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Sample records for dumbfounded affects myoblast

  1. The intracellular domain of Dumbfounded affects myoblast fusion efficiency and interacts with Rolling pebbles and Loner.

    PubMed

    Bulchand, Sarada; Menon, Sree Devi; George, Simi Elizabeth; Chia, William

    2010-02-23

    Drosophila body wall muscles are multinucleated syncytia formed by successive fusions between a founder myoblast and several fusion competent myoblasts. Initial fusion gives rise to a bi/trinucleate precursor followed by more fusion cycles forming a mature muscle. This process requires the functions of various molecules including the transmembrane myoblast attractants Dumbfounded (Duf) and its paralogue Roughest (Rst), a scaffold protein Rolling pebbles (Rols) and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor Loner. Fusion completely fails in a duf, rst mutant, and is blocked at the bi/trinucleate stage in rols and loner single mutants. We analysed the transmembrane and intracellular domains of Duf, by mutating conserved putative signaling sites and serially deleting the intracellular domain. These were tested for their ability to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner and to rescue the fusion defect in duf, rst mutant embryos. Studying combinations of double mutants, further tested the function of Rols, Loner and other fusion molecules. Here we show that serial truncations of the Duf intracellular domain successively compromise its function to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner in addition to affecting myoblast fusion efficiency in embryos. Putative phosphorylation sites function additively while the extreme C terminus including a PDZ binding domain is dispensable for its function. We also show that fusion is completely blocked in a rols, loner double mutant and is compromised in other double mutants. These results suggest an additive function of the intracellular domain of Duf and an early function of Rols and Loner which is independent of Duf.

  2. The Intracellular Domain of Dumbfounded Affects Myoblast Fusion Efficiency and Interacts with Rolling Pebbles and Loner

    PubMed Central

    Bulchand, Sarada; Menon, Sree Devi; George, Simi Elizabeth; Chia, William

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila body wall muscles are multinucleated syncytia formed by successive fusions between a founder myoblast and several fusion competent myoblasts. Initial fusion gives rise to a bi/trinucleate precursor followed by more fusion cycles forming a mature muscle. This process requires the functions of various molecules including the transmembrane myoblast attractants Dumbfounded (Duf) and its paralogue Roughest (Rst), a scaffold protein Rolling pebbles (Rols) and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor Loner. Fusion completely fails in a duf, rst mutant, and is blocked at the bi/trinucleate stage in rols and loner single mutants. We analysed the transmembrane and intracellular domains of Duf, by mutating conserved putative signaling sites and serially deleting the intracellular domain. These were tested for their ability to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner and to rescue the fusion defect in duf, rst mutant embryos. Studying combinations of double mutants, further tested the function of Rols, Loner and other fusion molecules. Here we show that serial truncations of the Duf intracellular domain successively compromise its function to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner in addition to affecting myoblast fusion efficiency in embryos. Putative phosphorylation sites function additively while the extreme C terminus including a PDZ binding domain is dispensable for its function. We also show that fusion is completely blocked in a rols, loner double mutant and is compromised in other double mutants. These results suggest an additive function of the intracellular domain of Duf and an early function of Rols and Loner which is independent of Duf. PMID:20186342

  3. Substrate stiffness affects skeletal myoblast differentiation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanazzo, Sara; Forte, Giancarlo; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Uto, Koichiro; Pagliari, Stefania; Aoyagi, Takao; Traversa, Enrico; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

    2012-12-01

    To maximize the therapeutic efficacy of cardiac muscle constructs produced by stem cells and tissue engineering protocols, suitable scaffolds should be designed to recapitulate all the characteristics of native muscle and mimic the microenvironment encountered by cells in vivo. Moreover, so not to interfere with cardiac contractility, the scaffold should be deformable enough to withstand muscle contraction. Recently, it was suggested that the mechanical properties of scaffolds can interfere with stem/progenitor cell functions, and thus careful consideration is required when choosing polymers for targeted applications. In this study, cross-linked poly-ɛ-caprolactone membranes having similar chemical composition and controlled stiffness in a supra-physiological range were challenged with two sources of myoblasts to evaluate the suitability of substrates with different stiffness for cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, muscle-specific and non-related feeder layers were prepared on stiff surfaces to reveal the contribution of biological and mechanical cues to skeletal muscle progenitor differentiation. We demonstrated that substrate stiffness does affect myogenic differentiation, meaning that softer substrates can promote differentiation and that a muscle-specific feeder layer can improve the degree of maturation in skeletal muscle stem cells.

  4. Thermal manipulation during embryogenesis affects myoblast proliferation and skeletal muscle growth in meat-type chickens.

    PubMed

    Piestun, Yogev; Yahav, Shlomo; Halevy, Orna

    2015-10-01

    Thermal manipulation (TM) of 39.5°C applied during mid-embryogenesis (embryonic d 7 to 16) has been proven to promote muscle development and enhance muscle growth and meat production in meat-type chickens. This study aimed to elucidate the cellular basis for this effect. Continuous TM or intermittent TM (for 12 h/d) increased myoblast proliferation manifested by higher (25 to 48%) myoblast number in the pectoral muscles during embryonic development but also during the first week posthatch. Proliferation ability of the pectoral-muscle-derived myoblasts in vitro was significantly higher in the TM treatments until embryonic d 15 (intermittent TM) or 13 (continuous TM) compared to that of controls, suggesting increased myogenic progeny reservoir in the muscle. However, the proliferation ability of myoblasts was lower in the TM treatments vs. control during the last days of incubation. This coincided with higher levels of myogenin expression in the muscle, indicating enhanced cell differentiation in the TM muscle. A similar pattern was observed posthatch: Myoblast proliferation was significantly higher in the TM chicks relative to controls during the peak of posthatch cell proliferation until d 6, followed by lower cell number 2 wk posthatch as myoblast number sharply decreases. Higher myogenin expression was observed in the TM chicks on d 6. This resulted in increased muscle growth, manifested by significantly higher relative weight of breast muscle in the embryo and posthatch. It can be concluded that temperature elevation during mid-term embryogenesis promotes myoblast proliferation, thus increasing myogenic progeny reservoir in the muscle, resulting in enhanced muscle growth in the embryo and posthatch. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  5. Drosophila rolling pebbles colocalises and putatively interacts with alpha-Actinin and the Sls isoform Zormin in the Z-discs of the sarcomere and with Dumbfounded/Kirre, alpha-Actinin and Zormin in the terminal Z-discs.

    PubMed

    Kreisköther, Nina; Reichert, Nina; Buttgereit, Detlev; Hertenstein, Alexander; Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2006-01-01

    The rolling pebbles gene of Drosophila encodes two proteins, one of which, Rols7, is essential for myoblast fusion. In addition, Rols 7 is expressed during myofibrillogenesis and in the mature muscles. Here it overlaps with alpha-Actinin (alpha-Actn) and the N-terminus of D-Titin/Kettin/Zormin in the Z-line of the sarcomeres. In the attachment sites of the somatic muscles, Rols7 and the immunoglobulin superfamily protein Dumbfounded/Kin of irreC (Duf/Kirre) colocalise. As Duf/Kirre is detectable only transiently, it may be involved in establishing the first contact of the outgrowing muscle fiber to the epidermal attachment site. We propose that Rols7 and Duf/Kirre link the terminal Z-disc to the cell membrane by direct interaction. This is supported by the fact that in yeast two hybrid assays the tetratricopeptide repeat E (TPR E) of Rols7 shows interaction with the intracellular domain of Duf/Kirre. The colocalisation of Rols7 with alpha-Actn and with D-Titin/Kettin/Zormin in the Z-dics is reflected in interactions with different domains of Rols7 in this assay. In summary, these data show that besides the role in myoblast fusion, Rols7 is a scaffold protein during myofibrillogenesis and in the Z-line of the sarcomere as well as in the terminal Z-disc linking the muscle to the epidermal attachment sites.

  6. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  7. A positive feedback loop between Dumbfounded and Rolling pebbles leads to myotube enlargement in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Sree Devi; Osman, Zalina; Chenchill, Kho; Chia, William

    2005-01-01

    In Drosophila, myoblasts are subdivided into founders and fusion-competent myoblasts (fcm) with myotubes forming through fusion of one founder and several fcm. Duf and rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7; also known as antisocial) are expressed in founders, whereas sticks and stones (SNS) is present in fcm. Duf attracts fcm toward founders and also causes translocation of Rols7 from the cytoplasm to the fusion site. We show that Duf is a type 1 transmembrane protein that induces Rols7 translocation specifically when present intact and engaged in homophilic or Duf–SNS adhesion. Although its membrane-anchored extracellular domain functions as an attractant and is sufficient for the initial round of fusion, subsequent fusions require replenishment of Duf through cotranslocation with Rols7 tetratricopeptide repeat/coiled-coil domain-containing vesicles to the founder/myotube surface, causing both Duf and Rols7 to be at fusion sites between founders/myotubes and fcm. This implicates the Duf–Rols7 positive feedback loop to the occurrence of fusion at specific sites along the membrane and provides a mechanism by which the rate of fusion is controlled. PMID:15955848

  8. G-protein coupled receptor BAI3 promotes myoblast fusion in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hamoud, Noumeira; Tran, Viviane; Croteau, Louis-Philippe; Kania, Artur; Côté, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Muscle fibers form as a result of myoblast fusion, yet the cell surface receptors regulating this process are unknown in vertebrates. In Drosophila, myoblast fusion involves the activation of the Rac pathway by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Myoblast City and its scaffolding protein ELMO, downstream of cell-surface cell-adhesion receptors. We previously showed that the mammalian ortholog of Myoblast City, DOCK1, functions in an evolutionarily conserved manner to promote myoblast fusion in mice. In search for regulators of myoblast fusion, we identified the G-protein coupled receptor brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor (BAI3) as a cell surface protein that interacts with ELMO. In cultured cells, BAI3 or ELMO1/2 loss of function severely impaired myoblast fusion without affecting differentiation and cannot be rescued by reexpression of BAI3 mutants deficient in ELMO binding. The related BAI protein family member, BAI1, is functionally distinct from BAI3, because it cannot rescue the myoblast fusion defects caused by the loss of BAI3 function. Finally, embryonic muscle precursor expression of a BAI3 mutant unable to bind ELMO was sufficient to block myoblast fusion in vivo. Collectively, our findings provide a role for BAI3 in the relay of extracellular fusion signals to their intracellular effectors, identifying it as an essential transmembrane protein for embryonic vertebrate myoblast fusion. PMID:24567399

  9. Decreased proliferation kinetics of mouse myoblasts overexpressing FRG1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Steven C; Frett, Ellie; Marx, Joseph; Bosnakovski, Darko; Reed, Xylena; Kyba, Michael; Kennedy, Brian K

    2011-01-01

    Although recent publications have linked the molecular events driving facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) to expression of the double homeobox transcription factor DUX4, overexpression of FRG1 has been proposed as one alternative causal agent as mice overexpressing FRG1 present with muscular dystrophy. Here, we characterize proliferative defects in two independent myoblast lines overexpressing FRG1. Myoblasts isolated from thigh muscle of FRG1 transgenic mice, an affected dystrophic muscle, exhibit delayed proliferation as measured by decreased clone size, whereas myoblasts isolated from the unaffected diaphragm muscle proliferated normally. To confirm the observation that overexpression of FRG1 could impair myoblast proliferation, we examined C2C12 myoblasts with inducible overexpression of FRG1, finding increased doubling time and G1-phase cells in mass culture after induction of FRG1 and decreased levels of pRb phosphorylation. We propose that depressed myoblast proliferation may contribute to the pathology of mice overexpressing FRG1 and may play a part in FSHD.

  10. Skeletal myoblasts for cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Durrani, Shazia; Konoplyannikov, Mikhail; Ashraf, Muhammad; Haider, Khawaja Husnain

    2010-11-01

    Stem cells provide an alternative curative intervention for the infarcted heart by compensating for the cardiomyocyte loss subsequent to myocardial injury. The presence of resident stem and progenitor cell populations in the heart, and nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells with genetic induction of pluripotency markers are the emerging new developments in stem cell-based regenerative medicine. However, until safety and feasibility of these cells are established by extensive experimentation in in vitro and in vivo experimental models, skeletal muscle-derived myoblasts, and bone marrow cells remain the most well-studied donor cell types for myocardial regeneration and repair. This article provides a critical review of skeletal myoblasts as donor cells for transplantation in the light of published experimental and clinical data, and indepth discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of skeletal myoblast-based therapeutic intervention for augmentation of myocardial function in the infarcted heart. Furthermore, strategies to overcome the problems of arrhythmogenicity and failure of the transplanted skeletal myoblasts to integrate with the host cardiomyocytes are discussed.

  11. The brain expressed x-linked gene 1 (Bex1) regulates myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Feng; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle development (myogenesis) is a complex but precisely orchestrated process involving spatiotemporal regulation of the proliferation, differentiation and fusion of myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts). Here we identify brain expressed x-linked gene 1 (Bex1) as a transient, developmentally regulated gene involved in myoblast fusion. Bex1 expression is undetectable in adult muscles or in quiescent muscle stem cells (satellite cells). During embryonic myogenesis, however, Bex1 is robustly expressed by myogenin+ differentiating myoblasts, but not by Pax7+ proliferating myoblasts. Interestingly, Bex1 is initially localized in the cytoplasm and then translocates into the nucleus. During adult muscle regeneration, Bex1 is highly expressed in newly regenerated myofibers and the expression is rapidly downregulated during maturation. Consistently, in cultured myoblasts, Bex1 is not expressed at the proliferation stage but transiently expressed upon induction of myogenic differentiation, following a similar cytoplasm to nucleus translocation pattern as seen in vivo. Using gain- and loss-of-function studies, we found that overexpression of Bex1 promotes the fusion of primary myoblasts without affecting myogenic differentiation and myogenin expression. Conversely, Bex1 knockout myoblasts exhibit obvious fusion defects, even though they express normal levels of myogenin and differentiate normally. These results elucidate a novel role of Bex1 in myogenesis through regulating myoblast fusion. PMID:26586200

  12. Signaling Mechanisms in Mammalian Myoblast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hindi, Sajedah M.; Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is a critical process that contributes to the growth of muscle during development and to the regeneration of myofibers upon injury. Myoblasts fuse with each other as well as with multinucleated myotubes to enlarge the myofiber. Initial studies demonstrated that myoblast fusion requires extracellular calcium and changes in cell membrane topography and cytoskeletal organization. More recent studies have identified several cell-surface and intracellular proteins that mediate myoblast fusion. Furthermore, emerging evidence suggests that myoblast fusion is also regulated by the activation of specific cell-signaling pathways that lead to the expression of genes whose products are essential for the fusion process and for modulating the activity of molecules that are involved in cytoskeletal rearrangement. Here, we review the roles of the major signaling pathways in mammalian myoblast fusion. PMID:23612709

  13. Signaling mechanisms in mammalian myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Sajedah M; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-04-23

    Myoblast fusion is a critical process that contributes to the growth of muscle during development and to the regeneration of myofibers upon injury. Myoblasts fuse with each other as well as with multinucleated myotubes to enlarge the myofiber. Initial studies demonstrated that myoblast fusion requires extracellular calcium and changes in cell membrane topography and cytoskeletal organization. More recent studies have identified several cell-surface and intracellular proteins that mediate myoblast fusion. Furthermore, emerging evidence suggests that myoblast fusion is also regulated by the activation of specific cell-signaling pathways that lead to the expression of genes whose products are essential for the fusion process and for modulating the activity of molecules that are involved in cytoskeletal rearrangement. Here, we review the roles of the major signaling pathways in mammalian myoblast fusion.

  14. Palmdelphin promotes myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yaping; Chen, Hu; Guo, Cilin; Yuan, Zhuning; Zhou, Xingyu; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xumeng; Mo, Delin; Chen, Yaosheng

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation of myoblasts is essential in the development and regeneration of skeletal muscles to form multinucleated, contractile muscle fibers. However, the process of myoblast differentiation in mammals is complicated and requires to be further investigated. In this study, we found Palmdelphin (Palmd), a cytosolic protein, promotes myoblast differentiation. Palmd is predominantly expressed in the cytosol of myoblasts and is gradually up-regulated after differentiation. Knockdown of Palmd by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in C2C12 markedly inhibits myogenic differentiation, suggesting a specific role of Palmd in the morphological changes of myoblast differentiation program. Overexpression of Palmd in C2C12 enhances myogenic differentiation. Remarkably, inhibition of Palmd results in impaired myotube formation during muscle regeneration after injury. These findings reveal a new cytosolic protein that promotes mammalian myoblast differentiation and provide new insights into the molecular regulation of muscle formation. PMID:28148961

  15. Myoblast replication is reduced in the IUGR fetus despite maintained proliferative capacity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Soto, Susan M; Blake, Amy C; Wesolowski, Stephanie R; Rozance, Paul J; Barthel, Kristen B; Gao, Bifeng; Hetrick, Byron; McCurdy, Carrie E; Garza, Natalia G; Hay, William W; Leinwand, Leslie A; Friedman, Jacob E; Brown, Laura D

    2017-03-01

    Adults who were affected by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) suffer from reductions in muscle mass and insulin resistance, suggesting muscle growth may be restricted by molecular events that occur during fetal development. To explore the basis of restricted fetal muscle growth, we used a sheep model of progressive placental insufficiency-induced IUGR to assess myoblast proliferation within intact skeletal muscle in vivo and isolated myoblasts stimulated with insulin in vitro Gastrocnemius and soleus muscle weights were reduced by 25% in IUGR fetuses compared to those in controls (CON). The ratio of PAX7+ nuclei (a marker of myoblasts) to total nuclei was maintained in IUGR muscle compared to CON, but the fraction of PAX7+ myoblasts that also expressed Ki-67 (a marker of cellular proliferation) was reduced by 23%. Despite reduced proliferation in vivo, fetal myoblasts isolated from IUGR biceps femoris and cultured in enriched media in vitro responded robustly to insulin in a dose- and time-dependent manner to increase proliferation. Similarly, insulin stimulation of IUGR myoblasts upregulated key cell cycle genes and DNA replication. There were no differences in the expression of myogenic regulatory transcription factors that drive commitment to muscle differentiation between CON and IUGR groups. These results demonstrate that the molecular machinery necessary for transcriptional control of proliferation remains intact in IUGR fetal myoblasts, indicating that in vivo factors such as reduced insulin and IGF1, hypoxia and/or elevated counter-regulatory hormones may be inhibiting muscle growth in IUGR fetuses. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Engineering skeletal myoblasts: roles of three-dimensional culture and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pedrotty, Dawn M; Koh, Jennifer; Davis, Bryce H; Taylor, Doris A; Wolf, Patrick; Niklason, Laura E

    2005-04-01

    Immature skeletal muscle cells, or myoblasts, have been used in cellular cardiomyoplasty in attempts to regenerate cardiac muscle tissue by injection of cells into damaged myocardium. In some studies, muscle tissue within myoblast implant sites may be morphologically similar to cardiac muscle. We hypothesized that identifiable aspects of the cardiac milieu may contribute to growth and development of implanted myoblasts in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we designed a novel in vitro system to mimic some aspects of the electrical and biochemical environment of native myocardium. This system enabled us to separate the three-dimensional (3-D) electrical and biochemical signals that may be involved in myoblast proliferation and plasticity. Myoblasts were grown on 3-D polyglycolic acid mesh scaffolds under control conditions, in the presence of cardiac-like electrical current fluxes, or in the presence of culture medium that had been conditioned by mature cardiomyocytes. Cardiac-like electrical current fluxes caused increased myoblast number in 3-D culture, as determined by DNA assay. The increase in cell number was due to increased cellular proliferation and not differences in apoptosis, as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling. Cardiomyocyte-conditioned medium also significantly increased myoblast proliferation. Expression of transcription factors governing differentiation along skeletal or cardiac lineages was evaluated by immunoblotting. Although these assays are qualitative, no changes in differentiation state along skeletal or cardiac lineages were observed in response to electrical current fluxes. Furthermore, from these experiments, conditioned medium did not appear to alter the differentiation state of skeletal myoblasts. Hence, cardiac milieu appears to stimulate proliferation but does not affect differentiation of skeletal myoblasts.

  17. Determining the mechanical properties of plectin in mouse myoblasts and keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Navid; Schilling, Achim; Spörrer, Marina; Lennert, Pablo; Mainka, Astrid; Winter, Lilli; Walko, Gernot; Wiche, Gerhard; Fabry, Ben; Goldmann, Wolfgang H

    2015-02-15

    Plectin is the prototype of an intermediate filament (IF)-based cytolinker protein. It affects cells mechanically by interlinking and anchoring cytoskeletal filaments and acts as scaffolding and docking platform for signaling proteins to control cytoskeleton dynamics. The most common disease caused by mutations in the human plectin gene, epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), is characterized by severe skin blistering and progressive muscular dystrophy. Therefore, we compared the biomechanical properties and the response to mechanical stress of murine plectin-deficient myoblasts and keratinocytes with wild-type cells. Using a cell stretching device, plectin-deficient myoblasts exhibited lower mechanical vulnerability upon external stress compared to wild-type cells, which we attributed to lower cellular pre-stress. Contrary to myoblasts, wild-type and plectin-deficient keratinocytes showed no significant differences. In magnetic tweezer measurements using fibronectin-coated paramagnetic beads, the stiffness of keratinocytes was higher than of myoblasts. Interestingly, cell stiffness, adhesion strength, and cytoskeletal dynamics were strikingly altered in plectin-deficient compared to wild-type myoblasts, whereas smaller differences were observed between plectin-deficient and wild-type keratinocytes, indicating that plectin might be more important for stabilizing cytoskeletal structures in myoblasts than in keratinocytes. Traction forces strongly correlated with the stiffness of plectin-deficient and wild-type myoblasts and keratinocytes. Contrary to that cell motility was comparable in plectin-deficient and wild-type myoblasts, but was significantly increased in plectin-deficient compared to wild-type keratinocytes. Thus, we postulate that the lack of plectin has divergent implications on biomechanical properties depending on the respective cell type. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunological studies of the embryonic muscle cell surface. Antiserum to the prefusion myoblast

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Xenogeneic antisera raised in rabbits have been used to detect compositional changes at the cell surfaces of differentiating embryonic chick skeletal muscle. In this report, we present the serological characterization of antiserum (Anti-M-24) against muscle tissue and developmental stage-specific cell surface antigens of the prefusion myoblast. Cells from primary cultures of 12-d-old embryonic chick hindlimb muscle were injected into rabbits, and the resulting antisera were selectively absorbed to obtain immunological specificity. Cytotoxicity and immunohistochemical assays were used to test this antiserum. Absorption with embryonic or adult chick heart, brain, retina, liver, erythrocytes, or skeletal muscle fibroblasts failed to remove all reactivity of Anti-M-24 for myogenic cells at all stages of development. After absorption with embryonic myotubes, however, Anti-M- 24 no longer reacted with differentiated myofibers, but did react with prefusion myoblasts. The myoblast surface antigens detected with Anti-M- 24 are components of the muscle cell membrane: (a) these macromolecules are free to diffuse laterally within the myoblast membrane; (b) Anti-M- 24, in the presence of complement, induced lysis of the muscle cell membrane; and (c) intact monolayers of viable myoblasts completely absorbed reactivity of Anti-M-24 for myoblasts. These antigens are not loosely adsorbed culture medium components or an artifact of tissue culture because: (a) absorption of Anti-M-24 with homogenized embryonic muscle removed all antibodies to cultured myoblasts; (b) Anti-M-24 reacted with myoblast surfaces in vivo; and (c) absorption of Anti-M-24 with culture media did not affect the titer of this antiserum for myoblasts. We conclude that myogenic cells at all stages of development possess externally exposed antigens which are undetected on other embryonic and adult chick tissues. In addition, myoblasts exhibit surface antigenic determinants that are either masked, absent, or present

  19. Myoblast fusion: lessons from flies and mice

    PubMed Central

    Abmayr, Susan M.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2012-01-01

    The fusion of myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia plays a fundamental role in muscle function, as it supports the formation of extended sarcomeric arrays, or myofibrils, within a large volume of cytoplasm. Principles learned from the study of myoblast fusion not only enhance our understanding of myogenesis, but also contribute to our perspectives on membrane fusion and cell-cell fusion in a wide array of model organisms and experimental systems. Recent studies have advanced our views of the cell biological processes and crucial proteins that drive myoblast fusion. Here, we provide an overview of myoblast fusion in three model systems that have contributed much to our understanding of these events: the Drosophila embryo; developing and regenerating mouse muscle; and cultured rodent muscle cells. PMID:22274696

  20. Ultrastructural Analysis of Myoblast Fusion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiliang; Chen, Elizabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Myoblast fusion in Drosophila has become a powerful genetic system with which to unravel the mechanisms underlying cell fusion. The identification of important components of myoblast fusion by genetic analysis has led to a molecular pathway toward our understanding of this cellular process. In addition to the application of immunohistochemistry and live imaging techniques to visualize myoblast fusion at the light microscopic level, ultrastructural analysis using electron microscopy remains an indispensable tool to reveal fusion intermediates and specific membrane events at sites of fusion. In this chapter, we describe conventional chemical fixation and high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution methods for visualizing fusion intermediates during Drosophila myoblast fusion. Furthermore, we describe an immunoelectron microscopic method for localizing specific proteins relative to the fusion apparatus. PMID:18979250

  1. Successful myoblast transplantation in rat tongue reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Luxameechanporn, Thongchai; Hadlock, Tessa; Shyu, Jeffrey; Cowan, Douglas; Faquin, William; Varvares, Mark

    2006-06-01

    Controversy exists regarding the success of myoblast transplantation. The purpose of this study was to determine the survival of transplanted myoblasts in a rat tongue reconstruction model by using fluorescently labeled myoblasts and surgical stains to mark the location of the pocket into which transplanted cells were delivered. We evaluated tongue histology after myoblast transplantation under the hypothesis that myoblast transplantation will promote muscle regeneration and result in minimal scar tissue formation. Sterile solutions of 1:10 India ink, 1% methylene blue, and 1% crystal violet were applied to the inner lining of a left-sided mucosa-sparing hemiglossectomy pocket. After air-drying, the hemiglossectomy defect was filled with collagen gel and closed. The tongues were evaluated histologically at 6 weeks. Next, myoblasts were cultured and labeled with three commercially available fluorescent dyes, 5-chloromethyl-fluorescein diacetate (CMFDA), chloromethylbenzamido (CM-DiI), and fluorescently labeled microspheres (FLMs), to determine which would optimally label myoblasts in a tongue reconstruction model. Next, Lewis rats underwent left hemiglossectomy, and the created pockets were coated with 1:10 India ink. Control animals received collagen gel alone, whereas experimental animals received labeled myoblast/collagen constructs into the tongue defect. Tongues were harvested at intervals to determine the presence of labeled fluorescent cells, the relative numbers of viable myoblasts, and the degree of scarring. India ink coating of the hemiglossectomy pocket caused minimal inflammation and lasted longer than the other tested dyes. CMFDA and FLMs both successfully label myoblasts for transplantation. In vivo, donor cells were observed in all specimens at week 0 with increasing numbers of cells and muscle formation, determined by desmin immunofluorescence, after 6 weeks. There was less scar tissue contracture in the experimental group and a significant increase

  2. Functional KCa1.1 channels are crucial for regulating the proliferation, migration and differentiation of human primary skeletal myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Tajhya, Rajeev B; Hu, Xueyou; Tanner, Mark R; Huq, Redwan; Kongchan, Natee; Neilson, Joel R; Rodney, George G; Horrigan, Frank T; Timchenko, Lubov T; Beeton, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Myoblasts are mononucleated precursors of myofibers; they persist in mature skeletal muscles for growth and regeneration post injury. During myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a complex autosomal-dominant neuromuscular disease, the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts into functional myotubes is impaired, resulting in muscle wasting and weakness. The mechanisms leading to this altered differentiation are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the calcium- and voltage-dependent potassium channel, KCa1.1 (BK, Slo1, KCNMA1), regulates myoblast proliferation, migration, and fusion. We also show a loss of plasma membrane expression of the pore-forming α subunit of KCa1.1 in DM1 myoblasts. Inhibiting the function of KCa1.1 in healthy myoblasts induced an increase in cytosolic calcium levels and altered nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) levels without affecting cell survival. In these normal cells, KCa1.1 block resulted in enhanced proliferation and decreased matrix metalloproteinase secretion, migration, and myotube fusion, phenotypes all observed in DM1 myoblasts and associated with disease pathogenesis. In contrast, introducing functional KCa1.1 α-subunits into DM1 myoblasts normalized their proliferation and rescued expression of the late myogenic marker Mef2. Our results identify KCa1.1 channels as crucial regulators of skeletal myogenesis and suggest these channels as novel therapeutic targets in DM1. PMID:27763639

  3. Overexpression of calpastatin inhibits L8 myoblast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnoy, Sivia; E-mail: sivia@post.tau.ac.il; Maki, Masatoshi; Kosower, Nechama S.

    2005-07-08

    The formation of skeletal muscle fibers involves cessation of myoblast division, myoblast alignment, and fusion to multinucleated myofibers. Calpain is one of the factors shown to be involved in myoblast fusion. Using L8 rat myoblasts, we found that calpain levels did not change significantly during myoblast differentiation, whereas calpastatin diminished prior to myoblast fusion and reappeared after fusion. The transient diminution in calpastatin allows the Ca{sup 2+}-promoted activation of calpain and calpain-induced membrane proteolysis, which is required for myoblast fusion. Here we show that calpastatin overexpression in L8 myoblasts does not inhibit cell proliferation and alignment, but prevents myoblast fusion and fusion-associated protein degradation. In addition, calpastatin appears to modulate myogenic gene expression, as indicated by the lack of myogenin (a transcription factor expressed in differentiating myoblasts) in myoblasts overexpressing calpastatin. These results suggest that, in addition to the role in membrane disorganization in the fusing myoblasts, the calpain-calpastatin system may also modulate the levels of factors required for myoblast differentiation.

  4. AAV-2-mediated expression of IGF-1 in skeletal myoblasts stimulates angiogenesis and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Indira V; Fernandes, Brian C A; Robinson, Timothy; Koening, Jennifer; Lapara, Kelly S; Ramakrishnan, S

    2009-03-01

    The transplantation of skeletal myoblasts is being tested in various organ systems to facilitate tissue repair and regeneration. Previous studies have indicated that transplanted cells for varied reasons were not surviving in sufficient numbers following transplantation, thus negatively affecting overall therapeutic efficacy of the approach. We hypothesize that the genetic modification of myoblasts to express insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) locally may enhance the survival of transplanted cells by stimulating neo-vascularization, decreasing apoptosis, and promoting cell proliferation. Using an adeno-associated virus (adeno-associated virus type 2) vector system, the IGF-1 gene was introduced into canine skeletal myoblasts. As a negative control, myoblasts transduced with the green fluorescence protein (GFP) was used. Relative angiogenic response induced by IGF-1 myoblast was compared to VEGF165-induced neo-vascularization using Matrigel plugs under similar conditions. In vitro evaluation and characterization revealed that the secreted IGF-1 protein was biologically and functionally active in promoting endothelial cell proliferation, migration and assembly into vessel-like structures. Matrigel plugs containing the three test groups were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice (n = 5). After 3 weeks, analysis of explanted samples revealed an enhanced neo-vascularization with an average microvessel density per field for IGF-1 at 55.9 versus 33.4 for vascular endothelial growth factor and 24 for GFP. Additionally, apoptosis was significantly reduced (p myoblasts. We conclude that the genetic modification of skeletal myoblasts with the IGF-1 gene offers a potential means for enhanced cell survival following transplantation.

  5. Proliferation of Human Primary Myoblasts Is Associated with Altered Energy Metabolism in Dependence on Ageing In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Piirsoo, Andres; Peet, Nadežda; Laada, Liidia; Kadaja, Lumme; Roosimaa, Mart; Märtson, Aare; Seppet, Enn; Paju, Kalju

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ageing is associated with suppressed regenerative potential of muscle precursor cells due to decrease of satellite cells and suppressive intramuscular milieu on their activation, associated with ageing-related low-grade inflammation. The aim of the study was to characterize the function of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), glycolysis, adenylate kinase (AK), and creatine kinase (CK) mediated systems in young and older individuals. Materials and Methods. Myoblasts were cultivated from biopsies taken by transcutaneous conchotomy from vastus lateralis muscle in young (20–29 yrs, n = 7) and older (70–79 yrs, n = 7) subjects. Energy metabolism was assessed in passages 2 to 6 by oxygraphy and enzyme analysis. Results. In myoblasts of young and older subjects the rate of OXPHOS decreased during proliferation from passages 2 to 6. The total activities of CK and AK decreased. Myoblasts of passage 2 cultivated from young muscle showed higher rate of OXPHOS and activities of CK and AK compared to myoblasts from older subjects while hexokinase and pyruvate kinase were not affected by ageing. Conclusions. Proliferation of myoblasts in vitro is associated with downregulation of OXPHOS and energy storage and transfer systems. Ageing in vivo exerts an impact on satellite cells which results in altered metabolic profile in favour of the prevalence of glycolytic pathways over mitochondrial OXPHOS of myoblasts. PMID:26881042

  6. Beta-carotene preferentially regulates chicken myoblast proliferation withdrawal and differentiation commitment via BCO1 activity and retinoic acid production.

    PubMed

    Praud, C; Al Ahmadieh, S; Voldoire, E; Le Vern, Y; Godet, E; Couroussé, N; Graulet, B; Le Bihan Duval, E; Berri, C; Duclos, M J

    2017-09-15

    The enzyme β-carotene oxygenase 1 (BCO1) catalyzes the breakdown of provitamin A, including beta-carotene (BC), into retinal, prior to its oxidation into retinoic acid (RA). Allelic variation at the BCO1 locus results in differential expression of its mRNA and affects carotenoid metabolism specifically in chicken Pectoralis major muscle. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the potential myogenic effect of BC and the underlying mechanisms in chicken myoblasts. BCO1 mRNA was detected in myoblasts derived from chicken satellite cells. Treating these myoblasts with BC led to a significant decrease in BrdU incorporation. This anti-proliferative effect was confirmed by a cell cycle study using flow cytometry. BC also significantly increased the differentiation index, suggesting a positive effect on the commitment of avian myoblasts to myogenic differentiation. Addition of DEAB, a specific inhibitor of RALDH activity, significantly reduced BC anti-proliferative and pro-differentiating effects, suggesting that BC exerted its biological effect on chicken myoblasts through activation of the RA pathway. We also observed that in myoblast showing decreased BCO1 expression consecutive to a natural mutation or to a siRNA treatment, the response to BC was inhibited. Nevertheless, BCO1 siRNA transfection increased expression of BCO2 which inhibited cell proliferation in control and BC treated cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Ameliorates Antioxidant Defense Mechanisms and Improves Replicative Senescence-Associated Oxidative Stress in Human Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Abdul Karim, Norwahidah

    2017-01-01

    During aging, oxidative stress affects the normal function of satellite cells, with consequent regeneration defects that lead to sarcopenia. This study aimed to evaluate tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) modulation in reestablishing the oxidative status of myoblasts during replicative senescence and to compare the effects of TRF with other antioxidants (α-tocopherol (ATF) and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC)). Primary human myoblasts were cultured to young, presenescent, and senescent phases. The cells were treated with antioxidants for 24 h, followed by the assessment of free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme mRNA expression and activities, and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione. Our data showed that replicative senescence increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and lipid peroxidation in myoblasts. Treatment with TRF significantly diminished ROS production and decreased lipid peroxidation in senescent myoblasts. Moreover, the gene expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD2), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) was modulated by TRF treatment, with increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase and reduced glutathione peroxidase in senescent myoblasts. In comparison to ATF and NAC, TRF was more efficient in heightening the antioxidant capacity and reducing free radical insults. These results suggested that TRF is able to ameliorate antioxidant defense mechanisms and improves replicative senescence-associated oxidative stress in myoblasts. PMID:28243354

  8. Myoblast fusion: Experimental systems and cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schejter, Eyal D

    2016-12-01

    Fusion of myoblasts gives rise to the large, multi-nucleated muscle fibers that power and support organism motion and form. The mechanisms underlying this prominent form of cell-cell fusion have been investigated by a variety of experimental approaches, in several model systems. The purpose of this review is to describe and discuss recent progress in the field, as well as point out issues currently unresolved and worthy of further investigation. Following a description of several new experimental settings employed in the study of myoblast fusion, a series of topics relevant to the current understanding of the process are presented. These pertain to elements of three major cellular machineries- cell-adhesion, the actin-based cytoskeleton and membrane-associated elements- all of which play key roles in mediating myoblast fusion. Among the issues raised are the diversity of functions ascribed to different adhesion proteins (e.g. external cell apposition and internal recruitment of cytoskeleton regulators); functional significance of fusion-associated actin structures; and discussion of alternative mechanisms employing single or multiple fusion pore formation as the basis for muscle cell fusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Low Oxygen Tension Enhances Expression of Myogenic Genes When Human Myoblasts Are Activated from G0 Arrest.

    PubMed

    Sellathurai, Jeeva; Nielsen, Joachim; Hejbøl, Eva Kildall; Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2016-01-01

    Most cell culture studies have been performed at atmospheric oxygen tension of 21%, however the physiological oxygen tension is much lower and is a factor that may affect skeletal muscle myoblasts. In this study we have compared activation of G0 arrested myoblasts in 21% O2 and in 1% O2 in order to see how oxygen tension affects activation and proliferation of human myoblasts. Human myoblasts were isolated from skeletal muscle tissue and G0 arrested in vitro followed by reactivation at 21% O2 and 1% O2. The effect was assesses by Real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and western blot. We found an increase in proliferation rate of myoblasts when activated at a low oxygen tension (1% O2) compared to 21% O2. In addition, the gene expression studies showed up regulation of the myogenesis related genes PAX3, PAX7, MYOD, MYOG (myogenin), MET, NCAM, DES (desmin), MEF2A, MEF2C and CDH15 (M-cadherin), however, the fraction of DES and MYOD positive cells was not increased by low oxygen tension, indicating that 1% O2 may not have a functional effect on the myogenic response. Furthermore, the expression of genes involved in the TGFβ, Notch and Wnt signaling pathways were also up regulated in low oxygen tension. The differences in gene expression were most pronounced at day one after activation from G0-arrest, thus the initial activation of myoblasts seemed most sensitive to changes in oxygen tension. Protein expression of HES1 and β-catenin indicated that notch signaling may be induced in 21% O2, while the canonical Wnt signaling may be induced in 1% O2 during activation and proliferation of myoblasts.

  10. Low Oxygen Tension Enhances Expression of Myogenic Genes When Human Myoblasts Are Activated from G0 Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sellathurai, Jeeva; Nielsen, Joachim; Hejbøl, Eva Kildall; Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Most cell culture studies have been performed at atmospheric oxygen tension of 21%, however the physiological oxygen tension is much lower and is a factor that may affect skeletal muscle myoblasts. In this study we have compared activation of G0 arrested myoblasts in 21% O2 and in 1% O2 in order to see how oxygen tension affects activation and proliferation of human myoblasts. Materials and Methods Human myoblasts were isolated from skeletal muscle tissue and G0 arrested in vitro followed by reactivation at 21% O2 and 1% O2. The effect was assesses by Real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and western blot. Results and Conclusions We found an increase in proliferation rate of myoblasts when activated at a low oxygen tension (1% O2) compared to 21% O2. In addition, the gene expression studies showed up regulation of the myogenesis related genes PAX3, PAX7, MYOD, MYOG (myogenin), MET, NCAM, DES (desmin), MEF2A, MEF2C and CDH15 (M-cadherin), however, the fraction of DES and MYOD positive cells was not increased by low oxygen tension, indicating that 1% O2 may not have a functional effect on the myogenic response. Furthermore, the expression of genes involved in the TGFβ, Notch and Wnt signaling pathways were also up regulated in low oxygen tension. The differences in gene expression were most pronounced at day one after activation from G0-arrest, thus the initial activation of myoblasts seemed most sensitive to changes in oxygen tension. Protein expression of HES1 and β-catenin indicated that notch signaling may be induced in 21% O2, while the canonical Wnt signaling may be induced in 1% O2 during activation and proliferation of myoblasts. PMID:27442119

  11. Inhibition of myoblast differentiation by lack of zinc.

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, L; Chesters, J K; Franklin, M

    1991-01-01

    The impact of restricted zinc availability on myoblast differentiation was investigated. Lack of zinc prevented myoblast fusion and the increase in muscle-specific creatine kinase activity. The depression of activity of creatine kinase in the zinc-deficient cultures was accompanied by a similar decrease in the concentration of creatine kinase mRNA and was apparent even when fusion of the myoblasts was inhibited by cytochalasin B. Thus zinc appears to be necessary for the expression of creatine kinase during myoblast differentiation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2039464

  12. Distinct transcriptional networks in quiescent myoblasts: a role for Wnt signaling in reversible vs. irreversible arrest.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sindhu; Sreenivas, Prethish; Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Reddy, Vatrapu Rami; Shashidhara, Lingadahalli Subrahmanya; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Mylavarapu, Madhavi; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2014-01-01

    Most cells in adult mammals are non-dividing: differentiated cells exit the cell cycle permanently, but stem cells exist in a state of reversible arrest called quiescence. In damaged skeletal muscle, quiescent satellite stem cells re-enter the cell cycle, proliferate and subsequently execute divergent programs to regenerate both post-mitotic myofibers and quiescent stem cells. The molecular basis for these alternative programs of arrest is poorly understood. In this study, we used an established myogenic culture model (C2C12 myoblasts) to generate cells in alternative states of arrest and investigate their global transcriptional profiles. Using cDNA microarrays, we compared G0 myoblasts with post-mitotic myotubes. Our findings define the transcriptional program of quiescent myoblasts in culture and establish that distinct gene expression profiles, especially of tumour suppressor genes and inhibitors of differentiation characterize reversible arrest, distinguishing this state from irreversibly arrested myotubes. We also reveal the existence of a tissue-specific quiescence program by comparing G0 C2C12 myoblasts to isogenic G0 fibroblasts (10T1/2). Intriguingly, in myoblasts but not fibroblasts, quiescence is associated with a signature of Wnt pathway genes. We provide evidence that different levels of signaling via the canonical Wnt pathway characterize distinct cellular states (proliferation vs. quiescence vs. differentiation). Moderate induction of Wnt signaling in quiescence is associated with critical properties such as clonogenic self-renewal. Exogenous Wnt treatment subverts the quiescence program and negatively affects clonogenicity. Finally, we identify two new quiescence-induced regulators of canonical Wnt signaling, Rgs2 and Dkk3, whose induction in G0 is required for clonogenic self-renewal. These results support the concept that active signal-mediated regulation of quiescence contributes to stem cell properties, and have implications for pathological

  13. Mechanisms of myoblast fusion during muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Jin, Peng; Duan, Rui; Chen, Elizabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    The development and regeneration of skeletal muscles require the fusion of mononulceated muscle cells to form multinucleated, contractile muscle fibers. Studies using a simple genetic model, Drosophila melanogaster, have discovered many evolutionarily conserved fusion-promoting factors in vivo. Recent work in zebrafish and mouse also identified several vertebrate-specific factors required for myoblast fusion. Here, we integrate progress in multiple in vivo systems and highlight conceptual advance in understanding how muscle cell membranes are brought together for fusion. We focus on the molecular machinery at the fusogenic synapse and present a three-step model to describe the molecular and cellular events leading to fusion pore formation. PMID:25989064

  14. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    PubMed

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells.

  15. Systemic delivery of recombinant proteins by genetically modified myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, E.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1991-12-06

    The ability to stably deliver recombinant proteins to the systemic circulation would facilitate the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited diseases. To explore the feasibility of the use of genetically engineered myoblasts as a recombinant protein delivery system, stable transfectants of the murine C2C12 myoblast cell line were produced that synthesize and secrete high levels of human growth hormone (hGH) in vitro. Mice injected with hGH-transfected myoblasts had significant levels of hGH in both muscle and serum that were stable for at least 3 weeks after injection. Histological examination of muscles injected with {beta}-galactosidase-expressing C2C12 myoblasts demonstrated that many of the injected cells had fused to form multinucleated myotubes. Thus, genetically engineered myoblasts can be used for the stable delivery of recombinant proteins into the circulation.

  16. M & M's: Mechanosensitivity and Mechanotransduction in Myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    The effect of external mechanical stimulation of muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) during exercise is a crucial step in myogenesis. This effect takes place many hours later while muscles are in a resting state; however it remains unclear to what extent the role of force application has on the promotion of myogenesis. Here, we combine Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to directly measure the magnitude of generated cellular traction forces (CTFs) in myoblasts, as a result of controlled mechanical loading. Precise nanonewton forces (1 & 10 nN) were applied to live cells with the AFM tip while simultaneous TFM measurements were performed. The experiment was performed on substrates ranging in elastic moduli (E), (16-89 kPa) mimicking resting and active muscle tissue, respectively. The results of this analysis demonstrated that the magnitude of CTFs was dependent on substrate E, as expected. However, CTFs only increased in response to applied force (compared to controls) on substrates with E greater than 62 kPa. Our results suggest that muscle precursor cells are most sensitive to mechanical force when the surrounding muscle tissue is stiff and contracted, whereas myogenesis itself proceeds optimally on softer, resting tissue.

  17. Myomaker: A membrane activator of myoblast fusion and muscle formation

    PubMed Central

    Millay, Douglas P.; O’Rourke, Jason R.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Shelton, John M.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fusion of myoblasts is essential for the formation of multi-nucleated muscle fibers. However, the identity of myogenic proteins that directly govern this fusion process has remained elusive. Here, we discovered a muscle-specific membrane protein, named Myomaker, that controls myoblast fusion. Myomaker is expressed on the cell surface of myoblasts during fusion and is down-regulated thereafter. Over-expression of Myomaker in myoblasts dramatically enhances fusion and genetic disruption of Myomaker in mice causes perinatal death due to an absence of multi-nucleated muscle fibers. Remarkably, forced expression of Myomaker in fibroblasts promotes fusion with myoblasts, demonstrating the direct participation of this protein in the fusion process. Pharmacologic perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton abolishes the activity of Myomaker, consistent with prior studies implicating actin dynamics in myoblast fusion. These findings reveal a long-sought myogenic fusion protein both necessary and sufficient for mammalian myoblast fusion and provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of muscle formation. PMID:23868259

  18. A genomic approach to myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Beatriz; Michelson, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We have developed an integrated genetic, genomic and computational approach to identify and characterize genes involved in myoblast fusion in Drosophila. We first used fluorescence activated cell sorting to purify mesodermal cells both from wild-type embryos and from twelve variant genotypes in which muscle development is perturbed in known ways. Then, we obtained gene expression profiles for the purified cells by hybridizing isolated mesodermal RNA to Affymetrix GeneChip arrays. These data were subsequently compounded into a statistical meta-analysis that predicts myoblast subtype-specific gene expression signatures that were later validated by in situ hybridization experiments. Finally, we analyzed the myogenic functions of a subset of these myoblast genes using a double-stranded RNA interference assay in living embryos expressing green fluorescent protein under control of a muscle-specific promoter. This experimental strategy led to the identification of several previously uncharacterized genes required for myoblast fusion in Drosophila. PMID:18979251

  19. [Present and future of clinical application of myoblast].

    PubMed

    Liu, Libin; Zhou, Hongyu

    2007-07-01

    To introduce the current situation and future of myoblast transfer therapy (MTT) in clinical application. The latest fifteen-year literatures were extensively reviewed, concerning gene therapy for Duchenne's muscular dystrophy, Parkinson's disease, myelopathy, permanent facial paralysis, angiocardiopathy, injuries of bone, joint and muscle, hematopathy, and pituitary dwarf. In medical field, MTT is an ideal method to treat some common diseases. The problems were immunologic rejection and better carriers for myoblasts implantation. It is the focus on the use of myoblast as a vector to carry exogenous gene in some disease therapy. The major problems of MTT include transplantation immunity, cell fusion and target protein expression. It is easy to gain, culture and transfuse to the host for myoblasts, these merits are beneficial to clinical application.

  20. CaMKK2 Suppresses Muscle Regeneration through the Inhibition of Myoblast Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Cheng; Zhang, Duo; Zhao, Lei; Li, Yan; Yao, Xiaohan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Shengjie; Liu, Wei; Cao, Hongchao; Yu, Shuxian; Wang, Yucheng; Jiang, Jingjing; Wang, Hui; Li, Xihua; Ying, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a major role in locomotion and muscle disorders are associated with poor regenerative efficiency. Therefore, a deeper understanding of muscle regeneration is needed to provide a new insight for new therapies. CaMKK2 plays a role in the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase cascade; however, its role in skeletal muscle remains unknown. Here, we found that CaMKK2 expression levels were altered under physiological and pathological conditions including postnatal myogensis, freeze or cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Overexpression of CaMKK2 suppressed C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation, while inhibition of CaMKK2 had opposite effect. We also found that CaMKK2 is able to activate AMPK in C2C12 myocytes. Inhibition of AMPK could attenuate the effect of CaMKK2 overexpression, while AMPK agonist could abrogate the effect of CaMKK2 knockdown on C2C12 cell differentiation and proliferation. These results suggest that CaMKK2 functions as an AMPK kinase in muscle cells and AMPK mediates the effect of CaMKK2 on myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Our data also indicate that CaMKK2 might inhibit myoblast proliferation through AMPK-mediated cell cycle arrest by inducing cdc2-Tyr15 phosphorylation and repress differentiation through affecting PGC1α transcription. Lastly, we show that overexpressing CaMKK2 in the muscle of mice via electroporation impaired the muscle regeneration during freeze-induced injury, indicating that CaMKK2 could serve as a potential target to treat patients with muscle injury or myopathies. Together, our study reveals a new role for CaMKK2 as a negative regulator of myoblast differentiation and proliferation and sheds new light on the molecular regulation of muscle regeneration. PMID:27783047

  1. Reversal of Myoblast Aging by Tocotrienol Rich Fraction Posttreatment

    PubMed Central

    Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mouly, Vincent; Abdul Karim, Norwahidah

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are heavily involved in the regeneration of skeletal muscle in response to the aging-related deterioration of the skeletal muscle mass, strength, and regenerative capacity, termed as sarcopenia. This study focused on the effect of tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF) on regenerative capacity of myoblasts in stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). The myoblasts was grouped as young control, SIPS-induced, TRF control, TRF pretreatment, and TRF posttreatment. Optimum dose of TRF, morphological observation, activity of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-galactosidase), and cell proliferation were determined. 50 μg/mL TRF treatment exhibited the highest cell proliferation capacity. SIPS-induced myoblasts exhibit large flattened cells and prominent intermediate filaments (senescent-like morphology). The activity of SA-β-galactosidase was significantly increased, but the proliferation capacity was significantly reduced as compared to young control. The activity of SA-β-galactosidase was significantly reduced and cell proliferation was significantly increased in the posttreatment group whereas there was no significant difference in SA-β-galactosidase activity and proliferation capacity of pretreatment group as compared to SIPS-induced myoblasts. Based on the data, we hypothesized that TRF may reverse the myoblasts aging through replenishing the regenerative capacity of the cells. However, further investigation on the mechanism of TRF in reversing the myoblast aging is needed. PMID:24349615

  2. Ferlin proteins in myoblast fusion and muscle growth

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Avery D.; Demonbreun, Alexis; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    Myoblast fusion contributes to muscle growth in development and during regeneration of mature muscle. Myoblasts fuse to each other as well as to multinucleate myotubes to enlarge the myofiber. The molecular mechanisms of myoblast fusion are incompletely understood. Adhesion, apposition, and membrane fusion are accompanied by cytoskeletal rearrangements. The ferlin family of proteins is implicated in human muscle disease and has been implicated in fusion events in muscle, including myoblast fusion, vesicle trafficking and membrane repair. Dysferlin was the first mammalian ferlin identified and it is now know that there are six different ferlins. Loss of function mutations in the dysferlin gene lead to limb girdle muscular dystrophy and the milder disorder Miyoshi myopathy. Dysferlin is a membrane-associated protein that has been implicated in resealing disruptions in the muscle plasma membrane. Newer data supports a broader role for dysferlin in intracellular vesicular movement, a process also important for resealing. Myoferlin is highly expressed in myoblasts that undergoing fusion, and the absence of myoferlin leads to impaired myoblast fusion. Myoferlin also regulates intracellular trafficking events, including endocytic recycling, a process where internalized vesicles are returned to the plasma membrane. The trafficking role of ferlin proteins is reviewed herein with a specific focus as to how this machinery alters myogenesis and muscle growth. PMID:21621072

  3. Drosophila Kette coordinates myoblast junction dissolution and the ratio of Scar-to-WASp during myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hamp, Julia; Löwer, Andreas; Dottermusch-Heidel, Christine; Beck, Lothar; Moussian, Bernard; Flötenmeyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fusion of founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs) is crucial for muscle formation in Drosophila. Characteristic events of myoblast fusion include the recognition and adhesion of myoblasts, and the formation of branched F-actin by the Arp2/3 complex at the site of cell–cell contact. At the ultrastructural level, these events are reflected by the appearance of finger-like protrusions and electron-dense plaques that appear prior to fusion. Severe defects in myoblast fusion are caused by the loss of Kette (a homolog of Nap1 and Hem-2, also known as NCKAP1 and NCKAP1L, respectively), a member of the regulatory complex formed by Scar or WAVE proteins (represented by the single protein, Scar, in flies). kette mutants form finger-like protrusions, but the electron-dense plaques are extended. Here, we show that the electron-dense plaques in wild-type and kette mutant myoblasts resemble other electron-dense structures that are known to function as cellular junctions. Furthermore, analysis of double mutants and attempts to rescue the kette mutant phenotype with N-cadherin, wasp and genes of members of the regulatory Scar complex revealed that Kette has two functions during myoblast fusion. First, Kette controls the dissolution of electron-dense plaques. Second, Kette controls the ratio of the Arp2/3 activators Scar and WASp in FCMs. PMID:27521427

  4. Activation of an adipogenic program in adult myoblasts with age.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Jones, Jane M; McGehee, Robert E; Rando, Thomas A; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Lipschitz, David A; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2002-03-31

    Myoblasts isolated from mouse hindlimb skeletal muscle demonstrated increased adipogenic potential as a function of age. Whereas myoblasts from 8-month-old adult mice did not significantly accumulate terminal markers of adipogenesis regardless of culture conditions, myoblasts from 23-month-old mice accumulated fat and expressed genes characteristic of differentiated adipocytes, such as the fatty acid binding protein aP2. This change in differentiation potential was associated with a change in the abundance of the mRNA encoding the transcription factor C/EBPalpha, and in the relative abundance of PPARgamma2 to PPARgamma1 mRNAs. Furthermore, PPARgamma activity appeared to be regulated at the level of phosphorylation, being more highly phosphorylated in myoblasts isolated from younger animals. Although adipogenic gene expression in myoblasts from aged animals was activated, presumably in response to PPARgamma and C/EBPalpha, unexpectedly, myogenic gene expression was not effectively repressed. The Wnt signaling pathway may also alter differentiation potential in muscle with age. Wnt-10b mRNA was more abundantly expressed in muscle tissue and cultured myoblasts from adult compared with aged mice, resulting in stabilization of cytosolic beta-catenin, that may potentially contribute to inhibition of adipogenic gene expression in adult myoblasts. The changes reported here, together with those reported in bone marrow stroma with age, suggest that a default program may be activated in mesenchymal cells with increasing age resulting in a more adipogenic-like phenotype. Whether this change in differentiation potential contributes to the increased adiposity in muscle with age remains to be determined.

  5. Phosphatidylserine directly and positively regulates fusion of myoblasts into myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jaemin; Conboy, Irina M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} PS broadly and persistently trans-locates to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane during myoblast fusion into myotubes. {yields} Robust myotubes are formed when PS liposomes are added exogenously. {yields} PS increases the width of de novo myotubes and the numbers of myonuclei, but not the myotube length. {yields} Annexin V or PS antibody inhibits myotube formation by masking exposed PS. -- Abstract: Cell membrane consists of various lipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Among them, PS is a molecular marker of apoptosis, because it is located to the inner leaflet of plasma membrane generally but it is moved to the outer leaflet during programmed cell death. The process of apoptosis has been implicated in the fusion of muscle progenitor cells, myoblasts, into myotubes. However, it remained unclear whether PS regulates muscle cell differentiation directly. In this paper, localization of PS to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane in proliferating primary myoblasts and during fusion of these myoblasts into myotubes is validated using Annexin V. Moreover, we show the presence of PS clusters at the cell-cell contact points, suggesting the importance of membrane ruffling and PS exposure for the myogenic cell fusion. Confirming this conclusion, experimentally constructed PS, but not PC liposomes dramatically enhance the formation of myotubes from myoblasts, thus demonstrating a direct positive effect of PS on the muscle cell fusion. In contrast, myoblasts exposed to PC liposomes produce long myotubes with low numbers of myonuclei. Moreover, pharmacological masking of PS on the myoblast surface inhibits fusion of these cells into myotubes in a dose-dependent manner.

  6. Identification of singles bar as a direct transcriptional target of Drosophila Myocyte enhancer factor-2 and a regulator of adult myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Tonya M; Fremin, Brayon J; Cripps, Richard M

    2015-05-15

    In Drosophila, myoblast fusion is a conserved process in which founder cells (FCs) and fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fuse to form a syncytial muscle fiber. Mutants for the myogenic regulator Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) show a failure of myoblast fusion, indicating that MEF2 regulates the fusion process. Indeed, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show that several genes involved in myoblast fusion are bound by MEF2 during embryogenesis. Of these, the MARVEL domain gene singles bar (sing), is down-regulated in MEF2 knockdown pupae, and has five consensus MEF2 binding sites within a 9000-bp region. To determine if MEF2 is an essential and direct regulator of sing during pupal muscle development, we identified a 315-bp myoblast enhancer of sing. This enhancer was active during myoblast fusion, and mutation of two MEF2 sites significantly decreased enhancer activity. We show that lack of sing expression resulted in adult lethality and muscle loss, due to a failure of fusion during the pupal stage. Additionally, we sought to determine if sing was required in either FCs or FCMs to support fusion. Interestingly, knockdown of sing in either population did not significantly affect fusion, however, knockdown in both FCs and FCMs resulted in muscles with significantly reduced nuclei numbers, provisionally indicating that sing function is required in either cell type, but not both. Finally, we found that MEF2 regulated sing expression at the embryonic stage through the same 315-bp enhancer, indicating that sing is a MEF2 target at both critical stages of myoblast fusion. Our studies define for the first time how MEF2 directly controls fusion at multiple stages of the life cycle, and provide further evidence that the mechanisms of fusion characterized in Drosophila embryos is also used in the formation of the more complex adult muscles.

  7. Bovine myoblast cell production in a microcarriers-based system.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Sanne; Luining, Daan; van Essen, Anon; Post, Mark J

    2017-05-03

    For several tissue engineering applications, in particular food products, scaling up culture of mammalian cells is a necessary task. The prevailing method for large scale cell culture is the stirred tank bioreactor where anchor dependent cells are grown on microcarriers suspended in medium. We use a spinner flask system with cells grown on microcarriers to optimize the growth of bovine myoblasts. Freshly isolated primary cells were seeded on microcarriers (Synthemax(®), CellBIND(®) and Cytodex(®) 1 MCs). In this study, we provide proof of principle that bovine myoblasts can be cultured on microcarriers. No major differences were observed between the three tested microcarriers, except that sparsely populated beads were more common with CellBIND(®) and Synthemax(®) II beads suggesting a slower initiation of exponential growth than on Cytodex(®). We also provide direct evidence that bovine myoblasts display bead-to-bead transfer. A remarkable pick up of growth was observed by adding new MCs. Bovine myoblasts seem to behave like human mesenchymal stem cells. Thus, our results provide valuable data to further develop and scale-up the production of bovine myoblasts as a prerequisite for efficient and cost-effective development of cultured meat. Applicability to other anchorage dependent cells can extend the importance of these results to cell culture for medical tissue engineering or cell therapy.

  8. Stabilin-2 modulates the efficiency of myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Yun, Youngeun; Lim, Jung-Suk; Kim, Mi-Jin; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-San

    2016-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is essential for the formation of skeletal muscle myofibres. Studies have shown that phosphatidylserine is necessary for myoblast fusion, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here we show that the phosphatidylserine receptor stabilin-2 acts as a membrane protein for myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration. Stabilin-2 expression is induced during myogenic differentiation, and is regulated by calcineurin/NFAT signalling in myoblasts. Forced expression of stabilin-2 in myoblasts is associated with increased myotube formation, whereas deficiency of stabilin-2 results in the formation of small, thin myotubes. Stab2-deficient mice have myofibres with small cross-sectional area and few myonuclei and impaired muscle regeneration after injury. Importantly, myoblasts lacking stabilin-2 have reduced phosphatidylserine-dependent fusion. Collectively, our results show that stabilin-2 contributes to phosphatidylserine-dependent myoblast fusion and provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which phosphatidylserine mediates myoblast fusion during muscle growth and regeneration. PMID:26972991

  9. FOXO1 delays skeletal muscle regeneration and suppresses myoblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Atsushi; Hatazawa, Yukino; Hirose, Yuma; Ono, Yusuke; Kamei, Yasutomi

    2016-08-01

    Unloading stress, such as bed rest, inhibits the regenerative potential of skeletal muscles; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. FOXO1 expression, which induces the upregulated expression of the cell cycle inhibitors p57 and Gadd45α, is known to be increased in the skeletal muscle under unloading conditions. However, there is no report addressing FOXO1-induced inhibition of myoblast proliferation. Therefore, we induced muscle injury by cardiotoxin in transgenic mice overexpressing FOXO1 in the skeletal muscle (FOXO1-Tg mice) and observed regeneration delay in skeletal muscle mass and cross-sectional area in FOXO1-Tg mice. Increased p57 and Gadd45α mRNA levels, and decreased proliferation capacity were observed in C2C12 myoblasts expressing a tamoxifen-inducible active form of FOXO1. These results suggest that decreased proliferation capacity of myoblasts by FOXO1 disrupts skeletal muscle regeneration under FOXO1-increased conditions, such as unloading.

