves interactions with numerous downstream signaling mediators, including the Notch pathway. PMID:21508334

  18. CD36 is required for myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Yun, Youngeun; Kim, In-San

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was induced during myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was localized in multinucleated myotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of myogenic markers is attenuated in CD36 knockdown C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of CD36 significantly inhibited myotube formation during differentiation. -- Abstract: Recently, CD36 has been found to be involved in the cytokine-induced fusion of macrophage. Myoblast fusion to form multinucleated myotubes is required for myogenesis and muscle regeneration. Because a search of gene expression database revealed the attenuation of CD36 expression in the muscles of muscular dystrophy patients, the possibility that CD36 could be required for myoblast fusion was investigated. CD36 expression was markedly up-regulated during myoblast differentiation and localized in multinucleated myotubes. Knockdown of endogenous CD36 significantly decreased the expression of myogenic markers as well as myotube formation. These results support the notion that CD36 plays an important role in cell fusion during myogenic differentiation. Our finding will aid the elucidation of the common mechanism governing cell-to-cell fusion in various fusion models.

  19. Nitric oxide donors, sodium nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetylpencillamine, stimulate myoblast proliferation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulibarri, J. A.; Mozdziak, P. E.; Schultz, E.; Cook, C.; Best, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an inter- and intracellular messenger involved in a variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. The effect of two NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and their effect on myoblast proliferation was examined. Both donors stimulated an increase in myoblast cell number over a range (1-10 microM) of donor concentrations. However, 50 microM SNAP inhibited myoblast proliferation. Cell numbers from cultures treated with degraded 10 microM SNAP were equivalent to the control. Therefore, it appears NO can stimulate as well as inhibit myoblast proliferation.

  20. Transplanted myoblasts can migrate several millimeters to fuse with damaged myofibers in nonhuman primate skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Skuk, Daniel; Goulet, Marlyne; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2011-09-01

    A major restriction of the intramuscular transplantation of myoblasts is that the grafted cells fuse mostly with myofibers along the injection trajectories. This has been attributed to a "lack of migration ability" of the grafted myoblasts. It has been assumed that grafted myoblasts remain motionless in the sites of delivery and fuse only with myofibers with which they come into contact. In the present study, we analyzed this phenomenon in 17 cynomolgus monkeys. We found that intramuscularly injected myoblasts within 1 hour after their injection are mainly located in the perimysium and not distributed along the injection trajectories. This suggested that the grafted myoblasts later migrate from the perimysium to fuse with myofibers that are damaged by the injections. Therefore, we analyzed whether β-galactosidase-labeled myoblasts injected subcutaneously over skeletal muscles migrate in needle-damaged and nondamaged muscle regions. We observed that grafted myoblasts migrated up to 1cm in depth from the muscle surface into the muscles, although they seemingly fused mainly with damaged myofibers. Our findings suggest that myoblast transplantation is not necessarily restricted bya "lack of migration ability" of the grafted cells but by the fact that myoblasts fuse with regenerating myofibers and not with undamaged myofibers.

  1. Bioreducible Polymer-Transfected Skeletal Myoblasts for VEGF Delivery to Acutely Ischemic Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    McGinn, Arlo N.; Nam, Hye Yeong; Ou, Mei; Straub, Catherine M.; Hu, Norman; Yockman, James W.; Bull, David A.; Kim, Sung Wan

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of skeletal myoblasts to the heart has been investigated as a means to regenerate and protect the myocardium from damage after myocardial infarction. While several animal studies utilizing skeletal myoblasts have reported positive findings, results from clinical studies have been mixed. In this study we utilize a newly developed bioreducible polymer system to transfect skeletal myoblasts with a plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) prior to implantation into acutely ischemic myocardium. VEGF has been demonstrated to promote revascularization of the myocardium following myocardial infarction. We report that implanting VEGF expressing skeletal myoblasts into acutely ischemic myocardium produces superior results compared to implantation of untransfected skeletal myoblasts. Skeletal myoblasts expressing secreted VEGF were able to restore cardiac function to non-diseased levels as measured by ejection fraction, to limit remodeling of the heart chamber as measured by end systolic and diastolic volumes, and to prevent myocardial wall thinning. Additionally, arteriole and capillary formation, retention of viable cardiomyocytes, and prevention of apoptosis was significantly improved by VEGF expressing skeletal myoblasts compared to untransfected myoblasts. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using bioreducible cationic polymers to create engineered skeletal myoblasts to treat acutely ischemic myocardium. PMID:20970850

  2. Phospho-tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Bpv(Hopic) enhances C2C12 myoblast migration in vitro. Requirement of PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK pathways.

    PubMed

    Dimchev, Georgi A; Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire E

    2013-05-01

    Muscle progenitor cell migration is an important step in skeletal muscle myogenesis and regeneration. Migration is required for muscle precursors to reach the site of damage and for the alignment of myoblasts prior to their fusion, which ultimately contributes to muscle regeneration. Limited spreading and migration of donor myoblasts are reported problems of myoblast transfer therapy, a proposed therapeutic strategy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, warranting further investigation into different approaches for improving the motility and homing of these cells. In this article, the effect of protein phospho-tyrosine phosphatase and PTEN inhibitor BpV(Hopic) on C2C12 myoblast migration and differentiation was investigated. Applying a wound healing migration model, it is reported that 1 μM BpV(Hopic) is capable of enhancing the migration of C2C12 myoblasts by approximately 40 % in the presence of myotube conditioned media, without significantly affecting their capacity to differentiate and fuse into multinucleated myotubes. Improved migration of myoblasts treated with 1 μM BpV(Hopic) was associated with activation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK pathways, while their inhibition with either LY294002 or UO126, respectively, resulted in a reduction of C2C12 migration back to control levels. These results propose that bisperoxovanadium compounds may be considered as potential tools for enhancing the migration of myoblasts, while not reducing their differentiation capacity and underpin the importance of PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK signalling for the process of myogenic progenitor migration. PMID:23553034

  3. Hepatocyte growth factor-transfected skeletal myoblasts to limit the development of postinfarction heart failure.

    PubMed

    Poppe, Annika; Golsong, Peter; Blumenthal, Britta; von Wattenwyl, Robert; Blanke, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Schlensak, Christian; Siepe, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Stem cells transplanted to an injured heart affect the host myocardium indirectly. The cytokine hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) may play a key role in this paracrine activity. We hypothesized that HGF-overexpressing stem cells would restore cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI). Because there is a high rate of cell death when injecting the cells intramyocardially, we used scaffold-based cell transfer. Skeletal myoblasts (SkMs) were isolated and expanded from newborn Lewis rats. Cells were transfected with pcDNA3-huHGF and seeded on polyurethane (PU) scaffolds or diluted in medium for cell injection. The seeded scaffolds were transplanted in rats two weeks after MI (group: PU-HGF-SkM) or the infection solution was intramyocardially injected (group: Inj-HGF-SkM). Two groups (Inj-SkM and PU-SkM) have been prepared with untransfected cells and sham group without any cell therapy served as control (n = 10 each group). At the beginning of treatment (baseline) and six weeks later, hemodynamic parameters were assessed. At the end of the study, histological analysis was employed. In sham animals we detected a decrease in systolic and diastolic function during the observation time. Treatment with untransfected myoblasts did not lead to any significant changes in hemodynamic parameters between the intervention and six weeks later. In group PU-HGF-SkM, systolic parameters like dP/dt(max), dP/dt(min) and isovolumic contraction improved significantly from baseline to study end. Some diastolic parameters were inferior as compared to baseline (SB-Ked, pressure half time [PHT], Tau). In group Inj-HGF-SkM, only PHT was impaired as compared to preinterventional values. Histological analysis showed significantly more capillaries in the infarction border zone in groups PU-HGF-SkM than in sham and Inj-SkM group. The infarction size was not affected by the therapy. Transplanting HGF-transfected myoblasts after MI can limit the development of ventricular dysfunction

  4. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy myoblasts efficiently repair moderate levels of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bou Saada, Yara; Dib, Carla; Dmitriev, Petr; Hamade, Aline; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2016-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a progressive muscular dystrophy linked to a deletion of a subset of D4Z4 macrosatellite repeats accompanied by a chromatin relaxation of the D4Z4 array on chromosome 4q. In vitro, FSHD primary myoblasts show altered expression of oxidative-related genes and are more susceptible to oxidative stress. Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) gene, encoded within each D4Z4 unit, is normally transcriptionally silenced but is found aberrantly expressed in skeletal muscles of FSHD patients. Its expression leads to a deregulation of DUX4 target genes including those implicated in redox balance. Here, we assessed DNA repair efficiency of oxidative DNA damage in FSHD myoblasts and DUX4-transfected myoblasts. We have shown that the DNA repair activity is altered neither in FSHD myoblasts nor in immortalized human myoblasts transiently expressing DUX4. DNA damage caused by moderate doses of an oxidant is efficiently repaired while FSHD myoblasts exposed for 24 h to high levels of oxidative stress accumulated more DNA damage than normal myoblasts, suggesting that FSHD myoblasts remain more vulnerable to oxidative stress at high doses of oxidants. PMID:26860865

  5. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  6. The block of ryanodine receptors selectively inhibits fetal myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pisaniello, Alessandro; Serra, Carlo; Rossi, Daniela; Vivarelli, Elisabetta; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Molinaro, Mario; Bouché, Marina

    2003-04-15

    Differentiation and morphogenesis of skeletal muscle are complex and asynchronous events that involve various myogenic cell populations and extracellular signals. Embryonic and fetal skeletal myoblasts are responsible for the formation of primary and secondary fibers, respectively, although the mechanism that diversifies their fate is not fully understood. Calcium transients appear to be a signaling mechanism that is widely utilized in differentiation and embryogenesis. In mature skeletal muscle, calcium transients are generated mainly by ryanodine receptors (type 1 and type 3), which are involved in excitation-contraction coupling. However, it is not clear whether the activity of these receptors is important for contractile activity alone or whether it may also play a role in regulating the differentiation/developmental processes. To clarify this point, we first examined the expression of the receptors during development. The results show that the expression of both receptors appears as early as E13 during limb muscle development and parallels the expression of skeletal myosin. The expression and the activity of both receptors is maintained in vitro by all myogenic cell populations isolated from different stages of development, including somitic, embryonic and fetal myoblasts and satellite cells. Blocking ryanodine receptor activity by using ryanodine inhibits in vitro differentiation of fetal myoblasts (judged by the expression of sarcomeric myosin and formation of multinucleated myotubes) but not of somitic or embryonic and satellite muscle cells. This block is caused by the transcriptional inhibition of markers characteristic of terminal differentiation, rather than commitment, as the expression of muscle regulatory factors is not impaired by ryanodine treatment. Taken together, the data reported in this paper demonstrate that, although calcium transients represent a general mechanism for the control of differentiation and development, multiple calcium

  7. Prostaglandin E2 promotes proliferation of skeletal muscle myoblasts via EP4 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Mo, Chenglin; Zhao, Ruonan; Vallejo, Julian; Igwe, Orisa; Bonewald, Lynda; Wetmore, Lori; Brotto, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that conditioned media (CM) from osteocytes enhances myogenic differentiation of myoblasts, suggesting that signaling from bone may be important for skeletal muscle myogenesis. The effect of CM was closely mimicked by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a bioactive lipid mediator in various physiological or pathological conditions. PGE2 is secreted at high levels by osteocytes and such secretion is further enhanced under loading conditions. Although four types of receptors, EP1 to EP4, mediate PGE2 signaling, it is unknown whether these receptors play a role in myogenesis. Therefore, in this study, the expression of EPs in mouse primary myoblasts was characterized, followed by examination of their roles in myoblast proliferation by treating myoblasts with PGE2 or specific agonists. All four PGE2 receptor mRNAs were detectable by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), but only PGE2 and EP4 agonist CAY 10598 significantly enhance myoblast proliferation. EP1/EP3 agonist 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 (17-PT PGE2) and EP2 agonist butaprost did not have any significant effects. Moreover, treatment with EP4 antagonist L161,982 dose-dependently inhibited myoblast proliferation. These results were confirmed by cell cycle analysis and the gene expression of cell cycle regulators. Concomitant with the inhibition of myoblast proliferation, treatment with L161,982 significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Cotreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or sodium ascorbate (SA) successfully reversed the inhibition of myoblast proliferation and ROS overproduction caused by L161,982. Therefore, PGE2 signaling via the EP4 receptor regulates myogenesis by promoting myoblast proliferation and blocking this receptor results in increased ROS production in myoblasts.

  8. Combining a micro/nano-hierarchical scaffold with cell-printing of myoblasts induces cell alignment and differentiation favorable to skeletal muscle tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Miji; Lee, Hyeongjin; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical scaffolds must be used in tissue engineering to provide physical stability and topological/biochemical properties that directly affect tissue regeneration. In this study, a new cell-laden scaffold was developed that supplies micro/nano-topological cues and promotes efficient release of cells. The hierarchical structure consisted of poly(ε-caprolactone) macrosized struts for sustaining a three-dimensional structural shape, aligned nanofibers obtained with optimized electrospinning, and cell-printed myoblasts. Importantly, the printed myoblasts were fully safe and were efficiently released from the cell-laden struts to neighboring nanofiber networks. The incorporation of micro/nanofibers in the hierarchical scaffold significantly affected myoblast proliferation, alignment, and even facilitated the formation of myotubes. We observed that myosin heavy chain expression and the expression levels of various myogenic genes (MyoD, myogenin, and troponin T) were significantly affected by the fiber alignment achieved in our hierarchical cell-laden structure. We believe that the combination of cell-printing and a hierarchical scaffold that encourages fiber alignment is a highly promising technique for skeletal muscle tissue engineering. PMID:27634918

  9. Combining a micro/nano-hierarchical scaffold with cell-printing of myoblasts induces cell alignment and differentiation favorable to skeletal muscle tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Miji; Lee, Hyeongjin; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2016-09-16

    Biomedical scaffolds must be used in tissue engineering to provide physical stability and topological/biochemical properties that directly affect tissue regeneration. In this study, a new cell-laden scaffold was developed that supplies micro/nano-topological cues and promotes efficient release of cells. The hierarchical structure consisted of poly(ε-caprolactone) macrosized struts for sustaining a three-dimensional structural shape, aligned nanofibers obtained with optimized electrospinning, and cell-printed myoblasts. Importantly, the printed myoblasts were fully safe and were efficiently released from the cell-laden struts to neighboring nanofiber networks. The incorporation of micro/nanofibers in the hierarchical scaffold significantly affected myoblast proliferation, alignment, and even facilitated the formation of myotubes. We observed that myosin heavy chain expression and the expression levels of various myogenic genes (MyoD, myogenin, and troponin T) were significantly affected by the fiber alignment achieved in our hierarchical cell-laden structure. We believe that the combination of cell-printing and a hierarchical scaffold that encourages fiber alignment is a highly promising technique for skeletal muscle tissue engineering.

  10. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Koshi N.; Okuno, Hiroshi; Sano, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Kazuo; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. {yields} The expression of C/EBP{beta}, {alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased under hypoxia. {yields} Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) {beta}, {alpha} and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) {gamma} were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  11. Effects of 1,25(OH)2 D3 and 25(OH)D3 on C2C12 Myoblast Proliferation, Differentiation, and Myotube Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    van der Meijden, K; Bravenboer, N; Dirks, N F; Heijboer, A C; den Heijer, M; de Wit, G M J; Offringa, C; Lips, P; Jaspers, R T

    2016-11-01

    An adequate vitamin D status is essential to optimize muscle strength. However, whether vitamin D directly reduces muscle fiber atrophy or stimulates muscle fiber hypertrophy remains subject of debate. A mechanism that may affect the role of vitamin D in the regulation of muscle fiber size is the local conversion of 25(OH)D to 1,25(OH)2 D by 1α-hydroxylase. Therefore, we investigated in a murine C2C12 myoblast culture whether both 1,25(OH)2 D3 and 25(OH)D3 affect myoblast proliferation, differentiation, and myotube size and whether these cells are able to metabolize 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2 D3 . We show that myoblasts not only responded to 1,25(OH)2 D3 , but also to the precursor 25(OH)D3 by increasing their VDR mRNA expression and reducing their proliferation. In differentiating myoblasts and myotubes 1,25(OH)2 D3 as well as 25(OH)D3 stimulated VDR mRNA expression and in myotubes 1,25(OH)2 D3 also stimulated MHC mRNA expression. However, this occurred without notable effects on myotube size. Moreover, no effects on the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway as well as MyoD and myogenin mRNA levels were observed. Interestingly, both myoblasts and myotubes expressed CYP27B1 and CYP24 mRNA which are required for vitamin D3 metabolism. Although 1α-hydroxylase activity could not be shown in myotubes, after treatment with 1,25(OH)2 D3 or 25(OH)D3 myotubes showed strongly elevated CYP24 mRNA levels compared to untreated cells. Moreover, myotubes were able to convert 25(OH)D3 to 24R,25(OH)2 D3 which may play a role in myoblast proliferation and differentiation. These data suggest that skeletal muscle is not only a direct target for vitamin D3 metabolites, but is also able to metabolize 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2 D3 . J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2517-2528, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Low Glucose but Not Galactose Enhances Oxidative Mitochondrial Metabolism in C2C12 Myoblasts and Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Anděl, Michal; Trnka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Substituting galactose for glucose in cell culture media has been suggested to enhance mitochondrial metabolism in a variety of cell lines. We studied the effects of carbohydrate availability on growth, differentiation and metabolism of C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured growth rates, ability to differentiate, citrate synthase and respiratory chain activities and several parameters of mitochondrial respiration in C2C12 cells grown in media with varying carbohydrate availability (5 g/l glucose, 1 g/l glucose, 1 g/l galactose, and no added carbohydrates). C2C12 myoblasts grow more slowly without glucose irrespective of the presence of galactose, which is not consumed by the cells, and they fail to differentiate without glucose in the medium. Cells grown in a no-glucose medium (with or without galactose) have lower maximal respiration and spare respiratory capacity than cells grown in the presence of glucose. However, increasing glucose concentration above physiological levels decreases the achievable maximal respiration. C2C12 myotubes differentiated at a high glucose concentration showed higher dependency on oxidative respiration under basal conditions but had lower maximal and spare respiratory capacity when compared to cells differentiated under low glucose condition. Citrate synthase activity or mitochondrial yield were not significantly affected by changes in the available substrate concentration but a trend towards a higher respiratory chain activity was observed at reduced glucose levels. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that using galactose to increase oxidative metabolism may not be applicable to every cell line, and the changes in mitochondrial respiratory parameters associated with treating cells with galactose are mainly due to glucose deprivation. Moderate concentrations of glucose (1 g/l) in a growth medium are optimal for mitochondrial respiration in C2C12 cell line while supraphysiological

  13. Novel function of stabilin-2 in myoblast fusion: the recognition of extracellular phosphatidylserine as a “fuse-me” signal

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Go-Woon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Kim, In-San

    2016-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is important for skeletal muscle formation. Even though the knowledge of myoblast fusion mechanism has accumulated over the years, the initial signal of fusion is yet to be elucidated. Our study reveals the novel function of a phosphatidylserine (PS) receptor, stabilin-2 (Stab2), in the modulation of myoblast fusion, through the recognition of PS exposed on myoblasts. During differentiation of myoblasts, Stab2 expression is higher than other PS receptors and is controlled by calcineurin/NFAT signaling on myoblasts. The forced expression of Stab2 results in an increase in myoblast fusion; genetic ablation of Stab2 in mice causes a reduction in muscle size, as a result of impaired myoblast fusion. After muscle injury, muscle regeneration is impaired in Stab2-deficient mice, resulting in small myofibers with fewer nuclei, which is due to reduction of fusion rather than defection of myoblast differentiation. The fusion-promoting role of Stab2 is dependent on its PS-binding motif, and the blocking of PS-Stab2 binding impairs cell-cell fusion on myoblasts. Given our previous finding that Stab2 recognizes PS exposed on apoptotic cells for sensing as an “eat-me” signal, we propose that PS-Stab2 binding is required for sensing of a “fuse-me” signal as the initial signal of myoblast fusion. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 303-304] PMID:27174501

  14. Novel function of stabilin-2 in myoblast fusion: the recognition of extracellular phosphatidylserine as a "fuse-me" signal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Go-Woon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Kim, In-San

    2016-06-01

    Myoblast fusion is important for skeletal muscle formation. Even though the knowledge of myoblast fusion mechanism has accumulated over the years, the initial signal of fusion is yet to be elucidated. Our study reveals the novel function of a phosphatidylserine (PS) receptor, stabilin-2 (Stab2), in the modulation of myoblast fusion, through the recognition of PS exposed on myoblasts. During differentiation of myoblasts, Stab2 expression is higher than other PS receptors and is controlled by calcineurin/NFAT signaling on myoblasts. The forced expression of Stab2 results in an increase in myoblast fusion; genetic ablation of Stab2 in mice causes a reduction in muscle size, as a result of impaired myoblast fusion. After muscle injury, muscle regeneration is impaired in Stab2- deficient mice, resulting in small myofibers with fewer nuclei, which is due to reduction of fusion rather than defection of myoblast differentiation. The fusion-promoting role of Stab2 is dependent on its PS-binding motif, and the blocking of PS-Stab2 binding impairs cell-cell fusion on myoblasts. Given our previous finding that Stab2 recognizes PS exposed on apoptotic cells for sensing as an "eat-me" signal, we propose that PS-Stab2 binding is required for sensing of a "fuse-me" signal as the initial signal of myoblast fusion. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 303-304].

  15. Hypomorphic Smn knockdown C2C12 myoblasts reveal intrinsic defects in myoblast fusion and myotube morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Shafey, Dina; Cote, Patrice D.; Kothary, Rashmi . E-mail: rkothary@ohri.ca

    2005-11-15

    Dosage of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein has been directly correlated with the severity of disease in patients diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). It is also clear that SMA is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the degeneration of the {alpha}-motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord and atrophy of the associated skeletal muscle. What is more controversial is whether it is neuronal and/or muscle-cell-autonomous defects that are responsible for the disease per se. Although motor neuron degeneration is generally accepted as the primary event in SMA, intrinsic muscle defects in this disease have not been ruled out. To gain a better understanding of the influence of SMN protein dosage in muscle, we have generated a hypomorphic series of myoblast (C2C12) stable cell lines with variable Smn knockdown. We show that depletion of Smn in these cells resulted in a decrease in the number of nuclear 'gems' (gemini of coiled bodies), reduced proliferation with no increase in cell death, defects in myoblast fusion, and malformed myotubes. Importantly, the severity of these abnormalities is directly correlated with the decrease in Smn dosage. Taken together, our work supports the view that there is an intrinsic defect in skeletal muscle cells of SMA patients and that this defect contributes to the overall pathogenesis in this devastating disease.

  16. Development of Approaches to Improve Cell Survival in Myoblast Transfer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhuqing; Balkir, Levent; van Deutekom, Judith C.T.; Robbins, Paul D.; Pruchnic, Ryan; Huard, Johnny

    1998-01-01

    Myoblast transplantation has been extensively studied as a gene complementation approach for genetic diseases such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. This approach has been found capable of delivering dystrophin, the product missing in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy muscle, and leading to an increase of strength in the dystrophic muscle. This approach, however, has been hindered by numerous limitations, including immunological problems, and low spread and poor survival of the injected myoblasts. We have investigated whether antiinflammatory treatment and use of different populations of skeletal muscle–derived cells may circumvent the poor survival of the injected myoblasts after implantation. We have observed that different populations of muscle-derived cells can be isolated from skeletal muscle based on their desmin immunoreactivity and differentiation capacity. Moreover, these cells acted differently when injected into muscle: 95% of the injected cells in some populations died within 48 h, while others richer in desmin-positive cells survived entirely. Since pure myoblasts obtained from isolated myofibers and myoblast cell lines also displayed a poor survival rate of the injected cells, we have concluded that the differential survival of the populations of muscle-derived cells is not only attributable to their content in desmin-positive cells. We have observed that the origin of the myogenic cells may influence their survival in the injected muscle. Finally, we have observed that myoblasts genetically engineered to express an inhibitor of the inflammatory cytokine, IL-1, can improve the survival rate of the injected myoblasts. Our results suggest that selection of specific muscle-derived cell populations or the control of inflammation can be used as an approach to improve cell survival after both myoblast transplantation and the myoblast-mediated ex vivo gene transfer approach. PMID:9732286

  17. Biomechanical strain vehicles for fibroblast-directed skeletal myoblast differentiation and myotube functionality in a novel coculture

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Thanh V.; Standley, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle functionality is governed by multiple stimuli, including cytokines and biomechanical strain. Fibroblasts embedded within muscle connective tissue respond to biomechanical strain by secreting cytokines that induce myoblast differentiation and, we hypothesize, regulate myotube function. A coculture was established to allow cross talk between fibroblasts in Bioflex wells and myoblasts on nondeformable coverslips situated above Bioflex wells. Cyclic short-duration strain (CSDS) modeling repetitive stress/injury, acyclic long-duration strain (ALDS) modeling manipulative therapy, and combined strain paradigms (CSDS + ALDS) were applied to fibroblasts. Nonstrained myoblasts in uniculture and coculture served as controls. After fibroblasts had induced myoblast differentiation, myotube contraction was assessed by perfusion of ACh (10−11–10−3 M). CSDS-treated fibroblasts increased myotube contractile sensitivity vs. uniculture (P < 0.05). As contraction is dependent on ACh binding, expression and clustering of nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs) were measured. CSDS-treated fibroblasts increased nAChR expression (P < 0.05), which correlated with myotube contraction. ALDS-treated fibroblasts did not significantly affect contraction or nAChR expression. Agrin-treated myotubes were then used to design a computer algorithm to identify α-bungarotoxin-stained nAChR clusters. ALDS-treated fibroblasts increased nAChR clustering (P < 0.05), while CSDS-treated fibroblasts disrupted cluster formation. CSDS-treated fibroblasts produced nAChRs preferentially located in nonclustered regions (P < 0.05). Strain-activated fibroblasts mediate myotube differentiation with multiple functional phenotypes. Similar to muscle injury, CSDS-treated fibroblasts disrupted nAChR clusters and hypersensitized myotube contraction, while ALDS-treated fibroblasts aggregated nAChRs in large clusters, which may have important clinical implications. Cellular strategies aimed at improving

  18. Myostatin acts as an autocrine/paracrine negative regulator in myoblast differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Kishida, Tsunao; Ejima, Akika; Gojo, Satoshi; Mazda, Osam

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► iPS-derived cells express myostatin and its receptor upon myoblast differentiation. ► Myostatin inhibits myoblast differentiation by inhibiting MyoD and Myo5a induction. ► Silencing of myostatin promotes differentiation of human iPS cells into myoblasts. -- Abstract: Myostatin, also known as growth differentiation factor (GDF-8), regulates proliferation of muscle satellite cells, and suppresses differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes via down-regulation of key myogenic differentiation factors including MyoD. Recent advances in stem cell biology have enabled generation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells, but it remains to be clarified whether myostatin is also involved in regulation of artificial differentiation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells. Here we show that the human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells that were induced to differentiate into myoblasts expressed myostatin and its receptor during the differentiation. An addition of recombinant human myostatin (rhMyostatin) suppressed induction of MyoD and Myo5a, resulting in significant suppression of myoblast differentiation. The rhMyostatin treatment also inhibited proliferation of the cells at a later phase of differentiation. RNAi-mediated silencing of myostatin promoted differentiation of human iPS-derived embryoid body (EB) cells into myoblasts. These results strongly suggest that myostatin plays an important role in regulation of myoblast differentiation from iPS cells of human origin. The present findings also have significant implications for potential regenerative medicine for muscular diseases.

  19. Overexpression of NUDT7, a candidate quantitative trait locus for pork color, downregulates heme biosynthesis in L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masaaki; Hayashi, Takeshi; Nii, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Tomomi; Fujishima-Kanaya, Naoe; Awata, Takashi; Mikawa, Satoshi

    2010-11-01

    While testing a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for pork color in a cross population of pigs from the mating of Large White dams to a Japanese wild boar, our laboratory discovered a candidate gene (NUDT7) that might affect heme biosynthesis in porcine muscle. Therefore, this experiment was designed to test the effect of NUDT7 on heme biosynthesis in cultured myoblasts. Rat L6 myoblasts were transfected with a mammalian expression vector for pig NUDT7 immediately after the induction of cell differentiation, and samples were harvested at 2, 4, 6, and 8 days. Expression of exogenous NUDT7 mRNA was highest on day 4, when the heme content was substantially lower (P<0.01) than that of the control (14.2 vs. 63.9 pmol/10(5) cells). These results suggest that overexpression of pig NUDT7 may be associated with heme biosynthesis downregulation in skeletal muscle, which may partially explain differences in meat color among breeds of livestock.

  20. Modeling Myotonic Dystrophy 1 in C2C12 Myoblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rui; Dong, Wei; Shen, Xiaopeng; Peng, Xiaoping; Aceves, Angie G; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is a common form of muscular dystrophy. Although several animal models have been established for DM1, myoblast cell models are still important because they offer an efficient cellular alternative for studying cellular and molecular events. Though C2C12 myoblast cells have been widely used to study myogenesis, resistance to gene transfection, or viral transduction, hinders research in C2C12 cells. Here, we describe an optimized protocol that includes daily maintenance, transfection and transduction procedures to introduce genes into C2C12 myoblasts and the induction of myocyte differentiation. Collectively, these procedures enable best transfection/transduction efficiencies, as well as consistent differentiation outcomes. The protocol described in establishing DM1 myoblast cell models would benefit the study of myotonic dystrophy, as well as other muscular diseases. PMID:27501221

  1. The prelamin A pre-peptide induces cardiac and skeletal myoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Gary L. . E-mail: Gary.Brodsky@uchsc.edu; Bowersox, Jeffrey A.; Fitzgerald-Miller, Lisa; Miller, Leslie A.; Maclean, Kenneth N.

    2007-05-18

    Prelamin A processing is unique amongst mammalian proteins and results in the production of a farnesylated and carboxymethylated peptide. We examined the effect of pathogenic LMNA mutations on prelamin A processing, and of the covalently modified peptide on cardiac and skeletal myoblast differentiation. Here we report a mutation associated with dilated cardiomyopathy prevents prelamin A peptide production. In addition, topical application of the covalently modified C-terminal peptide to proliferating skeletal and cardiac myoblasts induced myotube and striated tissue formation, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that skeletal and cardiac myoblasts are the first cell lines examined to contain unprocessed prelamin A, and immunostaining of peptide-treated cells revealed a previously unidentified role for prelamin A in cytoskeleton formation and intercellular organization. These results demonstrate a direct role for prelamin A in myoblast differentiation and indicate the prelamin A peptide may have therapeutic potential.

  2. Myoblasts transplanted into rat infarcted myocardium are functionally isolated from their host

    PubMed Central

    Léobon, Bertrand; Garcin, Isabelle; Menasché, Philippe; Vilquin, Jean-Thomas; Audinat, Etienne; Charpak, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Survival and differentiation of myogenic cells grafted into infarcted myocardium have raised the hope that cell transplantation becomes a new therapy for cardiovascular diseases. The approach was further supported by transplantation of skeletal myoblasts, which was shown to improve cardiac performance in several animal species. Despite the success of myoblast transplantation and its recent trial in human, the mechanism responsible for the functional improvement remains unclear. Here, we used intracellular recordings coupled to video and fluorescence microscopy to establish whether myoblasts, genetically labeled with enhanced GFP and transplanted into rat infarcted myocardium, retain excitable and contractile properties, and participate actively to cardiac function. Our results indicate that grafted myoblasts differentiate into peculiar hyperexcitable myotubes with a contractile activity fully independent of neighboring cardiomyocytes. We conclude that mechanisms other than electromechanical coupling between grafted and host cells are involved in the improvement of cardiac function. PMID:12805561

  3. PARP1 Differentially Interacts with Promoter region of DUX4 Gene in FSHD Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishakha; Pandey, Sachchida Nand; Khawaja, Hunain; Brown, Kristy J; Hathout, Yetrib; Chen, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of the study is to identity proteins, which interact with the promoter region of double homeobox protein 4 (DUX4) gene known to be causative for the autosomal dominant disorder Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD). Methods We performed a DNA pull down assay coupled with mass spectrometry analysis to identify proteins that interact with a DUX4 promoter probe in Rhabdomyosarcomca (RD) cells. We selected the top ranked protein poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) from our mass spectrometry data for further ChIP-qPCR validation using patients' myoblasts. We then treated FSHD myoblasts with PARP1 inhibitors to investigate the role of PARP1 in the FSHD myoblasts. Results In our mass spectrometry analysis, PARP1 was found to be the top ranked protein interacting preferentially with the DUX4 promoter probe in RD cells. We further validated this interaction by immunoblotting in RD cells (2-fold enrichment compared to proteins pulled down by a control probe, p<0.05) and ChIP-qPCR in patients' myoblasts (65-fold enrichment, p<0.01). Interestingly, the interaction was only observed in FSHD myoblasts but not in the control myoblasts. Upon further treatment of FSHD myoblasts with PARP1 inhibitors, we showed that treatment with a PARP1 inhibitor, 3-aminobenzamide (0.5 mM), for 24 h had a suppression of DUX4 (2.6 fold, p<0.05) and ZSCAN4, a gene previously shown to be upregulated by DUX4, (1.6 fold, p<0.01) in FSHD myoblasts. Treatment with fisetin (0.5 mM), a polyphenol compound with PARP1 inhibitory property, for 24 h also suppressed the expression of DUX4 (44.8 fold, p<0.01) and ZSCAN4 (2.2 fold, p<0.05) in the FSHD myoblasts. We further showed that DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), a gene regulated by PARP1 was also enriched at the DUX4 promoter in RD cells through immunoblotting (2-fold, p<0.01) and immortalized FSHD myoblasts (42-fold, p<0.01) but not control myoblasts through ChIP qPCR. Conclusion Our results showed that PARP1 and DNMT1

  4. Elastic hydrogel substrate supports robust expansion of murine myoblasts and enhances their engraftment

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Ke; Yang, Zhong; Xu, Jian-zhong; Liu, Wen-ying; Zeng, Qiang; Hou, Fang; Lin, Sen

    2015-09-10

    The application of satellite cell-derived myoblasts in regenerative medicine has been restricted by the rapid loss of stemness during in vitro cell expansion using traditional culture systems. However, studies published in the past decade have highlighted the influence of substrate elasticity on stem cell fate and revealed that culture on a soft hydrogel substrate can promote self-renewal and prolong the regenerative potential of muscle stem cells. Whether hydrogel substrates have similar effects after long-term robust expansion remains to be determined. Herein we prepared an elastic chitosan/beta-glycerophosphate/collagen hydrogel mimicking the soft microenvironment of muscle tissues for use as the substrate for satellite cell culture and investigated its influence on long-term cell expansion. After 20 passages in culture, satellite cell-derived myoblasts cultured on our hydrogel substrate exhibited significant improvements in proliferation capability, cell viability, colony forming frequency, and potential for myogenic differentiation compared to those cultured on a routine rigid culture surface. Immunochemical staining and western blot analysis both confirmed that myoblasts cultured on the hydrogel substrate expressed higher levels of several differentiation-related markers, including Pax7, Pax3, and SSEA-1, and a lower level of MyoD compared to myoblasts cultured on rigid culture plates (all p<0.05). After transplantation into the tibialis anterior of nude mice, myoblasts that had been cultured on the hydrogel substrate demonstrated a significantly greater engraftment efficacy than those cultured on the traditional surface. Collectively, these results indicate that the elastic hydrogel substrate supported robust expansion of murine myoblasts and enhanced their engraftment in vivo. - Highlights: • An elastic hydrogel was designed to mimic the pliable muscle tissue microenvironment. • Myoblasts retained their stemness in long-term culture on the elastic

  5. Spatial Geometries of Self-Assembled Chitohexaose Monolayers Regulate Myoblast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Poosala, Pornthida; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Kitaoka, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Myoblast fusion into functionally-distinct myotubes to form in vitro skeletal muscle constructs under differentiation serum-free conditions still remains a challenge. Herein, we report that our microtopographical carbohydrate substrates composed of bioactive hexa-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc6) modulated the efficiency of myoblast fusion without requiring horse serum or any differentiation medium during cell culture. Promotion of the differentiation of dissociated mononucleated skeletal myoblasts (C2C12; a mouse myoblast cell line) into robust myotubes was found only on GlcNAc6 micropatterns, whereas the myoblasts on control, non-patterned GlcNAc6 substrates or GlcNAc6-free patterns exhibited an undifferentiated form. We also examined the possible role of GlcNAc6 micropatterns with various widths in the behavior of C2C12 cells in early and late stages of myogenesis through mRNA expression of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms. The spontaneous contraction of myotubes was investigated via the regulation of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), which is involved in stimulating glucose uptake during cellular contraction. Narrow patterns demonstrated enhanced glucose uptake rate and generated a fast-twitch muscle fiber type, whereas the slow-twitch muscle fiber type was dominant on wider patterns. Our findings indicated that GlcNAc6-mediated integrin interactions are responsible for guiding myoblast fusion forward along with myotube formation. PMID:27164094

  6. Tethering Membrane Fusion: Common and Different Players in Myoblasts and at the Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Marco B.; Jacob, Ralf; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Membrane fusion is essential for the communication of membrane-defined compartments, development of multicellular organisms and tissue homeostasis. Although membrane fusion has been studied extensively, still little is known about the molecular mechanisms. Especially the intercellular fusion of cells during development and tissue homeostasis is poorly understood. Somatic muscle formation in Drosophila depends on the intercellular fusion of myoblasts. In this process, myoblasts recognize each other and adhere, thereby triggering a protein machinery that leads to electron-dense plaques, vesicles and F-actin formation at apposing membranes. Two models of how local membrane stress is achieved to induce the merging of the myoblast membranes have been proposed: the electron-dense vesicles transport and release a fusogen and F-actin bends the plasma membrane. In this review, we highlight cell-adhesion molecules and intracellular proteins known to be involved in myoblast fusion. The cell-adhesion proteins also mediate the recognition and adhesion of other cell types, such as neurons that communicate with each other via special intercellular junctions, termed chemical synapses. At these synapses, neurotransmitters are released through the intracellular fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane. As the targeting of electron-dense vesicles in myoblasts shares some similarities with the targeting of synaptic vesicle fusion, we compare molecules required for synaptic vesicle fusion to recently identified molecules involved in myoblast fusion. PMID:24957080

  7. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Ogura, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the complex process of muscle regeneration after injury remain unknown. Transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in several cell types, including skeletal muscle, and is activated by high temperature and by certain molecules secreted during tissue inflammation. Severe inflammation and local temperature perturbations are induced during muscle regeneration, which suggests that TRPV1 might be activated and involved in the process. The aim of this study, was to clarify the role of TRPV1 in the myogenic potential of satellite cells responsible for muscle regeneration. We found that mRNA and protein levels of TRPV1 increased during regeneration after cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury in mice. Using isolated mouse satellite cells (i.e., myoblasts), we observed that activation of TRPV1 by its agonist capsaicin (CAP) augmented myogenin protein levels. Whereas CAP did not alter myoblast proliferation, it facilitated myoblast fusion (evaluated using myonucleii number per myotube and fusion index). In contrast, suppression of TRPV1 by siRNA impaired myoblast fusion. Using mice, we also demonstrated that intramuscular injection of CAP facilitated muscle repair after CTX-induced muscle injury. Moreover, we showed that these roles of TRPV1 might be mediated by interleukin-4 and calcium signaling during myoblast fusion. Collectively, these results suggest that TRPV1 underlies normal myogenesis through promotion of myoblast fusion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2275-2285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26892397

  8. Phospholipase D1 facilitates second-phase myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Teng, Shuzhi; Stegner, David; Chen, Qin; Hongu, Tsunaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Chen, Li; Kanaho, Yasunori; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Frohman, Michael A; Huang, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Myoblast differentiation and fusion is a well-orchestrated multistep process that is essential for skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1) has been implicated in the initiation of myoblast differentiation in vitro. However, whether PLD1 plays additional roles in myoblast fusion and exerts a function in myogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that PLD1 expression is up-regulated in myogenic cells during muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin injury and that genetic ablation of PLD1 results in delayed myofiber regeneration. Myoblasts derived from PLD1-null mice or treated with PLD1-specific inhibitor are unable to form mature myotubes, indicating defects in second-phase myoblast fusion. Concomitantly, the PLD1 product phosphatidic acid is transiently detected on the plasma membrane of differentiating myocytes, and its production is inhibited by PLD1 knockdown. Exogenous lysophosphatidylcholine, a key membrane lipid for fusion pore formation, partially rescues fusion defect resulting from PLD1 inhibition. Thus these studies demonstrate a role for PLD1 in myoblast fusion during myogenesis in which PLD1 facilitates the fusion of mononuclear myocytes with nascent myotubes. PMID:25428992

  9. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Ogura, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the complex process of muscle regeneration after injury remain unknown. Transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in several cell types, including skeletal muscle, and is activated by high temperature and by certain molecules secreted during tissue inflammation. Severe inflammation and local temperature perturbations are induced during muscle regeneration, which suggests that TRPV1 might be activated and involved in the process. The aim of this study, was to clarify the role of TRPV1 in the myogenic potential of satellite cells responsible for muscle regeneration. We found that mRNA and protein levels of TRPV1 increased during regeneration after cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury in mice. Using isolated mouse satellite cells (i.e., myoblasts), we observed that activation of TRPV1 by its agonist capsaicin (CAP) augmented myogenin protein levels. Whereas CAP did not alter myoblast proliferation, it facilitated myoblast fusion (evaluated using myonucleii number per myotube and fusion index). In contrast, suppression of TRPV1 by siRNA impaired myoblast fusion. Using mice, we also demonstrated that intramuscular injection of CAP facilitated muscle repair after CTX-induced muscle injury. Moreover, we showed that these roles of TRPV1 might be mediated by interleukin-4 and calcium signaling during myoblast fusion. Collectively, these results suggest that TRPV1 underlies normal myogenesis through promotion of myoblast fusion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2275-2285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Skeletal muscle myoblasts possess a stretch-responsive local angiotensin signalling system.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Adam P W; Baker, Jeff; De Lisio, Michael; Parise, Gianni

    2011-06-01

    A paucity of information exists regarding the presence of local renin-angiotensin systems (RASs) in skeletal muscle and associated muscle stem cells. Skeletal muscle and muscle stem cells were isolated from C57BL/6 mice and examined for the presence of a local RAS using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry (IHC), Western blotting and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Furthermore, the effect of mechanical stimulation on RAS member gene expression was analysed. Whole skeletal muscle, primary myoblasts and C2C12 derived myoblasts and myotubes differentially expressed members of the RAS including angiotensinogen, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT(1)) and type 2 (AT(2)). Renin transcripts were never detected, however, mRNA for the 'renin-like' enzyme cathepsin D was observed and Ang I and Ang II were identified in cell culture supernatants from proliferating myoblasts. AT(1) appeared to co-localise with polymerised actin filaments in proliferating myoblasts and was primarily found in the nucleus of terminally differentiated myotubes. Furthermore, mechanical stretch of proliferating and differentiating C2C12 cells differentially induced mRNA expression of angiotensinogen, AT(1) and AT(2). Proliferating and differentiated muscle stem cells possess a local stress-responsive RAS in vitro. The precise function of a local RAS in myoblasts remains unknown. However, evidence presented here suggests that Ang II may be a regulator of skeletal muscle myoblasts.

  11. Phospholipase D1 facilitates second-phase myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Teng, Shuzhi; Stegner, David; Chen, Qin; Hongu, Tsunaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Chen, Li; Kanaho, Yasunori; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Frohman, Michael A; Huang, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Myoblast differentiation and fusion is a well-orchestrated multistep process that is essential for skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1) has been implicated in the initiation of myoblast differentiation in vitro. However, whether PLD1 plays additional roles in myoblast fusion and exerts a function in myogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that PLD1 expression is up-regulated in myogenic cells during muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin injury and that genetic ablation of PLD1 results in delayed myofiber regeneration. Myoblasts derived from PLD1-null mice or treated with PLD1-specific inhibitor are unable to form mature myotubes, indicating defects in second-phase myoblast fusion. Concomitantly, the PLD1 product phosphatidic acid is transiently detected on the plasma membrane of differentiating myocytes, and its production is inhibited by PLD1 knockdown. Exogenous lysophosphatidylcholine, a key membrane lipid for fusion pore formation, partially rescues fusion defect resulting from PLD1 inhibition. Thus these studies demonstrate a role for PLD1 in myoblast fusion during myogenesis in which PLD1 facilitates the fusion of mononuclear myocytes with nascent myotubes.

  12. MicroRNA-27a promotes myoblast proliferation by targeting myostatin

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhiqing; Chen, Xiaoling; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Chen, Daiwen

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified a myogenic role for miR-27a and a new target, myostatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The miR-27a was confirmed to target myostatin 3 Prime UTR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-27a is upregulated and myostatin is downregulated during myoblast proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-27a promotes myoblast proliferation by reducing the expression of myostatin. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous non-coding RNAs that play critical roles in skeletal muscle development as well as in regulation of muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the role of miRNAs in myoblast proliferation remains poorly understood. Here we found that the expression of miR-27a was increased during proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts. Moreover, overexpression of miR-27a in C2C12 cells promoted myoblast proliferation by reducing the expression of myostatin, a critical inhibitor of skeletal myogenesis. In addition, the miR-27a was confirmed to target myostatin 3 Prime UTR by a luciferase reporter analysis. Together, these results suggest that miR-27a promotes myoblast proliferation through targeting myostatin.

  13. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signals through SHP2 to regulate primary mouse myoblast proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ju; Reed, Sarah A.; Johnson, Sally E.

    2009-08-01

    Niche localized HGF plays an integral role in G{sub 0} exit and the return to mitotic activity of adult skeletal muscle satellite cells. HGF actions are regulated by MET initiated intracellular signaling events that include recruitment of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The importance of SHP2 in HGF-mediated signaling was examined in myoblasts and primary cultures of satellite cells. Myoblasts stably expressing SHP2 (23A2-SHP2) demonstrate increased proliferation rates by comparison to controls or myoblasts expressing a phosphatase-deficient SHP2 (23A2-SHP2DN). By comparison to 23A2 myoblasts, treatment of 23A2-SHP2 cells with HGF does not further increase proliferation rates and 23A2-SHP2DN myoblasts are unresponsive to HGF. Importantly, the effects of SHP2 are independent of downstream ERK1/2 activity as inclusion of PD98059 does not blunt the HGF-induced proliferative response. SHP2 function was further evaluated in primary satellite cell cultures. Ectopic expression of SHP2 in satellite cells tends to decrease proliferation rates and siSHP2 causes an increase the percentage of dividing myogenic cells. Interestingly, treatment of satellite cells with high concentrations of HGF (50 ng/ml) inhibits proliferation, which can be overcome by knockdown of SHP2. From these results, we conclude that HGF signals through SHP2 in myoblasts and satellite cells to directly alter proliferation rates.

  14. Myoblast cytonemes mediate Wg signaling from the wing imaginal disc and Delta-Notch signaling to the air sac primordium

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    The flight muscles, dorsal air sacs, wing blades, and thoracic cuticle of the Drosophila adult function in concert, and their progenitor cells develop together in the wing imaginal disc. The wing disc orchestrates dorsal air sac development by producing decapentaplegic and fibroblast growth factor that travel via specific cytonemes in order to signal to the air sac primordium (ASP). Here, we report that cytonemes also link flight muscle progenitors (myoblasts) to disc cells and to the ASP, enabling myoblasts to relay signaling between the disc and the ASP. Frizzled (Fz)-containing myoblast cytonemes take up Wingless (Wg) from the disc, and Delta (Dl)-containing myoblast cytonemes contribute to Notch activation in the ASP. Wg signaling negatively regulates Dl expression in the myoblasts. These results reveal an essential role for cytonemes in Wg and Notch signaling and for a signal relay system in the myoblasts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06114.001 PMID:25951303

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) activates promyogenic signaling pathways, thereby promoting myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Jin; Go, Ga-Yeon; Yoo, Miran; Kim, Yong Kee; Seo, Dong-Wan; Kang, Jong-Sun; Bae, Gyu-Un

    2016-01-29

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) regulates postnatal myogenesis by alleviating myostatin activity, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates myogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we investigate molecular mechanisms of PPARβ/δ in myoblast differentiation. C2C12 myoblasts treated with a PPARβ/δ agonist, GW0742 exhibit enhanced myotube formation and muscle-specific gene expression. GW0742 treatment dramatically activates promyogenic kinases, p38MAPK and Akt, in a dose-dependent manner. GW0742-stimulated myoblast differentiation is mediated by p38MAPK and Akt, since it failed to restore myoblast differentiation repressed by inhibition of p38MAPK and Akt. In addition, GW0742 treatment enhances MyoD-reporter activities. Consistently, overexpression of PPARβ/δ enhances myoblast differentiation accompanied by elevated activation of p38MAPK and Akt. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARβ/δ enhances myoblast differentiation through activation of promyogenic signaling pathways.

  16. Mechanical strain applied to human fibroblasts differentially regulates skeletal myoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Michael R.; Cao, Thanh V.; Campbell, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic short-duration stretches (CSDS) such as those resulting from repetitive motion strain increase the risk of musculoskeletal injury. Myofascial release is a common technique used by clinicians that applies an acyclic long-duration stretch (ALDS) to muscle fascia to repair injury. When subjected to mechanical strain, fibroblasts within muscle fascia secrete IL-6, which has been shown to induce myoblast differentiation, essential for muscle repair. We hypothesize that fibroblasts subjected to ALDS following CSDS induce myoblast differentiation through IL-6. Fibroblast conditioned media and fibroblast-myoblast cocultures were used to test fibroblasts' ability to induce myoblast differentiation. The coculture system applies strain to fibroblasts only but still allows for diffusion of potential differentiation mediators to unstrained myoblasts on coverslips. To determine the role of IL-6, we utilized myoblast unicultures ± IL-6 (0–100 ng/ml) and cocultures ± α-IL-6 (0–200 μg/ml). Untreated uniculture myoblasts served as a negative control. After 96 h, coverslips (n = 6–21) were microscopically analyzed and quantified by blinded observer for differentiation endpoints: myotubes per square millimeter (>3 nuclei/cell), nuclei/myotube, and fusion efficiency (%nuclei within myotubes). The presence of fibroblasts and fibroblast conditioned media significantly enhanced myotube number (P < 0.05). However, in coculture, CSDS applied to fibroblasts did not reproduce this effect. ALDS following CSDS increased myotube number by 78% and fusion efficiency by 96% vs. CSDS alone (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts in coculture increase IL-6 secretion; however, IL-6 secretion did not correlate with enhanced differentiation among strain groups. Exogenous IL-6 in myoblast uniculture failed to induce differentiation. However, α-IL-6 attenuated differentiation in all coculture groups (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts secrete soluble mediators that have profound effects on several measures of

  17. Mechanical strain applied to human fibroblasts differentially regulates skeletal myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Michael R; Cao, Thanh V; Campbell, David H; Standley, Paul R

    2012-08-01

    Cyclic short-duration stretches (CSDS) such as those resulting from repetitive motion strain increase the risk of musculoskeletal injury. Myofascial release is a common technique used by clinicians that applies an acyclic long-duration stretch (ALDS) to muscle fascia to repair injury. When subjected to mechanical strain, fibroblasts within muscle fascia secrete IL-6, which has been shown to induce myoblast differentiation, essential for muscle repair. We hypothesize that fibroblasts subjected to ALDS following CSDS induce myoblast differentiation through IL-6. Fibroblast conditioned media and fibroblast-myoblast cocultures were used to test fibroblasts' ability to induce myoblast differentiation. The coculture system applies strain to fibroblasts only but still allows for diffusion of potential differentiation mediators to unstrained myoblasts on coverslips. To determine the role of IL-6, we utilized myoblast unicultures ± IL-6 (0-100 ng/ml) and cocultures ± α-IL-6 (0-200 μg/ml). Untreated uniculture myoblasts served as a negative control. After 96 h, coverslips (n = 6-21) were microscopically analyzed and quantified by blinded observer for differentiation endpoints: myotubes per square millimeter (>3 nuclei/cell), nuclei/myotube, and fusion efficiency (%nuclei within myotubes). The presence of fibroblasts and fibroblast conditioned media significantly enhanced myotube number (P < 0.05). However, in coculture, CSDS applied to fibroblasts did not reproduce this effect. ALDS following CSDS increased myotube number by 78% and fusion efficiency by 96% vs. CSDS alone (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts in coculture increase IL-6 secretion; however, IL-6 secretion did not correlate with enhanced differentiation among strain groups. Exogenous IL-6 in myoblast uniculture failed to induce differentiation. However, α-IL-6 attenuated differentiation in all coculture groups (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts secrete soluble mediators that have profound effects on several measures of myoblast

  18. Heat shock pretreatment enhances porcine myoblasts survival after autotransplantation in intact skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng; Laumonier, Thomas; Menetrey, Jacques

    2007-08-01

    Myoblast transplantation (MT) is a cell-based gene therapy treatment, representing a potential treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), cardiac failure and muscle trauma. The rapid and massive death of transplanted cells after MT is considered as a major hurdle which limits the efficacy of MT treatment. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are overexpressed when cells undergo various insults. HSPs have been described to protect cells in vivo and in vitro against diverse insults. The aim of our study is to investigate whether HSP overexpression could increase myoblast survival after autotransplantation in pig intact skeletal muscle. HSP expression was induced by warming the cells at 42 degrees C for 1 h. HSP70 expression was quantified by Western blot and flow cytometry 24 h after the treatment. To investigate the myogenic characteristics of myoblasts, desmin and CD56 were analysed by Western blot and flow cytometry; and the fusion index was measured. We also quantified cell survival after autologous transplantation in pig intact skeletal muscle and followed cell integration. Results showed that heat shock treatment of myoblasts induced a significative overexpression of the HSP70 (P < 0.01) without loss of their myogenic characteristics as assessed by FACS and fusion index. In vivo (n=7), the myoblast survival rate was not significantly different at 24 h between heat shock treated and nontreated cells (67.69% +/- 8.35% versus 58.79% +/- 8.35%, P > 0.05). However, the myoblast survival rate in the heat shocked cells increased by twofold at 48 h (53.32% +/- 8.22% versus 28.27% +/- 6.32%, P < 0.01) and more than threefold at 120 h (26.33% +/- 5.54% versus 8.79% +/- 2.51%, P < 0.01). Histological analysis showed the presence of non-heat shocked and heat shocked donor myoblasts fused with host myoblasts. These results suggested that heat shock pretreatment increased the HSP70 expression in porcine myoblasts, and improved the survival rate after autologous transplantation

  19. Modulation of acto-myosin contractility in skeletal muscle myoblasts uncouples growth arrest from differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Jyotsna; Helfman, David M

    2004-08-01

    Cell-substratum interactions trigger key signaling pathways that modulate growth control and tissue-specific gene expression. We have previously shown that abolishing adhesive interactions by suspension culture results in G(0) arrest of myoblasts. We report that blocking intracellular transmission of adhesion-dependent signals in adherent cells mimics the absence of adhesive contacts. We investigated the effects of pharmacological inhibitors of acto-myosin contractility on growth and differentiation of C2C12 myogenic cells. ML7 (5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl homopiperazine) and BDM (2,3, butanedione monoxime) are specific inhibitors of myosin light chain kinase, and myosin heavy chain ATPase, respectively. ML7 and BDM affected cell shape by reducing focal adhesions and stress fibers. Both inhibitors rapidly blocked DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent, reversible fashion. Furthermore, both ML7 and BDM suppressed expression of MyoD and myogenin, induced p27(kip1) but not p21(cip1), and inhibited differentiation. Thus, as with suspension-arrest, inhibition of acto-myosin contractility in adherent cells led to arrest uncoupled from differentiation. Over-expression of inhibitors of the small GTPase RhoA (dominant negative RhoA and C3 transferase) mimicked the effects of myosin inhibitors. By contrast, wild-type RhoA induced arrest, maintained MyoD and activated myogenin and p21 expression. The Rho effector kinase ROCK did not appear to mediate Rho's effects on MyoD. Thus, ROCK and MLCK play different roles in the myogenic program. Signals regulated by MLCK are critical, since inhibition of MLCK suppressed MyoD expression but inhibition of ROCK did not. Inhibition of contractility suppressed MyoD but did not reduce actin polymer levels. However, actin depolymerization with latrunculin B inhibited MyoD expression. Taken together, our observations indicate that actin polymer status and contractility regulate MyoD expression. We suggest that in myoblasts, the Rho pathway and

  20. Thyroid Hormone Receptor α Plays an Essential Role in Male Skeletal Muscle Myoblast Proliferation, Differentiation, and Response to Injury.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Anna; Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Nam-Ho; Liu, Yan-Yun; Yang, An; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Kahng, Andrew; Cervantes, Vanessa; Tripuraneni, Nikita; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Perin, Laura; Brent, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone plays an essential role in myogenesis, the process required for skeletal muscle development and repair, although the mechanisms have not been established. Skeletal muscle develops from the fusion of precursor myoblasts into myofibers. We have used the C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblast cell line, primary myoblasts, and mouse models of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) α and β, to determine the role of thyroid hormone in the regulation of myoblast differentiation. T3, which activates thyroid hormone receptor (TR) α and β, increased myoblast differentiation whereas GC1, a selective TRβ agonist, was minimally effective. Genetic approaches confirmed that TRα plays an important role in normal myoblast proliferation and differentiation and acts through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Myoblasts with TRα knockdown, or derived from RTH-TRα PV (a frame-shift mutation) mice, displayed reduced proliferation and myogenic differentiation. Moreover, skeletal muscle from the TRα1PV mutant mouse had impaired in vivo regeneration after injury. RTH-TRβ PV mutant mouse model skeletal muscle and derived primary myoblasts did not have altered proliferation, myogenic differentiation, or response to injury when compared with control. In conclusion, TRα plays an essential role in myoblast homeostasis and provides a potential therapeutic target to enhance skeletal muscle regeneration.

  1. [Insulin promotes proliferation of skeletal myoblast cells through PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways in rats].

    PubMed

    Yu, Huan; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Yong; Wu, Ping; Chen, Pei-Liang; Li, Wei-Dong

    2013-02-25

    The present study was to explore the effects of insulin on proliferation of skeletal myoblast cells in rats. Separated and cultured primary skeletal myoblast cells from rats were treated by insulin. By means of the incorporation of (3)H-TdR, BrdU assay and MTT assay, the proliferation of skeletal myoblast cells was detected. Western blot was used to check the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK of myoblast cells. The results showed that insulin significantly promoted the incorporation of (3)H-TdR into cultured skeletal myoblast cells in a dose-dependent manner. MTT assay and BrdU assay also showed insulin promoted the proliferation of skeletal myoblast cells. The promotion of skeletal myoblast cells proliferation by insulin was inhibited by PI3K inhibitor wortmannin or MEK inhibitor U0126, and the same phenomenon was shown in L6 and C2C12 cells. Also, insulin increased the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK in myoblast cells. These results suggest that insulin may promote proliferation of skeletal myoblast cells through PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways.

  2. A novel myoblast enhancer element mediates MyoD transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Tapscott, S J; Lassar, A B; Weintraub, H

    1992-01-01

    The MyoD gene can orchestrate the expression of the skeletal muscle differentiation program. We have identified the regions of the gene necessary to reproduce transcription specific to skeletal myoblasts and myotubes. A proximal regulatory region (PRR) contains a conserved TATA box, a CCAAT box, and a GC-rich region that includes a consensus SP1 binding site. The PRR is sufficient for high levels of skeletal muscle-specific activity in avian muscle cells. In murine cells the PRR alone has only low levels of activity and requires an additional distal regulatory region to achieve high levels of muscle-specific activity. The distal regulatory region differs from a conventional enhancer in that chromosomal integration appears necessary for productive interactions with the PRR. While the Moloney leukemia virus long terminal repeat can enhance transcription from the MyoD PRR in both transient and stable assays, the simian virus 40 enhancer cannot, suggesting that specific enhancer-promoter interactions are necessary for PRR function. Images PMID:1328870

  3. Oxidative Stress and Plasma Membrane Repair in Single Myoblasts After Femtosecond Laser Photoporation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xinxing; Chan, Kam Tai; Lee, Kenneth K H; Mak, Arthur F T

    2015-11-01

    Cell membranes are susceptible to biophysical damages. These biophysical damages often present themselves in challenging oxidative environments, such as in chronic inflammation. Here we report the damage evolution after single myoblasts were individually subjected to femtosecond (fs) laser photoporation on their plasma membranes under normal and oxidative conditions. A well-characterized tunable fs laser was coupled with a laser scanning confocal microscope. The post-damage wound evolution was documented by real-time imaging. The fs laser could generate a highly focused hole at a targeted site of the myoblast plasma membrane. The initial hole size depended on the laser dosage in terms of power and exposure duration. With the same laser power and irradiation duration, photoporation invoked bigger holes in the oxidative groups than in the control. Myoblasts showed difficulty in repairing holes with initial size beyond certain threshold. Within the threshold, holes could apparently be resealed within 100 s under the normal condition; while in oxidative condition, the resealing process could take 100-300 s. The hole-resealing capacity of myoblasts was compromised under oxidative stress particularly when the oxidative exposure was chronic. It is interesting to note that brief exposure to oxidative stress apparently could promote resealing in myoblasts after photoporation. PMID:26014361

  4. Promoting differentiation of cultured myoblasts using biomimetic surfaces that present alpha-laminin-2 peptides.

    PubMed

    Parker, Francine; White, Kathryn; Phillips, Siȏn; Peckham, Michelle

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, muscle cell lines are cultured on glass coverslips and differentiated to investigate myoblast fusion and differentiation. Efficient differentiation of myoblasts produces a dense network of myotubes with the correct organisation for contraction. Here we have tested the ability of artificially generated, precisely controlled peptide surfaces to enhance the efficiency of myoblast differentiation. We focused on specific short peptides from α-laminin-2 (IKVSV, VQLRNGFPYFSY and GLLFYMARINHA) as well as residues 15-155 from FGF1. We tested if these peptides in isolation, and/or in combination promoted muscle differentiation in culture, by promoting fusion and/or by improving sarcomere organisation. The majority of these peptides promoted fusion and differentiation in two different mouse myogenic cell lines and in primary human myoblasts. The additive effects of all four peptides gave the best results for both mouse cell lines tested, while primary human cell cultures differentiated equally well on most peptide surfaces tested. These data show that a mixture of short biomimetic peptides can reliably promote differentiation in mouse and human myoblasts. PMID:27507643

  5. [AO distribution and fluorescence spectra in myoblasts and single muscle fibres].

    PubMed

    Beliaeva, T N; Krolenko, S A; Leont'eva, E A; Mozhenok, T P; Salova, A V; Faddeeva, M D

    2009-01-01

    Using spectral scanning regime of Leica TCS SL confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) fluorescence spectra in nuclei and cytoplasms of living myoblasts L6J1 and frog single muscle fibres have been studied. AO fluorescence spectra in salt solutions dependent on free AO concentrations and in AO complexes with DNA have also been obtained for comparison. Myoblasts nuclei fluoresced in green spectral region with maximum at approximately 530 nm (corresponding AO monomers fluorescence), nucleoli fluoresced most brightly. Nuclear chromatin fluoresced not uniformly in these cells. We saw similar to myoblasts AO emission in nucleoli and nuclei of frog single muscle fibres. The uniformed weak green fluorescence was observed for myoblast cytoplasm. As to the muscle fibres sarcoplasm, we saw also AO green fluorescence in A-discs. In myoblasts and muscle fibre cytoplasm we saw the fluorescent red, yellow and green granules which were acidic organelles. The comparison of AO fluorescence spectra in living cells with fluorescence spectra of different AO concentrations and complexes of AO with DNA in buffer solutions allows estimation of AO concentration in acidic granules which is of interest in the investigation of cellular organelles functions in the processes of intracellular transport, adaptation, apoptosis and a number of pathological conditions.

  6. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darrion L.; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  7. Dedifferentiation of Adult Human Myoblasts Induced by Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoping; Mao, Zebin; Liu, Shuhong; Liu, Hong; Wang, Xuan; Wu, Haitao; Wu, Yan; Zhao, Tong; Fan, Wenhong; Li, Yong; Yew, David T.; Kindler, Pawel M.; Li, Linsong; He, Qihua; Qian, Lingjia; Wang, Xiaomin; Fan, Ming

    2005-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is primarily known for its important cellular effects within the nervous system. However, recent studies indicate that its receptor can be highly expressed in denervated skeletal muscle. Here, we investigated the direct effect of CNTF on skeletal myoblasts of adult human. Surprisingly, we found that CNTF induced the myogenic lineage-committed myoblasts at a clonal level to dedifferentiate into multipotent progenitor cells—they not only could proliferate for over 20 passages with the expression absence of myogenic specific factors Myf5 and MyoD, but they were also capable of differentiating into new phenotypes, mainly neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, and adipocytes. These “progenitor cells” retained their myogenic memory and were capable of redifferentiating into myotubes. Furthermore, CNTF could activate the p44/p42 MAPK and down-regulate the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). Finally, PD98059, a specific inhibitor of p44/p42 MAPK pathway, was able to abolish the effects of CNTF on both myoblast fate and MRF expression. Our results demonstrate the myogenic lineage-committed human myoblasts can dedifferentiate at a clonal level and CNTF is a novel regulator of skeletal myoblast dedifferentiation via p44/p42 MAPK pathway. PMID:15843428

  8. Combination of lipid metabolism alterations and their sensitivity to inflammatory cytokines in human lipin-1-deficient myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Michot, Caroline; Mamoune, Asmaa; Vamecq, Joseph; Viou, Mai Thao; Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Testet, Eric; Lainé, Jeanne; Hubert, Laurence; Dessein, Anne-Frédérique; Fontaine, Monique; Ottolenghi, Chris; Fouillen, Laetitia; Nadra, Karim; Blanc, Etienne; Bastin, Jean; Candon, Sophie; Pende, Mario; Munnich, Arnold; Smahi, Asma; Djouadi, Fatima; Carman, George M; Romero, Norma; de Keyzer, Yves; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2013-12-01

    Lipin-1 deficiency is associated with massive rhabdomyolysis episodes in humans, precipitated by febrile illnesses. Despite well-known roles of lipin-1 in lipid biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to rhabdomyolysis remain unknown. Here we show that primary myoblasts from lipin-1-deficient patients exhibit a dramatic decrease in LPIN1 expression and phosphatidic acid phosphatase 1 activity, and a significant accumulation of lipid droplets (LD). The expression levels of LPIN1-target genes [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors delta and alpha (PPARδ, PPARα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, very long (ACADVL), carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB and 2 (CPT1B and CPT2)] were not affected while lipin-2 protein level, a closely related member of the family, was increased. Microarray analysis of patients' myotubes identified 19 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated genes, indicating pleiotropic effects of lipin-1 deficiency. Special attention was paid to the up-regulated ACACB (acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta), a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis/oxidation balance. We demonstrated that overexpression of ACACB was associated with free fatty acid accumulation in patients' myoblasts whereas malonyl-carnitine (as a measure of malonyl-CoA) and CPT1 activity were in the normal range in basal conditions accordingly to the normal daily activity reported by the patients. Remarkably ACACB invalidation in patients' myoblasts decreased LD number and size while LPIN1 invalidation in controls induced LD accumulation. Further, pro-inflammatory treatments tumor necrosis factor alpha+Interleukin-1beta(TNF1α+IL-1ß) designed to mimic febrile illness, resulted in increased malonyl-carnitine levels, reduced CPT1 activity and enhanced LD accumulation, a phenomenon reversed by dexamethasone and TNFα or IL-1ß inhibitors. Our data suggest that the pathogenic mechanism

  9. Combination of lipid metabolism alterations and their sensitivity to inflammatory cytokines in human lipin-1-deficient myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Michot, Caroline; Mamoune, Asmaa; Vamecq, Joseph; Viou, Mai Thao; Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Testet, Eric; Lainé, Jeanne; Hubert, Laurence; Dessein, Anne-Frédérique; Fontaine, Monique; Ottolenghi, Chris; Fouillen, Laetitia; Nadra, Karim; Blanc, Etienne; Bastin, Jean; Candon, Sophie; Pende, Mario; Munnich, Arnold; Smahi, Asma; Djouadi, Fatima; Carman, George M; Romero, Norma; de Keyzer, Yves; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2013-12-01

    Lipin-1 deficiency is associated with massive rhabdomyolysis episodes in humans, precipitated by febrile illnesses. Despite well-known roles of lipin-1 in lipid biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to rhabdomyolysis remain unknown. Here we show that primary myoblasts from lipin-1-deficient patients exhibit a dramatic decrease in LPIN1 expression and phosphatidic acid phosphatase 1 activity, and a significant accumulation of lipid droplets (LD). The expression levels of LPIN1-target genes [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors delta and alpha (PPARδ, PPARα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, very long (ACADVL), carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB and 2 (CPT1B and CPT2)] were not affected while lipin-2 protein level, a closely related member of the family, was increased. Microarray analysis of patients' myotubes identified 19 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated genes, indicating pleiotropic effects of lipin-1 deficiency. Special attention was paid to the up-regulated ACACB (acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta), a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis/oxidation balance. We demonstrated that overexpression of ACACB was associated with free fatty acid accumulation in patients' myoblasts whereas malonyl-carnitine (as a measure of malonyl-CoA) and CPT1 activity were in the normal range in basal conditions accordingly to the normal daily activity reported by the patients. Remarkably ACACB invalidation in patients' myoblasts decreased LD number and size while LPIN1 invalidation in controls induced LD accumulation. Further, pro-inflammatory treatments tumor necrosis factor alpha+Interleukin-1beta(TNF1α+IL-1ß) designed to mimic febrile illness, resulted in increased malonyl-carnitine levels, reduced CPT1 activity and enhanced LD accumulation, a phenomenon reversed by dexamethasone and TNFα or IL-1ß inhibitors. Our data suggest that the pathogenic mechanism

  10. Cryopreservation effects on recombinant myoblasts encapsulated in adhesive alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Hajira F; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2013-06-01

    Cell encapsulation in hydrogels is widely used in tissue engineering applications, including encapsulation of islets or other insulin-secreting cells in pancreatic substitutes. Use of adhesive, biofunctionalized hydrogels is receiving increasing attention as cell-matrix interactions in three-dimensional (3-D) environments can be important for various cell processes. With pancreatic substitutes, studies have indicated benefits of 3-D adhesion on the viability and/or function of insulin-secreting cells. As long-term storage of microencapsulated cells is critical for their clinical translation, cryopreservation of cells in hydrogels is being actively investigated. Previous studies have examined the cryopreservation response of cells encapsulated in non-adhesive hydrogels using conventional freezing and/or vitrification (ice-free cryopreservation); however, none have systematically compared the two cryopreservation methods with cells encapsulated within an adhesive 3-D environment. The latter would be significant, as evidence suggests adhesion influences the cellular response to cryopreservation. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the response to conventional freezing and vitrification of insulin-secreting cells encapsulated in an adhesive biomimetic hydrogel. Recombinant insulin-secreting C2C12 myoblasts were encapsulated in oxidized RGD-alginate and cultured for 1 or 4days post-encapsulation, cryopreserved, and assessed up to 3days post-warming for metabolic activity and insulin secretion, and 1day post-warming for cell morphology. Besides certain transient differences in the vitrified group relative to the fresh control, both conventional freezing and vitrification maintained the metabolism, secretory activity, and morphology of the recombinant C2C12 cells. Thus, due to a simpler procedure and slightly superior results, conventional freezing is recommended over vitrification for the cryopreservation of C2C12 cells encapsulated in oxidized, RGD

  11. Myomaker, Regulated by MYOD, MYOG and miR-140-3p, Promotes Chicken Myoblast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen; Li, Erxin; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-01-01

    The fusion of myoblasts is an important step during skeletal muscle differentiation. A recent study in mice found that a transmembrane protein called Myomaker, which is specifically expressed in muscle, is critical for myoblast fusion. However, the cellular mechanism of its roles and the regulatory mechanism of its expression remain unclear. Chicken not only plays an important role in meat production but is also an ideal model organism for muscle development research. Here, we report that Myomaker is also essential for chicken myoblast fusion. Forced expression of Myomaker in chicken primary myoblasts promotes myoblast fusion, whereas knockdown of Myomaker by siRNA inhibits myoblast fusion. MYOD and MYOG, which belong to the family of myogenic regulatory factors, can bind to a conserved E-box located proximal to the Myomaker transcription start site and induce Myomaker transcription. Additionally, miR-140-3p can inhibit Myomaker expression and myoblast fusion, at least in part, by binding to the 3ʹ UTR of Myomaker in vitro. These findings confirm the essential roles of Myomaker in avian myoblast fusion and show that MYOD, MYOG and miR-140-3p can regulate Myomaker expression. PMID:26540045

  12. Cell-type specific adhesive interactions of skeletal myoblasts with thrombospondin-1.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, J C; Lawler, J

    1994-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that may play important roles in the morphogenesis and repair of skeletal muscle. To begin to explore the role of thrombospondin-1 in this tissue, we have examined the interactions of three rodent skeletal muscle cell lines, C2C12, G8, and H9c2, with platelet TSP-1. The cells secrete thrombospondin and incorporate it into the cell layer in a distribution distinct from that of fibronectin. Myoblasts attach and spread on fibronectin- or thrombospondin-coated substrates with similar time and concentration dependencies. Whereas cells adherent on fibronectin organize actin stress fibers, cells adherent on TSP-1 display prominent membrane ruffles and lamellae that contain radial actin microspikes. Attachment to thrombospondin-1 or the 140-kDa tryptic fragment is mediated by interactions with the type 1 repeats and the carboxy-terminal globular domain. Attachment is not inhibited by heparin, GRGDSP peptide, or VTCG peptide but is inhibited by chondroitin sulphate A. Integrins of the beta 1 or alpha V subgroups do not appear to be involved in myoblast attachment to TSP-1; instead, this process depends in part on cell surface chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. Whereas the central 70-kDa chymotryptic fragment of TSP-1 does not support myoblast attachment, the carboxy-terminal domain of TSP-1 expressed as a fusion protein in the bacterial expression vector, pGEX, supported myoblast attachment to 30% the level of intact TSP-1. Thrombospondin-4 (TSP-4) is also present in skeletal muscle and a fusion protein containing the carboxy-terminal domain of TSP-4 also supported myoblast adhesion, although this protein was less active on a molar basis than the TSP-1 fusion protein. Thus, the carboxyterminal domain of TSP-1 appears to contain a primary attachment site for myoblasts, and this activity is present in a second member of the thrombospondin family. Images PMID:7519904

  13. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Stimulate Skeletal Myoblast Proliferation through the Paracrine Release of VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Chellini, Flaminia; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Nistri, Silvia; Nosi, Daniele; Saccardi, Riccardo; Quercioli, Franco; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Formigli, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are the leading cell candidates in the field of regenerative medicine. These cells have also been successfully used to improve skeletal muscle repair/regeneration; however, the mechanisms responsible for their beneficial effects remain to be clarified. On this basis, in the present study, we evaluated in a co-culture system, the ability of bone-marrow MSCs to influence C2C12 myoblast behavior and analyzed the cross-talk between the two cell types at the cellular and molecular level. We found that myoblast proliferation was greatly enhanced in the co-culture as judged by time lapse videomicroscopy, cyclin A expression and EdU incorporation. Moreover, myoblasts immunomagnetically separated from MSCs after co-culture expressed higher mRNA and protein levels of Notch-1, a key determinant of myoblast activation and proliferation, as compared with the single culture. Notch-1 intracellular domain and nuclear localization of Hes-1, a Notch-1 target gene, were also increased in the co-culture. Interestingly, the myoblastic response was mainly dependent on the paracrine release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by MSCs. Indeed, the addition of MSC-derived conditioned medium (CM) to C2C12 cells yielded similar results as those observed in the co-culture and increased the phosphorylation and expression levels of VEGFR. The treatment with the selective pharmacological VEGFR inhibitor, KRN633, resulted in a marked attenuation of the receptor activation and concomitantly inhibited the effects of MSC-CM on C2C12 cell growth and Notch-1 signaling. In conclusion, this study provides novel evidence for a role of MSCs in stimulating myoblast cell proliferation and suggests that the functional interaction between the two cell types may be exploited for the development of new and more efficient cell-based skeletal muscle repair strategies. PMID:22815682

  14. Recent progress in satellite cell/myoblast engraftment – relevance for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Deborah; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2013-01-01

    There is currently no cure for muscular dystrophies, although several promising strategies are in basic and clinical research. One such strategy is cell transplantation with satellite cells (or their myoblast progeny) to repair damaged muscle and provide dystrophin protein with the aim of preventing subsequent myofibre degeneration and repopulating the stem cell niche for future use. The present review aims to cover recent advances in satellite cell/myoblast therapy and to discuss the challenges that remain for it to become a realistic therapy. PMID:23560812

  15. DRAGON, a GPI-anchored membrane protein, inhibits BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kanomata, Kazuhiro; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Nojima, Junya; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu

    2009-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce osteoblastic differentiation of myoblasts via binding to cell surface receptors. Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs) have been identified as BMP co-receptors. We report here that DRAGON/RGMb, a member of the RGM family, suppressed BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts via a novel mechanism. All RGMs were expressed in C2C12 cells that were differentiated into myocytes and osteoblastic cells, but RGMc was not detected in immature cells. In C2C12 cells, only DRAGON suppressed ALP and Id1 promoter activities induced by BMP-4 or by constitutively activated BMP type I receptors. This inhibition by DRAGON was dependent on the secretory form of the von Willbrand factor type D domain. DRAGON even suppressed BMP signaling induced by constitutively activated Smad1. Over-expression of neogenin did not alter the inhibitory capacity of DRAGON. Taken together, these findings indicate that DRAGON may be an inhibitor of BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts. We also suggest that a novel molecule(s) expressed on the cell membrane may mediate the signal transduction of DRAGON in order to suppress BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

  16. Electrotransfection and lipofection show comparable efficiency for in vitro gene delivery of primary human myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Mars, Tomaz; Strazisar, Marusa; Mis, Katarina; Kotnik, Nejc; Pegan, Katarina; Lojk, Jasna; Grubic, Zoran; Pavlin, Mojca

    2015-04-01

    Transfection of primary human myoblasts offers the possibility to study mechanisms that are important for muscle regeneration and gene therapy of muscle disease. Cultured human myoblasts were selected here because muscle cells still proliferate at this developmental stage, which might have several advantages in gene therapy. Gene therapy is one of the most sought-after tools in modern medicine. Its progress is, however, limited due to the lack of suitable gene transfer techniques. To obtain better insight into the transfection potential of the presently used techniques, two non-viral transfection methods--lipofection and electroporation--were compared. The parameters that can influence transfection efficiency and cell viability were systematically approached and compared. Cultured myoblasts were transfected with the pEGFP-N1 plasmid either using Lipofectamine 2000 or with electroporation. Various combinations for the preparation of the lipoplexes and the electroporation media, and for the pulsing protocols, were tested and compared. Transfection efficiency and cell viability were inversely proportional for both approaches. The appropriate ratio of Lipofectamine and plasmid DNA provides optimal conditions for lipofection, while for electroporation, RPMI medium and a pulsing protocol using eight pulses of 2 ms at E = 0.8 kV/cm proved to be the optimal combination. The transfection efficiencies for the optimal lipofection and optimal electrotransfection protocols were similar (32 vs. 32.5%, respectively). Both of these methods are effective for transfection of primary human myoblasts; however, electroporation might be advantageous for in vivo application to skeletal muscle.

  17. Structure–function analysis of myomaker domains required for myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Millay, Douglas P.; Gamage, Dilani G.; Quinn, Malgorzata E.; Min, Yi-Li; Mitani, Yasuyuki; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    During skeletal muscle development, myoblasts fuse to form multinucleated myofibers. Myomaker [Transmembrane protein 8c (TMEM8c)] is a muscle-specific protein that is essential for myoblast fusion and sufficient to promote fusion of fibroblasts with muscle cells; however, the structure and biochemical properties of this membrane protein have not been explored. Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis to disrupt myomaker expression in the C2C12 muscle cell line, which resulted in complete blockade to fusion. To define the functional domains of myomaker required to direct fusion, we established a heterologous cell–cell fusion system, in which fibroblasts expressing mutant versions of myomaker were mixed with WT myoblasts. Our data indicate that the majority of myomaker is embedded in the plasma membrane with seven membrane-spanning regions and a required intracellular C-terminal tail. We show that myomaker function is conserved in other mammalian orthologs; however, related family members (TMEM8a and TMEM8b) do not exhibit fusogenic activity. These findings represent an important step toward deciphering the cellular components and mechanisms that control myoblast fusion and muscle formation. PMID:26858401

  18. Surface apposition and multiple cell contacts promote myoblast fusion in Drosophila flight muscles.

    PubMed

    Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Segal, Dagan; Shimoni, Eyal; Shinder, Vera; Shilo, Ben-Zion; VijayRaghavan, K; Schejter, Eyal D

    2015-10-12

    Fusion of individual myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers constitutes a widely conserved program for growth of the somatic musculature. We have used electron microscopy methods to study this key form of cell-cell fusion during development of the indirect flight muscles (IFMs) of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that IFM myoblast-myotube fusion proceeds in a stepwise fashion and is governed by apparent cross talk between transmembrane and cytoskeletal elements. Our analysis suggests that cell adhesion is necessary for bringing myoblasts to within a minimal distance from the myotubes. The branched actin polymerization machinery acts subsequently to promote tight apposition between the surfaces of the two cell types and formation of multiple sites of cell-cell contact, giving rise to nascent fusion pores whose expansion establishes full cytoplasmic continuity. Given the conserved features of IFM myogenesis, this sequence of cell interactions and membrane events and the mechanistic significance of cell adhesion elements and the actin-based cytoskeleton are likely to represent general principles of the myoblast fusion process.

  19. Long-term evaluation of myoblast seeded patches implanted on infarcted rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Marie-Noëlle; Flueckiger, Remy; Cook, Stéphane; Ayuni, Erick; Siepe, Matthias; Carrel, Thierry; Tevaearai, Hendrik

    2010-06-01

    Cell transplantation presents great potential for treatment of patients with severe heart failure. However, its clinical application was revealed to be more challenging than initially expected in experimental studies. Further investigations need to be undertaken to define the optimal treatment conditions. We previously reported on the epicardial implantation of a bio-engineered construct of skeletal myoblast-seeded polyurethane and its preventive effect on progression toward heart failure. In the present study, we present a long-term evaluation of this functional outcome. Left anterior descending coronary ligation was performed in female Lewis rats. Two weeks later, animals were treated with either epicardial implantation of biograft, acellular scaffold, sham operation, or direct intramyocardial skeletal myoblast injection. Functional assessments were performed with serial echocardiographies every 3 months and end point left ventricle pressure was assessed. Hearts were then harvested for histological examinations. Myocardial infarction induced a slow and progressive reduction in fractional shortening after 3 months. Progression toward heart failure was significantly prevented for up to 6 months after injection of myoblasts and for up to 9 months following biograft implantation. Nevertheless, this effect vanished after 12 months, with immunohistological examinations revealing an absence of the transplanted myoblasts within the scaffold. We demonstrated that tissue therapy is superior to cell therapy for stabilization of heart function. However, beneficial effects are transient.

  20. Leucine and isoleucine reduce protein degradation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myoblast cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myogenic precursor cells were isolated from rainbow trout skeletal muscle and incubated in media containing 10% fetal bovine serum for 7 days, thereby differentiating into myoblasts. Rates of protein degradation were determined in response to minimal essential media (MEM) of various amino acid (AA)...

  1. HACD1, a regulator of membrane composition and fluidity, promotes myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Blondelle, Jordan; Ohno, Yusuke; Gache, Vincent; Guyot, Stéphane; Storck, Sébastien; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Barthélémy, Inès; Walmsley, Gemma; Rahier, Anaëlle; Gadin, Stéphanie; Maurer, Marie; Guillaud, Laurent; Prola, Alexandre; Ferry, Arnaud; Aubin-Houzelstein, Geneviève; Demarquoy, Jean; Relaix, Frédéric; Piercy, Richard J; Blot, Stéphane; Kihara, Akio; Tiret, Laurent; Pilot-Storck, Fanny

    2015-10-01

    The reduced diameter of skeletal myofibres is a hallmark of several congenital myopathies, yet the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we investigate the role of HACD1/PTPLA, which is involved in the elongation of the very long chain fatty acids, in muscle fibre formation. In humans and dogs, HACD1 deficiency leads to a congenital myopathy with fibre size disproportion associated with a generalized muscle weakness. Through analysis of HACD1-deficient Labradors, Hacd1-knockout mice, and Hacd1-deficient myoblasts, we provide evidence that HACD1 promotes myoblast fusion during muscle development and regeneration. We further demonstrate that in normal differentiating myoblasts, expression of the catalytically active HACD1 isoform, which is encoded by a muscle-enriched splice variant, yields decreased lysophosphatidylcholine content, a potent inhibitor of myoblast fusion, and increased concentrations of ≥ C18 and monounsaturated fatty acids of phospholipids. These lipid modifications correlate with a reduction in plasma membrane rigidity. In conclusion, we propose that fusion impairment constitutes a novel, non-exclusive pathological mechanism operating in congenital myopathies and reveal that HACD1 is a key regulator of a lipid-dependent muscle fibre growth mechanism. PMID:26160855

  2. Aphidicolin-resistant polyomavirus and subgenomic cellular DNA synthesis occur early in the differentiation of cultured myoblasts to myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    DePolo, N J; Villarreal, L P

    1993-01-01

    Small DNA viruses have been historically used as probes of cellular control mechanisms of DNA replication, gene expression, and differentiation. Polyomavirus (Py) DNA replication is known to be linked to differentiation of may cells, including myoblasts. In this report, we use this linkage in myoblasts to simultaneously examine (i) cellular differentiation control of Py DNA replication and (ii) an unusual type of cellular and Py DNA synthesis during differentiation. Early proposals that DNA synthesis was involved in the induced differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes were apparently disproved by reliance on inhibitors of DNA synthesis (cytosine arabinoside and aphidicolin), which indicated that mitosis and DNA replication are not necessary for differentiation. Theoretical problems with the accessibility of inactive chromatin to trans-acting factors led us to reexamine possible involvement of DNA replication in myoblast differentiation. We show here that Py undergoes novel aphidicolin-resistant net DNA synthesis under specific conditions early in induced differentiation of myoblasts (following delayed aphidicolin addition). Under similar conditions, we also examined uninfected myoblast DNA synthesis, and we show that soon after differentiation induction, a period of aphidicolin-resistant cellular DNA synthesis can also be observed. This drug-resistant DNA synthesis appears to be subgenomic, not contributing to mitosis, and more representative of polyadenylated than of nonpolyadenylated RNA. These results renew the possibility that DNA synthesis plays a role in myoblast differentiation and suggest that the linkage of Py DNA synthesis to differentiation may involve a qualitative cellular alteration in Py DNA replication. Images PMID:8389922

  3. Myostatin acts as an autocrine/paracrine negative regulator in myoblast differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Kishida, Tsunao; Ejima, Akika; Gojo, Satoshi; Mazda, Osam

    2013-02-01

    Myostatin, also known as growth differentiation factor (GDF-8), regulates proliferation of muscle satellite cells, and suppresses differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes via down-regulation of key myogenic differentiation factors including MyoD. Recent advances in stem cell biology have enabled generation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells, but it remains to be clarified whether myostatin is also involved in regulation of artificial differentiation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells. Here we show that the human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells that were induced to differentiate into myoblasts expressed myostatin and its receptor during the differentiation. An addition of recombinant human myostatin (rhMyostatin) suppressed induction of MyoD and Myo5a, resulting in significant suppression of myoblast differentiation. The rhMyostatin treatment also inhibited proliferation of the cells at a later phase of differentiation. RNAi-mediated silencing of myostatin promoted differentiation of human iPS-derived embryoid body (EB) cells into myoblasts. These results strongly suggest that myostatin plays an important role in regulation of myoblast differentiation from iPS cells of human origin. The present findings also have significant implications for potential regenerative medicine for muscular diseases. PMID:23291166

  4. Cell death-resistance of differentiated myotubes is associated with enhanced anti-apoptotic mechanisms compared to myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rijin; Ferry, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is associated with elevated apoptosis while muscle differentiation results in apoptosis resistance, indicating that the role of apoptosis in skeletal muscle is multifaceted. The objective of this study was to investigate mechanisms underlying apoptosis susceptibility in proliferating myoblasts compared to differentiated myotubes and we hypothesized that cell death-resistance in differentiated myotubes is mediated by enhanced anti-apoptotic pathways. C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes were treated with H2O2 or staurosporine (Stsp) to induce cell death. H2O2 and Stsp induced DNA fragmentation in more than 50% of myoblasts, but in myotubes less than 10% of nuclei showed apoptotic changes. Mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation was detected with H2O2 and Stsp in myoblasts, while this response was greatly diminished in myotubes. Caspase-3 activity was 10-fold higher in myotubes compared to myoblasts, and Stsp caused a significant caspase-3 induction in both. However, exposure to H2O2 did not lead to caspase-3 activation in myoblasts, and only to a modest induction in myotubes. A similar response was observed for caspase-2, -8 and -9. Abundance of caspase-inhibitors (apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), and heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and -25 was significantly higher in myotubes compared to myoblasts, and in addition ARC was suppressed in response to Stsp in myotubes. Moreover, increased expression of HSPs in myoblasts attenuated cell death in response to H2O2 and Stsp. Protein abundance of the pro-apoptotic protein endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was higher in myotubes compared to myoblasts. These results show that resistance to apoptosis in myotubes is increased despite high levels of pro-apoptotic signaling mechanisms, and we suggest that this protective effect is mediated by enhanced anti-caspase mechanisms. PMID:21161388

  5. TIPS to manipulate myogenesis: retention of myoblast differentiation capacity using microsphere culture.

    PubMed

    Parmar, N; Day, R M

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is an emerging option for regenerating skeletal muscle. Improved delivery methods for anchorage-dependent myoblasts are likely to improve integration and function of transplanted muscle cells. Highly porous microspheres, produced using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS), have features ideally suited for minimally invasive cell delivery. The purpose of this study was to investigate, for the first time, the use of TIPS microspheres as highly porous microcarriers for manipulation of human skeletal muscle myoblasts (HSMM) under defined culture conditions. HSMM cells readily attached to the surface of poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) TIPS microcarriers, where they were induced to continue proliferating or to be driven towards differentiation whilst under static-dynamic culture conditions for 7 days. Switching from proliferation medium to differentiation medium for 7 days, resulted in increased protein expression of skeletal muscle cell contractile apparatus components, MyoD and skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain, compared with cells cultured on conventional culture plasticware for the same duration (p < 0.001). Growth of myoblasts on the surface of the microcarriers and their migration following simulated delivery, caused no change to the proliferative capacity of cells over 7 days. Results from this study demonstrate that TIPS microspheres provide an ideal vehicle for the expansion and delivery of myoblasts for therapeutic applications. Transplantation of myoblasts anchored to a substrate, rather than in suspension, will reduce the amount of ex vivo manipulation required during preparation of the product and allows cells to be delivered in a more natural state. This will improve the ability to control cell dosage and increase the likelihood of efficacy.

  6. An Integrated Strategy for Analyzing the Unique Developmental Programs of Different Myoblast Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Michaud, Sebastien; Raj, Lakshmi; Busser, Brian W; Halfon, Marc S; Church, George M; Michelson, Alan M

    2006-01-01

    An important but largely unmet challenge in understanding the mechanisms that govern the formation of specific organs is to decipher the complex and dynamic genetic programs exhibited by the diversity of cell types within the tissue of interest. Here, we use an integrated genetic, genomic, and computational strategy to comprehensively determine the molecular identities of distinct myoblast subpopulations within the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm at the time that cell fates are initially specified. A compendium of gene expression profiles was generated for primary mesodermal cells purified by flow cytometry from appropriately staged wild-type embryos and from 12 genotypes in which myogenesis was selectively and predictably perturbed. A statistical meta-analysis of these pooled datasets—based on expected trends in gene expression and on the relative contribution of each genotype to the detection of known muscle genes—provisionally assigned hundreds of differentially expressed genes to particular myoblast subtypes. Whole embryo in situ hybridizations were then used to validate the majority of these predictions, thereby enabling true-positive detection rates to be estimated for the microarray data. This combined analysis reveals that myoblasts exhibit much greater gene expression heterogeneity and overall complexity than was previously appreciated. Moreover, it implicates the involvement of large numbers of uncharacterized, differentially expressed genes in myogenic specification and subsequent morphogenesis. These findings also underscore a requirement for considerable regulatory specificity for generating diverse myoblast identities. Finally, to illustrate how the developmental functions of newly identified myoblast genes can be efficiently surveyed, a rapid RNA interference assay that can be scored in living embryos was developed and applied to selected genes. This integrated strategy for examining embryonic gene expression and function provides a substantially

  7. ADP-Ribosylation Factor 6 Regulates Mammalian Myoblast Fusion through Phospholipase D1 and Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Enjalbert, Sandrine; Comunale, Franck; Bodin, Stéphane; Vitale, Nicolas; Charrasse, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is an essential step during myoblast differentiation that remains poorly understood. M-cadherin–dependent pathways that signal through Rac1 GTPase activation via the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Trio are important for myoblast fusion. The ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)6 GTPase has been shown to bind to Trio and to regulate Rac1 activity. Moreover, Loner/GEP100/BRAG2, a GEF of ARF6, has been involved in mammalian and Drosophila myoblast fusion, but the specific role of ARF6 has been not fully analyzed. Here, we show that ARF6 activity is increased at the time of myoblast fusion and is required for its implementation in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Specifically, at the onset of myoblast fusion, ARF6 is associated with the multiproteic complex that contains M-cadherin, Trio, and Rac1 and accumulates at sites of myoblast fusion. ARF6 silencing inhibits the association of Trio and Rac1 with M-cadherin. Moreover, we demonstrate that ARF6 regulates myoblast fusion through phospholipase D (PLD) activation and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate production. Together, these data indicate that ARF6 is a critical regulator of C2C12 myoblast fusion and participates in the regulation of PLD activities that trigger both phospholipids production and actin cytoskeleton reorganization at fusion sites. PMID:20505075

  8. Proteomic Analysis of C2C12 Myoblast and Myotube Exosome-Like Vesicles: A New Paradigm for Myoblast-Myotube Cross Talk?

    PubMed Central

    Forterre, Alexis; Jalabert, Audrey; Chikh, Karim; Errazuriz, Elisabeth; De Larichaudy, Joffrey; Chanon, Stéphanie; Weiss-Gayet, Michèle; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Record, Michel; Geloen, Alain; Lefai, Etienne; Vidal, Hubert; Couté, Yohann; Rome, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized microvesicles formed in multivesicular bodies (MVBs) during endosome maturation. Exosomes are released from cells into the microenvironment following fusion of MVBs with the plasma membrane. During the last decade, skeletal muscle-secreted proteins have been identified with important roles in intercellular communications. To investigate whether muscle-derived exosomes participate in this molecular dialog, we determined and compared the protein contents of the exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) released from C2C12 murine myoblasts during proliferation (ELV-MB), and after differentiation into myotubes (ELV-MT). Using a proteomic approach combined with electron microscopy, western-blot and bioinformatic analyses, we compared the protein repertoires within ELV-MB and ELV-MT. We found that these vesicles displayed the classical properties of exosomes isolated from other cell types containing components of the ESCRT machinery of the MVBs, as well as numerous tetraspanins. Specific muscle proteins were also identified confirming that ELV composition also reflects their muscle origin. Furthermore quantitative analysis revealed stage-preferred expression of 31 and 78 proteins in ELV-MB and ELV-MT respectively. We found that myotube-secreted ELVs, but not ELV-MB, reduced myoblast proliferation and induced differentiation, through, respectively, the down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and the up-regulation of myogenin. We also present evidence that proteins from ELV-MT can be incorporated into myoblasts by using the GFP protein as cargo within ELV-MT. Taken together, our data provide a useful database of proteins from C2C12-released ELVs throughout myogenesis and reveals the importance of exosome-like vesicles in skeletal muscle biology. PMID:24392111

  9. Kras activation in p53-deficient myoblasts results in high-grade sarcoma formation with impaired myogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Timothy; Venier, Rosemarie; Dickson, Brendan C.; Kabaroff, Leah; Alkema, Manon; Chen, Li; Shern, Jack F.; Yohe, Marielle E.; Khan, Javed; Gladdy, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    While genomic studies have improved our ability to classify sarcomas, the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation and progression of many sarcoma subtypes are unknown. To better understand developmental origins and genetic drivers involved in rhabdomyosarcomagenesis, we describe a novel sarcoma model system employing primary murine p53-deficient myoblasts that were isolated and lentivirally transduced with KrasG12D. Myoblast cell lines were characterized and subjected to proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and differentiation assays to assess the effects of transgenic KrasG12D expression. KrasG12D overexpression transformed p53−/− myoblasts as demonstrated by an increased anchorage-independent growth. Induction of differentiation in parental myoblasts resulted in activation of key myogenic regulators. In contrast, Kras-transduced myoblasts had impaired terminal differentiation. p53−/− myoblasts transformed by KrasG12D overexpression resulted in rapid, reproducible tumor formation following orthotopic injection into syngeneic host hindlimbs. Pathological analysis revealed high-grade sarcomas with myogenic differentiation based on the expression of muscle-specific markers, such as Myod1 and Myog. Gene expression patterns of murine sarcomas shared biological pathways with RMS gene sets as determined by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and were 61% similar to human RMS as determined by metagene analysis. Thus, our novel model system is an effective means to model high-grade sarcomas along the RMS spectrum. PMID:25992772

  10. Biomarker-free dielectrophoretic sorting of differentiating myoblast multipotent progenitor cells and their membrane analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Massimo; Srsen, Vlastimil; Waterfall, Martin; Downes, Andrew; Pethig, Ronald

    2012-09-01

    Myoblasts are muscle derived mesenchymal stem cell progenitors that have great potential for use in regenerative medicine, especially for cardiomyogenesis grafts and intracardiac cell transplantation. To utilise such cells for pre-clinical and clinical applications, and especially for personalized medicine, it is essential to generate a synchronised, homogenous, population of cells that display phenotypic and genotypic homogeneity within a population of cells. We demonstrate that the biomarker-free technique of dielectrophoresis (DEP) can be used to discriminate cells between stages of differentiation in the C2C12 myoblast multipotent mouse model. Terminally differentiated myotubes were separated from C2C12 myoblasts to better than 96% purity, a result validated by flow cytometry and Western blotting. To determine the extent to which cell membrane capacitance, rather than cell size, determined the DEP response of a cell, C2C12 myoblasts were co-cultured with GFP-expressing MRC-5 fibroblasts of comparable size distributions (mean diameter ∼10 μm). A DEP sorting efficiency greater than 98% was achieved for these two cell types, a result concluded to arise from the fibroblasts possessing a larger membrane capacitance than the myoblasts. It is currently assumed that differences in membrane capacitance primarily reflect differences in the extent of folding or surface features of the membrane. However, our finding by Raman spectroscopy that the fibroblast membranes contained a smaller proportion of saturated lipids than those of the myoblasts suggests that the membrane chemistry should also be taken into account. PMID:23940503

  11. Biomarker-free dielectrophoretic sorting of differentiating myoblast multipotent progenitor cells and their membrane analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Massimo; Srsen, Vlastimil; Waterfall, Martin; Downes, Andrew; Pethig, Ronald

    2012-09-01

    Myoblasts are muscle derived mesenchymal stem cell progenitors that have great potential for use in regenerative medicine, especially for cardiomyogenesis grafts and intracardiac cell transplantation. To utilise such cells for pre-clinical and clinical applications, and especially for personalized medicine, it is essential to generate a synchronised, homogenous, population of cells that display phenotypic and genotypic homogeneity within a population of cells. We demonstrate that the biomarker-free technique of dielectrophoresis (DEP) can be used to discriminate cells between stages of differentiation in the C2C12 myoblast multipotent mouse model. Terminally differentiated myotubes were separated from C2C12 myoblasts to better than 96% purity, a result validated by flow cytometry and Western blotting. To determine the extent to which cell membrane capacitance, rather than cell size, determined the DEP response of a cell, C2C12 myoblasts were co-cultured with GFP-expressing MRC-5 fibroblasts of comparable size distributions (mean diameter ∼10 μm). A DEP sorting efficiency greater than 98% was achieved for these two cell types, a result concluded to arise from the fibroblasts possessing a larger membrane capacitance than the myoblasts. It is currently assumed that differences in membrane capacitance primarily reflect differences in the extent of folding or surface features of the membrane. However, our finding by Raman spectroscopy that the fibroblast membranes contained a smaller proportion of saturated lipids than those of the myoblasts suggests that the membrane chemistry should also be taken into account.

  12. A surgical robot with a heart-surface-motion synchronization mechanism for myoblast cell sheet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kangyi; Nakamura, Ryoichi

    2013-01-01

    Myoblast cell sheets are employed in the clinical treatment of heart disorders. We propose a surgical robot system with two endoscopic cameras, characterized by a double remote center of motion (RCM) mechanism, to realize heart-surface-motion synchronization movement for myoblast cell sheet transplantation on a beating heart surface. A robot system with the double RCM mechanism was developed for which the linear and rotation motions are totally isolated, and an experiment was conducted to evaluate the tracking accuracy of the robot system when tracking a randomly moving target. The tracking data were updated with a Polaris system at 30 Hz. The experiment results showed linear and rotation tracking errors of 4.93 ± 5.92 mm and 2.54 ± 5.44°, respectively.

  13. Genomic-wide transcriptional profiling in primary myoblasts reveals Runx1-regulated genes in muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Umansky, Kfir Baruch; Feldmesser, Ester; Groner, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    In response to muscle damage the muscle adult stem cells are activated and differentiate into myoblasts that regenerate the damaged tissue. We have recently showed that following myopathic damage the level of the Runx1 transcription factor (TF) is elevated and that during muscle regeneration this TF regulates the balance between myoblast proliferation and differentiation (Umansky et al.). We employed Runx1-dependent gene expression, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), Assay for Transposase-Accessible Chromatin with high-throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) and histone H3K4me1/H3K27ac modification analyses to identify a subset of Runx1-regulated genes that are co-occupied by the TFs MyoD and c-Jun and are involved in muscle regeneration (Umansky et al.). The data is available at the GEO database under the superseries accession number GSE56131. PMID:26697350

  14. The Formin Diaphanous Regulates Myoblast Fusion through Actin Polymerization and Arp2/3 Regulation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Su; Bothe, Ingo; Baylies, Mary K

    2015-08-01

    The formation of multinucleated muscle cells through cell-cell fusion is a conserved process from fruit flies to humans. Numerous studies have shown the importance of Arp2/3, its regulators, and branched actin for the formation of an actin structure, the F-actin focus, at the fusion site. This F-actin focus forms the core of an invasive podosome-like structure that is required for myoblast fusion. In this study, we find that the formin Diaphanous (Dia), which nucleates and facilitates the elongation of actin filaments, is essential for Drosophila myoblast fusion. Following cell recognition and adhesion, Dia is enriched at the myoblast fusion site, concomitant with, and having the same dynamics as, the F-actin focus. Through analysis of Dia loss-of-function conditions using mutant alleles but particularly a dominant negative Dia transgene, we demonstrate that reduction in Dia activity in myoblasts leads to a fusion block. Significantly, no actin focus is detected, and neither branched actin regulators, SCAR or WASp, accumulate at the fusion site when Dia levels are reduced. Expression of constitutively active Dia also causes a fusion block that is associated with an increase in highly dynamic filopodia, altered actin turnover rates and F-actin distribution, and mislocalization of SCAR and WASp at the fusion site. Together our data indicate that Dia plays two roles during invasive podosome formation at the fusion site: it dictates the level of linear F-actin polymerization, and it is required for appropriate branched actin polymerization via localization of SCAR and WASp. These studies provide new insight to the mechanisms of cell-cell fusion, the relationship between different regulators of actin polymerization, and invasive podosome formation that occurs in normal development and in disease.

  15. Low-level infrared laser modulates muscle repair and chromosome stabilization genes in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa Alexsandra; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; da Silva, Camila Luna; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-08-01

    Infrared laser therapy is used for skeletal muscle repair based on its biostimulative effect on satellite cells. However, shortening of telomere length limits regenerative potential in satellite cells, which occurs after each cell division cycle. Also, laser therapy could be more effective on non-physiologic tissues. This study evaluated low-level infrared laser exposure effects on mRNA expression from muscle injury repair and telomere stabilization genes in myoblasts in normal and stressful conditions. Laser fluences were those used in clinical protocols. C2C12 myoblast cultures were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) in standard or normal (10 %) and reduced (2 %) fetal bovine serum concentrations; total RNA was extracted for mRNA expression evaluation from muscle injury repair (MyoD and Pax7) and chromosome stabilization (TRF1 and TRF2) genes by real time quantitative polymerization chain reaction. Data show that low-level infrared laser increases the expression of MyoD and Pax7 in 10 J/cm(2) fluence, TRF1 expression in all fluences, and TRF2 expression in 70 J/cm(2) fluence in both 10 and 2 % fetal bovine serum. Low-level infrared laser increases mRNA expression from genes related to muscle repair and telomere stabilization in myoblasts in standard or normal and stressful conditions.

  16. MicroRNA-16 modulates macrophage polarization leading to improved insulin sensitivity in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Talari, Malathi; Kapadia, Bandish; Kain, Vasundhara; Seshadri, Sriram; Prajapati, Bhumika; Rajput, Parth; Misra, Parimal; Parsa, Kishore V L

    2015-12-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation leads to several diseases such as insulin resistance, T2D and several types of cancers. The functional role of microRNAs in inflammation induced insulin resistance is poorly studied. MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulatory molecules which mediate diverse biological processes. We here show that miR-16 expression levels are down-regulated in different inflammatory conditions such as LPS/IFNγ or palmitate treated macrophages, palmitate exposed myoblasts and insulin responsive tissues of high sucrose diet induced insulin resistant rats. Importantly, forced expression of miR-16 in macrophages impaired the production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-β leading to enhanced insulin stimulated glucose uptake in co-cultured skeletal myoblasts. Further, ectopic expression of miR-16 enhanced insulin stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal myoblasts via the up-regulation of GLUT4 and MEF2A, two key players involved in insulin stimulated glucose uptake. Collectively, our data highlight the important role of miR-16 in ameliorating inflammation induced insulin resistance. PMID:26453808

  17. Dynamin and endocytosis are required for the fusion of osteoclasts and myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Nah-Young; Choi, Hyewon; Neff, Lynn; Wu, Yumei; Saito, Hiroaki; Ferguson, Shawn M.; De Camilli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Cell–cell fusion is an evolutionarily conserved process that leads to the formation of multinucleated myofibers, syncytiotrophoblasts and osteoclasts, allowing their respective functions. Although cell–cell fusion requires the presence of fusogenic membrane proteins and actin-dependent cytoskeletal reorganization, the precise machinery allowing cells to fuse is still poorly understood. Using an inducible knockout mouse model to generate dynamin 1– and 2–deficient primary osteoclast precursors and myoblasts, we found that fusion of both cell types requires dynamin. Osteoclast and myoblast cell–cell fusion involves the formation of actin-rich protrusions closely associated with clathrin-mediated endocytosis in the apposed cell. Furthermore, impairing endocytosis independently of dynamin also prevented cell–cell fusion. Since dynamin is involved in both the formation of actin-rich structures and in endocytosis, our results indicate that dynamin function is central to the osteoclast precursors and myoblasts fusion process, and point to an important role of endocytosis in cell–cell fusion. PMID:25287300

  18. Hes6 is required for actin cytoskeletal organization in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Caroline M.P.; Domaschenz, Renae; Amagase, Yoko; Dunham, Ian; Murai, Kasumi; Jones, Philip H.

    2011-07-01

    Hes6 is a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors that regulate proliferating cell fate in development and is known to be expressed in developing muscle. Here we investigate its function in myogenesis in vitro. We show that Hes6 is a direct transcriptional target of the myogenic transcription factors MyoD and Myf5, indicating that it is integral to the myogenic transcriptional program. The localization of Hes6 protein changes during differentiation, becoming predominantly nuclear. Knockdown of Hes6 mRNA levels by siRNA has no effect on cell cycle exit or induction of myosin heavy chain expression in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts, but F-actin filament formation is disrupted and both cell motility and myoblast fusion are reduced. The knockdown phenotype is rescued by expression of Hes6 cDNA resistant to siRNA. These results define a novel role for Hes6 in actin cytoskeletal dynamics in post mitotic myoblasts.

  19. Rab35 regulates cadherin-mediated adherens junction formation and myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Charrasse, Sophie; Comunale, Franck; De Rossi, Sylvain; Echard, Arnaud; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cadherins are homophilic cell–cell adhesion molecules implicated in many fundamental processes, such as morphogenesis, cell growth, and differentiation. They accumulate at cell–cell contact sites and assemble into large macromolecular complexes named adherens junctions (AJs). Cadherin targeting and function are regulated by various cellular processes, many players of which remain to be uncovered. Here we identify the small GTPase Rab35 as a new regulator of cadherin trafficking and stabilization at cell–cell contacts in C2C12 myoblasts and HeLa cells. We find that Rab35 accumulates at cell–cell contacts in a cadherin-dependent manner. Knockdown of Rab35 or expression of a dominant-negative form of Rab35 impaired N- and M-cadherin recruitment to cell–cell contacts, their stabilization at the plasma membrane, and association with p120 catenin and led to their accumulation in transferrin-, clathrin-, and AP-2–positive intracellular vesicles. We also find that Rab35 function is required for PIP5KIγ accumulation at cell–cell contacts and phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate production, which is involved in cadherin stabilization at contact sites. Finally, we show that Rab35 regulates myoblast fusion, a major cellular process under the control of cadherin-dependent signaling. Taken together, these results reveal that Rab35 regulates cadherin-dependent AJ formation and myoblast fusion. PMID:23197472

  20. Surface apposition and multiple cell contacts promote myoblast fusion in Drosophila flight muscles

    PubMed Central

    Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Segal, Dagan; Shimoni, Eyal; Shinder, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of individual myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers constitutes a widely conserved program for growth of the somatic musculature. We have used electron microscopy methods to study this key form of cell–cell fusion during development of the indirect flight muscles (IFMs) of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that IFM myoblast–myotube fusion proceeds in a stepwise fashion and is governed by apparent cross talk between transmembrane and cytoskeletal elements. Our analysis suggests that cell adhesion is necessary for bringing myoblasts to within a minimal distance from the myotubes. The branched actin polymerization machinery acts subsequently to promote tight apposition between the surfaces of the two cell types and formation of multiple sites of cell–cell contact, giving rise to nascent fusion pores whose expansion establishes full cytoplasmic continuity. Given the conserved features of IFM myogenesis, this sequence of cell interactions and membrane events and the mechanistic significance of cell adhesion elements and the actin-based cytoskeleton are likely to represent general principles of the myoblast fusion process. PMID:26459604

  1. Inhibition of Na{sup +} channel currents in rat myoblasts by 4-aminopyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Boxun; Liu Linyun; Liao Lei; Zhang Zhihong; Mei Yanai . E-mail: yamei@fudan.edu.cn

    2005-09-15

    Our previous study revealed that 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a specific blocker of A-type current, could also inhibit inward Na{sup +} currents (I {sub Na}) with a state-independent mechanism in rat cerebellar granule cells. In the present study, we report an inhibitory effect of 4-AP on voltage-gated and tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive I {sub Na} recorded from cultured rat myoblasts. 4-AP inhibited I {sub Na} amplitude in a dose-dependent manner between the concentrations of 0.5 and 10 mM without significant alteration in the activation or inactivation kinetics of the channel. By comparison to the 4-AP-induced inhibitory effect on cerebellum neurons, the inhibitory effect on myoblasts was enhanced through repetitive pulse and inflected by changing frequency. Specifically, the lower the frequency of pulse, the higher the inhibition observed, suggesting that block manner is inversely use-dependent. Moreover, experiments adding 4-AP to the intracellular solution indicate that the inhibitory effects are localized inside the cell. Additionally, 4-AP significantly modifies the properties of steady-state activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel. Our data suggest that the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-AP inhibits both neuron and myoblast Na{sup +} channels via different mechanisms. These findings may also provide information regarding 4-AP-induced pharmacological and toxicological effects in clinical use and experimental research.

  2. Low-level infrared laser modulates muscle repair and chromosome stabilization genes in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa Alexsandra; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; da Silva, Camila Luna; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-08-01

    Infrared laser therapy is used for skeletal muscle repair based on its biostimulative effect on satellite cells. However, shortening of telomere length limits regenerative potential in satellite cells, which occurs after each cell division cycle. Also, laser therapy could be more effective on non-physiologic tissues. This study evaluated low-level infrared laser exposure effects on mRNA expression from muscle injury repair and telomere stabilization genes in myoblasts in normal and stressful conditions. Laser fluences were those used in clinical protocols. C2C12 myoblast cultures were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) in standard or normal (10 %) and reduced (2 %) fetal bovine serum concentrations; total RNA was extracted for mRNA expression evaluation from muscle injury repair (MyoD and Pax7) and chromosome stabilization (TRF1 and TRF2) genes by real time quantitative polymerization chain reaction. Data show that low-level infrared laser increases the expression of MyoD and Pax7 in 10 J/cm(2) fluence, TRF1 expression in all fluences, and TRF2 expression in 70 J/cm(2) fluence in both 10 and 2 % fetal bovine serum. Low-level infrared laser increases mRNA expression from genes related to muscle repair and telomere stabilization in myoblasts in standard or normal and stressful conditions. PMID:27220530

  3. The Mutual Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Myoblasts in an Autologous Co-Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanska, Izabela; Zarychta-Wisniewska, Weronika; Pajak, Beata; Bojarczuk, Kamil; Dybowski, Bartosz; Paczek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Both myoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) take part in the muscle tissue regeneration and have been used as experimental cellular therapy in muscular disorders treatment. It is possible that co-transplantation approach could improve the efficacy of this treatment. However, the relations between those two cell types are not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to determine the reciprocal interactions between myoblasts and MSC in vitro in terms of the features important for the muscle regeneration process. Primary caprine muscle-derived cells (MDC) and bone marrow-derived MSC were analysed in autologous settings. We found that MSC contribute to myotubes formation by fusion with MDC when co-cultured directly, but do not acquire myogenic phenotype if exposed to MDC-derived soluble factors only. Experiments with exposure to hydrogen peroxide showed that MSC are significantly more resistant to oxidative stress than MDC, but a direct co-culture with MSC does not diminish the cytotoxic effect of H2O2 on MDC. Cell migration assay demonstrated that MSC possess significantly greater migration ability than MDC which is further enhanced by MDC-derived soluble factors, whereas the opposite effect was not found. MSC-derived soluble factors significantly enhanced the proliferation of MDC, whereas MDC inhibited the division rate of MSC. To conclude, presented results suggest that myogenic precursors and MSC support each other during muscle regeneration and therefore myoblasts-MSC co-transplantation could be an attractive approach in the treatment of muscular disorders. PMID:27551730

  4. Mitophagy is required for mitochondrial biogenesis and myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Jon; Andres, Allen M.; Taylor, David J. R.; Weston, Thomas; Hiraumi, Yoshimi; Stotland, Aleksandr; Kim, Brandon J.; Huang, Chengqun; Doran, Kelly S.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myogenesis is a crucial process governing skeletal muscle development and homeostasis. Differentiation of primitive myoblasts into mature myotubes requires a metabolic switch to support the increased energetic demand of contractile muscle. Skeletal myoblasts specifically shift from a highly glycolytic state to relying predominantly on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) upon differentiation. We have found that this phenomenon requires dramatic remodeling of the mitochondrial network involving both mitochondrial clearance and biogenesis. During early myogenic differentiation, autophagy is robustly upregulated and this coincides with DNM1L/DRP1 (dynamin 1-like)-mediated fragmentation and subsequent removal of mitochondria via SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1)-mediated mitophagy. Mitochondria are then repopulated via PPARGC1A/PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha)-mediated biogenesis. Mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1 (optic atrophy 1 [autosomal dominant]) is then briskly upregulated, resulting in the reformation of mitochondrial networks. The final product is a myotube replete with new mitochondria. Respirometry reveals that the constituents of these newly established mitochondrial networks are better primed for OXPHOS and are more tightly coupled than those in myoblasts. Additionally, we have found that suppressing autophagy with various inhibitors during differentiation interferes with myogenic differentiation. Together these data highlight the integral role of autophagy and mitophagy in myogenic differentiation. PMID:26566717

  5. Differential Cooperation between Heterochromatin Protein HP1 Isoforms and MyoD in Myoblasts*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yahi, Hakima; Fritsch, Lauriane; Philipot, Ophelie; Guasconi, Valentina; Souidi, Mouloud; Robin, Philippe; Polesskaya, Anna; Losson, Regine; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms of transcriptional repression are important during cell differentiation. Mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 isoforms HP1α, HP1β, and HP1γ play important roles in the regulation of chromatin structure and function. We explored the possibility of different roles for the three HP1 isoforms in an integrated system, skeletal muscle terminal differentiation. In this system, terminal differentiation is initiated by the transcription factor MyoD, whose target genes remain mainly silent until myoblasts are induced to differentiate. Here we show that HP1α and HP1β isoforms, but not HP1γ, interact with MyoD in myoblasts. This interaction is direct, as shown using recombinant proteins in vitro. A gene reporter assay revealed that HP1α and HP1β, but not HP1γ, inhibit MyoD transcriptional activity, suggesting a model in which MyoD could serve as a bridge between nucleosomes and chromatin-binding proteins such as HDACs and HP1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show a preferential recruitment of HP1 proteins on MyoD target genes in proliferating myoblasts. Finally, modulation of HP1 protein level impairs MyoD target gene expression and muscle terminal differentiation. Together, our data show a nonconventional interaction between HP1 and a tissue-specific transcription factor, MyoD. In addition, they strongly suggest that HP1 isoforms play important roles during muscle terminal differentiation in an isoform-dependent manner. PMID:18599480

  6. The Mutual Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Myoblasts in an Autologous Co-Culture Model.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Agnieszka; Burdzinska, Anna; Szczepanska, Izabela; Zarychta-Wisniewska, Weronika; Pajak, Beata; Bojarczuk, Kamil; Dybowski, Bartosz; Paczek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Both myoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) take part in the muscle tissue regeneration and have been used as experimental cellular therapy in muscular disorders treatment. It is possible that co-transplantation approach could improve the efficacy of this treatment. However, the relations between those two cell types are not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to determine the reciprocal interactions between myoblasts and MSC in vitro in terms of the features important for the muscle regeneration process. Primary caprine muscle-derived cells (MDC) and bone marrow-derived MSC were analysed in autologous settings. We found that MSC contribute to myotubes formation by fusion with MDC when co-cultured directly, but do not acquire myogenic phenotype if exposed to MDC-derived soluble factors only. Experiments with exposure to hydrogen peroxide showed that MSC are significantly more resistant to oxidative stress than MDC, but a direct co-culture with MSC does not diminish the cytotoxic effect of H2O2 on MDC. Cell migration assay demonstrated that MSC possess significantly greater migration ability than MDC which is further enhanced by MDC-derived soluble factors, whereas the opposite effect was not found. MSC-derived soluble factors significantly enhanced the proliferation of MDC, whereas MDC inhibited the division rate of MSC. To conclude, presented results suggest that myogenic precursors and MSC support each other during muscle regeneration and therefore myoblasts-MSC co-transplantation could be an attractive approach in the treatment of muscular disorders. PMID:27551730

  7. TAK-1/p38/nNFκB signaling inhibits myoblast differentiation by increasing levels of Activin A

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    myoblasts treated with IL-1β or TNF-α, resulting in normal differentiation into myotubes. Studies in aged rats as a model of sarcopenia confirmed that this pro-inflammatory cytokine pathway identified is activated during aging. Conclusions In this study, we found an unexpected connection between cytokine and Activin signaling, revealing a new mechanism by which cytokines affect skeletal muscle, and establishing the physiologic relevance of this pathway in the impaired regeneration seen in sarcopenia. PMID:22313861

  8. Transcription Factor ZBED6 Mediates IGF2 Gene Expression by Regulating Promoter Activity and DNA Methylation in Myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Liang-Zhi; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Li, Ming-Xun; Sun, Yu-Jia; Li, Cong-Jun; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were upregulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels were negatively associated with the methylation status in beef cattle (P < 0.05). A luciferase assay for the IGF2 intron 3 and P3 promoter showed that the mutant-type 439 A-SNP-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the wild-type 439 G-SNP-pGL3 construct (P < 0.05). An over-expression assay revealed that ZBED6 regulate IGF2 expression and promote myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of ZBED6 led to IGF2 expression change in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that ZBED6 inhibits IGF2 activity and expression via a G to A transition disrupts the interaction. Thus, we propose that ZBED6 plays a critical role in myogenic differentiation.