  10. The critical role of myostatin in differentiation of sheep myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenxi; Li, Wenrong; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhang, Ning; He, Sangang; Huang, Juncheng; Ge, Yubin; Liu, Mingjun

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of the effective and specific shRNA to knockdown MSTN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of MSTN reversibly suppressed myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knockdown of endogenous MSTN promoted ovine myoblast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSTN inhibits myogenic differentiation through down-regulation of MyoD and Myogenin and up-regulation of Smad3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provides a promise for the generation of transgenic sheep to improve meat productivity. -- Abstract: Myostatin [MSTN, also known as growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8)], is an inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth. Blockade of MSTN function has been reported to result in increased muscle mass in mice. However, its role in myoblast differentiation in farm animals has not been determined. In the present study, we sought to determine the role of MSTN in the differentiation of primary sheep myoblasts. We found that ectopic overexpression of MSTN resulted in lower fusion index in sheep myoblasts, which indicated the repression of myoblast differentiation. This phenotypic change was reversed by shRNA knockdown of the ectopically expressed MSTN in the cells. In contrast, shRNA knockdown of the endogenous MSTN resulted in induction of myogenic differentiation. Additional studies revealed that the induction of differentiation by knocking down the ectopically or endogenously expressed MSTN was accompanied by up-regulation of MyoD and myogenin, and down-regulation of Smad3. Our results demonstrate that MSTN plays critical role in myoblast differentiation in sheep, analogous to that in mice. This study also suggests that shRNA knockdown of MSTN could be a potentially promising approach to improve sheep muscle growth, so as to increase meat productivity.

  11. Identification and functional characterization of TRPA1 in human myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Osterloh, Markus; Böhm, Mario; Kalbe, Benjamin; Osterloh, Sabrina; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-02-01

    The proper function of the skeletal muscle is essential for the survival of most animals. Thus, efficient and rapid repair of muscular damage following injury is crucial. In recent years, satellite cells have emerged as key players of muscle repair, capable of undergoing extensive proliferation after injury, fusing into myotubes and restoring muscle function. Furthermore, it has been shown that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent generation of nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of muscle repair. Here, we demonstrate the functional expression of transient receptor potential, subfamily A1 (TRPA1) channel in human primary myoblasts. Stimulation of these cells with well-known TRPA1 ligands led to robust intracellular Ca(2+) rises which could be inhibited by specific TRPA1 antagonists. Moreover, we show that TRPA1 activation enhances important aspects of skeletal muscle repair such as cell migration and myoblast fusion in vitro. Interestingly, TRPA1 levels and inducible Ca(2+) transients decline with ongoing myoblast differentiation. We suggest that TRPA1 might serve as a physiological mediator for inflammatory signals and appears to have a functional role in promoting myoblast migration, fusion, and potentially also in activating satellite cells in humans.

  12. Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Myoblast Differentiation and Proliferation by Pannexins.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Stéphanie; Cowan, Kyle N

    2017-01-01

    Pannexins are newly discovered channels that are now recognized as mediators of adenosine triphosphate release from several cell types allowing communication with the extracellular environment. Pannexins have been associated with various physiological and pathological processes including apoptosis, inflammation, and cancer. However, it is only recently that our work has unveiled a role for Pannexin 1 and Pannexin 3 as novel regulators of skeletal muscle myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Myoblast differentiation is an ordered multistep process that includes withdrawal from the cell cycle and the expression of key myogenic factors leading to myoblast differentiation and fusion into multinucleated myotubes. Eventually, myotubes will give rise to the diverse muscle fiber types that build the complex skeletal muscle architecture essential for body movement, postural behavior, and breathing. Skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation are crucial processes required for proper skeletal muscle development during embryogenesis, as well as for the postnatal skeletal muscle regeneration that is necessary for muscle repair after injury or exercise. However, defects in skeletal muscle cell differentiation and/or deregulation of cell proliferation are involved in various skeletal muscle pathologies. In this review, we will discuss the expression of pannexins and their post-translational modifications in skeletal muscle, their known functions in various steps of myogenesis, including myoblast proliferation and differentiation, as well as their possible roles in skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  13. Myomaker is a membrane activator of myoblast fusion and muscle formation.

    PubMed

    Millay, Douglas P; O'Rourke, Jason R; Sutherland, Lillian B; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Shelton, John M; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2013-07-18

    Fusion of myoblasts is essential for the formation of multi-nucleated muscle fibres. However, the identity of muscle-specific proteins that directly govern this fusion process in mammals has remained elusive. Here we identify a muscle-specific membrane protein, named myomaker, that controls myoblast fusion. Myomaker is expressed on the cell surface of myoblasts during fusion and is downregulated thereafter. Overexpression of myomaker in myoblasts markedly enhances fusion, and genetic disruption of myomaker in mice causes perinatal death due to an absence of multi-nucleated muscle fibres. Remarkably, forced expression of myomaker in fibroblasts promotes fusion with myoblasts, demonstrating the direct participation of this protein in the fusion process. Pharmacological perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton abolishes the activity of myomaker, consistent with previous studies implicating actin dynamics in myoblast fusion. These findings reveal a long-sought myogenic fusion protein that controls mammalian myoblast fusion and provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of muscle formation.

  14. Three-dimensional Myoblast Aggregates--Effects of Modeled Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byerly, Diane; Sognier, M. A.; Marquette, M. L.

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of these studies is to elucidate the molecular and cellular alterations that contribute to muscle atrophy in astronauts caused by exposure to microgravity conditions in space. To accomplish this, a three-dimensional model test system was developed using mouse myoblast cells (C2C12). Myoblast cells were grown as three-dimensional aggregates (without scaffolding or other solid support structures) in both modeled microgravity (Rotary Cell Culture System, Synthecon, Inc.) and at unit gravity in coated Petri dishes. Evaluation of H&E stained thin sections of the aggregates revealed the absence of any necrosis. Confocal microscopy evaluations of cells stained with the Live/Dead assay (Molecular Probes) confirmed that viable cells were present throughout the aggregates with an average of only three dead cells observed per aggregate. Preliminary results from gene array analysis (Affymetrix chip U74Av2) showed that approximately 14% of the genes were down regulated (decreased more than 3 fold) and 4% were upregulated in cells exposed to modeled microgravity for 12 hours compared to unit gravity controls. Additional studies using fluorescent phallacidin revealed a decrease in F-actin in the cells exposed to modeled microgravity compared to unit gravity. Myoblast cells grown as aggregates in modeled microgravity exhibited spontaneous differentiation into syncitia while no differentiation was seen in the unit gravity controls. These studies show that 1)the model test system developed is suitable for assessing cellular and molecular alterations in myoblasts; 2) gene expression alterations occur rapidly (within 12 hours) following exposure to modeled microgravity; and 3) modeled microgravity conditions stimulated myoblast cell differentiation. Achieving a greater understanding of the molecular alterations leading to muscle atrophy will eventually enable the development of cell-based countermeasures, which may be valuable for treatment of muscle diseases on

  15. Microfluidic analysis of extracellular matrix-bFGF crosstalk on primary human myoblast chemoproliferation, chemokinesis, and chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Meghaan M.; Dewi, Ruby E.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2015-01-01

    Exposing myoblasts to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which is released after muscle injury, results in receptor phosphorylation, faster migration, and increased proliferation. These effects occur on time scales that extend across three orders of magnitude (100 – 103 minutes). Finite element modeling of Transwell assays, which are traditionally used to assess chemotaxis, revealed that the bFGF gradient formed across the membrane pore is short-lived and diminishes 45% within the first minute. Thus, to evaluate bFGF-induced migration over 102 minutes, we employed a microfluidic assay capable of producing a stable, linear concentration gradient to perform single-cell analyses of chemokinesis and chemotaxis. We hypothesized that the composition of the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM) may affect the behavioral response of myoblasts to soluble bFGF, as previous work with other cell types has suggested crosstalk between integrin and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors. Consistent with this notion, we found that bFGF significantly reduced the doubling time of myoblasts cultured on laminin but not fibronectin or collagen. Laminin also promoted significantly faster migration speeds (13.4 μm/h) than either fibronectin (10.6 μm/h) or collagen (7.6 μm/h) without bFGF stimulation. Chemokinesis driven by bFGF further increased migration speed in a strictly additive manner, resulting in an average increase of 2.3 μm/h across all ECMs tested. We observed relatively mild chemoattraction (~ 67% of myoblast population) in response to bFGF gradients of 3.2 ng/mL/mm regardless of ECM identity. Thus, while ECM-bFGF crosstalk did impact chemoproliferation, it did not have a significant effect on chemokinesis or chemotaxis. These data suggest that the main physiological effect of bFGF on myoblast migration is chemokinesis and that changes in the surrounding ECM, resulting from aging and/or disease may impact muscle regeneration by altering myoblast migration and

  16. Microfluidic analysis of extracellular matrix-bFGF crosstalk on primary human myoblast chemoproliferation, chemokinesis, and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Meghaan M; Dewi, Ruby E; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2015-05-01

    Exposing myoblasts to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which is released after muscle injury, results in receptor phosphorylation, faster migration, and increased proliferation. These effects occur on time scales that extend across three orders of magnitude (10(0)-10(3) minutes). Finite element modeling of Transwell assays, which are traditionally used to assess chemotaxis, revealed that the bFGF gradient formed across the membrane pore is short-lived and diminishes 45% within the first minute. Thus, to evaluate bFGF-induced migration over 10(2) minutes, we employed a microfluidic assay capable of producing a stable, linear concentration gradient to perform single-cell analyses of chemokinesis and chemotaxis. We hypothesized that the composition of the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM) may affect the behavioral response of myoblasts to soluble bFGF, as previous work with other cell types has suggested crosstalk between integrin and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors. Consistent with this notion, we found that bFGF significantly reduced the doubling time of myoblasts cultured on laminin but not fibronectin or collagen. Laminin also promoted significantly faster migration speeds (13.4 μm h(-1)) than either fibronectin (10.6 μm h(-1)) or collagen (7.6 μm h(-1)) without bFGF stimulation. Chemokinesis driven by bFGF further increased migration speed in a strictly additive manner, resulting in an average increase of 2.3 μm h(-1) across all ECMs tested. We observed relatively mild chemoattraction (∼67% of myoblast population) in response to bFGF gradients of 3.2 ng mL(-1) mm(-1) regardless of ECM identity. Thus, while ECM-bFGF crosstalk did impact chemoproliferation, it did not have a significant effect on chemokinesis or chemotaxis. These data suggest that the main physiological effect of bFGF on myoblast migration is chemokinesis and that changes in the surrounding ECM, resulting from aging and/or disease may impact muscle regeneration by altering

  17. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through homophilic trans-interactions.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Francis X; Martin, Ryan A; Springer, Evan M; Leffler, Maxwell S; Woelmer, Bryce R; Recker, Isaac J; Leaman, Douglas W

    2017-07-11

    The overall objective of the study was to identify mechanisms through which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) augments the adhesive and fusogenic properties of myogenic cells. Hypotheses were tested using cultured myoblasts and fibroblasts, which do not constitutively express ICAM-1, and myoblasts and fibroblasts forced to express full length ICAM-1 or a truncated form lacking the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. ICAM-1 mediated myoblast adhesion and fusion were quantified using novel assays and cell mixing experiments. We report that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion to myoblasts and myotubes through homophilic trans-interactions. Such adhesive interactions enhanced levels of active Rac in adherent and fusing myoblasts, as well as triggered lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts through the signaling function of the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. Rac inhibition negated ICAM-1 mediated lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts. The fusogenic property of ICAM-1-ICAM-1 interactions was restricted to myogenic cells, as forced expression of ICAM-1 by fibroblasts did not augment their fusion to ICAM-1+ myoblasts/myotubes. We conclude that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through its ability to self-associate and initiate Rac-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton.

  18. Characterization of hereditary inclusion body myopathy myoblasts: possible primary impairment of apoptotic events.

    PubMed

    Amsili, S; Shlomai, Z; Levitzki, R; Krause, S; Lochmuller, H; Ben-Bassat, H; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, S

    2007-11-01

    Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is a unique muscular disorder caused by mutations in the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) gene. GNE encodes a bi-functional enzyme acting in the biosynthetic pathway of sialic acid. Since the underlying myopathological mechanism leading to the disease phenotype is poorly understood, we have established human myoblasts cultures, derived from HIBM satellite cells carrying the homozygous M712T mutation, and identified cellular and molecular characteristics of these cells. HIBM and control myoblasts showed similar heterogeneous patterns of proliferation and differentiation. Upon apoptosis induction, phosphatidylserine externalization was similar in HIBM and controls. In contrast, the active forms of caspase-3 and -9 were strongly enhanced in most HIBM cultures compared to controls, while pAkt, downregulated in controls, remained high in HIBM cells. These results could indicate impaired apoptotic signaling in HIBM cells. Since satellite cells enable partial regeneration of the post-mitotic muscle tissue, these altered processes could contribute to the muscle mass loss seen in patients. The identification of survival defects in HIBM affected muscle cells could disclose new functions for GNE in muscle cells.

  19. Talin 1 and 2 are required for myoblast fusion, sarcomere assembly and the maintenance of myotendinous junctions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Francesco J.; Monkley, Sue J.; Wood, Malcolm R.; Critchley, David R.; Müller, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Summary Talin 1 and 2 connect integrins to the actin cytoskeleton and regulate the affinity of integrins for ligands. In skeletal muscle, talin 1 regulates the stability of myotendinous junctions (MTJs), but the function of talin 2 in skeletal muscle is not known. Here we show that MTJ integrity is affected in talin 2-deficient mice. Concomitant ablation of talin 1 and 2 leads to defects in myoblast fusion and sarcomere assembly, resembling defects in muscle lacking β1 integrins. Talin 1/2-deficient myoblasts express functionally active β1 integrins, suggesting that defects in muscle development are not primarily caused by defects in ligand binding, but rather by disruptions of the interaction of integrins with the cytoskeleton. Consistent with this finding, assembly of integrin adhesion complexes is perturbed in the remaining muscle fibers of talin 1/2-deficient mice. We conclude that talin 1 and 2 are crucial for skeletal muscle development, where they regulate myoblast fusion, sarcomere assembly and the maintenance of MTJs. PMID:19793892

  20. Possible role of TIEG1 as a feedback regulator of myostatin and TGF-{beta} in myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Masato; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Iwasaki, Shunsuke; Chao, Guozheng; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Kouichi; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Aso, Hisashi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro

    2010-03-19

    Myostatin and TGF-{beta} negatively regulate skeletal muscle development and growth. Both factors signal through the Smad2/3 pathway. However, the regulatory mechanism of myostatin and TGF-{beta} signaling remains unclear. TGF-{beta} inducible early gene (TIEG) 1 is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and has been implicated in the modulation of TGF-{beta} signaling. These findings prompted us to investigate the effect of TIEG1 on myostatin and TGF-{beta} signaling using C2C12 myoblasts. Myostatin and TGF-{beta} induced the expression of TIEG1 and Smad7 mRNAs, but not TIEG2 mRNA, in proliferating C2C12 cells. When differentiating C2C12 myoblasts were stimulated by myostatin, TIEG1 mRNA was up-regulated at a late stage of differentiation. In contrast, TGF-{beta} enhanced TIEG1 expression at an early stage. Overexpression of TIEG1 prevented the transcriptional activation of Smad by myostatin and TGF-{beta} in both proliferating or differentiating C2C12 cells, but the expression of Smad2 and Smad7 mRNAs was not affected. Forced expression of TIEG1 inhibited myogenic differentiation but did not cause more inhibition than the empty vector in the presence of myostatin or TGF-{beta}. These results demonstrate that TIEG1 is one possible feedback regulator of myostatin and TGF-{beta} that prevents excess action in myoblasts.

  1. Effect of atrophy and contractions on myogenin mRNA concentration in chick and rat myoblast omega muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. M.; Denney, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The skeletal rat myoblast omega (RMo) cell line forms myotubes that exhibit spontaneous contractions under appropriate conditions in culture. We examined if the RMo cells would provide a model for studying atrophy and muscle contraction. To better understand how to obtain contractile cultures, we examined levels of contraction under different growing conditions. The proliferation medium and density of plating affected the subsequent proportion of spontaneously contracting myotubes. Using a ribonuclease protection assay, we found that exponentially growing RMo myoblasts contained no detectable myogenin or herculin mRNA, while differentiating myoblasts contained high levels of myogenin mRNA but no herculin mRNA. There was no increase in myogenin mRNA concentration in either primary chick or RMo myotubes whose contractions were inhibited by depolarizing concentrations of potassium (K+). Thus, altered myogenin mRNA concentrations are not involved in atrophy of chick myotubes. Depolarizing concentrations of potassium inhibited spontaneous contractions in both RMo cultures and primary chick myotube cultures. However, we found that the myosin concentration of 6-d-old contracting RMo cells fed medium plus AraC was 11 +/- 3 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA, not significantly different from 12 +/- 4 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA (n = 3), the myosin concentration of noncontracting RMo cells (treated with 12 mM K+ for 6 d). Resolving how RMo cells maintained their myosin content when contraction is inhibited may be important for understanding atrophy.

  2. Effect of atrophy and contractions on myogenin mRNA concentration in chick and rat myoblast omega muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. M.; Denney, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The skeletal rat myoblast omega (RMo) cell line forms myotubes that exhibit spontaneous contractions under appropriate conditions in culture. We examined if the RMo cells would provide a model for studying atrophy and muscle contraction. To better understand how to obtain contractile cultures, we examined levels of contraction under different growing conditions. The proliferation medium and density of plating affected the subsequent proportion of spontaneously contracting myotubes. Using a ribonuclease protection assay, we found that exponentially growing RMo myoblasts contained no detectable myogenin or herculin mRNA, while differentiating myoblasts contained high levels of myogenin mRNA but no herculin mRNA. There was no increase in myogenin mRNA concentration in either primary chick or RMo myotubes whose contractions were inhibited by depolarizing concentrations of potassium (K+). Thus, altered myogenin mRNA concentrations are not involved in atrophy of chick myotubes. Depolarizing concentrations of potassium inhibited spontaneous contractions in both RMo cultures and primary chick myotube cultures. However, we found that the myosin concentration of 6-d-old contracting RMo cells fed medium plus AraC was 11 +/- 3 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA, not significantly different from 12 +/- 4 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA (n = 3), the myosin concentration of noncontracting RMo cells (treated with 12 mM K+ for 6 d). Resolving how RMo cells maintained their myosin content when contraction is inhibited may be important for understanding atrophy.

  3. Effects of omega-3 on matrix metalloproteinase-9, myoblast transplantation and satellite cell activation in dystrophin-deficient muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Samara Camaçari; Hindi, Sajedah M; Kumar, Ashok; Marques, Maria Julia

    2017-06-17

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), lack of dystrophin leads to progressive muscle degeneration, with DMD patients suffering from cardiorespiratory failure. Cell therapy is an alternative to life-long corticoid therapy. Satellite cells, the stem cells of skeletal muscles, do not completely compensate for the muscle damage in dystrophic muscles. Elevated levels of proinflammatory and profibrotic factors, such as metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), impair muscle regeneration, leading to extensive fibrosis and poor results with myoblast transplantation therapies. Omega-3 is an anti-inflammatory drug that protects against muscle degeneration in the mdx mouse model of DMD. In the present study, we test our hypothesis that omega-3 affects MMP-9 and thereby benefits muscle regeneration and myoblast transplantation in the mdx mouse. We observe that omega-3 reduces MMP-9 gene expression and improves myoblast engraftment, satellite cell activation, and muscle regeneration by mechanisms involving, at least in part, the regulation of macrophages, as shown here with the fluorescence-activated cell sorting technique. The present study demonstrates the benefits of omega-3 on satellite cell survival and muscle regeneration, further supporting its use in clinical trials and cell therapies in DMD.

  4. Myostatin gene targeting in cultured China Han ovine myoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Yang, X; An, X; Chen, Y

    2007-11-01

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, has been shown to be a negative regulator of myogenesis. Natural mutation in beef cattle causes double-muscling phenotypes. We report an investigation designed to knockout the MSTN gene by gene targeting in ovine myoblast cells. Two promoter-trap targeting vectors MSTN-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and MSTN-neo were constructed and used to transfect foetal and neonatal ovine primary myoblast cells. Both GFP-expressing cells and drug-resistant cells were obtained. Targeted cells expressing GFP were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and drug-resistant cells were characterised by PCR and Southern blot after growing into cell clones.

  5. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Modulates Skeletal Myoblast Function

    PubMed Central

    Germani, Antonia; Di Carlo, Anna; Mangoni, Antonella; Straino, Stefania; Giacinti, Cristina; Turrini, Paolo; Biglioli, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression is enhanced in ischemic skeletal muscle and is thought to play a key role in the angiogenic response to ischemia. However, it is still unknown whether, in addition to new blood vessel growth, VEGF modulates skeletal muscle cell function. In the present study immunohistochemical analysis showed that, in normoperfused mouse hindlimb, VEGF and its receptors Flk-1 and Flt-1 were expressed mostly in quiescent satellite cells. Unilateral hindlimb ischemia was induced by left femoral artery ligation. At day 3 and day 7 after the induction of ischemia, Flk-1 and Flt-1 were expressed in regenerating muscle fibers and VEGF expression by these fibers was markedly enhanced. Additional in vitro experiments showed that in growing medium both cultured satellite cells and myoblast cell line C2C12 expressed VEGF and its receptors. Under these conditions, Flk-1 receptor exhibited constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation that was increased by VEGF treatment. During myogenic differentiation Flk-1 and Flt-1 were down-regulated. In a modified Boyden Chamber assay, VEGF enhanced C2C12 myoblasts migration approximately fivefold. Moreover, VEGF administration to differentiating C2C12 myoblasts prevented apoptosis, while inhibition of VEGF signaling either with selective VEGF receptor inhibitors (SU1498 and CB676475) or a neutralizing Flk-1 antibody, enhanced cell death approximately 3.5-fold. Finally, adenovirus-mediated VEGF165 gene transfer inhibited ischemia-induced apoptosis in skeletal muscle. These results support a role for VEGF in myoblast migration and survival, and suggest a novel autocrine role of VEGF in skeletal muscle repair during ischemia. PMID:14507649

  6. AAV2-mediated follistatin overexpression induces ovine primary myoblasts proliferation.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Mahmood; Salabi, Fatemeh; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Fuping; Wei, Caihong; Du, Lixin

    2014-10-21

    Follistatin (FST) has been shown to bind to some TGF-β family members and can function as a potent myostatin (MSTN) antagonist. Recent studies have revealed that over-expression of FST by adeno-associated viruses increases muscle growth in mice, humans and nonhuman primates. In the present study, to determine the effect of FST on ovine primary myoblast (OPM) proliferation, FST was over-expressed using an adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV 2) vector. Western blot results showed that AAV induced the expression of FST protein in transduced OPM cells. Real-time quantitative PCR results indicated that over-expression of FST resulted in a dramatic increase in Akt I and CDK2 expression and a decrease in p21 expression. Moreover, cell cycle analysis confirmed that FST down-regulated p21, a CDK inhibitor, and increased the level of CDK2 expression in OPM cells. Hence, follistatin positively regulated the G1 to S progression. Our results showed that FST induced proliferation through a down-regulation of p21, as only the p21 expression level was down-regulated as a result of FST over-expression in myoblasts, whereas no change was observed in the level of p57 expression. These results expanded our understanding of the regulation mechanism of FST in ovine primary myoblasts. Our results provide the first evidence that the AAV viral system can be used for gene transfer in ovine myoblast cells. Moreover, the results showed that an AAV vector can successfully induce the expression of FST in OPM cells in vitro. These findings demonstrated that FST over-expression induces proliferation through a down-regulation of the p21 gene under proliferating conditions.

  7. CD36 is required for myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Yun, Youngeun; Kim, In-San

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was induced during myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was localized in multinucleated myotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of myogenic markers is attenuated in CD36 knockdown C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of CD36 significantly inhibited myotube formation during differentiation. -- Abstract: Recently, CD36 has been found to be involved in the cytokine-induced fusion of macrophage. Myoblast fusion to form multinucleated myotubes is required for myogenesis and muscle regeneration. Because a search of gene expression database revealed the attenuation of CD36 expression in the muscles of muscular dystrophy patients, the possibility that CD36 could be required for myoblast fusion was investigated. CD36 expression was markedly up-regulated during myoblast differentiation and localized in multinucleated myotubes. Knockdown of endogenous CD36 significantly decreased the expression of myogenic markers as well as myotube formation. These results support the notion that CD36 plays an important role in cell fusion during myogenic differentiation. Our finding will aid the elucidation of the common mechanism governing cell-to-cell fusion in various fusion models.

  8. Transdifferentiation of myoblasts into osteoblasts - possible use for bone therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daphne P L; Carnagarin, Revathy; Dharmarajan, Arun; Dass, Crispin R

    2017-08-15

    Transdifferentiation is defined as the conversion of one cell type to another and is an ever-expanding field with a growing number of cells found to be capable of such a process. To date, the fact remains that there are limited treatment options for fracture healing, osteoporosis and bone repair post-destruction by bone tumours. Hence, this review focuses on the transdifferentiation of myoblast to osteoblast as a means to further understand the transdifferentiation process and to investigate a potential therapeutic option if successful. The potent osteoinductive effects of the bone morphogenetic protein-2 are largely implicated in the transdifferentiation of myoblast to osteoblast. Bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced activation of the Smad1 protein ultimately results in JunB synthesis, the first transcriptional step in myoblast dedifferentiation. The upregulation of the activating protein-1 binding activity triggers the transcription of the runt-related transcription factor 2 gene, a transcription factor that plays a major role in osteoblast differentiation. This potential transdifferentiation treatment may be utilised for dental implants, fracture healing, osteoporosis and bone repair post-destruction by bone tumours. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Ductile electroactive biodegradable hyperbranched polylactide copolymers enhancing myoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Meihua; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Y. Eugene; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    Myotube formation is crucial to restoring muscular functions, and biomaterials that enhance the myoblast differentiation into myotubes are highly desirable for muscular repair. Here, we report the synthesis of electroactive, ductile, and degradable copolymers and their application in enhancing the differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes. A hyperbranched ductile polylactide (HPLA) was synthesized and then copolymerized with aniline tetramer (AT) to produce a series of electroactive, ductile and degradable copolymers (HPLAAT). The HPLA and HPLAAT showed excellent ductility with strain to failure from 158.9% to 42.7% and modulus from 265.2 to 758.2 MPa. The high electroactivity of the HPLAAT was confirmed by UV spectrometer and cyclic voltammogram measurements. These HPLAAT polymers also showed improved thermal stability and controlled biodegradation rate compared to HPLA. Importantly, when applying these polymers for myotube formation, the HPLAAT significantly improved the proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts in vitro compared to HPLA. Furthermore, these polymers greatly promoted myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells as measured by quantitative analysis of myotube number, length, diameter, maturation index, and gene expression of MyoD and TNNT. Together, our study shows that these electroactive, ductile and degradable HPLAAT copolymers represent significantly improved biomaterials for muscle tissue engineering compared to HPLA. PMID:26335860

  10. Ductile electroactive biodegradable hyperbranched polylactide copolymers enhancing myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meihua; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-01

    Myotube formation is crucial to restoring muscular functions, and biomaterials that enhance the myoblast differentiation into myotubes are highly desirable for muscular repair. Here, we report the synthesis of electroactive, ductile, and degradable copolymers and their application in enhancing the differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes. A hyperbranched ductile polylactide (HPLA) was synthesized and then copolymerized with aniline tetramer (AT) to produce a series of electroactive, ductile and degradable copolymers (HPLAAT). The HPLA and HPLAAT showed excellent ductility with strain to failure from 158.9% to 42.7% and modulus from 265.2 to 758.2 MPa. The high electroactivity of the HPLAAT was confirmed by UV spectrometer and cyclic voltammogram measurements. These HPLAAT polymers also showed improved thermal stability and controlled biodegradation rate compared to HPLA. Importantly, when applying these polymers for myotube formation, the HPLAAT significantly improved the proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts in vitro compared to HPLA. Furthermore, these polymers greatly promoted myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells as measured by quantitative analysis of myotube number, length, diameter, maturation index, and gene expression of MyoD and TNNT. Together, our study shows that these electroactive, ductile and degradable HPLAAT copolymers represent significantly improved biomaterials for muscle tissue engineering compared to HPLA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Utilization of an antibody specific for human dystrophin to follow myoblast transplantation in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Huard, J; Tremblay, G; Verreault, S; Labrecque, C; Tremblay, J P

    1993-01-01

    Human myoblasts were transplanted in nude mice. The efficacy of these transplantations was analyzed using a monoclonal antibody (NCLDys3) specific for human dystrophin. This antibody did not reveal any dystrophin in nude mice that did not receive a human myoblast transplantation. However, about 30 days after a human myoblast transplantation, dystrophin-positive muscle fibers were observed. They were not abundant, and were present either in small clusters or isolated. This technique follows the fate of myoblast transplantation in animals that already have dystrophin, and distinguishes between new dystrophin-positive fibers due to the transplantation and the revertant fibers in mdx mice. Moreover, this technique does not require any labelling of the myoblasts before transplantation. It can also be used to detect dystrophin produced following the fusion of myoblasts transfected with the human dystrophin gene.

  12. Abnormal proliferation and spontaneous differentiation of myoblasts from a symptomatic female carrier of X-linked Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Peter; Schneiderat, Peter; Srsen, Vlastimil; Korfali, Nadia; Lê Thành, Phú; Cowan, Graeme J.M.; Cavanagh, David R.; Wehnert, Manfred; Schirmer, Eric C.; Walter, Maggie C.

    2015-01-01

    Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is a neuromuscular disease characterized by early contractures, slowly progressive muscular weakness and life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia that can develop into cardiomyopathy. In X-linked EDMD (EDMD1), female carriers are usually unaffected. Here we present a clinical description and in vitro characterization of a mildly affected EDMD1 female carrying the heterozygous EMD mutation c.174_175delTT; p.Y59* that yields loss of protein. Muscle tissue sections and cultured patient myoblasts exhibited a mixed population of emerin-positive and -negative cells; thus uneven X-inactivation was excluded as causative. Patient blood cells were predominantly emerin-positive, but considerable nuclear lobulation was observed in non-granulocyte cells – a novel phenotype in EDMD. Both emerin-positive and emerin-negative myoblasts exhibited spontaneous differentiation in tissue culture, though emerin-negative myoblasts were more proliferative than emerin-positive cells. The preferential proliferation of emerin-negative myoblasts together with the high rate of spontaneous differentiation in both populations suggests that loss of functional satellite cells might be one underlying mechanism for disease pathology. This could also account for the slowly developing muscle phenotype. PMID:25454731

  13. Abnormal proliferation and spontaneous differentiation of myoblasts from a symptomatic female carrier of X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Peter; Schneiderat, Peter; Srsen, Vlastimil; Korfali, Nadia; Lê Thành, Phú; Cowan, Graeme J M; Cavanagh, David R; Wehnert, Manfred; Schirmer, Eric C; Walter, Maggie C

    2015-02-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is a neuromuscular disease characterized by early contractures, slowly progressive muscular weakness and life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia that can develop into cardiomyopathy. In X-linked EDMD (EDMD1), female carriers are usually unaffected. Here we present a clinical description and in vitro characterization of a mildly affected EDMD1 female carrying the heterozygous EMD mutation c.174_175delTT; p.Y59* that yields loss of protein. Muscle tissue sections and cultured patient myoblasts exhibited a mixed population of emerin-positive and -negative cells; thus uneven X-inactivation was excluded as causative. Patient blood cells were predominantly emerin-positive, but considerable nuclear lobulation was observed in non-granulocyte cells - a novel phenotype in EDMD. Both emerin-positive and emerin-negative myoblasts exhibited spontaneous differentiation in tissue culture, though emerin-negative myoblasts were more proliferative than emerin-positive cells. The preferential proliferation of emerin-negative myoblasts together with the high rate of spontaneous differentiation in both populations suggests that loss of functional satellite cells might be one underlying mechanism for disease pathology. This could also account for the slowly developing muscle phenotype.

  14. Interactions between Skeletal Muscle Myoblasts and their Extracellular Matrix Revealed by a Serum Free Culture System.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Vishal; Dye, Danielle E; Kinnear, Beverley F; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Grounds, Miranda D; Coombe, Deirdre R

    2015-01-01

    Decellularisation of skeletal muscle provides a system to study the interactions of myoblasts with muscle extracellular matrix (ECM). This study describes the efficient decellularisation of quadriceps muscle with the retention of matrix components and the use of this matrix for myoblast proliferation and differentiation under serum free culture conditions. Three decellularisation approaches were examined; the most effective was phospholipase A2 treatment, which removed cellular material while maximizing the retention of ECM components. Decellularised muscle matrices were then solubilized and used as substrates for C2C12 mouse myoblast serum free cultures. The muscle matrix supported myoblast proliferation and differentiation equally as well as collagen and fibronectin. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that myoblasts seeded on muscle matrix and fibronectin differentiated to form long, well-aligned myotubes, while myoblasts seeded on collagen were less organized. qPCR analyses showed a time dependent increase in genes involved in skeletal muscle differentiation and suggested that muscle-derived matrix may stimulate an increased rate of differentiation compared to collagen and fibronectin. Decellularized whole muscle three-dimensional scaffolds also supported cell adhesion and spreading, with myoblasts aligning along specific tracts of matrix proteins within the scaffolds. Thus, under serum free conditions, intact acellular muscle matrices provided cues to direct myoblast adhesion and migration. In addition, myoblasts were shown to rapidly secrete and organise their own matrix glycoproteins to create a localized ECM microenvironment. This serum free culture system has revealed that the correct muscle ECM facilitates more rapid cell organisation and differentiation than single matrix glycoprotein substrates.

  15. Analysis of Mitochondrial Network Morphology in Cultured Myoblasts from Patients with Mitochondrial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sládková, J; Spáčilová, J; Čapek, M; Tesařová, M; Hansíková, H; Honzík, T; Martínek, J; Zámečník, J; Kostková, O; Zeman, J

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial morphology was studied in cultivated myoblasts obtained from patients with mitochondrial disorders, including CPEO, MELAS and TMEM70 deficiency. Mitochondrial networks and ultrastructure were visualized by fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. A heterogeneous picture of abnormally sized and shaped mitochondria with fragmentation, shortening, and aberrant cristae, lower density of mitochondria and an increased number of "megamitochondria" were found in patient myoblasts. Morphometric Fiji analyses revealed different mitochondrial network properties in myoblasts from patients and controls. The small number of cultivated myoblasts required for semiautomatic morphometric image analysis makes this tool useful for estimating mitochondrial disturbances in patients with mitochondrial disorders.

  16. Nitric oxide donors, sodium nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetylpencillamine, stimulate myoblast proliferation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulibarri, J. A.; Mozdziak, P. E.; Schultz, E.; Cook, C.; Best, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an inter- and intracellular messenger involved in a variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. The effect of two NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and their effect on myoblast proliferation was examined. Both donors stimulated an increase in myoblast cell number over a range (1-10 microM) of donor concentrations. However, 50 microM SNAP inhibited myoblast proliferation. Cell numbers from cultures treated with degraded 10 microM SNAP were equivalent to the control. Therefore, it appears NO can stimulate as well as inhibit myoblast proliferation.

  17. Nitric oxide donors, sodium nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetylpencillamine, stimulate myoblast proliferation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulibarri, J. A.; Mozdziak, P. E.; Schultz, E.; Cook, C.; Best, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an inter- and intracellular messenger involved in a variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. The effect of two NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and their effect on myoblast proliferation was examined. Both donors stimulated an increase in myoblast cell number over a range (1-10 microM) of donor concentrations. However, 50 microM SNAP inhibited myoblast proliferation. Cell numbers from cultures treated with degraded 10 microM SNAP were equivalent to the control. Therefore, it appears NO can stimulate as well as inhibit myoblast proliferation.

  18. α-Syntrophin Modulates Myogenin Expression in Differentiating Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jeong; Hwang, Sung Ho; Lim, Jeong A.; Froehner, Stanley C.; Adams, Marvin E.; Kim, Hye Sun

    2010-01-01

    Background α-Syntrophin is a scaffolding protein linking signaling proteins to the sarcolemmal dystrophin complex in mature muscle. However, α-syntrophin is also expressed in differentiating myoblasts during the early stages of muscle differentiation. In this study, we examined the relationship between the expression of α-syntrophin and myogenin, a key muscle regulatory factor. Methods and Findings The absence of α-syntrophin leads to reduced and delayed myogenin expression. This conclusion is based on experiments using muscle cells isolated from α-syntrophin null mice, muscle regeneration studies in α-syntrophin null mice, experiments in Sol8 cells (a cell line that expresses only low levels of α-syntrophin) and siRNA studies in differentiating C2 cells. In primary cultured myocytes isolated from α-syntrophin null mice, the level of myogenin was less than 50% that from wild type myocytes (p<0.005) 40 h after differentiation induction. In regenerating muscle, the expression of myogenin in the α-syntrophin null muscle was reduced to approximately 25% that of wild type muscle (p<0.005). Conversely, myogenin expression is enhanced in primary cultures of myoblasts isolated from a transgenic mouse over-expressing α-syntrophin and in Sol8 cells transfected with a vector to over-express α-syntrophin. Moreover, we find that myogenin mRNA is reduced in the absence of α-syntrophin and increased by α-syntrophin over-expression. Immunofluorescence microscopy shows that α-syntrophin is localized to the nuclei of differentiating myoblasts. Finally, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that α-syntrophin associates with Mixed-Lineage Leukemia 5, a regulator of myogenin expression. Conclusions We conclude that α-syntrophin plays an important role in regulating myogenesis by modulating myogenin expression. PMID:21179410

  19. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  20. Characterization of human myoblast cultures for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Stern-Straeter, Jens; Bran, Gregor; Riedel, Frank; Sauter, Alexander; Hörmann, Karl; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering, a promising specialty, aims at the reconstruction of skeletal muscle loss. In vitro tissue engineering attempts to achieve this goal by creating differentiated, functional muscle tissue through a process in which stem cells are extracted from the patient, e.g. by muscle biopsies, expanded and differentiated in a controlled environment, and subsequently re-implanted. A prerequisite for this undertaking is the ability to cultivate and differentiate human skeletal muscle cell cultures. Evidently, optimal culture conditions must be investigated for later clinical utilization. We therefore analysed the proliferation of human cells in different environments and evaluated the differentiation potential of different culture media. It was shown that human myoblasts have a higher rate of proliferation in the alamarBlue assay when cultured on gelatin-coated culture flasks rather than polystyrene-coated flasks. We also demonstrated that myoblasts treated with a culture medium with a high concentration of growth factors [growth medium (GM)] showed a higher proliferation compared to cultures treated with a culture medium with lower amounts of growth factors [differentiation medium (DM)]. Differentiation of human myoblast cell cultures treated with GM and DM was analysed until day 16 and myogenesis was verified by expression of MyoD, myogenin, alpha-sarcomeric actin and myosin heavy chain by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining for desmin, Myf-5 and alpha-sarcomeric actin was performed to verify the myogenic phenotype of extracted satellite cells and to prove the maturation of cells. Cultures treated with DM showed positive staining for alpha-sarcomeric actin. Notably, markers of differentiation were also detected in cultures treated with GM, but there was no formation of myotubes. In the enzymatic assay of creatine phosphokinase, cultures treated with DM showed a higher activity, evidencing a higher degree of differentiation

  1. Phosphocreatine as an energy source for actin cytoskeletal rearrangements during myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Roddy S; Steeds, Craig M; Wiseman, Robert W; Pavlath, Grace K

    2008-06-15

    Myoblast fusion is essential for muscle development, postnatal growth and muscle repair after injury. Recent studies have demonstrated roles for actin polymerization during myoblast fusion. Dynamic cytoskeletal assemblies directing cell-cell contact, membrane coalescence and ultimately fusion require substantial cellular energy demands. Various energy generating systems exist in cells but the partitioning of energy sources during myoblast fusion is unknown. Here, we demonstrate a novel role for phosphocreatine (PCr) as a spatiotemporal energy buffer during primary mouse myoblast fusion with nascent myotubes. Creatine treatment enhanced cell fusion in a creatine kinase (CK)-dependent manner suggesting that ATP-consuming reactions are replenished through the PCr/CK system. Furthermore, selective inhibition of actin polymerization prevented myonuclear addition following creatine treatment. As myotube formation is dependent on cytoskeletal reorganization, our findings suggest that PCr hydrolysis is coupled to actin dynamics during myoblast fusion. We conclude that myoblast fusion is a high-energy process, and can be enhanced by PCr buffering of energy demands during actin cytoskeletal rearrangements in myoblast fusion. These findings implicate roles for PCr as a high-energy phosphate buffer in the fusion of multiple cell types including sperm/oocyte, trophoblasts and macrophages. Furthermore, our results suggest the observed beneficial effects of oral creatine supplementation in humans may result in part from enhanced myoblast fusion.

  2. Fbxw7β, E3 ubiquitin ligase, negative regulation of primary myoblast differentiation, proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyungshin; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Choi, Ik Joon; Ko, Young-Gyu; Jeong, Jaemin; Kwon, Heechung

    2017-04-01

    Satellite cells attached to skeletal muscle fibers play a crucial role in skeletal muscle regeneration. During regeneration, the satellite cells proliferate, migrate to the damaged region, and fuse to each other. Although it is important to determine the cellular mechanisms controlling myoblast behavior, their regulators are not well understood. In this study, we evaluated the roles of Fbxw7 in primary myoblasts and determined its potential as a therapeutic target for muscle disease. We originally found that Fbxw7β, one of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Fbxw7 subtypes, negatively regulates differentiation, proliferation and migration of myoblasts and satellite cells on muscle fiber. However, these phenomena were not observed in myoblasts expressing a dominant-negative, F-box deleted Fbxw7β, mutant. Our results suggest that myoblast differentiation potential and muscle regeneration can be regulated by Fbxw7β.

  3. Prostaglandin E2 promotes proliferation of skeletal muscle myoblasts via EP4 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Chenglin; Zhao, Ruonan; Vallejo, Julian; Igwe, Orisa; Bonewald, Lynda; Wetmore, Lori; Brotto, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that conditioned media (CM) from osteocytes enhances myogenic differentiation of myoblasts, suggesting that signaling from bone may be important for skeletal muscle myogenesis. The effect of CM was closely mimicked by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a bioactive lipid mediator in various physiological or pathological conditions. PGE2 is secreted at high levels by osteocytes and such secretion is further enhanced under loading conditions. Although four types of receptors, EP1 to EP4, mediate PGE2 signaling, it is unknown whether these receptors play a role in myogenesis. Therefore, in this study, the expression of EPs in mouse primary myoblasts was characterized, followed by examination of their roles in myoblast proliferation by treating myoblasts with PGE2 or specific agonists. All four PGE2 receptor mRNAs were detectable by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), but only PGE2 and EP4 agonist CAY 10598 significantly enhance myoblast proliferation. EP1/EP3 agonist 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 (17-PT PGE2) and EP2 agonist butaprost did not have any significant effects. Moreover, treatment with EP4 antagonist L161,982 dose-dependently inhibited myoblast proliferation. These results were confirmed by cell cycle analysis and the gene expression of cell cycle regulators. Concomitant with the inhibition of myoblast proliferation, treatment with L161,982 significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Cotreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or sodium ascorbate (SA) successfully reversed the inhibition of myoblast proliferation and ROS overproduction caused by L161,982. Therefore, PGE2 signaling via the EP4 receptor regulates myogenesis by promoting myoblast proliferation and blocking this receptor results in increased ROS production in myoblasts. PMID:25785867

  4. A role for acetylcholine receptors in the fusion of chick myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The role of acetylcholine receptors in the control of chick myoblast fusion in culture has been explored. Spontaneous fusion of myoblasts was inhibited by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists alpha- bungarotoxin, Naja naja toxin and monoclonal antibody mcAb 5.5. The muscarinic antagonists QNB and n-methyl scopolamine were without effect. Atropine had no effect below 1 microM, where it blocks muscarinic receptors; at higher concentrations, when it blocks nicotinic receptors also, atropine inhibited myoblast fusion. The inhibitions imposed by acetylcholine receptor antagonists lasted for approximately 12 h; fusion stimulated by other endogenous substances then took over. The inhibition was limited to myoblast fusion. The increases in cell number, DNA content, the level of creatine phosphokinase activity (both total and muscle-specific isozyme) and the appearance of heavy chain myosin, which accompany muscle differentiation, followed a normal time course. Pre-fusion myoblasts, fusing myoblasts, and young myotubes specifically bound labeled alpha- bungarotoxin, indicating the presence of acetylcholine receptors. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, carbachol, induced uptake of [14C]Guanidinium through the acetylcholine receptor. Myoblasts, aligned myoblasts and young myotubes expressed the synthetic enzyme Choline acetyltransferase and stained positively with antibodies against acetylcholine. The appearance of ChAT activity in myogenic cultures was prevented by treatment with BUDR; nonmyogenic cells in the cultures expressed ChAT at a level which was too low to account for the activity in myogenic cultures. We conclude that activation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is part of the mechanism controlling spontaneous myoblast fusion and that myoblasts synthesize an endogenous, fusion- inducing agent that activates the nicotinic ACh receptor. PMID:3372592

  5. p75NTR-mediated signaling promotes the survival of myoblasts and influences muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Reddypalli, Shailaja; Roll, Kristin; Lee, Hyung-Kook; Lundell, Martha; Barea-Rodriguez, Edwin; Wheeler, Esther F

    2005-09-01

    During muscle development, the p75(NTR) is expressed transiently on myoblasts. The temporal expression pattern of the receptor raises the possibility that the receptor is influencing muscle development. To test this hypothesis, p75(NTR)-deficient mutant mice were tested for muscle strength by using a standard wire gripe strength test and were found to have significantly decreased strength relative to that of normal mice. When normal mybolasts were examined in vivo for expression of NGF receptors, p75(NTR) was detected on myoblasts but the high affinity NGF receptor, trk A, was not co-expressed with p75(NTR). In vitro, proliferating C2C12 and primary myoblasts co-expressed the p75(NTR) and MyoD, but immunofluorescent analysis of primary myoblasts and RT-PCR analysis of C2C12 mRNA revealed that myoblasts were devoid of trk A. In contrast to the cell death functions that characterize the p75(NTR) in neurons, p75(NTR)-positive primary and C2C12 myoblasts did not differentiate or undergo apoptosis in response to neurotrophins. Rather, myoblasts survived and even proliferated when grown at subconfluent densities in the presence of the neurotrophins. Furthermore, when myoblasts treated with NGF were lysed and immunoprecipitated with antibodies against phosphorylated I-kappaB and AKT, the cells contained increased levels of both phospho-proteins, both of which promote cell survival. By contrast, neurotrophin-treated myoblasts did not induce phosphorylation of Map Kinase p42/44 or p38, indicating the survival was not mediated by the trk A receptor. Taken together, the data indicate that the p75(NTR) mediates survival of myoblasts prior to differentiation and that the activity of this receptor during myogenesis is important for developing muscle. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Distinct Effects of Rac1 on Differentiation of Primary Avian Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Rita; Serafini, Marco; Castellani, Loriana; Falcone, Germana; Alemà, Stefano

    1999-01-01

    Rho family GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in response to extracellular cues and in the transduction of signals from the membrane to the nucleus. Their role in development and cell differentiation, however, is little understood. Here we show that the transient expression of constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 in unestablished avian myoblasts is sufficient to cause inhibition of myogenin expression and block of the transition to the myocyte compartment, whereas activated RhoA affects myogenic differentiation only marginally. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) appears not to be essential for block of differentiation because, although Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases modestly activate JNK in quail myoblasts, a Rac1 mutant defective for JNK activation can still inhibit myogenic differentiation. Stable expression of active Rac1, attained by infection with a recombinant retrovirus, is permissive for terminal differentiation, but the resulting myotubes accumulate severely reduced levels of muscle-specific proteins. This inhibition is the consequence of posttranscriptional events and suggests the presence of a novel level of regulation of myogenesis. We also show that myotubes expressing constitutively active Rac1 fail to assemble ordered sarcomeres. Conversely, a dominant-negative Rac1 variant accelerates sarcomere maturation and inhibits v-Src–induced selective disassembly of I-Z-I complexes. Collectively, our findings provide a role for Rac1 during skeletal muscle differentiation and strongly suggest that Rac1 is required downstream of v-Src in the signaling pathways responsible for the dismantling of tissue-specific supramolecular structures. PMID:10512856

  7. Cullin E3 Ligase Activity Is Required for Myoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Blondelle, Jordan; Shapiro, Paige; Domenighetti, Andrea A; Lange, Stephan

    2017-04-07

    The role of cullin E3-ubiquitin ligases for muscle homeostasis is best known during muscle atrophy, as the cullin-1 substrate adaptor atrogin-1 is among the most well-characterized muscle atrogins. We investigated whether cullin activity was also crucial during terminal myoblast differentiation and aggregation of acetylcholine receptors for the establishment of neuromuscular junctions in vitro. The activity of cullin E3-ligases is modulated through post-translational modification with the small ubiquitin-like modifier nedd8. Using either the Nae1 inhibitor MLN4924 (Pevonedistat) or siRNA against nedd8 in early or late stages of differentiation on C2C12 myoblasts, and primary satellite cells from mouse and human, we show that cullin E3-ligase activity is necessary for each step of the muscle cell differentiation program in vitro. We further investigate known transcriptional repressors for terminal muscle differentiation, namely ZBTB38, Bhlhe41, and Id1. Due to their identified roles for terminal muscle differentiation, we hypothesize that the accumulation of these potential cullin E3-ligase substrates may be partially responsible for the observed phenotype. MLN4924 is currently undergoing clinical trials in cancer patients, and our experiments highlight concerns on the homeostasis and regenerative capacity of muscles in these patients who often experience cachexia.

  8. Codependent activators direct myoblast-specific MyoD transcription.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Geles, Kenneth G; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A; Tjian, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Although FoxO and Pax proteins represent two important families of transcription factors in determining cell fate, they had not been functionally or physically linked together in mediating regulation of a common target gene during normal cellular transcription programs. Here, we identify MyoD, a key regulator of myogenesis, as a direct target of FoxO3 and Pax3/7 in myoblasts. Our cell-based assays and in vitro studies reveal a tight codependent partnership between FoxO3 and Pax3/7 to coordinately recruit RNA polymerase II and form a preinitiation complex (PIC) to activate MyoD transcription in myoblasts. The role of FoxO3 in regulating muscle differentiation is confirmed in vivo by observed defects in muscle regeneration caused by MyoD downregulation in FoxO3 null mice. These data establish a mutual interdependence and functional link between two families of transcription activators serving as potential signaling sensors and regulators of cell fate commitment in directing tissue specific MyoD transcription.

  9. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Koshi N.; Okuno, Hiroshi; Sano, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Kazuo; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. {yields} The expression of C/EBP{beta}, {alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased under hypoxia. {yields} Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) {beta}, {alpha} and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) {gamma} were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  10. Effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 and 25(OH)D3 on C2C12 Myoblast Proliferation, Differentiation, and Myotube Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    van der Meijden, K.; Bravenboer, N.; Dirks, N.F.; Heijboer, A.C.; den Heijer, M.; de Wit, G.M.J.; Offringa, C.; Lips, P.

    2016-01-01

    An adequate vitamin D status is essential to optimize muscle strength. However, whether vitamin D directly reduces muscle fiber atrophy or stimulates muscle fiber hypertrophy remains subject of debate. A mechanism that may affect the role of vitamin D in the regulation of muscle fiber size is the local conversion of 25(OH)D to 1,25(OH)2D by 1α‐hydroxylase. Therefore, we investigated in a murine C2C12 myoblast culture whether both 1,25(OH)2D3 and 25(OH)D3 affect myoblast proliferation, differentiation, and myotube size and whether these cells are able to metabolize 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3. We show that myoblasts not only responded to 1,25(OH)2D3, but also to the precursor 25(OH)D3 by increasing their VDR mRNA expression and reducing their proliferation. In differentiating myoblasts and myotubes 1,25(OH)2D3 as well as 25(OH)D3 stimulated VDR mRNA expression and in myotubes 1,25(OH)2D3 also stimulated MHC mRNA expression. However, this occurred without notable effects on myotube size. Moreover, no effects on the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway as well as MyoD and myogenin mRNA levels were observed. Interestingly, both myoblasts and myotubes expressed CYP27B1 and CYP24 mRNA which are required for vitamin D3 metabolism. Although 1α‐hydroxylase activity could not be shown in myotubes, after treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 or 25(OH)D3 myotubes showed strongly elevated CYP24 mRNA levels compared to untreated cells. Moreover, myotubes were able to convert 25(OH)D3 to 24R,25(OH)2D3 which may play a role in myoblast proliferation and differentiation. These data suggest that skeletal muscle is not only a direct target for vitamin D3 metabolites, but is also able to metabolize 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2517–2528, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018098

  11. Effects of 1,25(OH)2 D3 and 25(OH)D3 on C2C12 Myoblast Proliferation, Differentiation, and Myotube Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    van der Meijden, K; Bravenboer, N; Dirks, N F; Heijboer, A C; den Heijer, M; de Wit, G M J; Offringa, C; Lips, P; Jaspers, R T

    2016-11-01

    An adequate vitamin D status is essential to optimize muscle strength. However, whether vitamin D directly reduces muscle fiber atrophy or stimulates muscle fiber hypertrophy remains subject of debate. A mechanism that may affect the role of vitamin D in the regulation of muscle fiber size is the local conversion of 25(OH)D to 1,25(OH)2 D by 1α-hydroxylase. Therefore, we investigated in a murine C2C12 myoblast culture whether both 1,25(OH)2 D3 and 25(OH)D3 affect myoblast proliferation, differentiation, and myotube size and whether these cells are able to metabolize 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2 D3 . We show that myoblasts not only responded to 1,25(OH)2 D3 , but also to the precursor 25(OH)D3 by increasing their VDR mRNA expression and reducing their proliferation. In differentiating myoblasts and myotubes 1,25(OH)2 D3 as well as 25(OH)D3 stimulated VDR mRNA expression and in myotubes 1,25(OH)2 D3 also stimulated MHC mRNA expression. However, this occurred without notable effects on myotube size. Moreover, no effects on the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway as well as MyoD and myogenin mRNA levels were observed. Interestingly, both myoblasts and myotubes expressed CYP27B1 and CYP24 mRNA which are required for vitamin D3 metabolism. Although 1α-hydroxylase activity could not be shown in myotubes, after treatment with 1,25(OH)2 D3 or 25(OH)D3 myotubes showed strongly elevated CYP24 mRNA levels compared to untreated cells. Moreover, myotubes were able to convert 25(OH)D3 to 24R,25(OH)2 D3 which may play a role in myoblast proliferation and differentiation. These data suggest that skeletal muscle is not only a direct target for vitamin D3 metabolites, but is also able to metabolize 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2 D3 . J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2517-2528, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Hypomorphic Smn knockdown C2C12 myoblasts reveal intrinsic defects in myoblast fusion and myotube morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Shafey, Dina; Cote, Patrice D.; Kothary, Rashmi . E-mail: rkothary@ohri.ca

    2005-11-15

    Dosage of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein has been directly correlated with the severity of disease in patients diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). It is also clear that SMA is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the degeneration of the {alpha}-motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord and atrophy of the associated skeletal muscle. What is more controversial is whether it is neuronal and/or muscle-cell-autonomous defects that are responsible for the disease per se. Although motor neuron degeneration is generally accepted as the primary event in SMA, intrinsic muscle defects in this disease have not been ruled out. To gain a better understanding of the influence of SMN protein dosage in muscle, we have generated a hypomorphic series of myoblast (C2C12) stable cell lines with variable Smn knockdown. We show that depletion of Smn in these cells resulted in a decrease in the number of nuclear 'gems' (gemini of coiled bodies), reduced proliferation with no increase in cell death, defects in myoblast fusion, and malformed myotubes. Importantly, the severity of these abnormalities is directly correlated with the decrease in Smn dosage. Taken together, our work supports the view that there is an intrinsic defect in skeletal muscle cells of SMA patients and that this defect contributes to the overall pathogenesis in this devastating disease.

  13. Low Glucose but Not Galactose Enhances Oxidative Mitochondrial Metabolism in C2C12 Myoblasts and Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Anděl, Michal; Trnka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Substituting galactose for glucose in cell culture media has been suggested to enhance mitochondrial metabolism in a variety of cell lines. We studied the effects of carbohydrate availability on growth, differentiation and metabolism of C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured growth rates, ability to differentiate, citrate synthase and respiratory chain activities and several parameters of mitochondrial respiration in C2C12 cells grown in media with varying carbohydrate availability (5 g/l glucose, 1 g/l glucose, 1 g/l galactose, and no added carbohydrates). C2C12 myoblasts grow more slowly without glucose irrespective of the presence of galactose, which is not consumed by the cells, and they fail to differentiate without glucose in the medium. Cells grown in a no-glucose medium (with or without galactose) have lower maximal respiration and spare respiratory capacity than cells grown in the presence of glucose. However, increasing glucose concentration above physiological levels decreases the achievable maximal respiration. C2C12 myotubes differentiated at a high glucose concentration showed higher dependency on oxidative respiration under basal conditions but had lower maximal and spare respiratory capacity when compared to cells differentiated under low glucose condition. Citrate synthase activity or mitochondrial yield were not significantly affected by changes in the available substrate concentration but a trend towards a higher respiratory chain activity was observed at reduced glucose levels. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that using galactose to increase oxidative metabolism may not be applicable to every cell line, and the changes in mitochondrial respiratory parameters associated with treating cells with galactose are mainly due to glucose deprivation. Moderate concentrations of glucose (1 g/l) in a growth medium are optimal for mitochondrial respiration in C2C12 cell line while supraphysiological

  14. Novel function of stabilin-2 in myoblast fusion: the recognition of extracellular phosphatidylserine as a “fuse-me” signal

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Go-Woon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Kim, In-San

    2016-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is important for skeletal muscle formation. Even though the knowledge of myoblast fusion mechanism has accumulated over the years, the initial signal of fusion is yet to be elucidated. Our study reveals the novel function of a phosphatidylserine (PS) receptor, stabilin-2 (Stab2), in the modulation of myoblast fusion, through the recognition of PS exposed on myoblasts. During differentiation of myoblasts, Stab2 expression is higher than other PS receptors and is controlled by calcineurin/NFAT signaling on myoblasts. The forced expression of Stab2 results in an increase in myoblast fusion; genetic ablation of Stab2 in mice causes a reduction in muscle size, as a result of impaired myoblast fusion. After muscle injury, muscle regeneration is impaired in Stab2-deficient mice, resulting in small myofibers with fewer nuclei, which is due to reduction of fusion rather than defection of myoblast differentiation. The fusion-promoting role of Stab2 is dependent on its PS-binding motif, and the blocking of PS-Stab2 binding impairs cell-cell fusion on myoblasts. Given our previous finding that Stab2 recognizes PS exposed on apoptotic cells for sensing as an “eat-me” signal, we propose that PS-Stab2 binding is required for sensing of a “fuse-me” signal as the initial signal of myoblast fusion. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 303-304] PMID:27174501

  15. Novel function of stabilin-2 in myoblast fusion: the recognition of extracellular phosphatidylserine as a "fuse-me" signal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Go-Woon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Kim, In-San

    2016-06-01

    Myoblast fusion is important for skeletal muscle formation. Even though the knowledge of myoblast fusion mechanism has accumulated over the years, the initial signal of fusion is yet to be elucidated. Our study reveals the novel function of a phosphatidylserine (PS) receptor, stabilin-2 (Stab2), in the modulation of myoblast fusion, through the recognition of PS exposed on myoblasts. During differentiation of myoblasts, Stab2 expression is higher than other PS receptors and is controlled by calcineurin/NFAT signaling on myoblasts. The forced expression of Stab2 results in an increase in myoblast fusion; genetic ablation of Stab2 in mice causes a reduction in muscle size, as a result of impaired myoblast fusion. After muscle injury, muscle regeneration is impaired in Stab2- deficient mice, resulting in small myofibers with fewer nuclei, which is due to reduction of fusion rather than defection of myoblast differentiation. The fusion-promoting role of Stab2 is dependent on its PS-binding motif, and the blocking of PS-Stab2 binding impairs cell-cell fusion on myoblasts. Given our previous finding that Stab2 recognizes PS exposed on apoptotic cells for sensing as an "eat-me" signal, we propose that PS-Stab2 binding is required for sensing of a "fuse-me" signal as the initial signal of myoblast fusion. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 303-304].