  9. Defective Regulation of MicroRNA Target Genes in Myoblasts from Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients*

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Petr; Stankevicins, Luiza; Ansseau, Eugenie; Petrov, Andrei; Barat, Ana; Dessen, Philippe; Robert, Thomas; Turki, Ahmed; Lazar, Vladimir; Labourer, Emmanuel; Belayew, Alexandra; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S.

    2013-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant hereditary neuromuscular disorder linked to the deletion of an integral number of 3.3-kb-long macrosatellite repeats (D4Z4) within the subtelomeric region of chromosome 4q. Most genes identified in this region are overexpressed in FSHD myoblasts, including the double homeobox genes DUX4 and DUX4c. We have carried out a simultaneous miRNome/transcriptome analysis of FSHD and control primary myoblasts. Of 365 microRNAs (miRNAs) analyzed in this study, 29 were found to be differentially expressed between FSHD and normal myoblasts. Twenty-one microRNAs (miR-1, miR-7, miR-15a, miR-22, miR-30e, miR-32, miR-107, miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-139, miR-152, miR-206, miR-223, miR-302b, miR-331, miR-362, miR-365, miR-382, miR-496, miR-532, miR-654, and miR-660) were up-regulated, and eight were down-regulated (miR-15b, miR-20b, miR-21, miR-25, miR-100, miR-155, miR-345, and miR-594). Twelve of the miRNAs up-regulated in FHSD were also up-regulated in the cells ectopically expressing DUX4c, suggesting that this gene could regulate miRNA gene transcription. The myogenic miRNAs miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-206 were highly expressed in FSHD myoblasts, which nonetheless did not prematurely enter myogenic differentiation. This could be accounted for by the fact that in FSHD myoblasts, functionally important target genes, including cell cycle, DNA damage, and ubiquitination-related genes, escape myogenic microRNA-induced repression. PMID:24145033

  10. On-chip monitoring of skeletal myoblast transplantation for the treatment of hypoxia-induced myocardial injury.

    PubMed

    He, Juan; Ma, Chao; Liu, Wenming; Wang, Jinyi

    2014-09-21

    A comprehensive elucidation of the unexpected adverse events that occur in skeletal myoblast transplantation is fundamental for the optimization of myocardial therapeutic effects. However, a well-defined method to study the interactions between skeletal myoblasts and cardiomyocytes during the healing process is out of reach. Here, we describe a microfluidic method for monitoring the interactions between skeletal myoblasts and hypoxia-injured cardiomyocytes in a spatiotemporally-controlled manner, mimicking the in vivo cell transplantation process. A myocardial hypoxia environment was created using an oxygen consumption blocking reagent, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone. Meanwhile, the interactions between the skeletal L6 myoblasts and hypoxia-injured myocardium H9c2 cells were investigated, and the effects of a L6 conditional medium on H9c2 cells were comparatively analyzed by quantitatively measuring the morphological and pathophysiological dynamics of H9c2 cells. The results showed that skeletal myoblasts could repair hypoxia-injured H9c2 cells mainly through direct cell-to-cell interactions. This simple on-chip assay for investigating myocardial repair processes may provide avenues for the in vitro screening of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:25025637

  11. Inducing myoblast re-entry into the cell cycle: a potential mechanism for laser-enhanced skeletal muscle regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Fang, Y.; Zhang, C. P.; Chen, P.; Wang, C. Z.; Kang, H. X.; Shen, B. J.; Liang, J.; Fu, X. B.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the cell cycle and proliferative activity of cultured myoblasts, and sought to elucidate the possible cellular mechanism by which LLLI promotes the regeneration of skeletal muscle in vivo. Primary myoblasts isolated from rat hindlegs were irradiated with helium-neon laser light at different energy densities. Distributions of cell-cycle subpopulations and the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins in myoblasts were assessed using flow cytometric analysis and western blot assay. It was found that laser irradiation stimulated cell-cycle entry; induced the expression of cyclin A and cyclin D; and increased cell proliferation index and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation as compared to the unirradiated control cells, indicating LLLI augmented the number of proliferative myoblasts in the S phase and G2/M phase of the cell cycle. These results suggest that LLLI at certain fluxes and wavelengths could activate quiescent myoblasts, leading to cell division and facilitating new myofiber formation. This could contribute to the improvement of skeletal muscle regeneration following trauma and myopathic diseases.

  12. Myoblast proliferation and syncytial fusion both depend on connexin43 function in transfected skeletal muscle primary cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbe, Aniko; Krenacs, Tibor; Cook, Jeremy E.; Becker, David L. . E-mail: d.becker@ucl.ac.uk

    2007-04-01

    Muscles are formed by fusion of individual postmitotic myoblasts to form multinucleated syncytial myotubes. The process requires a well-coordinated transition from proliferation, through migratory alignment and cycle exit, to breakdown of apposed membranes. Connexin43 protein and cell-cycle inhibitor levels are correlated, and gap junction blockers can delay muscle regeneration, so a coordinating role for gap junctions has been proposed. Here, wild-type and dominant-negative connexin43 variants (wtCx43, dnCx43) were introduced into rat myoblasts in primary culture through pIRES-eGFP constructs that made transfected cells fluoresce. GFP-positive cells and vitally-stained nuclei were counted on successive days to reveal differences in proliferation, and myotubes were counted to reveal differences in fusion. Individual transfected cells were injected with Cascade Blue, which permeates gap junctions, mixed with FITC-dextran, which requires cytoplasmic continuity to enter neighbouring cells. Myoblasts transfected with wtCx43 showed more gap-junctional coupling than GFP-only controls, began fusion sooner as judged by the incidence of cytoplasmic coupling, and formed more myotubes. Myoblasts transfected with dnCx43 remained proliferative for longer than either GFP-only or wtCx43 myoblasts, showed less coupling, and underwent little fusion into myotubes. These results highlight the critical role of gap-junctional coupling in myotube formation.

  13. Expression of Non-acetylatable H2A.Z in Myoblast Cells Blocks Myoblast Differentiation through Disruption of MyoD Expression.

    PubMed

    Law, Cindy; Cheung, Peter

    2015-05-22

    H2A.Z is a histone H2A variant that is essential for viability in Tetrahymena and Drosophila and also during embryonic development of mice. Although implicated in diverse cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome segregation, and heterochromatin formation, its essential function in cells remains unknown. Cellular differentiation is part of the developmental process of multicellular organisms. To elucidate the roles of H2A.Z and H2A.Z acetylation in cellular differentiation, we examined the effects of expressing wild type (WT) or a non-acetylatable form of H2A.Z in the growth and differentiation of the myoblast C2C12 cell line. Ectopic expression of wild type or mutant H2A.Z resulted in distinct phenotypes in the differentiation of the C2C12 cells and the formation of myotubes. Most strikingly, expression of the H2A.Z non-acetylatable mutant (H2A.Z-Ac-mut) resulted in a complete block of myoblast differentiation. We determined that this phenotype is caused by a loss of MyoD expression in the Ac-mut-expressing cells prior to and after induction of differentiation. Moreover, chromatin accessibility assays showed that the promoter region of MyoD is less accessible in the differentiation-defective cells. Altogether, these new findings show that expression of the Ac-mut form of H2A.Z resulted in a dominant phenotype that blocked differentiation due to chromatin changes at the MyoD promoter.

  14. Expression of Non-acetylatable H2A.Z in Myoblast Cells Blocks Myoblast Differentiation through Disruption of MyoD Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Law, Cindy; Cheung, Peter

    2015-01-01

    H2A.Z is a histone H2A variant that is essential for viability in Tetrahymena and Drosophila and also during embryonic development of mice. Although implicated in diverse cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome segregation, and heterochromatin formation, its essential function in cells remains unknown. Cellular differentiation is part of the developmental process of multicellular organisms. To elucidate the roles of H2A.Z and H2A.Z acetylation in cellular differentiation, we examined the effects of expressing wild type (WT) or a non-acetylatable form of H2A.Z in the growth and differentiation of the myoblast C2C12 cell line. Ectopic expression of wild type or mutant H2A.Z resulted in distinct phenotypes in the differentiation of the C2C12 cells and the formation of myotubes. Most strikingly, expression of the H2A.Z non-acetylatable mutant (H2A.Z-Ac-mut) resulted in a complete block of myoblast differentiation. We determined that this phenotype is caused by a loss of MyoD expression in the Ac-mut-expressing cells prior to and after induction of differentiation. Moreover, chromatin accessibility assays showed that the promoter region of MyoD is less accessible in the differentiation-defective cells. Altogether, these new findings show that expression of the Ac-mut form of H2A.Z resulted in a dominant phenotype that blocked differentiation due to chromatin changes at the MyoD promoter. PMID:25839232

  15. Comparative analysis of genetically engineered immunodeficient mouse strains as recipients for human myoblast transplantation.

    PubMed

    Silva-Barbosa, Suse D; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Di Santo, James P; Mouly, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    The development of an optimized animal model for the in vivo analysis of human muscle cells remains an important goal in the search of therapy for muscular dystrophy. Here we examined the efficiency of human myoblast xenografts in three distinct immunodeficient mouse models. We found that different conditioning regimes used to provoke host muscle regeneration (i.e., cardiotoxin versus cryodamage) had a marked impact on xenograft success. Tibialis anterior muscle of Rag2-, Rag-/gammac-, and Rag-/gammac-/C5- mice was treated by cardiotoxin or cryodamage, submitted to enzymatic digestion, and analyzed by cytofluorometry to quantitate inflammatory cells. Human myoblasts were injected into pretreated muscles from immunodeficient recipients and the cell engraftment evaluated by immunocytochemistry, 4-8 weeks after transplantation. Donor cell differentiation and dispersion within the host muscles was also investigated. Host regeneration in cardiotoxin-treated mice was accompanied by a higher inflammatory cell infiltration when compared to that induced by cryodamage. Accordingly, when compared to the cardiotoxin group, more human myogenic cells were found after cryodamage. When the distinct immunodeficient mice were compared, we found that the alymphoid strain lacking the complement component C5 (Rag-/gammac-/C5- mice) was the most efficient host for human muscle xenografts, when compared with C5(+)Rag-/gammac- mice or Rag- mice. Our results demonstrate that cryolesion-conditioned muscles of Rag-/gammac-/C5- mice provide the best environment for long-term in vivo human myoblast differentiation, opening the way for a novel approach to study the pathophysiology of human muscle disorders. PMID:16285254

  16. Expression of myosin heavy-chain mRNA in cultured myoblasts induced by centrifugal force.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Katsuhide; Sakiyama, Koji; Abe, Shinichi; Hiroki, Emi; Naito, Kaoru; Nakajima, Kazunori; Takeda, Tomotaka; Inoue, Takashi; Ide, Yoshinobu; Ishigami, Keiichi

    2008-11-01

    Ballistic muscle training leads to hypertrophy of fast type fibers and training for endurance induces that of slow type fibers. Numerous studies have been conducted on electrical, extending and magnetic stimulation of cells, but the effect of centrifugal force on cells remains to be investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of stimulating cultured myoblasts with centrifugal force at different speeds on cell proliferation and myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) mRNA expression in muscle fiber. Stimulation of myoblasts was carried out at 2 different speeds for 20 min using the Himac CT6D, a desk centrifuge, and cells were observed at 1, 3 and 5 days later. Number of cells 1 and 5 days after centrifugal stimulation was significantly larger in the 62.5 x g and 4,170 x g stimulation groups than in the control group. Expression of MyHC-2b mRNA 1 day after centrifugal stimulation was significantly higher in the 2 stimulation groups than in the control group. Almost no expression of MyHC-2a was observed in any group at 1 and 3 days after centrifugal stimulation. However, 5 days after stimulation, MyHC-2a was strongly expressed in the 2 stimulation groups in comparison to the control group. Three days after centrifugal stimulation, expression of MyHC-1 was significantly higher in the 2 stimulation groups than in the control group. The results of this study clarified the effect of different centrifugal stimulation speeds on muscle fiber characteristics, and suggest that centrifugal stimulation of myoblasts enhances cell proliferation.

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid and bFGF control different modes in proliferating myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Myogenic cells provide excellent in vitro models for studying the cell growth and differentiation. In this study we report that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive phospholipid contained in serum, stimulates the growth and inhibits the differentiation of mouse C2C12 myoblast cells, in a distinct manner from basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) whose mitotic and anti-differentiation actions have been well investigated. These actions of LPA were both blocked by pertussis toxin, suggesting the involvement of Gi class of G proteins, whereas bFGF acts through receptor tyrosine kinases. Detailed analysis revealed that LPA and bFGF act differently in regulating the myogenic basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins, the key players in myogenic differentiation process. LPA stimulates the proliferation of undifferentiated myoblasts allowing the continued expression of MyoD, but in contrast, bFGF does so with the MyoD expression suppressed at the mRNA level. Both compounds maintain the myf-5 expression, and suppress the myogenin expression. In addition, while LPA did not inhibit cell-cell contact-induced differentiation, bFGF strongly inhibited this process. Furthermore, LPA and bFGF act cooperatively in their mitogenic and anti-differentiation abilities. These findings indicate that LPA and bFGF differently stimulate intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in proliferating myoblasts each bearing a distinct expression pattern of myogenic bHLH proteins and distinct differentiation potentials in response to cell-cell contact, and illustrate the biological significance of Gi-mediated and tyrosine kinase-mediated signals. PMID:8567722

  18. Follistatin could promote the proliferation of duck primary myoblasts by activating PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinxin; Liu, Hehe; Wang, Haohan; Sun, Lingli; Ding, Fang; Sun, Wenqiang; Han, Chunchun; Wang, Jiwen

    2014-01-01

    FST (follistatin) is essential for skeletal muscle development, but the intracellular signalling networks that regulate FST-induced effects are not well defined. We sought to investigate whether FST promotes the proliferation of myoblasts through the PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt (protein kinase B)/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling. In the present study, we transfected the pEGFP-duFST plasmid and added PI3K and mTOR inhibitors to the medium of duck primary myoblasts. Then, we analysed the cellular phenotypic changes that occurred and analysed the expression of target genes. The results showed that FST promoted myoblast proliferation, induced the mRNA expression of PI3K, Akt, mTOR, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6K (S6 kinase) and the protein expression of phospho-Akt (Thr308), mTOR, phospho-mTOR (serine 2448), phospho-S6K (Ser417), inhibited the mRNA expression of FoxO1, MuRF1 (muscle RING finger-1) and the protein expression of phospho-FoxO1 (Ser256). Moreover, we found that the overexpression of FST could alleviate the inhibitory effect of myoblast proliferation caused by the addition of LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor. Additionally, the overexpression of duck FST also relieved the inhibition of myoblast proliferation caused by the addition of rapamycin (an mTOR inhibitor) through PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling. In light of the present results, we hypothesize that duck FST could promote myoblast proliferation, which is dependent on PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling. PMID:25200144

  19. Dynamics of the Skeletal Muscle Secretome during Myoblast Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Henningsen, Jeanette; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T. G.; Blagoev, Blagoy; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Kratchmarova, Irina

    2010-01-01

    During recent years, increased efforts have focused on elucidating the secretory function of skeletal muscle. Through secreted molecules, skeletal muscle affects local muscle biology in an auto/paracrine manner as well as having systemic effects on other tissues. Here we used a quantitative proteomics platform to investigate the factors secreted during the differentiation of murine C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. Using triple encoding stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, we compared the secretomes at three different time points of muscle differentiation and followed the dynamics of protein secretion. We identified and quantitatively analyzed 635 secreted proteins, including 35 growth factors, 40 cytokines, and 36 metallopeptidases. The extensive presence of these proteins that can act as potent signaling mediators to other cells and tissues strongly highlights the important role of the skeletal muscle as a prominent secretory organ. In addition to previously reported molecules, we identified many secreted proteins that have not previously been shown to be released from skeletal muscle cells nor shown to be differentially released during the process of myogenesis. We found 188 of these secreted proteins to be significantly regulated during the process of myogenesis. Comparative analyses of selected secreted proteins revealed little correlation between their mRNA and protein levels, indicating pronounced regulation by posttranscriptional mechanisms. Furthermore, analyses of the intracellular levels of members of the semaphorin family and their corresponding secretion dynamics demonstrated that the release of secreted proteins is tightly regulated by the secretory pathway, the stability of the protein, and/or the processing of secreted proteins. Finally, we provide 299 unique hydroxyproline sites mapping to 48 distinct secreted proteins and have discovered a novel hydroxyproline motif. PMID:20631206

  20. Loss of miR-29 in myoblasts contributes to dystrophic muscle pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Zhou, Liang; Jiang, Peiyong; Lu, Leina; Chen, Xiaona; Lan, Huiyao; Guttridge, Denis C; Sun, Hao; Wang, Huating

    2012-06-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression in post-transcriptional fashion, and emerging studies support their importance in a multitude of physiological and pathological processes. Here, we describe the regulation and function of miR-29 in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and its potential use as therapeutic target. Our results demonstrate that miR-29 expression is downregulated in dystrophic muscles of mdx mice, a model of DMD. Restoration of its expression by intramuscular and intravenous injection improved dystrophy pathology by both promoting regeneration and inhibiting fibrogenesis. Mechanistic studies revealed that loss of miR-29 in muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) promotes their transdifferentiation into myofibroblasts through targeting extracellular molecules including collagens and microfibrillar-associated protein 5 (Mfap5). We further demonstrated that miR-29 is under negative regulation by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. Together, these results not only identify TGF-β-miR-29 as a novel regulatory axis during myoblasts conversion into myofibroblasts which constitutes a novel contributing route to muscle fibrogenesis of DMD but also implicate miR-29 replacement therapy as a promising treatment approach for DMD.

  1. Notch pathway activation contributes to inhibition of C2C12 myoblast differentiation by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Arya, Michelle A; Tai, Albert K; Wooten, Eric C; Parkin, Christopher D; Kudryavtseva, Elena; Huggins, Gordon S

    2013-01-01

    The loss of muscle mass in alcoholic myopathy may reflect alcohol inhibition of myogenic cell differentiation into myotubes. Here, using a high content imaging system we show that ethanol inhibits C2C12 myoblast differentiation by reducing myogenic fusion, creating smaller and less complex myotubes compared with controls. Ethanol administration during C2C12 differentiation reduced MyoD and myogenin expression, and microarray analysis identified ethanol activation of the Notch signaling pathway target genes Hes1 and Hey1. A reporter plasmid regulated by the Hes1 proximal promoter was activated by alcohol treatment in C2C12 cells. Treatment of differentiating C2C12 cells with a gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI) abrogated induction of Hes1. On a morphological level GSI treatment completely rescued myogenic fusion defects and partially restored other myotube parameters in response to alcohol. We conclude that alcohol inhibits C2C12 myoblast differentiation and the inhibition of myogenic fusion is mediated by Notch pathway activation.

  2. AlphaB-crystallin is involved in oxidative stress protection determined by VEGF in skeletal myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Mercatelli, Neri; Dimauro, Ivan; Ciafré, Silvia Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Caporossi, Daniela

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that the effects of VEGF-A, the prototype VEGF ligand, may extend to a variety of cell types other than endothelial cells. The expression of VEGF-A and its main receptors, Flt-1/VEGFR-1 and KDR/Flk-1/VEGFR-2, was indeed detected in several cell types, including cardiac myocytes and regenerating myotubes. In addition to its proangiogenic activity, evidence indicates that VEGF-A can sustain skeletal muscle regeneration by enhancing the survival and migration of myogenic cells and by promoting the growth of myogenic fibers. In this study, our aim was to investigate whether VEGF could protect skeletal muscle satellite cells from apoptotic cell death triggered by reactive oxygen species and to identify the main molecular mechanisms. C2C12 mouse myoblasts, cultured in vitro in the presence of exogenous VEGF or stably transfected with a plasmid vector expressing VEGF-A, were subjected to oxidative stress and analyzed for cell growth and survival, induction of apoptosis, and molecular signaling. The results of our study demonstrated that VEGF protects C2C12 myoblasts from apoptosis induced by oxidative or hypoxic-like stress. This protection did not correlate with the modulation of the expression of VEGF receptors, but is clearly linked to the phosphorylation of the KDR/Flk-1 receptor, the activation of NF-kappaB, and/or the overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein alphaB-crystallin. PMID:20441791

  3. Coordination of cell cycle, DNA repair and muscle gene expression in myoblasts exposed to genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, Giulia Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Upon exposure to genotoxic stress, skeletal muscle progenitors coordinate DNA repair and the activation of the differentiation program through the DNA damage-activated differentiation checkpoint, which holds the transcription of differentiation genes while the DNA is repaired. A conceptual hurdle intrinsic to this process relates to the coordination of DNA repair and muscle-specific gene transcription within specific cell cycle boundaries (cell cycle checkpoints) activated by different types of genotoxins. Here, we show that, in proliferating myoblasts, the inhibition of muscle gene transcription occurs by either a G1- or G2-specific differentiation checkpoint. In response to genotoxins that induce G1 arrest, MyoD binds target genes but is functionally inactivated by a c-Abl-dependent phosphorylation. In contrast, DNA damage-activated G2 checkpoint relies on the inability of MyoD to bind the chromatin at the G2 phase of the cell cycle. These results indicate an intimate relationship between DNA damage-activated cell cycle checkpoints and the control of tissue-specific gene expression to allow DNA repair in myoblasts prior to the activation of the differentiation program. PMID:21685725

  4. Actin-associated protein palladin is required for migration behavior and differentiation potential of C2C12 myoblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ngoc Uyen Nhi; Liang, Vincent Roderick; Wang, Hao-Ven

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Palladin is involved in myogenesis in vitro. • Palladin knockdown by siRNA increases myoblast proliferation, viability and differentiation. • Palladin knockdown decreases C2C12 myoblast migration ability. - Abstract: The actin-associated protein palladin has been shown to be involved in differentiation processes in non-muscle tissues. However, but its function in skeletal muscle has rarely been studied. Palladin plays important roles in the regulation of diverse actin-related signaling in a number of cell types. Since intact actin-cytoskeletal remodeling is necessary for myogenesis, in the present study, we pursue to investigate the role of actin-associated palladin in skeletal muscle differentiation. Palladin in C2C12 myoblasts is knocked-down using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results show that down-regulation of palladin decreased migratory activity of mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts. Furthermore, the depletion of palladin enhances C2C12 vitality and proliferation. Of note, the loss of palladin promotes C2C12 to express the myosin heavy chain, suggesting that palladin has a role in the modulation of C2C12 differentiation. It is thus proposed that palladin is required for normal C2C12 myogenesis in vitro.

  5. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Secreted Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Exerts a Stimulatory Effect on Skeletal Myoblast Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Alessia; Anderloni, Giulia; Pierucci, Federica; Matteini, Francesca; Chellini, Flaminia; Zecchi Orlandini, Sandra; Meacci, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have the potential to significantly contribute to skeletal muscle healing through the secretion of paracrine factors that support proliferation and enhance participation of the endogenous muscle stem cells in the process of repair/regeneration. However, MSC-derived trophic molecules have been poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate paracrine signaling effects of MSCs on skeletal myoblasts. It was found, using a biochemical and morphological approach that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a natural bioactive lipid exerting a broad range of muscle cell responses, is secreted by MSCs and represents an important factor by which these cells exert their stimulatory effects on C2C12 myoblast and satellite cell proliferation. Indeed, exposure to conditioned medium obtained from MSCs cultured in the presence of the selective sphingosine kinase inhibitor (iSK), blocked increased cell proliferation caused by the conditioned medium from untreated MSCs, and the addition of exogenous S1P in the conditioned medium from MSCs pre-treated with iSK further increased myoblast proliferation. Finally, we also demonstrated that the myoblast response to MSC-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) involves the release of S1P from C2C12 cells. Our data may have important implications in the optimization of cell-based strategies to promote skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:25264785

  6. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enhances myoblast fusion and induces the formation of myotubes with disorganized nuclei.

    PubMed

    Mermelstein, Cláudia S; Portilho, Débora M; Medeiros, Rommel B; Matos, Aline R; Einicker-Lamas, Marcelo; Tortelote, Giovane G; Vieyra, Adalberto; Costa, Manoel L

    2005-02-01

    The formation of a skeletal muscle fiber begins with the withdrawal of committed mononucleated precursors from the cell cycle. These myoblasts elongate while aligning with each other, guided by recognition between their membranes. This step is followed by cell fusion and the formation of long striated multinucleated myotubes. We used methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) in primary cultured chick skeletal muscle cells to deplete membrane cholesterol and investigate its role during myogenesis. MCD promoted a significant increase in the expression of troponin T, enhanced myoblast fusion, and induced the formation of large multinucleated myotubes with nuclei being clustered centrally and not aligned at the cell periphery. MCD myotubes were striated, as indicated by sarcomeric alpha-actinin staining, and microtubule and desmin filament distribution was not altered. Pre-fusion MCD-treated myoblasts formed large aggregates, with cadherin and beta-catenin being accumulated in cell adhesion contacts. We also found that the membrane microdomain marker GM1 was not present as clusters in the membrane of MCD-treated myoblasts. Our data demonstrate that cholesterol is involved in the early steps of skeletal muscle differentiation.

  7. Novel hyperbranched polyamidoamine nanoparticles for transfecting skeletal myoblasts with vascular endothelial growth factor gene for cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kai; Guo, Changfa; Lai, Hao; Yang, Wuli; Xia, Yu; Zhao, Dong; Wang, Chunsheng

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the feasibility and efficacy of hyperbranched polyamidoamine (hPAMAM) mediated human vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (hVEGF(165)) gene transfer into skeletal myoblasts for cardiac repair. The hPAMAM was synthesized using a modified one-pot method. Encapsulated DNA was protected by hPAMAM from degradation for over 120 min. The transfection efficiency of hPAMAM in myoblasts was 82.6 ± 7.0% with cell viability of 94.6 ± 1.4% under optimal conditions. The hPAMAM showed much higher transfection efficiency (P < 0.05) than polyetherimide and Lipofectamine 2000 with low cytotoxicity. The transfected skeletal myoblasts gave stable hVEGF(165) expression for 18 days. After transplantation of hPAMAM-hVEGF(165) transfected cells, apoptotic myocardial cells decreased at day 1 and heart function improved at day 28, with increased neovascularization (P < 0.05). These results indicate that hPAMAM-based gene delivery into myoblasts is feasible and effective and may serve as a novel and promising non-viral DNA vehicle for gene therapy in myocardial infarction.

  8. Elastase levels and activity are increased in dystrophic muscle and impair myoblast cell survival, proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Arecco, N.; Clarke, C. J.; Jones, F. K.; Simpson, D. M.; Mason, D.; Beynon, R. J.; Pisconti, A.

    2016-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy, progressive loss of muscle tissue is accompanied by fibrosis, chronic inflammation and reduced muscle regenerative capacity. Although much is known about the development of fibrosis and chronic inflammation in muscular dystrophy, less is known about how they are mechanistically linked to loss of muscle regenerative capacity. We have developed a proteomics method to discover dystrophy-associated changes in the muscle progenitor cell niche, which identified serine proteases, and especially neutrophil elastase, as candidates. We show that elastase activity is increased in dystrophic (mdx4cv) muscle and impairs myoblast survival in culture. While the effect of elastase on C2C12 cell survival correlates with the kinetics of elastase-mediated degradation of the substrate to which the cells adhere, the effect of elastase on satellite cell-derived primary myoblast growth and differentiation is substrate-independent and even more dramatic than the effect on C2C12 cells, suggesting a detrimental role for elastase on myogenesis in vivo. Additionally, elastase impairs differentiation of both primary and C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes. Our findings evidence the importance of neutrophil-mediated inflammation in muscular dystrophy and indicate elastase-mediated regulation of myoblast behaviour as a potential mechanism underlying loss of regenerative capacity in dystrophic muscle. PMID:27241590

  9. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cell Secreted IGF-1 Protects Myoblasts from the Negative Effect of Myostatin

    PubMed Central

    Gehmert, Sebastian; Nerlich, Michael; Gosau, Martin; Klein, Silvan; Schreml, Stephan; Prantl, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Myostatin, a TGF-β family member, is associated with inhibition of muscle growth and differentiation and might interact with the IGF-1 signaling pathway. Since IGF-1 is secreted at a bioactive level by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs), these cells (ASCs) provide a therapeutic option for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). But the protective effect of stem cell secreted IGF-1 on myoblast under high level of myostatin remains unclear. In the present study murine myoblasts were exposed to myostatin under presence of ASCs conditioned medium and investigated for proliferation and apoptosis. The protective effect of IGF-1 was further examined by using IGF-1 neutralizing and receptor antibodies as well as gene silencing RNAi technology. MyoD expression was detected to identify impact of IGF-1 on myoblasts differentiation when exposed to myostatin. IGF-1 was accountable for 43.6% of the antiapoptotic impact and 48.8% for the proliferative effect of ASCs conditioned medium. Furthermore, IGF-1 restored mRNA and protein MyoD expression of myoblasts under risk. Beside fusion and transdifferentiation the beneficial effect of ASCs is mediated by paracrine secreted cytokines, particularly IGF-1. The present study underlines the potential of ASCs as a therapeutic option for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other dystrophic muscle diseases. PMID:24575400

  10. The Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Is Superior to Tocopherol in Promoting Myogenic Differentiation in the Prevention of Replicative Senescence of Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Khor, Shy Cian; Razak, Azraul Mumtazah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Makpol, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    Aging results in a loss of muscle mass and strength. Myoblasts play an important role in maintaining muscle mass through regenerative processes, which are impaired during aging. Vitamin E potentially ameliorates age-related phenotypes. Hence, this study aimed to determine the effects of the tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) and α-tocopherol (ATF) in protecting myoblasts from replicative senescence and promoting myogenic differentiation. Primary human myoblasts were cultured into young and senescent stages and were then treated with TRF or ATF for 24 h, followed by an analysis of cell proliferation, senescence biomarkers, cellular morphology and differentiation. Our data showed that replicative senescence impaired the normal regenerative processes of myoblasts, resulting in changes in cellular morphology, cell proliferation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) expression, myogenic differentiation and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) expression. Treatment with both TRF and ATF was beneficial to senescent myoblasts in reclaiming the morphology of young cells, improved cell viability and decreased SA-β-gal expression. However, only TRF treatment increased BrdU incorporation in senescent myoblasts, as well as promoted myogenic differentiation through the modulation of MRFs at the mRNA and protein levels. MYOD1 and MYOG gene expression and myogenin protein expression were modulated in the early phases of myogenic differentiation. In conclusion, the tocotrienol-rich fraction is superior to α-tocopherol in ameliorating replicative senescence-related aberration and promoting differentiation via modulation of MRFs expression, indicating vitamin E potential in modulating replicative senescence of myoblasts.

  11. Differences in response of primary human myoblasts to infection with recent epidemic strains of Chikungunya virus isolated from patients with and without myalgia.

    PubMed

    Lohachanakul, Jindarat; Phuklia, Weerawat; Thannagith, Montri; Thongsakulprasert, Tipparat; Smith, Duncan R; Ubol, Sukathida

    2015-05-01

    In addition to fever, rash, and arthralgia/arthritis, myalgia is another dominant symptom in Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection. How CHIKV induces myalgia is unclear. To better understand the viral factors involved in CHIKV-induced myalgia, CHIKVs were isolated from patients with and without myalgia designated myalgia-CHIKV and mild-CHIKV, respectively. The response of myoblasts to infection by the two groups of clinical isolates of CHIKV was investigated. Both groups of CHIKV replicated well in primary human myoblasts. However, the myalgia-CHIKVs replicated to a higher titer and caused the death of infected myoblast more rapidly than the mild-CHIKVs. CHIKV-infected myoblasts increased production of four out of five inflammatory cytokines examined (MCP-1, IP-10, MIP-1α, and IL-8) in comparison to mock-infected cells. Comparison between the myoblast inflammatory cytokine responses showed that myalgia-CHIKVs were stronger activators of cytokines than mild-CHIKVs. This means that recent epidemic strains of CHIKV exhibited different degrees of myoblast permissiveness as evidenced by differences in the ability to replicate and to stimulate inflammatory responses in myoblasts. This data suggest that the myopathic syndrome in recent epidemics is dependent upon the strain of CHIKV.

  12. Morphological changes and spatial regulation of diacylglycerol kinase-zeta, syntrophins, and Rac1 during myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Abramovici, Hanan; Gee, Stephen H

    2007-07-01

    The fusion of mononuclear myoblasts into multinucleated myofibers is essential for the formation and growth of skeletal muscle. Myoblast fusion follows a well-defined sequence of cellular events, from initial recognition and adhesion, to alignment, and finally plasma membrane fusion. These processes depend upon coordinated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Our recent studies suggest diacylglycerol kinase-zeta (DGK-zeta), an enzyme that metabolizes diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid, plays an important role in actin reorganization. Here, we investigated whether DGK-zeta has a role in the fusion of cultured C2C12 myoblasts. We show that DGK-zeta and syntrophins, scaffold proteins of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex that bind directly to DGK-zeta, are spatially regulated during fusion. Both proteins accumulated with the GTPase Rac1 at sites where fine filopodia mediate the initial contact between myoblasts. In addition, DGK-zeta codistributed with the Ca(2+)-dependent cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin at nascent, but not previously established cell contacts. We provide evidence that C2 cells are pulled together at cell-cell junctions by N-cadherin-containing filopodia reminiscent of epithelial adhesion zippers, which guide the advance of lamellipodia from apposing cells. At later times, vesicles with properties of macropinosomes formed close to cell-cell junctions. Reconstruction of confocal optical sections showed these form dome-like protrusions from the dorsal surface of contacting cells. Collectively, these results suggest DGK-zeta and syntrophins play a role at multiple stages of the fusion process. Moreover, our findings provide a potential link between changes in the lipid content of the membrane bilayer and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton during myoblast fusion. PMID:17410543

  13. Improvement of maternal vitamin D status with 25-hydroxycholecalciferol positively impacts porcine fetal skeletal muscle development and myoblast activity.

    PubMed

    Hines, E A; Coffey, J D; Starkey, C W; Chung, T K; Starkey, J D

    2013-09-01

    There is little information available regarding the influence of maternal vitamin D status on fetal skeletal muscle development. Therefore, we investigated the effect of improved vitamin D status resulting from 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25OHD3) supplementation of dams on fetal skeletal muscle developmental characteristics and myoblast activity using Camborough 22 gilts (n = 40) randomly assigned to 1 of 2 corn-soybean meal-based diets. The control diet (CTL) contained 2,500 IU cholecalciferol (D3)/kg diet, whereas the experimental diet contained 500 IU D3/kg diet plus 50 µg 25OHD3/kg diet. Gilts were fed 2.7 kg of their assigned diet once daily beginning 43 d before breeding through d 90 of gestation. On gestational d 90 (± 1), fetal LM and semitendinosus muscle samples were collected for analysis of developmental characteristics and myoblast activity, respectively. No treatment difference was observed in fetal LM cross-sectional area (P = 0.25). Fetuses from 25OHD3-supplemented gilts had more LM fibers (P = 0.04) that tended to be smaller in cross-sectional area compared with CTL fetuses (P = 0.11). A numerical increase in the total number of Pax7+ myoblasts was also observed in fetuses from 25OHD3-supplemented gilts (P = 0.12). Myoblasts derived from the muscles of fetuses from 25OHD3-fed dams displayed an extended proliferative phase in culture compared with those from fetuses of dams fed only D3 (P < 0.0001). The combination of additional muscle fibers and Pax7+ myoblasts with prolonged proliferative capacity could enhance the postnatal skeletal muscle growth potential of fetuses from 25OHD3-supplemented gilts. These data highlight the importance of maternal vitamin D status on the development of fetal skeletal muscle.

  14. Human Muscle Economy Myoblast Differentiation and Excitation-Contraction Coupling Use the Same Molecular Partners, STIM1 and STIM2*

    PubMed Central

    Darbellay, Basile; Arnaudeau, Serge; Ceroni, Dimitri; Bader, Charles R.; Konig, Stephane; Bernheim, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Our recent work identified store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) as the critical Ca2+ source required for the induction of human myoblast differentiation (Darbellay, B., Arnaudeau, S., König, S., Jousset, H., Bader, C., Demaurex, N., and Bernheim, L. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 5370–5380). The present work indicates that STIM2 silencing, similar to STIM1 silencing, reduces myoblast SOCE amplitude and differentiation. Because myoblasts in culture can be induced to differentiate into myotubes, which spontaneously contract in culture, we used the same molecular tools to explore whether the Ca2+ mechanism of excitation-contraction coupling also relies on STIM1 and STIM2. Live cell imaging of early differentiating myoblasts revealed a characteristic clustering of activated STIM1 and STIM2 during the first few hours of differentiation. Thapsigargin-induced depletion of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content caused STIM1 and STIM2 redistribution into clusters, and co-localization of both STIM proteins. Interaction of STIM1 and STIM2 was revealed by a rapid increase in fluorescence resonance energy transfer between CFP-STIM1 and YFP-STIM2 after SOCE activation and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous STIM1 and STIM2. Although both STIM proteins clearly contribute to SOCE and are required during the differentiation process, STIM1 and STIM2 are functionally largely redundant as overexpression of either STIM1 or STIM2 corrected most of the impact of STIM2 or STIM1 silencing on SOCE and differentiation. With respect to excitation-contraction, we observed that human myotubes rely also on STIM1 and STIM2 to refill their endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-content during repeated KCl-induced Ca2+ releases. This indicates that STIM2 is a necessary partner of STIM1 for excitation-contraction coupling. Thus, both STIM proteins are required and interact to control SOCE during human myoblast differentiation and human myotube excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:20436167

  15. Trpc1 ion channel modulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zanou, Nadège; Schakman, Olivier; Louis, Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T; Dietrich, Alexander; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Gailly, Philippe

    2012-04-27

    We previously showed in vitro that calcium entry through Trpc1 ion channels regulates myoblast migration and differentiation. In the present work, we used primary cell cultures and isolated muscles from Trpc1(-/-) and Trpc1(+/+) murine model to investigate the role of Trpc1 in myoblast differentiation and in muscle regeneration. In these models, we studied regeneration consecutive to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury and observed a significant hypotrophy and a delayed regeneration in Trpc1(-/-) muscles consisting in smaller fiber size and increased proportion of centrally nucleated fibers. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myf5, and myogenin and of one of their targets, the developmental MHC (MHCd). Consequently, muscle tension was systematically lower in muscles from Trpc1(-/-) mice. Importantly, the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway, which plays a crucial role in muscle growth and regeneration, was down-regulated in regenerating Trpc1(-/-) muscles. Indeed, phosphorylation of both Akt and p70S6K proteins was decreased as well as the activation of PI3K, the main upstream regulator of the Akt. This effect was independent of insulin-like growth factor expression. Akt phosphorylation also was reduced in Trpc1(-/-) primary myoblasts and in control myoblasts differentiated in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) or pretreated with EGTA-AM or wortmannin, suggesting that the entry of Ca(2+) through Trpc1 channels enhanced the activity of PI3K. Our results emphasize the involvement of Trpc1 channels in skeletal muscle development in vitro and in vivo, and identify a Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration.

  16. Trpc1 Ion Channel Modulates Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Akt Pathway during Myoblast Differentiation and Muscle Regeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Zanou, Nadège; Schakman, Olivier; Louis, Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T.; Dietrich, Alexander; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Gailly, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed in vitro that calcium entry through Trpc1 ion channels regulates myoblast migration and differentiation. In the present work, we used primary cell cultures and isolated muscles from Trpc1−/− and Trpc1+/+ murine model to investigate the role of Trpc1 in myoblast differentiation and in muscle regeneration. In these models, we studied regeneration consecutive to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury and observed a significant hypotrophy and a delayed regeneration in Trpc1−/− muscles consisting in smaller fiber size and increased proportion of centrally nucleated fibers. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myf5, and myogenin and of one of their targets, the developmental MHC (MHCd). Consequently, muscle tension was systematically lower in muscles from Trpc1−/− mice. Importantly, the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway, which plays a crucial role in muscle growth and regeneration, was down-regulated in regenerating Trpc1−/− muscles. Indeed, phosphorylation of both Akt and p70S6K proteins was decreased as well as the activation of PI3K, the main upstream regulator of the Akt. This effect was independent of insulin-like growth factor expression. Akt phosphorylation also was reduced in Trpc1−/− primary myoblasts and in control myoblasts differentiated in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ or pretreated with EGTA-AM or wortmannin, suggesting that the entry of Ca2+ through Trpc1 channels enhanced the activity of PI3K. Our results emphasize the involvement of Trpc1 channels in skeletal muscle development in vitro and in vivo, and identify a Ca2+-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration. PMID:22399301

  17. Barx2 and Pax7 Regulate Axin2 Expression in Myoblasts by Interaction with β-Catenin and Chromatin Remodelling.

    PubMed

    Hulin, Julie-Ann; Nguyen, Thi Diem Tran; Cui, Shuang; Marri, Shashikanth; Yu, Ruth T; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M; Makarenkova, Helen; Meech, Robyn

    2016-08-01

    Satellite cells are the resident stem cells of skeletal muscle; quiescent in adults until activated by injury to generate proliferating myoblasts. The canonical Wnt signalling pathway, mediated by T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) and β-catenin effector proteins, controls myoblast differentiation in vitro, and recent work suggests that timely termination of the Wnt/β-catenin signal is important for normal adult myogenesis. We recently identified the Barx2 and Pax7 homeobox proteins as novel components of the Wnt effector complex. Here, we examine molecular and epigenetic mechanisms by which Barx2 and Pax7 regulate the canonical Wnt target gene Axin2, which mediates critical feedback to terminate the transcriptional response to Wnt signals. Barx2 is recruited to the Axin2 gene via TCF/LEF binding sites, recruits β-catenin and the coactivator GRIP-1, and induces local H3K-acetylation. Barx2 also promotes nuclear localization of β-catenin. Conversely, Pax7 represses Axin2 promoter/intron activity and inhibits Barx2-mediated H3K-acetylation via the corepressor HDAC1. Wnt3a not only induces Barx2 mRNA, but also stabilises Barx2 protein in myoblasts; conversely, Wnt3a potently inhibits Pax7 protein expression. As Barx2 promotes myogenic differentiation and Pax7 suppresses it, this novel posttranscriptional regulation of Barx2 and Pax7 by Wnt3a may be involved in the specification of differentiation-competent and -incompetent myoblast populations. Finally, we propose a model for dual function of Barx2 downstream of Wnt signals: activation of myogenic target genes in association with canonical myogenic regulatory factors, and regulation of the negative feedback loop that limits the response of myoblasts to Wnt signals via direct interaction of Barx2 with the TCF/β-catenin complex. Stem Cells 2016;34:2169-2182. PMID:27144473

  18. Distinct genetic programs guide Drosophila circular and longitudinal visceral myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The visceral musculature of Drosophila larvae comprises circular visceral muscles tightly interwoven with longitudinal visceral muscles. During myogenesis, the circular muscles arise by one-to-one fusion of a circular visceral founder cell (FC) with a visceral fusion-competent myoblast (FCM) from the trunk visceral mesoderm, and longitudinal muscles arise from FCs of the caudal visceral mesoderm. Longitudinal FCs migrate anteriorly under guidance of fibroblast growth factors during embryogenesis; it is proposed that they fuse with FCMs from the trunk visceral mesoderm to give rise to syncytia containing up to six nuclei. Results Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunochemical analyses, we investigated whether these fusion events during migration use the same molecular repertoire and cellular components as fusion-restricted myogenic adhesive structure (FuRMAS), the adhesive signaling center that mediates myoblast fusion in the somatic mesoderm. Longitudinal muscles were formed by the fusion of one FC with Sns-positive FCMs, and defects in FCM specification led to defects in longitudinal muscle formation. At the fusion sites, Duf/Kirre and the adaptor protein Rols7 accumulated in longitudinal FCs, and Blow and F-actin accumulated in FCMs. The accumulation of these four proteins at the fusion sites argues for FuRMAS-like adhesion and signaling centers. Longitudinal fusion was disturbed in rols and blow single, and scar wip double mutants. Mutants of wasp or its interaction partner wip had no defects in longitudinal fusion. Conclusions Our results indicated that all embryonic fusion events depend on the same cell-adhesion molecules, but that the need for Rols7 and regulators of F-actin distinctly differs. Rols7 was required for longitudinal visceral and somatic myoblast fusion but not for circular visceral fusion. Importantly, longitudinal fusion depended on Kette and SCAR/Wave but was independent of WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation. Thus, the

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta1 upregulates myostatin expression in mouse C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Budasz-Rwiderska, M; Jank, M; Motyl, T

    2005-06-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) belong to the same TGF-beta superfamily of proteins. They are involved in regulation of skeletal muscle growth and development as well as muscle catabolism. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between MSTN and TGF-beta1 expression in proliferating and differentiating mouse C2C12 myoblasts cultured in normal and catabolic conditions and to evaluate the effect of exogenous TGF-beta1 as well as "knock down" of TGF-beta1 receptor type II on MSTN expression in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells. The direct effect of TGF-beta1 on myostatin was also examined. Myostatin expression increased gradually with cell confluency in proliferating cultures, while the level of TGF-beta1, detected in the form of a 100 kDa small latent complex diminished. Myostatin expression was accompanied by a partial cell cycle arrest. Three forms of myostatin were found: a 52 kDa precursor, a 40 kDa latency associated propeptide, and a 26 kDa active peptide. A decrease in myostatin and TGF-beta1 levels was observed during the first three days of differentiation, which was subsequently followed by significant increase of their expression during next three to four days of differentiation. Catabolic state induced by dexamethasone significantly increased the level of all forms of myostatin as well as latent (100 kDa) and active (25 kDa) forms of TGF-beta1 in differentiating myoblasts in a dose dependent manner. Exogenous TGF-beta1 (2 ng/ml) significantly increased myostatin levels both in proliferating and differentiating C2C12 myoblasts, whereas silencing of the TGF-beta1 receptor II gene significantly lowered myostatin level in examined cells. The presented results indicate that TGF-beta1 may control myostatin-related regulation of myogenesis through up-regulation of myostatin, predominantly in the course of terminal differentiation and glucocorticoid-dependent catabolic stimulation.

  20. Engineering Skeletal Muscle Tissues from Murine Myoblast Progenitor Cells and Application of Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    van der Schaft, Daisy W. J.; van Spreeuwel, Ariane C. C.; Boonen, Kristel J. M.; Langelaan, Marloes L. P.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.; Baaijens, Frank P. T.

    2013-01-01

    Engineered muscle tissues can be used for several different purposes, which include the production of tissues for use as a disease model in vitro, e.g. to study pressure ulcers, for regenerative medicine and as a meat alternative 1. The first reported 3D muscle constructs have been made many years ago and pioneers in the field are Vandenburgh and colleagues 2,3. Advances made in muscle tissue engineering are not only the result from the vast gain in knowledge of biochemical factors, stem cells and progenitor cells, but are in particular based on insights gained by researchers that physical factors play essential roles in the control of cell behavior and tissue development. State-of-the-art engineered muscle constructs currently consist of cell-populated hydrogel constructs. In our lab these generally consist of murine myoblast progenitor cells, isolated from murine hind limb muscles or a murine myoblast cell line C2C12, mixed with a mixture of collagen/Matrigel and plated between two anchoring points, mimicking the muscle ligaments. Other cells may be considered as well, e.g. alternative cell lines such as L6 rat myoblasts 4, neonatal muscle derived progenitor cells 5, cells derived from adult muscle tissues from other species such as human 6 or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) 7. Cell contractility causes alignment of the cells along the long axis of the construct 8,9 and differentiation of the muscle progenitor cells after approximately one week of culture. Moreover, the application of electrical stimulation can enhance the process of differentiation to some extent 8. Because of its limited size (8 x 2 x 0.5 mm) the complete tissue can be analyzed using confocal microscopy to monitor e.g. viability, differentiation and cell alignment. Depending on the specific application the requirements for the engineered muscle tissue will vary; e.g. use for regenerative medicine requires the up scaling of tissue size and vascularization, while to serve as a

  1. Engineering skeletal muscle tissues from murine myoblast progenitor cells and application of electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    van der Schaft, Daisy W J; van Spreeuwel, Ariane C C; Boonen, Kristel J M; Langelaan, Marloes L P; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2013-03-19

    Engineered muscle tissues can be used for several different purposes, which include the production of tissues for use as a disease model in vitro, e.g. to study pressure ulcers, for regenerative medicine and as a meat alternative (1). The first reported 3D muscle constructs have been made many years ago and pioneers in the field are Vandenburgh and colleagues (2,3). Advances made in muscle tissue engineering are not only the result from the vast gain in knowledge of biochemical factors, stem cells and progenitor cells, but are in particular based on insights gained by researchers that physical factors play essential roles in the control of cell behavior and tissue development. State-of-the-art engineered muscle constructs currently consist of cell-populated hydrogel constructs. In our lab these generally consist of murine myoblast progenitor cells, isolated from murine hind limb muscles or a murine myoblast cell line C2C12, mixed with a mixture of collagen/Matrigel and plated between two anchoring points, mimicking the muscle ligaments. Other cells may be considered as well, e.g. alternative cell lines such as L6 rat myoblasts (4), neonatal muscle derived progenitor cells (5), cells derived from adult muscle tissues from other species such as human (6) or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) (7). Cell contractility causes alignment of the cells along the long axis of the construct (8,9) and differentiation of the muscle progenitor cells after approximately one week of culture. Moreover, the application of electrical stimulation can enhance the process of differentiation to some extent (8). Because of its limited size (8 x 2 x 0.5 mm) the complete tissue can be analyzed using confocal microscopy to monitor e.g. viability, differentiation and cell alignment. Depending on the specific application the requirements for the engineered muscle tissue will vary; e.g. use for regenerative medicine requires the up scaling of tissue size and vascularization, while

  2. A novel role for the RNA-binding protein FXR1P in myoblasts cell-cycle progression by modulating p21/Cdkn1a/Cip1/Waf1 mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Davidovic, Laetitia; Durand, Nelly; Khalfallah, Olfa; Tabet, Ricardo; Barbry, Pascal; Mari, Bernard; Sacconi, Sabrina; Moine, Hervé; Bardoni, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    The Fragile X-Related 1 gene (FXR1) is a paralog of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 gene (FMR1), whose absence causes the Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. FXR1P plays an important role in normal muscle development, and its absence causes muscular abnormalities in mice, frog, and zebrafish. Seven alternatively spliced FXR1 transcripts have been identified and two of them are skeletal muscle-specific. A reduction of these isoforms is found in myoblasts from Facio-Scapulo Humeral Dystrophy (FSHD) patients. FXR1P is an RNA-binding protein involved in translational control; however, so far, no mRNA target of FXR1P has been linked to the drastic muscular phenotypes caused by its absence. In this study, gene expression profiling of C2C12 myoblasts reveals that transcripts involved in cell cycle and muscular development pathways are modulated by Fxr1-depletion. We observed an increase of p21--a regulator of cell-cycle progression--in Fxr1-knocked-down mouse C2C12 and FSHD human myoblasts. Rescue of this molecular phenotype is possible by re-expressing human FXR1P in Fxr1-depleted C2C12 cells. FXR1P muscle-specific isoforms bind p21 mRNA via direct interaction with a conserved G-quadruplex located in its 3' untranslated region. The FXR1P/G-quadruplex complex reduces the half-life of p21 mRNA. In the absence of FXR1P, the upregulation of p21 mRNA determines the elevated level of its protein product that affects cell-cycle progression inducing a premature cell-cycle exit and generating a pool of cells blocked at G0. Our study describes a novel role of FXR1P that has crucial implications for the understanding of its role during myogenesis and muscle development, since we show here that in its absence a reduced number of myoblasts will be available for muscle formation/regeneration, shedding new light into the pathophysiology of FSHD.

  3. Skeletal muscle Kv7 (KCNQ) channels in myoblast differentiation and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Roura-Ferrer, Meritxell; Sole, Laura; Martinez-Marmol, Ramon; Villalonga, Nuria; Felipe, Antonio

    2008-05-16

    Voltage-dependent K{sup +} channels (Kv) are involved in myocyte proliferation and differentiation by triggering changes in membrane potential and regulating cell volume. Since Kv7 channels may participate in these events, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether skeletal muscle Kv7.1 and Kv7.5 were involved during proliferation and myogenesis. Here we report that, while myotube formation did not regulate Kv7 channels, Kv7.5 was up-regulated during cell cycle progression. Although, Kv7.1 mRNA also increased during the G{sub 1}-phase, pharmacological evidence mainly involves Kv7.5 in myoblast growth. Our results indicate that the cell cycle-dependent expression of Kv7.5 is involved in skeletal muscle cell proliferation.

  4. Construction and Myogenic Differentiation of 3D Myoblast Tissues Fabricated by Fibronectin-Gelatin Nanofilm Coating

    PubMed Central

    Gribova, Varvara; Liu, Chen Yun; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Matsusaki, Michiya; Boudou, Thomas; Picart, Catherine; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a recently developed approach of coating the cells with fibronectin-gelatin nanofilms to build 3D skeletal muscle tissue models. We constructed the microtissues from C2C12 myoblasts and subsequently differentiated them to form muscle-like tissue. The thickness of the constructs could be successfully controlled by altering the number of seeded cells. We were able to build up to ~ 76 µm thick 3D constructs that formed multinucleated myotubes. We also found that Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632 improved myotube formation in thick constructs. Our approach makes it possible to rapidly form 3D muscle tissues and is promising for the in vitro construction of physiologically relevant human skeletal muscle tissue models. PMID:27125461

  5. The E8 subfragment of laminin promotes locomotion of myoblasts over extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The locomotion of murine myoblasts over the extracellular matrix components laminin and fibronectin was analyzed using quantitative videomicroscopy, and the organization of the cytoskeleton was observed in parallel immunofluorescence studies. Cells plated on the laminin- nidogen complex locomoted twice as fast as on laminin alone. The main form of translocation on laminin was a jerky cycle of prolonged lamellipod extension followed by rapid (approximately 200- less than 500 microh h-1) movement of the cell body into the extended lamellipod. The locomotion-stimulating activity of laminin resides in the elastase digestion fragment E8, part of the laminin long arm, while the E1-4 fragment containing the three short arms is inactive. Myoblasts moved poorly over fibronectin irrespective of whether high, intermediate, or low coating concentrations were used (approximately 5,000- approximately 10 fmol cm-2). In contrast, the locomotory responses both to laminin and to E8 peaked sharply at coating concentrations approximately 20-50 fmol cm-2 and decreased at higher concentrations. This response corresponds to that expected for a haptotactic stimulant. When cells locomoted over a mixed substrate of laminin and fibronectin, the fibronectin effects appeared to predominate. The cytoskeleton has been implicated in many cellular motile processes. Within 6 h on fibronectin many cells expressed vinculin-containing focal contacts, elaborated stress fibers and had periodically organized alpha actinin, whereas on laminin, most cells showed diffuse vinculin and alpha actinin and a fine meshlike actin cytoskeleton. We conclude that the poor locomotion of cells over fibronectin is because of the cytoskeletal stabilization it induces. PMID:2503526

  6. Gene Expression Profiling of H9c2 Myoblast Differentiation towards a Cardiac-Like Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Branco, Ana F; Pereira, Susana P; Gonzalez, Susana; Gusev, Oleg; Rizvanov, Albert A; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2015-01-01

    H9c2 myoblasts are a cell model used as an alternative for cardiomyocytes. H9c2 cells have the ability to differentiate towards a cardiac phenotype when the media serum is reduced in the presence of all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), creating multinucleated cells with low proliferative capacity. In the present study, we performed for the first time a transcriptional analysis of the H9c2 cell line in two differentiation states, i.e. embryonic cells and differentiated cardiac-like cells. The results show that RA-induced H9c2 differentiation increased the expression of genes encoding for cardiac sarcomeric proteins such as troponin T, or calcium transporters and associated machinery, including SERCA2, ryanodine receptor and phospholamban as well as genes associated with mitochondrial energy production including respiratory chain complexes subunits, mitochondrial creatine kinase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and uncoupling proteins. Undifferentiated myoblasts showed increased gene expression of pro-survival proteins such as Bcl-2 as well as cell cycle-regulating proteins. The results indicate that the differentiation of H9c2 cells lead to an increase of transcripts and protein levels involved in calcium handling, glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, confirming that H9c2 cell differentiation induced by RA towards a more cardiac-like phenotype involves remodeled mitochondrial function. PI3K, PDK1 and p-CREB also appear to be involved on H9c2 differentiation. Furthermore, complex analysis of differently expressed transcripts revealed significant up-regulation of gene expression related to cardiac muscle contraction, dilated cardiomyopathy and other pathways specific for the cardiac tissue. Metabolic and gene expression remodeling impacts cell responses to different stimuli and determine how these cells are used for biochemical assays. PMID:26121149

  7. Effect of oxygen tension on bioenergetics and proteostasis in young and old myoblast precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Konigsberg, M; Pérez, V I; Ríos, C; Liu, Y; Lee, S; Shi, Y; Van Remmen, H

    2013-01-01

    In the majority of studies using primary cultures of myoblasts, the cells are maintained at ambient oxygen tension (21% O2), despite the fact that physiological O2 at the tissue level in vivo is much lower (~1-5% O2). We hypothesized that the cellular response in presence of high oxygen concentration might be particularly important in studies comparing energetic function or oxidative stress in cells isolated from young versus old animals. To test this, we asked whether oxygen tension plays a role in mitochondrial bioenergetics (oxygen consumption, glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation) or oxidative damage to proteins (protein disulfides, carbonyls and aggregates) in myoblast precursor cells (MPCs) isolated from young (3-4 m) and old (29-30 m) C57BL/6 mice. MPCs were grown under physiological (3%) or ambient (21%) O2 for two weeks prior to exposure to an acute oxidative insult (H2O2). Our results show significantly higher basal mitochondrial respiration in young versus old MPCs, an increase in basal respiration in young MPCs maintained at 3% O2 compared to cells maintained at 21% O2, and a shift toward glycolytic metabolism in old MPCs grown at 21% O2. H2O2 treatment significantly reduced respiration in old MPCs grown at 3% O2 but did not further repress respiration at 21% O2 in old MPCs. Oxidative damage to protein was higher in cells maintained at 21% O2 and increased in response to H2O2 in old MPCs. These data underscore the importance of understanding the effect of ambient oxygen tension in cell culture studies, in particular studies measuring oxidative damage and mitochondrial function. PMID:24191243

  8. Preparation of primary myogenic precursor cell/myoblast cultures from basal vertebrate lineages.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, Jacob Michael; Seiliez, Iban; Gabillard, Jean-Charles; Biga, Peggy R

    2014-01-01

    Due to the inherent difficulty and time involved with studying the myogenic program in vivo, primary culture systems derived from the resident adult stem cells of skeletal muscle, the myogenic precursor cells (MPCs), have proven indispensible to our understanding of mammalian skeletal muscle development and growth. Particularly among the basal taxa of Vertebrata, however, data are limited describing the molecular mechanisms controlling the self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation of MPCs. Of particular interest are potential mechanisms that underlie the ability of basal vertebrates to undergo considerable postlarval skeletal myofiber hyperplasia (i.e. teleost fish) and full regeneration following appendage loss (i.e. urodele amphibians). Additionally, the use of cultured myoblasts could aid in the understanding of regeneration and the recapitulation of the myogenic program and the differences between them. To this end, we describe in detail a robust and efficient protocol (and variations therein) for isolating and maintaining MPCs and their progeny, myoblasts and immature myotubes, in cell culture as a platform for understanding the evolution of the myogenic program, beginning with the more basal vertebrates. Capitalizing on the model organism status of the zebrafish (Danio rerio), we report on the application of this protocol to small fishes of the cyprinid clade Danioninae. In tandem, this protocol can be utilized to realize a broader comparative approach by isolating MPCs from the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) and even laboratory rodents. This protocol is now widely used in studying myogenesis in several fish species, including rainbow trout, salmon, and sea bream(1-4). PMID:24835774

  9. Stem cell antigen-1 regulates the tempo of muscle repair through effects on proliferation of {alpha}7 integrin-expressing myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Epting, Conrad L.; Lopez, Javier E.; Pedersen, Anissa; Brown, Courtney; Spitz, Paul; Ursell, Philip C.; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2008-03-10

    Skeletal muscle repair occurs through a programmed series of events including myogenic precursor activation, myoblast proliferation, and differentiation into new myofibers. We previously identified a role for Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) in myoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro. We demonstrated that blocking Sca-1 expression resulted in sustained myoblast cell division. Others have since demonstrated that Sca-1-null myoblasts display a similar phenotype when cultured ex vivo. To test the importance of Sca-1 during myogenesis in vivo, we employed a myonecrotic injury model in Sca-1{sup -/-} and Sca-1{sup +/+} mice. Our results demonstrate that Sca-1{sup -/-} myoblasts exhibit a hyperproliferative response consisting of prolonged and accelerated cell division in response to injury. This leads to delayed myogenic differentiation and muscle repair. These data provide the first in vivo evidence for Sca-1 as a regulator of myoblast proliferation during muscle regeneration. These studies also suggest that the balance between myogenic precursor proliferation and differentiation is critical to normal muscle repair.

  10. Genetic Evidence That Captured Retroviral Envelope syncytins Contribute to Myoblast Fusion and Muscle Sexual Dimorphism in Mice.

    PubMed

    Redelsperger, François; Raddi, Najat; Bacquin, Agathe; Vernochet, Cécile; Mariot, Virginie; Gache, Vincent; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Charrin, Stéphanie; Tiret, Laurent; Dumonceaux, Julie; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Syncytins are envelope genes from endogenous retroviruses, "captured" for a role in placentation. They mediate cell-cell fusion, resulting in the formation of a syncytium (the syncytiotrophoblast) at the fetomaternal interface. These genes have been found in all placental mammals in which they have been searched for. Cell-cell fusion is also pivotal for muscle fiber formation and repair, where the myotubes are formed from the fusion of mononucleated myoblasts into large multinucleated structures. Here we show, taking advantage of mice knocked out for syncytins, that these captured genes contribute to myoblast fusion, with a >20% reduction in muscle mass, mean muscle fiber area and number of nuclei per fiber in knocked out mice for one of the two murine syncytin genes. Remarkably, this reduction is only observed in males, which subsequently show muscle quantitative traits more similar to those of females. In addition, we show that syncytins also contribute to muscle repair after cardiotoxin-induced injury, with again a male-specific effect on the rate and extent of regeneration. Finally, ex vivo experiments carried out on murine myoblasts demonstrate the direct involvement of syncytins in fusion, with a >40% reduction in fusion index upon addition of siRNA against both syncytins. Importantly, similar effects are observed with primary myoblasts from sheep, dog and human, with a 20-40% reduction upon addition of siRNA against the corresponding syncytins. Altogether, these results show a direct contribution of the fusogenic syncytins to myogenesis, with a demonstrated male-dependence of the effect in mice, suggesting that these captured genes could be responsible for the muscle sexual dimorphism observed in placental mammals. PMID:27589388

  11. Genetic Evidence That Captured Retroviral Envelope syncytins Contribute to Myoblast Fusion and Muscle Sexual Dimorphism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vernochet, Cécile; Mariot, Virginie; Gache, Vincent; Charrin, Stéphanie; Tiret, Laurent; Dumonceaux, Julie; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Syncytins are envelope genes from endogenous retroviruses, “captured” for a role in placentation. They mediate cell-cell fusion, resulting in the formation of a syncytium (the syncytiotrophoblast) at the fetomaternal interface. These genes have been found in all placental mammals in which they have been searched for. Cell-cell fusion is also pivotal for muscle fiber formation and repair, where the myotubes are formed from the fusion of mononucleated myoblasts into large multinucleated structures. Here we show, taking advantage of mice knocked out for syncytins, that these captured genes contribute to myoblast fusion, with a >20% reduction in muscle mass, mean muscle fiber area and number of nuclei per fiber in knocked out mice for one of the two murine syncytin genes. Remarkably, this reduction is only observed in males, which subsequently show muscle quantitative traits more similar to those of females. In addition, we show that syncytins also contribute to muscle repair after cardiotoxin-induced injury, with again a male-specific effect on the rate and extent of regeneration. Finally, ex vivo experiments carried out on murine myoblasts demonstrate the direct involvement of syncytins in fusion, with a >40% reduction in fusion index upon addition of siRNA against both syncytins. Importantly, similar effects are observed with primary myoblasts from sheep, dog and human, with a 20–40% reduction upon addition of siRNA against the corresponding syncytins. Altogether, these results show a direct contribution of the fusogenic syncytins to myogenesis, with a demonstrated male-dependence of the effect in mice, suggesting that these captured genes could be responsible for the muscle sexual dimorphism observed in placental mammals. PMID:27589388

  12. Six1 induces protein synthesis signaling expression in duck myoblasts mainly via up-regulation of mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haohan; Li, Xinxin; Liu, Hehe; Sun, Lingli; Zhang, Rongping; Li, Liang; Wangding, Mincheng; Wang, Jiwen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As a critical transcription factor, Six1 plays an important role in the regulation of myogenesis and muscle development. However, little is known about its regulatory mechanism associated with muscular protein synthesis. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of overexpression ofSix1 on the expression of key protein metabolism-related genes in duck myoblasts. Through an experimental model where duck myoblasts were transfected with a pEGFP-duSix1 construct, we found that overexpression of duckSix1 could enhance cell proliferation activity and increase mRNA expression levels of key genes involved in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, while the expression of FOXO1, MuRF1and MAFbx was not significantly altered, indicating thatSix1 could promote protein synthesis in myoblasts through up-regulating the expression of several related genes. Additionally, in duck myoblasts treated with LY294002 and rapamycin, the specific inhibitors ofPI3K and mTOR, respectively, the overexpression of Six1 could significantly ameliorate inhibitive effects of these inhibitors on protein synthesis. Especially, the mRNA expression levels of mTOR and S6K1 were observed to undergo a visible change, and a significant increase in protein expression of S6K1 was seen. These data suggested that Six1plays an important role in protein synthesis, which may be mainly due to activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27007909

  13. Space shuttle flight (STS-45) of L8 myoblast cells results in the isolation of a nonfusing cell line variant.

    PubMed

    Kulesh, D A; Anderson, L H; Wilson, B; Otis, E J; Elgin, D M; Barker, M J; Mehm, W J; Kearney, G P

    1994-08-01

    Myoblast cell cultures have been widely employed in conventional (1g) studies of biological processes because characteristics of intact muscle can be readily observed in these cultured cells. We decided to investigate the effects of spaceflight on muscle by utilizing a well characterized myoblast cell line (L8 rat myoblasts) as cultured in the recently designed Space Tissue Loss Flight Module "A" (STL-A). The STL-A is a "state of the art," compact, fully contained, automated cell culture apparatus which replaces a single mid-deck locker on the Space Shuttle. The L8 cells were successfully flown in the STL-A on the Space Shuttle STS-45 mission. Upon return to earth, reculturing of these spaceflown L8 cells (L8SF) resulted in their unexpected failure to fuse and differentiate into myotubes. This inability of the L8SF cells to fuse was found to be a permanent phenotypic alteration. Scanning electron microscopic examination of L8SF cells growing at 1g on fibronectin-coated polypropylene fibers exhibited a strikingly different morphology as compared to control cells. In addition to their failure to fuse into myotubes, L8SF cells also piled up on top of each other. When assayed in fusion-promoting soft agar, L8SF cells gave rise to substantially more and larger colonies than did either preflight (L8AT) or ground control (L8GC) cells. All data to this point indicate that flying L8 rat myoblasts on the Space Shuttle for a duration of 7-10 d at subconfluent densities results in several permanent phenotypic alterations in these cells.

  14. Space shuttle flight (STS-45) of L8 myoblast cells results in the isolation of a nonfusing cell line variant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulesh, D. A.; Anderson, L. H.; Wilson, B.; Otis, E. J.; Elgin, D. M.; Barker, M. J.; Mehm, W. J.; Kearney, G. P.

    1994-01-01

    Myoblast cell cultures have been widely employed in conventional (1g) studies of biological processes because characteristics of intact muscle can be readily observed in these cultured cells. We decided to investigate the effects of spaceflight on muscle by utilizing a well characterized myoblast cell line (L8 rat myoblasts) as cultured in the recently designed Space Tissue Loss Flight Module "A" (STL-A). The STL-A is a "state of the art," compact, fully contained, automated cell culture apparatus which replaces a single mid-deck locker on the Space Shuttle. The L8 cells were successfully flown in the STL-A on the Space Shuttle STS-45 mission. Upon return to earth, reculturing of these spaceflown L8 cells (L8SF) resulted in their unexpected failure to fuse and differentiate into myotubes. This inability of the L8SF cells to fuse was found to be a permanent phenotypic alteration. Scanning electron microscopic examination of L8SF cells growing at 1g on fibronectin-coated polypropylene fibers exhibited a strikingly different morphology as compared to control cells. In addition to their failure to fuse into myotubes, L8SF cells also piled up on top of each other. When assayed in fusion-promoting soft agar, L8SF cells gave rise to substantially more and larger colonies than did either preflight (L8AT) or ground control (L8GC) cells. All data to this point indicate that flying L8 rat myoblasts on the Space Shuttle for a duration of 7-10 d at subconfluent densities results in several permanent phenotypic alterations in these cells.

  15. An exploration of the antioxidant effects of garlic saponins in mouse-derived C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji Sook; Kim, Sung Ok; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung Woo; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Wun-Jae; Kim, Cheol Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to confirm the protective effects of garlic saponins against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage and to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms in mouse-derived C2C12 myoblasts. Relative cell viability was determined by 3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2.5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Comet assay was used to measure DNA damage and oxidative stress was determined using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate to measure intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Western blot analysis and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based knockdown were used in order to investigate the possible molecular mechanisms. Our results revealed that garlic saponins prevented hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth inhibition and exhibited scavenging activity against intracellular ROS. We also observed that garlic saponins prevented H2O2-induced comet tail formation and decreased the phosphorylation levels of γH2AX expression, suggesting that they can prevent H2O2-induced DNA damage. In addition, garlic saponins increased the levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent antioxidant enzyme associated with the induction and phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and the translocation of Nrf2 from the cytosol into the nucleus. However, the protective effects of garlic saponins on H2O2-induced ROS generation and growth inhibition were significantly reduced by zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, an HO-1 competitive inhibitor. In addition, the potential of garlic saponins to mediate HO-1 induction and protect against H2O2‑mediated growth inhibition was adversely affected by transient transfection with Nrf2-specific siRNA. Garlic saponins activated extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) signaling, whereas a specific ERK inhibitor was able to inhibit HO-1 upregulation, as well as Nrf2 induction and phosphorylation. Taken together, the findings of our study suggest that garlic saponins activate the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway by enabling

  16. An exploration of the antioxidant effects of garlic saponins in mouse-derived C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji Sook; Kim, Sung Ok; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung Woo; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Wun-Jae; Kim, Cheol Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to confirm the protective effects of garlic saponins against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage and to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms in mouse-derived C2C12 myoblasts. Relative cell viability was determined by 3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2.5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Comet assay was used to measure DNA damage and oxidative stress was determined using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate to measure intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Western blot analysis and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based knockdown were used in order to investigate the possible molecular mechanisms. Our results revealed that garlic saponins prevented hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth inhibition and exhibited scavenging activity against intracellular ROS. We also observed that garlic saponins prevented H2O2-induced comet tail formation and decreased the phosphorylation levels of γH2AX expression, suggesting that they can prevent H2O2-induced DNA damage. In addition, garlic saponins increased the levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent antioxidant enzyme associated with the induction and phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and the translocation of Nrf2 from the cytosol into the nucleus. However, the protective effects of garlic saponins on H2O2-induced ROS generation and growth inhibition were significantly reduced by zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, an HO-1 competitive inhibitor. In addition, the potential of garlic saponins to mediate HO-1 induction and protect against H2O2‑mediated growth inhibition was adversely affected by transient transfection with Nrf2-specific siRNA. Garlic saponins activated extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) signaling, whereas a specific ERK inhibitor was able to inhibit HO-1 upregulation, as well as Nrf2 induction and phosphorylation. Taken together, the findings of our study suggest that garlic saponins activate the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway by enabling

  17. The collagen derived dipeptide hydroxyprolyl-glycine promotes C2C12 myoblast differentiation and myotube hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kitakaze, Tomoya; Sakamoto, Tomotaka; Kitano, Takehiro; Inoue, Naoki; Sugihara, Fumihito; Harada, Naoki; Yamaji, Ryoichi

    2016-09-23

    The majority of studies on possible roles for collagen hydrolysates in human health have focused on their effects on bone and skin. Hydroxyprolyl-glycine (Hyp-Gly) was recently identified as a novel collagen hydrolysate-derived dipeptide in human blood. However, any possible health benefits of Hyp-Gly remain unclear. Here, we report the effects of Hyp-Gly on differentiation and hypertrophy of murine skeletal muscle C2C12 cells. Hyp-Gly increased the fusion index, the myotube size, and the expression of the myotube-specific myosin heavy chain (MyHC) and tropomyosin structural proteins. Hyp-Gly increased the phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, and p70S6K in myoblasts, whereas the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 inhibited their phosphorylation by Hyp-Gly. LY294002 and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin repressed the enhancing effects of Hyp-Gly on MyHC and tropomyosin expression. The peptide/histidine transporter 1 (PHT1) was highly expressed in both myoblasts and myotubes, and co-administration of histidine inhibited Hyp-Gly-induced phosphorylation of p70S6K in myoblasts and myotubes. These results indicate that Hyp-Gly can induce myogenic differentiation and myotube hypertrophy and suggest that Hyp-Gly promotes myogenic differentiation by activating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, perhaps depending on PHT1 for entry into cells.

  18. TiO2 nanorods via one-step electrospinning technique: a novel nanomatrix for mouse myoblasts adhesion and propagation.

    PubMed

    Amna, Touseef; Hassan, M Shamshi; Shin, Woon-Seob; Van Ba, Hoa; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Khil, Myung-Seob; Hwang, I H

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at the synthesis and characterization of novel Titania nanorods by sol-gel electrospinning technique. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized nanorods were determined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern. To examine the in vitro cytotoxicity, mouse myoblast C2C12 cells were treated with different concentrations of as prepared TiO(2) nanorods and the viability of cells was analyzed by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay at regular time intervals. The morphological features of the cells attached with nanorods were examined by Bio-SEM. Cytotoxicity experiments indicated that the mouse myoblast cells could attach to the TiO(2) nanorods after being cultured. We observed that TiO(2) nanorods could support cell adhesion and growth and guide spreading behavior of myoblasts. We conclude that the electrospun TiO(2) nanorods scaffolds with unique morphology had excellent biocompatibility. Thus, the current work demonstrates that the as-synthesized TiO(2) nanorods represent a promising biomaterial to be exploited for various tissue engineering applications.

  19. Proinflammatory macrophages enhance the regenerative capacity of human myoblasts by modifying their kinetics of proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bencze, Maximilien; Negroni, Elisa; Vallese, Denis; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Chaouch, Soraya; Wolff, Annie; Aamiri, Ahmed; Di Santo, James P; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Savino, Wilson; Mouly, Vincent; Riederer, Ingo

    2012-11-01

    Macrophages have been shown to be essential for muscle repair by delivering trophic cues to growing skeletal muscle precursors and young fibers. Here, we investigated whether human macrophages, either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory, coinjected with human myoblasts into regenerating muscle of Rag2(-/-) γC(-/-) immunodeficient mice, could modify in vivo the kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of the transplanted human myogenic precursors. Our results clearly show that proinflammatory macrophages improve in vivo the participation of injected myoblasts to host muscle regeneration, extending the window of proliferation, increasing migration, and delaying differentiation. Interestingly, immunostaining of transplanted proinflammatory macrophages at different time points strongly suggests that these cells are able to switch to an anti-inflammatory phenotype in vivo, which then may stimulate differentiation during muscle regeneration. Conceptually, our data provide for the first time in vivo evidence strongly suggesting that proinflammatory macrophages play a supportive role in the regulation of myoblast behavior after transplantation into preinjured muscle, and could thus potentially optimize transplantation of myogenic progenitors in the context of cell therapy.

  20. The collagen derived dipeptide hydroxyprolyl-glycine promotes C2C12 myoblast differentiation and myotube hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kitakaze, Tomoya; Sakamoto, Tomotaka; Kitano, Takehiro; Inoue, Naoki; Sugihara, Fumihito; Harada, Naoki; Yamaji, Ryoichi

    2016-09-23

    The majority of studies on possible roles for collagen hydrolysates in human health have focused on their effects on bone and skin. Hydroxyprolyl-glycine (Hyp-Gly) was recently identified as a novel collagen hydrolysate-derived dipeptide in human blood. However, any possible health benefits of Hyp-Gly remain unclear. Here, we report the effects of Hyp-Gly on differentiation and hypertrophy of murine skeletal muscle C2C12 cells. Hyp-Gly increased the fusion index, the myotube size, and the expression of the myotube-specific myosin heavy chain (MyHC) and tropomyosin structural proteins. Hyp-Gly increased the phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, and p70S6K in myoblasts, whereas the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 inhibited their phosphorylation by Hyp-Gly. LY294002 and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin repressed the enhancing effects of Hyp-Gly on MyHC and tropomyosin expression. The peptide/histidine transporter 1 (PHT1) was highly expressed in both myoblasts and myotubes, and co-administration of histidine inhibited Hyp-Gly-induced phosphorylation of p70S6K in myoblasts and myotubes. These results indicate that Hyp-Gly can induce myogenic differentiation and myotube hypertrophy and suggest that Hyp-Gly promotes myogenic differentiation by activating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, perhaps depending on PHT1 for entry into cells. PMID:27553280

  1. Human myoblasts from skeletal muscle biopsies: in vitro culture preparations for morphological and cytochemical analyses at light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Malatesta, Manuela; Giagnacovo, Marzia; Cardani, Rosanna; Meola, Giovanni; Pellicciari, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    We describe protocols for the isolation of satellite cells from human muscle biopsies, for the in vitro culture of proliferating and differentiating myoblasts, and for the preparation of cell samples suitable for morphological and cytochemical analyses at light and electron microscopy. The procedures described are especially appropriate for processing small muscle biopsies, and allow obtaining myoblast/myotube monolayers on glass coverslips, thus preserving good cell morphology and immunoreactivity for protein markers of myoblast proliferation, differentiation, and senescence.These cell preparations are suitable for cytochemical, immunocytochemical, and FISH procedures at light microscopy, and can be observed not only in bright field, phase contrast, and differential interference contrast but also in fluorescence (which can hardly be used for cells grown on conventional plastic surfaces, which generally exhibit intense autofluorescence). In their ultrastructural cytochemical application, the protocols are intended for post-embedding techniques, by which ultrathin sections from a single sample may be used for detecting a wide variety of molecular markers. PMID:23400435

  2. Photobiomodulation Protects and Promotes Differentiation of C2C12 Myoblast Cells Exposed to Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Aline; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Cogo, José Carlos; Zamuner, Stella Regina

    2016-01-01

    Background Snakebites is a neglected disease and in Brazil is considered a serious health problem, with the majority of the snakebites caused by the genus Bothrops. Antivenom therapy and other first-aid treatments do not reverse local myonecrose which is the main sequel caused by the envenomation. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of low level laser (LLL) therapy in reducing local myonecrosis induced by Bothropic venoms, however the mechanism involved in this effect is unknown. In this in vitro study, we aimed to analyze the effect of LLL irradiation against cytotoxicity induced by Bothrops jararacussu venom on myoblast C2C12 cells. Methodology C2C12 were utilized as a model target and were incubated with B. jararacussu venom (12.5 μg/mL) and immediately irradiated with LLL at wavelength of red 685 nm or infrared 830 nm with energy density of 2.0, 4.6 and 7.0 J/cm2. Effects of LLL on cellular responses of venom-induced cytotoxicity were examined, including cell viability, measurement of cell damage and intra and extracellular ATP levels, expression of myogenic regulatory factors, as well as cellular differentiation. Results In non-irradiated cells, the venom caused a decrease in cell viability and a massive release of LDH and CK levels indicating myonecrosis. Infrared and red laser at all energy densities were able to considerably decrease venom-induced cytotoxicity. Laser irradiation induced myoblasts to differentiate into myotubes and this effect was accompanied by up regulation of MyoD and specially myogenin. Moreover, LLL was able to reduce the extracellular while increased the intracellular ATP content after venom exposure. In addition, no difference in the intensity of cytotoxicity was shown by non-irradiated and irradiated venom. Conclusion LLL irradiation caused a protective effect on C2C12 cells against the cytotoxicity caused by B. jararacussu venom and promotes differentiation of these cells by up regulation of myogenic factors. A modulatory

  3. SMAD3 and SP1/SP3 Transcription Factors Collaborate to Regulate Connective Tissue Growth Factor Gene Expression in Myoblasts in Response to Transforming Growth Factor β.

    PubMed

    Córdova, Gonzalo; Rochard, Alice; Riquelme-Guzmán, Camilo; Cofré, Catalina; Scherman, Daniel; Bigey, Pascal; Brandan, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Fibrotic disorders are characterized by an increase in extracellular matrix protein expression and deposition, Duchene Muscular Dystrophy being one of them. Among the factors that induce fibrosis are Transforming Growth Factor type β (TGF-β) and the matricellular protein Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2), the latter being a target of the TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway and is the responsible for the profibrotic effects of TGF-β. Both CTGF and TGF are increased in tissues affected by fibrosis but little is known about the regulation of the expression of CTGF mediated by TGF-β in muscle cells. By using luciferase reporter assays, site directed mutagenesis and specific inhibitors in C2C12 cells; we described a novel SMAD Binding Element (SBE) located in the 5' UTR region of the CTGF gene important for the TGF-β-mediated expression of CTGF in myoblasts. In addition, our results suggest that additional transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) present in the 5' UTR of the CTGF gene are important for this expression and that SP1/SP3 factors are involved in TGF-β-mediated CTGF expression.

  4. The Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Is Superior to Tocopherol in Promoting Myogenic Differentiation in the Prevention of Replicative Senescence of Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Shy Cian; Razak, Azraul Mumtazah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Makpol, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    Aging results in a loss of muscle mass and strength. Myoblasts play an important role in maintaining muscle mass through regenerative processes, which are impaired during aging. Vitamin E potentially ameliorates age-related phenotypes. Hence, this study aimed to determine the effects of the tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) and α-tocopherol (ATF) in protecting myoblasts from replicative senescence and promoting myogenic differentiation. Primary human myoblasts were cultured into young and senescent stages and were then treated with TRF or ATF for 24 h, followed by an analysis of cell proliferation, senescence biomarkers, cellular morphology and differentiation. Our data showed that replicative senescence impaired the normal regenerative processes of myoblasts, resulting in changes in cellular morphology, cell proliferation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) expression, myogenic differentiation and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) expression. Treatment with both TRF and ATF was beneficial to senescent myoblasts in reclaiming the morphology of young cells, improved cell viability and decreased SA-β-gal expression. However, only TRF treatment increased BrdU incorporation in senescent myoblasts, as well as promoted myogenic differentiation through the modulation of MRFs at the mRNA and protein levels. MYOD1 and MYOG gene expression and myogenin protein expression were modulated in the early phases of myogenic differentiation. In conclusion, the tocotrienol-rich fraction is superior to α-tocopherol in ameliorating replicative senescence-related aberration and promoting differentiation via modulation of MRFs expression, indicating vitamin E potential in modulating replicative senescence of myoblasts. PMID:26885980

  5. Cdo Regulates Surface Expression of Kir2.1 K+ Channel in Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jewoo; Kang, KyeongJin; Bae, Gyu-Un; Cho, Hana; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    A potassium channel Kir2.1-associated membrane hyperpolarization is required for myogenic differentiation. However the molecular regulatory mechanisms modulating Kir2.1 channel activities in early stage of myogenesis are largely unknown. A cell surface protein, Cdo functions as a component of multiprotein cell surface complexes to promote myogenesis. In this study, we report that Cdo forms a complex with Kir2.1 during myogenic differentiation, and is required for the channel activity by enhancing the surface expression of Kir2.1 in the early stage of differentiation. The expression of a constitutively active form of the upstream kinase for p38MAPK, MKK6(EE) can restore Kir2.1 activities in Cdo-depleted C2C12 cells, while the treatment with a p38MAPK inhibitor, SB203580 exhibits a similar effect of Cdo depletion on Kir2.1 surface expression. Furthermore, Cdo-/- primary myoblasts, which display a defective differentiation program, exhibit a defective Kir2.1 activity. Taken together, our results suggest that a promyogenic Cdo signaling is critical for Kir2.1 activities in the induction of myogenic differentiation. PMID:27380411

  6. Novel Endogenous, Insulin-Stimulated Akt2 Protein Interaction Partners in L6 Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Michael; Zhang, Xiangmin; Ma, Danjun; Yang, Zhao; Qi, Yue; Yi, Zhengping

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes are marked by an aberrant response in the insulin signaling network. The phosphoinositide-dependent serine/threonine kinase, Akt2, plays a key role in insulin signaling and glucose uptake, most notably within skeletal muscle. Protein-protein interaction regulates the functional consequence of Akt2 and in turn, Akt2’s role in glucose uptake. However, only few insulin-responsive Akt2 interaction partners have been identified in skeletal muscle cells. In the present work, rat L6 myoblasts, a widely used insulin sensitive skeletal muscle cell line, were used to examine endogenous, insulin-stimulated Akt2 protein interaction partners. Akt2 co-immunoprecipitation was coupled with 1D-SDS-PAGE and fractions were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS to reveal Akt2 protein-protein interactions. The pull-down assay displayed specificity for the Akt2 isoform; Akt1 and Akt3 unique peptides were not detected. A total of 49 were detected with a significantly increased (47) or decreased (2) association with Akt2 following insulin administration (n = 4; p<0.05). Multiple pathways were identified for the novel Akt2 interaction partners, such as the EIF2 and ubiquitination pathways. These data suggest that multiple new endogenous proteins may associate with Akt2 under basal as well as insulin-stimulated conditions, providing further insight into the insulin signaling network. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002557. PMID:26465754

  7. A gene-trap strategy identifies quiescence-induced genes in synchronized myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Pavlath, Grace K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2008-03-01

    Cellular quiescence is characterized not only by reduced mitotic and metabolic activity but also by altered gene expression. Growing evidence suggests that quiescence is not merely a basal state but is regulated by active mechanisms. To understand the molecular programme that governs reversible cell cycle exit, we focused on quiescence-related gene expression in a culture model of myogenic cell arrest and activation. Here we report the identification of quiescence-induced genes using a gene-trap strategy. Using a retroviral vector, we generated a library of gene traps in C2C12 myoblasts that were screened for arrest-induced insertions by live cell sorting (FACS-gal). Several independent gene- trap lines revealed arrest-dependent induction of betagal activity, confirming the efficacy of the FACS screen. The locus of integration was identified in 15 lines. In three lines,insertion occurred in genes previously implicated in the control of quiescence, i.e. EMSY - a BRCA2--interacting protein, p8/com1 - a p300HAT -- binding protein and MLL5 - a SET domain protein. Our results demonstrate that expression of chromatin modulatory genes is induced in G0, providing support to the notion that this reversibly arrested state is actively regulated.

  8. Gravitational force modulates G2/M phase exit in mechanically unloaded myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Benavides Damm, Tatiana; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Egli, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged spaceflight gives rise to muscle loss and reduced strength, a condition commonly referred to as space atrophy. During exposure to microgravity, skeletal muscle myoblasts are mechanically unloaded and respond with attenuated cell proliferation, slowed cell cycle progression, and modified protein expression. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms by which muscle mass declines in response to prolonged microgravity exposure, we grew C2C12 mouse muscle cells under conditions of simulated microgravity (SM) and analyzed their proliferative capacity, cell cycle progression, and cyclin B and D expression. We demonstrated that the retarded cell growth observed in SM was correlated with an approximate 16 h delay in G2/M phase progression, where cells accumulated specifically between the G2 checkpoint and the onset of anaphase, concomitantly with a positive expression for cyclin B. The effect was specific for gravitational mechanical unloading as cells grown under conditions of hypergravity (HG, 4 g) for similar durations of time exhibited normal proliferation and normal cell cycle progression. Our results show that SM and HG exert phenomenological distinct responses over cell cycle progression. The deficits of SM can be restored by terrestrial gravitational force, whereas the effects of HG are indistinguishable from the 1 g control. This suggests that the mechanotransduction apparatus of cells responds differently to mechanical unloading and loading. PMID:23974110

  9. Photovoltaic surfaces enable clonal myoblastic cell release using visible light as external stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Mohammod Kabir; Rodriguez-Devora, Jorge; Tseng, Tzu-Liang Bill; Boland, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Many new biomedical approaches to treating disease require the supply of cells delivered to an injured or diseased organ either individually, collectively as aggregates or sheets, or encapsulated with a scaffold. The collection of cells is accomplished by using enzymatic digestion witch suffer from the need to remove the enzymes after digestion. In addition, enzymatic methods are not applicable for all cells, cell aggregates, cell sheets or 3D structures. The objective of this study was to investigate the release of cultured cells from silicon based Photovoltaic (PV) surfaces using a light source as external stimulation. C2C12 myoblasts were cultured on the negative surface of a PV device and upon confluence they were exposed to light. The amount of released cells was quantified as a function light exposure. It was found that light exposure at 25,000 lux for one hour caused equivalent cell release from the PV surface than trypsination. The released cells are viable and can be re-cultured if needed. This mechanism may offer an alternative method to release excitable cells without using an enzymatic agent. This may be important for cell therapy if larger cell structures such as sheets need to be collected. PMID:26710125

  10. Cross talk between matrix elasticity and mechanical force regulates myoblast traction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E

    2013-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that critical cellular processes are profoundly influenced by the cross talk between extracellular nanomechanical forces and the material properties of the cellular microenvironment. Although many studies have examined either the effect of nanomechanical forces or the material properties of the microenvironment on biological processes, few have investigated the influence of both. Here, we performed simultaneous atomic force microscopy and traction force microscopy to demonstrate that muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) rapidly generate a significant increase in traction when stimulated with a local 10 nN force. Cells were cultured and nanomechanically stimulated on hydrogel substrates with controllable local elastic moduli varying from ~16-89 kPa, as confirmed with atomic force microscopy. Importantly, cellular traction dynamics in response to nanomechanical stimulation only occurred on substrates that were similar to the elasticity of working muscle tissue (~64-89 kPa) as opposed to substrates mimicking resting tissue (~16-51 kPa). The traction response was also transient, occurring within 30 s, and dissipating by 60 s, during constant nanomechanical stimulation. The observed biophysical dynamics are very much dependent on rho-kinase and myosin-II activity and likely contribute to the physiology of these cells. Our results demonstrate the fundamental ability of cells to integrate nanoscale information in the cellular microenvironment, such as nanomechanical forces and substrate mechanics, during the process of mechanotransduction.

  11. Creating Hierarchical Topographies on Fibrous Platforms Using Femtosecond Laser Ablation for Directing Myoblasts Behavior.

    PubMed

    Jun, Indong; Chung, Yong-Woo; Heo, Yun-Hoe; Han, Hyung-Seop; Park, Jimin; Jeong, Hongsoo; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Yu Bin; Kim, Yu-Chan; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Shin, Heungsoo; Jeon, Hojeong

    2016-02-10

    Developing an artificial extracellular matrix that closely mimics the native tissue microenvironment is important for use as both a cell culture platform for controlling cell fate and an in vitro model system for investigating the role of the cellular microenvironment. Electrospinning, one of the methods for fabricating structures that mimic the native ECM, is a promising technique for creating fibrous platforms. It is well-known that align or randomly distributed electrospun fibers provide cellular contact guidance in a single pattern. However, native tissues have hierarchical structures, i.e., topographies on the micro- and nanoscales, rather than a single structure. Thus, we fabricated randomly distributed nanofibrous (720 ± 80 nm in diameter) platforms via a conventional electrospinning process, and then we generated microscale grooves using a femtosecond laser ablation process to develop engineered fibrous platforms with patterned hierarchical topographies. The engineered fibrous platforms can regulate cellular adhesive morphology, proliferation, and distinct distribution of focal adhesion proteins. Furthermore, confluent myoblasts cultured on the engineered fibrous platforms revealed that the direction of myotube assembly can be controlled. These results indicate that our engineered fibrous platforms may be useful tools in investigating the roles of nano- and microscale topographies in the communication between cells and ECM. PMID:26771693

  12. Chromatin plasticity as a differentiation index during muscle differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Higuchi, Sayaka; Kawauchi, Keiko; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Ichimura, Taro; Fujita, Hideaki

    2012-02-24

    Skeletal muscle undergoes complicated differentiation steps that include cell-cycle arrest, cell fusion, and maturation, which are controlled through sequential expression of transcription factors. During muscle differentiation, remodeling of the epigenetic landscape is also known to take place on a large scale, determining cell fate. In an attempt to determine the extent of epigenetic remodeling during muscle differentiation, we characterized the plasticity of the chromatin structure using C2C12 myoblasts. Differentiation of C2C12 cells was induced by lowering the serum concentration after they had reached full confluence, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated myotubes. Upon induction of differentiation, the nucleus size decreased whereas the aspect ratio increased, indicating the presence of force on the nucleus during differentiation. Movement of the nucleus was also suppressed when differentiation was induced, indicating that the plasticity of chromatin changed upon differentiation. To evaluate the histone dynamics during differentiation, FRAP experiment was performed, which showed an increase in the immobile fraction of histone proteins when differentiation was induced. To further evaluate the change in the histone dynamics during differentiation, FCS was performed, which showed a decrease in histone mobility on differentiation. We here show that the plasticity of chromatin decreases upon differentiation, which takes place in a stepwise manner, and that it can be used as an index for the differentiation stage during myogenesis using the state diagram developed with the parameters obtained in this study.

  13. Photovoltaic surfaces enable clonal myoblastic cell release using visible light as external stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Mohammod Kabir; Rodriguez-Devora, Jorge; Tseng, Tzu-Liang Bill; Boland, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Many new biomedical approaches to treating disease require the supply of cells delivered to an injured or diseased organ either individually, collectively as aggregates or sheets, or encapsulated with a scaffold. The collection of cells is accomplished by using enzymatic digestion witch suffer from the need to remove the enzymes after digestion. In addition, enzymatic methods are not applicable for all cells, cell aggregates, cell sheets or 3D structures. The objective of this study was to investigate the release of cultured cells from silicon based Photovoltaic (PV) surfaces using a light source as external stimulation. C2C12 myoblasts were cultured on the negative surface of a PV device and upon confluence they were exposed to light. The amount of released cells was quantified as a function light exposure. It was found that light exposure at 25,000 lux for one hour caused equivalent cell release from the PV surface than trypsination. The released cells are viable and can be re-cultured if needed. This mechanism may offer an alternative method to release excitable cells without using an enzymatic agent. This may be important for cell therapy if larger cell structures such as sheets need to be collected.

  14. Chitooligomer-Immobilized Biointerfaces with Micropatterned Geometries for Unidirectional Alignment of Myoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poosala, Pornthida; Kitaoka, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses a robust capacity to regenerate functional architectures with a unidirectional orientation. In this study, we successfully arranged skeletal myoblast (C2C12) cells along micropatterned gold strips on which chitohexaose was deposited via a vectorial chain immobilization approach. Hexa-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc6) was site-selectively modified at its reducing end with thiosemicarbazide, then immobilized on a gold substrate in striped micropatterns via S–Au chemisorption. Gold micropatterns ranged from 100 to 1000 µm in width. Effects of patterning geometries on C2C12 cell alignment, morphology, and gene expression were investigated. Unidirectional alignment of C2C12 cells having GlcNAc6 receptors was clearly observed along the micropatterns. Decreasing striped pattern width increased cell attachment and proliferation, suggesting that the fixed GlcNAc6 and micropatterns impacted cell function. Possibly, interactions between nonreducing end groups of fixed GlcNAc6 and cell surface receptors initiated cellular alignment. Our technique for mimicking native tissue organization should advance applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26784249

  15. Distinctive Effects of Cytochalasin B in Chick Primary Myoblasts and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Ivone Rosa; Costa, Manoel Luis; Mermelstein, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Actin-based structures play fundamental roles in cellular functions. However it remains controversial how cells cope with the absence of F-actin structures. This report focuses on short- and long-term effects of cytochalasin B (CB) on actin-complexes in fibroblasts and myoblasts. Thirty min of CB treatment dispersed subplasma actin cortices, lamellipodia, ruffled membranes, stress fibers and adhesion plaques into actin patches in fibroblasts and muscle cells. In contrast, 72 hrs CB treatment showed distinct morphological effects. Fibroblasts became giant multinucleated-finger shaped with 5 to 10 protrusions, 3–8 μm in width, and >200 μm in length. They lacked cortical actin, stress fibers, adhesion plaques and ruffled membranes but contained immense lamelliopodia with abnormal adhesion plaque protein complexes. Muscle cells transformed into multinucleated globular-shaped but contained normal I-Z-I and A-bands, indicating that CB did not interfere with the assembly of myofibrils. Within 30 min after CB removal, finger-shaped fibroblasts returned to their original shape and actin-containing structures rapidly reappeared, whereas muscle cells respond slowly to form elongated myotubes following CB washout. The capacity to grow, complete several nuclear cycles, assemble intermediate filaments and microtubules without a morphologically recognizable actin cytoskeleton raises interesting issues related to the role of the actin compartments in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27119825

  16. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  17. MyoD-positive myoblasts are present in mature fetal organs lacking skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gerhart, Jacquelyn; Bast, Brian; Neely, Christine; Iem, Stephanie; Amegbe, Paula; Niewenhuis, Robert; Miklasz, Steven; Cheng, Pei Feng; George-Weinstein, Mindy

    2001-01-01

    The epiblast of the chick embryo gives rise to the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm during gastrulation. Previous studies revealed that MyoD-positive cells were present throughout the epiblast, suggesting that skeletal muscle precursors would become incorporated into all three germ layers. The focus of the present study was to examine a variety of organs from the chicken fetus for the presence of myogenic cells. RT-PCR and in situ hybridizations demonstrated that MyoD-positive cells were present in the brain, lung, intestine, kidney, spleen, heart, and liver. When these organs were dissociated and placed in culture, a subpopulation of cells differentiated into skeletal muscle. The G8 antibody was used to label those cells that expressed MyoD in vivo and to follow their fate in vitro. Most, if not all, of the muscle that formed in culture arose from cells that expressed MyoD and G8 in vivo. Practically all of the G8-positive cells from the intestine differentiated after purification by FACS®. This population of ectopically located cells appears to be distinct from multipotential stem cells and myofibroblasts. They closely resemble quiescent, stably programmed skeletal myoblasts with the capacity to differentiate when placed in a permissive environment. PMID:11684706

  18. An adaptable stage perfusion incubator for the controlled cultivation of C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Felix; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Bärtschi, Christoph A; Dittrich, Petra S

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a stage perfusion incubation system that allows for the cultivation of mammalian cells within PDMS microfluidic devices for long-term microscopic examination and analysis. The custom-built stage perfusion incubator is adaptable to any x-y microscope stage and is enabled for temperature, gas and humidity control as well as equipped with chip and tubing holder. The applied double-layered microfluidic chip allows the predetermined positioning and concentration of cells while the gas permeable PDMS material facilitates pH control via CO2 levels throughout the chip. We demonstrate the functionality of this system by culturing C2C12 murine myoblasts in buffer free medium within its confines for up to 26 hours. We moreover demonstrated the system's compatibility with various chip configurations, other cells lines (HEK-293 cells) and for longer-term culturing. The cost-efficient system are applicable for any type of PDMS-based cell culture system. Detailed technical drawings and specification to reproduce this perfusion incubation system is provided in the ESI.

  19. Plasma membrane characterization, by scanning electron microscopy, of multipotent myoblasts-derived populations sorted using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Massimo; Mitchell, Steve; Waterfall, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Multipotent progenitor cells have shown promise for use in biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. The implementation of such cells for clinical application requires a synchronized, phenotypically and/or genotypically, homogenous cell population. Here we have demonstrated the implementation of a biological tag-free dielectrophoretic device used for discrimination of multipotent myoblastic C2C12 model. The multipotent capabilities in differentiation, for these cells, diminishes with higher passage number, so for cultures above 70 passages only a small percentage of cells is able to differentiate into terminal myotubes. In this work we demonstrated that we could recover, above 96% purity, specific cell types from a mixed population of cells at high passage number without any biological tag using dielectrophoresis. The purity of the samples was confirmed by cytometric analysis using the cell specific marker embryonic myosin. To further investigate the dielectric properties of the cell plasma membrane we co-culture C2C12 with similar size, when in suspension, GFP-positive fibroblast as feeder layer. The level of separation between the cell types was above 98% purity which was confirmed by flow cytometry. These levels of separation are assumed to account for cell size and for the plasma membrane morphological differences between C2C12 and fibroblast unrelated to the stages of the cell cycle which was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Plasma membrane conformational differences were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. PMID:23933253

  20. Plasma membrane characterization, by scanning electron microscopy, of multipotent myoblasts-derived populations sorted using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Massimo; Mitchell, Steve; Waterfall, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Multipotent progenitor cells have shown promise for use in biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. The implementation of such cells for clinical application requires a synchronized, phenotypically and/or genotypically, homogenous cell population. Here we have demonstrated the implementation of a biological tag-free dielectrophoretic device used for discrimination of multipotent myoblastic C2C12 model. The multipotent capabilities in differentiation, for these cells, diminishes with higher passage number, so for cultures above 70 passages only a small percentage of cells is able to differentiate into terminal myotubes. In this work we demonstrated that we could recover, above 96% purity, specific cell types from a mixed population of cells at high passage number without any biological tag using dielectrophoresis. The purity of the samples was confirmed by cytometric analysis using the cell specific marker embryonic myosin. To further investigate the dielectric properties of the cell plasma membrane we co-culture C2C12 with similar size, when in suspension, GFP-positive fibroblast as feeder layer. The level of separation between the cell types was above 98% purity which was confirmed by flow cytometry. These levels of separation are assumed to account for cell size and for the plasma membrane morphological differences between C2C12 and fibroblast unrelated to the stages of the cell cycle which was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Plasma membrane conformational differences were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Cross talk between matrix elasticity and mechanical force regulates myoblast traction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2013-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that critical cellular processes are profoundly influenced by the cross talk between extracellular nanomechanical forces and the material properties of the cellular microenvironment. Although many studies have examined either the effect of nanomechanical forces or the material properties of the microenvironment on biological processes, few have investigated the influence of both. Here, we performed simultaneous atomic force microscopy and traction force microscopy to demonstrate that muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) rapidly generate a significant increase in traction when stimulated with a local 10 nN force. Cells were cultured and nanomechanically stimulated on hydrogel substrates with controllable local elastic moduli varying from ˜16-89 kPa, as confirmed with atomic force microscopy. Importantly, cellular traction dynamics in response to nanomechanical stimulation only occurred on substrates that were similar to the elasticity of working muscle tissue (˜64-89 kPa) as opposed to substrates mimicking resting tissue (˜16-51 kPa). The traction response was also transient, occurring within 30 s, and dissipating by 60 s, during constant nanomechanical stimulation. The observed biophysical dynamics are very much dependent on rho-kinase and myosin-II activity and likely contribute to the physiology of these cells. Our results demonstrate the fundamental ability of cells to integrate nanoscale information in the cellular microenvironment, such as nanomechanical forces and substrate mechanics, during the process of mechanotransduction.

  2. Graphene oxide increases the viability of C2C12 myoblasts microencapsulated in alginate.

    PubMed

    Ciriza, J; Saenz del Burgo, L; Virumbrales-Muñoz, M; Ochoa, I; Fernandez, L J; Orive, G; Hernandez, R M; Pedraz, J L

    2015-09-30

    Cell microencapsulation represents a great promise for long-term drug delivery, but still several challenges need to be overcome before its translation into the clinic, such as the long term cell survival inside the capsules. On this regard, graphene oxide has shown to promote proliferation of different cell types either in two or three dimensions. Therefore, we planned to combine graphene oxide with the cell microencapsulation technology. We first studied the effect of this material on the stability of the capsules and next we analyzed the biocompatibility of this chemical compound with erythropoietin secreting C2C12 myoblasts within the microcapsule matrix. We produced 160 μm-diameter alginate microcapsules with increasing concentrations of graphene oxide and did not find modifications on the physicochemical parameters of traditional alginate microcapsules. Moreover, we observed that the viability of encapsulated cells within alginate microcapsules containing specific graphene oxide concentrations was enhanced. These results provide a relevant step for the future clinical application of graphene oxide on cell microencapsulation.

  3. An NF-κB--EphrinA5-Dependent Communication between NG2(+) Interstitial Cells and Myoblasts Promotes Muscle Growth in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jin-Mo; Wang, David J; Peterson, Jennifer M; Shintaku, Jonathan; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Coppola, Vincenzo; Frakes, Ashley E; Kaspar, Brian K; Cornelison, Dawn D; Guttridge, Denis C

    2016-01-25

    Skeletal muscle growth immediately following birth is critical for proper body posture and locomotion. However, compared with embryogenesis and adulthood, the processes regulating the maturation of neonatal muscles is considerably less clear. Studies in the 1960s predicted that neonatal muscle growth results from nuclear accretion of myoblasts preferentially at the tips of myofibers. Remarkably, little information has been added since then to resolve how myoblasts migrate to the ends of fibers. Here, we provide insight into this process by revealing a unique NF-κB-dependent communication between NG2(+) interstitial cells and myoblasts. NF-κB in NG2(+) cells promotes myoblast migration to the tips of myofibers through cell-cell contact. This occurs through expression of ephrinA5 from NG2(+) cells, which we further deduce is an NF-κB target gene. Together, these results suggest that NF-κB plays an important role in the development of newborn muscles to ensure proper myoblast migration for fiber growth.

  4. Silicon substrate as a novel cell culture device for myoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tissue and organ regeneration via transplantation of cell bodies in-situ has become an interesting strategy in regenerative medicine. Developments of cell carriers to systematically deliver cell bodies in the damage site have fall shorten on effectively meet this purpose due to inappropriate release control. Thus, there is still need of novel substrate to achieve targeted cell delivery with appropriate vehicles. In the present study, silicon based photovoltaic (PV) devices are used as a cell culturing substrate for the expansion of myoblast mouse cell (C2C12 cells) that offers an atmosphere for regular cell growth in vitro. The adherence, viability and proliferation of the cells on the silicon surface were examined by direct cell counting and fluorescence microscopy. Results It was found that on the silicon surface, cells proliferated over 7 days showing normal morphology, and expressed their biological activities. Cell culture on silicon substrate reveals their attachment and proliferation over the surface of the PV device. After first day of culture, cell viability was 88% and cell survival remained above 86% as compared to the seeding day after the seventh day. Furthermore, the DAPI staining revealed that the initially scattered cells were able to eventually build a cellular monolayer on top of the silicon substrate. Conclusions This study explored the biological applications of silicon based PV devices, demonstrating its biocompatibility properties and found useful for culture of cells on porous 2-D surface. The incorporation of silicon substrate has been efficaciously revealed as a potential cell carrier or vehicle in cell growth technology, allowing for their use in cell based gene therapy, tissue engineering, and therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:24885347

  5. Application of novel anodized titanium for enhanced recruitment of H9C2 cardiac myoblast

    PubMed Central

    Behjati, Mohaddeseh; Moradi, Iman; Kazemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Anodized treated titanium surfaces, have been proposed as potential surfaces with better cell attachment capacities. We have investigated the adhesion and proliferation properties of H9C2 cardiac myoblasts on anodized treated titanium surface. Materials and Methods: Surface topography and anodized tubules were examined by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Control and test substrates were inserted to the bottom of 24-well tissue culture plates. Culture media including H9C2 cells were loaded on the surface of substrate and control wells at the second passage. Evaluation of cell growth, proliferation, viability and surface cytotoxicity was performed using MTT test. After 48 hr, some samples were inspected by SEM. DAPI-staining was used to count attached cells. Results: MTT results for cells cultured on anodized titanium and unanodized titanium surfaces was equal to 1.56 and 0.55 fold change compared to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The surface had no cytotoxic effects on cells. The average cell attachment to TCPS, unanodized and anodized titanium surface was 2497±40.16, 1250±20.11 and 4859.5±54.173, respectively. Cell adhesion to anodized titanium was showed 1.95 and 3.89 fold increase compared to TCPS and unanodized titanium, respectively (P<0.05). Conclusion: Anodized titanium surfaces can be potentially applied for enhanced recruitment of H9C2 cells. This unique property makes these inexpensive anodized surfaces as a candidate surface for attachment of cardiac cells and consequently for cardiac regeneration purposes. PMID:26526098

  6. Chromatin plasticity as a differentiation index during muscle differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Higuchi, Sayaka; Kawauchi, Keiko; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Ichimura, Taro; Fujita, Hideaki

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Change in the epigenetic landscape during myogenesis was optically investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mobility of nuclear proteins was used to state the epigenetic status of the cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mobility of nuclear proteins decreased as myogenesis progressed in C2C12. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation state diagram was developed using parameters obtained. -- Abstract: Skeletal muscle undergoes complicated differentiation steps that include cell-cycle arrest, cell fusion, and maturation, which are controlled through sequential expression of transcription factors. During muscle differentiation, remodeling of the epigenetic landscape is also known to take place on a large scale, determining cell fate. In an attempt to determine the extent of epigenetic remodeling during muscle differentiation, we characterized the plasticity of the chromatin structure using C2C12 myoblasts. Differentiation of C2C12 cells was induced by lowering the serum concentration after they had reached full confluence, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated myotubes. Upon induction of differentiation, the nucleus size decreased whereas the aspect ratio increased, indicating the presence of force on the nucleus during differentiation. Movement of the nucleus was also suppressed when differentiation was induced, indicating that the plasticity of chromatin changed upon differentiation. To evaluate the histone dynamics during differentiation, FRAP experiment was performed, which showed an increase in the immobile fraction of histone proteins when differentiation was induced. To further evaluate the change in the histone dynamics during differentiation, FCS was performed, which showed a decrease in histone mobility on differentiation. We here show that the plasticity of chromatin decreases upon differentiation, which takes place in a stepwise manner, and that it can be used as an index for the differentiation stage

  7. Plasma membrane characterization, by scanning electron microscopy, of multipotent myoblasts-derived populations sorted using dielectrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Muratore, Massimo; Mitchell, Steve; Waterfall, Martin

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Dielectrophoretic separation/sorting of multipotent cells. •Plasma membrane microvilli structure of C2C12 and fibroblasts by SEM microscopy. •Cell cycle determination by Ki-67 in DEP-sorted cells. •Plasma membrane differences responsible for changes in membrane capacitance. -- Abstract: Multipotent progenitor cells have shown promise for use in biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. The implementation of such cells for clinical application requires a synchronized, phenotypically and/or genotypically, homogenous cell population. Here we have demonstrated the implementation of a biological tag-free dielectrophoretic device used for discrimination of multipotent myoblastic C2C12 model. The multipotent capabilities in differentiation, for these cells, diminishes with higher passage number, so for cultures above 70 passages only a small percentage of cells is able to differentiate into terminal myotubes. In this work we demonstrated that we could recover, above 96% purity, specific cell types from a mixed population of cells at high passage number without any biological tag using dielectrophoresis. The purity of the samples was confirmed by cytometric analysis using the cell specific marker embryonic myosin. To further investigate the dielectric properties of the cell plasma membrane we co-culture C2C12 with similar size, when in suspension, GFP-positive fibroblast as feeder layer. The level of separation between the cell types was above 98% purity which was confirmed by flow cytometry. These levels of separation are assumed to account for cell size and for the plasma membrane morphological differences between C2C12 and fibroblast unrelated to the stages of the cell cycle which was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Plasma membrane conformational differences were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Runx1 Transcription Factor Is Required for Myoblasts Proliferation during Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Umansky, Kfir Baruch; Gruenbaum-Cohen, Yael; Tsoory, Michael; Feldmesser, Ester; Goldenberg, Dalia; Brenner, Ori; Groner, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Following myonecrosis, muscle satellite cells proliferate, differentiate and fuse, creating new myofibers. The Runx1 transcription factor is not expressed in naïve developing muscle or in adult muscle tissue. However, it is highly expressed in muscles exposed to myopathic damage yet, the role of Runx1 in muscle regeneration is completely unknown. Our study of Runx1 function in the muscle’s response to myonecrosis reveals that this transcription factor is activated and cooperates with the MyoD and AP-1/c-Jun transcription factors to drive the transcription program of muscle regeneration. Mice lacking dystrophin and muscle Runx1 (mdx - /Runx1 f/f), exhibit impaired muscle regeneration leading to age-dependent muscle waste, gradual decrease in motor capabilities and a shortened lifespan. Runx1-deficient primary myoblasts are arrested at cell cycle G1 and consequently differentiate. Such premature differentiation disrupts the myoblasts’ normal proliferation/differentiation balance, reduces the number and size of regenerating myofibers and impairs muscle regeneration. Our combined Runx1-dependent gene expression, ChIP-seq, ATAC-seq and histone H3K4me1/H3K27ac modification analyses revealed a subset of Runx1-regulated genes that are co-occupied by MyoD and c-Jun in mdx - /Runx1 f/f muscle. The data provide unique insights into the transcriptional program driving muscle regeneration and implicate Runx1 as an important participant in the pathology of muscle wasting diseases. PMID:26275053

  9. Live imaging provides new insights on dynamic F-actin filopodia and differential endocytosis during myoblast fusion in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Haralalka, Shruti; Shelton, Claude; Cartwright, Heather N; Guo, Fengli; Trimble, Rhonda; Kumar, Ram P; Abmayr, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    The process of myogenesis includes the recognition, adhesion, and fusion of committed myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia. In the larval body wall muscles of Drosophila, this elaborate process is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs), and cell adhesion molecules Kin-of-IrreC (Kirre) and Sticks-and-stones (Sns) on their respective surfaces. The FCMs appear to provide the driving force for fusion, via the assembly of protrusions associated with branched F-actin and the WASp, SCAR and Arp2/3 pathways. In the present study, we utilize the dorsal pharyngeal musculature that forms in the Drosophila embryo as a model to explore myoblast fusion and visualize the fusion process in live embryos. These muscles rely on the same cell types and genes as the body wall muscles, but are amenable to live imaging since they do not undergo extensive morphogenetic movement during formation. Time-lapse imaging with F-actin and membrane markers revealed dynamic FCM-associated actin-enriched protrusions that rapidly extend and retract into the myotube from different sites within the actin focus. Ultrastructural analysis of this actin-enriched area showed that they have two morphologically distinct structures: wider invasions and/or narrow filopodia that contain long linear filaments. Consistent with this, formin Diaphanous (Dia) and branched actin nucleator, Arp3, are found decorating the filopodia or enriched at the actin focus, respectively, indicating that linear actin is present along with branched actin at sites of fusion in the FCM. Gain-of-function Dia and loss-of-function Arp3 both lead to fusion defects, a decrease of F-actin foci and prominent filopodia from the FCMs. We also observed differential endocytosis of cell surface components at sites of fusion, with actin reorganizing factors, WASp and SCAR, and Kirre remaining on the myotube surface and Sns preferentially taken up with other membrane proteins into early endosomes and lysosomes in the

  10. The Hippo effector TAZ (WWTR1) transforms myoblasts and TAZ abundance is associated with reduced survival in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Abdalla; Sun, Congshan; De Mello, Vanessa; Selfe, Joanna; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shipley, Janet; Murray, Graeme I; Zammit, Pete S; Wackerhage, Henning

    2016-09-01

    The Hippo effector YAP has recently been identified as a potent driver of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Most reports suggest that the YAP paralogue TAZ (gene symbol WWTR1) functions as YAP but, in skeletal muscle, TAZ has been reported to promote myogenic differentiation, whereas YAP inhibits it. Here, we investigated whether TAZ is also a rhabdomyosarcoma oncogene or whether TAZ acts as a YAP antagonist. Immunostaining of rhabdomyosarcoma tissue microarrays revealed that TAZ is significantly associated with poor survival in ERMS. In 12% of fusion gene-negative rhabdomyosarcomas, the TAZ locus is gained, which is correlated with increased expression. Constitutively active TAZ S89A significantly increased proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts and, importantly, colony formation on soft agar, suggesting transformation. However, TAZ then switches to enhance myogenic differentiation in C2C12 myoblasts, unlike YAP. Conversely, lentiviral shRNA-mediated TAZ knockdown in human ERMS cells reduced proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. While TAZ S89A or YAP1 S127A similarly activated the 8XGTIIC-Luc Hippo reporter, only YAP1 S127A activated the Brachyury (T-box) reporter. Consistent with its oncogene function, TAZ S89A induced expression of the ERMS cancer stem cell gene Myf5 and the serine biosynthesis pathway (Phgdh, Psat1, Psph) in C2C12 myoblasts. Thus, TAZ is associated with poor survival in ERMS and could act as an oncogene in rhabdomyosarcoma. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:27184927

  11. Glypican-1 regulates myoblast response to HGF via Met in a lipid raft-dependent mechanism: effect on migration of skeletal muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Via the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exerts key roles involving skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are critical modulators of HGF activity, but the role of specific HSPGs in HGF regulation is poorly understood. Glypican-1 is the only HSPG expressed in myoblasts that localize in lipid raft membrane domains, controlling cell responses to extracellular stimuli. We determined if glypican-1 in these domains is necessary to stabilize the HGF-Met signaling complex and myoblast response to HGF. Methods C2C12 myoblasts and a derived clone (C6) with low glypican-1 expression were used as an experimental model. The activation of Met, ERK1/2 and AKT in response to HGF was evaluated. The distribution of Met and its activated form in lipid raft domains, as well as its dependence on glypican-1, were characterized by sucrose density gradient fractionation in both cell types. Rescue experiments reexpressing glypican-1 or a chimeric glypican-1 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of mouse syndecan-1 or myoblast pretreatment with MβCD were conducted. In vitro and in vivo myoblast migration assays in response to HGF were also performed. Results Glypican-1 localization in membrane raft domains was required for a maximum cell response to HGF. It stabilized Met and HGF in lipid raft domains, forming a signaling complex where the active phospho-Met receptor was concentrated. Glypican-1 also stabilized CD44 in a HGF-dependent manner. In addition, glypican-1 was required for in vitro and in vivo HGF-dependent myoblast migration. Conclusions Glypican-1 is a regulator of HGF-dependent signaling via Met in lipid raft domains. PMID:24517345

  12. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) promotes myoblast proliferation and skeletal muscle growth of embryonic chickens via the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Minli; Wang, Huan; Xu, Yali; Yu, Debing; Li, Dongfeng; Liu, Xiuhong; Du, Wenxing

    2015-08-01

    During embryonic development, IGF-1 fulfils crucial roles in skeletal myogenesis. However, the involvement of IGF-1-induced myoblast proliferation in muscle growth is still unclear. In the present study, we have characterised the role of IGF-1 in myoblast proliferation both in vitro and in vivo and have revealed novel details of how exogenous IGF-1 influences myogenic genes in chicken embryos. The results show that IGF-1 significantly induces the proliferation of cultured myoblasts in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the IGF-1 treatment significantly promoted myoblasts entering a new cell cycle and increasing the mRNA expression levels of cell cycle-dependent genes. However, these effects were inhibited by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and the Akt inhibitor KP372-1. These data indicated that the pro-proliferative effect of IGF-1 was mediated in response to the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. Moreover, we also showed that exogenous IGF-1 stimulated myoblast proliferation in vivo. IGF-1 administration obviously promoted the incorporation of BrdU and remarkably increased the number of PAX7-positive cells in the skeletal muscle of chicken embryos. Administration of IGF-1 also significantly induced the upregulation of myogenic factors gene, the enhancement of c-Myc and the inhibition of myostatin (Mstn) expression. These findings demonstrate that IGF-1 has strong activity as a promoter of myoblast expansion and muscle fiber formation during early myogenesis. Therefore, this study offers insight into the mechanisms responsible for IGF-1-mediated stimulation of embryonic skeletal muscle development, which could have important implications for the improvement of chicken meat production.