  16. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering using isolated myoblasts on synthetic biodegradable polymers: preliminary studies.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A K; Marler, J; Benvenuto, M; Willital, G H; Vacanti, J P

    1999-12-01

    Skeletal muscle is responsible for the control of voluntary movement and the maintenance of structural contours of the body. Muscle loss or deficiency is encountered in various pathological states, and attempts to correct them have been employed with limited success. The aim of the present study was to tissue engineer three-dimensional vascularized skeletal muscle using isolated myoblasts attached to synthetic biodegradable polymer for tissue replacement in the enhancement of muscle regeneration. Myoblasts derived from neonatal rats (3-5-day-old), Fisher CDF-F344, were seeded onto polyglycolic acid meshes and implanted into the omentum of syngeneic adult Fisher CDF-F344 rats. Rats were sacrificed on day 30 and day 45 after the transplantation, and the cell-polymer constructs were harvested for morphological analysis. Histological analysis of the constructs were performed by hematoxylin and eosin, and immunohistochemical staining was positive for alpha sarcomeric actin and desmin skeletal muscle marker. Viable myoblasts organized between strands of degrading polymer mesh formed the new tissue, and vascularization of the entire construct was observed. Organization of neomuscle strands surrounded by vascularized tissue composed of degrading polymer and fusing myoblasts demonstrated the ability of myoblast constructs to survive, reorganize and regenerate tissue-like structures. Since myoblast transplantation to date has been limited to the cellular level of replacement, myoblast-polyglycolic acid constructs may be useful in defining the application of tissue engineering for future skeletal muscle transplantations.

  17. Myostatin inhibits myoblast differentiation by down-regulating MyoD expression.

    PubMed

    Langley, Brett; Thomas, Mark; Bishop, Amy; Sharma, Mridula; Gilmour, Stewart; Kambadur, Ravi

    2002-12-20

    Myostatin, a negative regulator of myogenesis, is shown to function by controlling the proliferation of myoblasts. In this study we show that myostatin is an inhibitor of myoblast differentiation and that this inhibition is mediated through Smad 3. In vitro, increasing concentrations of recombinant mature myostatin reversibly blocked the myogenic differentiation of myoblasts, cultured in low serum media. Western and Northern blot analysis indicated that addition of myostatin to the low serum culture media repressed the levels of MyoD, Myf5, myogenin, and p21 leading to the inhibition of myogenic differentiation. The transient transfection of C(2)C(12) myoblasts with MyoD expressing constructs did not rescue myostatin-inhibited myogenic differentiation. Myostatin signaling specifically induced Smad 3 phosphorylation and increased Smad 3.MyoD association, suggesting that Smad 3 may mediate the myostatin signal by interfering with MyoD activity and expression. Consistent with this, the expression of dominant-negative Smad3 rescued the activity of a MyoD promoter-reporter in C(2)C(12) myoblasts treated with myostatin. Taken together, these results suggest that myostatin inhibits MyoD activity and expression via Smad 3 resulting in the failure of the myoblasts to differentiate into myotubes. Thus we propose that myostatin plays a critical role in myogenic differentiation and that the muscular hyperplasia and hypertrophy seen in animals that lack functional myostatin is because of deregulated proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts.

  18. S100B engages RAGE or bFGF/FGFR1 in myoblasts depending on its own concentration and myoblast density. Implications for muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Riuzzi, Francesca; Sorci, Guglielmo; Beccafico, Sara; Donato, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    In high-density myoblast cultures S100B enhances basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) receptor 1 (FGFR1) signaling via binding to bFGF and blocks its canonical receptor, receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), thereby stimulating proliferation and inhibiting differentiation. Here we show that upon skeletal muscle injury S100B is released from myofibers with maximum release at day 1 post-injury in coincidence with satellite cell activation and the beginning of the myoblast proliferation phase, and declining release thereafter in coincidence with reduced myoblast proliferation and enhanced differentiation. By contrast, levels of released bFGF are remarkably low at day 1 post-injury, peak around day 5 and decline thereafter. We also show that in low-density myoblast cultures S100B binds RAGE, but not bFGF/FGFR1 thereby simultaneously stimulating proliferation via ERK1/2 and activating the myogenic program via p38 MAPK. Clearance of S100B after a 24-h treatment of low-density myoblasts results in enhanced myotube formation compared with controls as a result of increased cell numbers and activated myogenic program, whereas chronic treatment with S100B results in stimulation of proliferation and inhibition of differentiation due to a switch of the initial low-density culture to a high-density culture. However, at relatively high doses, S100B stimulates the mitogenic bFGF/FGFR1 signaling in low-density myoblasts, provided bFGF is present. We propose that S100B is a danger signal released from injured muscles that participates in skeletal muscle regeneration by activating the promyogenic RAGE or the mitogenic bFGF/FGFR1 depending on its own concentration, the absence or presence of bFGF, and myoblast density.

  19. S100B Engages RAGE or bFGF/FGFR1 in Myoblasts Depending on Its Own Concentration and Myoblast Density. Implications for Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Beccafico, Sara; Donato, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    In high-density myoblast cultures S100B enhances basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) receptor 1 (FGFR1) signaling via binding to bFGF and blocks its canonical receptor, receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), thereby stimulating proliferation and inhibiting differentiation. Here we show that upon skeletal muscle injury S100B is released from myofibers with maximum release at day 1 post-injury in coincidence with satellite cell activation and the beginning of the myoblast proliferation phase, and declining release thereafter in coincidence with reduced myoblast proliferation and enhanced differentiation. By contrast, levels of released bFGF are remarkably low at day 1 post-injury, peak around day 5 and decline thereafter. We also show that in low-density myoblast cultures S100B binds RAGE, but not bFGF/FGFR1 thereby simultaneously stimulating proliferation via ERK1/2 and activating the myogenic program via p38 MAPK. Clearance of S100B after a 24-h treatment of low-density myoblasts results in enhanced myotube formation compared with controls as a result of increased cell numbers and activated myogenic program, whereas chronic treatment with S100B results in stimulation of proliferation and inhibition of differentiation due to a switch of the initial low-density culture to a high-density culture. However, at relatively high doses, S100B stimulates the mitogenic bFGF/FGFR1 signaling in low-density myoblasts, provided bFGF is present. We propose that S100B is a danger signal released from injured muscles that participates in skeletal muscle regeneration by activating the promyogenic RAGE or the mitogenic bFGF/FGFR1 depending on its own concentration, the absence or presence of bFGF, and myoblast density. PMID:22276098

  20. Interactions between Skeletal Muscle Myoblasts and their Extracellular Matrix Revealed by a Serum Free Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Vishal; Dye, Danielle E.; Kinnear, Beverley F.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Coombe, Deirdre R.

    2015-01-01

    Decellularisation of skeletal muscle provides a system to study the interactions of myoblasts with muscle extracellular matrix (ECM). This study describes the efficient decellularisation of quadriceps muscle with the retention of matrix components and the use of this matrix for myoblast proliferation and differentiation under serum free culture conditions. Three decellularisation approaches were examined; the most effective was phospholipase A2 treatment, which removed cellular material while maximizing the retention of ECM components. Decellularised muscle matrices were then solubilized and used as substrates for C2C12 mouse myoblast serum free cultures. The muscle matrix supported myoblast proliferation and differentiation equally as well as collagen and fibronectin. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that myoblasts seeded on muscle matrix and fibronectin differentiated to form long, well-aligned myotubes, while myoblasts seeded on collagen were less organized. qPCR analyses showed a time dependent increase in genes involved in skeletal muscle differentiation and suggested that muscle-derived matrix may stimulate an increased rate of differentiation compared to collagen and fibronectin. Decellularized whole muscle three-dimensional scaffolds also supported cell adhesion and spreading, with myoblasts aligning along specific tracts of matrix proteins within the scaffolds. Thus, under serum free conditions, intact acellular muscle matrices provided cues to direct myoblast adhesion and migration. In addition, myoblasts were shown to rapidly secrete and organise their own matrix glycoproteins to create a localized ECM microenvironment. This serum free culture system has revealed that the correct muscle ECM facilitates more rapid cell organisation and differentiation than single matrix glycoprotein substrates. PMID:26030912

  1. Asymmetric Mbc, active Rac1 and F-actin foci in the fusion-competent myoblasts during myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Haralalka, Shruti; Shelton, Claude; Cartwright, Heather N.; Katzfey, Erin; Janzen, Evan; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is an intricate process that is initiated by cell recognition and adhesion, and culminates in cell membrane breakdown and formation of multinucleate syncytia. In the Drosophila embryo, this process occurs asymmetrically between founder cells that pattern the musculature and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs) that account for the bulk of the myoblasts. The present studies clarify and amplify current models of myoblast fusion in several important ways. We demonstrate that the non-conventional guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Mbc plays a fundamental role in the FCMs, where it functions to activate Rac1, but is not required in the founder cells for fusion. Mbc, active Rac1 and F-actin foci are highly enriched in the FCMs, where they localize to the Sns:Kirre junction. Furthermore, Mbc is crucial for the integrity of the F-actin foci and the FCM cytoskeleton, presumably via its activation of Rac1 in these cells. Finally, the local asymmetric distribution of these proteins at adhesion sites is reminiscent of invasive podosomes and, consistent with this model, they are enriched at sites of membrane deformation, where the FCM protrudes into the founder cell/myotube. These data are consistent with models promoting actin polymerization as the driving force for myoblast fusion. PMID:21389053

  2. Myoblasts transplanted into rat infarcted myocardium are functionally isolated from their host

    PubMed Central

    Léobon, Bertrand; Garcin, Isabelle; Menasché, Philippe; Vilquin, Jean-Thomas; Audinat, Etienne; Charpak, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Survival and differentiation of myogenic cells grafted into infarcted myocardium have raised the hope that cell transplantation becomes a new therapy for cardiovascular diseases. The approach was further supported by transplantation of skeletal myoblasts, which was shown to improve cardiac performance in several animal species. Despite the success of myoblast transplantation and its recent trial in human, the mechanism responsible for the functional improvement remains unclear. Here, we used intracellular recordings coupled to video and fluorescence microscopy to establish whether myoblasts, genetically labeled with enhanced GFP and transplanted into rat infarcted myocardium, retain excitable and contractile properties, and participate actively to cardiac function. Our results indicate that grafted myoblasts differentiate into peculiar hyperexcitable myotubes with a contractile activity fully independent of neighboring cardiomyocytes. We conclude that mechanisms other than electromechanical coupling between grafted and host cells are involved in the improvement of cardiac function. PMID:12805561

  3. The prelamin A pre-peptide induces cardiac and skeletal myoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Gary L. . E-mail: Gary.Brodsky@uchsc.edu; Bowersox, Jeffrey A.; Fitzgerald-Miller, Lisa; Miller, Leslie A.; Maclean, Kenneth N.

    2007-05-18

    Prelamin A processing is unique amongst mammalian proteins and results in the production of a farnesylated and carboxymethylated peptide. We examined the effect of pathogenic LMNA mutations on prelamin A processing, and of the covalently modified peptide on cardiac and skeletal myoblast differentiation. Here we report a mutation associated with dilated cardiomyopathy prevents prelamin A peptide production. In addition, topical application of the covalently modified C-terminal peptide to proliferating skeletal and cardiac myoblasts induced myotube and striated tissue formation, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that skeletal and cardiac myoblasts are the first cell lines examined to contain unprocessed prelamin A, and immunostaining of peptide-treated cells revealed a previously unidentified role for prelamin A in cytoskeleton formation and intercellular organization. These results demonstrate a direct role for prelamin A in myoblast differentiation and indicate the prelamin A peptide may have therapeutic potential.

  4. Myostatin acts as an autocrine/paracrine negative regulator in myoblast differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Kishida, Tsunao; Ejima, Akika; Gojo, Satoshi; Mazda, Osam

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► iPS-derived cells express myostatin and its receptor upon myoblast differentiation. ► Myostatin inhibits myoblast differentiation by inhibiting MyoD and Myo5a induction. ► Silencing of myostatin promotes differentiation of human iPS cells into myoblasts. -- Abstract: Myostatin, also known as growth differentiation factor (GDF-8), regulates proliferation of muscle satellite cells, and suppresses differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes via down-regulation of key myogenic differentiation factors including MyoD. Recent advances in stem cell biology have enabled generation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells, but it remains to be clarified whether myostatin is also involved in regulation of artificial differentiation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells. Here we show that the human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells that were induced to differentiate into myoblasts expressed myostatin and its receptor during the differentiation. An addition of recombinant human myostatin (rhMyostatin) suppressed induction of MyoD and Myo5a, resulting in significant suppression of myoblast differentiation. The rhMyostatin treatment also inhibited proliferation of the cells at a later phase of differentiation. RNAi-mediated silencing of myostatin promoted differentiation of human iPS-derived embryoid body (EB) cells into myoblasts. These results strongly suggest that myostatin plays an important role in regulation of myoblast differentiation from iPS cells of human origin. The present findings also have significant implications for potential regenerative medicine for muscular diseases.

  5. One-Step Purification of Human Skeletal Muscle Myoblasts and Subsequent Expansion Using Laminin-Coated Surface.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shiplu Roy; binti Ismail, Annis; Chee, Sia Chye; bin Laupa, Mohd Suffian; binti Jaffri, Fadhlun; Saberi, Salfarina Ezrina Mohmad; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal myoblasts have been extensively used to study muscle growth and differentiation, and were recently tested for their application as cell therapy and as a gene delivery system to treat muscle and nonmuscle diseases. However, contamination of fibroblasts in isolated cells from skeletal muscle is one of the long-standing problems for routine expansion. This study aimed to establish a simple one-step process to purify myoblasts and maintain their purity during expansion. Mixed cells were preplated serially on laminin- and collagen type I-coated surfaces in a different array for 5, 10, and 15 min. Immunocytochemical staining with antibodies specific to myoblasts was performed to evaluate myoblast attachment efficiency, purity, and yield. It was found that laminin-coated surface favors the attachment of myoblasts. Highest myoblast purity of 78.9% ± 6.8% was achieved by 5 min of preplating only on the laminin-coated surface with a yield of 56.9% ± 3.3%. Primary cells, isolated from skeletal muscle (n = 4), confirm the enhancement of purity through preplating on laminin-coated surface for 5 min. Subsequent expansion after preplating enhanced myoblast purity due to an increase in myoblast growth than fibroblasts. Myoblast purity of ∼ 98% was achieved when another preplating was performed during passaging. In conclusion, myoblasts can be purified and efficiently expanded in one step by preplating on laminin-coated surface, which is a simple and robust technique.

  6. PARP1 Differentially Interacts with Promoter region of DUX4 Gene in FSHD Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishakha; Pandey, Sachchida Nand; Khawaja, Hunain; Brown, Kristy J; Hathout, Yetrib; Chen, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of the study is to identity proteins, which interact with the promoter region of double homeobox protein 4 (DUX4) gene known to be causative for the autosomal dominant disorder Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD). Methods We performed a DNA pull down assay coupled with mass spectrometry analysis to identify proteins that interact with a DUX4 promoter probe in Rhabdomyosarcomca (RD) cells. We selected the top ranked protein poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) from our mass spectrometry data for further ChIP-qPCR validation using patients' myoblasts. We then treated FSHD myoblasts with PARP1 inhibitors to investigate the role of PARP1 in the FSHD myoblasts. Results In our mass spectrometry analysis, PARP1 was found to be the top ranked protein interacting preferentially with the DUX4 promoter probe in RD cells. We further validated this interaction by immunoblotting in RD cells (2-fold enrichment compared to proteins pulled down by a control probe, p<0.05) and ChIP-qPCR in patients' myoblasts (65-fold enrichment, p<0.01). Interestingly, the interaction was only observed in FSHD myoblasts but not in the control myoblasts. Upon further treatment of FSHD myoblasts with PARP1 inhibitors, we showed that treatment with a PARP1 inhibitor, 3-aminobenzamide (0.5 mM), for 24 h had a suppression of DUX4 (2.6 fold, p<0.05) and ZSCAN4, a gene previously shown to be upregulated by DUX4, (1.6 fold, p<0.01) in FSHD myoblasts. Treatment with fisetin (0.5 mM), a polyphenol compound with PARP1 inhibitory property, for 24 h also suppressed the expression of DUX4 (44.8 fold, p<0.01) and ZSCAN4 (2.2 fold, p<0.05) in the FSHD myoblasts. We further showed that DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), a gene regulated by PARP1 was also enriched at the DUX4 promoter in RD cells through immunoblotting (2-fold, p<0.01) and immortalized FSHD myoblasts (42-fold, p<0.01) but not control myoblasts through ChIP qPCR. Conclusion Our results showed that PARP1 and DNMT1

  7. Phosphorylation of Lbx1 controls lateral myoblast migration into the limb.

    PubMed

    Masselink, Wouter; Masaki, Megumi; Sieiro, Daniel; Marcelle, Christophe; Currie, Peter D

    2017-08-24

    The migration of limb myogenic precursors from limb level somites to their ultimate site of differentiation in the limb is a paradigmatic example of a set of dynamic and orchestrated migratory cell behaviours. The homeobox containing transcription factor ladybird homeobox 1 (Lbx1) is a central regulator of limb myoblast migration, null mutations of Lbx1 result in severe disruptions to limb muscle formation, particularly in the distal region of the limb in mice (Gross et al., 2000). As such Lbx1 has been hypothesized to control lateral migration of myoblasts into the distal limb anlage. It acts as a core regulator of the limb myoblast migration machinery, controlled by Pax3. A secondary role for Lbx1 in the differentiation and commitment of limb musculature has also been proposed (Brohmann et al., 2000; Uchiyama et al., 2000). Here we show that lateral migration, but not differentiation or commitment of limb myoblasts, is controlled by the phosphorylation of three adjacent serine residues of LBX1. Electroporation of limb level somites in the chick embryo with a dephosphomimetic form of Lbx1 results in a specific defect in the lateral migration of limb myoblasts. Although the initial delamination and migration of myoblasts is unaffected, migration into the distal limb bud is severely disrupted. Interestingly, myoblasts undergo normal differentiation independent of their migratory status, suggesting that the differentiation potential of hypaxial muscle is not regulated by the phosphorylation state of LBX1. Furthermore, we show that FGF8 and ERK mediated signal transduction, both critical regulators of the developing limb bud, have the capacity to induce the phosphorylation of LBX1 at these residues. Overall, this suggests a mechanism whereby the phosphorylation of LBX1, potentially through FGF8 and ERK signalling, controls the lateral migration of myoblasts into the distal limb bud. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Induction of angiogenesis by implantation of encapsulated primary myoblasts expressing vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Springer, M L; Hortelano, G; Bouley, D M; Wong, J; Kraft, P E; Blau, H M

    2000-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that intramuscular implantation of primary myoblasts engineered to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) constitutively resulted in hemangioma formation and the appearance of VEGF in the circulation. To investigate the potential for using allogeneic myoblasts and the effects of delivery of VEGF-expressing myoblasts to non-muscle sites, we have enclosed them in microcapsules that protect allogeneic cells from rejection, yet allow the secretion of proteins produced by the cells. Encapsulated mouse primary myoblasts that constitutively expressed murine VEGF164, or encapsulated negative control cells, were implanted either subcutaneously or intraperitoneally into mice. Upon subcutaneous implantation, capsules containing VEGF-expressing myoblasts gave rise to large tissue masses at the implantation site that continued to grow and were composed primarily of endothelial and smooth muscle cells directly surrounding the capsules, and macrophages and capillaries further away from the capsules. Similarly, when injected intraperitoneally, VEGF-producing capsules caused significant localized inflammation and angiogenesis within the peritoneum, and ultimately led to fatal intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Notably, however, VEGF was not detected in the plasma of any mice. We conclude that encapsulated primary myoblasts persist and continue to secrete VEGF subcutaneously and intraperitoneally, but that the heparin-binding isoform VEGF164 exerts localized effects at the site of production. VEGF secreted from the capsules attracts endothelial and smooth muscle cells in a macrophage-independent manner. These results, along with our previous results, show that the mode and site of delivery of the same factor by the same engineered myoblasts can lead to markedly different outcomes. Moreover, the results confirm that constitutive delivery of high levels of VEGF is not desirable. In contrast, regulatable expression may lead to efficacious, safe, and

  9. Elastic hydrogel substrate supports robust expansion of murine myoblasts and enhances their engraftment

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Ke; Yang, Zhong; Xu, Jian-zhong; Liu, Wen-ying; Zeng, Qiang; Hou, Fang; Lin, Sen

    2015-09-10

    The application of satellite cell-derived myoblasts in regenerative medicine has been restricted by the rapid loss of stemness during in vitro cell expansion using traditional culture systems. However, studies published in the past decade have highlighted the influence of substrate elasticity on stem cell fate and revealed that culture on a soft hydrogel substrate can promote self-renewal and prolong the regenerative potential of muscle stem cells. Whether hydrogel substrates have similar effects after long-term robust expansion remains to be determined. Herein we prepared an elastic chitosan/beta-glycerophosphate/collagen hydrogel mimicking the soft microenvironment of muscle tissues for use as the substrate for satellite cell culture and investigated its influence on long-term cell expansion. After 20 passages in culture, satellite cell-derived myoblasts cultured on our hydrogel substrate exhibited significant improvements in proliferation capability, cell viability, colony forming frequency, and potential for myogenic differentiation compared to those cultured on a routine rigid culture surface. Immunochemical staining and western blot analysis both confirmed that myoblasts cultured on the hydrogel substrate expressed higher levels of several differentiation-related markers, including Pax7, Pax3, and SSEA-1, and a lower level of MyoD compared to myoblasts cultured on rigid culture plates (all p<0.05). After transplantation into the tibialis anterior of nude mice, myoblasts that had been cultured on the hydrogel substrate demonstrated a significantly greater engraftment efficacy than those cultured on the traditional surface. Collectively, these results indicate that the elastic hydrogel substrate supported robust expansion of murine myoblasts and enhanced their engraftment in vivo. - Highlights: • An elastic hydrogel was designed to mimic the pliable muscle tissue microenvironment. • Myoblasts retained their stemness in long-term culture on the elastic

  10. Balance between S-nitrosylation and denitrosylation modulates myoblast proliferation independently of soluble guanylyl cyclase activation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Aline M S; Ancillotti, Maryana T C; Rangel, Luciana P; Fontenele, Marcio; Figueiredo-Freitas, Cicero; Possidonio, Ana C; Soares, Carolina P; Sorenson, Martha M; Mermelstein, Claudia; Nogueira, Leonardo

    2017-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to myogenesis by regulating the transition between myoblast proliferation and fusion through cGMP signaling. NO can form S-nitrosothiols (RSNO), which control signaling pathways in many different cell types. However, neither the role of RSNO content nor its regulation by the denitrosylase activity of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) during myogenesis is understood. Here, we used primary cultures of chick embryonic skeletal muscle cells to investigate whether changes in intracellular RSNO alter proliferation and fusion of myoblasts in the presence and absence of cGMP. Cultures were grown to fuse most of the myoblasts into myotubes, with and without S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO), 8-Br-cGMP, DETA-NO, or inhibitors for NO synthase (NOS), GSNOR, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), or a combination of these, followed by analysis of GSNOR activity, protein expression, RSNO, cGMP, and cell morphology. Although the activity of GSNOR increased progressively over 72 h, inhibiting GSNOR (by GSNOR inhibitor - GSNORi - or by knocking down GSNOR with siRNA) produced an increase in RSNO and in the number of myoblasts and fibroblasts, accompanied by a decrease in myoblast fusion index. This was also detected with CysNO supplementation. Enhanced myoblast number was proportional to GSNOR inhibition. Effects of the GSNORi and GSNOR knockdown were blunted by NOS inhibition, suggesting their dependence on NO synthesis. Interestingly, GSNORi and GSNOR knockdown reversed the attenuated proliferation obtained with sGC inhibition in myoblasts, but not in fibroblasts. Hence myoblast proliferation is enhanced by increasing RSNO, and regulated by GSNOR activity, independently of cGMP production and signaling. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Cellular cardiomyoplasty: development of a technique to culture human myoblasts for clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M Esther Rendal; Cabarcos, M Rodriguez; Román, T Diaz; Stein, A Juffé; Garcia, N Doménech; Nazar, B Adrio; Dopico, M J Sánchez; Núñez, C Andión; Garcia, F J Blanco

    2005-01-01

    Some recent studies have demonstrated that epicardial injection of autologous myoblasts, obtained from satellite cells of skeletal muscle, in association to coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) in patients with decreased left ventricular function secondary to ischaemic disease could be of some utility to get a better recovery of ventricular function due to the ability of these cells to grow and generate new muscle fibers over the previous fibrotic scar. The aims are the setting up of a process for the collection of the cellular cardiomyoplasty in samples of multiorganic donations and to carry out this technique in the same surgical moment as the revascularisation is performed in two patients. For this purpose we obtained muscle through biopsy of 15 human multiorgan donors and of two patients. Separation of fatty tissue, minced, and further digestion with collagenase type I (1.5 mgr/ml/2 gr by weight) and trypsin 1 x. Filtration of the cellular suspension, centrifugation and sowing of this suspension in culture medium, with 20% of human serum. Culture for three weeks until obtainment of between 200-300 million cells. Inmunohistochemistry and flow cytometry for the identification of the myoblasts was carried out. The results were obtained through flow cytometry, using CD56 as an indicator of the presence of myoblasts, between 70 and 80% of these types of cells were obtained after three weeks of culture. By inmunohistochemistry analyses, different markers were analyzed: desmin and myogenin. The results indicated the presence of a great number of positive cells with these markers, possibly myoblasts. Skeletal myoblast implant was not associated with adverse effects. The culture of autologous myoblasts is a rapid and simple technique where after three weeks of culture a great number of cells for implantation are obtained. In patients with old myocardial infarction, treatment with skeletal myoblast in conjunction with coronary artery bypass is safe and feasible

  12. The CELF1 RNA-Binding Protein Regulates Decay of Signal Recognition Particle mRNAs and Limits Secretion in Mouse Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Joseph; Lee, Jerome E.; López, Carolina M.; Anderson, John; Nguyen, Thuy-mi P.; Heck, Adam M.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    We previously identified several mRNAs encoding components of the secretory pathway, including signal recognition particle (SRP) subunit mRNAs, among transcripts associated with the RNA-binding protein CELF1. Through immunoprecipitation of RNAs crosslinked to CELF1 in myoblasts and in vitro binding assays using recombinant CELF1, we now provide evidence that CELF1 directly binds the mRNAs encoding each of the subunits of the SRP. Furthermore, we determined the half-lives of the Srp transcripts in control and CELF1 knockdown myoblasts. Our results indicate CELF1 is a destabilizer of at least five of the six Srp transcripts and that the relative abundance of the SRP proteins is out of balance when CELF1 is depleted. CELF1 knockdown myoblasts exhibit altered secretion of a luciferase reporter protein and are impaired in their ability to migrate and close a wound, consistent with a defect in the secreted extracellular matrix. Importantly, similar defects in wound healing are observed when SRP subunit imbalance is induced by over-expression of SRP68. Our studies support the existence of an RNA regulon containing Srp mRNAs that is controlled by CELF1. One implication is that altered function of CELF1 in myotonic dystrophy may contribute to changes in the extracellular matrix of affected muscle through defects in secretion. PMID:28129347

  13. M-Cadherin Activates Rac1 GTPase through the Rho-GEF Trio during Myoblast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Charrasse, Sophie; Comunale, Franck; Fortier, Mathieu; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Debant, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Cadherins are transmembrane glycoproteins that mediate Ca2+-dependent homophilic cell–cell adhesion and play crucial role during skeletal myogenesis. M-cadherin is required for myoblast fusion into myotubes, but its mechanisms of action remain unknown. The goal of this study was to cast some light on the nature of the M-cadherin–mediated signals involved in myoblast fusion into myotubes. We found that the Rac1 GTPase activity is increased at the time of myoblast fusion and it is required for this process. Moreover, we showed that M-cadherin–dependent adhesion activates Rac1 and demonstrated the formation of a multiproteic complex containing M-cadherin, the Rho-GEF Trio, and Rac1 at the onset of myoblast fusion. Interestingly, Trio knockdown efficiently blocked both the increase in Rac1-GTP levels, observed after M-cadherin–dependent contact formation, and myoblast fusion. We conclude that M-cadherin–dependent adhesion can activate Rac1 via the Rho-GEF Trio at the time of myoblast fusion. PMID:17332503

  14. Skeletal muscle myoblasts possess a stretch-responsive local angiotensin signalling system.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Adam P W; Baker, Jeff; De Lisio, Michael; Parise, Gianni

    2011-06-01

    A paucity of information exists regarding the presence of local renin-angiotensin systems (RASs) in skeletal muscle and associated muscle stem cells. Skeletal muscle and muscle stem cells were isolated from C57BL/6 mice and examined for the presence of a local RAS using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry (IHC), Western blotting and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Furthermore, the effect of mechanical stimulation on RAS member gene expression was analysed. Whole skeletal muscle, primary myoblasts and C2C12 derived myoblasts and myotubes differentially expressed members of the RAS including angiotensinogen, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT(1)) and type 2 (AT(2)). Renin transcripts were never detected, however, mRNA for the 'renin-like' enzyme cathepsin D was observed and Ang I and Ang II were identified in cell culture supernatants from proliferating myoblasts. AT(1) appeared to co-localise with polymerised actin filaments in proliferating myoblasts and was primarily found in the nucleus of terminally differentiated myotubes. Furthermore, mechanical stretch of proliferating and differentiating C2C12 cells differentially induced mRNA expression of angiotensinogen, AT(1) and AT(2). Proliferating and differentiated muscle stem cells possess a local stress-responsive RAS in vitro. The precise function of a local RAS in myoblasts remains unknown. However, evidence presented here suggests that Ang II may be a regulator of skeletal muscle myoblasts.

  15. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Ogura, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the complex process of muscle regeneration after injury remain unknown. Transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in several cell types, including skeletal muscle, and is activated by high temperature and by certain molecules secreted during tissue inflammation. Severe inflammation and local temperature perturbations are induced during muscle regeneration, which suggests that TRPV1 might be activated and involved in the process. The aim of this study, was to clarify the role of TRPV1 in the myogenic potential of satellite cells responsible for muscle regeneration. We found that mRNA and protein levels of TRPV1 increased during regeneration after cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury in mice. Using isolated mouse satellite cells (i.e., myoblasts), we observed that activation of TRPV1 by its agonist capsaicin (CAP) augmented myogenin protein levels. Whereas CAP did not alter myoblast proliferation, it facilitated myoblast fusion (evaluated using myonucleii number per myotube and fusion index). In contrast, suppression of TRPV1 by siRNA impaired myoblast fusion. Using mice, we also demonstrated that intramuscular injection of CAP facilitated muscle repair after CTX-induced muscle injury. Moreover, we showed that these roles of TRPV1 might be mediated by interleukin-4 and calcium signaling during myoblast fusion. Collectively, these results suggest that TRPV1 underlies normal myogenesis through promotion of myoblast fusion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2275-2285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Critical Role of the Rb Family in Myoblast Survival and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ciavarra, Giovanni; Ho, Andrew T.; Cobrinik, David; Zacksenhaus, Eldad

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Rb is thought to control cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. We recently showed that differentiating Rb-deficient mouse myoblasts can fuse to form short myotubes that quickly collapse through a mechanism involving autophagy, and that autophagy inhibitors or hypoxia could rescue the defect leading to long, twitching myotubes. Here we determined the contribution of pRb relatives, p107 and p130, to this process. We show that chronic or acute inactivation of Rb plus p107 or p130 increased myoblast cell death and reduced myotube formation relative to Rb loss alone. Treatment with autophagy antagonists or hypoxia extended survival of double-knockout myotubes, which appeared indistinguishable from control fibers. In contrast, triple mutations in Rb, p107 and p130, led to substantial increase in myoblast death and to elongated bi-nuclear myocytes, which seem to derive from nuclear duplication, as opposed to cell fusion. Under hypoxia, some rare, abnormally thin triple knockout myotubes survived and twitched. Thus, mutation of p107 or p130 reduces survival of Rb-deficient myoblasts during differentiation but does not preclude myoblast fusion or necessitate myotube degeneration, whereas combined inactivation of the entire Rb family produces a distinct phenotype, with drastically impaired myoblast fusion and survival. PMID:21423694

  17. Drosophila and mammalian models uncover a role for the myoblast fusion gene TANC1 in rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Avirneni-Vadlamudi, Usha; Galindo, Kathleen A.; Endicott, Tiana R.; Paulson, Vera; Cameron, Scott; Galindo, Rene L.

    2011-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a malignancy of muscle myoblasts, which fail to exit the cell cycle, resist terminal differentiation, and are blocked from fusing into syncytial skeletal muscle. In some patients, RMS is caused by a translocation that generates the fusion oncoprotein PAX-FOXO1, but the underlying RMS pathogenetic mechanisms that impede differentiation and promote neoplastic transformation remain unclear. Using a Drosophila model of PAX-FOXO1–mediated transformation, we show here that mutation in the myoblast fusion gene rolling pebbles (rols) dominantly suppresses PAX-FOXO1 lethality. Further analysis indicated that PAX-FOXO1 expression caused upregulation of rols, which suggests that Rols acts downstream of PAX-FOXO1. In mammalian myoblasts, gene silencing of Tanc1, an ortholog of rols, revealed that it is essential for myoblast fusion, but is dispensable for terminal differentiation. Misexpression of PAX-FOXO1 in myoblasts upregulated Tanc1 and blocked differentiation, whereas subsequent reduction of Tanc1 expression to native levels by RNAi restored both fusion and differentiation. Furthermore, decreasing human TANC1 gene expression caused RMS cancer cells to lose their neoplastic state, undergo fusion, and form differentiated syncytial muscle. Taken together, these findings identify misregulated myoblast fusion caused by ectopic TANC1 expression as a RMS neoplasia mechanism and suggest fusion molecules as candidates for targeted RMS therapy. PMID:22182840

  18. Phospholipase D1 facilitates second-phase myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Teng, Shuzhi; Stegner, David; Chen, Qin; Hongu, Tsunaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Chen, Li; Kanaho, Yasunori; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Frohman, Michael A; Huang, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Myoblast differentiation and fusion is a well-orchestrated multistep process that is essential for skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1) has been implicated in the initiation of myoblast differentiation in vitro. However, whether PLD1 plays additional roles in myoblast fusion and exerts a function in myogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that PLD1 expression is up-regulated in myogenic cells during muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin injury and that genetic ablation of PLD1 results in delayed myofiber regeneration. Myoblasts derived from PLD1-null mice or treated with PLD1-specific inhibitor are unable to form mature myotubes, indicating defects in second-phase myoblast fusion. Concomitantly, the PLD1 product phosphatidic acid is transiently detected on the plasma membrane of differentiating myocytes, and its production is inhibited by PLD1 knockdown. Exogenous lysophosphatidylcholine, a key membrane lipid for fusion pore formation, partially rescues fusion defect resulting from PLD1 inhibition. Thus these studies demonstrate a role for PLD1 in myoblast fusion during myogenesis in which PLD1 facilitates the fusion of mononuclear myocytes with nascent myotubes. © 2015 Teng et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  19. Tethering Membrane Fusion: Common and Different Players in Myoblasts and at the Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Marco B.; Jacob, Ralf; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Membrane fusion is essential for the communication of membrane-defined compartments, development of multicellular organisms and tissue homeostasis. Although membrane fusion has been studied extensively, still little is known about the molecular mechanisms. Especially the intercellular fusion of cells during development and tissue homeostasis is poorly understood. Somatic muscle formation in Drosophila depends on the intercellular fusion of myoblasts. In this process, myoblasts recognize each other and adhere, thereby triggering a protein machinery that leads to electron-dense plaques, vesicles and F-actin formation at apposing membranes. Two models of how local membrane stress is achieved to induce the merging of the myoblast membranes have been proposed: the electron-dense vesicles transport and release a fusogen and F-actin bends the plasma membrane. In this review, we highlight cell-adhesion molecules and intracellular proteins known to be involved in myoblast fusion. The cell-adhesion proteins also mediate the recognition and adhesion of other cell types, such as neurons that communicate with each other via special intercellular junctions, termed chemical synapses. At these synapses, neurotransmitters are released through the intracellular fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane. As the targeting of electron-dense vesicles in myoblasts shares some similarities with the targeting of synaptic vesicle fusion, we compare molecules required for synaptic vesicle fusion to recently identified molecules involved in myoblast fusion. PMID:24957080

  20. Spatial Geometries of Self-Assembled Chitohexaose Monolayers Regulate Myoblast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Poosala, Pornthida; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Kitaoka, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Myoblast fusion into functionally-distinct myotubes to form in vitro skeletal muscle constructs under differentiation serum-free conditions still remains a challenge. Herein, we report that our microtopographical carbohydrate substrates composed of bioactive hexa-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc6) modulated the efficiency of myoblast fusion without requiring horse serum or any differentiation medium during cell culture. Promotion of the differentiation of dissociated mononucleated skeletal myoblasts (C2C12; a mouse myoblast cell line) into robust myotubes was found only on GlcNAc6 micropatterns, whereas the myoblasts on control, non-patterned GlcNAc6 substrates or GlcNAc6-free patterns exhibited an undifferentiated form. We also examined the possible role of GlcNAc6 micropatterns with various widths in the behavior of C2C12 cells in early and late stages of myogenesis through mRNA expression of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms. The spontaneous contraction of myotubes was investigated via the regulation of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), which is involved in stimulating glucose uptake during cellular contraction. Narrow patterns demonstrated enhanced glucose uptake rate and generated a fast-twitch muscle fiber type, whereas the slow-twitch muscle fiber type was dominant on wider patterns. Our findings indicated that GlcNAc6-mediated integrin interactions are responsible for guiding myoblast fusion forward along with myotube formation. PMID:27164094

  1. The nuclear protein-coding gene ANKRD23 negatively regulates myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Rui; Xu, Haiyang; Xu, Zaiyan; Zuo, Bo

    2017-09-20

    Muscle fiber formation is a complex process and subject to fine regulation of a variety of protein-coding genes and non-coding RNA. In this study, we identified a nuclear protein-coding gene ANKRD23 which was highly expressed in muscle. Quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to detect the expression change of myoblast differentiation marker genes after knockdown and overexpression of ANKRD23. The results showed that the expression of myoblast differentiation marker genes were increased by interference and reduced by ANKRD23 overexpression, indicating that ANKRD23 played a negative role in the myoblast differentiation. Interestingly, we discovered a long non-coding RNA-AK004293 which was overlapped with the 3'UTR of ANKRD23 gene. Then we detected the effect of AK004293 on the expression of ANKRD23 and myoblast differentiation marker genes in C2C12 myoblasts. The results showed that AK004293 had no significant effect on the expression of myoblast differentiation maker genes and ANKRD23. In conclusion, our results established the foundation for further studies about the regulation mechanism of ANKRD23 in muscle development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Phospholipase D1 facilitates second-phase myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shuzhi; Stegner, David; Chen, Qin; Hongu, Tsunaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Chen, Li; Kanaho, Yasunori; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Frohman, Michael A.; Huang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Myoblast differentiation and fusion is a well-orchestrated multistep process that is essential for skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1) has been implicated in the initiation of myoblast differentiation in vitro. However, whether PLD1 plays additional roles in myoblast fusion and exerts a function in myogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that PLD1 expression is up-regulated in myogenic cells during muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin injury and that genetic ablation of PLD1 results in delayed myofiber regeneration. Myoblasts derived from PLD1-null mice or treated with PLD1-specific inhibitor are unable to form mature myotubes, indicating defects in second-phase myoblast fusion. Concomitantly, the PLD1 product phosphatidic acid is transiently detected on the plasma membrane of differentiating myocytes, and its production is inhibited by PLD1 knockdown. Exogenous lysophosphatidylcholine, a key membrane lipid for fusion pore formation, partially rescues fusion defect resulting from PLD1 inhibition. Thus these studies demonstrate a role for PLD1 in myoblast fusion during myogenesis in which PLD1 facilitates the fusion of mononuclear myocytes with nascent myotubes. PMID:25428992

  3. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signals through SHP2 to regulate primary mouse myoblast proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ju; Reed, Sarah A.; Johnson, Sally E.

    2009-08-01

    Niche localized HGF plays an integral role in G{sub 0} exit and the return to mitotic activity of adult skeletal muscle satellite cells. HGF actions are regulated by MET initiated intracellular signaling events that include recruitment of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The importance of SHP2 in HGF-mediated signaling was examined in myoblasts and primary cultures of satellite cells. Myoblasts stably expressing SHP2 (23A2-SHP2) demonstrate increased proliferation rates by comparison to controls or myoblasts expressing a phosphatase-deficient SHP2 (23A2-SHP2DN). By comparison to 23A2 myoblasts, treatment of 23A2-SHP2 cells with HGF does not further increase proliferation rates and 23A2-SHP2DN myoblasts are unresponsive to HGF. Importantly, the effects of SHP2 are independent of downstream ERK1/2 activity as inclusion of PD98059 does not blunt the HGF-induced proliferative response. SHP2 function was further evaluated in primary satellite cell cultures. Ectopic expression of SHP2 in satellite cells tends to decrease proliferation rates and siSHP2 causes an increase the percentage of dividing myogenic cells. Interestingly, treatment of satellite cells with high concentrations of HGF (50 ng/ml) inhibits proliferation, which can be overcome by knockdown of SHP2. From these results, we conclude that HGF signals through SHP2 in myoblasts and satellite cells to directly alter proliferation rates.

  4. MicroRNA-27a promotes myoblast proliferation by targeting myostatin

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhiqing; Chen, Xiaoling; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Chen, Daiwen

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified a myogenic role for miR-27a and a new target, myostatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The miR-27a was confirmed to target myostatin 3 Prime UTR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-27a is upregulated and myostatin is downregulated during myoblast proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-27a promotes myoblast proliferation by reducing the expression of myostatin. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous non-coding RNAs that play critical roles in skeletal muscle development as well as in regulation of muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the role of miRNAs in myoblast proliferation remains poorly understood. Here we found that the expression of miR-27a was increased during proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts. Moreover, overexpression of miR-27a in C2C12 cells promoted myoblast proliferation by reducing the expression of myostatin, a critical inhibitor of skeletal myogenesis. In addition, the miR-27a was confirmed to target myostatin 3 Prime UTR by a luciferase reporter analysis. Together, these results suggest that miR-27a promotes myoblast proliferation through targeting myostatin.

  5. Myoblast cytonemes mediate Wg signaling from the wing imaginal disc and Delta-Notch signaling to the air sac primordium

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    The flight muscles, dorsal air sacs, wing blades, and thoracic cuticle of the Drosophila adult function in concert, and their progenitor cells develop together in the wing imaginal disc. The wing disc orchestrates dorsal air sac development by producing decapentaplegic and fibroblast growth factor that travel via specific cytonemes in order to signal to the air sac primordium (ASP). Here, we report that cytonemes also link flight muscle progenitors (myoblasts) to disc cells and to the ASP, enabling myoblasts to relay signaling between the disc and the ASP. Frizzled (Fz)-containing myoblast cytonemes take up Wingless (Wg) from the disc, and Delta (Dl)-containing myoblast cytonemes contribute to Notch activation in the ASP. Wg signaling negatively regulates Dl expression in the myoblasts. These results reveal an essential role for cytonemes in Wg and Notch signaling and for a signal relay system in the myoblasts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06114.001 PMID:25951303

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) activates promyogenic signaling pathways, thereby promoting myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Jin; Go, Ga-Yeon; Yoo, Miran; Kim, Yong Kee; Seo, Dong-Wan; Kang, Jong-Sun; Bae, Gyu-Un

    2016-01-29

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) regulates postnatal myogenesis by alleviating myostatin activity, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates myogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we investigate molecular mechanisms of PPARβ/δ in myoblast differentiation. C2C12 myoblasts treated with a PPARβ/δ agonist, GW0742 exhibit enhanced myotube formation and muscle-specific gene expression. GW0742 treatment dramatically activates promyogenic kinases, p38MAPK and Akt, in a dose-dependent manner. GW0742-stimulated myoblast differentiation is mediated by p38MAPK and Akt, since it failed to restore myoblast differentiation repressed by inhibition of p38MAPK and Akt. In addition, GW0742 treatment enhances MyoD-reporter activities. Consistently, overexpression of PPARβ/δ enhances myoblast differentiation accompanied by elevated activation of p38MAPK and Akt. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARβ/δ enhances myoblast differentiation through activation of promyogenic signaling pathways.

  7. Mechanical strain applied to human fibroblasts differentially regulates skeletal myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Michael R; Cao, Thanh V; Campbell, David H; Standley, Paul R

    2012-08-01

    Cyclic short-duration stretches (CSDS) such as those resulting from repetitive motion strain increase the risk of musculoskeletal injury. Myofascial release is a common technique used by clinicians that applies an acyclic long-duration stretch (ALDS) to muscle fascia to repair injury. When subjected to mechanical strain, fibroblasts within muscle fascia secrete IL-6, which has been shown to induce myoblast differentiation, essential for muscle repair. We hypothesize that fibroblasts subjected to ALDS following CSDS induce myoblast differentiation through IL-6. Fibroblast conditioned media and fibroblast-myoblast cocultures were used to test fibroblasts' ability to induce myoblast differentiation. The coculture system applies strain to fibroblasts only but still allows for diffusion of potential differentiation mediators to unstrained myoblasts on coverslips. To determine the role of IL-6, we utilized myoblast unicultures ± IL-6 (0-100 ng/ml) and cocultures ± α-IL-6 (0-200 μg/ml). Untreated uniculture myoblasts served as a negative control. After 96 h, coverslips (n = 6-21) were microscopically analyzed and quantified by blinded observer for differentiation endpoints: myotubes per square millimeter (>3 nuclei/cell), nuclei/myotube, and fusion efficiency (%nuclei within myotubes). The presence of fibroblasts and fibroblast conditioned media significantly enhanced myotube number (P < 0.05). However, in coculture, CSDS applied to fibroblasts did not reproduce this effect. ALDS following CSDS increased myotube number by 78% and fusion efficiency by 96% vs. CSDS alone (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts in coculture increase IL-6 secretion; however, IL-6 secretion did not correlate with enhanced differentiation among strain groups. Exogenous IL-6 in myoblast uniculture failed to induce differentiation. However, α-IL-6 attenuated differentiation in all coculture groups (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts secrete soluble mediators that have profound effects on several measures of myoblast

  8. Thyroid Hormone Receptor α Plays an Essential Role in Male Skeletal Muscle Myoblast Proliferation, Differentiation, and Response to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Nam-Ho; Liu, Yan-Yun; Yang, An; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Kahng, Andrew; Cervantes, Vanessa; Tripuraneni, Nikita; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Perin, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone plays an essential role in myogenesis, the process required for skeletal muscle development and repair, although the mechanisms have not been established. Skeletal muscle develops from the fusion of precursor myoblasts into myofibers. We have used the C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblast cell line, primary myoblasts, and mouse models of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) α and β, to determine the role of thyroid hormone in the regulation of myoblast differentiation. T3, which activates thyroid hormone receptor (TR) α and β, increased myoblast differentiation whereas GC1, a selective TRβ agonist, was minimally effective. Genetic approaches confirmed that TRα plays an important role in normal myoblast proliferation and differentiation and acts through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Myoblasts with TRα knockdown, or derived from RTH-TRα PV (a frame-shift mutation) mice, displayed reduced proliferation and myogenic differentiation. Moreover, skeletal muscle from the TRα1PV mutant mouse had impaired in vivo regeneration after injury. RTH-TRβ PV mutant mouse model skeletal muscle and derived primary myoblasts did not have altered proliferation, myogenic differentiation, or response to injury when compared with control. In conclusion, TRα plays an essential role in myoblast homeostasis and provides a potential therapeutic target to enhance skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:26451739

  9. Encapsulated engineered myoblasts can cure Hurler syndrome: preclinical experiments in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Piller Puicher, E; Tomanin, R; Salvalaio, M; Friso, A; Hortelano, G; Marin, O; Scarpa, M

    2012-04-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPSI) is an autosomic recessive, lysosomal storage disorder due to the deficit of the enzyme α-L-iduronidase (IDUA). The disease accounts for a general impairment of tissue and organ functions, mainly including heart disease, corneal clouding, organomegaly, skeletal malformations and joint stiffness. Neurological deterioration affects the severe forms. Both haemopoietic stem cell transplantation and enzyme replacement therapy can be applied to the treatment of the disorder; however, they both present several limitations. Thus, the search for alternative strategies to complement the present procedures is highly desirable. A murine myoblast cell line engineered to overexpress IDUA was generated and enclosed in alginate microcapsules, which were intra-peritoneally implanted in the MPSI mouse model. Plasma and tissue enzyme activity induced by the treatment and urinary and tissue glycosaminoglycan content were monitored in the animals, progressively sacrificed up to 4 months after implantation. Significant induction of enzyme activity and reduction of glycosaminoglycan accumulation were detected in the implanted animals, complete normalization of deposits was achieved in two animals. Intra-peritoneal implantation of alginate microcapsule confirms to be a valid approach as an endogenous enzyme replacement procedure.

  10. Reductive stress impairs myoblasts mitochondrial function and triggers mitochondrial hormesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, François; Charles, Anne-Laure; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Bouitbir, Jamal; Bonifacio, Annalisa; Piquard, François; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Geny, Bernard; Zoll, Joffrey

    2015-07-01

    Even though oxidative stress damage from excessive production of ROS is a well known phenomenon, the impact of reductive stress remains poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that cellular reductive stress could lead to mitochondrial malfunction, triggering a mitochondrial hormesis (mitohormesis) phenomenon able to protect mitochondria from the deleterious effects of statins. We performed several in vitro experiments on L6 myoblasts and studied the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at different exposure times. Direct NAC exposure (1mM) led to reductive stress, impairing mitochondrial function by decreasing maximal mitochondrial respiration and increasing H₂O₂production. After 24h of incubation, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased. The resulting mitochondrial oxidation activated mitochondrial biogenesis pathways at the mRNA level. After one week of exposure, mitochondria were well-adapted as shown by the decrease of cellular ROS, the increase of mitochondrial content, as well as of the antioxidant capacities. Atorvastatin (ATO) exposure (100μM) for 24h increased ROS levels, reduced the percentage of live cells, and increased the total percentage of apoptotic cells. NAC exposure during 3days failed to protect cells from the deleterious effects of statins. On the other hand, NAC pretreatment during one week triggered mitochondrial hormesis and reduced the deleterious effect of statins. These results contribute to a better understanding of the redox-dependant pathways linked to mitochondria, showing that reductive stress could trigger mitochondrial hormesis phenomenon.

  11. ERK2 is required for efficient terminal differentiation of skeletal myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ju; Johnson, Sally E. . E-mail: sjohnson@animal.ufl.edu

    2006-07-14

    Terminal differentiation of skeletal myoblasts involves alignment of the mononucleated cells, fusion into multinucleated syncitia, and transcription of muscle-specific genes. Myogenesis in vivo is regulated partially by IGF-I initiated signaling that results in activation of an intracellular phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) signaling cascade. Downstream signaling through the Raf/MEK/ERK axis, a pathway initiated by IGF-I, also is implicated in the regulation of muscle formation. The involvement of ERK1 and ERK2 during myogenesis was examined in C2C12 myoblasts. C2C12 myoblasts stably expressing a small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed against ERK1 or ERK2 were created. Both of the kinases were reduced to trace levels as measured by Western for total ERK and retained the capacity to become phosphorylated. C2C12siERK2 knockdown myoblasts failed to fuse into multinucleated myofibers. By contrast, cells expressing a scrambled siRNA or ERK1 siRNA fused into large multinucleated structures. The block to muscle formation did not involve continued cell cycle progression or apoptosis. C2C12siERK1 myoblasts expressed an increased amount of ERK2 protein and formed larger myofibers in response to IGF-I treatment. Interestingly, IGF-I treatment of C2C12 ERK2 knockdown myoblasts did not reinstate the myogenic program arguing that ERK2 is required for differentiation. These results provide evidence for ERK2 as a positive regulator of myogenesis and suggest that ERK1 is dispensable for myoblast proliferation and differentiation.

  12. Overexpression of connexin 43 using a retroviral vector improves electrical coupling of skeletal myoblasts with cardiac myocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachov, Oleg; Ma, Yu-Ling; Themis, Michael; Patel, Pravina; Spohr, Hilmar; MacLeod, Kenneth T; Ullrich, Nina D; Kienast, Yvonne; Coutelle, Charles; Peters, Nicholas S

    2006-01-01

    Background Organ transplantation is presently often the only available option to repair a damaged heart. As heart donors are scarce, engineering of cardiac grafts from autologous skeletal myoblasts is a promising novel therapeutic strategy. The functionality of skeletal muscle cells in the heart milieu is, however, limited because of their inability to integrate electrically and mechanically into the myocardium. Therefore, in pursuit of improved cardiac integration of skeletal muscle grafts we sought to modify primary skeletal myoblasts by overexpression of the main gap-junctional protein connexin 43 and to study electrical coupling of connexin 43 overexpressing myoblasts to cardiac myocytes in vitro. Methods To create an efficient means for overexpression of connexin 43 in skeletal myoblasts we constructed a bicistronic retroviral vector MLV-CX43-EGFP expressing the human connexin 43 cDNA and the marker EGFP gene. This vector was employed to transduce primary rat skeletal myoblasts in optimised conditions involving a concomitant use of the retrovirus immobilising protein RetroNectin® and the polycation transduction enhancer Transfectam®. The EGFP-positive transduced cells were then enriched by flow cytometry. Results More than four-fold overexpression of connexin 43 in the transduced skeletal myoblasts, compared with non-transduced cells, was shown by Western blotting. Functionality of the overexpressed connexin 43 was demonstrated by microinjection of a fluorescent dye showing enhanced gap-junctional intercellular transfer in connexin 43 transduced myoblasts compared with transfer in non-transduced myoblasts. Rat cardiac myocytes were cultured in multielectrode array culture dishes together with connexin 43/EGFP transduced skeletal myoblasts, control non-transduced skeletal myoblasts or alone. Extracellular field action potential activation rates in the co-cultures of connexin 43 transduced skeletal myoblasts with cardiac myocytes were significantly higher than

  13. Activation of IL-11/STAT3 pathway in preconditioned human skeletal myoblasts blocks apoptotic cascade under oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Idris, Niagara Muhammad; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmed, Rafeeq P H; Shujia, Jiang; Haider, Khawaja H

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether our novel approach of diazoxide-induced stem cell preconditioning might be extrapolated to human skeletal myoblasts to support their survival under lethal oxidant stress. Using an in vitro model of H(2)O(2) treatment of human skeletal myoblasts, we report the ability of diazoxide-preconditioned human skeletal myoblasts to express cytokines and growth factors, which act in an autocrine and paracrine fashion to promote their own survival. Preconditioning of skeletal myoblasts was cytoprotective and significantly reduced their apoptotic index (p < 0.05). IL-11 gene and protein expression was significantly increased in preconditioned skeletal myoblasts. Transfection of skeletal myoblasts with IL-11-specific siRNA incurred their death under oxidant stress. The cytoprotective effect of diazoxide preconditioning was blocked by Erk1/2 inhibitor PD98059 (20-100 µM), which abrogated STAT-3 phosphorylation, thus confirming a possible involvement of Erk1/2/STAT3 signaling downstream of IL-11 in cell survival. We also investigated the time course of subcellular changes and signaling pathway of skeletal myoblasts apoptosis under oxidant stress before and after preconditioning. Apoptosis was induced in skeletal myoblasts with 100-500 µM H(2)O(2) for time points ranging from 1 to 24 h. Release of lactate dehydrogenase, disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome-c translocation into cytoplasm were the earliest signs of apoptosis. Total Akt protein remained unchanged whereas marked reduction in pAkt was observed in the native skeletal myoblasts. Terminal dUTP nick end-labeling and annexin-V positivity were significantly increased after 4 h. Ultra-structure studies showed condensed chromatin, shriveled nuclei and swollen mitochondria. These data suggest that skeletal myoblasts undergo apoptosis under oxidant stress in a time-dependent manner and preconditioning of skeletal myoblasts significantly prevented their apoptosis via IL-11/STAT3

  14. The MARVEL domain protein, Singles Bar, is required for progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Beatriz; Maeland, Anne D.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Bloor, James W.; Brown, Nicholas H.; Michelson, Alan M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Multinucleated myotubes develop by the sequential fusion of individual myoblasts. Using a convergence of genomic and classical genetic approaches, we have discovered a novel gene, singles bar (sing), that is essential for myoblast fusion. sing encodes a small multipass transmembrane protein containing a MARVEL domain, which is found in vertebrate proteins involved in processes such as tight junction formation and vesicle trafficking where—as in myoblast fusion—membrane apposition occurs. sing is expressed in both founder cells and fusion competent myoblasts preceding and during myoblast fusion. Examination of embryos injected with double-stranded sing RNA or embryos homozygous for ethane methyl sulfonate-induced sing alleles revealed an identical phenotype: replacement of multinucleated myofibers by groups of single, myosin-expressing myoblasts at a stage when formation of the mature muscle pattern is complete in wild-type embryos. Unfused sing mutant myoblasts form clusters, suggesting that early recognition and adhesion of these cells is unimpaired. To further investigate this phenotype, we undertook electron microscopic ultrastructural studies of fusing myoblasts in both sing and wild-type embryos. These experiments revealed that more sing mutant myoblasts than wild-type contain pre-fusion complexes, which are characterized by electron-dense vesicles paired on either side of the fusing plasma membranes. In contrast, embryos mutant for another muscle fusion gene, blown fuse (blow), have a normal number of such complexes. Together, these results lead to the hypothesis that sing acts at a step distinct from that of blow, and that sing is required on both founder cell and fusion-competent myoblast membranes to allow progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion, possibly by mediating fusion of the electron-dense vesicles to the plasma membrane. PMID:17537424

  15. The MARVEL domain protein, Singles Bar, is required for progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Beatriz; Maeland, Anne D; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Bloor, James W; Brown, Nicholas H; Michelson, Alan M

    2007-07-15

    Multinucleated myotubes develop by the sequential fusion of individual myoblasts. Using a convergence of genomic and classical genetic approaches, we have discovered a novel gene, singles bar (sing), that is essential for myoblast fusion. sing encodes a small multipass transmembrane protein containing a MARVEL domain, which is found in vertebrate proteins involved in processes such as tight junction formation and vesicle trafficking where--as in myoblast fusion--membrane apposition occurs. sing is expressed in both founder cells and fusion competent myoblasts preceding and during myoblast fusion. Examination of embryos injected with double-stranded sing RNA or embryos homozygous for ethane methyl sulfonate-induced sing alleles revealed an identical phenotype: replacement of multinucleated myofibers by groups of single, myosin-expressing myoblasts at a stage when formation of the mature muscle pattern is complete in wild-type embryos. Unfused sing mutant myoblasts form clusters, suggesting that early recognition and adhesion of these cells are unimpaired. To further investigate this phenotype, we undertook electron microscopic ultrastructural studies of fusing myoblasts in both sing and wild-type embryos. These experiments revealed that more sing mutant myoblasts than wild-type contain pre-fusion complexes, which are characterized by electron-dense vesicles paired on either side of the fusing plasma membranes. In contrast, embryos mutant for another muscle fusion gene, blown fuse (blow), have a normal number of such complexes. Together, these results lead to the hypothesis that sing acts at a step distinct from that of blow, and that sing is required on both founder cell and fusion-competent myoblast membranes to allow progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion, possibly by mediating fusion of the electron-dense vesicles to the plasma membrane.

  16. An in silico prediction tool for the expansion culture of human skeletal muscle myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative therapy using autologous skeletal myoblasts requires a large number of cells to be prepared for high-level secretion of cytokines and chemokines to induce good regeneration of damaged regions. However, myoblast expansion culture is hindered by a reduction in growth rate owing to cellular quiescence and differentiation, therefore optimization is required. We have developed a kinetic computational model describing skeletal myoblast proliferation and differentiation, which can be used as a prediction tool for the expansion process. In the model, myoblasts migrate, divide, quiesce and differentiate as observed during in vitro culture. We assumed cell differentiation initiates following cell–cell attachment for a defined time period. The model parameter values were estimated by fitting to several predetermined experimental datasets. Using an additional experimental dataset, we confirmed validity of the developed model. We then executed simulations using the developed model under several culture conditions and quantitatively predicted that non-uniform cell seeding had adverse effects on the expansion culture, mainly by reducing the existing ratio of proliferative cells. The proposed model is expected to be useful for predicting myoblast behaviours and in designing efficient expansion culture conditions for these cells. PMID:27853565

  17. Isolation, Culturing, and Differentiation of Primary Myoblasts from Skeletal Muscle of Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Lubna; McMillan, Joseph D; Afroze, Dil; Hindi, Sajedah M; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-05-05

    Myogenesis is a multi-step process that leads to the formation of skeletal muscle during embryonic development and repair of injured myofibers. In this process, myoblasts are the main effector cell type which fuse with each other or to injured myofibers leading to the formation of new myofibers or regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults. Many steps of myogenesis can be recapitulated through in vitro differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. Most laboratories use immortalized myogenic cells lines that also differentiate into myotubes. Although these cell lines have been found quite useful to delineating the regulatory mechanisms of myogenesis, they often show a great degree of variability depending on the origin of the cells and culture conditions. Primary myoblasts have been suggested as the most physiologically relevant model for studying myogenesis in vitro. However, due to their low abundance in adult skeletal muscle, isolation of primary myoblasts is technically challenging. In this article, we describe an improved protocol for the isolation of primary myoblasts from adult skeletal muscle of mice. We also describe methods for their culturing and differentiation into myotubes.