  13. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling changes C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation by inducing Id3 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long; Shi, Songting; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Fangfang; Dijke, Peter ten

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Id3 but not Id1 is induced by Wnt3a stimulation in C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a induces Id3 expression via canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a-induced Id3 expression does not depend on BMP signaling activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Induction of Id3 expression is critical determinant in Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Canonical Wnt signaling plays important roles in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we report that inhibitor of differentiation (Id)3 is a Wnt-inducible gene in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Wnt3a induced Id3 expression in a {beta}-catenin-dependent manner. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) also potently induced Id3 expression. However, Wnt-induced Id3 expression occurred independent of the BMP/Smad pathway. Functional studies showed that Id3 depletion in C2C12 cells impaired Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity, an early marker of osteoblast cells. Id3 depletion elevated myogenin induction during myogenic differentiation and partially impaired Wnt3a suppressed myogenin expression in C2C12 cells. These results suggest that Id3 is an important Wnt/{beta}-catenin induced gene in myoblast cell fate determination.

  14. α-Syntrophin is involved in the survival signaling pathway in myoblasts under menadione-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeong-A; Choi, Su Jin; Moon, Jae Yun; Kim, Hye Sun

    2016-05-15

    Dystrophin-deficient muscle is known to be more vulnerable to oxidative stress, but not much is known about the signaling pathway(s) responsible for this phenomenon. α-Syntrophin, a component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, can function as a scaffold protein because of its multiple protein interaction domains. In this study, we investigated the role of α-syntrophin in C2 myoblasts under menadione-induced oxidative stress. We found that the protein level of α-syntrophin was elevated when cells were exposed to menadione. To investigate the function of α-syntrophin during oxidative stress, we established α-syntrophin-overexpressing and knockdown cell lines. The α-syntrophin-overexpressing cells were resistant to the menadione-induced oxidative stress. In addition, survival signalings such as protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation and the Bcl-2/BAX ratio were increased in these cells. On the other hand, apoptotic signals such as cleavage of caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) were increased in the α-syntrophin knockdown cells. Furthermore, Ca(2+)influx, which is known to increase when cells are exposed to oxidative stress, decreased in the α-syntrophin-overexpressing cells, but increased in the knockdown cells. These results suggest that α-syntrophin plays a pivotal role in the survival pathway triggered by menadione-induced oxidative stress in cultured myoblasts.

  15. Muscle-specific androgen receptor deletion shows limited actions in myoblasts but not in myofibers in different muscles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kesha; Chiu, Maria W S; Russell, Patricia K; Skinner, Jarrod P; Lee, Nicole K L; Fam, Barbara C; Zajac, Jeffrey D; MacLean, Helen E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the direct muscle cell-mediated actions of androgens by comparing two different mouse lines. The cre-loxP system was used to delete the DNA-binding activity of the androgen receptor (AR) in mature myofibers (MCK mAR(ΔZF2)) in one model and the DNA-binding activity of the AR in both proliferating myoblasts and myofibers (α-actin mAR(ΔZF2)) in another model. We found that hind-limb muscle mass was normal in MCK mAR(ΔZF2) mice and that relative mass of only some hind-limb muscles was reduced in α-actin mAR(ΔZF2) mice. This suggests that myoblasts and myofibers are not the major cellular targets mediating the anabolic actions of androgens on male muscle during growth and development. Levator ani muscle mass was decreased in both mouse lines, demonstrating that there is a myofiber-specific effect in this unique androgen-dependent muscle. We found that the pattern of expression of genes including c-myc, Fzd4 and Igf2 is associated with androgen-dependent changes in muscle mass; therefore, these genes are likely to be mediators of anabolic actions of androgens. Further research is required to identify the major targets of androgen actions in muscle, which are likely to include indirect actions via other tissues.

  16. Myocyte-derived Tnfsf14 is a survival factor necessary for myoblast differentiation and skeletal muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Waldemer-Streyer, R J; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle tissue has a uniquely robust capacity for regeneration, which gradually declines with aging or is compromised in muscle diseases. The cellular mechanisms regulating adult myogenesis remain incompletely understood. Here we identify the cytokine tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (Tnfsf14) as a positive regulator of myoblast differentiation in culture and muscle regeneration in vivo. We find that Tnfsf14, as well as its cognate receptors herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) and lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR), are expressed in both differentiating myocytes and regenerating myofibers. Depletion of Tnfsf14 or either receptor inhibits myoblast differentiation and promotes apoptosis. Our results also suggest that Tnfsf14 regulates myogenesis by supporting cell survival and maintaining a sufficient pool of cells for fusion. In addition, we show that Akt mediates the survival and myogenic function of Tnfsf14. Importantly, local knockdown of Tnfsf14 is found to impair injury-induced muscle regeneration in a mouse model, affirming an important physiological role for Tnfsf14 in myogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate that localized overexpression of Tnfsf14 potently enhances muscle regeneration, and that this regenerative capacity of Tnfsf14 is dependent on Akt signaling. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel regulator of skeletal myogenesis and implicate Tnfsf14 in future therapeutic development. PMID:26720335

  17. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Nordgren, Kendra K.S. Wallace, Kendall B.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  18. Novel long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in myogenesis: a miR-31 overlapping lncRNA transcript controls myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ballarino, Monica; Cazzella, Valentina; D'Andrea, Daniel; Grassi, Luigi; Bisceglie, Lavinia; Cipriano, Andrea; Santini, Tiziana; Pinnarò, Chiara; Morlando, Mariangela; Tramontano, Anna; Bozzoni, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Transcriptome analysis allowed the identification of new long noncoding RNAs differentially expressed during murine myoblast differentiation. These transcripts were classified on the basis of their expression under proliferating versus differentiated conditions, muscle-restricted activation, and subcellular localization. Several species displayed preferential expression in dystrophic (mdx) versus wild-type muscles, indicating their possible link with regenerative processes. One of the identified transcripts, lnc-31, even if originating from the same nuclear precursor of miR-31, is produced by a pathway mutually exclusive. We show that lnc-31 and its human homologue hsa-lnc-31 are expressed in proliferating myoblasts, where they counteract differentiation. In line with this, both species are more abundant in mdx muscles and in human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) myoblasts, than in their normal counterparts. Altogether, these data suggest a crucial role for lnc-31 in controlling the differentiation commitment of precursor myoblasts and indicate that its function is maintained in evolution despite the poor sequence conservation with the human counterpart.

  19. Transcriptional upregulation centra of HO-1 by EGB via the MAPKs/Nrf2 pathway in mouse C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Ying; Luo, Meiling; Wu, Qiong; Yu, Lijun; Chu, Haiying

    2015-03-01

    Long-term abuse of alcohol results in chronic alcoholic myopathy which is associated with increased oxidative stress. Ginkgo biloba extract (EGB) is widely used as a therapeutic agent to treat certain cardiovascular and neurological disorders. Although EGB is known to possess antioxidant functions and potent cytoprotective effects, its protective mechanism on alcohol-induced oxidative damage in C2C12 myoblasts remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytoprotective mechanisms of EGB against alcohol-derived oxidative stress in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Challenge with alcohol (100mM) caused an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species in mouse C2C12 myoblasts, which was not alleviated by treatment with EGB. These results indicate that EGB does not seem to act as an ROS scavenger in this experimental model. Additionally, EGB produced activation of ERK and JNK [two major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)], an increase in the nuclear level of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, a stress-responsive protein with antioxidant function). Pretreatment with inhibitors of MAPKs PD98059 (a specific inhibitor of ERK), SP600125 (a specific inhibitor of JNK) abolished both EGB-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 up-regulation. We conclude that EGB confers cytoprotective effects from oxidative stress induced by alcohol in mouse C2C12 myoblasts depend on transcriptional upregulation of HO-1 by EGB via the MAPKs/Nrf2 pathway.

  20. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin enhances cell proliferation and increases the number of desmin-positive cells in myoblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Portilho, Débora M; Soares, Carolina P; Morrot, Alexandre; Thiago, Leandro S; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Savino, Wilson; Costa, Manoel L; Mermelstein, Cláudia

    2012-11-01

    Skeletal myogenesis comprises myoblast replication and differentiation into striated multinucleated myotubes. Agents that interfere with myoblast replication are important tools for the understanding of myogenesis. Recently, we showed that cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) enhances the differentiation step in chick-cultured myogenic cells, involving the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. However, the effects of cholesterol depletion on myoblast replication have not been carefully studied. Here we show that MCD treatment increases cell proliferation in primary chick myogenic cell cultures. Treatment of myogenic cells with the anti-mitotic reagent cytosine arabinoside, immediately following cholesterol depletion, blocks the MCD-induced effects on proliferation. Cholesterol depletion induced an increase in the number of desmin-positive mononucleated cells, and an increase in desmin expression. MCD induces an increase in the expression of the cell cycle regulator p53 and the master switch gene MyoD1. Treatment with BIO, a specific inhibitor of GSK3β, induced effects similar to MCD on cell proliferation; while treatment with Dkk1, a specific inhibitor of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, neutralized the effects of MCD. These findings indicate that rapid changes in the cholesterol content in cell membranes of myoblasts can induce cell proliferation, possibly by the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  1. Administration of insulin to newly hatched chicks improves growth performance via impairment of MyoD gene expression and enhancement of cell proliferation in chicken myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kan; Aoki, Michiru; Kondo, Ryota; Matsushita, Kohichi; Akiba, Yukio; Kamada, Tosihiko

    2012-02-01

    The insulin/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is strongly involved in the differentiation of C2C12 cells, as has been demonstrated by the addition of IGFs and insulin to culture media. In this study, we have characterized the role of insulin in chick myoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and have revealed novel details of how this exogenous hormone influences myogenic genes during differentiation. Chick myoblast cells cultured in differentiation medium (DMEM containing 2% FBS) supplemented with insulin exhibited a significant decrease in MyoD and myogenin mRNA expression after 12h of culture compared to cells cultured in differentiation media alone. MyoD and myogenin immunoreactive proteins in cells cultured in differentiation medium supplemented with insulin were quite low compared to those in control culture. Supplementation of the differentiation media containing insulin with LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor) induced myoblast differentiation. A significant increase in MyoD and myogenin mRNA expression was observed in these cells after incubation for 12h, and the level of expression was similar to that of control cells incubated with differentiation media alone. The DNA content and the phosphor-Erk1/2 protein level were increased by the addition of insulin to the differentiation medium. These results suggest that insulin and its signaling pathway play an inhibitory role in chick myoblast differentiation. A high level of Pax7 mRNA was observed in the skeletal muscle of 3-day-old chicks administered insulin or tolbutamide at 1-day-of-age. In addition, body weight at 21 and 50 days-of-age was significantly greater for chickens administered insulin or tolbutamide at 1-day-of-age than for control chickens. These results detail not only species-specific differences in insulin action for myoblasts but also provide novel information that may be used for the improvement of chicken meat production. PMID:22172340

  2. The CDM superfamily protein MBC directs myoblast fusion through a mechanism that requires phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate binding but is independent of direct interaction with DCrk.

    PubMed

    Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Chen, Mei-Hui; Geisbrecht, Erika R; Abmayr, Susan M

    2006-12-01

    Myoblast city (mbc), a member of the CDM superfamily, is essential in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo for fusion of myoblasts into multinucleate fibers. Using germ line clones in which both maternal and zygotic contributions were eliminated and rescue of the zygotic loss-of-function phenotype, we established that mbc is required in the fusion-competent subset of myoblasts. Along with its close orthologs Dock180 and CED-5, MBC has an SH3 domain at its N terminus, conserved internal domains termed DHR1 and DHR2 (or "Docker"), and C-terminal proline-rich domains that associate with the adapter protein DCrk. The importance of these domains has been evaluated by the ability of MBC mutations and deletions to rescue the mbc loss-of-function muscle phenotype. We demonstrate that the SH3 and Docker domains are essential. Moreover, ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutations that change amino acids within the MBC Docker domain to residues that are conserved in other CDM family members nevertheless eliminate MBC function in the embryo, which suggests that these sites may mediate interactions specific to Drosophila MBC. A functional requirement for the conserved DHR1 domain, which binds to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate, implicates phosphoinositide signaling in myoblast fusion. Finally, the proline-rich C-terminal sites mediate strong interactions with DCrk, as expected. These sites are not required for MBC to rescue the muscle loss-of-function phenotype, however, which suggests that MBC's role in myoblast fusion can be carried out independently of direct DCrk binding.

  3. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Zuloaga, R.; Fuentes, E.N.; Molina, A.; Valdés, J.A.

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP{sub 3}/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation.

  4. Administration of insulin to newly hatched chicks improves growth performance via impairment of MyoD gene expression and enhancement of cell proliferation in chicken myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kan; Aoki, Michiru; Kondo, Ryota; Matsushita, Kohichi; Akiba, Yukio; Kamada, Tosihiko

    2012-02-01

    The insulin/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is strongly involved in the differentiation of C2C12 cells, as has been demonstrated by the addition of IGFs and insulin to culture media. In this study, we have characterized the role of insulin in chick myoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and have revealed novel details of how this exogenous hormone influences myogenic genes during differentiation. Chick myoblast cells cultured in differentiation medium (DMEM containing 2% FBS) supplemented with insulin exhibited a significant decrease in MyoD and myogenin mRNA expression after 12h of culture compared to cells cultured in differentiation media alone. MyoD and myogenin immunoreactive proteins in cells cultured in differentiation medium supplemented with insulin were quite low compared to those in control culture. Supplementation of the differentiation media containing insulin with LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor) induced myoblast differentiation. A significant increase in MyoD and myogenin mRNA expression was observed in these cells after incubation for 12h, and the level of expression was similar to that of control cells incubated with differentiation media alone. The DNA content and the phosphor-Erk1/2 protein level were increased by the addition of insulin to the differentiation medium. These results suggest that insulin and its signaling pathway play an inhibitory role in chick myoblast differentiation. A high level of Pax7 mRNA was observed in the skeletal muscle of 3-day-old chicks administered insulin or tolbutamide at 1-day-of-age. In addition, body weight at 21 and 50 days-of-age was significantly greater for chickens administered insulin or tolbutamide at 1-day-of-age than for control chickens. These results detail not only species-specific differences in insulin action for myoblasts but also provide novel information that may be used for the improvement of chicken meat production.

  5. Dock mediates Scar- and WASp-dependent actin polymerization through interaction with cell adhesion molecules in founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kaipa, Balasankara Reddy; Shao, Huanjie; Schäfer, Gritt; Trinkewitz, Tatjana; Groth, Verena; Liu, Jianqi; Beck, Lothar; Bogdan, Sven; Abmayr, Susan M.; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2013-01-01

    Summary The formation of the larval body wall musculature of Drosophila depends on the asymmetric fusion of two myoblast types, founder cells (FCs) and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs). Recent studies have established an essential function of Arp2/3-based actin polymerization during myoblast fusion, formation of a dense actin focus at the site of fusion in FCMs, and a thin sheath of actin in FCs and/or growing muscles. The formation of these actin structures depends on recognition and adhesion of myoblasts that is mediated by cell surface receptors of the immunoglobulin superfamily. However, the connection of the cell surface receptors with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization is poorly understood. To date only the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Crk has been suggested to link cell adhesion with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization in FCMs. Here, we propose that the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Dock, like Crk, links cell adhesion with actin polymerization. We show that Dock is expressed in FCs and FCMs and colocalizes with the cell adhesion proteins Sns and Duf at cell–cell contact points. Biochemical data in this study indicate that different domains of Dock are involved in binding the cell adhesion molecules Duf, Rst, Sns and Hbs. We emphasize the importance of these interactions by quantifying the enhanced myoblast fusion defects in duf dock, sns dock and hbs dock double mutants. Additionally, we show that Dock interacts biochemically and genetically with Drosophila Scar, Vrp1 and WASp. Based on these data, we propose that Dock links cell adhesion in FCs and FCMs with either Scar– or Vrp1–WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation. PMID:22992459

  6. Dock mediates Scar- and WASp-dependent actin polymerization through interaction with cell adhesion molecules in founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kaipa, Balasankara Reddy; Shao, Huanjie; Schäfer, Gritt; Trinkewitz, Tatjana; Groth, Verena; Liu, Jianqi; Beck, Lothar; Bogdan, Sven; Abmayr, Susan M; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the larval body wall musculature of Drosophila depends on the asymmetric fusion of two myoblast types, founder cells (FCs) and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs). Recent studies have established an essential function of Arp2/3-based actin polymerization during myoblast fusion, formation of a dense actin focus at the site of fusion in FCMs, and a thin sheath of actin in FCs and/or growing muscles. The formation of these actin structures depends on recognition and adhesion of myoblasts that is mediated by cell surface receptors of the immunoglobulin superfamily. However, the connection of the cell surface receptors with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization is poorly understood. To date only the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Crk has been suggested to link cell adhesion with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization in FCMs. Here, we propose that the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Dock, like Crk, links cell adhesion with actin polymerization. We show that Dock is expressed in FCs and FCMs and colocalizes with the cell adhesion proteins Sns and Duf at cell-cell contact points. Biochemical data in this study indicate that different domains of Dock are involved in binding the cell adhesion molecules Duf, Rst, Sns and Hbs. We emphasize the importance of these interactions by quantifying the enhanced myoblast fusion defects in duf dock, sns dock and hbs dock double mutants. Additionally, we show that Dock interacts biochemically and genetically with Drosophila Scar, Vrp1 and WASp. Based on these data, we propose that Dock links cell adhesion in FCs and FCMs with either Scar- or Vrp1-WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation.

  7. Co-transplantation of plasmid-transfected myoblasts and myotubes into rat brains enables high levels of gene expression long-term

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, S.; Williams, P.; Safda, N.; Schultz, E.; Wolff, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously proposed the use of primary muscle cells as a "platform," or "vehicle" for intracerebral transgene expression. Brain grafts of minced muscle, or cultured muscle cells persisted in rat brains for at least 6 mo without any decrease in graft size, or tumor formation. Stable, but moderate levels of intracerebral transgene expression were obtained by transplanting plasmid-transfected myotubes in culture. In the present study, high and stable levels of intracerebral transgene expression were achieved by the co-transplantation of plasmid-transfected myoblasts and myotubes in culture. Approximately 5 X 10(5) myoblasts and myotubes were transfected with 10 micrograms pRSVL plasmid DNA, and 30 micrograms Lipofectin (BRL), respectively. They were mixed together (total cell number was 1 million), and stereotactically injected into the caudate nucleus of an adult rat brain. The activity of luciferase, the product of transgene expression, was stable for at least 4 mo, and much higher than the levels in myotube grafts, or co-grafts of myoblasts and minced muscle. Presumably, the myotubes served as a framework on which the myoblasts can form myotubes. The sections of brains transplanted with co-graft of myoblasts, and myotubes transfected with pRSVLac-Z were stained immunofluorescently for beta-galactosidase activity. The muscle grafts contained beta-galactosidase positive myofibers 4 mo after transplantation. Such high and stable levels of in vivo expression after postnatal gene transfer have rarely been achieved. Primary muscle cells are useful vehicle for transgene expression in brains, and potentially valuable for gene therapy of degenerative neurological disorders.

  8. Silk fibroin-polyurethane blends: physical properties and effect of silk fibroin content on viscoelasticity, biocompatibility and myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung-seok; Gong, Myoung-Seon; Park, Jeong-Hui; Moon, Sung-Il; Wall, Ivan B; Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Jae Ho; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2013-11-01

    As a way to modify both the physical and biological properties of a highly elastic and degradable polyurethane (PU), silk fibroin (SF) was blended with the PU at differing ratios. With increasing SF content, the tensile strength decreased as did the strain at break; the stiffness increased to around 35 MPa for the highest silk content. C2C12 (a mouse myoblast cell line) cells were used for in vitro experiments and showed significantly improved cell responses with increasing SF content. With increasing SF content the number of non-adherent cells was reduced at both 4 and 8h compared to the sample with the lowest SF content. In addition, muscle marker genes were upregulated compared to the sample containing no SF, and in particular sarcomeric actin and α-actin. PMID:23892141

  9. Conessine Interferes with Oxidative Stress-Induced C2C12 Myoblast Cell Death through Inhibition of Autophagic Flux

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunju; Lee, Kang Il; Jang, Minsu; Namkoong, Sim; Park, Rackhyun; Ju, Hyunwoo; Choi, Inho; Oh, Won Keun

    2016-01-01

    Conessine, a steroidal alkaloid isolated from Holarrhena floribunda, has anti-malarial activity and interacts with the histamine H3 receptor. However, the cellular effects of conessine are poorly understood. Accordingly, we evaluated the involvement of conessine in the regulation of autophagy. We searched natural compounds that modulate autophagy, and conessine was identified as an inhibitor of autophagic flux. Conessine treatment induced the formation of autophagosomes, and p62, an autophagic adapter, accumulated in the autophagosomes. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) result in muscle cell death by inducing excessive autophagic flux. Treatment with conessine inhibited H2O2-induced autophagic flux in C2C12 myoblast cells and also interfered with cell death. Our results indicate that conessine has the potential effect to inhibit muscle cell death by interfering with autophagic flux. PMID:27257813

  10. Degree of Suppression of Mouse Myoblast Cell Line C2C12 Differentiation Varies According to Chondroitin Sulfate Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Warita, Katsuhiko; Oshima, Nana; Takeda-Okuda, Naoko; Tamura, Jun-ichi; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z.

    2016-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS), a type of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), is a factor involved in the suppression of myogenic differentiation. CS comprises two repeating sugars and has different subtypes depending on the position and number of bonded sulfate groups. However, the effect of each subtype on myogenic differentiation remains unclear. In this study, we spiked cultures of C2C12 myoblasts, cells which are capable of undergoing skeletal muscle differentiation, with one of five types of CS (CS-A, -B, -C, -D, or -E) and induced differentiation over a fixed time. After immunostaining of the formed myotubes with an anti-MHC antibody, we counted the number of nuclei in the myotubes and then calculated the fusion index (FI) as a measure of myotube differentiation. The FI values of all the CS-treated groups were lower than the FI value of the control group, especially the group treated with CS-E, which displayed notable suppression of myotube formation. To confirm that the sugar chain in CS-E is important in the suppression of differentiation, chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), which catabolizes CS, was added to the media. The addition of ChABC led to the degradation of CS-E, and neutralized the suppression of myotube formation by CS-E. Collectively, it can be concluded that the degree of suppression of differentiation depends on the subtype of CS and that CS-E strongly suppresses myogenic differentiation. We conclude that the CS sugar chain has inhibitory action against myoblast cell fusion. PMID:27775651

  11. Reduction of myoblast differentiation following multiple population doublings in mouse C2 C12 cells: a model to investigate ageing?

    PubMed

    Sharples, Adam P; Al-Shanti, Nasser; Lewis, Mark P; Stewart, Claire E

    2011-12-01

    Ageing skeletal muscle displays declines in size, strength, and functional capacity. Given the acknowledged role that the systemic environment plays in reduced regeneration (Conboy et al. [2005] Nature 433: 760-764), the role of resident satellite cells (termed myoblasts upon activation) is relatively dismissed, where, multiple cellular divisions in-vivo throughout the lifespan could also impact on muscular deterioration. Using a model of multiple population doublings (MPD) in-vitro thus provided a system in which to investigate the direct impact of extensive cell duplications on muscle cell behavior. C(2) C(12) mouse skeletal myoblasts (CON) were used fresh or following 58 population doublings (MPD). As a result of multiple divisions, reduced morphological and biochemical (creatine kinase, CK) differentiation were observed. Furthermore, MPD cells had significantly increased cells in the S and decreased cells in the G1 phases of the cell cycle versus CON, following serum withdrawal. These results suggest continued cycling rather than G1 exit and thus reduced differentiation (myotube atrophy) occurs in MPD muscle cells. These changes were underpinned by significant reductions in transcript expression of: IGF-I and myogenic regulatory factors (myoD and myogenin) together with elevated IGFBP5. Signaling studies showed that decreased differentiation in MPD was associated with decreased phosphorylation of Akt, and with later increased phosphorylation of JNK1/2. Chemical inhibition of JNK1/2 (SP600125) in MPD cells increased IGF-I expression (non-significantly), however, did not enhance differentiation. This study provides a potential model and molecular mechanisms for deterioration in differentiation capacity in skeletal muscle cells as a consequence of multiple population doublings that would potentially contribute to the ageing process. PMID:21826704

  12. Automated High-Content Assay for Compounds Selectively Toxic to Trypanosoma cruzi in a Myoblastic Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Cotillo, Ignacio; Presa, Jesús L.; Cantizani, Juan; Peña, Imanol; Bardera, Ana I.; Martín, Jose J.; Rodriguez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a very important public health problem in Latin America where it is endemic. Although mostly asymptomatic at its initial stage, after the disease becomes chronic, about a third of the infected patients progress to a potentially fatal outcome due to severe damage of heart and gut tissues. There is an urgent need for new drugs against Chagas disease since there are only two drugs available, benznidazole and nifurtimox, and both show toxic side effects and variable efficacy against the chronic stage of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Genetically engineered parasitic strains are used for high throughput screening (HTS) of large chemical collections in the search for new anti-parasitic compounds. These assays, although successful, are limited to reporter transgenic parasites and do not cover the wide T. cruzi genetic background. With the aim to contribute to the early drug discovery process against Chagas disease we have developed an automated image-based 384-well plate HTS assay for T. cruzi amastigote replication in a rat myoblast host cell line. An image analysis script was designed to inform on three outputs: total number of host cells, ratio of T. cruzi amastigotes per cell and percentage of infected cells, which respectively provides one host cell toxicity and two T. cruzi toxicity readouts. The assay was statistically robust (Z´ values >0.6) and was validated against a series of known anti-trypanosomatid drugs. Conclusions/Significance We have established a highly reproducible, high content HTS assay for screening of chemical compounds against T. cruzi infection of myoblasts that is amenable for use with any T. cruzi strain capable of in vitro infection. Our visual assay informs on both anti-parasitic and host cell toxicity readouts in a single experiment, allowing the direct identification of compounds selectively targeted to the parasite. PMID:25615687

  13. Exogenous connexin43-expressing autologous skeletal myoblasts ameliorate mechanical function and electrical activity of the rabbit heart after experimental infarction.

    PubMed

    Antanavičiūtė, Ieva; Ereminienė, Eglė; Vysockas, Vaidas; Račkauskas, Mindaugas; Skipskis, Vilius; Rysevaitė, Kristina; Treinys, Rimantas; Benetis, Rimantas; Jurevičius, Jonas; Skeberdis, Vytenis A

    2015-02-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the major causes of mortality worldwide. For regeneration of the rabbit heart after experimentally induced infarction we used autologous skeletal myoblasts (SMs) due to their high proliferative potential, resistance to ischaemia and absence of immunological and ethical concerns. The cells were characterized with muscle-specific and myogenic markers. Cell transplantation was performed by injection of cell suspension (0.5 ml) containing approximately 6 million myoblasts into the infarction zone. The animals were divided into four groups: (i) no injection; (ii) sham injected; (iii) injected with wild-type SMs; and (iv) injected with SMs expressing connexin43 fused with green fluorescent protein (Cx43EGFP). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was evaluated by 2D echocardiography in vivo before infarction, when myocardium has stabilized after infarction, and 3 months after infarction. Electrical activity in the healthy and infarction zones of the heart was examined ex vivo in Langendorff-perfused hearts by optical mapping using di-4-ANEPPS, a potential sensitive fluorescent dye. We demonstrate that SMs in the coculture can couple electrically not only to abutted but also to remote acutely isolated allogenic cardiac myocytes through membranous tunnelling tubes. The beneficial effect of cellular therapy on LVEF and electrical activity was observed in the group of animals injected with Cx43EGFP-expressing SMs. L-type Ca(2+) current amplitude was approximately fivefold smaller in the isolated SMs compared to healthy myocytes suggesting that limited recovery of LVEF may be related to inadequate expression or function of L-type Ca(2+) channels in transplanted differentiating SMs. PMID:25529770

  14. NEU3 Sialidase Strictly Modulates GM3 Levels in Skeletal Myoblasts C2C12 Thus Favoring Their Differentiation and Protecting Them from Apoptosis*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Anastasia, Luigi; Papini, Nadia; Colazzo, Francesca; Palazzolo, Giacomo; Tringali, Cristina; Dileo, Loredana; Piccoli, Marco; Conforti, Erika; Sitzia, Clementina; Monti, Eugenio; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Tettamanti, Guido; Venerando, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Membrane-bound sialidase NEU3, often referred to as the “ganglioside sialidase,” has a critical regulatory function on the sialoglycosphingolipid pattern of the cell membrane, with an anti-apoptotic function, especially in cancer cells. Although other sialidases have been shown to be involved in skeletal muscle differentiation, the role of NEU3 had yet to be disclosed. Herein we report that NEU3 plays a key role in skeletal muscle differentiation by strictly modulating the ganglioside content of adjacent cells, with special regard to GM3. Induced down-regulation of NEU3 in murine C2C12 myoblasts, even when partial, totally inhibits their capability to differentiate by increasing the GM3 level above a critical point, which causes epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition (and ultimately its down-regulation) and an higher responsiveness of myoblasts to the apoptotic stimuli. PMID:18945680

  15. Use of 5-Bromodeoxyuridine and irradiation for the estimation of the myoblast and myocyte content of primary rat heart cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Masse, M.J.O.; Harary, I.

    1980-11-01

    A method for killing dividing cells was adapted for the elimination of dividing heart muscle cells (myoblasts) in cultures. We have used this method to demonstrate their presence and to estimate their number as well as the number of nondividing heart muscle cells (myocytes) in the neo-natal rat heart. Cells were cultivated in BUdR (5-bromodeoxyuridine) 10/sup -4/ M for 3 days and then irradiated with long uv light. The selective elimination of dividing cells led to a loss of myosin Ca/sup 2 +/-activated ATPase in the cultures. The percent of ATPase left after irradiation was 32% of the control in cultures derived from 1-day postnatal rats and 48% in cultures from 4-day postnatal rats. This reflects an in vivo shift of myoblasts to myocytes in the muscle cell population as the rat ages.

  16. A Pitx2-MicroRNA Pathway Modulates Cell Proliferation in Myoblasts and Skeletal-Muscle Satellite Cells and Promotes Their Commitment to a Myogenic Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Velasco, Estefanía; Vallejo, Daniel; Esteban, Francisco J; Doherty, Chris; Hernández-Torres, Francisco; Franco, Diego; Aránega, Amelia Eva

    2015-09-01

    The acquisition of a proliferating-cell status from a quiescent state as well as the shift between proliferation and differentiation are key developmental steps in skeletal-muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to provide proper muscle regeneration. However, how satellite cell proliferation is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we report that the c-isoform of the transcription factor Pitx2 increases cell proliferation in myoblasts by downregulating microRNA 15b (miR-15b), miR-23b, miR-106b, and miR-503. This Pitx2c-microRNA (miRNA) pathway also regulates cell proliferation in early-activated satellite cells, enhancing Myf5(+) satellite cells and thereby promoting their commitment to a myogenic cell fate. This study reveals unknown functions of several miRNAs in myoblast and satellite cell behavior and thus may have future applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:26055324

  17. Myosin heavy chain-like localizes at cell contact sites during Drosophila myoblast fusion and interacts in vitro with Rolling pebbles 7

    SciTech Connect

    Bonn, Bettina R.; Rudolf, Anja; Hornbruch-Freitag, Christina; Daum, Gabor; Kuckwa, Jessica; Kastl, Lena; Buttgereit, Detlev; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2013-02-15

    Besides representing the sarcomeric thick filaments, myosins are involved in many cellular transport and motility processes. Myosin heavy chains are grouped into 18 classes. Here we show that in Drosophila, the unconventional group XVIII myosin heavy chain-like (Mhcl) is transcribed in the mesoderm of embryos, most prominently in founder cells (FCs). An ectopically expressed GFP-tagged Mhcl localizes in the growing muscle at cell–cell contacts towards the attached fusion competent myoblast (FCM). We further show that Mhcl interacts in vitro with the essential fusion protein Rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7), which is part of a protein complex established at cell contact sites (Fusion-restricted Myogenic-Adhesive Structure or FuRMAS). Here, branched F-actin is likely needed to widen the fusion pore and to integrate the myoblast into the growing muscle. We show that the localization of Mhcl is dependent on the presence of Rols7, and we postulate that Mhcl acts at the FuRMAS as an actin motor protein. We further show that Mhcl deficient embryos develop a wild-type musculature. We thus propose that Mhcl functions redundantly to other myosin heavy chains in myoblasts. Lastly, we found that the protein is detectable adjacent to the sarcomeric Z-discs, suggesting an additional function in mature muscles. - Highlights: ► The class XVIII myosin encoding gene Mhcl is transcribed in the mesoderm. ► Mhcl localization at contact sites of fusing myoblasts depends on Rols7. ► Mhcl interacts in vitro with Rols7 which is essential for myogenesis. ► Functional redundancy with other myosins is likely as mutants show no muscle defects. ► Mhcl localizes adjacent to Z-discs of sarcomeres and might support muscle integrity.

  18. Mechano-growth factor peptide, the COOH terminus of unprocessed insulin-like growth factor 1, has no apparent effect on myoblasts or primary muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fornaro, Mara; Hinken, Aaron C; Needle, Saul; Hu, Erding; Trendelenburg, Anne-Ulrike; Mayer, Angelika; Rosenstiel, Antonia; Chang, Calvin; Meier, Viktor; Billin, Andrew N; Becherer, J David; Brace, Arthur D; Evans, William J; Glass, David J; Russell, Alan J

    2014-01-15

    A splice form of IGF-1, IGF-1Eb, is upregulated after exercise or injury. Physiological responses have been ascribed to the 24-amino acid COOH-terminal peptide that is cleaved from the NH3-terminal 70-amino acid mature IGF-1 protein. This COOH-terminal peptide was termed "mechano-growth factor" (MGF). Activities claimed for the MGF peptide included enhancing muscle satellite cell proliferation and delaying myoblast fusion. As such, MGF could represent a promising strategy to improve muscle regeneration. Thus, at our two pharmaceutical companies, we attempted to reproduce the claimed effect of MGF peptides on human and mouse muscle myoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro. Concentrations of peptide up to 500 ng/ml failed to increase the proliferation of C2C12 cells or primary human skeletal muscle myoblasts. In contrast, all cell types exhibited a proliferative response to mature IGF-1 or full-length IGF-1Eb. MGF also failed to inhibit the differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. To address whether the response to MGF was lost in these tissue culture lines, we measured proliferation and differentiation of primary mouse skeletal muscle stem cells exposed to MGF. This, too, failed to demonstrate a significant effect. Finally, we tested whether MGF could alter a separate documented in vitro effect of the peptide, activation of p-ERK, but not p-Akt, in cardiac myocytes. Although a robust response to IGF-1 was observed, there were no demonstrated activating responses from the native or a stabilized MGF peptide. These results call in to question whether there is a physiological role for MGF.

  19. Endocytic Recycling Proteins EHD1 and EHD2 Interact with Fer-1-like-5 (Fer1L5) and Mediate Myoblast Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Avery D.; Pytel, Peter; Gardikiotes, Konstantina; Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Rainey, Mark; George, Manju; Band, Hamid; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian ferlins are calcium-sensing, C2 domain-containing proteins involved in vesicle trafficking. Myoferlin and dysferlin regulate myoblast fusion and muscle membrane resealing, respectively. Correspondingly, myoferlin is most highly expressed in singly nucleated myoblasts, whereas dysferlin expression is increased in mature, multinucleated myotubes. Myoferlin also mediates endocytic recycling and participates in trafficking the insulin-like growth factor receptor. We have now characterized a novel member of the ferlin family, Fer1L5, because of its high homology to dysferlin and myoferlin. We found that Fer1L5 protein is expressed in small myotubes that contain only two to four nuclei. We also found that Fer1L5 protein binds directly to the endocytic recycling proteins EHD1 and EHD2 and that the second C2 domain in Fer1L5 mediates this interaction. Reduction of EHD1 and/or EHD2 inhibits myoblast fusion, and EHD2 is required for normal translocation of Fer1L5 to the plasma membrane. The characterization of Fer1L5 and its interaction with EHD1 and EHD2 underscores the complex requirement of ferlin proteins and mediators of endocytic recycling for membrane trafficking events during myotube formation. PMID:21177873

  20. Endocytic recycling proteins EHD1 and EHD2 interact with fer-1-like-5 (Fer1L5) and mediate myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Posey, Avery D; Pytel, Peter; Gardikiotes, Konstantina; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Rainey, Mark; George, Manju; Band, Hamid; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2011-03-01

    The mammalian ferlins are calcium-sensing, C2 domain-containing proteins involved in vesicle trafficking. Myoferlin and dysferlin regulate myoblast fusion and muscle membrane resealing, respectively. Correspondingly, myoferlin is most highly expressed in singly nucleated myoblasts, whereas dysferlin expression is increased in mature, multinucleated myotubes. Myoferlin also mediates endocytic recycling and participates in trafficking the insulin-like growth factor receptor. We have now characterized a novel member of the ferlin family, Fer1L5, because of its high homology to dysferlin and myoferlin. We found that Fer1L5 protein is expressed in small myotubes that contain only two to four nuclei. We also found that Fer1L5 protein binds directly to the endocytic recycling proteins EHD1 and EHD2 and that the second C2 domain in Fer1L5 mediates this interaction. Reduction of EHD1 and/or EHD2 inhibits myoblast fusion, and EHD2 is required for normal translocation of Fer1L5 to the plasma membrane. The characterization of Fer1L5 and its interaction with EHD1 and EHD2 underscores the complex requirement of ferlin proteins and mediators of endocytic recycling for membrane trafficking events during myotube formation.

  1. A novel adipokine C1q/TNF-related protein 3 is expressed in developing skeletal muscle and controls myoblast proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Otani, Masataka; Furukawa, Souhei; Wakisaka, Satoshi; Maeda, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Several hormones and growth factors, including adipokines, play important roles during muscle development and regeneration. CTRP3, a paralog of adiponectin, is a member of the C1q and tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) superfamily. CTRP3 is a novel adipokine previously reported to reduce glucose output in hepatocytes and lower glucose levels in mice models. In the present study, we provide the first evidence for a physiological role of the CTRP3 in myogenesis using C2C12 myoblasts. CTRP3 was expressed in developing skeletal muscle tissues, and the expression level of CTRP3 was increased during myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells. Recombinant CTRP3 (rCTRP3) promoted the proliferation of undifferentiated C2C12 myoblasts and this response required activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway. In contrary, rCTRP3 inhibited myogenic differentiation and fusion of C2C12 cells by suppressing the expression of myogenic marker genes (myogenin and myosin heavy chain). CTRP3 mRNA expression was increased in C2C12 myoblasts treated with transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3), suggesting that TGF-β3 is one of the extracellular factors regulating CTRP3 expression during myogenesis. These results indicate a novel physiological role for CTRP3 during skeletal myogenesis.

  2. Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Bower, Neil I; Johnston, Ian A

    2010-06-01

    The mRNA expression of myogenic regulatory factors, including myoD1 (myoblast determination factor) gene paralogs, and their regulation by amino acids and insulin-like growth factors were investigated in primary cell cultures isolated from fast myotomal muscle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The cell cycle and S phase were determined as 28.1 and 13.3 h, respectively, at 18 degrees C. Expression of myoD1b and myoD1c peaked at 8 days of culture in the initial proliferation phase and then declined more than sixfold as cells differentiated and was correlated with PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) expression (R = 0.88, P < 0.0001; R = 0.70, P < 0.0001). In contrast, myoD1a transcripts increased from 2 to 8 days and remained at elevated levels as myotubes were formed. mRNA levels of myoD1c were, on average, 3.1- and 5.7-fold higher than myoD1a and myoD1b, respectively. Depriving cells of amino acids and serum led to a rapid increase in pax7 and a decrease in myoD1c and PCNA expression, indicating a transition to a quiescent state. In contrast, amino acid replacement in starved cells produced significant increases in myoD1c (at 6 h), PCNA (at 12 h), and myoD1b (at 24 h) and decreases in pax7 expression as cells entered the cell cycle. Our results are consistent with temporally distinct patterns of myoD1c and myoD1b expression at the G(1) and S/G(2) phases of the cell cycle. Treatment of starved cells with insulin-like growth factor I or II did not alter expression of the myoD paralogs. It was concluded that, in vitro, amino acids alone are sufficient to stimulate expression of genes regulating myogenesis in myoblasts involving autocrine/paracrine pathways. The differential responses of myoD paralogs during myotube maturation and amino acid treatments suggest that myoD1b and myoD1c are primarily expressed in proliferating cells and myoD1a in differentiating cells, providing evidence for their subfunctionalization following whole genome and local duplications in

  3. Mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based substrates for cell directed delivery of Notch signalling modulators to control myoblast differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böcking, Dominique; Wiltschka, Oliver; Niinimäki, Jenni; Shokry, Hussein; Brenner, Rolf; Lindén, Mika; Sahlgren, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical cues are critical to control stem cell function and can be utilized to develop smart biomaterials for stem cell engineering. The challenge is to deliver these cues in a restricted manner with spatial and temporal control. Here we have developed bilayer films of mesoporous silica nanoparticles for delayed cellular delivery of Notch modulators to promote muscle stem cell differentiation. We demonstrate that drug-loaded particles are internalized from the particle-covered surface, which allows for direct delivery of the drug into the cell and a delayed and confined drug release. Substrates of particles loaded with γ-secretase-inhibitors, which block the Notch signalling pathway, promoted efficient differentiation of myoblasts. The particle substrates were fully biocompatible and did not interfere with the inherent differentiation process. We further demonstrate that impregnating commercially available, biocompatible polymer scaffolds with MSNs allows for a free standing substrate for cell directed drug delivery.Biochemical cues are critical to control stem cell function and can be utilized to develop smart biomaterials for stem cell engineering. The challenge is to deliver these cues in a restricted manner with spatial and temporal control. Here we have developed bilayer films of mesoporous silica nanoparticles for delayed cellular delivery of Notch modulators to promote muscle stem cell differentiation. We demonstrate that drug-loaded particles are internalized from the particle-covered surface, which allows for direct delivery of the drug into the cell and a delayed and confined drug release. Substrates of particles loaded with γ-secretase-inhibitors, which block the Notch signalling pathway, promoted efficient differentiation of myoblasts. The particle substrates were fully biocompatible and did not interfere with the inherent differentiation process. We further demonstrate that impregnating commercially available, biocompatible polymer scaffolds with

  4. Subnuclear localization and differentiation-dependent increased expression of DGK-zeta in C2C12 mouse myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Evangelisti, Camilla; Riccio, Massimo; Faenza, Irene; Zini, Nicoletta; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Goto, Kaoru; Cocco, L; Martelli, Alberto M

    2006-11-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) catalyze phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DG) to yield phosphatidic acid (PA). Previous evidence has shown that the nucleus contains several DGK isoforms. In this study, we have analyzed the expression and subnuclear localization of DGK-zeta employing C2C12 mouse myoblasts. Immunocytochemistry coupled to confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that both endogenous and green fluorescent protein-tagged overexpressed DGK-zeta localized mostly to the nucleus. In contrast, overexpressed DGK-alpha, -beta, -delta, and -iota did not migrate to the nucleus. DGK-zeta was present in the nuclear speckle domains, as also revealed by immuno-electron microscopy analysis. Moreover, DGK-zeta co-localized and interacted with phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 (PLCbeta1), that is involved in inositide-dependent signaling pathways important for the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, we report that DGK-zeta associated with nuclear matrix, the fundamental organizing principle of the nucleus where many cell functions take place, including DNA replication, gene expression, and protein phosphorylation. Nuclear DGK-zeta increased during myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells, while DGK-zeta down-regulation by siRNA markedly impaired differentiation. Overall, our findings further support the importance of speckles and nuclear matrix in lipid-dependent signaling and suggest that nuclear DGK-zeta might play some fundamental role during myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells. PMID:16897754

  5. MicroRNA-17-92 regulates myoblast proliferation and differentiation by targeting the ENH1/Id1 signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, H; Liu, N; Luo, L; Zhong, J; Tang, Z; Kang, K; Qu, J; Peng, W; Liu, L; Li, L; Gou, D

    2016-01-01

    Myogenesis is an important biological process that occurs during both skeletal muscle regeneration and postnatal growth. Growing evidence points to the critical role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in myogenesis. Our analysis of miRNA expression patterns reveal that miRNAs of miR-17-92 cluster are dramatically downregulated in C2C12 cells after myogenesis stimulation, are strongly induced in mouse skeletal muscle after injury and decrease steadily thereafter and are downregulated with age in skeletal muscle during mouse and porcine postnatal growth. However, their roles in muscle developmental processes remain elusive. We show that the miR-17-92 cluster promotes mouse myoblast proliferation but inhibits myotube formation. miR-17, -20a and -92a target the actin-associated protein enigma homolog 1 (ENH1). The silencing of ENH1 increased the nuclear accumulation of the inhibitor of differentiation 1 (Id1) and represses myogenic differentiation. Furthermore, the injection of adenovirus expressing miR-20a into the tibialia anterior muscle downregulates ENH1 and delays regeneration. In addition, the downregulation of miR-17-92 during myogenesis is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. Overall, our results reveal a E2F1/miR-17-92/ENH1/Id1 regulatory axis during myogenesis. PMID:27315298

  6. Comparative Proteomic Study of Fatty Acid-treated Myoblasts Reveals Role of Cox-2 in Palmitate-induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiulan; Xu, Shimeng; Wei, Shasha; Deng, Yaqin; Li, Yiran; Yang, Fuquan; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated studies demonstrate that saturated fatty acids (FAs) such as palmitic acid (PA) inhibit insulin signaling in skeletal muscle cells and monounsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid (OA) reverse the effect of PA on insulin signaling. The detailed molecular mechanism of these opposite effects remains elusive. Here we provide a comparative proteomic study of skeletal myoblast cell line C2C12 that were untreated or treated with PA, and PA plus OA. A total of 3437 proteins were quantified using SILAC in this study and 29 proteins fall into the pattern that OA reverses PA effect. Expression of some these proteins were verified using qRT-PCR and Western blot. The most significant change was cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2). In addition to whole cell comparative proteomic study, we also compared lipid droplet (LD)-associated proteins and identified that Cox-2 was one of three major altered proteins under the FA treatment. This finding was then confirmed using immunofluorescence. Finally, Cox-2 selective inhibitor, celecoxib protected cells from PA-reduced insulin signaling Akt phosphorylation. Together, these results not only provide a dataset of protein expression change in FA treatment but also suggest that Cox-2 and lipid droplets (LDs) are potential players in PA- and OA-mediated cellular processes. PMID:26899878

  7. Small molecules dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 inhibit myostatin/GDF8 signaling and promote functional myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horbelt, Daniel; Boergermann, Jan H; Chaikuad, Apirat; Alfano, Ivan; Williams, Eleanor; Lukonin, Ilya; Timmel, Tobias; Bullock, Alex N; Knaus, Petra

    2015-02-01

    GDF8, or myostatin, is a member of the TGF-β superfamily of secreted polypeptide growth factors. GDF8 is a potent negative regulator of myogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. We found that GDF8 signaling was inhibited by the small molecule ATP competitive inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189. These compounds were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of BMP signaling by binding to the BMP type I receptors ALK1/2/3/6. We present the crystal structure of the type II receptor ActRIIA with dorsomorphin and demonstrate that dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 target GDF8 induced Smad2/3 signaling and repression of myogenic transcription factors. As a result, both inhibitors rescued myogenesis in myoblasts treated with GDF8. As revealed by quantitative live cell microscopy, treatment with dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 promoted the contractile activity of myotubular networks in vitro. We therefore suggest these inhibitors as suitable tools to promote functional myogenesis. PMID:25368322

  8. Selective androgen receptor modulator, YK11, regulates myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts by follistatin expression.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Ota, Rumi; Someya, Kousuke; Kusakabe, Taichi; Kato, Keisuke; Inouye, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblast cells is induced by the novel androgen receptor (AR) partial agonist, (17α,20E)-17,20-[(1-methoxyethylidene)bis-(oxy)]-3-oxo-19-norpregna-4,20-diene-21-carboxylic acid methyl ester (YK11), as well as by dihydrotestosterone (DHT). YK11 is a selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM), which activates AR without the N/C interaction. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism by which YK11 induces myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells. The induction of key myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), such as myogenic differentiation factor (MyoD), myogenic factor 5 (Myf5) and myogenin, was more significant in the presence of YK11 than in the presence of DHT. YK11 treatment of C2C12 cells, but not DHT, induced the expression of follistatin (Fst), and the YK11-mediated myogenic differentiation was reversed by anti-Fst antibody. These results suggest that the induction of Fst is important for the anabolic effect of YK11. PMID:23995658

  9. Specific deletion of CMF1 nuclear localization domain causes incomplete cell cycle withdrawal and impaired differentiation in avian skeletal myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, Ellen . E-mail: ellen.dees@vanderbilt.edu; Robertson, J. Brian; Zhu, Tianli; Bader, David

    2006-10-01

    CMF1 is a protein expressed in embryonic striated muscle with onset of expression preceding that of contractile proteins. Disruption of CMF1 in myoblasts disrupts muscle-specific protein expression. Preliminary studies indicate both nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of CMF1 protein, suggesting functional roles in both cellular compartments. Here we examine the nuclear function of CMF1, using a newly characterized antibody generated against the CMF1 nuclear localization domain and a CMF1 nuclear localization domain-deleted stable myocyte line. The antibody demonstrates nuclear distribution of the CMF1 protein both in vivo and in cell lines, with clustering of CMF1 protein around chromatin during mitosis. In more differentiated myocytes, the protein shifts to the cytoplasm. The CMF1 NLS-deleted cell lines have markedly impaired capacity to differentiate. Specifically, these cells express less contractile protein than wild-type or full-length CMF1 stably transfected cells, and do not fuse properly into multinucleate syncytia with linear nuclear alignment. In response to low serum medium, a signal to differentiate, CMF1 NLS-deleted cells enter G0, but continue to express proliferation markers and will reenter the cell cycle when stimulated by restoring growth medium. These data suggest that CMF1 is involved in regulation the transition from proliferation to differentiation in embryonic muscle.

  10. MicroRNAs Regulate Cellular ATP Levels by Targeting Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism Genes during C2C12 Myoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Siengdee, Puntita; Trakooljul, Nares; Murani, Eduard; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we identified an miRNA regulatory network involved in energy metabolism in porcine muscle. To better understand the involvement of miRNAs in cellular ATP production and energy metabolism, here we used C2C12 myoblasts, in which ATP levels increase during differentiation, to identify miRNAs modulating these processes. ATP level, miRNA and mRNA microarray expression profiles during C2C12 differentiation into myotubes were assessed. The results suggest 14 miRNAs (miR-423-3p, miR-17, miR-130b, miR-301a/b, miR-345, miR-15a, miR-16a, miR-128, miR-615, miR-1968, miR-1a/b, and miR-194) as cellular ATP regulators targeting genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism (Cox4i2, Cox6a2, Ndufb7, Ndufs4, Ndufs5, and Ndufv1) during C2C12 differentiation. Among these, miR-423-3p showed a high inverse correlation with increasing ATP levels. Besides having implications in promoting cell growth and cell cycle progression, its function in cellular ATP regulation is yet unknown. Therefore, miR-423-3p was selected and validated for the function together with its potential target, Cox6a2. Overexpression of miR-423-3p in C2C12 myogenic differentiation lead to decreased cellular ATP level and decreased expression of Cox6a2 compared to the negative control. These results suggest miR-423-3p as a novel regulator of ATP/energy metabolism by targeting Cox6a2.

  11. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Young Woo; Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin; Park, Won Jin; Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong; Lee, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  12. NDRG2 promotes myoblast proliferation and caspase 3/7 activities during differentiation, and attenuates hydrogen peroxide - But not palmitate-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kimberley J; Russell, Aaron P; Foletta, Victoria C

    2015-01-01

    The function of the stress-responsive N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) in the control of myoblast growth, and the amino acids contributing to its function, are not well characterized. Here, we investigated the effect of increased NDRG2 levels on the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in skeletal muscle cells under basal and stress conditions. NDRG2 overexpression increased C2C12 myoblast proliferation and the expression of positive cell cycle regulators, cdk2, cyclin B and cyclin D, and phosphorylation of Rb, while the serine/threonine-deficient NDRG2, 3A-NDRG2, had less effect. The onset of differentiation was enhanced by NDRG2 as determined through the myogenic regulatory factor expression profiles and myocyte fusion index. However, the overall level of differentiation in myotubes was not different. While NDRG2 up-regulated caspase 3/7 activities during differentiation, no increase in apoptosis was measured by TUNEL assay or through cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP proteins. During H2O2 treatment to induce oxidative stress, NDRG2 helped protect against the loss of proliferation and ER stress as measured by GRP78 expression with 3A-NDRG2 displaying less protection. NDRG2 also attenuated apoptosis by reducing cleavage of PARP and caspase 3 and expression of pro-apoptotic Bax while enhancing the pro-survival Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL levels. In contrast, Mcl-1 was not altered, and NDRG2 did not protect against palmitate-induced lipotoxicity. Our findings show that NDRG2 overexpression increases myoblast proliferation and caspase 3/7 activities without increasing overall differentiation. Furthermore, NDRG2 attenuates H2O2-induced oxidative stress and specific serine and threonine amino acid residues appear to contribute to its function in muscle cells. PMID:26380811

  13. Transmembrane proteoglycans syndecan-2, 4, receptor candidates for the impact of HGF and FGF2 on semaphorin 3A expression in early-differentiated myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Do, Mai-Khoi Q; Shimizu, Naomi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ohtsubo, Hideaki; Mizunoya, Wataru; Nakamura, Mako; Sawano, Shoko; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide; Anderson, Judy E; Tatsumi, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative mechanisms that regulate intramuscular motor innervation are thought to reside in the spatiotemporal expression of axon-guidance molecules. Our previous studies proposed an unexplored role of resident myogenic stem cell (satellite cell)-derived myoblasts as a key presenter of a secreted neural chemorepellent semaphorin 3A (Sema3A); hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) triggered its expression exclusively at the early differentiation phase. In order to advance this concept, the present study described that transmembrane heparan/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans syndecan-2, 4 may be the plausible receptor candidates for HGF and FGF2 to signal Sema3A expression. Results showed that mRNA expression of syndecan-2, 4 was abundant (two magnitudes higher than syndecan-1, 3) in early-differentiated myoblasts and their in vitro knockdown diminished the HGF/FGF2-induced expression of Sema3A down to a baseline level. Pretreatment with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC decreased the HGF and FGF2 responses, respectively, in non–knockdown cultures, supporting a possible model that HGF and FGF2 may bind to heparan and chondroitin sulfate chains of syndecan-2, 4 to signal Sema3A expression. The findings, therefore, extend our understanding that HGF/FGF2-syndecan-2, 4 association may stimulate a burst of Sema3A secretion by myoblasts recruited to the site of muscle injury; this would ensure a coordinated delay in the attachment of motoneuron terminals onto fibers early in muscle regeneration, and thus synchronize the recovery of muscle fiber integrity and the early resolution of inflammation after injury with reinnervation toward functional recovery. PMID:26381016

  14. Sodium arsenite delays the differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblast cells and alters methylation patterns on the transcription factor myogenin

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, Amanda A.; Hong Giaming; Bain, Lisa J.

    2011-01-15

    Epidemiological studies have correlated arsenic exposure with cancer, skin diseases, and adverse developmental outcomes such as spontaneous abortions, neonatal mortality, low birth weight, and delays in the use of musculature. The current study used C2C12 mouse myoblast cells to examine whether low concentrations of arsenic could alter their differentiation into myotubes, indicating that arsenic can act as a developmental toxicant. Myoblast cells were exposed to 20 nM sodium arsenite, allowed to differentiate into myotubes, and expression of the muscle-specific transcription factor myogenin, along with the expression of tropomyosin, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (Socs3), prostaglandin I2 synthesis (Ptgis), and myocyte enhancer 2 (Mef2), was investigated using QPCR and immunofluorescence. Exposing C2C12 cells to 20 nM sodium arsenite delayed the differentiation process, as evidenced by a significant reduction in the number of multinucleated myotubes, a decrease in myogenin mRNA expression, and a decrease in the total number of nuclei expressing myogenin protein. The expression of mRNA involved in myotube formation, such as Ptgis and Mef2 mRNA, was also significantly reduced by 1.6-fold and 4-fold during differentiation. This was confirmed by immunofluorescence for Mef2, which showed a 2.6-fold reduction in nuclear translocation. Changes in methylation patterns in the promoter region of myogenin (-473 to + 90) were examined by methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite genomic sequencing. Hypermethylated CpGs were found at -236 and -126 bp, whereas hypomethylated CpGs were found at -207 bp in arsenic-exposed cells. This study indicates that 20 nM sodium arsenite can alter myoblast differentiation by reducing the expression of the transcription factors myogenin and Mef2c, which is likely due to changes in promoter methylation patterns. The delay in muscle differentiation may lead to developmental abnormalities.

  15. The LIM domain protein nTRIP6 acts as a co-repressor for the transcription factor MEF2C in myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kemler, Denise; Dahley, Oliver; Roßwag, Sven; Litfin, Margarethe; Kassel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays a key role in the late differentiation of skeletal muscle progenitor cells, the so-called myoblasts. During myoblast differentiation, both MEF2C expression and transcriptional activity are regulated. We have reported that nTRIP6, the nuclear isoform of the focal adhesion LIM domain protein TRIP6, acts as an adaptor transcriptional co-activator for several transcription factors. It interacts with the promoter-bound transcription factors and consequently mediates the recruitment of other co-activators. Based on a described interaction between MEF2C and TRIP6 in a yeast-two-hybrid screen, we hypothesised a co-regulatory function of nTRIP6 for MEF2C. In proliferating myoblasts, nTRIP6 interacted with MEF2C and was recruited together with MEF2C to the MEF2-binding regions of the MEF2C target genes Myom2, Mb, Tnni2 and Des. Silencing nTRIP6 or preventing its interaction with MEF2C increased MEF2C transcriptional activity and increased the expression of these MEF2C target genes. Thus, nTRIP6 acts as a co-repressor for MEF2C. Mechanistically, nTRIP6 mediated the recruitment of the class IIa histone deacetylase HDAC5 to the MEF2C-bound promoters. In conclusion, our results unravel a transcriptional co-repressor function for nTRIP6. This adaptor co-regulator can thus exert either co-activator or co-repressor functions, depending on the transcription factor it interacts with. PMID:27292777

  16. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm‑2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  17. Ethanol extract of Cyclolepis genistoides D. Don (palo azul) induces formation of myotubes, which involves differentiation of C2C12 myoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiromi; Funaki, Asami; Kimura, Yuki; Sumitomo, Mai; Yoshida, Hiroya; Fukata, Hideki; Ueno, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we examined the cell differentiation effect of an ethanol extract of Cyclolepis genistoides D. Don, a herbaceous perennial belonging to the family Asteraceae (vernacular name: palo azul). Palo azul has numerous physiological effects that contribute to the prevention of metabolic syndromes, although the mechanism remains unclear. We previously suggested that palo azul has antidiabetic activity via an adipose differentiation effect. Here, we focused on whether palo azul promoted the differentiation of myoblasts. The mouse muscle myoblast cell line C2C12 was cultured and differentiated using horse serum with or without an ethanol extract of palo azul (12.5-200 μg/mL). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to evaluate differentiation markers, including insulin-like growth factor-1 and myogenin. To evaluate myotube formation, myosin heavy-chain (MHC) expression and localization were detected by immunohistochemistry. Palo azul increased the expression of the differentiation markers. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed increased formation of MHC myotubes after palo azul treatment along with increased diameter and fusion indices of the myotubes. The expression level of MHC was also increased. In conclusion, palo azul may increase muscle mass in the body and improve insulin resistance conditions by facilitating the formation of myotubes by promoting myocyte differentiation. PMID:27262535

  18. Nanofiber Yarn/Hydrogel Core-Shell Scaffolds Mimicking Native Skeletal Muscle Tissue for Guiding 3D Myoblast Alignment, Elongation, and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wu, Yaobin; Guo, Baolin; Ma, Peter X

    2015-09-22

    Designing scaffolds that can mimic native skeletal muscle tissue and induce 3D cellular alignment and elongated myotube formation remains an ongoing challenge for skeletal muscle tissue engineering. Herein, we present a simple technique to generate core-shell composite scaffolds for mimicking native skeletal muscle structure, which comprise the aligned nanofiber yarn (NFY) core and the photocurable hydrogel shell. The aligned NFYs are prepared by the hybrid composition including poly(caprolactone), silk fibroin, and polyaniline via a developed dry-wet electrospinning method. A series of core-shell column and sheet composite scaffolds are ultimately obtained by encapsulating a piece and layers of aligned NFY cores within the hydrogel shell after photo-cross-linking. C2C12 myoblasts are seeded within the core-shell scaffolds, and the good biocompatibility of these scaffolds and their ability to induce 3D cellular alignment and elongation are successfully demonstrated. Furthermore, the 3D elongated myotube formation within core-shell scaffolds is also performed after long-term cultivation. These data suggest that these core-shell scaffolds combine the aligned NFY core that guides the myoblast alignment and differentiation and the hydrogel shell that provides a suitable 3D environment for nutrition exchange and mechanical protection to perform a great practical application for skeletal muscle regeneration.

  19. YB1/p32, a nuclear Y-box binding protein 1, is a novel regulator of myoblast differentiation that interacts with Msx1 homeoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young Joon; Lee, Hansol

    2010-02-15

    Precisely controlled cellular differentiation is essential for the proper development of vertebrate embryo and deregulated differentiation is a major cause of many human congenital diseases as well as cancer. Msx1 is a member of the homeoprotein family implicated in these processes, which inhibits the differentiation of skeletal muscle and other cell types, presumably by regulating transcription of target genes through interaction with other cellular factors. We presently show that YB1/p32, a nuclear Y-box binding protein 1, interacts with Msx1 homeoprotein and functions as a regulator of C2C12 myoblast differentiation. We demonstrate that YB1/p32 functionally interacts with Msx1 through its N-terminal region and colocalizes with Msx1 at the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we find that YB1/p32 is competent for inhibition of C2C12 myoblast differentiation, which is correlated with its activity as a negative regulator of MyoD gene expression and binding to the MyoD core enhancer region (CER). Furthermore, YB1/p32 cooperates with Msx1 in transcriptional repression and knocking down the expression of endogenous YB1 attenuates the effects of Msx1. Taken together, our study has uncovered a new function of YB1/p32, a regulator of skeletal muscle differentiation.

  20. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm-2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  1. DNA methylation analysis of human myoblasts during in vitro myogenic differentiation: de novo methylation of promoters of muscle-related genes and its involvement in transcriptional down-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Kohei; Miyata, Tomoko; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Okamura, Kohji; Naito, Masashi; Kawai, Tomoko; Takada, Shuji; Kato, Kiyoko; Miyamoto, Shingo; Hata, Kenichiro; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Although DNA methylation is considered to play an important role during myogenic differentiation, chronological alterations in DNA methylation and gene expression patterns in this process have been poorly understood. Using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array, we obtained a chronological profile of the genome-wide DNA methylation status in a human myoblast differentiation model, where myoblasts were cultured in low-serum medium to stimulate myogenic differentiation. As the differentiation of the myoblasts proceeded, their global DNA methylation level increased and their methylation patterns became more distinct from those of mesenchymal stem cells. Gene ontology analysis revealed that genes whose promoter region was hypermethylated upon myoblast differentiation were highly significantly enriched with muscle-related terms such as ‘muscle contraction’ and ‘muscle system process’. Sequence motif analysis identified 8-bp motifs somewhat similar to the binding motifs of ID4 and ZNF238 to be most significantly enriched in hypermethylated promoter regions. ID4 and ZNF238 have been shown to be critical transcriptional regulators of muscle-related genes during myogenic differentiation. An integrated analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression profiles revealed that de novo DNA methylation of non-CpG island (CGI) promoters was more often associated with transcriptional down-regulation than that of CGI promoters. These results strongly suggest the existence of an epigenetic mechanism in which DNA methylation modulates the functions of key transcriptional factors to coordinately regulate muscle-related genes during myogenic differentiation. PMID:25190712

  2. A Natural Hepatocyte Growth Factor/Scatter Factor Autocrine Loop in Myoblast Cells and the Effect of the Constitutive Met Kinase Activation on Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Anastasi, Sergio; Giordano, Silvia; Sthandier, Olga; Gambarotta, Giovanna; Maione, Rossella; Comoglio, Paolo; Amati, Paolo

    1997-01-01

    As a rule, hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) is produced by mesenchymal cells, while its receptor, the tyrosine kinase encoded by the met proto-oncogene, is expressed by the neighboring epithelial cells in a canonical paracrine fashion. In the present work we show that both HGF/SF and met are coexpressed by undifferentiated C2 mouse myoblasts. In growing cells, the autocrine loop is active as the receptor exhibits a constitutive phosphorylation on tyrosine that can be abrogated by exogenously added anti-HGF/SF neutralizing antibodies. The transcription of HGF/SF and met genes is downregulated when myoblasts stop proliferating and differentiate. The coexpression of HGF/SF and met genes is not exclusive to C2 cells since it has been assessed also in other myogenic cell lines and in mouse primary satellite cells, suggesting that HGF/SF could play a role in muscle development through an autocrine way. To analyze the biological effects of HGF/SF receptor activation, we stably expressed the constitutively activated receptor catalytic domain (p65tpr-met) in C2 cells. This active kinase determined profound changes in cell shape and inhibited myogenesis at both morphological and biochemical levels. Notably, a complete absence of muscle regulatory markers such as MyoD and myogenin was observed in p65tpr-met highly expressing C2 clones. We also studied the effects of the ectopic expression of human isoforms of met receptor (h-met) and of HGF/SF (h-HGF/SF) in stable transfected C2 cells. Single constitutive expression of h-met or h-HGF/SF does not alter substantially the growth and differentiation properties of the myoblast cells, probably because of a species-specific ligand–receptor interaction. A C2 clone expressing simultaneously both h-met and h-HGF/SF is able to grow in soft agar and shows a decrease in myogenic potential comparable to that promoted by p65tpr-met kinase. These data indicate that a met kinase signal released from differentiation

  3. Ectopic expression of cyclin D3 corrects differentiation of DM1 myoblasts through activation of RNA CUG-binding protein, CUGBP1

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, Elizabeth; Sakai, Keiko; Schoser, Benedikt; Huichalaf, Claudia; Schneider-Gold, Christiane; Nguyen, Heather; Wang, Gou-Li; Albrecht, Jeffrey H.; Timchenko, Lubov T.

    2008-07-01

    Differentiation of myocytes is impaired in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1, DM1. CUG repeat binding protein, CUGBP1, is a key regulator of translation of proteins that are involved in muscle development and differentiation. In this paper, we present evidence that RNA-binding activity of CUGBP1 and its interactions with initiation translation complex eIF2 are differentially regulated during myogenesis by specific phosphorylation and that this regulation is altered in DM1. In normal myoblasts, Akt kinase phosphorylates CUGBP1 at Ser28 and increases interactions of CUGBP1 with cyclin D1 mRNA. During differentiation, CUGBP1 is phosphorylated by cyclinD3-cdk4/6 at Ser302, which increases CUGBP1 binding with p21 and C/EBP{beta} mRNAs. While cyclin D3 and cdk4 are elevated in normal myotubes; DM1 differentiating cells do not increase these proteins. In normal myotubes, CUGBP1 interacts with cyclin D3/cdk4/6 and eIF2; however, interactions of CUGBP1 with eIF2 are reduced in DM1 differentiating cells and correlate with impaired muscle differentiation in DM1. Ectopic expression of cyclin D3 in DM1 cells increases the CUGBP1-eIF2 complex, corrects expression of differentiation markers, myogenin and desmin, and enhances fusion of DM1 myoblasts. Thus, normalization of cyclin D3 might be a therapeutic approach to correct differentiation of skeletal muscle in DM1 patients.

  4. Myogenic differentiation of L6 rat myoblasts: evidence for pleiotropic effects on myogenesis by RNA polymerase II mutations to alpha-amanitin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Crerar, M M; Leather, R; David, E; Pearson, M L

    1983-01-01

    To assess the functional role of RNA polymerase II in the regulation of transcription during muscle differentiation, we isolated and characterized a large number of independent alpha-amanitin-resistant (AmaR) mutants of L6 rat myoblasts that express both wild-type and altered RNA polymerase II activities. We also examined their myogenic (Myo) phenotype by determining their ability to develop into mature myotubes, to express elevated levels of muscle creatine kinase, and to synthesize muscle-characteristic proteins as detected by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We found a two- to threefold increase in the frequency of clones with a myogenic-defective phenotype in the AmaR (RNA polymerase II) mutants as compared to control ethyl methane sulfonate-induced, 6-thioguanine-resistant (hypoxanthine, guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) mutants or to unselected survivors also exposed to ethyl methane sulfonate. Subsequent analysis showed that about half of these myogenic-defective AmaR mutants had a conditional Myo(ama) phenotype; when cultured in the presence of amanitin, they exhibited a Myo- phenotype; in its absence they exhibited a Myo+ phenotype. This conditional Myo(ama) phenotype is presumably caused by the inactivation by amanitin of the wild-type amanitin-sensitive RNA polymerase II activity and the subsequent rise in the level of mutant amanitin-resistant RNA polymerase II activity. In these Myo(ama) mutants, the wild-type RNA polymerase II is normally dominant with respect to the Myo+ phenotype, whereas the mutant RNA polymerase II is recessive and results in a Myo- phenotype only when the wild-type enzyme is inactivated. These findings suggest that certain mutations in the amaR structural gene for the amanitin-binding subunit of RNA polymerase II can selectively impair the transcription of genes specific for myogenic differentiation but not those specific for myoblast proliferation. Images PMID:6865946

  5. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion

    PubMed Central

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  6. Glucocorticoids retard skeletal muscle development and myoblast protein synthesis through a mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)-signaling pathway in broilers (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Jia, Qing; Xiao, Jingjing; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids exert a well-known catabolic protein action on skeletal muscle. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway acts as a central regulator of protein metabolism. Whether glucocorticoids regulate protein synthesis through the mTOR pathway in skeletal muscle of chickens remains unknown. This study was performed to characterize the effect of glucocorticoids on the mTOR pathway in skeletal muscle development in chickens, and on protein synthesis in cultured embryonic myoblasts. Male 29-d-old chickens were given a dexamethasone injection (2 mg/kg) twice per day for 4 d (n = 16). Chicken embryonic myoblasts were exposed to dexamethasone for 24 h (100 µmol/L, n = 4 cultures). The interaction between dexamethasone and leucine was also investigated. ANOVA and Duncan's multiple test were used to analyze the effects of the dexamethasone and leucine treatments. The results showed that dexamethasone decreased body weight gain, body weight, and feed efficiency. Protein synthesis was inhibited by in vitro dexamethasone exposure. Phosphorylation of mTOR and ribosomal protein S6 protein kinase (p70S6K) were inhibited by dexamethasone, suggesting the mTOR pathway may be involved in dexamethasone-regulated muscle protein synthesis. Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was not altered in vitro but was reduced in vivo by dexamethasone. These results imply that the mTOR and AMPK pathways are both involved in retarding muscle development and protein synthesis by glucocorticoids, but the mTOR pathway is a critical point linking glucocorticoid and protein synthesis. Leucine, at least partially, inhibited the effects of dexamethasone on protein synthesis via the mTOR pathway.

  7. Cell-Adhesive Matrices Composed of RGD Peptide-Displaying M13 Bacteriophage/Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Nanofibers Beneficial to Myoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Linhua; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Chuntae; Hong, Suck Won; Oh, Jin Woo; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-10-01

    Recently, there has been considerable effort to develop suitable scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Cell adhesion is a prerequisite for cells to survive. In nature, the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays this role. Therefore, an ideal scaffold should be structurally similar to the natural ECM and have biocompatibility and biodegradability. In addition, the scaffold should have biofunctionality, which provides the potent ability to enhance the cellular behaviors, such as adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. This study concentrates on fabricating cell-adhesive matrices composed of RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage (RGD-M13 phage) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) nanofibers. Long rod-shaped M13 bacteriophages are non-toxic and can express many desired proteins on their surface. A genetically engineered M13 phage was constructed to display RGD peptides on its surface. PLGA is a biodegradable polymer with excellent biocompatibility and suitable physicochemical property for adhesive matrices. In this study, RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid nanofiber matrices were fabricated by electrospinning. The physicochemical properties of these matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and contact angle measurement. In addition, the cellular behaviors, such as the initial attachment, proliferation and differentiation, were analyzed by a CCK-8 assay and immunofluorescence staining to evaluate the potential application of these matrices to tissue engineering scaffolds. The RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices could enhance the cellular behaviors and promote the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. These results suggest that the RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices are beneficial to myoblast differentiation and can serve as effective tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:26726438

  8. Annexin A1 Deficiency does not Affect Myofiber Repair but Delays Regeneration of Injured Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Leikina, Evgenia; Defour, Aurelia; Melikov, Kamran; Van der Meulen, Jack H.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Gebert, Claudia; Pfeifer, Karl; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.

    2015-01-01

    Repair and regeneration of the injured skeletal myofiber involves fusion of intracellular vesicles with sarcolemma and fusion of the muscle progenitor cells respectively. In vitro experiments have identified involvement of Annexin A1 (Anx A1) in both these fusion processes. To determine if Anx A1 contributes to these processes during muscle repair in vivo, we have assessed muscle growth and repair in Anx A1-deficient mouse (AnxA1−/−). We found that the lack of Anx A1 does not affect the muscle size and repair of myofibers following focal sarcolemmal injury and lengthening contraction injury. However, the lack of Anx A1 delayed muscle regeneration after notexin-induced injury. This delay in muscle regeneration was not caused by a slowdown in proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, lack of Anx A1 lowered the proportion of differentiating myoblasts that managed to fuse with the injured myofibers by days 5 and 7 after notexin injury as compared to the wild type (w.t.) mice. Despite this early slowdown in fusion of Anx A1−/− myoblasts, regeneration caught up at later times post injury. These results establish in vivo role of Anx A1 in cell fusion required for myofiber regeneration and not in intracellular vesicle fusion needed for repair of myofiber sarcolemma. PMID:26667898

  9. Annexin A1 Deficiency does not Affect Myofiber Repair but Delays Regeneration of Injured Muscles.

    PubMed

    Leikina, Evgenia; Defour, Aurelia; Melikov, Kamran; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Gebert, Claudia; Pfeifer, Karl; Chernomordik, Leonid V; Jaiswal, Jyoti K

    2015-01-01

    Repair and regeneration of the injured skeletal myofiber involves fusion of intracellular vesicles with sarcolemma and fusion of the muscle progenitor cells respectively. In vitro experiments have identified involvement of Annexin A1 (Anx A1) in both these fusion processes. To determine if Anx A1 contributes to these processes during muscle repair in vivo, we have assessed muscle growth and repair in Anx A1-deficient mouse (AnxA1-/-). We found that the lack of Anx A1 does not affect the muscle size and repair of myofibers following focal sarcolemmal injury and lengthening contraction injury. However, the lack of Anx A1 delayed muscle regeneration after notexin-induced injury. This delay in muscle regeneration was not caused by a slowdown in proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, lack of Anx A1 lowered the proportion of differentiating myoblasts that managed to fuse with the injured myofibers by days 5 and 7 after notexin injury as compared to the wild type (w.t.) mice. Despite this early slowdown in fusion of Anx A1-/- myoblasts, regeneration caught up at later times post injury. These results establish in vivo role of Anx A1 in cell fusion required for myofiber regeneration and not in intracellular vesicle fusion needed for repair of myofiber sarcolemma. PMID:26667898

  10. Sodium arsenite represses the expression of myogenin in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells through histone modifications and altered expression of Ezh2, Glp, and Igf-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Gia-Ming

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic is a toxicant commonly found in water systems and chronic exposure can result in adverse developmental effects including increased neonatal death, stillbirths, and miscarriages, low birth weight, and altered locomotor activity. Previous studies indicate that 20 nM sodium arsenite exposure to C2C12 mouse myocyte cells delayed myoblast differentiation due to reduced myogenin expression, the transcription factor that differentiates myoblasts into myotubes. In this study, several mechanisms by which arsenic could alter myogenin expression were examined. Exposing differentiating C2C12 cells to 20 nM arsenic increased H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) and H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) by 3-fold near the transcription start site of myogenin, which is indicative of increased repressive marks, and reduced H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) by 0.5-fold, indicative of reduced permissive marks. Protein expression of Glp or Ehmt1, a H3-K9 methyltransferase, was also increased by 1.6-fold in arsenic-exposed cells. In addition to the altered histone remodeling status on the myogenin promoter, protein and mRNA levels of Igf-1, a myogenic growth factor, were significantly repressed by arsenic exposure. Moreover, a 2-fold induction of Ezh2 expression, and an increased recruitment of Ezh2 (3.3-fold) and Dnmt3a (∼ 2-fold) to the myogenin promoter at the transcription start site (− 40 to + 42), were detected in the arsenic-treated cells. Together, we conclude that the repressed myogenin expression in arsenic-exposed C2C12 cells was likely due to a combination of reduced expression of Igf-1, enhanced nuclear expression and promoter recruitment of Ezh2, and altered histone remodeling status on myogenin promoter (− 40 to + 42). -- Highlights: ► Igf-1 expression is decreased in C2C12 cells after 20 nM arsenite exposure. ► Arsenic exposure alters histone remodeling on the myogenin promoter. ► Glp expression, a H3–K9 methyltransferase, was increased in arsenic-exposed cells. ► Ezh2

  11. Affective Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles T.

    This paper addresses itself to the question, "What does feeling have to do with knowing?" Two movements in affective education are discussed which have come into focus in recent years and which attempt to define the relationship between knowing and feeling. The first, a conscious application of the role of arousal in learning, emphasizes arousal…

  12. Fine-Tuning of the Actin Cytoskeleton and Cell Adhesion During Drosophila Development by the Unconventional Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Myoblast City and Sponge.

    PubMed

    Biersmith, Bridget; Wang, Zong-Heng; Geisbrecht, Erika R

    2015-06-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Dock proteins function as unconventional guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Upon binding to engulfment and cell motility (ELMO) proteins, Dock-ELMO complexes activate the Rho family of small GTPases to mediate a diverse array of biological processes, including cell motility, apoptotic cell clearance, and axon guidance. Overlapping expression patterns and functional redundancy among the 11 vertebrate Dock family members, which are subdivided into four families (Dock A, B, C, and D), complicate genetic analysis. In both vertebrate and invertebrate systems, the actin dynamics regulator, Rac, is the target GTPase of the Dock-A subfamily. However, it remains unclear whether Rac or Rap1 are the in vivo downstream GTPases of the Dock-B subfamily. Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent genetic model organism for understanding Dock protein function as its genome encodes one ortholog per subfamily: Myoblast city (Mbc; Dock A) and Sponge (Spg; Dock B). Here we show that the roles of Spg and Mbc are not redundant in the Drosophila somatic muscle or the dorsal vessel. Moreover, we confirm the in vivo role of Mbc upstream of Rac and provide evidence that Spg functions in concert with Rap1, possibly to regulate aspects of cell adhesion. Together these data show that Mbc and Spg can have different downstream GTPase targets. Our findings predict that the ability to regulate downstream GTPases is dependent on cellular context and allows for the fine-tuning of actin cytoskeletal or cell adhesion events in biological processes that undergo cell morphogenesis.

  13. CRABP2 Promotes Myoblast Differentiation and Is Modulated by the Transcription Factors MyoD and Sp1 in C2C12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Tang, Zhonglin; Yang, Shulin; Li, Kui

    2013-01-01

    Cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2), a member of a family of specific carrier proteins for Vitamin A, belongs to a family of small cytosolic lipid binding proteins. Our previous study suggested that CRABP2 was involved in skeletal muscle development; however, the molecular function and regulatory mechanism of CRABP2 in myogenesis remained unclear. In this study, we found that the expression of the CRABP2 gene was upregulated during C2C12 differentiation. An over-expression assay revealed that CRABP2 promotes myogenic transformation by regulating the cell cycle during C2C12 differentiation. The region from −459 to −4 bp was identified as the core promoter and contains a TATA box, a GC box and binding sites for the transcription factors MyoD and Sp1. Over-expression, site-directed mutagenesis and EMSA assays indicated that the transcription factors MyoD and Sp1 regulate CRABP2 expression and promote myoblast differentiation in C2C12 cells. PMID:23383201

  14. Temperature-Responsive Poly(ɛ-caprolactone) Cell Culture Platform with Dynamically Tunable Nano-Roughness and Elasticity for Control of Myoblast Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Uto, Koichiro; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Aoyagi, Takao

    2014-01-01

    We developed a dynamic cell culture platform with dynamically tunable nano-roughness and elasticity. Temperature-responsive poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) films were successfully prepared by crosslinking linear and tetra-branched PCL macromonomers. By optimizing the mixing ratios, the crystal-amorphous transition temperature (Tm) of the crosslinked film was adjusted to the biological relevant temperature (~33 °C). While the crosslinked films are relatively stiff (50 MPa) below the Tm, they suddenly become soft (1 MPa) above the Tm. Correspondingly, roughness of the surface was decreased from 63.4–12.4 nm. It is noted that the surface wettability was independent of temperature. To investigate the role of dynamic surface roughness and elasticity on cell adhesion, cells were seeded on PCL films at 32 °C. Interestingly, spread myoblasts on the film became rounded when temperature was suddenly increased to 37 °C, while significant changes in cell morphology were not observed for fibroblasts. These results indicate that cells can sense dynamic changes in the surrounding environment but the sensitivity depends on cell types. PMID:24451135

  15. Temperature-responsive poly(ε-caprolactone) cell culture platform with dynamically tunable nano-roughness and elasticity for control of myoblast morphology.

    PubMed

    Uto, Koichiro; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Aoyagi, Takao

    2014-01-01

    We developed a dynamic cell culture platform with dynamically tunable nano-roughness and elasticity. Temperature-responsive poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) films were successfully prepared by crosslinking linear and tetra-branched PCL macromonomers. By optimizing the mixing ratios, the crystal-amorphous transition temperature (Tm) of the crosslinked film was adjusted to the biological relevant temperature (~33 °C). While the crosslinked films are relatively stiff (50 MPa) below the Tm, they suddenly become soft (1 MPa) above the Tm. Correspondingly, roughness of the surface was decreased from 63.4-12.4 nm. It is noted that the surface wettability was independent of temperature. To investigate the role of dynamic surface roughness and elasticity on cell adhesion, cells were seeded on PCL films at 32 °C. Interestingly, spread myoblasts on the film became rounded when temperature was suddenly increased to 37 °C, while significant changes in cell morphology were not observed for fibroblasts. These results indicate that cells can sense dynamic changes in the surrounding environment but the sensitivity depends on cell types.

  16. Norepinephrine-induced apoptotic and hypertrophic responses in H9c2 cardiac myoblasts are characterized by different repertoire of reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Anita; Alam, Md Jahangir; Ajayakumar, M R; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Sharma, Manish; Goswami, Shyamal K

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent advances, the role of ROS in mediating hypertrophic and apoptotic responses in cardiac myocytes elicited by norepinephrine (NE) is rather poorly understood. We demonstrate through our experiments that H9c2 cardiac myoblasts treated with 2 µM NE (hypertrophic dose) generate DCFH-DA positive ROS only for 2h; while those treated with 100 µM NE (apoptotic dose) sustains generation for 48 h, followed by apoptosis. Though the levels of DCFH fluorescence were comparable at early time points in the two treatment sets, its quenching by DPI, catalase and MnTmPyP suggested the existence of a different repertoire of ROS. Both doses of NE also induced moderate levels of H2O2 but with different kinetics. Sustained but intermittent generation of highly reactive species detectable by HPF was seen in both treatment sets but no peroxynitrite was generated in either conditions. Sustained generation of hydroxyl radicals with no appreciable differences were noticed in both treatment sets. Nevertheless, despite similar profile of ROS generation between the two conditions, extensive DNA damage as evident from the increase in 8-OH-dG content, formation of γ-H2AX and PARP cleavage was seen only in cells treated with the higher dose of NE. We therefore conclude that hypertrophic and apoptotic doses of NE generate distinct but comparable repertoire of ROS/RNS leading to two very distinct downstream responses. PMID:26070033

  17. Nrf2-mediated HO-1 induction contributes to antioxidant capacity of a Schisandrae Fructus ethanol extract in C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji Sook; Han, Min Ho; Kim, Gi-Young; Kim, Cheol Min; Kim, Byung Woo; Hwang, Hye Jin; Hyun, Yung

    2014-12-01

    This study was designed to confirm the protective effect of Schisandrae Fructus, which are the dried fruits of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill, against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms in C2C12 myoblasts. Preincubating C2C12 cells with a Schisandrae Fructus ethanol extract (SFEE) significantly attenuated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inhibition of growth and induced scavenging activity against intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by H2O2. SFEE also inhibited comet tail formation and phospho-histone γH2A.X expression, suggesting that it prevents H2O2-induced cellular DNA damage. Furthermore, treating C2C12 cells with SFEE significantly induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). However, zinc protoporphyrin IX, a potent inhibitor of HO-1 activity, significantly reversed the protective effects of SFEE against H2O2-induced growth inhibition and ROS generation in C2C12 cells. Additional experiments revealed that the potential of the SFEE to induce HO-1 expression and protect against H2O2-mediated cellular damage was abrogated by transient transfection with Nrf2-specific small interfering RNA, suggesting that the SFEE protected C2C12 cells against oxidative stress-induced injury through the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. PMID:25493944

  18. Norepinephrine-induced apoptotic and hypertrophic responses in H9c2 cardiac myoblasts are characterized by different repertoire of reactive oxygen species generation

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Anita; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Ajayakumar, MR; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Sharma, Manish; Goswami, Shyamal K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances, the role of ROS in mediating hypertrophic and apoptotic responses in cardiac myocytes elicited by norepinephrine (NE) is rather poorly understood. We demonstrate through our experiments that H9c2 cardiac myoblasts treated with 2 µM NE (hypertrophic dose) generate DCFH-DA positive ROS only for 2 h; while those treated with 100 µM NE (apoptotic dose) sustains generation for 48 h, followed by apoptosis. Though the levels of DCFH fluorescence were comparable at early time points in the two treatment sets, its quenching by DPI, catalase and MnTmPyP suggested the existence of a different repertoire of ROS. Both doses of NE also induced moderate levels of H2O2 but with different kinetics. Sustained but intermittent generation of highly reactive species detectable by HPF was seen in both treatment sets but no peroxynitrite was generated in either conditions. Sustained generation of hydroxyl radicals with no appreciable differences were noticed in both treatment sets. Nevertheless, despite similar profile of ROS generation between the two conditions, extensive DNA damage as evident from the increase in 8-OH-dG content, formation of γ-H2AX and PARP cleavage was seen only in cells treated with the higher dose of NE. We therefore conclude that hypertrophic and apoptotic doses of NE generate distinct but comparable repertoire of ROS/RNS leading to two very distinct downstream responses. PMID:26070033

  19. Berberine Hydrochloride Protects C2C12 Myoblast Cells Against Oxidative Stress-Induced Damage via Induction of Nrf-2-Mediated HO-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of berberine hydrochloride (BBH), an isoquinoline alkaloid that can be isolated from a variety of herbs, on hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced oxidative stress in C2C12 myoblasts and to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in this process, especially the expression of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. BBH preconditioning attenuated H2 O2 -induced growth inhibition and DNA damage as well as apoptosis in C2C12 cells via suppression of the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with BBHride alone effectively upregulated the expression of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and elevated HO-1 activity. However, the protective effects of BBH against H2 O2 -induced ROS generation and cell growth reduction were abolished by an HO-1 inhibitor. Moreover, BBH-mediated induction and activation of HO-1 were reduced by genetic silencing of Nrf2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, the effects of BBH against H2 O2 -induced ROS accumulation and growth inhibition were abrogated in C2C12 cells transfected with Nrf2 siRNA. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that BBH could protect C2C12 cells against oxidative stress-induced injury and this effect involved activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. Drug Dev Res, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27535021

  20. Transcription factor ZBED6 mediates IGF2 gene expression by regulating promoter activity and DNA methylation in myoblasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were up regulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels wer...

  1. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  2. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy. PMID:23888587

  3. Global N-linked Glycosylation is Not Significantly Impaired in Myoblasts in Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes Caused by Defective Glutamine-Fructose-6-Phosphate Transaminase 1 (GFPT1)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiushi; Müller, Juliane S.; Pang, Poh-Choo; Laval, Steve H.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Dell, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase 1 (GFPT1) is the first enzyme of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. It transfers an amino group from glutamine to fructose-6-phosphate to yield glucosamine-6-phosphate, thus providing the precursor for uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) synthesis. UDP-GlcNAc is an essential substrate for all mammalian glycosylation biosynthetic pathways and N-glycan branching is especially sensitive to alterations in the concentration of this sugar nucleotide. It has been reported that GFPT1 mutations lead to a distinct sub-class of congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) termed “limb-girdle CMS with tubular aggregates”. CMS are hereditary neuromuscular transmission disorders in which neuromuscular junctions are impaired. To investigate whether alterations in protein glycosylation at the neuromuscular junction might be involved in this impairment, we have employed mass spectrometric strategies to study the N-glycomes of myoblasts and myotubes derived from two healthy controls, three GFPT1 patients, and four patients with other muscular diseases, namely CMS caused by mutations in DOK7, myopathy caused by mutations in MTND5, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A), and Pompe disease. A comparison of the relative abundances of bi-, tri-, and tetra-antennary N-glycans in each of the cell preparations revealed that all samples exhibited broadly similar levels of branching. Moreover, although some differences were observed in the relative abundances of some of the N-glycan constituents, these variations were modest and were not confined to the GFPT1 samples. Therefore, GFPT1 mutations in CMS patients do not appear to compromise global N-glycosylation in muscle cells. PMID:26501342

  4. Serotonin and Histamine Therapy Increases Tetanic Forces of Myoblasts, Reduces Muscle Injury, and Improves Grip Strength Performance of Dmd(mdx) Mice.

    PubMed

    Gurel, Volkan; Lins, Jeremy; Lambert, Kristyn; Lazauski, Joan; Spaulding, James; McMichael, John

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked fatal disorder caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Although several therapeutic approaches have been studied, none has led to substantial long-term effects in patients. The aim of this study was to test a serotonin and histamine (S&H) combination on human skeletal myoblasts and Dmd(mdx) mice for its effects on muscle strength and injury. Normal human bioartificial muscles (BAMs) were treated, and muscle tetanic forces and muscle injury tests were performed using the MyoForce Analysis System. Dmd(mdx) mice, the murine model of DMD, were administered serotonin, histamine, or S&H combination twice daily for 6 weeks, and functional performance tests were conducted once a week. The S&H combination treatment caused significant increases in tetanic forces at all time points and concentrations tested as compared to the saline controls. Dose response of the BAMs to the treatment demonstrated a significant increase in force generation at all concentrations compared to the controls after 3 to 4 days of drug treatment. The highest 3 concentrations had a significant effect on lowering contractile-induced injury as measured by a reduction in the release of adenylate kinase. Histamine-only and S&H treatments improved grip strength of Dmd(mdx) mice, whereas serotonin-only treatment resulted in no significant improvement in muscle strength. The results of this study indicate that S&H therapy might be a promising new strategy for muscular dystrophies and that the mechanism should be further investigated. PMID:26740813

  5. G-protein coupled receptor 56 promotes myoblast fusion through serum response factor- and nuclear factor of activated T-cell-mediated signalling but is not essential for muscle development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Melissa P; Doyle, Jamie R; Barry, Brenda; Beauvais, Ariane; Rozkalne, Anete; Piao, Xianhua; Lawlor, Michael W; Kopin, Alan S; Walsh, Christopher A; Gussoni, Emanuela

    2013-12-01

    Mammalian muscle cell differentiation is a complex process of multiple steps for which many of the factors involved have not yet been defined. In a screen to identify the regulators of myogenic cell fusion, we found that the gene for G-protein coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) was transiently up-regulated during the early fusion of human myoblasts. Human mutations in the gene for GPR56 cause the disease bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria; however, the consequences of receptor dysfunction on muscle development have not been explored. Using knockout mice, we defined the role of GPR56 in skeletal muscle. GPR56(-/-) myoblasts have decreased fusion and smaller myotube sizes in culture. In addition, a loss of GPR56 expression in muscle cells results in decreases or delays in the expression of myogenic differentiation 1, myogenin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT)c2. Our data suggest that these abnormalities result from decreased GPR56-mediated serum response element and NFAT signalling. Despite these changes, no overt differences in phenotype were identified in the muscle of GPR56 knockout mice, which presented only a mild but statistically significant elevation of serum creatine kinase compared to wild-type. In agreement with these findings, clinical data from 13 bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria patients revealed mild serum creatine kinase increase in only two patients. In summary, targeted disruption of GPR56 in mice results in myoblast abnormalities. The absence of a severe muscle phenotype in GPR56 knockout mice and human patients suggests that other factors may compensate for the lack of this G-protein coupled receptor during muscle development and that the motor delay observed in these patients is likely not a result of primary muscle abnormalities.

  6. Age-related changes in miR-143-3p:Igfbp5 interactions affect muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Arroquia, Ana; McCormick, Rachel; Molloy, Andrew P; McArdle, Anne; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna

    2016-04-01

    A common characteristic of aging is defective regeneration of skeletal muscle. The molecular pathways underlying age-related decline in muscle regenerative potential remain elusive. microRNAs are novel gene regulators controlling development and homeostasis and the regeneration of most tissues, including skeletal muscle. Here, we use satellite cells and primary myoblasts from mice and humans and an in vitro regeneration model, to show that disrupted expression of microRNA-143-3p and its target gene, Igfbp5, plays an important role in muscle regeneration in vitro. We identified miR-143 as a regulator of the insulin growth factor-binding protein 5 (Igfbp5) in primary myoblasts and show that the expression of miR-143 and its target gene is disrupted in satellite cells from old mice. Moreover, we show that downregulation of miR-143 during aging may act as a compensatory mechanism aiming at improving myogenesis efficiency; however, concomitant upregulation of miR-143 target gene, Igfbp5, is associated with increased cell senescence, thus affecting myogenesis. Our data demonstrate that dysregulation of miR-143-3p:Igfbp5 interactions in satellite cells with age may be responsible for age-related changes in satellite cell function. PMID:26762731

  7. Effect of anthocyanidins on myogenic differentiation in induced and non-induced primary myoblasts from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Villasante, Alejandro; Powell, Madison S; Murdoch, Gordon K; Overturf, Ken; Cain, Kenneth; Wacyk, Jurij; Hardy, Ronald W

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to test whether an anthocyanidin mixture (peonidin, cyanidin and pelargonidin chloride) modulates myogenesis in both induced and non-induced myogenic cells from juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We evaluated three different anthocyanidin concentrations (1×, 2.5× and 10×) at two sampling times (24 and 36h). To test for treatment effects, we analyzed the expression of myoD and pax7 as well as two target genes of the Notch signaling pathway, hey2 and her6. In induced myogenic cells, the lowest and middle anthocyanidin doses caused significantly greater expression of myoD after 24h of treatment compared to control. A significantly higher expression of pax7 in cells exposed to either anthocyanidin treatment during 36h compared was observed. Similarly, the pax7/myoD ratio was significantly lower in cells exposed to the lowest anthocyanidin doses during 24h compared to control. No significant effect of anthocyanidin treatments on the expression of hey2 and her6 at either sampling point was detected. In non-induced cells, we observed no effect of anthocyanidins on myoD expression and significant down-regulation on pax7 expression in cells exposed to either anthocyanidin mixture concentrations after 24 and 36h of treatment compared to control. Further, the pax7/myoD ratio was significantly lower in cells exposed to either anthocyanidin doses at both sampling time. In non-induced cells, the highest anthocyanidin dose provoked significantly greater expression of hey2 after 24h of treatment compared to control. We detected no such effect in non-induced cells exposed to the lowest and middle anthocyanidin doses during 24h of treatment. The expression of her6 was unaffected by anthocyanidin treatments at either sampling time or doses compared to control. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that anthocyanidins modulate specific components of the myogenic programming in fish, thereby potentially affecting somatic growth in fish fed

  8. Differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts expressing lamin A mutated at a site responsible for Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is improved by inhibition of the MEK-ERK pathway and stimulation of the PI3-kinase pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Favreau, Catherine; Delbarre, Erwan; Courvalin, Jean-Claude; Buendia, Brigitte

    2008-04-01

    Mutation R453W in A-type lamins, that are major nuclear envelope proteins, generates Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. We previously showed that mouse myoblasts expressing R453W-lamin A incompletely exit the cell cycle and differentiate into myocytes with a low level of multinucleation. Here we attempted to improve differentiation by treating these cells with a mixture of PD98059, an extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (also known as mitogen-activated kinase, MEK) inhibitor, and insulin-like growth factor-II, an activator of phosphoinositide 3-kinase. We show that mouse myoblasts expressing R453W-lamin A were sensitive to the drug treatment as shown by (i) an increase in multinucleation, (ii) downregulation of proliferation markers (cyclin D1, hyperphosphorylated Rb), (iii) upregulation of myogenin, and (iv) sustained activation of p21 and cyclin D3. However, nuclear matrix anchorage of p21 and cyclin D3 in a complex with hypophosphorylated Rb that is critical to trigger cell cycle arrest and myogenin induction was deficient and incompletely restored by drug treatment. As the turn-over of R453W-lamin A at the nuclear envelope was greatly enhanced, we propose that R453W-lamin A impairs the capacity of the nuclear lamina to serve as scaffold for substrates of the MEK-ERK pathway and for MyoD-induced proteins that play a role in the differentiation process.

  9. Myotube formation is affected by adipogenic lineage cells in a cell-to-cell contact-independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Takegahara, Yuki; Yamanouchi, Keitaro Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-05-15

    Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) formation is observed in some pathological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sarcopenia. Several studies have suggested that IMAT formation is not only negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass but also causes decreased muscle contraction in sarcopenia. In the present study, we examined w hether adipocytes affect myogenesis. For this purpose, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were transfected with siRNA of PPARγ (siPPARγ) in an attempt to inhibit adipogenesis. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotube formation was promoted in cells transfected with siPPARγ compared to that of cells transfected with control siRNA. To determine whether direct cell-to-cell contact between adipocytes and myoblasts is a prerequisite for adipocytes to affect myogenesis, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with pre- or mature adipocytes in a Transwell coculture system. MHC-positive myotube formation was inhibited when skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with mature adipocytes, but was promoted when they were cocultured with preadipocytes. Similar effects were observed when pre- or mature adipocyte-conditioned medium was used. These results indicate that preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass by promoting myogenesis; once differentiated, the resulting mature adipocytes negatively affect myogenesis, leading to the muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies. - Highlights: • We examined the effects of pre- and mature adipocytes on myogenesis in vitro. • Preadipocytes and mature adipocytes affect myoblast fusion. • Preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass. • Mature adipocytes lead to muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies.

  10. ANKRD1 modulates inflammatory responses in C2C12 myoblasts through feedback inhibition of NF-κB signaling activity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher

    2015-08-14

    Transcription factors of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) family play a pivotal role in inflammation, immunity and cell survival responses. Recent studies revealed that NF-κB also regulates the processes of muscle atrophy. NF-κB activity is regulated by various factors, including ankyrin repeat domain 2 (AnkrD2), which belongs to the muscle ankyrin repeat protein family. Another member of this family, AnkrD1 is also a transcriptional effector. The expression levels of AnkrD1 are highly upregulated in denervated skeletal muscle, suggesting an involvement of AnkrD1 in NF-κB mediated cellular responses to paralysis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the interactive role of AnkrD1 in NF-κB mediated cellular responses is not well understood. In the current study, we examined the effect of AnkrD1 on NF-κB activity and determined the interactions between AnkrD1 expression and NF-κB signaling induced by TNFα in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts. TNFα upregulated AnkrD1 mRNA and protein levels. AnkrD1-siRNA significantly increased TNFα-induced transcriptional activation of NF-κB, whereas overexpression of AnkrD1 inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AnkrD1 was able to bind p50 subunit of NF-κB and vice versa. Finally, CHIP assays revealed that AnkrD1 bound chromatin at a NF-κB binding site in the AnrkD2 promoter and required NF-κB to do so. These results provide evidence of signaling integration between AnkrD1 and NF-κB pathways, and suggest a novel anti-inflammatory role of AnkrD1 through feedback inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional activity by which AnkrD1 modulates the balance between physiological and pathological inflammatory responses in skeletal muscle. - Highlights: • AnkrD1 is upregulated by TNFα and represses NF-κB-induced transcriptional activity. • AnkrD1 binds to p50 subunit of NF-κB and is recruited to NF-κB bound to chromatin. • AnkrD1 mediates a feed-back inhibitory loop

  11. ANKRD1 modulates inflammatory responses in C2C12 myoblasts through feedback inhibition of NF-κB signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher

    2015-08-14

    Transcription factors of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) family play a pivotal role in inflammation, immunity and cell survival responses. Recent studies revealed that NF-κB also regulates the processes of muscle atrophy. NF-κB activity is regulated by various factors, including ankyrin repeat domain 2 (AnkrD2), which belongs to the muscle ankyrin repeat protein family. Another member of this family, AnkrD1 is also a transcriptional effector. The expression levels of AnkrD1 are highly upregulated in denervated skeletal muscle, suggesting an involvement of AnkrD1 in NF-κB mediated cellular responses to paralysis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the interactive role of AnkrD1 in NF-κB mediated cellular responses is not well understood. In the current study, we examined the effect of AnkrD1 on NF-κB activity and determined the interactions between AnkrD1 expression and NF-κB signaling induced by TNFα in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts. TNFα upregulated AnkrD1 mRNA and protein levels. AnkrD1-siRNA significantly increased TNFα-induced transcriptional activation of NF-κB, whereas overexpression of AnkrD1 inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AnkrD1 was able to bind p50 subunit of NF-κB and vice versa. Finally, CHIP assays revealed that AnkrD1 bound chromatin at a NF-κB binding site in the AnrkD2 promoter and required NF-κB to do so. These results provide evidence of signaling integration between AnkrD1 and NF-κB pathways, and suggest a novel anti-inflammatory role of AnkrD1 through feedback inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional activity by which AnkrD1 modulates the balance between physiological and pathological inflammatory responses in skeletal muscle. PMID:26102030

  12. Testosterone enables growth and hypertrophy in fusion impaired myoblasts that display myotube atrophy: deciphering the role of androgen and IGF-I receptors.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David C; Stewart, Claire E; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Dugdale, Hannah F; Yousefian, Farzad; Lewis, Mark P; Sharples, Adam P

    2016-06-01

    We have previously highlighted the ability of testosterone (T) to improve differentiation and myotube hypertrophy in fusion impaired myoblasts that display reduced myotube hypertrophy via multiple population doublings (PD) versus their parental controls (CON); an observation which is abrogated via PI3K/Akt inhibition (Deane et al. 2013). However, whether the most predominant molecular mechanism responsible for T induced hypertrophy occurs directly via androgen receptor or indirectly via IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt pathway is currently debated. PD and CON C2C12 muscle cells were exposed to low serum conditions in the presence or absence of T (100 nM) ± inhibitors of AR (flutamide/F, 40 μm) and IGF-IR (picropodophyllin/PPP, 150 nM) for 72 h and 7 days (early/late muscle differentiation respectively). T increased AR and Akt abundance, myogenin gene expression, and myotube hypertrophy, but not ERK1/2 activity in both CON and PD cell types. Akt activity was not increased significantly in either cell type with T. Testosterone was also unable to promote early differentiation in the presence of IGF-IR inhibitor (PPP) yet still able to promote appropriate later increases in myotube hypertrophy and AR abundance despite IGF-IR inhibition. The addition of the AR inhibitor powerfully attenuated all T induced increases in differentiation and myotube hypertrophy with corresponding reductions in AR abundance, phosphorylated Akt, ERK1/2 and gene expression of IGF-IR, myoD and myogenin with increases in myostatin mRNA in both cell types. Interestingly, despite basally reduced differentiation and myotube hypertrophy, PD cells showed larger T induced increases in AR abundance vs. CON cells, a response abrogated in the presence of AR but not IGF-IR inhibitors. Furthermore, T induced increases in Akt abundance were sustained despite the presence of IGF-IR inhibition in PD cells only. Importantly, flutamide alone reduced IGF-IR mRNA in both cell types across time points, with an observed

  13. eEF1A phosphorylation in the nucleus of insulin-stimulated C2C12 myoblasts: Ser⁵³ is a novel substrate for protein kinase C βI.

    PubMed

    Piazzi, Manuela; Bavelloni, Alberto; Faenza, Irene; Blalock, William; Urbani, Andrea; D'Aguanno, Simona; Fiume, Roberta; Ramazzotti, Giulia; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Cocco, Lucio

    2010-12-01

    Recent data indicate that some PKC isoforms are translocated to the nucleus, in response to certain stimuli, where they play an important role in nuclear signaling events. To identify novel interacting proteins of conventional PKC (cPKC) at the nuclear level during myogenesis and to find new PKC isozyme-specific phosphosubstrates, we performed a proteomics analysis of immunoprecipitated nuclear samples from mouse myoblast C2C12 cells following insulin administration. Using a phospho(Ser)-PKC substrate antibody, specific interacting proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS spectrometry. A total of 16 proteins with the exact and complete motif recognized by the phospho-cPKC substrate antibody were identified; among these, particular interest was given to eukaryotic elongation factor 1α (eEF1A). Nuclear eEF1A was focalized in the nucleoli, and its expression was observed to increase following insulin treatment. Of the cPKC isoforms, only PKCβI was demonstrated to be expressed in the nucleus of C2C12 myocytes and to co-immunoprecipitate with eEF1A. In-depth analysis using site-directed mutagenesis revealed that PKCβI could phosphorylate Ser⁵³ of the eEF1A2 isoform and that the association between eEF1A2 and PKCβI was dependent on the phosphorylation status of eEF1A2.

  14. The Cytoprotective Effect of Petalonia binghamiae Methanol Extract against Oxidative Stress in C2C12 Myoblasts: Mediation by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 and Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2 Related Factor 2

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Han, Min Ho; Lee, Dae-Sung; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Cheol Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the protective effects of the marine brown algae Petalonia binghamiae against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. P. binghamiae methanol extract (PBME) prevented hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth inhibition and exhibited scavenging activity against intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by H2O2 in mouse-derived C2C12 myoblasts. PBME also significantly attenuated H2O2-induced comet tail formation in a comet assay, histone γH2A.X phosphorylation, and annexin V-positive cells, suggesting that PBME prevented H2O2-induced cellular DNA damage and apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, PBME increased the levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent antioxidant enzyme, associated with the induction of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). However, zinc protoporphyrin IX, a HO-1 competitive inhibitor, significantly abolished the protective effects of PBME on H2O2-induced ROS generation, growth inhibition, and apoptosis. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PBME augments the antioxidant defense capacity through activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. PMID:25939035

  15. Induction of c-myc and c-jun proto-oncogene expression in rat L6 myoblasts by cadmium is inhibited by zinc preinduction of the metallothionein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Abshire, M.K.; Buzard, G.S.; Shiraishi, Noriyuki; Waalkers, M.P.

    1996-07-01

    Certain proto-oncogenes transfer growth regulatory signals from the cell surface to the nucleus. These genes often show activation soon after cells are exposed to mitogenic stimulation but can also be activated as a nonmitogenic stress response. Cadmium (Cd) is a carcinogenic metal in humans and rodents and, though its mechanism of action is unknown, it could involve activation of such proto-oncogenes. Metallothionein (MT), a metal-inducible protein that binds Cd, can protect against many aspects of Cd toxicity, including genotoxicity and possibly carcinogenesis. Thus, the effects of Cd on expression of c-myc and c-jun in rat L6 myoblasts, and the effect of preactivation of the MT gene by Zn treatment on such oncogene expression, were studied. MT protein levels were measured using oligonucleotide hybridization and standardized to {beta}-actin levels. Cd (5 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}, 0-30 h) stimulated both c-myc and c-jun mRNA expression. An initial peak of activation of c-myc expression occurred 2 h after initiation of Cd exposure, and levels remained elevated throughout the assessment period. Zn pretreatment markedly reduced the activation of c-myc expression by Cd compared to cells not receiving Zn pretreatment. Cd treatment increased c-jun mRNA levels by up to 3.5-fold. Again, Zn pretreatment markedly reduced. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Expression vectors encoding human growth hormone (hGH) controlled by human muscle-specific promoters: prospects for regulated production of hGH delivered by myoblast transfer or intravenous injection.

    PubMed

    Dahler, A; Wade, R P; Muscat, G E; Waters, M J

    1994-08-01

    We report here the construction of vectors that produce and secrete human growth hormone (hGH) in a muscle-specific manner. The promoter regions of the genes encoding human skeletal alpha-actin (HSA) and troponin I slow (HTnIs) were linked to the hGH-encoding gene. These vectors were designated pHSA2000GH and pHTnIs4200GH, respectively. The HSA and HTnIs promoters linked to the cat gene have previously been shown to be necessary and sufficient for developmentally regulated muscle-specific expression. Furthermore, these promoters function in a fibre-type-specific manner in transgenic animals. Transient and stable transfection analyses with pHSA2000GH and pHTnIs4200GH indicated that: (i) these vectors efficiently synthesized hGH in a muscle-specific manner; (ii) the myogenic master regulatory gene, myoD, a determinant of cell fate, trans-activated expression of hGH in pluripotential non-muscle cells; and (iii) these hGH expression vectors were developmentally regulated during myogenic differentiation. These regulated tissue/fibre-type-specific hGH-containing plasmids are suitable vectors for the delivery and stable production of GH in livestock and GH-deficient hosts by either transgenesis, myoblast transfer or liposome-mediated intravenous injection.

  17. The cytoprotective effect of isorhamnetin against oxidative stress is mediated by the upregulation of the Nrf2-dependent HO-1 expression in C2C12 myoblasts through scavenging reactive oxygen species and ERK inactivation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to confirm the protective effects of isorhamnetin against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage. Our results indicated that isorhamnetin inhibited the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth inhibition and exhibited scavenging activity against the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mouse-derived C2C12 myoblasts. Isorhamnetin also significantly attenuated H2O2-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, and increased the levels of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its phosphorylation associated with the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). However, the protective effects of isorhamnetin on H2O2-induced ROS and growth inhibition were significantly abolished by an HO-1 competitive inhibitor. Moreover, the potential of isorhamnetin to mediate HO-1 induction and protect against H2O2-mediated growth inhibition was abrogated by transient transfection with Nrf2-specific small interfering RNA. Additionally, isorhamnetin induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK. However, the specific inhibitor of ERK, but not JNK and p38 MAPK, was able to abolish the HO-1 upregulation and the Nrf2 phosphorylation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that isorhamnetin augments the cellular antioxidant defense capacity by activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway involving the activation of the ERK pathway, thus protecting the C2C12 cells from H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26830132

  18. Affective Dynamics in Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Trull, Timothy J.; Lane, Sean P.; Koval, Peter; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich W.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss three varieties of affective dynamics (affective instability, emotional inertia, and emotional differentiation). In each case, we suggest how these affective dynamics should be operationalized and measured in daily life using time-intensive methods, like ecological momentary assessment or ambulatory assessment, and recommend time-sensitive analyses that take into account not only the variability but also the temporal dependency of reports. Studies that explore how these affective dynamics are associated with psychological disorders and symptoms are reviewed, and we emphasize that these affective processes are within a nexus of other components of emotion regulation.

  19. Establishment of clonal myogenic cell lines from severely affected dystrophic muscles - CDK4 maintains the myogenic population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A hallmark of muscular dystrophies is the replacement of muscle by connective tissue. Muscle biopsies from patients severely affected with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) may contain few myogenic cells. Because the chromosomal contraction at 4q35 linked to FSHD is thought to cause a defect within myogenic cells, it is important to study this particular cell type, rather than the fibroblasts and adipocytes of the endomysial fibrosis, to understand the mechanism leading to myopathy. Results We present a protocol to establish clonal myogenic cell lines from even severely dystrophic muscle that has been replaced mostly by fat, using overexpression of CDK4 and the catalytic component of telomerase (human telomerase reverse transcriptase; hTERT), and a subsequent cloning step. hTERT is necessary to compensate for telomere loss during in vitro cultivation, while CDK4 prevents a telomere-independent growth arrest affecting CD56+ myogenic cells, but not their CD56- counterpart, in vitro. Conclusions These immortal cell lines are valuable tools to reproducibly study the effect of the FSHD mutation within myoblasts isolated from muscles that have been severely affected by the disease, without the confounding influence of variable amounts of contaminating connective-tissue cells. PMID:21798090

  20. Affectional Patterns of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    This study sought to determine if there is a shift with age in affection (1) from parents to friends, (2) from one parent to the other, and (3) from same-sex to opposite-sex friends. Subjects, eighth graders and eleventh graders, completed the Measurement of Family Affective Structure. (Author)

  1. Affective Involvement Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemlech, Johanna K.

    1970-01-01

    The Affective Involvement Instrument (AII) describes and classifies affective involvement in the process of decision-making as it occurs during classroom activities such as role-playing or group discussions. The thirty-celled instrument behaviorizes the six processes involved in decision-making and combines them with the taxonomic levels of the…

  2. Basic principles of muscle development and growth in meat-producing mammals as affected by the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system.

    PubMed

    Oksbjerg, Niels; Gondret, Florence; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2004-10-01

    This presentation aims to describe how the basic events in prenatal muscle development and postnatal muscle growth are controlled by the insulin-like growth factor system (IGF). The prenatal events (myogenesis) cover the rate of proliferation, the rate and extent of fusion, and the differentiation of three myoblast populations, giving rise to primary fibers, secondary fibers, and a satellite cell population, respectively. The number of muscle fibers, a key determinant of the postnatal growth rate, is fixed late in gestation. The postnatal events contributing to myofiber hypertrophy comprise satellite cell proliferation and differentiation, and protein turnover. Muscle cell cultures produce IGFs and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in various degrees depending on the origin (species, muscle type) and state of development of these cells, suggesting an autocrine/paracrine mode of action of IGF-related factors. In vivo studies and results based on cell lines or primary cell cultures show that IGF-I and IGF-II stimulate both proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts and satellite cells in a time and concentration-dependent way, via interaction with type I IGF receptors. However, IGF binding proteins (IGFBP) may either inhibit or potentiate the stimulating effects of IGFs on proliferation or differentiation. During postnatal growth in vivo or in fully differentiated muscle cells in culture, IGF-I stimulates the rate of protein synthesis and inhibits the rate of protein degradation, thereby enhancing myofiber hypertrophy. The possible roles and actions of the IGF system in regulating and determining muscle growth as affected by developmental stage and age, muscle type, feeding levels, treatment with growth hormone and selection for growth performance are discussed.

  3. [Affect and mimetic behavior].