  18. Isolation, Culturing, and Differentiation of Primary Myoblasts from Skeletal Muscle of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hindi, Lubna; McMillan, Joseph D.; Afroze, Dil; Hindi, Sajedah M.; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Myogenesis is a multi-step process that leads to the formation of skeletal muscle during embryonic development and repair of injured myofibers. In this process, myoblasts are the main effector cell type which fuse with each other or to injured myofibers leading to the formation of new myofibers or regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults. Many steps of myogenesis can be recapitulated through in vitro differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. Most laboratories use immortalized myogenic cells lines that also differentiate into myotubes. Although these cell lines have been found quite useful to delineating the regulatory mechanisms of myogenesis, they often show a great degree of variability depending on the origin of the cells and culture conditions. Primary myoblasts have been suggested as the most physiologically relevant model for studying myogenesis in vitro. However, due to their low abundance in adult skeletal muscle, isolation of primary myoblasts is technically challenging. In this article, we describe an improved protocol for the isolation of primary myoblasts from adult skeletal muscle of mice. We also describe methods for their culturing and differentiation into myotubes. PMID:28730161

  19. Requirements for the Ca2+-independent component in the initial intercellular adhesion of C2 myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Using a sensitive and quantitative adhesion assay, we have studied the initial stages of the intercellular adhesion of the C2 mouse myoblast line. After dissociation in low levels of trypsin in EDTA, C2 cells can rapidly reaggregate by Ca2+-independent mechanisms to form large multicellular aggregates. If cells are allowed to recover from dissociation by incubation in defined media, this adhesive system is augmented by a Ca2+-dependent mechanism with maximum recovery seen after 4 h incubation. The Ca2+-independent adhesion system is inhibited by preincubation of cell monolayers with cycloheximide before dissociation. Aggregation is also reduced after exposure to monensin, implicating a role for surface-translocated glycoproteins in this mechanism of adhesion. In coaggregation experiments using C2 myoblasts and 3T3 fibroblasts in which the Ca2+-dependent adhesion system was inactivated, no adhesive specificity between the two cell types was seen. Although synthetic peptides containing the RGD sequence are known to inhibit cell-substratum adhesion in various cell types, incubation of C2 myoblasts with the integrin-binding tetrapeptide, RGDS, greatly stimulated the Ca2+-independent aggregation of these cells while control analogs had no effect. These results show that a Ca2+- independent mechanism alone is sufficient to allow for the rapid formation of multicellular aggregates in a mouse myoblast line, and that many of the requirements and perturbants of the Ca2+-independent system of intercellular myoblast adhesion are similar to those of the Ca2+-dependent adhesion mechanisms. PMID:3198689

  20. Involvement of Ras and Ral in Chemotactic Migration of Skeletal Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jotaro; Yamazaki, Yuji; Guang, Li; Kaziro, Yoshito; Koide, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    In skeletal myoblasts, Ras has been considered to be a strong inhibitor of myogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that Ras is involved also in the chemotactic response of skeletal myoblasts. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of Ras inhibited chemotaxis of C2C12 myoblasts in response to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), key regulators of limb muscle development and skeletal muscle regeneration. A dominant-negative Ral also decreased chemotactic migration by these growth factors, while inhibitors for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) showed no effect. Activation of the Ras-Ral pathway by expression of an activated mutant of either Ras, the guanine-nucleotide dissociation stimulator for Ral, or Ral resulted in increased motility of myoblasts. The ability of Ral to stimulate motility was reduced by introduction of a mutation which prevents binding to Ral-binding protein 1 or phospholipase D. These results suggest that the Ras-Ral pathway is essential for the migration of myoblasts. Furthermore, we found that Ras and Ral are activated in C2C12 cells by bFGF, HGF and IGF-1 and that the Ral activation is regulated by the Ras- and the intracellular Ca2+-mediated pathways. Taken together, our data indicate that Ras and Ral regulate the chemotactic migration of skeletal muscle progenitors. PMID:10848592

  1. Slowing Down Differentiation of Engrafted Human Myoblasts Into Immunodeficient Mice Correlates With Increased Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Riederer, Ingo; Negroni, Elisa; Bencze, Maximilien; Wolff, Annie; Aamiri, Ahmed; Di Santo, James P; Silva-Barbosa, Suse D.; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Savino, Wilson; Mouly, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We have used a model of xenotransplantation in which human myoblasts were transplanted intramuscularly into immunodeficient Rag2-/-γC-/- mice, in order to investigate the kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of the transplanted cells. After injection, most of the human myoblasts had already differentiated by day 5. This differentiation correlated with reduction in proliferation and limited migration of the donor cells within the regenerating muscle. These results suggest that the precocious differentiation, already detected at 3 days postinjection, is a limiting factor for both the migration from the injection site and the participation of the donor cells to muscle regeneration. When we stimulated in vivo proliferation of human myoblasts, transplanting them in a serum-containing medium, we observed 5 days post-transplantation a delay of myogenic differentiation and an increase in cell numbers, which colonized a much larger area within the recipient's muscle. Importantly, these myoblasts maintained their ability to differentiate, since we found higher numbers of myofibers seen 1 month postengraftment, as compared to controls. Conceptually, these data suggest that in experimental myoblast transplantation, any intervention upon the donor cells and/or the recipient's microenvironment aimed at enhancing proliferation and migration should be done before differentiation of the implanted cells, e.g., day 3 postengraftment. PMID:21934656

  2. Slowing down differentiation of engrafted human myoblasts into immunodeficient mice correlates with increased proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Riederer, Ingo; Negroni, Elisa; Bencze, Maximilien; Wolff, Annie; Aamiri, Ahmed; Di Santo, James P; Silva-Barbosa, Suse D; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Savino, Wilson; Mouly, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We have used a model of xenotransplantation in which human myoblasts were transplanted intramuscularly into immunodeficient Rag2(-/-)γC(-/-) mice, in order to investigate the kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of the transplanted cells. After injection, most of the human myoblasts had already differentiated by day 5. This differentiation correlated with reduction in proliferation and limited migration of the donor cells within the regenerating muscle. These results suggest that the precocious differentiation, already detected at 3 days postinjection, is a limiting factor for both the migration from the injection site and the participation of the donor cells to muscle regeneration. When we stimulated in vivo proliferation of human myoblasts, transplanting them in a serum-containing medium, we observed 5 days post-transplantation a delay of myogenic differentiation and an increase in cell numbers, which colonized a much larger area within the recipient's muscle. Importantly, these myoblasts maintained their ability to differentiate, since we found higher numbers of myofibers seen 1 month postengraftment, as compared to controls. Conceptually, these data suggest that in experimental myoblast transplantation, any intervention upon the donor cells and/or the recipient's microenvironment aimed at enhancing proliferation and migration should be done before differentiation of the implanted cells, e.g., day 3 postengraftment.

  3. The real estate of myoblast cardiac transplantation: negative remodeling is associated with location.

    PubMed

    McCue, Jonathan D; Swingen, Cory; Feldberg, Tanya; Caron, Gabe; Kolb, Adam; Denucci, Christopher; Prabhu, Somnath; Motilall, Randy; Breviu, Brian; Taylor, Doris A

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal myoblast transplantation has been proposed as a therapy for ischemic cardiomyopathy owing to its possible role in myogenesis. The relative safety and efficacy based on location within scar is not known. We hypothesized that skeletal myoblasts transplanted into peripheral scar (compared with central scar) would more effectively attenuate negative left ventricular (LV) remodeling but at the risk of arrhythmia. New Zealand White rabbits (n = 34) underwent mid-left anterior descending artery (LAD) ligation to produce a transmural LV infarction. One month after LAD ligation, skeletal myoblasts were injected either in the scar center (n = 13) or scar periphery (n = 10) and compared with saline injection (n = 11). Holter monitoring and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed pre-injection; Holter monitoring was continued until 2 weeks after injection, with follow-up MRI at 1 month. The centrally treated animals demonstrated increased LV end-systolic volume, end-diastolic volume, and mass that correlated with the number of injected cells. There was a trend toward attenuation of negative LV remodeling in peripherally treated animals compared with vehicle. Significant late ectopy was seen in several centrally injected animals, with no late ectopy seen in peripherally injected animals. We noted untoward effects with respect to negative LV remodeling after central injection, suggesting that transplanted cell location with respect to scar may be a key factor in the safety and efficacy of skeletal myoblast cardiac transplantation. Administration of skeletal myoblasts into peripheral scar appears safe, with a trend toward improved function in comparison with sham injection.

  4. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darrion L.; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  5. [Effects of mechanical stimulation on expression of autoantigens in myoblasts].

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Liu, Xinghui; Huang, Weiyi; Zeng, Huijun; Shi, Dandan; Cao, Biao; Liao, Hua

    2013-09-01

    To explore the effects of mechanical stimulation on the expression of autoantigens in myoblasts. According to different processing methods, C2C12 cells were divided into the experimental group and control group; the experimental group was divided into 4 subgroups: 2-, 4-, and 6-day and 1-day stretch groups. In 2-, 4-, and 6-day stretch groups, mechanical loading was added on the C2C12 cells at a stretching frequency of 0.25 Hz and cellular deformation amplitude of 10%, 2 hours a day for 2, 4, and 6 days respectively by Flexercell 5000 strain unit, and at a stretching frequency of 1 Hz and cellular deformation amplitude of 15% for 1 hour in 1-day stretch group. In the control group, the cells were routinely cultured for 1, 2, 4, and 6 days (1-, 2-, 4-, and 6-day control). The cells were observed by inverted phase contrast microscope. The cell proliferation was detected by flow cytometry; the expressions of autoantigens were detected by Western blot method, including the Ku/the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), U1-70 (A part of ATP-dependent DNA helicase II), histidyl tRNA synthetase (HRS), and Mi-2 (reconfigurable components deacetylase complexes of NuRD). The exfoliated cells were found in 1-day stretch group, but no exfoliated cell was seen in the control group for 1-day culture. The cells proliferated more obviously in 2-day stretch group than in the control group for 2-day culture; cell differentiation was found in 4-day stretch group, and cell fusion in 6-day stretch group, which were similar to those in the control group for 4- and 6-day culture. After single stretching, cell apoptosis was found in 1-day stretch group, showing no significant difference in the relative DNA proliferation index (DPI) when compared with DPI of control group for 1-day culture (t = 0.346, P = 0.747). After cyclic stretching, DPIs of 2- and 4- day stretch groups were significantly increased when compared with those of the control group for 2- and 4-day

  6. CRYOPRESERVATION EFFECTS ON RECOMBINANT MYOBLASTS ENCAPSULATED IN ADHESIVE ALGINATE HYDROGELS

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Hajira F.; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2013-01-01

    Cell encapsulation in hydrogels is widely used in tissue engineering applications, including encapsulation of islets or other insulin-secreting cells in pancreatic substitutes. Use of adhesive, bio-functionalized hydrogels is receiving increasing attention, as cell-matrix interactions in 3-D can be important for various cell processes. With pancreatic substitutes, studies have indicated benefits of 3-D adhesion on the viability and/or function of insulin-secreting cells. As long-term storage of microencapsulated cells is critical for their clinical translation, cryopreservation of cells in hydrogels is actively being investigated. Previous studies have examined the cryopreservation response of cells encapsulated in non-adhesive hydrogels using conventional freezing and/or vitrification (ice-free cryopreservation), however, none have systematically compared the two cryopreservation methods with cells encapsulated within an adhesive 3-D environment. The latter would be significant, as evidence suggests adhesion influences cellular response to cryopreservation. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the response to conventional freezing and vitrification of insulin-secreting cells encapsulated in an adhesive biomimetic hydrogel. Recombinant insulin-secreting C2C12 myoblasts were encapsulated in oxidized RGD-alginate and cultured 1 or 4 days post-encapsulation, cryopreserved, and assessed up to 3 days post-warming for metabolic activity and insulin secretion, and one day post-warming for cell morphology. Besides certain transient differences of the vitrified group relative to the Fresh control, both conventional freezing and vitrification maintained metabolism, secretion and morphology of the recombinant C2C12 cells. Thus, due to a simpler procedure and slightly superior results, conventional freezing is recommended over vitrification for the cryopreservation of C2C12 cells in oxidized RGD-modified alginate. PMID:23499987

  7. Bioenergetic Profile Experiment using C2C12 Myoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, David G.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Wu, Min; Jensen, Per Bo; Rogers, George W.; Ferrick, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to measure cellular metabolism and understand mitochondrial dysfunction, has enabled scientists worldwide to advance their research in understanding the role of mitochondrial function in obesity, diabetes, aging, cancer, cardiovascular function and safety toxicity. Cellular metabolism is the process of substrate uptake, such as oxygen, glucose, fatty acids, and glutamine, and subsequent energy conversion through a series of enzymatically controlled oxidation and reduction reactions. These intracellular biochemical reactions result in the production of ATP, the release of heat and chemical byproducts, such as lactate and CO2 into the extracellular environment. Valuable insight into the physiological state of cells, and the alteration of the state of those cells, can be gained through measuring the rate of oxygen consumed by the cells, an indicator of mitochondrial respiration - the Oxygen Consumption Rate - or OCR. Cells also generate ATP through glycolysis, i.e.: the conversion of glucose to lactate, independent of oxygen. In cultured wells, lactate is the primary source of protons. Measuring the lactic acid produced indirectly via protons released into the extracellular medium surrounding the cells, which causes acidification of the medium provides the Extra-Cellular Acidification Rate - or ECAR. In this experiment, C2C12 myoblast cells are seeded at a given density in Seahorse cell culture plates. The basal oxygen consumption (OCR) and extracellular acidification (ECAR) rates are measured to establish baseline rates. The cells are then metabolically perturbed by three additions of different compounds (in succession) that shift the bioenergetic profile of the cell. This assay is derived from a classic experiment to assess mitochondria and serves as a framework with which to build more complex experiments aimed at understanding both physiologic and pathophysiologic function of mitochondria and to predict the ability of cells to respond to stress and

  8. Bioenergetic profile experiment using C2C12 myoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, David G; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; Wu, Min; Jensen, Per Bo; Rogers, George W; Ferrick, David A

    2010-12-06

    The ability to measure cellular metabolism and understand mitochondrial dysfunction, has enabled scientists worldwide to advance their research in understanding the role of mitochondrial function in obesity, diabetes, aging, cancer, cardiovascular function and safety toxicity. Cellular metabolism is the process of substrate uptake, such as oxygen, glucose, fatty acids, and glutamine, and subsequent energy conversion through a series of enzymatically controlled oxidation and reduction reactions. These intracellular biochemical reactions result in the production of ATP, the release of heat and chemical byproducts, such as lactate and CO(2) into the extracellular environment. Valuable insight into the physiological state of cells, and the alteration of the state of those cells, can be gained through measuring the rate of oxygen consumed by the cells, an indicator of mitochondrial respiration--the Oxygen Consumption Rate--or OCR. Cells also generate ATP through glycolysis, i.e.: the conversion of glucose to lactate, independent of oxygen. In cultured wells, lactate is the primary source of protons. Measuring the lactic acid produced indirectly via protons released into the extracellular medium surrounding the cells, which causes acidification of the medium provides the Extra-Cellular Acidification Rate--or ECAR. In this experiment, C2C12 myoblast cells are seeded at a given density in Seahorse cell culture plates. The basal oxygen consumption (OCR) and extracellular acidification (ECAR) rates are measured to establish baseline rates. The cells are then metabolically perturbed by three additions of different compounds (in succession) that shift the bioenergetic profile of the cell. This assay is derived from a classic experiment to assess mitochondria and serves as a framework with which to build more complex experiments aimed at understanding both physiologic and pathophysiologic function of mitochondria and to predict the ability of cells to respond to stress and

  9. Combination of lipid metabolism alterations and their sensitivity to inflammatory cytokines in human lipin-1-deficient myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Michot, Caroline; Mamoune, Asmaa; Vamecq, Joseph; Viou, Mai Thao; Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Testet, Eric; Lainé, Jeanne; Hubert, Laurence; Dessein, Anne-Frédérique; Fontaine, Monique; Ottolenghi, Chris; Fouillen, Laetitia; Nadra, Karim; Blanc, Etienne; Bastin, Jean; Candon, Sophie; Pende, Mario; Munnich, Arnold; Smahi, Asma; Djouadi, Fatima; Carman, George M; Romero, Norma; de Keyzer, Yves; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2013-12-01

    Lipin-1 deficiency is associated with massive rhabdomyolysis episodes in humans, precipitated by febrile illnesses. Despite well-known roles of lipin-1 in lipid biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to rhabdomyolysis remain unknown. Here we show that primary myoblasts from lipin-1-deficient patients exhibit a dramatic decrease in LPIN1 expression and phosphatidic acid phosphatase 1 activity, and a significant accumulation of lipid droplets (LD). The expression levels of LPIN1-target genes [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors delta and alpha (PPARδ, PPARα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, very long (ACADVL), carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB and 2 (CPT1B and CPT2)] were not affected while lipin-2 protein level, a closely related member of the family, was increased. Microarray analysis of patients' myotubes identified 19 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated genes, indicating pleiotropic effects of lipin-1 deficiency. Special attention was paid to the up-regulated ACACB (acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta), a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis/oxidation balance. We demonstrated that overexpression of ACACB was associated with free fatty acid accumulation in patients' myoblasts whereas malonyl-carnitine (as a measure of malonyl-CoA) and CPT1 activity were in the normal range in basal conditions accordingly to the normal daily activity reported by the patients. Remarkably ACACB invalidation in patients' myoblasts decreased LD number and size while LPIN1 invalidation in controls induced LD accumulation. Further, pro-inflammatory treatments tumor necrosis factor alpha+Interleukin-1beta(TNF1α+IL-1ß) designed to mimic febrile illness, resulted in increased malonyl-carnitine levels, reduced CPT1 activity and enhanced LD accumulation, a phenomenon reversed by dexamethasone and TNFα or IL-1ß inhibitors. Our data suggest that the pathogenic mechanism

  10. Combination of lipid metabolism alterations and their sensitivity to inflammatory cytokines in human lipin-1-deficient myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Michot, Caroline; Mamoune, Asmaa; Vamecq, Joseph; Viou, Mai Thao; Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Testet, Eric; Lainé, Jeanne; Hubert, Laurence; Dessein, Anne-Frédérique; Fontaine, Monique; Ottolenghi, Chris; Fouillen, Laetitia; Nadra, Karim; Blanc, Etienne; Bastin, Jean; Candon, Sophie; Pende, Mario; Munnich, Arnold; Smahi, Asma; Djouadi, Fatima; Carman, George M.; Romero, Norma; de Keyzer, Yves; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Lipin-1 deficiency is associated with massive rhabdomyolysis episodes in humans, precipitated by febrile illnesses. Despite well-known roles of lipin-1 in lipid biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to rhabdomyolysis remain unknown. Here we show that primary myoblasts from lipin-1-deficient patients exhibit a dramatic decrease in LPIN1 expression and phosphatidic acid phosphatase 1 activity, and a significant accumulation of lipid droplets (LD). The expression levels of LPIN1-target genes [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors delta and alpha (PPARδ, PPARα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, very long (ACADVL), carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB and 2 (CPT1B and CPT2)] were not affected while lipin-2 protein level, a closely related member of the family, was increased. Microarray analysis of patients’ myotubes identified 19 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated genes, indicating pleiotropic effects of lipin-1 deficiency. Special attention was paid to the up-regulated ACACB (acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta), a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis/oxidation balance. We demonstrated that overexpression of ACACB was associated with free fatty acid accumulation in patients’ myoblasts whereas malonyl-carnitine (as a measure of malonyl-CoA) and CPT1 activity were in the normal range in basal conditions accordingly to the normal daily activity reported by the patients. Remarkably ACACB invalidation in patients’ myoblasts decreased LD number and size while LPIN1 invalidation in controls induced LD accumulation. Further, pro-inflammatory treatments tumor necrosis factor alpha + Interleukin-1beta(TNF1α + IL-1β) designed to mimic febrile illness, resulted in increased malonyl-carnitine levels, reduced CPT1 activity and enhanced LD accumulation, a phenomenon reversed by dexamethasone and TNFα or IL-1β inhibitors. Our data suggest that the pathogenic

  11. Stiffness- and wettability-dependent myoblast cell compatibility of transparent poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Siddhi; T, Greeshma; Basu, Bikramjit; Goswami, Sudipta; Sinha, Arvind

    2013-02-01

    This study reports the in vitro compatibility of muscle cells (C2C12 mouse myoblast cell line) with the transparent poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels and the results are explained on the basis of surface wettability, crystallinity, and nanoscale elastic stiffness property. Nanoindentation was carried out with a maximum load of 100 μN for all the hydrogel compositions and the properties such as elastic stiffness, hardness and total work done during indentation were computed. The difference in cell viability as well as adhesion of cultured myoblast cells on the investigated hydrogel substrates were discussed in reference to the difference in the nanoscale elastic properties, crystallinity, and surface wettability. An important result has been that both elastic stiffness and surface wettability synergistically influence myoblast viability/adhesion on PVA hydrogels. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Spatial and functional restriction of regulatory molecules during mammalian myoblast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlath, Grace K.

    2010-11-01

    Myoblast fusion is a highly regulated process that is key for forming skeletal muscle during development and regeneration in mammals. Much remains to be understood about the molecular regulation of myoblast fusion. Some molecules that influence mammalian muscle fusion display specific cellular localization during myogenesis. Such molecules can be localized to the contact region between two fusing cells either in both cells or only in one of the cells. How distinct localization of molecules contributes to fusion is not clear. Further complexity exists as other molecules are functionally restricted to myoblasts at later stages of myogenesis to regulate their fusion with multinucleated myotubes. This review examines these three categories of molecules and discusses how spatial and functional restriction may contribute to the formation of a multinucleated cell. Understanding how and why molecules become restricted in location or function is likely to provide further insights into the mechanisms regulating mammalian muscle fusion.

  13. Extracellular annexins and dynamin are important for sequential steps in myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Leikina, Evgenia; Melikov, Kamran; Sanyal, Sarmistha; Verma, Santosh K.; Eun, Bokkee; Gebert, Claudia; Pfeifer, Karl; Lizunov, Vladimir A.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Myoblast fusion into multinucleated myotubes is a crucial step in skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Here, we accumulated murine myoblasts at the ready-to-fuse stage by blocking formation of early fusion intermediates with lysophosphatidylcholine. Lifting the block allowed us to explore a largely synchronized fusion. We found that initial merger of two cell membranes detected as lipid mixing involved extracellular annexins A1 and A5 acting in a functionally redundant manner. Subsequent stages of myoblast fusion depended on dynamin activity, phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate content, and cell metabolism. Uncoupling fusion from preceding stages of myogenesis will help in the analysis of the interplay between protein machines that initiate and complete cell unification and in the identification of additional protein players controlling different fusion stages. PMID:23277424

  14. [Differences in the Ca2+ signaling in proliferating and differentiating myoblasts in mice].

    PubMed

    Krasnyĭ, A M; Ozerniuk, N D

    2010-01-01

    Specific features of Ca2+ -signaling in proliferating and differentiated C2C12 myoblasts have been studied. It was shown that the system of Ca2+ -signaling is reduced in proliferating myoblasts: the intracellular ATP-regulated stock is insignificant, the buffer protein is absent or present in minimum quantities in endoplasmic reticulum, and the entry of Ca2+ is not registered when its endocellular stocks are exhausted. The formation of the Ca -signaling system occurs during the initial stages of differentiation (within eight to ten hours after transfer of cell to differentiation medium). During this period, the buffer protein is accumulated, and the entry of Ca begins. During the initial stages of myoblast differentiation, the voltage-dependent entry of Ca2+ also appears. It was also shown that the stock of in mitochondria makes an insignificant contribution to increase in Ca2+ concentration in the cytoplasm.

  15. Myomaker, Regulated by MYOD, MYOG and miR-140-3p, Promotes Chicken Myoblast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen; Li, Erxin; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-01-01

    The fusion of myoblasts is an important step during skeletal muscle differentiation. A recent study in mice found that a transmembrane protein called Myomaker, which is specifically expressed in muscle, is critical for myoblast fusion. However, the cellular mechanism of its roles and the regulatory mechanism of its expression remain unclear. Chicken not only plays an important role in meat production but is also an ideal model organism for muscle development research. Here, we report that Myomaker is also essential for chicken myoblast fusion. Forced expression of Myomaker in chicken primary myoblasts promotes myoblast fusion, whereas knockdown of Myomaker by siRNA inhibits myoblast fusion. MYOD and MYOG, which belong to the family of myogenic regulatory factors, can bind to a conserved E-box located proximal to the Myomaker transcription start site and induce Myomaker transcription. Additionally, miR-140-3p can inhibit Myomaker expression and myoblast fusion, at least in part, by binding to the 3ʹ UTR of Myomaker in vitro. These findings confirm the essential roles of Myomaker in avian myoblast fusion and show that MYOD, MYOG and miR-140-3p can regulate Myomaker expression. PMID:26540045

  16. Myomaker, Regulated by MYOD, MYOG and miR-140-3p, Promotes Chicken Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Li, Erxin; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-11-02

    The fusion of myoblasts is an important step during skeletal muscle differentiation. A recent study in mice found that a transmembrane protein called Myomaker, which is specifically expressed in muscle, is critical for myoblast fusion. However, the cellular mechanism of its roles and the regulatory mechanism of its expression remain unclear. Chicken not only plays an important role in meat production but is also an ideal model organism for muscle development research. Here, we report that Myomaker is also essential for chicken myoblast fusion. Forced expression of Myomaker in chicken primary myoblasts promotes myoblast fusion, whereas knockdown of Myomaker by siRNA inhibits myoblast fusion. MYOD and MYOG, which belong to the family of myogenic regulatory factors, can bind to a conserved E-box located proximal to the Myomaker transcription start site and induce Myomaker transcription. Additionally, miR-140-3p can inhibit Myomaker expression and myoblast fusion, at least in part, by binding to the 3' UTR of Myomaker in vitro. These findings confirm the essential roles of Myomaker in avian myoblast fusion and show that MYOD, MYOG and miR-140-3p can regulate Myomaker expression.

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) activates promyogenic signaling pathways, thereby promoting myoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Jin; Go, Ga-Yeon; Yoo, Miran; Kim, Yong Kee; Seo, Dong-Wan; Kang, Jong-Sun; Bae, Gyu-Un

    2016-01-29

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) regulates postnatal myogenesis by alleviating myostatin activity, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates myogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we investigate molecular mechanisms of PPARβ/δ in myoblast differentiation. C2C12 myoblasts treated with a PPARβ/δ agonist, GW0742 exhibit enhanced myotube formation and muscle-specific gene expression. GW0742 treatment dramatically activates promyogenic kinases, p38MAPK and Akt, in a dose-dependent manner. GW0742-stimulated myoblast differentiation is mediated by p38MAPK and Akt, since it failed to restore myoblast differentiation repressed by inhibition of p38MAPK and Akt. In addition, GW0742 treatment enhances MyoD-reporter activities. Consistently, overexpression of PPARβ/δ enhances myoblast differentiation accompanied by elevated activation of p38MAPK and Akt. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARβ/δ enhances myoblast differentiation through activation of promyogenic signaling pathways. - Highlights: • A PPARβ/δ agonist, GW0742 promotes myoblast differentiation. • GW0742 activates both p38MAPK and Akt activation in myogenic differentiation. • GW0742 enhances MyoD activity for myogenic differentiation. • Overexpression of PPARβ/δ enhances myoblast differentiation via activating promyogenic signaling pathways. • This is the first finding for agonistic mechanism of PPARβ/δ in myogenesis.

  18. Induction of Anoikis following myoblast transplantation into SCID mouse muscles requires the Bit1 and FADD pathways.

    PubMed

    Bouchentouf, M; Benabdallah, B F; Rousseau, J; Schwartz, L M; Tremblay, J P

    2007-06-01

    Seventy-five percent of the myoblasts transplanted in the mouse muscle die during the first 4 days following transplantation. The purpose of this study was to determine if anoikis plays a role in this phenomenon. Survival and proliferation of myoblasts in vitro were determined by Hoescht-PI labeling and cell counts respectively. In vivo cell survival and proliferation were quantified by injecting human male myoblasts labeled with (14)C-thymidine in SCID mouse muscles. Survival and proliferation of the transplanted myoblasts were evaluated by scintigraphy and quantitative PCR of human Y chromosomal DNA. Inclusion of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin enhanced transplanted myoblast survival by 1.7-fold while vitronectin improved their proliferation by 1.8-fold. Reductions in FADD and Bit1 expression reduced anoikis in vitro and improved the injected myoblast survival in vivo. Ectopic expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 completely abolished myoblast anoikis in vitro and enhanced cell survival by 3.1-fold in vivo. Cell death following transplantation appears to me mediated in part by anoikis. Inclusion of extracellular matrix proteins enhanced both survival and proliferation. Reduced expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bit1 and FADD or overexpression of Bcl-2 improved myoblast survival.

  19. High efficiency of muscle regeneration after human myoblast clone transplantation in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Huard, J; Verreault, S; Roy, R; Tremblay, M; Tremblay, J P

    1994-01-01

    SCID mouse tibialis anterior muscles were first irradiated to prevent regeneration by host myoblasts and injected with notexin to damage the muscle fibers and trigger regeneration. The muscles were then injected with roughly 5 million human myoblasts. 1 mo later, 16-33% of the normal number of muscle fibers were present in the injected muscle, because of incomplete regeneration. However, > 90% of these muscle fibers contained human dystrophin. Some newly formed muscle fibers had an accumulation of human dystrophin and desmin on a part of their membrane. Such accumulations have been demonstrated at neuromuscular junctions before suggesting that the new muscle fibers are innervated and functional. The same pool of clones of human myoblasts produced only < or = 4% of muscle fibers containing human dystrophin when injected in nude mice muscles. Several of the human myoblasts did not fuse and remained in interstitial space or tightly associated with muscle fibers suggesting that some of them have formed satellite cells. Moreover, cultures of 98% pure human myoblasts were obtained from transplanted SCID muscles. In some mice where the muscle regeneration was not complete, the muscle fibers containing human dystrophin also expressed uniformly HLA class 1, confirming that the fibers are of human origin. The presence of hybrid muscle fibers containing human dystrophin and mouse MHC was also demonstrated following transplantation. These results establish that in absence of an immune reaction, transplanted human myoblasts participate to the muscle regeneration with a high degree of efficacy even if the animals were killed only 1 mo after the transplantation. Images PMID:8113396

  20. Feasibility and safety of autologous myoblast transplantation in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dib, Nabil; McCarthy, Patrick; Campbell, Ann; Yeager, Michael; Pagani, Francis D; Wright, Susan; MacLellan, W Robb; Fonarow, Gregg; Eisen, Howard J; Michler, Robert E; Binkley, Philip; Buchele, Diane; Korn, Ronald; Ghazoul, Marwan; Dinsmore, Jonathan; Opie, Shaun R; Diethrich, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Successful autologous skeletal myoblast transplantation into infarcted myocardium in a variety of animal models has demonstrated improvement in cardiac function. We evaluated the safety and feasibility of transplanting autologous myoblasts into infarcted myocardium of patients undergoing concurrent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or left ventricular assist device implantation (LVAD). In addition, we sought to gain preliminary information on graft survival and any potential improvement of cardiac function. Eighteen patients with a history of ischemic cardiomyopathy participated in a phase I, nonrandomized, multicenter pilot study of autologous skeletal myoblast transplantation concurrent with CABG or LVAD implantation. Twelve patients with a history of previous myocardial infarction (MI) and a left ventricular ejection of less than 30% were enrolled in the CABG arm. In a second arm, six patients underwent LVAD implantation as a bridge to heart transplantation and were required to donate their heart for testing at the time of heart transplant. Myoblasts were successfully transplanted in all patients without any acute injection-related complications or significant long-term unexpected adverse events. Follow-up PET scans showed new areas of viability within the infarct scar in CABG patients. Echocardiography measured an average improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) from 25% to 34%. Histological evaluation in four out of five patients who underwent heart transplantation documented survival and engraftment of the skeletal myoblasts within the infarcted myocardium. These interim results demonstrate survival, feasibility, and safety of autologous myoblast transplantation and suggest that this modality may offer a potential therapeutic treatment for end-stage heart disease.

  1. Sera from young and older humans equally sustain proliferation and differentiation of human myoblasts.

    PubMed

    George, Tomasz; Velloso, Cristiana P; Alsharidah, Mansour; Lazarus, Norman R; Harridge, Stephen D R

    2010-11-01

    Using a human primary muscle cell culture model the behaviour of myoblasts (satellite cells) cultured in human serum obtained from either young or elderly individuals was studied. Serum was obtained from a total of 13 young (7 males and 6 females aged, 23-36 years) and 9 elderly (4 males and 5 females aged 69-84 years) subjects and used in a number of experiments. Myoblasts were extracted from human muscle biopsy samples taken from the vastus lateralis. In the first experiment myoblasts were isolated immediately after extraction from the biopsy in media containing human sera to examine its effects on the onset and progression of Ki67 and desmin expression. No effect of the age of the serum was observed at 3, 5 or 7 days of culture. In addition, cells were studied that had been expanded initially in optimum myoblast growth medium (GM, containing foetal calf serum and additional growth factors) prior to culture in medium containing 15% human serum. The proportion of proliferating muscle cells coexpressing desmin and Ki67 antigens after 46 h was again similar in the young and old serum conditions. Culturing these myoblasts in media containing 2% human serum to study their fusion and differentiation also resulted in no difference between young and old serum conditions in terms of the percentage of nuclei inside myosin heavy chain positive myotubes. Despite the variability of different samples of myoblasts, the age of the serum donor has no effect on the expression of any measured index. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The sphingosine kinase activator K6PC-5 stimulates C2C12 myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bernacchioni, C; Cencetti, F; Kwon, M J; Gwak, H S; Jeong, S K; Bruni, P; Donati, C

    2011-01-01

    Previously, K6PC-5, a synthetic derivative of ceramide, was demonstrated to activate sphingosine kinase (SK)-1 in keratinocytes. In this study its potential biological effect in mouse myoblasts was examined. The obtained results show that K6PC-5 promotes myogenic differentiation by enhancing myogenic marker expression, differentiation index and fusion index. Interestingly, its biological action was prevented by pharmacological inhibition of SK or S1P2 receptor, in full agreement with their recognized role in myoblast differentiation. This is the first evidence that pharmacological activation of SK accelerates myogenesis and suggests that this new therapeutic strategy could be possibly employed in skeletal muscle disorders where muscle regeneration is deficient.

  3. Correlation of autologous skeletal myoblast survival with changes in left ventricular remodeling in dilated ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Patrick I; del Rio, Carlos L; Jacoby, Douglas B; Pavlicova, Martina; Kwiatkowski, Pawel; Zawadzka, Agatha; Dinsmore, Jonathan H; Astra, Louis; Wisel, Sheik; Michler, Robert E

    2005-10-01

    The effect of autologous skeletal myoblast transplantation has not been rigorously studied in the setting of end-stage ischemic heart failure free of concomitant coronary revascularization. The aims of the present study were to determine autologous skeletal myoblast survival and its effects on left ventricular function and remodeling in sheep with dilated ischemic heart failure. Ischemic heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction, 30% +/- 2%; left ventricular end-systolic volume index, 82 +/- 9 mL/m2) was created in sheep (n = 11) with serial left circumflex coronary artery microembolizations. Instruments were inserted for the long-term determination of left ventricular global and regional dimensions, hemodynamics, and pressure-volume analysis after autologous skeletal myoblast transplantation (approximately 3.0 x 10(8) myoblasts; heart failure plus autologous skeletal myoblast group, n = 5) or without (heart failure-control group, n = 6). Measurements were performed in conscious animals. Autologous skeletal myoblast-derived skeletal muscle was found in all injected animals at 6 weeks. In ischemic heart failure, autologous skeletal myoblast cardiomyoplasty failed to improve systolic (left ventricular ejection fraction, 29% +/- 4%; dP/dT(max), 2863 +/- 152 mm Hg/s; end-systolic elastance, 1.6 +/- 0.22) or diastolic (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, 21 +/- 2 mm Hg; time constant of relaxation (Tau), 34 +/- 4 ms; dP/dT(min), -1880 +/- 68 mm Hg/s) function. There was, however, attenuation in the left ventricular dilatation after autologous skeletal myoblast transplantation (change in end-systolic volume index, 14% +/- 4% vs 32% +/- 6%; P < .05). The effects of autologous skeletal myoblast-derived skeletal muscle were exclusive to the left ventricular short-axis dimension and dependent on autologous skeletal myoblast survival (R2 = 0.59, P = .006, n = 11). Autologous skeletal cardiomyoplasty was able to attenuate left ventricular remodeling in sheep with

  4. HGF potentiates extracellular matrix-driven migration of human myoblasts: involvement of matrix metalloproteinases and MAPK/ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    González, Mariela Natacha; de Mello, Wallace; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Silva-Barbosa, Suse Dayse; Mouly, Vincent; Savino, Wilson; Riederer, Ingo

    2017-10-10

    The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is required for the activation of muscle progenitor cells called satellite cells (SC), plays a role in the migration of proliferating SC (myoblasts), and is present as a soluble factor during muscle regeneration, along with extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. In this study, we aimed at determining whether HGF is able to interact with ECM proteins, particularly laminin 111 and fibronectin, and to modulate human myoblast migration. We evaluated the expression of the HGF-receptor c-Met, laminin, and fibronectin receptors by immunoblotting, flow cytometry, or immunofluorescence and used Transwell assays to analyze myoblast migration on laminin 111 and fibronectin in the absence or presence of HGF. Zymography was used to check whether HGF could modulate the production of matrix metalloproteinases by human myoblasts, and the activation of MAPK/ERK pathways was evaluated by immunoblotting. We demonstrated that human myoblasts express c-Met, together with laminin and fibronectin receptors. We observed that human laminin 111 and fibronectin have a chemotactic effect on myoblast migration, and this was synergistically increased when low doses of HGF were added. We detected an increase in MMP-2 activity in myoblasts treated with HGF. Conversely, MMP-2 inhibition decreased the HGF-associated stimulation of cell migration triggered by laminin or fibronectin. HGF treatment also induced in human myoblasts activation of MAPK/ERK pathways, whose specific inhibition decreased the HGF-associated stimulus of cell migration triggered by laminin 111 or fibronectin. We demonstrate that HGF induces ERK phosphorylation and MMP production, thus stimulating human myoblast migration on ECM molecules. Conceptually, these data state that the mechanisms involved in the migration of human myoblasts comprise both soluble and insoluble moieties. This should be taken into account to optimize the design of therapeutic cell transplantation strategies by improving

  5. Human myoblast differentiation: Ca(2+) channels are activated by K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Bernheim, Laurent; Bader, Charles R

    2002-02-01

    In a paradigm of cellular differentiation, human myoblast fusion, we investigated how a Ca(2+) influx, indispensable for fusion, is triggered. We show how newly expressed Kir2.1 K(+) channels, via their hyperpolarizing effect on the membrane potential, generate a window Ca(2+) current (mediated by alpha 1H T-type Ca(2+) channels), which causes intracellular Ca(2+) to rise.

  6. Leucine and isoleucine reduce protein degradation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myoblast cultures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Myogenic precursor cells were isolated from rainbow trout skeletal muscle and incubated in media containing 10% fetal bovine serum for 7 days, thereby differentiating into myoblasts. Rates of protein degradation were determined in response to minimal essential media (MEM) of various amino acid (AA)...

  7. Single-nucleus RNA-seq of differentiating human myoblasts reveals the extent of fate heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Weihua; Jiang, Shan; Kong, Xiangduo; El-Ali, Nicole; Ball, Alexander R.; Ma, Christopher I-Hsing; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Yokomori, Kyoko; Mortazavi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Myoblasts are precursor skeletal muscle cells that differentiate into fused, multinucleated myotubes. Current single-cell microfluidic methods are not optimized for capturing very large, multinucleated cells such as myotubes. To circumvent the problem, we performed single-nucleus transcriptome analysis. Using immortalized human myoblasts, we performed RNA-seq analysis of single cells (scRNA-seq) and single nuclei (snRNA-seq) and found them comparable, with a distinct enrichment for long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in snRNA-seq. We then compared snRNA-seq of myoblasts before and after differentiation. We observed the presence of mononucleated cells (MNCs) that remained unfused and analyzed separately from multi-nucleated myotubes. We found that while the transcriptome profiles of myoblast and myotube nuclei are relatively homogeneous, MNC nuclei exhibited significant heterogeneity, with the majority of them adopting a distinct mesenchymal state. Primary transcripts for microRNAs (miRNAs) that participate in skeletal muscle differentiation were among the most differentially expressed lncRNAs, which we validated using NanoString. Our study demonstrates that snRNA-seq provides reliable transcriptome quantification for cells that are otherwise not amenable to current single-cell platforms. Our results further indicate that snRNA-seq has unique advantage in capturing nucleus-enriched lncRNAs and miRNA precursors that are useful in mapping and monitoring differential miRNA expression during cellular differentiation. PMID:27566152

  8. Alignment of skeletal muscle myoblasts and myotubes using linear micropatterned surfaces ground with abrasives.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Fujita, Hideaki; Nagamori, Eiji

    2009-06-15

    Alignment of cells plays a significant key role in skeletal muscle tissue engineering because skeletal muscle tissue in vivo has a highly organized structure consisting of long parallel multinucleated myotubes formed through differentiation and fusion of myoblasts. In the present study, we developed an easy, simple, and low-cost method for aligning skeletal muscle cells by using surfaces with linear microscale features fabricated by grinding. Iron blocks were ground in one direction with three kinds of abrasives (9 microm diamond suspension, #400 sandpaper, and #150 sandpaper) and then used as molds to make micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates (type I, type II, and type III). Observation of the surface topography revealed that the PDMS substrates exhibited different degree of mean roughness (Ra), 0.03 microm for type I, 0.16 microm for type II, and 0.56 microm for type III, respectively. Murine skeletal muscle cell line C2C12 myoblasts were cultured and differentiated on the patterned PDMS substrates, and it was examined whether the alignment of C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes was possible. Although the cell growth and differentiation on the three types of patterned substrates were similar to those on the flat PDMS substrate as a control, the alignment of both C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes was obviously observed on types II and III, but not on type I or the control substrate. These results indicate that surfaces ground with abrasives will be useful for fabricating aligned skeletal muscle tissues.

  9. Autologous Myoblast Transplantation for Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy: a Phase I/Iia Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Périé, Sophie; Trollet, Capucine; Mouly, Vincent; Vanneaux, Valérie; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Bouazza, Belaïd; Marolleau, Jean Pierre; Laforêt, Pascal; Chapon, Françoise; Eymard, Bruno; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Larghero, Jérome; St Guily, Jean Lacau

    2014-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset autosomal dominant genetic disease mainly characterized by ptosis and dysphagia. We conducted a phase I/IIa clinical study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00773227) using autologous myoblast transplantation following myotomy in adult OPMD patients. This study included 12 patients with clinical diagnosis of OPMD, indication for cricopharyngeal myotomy, and confirmed genetic diagnosis. The feasibility and safety end points of both autologous myoblast transplantation and the surgical procedure were assessed by videoendoscopy in addition to physical examinations. Potential therapeutic benefit was also assessed through videoendoscopy and videofluoroscopy of swallowing, quality of life score, dysphagia grade, and a drink test. Patients were injected with a median of 178 million myoblasts following myotomy. Short and long-term (2 years) safety and tolerability were observed in all the patients, with no adverse effects. There was an improvement in the quality of life score for all 12 patients, and no functional degradation in swallowing was observed for 10 patients. A cell dose-dependant improvement in swallowing was even observed in this study. This trial supports the hypothesis that a local injection of autologous myoblasts in the pharyngeal muscles is a safe and efficient procedure for OPMD patients. PMID:23831596

  10. ROCK-2 is associated with focal adhesion maturation during myoblast migration.

    PubMed

    Goetsch, K P; Snyman, C; Myburgh, K H; Niesler, C U

    2014-07-01

    Satellite cell migration is critical for skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. Controlled cell migration is dependent on the formation of mature focal adhesions between the cell and the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM). These cell-ECM interactions trigger the activation of signalling events such as the Rho/ROCK pathway. We have previously identified a specific role for ROCK-2 during myoblast migration. In this study we report that ROCK inhibition with Y-27632 increases C2C12 myoblast velocity, but at the expense of directional migration. In response to Y-27632 an increased number of smaller focal adhesions were distributed across adhesion sites that in turn were clearly larger than sites in untreated cells, suggesting a reduction in focal adhesion maturation. We also confirm ROCK-2 localisation to the focal adhesion sites in migrating myoblasts and demonstrate a change in the distribution of these ROCK-2 containing adhesions in response to Y-27632. Taken together, our observations provide further proof that ROCK-2 regulates directional myoblast migration through focal adhesion formation and maturation.

  11. Structure–function analysis of myomaker domains required for myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Millay, Douglas P.; Gamage, Dilani G.; Quinn, Malgorzata E.; Min, Yi-Li; Mitani, Yasuyuki; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    During skeletal muscle development, myoblasts fuse to form multinucleated myofibers. Myomaker [Transmembrane protein 8c (TMEM8c)] is a muscle-specific protein that is essential for myoblast fusion and sufficient to promote fusion of fibroblasts with muscle cells; however, the structure and biochemical properties of this membrane protein have not been explored. Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis to disrupt myomaker expression in the C2C12 muscle cell line, which resulted in complete blockade to fusion. To define the functional domains of myomaker required to direct fusion, we established a heterologous cell–cell fusion system, in which fibroblasts expressing mutant versions of myomaker were mixed with WT myoblasts. Our data indicate that the majority of myomaker is embedded in the plasma membrane with seven membrane-spanning regions and a required intracellular C-terminal tail. We show that myomaker function is conserved in other mammalian orthologs; however, related family members (TMEM8a and TMEM8b) do not exhibit fusogenic activity. These findings represent an important step toward deciphering the cellular components and mechanisms that control myoblast fusion and muscle formation. PMID:26858401

  12. HACD1, a regulator of membrane composition and fluidity, promotes myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle growth

    PubMed Central

    Blondelle, Jordan; Ohno, Yusuke; Gache, Vincent; Guyot, Stéphane; Storck, Sébastien; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Barthélémy, Inès; Walmsley, Gemma; Rahier, Anaëlle; Gadin, Stéphanie; Maurer, Marie; Guillaud, Laurent; Prola, Alexandre; Ferry, Arnaud; Aubin-Houzelstein, Geneviève; Demarquoy, Jean; Relaix, Frédéric; Piercy, Richard J.; Blot, Stéphane; Kihara, Akio; Tiret, Laurent; Pilot-Storck, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    The reduced diameter of skeletal myofibres is a hallmark of several congenital myopathies, yet the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we investigate the role of HACD1/PTPLA, which is involved in the elongation of the very long chain fatty acids, in muscle fibre formation. In humans and dogs, HACD1 deficiency leads to a congenital myopathy with fibre size disproportion associated with a generalized muscle weakness. Through analysis of HACD1-deficient Labradors, Hacd1-knockout mice, and Hacd1-deficient myoblasts, we provide evidence that HACD1 promotes myoblast fusion during muscle development and regeneration. We further demonstrate that in normal differentiating myoblasts, expression of the catalytically active HACD1 isoform, which is encoded by a muscle-enriched splice variant, yields decreased lysophosphatidylcholine content, a potent inhibitor of myoblast fusion, and increased concentrations of ≥C18 and monounsaturated fatty acids of phospholipids. These lipid modifications correlate with a reduction in plasma membrane rigidity. In conclusion, we propose that fusion impairment constitutes a novel, non-exclusive pathological mechanism operating in congenital myopathies and reveal that HACD1 is a key regulator of a lipid-dependent muscle fibre growth mechanism. PMID:26160855

  13. Structure-function analysis of myomaker domains required for myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Millay, Douglas P; Gamage, Dilani G; Quinn, Malgorzata E; Min, Yi-Li; Mitani, Yasuyuki; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2016-02-23

    During skeletal muscle development, myoblasts fuse to form multinucleated myofibers. Myomaker [Transmembrane protein 8c (TMEM8c)] is a muscle-specific protein that is essential for myoblast fusion and sufficient to promote fusion of fibroblasts with muscle cells; however, the structure and biochemical properties of this membrane protein have not been explored. Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis to disrupt myomaker expression in the C2C12 muscle cell line, which resulted in complete blockade to fusion. To define the functional domains of myomaker required to direct fusion, we established a heterologous cell-cell fusion system, in which fibroblasts expressing mutant versions of myomaker were mixed with WT myoblasts. Our data indicate that the majority of myomaker is embedded in the plasma membrane with seven membrane-spanning regions and a required intracellular C-terminal tail. We show that myomaker function is conserved in other mammalian orthologs; however, related family members (TMEM8a and TMEM8b) do not exhibit fusogenic activity. These findings represent an important step toward deciphering the cellular components and mechanisms that control myoblast fusion and muscle formation.

  14. Diaphragmatic repair through fetal tissue engineering: a comparison between mesenchymal amniocyte- and myoblast-based constructs.

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Fuchs, Julie R; Kaviani, Amir; Oh, Jung-Tak; LaVan, David A; Vacanti, Joseph P; Wilson, Jay M; Fauza, Dario O

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that fetal tissue engineering is a preferred alternative to diaphragmatic repair in a large animal model. This study was aimed at comparing diaphragmatic constructs seeded with mesenchymal amniocytes and fetal myoblasts in this model. Neonatal lambs (n = 14) underwent repair of an experimental diaphragmatic defect with identical scaffolds, either seeded with labeled autologous cells (mesenchymal amniocytes in group 1 and fetal myoblasts in group 2) or as an acellular graft (group 3). At 1 to 12 months postoperatively, implants were harvested for multiple analyses. Repair failure (reherniation or eventration) was significantly higher in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2, with no difference between groups 1 and 2. Seeded fetal myoblasts quickly lost their myogenic phenotype in vivo. All grafts contained cells with a fibroblastic-myofibroblastic profile. Elastin concentrations and both modular and ultimate tensile strengths were significantly higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. There were no differences in glycosaminoglycans and type I collagen levels among the groups. Diaphragmatic repair with a mesenchymal amniocyte-based engineered tendon leads to improved structural outcomes when compared with equivalent fetal myoblast-based and acellular grafts. The amniotic fluid is a preferred cell source for tissue-engineered diaphragmatic reconstruction.

  15. p130/p107 expression distinguishes adipogenic potential in primary myoblasts based on age.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yu; Taylor-Jones, Jane M; Peterson, Charlotte A; McGehee, Robert E

    2002-09-06

    Recent investigations have provided significant evidence that many mesodermally derived tissues contain stem cell-like precursors capable of being stimulated to undergo differentiation into a variety of cellular lineages. We have recently reported that primary myoblasts isolated from 23-month-old mice have an increased adipogenic potential when compared to their 8-month-old counterparts. To further characterize the degree of adipocyte differentiation in these myoblasts, we examined early and late markers of adipocyte differentiation. Within the first 24h of adipocyte differentiation, expression of p130 and p107, two members of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene family, are regulated and this event is an important one early in adipogenesis. Consistent with the increased adipogenic potential of the older myoblasts and in contrast to the younger cells, the p130:p107 pattern of expression is very similar to that observed in adipogenesis where there is a transient increase in p107 expression accompanied by a decrease in p130 expression. Interestingly, while these older cells accumulated lipid and expressed genes associated with lipid metabolism, they failed to express adipsin and leptin, two well-established markers of terminal adipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that older myoblasts are capable of initiating and progressing through the adipogenic program to a point where they express genes associated with lipid metabolism, but do not reach a terminally differentiated state. This finding may have important metabolic implications in the aging population.

  16. DRAGON, a GPI-anchored membrane protein, inhibits BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kanomata, Kazuhiro; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Nojima, Junya; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu

    2009-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce osteoblastic differentiation of myoblasts via binding to cell surface receptors. Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs) have been identified as BMP co-receptors. We report here that DRAGON/RGMb, a member of the RGM family, suppressed BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts via a novel mechanism. All RGMs were expressed in C2C12 cells that were differentiated into myocytes and osteoblastic cells, but RGMc was not detected in immature cells. In C2C12 cells, only DRAGON suppressed ALP and Id1 promoter activities induced by BMP-4 or by constitutively activated BMP type I receptors. This inhibition by DRAGON was dependent on the secretory form of the von Willbrand factor type D domain. DRAGON even suppressed BMP signaling induced by constitutively activated Smad1. Over-expression of neogenin did not alter the inhibitory capacity of DRAGON. Taken together, these findings indicate that DRAGON may be an inhibitor of BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts. We also suggest that a novel molecule(s) expressed on the cell membrane may mediate the signal transduction of DRAGON in order to suppress BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

  17. Single-nucleus RNA-seq of differentiating human myoblasts reveals the extent of fate heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Weihua; Jiang, Shan; Kong, Xiangduo; El-Ali, Nicole; Ball, Alexander R; Ma, Christopher I-Hsing; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Yokomori, Kyoko; Mortazavi, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Myoblasts are precursor skeletal muscle cells that differentiate into fused, multinucleated myotubes. Current single-cell microfluidic methods are not optimized for capturing very large, multinucleated cells such as myotubes. To circumvent the problem, we performed single-nucleus transcriptome analysis. Using immortalized human myoblasts, we performed RNA-seq analysis of single cells (scRNA-seq) and single nuclei (snRNA-seq) and found them comparable, with a distinct enrichment for long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in snRNA-seq. We then compared snRNA-seq of myoblasts before and after differentiation. We observed the presence of mononucleated cells (MNCs) that remained unfused and analyzed separately from multi-nucleated myotubes. We found that while the transcriptome profiles of myoblast and myotube nuclei are relatively homogeneous, MNC nuclei exhibited significant heterogeneity, with the majority of them adopting a distinct mesenchymal state. Primary transcripts for microRNAs (miRNAs) that participate in skeletal muscle differentiation were among the most differentially expressed lncRNAs, which we validated using NanoString. Our study demonstrates that snRNA-seq provides reliable transcriptome quantification for cells that are otherwise not amenable to current single-cell platforms. Our results further indicate that snRNA-seq has unique advantage in capturing nucleus-enriched lncRNAs and miRNA precursors that are useful in mapping and monitoring differential miRNA expression during cellular differentiation.

  18. Autologous myoblast transplantation for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a phase I/IIa clinical study.

    PubMed

    Périé, Sophie; Trollet, Capucine; Mouly, Vincent; Vanneaux, Valérie; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Bouazza, Belaïd; Marolleau, Jean Pierre; Laforêt, Pascal; Chapon, Françoise; Eymard, Bruno; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Larghero, Jérome; St Guily, Jean Lacau

    2014-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset autosomal dominant genetic disease mainly characterized by ptosis and dysphagia. We conducted a phase I/IIa clinical study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00773227) using autologous myoblast transplantation following myotomy in adult OPMD patients. This study included 12 patients with clinical diagnosis of OPMD, indication for cricopharyngeal myotomy, and confirmed genetic diagnosis. The feasibility and safety end points of both autologous myoblast transplantation and the surgical procedure were assessed by videoendoscopy in addition to physical examinations. Potential therapeutic benefit was also assessed through videoendoscopy and videofluoroscopy of swallowing, quality of life score, dysphagia grade, and a drink test. Patients were injected with a median of 178 million myoblasts following myotomy. Short and long-term (2 years) safety and tolerability were observed in all the patients, with no adverse effects. There was an improvement in the quality of life score for all 12 patients, and no functional degradation in swallowing was observed for 10 patients. A cell dose-dependant improvement in swallowing was even observed in this study. This trial supports the hypothesis that a local injection of autologous myoblasts in the pharyngeal muscles is a safe and efficient procedure for OPMD patients.