    PubMed

    Zepf, S; Ullrich, B; Hartmann, S

    1998-05-01

    The relationship between facial expression and experienced affect presents many problems. The two diametrically opposed positions proposing solutions to this problem are exemplified using the conceptions of Mandler u. Izard. The underlying premises of both conceptions still prevail in various forms. The authors reject the concepts according to which facial expression is merely correlated to the affects (see Mandler 1975) as well as the view that facial expression controls the affects (see Izard 1977). The relationship between affect and facial expression is reexamined, subjecting it to a semiotic, essentially semantic analysis similar to the Ogden and Richards' language and meaning approach. This analysis involves a critical discussion of Scherer's attempt of a purely communicational interpretation using Bühler's organon model. In the author's approach, facial expression is seen not simply as a system of signals, but as a system of representative signs which signify the affects and refer to the emotive meaning of things for the subject. The authors develop the thesis that human beings are not born simply with the ability to speak, but also with the abstract possibility of performing facial expressions. This ability develops by way of coordinating patterns of expressions, which are presumably phylogenetically determined, with affects that take on a socially determined individual form, similar to language acquisition during socialisation. The authors discuss the methodological implications arising for studies investigating the affective meaning of facial expressions. PMID:9632951

  4. Androgens Up-regulate Transcription of the Notch Inhibitor Numb in C2C12 Myoblasts via Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling to T Cell Factor Elements in the Numb Promoter*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Wu, Yong; Yao, Shen; Levine, Alice C.; Kirschenbaum, Alexander; Collier, Lauren; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    Androgen signaling via the androgen receptor is a key pathway that contributes to development, cell fate decisions, and differentiation, including that of myogenic progenitors. Androgens and synthetic steroids have well established anabolic actions on skeletal muscle. Wnt and Notch signaling pathways are also essential to myogenic cell fate decisions during development and tissue repair. However, the interactions among these pathways are largely unknown. Androgenic regulation of Wnt signaling has been reported. Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, has been shown to inhibit Notch signaling and up-regulate Numb, a Notch inhibitor. To elucidate the mechanisms of interaction between nandrolone and Wnt/Notch signaling, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Numb expression and Wnt signaling and determined the roles of Wnt signaling in nandrolone-induced Numb expression in C2C12 myoblasts. Nandrolone increased Numb mRNA and protein levels and T cell factor (Tcf) transcriptional activity via inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β. Up-regulation of Numb expression by nandrolone was blocked by the Wnt inhibitors, sFRP1 and DKK1, whereas Wnt3a increased Numb mRNA and protein expression. In addition, we observed that the proximal promoter of the Numb gene had functional Tcf binding elements to which β-catenin was recruited in a manner enhanced by both nandrolone and Wnt3a. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the Tcf binding sites in the Numb promoter are required for the nandrolone-induced Numb transcriptional activation in this cell line. These results reveal a novel molecular mechanism underlying up-regulation of Numb transcription with a critical role for increased canonical Wnt signaling. In addition, the data identify Numb as a novel target gene of the Wnt signaling pathway by which Wnts would be able to inhibit Notch signaling. PMID:23649620

  5. CTGF/CCN2 exerts profibrotic action in myoblasts via the up-regulation of sphingosine kinase-1/S1P3 signaling axis: Implications in the action mechanism of TGFβ.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Gennaro; Cencetti, Francesca; Pertici, Irene; Japtok, Lukasz; Bernacchioni, Caterina; Donati, Chiara; Bruni, Paola

    2015-02-01

    The matricellular protein connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is recognized as key player in the onset of fibrosis in various tissues, including skeletal muscle. In many circumstances, CTGF has been shown to be induced by transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and accounting, at least in part, for its biological action. In this study it was verified that in cultured myoblasts CTGF/CCN2 causes their transdifferentiation into myofibroblasts by up-regulating the expression of fibrosis marker proteins α-smooth muscle actin and transgelin. Interestingly, it was also found that the profibrotic effect exerted by CTGF/CCN2 was mediated by the sphingosine kinase (SK)-1/S1P3 signaling axis specifically induced by the treatment with the profibrotic cue. Following CTGF/CCN2-induced up-regulation, S1P3 became the S1P receptor subtype expressed at the highest degree, at least at mRNA level, and was thus capable of readdressing the sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling towards fibrosis rather than myogenic differentiation. Another interesting finding is that CTGF/CCN2 silencing prevented the TGFβ-dependent up-regulation of SK1/S1P3 signaling axis and strongly reduced the profibrotic effect exerted by TGFβ, pointing at a crucial role of endogenous CTGF/CCN2 generated following TGFβ challenge in the transmission of at least part of its profibrotic effect. These results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which CTGF/CCN2 drives its biological action and strengthen the concept that SK1/S1P3 axis plays a critical role in the onset of fibrotic cell phenotype.

  6. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  7. Affective responses to dance.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julia F; Pollick, Frank E; Lambrechts, Anna; Gomila, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present work was the characterization of mechanisms by which affective experiences are elicited in observers when watching dance movements. A total of 203 dance stimuli from a normed stimuli library were used in a series of independent experiments. The following measures were obtained: (i) subjective measures of 97 dance-naïve participants' affective responses (Likert scale ratings, interviews); and (ii) objective measures of the physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy, luminance), and of the movements represented in the stimuli (roundedness, impressiveness). Results showed that (i) participants' ratings of felt and perceived affect differed, (ii) felt and perceived valence but not arousal ratings correlated with physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy and luminance), (iii) roundedness in posture shape was related to the experience of more positive emotion than edgy shapes (1 of 3 assessed rounded shapes showed a clear effect on positiveness ratings while a second reached trend level significance), (iv) more impressive movements resulted in more positive affective responses, (v) dance triggered affective experiences through the imagery and autobiographical memories it elicited in some people, and (vi) the physical parameters of the video stimuli correlated only weakly and negatively with the aesthetics ratings of beauty, liking and interest. The novelty of the present approach was twofold; (i) the assessment of multiple affect-inducing mechanisms, and (ii) the use of one single normed stimulus set. The results from this approach lend support to both previous and present findings. Results are discussed with regards to current literature in the field of empirical aesthetics and affective neuroscience.

  8. Affective responses to dance.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julia F; Pollick, Frank E; Lambrechts, Anna; Gomila, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present work was the characterization of mechanisms by which affective experiences are elicited in observers when watching dance movements. A total of 203 dance stimuli from a normed stimuli library were used in a series of independent experiments. The following measures were obtained: (i) subjective measures of 97 dance-naïve participants' affective responses (Likert scale ratings, interviews); and (ii) objective measures of the physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy, luminance), and of the movements represented in the stimuli (roundedness, impressiveness). Results showed that (i) participants' ratings of felt and perceived affect differed, (ii) felt and perceived valence but not arousal ratings correlated with physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy and luminance), (iii) roundedness in posture shape was related to the experience of more positive emotion than edgy shapes (1 of 3 assessed rounded shapes showed a clear effect on positiveness ratings while a second reached trend level significance), (iv) more impressive movements resulted in more positive affective responses, (v) dance triggered affective experiences through the imagery and autobiographical memories it elicited in some people, and (vi) the physical parameters of the video stimuli correlated only weakly and negatively with the aesthetics ratings of beauty, liking and interest. The novelty of the present approach was twofold; (i) the assessment of multiple affect-inducing mechanisms, and (ii) the use of one single normed stimulus set. The results from this approach lend support to both previous and present findings. Results are discussed with regards to current literature in the field of empirical aesthetics and affective neuroscience. PMID:27235953

  9. Elements affecting runway traction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The five basic elements affecting runway traction for jet transport aircraft operation are identified and described in terms of pilot, aircraft system, atmospheric, tire, and pavement performance factors or parameters. Where possible, research results are summarized, and means for restoring or improving runway traction for these different conditions are discussed.

  10. What Variables Affect Solubility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Leyva, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Helps middle school students understand the concept of solubility through hands-on experience with a variety of liquids and solids. As they explore factors that affect solubility and saturation, students gain content mastery and an understanding of the inquiry process. Also enables teachers to authentically assess student performance on several…

  11. How Body Affects Brain.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Wendy A

    2016-08-01

    Studies show that physical exercise can affect a range of brain and cognitive functions. However, little is known about the peripheral signals that initiate these central changes. Moon et al. (2016) provide exciting new evidence that a novel myokine, cathepsin B (CTSB), released with exercise is associated with improved memory. PMID:27508865

  12. Food Affects Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1982-01-01

    A conference on whether food and nutrients affect human behavior was held on November 9, 1982 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Various research studies on this topic are reviewed, including the effects of food on brain biochemistry (particularly sleep) and effects of tryptophane as a pain reducer. (JN)

  13. Factors affecting soil cohesion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erodibility is a measure of a soil’s resistance against erosive forces and is affected by both intrinsic (or inherent) soil property and the extrinsic condition at the time erodibility measurement is made. Since soil erodibility is usually calculated from results obtained from erosion experimen...

  14. Affective antecedents of revenge.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Kieran; Adams, Gabrielle S

    2013-02-01

    We propose that revenge responses are often influenced more by affective reactions than by deliberate decision making as McCullough et al. suggest. We review social psychological evidence suggesting that justice judgments and reactions may be determined more by emotions than by cognitions.

  15. Dynamic Synchronization of Teacher-Students Affection in Affective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wenhai; Lu, Jiamei

    2011-01-01

    Based on Bower's affective network theory, the article links the dynamic analysis of affective factors in affective instruction, and presents affective instruction strategic of dynamic synchronization between teacher and students to implement the best ideal mood that promotes students' cognition and affection together. In the process of teaching,…

  16. The interplay between physical and chemical properties of protein films affects their bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Grover, Chloe N; Farndale, Richard W; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2012-09-01

    Although mechanical properties, roughness, and receptor molecule expression have all been shown to influence the cellular reactivity of collagen-based biomaterials, their relative contribution, in a given system remains unclear. Here, we study films containing combinations of collagen, gelatin, and soluble and insoluble elastin, crosslinking of which results in altered film stiffness and roughness. Collagen and gelatin have similar amino acid sequences but altered cell-binding sites. We studied cell response with both C2C12 myoblast cells (which possess RGD-recognizing integrins α(V)β(3) and α(5)β(1)) and C2C12-α2+ cells (which, in addition, express the collagen-binding integrin α(2)β(1)) to establish the effect of altering the available binding sites on cell adhesion and spreading on films. Systematically altering the composition, crosslinking and cell type, allows us to deconvolute the effects of physical parameters and available binding sites on the cell reactivity of films in this system. Collagen-based films were rougher and stiffer and supported lower cell surface coverage than gelatin-based films. Additionally, C2C12-α2+ cells showed preferential attachment to collagen-based films compared with C2C12 cells, but no significant difference was seen using gelatin-based films. The cell count and surface coverage were found to decrease significantly on all films after crosslinking (Coll XL coverage = 2-6%, Gel XL coverage = 20-32%), but cell area and aspect ratio on collagen films were affected to a greater extent than on gelatin films. The results show that, in this system, the composition, and more significantly, crosslinking, of films affects the cell reactivity to a greater extent than their stiffness or roughness.

  17. Factors Affecting Internal Blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, R. H.; Sandusky, H. W.; Felts, J. E.

    2007-12-01

    Internal blast refers to explosion effects in confined spaces, which are dominated by the heat output of the explosive. Theoretical temperatures and pressures may not be reached due to heat losses and incomplete gas mixing. Gas mixing can have the largest effect, potentially reducing peak quasi-static pressure by a factor of two due to lack of thermal equilibrium between products and atmosphere in the space, separate from the effect of incomplete combustion of excess fuel when that atmosphere is air. Chamber and test geometry affect gas mixing, which has been inferred through temperature and pressure measurements and compared to calculations. Late-time combustion is observed for TNT compared to HMX.

  18. Seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Kurlansik, Stuart L; Ibay, Annamarie D

    2012-12-01

    Seasonal affective disorder is a combination of biologic and mood disturbances with a seasonal pattern, typically occurring in the autumn and winter with remission in the spring or summer. In a given year, about 5 percent of the U.S. population experiences seasonal affective disorder, with symptoms present for about 40 percent of the year. Although the condition is seasonally limited, patients may have significant impairment from the associated depressive symptoms. Treatment can improve these symptoms and also may be used as prophylaxis before the subsequent autumn and winter seasons. Light therapy is generally well tolerated, with most patients experiencing clinical improvement within one to two weeks after the start of treatment. To avoid relapse, light therapy should continue through the end of the winter season until spontaneous remission of symptoms in the spring or summer. Pharmacotherapy with antidepressants and cognitive behavior therapy are also appropriate treatment options and have been shown to be as effective as light therapy. Because of the comparable effectiveness of treatment options, first-line management should be guided by patient preference.

  19. Cholesterol and Affective Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Palagummi, Narasimha M.; Behrendtsen, Ole; Coryell, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Depression and mania have been linked with low cholesterol though there has been limited prospective study of cholesterol and subsequent course of affective illness. We studied the relationship between fasting total cholesterol and subsequent depressive and manic symptoms. A total of 131 participants from a prospective cohort study were identified as having had a fasting total cholesterol evaluation at intake. Participants were predominantly inpatients at index visit and were followed for a median of 20 and up to 25 years. Cholesterol was modeled with age, gender, and index use of a mood stabilizer in linear regression to assess its influence on subsequent depressive symptom burden in participants with unipolar disorder as well as depressive and manic symptom burden in participants with bipolar disorder. Among bipolar participants (N=65), low cholesterol predicted a higher proportion of follow-up weeks with manic, but not depressive symptoms. Cholesterol did not appear to predict depressive symptom burden among participants with unipolar depression (N=66). Lower cholesterol levels may predispose individuals with bipolar disorder to a greater burden of manic symptomatology and may provide some insight into the underlying neurobiology. PMID:19969372

  20. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology.

  1. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology. PMID:27535258

  2. Pteridines and affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, R; Fekkes, D

    2002-06-01

    The pteridine tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor in the biosynthesis of dopamine, (nor)epinephrine, serotonin and nitric oxide (NO). Furthermore, BH4 has a direct influence on release mechanisms of these neurotransmitters and on serotonin receptor binding activity immunology. The synthesis of BH4 is stimulated by interferon-gamma and hence there is a close relationship with the immune system HPA-axis. In animal experiments it was also found that the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis influences the pteridine metabolism. In clinical studies, so far, no evidence has been found for this relationship diseases. A congenital biopterin deficiency results in atypical phenylketonuria with severe neuropsychiatric symptoms. In several neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, decreased levels of BH4 are found depression. Since 1984 there have been reports on decreased biopterin and increased neopterin levels in urine and plasma of depressed patients. Conflicting results have also been found, however, due probably to methodological problems therapy. Until now, oral administration of BH4 to depressed patients has been performed by two investigators, which resulted in mainly temporal clinical improvement discussion. Understanding of biochemical mechanisms in which pteridines are involved may contribute to our knowledge of the pathogenesis and treatment of affective disorders. This paper aims to provide an overview of the relevant literature and warrant for further research on this intriguing compound. PMID:26984153

  3. Community structure affects behavior.

    PubMed

    Jaenson, C

    1991-06-01

    AID's prevention efforts can benefit from taking into account 5 main aspects (KEPRA) of community structure identified by anthropologists: 1) kinship patterns, 2) economics, 3) politics, 4) religion, and 5) associations. For example, in Uganda among the Basoga and paternal aunt or senga is responsible for female sex education. Such culturally determined patterns need to be targeted in order to enhance education and effectiveness. Economics can reflect differing systems of family support through sexual means. The example given involves a poor family with a teenager in Thailand who exchanges a water buffalo or basic necessity for this daughter's prostitution. Politics must be considered because every society identifies people who have the power to persuade, influence, exchange resources, coerce, or in some way get people to do what is wanted. Utilizing these resources whether its ministers of health, factory owners, or peers is exemplified in the Monterey, Mexico factor floor supervisor and canteen worker introducing to workers the hows and whys of a new AID's education program. His peer status will command more respect than the director with direct authority. Religious beliefs have explanations for causes of sickness or disease, or provide instruction in sex practices. The example given is of a health workers in Uganda discussing AIDS with rural women by saying that we all know that disease and deaths are caused by spells. "But not AIDS - slim. AIDS is different." Associations can help provide educational, economic, and emotional assistance to the AID's effort or families affected.

  4. Affective Incoherence: When Affective Concepts and Embodied Reactions Clash

    PubMed Central

    Centerbar, David B.; Clore, Gerald L.; Schnall, Simone; Garvin, Erika

    2008-01-01

    In five studies, we examined the effects on cognitive performance of coherence and incoherence between conceptual and experiential sources of affective information. The studies crossed the priming of happy and sad concepts with affective experiences. In different experiments, these included: approach or avoidance actions, happy or sad feelings, and happy or sad expressive behaviors. In all studies, coherence between affective concepts and affective experiences led to better recall of a story than affective incoherence. We suggested that the experience of such experiential affective cues serves as evidence of the appropriateness of affective concepts that come to mind. The results suggest that affective coherence has epistemic benefits, and that incoherence is costly, for cognitive performance. PMID:18361672

  5. Affective incoherence: when affective concepts and embodied reactions clash.

    PubMed

    Centerbar, David B; Schnall, Simone; Clore, Gerald L; Garvin, Erika D

    2008-04-01

    In five studies, the authors examined the effects on cognitive performance of coherence and incoherence between conceptual and experiential sources of affective information. The studies crossed the priming of happy and sad concepts with affective experiences. In different experiments, these included approach or avoidance actions, happy or sad feelings, and happy or sad expressive behaviors. In all studies, coherence between affective concepts and affective experiences led to better recall of a story than did affective incoherence. The authors suggest that the experience of such experiential affective cues serves as evidence of the appropriateness of affective concepts that come to mind. The results suggest that affective coherence has epistemic benefits and that incoherence is costly in terms of cognitive performance.

  6. Encountering Science Education's Capacity to Affect and Be Affected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsop, Steve

    2016-01-01

    What might science education learn from the recent affective turn in the humanities and social sciences? Framed as a response to Michalinos Zembylas's article, this essay draws from selected theorizing in affect theory, science education and science and technology studies, in pursuit of diverse and productive ways to talk of affect within science…

  7. Thermal conditions experienced during differentiation affect metabolic and contractile phenotypes of mouse myotubes.

    PubMed

    Little, Alex G; Seebacher, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Central pathways regulate metabolic responses to cold in endotherms to maintain relatively stable internal core body temperatures. However, peripheral muscles routinely experience temperatures lower than core body temperature, so that it would be advantageous for peripheral tissues to respond to temperature changes independently from core body temperature regulation. Early developmental conditions can influence offspring phenotypes, and here we tested whether developing muscle can compensate locally for the effects of cold exposure independently from central regulation. Muscle myotubes originate from undifferentiated myoblasts that are laid down during embryogenesis. We show that in a murine myoblast cell line (C2C12), cold exposure (32°C) increased myoblast metabolic flux compared with 37°C control conditions. Importantly, myotubes that differentiated at 32°C compensated for the thermodynamic effects of low temperature by increasing metabolic rates, ATP production, and glycolytic flux. Myotube responses were also modulated by the temperatures experienced by "parent" myoblasts. Myotubes that differentiated under cold exposure increased activity of the AMP-stimulated protein kinase (AMPK), which may mediate metabolic changes in response cold exposure. Moreover, cold exposure shifted myosin heavy chains from slow to fast, presumably to overcome slower contractile speeds resulting from low temperatures. Adjusting thermal sensitivities locally in peripheral tissues complements central thermoregulation and permits animals to maintain function in cold environments. Muscle also plays a major metabolic role in adults, so that developmental responses to cold are likely to influence energy expenditure later in life. PMID:27385733

  8. Identifying Occupationally Specific Affective Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Data from two groups of cosmetology instructors (n=15) and two groups of machinist instructors (n=17) validated the Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis instrument as capable of identifying affective behaviors viewed as important to success in a given occupation. (SK)

  9. Individual Difference Variables, Affective Differentiation, and the Structures of Affect

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Antonio; McCrae, Robert R.; Hagemann, Dirk; Costa, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Methodological arguments are usually invoked to explain variations in the structure of affect. Using self-rated affect from Italian samples (N = 600), we show that individual difference variables related to affective differentiation can moderate the observed structure. Indices of circumplexity (Browne, 1992) and congruence coefficients to the hypothesized target were used to quantify the observed structures. Results did not support the circumplex model as a universal structure. A circular structure with axes of activation and valence was approximated only among more affectively differentiated groups: students and respondents with high scores on Openness to Feelings and measures of negative emotionality. A different structure, with unipolar Positive Affect and Negative Affect factors, was observed among adults and respondents with low Openness to Feelings and negative emotionality. The observed structure of affect will depend in part on the nature of the sample studied. PMID:12932207

  10. Affective Productions of Mathematical Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshaw, Margaret; Brown, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In underscoring the affective elements of mathematics experience, we work with contemporary readings of the work of Spinoza on the politics of affect, to understand what is included in the cognitive repertoire of the Subject. We draw on those resources to tell a pedagogical tale about the relation between cognition and affect in settings of…

  11. Affective Induction and Creative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernández-Abascal, Enrique G.; Díaz, María D. Martín

    2013-01-01

    Three studies explored the relation between affect and production of creative divergent thinking, assessed with the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (Figural TTCT). In the first study, general, positive, and negative affect, assessed with the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS) were compared with creative production. In the second study,…

  12. Encountering science education's capacity to affect and be affected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, Steve

    2016-09-01

    What might science education learn from the recent affective turn in the humanities and social sciences? Framed as a response to Michalinos Zembylas's article, this essay draws from selected theorizing in affect theory, science education and science and technology studies, in pursuit of diverse and productive ways to talk of affect within science education. These discussions are framed by desires to transcend traditional epistemic boundaries and practices. The article concludes offering some associated ambiguities and tensions involved.

  13. Encountering science education's capacity to affect and be affected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, Steve

    2015-12-01

    What might science education learn from the recent affective turn in the humanities and social sciences? Framed as a response to Michalinos Zembylas's article, this essay draws from selected theorizing in affect theory, science education and science and technology studies, in pursuit of diverse and productive ways to talk of affect within science education. These discussions are framed by desires to transcend traditional epistemic boundaries and practices. The article concludes offering some associated ambiguities and tensions involved.

  14. Testing the Grandchildren's Received Affection Scale using Affection Exchange Theory.

    PubMed

    Mansson, Daniel H

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the Grandchildren's Received Affection Scale (GRAS) using Affection Exchange Theory (Floyd, 2006). In accordance with Affection Exchange Theory, it was hypothesized that grandchildren's scores on the Trait Affection Received Scale (i.e., the extent to which individuals by nature receive affection) would be related significantly and positively to their reports of received affection from their grandparents (i.e., their scores on the GRAS). Additionally, a research question was asked to explore if grandchildren's received affection from their grandparents is dependent on their grandparent's biological sex or lineage (i.e., maternal vs paternal). Thus, young adult grandchildren (N = 422) completed the GRAS and the Trait Affection Received Scale. The results of zero-order Pearson correlational analyses provided support for the hypothesis, whereas the results of MANOVAs tests only partially support extant grandparent-grandchild theory and research. These findings broaden the scope of Affection Exchange Theory and also bolster the GRAS's utility in future grandparent-grandchild affectionate communication research. PMID:23833883

  15. Testing the Grandchildren's Received Affection Scale using Affection Exchange Theory.

    PubMed

    Mansson, Daniel H

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the Grandchildren's Received Affection Scale (GRAS) using Affection Exchange Theory (Floyd, 2006). In accordance with Affection Exchange Theory, it was hypothesized that grandchildren's scores on the Trait Affection Received Scale (i.e., the extent to which individuals by nature receive affection) would be related significantly and positively to their reports of received affection from their grandparents (i.e., their scores on the GRAS). Additionally, a research question was asked to explore if grandchildren's received affection from their grandparents is dependent on their grandparent's biological sex or lineage (i.e., maternal vs paternal). Thus, young adult grandchildren (N = 422) completed the GRAS and the Trait Affection Received Scale. The results of zero-order Pearson correlational analyses provided support for the hypothesis, whereas the results of MANOVAs tests only partially support extant grandparent-grandchild theory and research. These findings broaden the scope of Affection Exchange Theory and also bolster the GRAS's utility in future grandparent-grandchild affectionate communication research.

  16. [Development of the affect system].

    PubMed

    Moser, U; Von Zeppelin, I

    1996-01-01

    The authors show that the development of the affect system commences with affects of an exclusively communicative nature. These regulate the relationship between subject and object. On a different plane they also provide information on the feeling of self deriving from the interaction. Affect is seen throughout as a special kind of information. One section of the article is given over to intensity regulation and early affect defenses. The development of cognitive processes leads to the integration of affect systems and cognitive structures. In the pre-conceptual concretistic phase, fantasies change the object relation in such a way as to make unpleasant affects disappear. Only at a later stage do fantasies acquire the capacity to deal with affects. Ultimately, the affect system is grounded on an invariant relationship feeling. On a variety of different levels it displays the features typical of situation theory and the theory of the representational world, thus making it possible to entertain complex object relations. In this process the various planes of the affect system are retained and practised. Finally, the authors discuss the consequences of their remarks for the understanding of psychic disturbances and the therapies brought to bear on them. PMID:8584745

  17. Phentermine, sibutramine and affective disorders.

    PubMed

    An, Hoyoung; Sohn, Hyunjoo; Chung, Seockhoon

    2013-04-01

    A safe and effective way to control weight in patients with affective disorders is needed, and phentermine is a possible candidate. We performed a PubMed search of articles pertaining to phentermine, sibutramine, and affective disorders. We compared the studies of phentermine with those of sibutramine. The search yielded a small number of reports. Reports concerning phentermine and affective disorders reported that i) its potency in the central nervous system may be comparatively low, and ii) it may induce depression in some patients. We were unable to find more studies on the subject; thus, it is unclear presently whether phentermine use is safe in affective disorder patients. Reports regarding the association of sibutramine and affective disorders were slightly more abundant. A recent study that suggested that sibutramine may have deleterious effects in patients with a psychiatric history may provide a clue for future phentermine research. Three explanations are possible concerning the association between phentermine and affective disorders: i) phentermine, like sibutramine, may have a depression-inducing effect that affects a specific subgroup of patients, ii) phentermine may have a dose-dependent depression-inducing effect, or iii) phentermine may simply not be associated with depression. Large-scale studies with affective disorder patients focusing on these questions are needed to clarify this matter before investigation of its efficacy may be carried out and it can be used in patients with affective disorders. PMID:23678348

  18. Affect and Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmivuori, Marja-Liisa

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents affect as an essential aspect of students' self-reflection and self-regulation. The introduced concepts of self-system and self-system process stress the importance of self-appraisals of personal competence and agency in affective responses and self-regulation in problem solving. Students are viewed as agents who constantly…

  19. Factors Affecting Willingness to Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghislieri, Chiara; Gatti, Paola; Quaglino, Gian Piero

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a survey among 300 employees in Northern Italy to assess the willingness to mentor and identify the factors that affect it. Men and respondents with previous mentoring experience indicate a higher willingness to be a mentor. Willingness is affected by personal characteristics that are perceived as necessary for a mentor and the…

  20. Affect and Graphing Calculator Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Allison W.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study of six high school calculus students designed to build an understanding about the affect associated with graphing calculator use in independent situations. DeBellis and Goldin's (2006) framework for affect as a representational system was used as a lens through which to understand the ways in which…

  1. Intuition, Affect, and Peculiar Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Boden, Matthew Tyler; Berenbaum, Howard; Topper, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Research with college students has found that intuitive thinking (e.g., using hunches to ascribe meaning to experiences) and positive affect interactively predict ideas of reference and odd/magical beliefs. We investigated whether these results would generalize to a diverse community sample of adults that included individuals with elevated levels of peculiar perceptions and beliefs. We measured positive and negative affect and intuitive thinking through questionnaires, and peculiar beliefs (i.e., ideas of reference and odd/magical beliefs) through structured clinical interviews. We found that peculiar beliefs were associated with intuitive thinking and negative affect, but not positive affect. Furthermore, in no instance did the interaction of affect and intuitive thinking predict peculiar beliefs. These results suggest that there are important differences in the factors that contribute to peculiar beliefs between college students and clinically meaningful samples. PMID:22707815

  2. Flow, affect and visual creativity.

    PubMed

    Cseh, Genevieve M; Phillips, Louise H; Pearson, David G

    2015-01-01

    Flow (being in the zone) is purported to have positive consequences in terms of affect and performance; however, there is no empirical evidence about these links in visual creativity. Positive affect often--but inconsistently--facilitates creativity, and both may be linked to experiencing flow. This study aimed to determine relationships between these variables within visual creativity. Participants performed the creative mental synthesis task to simulate the creative process. Affect change (pre- vs. post-task) and flow were measured via questionnaires. The creativity of synthesis drawings was rated objectively and subjectively by judges. Findings empirically demonstrate that flow is related to affect improvement during visual creativity. Affect change was linked to productivity and self-rated creativity, but no other objective or subjective performance measures. Flow was unrelated to all external performance measures but was highly correlated with self-rated creativity; flow may therefore motivate perseverance towards eventual excellence rather than provide direct cognitive enhancement.

  3. Daily affect and daily beliefs.

    PubMed

    Harris, Claire; Daniels, Kevin

    2005-10-01

    Human resource directorate employees of a large United Kingdom public hospital (N=36) completed an initial questionnaire and then participated in a daily diary study. The questionnaire included measures of affect and beliefs about high work demands' influence on affect and work performance. The diary included measures of affect, extent of high work demands, and daily beliefs, corresponding to those measured in the questionnaire. Participants were required to complete the diary twice daily, before and after work over a 2-week period. Measures of affect after work were associated with beliefs concerning work demands' influence on work performance and on affect measured after work. Beliefs about work demands measured in the questionnaire were associated with subsequent daily assessments of beliefs.

  4. Does income affect fertility or does fertility affect income?

    PubMed

    Bonitsis, T H; Geithman, D T

    1987-01-01

    "This paper tests for the dynamic causal connection between real income per capita and the birth rate for a subset of developing countries. These countries are Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, and Uruguay. Our empirical findings show that, for the historical period under review, in several countries real income per capita affected the birth rate. Virtually no evidence is found to support the hypothesis that the birth rate affected real income per capita."

  5. Affective modulation of attentional switching.

    PubMed

    Heerebout, Bram T; Todorović, Ana; Smedinga, Hilde E; Phaf, R Hans

    2013-01-01

    Affective modulation of attentional switching may have developed early in evolution and may therefore have primacy over other affective influences. This behavioral study investigated the influence of affect on attentional switching between emotionally neutral stimuli, whether limited-capacity control processes are involved, and whether attentional flexibility should be distinguished from attentional broadening. Experiment 1 showed that suboptimally presented happy faces facilitated switching from an automatized response routine, whereas angry faces had the opposite effect. In Experiment 2, participants with a dominant global (i.e., broad) or local (i.e., narrow) spatial bias switched more easily to the opposite bias after suboptimal happy faces than after neutral primes but less easily after angry faces. Affective modulation of attentional switching was probably incorporated during evolution in many more complex forms of information processing.

  6. Sleep Can Affect Male Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161569.html Sleep Can Affect Male Fertility Study found too little ... appears to be 7 to 8 hours of sleep a night, said study author Lauren Wise, a ...

  7. Stress factors in affective diseases.

    PubMed

    Bidzińska, E J

    1984-02-01

    An investigation carried out on 97 patients with affective disorders and on 100 healthy control subjects, revealed that acute and chronic stress factors occurred more in the group of patients with affective disorders than among healthy control over a similar time period. The frequency of stressful life situations was the same before the first affective episode in patients with unipolar and bipolar illness. The possible participation of such factors in triggering the first phase of illness is discussed. Similar factors appeared in both types of affective disorders. Significantly more frequent among patients than in the control group were: marital and family conflicts, health problems, emotional and ambitional failures, lack of success and work overload.

  8. DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine inhibits intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi multiplication by affecting cell division but not trypomastigote-amastigote transformation.

    PubMed

    Yakubu, M A; Basso, B; Kierszenbaum, F

    1992-06-01

    DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific, irreversible inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), decreases the capacity of Trypanosoma cruzi to invade and multiply within different types of mammalian host cells in vitro. In this work we found that inhibition of intracellular growth results from selective impairment of amastigote division without appreciable alteration of the capacity of the invading trypomastigotes to transform into the replicative amastigote form. Addition of agmatine, the product of arginine decarboxylation, reversed the inhibitory effect of DFMA. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase activity by DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine present in the medium prior to and during infection did not affect trypomastigote transformation or amastigote replication and did not change the magnitude of the inhibitory effect of DFMA on parasite multiplication. Hence, neither polyamine synthesis via the ornithine decarboxylase pathway nor salvage of host cell polyamines by T. cruzi appeared to be a likely explanation for the normal rate of parasite transformation that was seen in the presence of DFMA. Two clones of T. cruzi, TMSU-1 and TMSU-2, were tested for their degrees of sensitivity to the inhibitory effects of DFMA. Both trypomastigote association with (i.e., binding to and penetration of) myoblasts, and intracellular amastigote multiplication by either clone were found to be significantly (P less than 0.05) but not completely inhibited by DFMA. Therefore, the partial inhibition of T. cruzi infectivity and replication caused by DFMA is unlikely to represent a composite of effects of the drug on DFMA-sensitive and insensitive clones.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. On Patterns in Affective Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ADAMATZKY, ANDREW

    In computational experiments with cellular automaton models of affective solutions, where chemical species represent happiness, anger, fear, confusion and sadness, we study phenomena of space time dynamic of emotions. We demonstrate feasibility of the affective solution paradigm in example of emotional abuse therapy. Results outlined in the present paper offer unconventional but promising technique to design, analyze and interpret spatio-temporal dynamic of mass moods in crowds.

  10. [Affective disorders and eating disorders].

    PubMed

    Fakra, Eric; Belzeaux, R; Azorin, J M; Adida, M

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies show a frequent co-occurence of affective and eating disorders. The incidence of one disorder in patients suffering from the other disorder is well over the incidence in the general population. Several causes could explain this increased comorbidity. First, the iatrogenic origin is detailed. Indeed, psychotropic drugs, and particularly mood stabilizers, often lead to modification in eating behaviors, generally inducing weight gain. These drugs can increase desire for food, reduce baseline metabolism or decrease motor activity. Also, affective and eating disorders share several characteristics in semiology. These similarities can not only obscure the differential diagnosis but may also attest of conjoint pathophysiological bases in the two conditions. However, genetic and biological findings so far are too sparse to corroborate this last hypothesis. Nonetheless, it is noteworthy that comorbidity of affective and eating disorders worsens patients'prognosis and is associated with more severe forms of affective disorders characterized by an earlier age of onset in the disease, higher number of mood episodes and a higher suicidality. Lastly, psychotropic drugs used in affective disorders (lithium, antiepileptic mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, antidepressants) are reviewed in order to weigh their efficacy in eating disorders. This could help establish the best therapeutic option when confronted to comorbidity.

  11. [Poststroke-bipolar affective disorder].

    PubMed

    Bengesser, S A; Wurm, W E; Lackner, N; Birner, A; Reininghaus, B; Kapfhammer, H-P; Reininghaus, E

    2013-08-01

    A few weeks after suffering from a basal ganglia infarction (globus pallidus) with left-sided hemiplegia, a 23-year-old woman exhibited for the first time a pronounced mania with self-endangerment. The use of oral contraceptives was the only determinable risk factor. During the further course, the mother also developed a depressive disorder. Thus a certain genetic predisposition for affective disorders may be relevant, although this would not explain the outbreak by itself. An association between the right-sided basal ganglia infarction and the occurrence of a bipolar affective disorder has been described in the literature. Vascular or, respectively, inflammatory risk factors in synopsis with the aetiopathogenesis of bipolar affective disorders are also discussed in depth in this case report. PMID:23939559

  12. Trends affecting hospitals' human resources.

    PubMed

    Neudeck, M M

    1985-01-01

    Hospital workers at every level--from administrators to housekeepers--will be affected by the interaction of changes already underway in the healthcare industry. Societal forces that will affect the hospital workforce include demographic change, the rise of the participatory ethic and decentralization, a growing philosophy of job entitlement, and new pressures for unionization. At the same time, the industry is faced with changing manpower requirements, cost containment, and the oversupply of physicians. This article identifies some of the likely effects of these changes on hospital human resources and suggests ways that administrators can prepare for them.

  13. Clinical Judgment and Affective Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Addressed the limitations of previous work on counselor clinical judgment in a study involving 20 counselors who were asked to make a series of judgments. Results suggested the judgment processes of experienced counselors making diagnoses of affective disorders differs depending on the type of judgment. (JAC)

  14. Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Means, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Ranciere. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Ranciere's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a…

  15. Factors Affecting the Tutoring Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Hope J.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes factors internal to the tutor and tutee (i.e., cognition, metacognition, and affect) and external to them (e.g., teacher/tutor background knowledge, educational environment, content to be learned, socioeconomic status, family background, and cultural forces) that influence the tutoring process. Suggests a theoretical framework for…

  16. Political Trends Affecting Nonmetropolitan America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nachtigal, Paul M.

    There are two stories about political trends affecting nonmetropolitan America. The old story, which is the story of declining rural population and declining rural influence on public policy formation, has its roots in early deliberations about governance in this country. Jefferson's republicanism focused on direct citizen involvement in decision…

  17. Sperm function in affective illness.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, J; Winokur, A; Levin, R

    1981-04-01

    There is evidence for functional changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of patients with affective disorders. Little is known concerning spermatogenesis or sperm function in depressed men. We systematically evaluated the sperm indices in a group of depressed males complaining of diminished libido, and a healthy control group. No differences were noted in sperm parameters between the groups.

  18. Unconscious Affective Responses to Food

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Wataru; Sawada, Reiko; Kubota, Yasutaka; Toichi, Motomi; Fushiki, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Affective or hedonic responses to food are crucial for humans, both advantageously (e.g., enhancing survival) and disadvantageously (e.g., promoting overeating and lifestyle-related disease). Although previous psychological studies have reported evidence of unconscious cognitive and behavioral processing related to food, it remains unknown whether affective reactions to food can be triggered unconsciously and its relationship with daily eating behaviors. We investigated these issues by using the subliminal affective priming paradigm. Photographs of food or corresponding mosaic images were presented in the peripheral visual field for 33 ms. Target photos of faces with emotionally neutral expressions were then presented, and participants rated their preferences for the faces. Eating behaviors were also assessed using questionnaires. The food images, relative to the mosaics, increased participants’ preference for subsequent target faces. Furthermore, the difference in the preference induced by food versus mosaic images was positively correlated with the tendency to engage in external eating. These results suggest that unconscious affective reactions are elicited by the sight of food and that these responses contribute to daily eating behaviors related to overeating. PMID:27501443

  19. Test Expectancy Affects Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiede, Keith W.; Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Theory suggests that the accuracy of metacognitive monitoring is affected by the cues used to judge learning. Researchers have improved monitoring accuracy by directing attention to more appropriate cues; however, this is the first study to more directly point students to more appropriate cues using instructions regarding tests and…

  20. Motor Execution Affects Action Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Anne; Brandstadter, Simone; Liepelt, Roman; Birngruber, Teresa; Giese, Martin; Mechsner, Franz; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies provided evidence of the claim that the prediction of occluded action involves real-time simulation. We report two experiments that aimed to study how real-time simulation is affected by simultaneous action execution under conditions of full, partial or no overlap between observed and executed actions. This overlap was analysed by…

  1. Supersonic Wave Interference Affecting Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Eugene S.

    1958-01-01

    Some of the significant interference fields that may affect stability of aircraft at supersonic speeds are briefly summarized. Illustrations and calculations are presented to indicate the importance of interference fields created by wings, bodies, wing-body combinations, jets, and nacelles.

  2. [Faces affect recognition in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Prochwicz, Katarzyna; Rózycka, Jagoda

    2012-01-01

    Clinical observations and the results of many experimental researches indicate that individuals suffering from schizophrenia reveal difficulties in the recognition of emotional states experienced by other people; however the causes and the range of these problems have not been clearly described. Despite early research results confirming that difficulties in emotion recognition are related only to negative emotions, the results of the researches conducted over the lat 30 years indicate that emotion recognition problems are a manifestation of a general cognitive deficit, and they do not concern specific emotions. The article contains a review of the research on face affect recognition in schizophrenia. It discusses the causes of these difficulties, the differences in the accuracy of the recognition of specific emotions, the relationship between the symptoms of schizophrenia and the severity of problems with face perception, and the types of cognitive processes which influence the disturbances in face affect recognition. Particular attention was paid to the methodology of the research on face affect recognition, including the methods used in control tasks relying on the identification of neutral faces designed to assess the range of deficit underlying the face affect recognition problems. The analysis of methods used in particular researches revealed some weaknesses. The article also deals with the question of the possibilities of improving the ability to recognise the emotions, and briefly discusses the efficiency of emotion recognition training programs designed for patients suffering from schizophrenia.

  3. How Supplementation Affects Grazing Behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers are still in the early stages of understanding how supplementation affects grazing behavior. Conventional nutrition wisdom, including early research with grazing cattle, has been based almost entirely upon stored feeds fed in confinement. In these situations, most dietary “choices” were ...

  4. Affective Experience in a Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ariel; And Others

    This study introduces a novel methodology for examining affective experiences in the classroom. The general procedure is to make auditory and visual recordings of a particular child during a normal classroom period. That child is then immediately taken from the class and placed in a private room where the recordings are replayed. The student is…

  5. Bodily action penetrates affective perception

    PubMed Central

    Rigutti, Sara; Gerbino, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Fantoni & Gerbino (2014) showed that subtle postural shifts associated with reaching can have a strong hedonic impact and affect how actors experience facial expressions of emotion. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure (MAMIP), they found consistent congruency effects in participants who performed a facial emotion identification task after a sequence of visually-guided reaches: a face perceived as neutral in a baseline condition appeared slightly happy after comfortable actions and slightly angry after uncomfortable actions. However, skeptics about the penetrability of perception (Zeimbekis & Raftopoulos, 2015) would consider such evidence insufficient to demonstrate that observer’s internal states induced by action comfort/discomfort affect perception in a top-down fashion. The action-modulated mood might have produced a back-end memory effect capable of affecting post-perceptual and decision processing, but not front-end perception. Here, we present evidence that performing a facial emotion detection (not identification) task after MAMIP exhibits systematic mood-congruent sensitivity changes, rather than response bias changes attributable to cognitive set shifts; i.e., we show that observer’s internal states induced by bodily action can modulate affective perception. The detection threshold for happiness was lower after fifty comfortable than uncomfortable reaches; while the detection threshold for anger was lower after fifty uncomfortable than comfortable reaches. Action valence induced an overall sensitivity improvement in detecting subtle variations of congruent facial expressions (happiness after positive comfortable actions, anger after negative uncomfortable actions), in the absence of significant response bias shifts. Notably, both comfortable and uncomfortable reaches impact sensitivity in an approximately symmetric way relative to a baseline inaction condition. All of these constitute compelling evidence of a genuine top-down effect on

  6. Environmental issues affecting CCT development

    SciTech Connect

    Reidy, M.

    1997-12-31

    While no final legislative schedule has been set for the new Congress, two issues with strong environmental ramifications which are likely to affect the coal industry seem to top the list of closely watched debates in Washington -- the Environmental Protection Agency`s proposed new ozone and particulate matter standards and utility restructuring. The paper discusses the background of the proposed standards, public comment, the Congressional review of regulations, other legislative options, and utility restructuring.

  7. Affective cycling in thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tapp, A.

    1988-05-01

    Depression in an elderly man with primary recurrent unipolar depression responded to radioactive iodine treatment of a thyrotoxic nodule, without the addition of psychotropic medications. Two months later, manic symptoms developed concomitant with the termination of the hyperthyroid state secondary to the radioactive iodine treatment. Clinical implications of these findings in relation to the possible mechanism of action of thyroid hormones on affective cycling are discussed.

  8. Emotional processing affects movement speed.

    PubMed

    Hälbig, Thomas D; Borod, Joan C; Frisina, Pasquale G; Tse, Winona; Voustianiouk, Andrei; Olanow, C Warren; Gracies, Jean-Michel

    2011-09-01

    Emotions can affect various aspects of human behavior. The impact of emotions on behavior is traditionally thought to occur at central, cognitive and motor preparation stages. Using EMG to measure the effects of emotion on movement, we found that emotional stimuli differing in valence and arousal elicited highly specific effects on peripheral movement time. This result has conceptual implications for the emotion-motion link and potentially practical implications for neurorehabilitation and professional environments where fast motor reactions are critical.

  9. Anticipation in bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    McInnis, M.G.; McMahon, F.J.; Chase, G.A.; Simpson, S.G.; Ross, C.A.; DePaulo, J.R. Jr. )

    1993-08-01

    Anticipation refers to the increase in disease severity or decrease in age at onset in succeeding generations. This phenomenon, formerly ascribed to observation biases, correlates with the expansion of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TNRs) in some disorders. If present in bipolar affective disorder (BPAD), anticipation could provide clues to its genetic etiology. The authors compared age at onset and disease severity between two generations of 34 unilineal families ascertained for a genetic linkage study of BPAD. Life-table analyses showed a significant decrease in survival to first mania or depression from the first to the second generation (P <.001). Intergenerational pairwise comparisons showed both a significantly earlier age at onset (P < .001) and a significantly increased disease severity (P < .001) in the second generation. This difference was significant under each of four data-sampling schemes which excluded probands in the second generation. The second generation experienced onset 8.9-13.5 years earlier and illness 1.8-3.4 times more severe than did the first generation. In additional analyses, drug abuse, deaths of affected individuals prior to interview, decreased fertility, censoring of age at onset, and the cohort effect did not affect our results. The authors conclude that genetic anticipation occurs in this sample of unilineal BPAD families. These findings may implicate genes with expanding TNRs in the genetic etiology of BPAD. 24 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Cortical Control of Affective Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Black, Sherilynn J.; Hultman, Rainbo; Szabo, Steven T.; DeMaio, Kristine D.; Du, Jeanette; Katz, Brittany M.; Feng, Guoping; Covington, Herbert E.; Dzirasa, Kafui

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation and deep brain stimulation have emerged as therapeutic modalities for treatment refractory depression; however, little remains known regarding the circuitry that mediates the therapeutic effect of these approaches. Here we show that direct optogenetic stimulation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) descending projection neurons in mice engineered to express Chr2 in layer V pyramidal neurons (Thy1–Chr2 mice) models an antidepressant-like effect in mice subjected to a forced-swim test. Furthermore, we show that this PFC stimulation induces a long-lasting suppression of anxiety-like behavior (but not conditioned social avoidance) in socially stressed Thy1–Chr2 mice: an effect that is observed >10 d after the last stimulation. Finally, we use optogenetic stimulation and multicircuit recording techniques concurrently in Thy1–Chr2 mice to demonstrate that activation of cortical projection neurons entrains neural oscillatory activity and drives synchrony across limbic brain areas that regulate affect. Importantly, these neural oscillatory changes directly correlate with the temporally precise activation and suppression of limbic unit activity. Together, our findings show that the direct activation of cortical projection systems is sufficient to modulate activity across networks underlying affective regulation. They also suggest that optogenetic stimulation of cortical projection systems may serve as a viable therapeutic strategy for treating affective disorders. PMID:23325249

  11. The Affective Regulation of Cognitive Priming

    PubMed Central

    Storbeck, Justin; Clore, Gerald L.

    2008-01-01

    Semantic and affective priming are classic effects observed in cognitive and social psychology, respectively. We discovered that affect regulates such priming effects. In Experiment 1, positive and negative moods were induced prior to one of three priming tasks; evaluation, categorization, or lexical decision. As predicted, positive affect led to both affective priming (evaluation task) and semantic priming (category and lexical decision tasks). However, negative affect inhibited such effects. In Experiment 2, participants in their natural affective state completed the same priming tasks as in Experiment 1. As expected, affective priming (evaluation task) and category priming (categorization and lexical decision tasks) were observed in such resting affective states. Hence, we conclude that negative affect inhibits semantic and affective priming. These results support recent theoretical models, which suggest that positive affect promotes associations among strong and weak concepts, and that negative affect impairs such associations (Kuhl, 2000; Clore & Storbeck, 2006). PMID:18410195

  12. Polystyrene nanoparticles affecting blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Oslakovic, Cecilia; Cedervall, Tommy; Linse, Sara; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2012-08-01

    The association of nanoparticles (NPs) with blood coagulation proteins may influence the natural balance between pro- and anticoagulant pathways. We investigated whether polystyrene NPs, when added to human plasma, affected the generation of thrombin in plasma. Amine-modified NPs were found to decrease the thrombin formation due to binding of factors VII and IX to the NPs, which resulted in depletion of the respective protein in solution. In contrast, carboxyl-modified NPs were able to act as a surface for activation of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation in plasma. These results highlight the influence of NPs on a biologically important pathway.

  13. Mood Swings: An Affective Interactive Art System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialoskorski, Leticia S. S.; Westerink, Joyce H. D. M.; van den Broek, Egon L.

    The progress in the field of affective computing enables the realization of affective consumer products, affective games, and affective art. This paper describes the affective interactive art system Mood Swings, which interprets and visualizes affect expressed by a person. Mood Swings is founded on the integration of a framework for affective movements and a color model. This enables Mood Swings to recognize affective movement characteristics as expressed by a person and display a color that matches the expressed emotion. With that, a unique interactive system is introduced, which can be considered as art, a game, or a combination of both.

  14. How anthropogenic noise affects foraging.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinhong; Siemers, Björn M; Koselj, Klemen

    2015-09-01

    The influence of human activity on the biosphere is increasing. While direct damage (e.g. habitat destruction) is relatively well understood, many activities affect wildlife in less apparent ways. Here, we investigate how anthropogenic noise impairs foraging, which has direct consequences for animal survival and reproductive success. Noise can disturb foraging via several mechanisms that may operate simultaneously, and thus, their effects could not be disentangled hitherto. We developed a diagnostic framework that can be applied to identify the potential mechanisms of disturbance in any species capable of detecting the noise. We tested this framework using Daubenton's bats, which find prey by echolocation. We found that traffic noise reduced foraging efficiency in most bats. Unexpectedly, this effect was present even if the playback noise did not overlap in frequency with the prey echoes. Neither overlapping noise nor nonoverlapping noise influenced the search effort required for a successful prey capture. Hence, noise did not mask prey echoes or reduce the attention of bats. Instead, noise acted as an aversive stimulus that caused avoidance response, thereby reducing foraging efficiency. We conclude that conservation policies may seriously underestimate numbers of species affected and the multilevel effects on animal fitness, if the mechanisms of disturbance are not considered.

  15. Factors Affecting Medical Service Quality

    PubMed Central

    MOSADEGHRAD, Ali Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background A better understanding of factors influencing quality of medical service can pinpoint better strategies for quality assurance in medical services. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the quality of medical services provided by Iranian physicians. Methods Exploratory in-depth individual interviews were conducted with sixty-four physicians working in various medical institutions in Iran. Results Individual, organizational and environmental factors enhance or inhibit the quality of medical services. Quality of medical services depends on the personal factors of the physician and patient, and factors pertaining to the healthcare setting and the broader environment. Conclusion Differences in internal and external factors such as availability of resources, patient cooperation and collaboration among providers affect the quality of medical services and patient outcomes. Supportive leadership, proper planning, education and training and effective management of resources and processes improve the quality of medical services. This article contributes to healthcare theory and practice by developing a conceptual framework for understanding factors that influence medical services quality. PMID:26060745

  16. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Engmann, Birk

    2012-01-01

    This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet. PMID:22649454

  17. How competition affects evolutionary rescue

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, Matthew Miles; de Mazancourt, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Populations facing novel environments can persist by adapting. In nature, the ability to adapt and persist will depend on interactions between coexisting individuals. Here we use an adaptive dynamic model to assess how the potential for evolutionary rescue is affected by intra- and interspecific competition. Intraspecific competition (negative density-dependence) lowers abundance, which decreases the supply rate of beneficial mutations, hindering evolutionary rescue. On the other hand, interspecific competition can aid evolutionary rescue when it speeds adaptation by increasing the strength of selection. Our results clarify this point and give an additional requirement: competition must increase selection pressure enough to overcome the negative effect of reduced abundance. We therefore expect evolutionary rescue to be most likely in communities which facilitate rapid niche displacement. Our model, which aligns to previous quantitative and population genetic models in the absence of competition, provides a first analysis of when competitors should help or hinder evolutionary rescue. PMID:23209167

  18. Interplanetary Disturbances Affecting Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    The Sun somehow accelerates the solar wind, an incessant stream of plasma originating in coronal holes and some, as yet unidentified, regions. Occasionally, coronal, and possibly sub-photospheric structures, conspire to energize a spectacular eruption from the Sun which we call a coronal mass ejection (CME). These can leave the Sun at very high speeds and travel through the interplanetary medium, resulting in a large-scale disturbance of the ambient background plasma. These interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) can drive shocks which in turn accelerate particles, but also have a distinct intrinsic magnetic structure which is capable of disturbing the Earth's magnetic field and causing significant geomagnetic effects. They also affect other planets, so they can and do contribute to space weather throughout the heliosphere. This paper presents a historical review of early space weather studies, a modern-day example, and discusses space weather throughout the heliosphere.

  19. Nutritional Factors Affecting Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Lim, So Young; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Arang; Lee, Hee Jae; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Dietary intake and nutritional status of individuals are important factors affecting mental health and the development of psychiatric disorders. Majority of scientific evidence relating to mental health focuses on depression, cognitive function, and dementia, and limited evidence is available about other psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. As life span of human being is increasing, the more the prevalence of mental disorders is, the more attention rises. Lists of suggested nutritional components that may be beneficial for mental health are omega-3 fatty acids, phospholipids, cholesterol, niacin, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. Saturated fat and simple sugar are considered detrimental to cognitive function. Evidence on the effect of cholesterol is conflicting; however, in general, blood cholesterol levels are negatively associated with the risk of depression. Collectively, the aims of this review are to introduce known nutritional factors for mental health, and to discuss recent issues of the nutritional impact on cognitive function and healthy brain aging. PMID:27482518

  20. Affective dimensions of intergroup humiliation.

    PubMed

    Leidner, Bernhard; Sheikh, Hammad; Ginges, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Despite the wealth of theoretical claims about the emotion of humiliation and its effect on human relations, there has been a lack of empirical research investigating what it means to experience humiliation. We studied the affective characteristics of humiliation, comparing the emotional experience of intergroup humiliation to two other emotions humiliation is often confused with: anger and shame. The defining characteristics of humiliation were low levels of guilt and high levels of other-directed outrage (like anger and unlike shame), and high levels of powerlessness (like shame and unlike anger). Reasons for the similarities and differences of humiliation with anger and shame are discussed in terms of perceptions of undeserved treatment and injustice. Implications for understanding the behavioral consequences of humiliation and future work investigating the role of humiliation in social life are discussed. PMID:23029499

  1. Apparent causality affects perceived simultaneity.

    PubMed

    Kohlrausch, Armin; van Eijk, Rob; Juola, James F; Brandt, Inge; van de Par, Steven

    2013-10-01

    The present research addresses the question of how visual predictive information and implied causality affect audio-visual synchrony perception. Previous research has shown a systematic shift in the likelihood of observers to accept audio-leading stimulus pairs as being apparently simultaneous in variants of audio-visual stimulus pairs that differ in (1) the amount of visual predictive information available and (2) the apparent causal relation between the auditory and visual components. An experiment was designed to separate the predictability and causality explanations, and the results indicated that shifts in subjective simultaneity were explained completely by changes in the implied causal relations in the stimuli and that predictability had no added value. Together with earlier findings, these results further indicate that the observed shifts in subjective simultaneity due to causal relations among auditory and visual events do not reflect a mere change in response strategy, but rather result from early multimodal integration processes in event perception.

  2. Factors affecting gallbladder motility: drugs.

    PubMed

    Marzio, L

    2003-07-01

    Various drugs and medications that inhibit or stimulate gallbladder contraction and basal tone in humans are described. Active gallbladder contraction may be achieved using synthetic hormones such as cholecystokinin, caerulein and motilin, cholinomimetic drugs such as bethanecol, prostigmine, and erythromycin due to its motilin-like effect. Furthermore, cisapride and cholestyramine, may have some excitatory activity on the gallbladder muscle. Intravenous amino acids also induce gallbladder contraction through the release of cholecystokinin. Inhibition of gallbladder contraction induced by a meal, or reduction of the basal fasting tone may be achieved by using atropine and other cholinergics, and by inhibitory hormones such as somatostatin, the nitric acid releaser arginine, the calcium channel antagonist nifedipine, and progesterone. Other drugs such as trimebutine, loperamide and ondansetron may negatively affect gallbladder contraction. PMID:12974504

  3. Nutritional Factors Affecting Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Lim, So Young; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Arang; Lee, Hee Jae; Choi, Hyun Jin; Yang, Soo Jin

    2016-07-01

    Dietary intake and nutritional status of individuals are important factors affecting mental health and the development of psychiatric disorders. Majority of scientific evidence relating to mental health focuses on depression, cognitive function, and dementia, and limited evidence is available about other psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. As life span of human being is increasing, the more the prevalence of mental disorders is, the more attention rises. Lists of suggested nutritional components that may be beneficial for mental health are omega-3 fatty acids, phospholipids, cholesterol, niacin, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. Saturated fat and simple sugar are considered detrimental to cognitive function. Evidence on the effect of cholesterol is conflicting; however, in general, blood cholesterol levels are negatively associated with the risk of depression. Collectively, the aims of this review are to introduce known nutritional factors for mental health, and to discuss recent issues of the nutritional impact on cognitive function and healthy brain aging. PMID:27482518

  4. Factors affecting rotator cuff healing.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Tanaka, Miho J; Choi, Luke S; Paletta, George A

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have noted that increasing age is a significant factor for diminished rotator cuff healing, while biomechanical studies have suggested the reason for this may be an inferior healing environment in older patients. Larger tears and fatty infiltration or atrophy negatively affect rotator cuff healing. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, double-row repairs, performing a concomitant acromioplasty, and the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) do not demonstrate an improvement in structural healing over mini-open rotator cuff repairs, single-row repairs, not performing an acromioplasty, or not using PRP. There is conflicting evidence to support postoperative rehabilitation protocols using early motion over immobilization following rotator cuff repair. PMID:24806015

  5. Factors affecting smoking in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Beratis, S; Katrivanou, A; Gourzis, P

    2001-01-01

    There is an increased frequency of smoking among patients with schizophrenia. However, it is unknown whether the smoking behavior of the patients is similar in all schizophrenia subtypes, as well as which is the relationship between smoking initiation and disease onset. Four hundred six patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia were interviewed to determine the smoking status in relationship to gender and schizophrenic subtype, and to other factors that could affect or be affected by smoking. The frequency of smoking among patients (58%) was significantly greater than in subjects from the general population (42%) (P =.000005). Male patients smoked significantly more frequently (70%) than the corresponding control subjects (50%) (P =.000006), whereas the difference failed to reach significance between female patients (41%) and control subjects (32%). Among male patients, the number of smokers was significantly greater than in the controls in the paranoid (77%), undifferentiated (72%), and residual (78%) subtypes, whereas there was no significant difference in the disorganized (44%) and catatonic (22%) subtypes. The findings show that the frequency of smoking in schizophrenia patients increases with increasing positive symptoms and decreases with increasing negative symptoms. Male and female smoking patients consumed approximately 10 cigarettes per day more than the corresponding control subjects (P <.000001). In 86% of the patients, smoking initiation occurred before the disease onset. Among patients who smoked, smoking initiation and disease onset occurred at age 18.7 +/- 4.4 and 24.1 +/- 6.1 years, respectively (P <.000001). It appears that smoking in schizophrenia is influenced by gender and subtype. However, the nature of this association remains uncertain because in the vast majority of the patients smoking initiation occurs earlier than the disease onset.

  6. Developing Hierarchical Structures Integrating Cognition and Affect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Barbara Martin

    Several categories of the affective domain are important to the schooling process. Schools are delegated the responsibility of helping students to clarify their esthetic, instrumental, and moral values. Three areas of affect are related to student achievement: subject-related affect, school-related affect, and academic self concept. In addition,…

  7. Affective and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrell, Ileana Collado; Herrell, James M.

    1980-01-01

    A study showing that lexically equivalent words in two languages have different affective meanings, that affective intensity of dominant language words is greater than for second language equivalents, and that the difference is greatest for words with high affective meaning demonstrates that affective meaning is an important component of…

  8. The affective shift model of work engagement.

    PubMed

    Bledow, Ronald; Schmitt, Antje; Frese, Michael; Kühnel, Jana

    2011-11-01

    On the basis of self-regulation theories, the authors develop an affective shift model of work engagement according to which work engagement emerges from the dynamic interplay of positive and negative affect. The affective shift model posits that negative affect is positively related to work engagement if negative affect is followed by positive affect. The authors applied experience sampling methodology to test the model. Data on affective events, mood, and work engagement was collected twice a day over 9 working days among 55 software developers. In support of the affective shift model, negative mood and negative events experienced in the morning of a working day were positively related to work engagement in the afternoon if positive mood in the time interval between morning and afternoon was high. Individual differences in positive affectivity moderated within-person relationships. The authors discuss how work engagement can be fostered through affect regulation.

  9. Communication and Affect: Thoughts, Feelings, and Issues for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillard, James Price; Wilson, Barbara J.

    1993-01-01

    Introduces this special issue on the role of affect in persuading and informing. Discusses conceptualizing affect, affect and message processing, affect and message production, and operationalizing affect. (SR)

  10. Ash in fire affected ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Jordan, Antonio; Cerda, Artemi; Martin, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Ash in fire affected ecosystems Ash lefts an important footprint in the ecosystems and has a key role in the immediate period after the fire (Bodi et al., 2014; Pereira et al., 2015). It is an important source of nutrients for plant recover (Pereira et al., 2014a), protects soil from erosion and controls soil hydrological process as runoff, infiltration and water repellency (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Bodi et al., 2012, Pereira et al., 2014b). Despite the recognition of ash impact and contribution to ecosystems recuperation, it is assumed that we still have little knowledge about the implications of ash in fire affected areas. Regarding this situation we wanted to improve our knowledge in this field and understand the state of the research about fire ash around world. The special issue about "The role of ash in fire affected ecosystems" currently in publication in CATENA born from the necessity of joint efforts, identify research gaps, and discuss future cooperation in this interdisciplinary field. This is the first special issue about fire ash in the international literature. In total it will be published 10 papers focused in different aspects of the impacts of ash in fire affected ecosystems from several parts of the world: • Fire reconstruction using charcoal particles (Burjachs and Espositio, in press) • Ash slurries impact on rheological properties of Runoff (Burns and Gabet, in press) • Methods to analyse ash conductivity and sorbtivity in the laboratory and in the field (Balfour et al., in press) • Termogravimetric and hydrological properties of ash (Dlapa et al. in press) • Effects of ash cover in water infiltration (Leon et al., in press) • Impact of ash in volcanic soils (Dorta Almenar et al., in press; Escuday et al., in press) • Ash PAH and Chemical extracts (Silva et al., in press) • Microbiology (Barreiro et al., in press; Lombao et al., in press) We believe that this special issue will contribute importantly to the better understanding of

  11. Ash in fire affected ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Jordan, Antonio; Cerda, Artemi; Martin, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Ash in fire affected ecosystems Ash lefts an important footprint in the ecosystems and has a key role in the immediate period after the fire (Bodi et al., 2014; Pereira et al., 2015). It is an important source of nutrients for plant recover (Pereira et al., 2014a), protects soil from erosion and controls soil hydrological process as runoff, infiltration and water repellency (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Bodi et al., 2012, Pereira et al., 2014b). Despite the recognition of ash impact and contribution to ecosystems recuperation, it is assumed that we still have little knowledge about the implications of ash in fire affected areas. Regarding this situation we wanted to improve our knowledge in this field and understand the state of the research about fire ash around world. The special issue about "The role of ash in fire affected ecosystems" currently in publication in CATENA born from the necessity of joint efforts, identify research gaps, and discuss future cooperation in this interdisciplinary field. This is the first special issue about fire ash in the international literature. In total it will be published 10 papers focused in different aspects of the impacts of ash in fire affected ecosystems from several parts of the world: • Fire reconstruction using charcoal particles (Burjachs and Espositio, in press) • Ash slurries impact on rheological properties of Runoff (Burns and Gabet, in press) • Methods to analyse ash conductivity and sorbtivity in the laboratory and in the field (Balfour et al., in press) • Termogravimetric and hydrological properties of ash (Dlapa et al. in press) • Effects of ash cover in water infiltration (Leon et al., in press) • Impact of ash in volcanic soils (Dorta Almenar et al., in press; Escuday et al., in press) • Ash PAH and Chemical extracts (Silva et al., in press) • Microbiology (Barreiro et al., in press; Lombao et al., in press) We believe that this special issue will contribute importantly to the better understanding of

  12. Clinorotation affects soybean seedling morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, Emmanuel; Guikema, James A.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1995-01-01

    Although spaceflight does not appear to significantly affect seed germination, it can influence subsequent plant growth. On STS-3 and SL-2, decreased growth (measured as plant length, fresh weight, and dry weight) was noted for pine, oat, and mung bean. In the CHROMEX-01 and 02 experiments with Haplopappus and in the CHROMEX-03 experiment with Arabidopsis, enhanced root growth was noted in the space-grown plants. In the CHROMEX-04 experiments with wheat, both leaf fresh weight and leaf area were diminished in the space-grown plants but there was no difference in total plant height (CS Brown, HG Levine, and AD Krikorian, unpublished data). These data suggest that microgravity impacts growth by whole plant partitioning of the assimilates. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of clinorotation on the growth and the morphology of soybean seedlings grown in the Biological Research In Canister (BRIC) flight hardware. This experiment provided baseline data for a spaceflight experiment (BRIC-3) flown on STS-63 (February 3-11, 1995).

  13. Spatial layout affects speed discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verghese, P.; Stone, L. S.

    1997-01-01

    We address a surprising result in a previous study of speed discrimination with multiple moving gratings: discrimination thresholds decreased when the number of stimuli was increased, but remained unchanged when the area of a single stimulus was increased [Verghese & Stone (1995). Vision Research, 35, 2811-2823]. In this study, we manipulated the spatial- and phase relationship between multiple grating patches to determine their effect on speed discrimination thresholds. In a fusion experiment, we merged multiple stimulus patches, in stages, into a single patch. Thresholds increased as the patches were brought closer and their phase relationship was adjusted to be consistent with a single patch. Thresholds increased further still as these patches were fused into a single patch. In a fission experiment, we divided a single large patch into multiple patches by superimposing a cross with luminance equal to that of the background. Thresholds decreased as the large patch was divided into quadrants and decreased further as the quadrants were maximally separated. However, when the cross luminance was darker than the background, it was perceived as an occluder and thresholds, on average, were unchanged from that for the single large patch. A control experiment shows that the observed trend in discrimination thresholds is not due to the differences in perceived speed of the stimuli. These results suggest that the parsing of the visual image into entities affects the combination of speed information across space, and that each discrete entity effectively provides a single independent estimate of speed.

  14. Bilingualism affects audiovisual phoneme identification.

    PubMed

    Burfin, Sabine; Pascalis, Olivier; Ruiz Tada, Elisa; Costa, Albert; Savariaux, Christophe; Kandel, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    We all go through a process of perceptual narrowing for phoneme identification. As we become experts in the languages we hear in our environment we lose the ability to identify phonemes that do not exist in our native phonological inventory. This research examined how linguistic experience-i.e., the exposure to a double phonological code during childhood-affects the visual processes involved in non-native phoneme identification in audiovisual speech perception. We conducted a phoneme identification experiment with bilingual and monolingual adult participants. It was an ABX task involving a Bengali dental-retroflex contrast that does not exist in any of the participants' languages. The phonemes were presented in audiovisual (AV) and audio-only (A) conditions. The results revealed that in the audio-only condition monolinguals and bilinguals had difficulties in discriminating the retroflex non-native phoneme. They were phonologically "deaf" and assimilated it to the dental phoneme that exists in their native languages. In the audiovisual presentation instead, both groups could overcome the phonological deafness for the retroflex non-native phoneme and identify both Bengali phonemes. However, monolinguals were more accurate and responded quicker than bilinguals. This suggests that bilinguals do not use the same processes as monolinguals to decode visual speech.

  15. Factors affecting tactile spatial acuity.

    PubMed

    Craig, J C; Kisner, J M

    1998-01-01

    Tactile spatial acuity on the fingerpad was measured using a grating orientation task. In this task, subjects are required to identify the orientation of square-wave gratings placed on the skin. Previous studies have shown that performance varies as a function of the width of the grooves in the gratings. In the present study, both groove width and the overall size and configuration of the contactors were varied. Sensitivity improved with wider grooves and with larger contactors. Additional measurements showed that the improved sensitivity is not the result of the increase in total area contacted, but rather is due to two other factors associated with larger contactors. One is the greater linear extent of the larger contactors. The other appears to be due to the reduction in the interference produced by the outer edge of the contactor. Specifically, as the contactor increases in size, the distance between the outer edge and the center portion of the grooves also increases. It was also shown that subjects are more sensitive to a single, continuous groove as compared with two grooves of the same total length but spatially discontinuous. Similarly, subjects are more sensitive to a contactor with a continuous groove than to a contactor in which just the end points of the groove are presented. The results are generally consistent with the results of peripheral, neurophysiological recordings. The results are discussed in terms of the way in which both spatial and intensive factors may affect sensitivity to grating orientation.

  16. How feeling betrayed affects cooperation.

    PubMed

    Ramazi, Pouria; Hessel, Jop; Cao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    For a population of interacting self-interested agents, we study how the average cooperation level is affected by some individuals' feelings of being betrayed and guilt. We quantify these feelings as adjusted payoffs in asymmetric games, where for different emotions, the payoff matrix takes the structure of that of either a prisoner's dilemma or a snowdrift game. Then we analyze the evolution of cooperation in a well-mixed population of agents, each of whom is associated with such a payoff matrix. At each time-step, an agent is randomly chosen from the population to update her strategy based on the myopic best-response update rule. According to the simulations, decreasing the feeling of being betrayed in a portion of agents does not necessarily increase the level of cooperation in the population. However, this resistance of the population against low-betrayal-level agents is effective only up to some extend that is explicitly determined by the payoff matrices and the number of agents associated with these matrices. Two other models are also considered where the betrayal factor of an agent fluctuates as a function of the number of cooperators and defectors that she encounters. Unstable behaviors are observed for the level of cooperation in these cases; however, we show that one can tune the parameters in the function to make the whole population become cooperative or defective. PMID:25922933

  17. Quantum Tunneling Affects Engine Performance.

    PubMed

    Som, Sibendu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Dingyu D Y; Magnotti, Gina M; Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Longman, Douglas E; Skodje, Rex T; Davis, Michael J

    2013-06-20

    We study the role of individual reaction rates on engine performance, with an emphasis on the contribution of quantum tunneling. It is demonstrated that the effect of quantum tunneling corrections for the reaction HO2 + HO2 = H2O2 + O2 can have a noticeable impact on the performance of a high-fidelity model of a compression-ignition (e.g., diesel) engine, and that an accurate prediction of ignition delay time for the engine model requires an accurate estimation of the tunneling correction for this reaction. The three-dimensional model includes detailed descriptions of the chemistry of a surrogate for a biodiesel fuel, as well as all the features of the engine, such as the liquid fuel spray and turbulence. This study is part of a larger investigation of how the features of the dynamics and potential energy surfaces of key reactions, as well as their reaction rate uncertainties, affect engine performance, and results in these directions are also presented here.

  18. Sugars proportionately affect artemisinin production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Weathers, P J

    2007-07-01

    Little is known about the effect of sugars in controlling secondary metabolism. In this study, sugars alone or in combination with their analogs were used to investigate their role in the production of the antimalarial drug, artemisinin, in Artemisia annua L. seedlings. Compared to sucrose, a 200% increase in artemisinin by glucose was observed. Different ratios of fructose to glucose yielded artemisinin levels directly proportional to increases in relative glucose concentration. When the glucose analog, 3-O-methylglucose, was added with glucose, artemisinin production was dramatically decreased, but hexokinase activity was significantly increased compared to glucose alone. In contrast, neither mannose nor mannitol had any significant effect on artemisinin yield. In comparison with 30 g/l sucrose, artemisinin levels were significantly reduced by 80% in the presence of 27 g/l sucrose + 3 g/l palatinose, which cannot be transported into cells through the sucrose transporter. Together these results suggest that both monosaccharide and disaccharide sugars are likely acting not only as carbon sources but also as signals to affect the downstream production of artemisinin, and that the mechanism of these effects appears to be complex. PMID:17221224

  19. Focus cues affect perceived depth

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Simon J.; Akeley, Kurt; Ernst, Marc O.; Banks, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    Depth information from focus cues—accommodation and the gradient of retinal blur—is typically incorrect in three-dimensional (3-D) displays because the light comes from a planar display surface. If the visual system incorporates information from focus cues into its calculation of 3-D scene parameters, this could cause distortions in perceived depth even when the 2-D retinal images are geometrically correct. In Experiment 1 we measured the direct contribution of focus cues to perceived slant by varying independently the physical slant of the display surface and the slant of a simulated surface specified by binocular disparity (binocular viewing) or perspective/texture (monocular viewing). In the binocular condition, slant estimates were unaffected by display slant. In the monocular condition, display slant had a systematic effect on slant estimates. Estimates were consistent with a weighted average of slant from focus cues and slant from disparity/texture, where the cue weights are determined by the reliability of each cue. In Experiment 2, we examined whether focus cues also have an indirect effect on perceived slant via the distance estimate used in disparity scaling. We varied independently the simulated distance and the focal distance to a disparity-defined 3-D stimulus. Perceived slant was systematically affected by changes in focal distance. Accordingly, depth constancy (with respect to simulated distance) was significantly reduced when focal distance was held constant compared to when it varied appropriately with the simulated distance to the stimulus. The results of both experiments show that focus cues can contribute to estimates of 3-D scene parameters. Inappropriate focus cues in typical 3-D displays may therefore contribute to distortions in perceived space. PMID:16441189

  20. [Harmful practices affecting women's health].

    PubMed

    1990-07-01

    The harmful practices discussed in this article are based on case histories form the Central Maternity in Niamey, yet these practices universally affect women throughout Africa. Nutritional taboos are aimed at certain diseases such as measles, diarrhea, dysentery, malnutrition and anemia and consumption of foods rich in proteins and lipids are forbidden. Children are forbidden from eating eggs; pregnant women are forbidden from eating fruits and vegetables because of the fear of hemorrhaging from the sugar content in the fruit; camel meat is forbidden for fear of extending the pregnancy. Female circumcision, a dangerous practice, especially during childbirth, causes many medical problems that remain permanent. Adolescent pregnancy and marriages are practiced to avoid delinquency among children; yet such practices take place because of arranged marriages for a dowry to young men or to older rich men and these forced marriages to adolescents are the causes of increases in divorce, prostitution and desertion. These young marriages have serious consequences on the health status of the mother and the infant, often leading to maternal and infant death. The high level of fertility in Niger is a response to the social structure of the family. It is a patrilineal system that encourages women to have many children, especially sons. In Niger, pregnancy is surrounded by supernatural and mysterious forces, where a child is the intervention for ancestral spirits. In Islam a child is considered a "Gift of God". A woman is expected to work until the delivery of her baby otherwise she is jeered by her neighbors. During delivery women are not expected to cry or show any pain for fear of dishonoring her family irregardless of any medical compilations she faces. Women in Africa are exploited as free labor, deteriorate and age rapidly, are generally illiterate and are not protected under any laws. PMID:12342832

  1. A Multimodal Theory of Affect Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kim; Kashima, Yoshihisa

    2015-09-01

    There is broad consensus in the literature that affect diffuses through social networks (such that a person may "acquire" or "catch" an affective state from his or her social contacts). It is further assumed that affect diffusion primarily occurs as the result of people's tendencies to synchronize their affective actions (such as smiles and frowns). However, as we show, there is a lack of clarity in the literature about the substrate and scope of affect diffusion. One consequence of this is a difficulty in distinguishing between affect diffusion and several other affective influence phenomena that look similar but have very different consequences. There is also a growing body of evidence that action synchrony is unlikely to be the only, or indeed the most important, pathway for affect diffusion. This paper has 2 key aims: (a) to craft a formal definition of affect diffusion that does justice to the core of the phenomenon while distinguishing it from other phenomena with which it is frequently confounded and (b) to advance a theory of the mechanisms of affect diffusion. This theory, which we call the multimodal theory of affect diffusion, identifies 3 parallel multimodal mechanisms that may act as routes for affect diffusion. It also provides a basis for novel predictions about the conditions under which affect is most likely to diffuse. PMID:26011791

  2. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxu; Lin, Jintai; Ni, Ruijing

    2016-04-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant a large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RF of aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissions per unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size. South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions, its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency. The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is lowered by a small per capita GDP. Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The

  3. Are anthropogenic aerosols affecting rainfall?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junkermann, Wolfgang; Hacker, Jorg

    2013-04-01

    Modification of cloud microphysics by anthropogenic aerosols is well known since several decades. Whether the underlying processes leads to changes in precipitation is by far less confirmed. Several different factors affect the production of rain in a way that a causality between increasing aerosol load in the atmosphere and a change of annual rainfall is very difficult to confirm. What would be expected as an effect of additional cloud condensation nuclei is a shift in the spatial and temporal rainfall distribution towards a lower number of days with low rain intensity and more frequent or more vigorous single events. In fact such a shift has been observed in several locations worldwide and has been suggested to be caused by increasing aerosol load, however, without further specification of the nature and number of the aerosols involved. Measurements of aerosols which might be important for cloud properties are extremely sparse and no long term monitoring data sets are available up to now. The problem of missing long term aerosol data that could be compared to available long term meteorological data sets can possibly be resolved in certain areas where well characterized large anthropogenic aerosol sources were installed in otherwise pristine areas without significant changes in land use over several decades. We investigated aerosol sources and current aerosol number, size and spatial distributions with airborne measurements in the planetary boundary layer over two regions in Australia that are reported to suffer from extensive drought despite the fact that local to regional scale water vapor in the atmosphere is slowly and constantly increasing. Such an increase of the total water in the planetary boundary layer would imply also an increase in annual precipitation as observed in many other locations elsewhere. The observed decline of rainfall in these areas thus requires a local to regional scale physical process modifying cloud properties in a way that rain

  4. Affect, Behavioural Schemas and the Proving Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selden, Annie; McKee, Kerry; Selden, John

    2010-01-01

    In this largely theoretical article, we discuss the relation between a kind of affect, behavioural schemas and aspects of the proving process. We begin with affect as described in the mathematics education literature, but soon narrow our focus to a particular kind of affect--nonemotional cognitive feelings. We then mention the position of feelings…

  5. Affective Priming with Associatively Acquired Valence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguado, Luis; Pierna, Manuel; Saugar, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments explored the effect of affectively congruent or incongruent primes on evaluation responses to positive or negative valenced targets (the "affective priming" effect). Experiment 1 replicated the basic affective priming effect with Spanish nouns: reaction time for evaluative responses (pleasant/unpleasant) were slower on…

  6. Trait Affectivity and Nonreferred Adolescent Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loney, Bryan R.; Lima, Elizabeth N.; Butler, Melanie A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined for profiles of positive trait affectivity (PA) and negative trait affectivity (NA) associated with adolescent conduct problems. Prior trait affectivity research has been relatively biased toward the assessment of adults and internalizing symptomatology. Consistent with recent developmental modeling of antisocial behavior, this…

  7. An Affect Control Theory of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shank, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Affect control theory is a theory of interaction that takes into account cultural meanings. Affect control research has previously considered interaction with technology, but there remains a lack of theorizing about inclusion of technology within the theory. This paper lays a foundation for an affect control theory of technology by addressing key…

  8. Dynamic artificial neural networks with affective systems.

    PubMed

    Schuman, Catherine D; Birdwell, J Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are processors that are trained to perform particular tasks. We couple a computational ANN with a simulated affective system in order to explore the interaction between the two. In particular, we design a simple affective system that adjusts the threshold values in the neurons of our ANN. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that this simple affective system can control the firing rate of the ensemble of neurons in the ANN, as well as to explore the coupling between the affective system and the processes of long term potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD), and the effect of the parameters of the affective system on its performance. We apply our networks with affective systems to a simple pole balancing example and briefly discuss the effect of affective systems on network performance.

  9. Emotional task management: neural correlates of switching between affective and non-affective task-sets

    PubMed Central

    Reeck, Crystal

    2015-01-01

    Although task-switching has been investigated extensively, its interaction with emotionally salient task content remains unclear. Prioritized processing of affective stimulus content may enhance accessibility of affective task-sets and generate increased interference when switching between affective and non-affective task-sets. Previous research has demonstrated that more dominant task-sets experience greater switch costs, as they necessitate active inhibition during performance of less entrenched tasks. Extending this logic to the affective domain, the present experiment examined (a) whether affective task-sets are more dominant than non-affective ones, and (b) what neural mechanisms regulate affective task-sets, so that weaker, non-affective task-sets can be executed. While undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging, participants categorized face stimuli according to either their gender (non-affective task) or their emotional expression (affective task). Behavioral results were consistent with the affective task dominance hypothesis: participants were slower to switch to the affective task, and cross-task interference was strongest when participants tried to switch from the affective to the non-affective task. These behavioral costs of controlling the affective task-set were mirrored in the activation of a right-lateralized frontostriatal network previously implicated in task-set updating and response inhibition. Connectivity between amygdala and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex was especially pronounced during cross-task interference from affective features. PMID:25552571

  10. Implicit affectivity and rapid processing of affective body language: An fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Suslow, Thomas; Ihme, Klas; Quirin, Markus; Lichev, Vladimir; Rosenberg, Nicole; Bauer, Jochen; Bomberg, Luise; Kersting, Anette; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Lobsien, Donald

    2015-10-01

    Previous research has revealed affect-congruity effects for the recognition of affects from faces. Little is known about the impact of affect on the perception of body language. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship of implicit (versus explicit) affectivity with the recognition of briefly presented affective body expressions. Implicit affectivity, which can be measured using indirect assessment methods, has been found to be more predictive of spontaneous physiological reactions than explicit (self-reported) affect. Thirty-four healthy women had to label the expression of body postures (angry, fearful, happy, or neutral) presented for 66 ms and masked by a neutral body posture in a forced-choice format while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants' implicit affectivity was assessed using the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test. Measures of explicit state and trait affectivity were also administered. Analysis of the fMRI data was focused on a subcortical network involved in the rapid perception of affective body expressions. Only implicit negative affect (but not explicit affect) was correlated with correct labeling performance for angry body posture. As expected, implicit negative affect was positively associated with activation of the subcortical network in response to fearful and angry expression (compared to neutral expression). Responses of the caudate nucleus to affective body expression were especially associated with its recognition. It appears that processes of rapid recognition of affects from body postures could be facilitated by an individual's implicit negative affect. PMID:26032148

  11. Audio-visual affective expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Thomas S.; Zeng, Zhihong

    2007-11-01

    Automatic affective expression recognition has attracted more and more attention of researchers from different disciplines, which will significantly contribute to a new paradigm for human computer interaction (affect-sensitive interfaces, socially intelligent environments) and advance the research in the affect-related fields including psychology, psychiatry, and education. Multimodal information integration is a process that enables human to assess affective states robustly and flexibly. In order to understand the richness and subtleness of human emotion behavior, the computer should be able to integrate information from multiple sensors. We introduce in this paper our efforts toward machine understanding of audio-visual affective behavior, based on both deliberate and spontaneous displays. Some promising methods are presented to integrate information from both audio and visual modalities. Our experiments show the advantage of audio-visual fusion in affective expression recognition over audio-only or visual-only approaches.

  12. Reliability Generalization: An Examination of the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leue, Anja; Lange, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) by means of the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule has received a remarkable popularity in the social sciences. Using a meta-analytic tool--namely, reliability generalization (RG)--population reliability scores of both scales have been investigated on the basis of a random…

  13. Schizophrenic reasoning about affect-laden material.

    PubMed

    Chapman, L J; Chapman, J P

    1975-10-01

    Drug-free schizophrenic patients (N equals 74) and nonpsychotic subjects (N equals 206) were given a test of affect-laden and affectively neutral multiple choice analogy items. The two subtests were matched on several psychometric characteristics that determine the power of the test to distinguish the more able from the less able normal subjects. Neither newly admitted schizophrenic nor long-term chronic schizophrenic patients performed differently on the affective subtest than on the neutral subtest. The many published findings of a cognitive deficit in schizophrenia in response to affect-laden stimuli can probably be attributed to the inappropriate use of unmatched tested. PMID:1180657

  14. Role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Sharma, P K; Garg, V K; Singh, A K; Mondal, S C

    2013-01-01

    This review was prepared with an aim to show role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder, which is also called as winter depression or winter blues, is mood disorder in which persons with normal mental health throughout most of the year will show depressive symptoms in the winter or, less commonly, in the summer. Serotonin is an important endogenous neurotransmitter which also acts as neuromodulator. The least invasive, natural, and researched treatment of seasonal affective disorder is natural or otherwise is light therapy. Negative air ionization, which acts by liberating charged particles on the sleep environment, has also become effective in treatment of seasonal affective disorder.  

  15. Factors affecting bone strength other than osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ratti, Chiara; Vulcano, Ettore; Canton, Gianluca; Marano, Marco; Murena, Luigi; Cherubino, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common cause of bone fragility, especially in post-menopausal women. Bone strength may be compromised by several other medical conditions and medications, which must be ruled out in the clinical management of patients affected by fragility fractures. Indeed, 20-30% of women and up to 50% of men affected by bone fragility are diagnosed with other conditions affecting bone strength other than osteoporosis. These conditions include disorders of bone homeostasis, impaired bone remodeling, collagen disorders, and medications qualitatively and quantitatively affecting bone strength. Proper diagnosis allows correct treatment to prevent the occurrence of fragility fractures. PMID:24046057

  16. Affect regulation: holding, containing and mirroring.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Gergely and colleagues' state that their "Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring" can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parental affect mirroring may be understood as a specification of these concepts. It is argued that despite similarities at a descriptive level the concepts are embedded in theories with different ideas of subjectivity. Hence an understanding of the concept of affect regulation as a concretization and specification of the classical concepts dilutes the complexity of both the concept of affect regulation and of the classical concepts. PMID:25351730

  17. Trait Affect and Job Search Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Stephane; Saks, Alan M.; Zikic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the role of trait affect in job search. One hundred and twenty-three university students completed measures of positive and negative affectivity, conscientiousness, job search self-efficacy, job search clarity, and job search intensity during their last year of school while on the job market. At the end of the school…

  18. 40 CFR 62.14102 - Affected facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plastics/rubber recycling unit (as defined in 40 CFR 60.51b) are not subject to this subpart if the owner... Requirements for Large Municipal Waste Combustors Constructed on or Before September 20, 1994 § 62.14102 Affected facilities. (a) The affected facility to which this subpart applies is each municipal...

  19. Life-Span Development of Affective Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Keiko

    This paper presents a model of affective relationships and a review of a number of empirical studies based on the model. The fundamental aim of the model is to describe the life-span development of affective relationships, which are measured in terms of an individual's representation of a variety of significant interpersonal relationships. These…

  20. Affective Scaffolds, Expressive Arts, and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Some theorists have argued that elements of the surrounding world play a crucial role in sustaining and amplifying both cognition and emotion. Such insights raise an interesting question about the relationship between cognitive and affective scaffolding: in addition to enabling the realization of specific affective states, can an affective niche also enable the realization of certain cognitive capacities? In order to gain a better understanding of this relationship between affective niches and cognition, I will examine the use of expressive arts in the context of psychotherapy and peacebuilding. In these settings, environmental resources and interpersonal scaffolds not only evoke emotion and encourage the adoption of particular bodily affective styles, but also support the development of capacities for self-awareness and interpersonal understanding. These affective scaffolds play a crucial role in therapy and peacebuilding, in fact, insofar as they facilitate the development of self-knowledge, enhance capacities associated with social cognition, and build positive rapport and trust among participants. I will argue that this is because affectivity is linked to the way that subjects frame and attend to their surroundings. Insofar as the regulation and modification of emotion goes hand in hand with opening up new interpretive frames and establishing new habits of mind, the creation of an affective niche can contribute significantly to various modes of cognition. PMID:27014164

  1. 42 CFR 1008.53 - Affected parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Affected parties. 1008.53 Section 1008.53 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.53 Affected parties....

  2. 28 CFR 80.5 - Affected parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Affected parties. 80.5 Section 80.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.5 Affected parties. An FCPA Opinion shall have no application to any party which does not join...

  3. 42 CFR 1008.53 - Affected parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Affected parties. 1008.53 Section 1008.53 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.53 Affected parties....

  4. 28 CFR 80.5 - Affected parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Affected parties. 80.5 Section 80.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.5 Affected parties. An FCPA Opinion shall have no application to any party which does not join...

  5. Affect and Engagement during Small Group Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linnenbrink-Garcia, Lisa; Rogat, Toni Kempler; Koskey, Kristin L. K.

    2011-01-01

    Two studies (Study 1: n = 137; Study 2: n = 192) were conducted to investigate how upper-elementary students' affect during small group instruction related to their social-behavioral engagement during group work. A circumplex model of affect consisting of valence (positive, negative) and activation (high, low) was used to examine the relation of…

  6. Priming Effects for Affective vs. Neutral Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Leslie A.; Rabin, Laura; Wyatt, Gwinne; Frohlich, Jonathan; Vardy, Susan B.; Dimitri, Diana

    2005-01-01

    Affective and Neutral Tasks (faces with negative or neutral content, with different lighting and orientation) requiring reaction time judgments of poser identity were administered to 32 participants. Speed and accuracy were better for the Affective than Neutral Task, consistent with literature suggesting facilitation of performance by affective…

  7. The Affective Regulation of Social Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clore, Gerald L.; Pappas, Jesse

    2007-01-01

    The recent publication of David Heise's "Expressive Order" (2007) provides an occasion for discussing some of the key ideas in Affect Control Theory. The theory proposes that a few dimensions of affective meaning provide a common basis for interrelating personal identities and social actions. It holds that during interpersonal interactions, social…

  8. Affective Priming with Auditory Speech Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degner, Juliane

    2011-01-01

    Four experiments explored the applicability of auditory stimulus presentation in affective priming tasks. In Experiment 1, it was found that standard affective priming effects occur when prime and target words are presented simultaneously via headphones similar to a dichotic listening procedure. In Experiment 2, stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) was…

  9. Affective Education for Gifted, Culturally Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Alexinia

    2009-01-01

    Over the years, there has been an ongoing controversy about affective education. Some see it as an important element of good teaching, and some see it as fluff, diminishing academics, and playing into the "feel good" movement. While criticisms may be appropriate in some situations, affective education can play a fundamental role in other…

  10. 40 CFR 1502.15 - Affected environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Affected environment. 1502.15 Section 1502.15 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.15 Affected environment. The environmental impact statement shall succinctly describe...

  11. 40 CFR 1502.15 - Affected environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Affected environment. 1502.15 Section 1502.15 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.15 Affected environment. The environmental impact statement shall succinctly describe...

  12. 40 CFR 1502.15 - Affected environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Affected environment. 1502.15 Section 1502.15 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.15 Affected environment. The environmental impact statement shall succinctly describe...

  13. 42 CFR 1008.53 - Affected parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Affected parties. 1008.53 Section 1008.53 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.53 Affected parties....

  14. 42 CFR 1008.53 - Affected parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Affected parties. 1008.53 Section 1008.53 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.53 Affected parties....

  15. 42 CFR 1008.53 - Affected parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Affected parties. 1008.53 Section 1008.53 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.53 Affected parties....

  16. Do School Facilities Affect Academic Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Mark

    This review explores which facility attributes affect academic outcomes the most and in what manner and degree. The research is examined in six categories: indoor air quality, ventilation, and thermal comfort; lighting; acoustics; building age and quality; school size; and class size. The review concludes that school facilities affect learning.…

  17. 47 CFR 1.2003 - Applications affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Applications affected. 1.2003 Section 1.2003 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Implementation of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 § 1.2003 Applications affected. The certification required by § 1.2002 must be...

  18. Helping Crack-Affected Children Succeed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Mary Bellis

    1993-01-01

    Crack-affected children who experience early intervention can be mainstreamed successfully into regular classes. These children can be overwhelmed by stimuli and need stability, routine, and sameness in the intervention classroom. Teachers have discovered effective methods for working with crack-affected children. (16 references) (MLF)

  19. Evaluation in the Affective Domain. NSPER: 76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gephart, William J.; And Others

    The National Symposium for Professors of Educational Research for 1976 focused on two topics: the nature of affect, and principles and guidelines for measuring individual affect and learning environment. This document contains five major papers presented at the conference. The first paper contrasted the physiological and emotional concept of…

  20. Affective Scaffolds, Expressive Arts, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Some theorists have argued that elements of the surrounding world play a crucial role in sustaining and amplifying both cognition and emotion. Such insights raise an interesting question about the relationship between cognitive and affective scaffolding: in addition to enabling the realization of specific affective states, can an affective niche also enable the realization of certain cognitive capacities? In order to gain a better understanding of this relationship between affective niches and cognition, I will examine the use of expressive arts in the context of psychotherapy and peacebuilding. In these settings, environmental resources and interpersonal scaffolds not only evoke emotion and encourage the adoption of particular bodily affective styles, but also support the development of capacities for self-awareness and interpersonal understanding. These affective scaffolds play a crucial role in therapy and peacebuilding, in fact, insofar as they facilitate the development of self-knowledge, enhance capacities associated with social cognition, and build positive rapport and trust among participants. I will argue that this is because affectivity is linked to the way that subjects frame and attend to their surroundings. Insofar as the regulation and modification of emotion goes hand in hand with opening up new interpretive frames and establishing new habits of mind, the creation of an affective niche can contribute significantly to various modes of cognition. PMID:27014164

  1. 40 CFR 1502.15 - Affected environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Affected environment. 1502.15 Section 1502.15 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.15 Affected environment. The environmental impact statement shall succinctly describe...

  2. 40 CFR 1502.15 - Affected environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Affected environment. 1502.15 Section 1502.15 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.15 Affected environment. The environmental impact statement shall succinctly describe...

  3. Summary of New Legislation Affecting Education, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This document summarizes major legislation, enacted by the 1993 New York State Legislature, that affected education and its related professions. Eight sections offer brief descriptions of legislation enacted in the following areas: laws affecting school districts generally; cultural education; state aid; taxation and financial administration;…

  4. 1989 Summary of New Legislation Affecting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Counsel.

    This summary of major legislation enacted by the 1989 New York State Legislature affecting education and the professions is organized in eight sections: (1) laws affecting school districts generally; (2) state aid; (3) taxation and financial administration; (4) miscellaneous; (5) laws of local application; (6) higher education; (7) laws affecting…

  5. Student Behavior and Attitudes: The Affective Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Patricia F.

    This two-part learning module, designed to acquaint teachers with the affective domain of Bloom's Taxonomy, provides a methodology for identifying the attitudinal and motivational problems of non-traditional students. Part I discusses the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains considered in Bloom's Taxonomy and presents possible learning…

  6. The affective Auditory Verbal Learning Test.

    PubMed

    Snyder, K A; Harrison, D W

    1997-01-01

    The study of emotion is hindered by the lack of tests for affect perception or comprehension. One solution is to develop affective versions of well-known tests. Using an index of word norms (Toglia & Battig, 1978), positively and negatively valenced word lists were developed as alternate forms of the affectively neutral Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVL; Rey, 1964). Participants (N=102) received either the original RAVL list, the positively valenced list, or the negatively valenced list. Results are depicted across acquisition trials and location within the list for comparison of primacy and recency effects. Each word list yielded comparable patterns of acquisition. Participants receiving the negative list evidenced an enhanced primacy effect, while participants receiving the positive list evidenced an enhanced recency effect. The positive and negative lists may prove useful in the evaluation of individuals with affective disorders and may provide an alternative for affect induction through an active learning paradigm.

  7. Leader affective presence and innovation in teams.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Hector P; Totterdell, Peter; Niven, Karen; Barros, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    Affective presence is a novel personality construct that describes the tendency of individuals to make their interaction partners feel similarly positive or negative. We adopt this construct, together with the input-process-output model of teamwork, to understand how team leaders influence team interaction and innovation performance. In 2 multisource studies, based on 350 individuals working in 87 teams of 2 public organizations and 734 individuals working in 69 teams of a private organization, we tested and supported hypotheses that team leader positive affective presence was positively related to team information sharing, whereas team leader negative affective presence was negatively related to the same team process. In turn, team information sharing was positively related to team innovation, mediating the effects of leader affective presence on this team output. The results indicate the value of adopting an interpersonal individual differences approach to understanding how affect-related characteristics of leaders influence interaction processes and complex performance in teams. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Positive affect and distressed affect over the day in older people.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, Andrew; Leigh, Elizabeth S; Kumari, Meena

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess patterns of affect over the day in a representative sample of older people, with particular emphasis on the impact of loneliness and depression. Momentary assessments of positive and distressed affect were obtained four times over a single day from 4,258 men and women aged 52-79 years from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Positive and distressed affect were only modestly correlated (r = -0.23). Positive affect was low on waking and peaked in the early evening, while distressed affect decreased progressively over the day. The diurnal variation in positive affect was greater in participants <65 years compared with older individuals. Positive affect was greater in men, married participants and in healthy individuals, while distressed affect was higher among women, unmarried and lower socioeconomic status respondents, and in those with limiting longstanding illnesses. Depressed individuals experienced lower positive affect throughout the day, while differences in distressed affect were more pronounced in the morning. Loneliness was associated with lower positive affect and greater distressed affect independently of age, sex, marital status, paid employment, socioeconomic status, health, and depression. This study demonstrates that ecological momentary assessment of affect is feasible on a large scale in older individuals, and generates information about positive affect and distress that is complementary to standard questionnaire measures. The associations with loneliness highlight the everyday distress and reduced happiness and excitement experienced by lonely older men and women, and these may contribute to enhanced risks to physical and mental health.

  9. Affect dysregulation as a way of life.

    PubMed

    Chefetz, R A

    2000-01-01

    Storms of affect, states of panic, and other apparently dysregulated affect states may not be as dysregulated as they seem. While initial states of panic during a rape, etc. may have the quality of chaos and be associated with dissociative experience, rekindled affect may actually burst forth in an unconsciously scripted manner, telling a story for which words have not yet been found. The story of abusive experience may only appear to be dysregulated. The patient with an apparent dysregulation of affect may be suffering from complex affect scripts to which she is subject via unconscious attempts to tell a story based on experience that has been nonverbally encoded. The interaction of neurobiological systems of affect and memory to produce decontextualized experience, which leaves a person bereft of understanding but reeling from storms of affect, is described. While more work remains to be done to delineate the kind of model described here, the efficacy of such an approach and the blamelessness of the neurobiological givens may be a useful construct. Rather than thinking of people who demonstrate affective dysregulation as being subject to psychic disorganization, attention to the sequences and repetition of affect states may lead to analysis of previously unknowable model scenes and their resolution. This framework brings some hope to an area of inquiry that is strewn with despair for both patient and clinician. The treatment of dissociative disorders teaches us much about how we all are much more alike than we are different. If only we are willing to immerse ourselves in the milieu of the affective chaos our patients bring to treatment, then we can begin to study the repetitive scripts of experience that act like the strange attractors of chaos theory.

  10. Affective brain-computer music interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Ian; Williams, Duncan; Kirke, Alexis; Weaver, James; Malik, Asad; Hwang, Faustina; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. We aim to develop and evaluate an affective brain-computer music interface (aBCMI) for modulating the affective states of its users. Approach. An aBCMI is constructed to detect a user's current affective state and attempt to modulate it in order to achieve specific objectives (for example, making the user calmer or happier) by playing music which is generated according to a specific affective target by an algorithmic music composition system and a case-based reasoning system. The system is trained and tested in a longitudinal study on a population of eight healthy participants, with each participant returning for multiple sessions. Main results. The final online aBCMI is able to detect its users current affective states with classification accuracies of up to 65% (3 class, p\\lt 0.01) and modulate its user's affective states significantly above chance level (p\\lt 0.05). Significance. Our system represents one of the first demonstrations of an online aBCMI that is able to accurately detect and respond to user's affective states. Possible applications include use in music therapy and entertainment.

  11. Embodied affectivity: on moving and being moved

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Thomas; Koch, Sabine C.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of research indicating that bodily sensation and behavior strongly influences one's emotional reaction toward certain situations or objects. On this background, a framework model of embodied affectivity1 is suggested: we regard emotions as resulting from the circular interaction between affective qualities or affordances in the environment and the subject's bodily resonance, be it in the form of sensations, postures, expressive movements or movement tendencies. Motion and emotion are thus intrinsically connected: one is moved by movement (perception; impression; affection2) and moved to move (action; expression; e-motion). Through its resonance, the body functions as a medium of emotional perception: it colors or charges self-experience and the environment with affective valences while it remains itself in the background of one's own awareness. This model is then applied to emotional social understanding or interaffectivity which is regarded as an intertwinement of two cycles of embodied affectivity, thus continuously modifying each partner's affective affordances and bodily resonance. We conclude with considerations of how embodied affectivity is altered in psychopathology and can be addressed in psychotherapy of the embodied self. PMID:24936191

  12. Affective brain–computer music interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Ian; Williams, Duncan; Kirke, Alexis; Weaver, James; Malik, Asad; Hwang, Faustina; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. We aim to develop and evaluate an affective brain–computer music interface (aBCMI) for modulating the affective states of its users. Approach. An aBCMI is constructed to detect a user's current affective state and attempt to modulate it in order to achieve specific objectives (for example, making the user calmer or happier) by playing music which is generated according to a specific affective target by an algorithmic music composition system and a case-based reasoning system. The system is trained and tested in a longitudinal study on a population of eight healthy participants, with each participant returning for multiple sessions. Main results. The final online aBCMI is able to detect its users current affective states with classification accuracies of up to 65% (3 class, p\\lt 0.01) and modulate its user's affective states significantly above chance level (p\\lt 0.05). Significance. Our system represents one of the first demonstrations of an online aBCMI that is able to accurately detect and respond to user's affective states. Possible applications include use in music therapy and entertainment.

  13. Embodied affectivity: on moving and being moved.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Thomas; Koch, Sabine C

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of research indicating that bodily sensation and behavior strongly influences one's emotional reaction toward certain situations or objects. On this background, a framework model of embodied affectivity is suggested: we regard emotions as resulting from the circular interaction between affective qualities or affordances in the environment and the subject's bodily resonance, be it in the form of sensations, postures, expressive movements or movement tendencies. Motion and emotion are thus intrinsically connected: one is moved by movement (perception; impression; affection) and moved to move (action; expression; e-motion). Through its resonance, the body functions as a medium of emotional perception: it colors or charges self-experience and the environment with affective valences while it remains itself in the background of one's own awareness. This model is then applied to emotional social understanding or interaffectivity which is regarded as an intertwinement of two cycles of embodied affectivity, thus continuously modifying each partner's affective affordances and bodily resonance. We conclude with considerations of how embodied affectivity is altered in psychopathology and can be addressed in psychotherapy of the embodied self. PMID:24936191

  14. Implicit Processing of Visual Emotions Is Affected by Sound-Induced Affective States and Individual Affective Traits

    PubMed Central

    Quarto, Tiziana; Blasi, Giuseppe; Pallesen, Karen Johanne; Bertolino, Alessandro; Brattico, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize emotions contained in facial expressions are affected by both affective traits and states and varies widely between individuals. While affective traits are stable in time, affective states can be regulated more rapidly by environmental stimuli, such as music, that indirectly modulate the brain state. Here, we tested whether a relaxing or irritating sound environment affects implicit processing of facial expressions. Moreover, we investigated whether and how individual traits of anxiety and emotional control interact with this process. 32 healthy subjects performed an implicit emotion processing task (presented to subjects as a gender discrimination task) while the sound environment was defined either by a) a therapeutic music sequence (MusiCure), b) a noise sequence or c) silence. Individual changes in mood were sampled before and after the task by a computerized questionnaire. Additionally, emotional control and trait anxiety were assessed in a separate session by paper and pencil questionnaires. Results showed a better mood after the MusiCure condition compared with the other experimental conditions and faster responses to happy faces during MusiCure compared with angry faces during Noise. Moreover, individuals with higher trait anxiety were faster in performing the implicit emotion processing task during MusiCure compared with Silence. These findings suggest that sound-induced affective states are associated with differential responses to angry and happy emotional faces at an implicit stage of processing, and that a relaxing sound environment facilitates the implicit emotional processing in anxious individuals. PMID:25072162

  15. How Coriolis meter design affects field performance

    SciTech Connect

    Levien, A.; Dudiak, A.

    1995-12-31

    Although many possibilities exist for the design of Coriolis flowmeters, a common set of fundamental physical principles affect practical meter design. Design criteria such as tube geometry, alloy section, operating frequencies, stress levels, and tubing wall thickness have varying impacts on meter performance. Additionally, field conditions such as changing temperature, pressure, pipeline stress and vibration affect measurement performance. The challenge created in Coriolis flow meter design is to maximize the sensitivity of the meter Coriolis forces, while minimizing the impact of outside environmental influences. Data are presented on the physical principles that affect Coriolis flowmeters, and how the various aspects of meter design influence field performance.

  16. Major affective disorders and forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kunjukrishnan, R; Varan, L R

    1992-09-01

    Major mental illnesses, such as major affective disorders and schizophrenias, form a relatively small diagnostic group among mentally disordered offenders. The major affective disorders are less common when compared with schizophrenics among such offenders. Yet, some of the most violent crimes, such as murder, attempted murder, and serious assaults, especially intrafamilial violence, are committed by major affective disorder patients. The offenses by this group of patients are committed while suffering from active symptoms of the illness. As such, a substantial majority is not considered fully criminally responsible for the offense. Many such offenders are found not guilty by reason of insanity and are sent to psychiatric hospitals.

  17. Hot Temperatures, Hostile Affect, Hostile Cognition, and Arousal: Tests of a General Model of Affective Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Craig A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Used a general model of affective aggression to generate predictions concerning hot temperatures. Results indicated that hot temperatures produced increases in hostile affect, hostile cognition, and physiological arousal. Concluded that hostile affect, hostile cognitions, and excitation transfer processes may all increase the likelihood of biased…

  18. Examining an Affective Aggression Framework: Weapon and Temperature Effects on Aggressive Thoughts, Affect, and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Craig A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A general framework for studying affective aggression, integrating many insights from previous models, is presented. New research examining effects of extreme temperature and photos of guns on arousal, cognition, and affect is presented. Hostile cognition was assessed using automatic priming tasks (i.e., Stroop interference). Hostile affect was…

  19. Cognitive and Affective Control in Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ralph E.; Harvey, Allison G.; Van der Linden, Martial

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent disabling chronic disorder. The aim of this paper is fourfold: (a) to review evidence suggesting that dysfunctional forms of cognitive control, such as thought suppression, worry, rumination, and imagery control, are associated with sleep disturbance; (b) to review a new budding field of scientific investigation – the role of dysfunctional affect control in sleep disturbance, such as problems with down-regulating negative and positive affective states; (c) to review evidence that sleep disturbance can impair next-day affect control; and (d) to outline, on the basis of the reviewed evidence, how the repetitive-thought literature and the affective science literature can be combined to further understanding of, and intervention for, insomnia. PMID:22162971

  20. Legal Issues Affecting Libraries and Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Joseph J.; Shuman, Bruce A.

    1988-01-01

    Review of employment laws affecting libraries includes definitions of qualified personnel, laws pertaining to medical and honesty testing, affirmative action, and sexual harassment. Laws covering crime within libraries are also discussed, as well as problems with existing legislation. (CLB)

  1. Organizational behavior: affect in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Brief, Arthur P; Weiss, Howard M

    2002-01-01

    The study of affect in the workplace began and peaked in the 1930s, with the decades that followed up to the 1990s not being particularly fertile. Whereas job satisfaction generally continues to be loosely but not carefully thought of and measured as an affective state, critical work in the 1990s has raised serious questions about the affective status of job satisfaction in terms of its causes as well as its definition and measurement. Recent research has focused on the production of moods and emotions at work, with an emphasis, at least conceptually, on stressful events, leaders, work groups, physical settings, and rewards/punishment. Other recent research has addressed the consequences of workers' feelings, in particular, a variety of performance outcomes (e.g., helping behaviors and creativity). Even though recent interest in affect in the workplace has been intense, many theoretical and methodological opportunities and challenges remain. PMID:11752487

  2. Organizational behavior: affect in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Brief, Arthur P; Weiss, Howard M

    2002-01-01

    The study of affect in the workplace began and peaked in the 1930s, with the decades that followed up to the 1990s not being particularly fertile. Whereas job satisfaction generally continues to be loosely but not carefully thought of and measured as an affective state, critical work in the 1990s has raised serious questions about the affective status of job satisfaction in terms of its causes as well as its definition and measurement. Recent research has focused on the production of moods and emotions at work, with an emphasis, at least conceptually, on stressful events, leaders, work groups, physical settings, and rewards/punishment. Other recent research has addressed the consequences of workers' feelings, in particular, a variety of performance outcomes (e.g., helping behaviors and creativity). Even though recent interest in affect in the workplace has been intense, many theoretical and methodological opportunities and challenges remain.

  3. 28 CFR 55.15 - Affected activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RIGHTS ACT REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Minority Language Materials and Assistance § 55.15 Affected... of applicable language minority groups to be effectively informed of and participate effectively...

  4. 28 CFR 55.15 - Affected activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RIGHTS ACT REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Minority Language Materials and Assistance § 55.15 Affected... of applicable language minority groups to be effectively informed of and participate effectively...

  5. 28 CFR 55.15 - Affected activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RIGHTS ACT REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Minority Language Materials and Assistance § 55.15 Affected... of applicable language minority groups to be effectively informed of and participate effectively...

  6. 28 CFR 55.15 - Affected activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RIGHTS ACT REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Minority Language Materials and Assistance § 55.15 Affected... of applicable language minority groups to be effectively informed of and participate effectively...

  7. 28 CFR 55.15 - Affected activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RIGHTS ACT REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Minority Language Materials and Assistance § 55.15 Affected... of applicable language minority groups to be effectively informed of and participate effectively...

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... in many US hospitals do not fully support breastfeeding. Some of the Ten Steps on which hospitals ...

  9. Variables Affecting Distance Educational Program Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Ellen D.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses variables that affect the success of distance education programs in elementary, secondary, and postsecondary education or corporate training environments. Topics addressed include needs assessment, audience analysis, instructional design, course selection and reconfiguration, instructional delivery systems, adapting media and other…

  10. Will Stress during Pregnancy Affect My Baby?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Will stress during pregnancy affect my baby? Skip sharing on ... health care provider during your prenatal visits. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Pregnancy PTSD is a more ...

  11. Gasoline Composition Regulations Affecting LUST Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments in 1990 imposed requirements on gasoline composition in the United States. Impacts to ground water are affected by the provisions that required oxygenated additives and limited benzene concentration. Reformulated and oxygenated gasoline w...

  12. Affective forecasting and the Big Five

    PubMed Central

    Hoerger, Michael; Quirk, Stuart W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies on affective forecasting clarify that the emotional reactions people anticipate often differ markedly from those they actually experience in response to affective stimuli and events. However, core personality differences in affective forecasting have received limited attention, despite their potential relevance to choice behavior. In the present study, 226 college undergraduates rated their anticipated and experienced reactions to the emotionally-evocative event of Valentine’s Day and completed a measure of the Big Five personality traits – neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness – and their facet scales. Neuroticism and extraversion were associated with baseline mood, experienced emotional reactions, and anticipated emotional reactions. The present findings hold implications for the study of individual differences in affective forecasting, personality theory, and interventions research. PMID:22021944

  13. Smoking Affects You | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    */ 18 Ways Smoking Affects Your Health Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body. Some of these harmful effects are immediate. Find out the health effects of smoking and what happens to your body when you quit.

  14. Psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test.

    PubMed

    Frankl, My; Philips, Björn; Berggraf, Lene; Ulvenes, Pål; Johansson, Robert; Wennberg, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to make the first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test, using the Swedish translation - a test developed to screen the ability to experience, express and regulate emotions. Data was collected from a clinical sample (N = 82) of patients with depression and/or anxiety participating in randomized controlled trial of Internet-based affect-focused treatment, and a university student sample (N = 197). The internal consistency for the total score was satisfactory (Clinical sample α = 0.88/Student sample α = 0.84) as well as for all the affective domains, except Anger/Assertion (α = 0.44/0.36), Sadness/Grief (α = 0.24/0.46) and Attachment/Closeness (α = 0.67/0.69). Test retest reliability was satisfactory (ICC > 0.77) for the total score and for all the affective domains except for Sadness/Grief (ICC = 0.04). The exploratory factor analysis resulted in a six-factor solution and did only moderately match the test's original affective domains. An empirical cut-off between the clinical and the university student sample were calculated and yielded a cut-off of 72 points. As expected, the Affect Phobia test showed negative significant correlations in the clinical group with measures on depression (rxy  = -0.229; p < 0.01) and anxiety (rxy  = -0.315; p < 0.05). The conclusion is that the psychometric properties are satisfactory for the total score of the Affect Phobia Test but not for some of the test's affective domains. Consequently the domains should not be used as subscales. The test can discriminate between individuals who seek help for psychological problems and those who do not. PMID:27461917

  15. Psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test.

    PubMed

    Frankl, My; Philips, Björn; Berggraf, Lene; Ulvenes, Pål; Johansson, Robert; Wennberg, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to make the first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test, using the Swedish translation - a test developed to screen the ability to experience, express and regulate emotions. Data was collected from a clinical sample (N = 82) of patients with depression and/or anxiety participating in randomized controlled trial of Internet-based affect-focused treatment, and a university student sample (N = 197). The internal consistency for the total score was satisfactory (Clinical sample α = 0.88/Student sample α = 0.84) as well as for all the affective domains, except Anger/Assertion (α = 0.44/0.36), Sadness/Grief (α = 0.24/0.46) and Attachment/Closeness (α = 0.67/0.69). Test retest reliability was satisfactory (ICC > 0.77) for the total score and for all the affective domains except for Sadness/Grief (ICC = 0.04). The exploratory factor analysis resulted in a six-factor solution and did only moderately match the test's original affective domains. An empirical cut-off between the clinical and the university student sample were calculated and yielded a cut-off of 72 points. As expected, the Affect Phobia test showed negative significant correlations in the clinical group with measures on depression (rxy  = -0.229; p < 0.01) and anxiety (rxy  = -0.315; p < 0.05). The conclusion is that the psychometric properties are satisfactory for the total score of the Affect Phobia Test but not for some of the test's affective domains. Consequently the domains should not be used as subscales. The test can discriminate between individuals who seek help for psychological problems and those who do not.

  16. Affective neuroscience and psychophysiology: toward a synthesis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Richard J

    2003-09-01

    This article reviews the author's program of research on the neural substrates of emotion and affective style and their behavioral and peripheral biological correlates. Two core dimensions along which affect is organized are approach and withdrawal. Some of the key circuitry underlying approach and withdrawal components of emotion is reviewed with an emphasis on the role played by different sectors of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and amygdala. Affective style refers to individual differences in valence-specific features of emotional reactivity and regulation. The different parameters of affective style can be objectively measured using specific laboratory probes. Relations between individual differences in prefrontal and amygdala function and specific components of affective style are illustrated. The final section of the article concludes with a brief discussion of plasticity in the central circuitry of emotion and the possibility that this circuitry can be shaped by training experiences that might potentially promote a more resilient, positive affective style. The implications of this body of work for a broader conception of psychophysiology and for training the next generation of psychophysiologists are considered in the conclusion. PMID:14696720

  17. Affect is greater than, not equal to, condition: condition and person effects in affective priming paradigms.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Adam A; Larsen, Randy J; Elliot, Andrew J

    2013-08-01

    Affective primes may impact ensuing behavior through condition and person effects. However, previous research has not experimentally disentangled these two sources of influence in affective priming paradigms. In the current research, we simultaneously examine the influence of condition factors, in terms of prime valence, and person factors, in terms of affect reactivity and personality. In both studies, undergraduate participants (total N = 174) were primed with either positive or negative affective stimuli (words, Study 1; pictures, Study 2) prior to judging the likability of a neutral target (Arabic characters, Study 1; inkblots, Study 2). Although we did observe between-condition differences for positive and negative primes, person-level effects were more consistent predictors of target ratings. Affect reactivity (affect Time 2, controlling Time 1) to the primes predicted evaluative judgments, even in the absence of condition effects. In addition, the personality traits of Neuroticism (Study 1) and behavioral inhibition system sensitivity (Study 2) predicted evaluative judgments of neutral targets following negative affective primes. With effects for condition, affect reactivity, and personality, our results suggest that affective primes influence ensuing behaviors through both informational and affective means. Research using affective priming methodologies should take into account both condition and person-level effects. PMID:23253181

  18. Affective Biases in Humans and Animals.

    PubMed

    Robinson, E S J; Roiser, J P

    2016-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common but poorly understood psychiatric conditions. Although drug treatments and psychological therapies are effective in some patients, many do not achieve full remission and some patients receive no apparent benefit. Developing new improved treatments requires a better understanding of the aetiology of symptoms and evaluation of novel therapeutic targets in pre-clinical studies. Recent developments in our understanding of the basic cognitive processes that may contribute to the development of depression and its treatment offer new opportunities for both clinical and pre-clinical research. This chapter discusses the clinical evidence supporting a cognitive neuropsychological model of depression and antidepressant efficacy, and how this information may be usefully translated to pre-clinical investigation. Studies using neuropsychological tests in depressed patients and at risk populations have revealed basic negative emotional biases and disrupted reward and punishment processing, which may also impact on non-affective cognition. These affective biases are sensitive to antidepressant treatments with early onset effects observed, suggesting an important role in recovery. This clinical work into affective biases has also facilitated back-translation to animals and the development of assays to study affective biases in rodents. These animal studies suggest that, similar to humans, rodents in putative negative affective states exhibit negative affective biases on decision-making and memory tasks. Antidepressant treatments also induce positive biases in these rodent tasks, supporting the translational validity of this approach. Although still in the early stages of development and validation, affective biases in depression have the potential to offer new insights into the clinical condition, as well as facilitating the development of more translational approaches for pre-clinical studies. PMID:27660073

  19. Dynamic musical communication of core affect

    PubMed Central

    Flaig, Nicole K.; Large, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    Is there something special about the way music communicates feelings? Theorists since Meyer (1956) have attempted to explain how music could stimulate varied and subtle affective experiences by violating learned expectancies, or by mimicking other forms of social interaction. Our proposal is that music speaks to the brain in its own language; it need not imitate any other form of communication. We review recent theoretical and empirical literature, which suggests that all conscious processes consist of dynamic neural events, produced by spatially dispersed processes in the physical brain. Intentional thought and affective experience arise as dynamical aspects of neural events taking place in multiple brain areas simultaneously. At any given moment, this content comprises a unified “scene” that is integrated into a dynamic core through synchrony of neuronal oscillations. We propose that (1) neurodynamic synchrony with musical stimuli gives rise to musical qualia including tonal and temporal expectancies, and that (2) music-synchronous responses couple into core neurodynamics, enabling music to directly modulate core affect. Expressive music performance, for example, may recruit rhythm-synchronous neural responses to support affective communication. We suggest that the dynamic relationship between musical expression and the experience of affect presents a unique opportunity for the study of emotional experience. This may help elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying arousal and valence, and offer a new approach to exploring the complex dynamics of the how and why of emotional experience. PMID:24672492

  20. Dynamic musical communication of core affect.

    PubMed

    Flaig, Nicole K; Large, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Is there something special about the way music communicates feelings? Theorists since Meyer (1956) have attempted to explain how music could stimulate varied and subtle affective experiences by violating learned expectancies, or by mimicking other forms of social interaction. Our proposal is that music speaks to the brain in its own language; it need not imitate any other form of communication. We review recent theoretical and empirical literature, which suggests that all conscious processes consist of dynamic neural events, produced by spatially dispersed processes in the physical brain. Intentional thought and affective experience arise as dynamical aspects of neural events taking place in multiple brain areas simultaneously. At any given moment, this content comprises a unified "scene" that is integrated into a dynamic core through synchrony of neuronal oscillations. We propose that (1) neurodynamic synchrony with musical stimuli gives rise to musical qualia including tonal and temporal expectancies, and that (2) music-synchronous responses couple into core neurodynamics, enabling music to directly modulate core affect. Expressive music performance, for example, may recruit rhythm-synchronous neural responses to support affective communication. We suggest that the dynamic relationship between musical expression and the experience of affect presents a unique opportunity for the study of emotional experience. This may help elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying arousal and valence, and offer a new approach to exploring the complex dynamics of the how and why of emotional experience. PMID:24672492