  19. Co-Activation of Nuclear Factor-κB and Myocardin/Serum Response Factor Conveys the Hypertrophy Signal of High Insulin Levels in Cardiac Myoblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Geng, Yong-Jian; Bolli, Roberto; Rokosh, Gregg; Ferdinandy, Peter; Patterson, Cam; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia contributes to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in patients with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Here, high circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α may synergize with insulin in signaling inflammation and cardiac hypertrophy. We tested whether high insulin affects activation of TNF-α-induced NF-κB and myocardin/serum response factor (SRF) to convey hypertrophy signaling in cardiac myoblasts. In canine cardiac myoblasts, treatment with high insulin (10−8 to 10−7 m) for 0–24 h increased insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 phosphorylation at Ser-307, decreased protein levels of chaperone-associated ubiquitin (Ub) E3 ligase C terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein (CHIP), increased SRF activity, as well as β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) and myocardin expressions. Here siRNAs to myocardin or NF-κB, as well as CHIP overexpression prevented (while siRNA-mediated CHIP disruption potentiated) high insulin-induced SR element (SRE) activation and β-MHC expression. Insulin markedly potentiated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation. Compared with insulin alone, insulin+TNF-α increased SRF/SRE binding and β-MHC expression, which was reversed by the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and by NF-κB silencing. In the hearts of db/db diabetic mice, in which Akt phosphorylation was decreased, p38MAPK, Akt1, and IRS-1 phosphorylation at Ser-307 were increased, together with myocardin expression as well as SRE and NF-κB activities. In response to high insulin, cardiac myoblasts increase the expression or the promyogenic transcription factors myocardin/SRF in a CHIP-dependent manner. Insulin potentiates TNF-α in inducing NF-κB and SRF/SRE activities. In hyperinsulinemic states, myocardin may act as a nuclear effector of insulin, promoting cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:24855642

  20. Encapsulated human primary myoblasts deliver functional hFIX in hemophilic mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianping; Xu, Nong; Li, Anna; Bourgeois, Jacqueline; Ofosu, Frederick A; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2007-11-01

    Hemophilia B is a bleeding disorder caused by defective factor IX (FIX), currently treated by regular infusions of plasma-derived or recombinant FIX. We propose a gene therapy strategy based on the implantation of cells secreting FIX enclosed in alginate microcapsules as a highly desirable alternative treatment. We have reported sustained delivery of human factor IX (hFIX) in immunocompetent mice implanted with encapsulated primary mouse myoblasts engineered to secrete hFIX. As a step towards the treatment of human patients, in this study we report the implantation of encapsulated human primary myoblasts secreting hFIX in hemophilia B mice. Human primary myoblasts were transfected with plasmids pKL4M-hFIX, pLNM-betaIXL, pMFG-hFIX, and transduced with retrovirus MFG-hFIX. Two human primary myoblast clones secreting approximately 1 microg hFIX/10(6) cells/day were enclosed in biocompatible alginate microcapsules and implanted intraperitoneally into SCID and hemophilic mice. Circulating hFIX (peak of approximately 120 ng/ml) was detected in hemophilia B mice on day 1 after implantation. Human FIX delivery was transient, however, becoming undetectable on day 14. Concurrently, anti-hFIX antibodies were detected. At the same time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was reduced from 94 s before treatment to 78-80 s. Tail bleeding time decreased from 15 min to 1.5-7 min after treatment, some mice being normalised. These findings indicate that the delivered hFIX is biologically active. Similarly treated NOD/SCID mice had circulating hFIX levels of 170 ng/ml on day 1 that remained detectable for 1 month, albeit at low levels. Cell viability of microcapsules retrieved on day 60 was below 5%. Our findings indicate that encapsulated human primary myoblasts secrete functional hFIX. Furthermore, implantation of encapsulated human primary myoblasts can partially correct the phenotype of hemophilia B mice, supporting the feasibility of this gene therapy approach for

  1. S100B in myoblasts regulates the transition from activation to quiescence and from quiescence to activation and reduces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tubaro, Claudia; Arcuri, Cataldo; Giambanco, Ileana; Donato, Rosario

    2011-05-01

    S100B protein activates IKKβ/NF-κB within myoblasts, thereby inhibiting the expression of MyoD and the MyoD-downstream effectors, myogenin and p21(WAF1), and myoblast differentiation. Herein we show that myoblasts downregulate S100B expression once transferred from proliferation medium to differentiation medium via a p38 MAPK-driven transcriptional mechanism as well as a post-translational, proteasome-dependent mechanism, and that myoblasts that have not been committed to differentiation resume expressing S100B once transferred back to proliferation medium. Likewise, myoblasts downregulate S100B expression once transferred to quiescence medium, and interference with S100B downregulation as obtained by stable overexpression of the protein results in reduced acquisition of quiescence and a faster proliferation upon transfer of the cells from quiescence medium to proliferation medium, compared to controls. These latter effects are dependent on S100B-induced activation of JNK. Moreover, S100B reduces myoblast apoptosis in an MEK-ERK1/2, Akt, JNK, and NF-κB-dependent manner. However, myogenin(+) myoblasts (i.e., myocytes) and myotubes abundantly express S100B likely induced by myogenin. Our results suggest that (1) a timely repression of S100B expression is required for efficient myogenic differentiation; (2) S100B plays an important role in the expansion of the activated (i.e., proliferating) myoblast population; (3) under conditions associated with enhanced expression of S100B, the transition from proliferation to quiescence and from quiescence to proliferation might be altered; and (4) S100B exerts different regulatory effects in myoblasts and myocytes/myotubes/myofibers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An Integrated Strategy for Analyzing the Unique Developmental Programs of Different Myoblast Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Michaud, Sebastien; Raj, Lakshmi; Busser, Brian W; Halfon, Marc S; Church, George M; Michelson, Alan M

    2006-01-01

    An important but largely unmet challenge in understanding the mechanisms that govern the formation of specific organs is to decipher the complex and dynamic genetic programs exhibited by the diversity of cell types within the tissue of interest. Here, we use an integrated genetic, genomic, and computational strategy to comprehensively determine the molecular identities of distinct myoblast subpopulations within the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm at the time that cell fates are initially specified. A compendium of gene expression profiles was generated for primary mesodermal cells purified by flow cytometry from appropriately staged wild-type embryos and from 12 genotypes in which myogenesis was selectively and predictably perturbed. A statistical meta-analysis of these pooled datasets—based on expected trends in gene expression and on the relative contribution of each genotype to the detection of known muscle genes—provisionally assigned hundreds of differentially expressed genes to particular myoblast subtypes. Whole embryo in situ hybridizations were then used to validate the majority of these predictions, thereby enabling true-positive detection rates to be estimated for the microarray data. This combined analysis reveals that myoblasts exhibit much greater gene expression heterogeneity and overall complexity than was previously appreciated. Moreover, it implicates the involvement of large numbers of uncharacterized, differentially expressed genes in myogenic specification and subsequent morphogenesis. These findings also underscore a requirement for considerable regulatory specificity for generating diverse myoblast identities. Finally, to illustrate how the developmental functions of newly identified myoblast genes can be efficiently surveyed, a rapid RNA interference assay that can be scored in living embryos was developed and applied to selected genes. This integrated strategy for examining embryonic gene expression and function provides a substantially

  3. The Activity of Differentiation Factors Induces Apoptosis in Polyomavirus Large T-Expressing Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fimia, Gian Maria; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Bellei, Barbara; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Tafuri, Agostino; Amati, Paolo; Maione, Rossella

    1998-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that pathways that regulate proliferation/differentiation processes, if altered in their normal interplay, can lead to the induction of programmed cell death. In a previous work we reported that Polyoma virus Large Tumor antigen (PyLT) interferes with in vitro terminal differentiation of skeletal myoblasts by binding and inactivating the retinoblastoma antioncogene product. This inhibition occurs after the activation of some early steps of the myogenic program. In the present work we report that myoblasts expressing wild-type PyLT, when subjected to differentiation stimuli, undergo cell death and that this cell death can be defined as apoptosis. Apoptosis in PyLT-expressing myoblasts starts after growth factors removal, is promoted by cell confluence, and is temporally correlated with the expression of early markers of myogenic differentiation. The block of the initial events of myogenesis by transforming growth factor β or basic fibroblast growth factor prevents PyLT-induced apoptosis, while the acceleration of this process by the overexpression of the muscle-regulatory factor MyoD further increases cell death in this system. MyoD can induce PyLT-expressing myoblasts to accumulate RB, p21, and muscle- specific genes but is unable to induce G00 arrest. Several markers of different phases of the cell cycle, such as cyclin A, cdk-2, and cdc-2, fail to be down-regulated, indicating the occurrence of cell cycle progression. It has been frequently suggested that apoptosis can result from an unbalanced cell cycle progression in the presence of a contrasting signal, such as growth factor deprivation. Our data involve differentiation pathways, as a further contrasting signal, in the generation of this conflict during myoblast cell apoptosis. PMID:9614186

  4. Mechanical preconditioning enables electrophysiologic coupling of skeletal myoblast cells to myocardium.

    PubMed

    Neef, Klaus; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Srinivasan, Sureshkumar Perumal; Treskes, Philipp; Cowan, Douglas B; Stamm, Christof; Rubach, Martin; Adelmann, Roland; Wittwer, Thorsten; Wahlers, Thorsten

    2012-11-01

    The effect of mechanical preconditioning on skeletal myoblasts in engineered tissue constructs was investigated to resolve issues associated with conduction block between skeletal myoblast cells and cardiomyocytes. Murine skeletal myoblasts were used to generate engineered tissue constructs with or without application of mechanical strain. After in vitro myotube formation, engineered tissue constructs were co-cultured for 6 days with viable embryonic heart slices. With the use of sharp electrodes, electrical coupling between engineered tissue constructs and embryonic heart slices was assessed in the presence or absence of pharmacologic agents. The isolation and expansion procedure for skeletal myoblasts resulted in high yields of homogeneously desmin-positive (97.1% ± 0.1%) cells. Mechanical strain was exerted on myotubes within engineered tissue constructs during gelation of the matrix, generating preconditioned engineered tissue constructs. Electrical coupling between preconditioned engineered tissue constructs and embryonic heart slices was observed; however, no coupling was apparent when engineered tissue constructs were not subjected to mechanical strain. Coupling of cells from engineered tissue constructs to cells in embryonic heart slices showed slower conduction velocities than myocardial cells with the embryonic heart slices (preconditioned engineered tissue constructs vs embryonic heart slices: 0.04 ± 0.02 ms vs 0.10 ± 0.05 ms, P = .011), lower maximum stimulation frequencies (preconditioned engineered tissue constructs vs embryonic heart slices: 4.82 ± 1.42 Hz vs 10.58 ± 1.56 Hz; P = .0009), and higher sensitivities to the gap junction inhibitor (preconditioned engineered tissue constructs vs embryonic heart slices: 0.22 ± 0.07 mmol/L vs 0.93 ± 0.15 mmol/L; P = .0004). We have generated skeletal myoblast-based transplantable grafts that electrically couple to myocardium. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by

  5. Myoblast-mediated gene therapy improves functional collateralization in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Nils; Marushima, Aiki; Nieminen, Melina; Kremenetskaia, Irina; von Degenfeld, Georges; Woitzik, Johannes; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Direct extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery for treatment of cerebral hemodynamic compromise remains hindered by complications but alternative simple and safe indirect revascularization procedures, such as an encephalomyosynangiosis (EMS), lack hemodynamic efficiency. Here, the myoblast-mediated transfer of angiogenic genes presents an approach for induction of therapeutic collateralization. In this study, we tested the effect of myoblast-mediated delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) to the muscle/brain interface of an EMS in a model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Permanent unilateral internal carotid artery-occlusion was performed in adult C57/BL6 mice with or without (no EMS) surgical grafting of an EMS followed by implantation of monoclonal mouse myoblasts expressing either VEGF164 or an empty vector (EV). Cerebral hemodynamic impairment, transpial collateralization, angiogenesis, mural cell investment, microvascular permeability, and cortical infarction after ipsilateral stroke were assessed by real-time laser speckle blood flow imaging, 2- and 3-dimensional immunofluorescence and MRI. VEGF-expressing myoblasts improved hemodynamic rescue by day 14 (no EMS 37±21%, EV 42±9%, VEGF 48±12%; P<0.05 for VEGF versus no EMS and versus EV), together with the EMS take rate (VEGF 60%, EV 18.2%; P<0.05) and angiogenesis of mature cortical microvessels below the EMS (P<0.05 for VEGF versus EV). Importantly, functional and morphological results were paralleled by a 25% reduction of cortical infarction after experimental stroke on the side of the EMS. Myoblast-mediated VEGF supplementation at the target site of an EMS could help overcome the clinical dilemma of poor surgical revascularization results and provide protection from ischemic stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. TIPS to manipulate myogenesis: retention of myoblast differentiation capacity using microsphere culture.

    PubMed

    Parmar, N; Day, R M

    2015-07-27

    Cell therapy is an emerging option for regenerating skeletal muscle. Improved delivery methods for anchorage-dependent myoblasts are likely to improve integration and function of transplanted muscle cells. Highly porous microspheres, produced using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS), have features ideally suited for minimally invasive cell delivery. The purpose of this study was to investigate, for the first time, the use of TIPS microspheres as highly porous microcarriers for manipulation of human skeletal muscle myoblasts (HSMM) under defined culture conditions. HSMM cells readily attached to the surface of poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) TIPS microcarriers, where they were induced to continue proliferating or to be driven towards differentiation whilst under static-dynamic culture conditions for 7 days. Switching from proliferation medium to differentiation medium for 7 days, resulted in increased protein expression of skeletal muscle cell contractile apparatus components, MyoD and skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain, compared with cells cultured on conventional culture plasticware for the same duration (p < 0.001). Growth of myoblasts on the surface of the microcarriers and their migration following simulated delivery, caused no change to the proliferative capacity of cells over 7 days. Results from this study demonstrate that TIPS microspheres provide an ideal vehicle for the expansion and delivery of myoblasts for therapeutic applications. Transplantation of myoblasts anchored to a substrate, rather than in suspension, will reduce the amount of ex vivo manipulation required during preparation of the product and allows cells to be delivered in a more natural state. This will improve the ability to control cell dosage and increase the likelihood of efficacy.

  7. Histone methyltransferase Setd2 is critical for the proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xin; Tao, Ye; Lin, Xi; Dai, Yuan; Yang, Tingli; Yue, Xiaojing; Jiang, Xuejun; Li, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Andrade, Kelsey C; Chang, Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation are tightly regulated. Epigenetic regulation is a major component of the regulatory mechanism governing these processes. Histone modification is part of the epigenetic code used for transcriptional regulation of chromatin through the establishment of an active or repressive state for genes involved in myogenesis in a temporal manner. Here, we uncovered the function of SET domain containing 2 (Setd2), an essential histone 3 lysine 36 trimethyltransferase, in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts. Setd2 was silenced in the skeletal muscle myoblast cell line, C2C12, using the CRISPR/CAS9 system. The mutant cells exhibited defect in myotube formation. The myotube formation marker, myosin heavy chain (MHC), was downregulated earlier in Setd2 silenced cells compared to wild-type myoblasts during differentiation. The deficiency in Setd2 also resulted in repression of Myogenin (MyoG) expression, a key myogenic regulator during differentiation. In addition to the myoblast differentiation defect, decreased proliferation rate with significantly reduced levels of histone 3 phosphorylation, indicative of cell proliferation defect, were observed in the Setd2 silenced cells; suggesting an impaired proliferation phenotype. Furthermore, compromised G1/S- and G2/M-phase transition and decreased expression levels of major regulators of cell cycle G1/S checkpoints, cyclin D1, CDK4, CDK6, and cyclin E2 were detected in Setd2 silenced cells. Consistent with the cell cycle arrested phenotype, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 was upregulated in Setd2 silenced cells. Together, this study demonstrates an essential role of Setd2 in myoblast proliferation and differentiation, and uncovers Setd2-mediated molecular mechanism through regulating MyoG and p21.

  8. Proteomic analysis of C2C12 myoblast and myotube exosome-like vesicles: a new paradigm for myoblast-myotube cross talk?

    PubMed

    Forterre, Alexis; Jalabert, Audrey; Berger, Emmanuelle; Baudet, Mathieu; Chikh, Karim; Errazuriz, Elisabeth; De Larichaudy, Joffrey; Chanon, Stéphanie; Weiss-Gayet, Michèle; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Record, Michel; Geloen, Alain; Lefai, Etienne; Vidal, Hubert; Couté, Yohann; Rome, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized microvesicles formed in multivesicular bodies (MVBs) during endosome maturation. Exosomes are released from cells into the microenvironment following fusion of MVBs with the plasma membrane. During the last decade, skeletal muscle-secreted proteins have been identified with important roles in intercellular communications. To investigate whether muscle-derived exosomes participate in this molecular dialog, we determined and compared the protein contents of the exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) released from C2C12 murine myoblasts during proliferation (ELV-MB), and after differentiation into myotubes (ELV-MT). Using a proteomic approach combined with electron microscopy, western-blot and bioinformatic analyses, we compared the protein repertoires within ELV-MB and ELV-MT. We found that these vesicles displayed the classical properties of exosomes isolated from other cell types containing components of the ESCRT machinery of the MVBs, as well as numerous tetraspanins. Specific muscle proteins were also identified confirming that ELV composition also reflects their muscle origin. Furthermore quantitative analysis revealed stage-preferred expression of 31 and 78 proteins in ELV-MB and ELV-MT respectively. We found that myotube-secreted ELVs, but not ELV-MB, reduced myoblast proliferation and induced differentiation, through, respectively, the down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and the up-regulation of myogenin. We also present evidence that proteins from ELV-MT can be incorporated into myoblasts by using the GFP protein as cargo within ELV-MT. Taken together, our data provide a useful database of proteins from C2C12-released ELVs throughout myogenesis and reveals the importance of exosome-like vesicles in skeletal muscle biology.

  9. Myoblast transfer therapy: is there any light at the end of the tunnel?

    PubMed

    Mouly, V; Aamiri, A; Périé, S; Mamchaoui, K; Barani, A; Bigot, A; Bouazza, B; François, V; Furling, D; Jacquemin, V; Negroni, E; Riederer, I; Vignaud, A; St Guily, J L; Butler-Browne, G S

    2005-10-01

    Myoblast transfer therapy (MTT) was proposed in the 70's as a potential treatment for muscular dystrophies, based upon the early results obtained in mdx mice: dystrophin expression was restored in this model by intramuscular injections of normal myoblasts. These results were quickly followed by clinical trials for patients suffering from Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in the early 90's, based mainly upon intramuscular injections of allogenic myoblasts. The clinical benefits obtained from these trials were minimal, if any, and research programs concentrated then on the various pitfalls that hampered these clinical trials, leading to numerous failures. Several causes for these failures were identified in mouse models, including a massive cell death of myoblasts following their injection, adverse events involving the immune system and requiring immunosuppression and the adverse events linked to it, as well as a poor dispersion of the injected cells following their injection. It should be noted that these studies were conducted in mouse models, not taking into account the fundamental differences between mice and men. One of these differences concerns the regulation of proliferation, which is strictly limited by proliferative senescence in humans. Although this list is certainly not exhaustive, new therapeutic venues were then explored, such as the use of stem cells with myogenic potential, which have been described in various populations, including bone marrow, circulating blood or muscle itself. These stem cells presented the main advantage to be available and not exhausted by the numerous cycles of degeneration/regeneration which characterize muscle dystrophies. However, the different stem candidates have shown their limits in terms of efficiency to participate to the regeneration of the host. Another issue was raised by clinical trials involving the injection of autologous myoblasts in infacted hearts, which showed that limited targets could be aimed with

  10. ADP-Ribosylation Factor 6 Regulates Mammalian Myoblast Fusion through Phospholipase D1 and Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Enjalbert, Sandrine; Comunale, Franck; Bodin, Stéphane; Vitale, Nicolas; Charrasse, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is an essential step during myoblast differentiation that remains poorly understood. M-cadherin–dependent pathways that signal through Rac1 GTPase activation via the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Trio are important for myoblast fusion. The ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)6 GTPase has been shown to bind to Trio and to regulate Rac1 activity. Moreover, Loner/GEP100/BRAG2, a GEF of ARF6, has been involved in mammalian and Drosophila myoblast fusion, but the specific role of ARF6 has been not fully analyzed. Here, we show that ARF6 activity is increased at the time of myoblast fusion and is required for its implementation in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Specifically, at the onset of myoblast fusion, ARF6 is associated with the multiproteic complex that contains M-cadherin, Trio, and Rac1 and accumulates at sites of myoblast fusion. ARF6 silencing inhibits the association of Trio and Rac1 with M-cadherin. Moreover, we demonstrate that ARF6 regulates myoblast fusion through phospholipase D (PLD) activation and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate production. Together, these data indicate that ARF6 is a critical regulator of C2C12 myoblast fusion and participates in the regulation of PLD activities that trigger both phospholipids production and actin cytoskeleton reorganization at fusion sites. PMID:20505075

  11. α-Linolenic Acid Reduces TNF-Induced Apoptosis in C2C12 Myoblasts by Regulating Expression of Apoptotic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Carotenuto, Felicia; Coletti, Dario; Di Nardo, Paolo; Teodori, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Impaired regeneration and consequent muscle wasting is a major feature of muscle degenerative diseases. Nutritional interventions such as adjuvant strategy for preventing these conditions are recently gaining increasing attention. Ingestion of n3-polyunsaturated fatty acids has been suggested as having a positive impact on muscle diseases. We recently demonstrated that a diet enriched with plant derived n3-fatty acid, α-linolenic acid (ALA), exerts potent beneficial effects in preserving skeletal muscle regeneration in models of muscle dystrophy. To better elucidate the underlying mechanism we here investigate on the expression level of the anti- and pro-apoptotic proteins, as well as caspase-3 activity, in C2C12 myoblasts challenged with pathological levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF). The results demonstrated that ALA protective effect on C2C12 myoblasts was associated with a decrease in caspase-3 activity and an increase of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Indeed, the effect of ALA was directed to rescuing Bcl-2 expression and to revert Bax translocation to mitochondria both affected in an opposite way by TNF, a major pro-inflammatory cytokine expressed in damaged skeletal muscle. Therefore, ALA counteracts inflammatory signals in the muscle microenvironment and may represent a valuable strategy for ameliorating skeletal muscle pathologies. PMID:28078067

  12. Assessment of the antioxidant activity of an olive oil total polyphenolic fraction and hydroxytyrosol from a Greek Olea europea variety in endothelial cells and myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kouka, Paraskevi; Priftis, Alexandros; Stagos, Dimitrios; Angelis, Apostolis; Stathopoulos, Panagiotis; Xinos, Nikos; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Léandros; Mamoulakis, Charalampos; Tsatsakis, Aristides M.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2017-01-01

    Olive oil (OO) constitutes the basis of the Mediterranean diet, and it seems that its biophenols, such as hydroxytyrosol (HT) may scavenge free radicals, attracting distinct attention due to their beneficial effects in many pathological conditions, such as cancer. To the best of our knowedge, this is the first study in which the functional properties of an OO total polyphenolic fraction (TPF) and pure HT were examined in order to determine their antioxidant effects at a cellular level in endothelial cells and myoblasts. The test compounds were isolated using a green gradient-elution centrifugal partition chromatography-based method that allows the isolation of large volumes of OO in a continuous extraction procedure and with extremely low solvent consumption. For the isolation of HT, a combination of two chromatographic techniques was used, which is effective for the recovery of pure compounds from complex natural extracts. Moreover, TPF and HT exhibited potent free radical scavenging activity in vitro. The cells were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations and their redox status [in terms of glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels] was assessed. TPF extract was less cytotoxic than HT, and the observed differences between the two cell lines used suggest a tissue-specific activity. Finally, flow cytometric analysis revealed that both TPF and HT improved the redox status by increasing the levels of GSH, one of the most important antioxidant molecules, in both endothelial cells and myoblasts, while the ROS levels were not significantly affected. PMID:28731131

  13. Developmental regulation of neuraminidase-sensitive lectin-binding glycoproteins during myogenesis of rat L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, P C; Pena, S D; Guerin, C W

    1984-01-01

    Intact monolayers of L6 myoblasts were treated with neuraminidase, with the aim of selectively removing sialic acid residues of cell-surface glycoproteins. Neuraminidase treatment unmasked binding sites for Ricinus communis agglutinin I and peanut agglutinin, thus allowing the identification of the major binding proteins for these lectins. For Ricinus communis agglutinin I these neuraminidase-sensitive glycoproteins had apparent Mr values of 136000, 115000, 87000, 83000 and 49000. For peanut agglutinin the major neuraminidase-sensitive glycoproteins had apparent Mr values of 200000, 136000, 87000 and 83000. We found highly reproducible, developmentally regulated, changes in the lectin-binding capacity of certain of these glycoproteins as L6 myoblasts differentiated into myotubes. Coincident with myoblast fusion there was a co-ordinate decrease in Ricinus communis agglutinin I binding by glycoproteins of apparent Mr of 136000 and 49000. There was also a co-ordinate shift in mobility of the broad band of glycoprotein, centred at an apparent Mr of 115000 in myoblasts, to a new average apparent Mr of 107000 in mid-fusion cultures and myotube cultures. Peanut agglutinin binding by the major protein of apparent Mr 136000 also decreased at the mid-fusion stage of myogenesis, and was barely detectable in 7-day-old fused cultures. These developmentally regulated changes in neuraminidase-sensitive glycoproteins were all inhibited by growth of myoblasts in 6.4 microM-5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, indicating that they are associated with myoblast differentiation. In contrast, an increase in fibronectin was seen in mid-fusion cultures, which was not inhibited by growth of myoblasts in 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. This initial increase in fibronectin is, therefore, unlikely to be directly related to myoblast fusion or differentiation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6712625

  14. Combined effect of mussel-inspired surface modification and topographical cues on the behavior of skeletal myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sook Hee; Park, Chan Beum

    2013-11-01

    The combined effect of mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) surface functionalization and topographical cues on the behavior of skeletal myoblasts is described. On PDA-modified nanofibers, myogenic protein expression and the fusion of myoblasts are increased significantly compared with those on unmodified nanofibers. The multinucleate myotubes on the aligned nanofibers are oriented in a direction parallel to the nanofibers. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Biomarker-free dielectrophoretic sorting of differentiating myoblast multipotent progenitor cells and their membrane analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Massimo; Srsen, Vlastimil; Waterfall, Martin; Downes, Andrew; Pethig, Ronald

    2012-09-01

    Myoblasts are muscle derived mesenchymal stem cell progenitors that have great potential for use in regenerative medicine, especially for cardiomyogenesis grafts and intracardiac cell transplantation. To utilise such cells for pre-clinical and clinical applications, and especially for personalized medicine, it is essential to generate a synchronised, homogenous, population of cells that display phenotypic and genotypic homogeneity within a population of cells. We demonstrate that the biomarker-free technique of dielectrophoresis (DEP) can be used to discriminate cells between stages of differentiation in the C2C12 myoblast multipotent mouse model. Terminally differentiated myotubes were separated from C2C12 myoblasts to better than 96% purity, a result validated by flow cytometry and Western blotting. To determine the extent to which cell membrane capacitance, rather than cell size, determined the DEP response of a cell, C2C12 myoblasts were co-cultured with GFP-expressing MRC-5 fibroblasts of comparable size distributions (mean diameter ∼10 μm). A DEP sorting efficiency greater than 98% was achieved for these two cell types, a result concluded to arise from the fibroblasts possessing a larger membrane capacitance than the myoblasts. It is currently assumed that differences in membrane capacitance primarily reflect differences in the extent of folding or surface features of the membrane. However, our finding by Raman spectroscopy that the fibroblast membranes contained a smaller proportion of saturated lipids than those of the myoblasts suggests that the membrane chemistry should also be taken into account.

  16. Ten-Eleven Translocation-2 (Tet2) Is Involved in Myogenic Differentiation of Skeletal Myoblast Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xia; Wang, Qian-Qian; Li, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Mei; An, Xiao-Rong; Hou, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Muscle cell differentiation is a complex process that is principally governed by related myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). DNA methylation is considered to play an important role on the expression of MRF genes and on muscle cell differentiation. However, the roles of enzymes specifically in myogenesis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Tet2, a ten-eleven translocation (Tet) methylcytosine dioxygenase, exerts a role during skeletal myoblast differentiation. By using an immunostaining method, we found that the levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) were much higher in differentiated myotubes than in undifferentiated C2C12 myoblasts. Both Tet1 and Tet2 expression were upregulated after differentiation induction of C2C12 myoblasts. Knockdown of Tet2, but not Tet1, significantly reduced the expression of myogenin as well as Myf6 and myomaker, and impaired myoblast differentiation. DNA demethylation of myogenin and myomaker promoters was negatively influenced by Tet2 knockdown as detected by bisulfite sequencing analysis. Furthermore, although vitamin C could promote genomic 5hmC generation, myogenic gene expression and myoblast differentiation, its effect was significantly attenuated by Tet2 knockdown. Taken together, these results indicate that Tet2 is involved in myoblast differentiation through promoting DNA demethylation and myogenic gene expression. PMID:28272491

  17. Ten-Eleven Translocation-2 (Tet2) Is Involved in Myogenic Differentiation of Skeletal Myoblast Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xia; Wang, Qian-Qian; Li, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Mei; An, Xiao-Rong; Hou, Jian

    2017-03-08

    Muscle cell differentiation is a complex process that is principally governed by related myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). DNA methylation is considered to play an important role on the expression of MRF genes and on muscle cell differentiation. However, the roles of enzymes specifically in myogenesis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Tet2, a ten-eleven translocation (Tet) methylcytosine dioxygenase, exerts a role during skeletal myoblast differentiation. By using an immunostaining method, we found that the levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) were much higher in differentiated myotubes than in undifferentiated C2C12 myoblasts. Both Tet1 and Tet2 expression were upregulated after differentiation induction of C2C12 myoblasts. Knockdown of Tet2, but not Tet1, significantly reduced the expression of myogenin as well as Myf6 and myomaker, and impaired myoblast differentiation. DNA demethylation of myogenin and myomaker promoters was negatively influenced by Tet2 knockdown as detected by bisulfite sequencing analysis. Furthermore, although vitamin C could promote genomic 5hmC generation, myogenic gene expression and myoblast differentiation, its effect was significantly attenuated by Tet2 knockdown. Taken together, these results indicate that Tet2 is involved in myoblast differentiation through promoting DNA demethylation and myogenic gene expression.

  18. Therapeutic angiogenesis by a myoblast layer harvested by tissue transfer printing from cell-adhesive, thermosensitive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wan; Jun, Indong; Lee, Tae-Jin; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Young Jun; Jang, Hyeon-Ki; Kang, Seokyung; Park, Ki Dong; Cho, Seung-Woo; Kim, Byung-Soo; Shin, Heungsoo

    2013-11-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by the altered structure and function of arteries caused by accumulated plaque. There have been many studies on treating this disease by the direct injection of various types of therapeutic cells, however, the low cell engraftment efficiency and diffusion of the transplanted cells have been major problems. In this study, we developed an approach (transfer printing) to deliver monolayer of cells to the hindlimb ischemic tissue using thermosensitive hydrogels, and investigated its efficacy in long term retention upon transplantation and therapeutic angiogenesis. We first investigated the in vitro maintenance of robust cell-cell contacts and stable expression of the ECM proteins in myoblast layer following transfer printing process. In order to confirm the therapeutic effect of the myoblasts in vivo, we cultured a monolayer of C2C12 myoblasts on thermosensitive hydrogels, which was then transferred to the hindlimb ischemia tissue of athymic mice directly from the hydrogel by conformal contact. The transferred myoblast layer was retained for a longer period of time than an intramuscularly injected cell suspension. In addition, the morphology of the mice and laser Doppler perfusion (28 days after treatment) supported that the myoblast layer enhanced the therapeutic effects on the ischemic tissue. In summary, the transplantation of the C2C12 myoblast layer using a tissue transfer printing method could represent a new approach for the treatment of PAD by therapeutic angiogenesis.

  19. Ginsenoside Rg1 from Panax ginseng enhances myoblast differentiation and myotube growth.

    PubMed

    Go, Ga-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Jin; Jo, Ayoung; Lee, Jaecheol; Seo, Dong-Wan; Kang, Jong-Sun; Kim, Si-Kwan; Kim, Su-Nam; Kim, Yong Kee; Bae, Gyu-Un

    2017-10-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 belongs to protopanaxatriol-type ginsenosides and has diverse pharmacological activities. In this report, we investigated whether Rg1 could upregulate muscular stem cell differentiation and muscle growth. C2C12 myoblasts, MyoD-transfected 10T1/2 embryonic fibroblasts, and HEK293T cells were treated with Rg1 and differentiated for 2 d, subjected to immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, or immunoprecipitation. Rg1 activated promyogenic kinases, p38MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and Akt signaling, that in turn promote the heterodimerization with MyoD and E proteins, resulting in enhancing myogenic differentiation. Through the activation of Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, Rg1 induced myotube growth and prevented dexamethasone-induced myotube atrophy. Furthermore, Rg1 increased MyoD-dependent myogenic conversion of fibroblast. Rg1 upregulates promyogenic kinases, especially Akt, resulting in improvement of myoblast differentiation and myotube growth.

  20. Trbp Is Required for Differentiation of Myoblasts and Normal Regeneration of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Nie, Mao; Liu, Jianming; Hu, Xiaoyun; Ma, Lixin; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Global inactivation of Trbp, a regulator of miRNA pathways, resulted in developmental defects and postnatal lethality in mice. Recently, we showed that cardiac-specific deletion of Trbp caused heart failure. However, its functional role(s) in skeletal muscle has not been characterized. Using a conditional knockout model, we generated mice lacking Trbp in the skeletal muscle. Unexpectedly, skeletal muscle specific Trbp mutant mice appear to be phenotypically normal under normal physiological conditions. However, these mice exhibited impaired muscle regeneration and increased fibrosis in response to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury, suggesting that Trbp is required for muscle repair. Using cultured myoblast cells we further showed that inhibition of Trbp repressed myoblast differentiation in vitro. The impaired myogenesis is associated with reduced expression of muscle-specific miRNAs, miR-1a and miR-133a. Together, our study demonstrated that Trbp participates in the regulation of muscle differentiation and regeneration. PMID:27159388

  1. SRSF10 Plays a Role in Myoblast Differentiation and Glucose Production via Regulation of Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning; Cheng, Yuanming; Wang, Zhijia; Liu, Yuguo; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Lina; Chen, Linlin; Xie, Zhiqin; Lu, Yun; Feng, Ying

    2015-11-24

    Alternative splicing is a major mechanism of controlling gene expression and protein diversity in higher eukaryotes. We report that the splicing factor SRSF10 functions during striated muscle development, myoblast differentiation, and glucose production both in cells and in mice. A combination of RNA-sequencing and molecular analysis allowed us to identify muscle-specific splicing events controlled by SRSF10 that are critically involved in striated muscle development. Inclusion of alternative exons 16 and 17 of Lrrfip1 is a muscle-specific event that is activated by SRSF10 and essential for myoblast differentiation. On the other hand, in mouse primary hepatocytes, PGC1α is a key target of SRSF10 that regulates glucose production by fasting. SRSF10 represses inclusion of PGC1α exon 7a and facilitates the production of functional protein. The results highlight the biological significance of SRSF10 and regulated alternative splicing in vivo.

  2. Pannexin 1 and Pannexin 3 Channels Regulate Skeletal Muscle Myoblast Proliferation and Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Stéphanie; Xiang, Xiao; Young, Kelsey; Cowan, Bryce J.; Penuela, Silvia; Cowan, Kyle N.

    2014-01-01

    Pannexins constitute a family of three glycoproteins (Panx1, -2, and -3) forming single membrane channels. Recent work demonstrated that Panx1 is expressed in skeletal muscle and involved in the potentiation of contraction. However, Panxs functions in skeletal muscle cell differentiation, and proliferation had yet to be assessed. We show here that Panx1 and Panx3, but not Panx2, are present in human and rodent skeletal muscle, and their various species are differentially expressed in fetal versus adult human skeletal muscle tissue. Panx1 levels were very low in undifferentiated human primary skeletal muscle cells and myoblasts (HSMM) but increased drastically during differentiation and became the main Panx expressed in differentiated cells. Using HSMM, we found that Panx1 expression promotes this process, whereas it was impaired in the presence of probenecid or carbenoxolone. As for Panx3, its lower molecular weight species were prominent in adult skeletal muscle but very low in the fetal tissue and in undifferentiated skeletal muscle cells and myoblasts. Its overexpression (∼43-kDa species) induced HSMM differentiation and also inhibited their proliferation. On the other hand, a ∼70-kDa immunoreactive species of Panx3, likely glycosylated, sialylated, and phosphorylated, was highly expressed in proliferative myoblasts but strikingly down-regulated during their differentiation. Reduction of its endogenous expression using two Panx3 shRNAs significantly inhibited HSMM proliferation without triggering their differentiation. In summary, our results demonstrate that Panx1 and Panx3 are co-expressed in human skeletal muscle myoblasts and play a pivotal role in dictating the proliferation and differentiation status of these cells. PMID:25239622

  3. Effects of type IV collagen on myogenic characteristics of IGF-I gene-engineered myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Ikeda, Kazushi; Sato, Masanori; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration requires migration, proliferation and fusion of myoblasts to form multinucleated myotubes. In our previous study, we showed that insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I gene delivery stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of mouse myoblast C2C12 cells and promotes the contractile force generated by tissue-engineered skeletal muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the extracellular matrix on IGF-I gene-engineered C2C12 cells in vitro. Retroviral vectors for doxycycline (Dox)-inducible expression of the IGF-I gene were transduced into C2C12 cells. When cultured on a type IV collagen-coated surface, we observed significant increases in the migration speed and number of IGF-I gene-engineered C2C12 cells with Dox addition, designated as C2C12/IGF (+) cells. Co-culture of C2C12/IGF (+) cells and parental C2C12 cells, which had been cultured in differentiation medium for 3 days, greatly enhanced myotube formation. Moreover, type IV collagen supplementation promoted the fusion of C2C12/IGF (+) cells with differentiated C2C12 cells and increased the number of myotubes with striations. Myotubes formed by C2C12/IGF (+) cells cultured on type IV collagen showed a dynamic contractile activity in response to electrical pulse stimulation. These findings indicate that type IV collagen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration mediated by IGF-I-expressing myoblasts, which may have important clinical implications in the design of myoblast-based therapies.

  4. The Formin Diaphanous Regulates Myoblast Fusion through Actin Polymerization and Arp2/3 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Su; Bothe, Ingo; Baylies, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multinucleated muscle cells through cell-cell fusion is a conserved process from fruit flies to humans. Numerous studies have shown the importance of Arp2/3, its regulators, and branched actin for the formation of an actin structure, the F-actin focus, at the fusion site. This F-actin focus forms the core of an invasive podosome-like structure that is required for myoblast fusion. In this study, we find that the formin Diaphanous (Dia), which nucleates and facilitates the elongation of actin filaments, is essential for Drosophila myoblast fusion. Following cell recognition and adhesion, Dia is enriched at the myoblast fusion site, concomitant with, and having the same dynamics as, the F-actin focus. Through analysis of Dia loss-of-function conditions using mutant alleles but particularly a dominant negative Dia transgene, we demonstrate that reduction in Dia activity in myoblasts leads to a fusion block. Significantly, no actin focus is detected, and neither branched actin regulators, SCAR or WASp, accumulate at the fusion site when Dia levels are reduced. Expression of constitutively active Dia also causes a fusion block that is associated with an increase in highly dynamic filopodia, altered actin turnover rates and F-actin distribution, and mislocalization of SCAR and WASp at the fusion site. Together our data indicate that Dia plays two roles during invasive podosome formation at the fusion site: it dictates the level of linear F-actin polymerization, and it is required for appropriate branched actin polymerization via localization of SCAR and WASp. These studies provide new insight to the mechanisms of cell-cell fusion, the relationship between different regulators of actin polymerization, and invasive podosome formation that occurs in normal development and in disease. PMID:26295716

  5. Stimulated myoblast differentiation on graphene oxide-impregnated PLGA-collagen hybrid fibre matrices.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Linhua; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Yong-Joo; Hyun, Jung Keun; Jung, Tae-Gon; Hong, Suck Won; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-03-12

    Electrospinning is a simple and effective method for fabricating micro- and nanofiber matrices. Electrospun fibre matrices have numerous advantages for use as tissue engineering scaffolds, such as high surface area-to-volume ratio, mass production capability and structural similarity to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Therefore, electrospun matrices, which are composed of biocompatible polymers and various biomaterials, have been developed as biomimetic scaffolds for the tissue engineering applications. In particular, graphene oxide (GO) has recently been considered as a novel biomaterial for skeletal muscle regeneration because it can promote the growth and differentiation of myoblasts. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to fabricate the hybrid fibre matrices that stimulate myoblasts differentiation for skeletal muscle regeneration. Hybrid fibre matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and collagen (Col) impregnated with GO (GO-PLGA-Col) were successfully fabricated using an electrospinning process. Our results indicated that the GO-PLGA-Col hybrid matrices were comprised of randomly-oriented continuous fibres with a three-dimensional non-woven porous structure. Compositional analysis showed that GO was dispersed uniformly throughout the GO-PLGA-Col matrices. In addition, the hydrophilicity of the fabricated matrices was significantly increased by blending with a small amount of Col and GO. The attachment and proliferation of the C2C12 skeletal myoblasts were significantly enhanced on the GO-PLGA-Col hybrid matrices. Furthermore, the GO-PLGA-Col matrices stimulated the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 skeletal myoblasts, which was enhanced further under the culture conditions of the differentiation media. Taking our findings into consideration, it is suggested that the GO-PLGA-Col hybrid fibre matrices can be exploited as potential biomimetic scaffolds for skeletal tissue engineering and regeneration because these GO

  6. Protein Kinase D2 Is an Essential Regulator of Murine Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pusapati, Ganesh V.; Armacki, Milena; Müller, Martin; Tümpel, Stefan; Illing, Anett; Hartmann, Daniel; Brunner, Cornelia; Liebau, Stefan; Rudolph, Karl L.; Adler, Guido; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Muscle differentiation is a highly conserved process that occurs through the activation of quiescent satellite cells whose progeny proliferate, differentiate, and fuse to generate new myofibers. A defined pattern of myogenic transcription factors is orchestrated during this process and is regulated via distinct signaling cascades involving various intracellular signaling pathways, including members of the protein kinase C (PKC) family. The protein kinase D (PKD) isoenzymes PKD1, -2, and -3, are prominent downstream targets of PKCs and phospholipase D in various biological systems including mouse and could hence play a role in muscle differentiation. In the present study, we used a mouse myoblast cell line (C2C12) as an in vitro model to investigate the role of PKDs, in particular PKD2, in muscle stem cell differentiation. We show that C2C12 cells express all PKD isoforms with PKD2 being highly expressed. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PKD2 is specifically phosphorylated/activated during the initiation of mouse myoblast differentiation. Selective inhibition of PKCs or PKDs by pharmacological inhibitors blocked myotube formation. Depletion of PKD2 by shRNAs resulted in a marked inhibition of myoblast cell fusion. PKD2-depleted cells exhibit impaired regulation of muscle development-associated genes while the proliferative capacity remains unaltered. Vice versa forced expression of PKD2 increases myoblast differentiation. These findings were confirmed in primary mouse satellite cells where myotube fusion was also decreased upon inhibition of PKDs. Active PKD2 induced transcriptional activation of myocyte enhancer factor 2D and repression of Pax3 transcriptional activity. In conclusion, we identify PKDs, in particular PKD2, as a major mediator of muscle cell differentiation in vitro and thereby as a potential novel target for the modulation of muscle regeneration. PMID:21298052

  7. ClipR-59 Interacts with Elmo2 and Modulates Myoblast Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yingmin; Ren, Wenying; Côté, Jean-François; Hinds, Philip W.; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Du, Keyong

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies using ClipR-59 knock-out mice implicated this protein in the regulation of muscle function. In this report, we have examined the role of ClipR-59 in muscle differentiation and found that ClipR-59 knockdown in C2C12 cells suppressed myoblast fusion. To elucidate the molecular mechanism whereby ClipR-59 regulates myoblast fusion, we carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen using ClipR-59 as the bait and identified Elmo2, a member of the Engulfment and cell motility protein family, as a novel ClipR-59-associated protein. We showed that the interaction between ClipR-59 and Elmo2 was mediated by the atypical PH domain of Elmo2 and the Glu-Pro-rich domain of ClipR-59 and regulated by Rho-GTPase. We have examined the impact of ClipR-59 on Elmo2 downstream signaling and found that interaction of ClipR-59 with Elmo2 enhanced Rac1 activation. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that formation of an Elmo2·ClipR-59 complex plays an important role in myoblast fusion. PMID:25572395

  8. Low-level infrared laser modulates muscle repair and chromosome stabilization genes in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa Alexsandra; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; da Silva, Camila Luna; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-08-01

    Infrared laser therapy is used for skeletal muscle repair based on its biostimulative effect on satellite cells. However, shortening of telomere length limits regenerative potential in satellite cells, which occurs after each cell division cycle. Also, laser therapy could be more effective on non-physiologic tissues. This study evaluated low-level infrared laser exposure effects on mRNA expression from muscle injury repair and telomere stabilization genes in myoblasts in normal and stressful conditions. Laser fluences were those used in clinical protocols. C2C12 myoblast cultures were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) in standard or normal (10 %) and reduced (2 %) fetal bovine serum concentrations; total RNA was extracted for mRNA expression evaluation from muscle injury repair (MyoD and Pax7) and chromosome stabilization (TRF1 and TRF2) genes by real time quantitative polymerization chain reaction. Data show that low-level infrared laser increases the expression of MyoD and Pax7 in 10 J/cm(2) fluence, TRF1 expression in all fluences, and TRF2 expression in 70 J/cm(2) fluence in both 10 and 2 % fetal bovine serum. Low-level infrared laser increases mRNA expression from genes related to muscle repair and telomere stabilization in myoblasts in standard or normal and stressful conditions.

  9. AKAP6 inhibition impairs myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration: Positive loop between AKAP6 and myogenin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae-Won; Won, Joo-Yun; Yang, Jimin; Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Su-Yeon; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2015-11-13

    Skeletal muscle regeneration occurs continuously to repair muscle damage incurred during normal activity and in chronic disease or injury. Herein, we report that A-kinase anchoring protein 6 (AKAP6) is important for skeletal myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration. Compared with unstimulated skeletal myoblasts that underwent proliferation, differentiated cells show significant stimulation of AKAP6 expression. AKAP6 knockdown with siRNA effectively halts the formation of myotubes and decreases the expression of the differentiation markers myogenin and myosin heavy chain. When shAKAP6-lentivirus is delivered to mice with cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury, muscle regeneration is impaired compared with that of mice injected with control shMock-lentivirus. The motor functions of mice infected with shAKAP6-lentivirus (CTX+shAK6) are significantly worse than those of mice infected with shMock-lentivirus (CTX+shMock). Mechanistic analysis showed that AKAP6 promotes myogenin expression through myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A). Notably, myogenin increases AKAP6 expression as well. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays showed that myogenin binds to an E-box site on the AKAP6 promoter. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a novel interplay between AKAP6 and myogenin, and we suggest that AKAP6 is an important regulator of myoblast differentiation, myotube formation, and muscle regeneration.

  10. Electrical Impedance Monitoring of C2C12 Myoblast Differentiation on an Indium Tin Oxide Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ilhwan; Hong, Yeonhee; Jun, Young-Hoo; Lee, Ga-Yeon; Jun, Hee-Sook; Pyun, Jae-Chul; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Cho, Sungbo

    2016-01-01

    Electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing is increasingly being used for label-free and real-time monitoring of changes in cell morphology and number during cell growth, drug screening, and differentiation. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using ECIS to monitor C2C12 myoblast differentiation using a fabricated indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode-based chip. C2C12 myoblast differentiation on the ITO electrode was validated based on decreases in the mRNA level of MyoD and increases in the mRNA levels of myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MHC). Additionally, MHC expression and morphological changes in myoblasts differentiated on the ITO electrode were comparable to those in cells in the control culture dish. From the monitoring the integration of the resistance change at 21.5 kHz, the cell differentiation was label-free and real-time detectable in 30 h of differentiation (p < 0.05). PMID:27929401

  11. Rab35 regulates cadherin-mediated adherens junction formation and myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Charrasse, Sophie; Comunale, Franck; De Rossi, Sylvain; Echard, Arnaud; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cadherins are homophilic cell–cell adhesion molecules implicated in many fundamental processes, such as morphogenesis, cell growth, and differentiation. They accumulate at cell–cell contact sites and assemble into large macromolecular complexes named adherens junctions (AJs). Cadherin targeting and function are regulated by various cellular processes, many players of which remain to be uncovered. Here we identify the small GTPase Rab35 as a new regulator of cadherin trafficking and stabilization at cell–cell contacts in C2C12 myoblasts and HeLa cells. We find that Rab35 accumulates at cell–cell contacts in a cadherin-dependent manner. Knockdown of Rab35 or expression of a dominant-negative form of Rab35 impaired N- and M-cadherin recruitment to cell–cell contacts, their stabilization at the plasma membrane, and association with p120 catenin and led to their accumulation in transferrin-, clathrin-, and AP-2–positive intracellular vesicles. We also find that Rab35 function is required for PIP5KIγ accumulation at cell–cell contacts and phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate production, which is involved in cadherin stabilization at contact sites. Finally, we show that Rab35 regulates myoblast fusion, a major cellular process under the control of cadherin-dependent signaling. Taken together, these results reveal that Rab35 regulates cadherin-dependent AJ formation and myoblast fusion. PMID:23197472

  12. Mitophagy is required for mitochondrial biogenesis and myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sin, Jon; Andres, Allen M; Taylor, David J R; Weston, Thomas; Hiraumi, Yoshimi; Stotland, Aleksandr; Kim, Brandon J; Huang, Chengqun; Doran, Kelly S; Gottlieb, Roberta A

    2016-01-01

    Myogenesis is a crucial process governing skeletal muscle development and homeostasis. Differentiation of primitive myoblasts into mature myotubes requires a metabolic switch to support the increased energetic demand of contractile muscle. Skeletal myoblasts specifically shift from a highly glycolytic state to relying predominantly on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) upon differentiation. We have found that this phenomenon requires dramatic remodeling of the mitochondrial network involving both mitochondrial clearance and biogenesis. During early myogenic differentiation, autophagy is robustly upregulated and this coincides with DNM1L/DRP1 (dynamin 1-like)-mediated fragmentation and subsequent removal of mitochondria via SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1)-mediated mitophagy. Mitochondria are then repopulated via PPARGC1A/PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha)-mediated biogenesis. Mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1 (optic atrophy 1 [autosomal dominant]) is then briskly upregulated, resulting in the reformation of mitochondrial networks. The final product is a myotube replete with new mitochondria. Respirometry reveals that the constituents of these newly established mitochondrial networks are better primed for OXPHOS and are more tightly coupled than those in myoblasts. Additionally, we have found that suppressing autophagy with various inhibitors during differentiation interferes with myogenic differentiation. Together these data highlight the integral role of autophagy and mitophagy in myogenic differentiation.

  13. Rigidity-patterned polyelectrolyte films to control myoblast cell adhesion and spatial organization

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Claire; Saha, Naresh; Boudou, Thomas; Pózos-Vásquez, Cuauhtemoc; Dulong, Virginie; Glinel, Karine; Picart, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In vivo, cells are sensitive to the stiffness of their micro-environment and especially to the spatial organization of the stiffness. In vitro studies of this phenomenon can help to better understand the mechanisms of the cell response to spatial variations of the matrix stiffness. In this work, we design polelyelectrolyte multilayer films made of poly(L-lysine) and a photo-reactive hyaluronan derivative. These films can be photo-crosslinked through a photomask to create spatial patterns of rigidity. Quartz substrates incorporating a chromium mask are prepared to expose selectively the film to UV light (in a physiological buffer), without any direct contact between the photomask and the soft film. We show that these micropatterns are chemically homogeneous and flat, without any preferential adsorption of adhesive proteins. Three groups of pattern geometries differing by their shape (circles or lines), size (form 2 to 100 μm) or interspacing distance between the motifs are used to study the adhesion and spatial organization of myoblast cells. On large circular micropatterns, the cells form large assemblies that are confined to the stiffest parts. Conversely, when the size of the rigidity patterns is subcellular, the cells respond by forming protrusions. Finally, on linear micropatterns of rigidity, myoblasts align and their nuclei drastically elongate in specific conditions. These results pave the way for the study of the different steps of myoblast fusion in response to matrix rigidity in well-defined geometrical conditions. PMID:25100929

  14. Differential Cooperation between Heterochromatin Protein HP1 Isoforms and MyoD in Myoblasts*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yahi, Hakima; Fritsch, Lauriane; Philipot, Ophelie; Guasconi, Valentina; Souidi, Mouloud; Robin, Philippe; Polesskaya, Anna; Losson, Regine; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms of transcriptional repression are important during cell differentiation. Mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 isoforms HP1α, HP1β, and HP1γ play important roles in the regulation of chromatin structure and function. We explored the possibility of different roles for the three HP1 isoforms in an integrated system, skeletal muscle terminal differentiation. In this system, terminal differentiation is initiated by the transcription factor MyoD, whose target genes remain mainly silent until myoblasts are induced to differentiate. Here we show that HP1α and HP1β isoforms, but not HP1γ, interact with MyoD in myoblasts. This interaction is direct, as shown using recombinant proteins in vitro. A gene reporter assay revealed that HP1α and HP1β, but not HP1γ, inhibit MyoD transcriptional activity, suggesting a model in which MyoD could serve as a bridge between nucleosomes and chromatin-binding proteins such as HDACs and HP1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show a preferential recruitment of HP1 proteins on MyoD target genes in proliferating myoblasts. Finally, modulation of HP1 protein level impairs MyoD target gene expression and muscle terminal differentiation. Together, our data show a nonconventional interaction between HP1 and a tissue-specific transcription factor, MyoD. In addition, they strongly suggest that HP1 isoforms play important roles during muscle terminal differentiation in an isoform-dependent manner. PMID:18599480

  15. Surface apposition and multiple cell contacts promote myoblast fusion in Drosophila flight muscles

    PubMed Central

    Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Segal, Dagan; Shimoni, Eyal; Shinder, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of individual myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers constitutes a widely conserved program for growth of the somatic musculature. We have used electron microscopy methods to study this key form of cell–cell fusion during development of the indirect flight muscles (IFMs) of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that IFM myoblast–myotube fusion proceeds in a stepwise fashion and is governed by apparent cross talk between transmembrane and cytoskeletal elements. Our analysis suggests that cell adhesion is necessary for bringing myoblasts to within a minimal distance from the myotubes. The branched actin polymerization machinery acts subsequently to promote tight apposition between the surfaces of the two cell types and formation of multiple sites of cell–cell contact, giving rise to nascent fusion pores whose expansion establishes full cytoplasmic continuity. Given the conserved features of IFM myogenesis, this sequence of cell interactions and membrane events and the mechanistic significance of cell adhesion elements and the actin-based cytoskeleton are likely to represent general principles of the myoblast fusion process. PMID:26459604

  16. Heterogeneous activation of a slow myosin gene in proliferating myoblasts and differentiated single myofibers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-hua; Wang, Qiao-jing; Wang, Chao; Reinholt, Brad; Grant, Alan L; Gerrard, David E; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-01-01

    Each skeletal muscle contains a fixed ratio of fast and slow myofibers that are distributed in a stereotyped pattern to achieve a specific motor function. How myofibers are specified during development and regeneration is poorly understood. Here we address this question using transgenic reporter mice that indelibly mark the myofiber lineages based on activation of fast or slow myosin. Lineage tracing indicates that during development all muscles have activated the fast myosin gene Myl1, but not the slow myosin gene Myh7, which is activated in all slow but a subset of fast myofibers. Similarly, most nascent myofibers do not activate Myh7 during fast muscle regeneration, but the ratio and pattern of fast and slow myofibers are restored at the completion of regeneration. At the single myofiber level, most mature fast myofibers are heterogeneous in nuclear composition, manifested by mosaic activation of Myh7. Strikingly, Myh7 is activated in a subpopulation of proliferating myoblasts that co-express the myogenic progenitor marker Pax7. When induced to differentiate, the Myh7-activated myoblasts differentiate more readily than the non-activated myoblasts, and have a higher tendency, but not restricted, to become slow myotubes. Together, our data reveal significant nuclear heterogeneity within a single myofiber, and challenge the conventional view that myosin genes are only expressed after myogenic differentiation. These results provide novel insights into the regulation of muscle fiber type specification. PMID:25794679

  17. Postnatal myocardial augmentation with skeletal myoblast-based fetal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julie R; Nasseri, Boris A; Vacanti, Joseph P; Fauza, Dario O

    2006-07-01

    Cardiac anomalies constitute the most common birth defects, many of which involve variable myocardial deficiencies. Therapeutic options for structural myocardial repair remain limited in the neonatal population. This study was aimed at determining whether engineered fetal muscle constructs undergo milieu-dependent transdifferentiation after cardiac implantation, thus becoming a potential means to increase/support myocardial mass after birth. Myoblasts were isolated from skeletal muscle specimens harvested from fetal lambs, labeled by transduction with a retrovirus-expressing green fluorescent protein, expanded in vitro, and then seeded onto collagen hydrogels. After birth, animals underwent autologous implantation of the engineered constructs (n = 8) onto the myocardium as an onlay patch. Between 4 and 30 weeks postoperatively, implants were harvested for multiple analyses. Fetal and postnatal survival rates were 89% and 100%, respectively. Labeled cells were identified within the implants at all time points by immunohistochemical staining for green fluorescent protein. At 24 and 30 weeks postimplantation, donor cells double-stained for green fluorescent protein and Troponin I, while losing skeletal (type II) myosin expression. Fetal skeletal myoblasts engraft in native myocardium up to 30 weeks after postnatal, autologous implantation as components of engineered onlay patches. These cells also display evidence of time-dependent transdifferentiation toward a cardiomyocyte-like lineage. Further analysis of fetal skeletal myoblast-based constructs for the repair of congenital myocardial defects is warranted.

  18. Acetylcholine receptor channels are present in undifferentiated satellite cells but not in embryonic myoblasts in culture.

    PubMed

    Cossu, G; Eusebi, F; Grassi, F; Wanke, E

    1987-09-01

    The expression and the physiological properties of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) of mononucleated myogenic cells, isolated from either embryonic or adult muscle of the mouse, have been investigated using the gigaohm seal patch-clamp technique in combination with immunocytochemistry (with an anti-myosin antibody) and alpha-bungarotoxin binding techniques. Undifferentiated (myosin-negative) embryonic myoblasts, grown either in mass culture or under clonal conditions, were found to be unresponsive to ACh and did not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. On the contrary, undifferentiated satellite cells (from adult muscle) exhibited channels activated by ACh and alpha-bungarotoxin binding sites similar to those observed in differentiated (myosin-positive) embryonic myoblasts and myotubes. Two classes of ACh-activated channels with different opening frequencies were identified. The major class of channels had a conductance of about 42 pS and mean open time of 3.1-8.2 msec. The minor class of channels had smaller conductance (about 17 pS) and similar open time. During differentiation, the conductance of the two channels did not change significantly, while channel lifetime became shorter in myotubes derived from satellite cells but not in myotubes derived from embryonic myoblasts. The relative proportion of small over large channels was significantly larger in embryonic than in adult myogenic cells.

  19. The Mutual Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Myoblasts in an Autologous Co-Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanska, Izabela; Zarychta-Wisniewska, Weronika; Pajak, Beata; Bojarczuk, Kamil; Dybowski, Bartosz; Paczek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Both myoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) take part in the muscle tissue regeneration and have been used as experimental cellular therapy in muscular disorders treatment. It is possible that co-transplantation approach could improve the efficacy of this treatment. However, the relations between those two cell types are not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to determine the reciprocal interactions between myoblasts and MSC in vitro in terms of the features important for the muscle regeneration process. Primary caprine muscle-derived cells (MDC) and bone marrow-derived MSC were analysed in autologous settings. We found that MSC contribute to myotubes formation by fusion with MDC when co-cultured directly, but do not acquire myogenic phenotype if exposed to MDC-derived soluble factors only. Experiments with exposure to hydrogen peroxide showed that MSC are significantly more resistant to oxidative stress than MDC, but a direct co-culture with MSC does not diminish the cytotoxic effect of H2O2 on MDC. Cell migration assay demonstrated that MSC possess significantly greater migration ability than MDC which is further enhanced by MDC-derived soluble factors, whereas the opposite effect was not found. MSC-derived soluble factors significantly enhanced the proliferation of MDC, whereas MDC inhibited the division rate of MSC. To conclude, presented results suggest that myogenic precursors and MSC support each other during muscle regeneration and therefore myoblasts-MSC co-transplantation could be an attractive approach in the treatment of muscular disorders. PMID:27551730

  20. Insulin receptor autophosphorylation in cultured myoblasts correlates to glucose disposal in Pima Indians.

    PubMed

    Youngren, J F; Goldfine, I D; Pratley, R E

    1999-05-01

    In a previous study [Youngren, J. F., I. D. Goldfire, and R. E. Pratley. Am. J. Physiol. 273 (Endocrinol. Metab. 36): E276-E283, 1997] of skeletal muscle biopsies from insulin-resistant, nondiabetic Pima Indians, we demonstrated that diminished insulin receptor (IR) autophosphorylation correlated with in vivo insulin resistance. In the present study, to determine whether decreased IR function is a primary trait of muscle, and not secondary to an altered in vivo environment, we cultured myoblasts from 17 nondiabetic Pima Indians in whom insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (M) was measured during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamps. Myoblast IR autophosphorylation was determined by a highly sensitive ELISA. IR autophosphorylation directly correlated with M (r = 0.56, P = 0.02) and inversely correlated with the fasting plasma insulin (r = -0.58, P < 0.05). The relationship between M and IR autophosphorylation remained significant after M was adjusted for the effects of percent body fat (partial r = 0.53, P < 0.04). The relationship between insulin resistance and the capacity for myoblast IR autophosphorylation in nondiabetic Pima Indians suggests that variations in IR-signaling capacity may be intrinsic characteristics of muscle that contribute to the genetic component determining insulin action in this population.

  1. Mitophagy is required for mitochondrial biogenesis and myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Jon; Andres, Allen M.; Taylor, David J. R.; Weston, Thomas; Hiraumi, Yoshimi; Stotland, Aleksandr; Kim, Brandon J.; Huang, Chengqun; Doran, Kelly S.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myogenesis is a crucial process governing skeletal muscle development and homeostasis. Differentiation of primitive myoblasts into mature myotubes requires a metabolic switch to support the increased energetic demand of contractile muscle. Skeletal myoblasts specifically shift from a highly glycolytic state to relying predominantly on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) upon differentiation. We have found that this phenomenon requires dramatic remodeling of the mitochondrial network involving both mitochondrial clearance and biogenesis. During early myogenic differentiation, autophagy is robustly upregulated and this coincides with DNM1L/DRP1 (dynamin 1-like)-mediated fragmentation and subsequent removal of mitochondria via SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1)-mediated mitophagy. Mitochondria are then repopulated via PPARGC1A/PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha)-mediated biogenesis. Mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1 (optic atrophy 1 [autosomal dominant]) is then briskly upregulated, resulting in the reformation of mitochondrial networks. The final product is a myotube replete with new mitochondria. Respirometry reveals that the constituents of these newly established mitochondrial networks are better primed for OXPHOS and are more tightly coupled than those in myoblasts. Additionally, we have found that suppressing autophagy with various inhibitors during differentiation interferes with myogenic differentiation. Together these data highlight the integral role of autophagy and mitophagy in myogenic differentiation. PMID:26566717

  2. Inhibition of Na{sup +} channel currents in rat myoblasts by 4-aminopyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Boxun; Liu Linyun; Liao Lei; Zhang Zhihong; Mei Yanai . E-mail: yamei@fudan.edu.cn

    2005-09-15

    Our previous study revealed that 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a specific blocker of A-type current, could also inhibit inward Na{sup +} currents (I {sub Na}) with a state-independent mechanism in rat cerebellar granule cells. In the present study, we report an inhibitory effect of 4-AP on voltage-gated and tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive I {sub Na} recorded from cultured rat myoblasts. 4-AP inhibited I {sub Na} amplitude in a dose-dependent manner between the concentrations of 0.5 and 10 mM without significant alteration in the activation or inactivation kinetics of the channel. By comparison to the 4-AP-induced inhibitory effect on cerebellum neurons, the inhibitory effect on myoblasts was enhanced through repetitive pulse and inflected by changing frequency. Specifically, the lower the frequency of pulse, the higher the inhibition observed, suggesting that block manner is inversely use-dependent. Moreover, experiments adding 4-AP to the intracellular solution indicate that the inhibitory effects are localized inside the cell. Additionally, 4-AP significantly modifies the properties of steady-state activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel. Our data suggest that the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-AP inhibits both neuron and myoblast Na{sup +} channels via different mechanisms. These findings may also provide information regarding 4-AP-induced pharmacological and toxicological effects in clinical use and experimental research.

  3. Gravity spun polycaprolactone fibres for soft tissue engineering: interaction with fibroblasts and myoblasts in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Matthew Richard; Adams, Eric F; Coombes, Allan G A

    2006-03-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) fibres were produced by wet spinning from solutions in acetone under low shear (gravity flow) conditions. As-spun PCL fibres exhibited a mean strength and stiffness of 7.9 MPa and 0.1 GPa, respectively and a rough, porous surface morphology. Cold drawing to an extension of 500% resulted in increases in fibre strength (43 MPa) and stiffness (0.3 GPa) and development of an oriented, fibrillar surface texture. The proliferation rate of Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblasts and C2C12 mouse myoblasts on as-spun, 500% cold-drawn and gelatin-modified PCL fibres was determined in cell culture to provide a basic measure of the biocompatibility of the fibres. Proliferation of both cell types was consistently higher on gelatin-coated fibres relative to as-spun fibres at time points below 7 days. Fibroblast growth rates on cold-drawn PCL fibres exceeded those on as-spun fibres but myoblast proliferation was similar on both substrates. After 1 day in culture, both cell types had spread and coalesced on the fibres to form a cell layer, which conformed closely to the underlying topography. The high fibre compliance combined with a potential for modifying the fibre surface chemistry with cell adhesion molecules and the surface architecture by cold drawing to enhance proliferation of fibroblasts and myoblasts, recommends further investigation of gravity-spun PCL fibres for 3-D scaffold production in soft tissue engineering.

  4. G-CSF influences mouse skeletal muscle development and regeneration by stimulating myoblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Mie; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Shimoji, Kenichiro; Onizuka, Takeshi; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Ohno, Yohei; Arai, Takahide; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kaneda, Ruri; Kimura, Kensuke; Makino, Shinji; Sano, Motoaki

    2011-01-01

    After skeletal muscle injury, neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages infiltrate the damaged area; this is followed by rapid proliferation of myoblasts derived from muscle stem cells (also called satellite cells). Although it is known that inflammation triggers skeletal muscle regeneration, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In this study, we show that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor (G-CSFR) is expressed in developing somites. G-CSFR and G-CSF were expressed in myoblasts of mouse embryos during the midgestational stage but not in mature myocytes. Furthermore, G-CSFR was specifically but transiently expressed in regenerating myocytes present in injured adult mouse skeletal muscle. Neutralization of endogenous G-CSF with a blocking antibody impaired the regeneration process, whereas exogenous G-CSF supported muscle regeneration by promoting the proliferation of regenerating myoblasts. Furthermore, muscle regeneration was markedly impaired in G-CSFR–knockout mice. These findings indicate that G-CSF is crucial for skeletal myocyte development and regeneration and demonstrate the importance of inflammation-mediated induction of muscle regeneration. PMID:21422169

  5. In vivo cell tracking of mouse embryonic myoblasts and fast fibers during development.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Lucia; Villar, Pedro; Martínez, Lidia; Badia-Careaga, Claudio; Arredondo, Juan J; Cervera, Margarita

    2014-09-01

    Fast and slow TnI are co-expressed in E11.5 embryos, and fast TnI is present from the very beginning of myogenesis. A novel green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter mouse lines (FastTnI/GFP lines) that carry the primary and secondary enhancer elements of the mouse fast troponin I (fast TnI), in which reporter expression correlates precisely with distribution of the endogenous fTnI protein was generated. Using the FastTnI/GFP mouse model, we characterized the early myogenic events in mice, analyzing the migration of GFP+ myoblasts, and the formation of primary and secondary myotubes in transgenic embryos. Interestingly, we found that the two contractile fast and slow isoforms of TnI are expressed during the migration of myoblasts from the somites to the limbs and body wall, suggesting that both participate in these events. Since no sarcomeres are present in myoblasts, we speculate that the function of fast TnI in early myogenesis is, like Myosin and Tropomyosin, to participate in cell movement during the initial myogenic stages. genesis © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Assessment of reactive oxygen species production in cultured equine skeletal myoblasts in response to conditions of anoxia followed by reoxygenation with or without exposure to peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Ceusters, Justine D; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange A; de la Rebière de Pouyade, Geoffroy; Franck, Thierry J; Votion, Dominique M; Deby-Dupont, Ginette P; Serteyn, Didier A

    2012-03-01

    To culture equine myoblasts from muscle microbiopsy specimens, examine myoblast production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in conditions of anoxia followed by reoxygenation, and assess the effects of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) on ROS production. 5 healthy horses (5 to 15 years old). Equine skeletal myoblast cultures were derived from 1 or 2 microbiopsy specimens obtained from a triceps brachii muscle of each horse. Cultured myoblasts were exposed to conditions of anoxia followed by reoxygenation or to conditions of normoxia (control cells). Cell production of ROS in the presence or absence of HRP or MPO was assessed by use of a gas chromatography method, after which cells were treated with a 3,3'-diaminobenzidine chromogen solution to detect peroxidase binding. Equine skeletal myoblasts were successfully cultured from microbiopsy specimens. In response to anoxia and reoxygenation, ROS production of myoblasts increased by 71%, compared with that of control cells. When experiments were performed in the presence of HRP or MPO, ROS production in myoblasts exposed to anoxia and reoxygenation was increased by 228% and 183%, respectively, compared with findings for control cells. Chromogen reaction revealed a close adherence of peroxidases to cells, even after several washes. Results indicated that equine skeletal myoblast cultures can be generated from muscle microbiopsy specimens. Anoxia-reoxygenation-treated myoblasts produced ROS, and production was enhanced in the presence of peroxidases. This experimental model could be used to study the damaging effect of exercise on muscles in athletic horses.

  7. Transcription Factor ZBED6 Mediates IGF2 Gene Expression by Regulating Promoter Activity and DNA Methylation in Myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Liang-Zhi; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Li, Ming-Xun; Sun, Yu-Jia; Li, Cong-Jun; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were upregulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels were negatively associated with the methylation status in beef cattle (P < 0.05). A luciferase assay for the IGF2 intron 3 and P3 promoter showed that the mutant-type 439 A-SNP-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the wild-type 439 G-SNP-pGL3 construct (P < 0.05). An over-expression assay revealed that ZBED6 regulate IGF2 expression and promote myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of ZBED6 led to IGF2 expression change in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that ZBED6 inhibits IGF2 activity and expression via a G to A transition disrupts the interaction. Thus, we propose that ZBED6 plays a critical role in myogenic differentiation.

  8. On-chip monitoring of skeletal myoblast transplantation for the treatment of hypoxia-induced myocardial injury.

    PubMed

    He, Juan; Ma, Chao; Liu, Wenming; Wang, Jinyi

    2014-09-21

    A comprehensive elucidation of the unexpected adverse events that occur in skeletal myoblast transplantation is fundamental for the optimization of myocardial therapeutic effects. However, a well-defined method to study the interactions between skeletal myoblasts and cardiomyocytes during the healing process is out of reach. Here, we describe a microfluidic method for monitoring the interactions between skeletal myoblasts and hypoxia-injured cardiomyocytes in a spatiotemporally-controlled manner, mimicking the in vivo cell transplantation process. A myocardial hypoxia environment was created using an oxygen consumption blocking reagent, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone. Meanwhile, the interactions between the skeletal L6 myoblasts and hypoxia-injured myocardium H9c2 cells were investigated, and the effects of a L6 conditional medium on H9c2 cells were comparatively analyzed by quantitatively measuring the morphological and pathophysiological dynamics of H9c2 cells. The results showed that skeletal myoblasts could repair hypoxia-injured H9c2 cells mainly through direct cell-to-cell interactions. This simple on-chip assay for investigating myocardial repair processes may provide avenues for the in vitro screening of drug-induced cardiotoxicity.

  9. E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain inhibits cell surface localization of endogenous cadherins and fusion of C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Masayuki

    2015-10-09

    Myoblast fusion is a highly regulated process that is essential for skeletal muscle formation during muscle development and regeneration in mammals. Much remains to be elucidated about the molecular mechanism of myoblast fusion although cadherins, which are Ca(2+)-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecules, are thought to play a critical role in this process. Mouse myoblasts lacking either N-cadherin or M-cadherin can still fuse to form myotubes, indicating that they have no specific function in this process and may be functionally replaced by either M-cadherin or N-cadherin, respectively. In this study, we show that expressing the E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain ectopically in C2C12 myoblasts inhibits cell surface localization of endogenous M-cadherin and N-cadherin, as well as cell-cell fusion. This domain, however, does not inhibit myoblast differentiation according to microarray-based gene expression analysis. In contrast, expressing a dominant-negative β-catenin mutant ectopically, which suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signaling, did not inhibit cell-cell fusion. Therefore, the E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain inhibits cell-cell fusion by inhibiting cell surface localization of endogenous cadherins and not by inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  10. Inducing myoblast re-entry into the cell cycle: a potential mechanism for laser-enhanced skeletal muscle regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Fang, Y.; Zhang, C. P.; Chen, P.; Wang, C. Z.; Kang, H. X.; Shen, B. J.; Liang, J.; Fu, X. B.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the cell cycle and proliferative activity of cultured myoblasts, and sought to elucidate the possible cellular mechanism by which LLLI promotes the regeneration of skeletal muscle in vivo. Primary myoblasts isolated from rat hindlegs were irradiated with helium-neon laser light at different energy densities. Distributions of cell-cycle subpopulations and the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins in myoblasts were assessed using flow cytometric analysis and western blot assay. It was found that laser irradiation stimulated cell-cycle entry; induced the expression of cyclin A and cyclin D; and increased cell proliferation index and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation as compared to the unirradiated control cells, indicating LLLI augmented the number of proliferative myoblasts in the S phase and G2/M phase of the cell cycle. These results suggest that LLLI at certain fluxes and wavelengths could activate quiescent myoblasts, leading to cell division and facilitating new myofiber formation. This could contribute to the improvement of skeletal muscle regeneration following trauma and myopathic diseases.

  11. Mechanical stretch regulates microRNA expression profile via NF-κB activation in C2C12 myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Wenxi; Zhang, Mahui; Wang, Yongkui; Yu, Lei; Zhao, Tingting; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Wang, Leyu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs/miRs) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation are involved in mechanical stretch-induced skeletal muscle regeneration. However, there are a small number of miRNAs that have been reported to be associated with NF-κB activation during mechanical stretch-induced myogenesis. In the present study, C2C12 myoblasts underwent cyclic mechanical stretch in vitro, to explore the relationship between miRNA expression and NF-κB activation during stretch-mediated myoblast proliferation. The results revealed that 10% deformation, 0.125 Hz cyclic mechanical stretch could promote myoblast proliferation. The miRNA expression profile was subsequently altered; miR-500, −1934, −31, −378, −331 and −5097 were downregulated, whereas miR-1941 was upregulated. These miRNAs were all involved in stretch-mediated myoblast proliferation. Notably, the expression of these miRNAs was reversed following treatment of 0.125 Hz mechanically stretched C2C12 cells with NF-κB inhibitors, which was accompanied by C2C12 cell growth suppression. Therefore, the present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to demonstrate that the NF-κB-dependent miRNA profile is associated with mechanical stretch-induced myoblast proliferation. PMID:27840929

  12. Influence of Concanavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin, and soybean agglutinin on the fusion of myoblasts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Although muscle cell fusion was shown to be an energy-requiring process, release of myoblasts from an EGTA fusion block could be accomplished with Earle's balanced salt solution (containing 1.8 mM Ca++) free of glucose or any other energy-produced metabolite. The effect of concanavalin A, abrin, and the lectins from wheat germ, soybean, and Lens culinaris on myoblast fusion was examined with synchronized myoblast cultures upon release from fusion block. At a concentration of 15 mug/ml, these lectins were found to inhibit the fusion process to the extent of 62%, 41%, 32%, 8%, and 19%, respectively. Concanavalin A inhibition could be prevented by alpha- methyl-D-mannoside. The inhibitory effect of all the lectins except abrin could be reversed by changing to the normal, serum-containing medium. The number of binding sites was 3.4 X 10(7), 6.1 X 10(7), and 1.7 X 10(6), respectively. Although myoblasts were found to have about twice as many binding sites for wheat germ agglutinin as for concanavalin A, concanavalin A was determined to be twice as effective as wheat germ agglutinin as an inhibitor of myoblast fusion. These findngs raise the possibility that specific cell surface glycoproteins may be an important factor in this process. PMID:1238406

  13. Expression of Non-acetylatable H2A.Z in Myoblast Cells Blocks Myoblast Differentiation through Disruption of MyoD Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Law, Cindy; Cheung, Peter

    2015-01-01

    H2A.Z is a histone H2A variant that is essential for viability in Tetrahymena and Drosophila and also during embryonic development of mice. Although implicated in diverse cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome segregation, and heterochromatin formation, its essential function in cells remains unknown. Cellular differentiation is part of the developmental process of multicellular organisms. To elucidate the roles of H2A.Z and H2A.Z acetylation in cellular differentiation, we examined the effects of expressing wild type (WT) or a non-acetylatable form of H2A.Z in the growth and differentiation of the myoblast C2C12 cell line. Ectopic expression of wild type or mutant H2A.Z resulted in distinct phenotypes in the differentiation of the C2C12 cells and the formation of myotubes. Most strikingly, expression of the H2A.Z non-acetylatable mutant (H2A.Z-Ac-mut) resulted in a complete block of myoblast differentiation. We determined that this phenotype is caused by a loss of MyoD expression in the Ac-mut-expressing cells prior to and after induction of differentiation. Moreover, chromatin accessibility assays showed that the promoter region of MyoD is less accessible in the differentiation-defective cells. Altogether, these new findings show that expression of the Ac-mut form of H2A.Z resulted in a dominant phenotype that blocked differentiation due to chromatin changes at the MyoD promoter. PMID:25839232

  14. The E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 regulates myoblast proliferation by controlling turnover of NDRG2.

    PubMed

    Mokhonova, Ekaterina I; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K; Kramerova, Irina; Kudryashova, Elena; Haykinson, Michael J; Spencer, Melissa J

    2015-05-15

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2H is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM32. Previously, we generated and characterized a Trim32 knockout mouse (T32KO) that displays both neurogenic and myopathic features. The myopathy in these mice is attributable to impaired muscle growth, associated with satellite cell senescence and premature sarcopenia. This satellite cell senescence is due to accumulation of the SUMO ligase PIASy, a substrate of TRIM32. The goal of this investigation was to identify additional substrates of TRIM32 using 2D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) in order to further explore its role in skeletal muscle. Because TRIM32 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, we reasoned that TRIM32's substrates would accumulate in its absence. 2D-DIGE identified 19 proteins that accumulate in muscles from the T32KO mouse. We focused on two of these proteins, NDRG2 and TRIM72, due to their putative roles in myoblast proliferation and myogenesis. Follow-up analysis confirmed that both proteins were ubiquitinated by TRIM32 in vitro; however, only NDRG2 accumulated in skeletal muscle and myoblasts in the absence of TRIM32. NDRG2 overexpression in myoblasts led to reduced cell proliferation and delayed cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. Thus, we identified NDRG2 as a novel target for TRIM32; these findings further corroborate the hypothesis that TRIM32 is involved in control of myogenic cells proliferation and differentiation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II induces accelerated myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C E; James, P L; Fant, M E; Rotwein, P

    1996-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that exogenous insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) can stimulate the terminal differentiation of skeletal myoblasts in culture and have established a correlation between the rate and the extent of IGF-II secretion by muscle cell lines and the rate of biochemical and morphological differentiation. To investigate the hypothesis that autocrine secretion of IGF-II plays a critical role in stimulating spontaneous myogenic differentiation in vitro, we have established C2 muscle cell lines that stably express a mouse IGF-II cDNA under control of the strong, constitutively active Moloney sarcoma virus promoter, enabling us to study directly the effects of IGF-II overproduction. Similar to observations with other muscle cell lines, IGF-II overexpressing myoblasts proliferated normally in growth medium containing 20% fetal serum, but they underwent enhanced differentiation compared with controls when incubated in low-serum differentiation medium. Accelerated differentiation of IGF-II overexpressing C2 cells was preceded by the rapid induction of myogenin mRNA and protein expression (within 1 h, compared with 24-48 h in controls) and was accompanied by an enhanced proportion of the retinoblastoma protein in an underphosphrylated and potentially active form, by a marked increase in activity of the muscle-specific enzyme, creatine phosphokinase, by extensive myotube formation by 48 h, and by elevated secretion of IGF binding protein-5 when compared with controls. These results confirm a role for IGF-II as an autocrine/paracrine differentiation factor for skeletal myoblasts, and they define a model cell system that will be useful in determining the biochemical mechanisms of IGF action in cellular differentiation.

  16. Gene expression of selenoproteins can be regulated by selenoprotein K silencing in chicken myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruifeng; Yao, Haidong; Zhao, Xia; Cao, Changyu; Yang, Tianshu; Luan, Yilin; Zhang, Ziwei; Xu, Shiwen

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of Selenoprotein K (Selk) silencing on the mRNA expression of 25 selenoproteins in chicken myoblasts. The specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) for Selk gene was designed and transfected into chicken myoblasts. Post-transfection mRNA expression of 25 selenoproteins was determined at various time periods i.e., 24, 48 and 72 h. Moreover, based on the results of expression of 25 selenoproteins, correlation analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) were used for further analysis. The results showed that the designed siRNA effectively inhibited Selk expression (decreased by 20, 29 and 43 % on 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively) and the mRNA expression levels of the 23 selenoproteins were influenced by silencing Selk differently (P < 0.05). Time-dependent pattern of mRNA expression after siRNA treatment in three groups were found similar: one group including Gpx1, Gpx2, Gpx3, Gpx4, Txnrd1, Txnrd2, Txnrd3, Sepw1, Selh, Sepp1, Selo and Sepx1, another group including Sepn1, Sels, Selt, Selm and Sep15 and other group including Dio2 and Dio3. The results of correlation analysis showed that Gpx1, Gpx2, Gpx3, Gpx4, Dio1, Dio3, Sepn1, Sels, Sepw1, Selt, Selh, Sep15, Seli and Selu had a positive correlation with Selk, while Dio2 and Sepp1 had a negative correlation with Selk. PCA data also indicated that Txnrd1, Txnrd2, Dio2, Selpb, Sepp1and Selo may play special roles in response to Selk silencing. In summary, these results indicated that different selenoproteins possess and exhibits distinct responses to silencing of Selk in chicken myoblasts.

  17. Folic acid is necessary for proliferation and differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seong Y; Kang, Yong J; Sung, Bokyung; Jang, Jung Y; Hwang, Na L; Oh, Hye J; Ahn, Yu R; Kim, Hong J; Shin, Jin H; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Kim, Cheol M; Chung, Hae Y; Kim, Nam D

    2017-05-04

    Folic acid, a water soluble B vitamin, plays an important role in cellular metabolic activities, such as functioning as a cofactor in one-carbon metabolism for DNA and RNA synthesis as well as nucleotide and amino acid biosynthesis in the body. A lack of dietary folic acid can lead to folic acid deficiency and result in several health problems, including macrocytic anemia, elevated plasma homocysteine, cardiovascular disease, birth defects, carcinogenesis, muscle weakness, and walking difficulty. However, the effect of folic acid deficiency on skeletal muscle development and its molecular mechanisms are unknown. We, therefore, investigated the effect of folic acid deficiency on myogenesis in skeletal muscle cells and found that folic acid deficiency induced proliferation inhibition and cell cycle breaking as well as cellular senescence in C2C12 myoblasts, implying that folic acid deficiency influences skeletal muscle development. Folic acid deficiency also inhibited differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts and induced deregulation of the cell cycle exit and many cell cycle regulatory genes. It inhibited expression of muscle-specific marker MyHC as well as myogenic regulatory factor (myogenin). Moreover, immunocytochemistry and Western blot analyses revealed that DNA damage was more increased in folic acid-deficient medium-treated differentiating C2C12 cells. Furthermore, we found that folic acid resupplementation reverses the effect on the cell cycle and senescence in folic acid-deficient C2C12 myoblasts but does not reverse the differentiation of C2C12 cells. Altogether, the study results suggest that folic acid is necessary for normal development of skeletal muscle cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Carbon-based hierarchical scaffolds for myoblast differentiation: Synergy between nano-functionalization and alignment.

    PubMed

    Patel, Akhil; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Wang, Wenhu; Karumuri, Anil; Sant, Vinayak; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M; Sant, Shilpa

    2016-03-01

    While several scaffolds have been proposed for skeletal muscle regeneration, multiscale hierarchical scaffolds with the complexity of extracellular matrix (ECM) haven't been engineered successfully. By precise control over nano- and microscale features, comprehensive understanding of the effect of multiple factors on skeletal muscle regeneration can be derived. In this study, we engineered carbon-based scaffolds with hierarchical nano- and microscale architecture with controlled physico-chemical properties. More specifically, we built multiscale hierarchy by growing carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets on two types of scaffolds, namely, interconnected microporous carbon foams and aligned carbon fiber mats. Nanostructured CNT carpets offered fine control over nano-roughness and wettability facilitating myoblast adhesion, growth and differentiation into myocytes. However, microporous foam architecture failed to promote their fusion into multinucleated myotubes. On the other hand, aligned fibrous architecture stimulated formation of multinucleated myotubes. Most importantly, nanostructured CNT carpets interfaced with microscale aligned fibrous architecture significantly enhanced myocyte fusion into multinucleated mature myotubes highlighting synergy between nanoscale surface features and micro-/macroscale aligned fibrous architecture in the process of myogenesis. Due to limited regenerative potential of skeletal muscle, strategies stimulating regeneration of functional muscles are important. These strategies are aimed at promoting differentiation of progenitor cells (myoblasts) into multinucleated myotubes, a key initial step in functional muscle regeneration. Recent tissue engineering approaches utilize various scaffolds ranging from decellularized matrices to aligned biomaterial scaffolds. Although, majority of them have focused on nano- or microscale organization, a systematic approach to build the multiscale hierarchy into these scaffolds is lacking. Here, we engineered

  19. Povidone-iodine Solutions Inhibit Cell Migration and Survival of Osteoblasts, Fibroblasts, and Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Liu, James X; Werner, Jordan A; Buza, John A; Kirsch, Thorsten; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Virk, Mandeep S

    2017-04-12

    In vitro laboratory study. The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of dilute povidone-iodine (PVI) solutions on human osteoblast, fibroblast and myoblast cells in vitro. Dilute PVI wound lavage has been used successfully in spine and joint arthroplasty procedures to prevent post-operative surgical site infection, but their biologic effect on host cells is largely unknown. Human primary osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and myoblasts were expanded in cell culture and subjected to various concentrations of PVI (0%, 0.001%, 0.01%, 0.1%, 0.35%, 1%) for 3 minutes. To assess the effect of PVI on cell migration, a scratch assay was performed, in which a "scratch" was made by a standard pipette tip in a cell monolayer following PVI exposure, and time to closure of the scratch was evaluated. Cell survival and proliferation was measured 48 hours post-PVI exposure using a cell viability and cytotoxicity assay. Closure of the scratch defect in all cell monolayers was achieved in < 24 hours in untreated controls and following exposure to PVI concentrations < 0.1%. The scratch defect remained open indefinitely following exposure to PVI concentrations of ≥ 0.1%. PVI concentrations < 0.1% did not have significant effect on survival rates compared with control for all cell types. Cells exposed to PVI ≥ 0.1% had cell survival rates of less than 6% (p < 0.05). Clinically used concentration of PVI (0.35%) exerts a pronounced cytotoxic effect on osteoblasts, fibroblast, and myoblasts in vitro. Further investigation is required to systematically study the effect of PVI on tissue healing in vivo and also determine a safe and clinically potent concentration for PVI lavage. N/A.

  20. Positive regulation of myoblast differentiation by medaka Neu3b sialidase through gangliosides desialylation.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Harasaki, Yusuke; Fukuda, Midori; Yoshinaga, Ayana; Ryuzono, Sena; Chigwechokha, Petros Kingstone; Komatsu, Masaharu; Miyagi, Taeko

    2016-04-01

    Sialidase Neu3b is an unique enzyme conserved in medaka and tilapia, but not in mammals. Previous study revealed that medaka Neu3b is localized at cytosol and is a ganglioside-specific sialidase. Neu3b functions, however, have not been understood, while Neu3a sialidase, which is widely conserved from human to fish, is known as a regulator of neurite formation. Here, we investigated the biological function of Neu3b for C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation. Bioinformatics analysis using genome browser revealed the presence of neu3b gene in some orders of fish species such as Beloniformes, Perciformes and Cyprinodontiformes. With the treatment of 2% horse serum, Neu3b-overexpression accelerated myoblast cell differentiation to myotubes accompanied with up-regulation of myogenesis biomarkers mRNA, myod and myog. Neu3b altered ganglioside composition in C2C12 cells results showing a decrease in GM2, and the increase of Lac-Cer, while desialylation of glycoproteins were not detected. Contrary to cell differentiation, Neu3b cell proliferation was suppressed in normal growth medium. To understand the mechanism of the alteration of cell differentiation and proliferation, phosphorylation of signal molecules in EGFR/ERK pathway was investigated. Neu3b induced a decline in phosphorylation of ERK and EGFR. Surprisingly, immuno-blot and real-time PCR analysis revealed that down-regulation of egfr gene could be involved in the acceleration of cell differentiation by Neu3b. These results suggested that Neu3b sialidase is a positive regulator for myoblast differentiation, similar with mammalian cytosolic sialidase Neu2.

  1. Impaired muscle regeneration and myoblast differentiation in mice with a muscle-specific KO of IGF-IR.

    PubMed

    Heron-Milhavet, Lisa; Mamaeva, Daria; LeRoith, Derek; Lamb, Ned J; Fernandez, Anne

    2010-10-01

    IGF-I and its receptor IGF-IR are seen as critical effectors of muscle hypertrophy, a notion recently questioned. Using MKR transgenic mice that express a dominant negative IGF-IR only in skeletal muscle, we have examined the role of the IGF-IR signaling in differentiation and repair of muscle fibers after damage-induced muscle regeneration. This process is impaired in MKR muscle, with incomplete regeneration, persistence of infiltrating cells and sustained expression of differentiation markers. Analysis of MKR and WT muscle-derived progenitor stem cells and myoblasts showed twice as many such cells in MKR muscle and an incomplete in vitro differentiation, that is, despite similar levels of myogenin expression, the level of fusion of MKR myoblasts was significantly reduced in comparison to WT myoblasts. These data show IGF-IR signaling is not only required at early hyperplasia stages of muscle differentiation, but also for late stages of myofiber maturation and hypertrophy.

  2. Propolis Ethanol Extract Stimulates Cytokine and Chemokine Production through NF-κB Activation in C2C12 Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Washio, Kohei; Kobayashi, Mao; Saito, Natsuko; Amagasa, Misato; Kitamura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Myoblast activation is a triggering event for muscle remodeling. We assessed the stimulatory effects of propolis, a beehive product, on myoblasts. After an 8 h treatment with 100 μg/mL of Brazilian propolis ethanol extract, expression of various chemokines, including CCL-2 and CCL-5, and cytokines, such as IL-6, increased. This propolis-induced cytokine production appears to depend on NF-κB activation, because the IKK inhibitor BMS-345541 repressed mRNA levels of CCL-2 by ~66%, CCL-5 by ~81%, and IL-6 by ~69% after propolis treatment. Supernatant from propolis-conditioned C2C12 cells upregulated RAW264 macrophage migration. The supernatant also stimulated RAW264 cells to produce angiogenic factors, including VEGF-A and MMP-12. Brazilian green propolis therefore causes myoblasts to secrete cytokines and chemokines, which might contribute to tissue remodeling of skeletal muscle. PMID:26604971

  3. Preparation and Culture of Myogenic Precursor Cells/Primary Myoblasts from Skeletal Muscle of Adult and Aged Humans.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Arroquia, Ana; Clegg, Peter D; Molloy, Andrew P; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna

    2017-02-16

    Skeletal muscle homeostasis depends on muscle growth (hypertrophy), atrophy and regeneration. During ageing and in several diseases, muscle wasting occurs. Loss of muscle mass and function is associated with muscle fiber type atrophy, fiber type switching, defective muscle regeneration associated with dysfunction of satellite cells, muscle stem cells, and other pathophysiological processes. These changes are associated with changes in intracellular as well as local and systemic niches. In addition to most commonly used rodent models of muscle ageing, there is a need to study muscle homeostasis and wasting using human models, which due to ethical implications, consist predominantly of in vitro cultures. Despite the wide use of human Myogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs) and primary myoblasts in myogenesis, there is limited data on using human primary myoblast and myotube cultures to study molecular mechanisms regulating different aspects of age-associated muscle wasting, aiding in the validation of mechanisms of ageing proposed in rodent muscle. The use of human MPCs, primary myoblasts and myotubes isolated from adult and aged people, provides a physiologically relevant model of molecular mechanisms of processes associated with muscle growth, atrophy and regeneration. Here we describe in detail a robust, inexpensive, reproducible and efficient protocol for the isolation and maintenance of human MPCs and their progeny - myoblasts and myotubes from human muscle samples using enzymatic digestion. Furthermore, we have determined the passage number at which primary myoblasts from adult and aged people undergo senescence in an in vitro culture. Finally, we show the ability to transfect these myoblasts and the ability to characterize their proliferative and differentiation capacity and propose their suitability for performing functional studies of molecular mechanisms of myogenesis and muscle wasting in vitro.

  4. Evidence for myoblast-extrinsic regulation of slow myosin heavy chain expression during muscle fiber formation in embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Cho, M; Webster, S G; Blau, H M

    1993-05-01

    Vertebrate muscles are composed of an array of diverse fast and slow fiber types with different contractile properties. Differences among fibers in fast and slow MyHC expression could be due to extrinsic factors that act on the differentiated myofibers. Alternatively, the mononucleate myoblasts that fuse to form multinucleated muscle fibers could differ intrinsically due to lineage. To distinguish between these possibilities, we determined whether the changes in proportion of slow fibers were attributable to inherent differences in myoblasts. The proportion of fibers expressing slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) was found to change markedly with time during embryonic and fetal human limb development. During the first trimester, a maximum of 75% of fibers expressed slow MyHC. Thereafter, new fibers formed which did not express this MyHC, so that the proportion of fibers expressing slow MyHC dropped to approximately 3% of the total by midgestation. Several weeks later, a subset of the new fibers began to express slow MyHC and from week 30 of gestation through adulthood, approximately 50% of fibers were slow. However, each myoblast clone (n = 2,119) derived from muscle tissues at six stages of human development (weeks 7, 9, 16, and 22 of gestation, 2 mo after birth and adult) expressed slow MyHC upon differentiation. We conclude from these results that the control of slow MyHC expression in vivo during muscle fiber formation in embryonic development is largely extrinsic to the myoblast. By contrast, human myoblast clones from the same samples differed in their expression of embryonic and neonatal MyHCs, in agreement with studies in other species, and this difference was shown to be stably heritable. Even after 25 population doublings in tissue culture, embryonic stage myoblasts did not give rise to myoblasts capable of expressing MyHCs typical of neonatal stages, indicating that stage-specific differences are not under the control of a division dependent mechanism, or

  5. Dexamethasone-dependent inhibition of differentiation of C2 myoblasts bearing steroid-inducible N-ras oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    ras proteins are localized to the plasma membrane where they are postulated to interact with growth factor receptors and other proximal elements in intracellular cascades triggered by growth factors. The molecular events associated with terminal differentiation of certain skeletal myoblasts are inhibited by specific polypeptide growth factors and by constitutive expression of transforming ras oncogenes. To determine whether the inhibitory effects of ras on myogenic differentiation were reversible and to investigate whether muscle- specific genes remained susceptible to ras-dependent repression in terminally differentiated myotubes, the murine myoblast cell line, C2, was transfected with a plasmid containing a mutationally activated human N-ras oncogene under transcriptional control of the steroid- sensitive promoter of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat. Addition of dexamethasone to myoblasts bearing steroid- inducible ras oncogenes prevented myotube formation and induction of muscle creatine kinase and acetylcholine receptors. Inhibition of differentiation by dexamethasone occurred in a dose-dependent manner and was a titratable function of ras expression. In the presence of dexamethasone, myoblasts bearing steroid-inducible ras genes retained their dependence on exogenous growth factors to divide and exhibited contact inhibition of growth at confluent densities, indicating that the inhibitory effects of ras on differentiation were independent of cell proliferation. Removal of dexamethasone from N-ras-transfected myoblasts led to fusion and induction of muscle-specific gene products in a manner indistinguishable from control C2 cells. Examination of the effects of culture media conditioned by ras-transfected myoblasts on differentiation of normal C2 cells yielded no evidence for inhibition of differentiation via an autocrine mechanism. In contrast to the ability of N-ras to prevent up-regulation of muscle-specific gene products in myoblasts

  6. Inhibition of DNA synthesis by carvacrol in mouse myoblast cells bearing a human N-RAS oncogene.

    PubMed

    Zeytinoglu, H; Incesu, Z; Baser, K H C

    2003-05-01

    Monoterpenes are dietary components found in the essential oils of a wide variety of plants. A number of these monoterpenes have antitumor activity. We have investigated the effects of carvacrol obtained by fractional distillation of Origanum onites L. essential oil, on DNA synthesis of N-ras transformed myoblast cells, CO25. Incubation of the cells with different doses of carvacrol prevented DNA synthesis in the growth medium and ras-activating medium, which contains dexamethasone. This result demonstrates that carvacrol inhibits growth of myoblast cells even after activation of mutated N-ras oncogene, suggesting the possibility that carvacrol may find application in cancer therapy.

  7. Production of IL-6 by human myoblasts stimulated with Abeta: relevance in the pathogenesis of IBM.

    PubMed

    Baron, P; Galimberti, D; Meda, L; Scarpini, E; Conti, G; Cogiamanian, F; Scarlato, G

    2001-11-13

    To determine whether amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) can induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines by cultured normal muscle cells. Sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) is characterized by the presence of rimmed vacuoles and fibrillary inclusions of Abeta in muscle fibers, and often inflammatory cells. Endomysial expression of proinflammatory molecules has suggested an ongoing immune process, but the site of sensitization and the mechanisms that trigger an inflammatory reaction is unknown. The authors used Northern blot analysis and specific immunoassays to study the expression and secretion in cell-free supernatants of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by purified human myoblasts and C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells incubated with Abeta[1-42] or Abeta[25-35] peptides. Nonstimulated muscle cells produced detectable IL-6, whereas secretion of IL-1beta and TNFalpha was absent. Incubation with Abeta peptides increased IL-6 production, whereas TNFalpha and IL-1beta levels remained undetectable. Northern blot analysis of Abeta-stimulated human myoblasts revealed an increase in IL-6 mRNA expression. Cultured muscle cells increase the constitutive production of IL-6 in response to local deposition of Abeta in sporadic IBM. IL-6 could be a CD8(+) proliferation and differentiation agent, an autocrine proteolysis-inducing factor of damaged myotubes, and a proliferation-stimulating agent for satellite cells to replace the destroyed myofibers in IBM.

  8. Cooperation between myogenic regulatory factors and SIX family transcription factors is important for myoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yubing; Chu, Alphonse; Chakroun, Imane; Islam, Uzma; Blais, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Precise regulation of gene expression is crucial to myogenesis and is thought to require the cooperation of various transcription factors. On the basis of a bioinformatic analysis of gene regulatory sequences, we hypothesized that myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), key regulators of skeletal myogenesis, cooperate with members of the SIX family of transcription factors, known to play important roles during embryonic skeletal myogenesis. To this day little is known regarding the exact molecular mechanism by which SIX factors regulate muscle development. We have conducted a functional genomic study of the role played by SIX1 and SIX4 during the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts, a model of adult muscle regeneration. We report that SIX factors cooperate with the members of the MRF family to activate gene expression during myogenic differentiation, and that their function is essential to this process. Our findings also support a model where SIX factors function not only ‘upstream’ of the MRFs during embryogenesis, but also ‘in parallel’ to them during myoblast differentiation. We have identified new essential nodes that depend on SIX factor function, in the myogenesis regulatory network, and have uncovered a novel way by which MRF function is modulated during differentiation. PMID:20601407

  9. Involvement of transglutaminase in myofibril assembly of chick embryonic myoblasts in culture

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Involvement of transglutaminase in myofibrillogenesis of chick embryonic myoblasts has been investigated in vitro. Both the activity and protein level of transglutaminase initially decreased to a minimal level at the time of burst of myoblast fusion but gradually increased thereafter. The localization of transglutaminase underwent a dramatic change from the whole cytoplasm in a diffuse pattern to the cross- striated sarcomeric A band, being strictly colocalized with the myosin thick filaments. For a brief period prior to the appearance of cross- striation, transglutaminase was localized in nonstriated filamental structures that coincided with the stress fiber-like structures. When 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate was added to muscle cell cultures to induce the sequential disassembly of thin and thick filaments, transglutaminase was strictly colocalized with the myosin thick filaments even in the myosacs, of which most of the thin filaments were disrupted. Moreover, monodansylcadaverine, a competitive inhibitor of transglutaminase, reversibly inhibited the myofibril maturation. In addition, myosin heavy chain behaved as one of the potential intracellular substrates for transglutaminase. The cross-linked myosin complex constituted approximately 5% of the total Triton X-100- insoluble pool of myosin molecules in developing muscle cells, and its level was reduced to below 1% upon treatment with monodansylcadaverine. These results suggest that transglutaminase plays a crucial role in myofibrillogenesis of developing chick skeletal muscle. PMID:7657697

  10. α-Syntrophin stabilizes catalase to reduce endogenous reactive oxygen species levels during myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jae Yun; Choi, Su Jin; Heo, Cheol Ho; Kim, Hwan Myung; Kim, Hye Sun

    2017-07-01

    α-Syntrophin is a component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that interacts with various intracellular signaling proteins in muscle cells. The α-syntrophin knock-down C2 cell line (SNKD), established by infecting lentivirus particles with α-syntrophin shRNA, is characterized by a defect in terminal differentiation and increase in cell death. Since myoblast differentiation is accompanied by intensive mitochondrial biogenesis, the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is also increased during myogenesis. Two-photon microscopy imaging showed that excessive intracellular ROS accumulated during the differentiation of SNKD cells as compared with control cells. The formation of 4-hydroxynonenal adduct, a byproduct of lipid peroxidation during oxidative stress, significantly increased in differentiated SNKD myotubes and was dramatically reduced by epigallocatechin-3-gallate, a well-known ROS scavenger. Among antioxidant enzymes, catalase was significantly decreased during differentiation of SNKD cells without changes at the mRNA level. Of interest was the finding that the degradation of catalase was rescued by MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, in the SNKD cells. This study demonstrates a novel function of α-syntrophin. This protein plays an important role in the regulation of oxidative stress from endogenously generated ROS during myoblast differentiation by modulating the protein stability of catalase. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. In vivo Fluorescence Imaging of Muscle Cell Regeneration by Transplanted EGFP-labeled Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyin; Yang, Zhong; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Yaming

    2010-01-01

    In vivo fluorescence imaging (FLI) enables monitoring fluorescent protein (FP)-labeled cells and proteins in living organisms noninvasively. Here, we examined whether this modality could reach a sufficient sensitivity to allow evaluation of the regeneration process of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-labeled muscle precursors (myoblasts). Using a basic FLI station, we were able to detect clear fluorescence signals generated by 40,000 labeled cells injected into a tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of mouse. We observed that the signal declined to ~25% on the 48 hours of cell injection followed by a recovery starting at the second day and reached a peak of ~45% of the original signal by the 7th day, suggesting that the survived population underwent a limited run of proliferation before differentiation. To assess whether transplanted myoblasts could form satellite cells, we injured the transplanted muscles repeatedly with cardiotoxin. We observed a recovery of fluorescence signal following a disappearance of the signal after each cardiotoxin injection. Histology results showed donor-derived cells located underneath basal membrane and expressing Pax7, confirming that the regeneration observed by imaging was indeed mediated by donor-derived satellite cells. Our results show that FLI is a powerful tool that can extend our ability to unveil complicated biological processes such as stem cell-mediated regeneration. PMID:20125125

  12. AlphaB-crystallin is involved in oxidative stress protection determined by VEGF in skeletal myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Mercatelli, Neri; Dimauro, Ivan; Ciafré, Silvia Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Caporossi, Daniela

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that the effects of VEGF-A, the prototype VEGF ligand, may extend to a variety of cell types other than endothelial cells. The expression of VEGF-A and its main receptors, Flt-1/VEGFR-1 and KDR/Flk-1/VEGFR-2, was indeed detected in several cell types, including cardiac myocytes and regenerating myotubes. In addition to its proangiogenic activity, evidence indicates that VEGF-A can sustain skeletal muscle regeneration by enhancing the survival and migration of myogenic cells and by promoting the growth of myogenic fibers. In this study, our aim was to investigate whether VEGF could protect skeletal muscle satellite cells from apoptotic cell death triggered by reactive oxygen species and to identify the main molecular mechanisms. C2C12 mouse myoblasts, cultured in vitro in the presence of exogenous VEGF or stably transfected with a plasmid vector expressing VEGF-A, were subjected to oxidative stress and analyzed for cell growth and survival, induction of apoptosis, and molecular signaling. The results of our study demonstrated that VEGF protects C2C12 myoblasts from apoptosis induced by oxidative or hypoxic-like stress. This protection did not correlate with the modulation of the expression of VEGF receptors, but is clearly linked to the phosphorylation of the KDR/Flk-1 receptor, the activation of NF-kappaB, and/or the overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein alphaB-crystallin. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biocompatible Elastic Conductive Films Significantly Enhanced Myogenic Differentiation of Myoblast for Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruonan; Zhao, Xin; Guo, Baolin; Ma, Peter X

    2017-09-11

    The key factor in skeletal muscle tissue engineering is regeneration of the functional skeletal muscles. Materials that could promote the myoblast proliferation and myogenic differentiation are promising candidates in skeletal muscle tissue engineering. Herein, we developed an elastic conductive poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(glycerol sebacate) (PEGS) grafted aniline pentamer (AP) copolymer that could promote the formation of myotubes by differentiating the C2C12 myoblast cells. The results of hydration behavior and water contact angle suggested that by adjusting the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and AP content, this film showed a proper surface hydrophilicity for cell attachment. Additionally, these films showed tunable conductivity and mechanical properties that can be altered by changing the AP content. The maximum conductivity of the films was 1.84 × 10(-4) S/cm and the Young's modulus of these films ranged from 14.58 ± 1.35 MPa to 24.62 ± 0.61 MPa. Our findings indicate that the PEGS-AP films promote the proliferation and myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells, suggesting that they are promising biomaterials for skeletal muscle tissue engineering.

  14. Co-dependent Activators Direct Myoblast Specific MyoD Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Geles, Kenneth G.; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Tjian, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although FoxO and Pax proteins represent two important families of transcription factors in determining cell fate, they had not been functionally or physically linked together in mediating regulation of a common target gene during normal cellular transcription programs. Here we identify MyoD, a key regulator of myogenesis, as a direct target of FoxO3 and Pax3/7 in myoblasts. Our cell based assays and in vitro studies reveal a tight co-dependent partnership between FoxO3 and Pax3/7 to coordinately recruit RNA polymerase II and form a pre-initiation complex (PIC) to activate MyoD transcription in myoblasts. The role of FoxO3 in regulating muscle differentiation is confirmed in vivo by observed defects in muscle regeneration caused by MyoD down-regulation in FoxO3 null mice. These data establish a mutual interdependence and functional link between two families of transcription activators serving as potential signaling sensors and regulators of cell fate commitment in directing tissue specific MyoD transcription. PMID:18854138

  15. Identification of novel MYO18A interaction partners required for myoblast adhesion and muscle integrity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian-Meng; Cheng, Xiao-Ning; Li, Shang-Qi; Heller, Stefan; Xu, Zhi-Gang; Shi, De-Li

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional myosin MYO18A that contains a PDZ domain is required for muscle integrity during zebrafish development. However, the mechanism by which it functions in myofibers is not clear. The presence of a PDZ domain suggests that MYO18A may interact with other partners to perform muscle-specific functions. Here we performed double-hybrid screening and co-immunoprecipitation to identify MYO18A-interacting proteins, and have identified p190RhoGEF and Golgin45 as novel partners for the MYO18A PDZ domain. We have also identified Lurap1, which was previously shown to bind MYO18A. Functional analyses indicate that, similarly as myo18a, knockdown of lurap1, p190RhoGEF and Golgin45 by morpholino oligonucleotides disrupts dystrophin localization at the sarcolemma and produces muscle lesions. Simultaneous knockdown of myo18a with either of these genes severely disrupts myofiber integrity and dystrophin localization, suggesting that they may function similarly to maintain myofiber integrity. We further show that MYO18A and its interaction partners are required for adhesion of myoblasts to extracellular matrix, and for the formation of the Golgi apparatus and organization of F-actin bundles in myoblast cells. These findings suggest that MYO18A has the potential to form a multiprotein complex that links the Golgi apparatus to F-actin, which regulates muscle integrity and function during early development. PMID:27824130

  16. Transient and stable transfections of mouse myoblasts with genes coding for pro-angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Bialas, M; Krupka, M; Janeczek, A; Rozwadowska, N; Fraczek, M; Kotlinowski, J; Kucharzewska, P; Lackowska, B; Kurpisz, M

    2011-04-01

    Cardiomyocyte loss in the ischaemic heart can be the reason of many complications, eventually being even the cause of patient's death. Despite many promises, cell therapy with the use of skeletal muscle stem cells (SMSC) still remains to be modified and improved. Combined cell and gene therapy seems to be a promising strategy to heal damaged myocardium. In the present study we have investigated the influence of a simultaneous overexpression of two potent pro-angiogenic genes encoding the fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4) and the vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) on a myogenic murine C2C12 cell line. We have demonstrated in in vitro conditions that myoblasts which overexpressed these factors exhibited significant changes in the cell cycle and pro-angiogenic potential with only slight differences in the expression of the myogenic genes. There was not observed the influence of transient or stable overexpression of FGF-4 and VEGF on cell apoptosis/necrosis in standard or oxidative stress conditions comparing to non transfected controls. Overall, our results suggest that the possible transplantation of myoblasts overexpressing pro-angiogenic factors may potentially improve the functionality of the injured myocardium although the definite proof must originate from in situ conducted pre-clinical studies.

  17. Runx2/Cbfa1-genetically engineered skeletal myoblasts mineralize collagen scaffolds in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, Charles A; Byers, Benjamin A; Pavlath, Grace K; Guldberg, Robert E; García, Andrés J

    2004-11-05

    Genetic engineering of progenitor and stem cells is an attractive approach to address cell sourcing limitations associated with tissue engineering applications. Bone tissue engineering represents a promising strategy to repair large bone defects, but has been limited in part by the availability of a sustained, mineralizing cell source. This study examined the in vitro mineralization potential of primary skeletal myoblasts genetically engineered to overexpress Runx2/Cbfa1, an osteoblastic transcriptional regulator essential to bone formation. These cells were viable at the periphery of 3D fibrous collagen scaffolds for 6 weeks of static culture. Exogenous Runx2 expression induced osteogenic differentiation and repressed myogenesis in these constructs relative to controls. Runx2-modified cells deposited significant amounts of mineralized matrix and hydroxyapatite, as determined by microcomputed tomography, histological analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, whereas scaffolds seeded with control cells exhibited no mineralized regions. Although mineralization by Runx2-engineered cells was confined to the periphery of the construct, colocalizing with cell viability, it was sufficient to increase the compressive modulus of constructs 30-fold relative to controls. This work demonstrates that Runx2 overexpression in skeletal myoblasts may address current obstacles of bone tissue engineering by providing a potent cell source for in vitro mineralization and construct maturation. Additionally, the use of genetic engineering methods to express downstream control factors and transcriptional regulators, in contrast to soluble signaling molecules, represents a robust strategy to enhance cellular activities for tissue engineering applications. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Myoblast transplantation in the porcine model: a potential technique for myocardial repair.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, C H; Claycomb, W C; Delcarpio, J B; Smith, D M; deGruiter, H; Smart, F; Ochsner, J L

    1995-11-01

    The use of transgenic cells transplanted in syngeneic rodents has shown modest success, but allogeneic and xenogeneic transplants have not been uniformly successful. To assess the feasibility of xenogeneic and allogeneic myoblast transplantation, we subjected seven adult swine to transplantation of murine atrial tumor cells (xenogeneic), neonatal porcine myocytes (allogeneic), and human fetal cardiomyocytes into the left ventricular wall. After general anesthesia, isolated cells were injected along the anterior and posterior walls of the porcine left ventricle. All the animals were immuno-suppressed and observed for 1 month after injection, at which time they were killed and analyzed. This report will present results primarily concerned with the success of human cell transfers. In all injected sites examined, the transplanted cells thrived within the host myocardium with no significant rejection. Transplant cells formed close associations with host myocytes that resembled nascent intercalated disks on electron microscopy. These cells also contained myofibrils and other cell architecture resembling the transplanted cell lines. Additionally, these cells appeared to produce an angiogenic influence resulting in the proliferation of the surrounding microvasculature. We believe that these findings indicate successful xenogeneic and allogeneic myoblast cell transplantation in a large animal model. These experiments set the stage for future studies to assess the ability of these cells to form a syncytium, contract, and potentially repair failed myocardium.

  19. Regulation of myostatin expression and myoblast differentiation by FoxO and SMAD transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Allen, David L; Unterman, Terry G

    2007-01-01

    Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta family, plays an important role in regulating skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. Here we examined the role of FoxO1 and SMAD transcription factors in regulating myostatin gene expression and myoblast differentiation in C(2)C(12) myotubes in vitro. Both myostatin and FoxO1 mRNA expression were greater in fast- vs. slow-twitch skeletal muscles in vivo. Moreover, expression of a constitutively active form of FoxO1 increased myostatin mRNA and increased activity of a myostatin promoter reporter construct in differentiated C(2)C(12) myotubes. Mutagenesis of highly conserved FoxO or SMAD binding sites significantly decreased myostatin promoter activity, and binding assays showed that both FoxO1 and SMADs bind to their respective sites in the myostatin promoter. Treatment with TGF-beta and/or overexpression of SMAD2, -3, or -4 also resulted in a significant increase in myostatin promoter activity. Treatment with TGF-beta along with overexpression of SMAD2 and FoxO1 resulted in the largest increase in myostatin promoter activity. Finally, TGF-beta treatment and SMAD2 overexpression greatly potentiated FoxO1-mediated suppression of myoblast differentiation. Together these data demonstrate that FoxO1 and SMAD transcription factors regulate the expression of myostatin and contribute to the control of muscle cell growth and differentiation.

  20. An invasive podosome-like structure promotes fusion pore formation during myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sens, Kristin L.; Zhang, Shiliang; Jin, Peng; Duan, Rui; Zhang, Guofeng; Luo, Fengbao; Parachini, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies in Drosophila have implicated actin cytoskeletal remodeling in myoblast fusion, but the cellular mechanisms underlying this process remain poorly understood. Here we show that actin polymerization occurs in an asymmetric and cell type–specific manner between a muscle founder cell and a fusion-competent myoblast (FCM). In the FCM, a dense F-actin–enriched focus forms at the site of fusion, whereas a thin sheath of F-actin is induced along the apposing founder cell membrane. The FCM-specific actin focus invades the apposing founder cell with multiple finger-like protrusions, leading to the formation of a single-channel macro fusion pore between the two muscle cells. Two actin nucleation–promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, WASP and Scar, are required for the formation of the F-actin foci, whereas WASP but not Scar promotes efficient foci invasion. Our studies uncover a novel invasive podosome-like structure (PLS) in a developing tissue and reveal a previously unrecognized function of PLSs in facilitating cell membrane juxtaposition and fusion. PMID:21098115

  1. Boron nitride nanotube-functionalised myoblast/microfibre constructs: a nanotech-assisted tissue-engineered platform for muscle stimulation.

    PubMed

    Danti, Serena; Ciofani, Gianni; Pertici, Gianni; Moscato, Stefania; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Ciabatti, Elena; Chiellini, Federica; D'Acunto, Mario; Mattoli, Virgilio; Berrettini, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    In this communication, we introduce boron nitride nanotube (BNNT)-functionalised muscle cell/microfibre mesh constructs, obtained via tissue engineering, as a three-dimensional (3D) platform to study a wireless stimulation system for electrically responsive cells and tissues. Our stimulation strategy exploits the piezoelectric behaviour of some classes of ceramic nanoparticles, such as BNNTs, able to polarize under mechanical stress, e.g. using low-frequency ultrasound (US). In the microfibre scaffolds, C2C12 myoblasts were able to differentiate into viable myotubes and to internalize BNNTs, also upon US irradiation, so as to obtain a nanotech-assisted 3D in vitro model. We then tested our stimulatory system on 2D and 3D cellular models by investigating the expression of connexin 43 (Cx43), as a molecule involved in cell crosstalk and mechanotransduction, and myosin, as a myogenic differentiation marker. Cx43 gene expression revealed a marked model dependency. In control samples (without US and/or BNNTs), Cx43 was upregulated under 2D culture conditions (10.78 ± 1.05-fold difference). Interactions with BNNTs increased Cx43 expression in 3D samples. Cx43 mRNA dropped in 2D under the 'BNNTs + US' regimen, while it was best enhanced in 3D samples (3.58 ± 1.05 vs 13.74 ± 1.42-fold difference, p = 0.0001). At the protein level, the maximal expressions of Cx43 and myosin were detected in the 3D model. In contrast with the 3D model, in 2D cultures, BNNTs and US exerted a synergistic depletive effect upon myosin synthesis. These findings indicate that model dimensionality and stimulatory regimens can strongly affect the responses of signalling and differentiation molecules, proving the importance of developing proper in vitro platforms for biological modelling.

  2. Elastase levels and activity are increased in dystrophic muscle and impair myoblast cell survival, proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Arecco, N.; Clarke, C. J.; Jones, F. K.; Simpson, D. M.; Mason, D.; Beynon, R. J.; Pisconti, A.

    2016-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy, progressive loss of muscle tissue is accompanied by fibrosis, chronic inflammation and reduced muscle regenerative capacity. Although much is known about the development of fibrosis and chronic inflammation in muscular dystrophy, less is known about how they are mechanistically linked to loss of muscle regenerative capacity. We have developed a proteomics method to discover dystrophy-associated changes in the muscle progenitor cell niche, which identified serine proteases, and especially neutrophil elastase, as candidates. We show that elastase activity is increased in dystrophic (mdx4cv) muscle and impairs myoblast survival in culture. While the effect of elastase on C2C12 cell survival correlates with the kinetics of elastase-mediated degradation of the substrate to which the cells adhere, the effect of elastase on satellite cell-derived primary myoblast growth and differentiation is substrate-independent and even more dramatic than the effect on C2C12 cells, suggesting a detrimental role for elastase on myogenesis in vivo. Additionally, elastase impairs differentiation of both primary and C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes. Our findings evidence the importance of neutrophil-mediated inflammation in muscular dystrophy and indicate elastase-mediated regulation of myoblast behaviour as a potential mechanism underlying loss of regenerative capacity in dystrophic muscle. PMID:27241590

  3. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Secreted Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Exerts a Stimulatory Effect on Skeletal Myoblast Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Alessia; Anderloni, Giulia; Pierucci, Federica; Matteini, Francesca; Chellini, Flaminia; Zecchi Orlandini, Sandra; Meacci, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have the potential to significantly contribute to skeletal muscle healing through the secretion of paracrine factors that support proliferation and enhance participation of the endogenous muscle stem cells in the process of repair/regeneration. However, MSC-derived trophic molecules have been poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate paracrine signaling effects of MSCs on skeletal myoblasts. It was found, using a biochemical and morphological approach that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a natural bioactive lipid exerting a broad range of muscle cell responses, is secreted by MSCs and represents an important factor by which these cells exert their stimulatory effects on C2C12 myoblast and satellite cell proliferation. Indeed, exposure to conditioned medium obtained from MSCs cultured in the presence of the selective sphingosine kinase inhibitor (iSK), blocked increased cell proliferation caused by the conditioned medium from untreated MSCs, and the addition of exogenous S1P in the conditioned medium from MSCs pre-treated with iSK further increased myoblast proliferation. Finally, we also demonstrated that the myoblast response to MSC-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) involves the release of S1P from C2C12 cells. Our data may have important implications in the optimization of cell-based strategies to promote skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:25264785

  4. Stem Cell Antigen-1 Localizes to Lipid Microdomains and Associates With Insulin Degrading Enzyme in Skeletal Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    EPTING, CONRAD L.; KING, FRANK W.; PEDERSEN, ANISSA; ZAMAN, JESSICA; RITNER, CARISSA; BERNSTEIN, HAROLD S.

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1, Ly6A/E) is a glycosylphosphotidylinositol-anchored protein that identifies many tissue progenitor cells. We originally identified Sca-1 as a marker of myogenic precursor cells and subsequently demonstrated that Sca-1 regulates proliferation of activated myoblasts, suggesting an important role for Sca-1 in skeletal muscle homeostasis. Beyond its functional role in regulating proliferation, however, little is known about the mechanism(s) that drive Sca-1-mediated events. We now report that lipid microdomain organization is essential for normal myogenic differentiation, and that Sca-1 constitutively localizes to these domains during myoblast proliferation and differentiation. We also demonstrate that Sca-1 associates with insulin degrading enzyme (IDE), a catalytic protein responsible for the cleavage of mitogenic peptides, in differentiating myoblasts. We show that chemical inhibition of IDE as well as RNAi knockdown of IDE mRNA recapitulates the phenotype of Sca-1 interference, that is, sustained myoblast proliferation and delayed myogenic differentiation. These findings identify the first signaling protein that physically and functionally associates with Sca-1 in myogenic precursor cells, and suggest a potential pathway for Sca-1-mediated signaling. Future efforts to manipulate this pathway may lead to new strategies for augmenting the myogenic proliferative response, and ultimately muscle repair. PMID:18506847

  5. Actin-associated protein palladin is required for migration behavior and differentiation potential of C2C12 myoblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ngoc Uyen Nhi; Liang, Vincent Roderick; Wang, Hao-Ven

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Palladin is involved in myogenesis in vitro. • Palladin knockdown by siRNA increases myoblast proliferation, viability and differentiation. • Palladin knockdown decreases C2C12 myoblast migration ability. - Abstract: The actin-associated protein palladin has been shown to be involved in differentiation processes in non-muscle tissues. However, but its function in skeletal muscle has rarely been studied. Palladin plays important roles in the regulation of diverse actin-related signaling in a number of cell types. Since intact actin-cytoskeletal remodeling is necessary for myogenesis, in the present study, we pursue to investigate the role of actin-associated palladin in skeletal muscle differentiation. Palladin in C2C12 myoblasts is knocked-down using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results show that down-regulation of palladin decreased migratory activity of mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts. Furthermore, the depletion of palladin enhances C2C12 vitality and proliferation. Of note, the loss of palladin promotes C2C12 to express the myosin heavy chain, suggesting that palladin has a role in the modulation of C2C12 differentiation. It is thus proposed that palladin is required for normal C2C12 myogenesis in vitro.

  6. Segregation of myoblast fusion and muscle-specific gene expression by distinct ligand-dependent inactivation of GSK-3β

    PubMed Central

    Pansters, N. A. M.; van der Velden, J. L. J.; Kelders, M. C. J. M.; Laeremans, H.; Schols, A. M. W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Myogenic differentiation involves myoblast fusion and induction of muscle-specific gene expression, which are both stimulated by pharmacological (LiCl), genetic, or IGF-I-mediated GSK-3β inactivation. To assess whether stimulation of myogenic differentiation is common to ligand-mediated GSK-3β inactivation, myoblast fusion and muscle-specific gene expression were investigated in response to Wnt-3a. Moreover, crosstalk between IGF-I/GSK-3β/NFATc3 and Wnt/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling was assessed. While both Wnt-3a and LiCl promoted myoblast fusion, muscle-specific gene expression was increased by LiCl, but not by Wnt-3a or β-catenin over-expression. Furthermore, LiCl and IGF-I, but not Wnt-3a, increased NFATc3 transcriptional activity. In contrast, β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity was increased by Wnt-3a and LiCl, but not IGF-I. These results for the first time reveal a segregated regulation of myoblast fusion and muscle-specific gene expression following stimulation of myogenic differentiation in response to distinct ligand-specific signaling routes of GSK-3β inactivation. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00018-010-0467-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20694829

  7. Activation of PPARγ2 by PPARγ1 through a functional PPRE in transdifferentiation of myoblasts to adipocytes induced by EPA.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hefeng; Zhou, Yuanfei; Hu, Xiaoming; Peng, Xuewu; Wei, Hongkui; Peng, Jian; Jiang, Siwen

    2015-01-01

    PPARγ and Wnt signaling are central positive and negative regulators of adipogenesis, respectively. Here we identified that, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) could effectively induce the transdifferentiation of myoblasts into adipocytes through modulation of both PPARγ expression and Wnt signaling. During the early stage of transdifferentiation, EPA activates PPARδ and PPARγ1, which in turn targets β-catenin to degradation and down-regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling, such that the myogenic fate of myoblasts could be switched to adipogenesis. In addition, EPA up-regulates the expression of PPARγ1 by activating RXRα, then PPARγ1 binds to the functional peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE) in the promoter of adipocyte-specific PPARγ2 to continuously activate the expression of PPARγ2 throughout the transdifferentiation process. Our data indicated that EPA acts as a dual-function stimulator of adipogenesis that both inhibits Wnt signaling and induces PPARγ2 expression to facilitate the transdifferentiation program, and the transcriptional activation of PPARγ2 by PPARγ1 is not only the key factor for the transdifferentiation of myoblasts to adipocytes, but also the crucial evidence for successful transdifferentiation. The present findings provided insight for the first time as to how EPA induces the transdifferentiation of myoblasts to adipocytes, but also provide new clues for strategies to prevent and treat some metabolic diseases.

  8. Separating myoblast differentiation from muscle cell fusion using IGF-I and the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB202190

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Samantha; Gross, Sean M.; David, Larry L.; Klimek, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The p38 MAP kinases play critical roles in skeletal muscle biology, but the specific processes regulated by these kinases remain poorly defined. Here we find that activity of p38α/β is important not only in early phases of myoblast differentiation, but also in later stages of myocyte fusion and myofibrillogenesis. By treatment of C2 myoblasts with the promyogenic growth factor insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, the early block in differentiation imposed by the p38 chemical inhibitor SB202190 could be overcome. Yet, under these conditions, IGF-I could not prevent the later impairment of muscle cell fusion, as marked by the nearly complete absence of multinucleated myofibers. Removal of SB202190 from the medium of differentiating myoblasts reversed the fusion block, as multinucleated myofibers were detected several hours later and reached ∼90% of the culture within 30 h. Analysis by quantitative mass spectroscopy of proteins that changed in abundance following removal of the inhibitor revealed a cohort of upregulated muscle-enriched molecules that may be important for both myofibrillogenesis and fusion. We have thus developed a model system that allows separation of myoblast differentiation from muscle cell fusion and should be useful in identifying specific steps regulated by p38 MAP kinase-mediated signaling in myogenesis. PMID:26246429

  9. Separating myoblast differentiation from muscle cell fusion using IGF-I and the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB202190.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Samantha; Gross, Sean M; David, Larry L; Klimek, John E; Rotwein, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The p38 MAP kinases play critical roles in skeletal muscle biology, but the specific processes regulated by these kinases remain poorly defined. Here we find that activity of p38α/β is important not only in early phases of myoblast differentiation, but also in later stages of myocyte fusion and myofibrillogenesis. By treatment of C2 myoblasts with the promyogenic growth factor insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, the early block in differentiation imposed by the p38 chemical inhibitor SB202190 could be overcome. Yet, under these conditions, IGF-I could not prevent the later impairment of muscle cell fusion, as marked by the nearly complete absence of multinucleated myofibers. Removal of SB202190 from the medium of differentiating myoblasts reversed the fusion block, as multinucleated myofibers were detected several hours later and reached ∼90% of the culture within 30 h. Analysis by quantitative mass spectroscopy of proteins that changed in abundance following removal of the inhibitor revealed a cohort of upregulated muscle-enriched molecules that may be important for both myofibrillogenesis and fusion. We have thus developed a model system that allows separation of myoblast differentiation from muscle cell fusion and should be useful in identifying specific steps regulated by p38 MAP kinase-mediated signaling in myogenesis.

  10. Engineering skeletal muscle tissues from murine myoblast progenitor cells and application of electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    van der Schaft, Daisy W J; van Spreeuwel, Ariane C C; Boonen, Kristel J M; Langelaan, Marloes L P; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2013-03-19

    Engineered muscle tissues can be used for several different purposes, which include the production of tissues for use as a disease model in vitro, e.g. to study pressure ulcers, for regenerative medicine and as a meat alternative (1). The first reported 3D muscle constructs have been made many years ago and pioneers in the field are Vandenburgh and colleagues (2,3). Advances made in muscle tissue engineering are not only the result from the vast gain in knowledge of biochemical factors, stem cells and progenitor cells, but are in particular based on insights gained by researchers that physical factors play essential roles in the control of cell behavior and tissue development. State-of-the-art engineered muscle constructs currently consist of cell-populated hydrogel constructs. In our lab these generally consist of murine myoblast progenitor cells, isolated from murine hind limb muscles or a murine myoblast cell line C2C12, mixed with a mixture of collagen/Matrigel and plated between two anchoring points, mimicking the muscle ligaments. Other cells may be considered as well, e.g. alternative cell lines such as L6 rat myoblasts (4), neonatal muscle derived progenitor cells (5), cells derived from adult muscle tissues from other species such as human (6) or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) (7). Cell contractility causes alignment of the cells along the long axis of the construct (8,9) and differentiation of the muscle progenitor cells after approximately one week of culture. Moreover, the application of electrical stimulation can enhance the process of differentiation to some extent (8). Because of its limited size (8 x 2 x 0.5 mm) the complete tissue can be analyzed using confocal microscopy to monitor e.g. viability, differentiation and cell alignment. Depending on the specific application the requirements for the engineered muscle tissue will vary; e.g. use for regenerative medicine requires the up scaling of tissue size and vascularization, while

  11. Engineering Skeletal Muscle Tissues from Murine Myoblast Progenitor Cells and Application of Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    van der Schaft, Daisy W. J.; van Spreeuwel, Ariane C. C.; Boonen, Kristel J. M.; Langelaan, Marloes L. P.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.; Baaijens, Frank P. T.

    2013-01-01

    Engineered muscle tissues can be used for several different purposes, which include the production of tissues for use as a disease model in vitro, e.g. to study pressure ulcers, for regenerative medicine and as a meat alternative 1. The first reported 3D muscle constructs have been made many years ago and pioneers in the field are Vandenburgh and colleagues 2,3. Advances made in muscle tissue engineering are not only the result from the vast gain in knowledge of biochemical factors, stem cells and progenitor cells, but are in particular based on insights gained by researchers that physical factors play essential roles in the control of cell behavior and tissue development. State-of-the-art engineered muscle constructs currently consist of cell-populated hydrogel constructs. In our lab these generally consist of murine myoblast progenitor cells, isolated from murine hind limb muscles or a murine myoblast cell line C2C12, mixed with a mixture of collagen/Matrigel and plated between two anchoring points, mimicking the muscle ligaments. Other cells may be considered as well, e.g. alternative cell lines such as L6 rat myoblasts 4, neonatal muscle derived progenitor cells 5, cells derived from adult muscle tissues from other species such as human 6 or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) 7. Cell contractility causes alignment of the cells along the long axis of the construct 8,9 and differentiation of the muscle progenitor cells after approximately one week of culture. Moreover, the application of electrical stimulation can enhance the process of differentiation to some extent 8. Because of its limited size (8 x 2 x 0.5 mm) the complete tissue can be analyzed using confocal microscopy to monitor e.g. viability, differentiation and cell alignment. Depending on the specific application the requirements for the engineered muscle tissue will vary; e.g. use for regenerative medicine requires the up scaling of tissue size and vascularization, while to serve as a

  12. Myogenesis in the sea urchin embryo: the molecular fingerprint of the myoblast precursors.

    PubMed

    Andrikou, Carmen; Iovene, Edmondo; Rizzo, Francesca; Oliveri, Paola; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2013-12-02

    In sea urchin larvae the circumesophageal fibers form a prominent muscle system of mesodermal origin. Although the morphology and later development of this muscle system has been well-described, little is known about the molecular signature of these cells or their precise origin in the early embryo. As an invertebrate deuterostome that is more closely related to the vertebrates than other commonly used model systems in myogenesis, the sea urchin fills an important phylogenetic gap and provides a unique perspective on the evolution of muscle cell development. Here, we present a comprehensive description of the development of the sea urchin larval circumesophageal muscle lineage beginning with its mesodermal origin using high-resolution localization of the expression of several myogenic transcriptional regulators and differentiation genes. A few myoblasts are bilaterally distributed at the oral vegetal side of the tip of the archenteron and first appear at the late gastrula stage. The expression of the differentiation genes Myosin Heavy Chain, Tropomyosin I and II, as well as the regulatory genes MyoD2, FoxF, FoxC, FoxL1, Myocardin, Twist, and Tbx6 uniquely identify these cells. Interestingly, evolutionarily conserved myogenic factors such as Mef2, MyoR and Six1/2 are not expressed in sea urchin myoblasts but are found in other mesodermal domains of the tip of the archenteron. The regulatory states of these domains were characterized in detail. Moreover, using a combinatorial analysis of gene expression we followed the development of the FoxF/FoxC positive cells from the onset of expression to the end of gastrulation. Our data allowed us to build a complete map of the Non-Skeletogenic Mesoderm at the very early gastrula stage, in which specific molecular signatures identify the precursors of different cell types. Among them, a small group of cells within the FoxY domain, which also express FoxC and SoxE, have been identified as plausible myoblast precursors. Together

  13. Myogenesis in the sea urchin embryo: the molecular fingerprint of the myoblast precursors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In sea urchin larvae the circumesophageal fibers form a prominent muscle system of mesodermal origin. Although the morphology and later development of this muscle system has been well-described, little is known about the molecular signature of these cells or their precise origin in the early embryo. As an invertebrate deuterostome that is more closely related to the vertebrates than other commonly used model systems in myogenesis, the sea urchin fills an important phylogenetic gap and provides a unique perspective on the evolution of muscle cell development. Results Here, we present a comprehensive description of the development of the sea urchin larval circumesophageal muscle lineage beginning with its mesodermal origin using high-resolution localization of the expression of several myogenic transcriptional regulators and differentiation genes. A few myoblasts are bilaterally distributed at the oral vegetal side of the tip of the archenteron and first appear at the late gastrula stage. The expression of the differentiation genes Myosin Heavy Chain, Tropomyosin I and II, as well as the regulatory genes MyoD2, FoxF, FoxC, FoxL1, Myocardin, Twist, and Tbx6 uniquely identify these cells. Interestingly, evolutionarily conserved myogenic factors such as Mef2, MyoR and Six1/2 are not expressed in sea urchin myoblasts but are found in other mesodermal domains of the tip of the archenteron. The regulatory states of these domains were characterized in detail. Moreover, using a combinatorial analysis of gene expression we followed the development of the FoxF/FoxC positive cells from the onset of expression to the end of gastrulation. Our data allowed us to build a complete map of the Non-Skeletogenic Mesoderm at the very early gastrula stage, in which specific molecular signatures identify the precursors of different cell types. Among them, a small group of cells within the FoxY domain, which also express FoxC and SoxE, have been identified as plausible myoblast

  14. Distinct genetic programs guide Drosophila circular and longitudinal visceral myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The visceral musculature of Drosophila larvae comprises circular visceral muscles tightly interwoven with longitudinal visceral muscles. During myogenesis, the circular muscles arise by one-to-one fusion of a circular visceral founder cell (FC) with a visceral fusion-competent myoblast (FCM) from the trunk visceral mesoderm, and longitudinal muscles arise from FCs of the caudal visceral mesoderm. Longitudinal FCs migrate anteriorly under guidance of fibroblast growth factors during embryogenesis; it is proposed that they fuse with FCMs from the trunk visceral mesoderm to give rise to syncytia containing up to six nuclei. Results Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunochemical analyses, we investigated whether these fusion events during migration use the same molecular repertoire and cellular components as fusion-restricted myogenic adhesive structure (FuRMAS), the adhesive signaling center that mediates myoblast fusion in the somatic mesoderm. Longitudinal muscles were formed by the fusion of one FC with Sns-positive FCMs, and defects in FCM specification led to defects in longitudinal muscle formation. At the fusion sites, Duf/Kirre and the adaptor protein Rols7 accumulated in longitudinal FCs, and Blow and F-actin accumulated in FCMs. The accumulation of these four proteins at the fusion sites argues for FuRMAS-like adhesion and signaling centers. Longitudinal fusion was disturbed in rols and blow single, and scar wip double mutants. Mutants of wasp or its interaction partner wip had no defects in longitudinal fusion. Conclusions Our results indicated that all embryonic fusion events depend on the same cell-adhesion molecules, but that the need for Rols7 and regulators of F-actin distinctly differs. Rols7 was required for longitudinal visceral and somatic myoblast fusion but not for circular visceral fusion. Importantly, longitudinal fusion depended on Kette and SCAR/Wave but was independent of WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation. Thus, the

  15. E2F1-miR-20a-5p/20b-5p auto-regulatory feedback loop involved in myoblast proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen; Li, Guihuan; Yi, Zhenhua; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    miR-17 family microRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial for embryo development, however, their role in muscle development is still unclear. miR-20a-5p and miR-20b-5p belong to the miR-17 family and are transcribed from the miR-17~92 and miR-106a~363 clusters respectively. In this study, we found that miR-20a-5p and miR-20b-5p promoted myoblast differentiation and repressed myoblast proliferation by directly binding the 3′ UTR of E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) mRNA. E2F1 is an important transcriptional factor for organism’s normal development. Overexpression of E2F1 in myoblasts promoted myoblast proliferation and inhibited myoblast differentiation. Conversely, E2F1 inhibition induced myoblast differentiation and repressed myoblast proliferation. Moreover, E2F1 can bind directly to promoters of the miR-17~92 and miR-106a~363 clusters and activate their transcription, and E2F1 protein expression is correlated with the expression of pri-miR-17~92 and pri-miR-106a~363 during myoblast differentiation. These results suggested an auto-regulatory feedback loop between E2F1 and miR-20a-5p/20b-5p, and indicated that miR-20a-5p, miR-20b-5p and E2F1 are involved in myoblast proliferation and differentiation through the auto-regulation between E2F1 and miR-20a-5p/20b-5p. These findings provide new insight into the mechanism of muscle differentiation, and further shed light on the understanding of muscle development and muscle diseases. PMID:27282946

  16. Comparison of Arrhythmogenicity and Proinflammatory Activity Induced by Intramyocardial or Epicardial Myoblast Sheet Delivery in a Rat Model of Ischemic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pätilä, Tommi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Imanishi, Yukiko; Fukushima, Satsuki; Siltanen, Antti; Mervaala, Eero; Kankuri, Esko; Harjula, Ari; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Although cell therapy of the failing heart by intramyocardial injections of myoblasts to results in regenerative benefit, it has also been associated with undesired and prospectively fatal arrhythmias. We hypothesized that intramyocardial injections of myoblasts could enhance inflammatory reactivity and facilitate electrical cardiac abnormalities that can be reduced by epicardial myoblast sheet delivery. In a rat model of ischemic heart failure, myoblast therapy either by intramyocardial injections or epicardial cell sheets was given 2 weeks after occlusion of the coronary artery. Ventricular premature contractions (VPCs) were assessed, using an implanted three-lead electrocardiograph at 1, 7, and 14 days after therapy, and 16-point epicardial electropotential mapping (EEPM) was used to evaluate ventricular arrhythmogenicity under isoproterenol stress. Cardiac functioning was assessed by echocardiography. Both transplantation groups showed therapeutic benefit over sham therapy. However, VPCs were more frequent in the Injection group on day 1 and day 14 after therapy than in animals receiving epicardial or sham therapy (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). EEPM under isoproterenol stress showed macroreentry at the infarct border area, leading to ventricular tachycardias in the Injection group, but not in the myoblast sheet- or sham-treated groups (p = 0.045). Both transplantation types modified the myocardial cytokine expression profile. In animals receiving epicardial myoblast therapy, selective reductions in the expressions of interferon gamma, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL12 were observed, accompanied by reduced infiltration of inflammatory CD11b- and CD68-positive leukocytes, compared with animals receiving myoblasts as intramyocardial injections. Intramyocardial myoblast delivery was associated with enhanced inflammatory and immunomodulatory reactivity and increased frequency of VPCs. In comparison to intramyocardial injection, the epicardial route may serve as

  17. Comparison of arrhythmogenicity and proinflammatory activity induced by intramyocardial or epicardial myoblast sheet delivery in a rat model of ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pätilä, Tommi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Imanishi, Yukiko; Fukushima, Satsuki; Siltanen, Antti; Mervaala, Eero; Kankuri, Esko; Harjula, Ari; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Although cell therapy of the failing heart by intramyocardial injections of myoblasts to results in regenerative benefit, it has also been associated with undesired and prospectively fatal arrhythmias. We hypothesized that intramyocardial injections of myoblasts could enhance inflammatory reactivity and facilitate electrical cardiac abnormalities that can be reduced by epicardial myoblast sheet delivery. In a rat model of ischemic heart failure, myoblast therapy either by intramyocardial injections or epicardial cell sheets was given 2 weeks after occlusion of the coronary artery. Ventricular premature contractions (VPCs) were assessed, using an implanted three-lead electrocardiograph at 1, 7, and 14 days after therapy, and 16-point epicardial electropotential mapping (EEPM) was used to evaluate ventricular arrhythmogenicity under isoproterenol stress. Cardiac functioning was assessed by echocardiography. Both transplantation groups showed therapeutic benefit over sham therapy. However, VPCs were more frequent in the Injection group on day 1 and day 14 after therapy than in animals receiving epicardial or sham therapy (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). EEPM under isoproterenol stress showed macroreentry at the infarct border area, leading to ventricular tachycardias in the Injection group, but not in the myoblast sheet- or sham-treated groups (p = 0.045). Both transplantation types modified the myocardial cytokine expression profile. In animals receiving epicardial myoblast therapy, selective reductions in the expressions of interferon gamma, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL12 were observed, accompanied by reduced infiltration of inflammatory CD11b- and CD68-positive leukocytes, compared with animals receiving myoblasts as intramyocardial injections. Intramyocardial myoblast delivery was associated with enhanced inflammatory and immunomodulatory reactivity and increased frequency of VPCs. In comparison to intramyocardial injection, the epicardial route may serve as

  18. Trpc1 Ion Channel Modulates Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Akt Pathway during Myoblast Differentiation and Muscle Regeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Zanou, Nadège; Schakman, Olivier; Louis, Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T.; Dietrich, Alexander; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Gailly, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed in vitro that calcium entry through Trpc1 ion channels regulates myoblast migration and differentiation. In the present work, we used primary cell cultures and isolated muscles from Trpc1−/− and Trpc1+/+ murine model to investigate the role of Trpc1 in myoblast differentiation and in muscle regeneration. In these models, we studied regeneration consecutive to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury and observed a significant hypotrophy and a delayed regeneration in Trpc1−/− muscles consisting in smaller fiber size and increased proportion of centrally nucleated fibers. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myf5, and myogenin and of one of their targets, the developmental MHC (MHCd). Consequently, muscle tension was systematically lower in muscles from Trpc1−/− mice. Importantly, the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway, which plays a crucial role in muscle growth and regeneration, was down-regulated in regenerating Trpc1−/− muscles. Indeed, phosphorylation of both Akt and p70S6K proteins was decreased as well as the activation of PI3K, the main upstream regulator of the Akt. This effect was independent of insulin-like growth factor expression. Akt phosphorylation also was reduced in Trpc1−/− primary myoblasts and in control myoblasts differentiated in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ or pretreated with EGTA-AM or wortmannin, suggesting that the entry of Ca2+ through Trpc1 channels enhanced the activity of PI3K. Our results emphasize the involvement of Trpc1 channels in skeletal muscle development in vitro and in vivo, and identify a Ca2+-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration. PMID:22399301

  19. Trpc1 ion channel modulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zanou, Nadège; Schakman, Olivier; Louis, Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T; Dietrich, Alexander; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Gailly, Philippe

    2012-04-27

    We previously showed in vitro that calcium entry through Trpc1 ion channels regulates myoblast migration and differentiation. In the present work, we used primary cell cultures and isolated muscles from Trpc1(-/-) and Trpc1(+/+) murine model to investigate the role of Trpc1 in myoblast differentiation and in muscle regeneration. In these models, we studied regeneration consecutive to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury and observed a significant hypotrophy and a delayed regeneration in Trpc1(-/-) muscles consisting in smaller fiber size and increased proportion of centrally nucleated fibers. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myf5, and myogenin and of one of their targets, the developmental MHC (MHCd). Consequently, muscle tension was systematically lower in muscles from Trpc1(-/-) mice. Importantly, the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway, which plays a crucial role in muscle growth and regeneration, was down-regulated in regenerating Trpc1(-/-) muscles. Indeed, phosphorylation of both Akt and p70S6K proteins was decreased as well as the activation of PI3K, the main upstream regulator of the Akt. This effect was independent of insulin-like growth factor expression. Akt phosphorylation also was reduced in Trpc1(-/-) primary myoblasts and in control myoblasts differentiated in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) or pretreated with EGTA-AM or wortmannin, suggesting that the entry of Ca(2+) through Trpc1 channels enhanced the activity of PI3K. Our results emphasize the involvement of Trpc1 channels in skeletal muscle development in vitro and in vivo, and identify a Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration.

  20. Improvement of maternal vitamin D status with 25-hydroxycholecalciferol positively impacts porcine fetal skeletal muscle development and myoblast activity.

    PubMed

    Hines, E A; Coffey, J D; Starkey, C W; Chung, T K; Starkey, J D

    2013-09-01

    There is little information available regarding the influence of maternal vitamin D status on fetal skeletal muscle development. Therefore, we investigated the effect of improved vitamin D status resulting from 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25OHD3) supplementation of dams on fetal skeletal muscle developmental characteristics and myoblast activity using Camborough 22 gilts (n = 40) randomly assigned to 1 of 2 corn-soybean meal-based diets. The control diet (CTL) contained 2,500 IU cholecalciferol (D3)/kg diet, whereas the experimental diet contained 500 IU D3/kg diet plus 50 µg 25OHD3/kg diet. Gilts were fed 2.7 kg of their assigned diet once daily beginning 43 d before breeding through d 90 of gestation. On gestational d 90 (± 1), fetal LM and semitendinosus muscle samples were collected for analysis of developmental characteristics and myoblast activity, respectively. No treatment difference was observed in fetal LM cross-sectional area (P = 0.25). Fetuses from 25OHD3-supplemented gilts had more LM fibers (P = 0.04) that tended to be smaller in cross-sectional area compared with CTL fetuses (P = 0.11). A numerical increase in the total number of Pax7+ myoblasts was also observed in fetuses from 25OHD3-supplemented gilts (P = 0.12). Myoblasts derived from the muscles of fetuses from 25OHD3-fed dams displayed an extended proliferative phase in culture compared with those from fetuses of dams fed only D3 (P < 0.0001). The combination of additional muscle fibers and Pax7+ myoblasts with prolonged proliferative capacity could enhance the postnatal skeletal muscle growth potential of fetuses from 25OHD3-supplemented gilts. These data highlight the importance of maternal vitamin D status on the development of fetal skeletal muscle.

  1. Intracellular Accumulation of Methylglyoxal by Glyoxalase 1 Knock Down Alters Collagen Homoeostasis in L6 Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, Bernd; Goldstein, Bernhard; Thornalley, Paul J; Rabbani, Naila; Tschoepe, Diethelm

    2017-02-23

    Hyperglycemia results in accumulation of the reactive dicarbonyl methylglyoxal (MG). Methylglyoxal is detoxified by the glyoxalase system (glyoxalase 1 and 2). The influence of glyoxalase 1 knockdown on expression of collagens 1, 3, 4, and 5 in L6 myoblasts under hyperglycemic conditions was investigated. Increased biosynthesis of collagens 1, 3, 4, and 5 was detected at mRNA-level following knockdown of glyoxalase 1 (GLO1). At the protein level a significant elevation of the concentration of collagen 1 and 4 was shown, whereas no increase of collagen 5 and a non-significant increase in collagen 3 were detectable. These results could partially explain MG-induced changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) which account for increased fibrosis and impaired function in myocytes. The mechanisms by which reactive glucose metabolites influence ECM composition deserve further investigation.

  2. Construction and Myogenic Differentiation of 3D Myoblast Tissues Fabricated by Fibronectin-Gelatin Nanofilm Coating

    PubMed Central

    Gribova, Varvara; Liu, Chen Yun; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Matsusaki, Michiya; Boudou, Thomas; Picart, Catherine; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a recently developed approach of coating the cells with fibronectin-gelatin nanofilms to build 3D skeletal muscle tissue models. We constructed the microtissues from C2C12 myoblasts and subsequently differentiated them to form muscle-like tissue. The thickness of the constructs could be successfully controlled by altering the number of seeded cells. We were able to build up to ~ 76 µm thick 3D constructs that formed multinucleated myotubes. We also found that Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632 improved myotube formation in thick constructs. Our approach makes it possible to rapidly form 3D muscle tissues and is promising for the in vitro construction of physiologically relevant human skeletal muscle tissue models. PMID:27125461

  3. Conductance-voltage relations in large-conductance chloride channels in proliferating L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Hurnák, O; Zachar, J

    1994-06-01

    Large-conductance chloride channels (maxi-Cl channels) were studied in cultured myoblasts (L6 rat muscle cell line); in excised (inside-out) and in cell attached membrane patches using a conventional patch clamp method. The incidence of maxi-Cl channels was substantially higher in proliferating myoballs, then in quiescent (bottom-attached) myoblasts (90% and 50% percent of examined cells, respectively). The maxi-Cl channels in myoballs were present both in cell attached and excised patches. The channel conductance at symmetric [Cl] = 150 mmol/l was 359 +/- 42 pS (n = 74) in quiescent cells and 439 +/- 10 pS (n = 6) in proliferating myoballs respectively. The conductance of the channel in quiescent cells increased with chloride concentration in symmetric NaCl rich solutions according to Michaelis-Menten curve with the saturation limiting conductance of about 640 pS (gmax) and Km = 112 mmol/l. The shift of the reversal potential upon increasing the pipette concentration of NaCl from 150 to 250 mmol/l was consistent with PNa/PCl = 0.1. Neither the conductance nor the activation of the channel were dependent on the presence of calcium ions. The bell-shaped steady state channel conductance-voltage relationship is asymmetric and can be fitted by two Boltzmann equations with different Vh and k constants; -25.6 mV and -6.8 mV, respectively, for the negative side and +49.6 mV and +13.7 mV for the positive side in quiescent cells. The corresponding values in proliferating myoballs were as follows: -15.5 mV and -2.4 mV, respectively, for the negative side and +31.4 mV and +6.8 mV for the positive side. From the maximum slopes of the Popen versus V curves an estimate was made of the charges for the gates that close at negative (3.5) or positive (1.7) potentials, respectively, in quiescent cells. The corresponding values in myoballs were 10.6 and 3.7, respectively. The probability of one gate to be open was dependent on the state of activation of the opposite gate as determined

  4. Influence of Capsaicin on Inflammatory Cytokines Induced by Lipopolysaccharide in Myoblast Cells Under In vitro Environment

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ke; Amna, Touseef; Amina, Musarat; Al-Musayeib, Nawal M.; Al-Deyab, Salem S.; Hwang, Inho

    2017-01-01

    Background: ellular damage initiated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the main cause of numerous severe diseases and therefore for this reason, the natural antioxidants have note worthy significance in human health. Capsaicin possesses noteworthy analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. It also possesses healing effects for treatment of arthritis, diabetic neuropathy, gastric lesions, and cardiac excitability that is why it is incorporated in creams and gels. Objective: The present study was carried out to estimate the in vitro antioxidant and ROS scavenging activities of capsaicin against muscle precursor cells. Till date, no investigation has been carried out to study the effect of capsaicin on myoblasts. Materials and methods: Herein, the cytotoxicity was induced by endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to analyze the effect of capsaicin on LPS induced inflammation and apoptosis on muscle cells. To find out the toxicity of endotoxin, myoblasts were exposed to different concentrations of LPS, viability and morphology was checkedby the means of CCK-8 test and microscopy, respectively. Apoptotic cell death was examined by fluorescence staining. Additionally, LPS-induced apoptosis was determined by mRNAexpression of calpain, caspase-3 and tumor necrosisfactor alpha (TNF-α), and were quantified by qRT-PCR. Results: The outcome of the presentstudy demonstrated that LPS stimulation generatestoxicity in dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatmentof myoblasts with capsaicin can considerably alleviate LPS-induced inflammation. Conclusion: In conclusion, this study indicates that dietetic supplementation of capsicum may help to alleviate/reduce the inflammatory effects and is therefore potent source of natural antioxidant agent which can be utilized to control muscle related diseases, such as myotube atrophy. SUMMARY In the present study cytotoxicity was induced by LPS to analyze the effect of capsaicin on LPS induced inflammation and apoptosis on muscle cells.The results of

  5. Skeletal muscle Kv7 (KCNQ) channels in myoblast differentiation and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Roura-Ferrer, Meritxell; Sole, Laura; Martinez-Marmol, Ramon; Villalonga, Nuria; Felipe, Antonio

    2008-05-16

    Voltage-dependent K{sup +} channels (Kv) are involved in myocyte proliferation and differentiation by triggering changes in membrane potential and regulating cell volume. Since Kv7 channels may participate in these events, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether skeletal muscle Kv7.1 and Kv7.5 were involved during proliferation and myogenesis. Here we report that, while myotube formation did not regulate Kv7 channels, Kv7.5 was up-regulated during cell cycle progression. Although, Kv7.1 mRNA also increased during the G{sub 1}-phase, pharmacological evidence mainly involves Kv7.5 in myoblast growth. Our results indicate that the cell cycle-dependent expression of Kv7.5 is involved in skeletal muscle cell proliferation.

  6. Altered expression of ganglioside GM3 molecular species and a potential regulatory role during myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Go, Shinji; Go, Shiori; Veillon, Lucas; Ciampa, Maria Grazia; Mauri, Laura; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken; Prinetti, Alessandro; Sonnino, Sandro; Inokuchi, Jin-Ichi

    2017-04-28

    Gangliosides (sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids) help regulate many important biological processes, including cell proliferation, signal transduction, and differentiation, via formation of functional microdomains in plasma membranes. The structural diversity of gangliosides arises from both the ceramide moiety and glycan portion. Recently, differing molecular species of a given ganglioside are suggested to have distinct biological properties and regulate specific and distinct biological events. Elucidation of the function of each molecular species is important and will provide new insights into ganglioside biology. Gangliosides are also suggested to be involved in skeletal muscle differentiation; however, the differential roles of ganglioside molecular species remain unclear. Here we describe striking changes in quantity and quality of gangliosides (particularly GM3) during differentiation of mouse C2C12 myoblast cells and key roles played by distinct GM3 molecular species at each step of the process. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. A defect in myoblast fusion underlies Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Connors, Samantha; Matsunami, Norisada; Cannavino, Jessica; Rose, Matthew F; Gilette, Nicole M; Artoni, Pietro; de Macena Sobreira, Nara Lygia; Chan, Wai-Man; Webb, Bryn D; Robson, Caroline D; Cheng, Long; Van Ryzin, Carol; Ramirez-Martinez, Andres; Mohassel, Payam; Leppert, Mark; Scholand, Mary Beth; Grunseich, Christopher; Ferreira, Carlos R; Hartman, Tyler; Hayes, Ian M; Morgan, Tim; Markie, David M; Fagiolini, Michela; Swift, Amy; Chines, Peter S; Speck-Martins, Carlos E; Collins, Francis S; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Olson, Eric N; Carey, John C; Robertson, Stephen P; Manoli, Irini; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2017-07-06

    Multinucleate cellular syncytial formation is a hallmark of skeletal muscle differentiation. Myomaker, encoded by Mymk (Tmem8c), is a well-conserved plasma membrane protein required for myoblast fusion to form multinucleated myotubes in mouse, chick, and zebrafish. Here, we report that autosomal recessive mutations in MYMK (OMIM 615345) cause Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome in humans (CFZS; OMIM 254940) by reducing but not eliminating MYMK function. We characterize MYMK-CFZS as a congenital myopathy with marked facial weakness and additional clinical and pathologic features that distinguish it from other congenital neuromuscular syndromes. We show that a heterologous cell fusion assay in vitro and allelic complementation experiments in mymk knockdown and mymk(insT/insT) zebrafish in vivo can differentiate between MYMK wild type, hypomorphic and null alleles. Collectively, these data establish that MYMK activity is necessary for normal muscle development and maintenance in humans, and expand the spectrum of congenital myopathies to include cell-cell fusion deficits.

  8. Construction and myogenic differentiation of 3D myoblast tissues fabricated by fibronectin-gelatin nanofilm coating.

    PubMed

    Gribova, Varvara; Liu, Chun-Yen; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Matsusaki, Michiya; Boudou, Thomas; Picart, Catherine; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-06-03

    In this study, we used a recently developed approach of coating the cells with fibronectin-gelatin nanofilms to build 3D skeletal muscle tissue models. We constructed the microtissues from C2C12 myoblasts and subsequently differentiated them to form muscle-like tissue. The thickness of the constructs could be successfully controlled by altering the number of seeded cells. We were able to build up to ∼76 μm thick 3D constructs that formed multinucleated myotubes. We also found that Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632 improved myotube formation in thick constructs. Our approach makes it possible to rapidly form 3D muscle tissues and is promising for the in vitro construction of physiologically relevant human skeletal muscle tissue models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rab8A regulates insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanbing; Ou, Liting; Fan, Jiannan; Xiao, Mei; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu; Sun, Yonghong; Xu, Yingke

    2017-02-01

    Rab proteins are important regulators of GLUT4 trafficking in muscle and adipose cells. It is still unclear which Rabs are involved in insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in C2C12 myoblasts. In this study, we detect the colocalization of Rab8A with GLUT4 and the presence of Rab8A at vesicle exocytic sites by TIRFM imaging. Overexpression of dominant-negative Rab8A (T22N) diminishes insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, while constitutively active Rab8A (Q67L) augments it. In addition, knockdown of Rab8A inhibits insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, which is rescued by replenishment of RNAi-resistant Rab8A. Together, these results indicate an indispensable role for Rab8A in insulin-regulated GLUT4 trafficking in C2C12 cells.

  10. Intracellular Accumulation of Methylglyoxal by Glyoxalase 1 Knock Down Alters Collagen Homoeostasis in L6 Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Bernd; Goldstein, Bernhard; Thornalley, Paul J.; Rabbani, Naila; Tschoepe, Diethelm

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia results in accumulation of the reactive dicarbonyl methylglyoxal (MG). Methylglyoxal is detoxified by the glyoxalase system (glyoxalase 1 and 2). The influence of glyoxalase 1 knockdown on expression of collagens 1, 3, 4, and 5 in L6 myoblasts under hyperglycemic conditions was investigated. Increased biosynthesis of collagens 1, 3, 4, and 5 was detected at mRNA-level following knockdown of glyoxalase 1 (GLO1). At the protein level a significant elevation of the concentration of collagen 1 and 4 was shown, whereas no increase of collagen 5 and a non-significant increase in collagen 3 were detectable. These results could partially explain MG-induced changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) which account for increased fibrosis and impaired function in myocytes. The mechanisms by which reactive glucose metabolites influence ECM composition deserve further investigation. PMID:28241483

  11. Enhanced Energetic State and Protection from Oxidative Stress in Human Myoblasts Overexpressing BMI1.

    PubMed

    Dibenedetto, Silvia; Niklison-Chirou, Maria; Cabrera, Claudia P; Ellis, Matthew; Robson, Lesley G; Knopp, Paul; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Ragazzi, Martina; Di Foggia, Valentina; Barnes, Michael R; Radunovic, Aleksandar; Marino, Silvia

    2017-08-08

    The Polycomb group gene BMI1 is essential for efficient muscle regeneration in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and its enhanced expression in adult skeletal muscle satellite cells ameliorates the muscle strength in this model. Here, we show that the impact of mild BMI1 overexpression observed in mouse models is translatable to human cells. In human myoblasts, BMI1 overexpression increases mitochondrial activity, leading to an enhanced energetic state with increased ATP production and concomitant protection against DNA damage both in vitro and upon xenografting in a severe dystrophic mouse model. These preclinical data in mouse models and human cells provide a strong rationale for the development of pharmacological approaches to target BMI1-mediated mitochondrial regulation and protection from DNA damage to sustain the regenerative potential of the skeletal muscle in conditions of chronic muscle wasting. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Necdin mediates skeletal muscle regeneration by promoting myoblast survival and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Deponti, Daniela; François, Stéphanie; Baesso, Silvia; Sciorati, Clara; Innocenzi, Anna; Broccoli, Vania; Muscatelli, Françoise; Meneveri, Raffaella; Clementi, Emilio; Cossu, Giulio; Brunelli, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Regeneration of muscle fibers that are lost during pathological muscle degeneration or after injuries is sustained by the production of new myofibers. An important cell type involved in muscle regeneration is the satellite cell. Necdin is a protein expressed in satellite cell–derived myogenic precursors during perinatal growth. However, its function in myogenesis is not known. We compare transgenic mice that overexpress necdin in skeletal muscle with both wild-type and necdin null mice. After muscle injury the necdin null mice show a considerable defect in muscle healing, whereas mice that overexpress necdin show a substantial increase in myofiber regeneration. We also find that in muscle, necdin increases myogenin expression, accelerates differentiation, and counteracts myoblast apoptosis. Collectively, these data clarify the function and mechanism of necdin in skeletal muscle and show the importance of necdin in muscle regeneration. PMID:17954612

  13. Rb1 gene inactivation expands satellite cell and postnatal myoblast pools.

    PubMed

    Hosoyama, Tohru; Nishijo, Koichi; Prajapati, Suresh I; Li, Guangheng; Keller, Charles

    2011-06-03

    Satellite cells are well known as a postnatal skeletal muscle stem cell reservoir that under injury conditions participate in repair. However, mechanisms controlling satellite cell quiescence and activation are the topic of ongoing inquiry by many laboratories. In this study, we investigated whether loss of the cell cycle regulatory factor, pRb, is associated with the re-entry of quiescent satellite cells into replication and subsequent stem cell expansion. By ablation of Rb1 using a Pax7CreER,Rb1 conditional mouse line, satellite cell number was increased 5-fold over 6 months. Furthermore, myoblasts originating from satellite cells lacking Rb1 were also increased 3-fold over 6 months, while terminal differentiation was greatly diminished. Similarly, Pax7CreER,Rb1 mice exhibited muscle fiber hypotrophy in vivo under steady state conditions as well as a delay of muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin-mediated injury. These results suggest that cell cycle re-entry of quiescent satellite cells is accelerated by lack of Rb1, resulting in the expansion of both satellite cells and their progeny in adolescent muscle. Conversely, that sustained Rb1 loss in the satellite cell lineage causes a deficit of muscle fiber formation. However, we also show that pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 activity, which will result in pRb inactivation accelerates satellite cell activation and/or expansion in a transient manner. Together, our results raise the possibility that reversible pRb inactivation in satellite cells and inhibition of protein phosphorylation may provide a new therapeutic tool for muscle atrophy by short term expansion of the muscle stem cells and myoblast pool.

  14. Automated drug screening with contractile muscle tissue engineered from dystrophic myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vandenburgh, Herman; Shansky, Janet; Benesch-Lee, Frank; Skelly, Kirsten; Spinazzola, Janelle M.; Saponjian, Yero; Tseng, Brian S.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of factors that improve muscle function in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) could lead to an improved quality of life. To establish a functional in vitro assay for muscle strength, mdx murine myoblasts, the genetic homologue of DMD, were tissue engineered in 96-microwell plates into 3-dimensional muscle constructs with parallel arrays of striated muscle fibers. When electrically stimulated, they generated tetanic forces measured with an automated motion tracking system. Thirty-one compounds of interest as potential treatments for patients with DMD were tested at 3 to 6 concentrations. Eleven of the compounds (insulin-like growth factor-1, creatine, β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate, trichostatin A, lisinopril, and 6 from the glucocorticoid family) significantly increased tetanic force relative to placebo-treated controls. The glucocorticoids methylprednisolone, deflazacort, and prednisone increased tetanic forces at low doses (EC50 of 6, 19, and 56 nM, respectively), indicating a direct muscle mechanism by which they may be benefitting DMD patients. The tetanic force assay also identified beneficial compound interactions (arginine plus deflazacort and prednisone plus creatine) as well as deleterious interactions (prednisone plus creatine inhibited by pentoxifylline) of combinatorial therapies taken by some DMD patients. Since mdx muscle in vivo and DMD patients respond in a similar manner to many of these compounds, the in vitro assay will be a useful tool for the rapid identification of new potential treatments for muscle weakness in DMD and other muscle disorders.—Vandenburgh, H., Shansky, J., Benesch-Lee, F., Skelly, K., Spinazzola, J.M., Saponjian, Y., Tseng, B.S. Automated drug screening with contractile muscle tissue engineered from dystrophic myoblasts. PMID:19487307

  15. Preparation of Primary Myogenic Precursor Cell/Myoblast Cultures from Basal Vertebrate Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Froehlich, Jacob Michael; Seiliez, Iban; Gabillard, Jean-Charles; Biga, Peggy R.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the inherent difficulty and time involved with studying the myogenic program in vivo, primary culture systems derived from the resident adult stem cells of skeletal muscle, the myogenic precursor cells (MPCs), have proven indispensible to our understanding of mammalian skeletal muscle development and growth. Particularly among the basal taxa of Vertebrata, however, data are limited describing the molecular mechanisms controlling the self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation of MPCs. Of particular interest are potential mechanisms that underlie the ability of basal vertebrates to undergo considerable postlarval skeletal myofiber hyperplasia (i.e. teleost fish) and full regeneration following appendage loss (i.e. urodele amphibians). Additionally, the use of cultured myoblasts could aid in the understanding of regeneration and the recapitulation of the myogenic program and the differences between them. To this end, we describe in detail a robust and efficient protocol (and variations therein) for isolating and maintaining MPCs and their progeny, myoblasts and immature myotubes, in cell culture as a platform for understanding the evolution of the myogenic program, beginning with the more basal vertebrates. Capitalizing on the model organism status of the zebrafish (Danio rerio), we report on the application of this protocol to small fishes of the cyprinid clade Danioninae. In tandem, this protocol can be utilized to realize a broader comparative approach by isolating MPCs from the Mexican axolotl (Ambystomamexicanum) and even laboratory rodents. This protocol is now widely used in studying myogenesis in several fish species, including rainbow trout, salmon, and sea bream1-4. PMID:24835774

  16. Methylglyoxal impairs GLUT4 trafficking and leads to increased glucose uptake in L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, B; Mattern, Y; Scheibler, S; Tschoepe, D; Gawlowski, T; Stratmann, B

    2014-02-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a highly reactive dicarbonyl compound derived mainly from glucose degradation pathways, but also from protein and fatty acid metabolism. MG modifies structure and function of different biomolecules and thus plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Hyperglycemia-associated accumulation of MG might be associated with generation of oxidative stress and subsequently insulin resistance. Therefore, the effects of MG on insulin signaling and on translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) were investigated in the rat skeletal muscle cell line L6-GLUT4myc stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4. Twenty four-hour MG treatment resulted in elevated GLUT4 presentation on the surface of L6 myoblasts and in an increased uptake of glucose even without insulin stimulation. Exogenously added MG neither effected IRS-1 expression nor IRS-1 phosphorylation. A decreased expression of Akt1 but not Akt2 and concomitantly increased apoptosis were detected following MG treatment. To exclude that oxidative stress caused by MG treatment leads to increased GLUT4 translocation, effects of pretreatment with 2 antioxidants were investigated. The antioxidant and MG scavenger NAC prevented the MG-induced GLUT4 translocation. In contrast, tiron, a well-known antioxidant that does not exert MG-scavenger function, had no impact on MG-induced GLUT4 translocation supporting the hypothesis of a direct effect of MG on GLUT4 trafficking. In conclusion, prolonged treatment with MG augments GLUT4 level on the surface of L6 myoblasts, at least in part through a higher translocation of GLUT4 from the intracellular compartment as well as a reduction of GLUT4 internalization, resulting in increased glucose uptake.

  17. Gene Expression Profiling of H9c2 Myoblast Differentiation towards a Cardiac-Like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Ana F.; Pereira, Susana P.; Gonzalez, Susana; Gusev, Oleg; Rizvanov, Albert A.; Oliveira, Paulo J.

    2015-01-01

    H9c2 myoblasts are a cell model used as an alternative for cardiomyocytes. H9c2 cells have the ability to differentiate towards a cardiac phenotype when the media serum is reduced in the presence of all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), creating multinucleated cells with low proliferative capacity. In the present study, we performed for the first time a transcriptional analysis of the H9c2 cell line in two differentiation states, i.e. embryonic cells and differentiated cardiac-like cells. The results show that RA-induced H9c2 differentiation increased the expression of genes encoding for cardiac sarcomeric proteins such as troponin T, or calcium transporters and associated machinery, including SERCA2, ryanodine receptor and phospholamban as well as genes associated with mitochondrial energy production including respiratory chain complexes subunits, mitochondrial creatine kinase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and uncoupling proteins. Undifferentiated myoblasts showed increased gene expression of pro-survival proteins such as Bcl-2 as well as cell cycle-regulating proteins. The results indicate that the differentiation of H9c2 cells lead to an increase of transcripts and protein levels involved in calcium handling, glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, confirming that H9c2 cell differentiation induced by RA towards a more cardiac-like phenotype involves remodeled mitochondrial function. PI3K, PDK1 and p-CREB also appear to be involved on H9c2 differentiation. Furthermore, complex analysis of differently expressed transcripts revealed significant up-regulation of gene expression related to cardiac muscle contraction, dilated cardiomyopathy and other pathways specific for the cardiac tissue. Metabolic and gene expression remodeling impacts cell responses to different stimuli and determine how these cells are used for biochemical assays. PMID:26121149

  18. Fad24, a Positive Regulator of Adipogenesis, Is Required for S Phase Re-entry of C2C12 Myoblasts Arrested in G0 Phase and Involved in p27(Kip1) Expression at the Protein Level.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Natsuki; Nishizuka, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    Factor for adipocyte differentiation 24 (fad24) is a positive regulator of adipogenesis. We previously found that human fad24 is abundantly expressed in skeletal muscle. However, the function of fad24 in skeletal muscle remains largely unknown. Because skeletal muscle is a highly regenerative tissue, we focused on the function of fad24 in skeletal muscle regeneration. In this paper, we investigated the role of fad24 in the cell cycle re-entry of quiescent C2C12 myoblasts-mimicked satellite cells. The expression levels of fad24 and histone acetyltransferase binding to ORC1 (hbo1), a FAD24-interacting factor, were elevated at the early phase of the regeneration process in response to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury. The knockdown of fad24 inhibited the proliferation of quiescent myoblasts, whereas fad24 knockdown did not affect differentiation. S phase entry following serum activation is abrogated by fad24 knockdown in quiescent cells. Furthermore, fad24 knockdown cells show a marked accumulation of p27(Kip1) protein. These results suggest that fad24 may have an important role in the S phase re-entry of quiescent C2C12 cells through the regulation of p27(Kip1) at the protein level.

  19. Stem cell antigen-1 regulates the tempo of muscle repair through effects on proliferation of {alpha}7 integrin-expressing myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Epting, Conrad L.; Lopez, Javier E.; Pedersen, Anissa; Brown, Courtney; Spitz, Paul; Ursell, Philip C.; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2008-03-10

    Skeletal muscle repair occurs through a programmed series of events including myogenic precursor activation, myoblast proliferation, and differentiation into new myofibers. We previously identified a role for Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) in myoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro. We demonstrated that blocking Sca-1 expression resulted in sustained myoblast cell division. Others have since demonstrated that Sca-1-null myoblasts display a similar phenotype when cultured ex vivo. To test the importance of Sca-1 during myogenesis in vivo, we employed a myonecrotic injury model in Sca-1{sup -/-} and Sca-1{sup +/+} mice. Our results demonstrate that Sca-1{sup -/-} myoblasts exhibit a hyperproliferative response consisting of prolonged and accelerated cell division in response to injury. This leads to delayed myogenic differentiation and muscle repair. These data provide the first in vivo evidence for Sca-1 as a regulator of myoblast proliferation during muscle regeneration. These studies also suggest that the balance between myogenic precursor proliferation and differentiation is critical to normal muscle repair.

  20. Involvement of tyrosine phosphorylation in HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor-induced cell death in L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, T; Kumano, T; Nakagawa, H; Kuriyama, M

    1999-02-05

    Our previous studies have shown that the HMG-CoA reductase (HCR) inhibitor (HCRI), simvastatin, causes myopathy in rabbits and kills L6 myoblasts. The present study was designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HCRI-induced cell death. We have demonstrated that simvastatin induces the tyrosine phosphorylation of several cellular proteins within 10 min. These phosphorylations were followed by apoptosis, as evidenced by the occurrence of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and by morphological changes detected with Nomarski optics. Simvastatin-induced cell death was prevented by tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The MTT assay revealed that the addition of mevalonic acid into the culture medium partially inhibited simvastatin-induced cell death. Thus, these results suggested that protein tyrosine phosphorylation might play an important role in the intracellular signal transduction pathway mediating the HCRI-induced death of myoblasts.

  1. Genetic Evidence That Captured Retroviral Envelope syncytins Contribute to Myoblast Fusion and Muscle Sexual Dimorphism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vernochet, Cécile; Mariot, Virginie; Gache, Vincent; Charrin, Stéphanie; Tiret, Laurent; Dumonceaux, Julie; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Syncytins are envelope genes from endogenous retroviruses, “captured” for a role in placentation. They mediate cell-cell fusion, resulting in the formation of a syncytium (the syncytiotrophoblast) at the fetomaternal interface. These genes have been found in all placental mammals in which they have been searched for. Cell-cell fusion is also pivotal for muscle fiber formation and repair, where the myotubes are formed from the fusion of mononucleated myoblasts into large multinucleated structures. Here we show, taking advantage of mice knocked out for syncytins, that these captured genes contribute to myoblast fusion, with a >20% reduction in muscle mass, mean muscle fiber area and number of nuclei per fiber in knocked out mice for one of the two murine syncytin genes. Remarkably, this reduction is only observed in males, which subsequently show muscle quantitative traits more similar to those of females. In addition, we show that syncytins also contribute to muscle repair after cardiotoxin-induced injury, with again a male-specific effect on the rate and extent of regeneration. Finally, ex vivo experiments carried out on murine myoblasts demonstrate the direct involvement of syncytins in fusion, with a >40% reduction in fusion index upon addition of siRNA against both syncytins. Importantly, similar effects are observed with primary myoblasts from sheep, dog and human, with a 20–40% reduction upon addition of siRNA against the corresponding syncytins. Altogether, these results show a direct contribution of the fusogenic syncytins to myogenesis, with a demonstrated male-dependence of the effect in mice, suggesting that these captured genes could be responsible for the muscle sexual dimorphism observed in placental mammals. PMID:27589388

  2. Space shuttle flight (STS-45) of L8 myoblast cells results in the isolation of a nonfusing cell line variant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulesh, D. A.; Anderson, L. H.; Wilson, B.; Otis, E. J.; Elgin, D. M.; Barker, M. J.; Mehm, W. J.; Kearney, G. P.

    1994-01-01

    Myoblast cell cultures have been widely employed in conventional (1g) studies of biological processes because characteristics of intact muscle can be readily observed in these cultured cells. We decided to investigate the effects of spaceflight on muscle by utilizing a well characterized myoblast cell line (L8 rat myoblasts) as cultured in the recently designed Space Tissue Loss Flight Module "A" (STL-A). The STL-A is a "state of the art," compact, fully contained, automated cell culture apparatus which replaces a single mid-deck locker on the Space Shuttle. The L8 cells were successfully flown in the STL-A on the Space Shuttle STS-45 mission. Upon return to earth, reculturing of these spaceflown L8 cells (L8SF) resulted in their unexpected failure to fuse and differentiate into myotubes. This inability of the L8SF cells to fuse was found to be a permanent phenotypic alteration. Scanning electron microscopic examination of L8SF cells growing at 1g on fibronectin-coated polypropylene fibers exhibited a strikingly different morphology as compared to control cells. In addition to their failure to fuse into myotubes, L8SF cells also piled up on top of each other. When assayed in fusion-promoting soft agar, L8SF cells gave rise to substantially more and larger colonies than did either preflight (L8AT) or ground control (L8GC) cells. All data to this point indicate that flying L8 rat myoblasts on the Space Shuttle for a duration of 7-10 d at subconfluent densities results in several permanent phenotypic alterations in these cells.

  3. Six1 induces protein synthesis signaling expression in duck myoblasts mainly via up-regulation of mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haohan; Li, Xinxin; Liu, Hehe; Sun, Lingli; Zhang, Rongping; Li, Liang; Wangding, Mincheng; Wang, Jiwen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As a critical transcription factor, Six1 plays an important role in the regulation of myogenesis and muscle development. However, little is known about its regulatory mechanism associated with muscular protein synthesis. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of overexpression ofSix1 on the expression of key protein metabolism-related genes in duck myoblasts. Through an experimental model where duck myoblasts were transfected with a pEGFP-duSix1 construct, we found that overexpression of duckSix1 could enhance cell proliferation activity and increase mRNA expression levels of key genes involved in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, while the expression of FOXO1, MuRF1and MAFbx was not significantly altered, indicating thatSix1 could promote protein synthesis in myoblasts through up-regulating the expression of several related genes. Additionally, in duck myoblasts treated with LY294002 and rapamycin, the specific inhibitors ofPI3K and mTOR, respectively, the overexpression of Six1 could significantly ameliorate inhibitive effects of these inhibitors on protein synthesis. Especially, the mRNA expression levels of mTOR and S6K1 were observed to undergo a visible change, and a significant increase in protein expression of S6K1 was seen. These data suggested that Six1plays an important role in protein synthesis, which may be mainly due to activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27007909

  4. S100B protein regulates myoblast proliferation and differentiation by activating FGFR1 in a bFGF-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Riuzzi, Francesca; Sorci, Guglielmo; Donato, Rosario

    2011-07-15

    S100B protein has been shown to exert anti-myogenic and mitogenic effects in myoblast cultures through inhibition of the myogenic p38 MAPK and activation of the mitogenic ERK1/2. However, the receptor mediating these effects had not been identified. Here, we show that S100B increases and/or stabilizes the binding of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to bFGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) by interacting with bFGF, thereby enhancing FGFR1 activation and the mitogenic and anti-myogenic effects of FGFR1. S100B also binds to its canonical receptor RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end-products), a multi-ligand receptor previously shown to transduce a pro-myogenic signal when activated by HMGB1, and recruits RAGE into a RAGE-S100B-bFGF-FGFR1 complex. However, when bound to S100B-bFGF-FGFR1, RAGE can no longer stimulate myogenic differentiation, whereas in the absence of either bFGF or FGFR1, binding of S100B to RAGE results in stimulation of RAGE anti-mitogenic and promyogenic signaling. An S100B-bFGF-FGFR1 complex also forms in Rage(-/-) myoblasts, leading to enhanced proliferation and reduced differentiation, which points to a dispensability of RAGE for the inhibitory effects of S100B on myoblasts under the present experimental conditions. These results reveal a new S100B-interacting protein - bFGF - in the extracellular milieu and suggest that S100B stimulates myoblast proliferation and inhibits myogenic differentiation by activating FGFR1 in a bFGF-dependent manner.

  5. Space shuttle flight (STS-45) of L8 myoblast cells results in the isolation of a nonfusing cell line variant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulesh, D. A.; Anderson, L. H.; Wilson, B.; Otis, E. J.; Elgin, D. M.; Barker, M. J.; Mehm, W. J.; Kearney, G. P.

    1994-01-01

    Myoblast cell cultures have been widely employed in conventional (1g) studies of biological processes because characteristics of intact muscle can be readily observed in these cultured cells. We decided to investigate the effects of spaceflight on muscle by utilizing a well characterized myoblast cell line (L8 rat myoblasts) as cultured in the recently designed Space Tissue Loss Flight Module "A" (STL-A). The STL-A is a "state of the art," compact, fully contained, automated cell culture apparatus which replaces a single mid-deck locker on the Space Shuttle. The L8 cells were successfully flown in the STL-A on the Space Shuttle STS-45 mission. Upon return to earth, reculturing of these spaceflown L8 cells (L8SF) resulted in their unexpected failure to fuse and differentiate into myotubes. This inability of the L8SF cells to fuse was found to be a permanent phenotypic alteration. Scanning electron microscopic examination of L8SF cells growing at 1g on fibronectin-coated polypropylene fibers exhibited a strikingly different morphology as compared to control cells. In addition to their failure to fuse into myotubes, L8SF cells also piled up on top of each other. When assayed in fusion-promoting soft agar, L8SF cells gave rise to substantially more and larger colonies than did either preflight (L8AT) or ground control (L8GC) cells. All data to this point indicate that flying L8 rat myoblasts on the Space Shuttle for a duration of 7-10 d at subconfluent densities results in several permanent phenotypic alterations in these cells.

  6. An exploration of the antioxidant effects of garlic saponins in mouse-derived C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji Sook; Kim, Sung Ok; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung Woo; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Wun-Jae; Kim, Cheol Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to confirm the protective effects of garlic saponins against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage and to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms in mouse-derived C2C12 myoblasts. Relative cell viability was determined by 3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2.5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Comet assay was used to measure DNA damage and oxidative stress was determined using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate to measure intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Western blot analysis and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based knockdown were used in order to investigate the possible molecular mechanisms. Our results revealed that garlic saponins prevented hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth inhibition and exhibited scavenging activity against intracellular ROS. We also observed that garlic saponins prevented H2O2-induced comet tail formation and decreased the phosphorylation levels of γH2AX expression, suggesting that they can prevent H2O2-induced DNA damage. In addition, garlic saponins increased the levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent antioxidant enzyme associated with the induction and phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and the translocation of Nrf2 from the cytosol into the nucleus. However, the protective effects of garlic saponins on H2O2-induced ROS generation and growth inhibition were significantly reduced by zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, an HO-1 competitive inhibitor. In addition, the potential of garlic saponins to mediate HO-1 induction and protect against H2O2‑mediated growth inhibition was adversely affected by transient transfection with Nrf2-specific siRNA. Garlic saponins activated extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) signaling, whereas a specific ERK inhibitor was able to inhibit HO-1 upregulation, as well as Nrf2 induction and phosphorylation. Taken together, the findings of our study suggest that garlic saponins activate the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway by enabling

  7. Store-operated calcium entry contributes to abnormal Ca²⁺ signalling in dystrophic mdx mouse myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Onopiuk, Marta; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Young, Christopher; Krasowska, Elżbieta; Róg, Justyna; Ritso, Morten; Wojciechowska, Sylwia; Arkle, Stephen; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Górecki, Dariusz C

    2015-03-01

    Sarcolemma damage and activation of various calcium channels are implicated in altered Ca(2+) homeostasis in muscle fibres of both Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) sufferers and in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Previously we have demonstrated that also in mdx myoblasts extracellular nucleotides trigger elevated cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentrations due to alterations of both ionotropic and metabotropic purinergic receptors. Here we extend these findings to show that the mdx mutation is associated with enhanced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Substantially increased rate of SOCE in mdx myoblasts in comparison to that in control cells correlated with significantly elevated STIM1 protein levels. These results reveal that mutation in the dystrophin-encoding Dmd gene may significantly impact cellular calcium response to metabotropic stimulation involving depletion of the intracellular calcium stores followed by activation of the store-operated calcium entry, as early as in undifferentiated myoblasts. These data are in agreement with the increasing number of reports showing that the dystrophic pathology resulting from dystrophin mutations may be developmentally regulated. Moreover, our results showing that aberrant responses to extracellular stimuli may contribute to DMD pathogenesis suggest that treatments inhibiting such responses might alter progression of this lethal disease.

  8. Shengmai-san enhances antioxidant potential in C2C12 myoblasts through the induction of intracellular glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Haruyo; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2007-12-01

    Cellular and tissue injury associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been reported in many kinds of disorders. While the antioxidant enzymes play critical roles in inhibiting the ROS-mediated injury, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) is scavenging hydroperoxides including H(2)O(2). We previously reported that Shengmai-san (SMS), a traditional Chinese medicine, prevented ischemia/reperfusion injury of the brain and other organs in rats. To clarify the effect of SMS on intracellular responses of muscle cells against oxidative stress, C2C12 myoblasts were subjected to H(2)O(2) abuse. SMS pre-incubation prevented the decreasing cell viability after H(2)O(2) treatment. The accumulations of cellular protein carbonyl associated with apoptotic cell death were also inhibited by the SMS pre-incubation prior to oxidative damage induction. At the same time, enhanced activity, protein, and mRNA expression levels of GPx were observed in cells pre-incubated with SMS prior to H(2)O(2) abuse. Moreover, intracellular GSH was subsequently decreased after H(2)O(2) treatment. These findings suggest that SMS improved the antioxidant capacity against acute oxidative stress through the constitutive enhancement of GPx expression in C2C12 myoblasts. Because of its antioxidative property, SMS might be useful not only for the oxidative damage associated diseases but also for the transplantation of myoblasts into muscular dystrophy patients.

  9. Cellular metabolic rates in cultured primary dermal fibroblasts and myoblast cells from fast-growing and control Coturnix quail.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Cooper-Mullin, Clara; Anthony, Nicholas B; Williams, Joseph B

    2014-05-01

    Fibroblast cells have been extensively used in research, including in medicine, physiology, physiological-ecology, and conservation biology. However, whether the physiology of fibroblasts reflects the physiology of other cell types in the same animal is unknown. Dermal fibroblasts are responsible for generating connective tissue and involved in wound healing, but generally, this cell type is thought to be metabolically inactive until it is required at the site of tissue damage. Thus, one might question whether fibroblasts are a representative model system to portray the metabolic profile of the whole organism, as compared with cells isolated from other tissues, like muscle, brain or kidneys. To explore whether fibroblasts have the same metabolic profile as do myoblast cells, we cultured cells from day-old chicks of quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) selected for fast-growth or normal growth (our control group). Our results suggest that isolated primary fibroblasts and myoblast cells had higher rates of glycolysis, oxygen consumption and more mitochondria in the fast-growing line than in the control line. Our findings lend support for the idea that fibroblasts are a representative cell system to characterize the whole organism metabolic signature at the cellular-level. These data are striking, however, because fibroblasts had higher rates of metabolism for every parameter measured than myoblast cells isolated from the same individuals.

  10. Proinflammatory Macrophages Enhance the Regenerative Capacity of Human Myoblasts by Modifying Their Kinetics of Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bencze, Maximilien; Negroni, Elisa; Vallese, Denis; Yacoub–Youssef, Houda; Chaouch, Soraya; Wolff, Annie; Aamiri, Ahmed; Di Santo, James P; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Savino, Wilson; Mouly, Vincent; Riederer, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages have been shown to be essential for muscle repair by delivering trophic cues to growing skeletal muscle precursors and young fibers. Here, we investigated whether human macrophages, either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory, coinjected with human myoblasts into regenerating muscle of Rag2−/− γC−/− immunodeficient mice, could modify in vivo the kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of the transplanted human myogenic precursors. Our results clearly show that proinflammatory macrophages improve in vivo the participation of injected myoblasts to host muscle regeneration, extending the window of proliferation, increasing migration, and delaying differentiation. Interestingly, immunostaining of transplanted proinflammatory macrophages at different time points strongly suggests that these cells are able to switch to an anti-inflammatory phenotype in vivo, which then may stimulate differentiation during muscle regeneration. Conceptually, our data provide for the first time in vivo evidence strongly suggesting that proinflammatory macrophages play a supportive role in the regulation of myoblast behavior after transplantation into preinjured muscle, and could thus potentially optimize transplantation of myogenic progenitors in the context of cell therapy. PMID:23070116

  11. Proinflammatory macrophages enhance the regenerative capacity of human myoblasts by modifying their kinetics of proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bencze, Maximilien; Negroni, Elisa; Vallese, Denis; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Chaouch, Soraya; Wolff, Annie; Aamiri, Ahmed; Di Santo, James P; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Savino, Wilson; Mouly, Vincent; Riederer, Ingo

    2012-11-01

    Macrophages have been shown to be essential for muscle repair by delivering trophic cues to growing skeletal muscle precursors and young fibers. Here, we investigated whether human macrophages, either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory, coinjected with human myoblasts into regenerating muscle of Rag2(-/-) γC(-/-) immunodeficient mice, could modify in vivo the kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of the transplanted human myogenic precursors. Our results clearly show that proinflammatory macrophages improve in vivo the participation of injected myoblasts to host muscle regeneration, extending the window of proliferation, increasing migration, and delaying differentiation. Interestingly, immunostaining of transplanted proinflammatory macrophages at different time points strongly suggests that these cells are able to switch to an anti-inflammatory phenotype in vivo, which then may stimulate differentiation during muscle regeneration. Conceptually, our data provide for the first time in vivo evidence strongly suggesting that proinflammatory macrophages play a supportive role in the regulation of myoblast behavior after transplantation into preinjured muscle, and could thus potentially optimize transplantation of myogenic progenitors in the context of cell therapy.

  12. Cellular responses to H(2)O(2) and bleomycin-induced oxidative stress in L6C5 rat myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Caporossi, Daniela; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Pittaluga, Monica; Savini, Isabella; Farace, Maria Giulia

    2003-12-01

    In muscle cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continually generated. It is believed that these molecules have a well-established role as physiological modulators of skeletal muscle functions, ranging from development to metabolism and from blood flow to contractile functions. Moreover, ROS may contribute to the development of muscle fatigue, inflammation, and degeneration, and may be implicated in many muscle diseases. The aim of the present study was to verify the role of short or prolonged exposure to oxidative stress, generated by different concentrations of H(2)O(2), on growth, chromosomal aberrations, and apoptosis induced in cultured L6C5 rat muscle cells used as model for myoblasts. Our results indicate that, in L6C5 cells, reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) can activate distinct cell pathways leading to cell growth induction and development of resistant phenotype, or to chromosomal aberrations, cell cycle arrest, or cell death. The positive vs. negative effects of H(2)O(2)-altered redox potential in myoblasts are strictly related to the intensity of oxidative stress, likely depending on the types and number of cellular targets involved. Among these, DNA molecules appear to be very sensitive to breakage by H(2)O(2), although DNA damage is not directly responsible for ROI-induced apoptosis in L6C5 rat myoblasts.

  13. Role of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) on tenocytes and myoblasts-potential application for treating rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengyao; Lee, Carlin; Laron, Dominique; Zhang, Nianli; Waldorff, Erik I; Ryaby, James T; Feeley, Brian; Liu, Xuhui

    2017-05-01

    The post-surgery integrity of the tendons and muscle quality are the two major factors in success of rotator cuff (RC) repair. Though surgical techniques for rotator cuff repair have significantly improved in the past two decades, there are no effective treatments to improve tendon-to-bone healing and muscle quality after repair at this point in time. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have previously been used for promoting fracture healing. Previous studies have shown that PEMF has a positive role in promoting osteoblast precursors proliferation and differentiation. However, PEMFs effect on tenocytes and muscle cells has not been determined fully yet. The purpose of this study is to define the role of a commercially available PEMF on tenocytes and myoblasts growth and differentiation in vitro. Human rotator cuff tenocytes and C2C12 murine myoblasts were cultured and treated with PEMF for 2 weeks under regular and inflammatory conditions. Our results showed that 2 weeks treatment of PEMF enhanced gene expressions of growth factors in human rotator cuff tenocytes under inflammatory conditions. PEMF significantly enhanced C2C12 myotube formation under normal and inflammatory conditions. Results from this study suggest that PEMF has a positive role in promoting tenocyte gene expression and myoblast differentiation. Therefore, PEMF may potentially serve as a non-operative treatment to improve clinical incomes rotator cuff tendon repairs. Results © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:956-964, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. An siRNA-based screen in C2C12 myoblasts identifies novel genes involved in myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Alwan, Rayan; Bruel, Ange-Line; Da Silva, Anne; Blanquet, Véronique; Bouhouche, Khaled

    2017-10-01

    Myogenesis is a highly regulated multi-step process involving myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Although studies over the last decades have identified several factors governing these distinct major phases, many of them are not yet known. In order to identify novel genes, we took advantage of the C2C12 myoblastic line to establish a functional siRNA screen combined with quantitative-imaging analysis of a large amount of differentiated myoblasts. We knocked down 100 preselected mouse genes without a previously characterized role in muscle. Using image analysis, we tracked gene-silencing phenotypes by quantitative assessment of cellular density, myotube quantity, myotube morphology and fusion index. Our results have revealed six genes involved in both stages of C2C12 myogenesis and 13 genes specific to the differentiation stage. These findings prove that our RNAi-based screen could be an efficient tool to detect clear and subtle phenotypes allowing the identification of new myogenic regulators in mammals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Photobiomodulation Protects and Promotes Differentiation of C2C12 Myoblast Cells Exposed to Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Aline; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Cogo, José Carlos; Zamuner, Stella Regina

    2016-01-01

    Background Snakebites is a neglected disease and in Brazil is considered a serious health problem, with the majority of the snakebites caused by the genus Bothrops. Antivenom therapy and other first-aid treatments do not reverse local myonecrose which is the main sequel caused by the envenomation. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of low level laser (LLL) therapy in reducing local myonecrosis induced by Bothropic venoms, however the mechanism involved in this effect is unknown. In this in vitro study, we aimed to analyze the effect of LLL irradiation against cytotoxicity induced by Bothrops jararacussu venom on myoblast C2C12 cells. Methodology C2C12 were utilized as a model target and were incubated with B. jararacussu venom (12.5 μg/mL) and immediately irradiated with LLL at wavelength of red 685 nm or infrared 830 nm with energy density of 2.0, 4.6 and 7.0 J/cm2. Effects of LLL on cellular responses of venom-induced cytotoxicity were examined, including cell viability, measurement of cell damage and intra and extracellular ATP levels, expression of myogenic regulatory factors, as well as cellular differentiation. Results In non-irradiated cells, the venom caused a decrease in cell viability and a massive release of LDH and CK levels indicating myonecrosis. Infrared and red laser at all energy densities were able to considerably decrease venom-induced cytotoxicity. Laser irradiation induced myoblasts to differentiate into myotubes and this effect was accompanied by up regulation of MyoD and specially myogenin. Moreover, LLL was able to reduce the extracellular while increased the intracellular ATP content after venom exposure. In addition, no difference in the intensity of cytotoxicity was shown by non-irradiated and irradiated venom. Conclusion LLL irradiation caused a protective effect on C2C12 cells against the cytotoxicity caused by B. jararacussu venom and promotes differentiation of these cells by up regulation of myogenic factors. A modulatory

  16. Shaping leg muscles in Drosophila: role of ladybird, a conserved regulator of appendicular myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Tariq; Soler, Cedric; Jagla, Teresa; Daczewska, Malgorzata; Lodha, Neha; Palliyil, Sudhir; VijayRaghavan, K; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2006-12-27

    Legs are locomotor appendages used by a variety of evolutionarily distant vertebrates and invertebrates. The primary biological leg function, locomotion, requires the formation of a specialised appendicular musculature. Here we report evidence that ladybird, an orthologue of the Lbx1 gene recognised as a hallmark of appendicular myogenesis in vertebrates, is expressed in leg myoblasts, and regulates the shape, ultrastructure and functional properties of leg muscles in Drosophila. Ladybird expression is progressively activated in myoblasts associated with the imaginal leg disc and precedes that of the founder cell marker dumbfounded. The RNAi-mediated attenuation of ladybird expression alters properties of developing myotubes, impairing their ability to grow and interact with the internal tendons and epithelial attachment sites. It also affects sarcomeric ultrastructure, resulting in reduced leg muscle performance and impaired mobility in surviving flies. The over-expression of ladybird also results in an abnormal pattern of dorsally located leg muscles, indicating different requirements for ladybird in dorsal versus ventral muscles. This differential effect is consistent with the higher level of Ladybird in ventrally located myoblasts and with positive ladybird regulation by extrinsic Wingless signalling from the ventral epithelium. In addition, ladybird expression correlates with that of FGF receptor Heartless and the read-out of FGF signalling downstream of FGF. FGF signals regulate the number of leg disc associated myoblasts and are able to accelerate myogenic differentiation by activating ladybird, leading to ectopic muscle fibre formation. A key role for ladybird in leg myogenesis is further supported by its capacity to repress vestigial and to down-regulate the vestigial-governed flight muscle developmental programme. Thus in Drosophila like in vertebrates, appendicular muscles develop from a specialised pool of myoblasts expressing ladybird/Lbx1. The

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells and myoblast differentiation under HGF and IGF-1 stimulation for 3D skeletal muscle tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Witt, R; Weigand, A; Boos, A M; Cai, A; Dippold, D; Boccaccini, A R; Schubert, D W; Hardt, M; Lange, C; Arkudas, A; Horch, R E; Beier, J P

    2017-02-28

    Volumetric muscle loss caused by trauma or after tumour surgery exceeds the natural regeneration capacity of skeletal muscle. Hence, the future goal of tissue engineering (TE) is the replacement and repair of lost muscle tissue by newly generating skeletal muscle combining different cell sources, such as myoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), within a three-dimensional matrix. Latest research showed that seeding skeletal muscle cells on aligned constructs enhance the formation of myotubes as well as cell alignment and may provide a further step towards the clinical application of engineered skeletal muscle. In this study the myogenic differentiation potential of MSCs upon co-cultivation with myoblasts and under stimulation with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was evaluated. We further analysed the behaviour of MSC-myoblast co-cultures in different 3D matrices. Primary rat myoblasts and rat MSCs were mono- and co-cultivated for 2, 7 or 14 days. The effect of different concentrations of HGF and IGF-1 alone, as well as in combination, on myogenic differentiation was analysed using microscopy, multicolour flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Furthermore, the influence of different three-dimensional culture models, such as fibrin, fibrin-collagen-I gels and parallel aligned electrospun poly-ε-caprolacton collagen-I nanofibers, on myogenic differentiation was analysed. MSCs could be successfully differentiated into the myogenic lineage both in mono- and in co-cultures independent of HGF and IGF-1 stimulation by expressing desmin, myocyte enhancer factor 2, myosin heavy chain 2 and alpha-sarcomeric actinin. An increased expression of different myogenic key markers could be observed under HGF and IGF-1 stimulation. Even though, stimulation with HGF/IGF-1 does not seem essential for sufficient myogenic differentiation. Three-dimensional cultivation in fibrin-collagen-I gels induced higher levels of myogenic differentiation

  18. SMAD3 and SP1/SP3 Transcription Factors Collaborate to Regulate Connective Tissue Growth Factor Gene Expression in Myoblasts in Response to Transforming Growth Factor β.

    PubMed

    Córdova, Gonzalo; Rochard, Alice; Riquelme-Guzmán, Camilo; Cofré, Catalina; Scherman, Daniel; Bigey, Pascal; Brandan, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Fibrotic disorders are characterized by an increase in extracellular matrix protein expression and deposition, Duchene Muscular Dystrophy being one of them. Among the factors that induce fibrosis are Transforming Growth Factor type β (TGF-β) and the matricellular protein Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2), the latter being a target of the TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway and is the responsible for the profibrotic effects of TGF-β. Both CTGF and TGF are increased in tissues affected by fibrosis but little is known about the regulation of the expression of CTGF mediated by TGF-β in muscle cells. By using luciferase reporter assays, site directed mutagenesis and specific inhibitors in C2C12 cells; we described a novel SMAD Binding Element (SBE) located in the 5' UTR region of the CTGF gene important for the TGF-β-mediated expression of CTGF in myoblasts. In addition, our results suggest that additional transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) present in the 5' UTR of the CTGF gene are important for this expression and that SP1/SP3 factors are involved in TGF-β-mediated CTGF expression.

  19. Effects of anabolic agents on protein breakdown in L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, F J; Francis, G L

    1983-01-01

    1. Protein degradation in rat L6 myoblasts is inhibited by high concentrations of insulin as well as by foetal bovine serum and bovine colostrum, mixtures rich in growth-factor activity. 2. Growth factors achieve maximal effects within 2 h after addition to the cell cultures, but these diminish with time. Indeed, during incubations greater than 12 h, foetal calf serum actually stimulates protein breakdown. The changed response, however, is not due to the depletion of growth factors from serum. 3. Protein breakdown is stimulated by dexamethasone by a process that takes several hours to be expressed, but is more pronounced over a 4 h measurement period than over 18h. The glucocorticoid response is prevented by insulin or by cycloheximide. 4. Anabolic agents such as trenbolone, diethylstilboestrol and testosterone do not alter rates of intracellular protein breakdown and do not interfere with the glucocorticoid-induced catabolic response. 5. The results are consistent with anabolic steroids and related agents acting indirectly on muscle, perhaps via altering concentrations of growth factors of the somatomedin type. PMID:6342615

  20. Curcumin reduces cold storage-induced damage in human cardiac myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Abuarqoub, Hadil; Green, Colin J; Foresti, Roberta; Motterlini, Roberto

    2007-04-30

    Curcumin is a polyphenolic compound possessing interesting anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and has the ability to induce the defensive protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The objective of this study was to investigate whether curcumin protects against cold storage-mediated damage of human adult atrial myoblast cells (Girardi cells) and to assess the potential involvement of HO-1 in this process. Girardi cells were exposed to either normothermic or hypothermic conditions in Celsior preservation solution in the presence or absence of curcumin. HO-1 protein expression and heme oxygenase activity as well as cellular damage were assessed after cold storage or cold storage followed by re-warming. In additional experiments, an inhibitor of heme oxygenase activity (tin protoporphyrin IX, 10 microM) or siRNA for HO-1 were used to investigate the participation of HO-1 as a mediator of curcumin-induced effects. Treatment with curcumin produced a marked induction of cardiac HO-1 in normothermic condition but cells were less responsive to the polyphenolic compound at low temperature. Cold storage-induced damage was markedly reduced in the presence of curcumin and HO-1 contributed to some extent to this effect. Thus, curcumin added to Celsior preservation solution effectively prevents the damage caused by cold-storage; this effect involves the protective enzyme HO-1 but also other not yet identified mechanisms.

  1. Graphene oxide increases the viability of C2C12 myoblasts microencapsulated in alginate.

    PubMed

    Ciriza, J; Saenz del Burgo, L; Virumbrales-Muñoz, M; Ochoa, I; Fernandez, L J; Orive, G; Hernandez, R M; Pedraz, J L

    2015-09-30

    Cell microencapsulation represents a great promise for long-term drug delivery, but still several challenges need to be overcome before its translation into the clinic, such as the long term cell survival inside the capsules. On this regard, graphene oxide has shown to promote proliferation of different cell types either in two or three dimensions. Therefore, we planned to combine graphene oxide with the cell microencapsulation technology. We first studied the effect of this material on the stability of the capsules and next we analyzed the biocompatibility of this chemical compound with erythropoietin secreting C2C12 myoblasts within the microcapsule matrix. We produced 160 μm-diameter alginate microcapsules with increasing concentrations of graphene oxide and did not find modifications on the physicochemical parameters of traditional alginate microcapsules. Moreover, we observed that the viability of encapsulated cells within alginate microcapsules containing specific graphene oxide concentrations was enhanced. These results provide a relevant step for the future clinical application of graphene oxide on cell microencapsulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Photovoltaic surfaces enable clonal myoblastic cell release using visible light as external stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Mohammod Kabir; Rodriguez-Devora, Jorge; Tseng, Tzu-Liang Bill; Boland, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Many new biomedical approaches to treating disease require the supply of cells delivered to an injured or diseased organ either individually, collectively as aggregates or sheets, or encapsulated with a scaffold. The collection of cells is accomplished by using enzymatic digestion witch suffer from the need to remove the enzymes after digestion. In addition, enzymatic methods are not applicable for all cells, cell aggregates, cell sheets or 3D structures. The objective of this study was to investigate the release of cultured cells from silicon based Photovoltaic (PV) surfaces using a light source as external stimulation. C2C12 myoblasts were cultured on the negative surface of a PV device and upon confluence they were exposed to light. The amount of released cells was quantified as a function light exposure. It was found that light exposure at 25,000 lux for one hour caused equivalent cell release from the PV surface than trypsination. The released cells are viable and can be re-cultured if needed. This mechanism may offer an alternative method to release excitable cells without using an enzymatic agent. This may be important for cell therapy if larger cell structures such as sheets need to be collected.

  3. Surgical and catheter delivery of autologous myoblasts in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Opie, Shaun R; Dib, Nabil

    2006-03-01

    Autologous skeletal myoblast (ASM) transplantation is being explored as a possible therapy for patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction. Our initial experience with direct injection during coronary artery bypass grafting demonstrated that this method of delivery was both feasible and safe. In addition, proof of concept of the engraftment and survival of ASMs was shown. However, since many patients who have survived a myocardial infarction are not candidates for surgery, a less invasive delivery method is preferred. We implemented a series of translational research steps to bring catheter-based technology to a clinical application. This included assessing the biocompatibility of the ASM and a novel needle injection catheter using a 3-dimensional endoventricular navigation system, the bioretention and biodistribution of ASMs in a porcine model of myocardial infarction, and the safety and efficacy of ASM transplantation for cardiac function in the porcine model. After catheter functionality had been demonstrated, electromechanical mapping was used to assess the viability in the region of ASM transplantation, and echocardiography, electrocardiogram, and angiography tests were used to assess cardiac function 2 months after ASM transplantation. The results from these preclinical studies were used as a foundation for application of these concepts to a human clinical trial. Here we review the results from our preclinical experiments and surgical delivery clinical trial, and describe the recent clinical studies undertaken to assess the safety and feasibility of catheter-based ASM transplantation into human subjects.

  4. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  5. Plasma membrane characterization, by scanning electron microscopy, of multipotent myoblasts-derived populations sorted using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Massimo; Mitchell, Steve; Waterfall, Martin

    2013-09-06

    Multipotent progenitor cells have shown promise for use in biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. The implementation of such cells for clinical application requires a synchronized, phenotypically and/or genotypically, homogenous cell population. Here we have demonstrated the implementation of a biological tag-free dielectrophoretic device used for discrimination of multipotent myoblastic C2C12 model. The multipotent capabilities in differentiation, for these cells, diminishes with higher passage number, so for cultures above 70 passages only a small percentage of cells is able to differentiate into terminal myotubes. In this work we demonstrated that we could recover, above 96% purity, specific cell types from a mixed population of cells at high passage number without any biological tag using dielectrophoresis. The purity of the samples was confirmed by cytometric analysis using the cell specific marker embryonic myosin. To further investigate the dielectric properties of the cell plasma membrane we co-culture C2C12 with similar size, when in suspension, GFP-positive fibroblast as feeder layer. The level of separation between the cell types was above 98% purity which was confirmed by flow cytometry. These levels of separation are assumed to account for cell size and for the plasma membrane morphological differences between C2C12 and fibroblast unrelated to the stages of the cell cycle which was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Plasma membrane conformational differences were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Effect of IR Laser on Myoblasts: Prospects of Application for Counteracting Microgravity-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monici, Monica; Cialdai, Francesca; Romano, Giovanni; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Rizzo, Angela Maria; Caselli, Anna; Ranaldi, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    Microgravity-induced muscle atrophy is a problem of utmost importance for the impact it may have on the health and performance of astronauts. Therefore, appropriate countermeasures are needed to prevent disuse atrophy and favour muscle recovery. Muscle atrophy is characterized by loss of muscle mass and strength, and a shift in substrate utilization from fat to glucose, that leads to a reduced metabolic efficiency and enhanced fatigability. Laser therapy is already used in physical medicine and rehabilitation to accelerate muscle recovery and in sports medicine to prevent damages produced by metabolic disturbances and inflammatory reactions after heavy exercise. The aim of the research we present was to get insights on possible benefits deriving from the application of an advanced infrared laser system to counteract deficits of muscle energy metabolism and stimulate the recovery of the hypotrophic tissue. The source used was a Multiwave Locked System (MLS) laser, which combines continuous and pulsed emissions at 808 nm and 905 nm, respectively. We studied the effect of MLS treatment on morphology and energy metabolism of C2C12 cells, a widely accepted myoblast model, previously exposed to microgravity conditions modelled by a Random Positioning Machine. The MLS laser treatment was able to restore basal levels of serine/threonine protein phosphatase activity and to counteract cytoskeletal alterations and increase in glycolytic enzymes activity that occurred following the exposure to modelled microgravity. In conclusion, the results provide interesting insights for the application of infrared laser in the treatment of muscle atrophy.

  7. Cross talk between matrix elasticity and mechanical force regulates myoblast traction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2013-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that critical cellular processes are profoundly influenced by the cross talk between extracellular nanomechanical forces and the material properties of the cellular microenvironment. Although many studies have examined either the effect of nanomechanical forces or the material properties of the microenvironment on biological processes, few have investigated the influence of both. Here, we performed simultaneous atomic force microscopy and traction force microscopy to demonstrate that muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) rapidly generate a significant increase in traction when stimulated with a local 10 nN force. Cells were cultured and nanomechanically stimulated on hydrogel substrates with controllable local elastic moduli varying from ˜16-89 kPa, as confirmed with atomic force microscopy. Importantly, cellular traction dynamics in response to nanomechanical stimulation only occurred on substrates that were similar to the elasticity of working muscle tissue (˜64-89 kPa) as opposed to substrates mimicking resting tissue (˜16-51 kPa). The traction response was also transient, occurring within 30 s, and dissipating by 60 s, during constant nanomechanical stimulation. The observed biophysical dynamics are very much dependent on rho-kinase and myosin-II activity and likely contribute to the physiology of these cells. Our results demonstrate the fundamental ability of cells to integrate nanoscale information in the cellular microenvironment, such as nanomechanical forces and substrate mechanics, during the process of mechanotransduction.

  8. Cross talk between matrix elasticity and mechanical force regulates myoblast traction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E

    2013-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that critical cellular processes are profoundly influenced by the cross talk between extracellular nanomechanical forces and the material properties of the cellular microenvironment. Although many studies have examined either the effect of nanomechanical forces or the material properties of the microenvironment on biological processes, few have investigated the influence of both. Here, we performed simultaneous atomic force microscopy and traction force microscopy to demonstrate that muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) rapidly generate a significant increase in traction when stimulated with a local 10 nN force. Cells were cultured and nanomechanically stimulated on hydrogel substrates with controllable local elastic moduli varying from ~16-89 kPa, as confirmed with atomic force microscopy. Importantly, cellular traction dynamics in response to nanomechanical stimulation only occurred on substrates that were similar to the elasticity of working muscle tissue (~64-89 kPa) as opposed to substrates mimicking resting tissue (~16-51 kPa). The traction response was also transient, occurring within 30 s, and dissipating by 60 s, during constant nanomechanical stimulation. The observed biophysical dynamics are very much dependent on rho-kinase and myosin-II activity and likely contribute to the physiology of these cells. Our results demonstrate the fundamental ability of cells to integrate nanoscale information in the cellular microenvironment, such as nanomechanical forces and substrate mechanics, during the process of mechanotransduction.

  9. Cdo Regulates Surface Expression of Kir2.1 K+ Channel in Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jewoo; Kang, KyeongJin; Bae, Gyu-Un; Cho, Hana; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    A potassium channel Kir2.1-associated membrane hyperpolarization is required for myogenic differentiation. However the molecular regulatory mechanisms modulating Kir2.1 channel activities in early stage of myogenesis are largely unknown. A cell surface protein, Cdo functions as a component of multiprotein cell surface complexes to promote myogenesis. In this study, we report that Cdo forms a complex with Kir2.1 during myogenic differentiation, and is required for the channel activity by enhancing the surface expression of Kir2.1 in the early stage of differentiation. The expression of a constitutively active form of the upstream kinase for p38MAPK, MKK6(EE) can restore Kir2.1 activities in Cdo-depleted C2C12 cells, while the treatment with a p38MAPK inhibitor, SB203580 exhibits a similar effect of Cdo depletion on Kir2.1 surface expression. Furthermore, Cdo-/- primary myoblasts, which display a defective differentiation program, exhibit a defective Kir2.1 activity. Taken together, our results suggest that a promyogenic Cdo signaling is critical for Kir2.1 activities in the induction of myogenic differentiation. PMID:27380411

  10. A gene-trap strategy identifies quiescence-induced genes in synchronized myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Pavlath, Grace K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2008-03-01

    Cellular quiescence is characterized not only by reduced mitotic and metabolic activity but also by altered gene expression. Growing evidence suggests that quiescence is not merely a basal state but is regulated by active mechanisms. To understand the molecular programme that governs reversible cell cycle exit, we focused on quiescence-related gene expression in a culture model of myogenic cell arrest and activation. Here we report the identification of quiescence-induced genes using a gene-trap strategy. Using a retroviral vector, we generated a library of gene traps in C2C12 myoblasts that were screened for arrest-induced insertions by live cell sorting (FACS-gal). Several independent gene- trap lines revealed arrest-dependent induction of betagal activity, confirming the efficacy of the FACS screen. The locus of integration was identified in 15 lines. In three lines,insertion occurred in genes previously implicated in the control of quiescence, i.e. EMSY - a BRCA2--interacting protein, p8/com1 - a p300HAT -- binding protein and MLL5 - a SET domain protein. Our results demonstrate that expression of chromatin modulatory genes is induced in G0, providing support to the notion that this reversibly arrested state is actively regulated.

  11. Arecoline inhibits myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts by reducing STAT3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Fu; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Liu, Shao-Tung; Tseng, Chao-Neng

    2012-10-01

    Areca nut (Areca catechu) is chewed regularly as a medical and psychoactive food by about 10% of the world population, in countries including India, Taiwan and parts of Southern Asia. Areca nut chewing during pregnancy has been associated with both lower birth weight and premature birth. Animals of low birth weights showed retardation of muscle development. Our previous study showed that arecoline, the major areca alkaloid, decreased the number of implanted embryos. Here we sought to determine the effects of arecoline in myogenic differentiation by in vitro assays using C2C12 myoblast cells. The results showed that arecoline higher than 0.4mM significantly increased apoptosis and decreased viability of C2C12 cells. Morphometric measurements of myotube formation and analyses of myogenic markers, myosin heavy chain and myogenin, revealed that myogenic differentiation was inhibited by 0.04-0.08 mM arecoline. Moreover, phosphorylated but not total STAT3 was significantly inhibited by arecoline during myotube formation. These results indicate that arecoline inhibits the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells by reducing the activation of STAT3, an upstream regulator of myogenesis. Improved understanding of the effects of arecoline during myogenic differentiation may help to establish public health policies and to develop potential treatments for such patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interactions between FGF18 and retinoic acid regulate differentiation of chick embryo limb myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Mok, Gi Fay; Cardenas, Ryan; Anderton, Helen; Campbell, Keith H S; Sweetman, Dylan

    2014-12-15

    During limb development Pax3 positive myoblasts delaminate from the hypaxial dermomyotome of limb level somites and migrate into the limb bud where they form the dorsal and ventral muscle masses. Only then do they begin to differentiate and express markers of myogenic commitment and determination such as Myf5 and MyoD. However the signals regulating this process remain poorly characterised. We show that FGF18, which is expressed in the distal mesenchyme of the limb bud, induces premature expression of both Myf5 and MyoD and that blocking FGF signalling also inhibits endogenous MyoD expression. This expression is mediated by ERK MAP kinase but not PI3K signalling. We also show that retinoic acid (RA) can inhibit the myogenic activity of FGF18 and that blocking RA signalling allows premature induction of MyoD by FGF18 at HH19. We propose a model where interactions between FGF18 in the distal limb and retinoic acid in the proximal limb regulate the timing of myogenic gene expression during limb bud development.

  13. Characterization of functional urotensin II receptors in human skeletal muscle myoblasts: comparison with angiotensin II receptors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jian-shen; Minor, Lisa K; Smith, Charles; Hu, Bing; Yang, Jing; Andrade-Gordon, Patricia; Damiano, Bruce

    2005-04-01

    The properties of urotensin II (U-II) receptor (UT receptor) and angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor (AT receptor) in primary human skeletal myoblasts (HSMM) and differentiated skeletal myotubes (HSMMT) were characterized. Radiolabeled U-II and ANG II bound specifically to HSMM with Kd's of 0.31 nM (2311 receptors/cell) and 0.61 nM (18,257 receptors/cell), respectively. The cyclic segment of U-II peptide, CFWKYC, was the minimal sequence required for binding, with the WKY residues essential. Inhibitor studies suggested AT1 is the predominant ANG II receptor. After radioligand binding, under conditions designed to minimize receptor internalization, half the bound U-II was resistant to acid washing suggesting that U-II binds tightly to its receptor in a quasi-irreversible fashion. The AT1 receptor-bound radioligand was completely removed under the same conditions. RT-PCR detected the expression of mRNAs for UT and AT1 receptors. Western blotting showed that U-II and ANG II signaled via ERK1/2 kinase. UT receptor was not lost upon differentiation into myotubes since both mRNA for UT receptor and U-II binding were still present. ANG II receptors were also present as shown by ANG II-induced calcium mobilization.

  14. Establishment of a Novel Primary Human Skeletal Myoblast Cellular Model for Chikungunya Virus Infection and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Khairunnisa' Mohamed; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Ng, Mary Mah-Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-02-19

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging arbovirus known to cause chronic myalgia and arthralgia and is now considered endemic in countries across Asia and Africa. The tissue tropism of CHIKV infection in humans remains, however, ill-defined. Due to the fact that myositis is commonly observed in most patients infected with CHIKV, we sought to develop a clinically relevant cellular model to better understand the pathogenesis of CHIKV infection. In this study, primary human skeletal muscle myoblasts (HSMM) were established as a novel human primary cell line that is highly permissive to CHIKV infection, with maximal amounts of infectious virions observed at 16 hours post infection. Genome-wide microarray profiling analyses were subsequently performed to identify and map genes that are differentially expressed upon CHIKV infection. Infection of HSMM cells with CHIKV resulted in altered expressions of host genes involved in skeletal- and muscular-associated disorders, innate immune responses, cellular growth and death, host metabolism and virus replication. Together, this study has shown the establishment of a clinically relevant primary human cell model that paves the way for the further analysis of host factors and their involvement in the various stages of CHIKV replication cycle and viral pathogenesis.

  15. THE REAL ESTATE OF MYOBLAST CARDIAC TRANSPLANTATION – NEGATIVE REMODELING IS ASSOCIATED WITH LOCATION

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Jonathan D.; Swingen, Cory; Feldberg, Tanya; Caron, Gabe; Kolb, Adam; Denucci, Christopher; Prabhu, Somnath; Motilall, Randy; Breviu, Brian; Taylor, Doris A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Skeletal myoblast (SKMB) transplantation has been proposed as a therapy for ischemic cardiomyopathy due to its possible role in myogenesis. The relative safety and efficacy based on location within scar is not known. We hypothesized that SKMB transplanted into peripheral scar (compared to central scar) would more effectively attenuate negative left ventricular (LV) remodeling but at the risk of arrhythmia. Methods 34 New Zealand White rabbits underwent mid-left anterior descending artery (LAD) ligation to produce a transmural LV infarction. One month after LAD ligation SKMBs were injected either in the scar center (n=13) or scar periphery (n=10) and compared to saline injection (n=11). Holter monitoring and MRI was performed pre-injection; Holter monitoring was continued until two weeks post injection, with follow-up MRI at one month. Results Centrally-treated animals demonstrated increased LV end systolic volume, end diastolic volume and mass that correlated with injected cell number. There was a trend toward attenuation of negative LV remodeling in peripherally-treated animals compared to vehicle. Significant late ectopy was seen in several centrally-injected animals with no late ectopy seen in peripherally-injected animals. Conclusions We noted untoward effects with respect to negative LV remodeling following central injection, suggesting that transplanted cell location with respect to scar may be a key factor in the safety and efficacy of SKMB cardiac transplantation. Administration of SKMBs into peripheral scar appears safe with a trend toward improved function in comparison to sham injection. PMID:18187097

  16. An adaptable stage perfusion incubator for the controlled cultivation of C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Felix; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Bärtschi, Christoph A; Dittrich, Petra S

    2015-01-07

    Here we present a stage perfusion incubation system that allows for the cultivation of mammalian cells within PDMS microfluidic devices for long-term microscopic examination and analysis. The custom-built stage perfusion incubator is adaptable to any x-y microscope stage and is enabled for temperature, gas and humidity control as well as equipped with chip and tubing holder. The applied double-layered microfluidic chip allows the predetermined positioning and concentration of cells while the gas permeable PDMS material facilitates pH control via CO2 levels throughout the chip. We demonstrate the functionality of this system by culturing C2C12 murine myoblasts in buffer free medium within its confines for up to 26 hours. We moreover demonstrated the system's compatibility with various chip configurations, other cells lines (HEK-293 cells) and for longer-term culturing. The cost-efficient system are applicable for any type of PDMS-based cell culture system. Detailed technical drawings and specification to reproduce this perfusion incubation system is provided in the ESI.

  17. Gravitational force modulates G2/M phase exit in mechanically unloaded myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Benavides Damm, Tatiana; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Egli, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged spaceflight gives rise to muscle loss and reduced strength, a condition commonly referred to as space atrophy. During exposure to microgravity, skeletal muscle myoblasts are mechanically unloaded and respond with attenuated cell proliferation, slowed cell cycle progression, and modified protein expression. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms by which muscle mass declines in response to prolonged microgravity exposure, we grew C2C12 mouse muscle cells under conditions of simulated microgravity (SM) and analyzed their proliferative capacity, cell cycle progression, and cyclin B and D expression. We demonstrated that the retarded cell growth observed in SM was correlated with an approximate 16 h delay in G2/M phase progression, where cells accumulated specifically between the G2 checkpoint and the onset of anaphase, concomitantly with a positive expression for cyclin B. The effect was specific for gravitational mechanical unloading as cells grown under conditions of hypergravity (HG, 4 g) for similar durations of time exhibited normal proliferation and normal cell cycle progression. Our results show that SM and HG exert phenomenological distinct responses over cell cycle progression. The deficits of SM can be restored by terrestrial gravitational force, whereas the effects of HG are indistinguishable from the 1 g control. This suggests that the mechanotransduction apparatus of cells responds differently to mechanical unloading and loading. PMID:23974110

  18. MyoD-positive myoblasts are present in mature fetal organs lacking skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gerhart, Jacquelyn; Bast, Brian; Neely, Christine; Iem, Stephanie; Amegbe, Paula; Niewenhuis, Robert; Miklasz, Steven; Cheng, Pei Feng; George-Weinstein, Mindy

    2001-01-01

    The epiblast of the chick embryo gives rise to the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm during gastrulation. Previous studies revealed that MyoD-positive cells were present throughout the epiblast, suggesting that skeletal muscle precursors would become incorporated into all three germ layers. The focus of the present study was to examine a variety of organs from the chicken fetus for the presence of myogenic cells. RT-PCR and in situ hybridizations demonstrated that MyoD-positive cells were present in the brain, lung, intestine, kidney, spleen, heart, and liver. When these organs were dissociated and placed in culture, a subpopulation of cells differentiated into skeletal muscle. The G8 antibody was used to label those cells that expressed MyoD in vivo and to follow their fate in vitro. Most, if not all, of the muscle that formed in culture arose from cells that expressed MyoD and G8 in vivo. Practically all of the G8-positive cells from the intestine differentiated after purification by FACS®. This population of ectopically located cells appears to be distinct from multipotential stem cells and myofibroblasts. They closely resemble quiescent, stably programmed skeletal myoblasts with the capacity to differentiate when placed in a permissive environment. PMID:11684706

  19. ZBED6 Modulates the Transcription of Myogenic Genes in Mouse Myoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lin; Wallerman, Ola; Younis, Shady; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Gilbert, Elizabeth R.; Sundström, Elisabeth; Ghazal, Awaisa; Zhang, Xiaolan; Wang, Li; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S.; Andersson, Göran; Andersson, Leif

    2014-01-01

    ZBED6 is a recently discovered transcription factor, unique to placental mammals, that has evolved from a domesticated DNA transposon. It acts as a repressor at the IGF2 locus. Here we show that ZBED6 acts as a transcriptional modulator in mouse myoblast cells, where more than 700 genes were differentially expressed after Zbed6-silencing. The most significantly enriched GO term was muscle protein and contractile fiber, which was consistent with increased myotube formation. Twenty small nucleolar RNAs all showed increased expression after Zbed6-silencing. The co-localization of histone marks and ZBED6 binding sites and the effect of Zbed6-silencing on distribution of histone marks was evaluated by ChIP-seq analysis. There was a strong association between ZBED6 binding sites and the H3K4me3, H3K4me2 and H3K27ac modifications, which are usually found at active promoters, but no association with the repressive mark H3K27me3. Zbed6-silencing led to increased enrichment of active marks at myogenic genes, in agreement with the RNA-seq findings. We propose that ZBED6 preferentially binds to active promoters and modulates transcriptional activity without recruiting repressive histone modifications. PMID:24714595

  20. The rotation of mouse myoblast nuclei is dependent on substrate elasticity.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Ryan; Pelling, Andrew E

    2017-04-01

    The complex interplay of biochemical signaling and mechanical traction forces regulate the position of cellular nuclei. Although the phenomenon of nuclear rotation has been observed for many years, the influence of substrate elasticity was unknown. We discovered another layer of complexity to this phenomenon: nuclear rotation is dependent on substrate elasticity. Nuclear rotation is drastically reduced on physiologically relevant stiffnesses. Here, we studied nuclear rotation in mouse C2C12 myoblasts cultured on soft substrates designed to mimic resting tissue (∼26 kPa) and on hard glass substrates. We examined the roles of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton on the presence and dynamics of nuclear rotation in these two different microenvironments. We demonstrated the clear dependence of nuclear rotation dynamics on matrix stiffness. These results will have important implications for the design of future studies of nuclear rotation and our understanding of the phenomenon as a whole. Unnaturally, hard substrates do not only fail to mimic the in vivo microenvironment, but can also induce cellular processes that would not normally occur in the natural cellular environment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Establishment of a Novel Primary Human Skeletal Myoblast Cellular Model for Chikungunya Virus Infection and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Khairunnisa’ Mohamed; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Ng, Mary Mah-Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging arbovirus known to cause chronic myalgia and arthralgia and is now considered endemic in countries across Asia and Africa. The tissue tropism of CHIKV infection in humans remains, however, ill-defined. Due to the fact that myositis is commonly observed in most patients infected with CHIKV, we sought to develop a clinically relevant cellular model to better understand the pathogenesis of CHIKV infection. In this study, primary human skeletal muscle myoblasts (HSMM) were established as a novel human primary cell line that is highly permissive to CHIKV infection, with maximal amounts of infectious virions observed at 16 hours post infection. Genome-wide microarray profiling analyses were subsequently performed to identify and map genes that are differentially expressed upon CHIKV infection. Infection of HSMM cells with CHIKV resulted in altered expressions of host genes involved in skeletal- and muscular-associated disorders, innate immune responses, cellular growth and death, host metabolism and virus replication. Together, this study has shown the establishment of a clinically relevant primary human cell model that paves the way for the further analysis of host factors and their involvement in the various stages of CHIKV replication cycle and viral pathogenesis. PMID:26892458

  2. Chromatin plasticity as a differentiation index during muscle differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Higuchi, Sayaka; Kawauchi, Keiko; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Ichimura, Taro; Fujita, Hideaki

    2012-02-24

    Skeletal muscle undergoes complicated differentiation steps that include cell-cycle arrest, cell fusion, and maturation, which are controlled through sequential expression of transcription factors. During muscle differentiation, remodeling of the epigenetic landscape is also known to take place on a large scale, determining cell fate. In an attempt to determine the extent of epigenetic remodeling during muscle differentiation, we characterized the plasticity of the chromatin structure using C2C12 myoblasts. Differentiation of C2C12 cells was induced by lowering the serum concentration after they had reached full confluence, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated myotubes. Upon induction of differentiation, the nucleus size decreased whereas the aspect ratio increased, indicating the presence of force on the nucleus during differentiation. Movement of the nucleus was also suppressed when differentiation was induced, indicating that the plasticity of chromatin changed upon differentiation. To evaluate the histone dynamics during differentiation, FRAP experiment was performed, which showed an increase in the immobile fraction of histone proteins when differentiation was induced. To further evaluate the change in the histone dynamics during differentiation, FCS was performed, which showed a decrease in histone mobility on differentiation. We here show that the plasticity of chromatin decreases upon differentiation, which takes place in a stepwise manner, and that it can be used as an index for the differentiation stage during myogenesis using the state diagram developed with the parameters obtained in this study.

  3. Disruption of myoblast alignment by highly motile rhabdomyosarcoma cell in tissue structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Menglu; Nagamori, Eiji; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2017-02-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a highly malignant tumor type of skeletal muscle origin, hallmarked by local invasion. Interaction between invasive tumor cells and normal cells plays a major role in tumor invasion and metastasis. Culturing tumor cells in a three-dimensional (3D) model can translate tumor malignancy relevant cell-cell interaction. To mimic tumor heterogeneity in vitro, a co-culture system consisting of a malignant embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) cell line RD and a normal human skeletal muscle myoblast (HSMM) cell line was established by cell sheet technology. Various ratios of RDs to HSMMs were employed to understand the quantitative effect on intercellular interactions. Disruption of sheet structure was observed in heterogeneous cell sheets having a low ratio of RDs to HSMMs, whereas homogeneous HSMM or RD sheets maintained intact structure. Deeper exploration of dynamic tumor cell behavior inside HSMM sheets revealed that HSMM cell alignment was disrupted by highly motile RDs. This study demonstrated that RMS cells are capable of compromising their surrounding environment through induced decay of HSMMs alignment in a cell-based 3D system. This suggests that muscle disruption might be a major consequence of RMS cell invasion into muscles, which could be a promising target to preventing tumor invasion. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Decreased myoblast differentiation in chronic binge alcohol-administered simian immunodeficiency virus-infected male macaques: role of decreased miR-206.

    PubMed

    Simon, L; Ford, S M; Song, K; Berner, P; Vande Stouwe, C; Nelson, S; Bagby, G J; Molina, P E

    2017-09-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells play a critical role in regeneration of myofibers. We previously demonstrated that chronic binge alcohol (CBA) markedly attenuates myoblast differentiation potential and myogenic gene expression. Muscle-specific microRNAs (miRs) are implicated in regulation of myogenic genes. The aim of this study was to determine whether myoblasts isolated from asymptomatic CBA-administered simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) showed similar impairments and, if so, to elucidate potential underlying mechanisms. Myoblasts were isolated from muscle at 11 mo after SIV infection from CBA/SIV macaques and from time-matched sucrose (SUC)-treated SIV-infected (SUC/SIV) animals and age-matched controls. Myoblast differentiation and myogenic gene expression were significantly decreased in myoblasts from SUC/SIV and CBA/SIV animals compared with controls. SIV and CBA decreased muscle-specific miR-206 in plasma and muscle and SIV decreased miR-206 expression in myoblasts, with no statistically significant changes in other muscle-specific miRs. These findings were associated with a significant increase in histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and decrease in myogenic enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) expression in CBA/SIV muscle. Transfection with miR-206 inhibitor decreased myotube differentiation, increased expression of HDAC4, and decreased MEF2C, suggesting a critical role of miR-206 in myogenesis. Moreover, HDAC4 was confirmed to be a direct miR-206 target. These results support a mechanistic role for decreased miR-206 in suppression of myoblast differentiation resulting from chronic alcohol and SIV infection. The parallel changes in skeletal muscle and circulating levels of miR-206 warrant studies to establish the possible use of plasma miR-206 as an indicator of impaired muscle function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. The Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Is Superior to Tocopherol in Promoting Myogenic Differentiation in the Prevention of Replicative Senescence of Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Shy Cian; Razak, Azraul Mumtazah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Makpol, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    Aging results in a loss of muscle mass and strength. Myoblasts play an important role in maintaining muscle mass through regenerative processes, which are impaired during aging. Vitamin E potentially ameliorates age-related phenotypes. Hence, this study aimed to determine the effects of the tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) and α-tocopherol (ATF) in protecting myoblasts from replicative senescence and promoting myogenic differentiation. Primary human myoblasts were cultured into young and senescent stages and were then treated with TRF or ATF for 24 h, followed by an analysis of cell proliferation, senescence biomarkers, cellular morphology and differentiation. Our data showed that replicative senescence impaired the normal regenerative processes of myoblasts, resulting in changes in cellular morphology, cell proliferation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) expression, myogenic differentiation and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) expression. Treatment with both TRF and ATF was beneficial to senescent myoblasts in reclaiming the morphology of young cells, improved cell viability and decreased SA-β-gal expression. However, only TRF treatment increased BrdU incorporation in senescent myoblasts, as well as promoted myogenic differentiation through the modulation of MRFs at the mRNA and protein levels. MYOD1 and MYOG gene expression and myogenin protein expression were modulated in the early phases of myogenic differentiation. In conclusion, the tocotrienol-rich fraction is superior to α-tocopherol in ameliorating replicative senescence-related aberration and promoting differentiation via modulation of MRFs expression, indicating vitamin E potential in modulating replicative senescence of myoblasts. PMID:26885980

  6. The Use of Platelet-Rich and Platelet-Poor Plasma to Enhance Differentiation of Skeletal Myoblasts: Implications for the Use of Autologous Blood Products for Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Miroshnychenko, Olga; Chang, Wen-Teh; Dragoo, Jason L

    2017-03-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used to augment tissue repair and regeneration after musculoskeletal injury. However, there is increasing clinical evidence that PRP does not show a consistent clinical effect. Purpose/Hypothesis: This study aimed to compare the effects of the following non-neutrophil-containing (leukocyte-poor) plasma fractions on human skeletal muscle myoblast (HSMM) differentiation: (1) PRP, (2) modified PRP (Mod-PRP), in which transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and myostatin (MSTN) were depleted, and (3) platelet-poor plasma (PPP). The hypothesis was that leukocyte-poor PRP would lead to myoblast proliferation (not differentiation), whereas certain modifications of PRP preparations would increase myoblast differentiation, which is necessary for skeletal muscle regeneration. Controlled laboratory study. Blood from 7 human donors was individually processed to simultaneously create leukocyte-poor fractions: PRP, Mod-PRP, PPP, and secondarily spun PRP and Mod-PRP (PRPss and Mod-PRPss, respectively). Mod-PRP was produced by removing TGF-β1 and MSTN from PRP using antibodies attached to sterile beads, while a second-stage centrifugal spin of PRP was performed to remove platelets. The biologics were individually added to cell culture groups. Analysis for induction into myoblast differentiation pathways included Western blot analysis, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry, as well as confocal microscopy to assess polynucleated myotubule formation. HSMMs cultured with PRP showed an increase in proliferation but no evidence of differentiation. Western blot analysis confirmed that MSTN and TGF-β1 could be decreased in Mod-PRP using antibody-coated beads, but this modification mildly improved myoblast differentiation. However, cell culture with PPP, PRPss, and Mod-PRPss led to a decreased proliferation rate but a significant induction of myoblast differentiation verified by increased multinucleated myotubule

  7. An NF-κB – EphrinA5 – Dependent Communication between NG2+ Interstitial Cells and Myoblasts Promotes Muscle Growth in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jin-Mo; Wang, David J.; Peterson, Jennifer M.; Shintaku, Jonathan; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Coppola, Vincenzo; Frakes, Ashley E.; Kaspar, Brian K.; Cornelison, Dawn D.; Guttridge, Denis C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Skeletal muscle growth immediately following birth is a critical for proper body posture and locomotion. However, compared to embryogenesis and adulthood, the processes regulating the maturation of neonatal muscles is considerably less clear. Studies in the 1960s predicted that neonatal muscle growth results from nuclear accretion of myoblasts preferentially at the tips of myofibers. Remarkably, little information has been added since then to resolve how myoblasts migrate to the ends of fibers. Here, we provide insight to this process by revealing a unique NF-κB-dependent communication between NG2+ interstitial cells and myoblasts. NF-κB in NG2+ cells promotes myoblast migration to the tips of myofibers through cell-cell contact. This occurs through expression of ephrinA5 from NG2+ cells, which we further deduce is an NF-κB target gene. Together, results suggest that NF-κB plays an important role in the development of newborn muscles to ensure proper myoblast migration for fiber growth. PMID:26777211

  8. Molecular mechanism underlying the regulatory specificity of a Drosophila homeodomain protein that specifies myoblast identity

    PubMed Central

    Busser, Brian W.; Shokri, Leila; Jaeger, Savina A.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Singhania, Aditi; Berger, Michael F.; Zhou, Bo; Bulyk, Martha L.; Michelson, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    A subfamily of Drosophila homeodomain (HD) transcription factors (TFs) controls the identities of individual muscle founder cells (FCs). However, the molecular mechanisms by which these TFs generate unique FC genetic programs remain unknown. To investigate this problem, we first applied genome-wide mRNA expression profiling to identify genes that are activated or repressed by the muscle HD TFs Slouch (Slou) and Muscle segment homeobox (Msh). Next, we used protein-binding microarrays to define the sequences that are bound by Slou, Msh and other HD TFs that have mesodermal expression. These studies revealed that a large class of HDs, including Slou and Msh, predominantly recognize TAAT core sequences but that each HD also binds to unique sites that deviate from this canonical motif. To understand better the regulatory specificity of an individual FC identity HD, we evaluated the functions of atypical binding sites that are preferentially bound by Slou relative to other HDs within muscle enhancers that are either activated or repressed by this TF. These studies showed that Slou regulates the activities of particular myoblast enhancers through Slou-preferred sequences, whereas swapping these sequences for sites that are capable of binding to multiple HD family members does not support the normal regulatory functions of Slou. Moreover, atypical Slou-binding sites are overrepresented in putative enhancers associated with additional Slou-responsive FC genes. Collectively, these studies provide new insights into the roles of individual HD TFs in determining cellular identity, and suggest that the diversity of HD binding preferences can confer regulatory specificity. PMID:22296846

  9. Reduction of GAG storage in MPS II mouse model following implantation of encapsulated recombinant myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Friso, Adelaide; Tomanin, Rosella; Alba, Sabrina; Gasparotto, Nicoletta; Puicher, Elisabetta Piller; Fusco, Mariella; Hortelano, Gonzalo; Muenzer, Joseph; Marin, Oriano; Zacchello, Franco; Scarpa, Maurizio

    2005-11-01

    Hunter syndrome, mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II), is a X-linked inherited disorder caused by the deficiency of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), involved in the lysosomal catabolism of the glycosaminoglycans (GAG) dermatan and heparan sulfate. Such a deficiency leads to the intracellular accumulation of undegraded GAG and eventually to a progressive severe clinical pattern. Many attempts have been made in the last two to three decades to identify possible therapeutic strategies for the disorder, including gene therapy and somatic cell therapy. In this study we evaluated the intraperitoneal implantation of allogeneic myoblasts over-expressing IDS, enclosed in alginate microcapsules, in the MPS II mouse model. Animals were monitored for 8 weeks post-implantation, during which plasma and tissue IDS levels, as well as tissue and urinary GAG contents, were measured. Induced enzyme activity occurred both in the plasma and in the different tissues analyzed. A significant decrease in urinary undegraded GAG between the fourth and the sixth week of treatment was observed. Moreover, a biochemical reduction of GAG deposits was measured 8 weeks after treatment in the liver and kidney, on average 30 and 38%, respectively, while in the spleen GAG levels were almost normalized. Finally, the therapeutic effect was confirmed by histolochemical examination of the same tissues. Such effects were obtained following implantation of about 1.5 x 10(6) recombinant cells/animal. Taken together, these results represent a clear evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of this strategy in the MPS II mouse model, and encourage further evaluation of this approach for potential treatment of human beings. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Immortalized pathological human myoblasts: towards a universal tool for the study of neuromuscular disorders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Investigations into both the pathophysiology and therapeutic targets in muscle dystrophies have been hampered by the limited proliferative capacity of human myoblasts. Isolation of reliable and stable immortalized cell lines from patient biopsies is a powerful tool for investigating pathological mechanisms, including those associated with muscle aging, and for developing innovative gene-based, cell-based or pharmacological biotherapies. Methods Using transduction with both telomerase-expressing and cyclin-dependent kinase 4-expressing vectors, we were able to generate a battery of immortalized human muscle stem-cell lines from patients with various neuromuscular disorders. Results The immortalized human cell lines from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B had greatly increased proliferative capacity, and maintained their potential to differentiate both in vitro and in vivo after transplantation into regenerating muscle of immunodeficient mice. Conclusions Dystrophic cellular models are required as a supplement to animal models to assess cellular mechanisms, such as signaling defects, or to perform high-throughput screening for therapeutic molecules. These investigations have been conducted for many years on cells derived from animals, and would greatly benefit from having human cell models with prolonged proliferative capacity. Furthermore, the possibility to assess in vivo the regenerative capacity of these cells extends their potential use. The innovative cellular tools derived from several different neuromuscular diseases as described in this report will allow investigation of the pathophysiology of these disorders and assessment of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:22040608

  11. Silicon substrate as a novel cell culture device for myoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tissue and organ regeneration via transplantation of cell bodies in-situ has become an interesting strategy in regenerative medicine. Developments of cell carriers to systematically deliver cell bodies in the damage site have fall shorten on effectively meet this purpose due to inappropriate release control. Thus, there is still need of novel substrate to achieve targeted cell delivery with appropriate vehicles. In the present study, silicon based photovoltaic (PV) devices are used as a cell culturing substrate for the expansion of myoblast mouse cell (C2C12 cells) that offers an atmosphere for regular cell growth in vitro. The adherence, viability and proliferation of the cells on the silicon surface were examined by direct cell counting and fluorescence microscopy. Results It was found that on the silicon surface, cells proliferated over 7 days showing normal morphology, and expressed their biological activities. Cell culture on silicon substrate reveals their attachment and proliferation over the surface of the PV device. After first day of culture, cell viability was 88% and cell survival remained above 86% as compared to the seeding day after the seventh day. Furthermore, the DAPI staining revealed that the initially scattered cells were able to eventually build a cellular monolayer on top of the silicon substrate. Conclusions This study explored the biological applications of silicon based PV devices, demonstrating its biocompatibility properties and found useful for culture of cells on porous 2-D surface. The incorporation of silicon substrate has been efficaciously revealed as a potential cell carrier or vehicle in cell growth technology, allowing for their use in cell based gene therapy, tissue engineering, and therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:24885347

  12. Plasma membrane characterization, by scanning electron microscopy, of multipotent myoblasts-derived populations sorted using dielectrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Muratore, Massimo; Mitchell, Steve; Waterfall, Martin

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Dielectrophoretic separation/sorting of multipotent cells. •Plasma membrane microvilli structure of C2C12 and fibroblasts by SEM microscopy. •Cell cycle determination by Ki-67 in DEP-sorted cells. •Plasma membrane differences responsible for changes in membrane capacitance. -- Abstract: Multipotent progenitor cells have shown promise for use in biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. The implementation of such cells for clinical application requires a synchronized, phenotypically and/or genotypically, homogenous cell population. Here we have demonstrated the implementation of a biological tag-free dielectrophoretic device used for discrimination of multipotent myoblastic C2C12 model. The multipotent capabilities in differentiation, for these cells, diminishes with higher passage number, so for cultures above 70 passages only a small percentage of cells is able to differentiate into terminal myotubes. In this work we demonstrated that we could recover, above 96% purity, specific cell types from a mixed population of cells at high passage number without any biological tag using dielectrophoresis. The purity of the samples was confirmed by cytometric analysis using the cell specific marker embryonic myosin. To further investigate the dielectric properties of the cell plasma membrane we co-culture C2C12 with similar size, when in suspension, GFP-positive fibroblast as feeder layer. The level of separation between the cell types was above 98% purity which was confirmed by flow cytometry. These levels of separation are assumed to account for cell size and for the plasma membrane morphological differences between C2C12 and fibroblast unrelated to the stages of the cell cycle which was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Plasma membrane conformational differences were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Chromatin plasticity as a differentiation index during muscle differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Higuchi, Sayaka; Kawauchi, Keiko; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Ichimura, Taro; Fujita, Hideaki

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Change in the epigenetic landscape during myogenesis was optically investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mobility of nuclear proteins was used to state the epigenetic status of the cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mobility of nuclear proteins decreased as myogenesis progressed in C2C12. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation state diagram was developed using parameters obtained. -- Abstract: Skeletal muscle undergoes complicated differentiation steps that include cell-cycle arrest, cell fusion, and maturation, which are controlled through sequential expression of transcription factors. During muscle differentiation, remodeling of the epigenetic landscape is also known to take place on a large scale, determining cell fate. In an attempt to determine the extent of epigenetic remodeling during muscle differentiation, we characterized the plasticity of the chromatin structure using C2C12 myoblasts. Differentiation of C2C12 cells was induced by lowering the serum concentration after they had reached full confluence, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated myotubes. Upon induction of differentiation, the nucleus size decreased whereas the aspect ratio increased, indicating the presence of force on the nucleus during differentiation. Movement of the nucleus was also suppressed when differentiation was induced, indicating that the plasticity of chromatin changed upon differentiation. To evaluate the histone dynamics during differentiation, FRAP experiment was performed, which showed an increase in the immobile fraction of histone proteins when differentiation was induced. To further evaluate the change in the histone dynamics during differentiation, FCS was performed, which showed a decrease in histone mobility on differentiation. We here show that the plasticity of chromatin decreases upon differentiation, which takes place in a stepwise manner, and that it can be used as an index for the differentiation stage

  14. Transplantation of novel vascular endothelial growth factor gene delivery system manipulated skeletal myoblasts promote myocardial repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kai; Guo, Changfa; Xia, Yu; Lai, Hao; Yang, Wuli; Wang, Yang; Song, Dongli; Wang, Chunsheng

    2013-10-03

    Skeletal myoblast (SkM) transplantation combined with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene delivery has been proposed as a promising therapy for cardiac repair. Nevertheless, the defective gene vectors and unregulable VEGF expression in vivo hinder its application. Therefore, the search for an economical, effective, controllable gene delivery system is quite necessary. In our study, hyperbranched polyamidoamine (h-PAMAM) dendrimer was synthesized as a novel gene delivery vector using a modified method. And hypoxia-regulated human VEGF-165 plasmids (pHRE-hVEGF165) were constructed for controllable VEGF gene expression. The efficiency and feasibility of h-PAMAM-HRE-hVEGF165 gene delivery system manipulated SkM transplantation for cardiac repair were investigated in myocardial infarction models. The h-PAMAM encapsulated pHRE-hVEGF165 could resist nuclease digestion for over 120 min. In primary SkMs, h-PAMAM-pHRE-hVEGF165 gene delivery system showed high transfection efficiency (43.47 ± 2.22%) and minor cytotoxicity (cell viability = 91.38 ± 0.48%). And the transfected SkMs could express hVEGF165 for 18 days under hypoxia in vitro. For myocardial infarction models, intramyocardial transplantation of the transfected SkMs could result in reduction of apoptotic myocardiocytes, improvement of grafted cell survival, decrease of infarct size and interstitial fibrosis, and increase of blood vessel density, which inhibited left ventricle remodeling and improved heart function at the late phase following infarction. These results indicate that h-PAMAM based pHRE-hVEGF165 gene delivery into SkMs is feasible and effective, and may serve as a novel and promising gene therapy strategy in ischemic heart disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Runx1 Transcription Factor Is Required for Myoblasts Proliferation during Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Umansky, Kfir Baruch; Gruenbaum-Cohen, Yael; Tsoory, Michael; Feldmesser, Ester; Goldenberg, Dalia; Brenner, Ori; Groner, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Following myonecrosis, muscle satellite cells proliferate, differentiate and fuse, creating new myofibers. The Runx1 transcription factor is not expressed in naïve developing muscle or in adult muscle tissue. However, it is highly expressed in muscles exposed to myopathic damage yet, the role of Runx1 in muscle regeneration is completely unknown. Our study of Runx1 function in the muscle’s response to myonecrosis reveals that this transcription factor is activated and cooperates with the MyoD and AP-1/c-Jun transcription factors to drive the transcription program of muscle regeneration. Mice lacking dystrophin and muscle Runx1 (mdx - /Runx1 f/f), exhibit impaired muscle regeneration leading to age-dependent muscle waste, gradual decrease in motor capabilities and a shortened lifespan. Runx1-deficient primary myoblasts are arrested at cell cycle G1 and consequently differentiate. Such premature differentiation disrupts the myoblasts’ normal proliferation/differentiation balance, reduces the number and size of regenerating myofibers and impairs muscle regeneration. Our combined Runx1-dependent gene expression, ChIP-seq, ATAC-seq and histone H3K4me1/H3K27ac modification analyses revealed a subset of Runx1-regulated genes that are co-occupied by MyoD and c-Jun in mdx - /Runx1 f/f muscle. The data provide unique insights into the transcriptional program driving muscle regeneration and implicate Runx1 as an important participant in the pathology of muscle wasting diseases. PMID:26275053

  16. FRG2, an FSHD candidate gene, is transcriptionally upregulated in differentiating primary myoblast cultures of FSHD patients

    PubMed Central

    Rijkers, T; Deidda, G; van Koningsbrugge..., S; van Geel, M; Lemmers, R; van Deutekom, J C T; Figlewicz, D; Hewitt, J; Padberg, G; Frants, R; van der Maarel, S M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Autosomal dominant facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is associated with partial deletion of the subtelomeric D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4qter. This chromosomal rearrangement may result in regional chromatin relaxation and transcriptional deregulation of genes nearby. Methods and results: Here we describe the isolation and characterisation of FRG2, a member of a chromosomally dispersed gene family, mapping only 37 kb proximal to the D4Z4 repeat array. Homology and motif searches yielded no clues to the function of the predicted protein. FRG2 expression is undetectable in all tissues tested except for differentiating myoblasts of FSHD patients, which display low, yet distinct levels of FRG2 expression, partly from chromosome 4 but predominantly originating from its homologue on chromosome 10. However, in non-FSHD myopathy patients only distantly related FRG2 homologues are transcribed, while differentiating myoblasts from healthy controls fail to express any member of this gene family. Moreover, fibroblasts of FSHD patients and control individuals undergoing forced Ad5-MyoD mediated myogenesis show expression of FRG2 mainly originating from chromosome 10. Luciferase reporter assays show that the FRG2 promoter region can direct high levels of expression but is inhibited by increasing numbers of D4Z4 repeat units. Transient transfection experiments with FRG2 fusion-protein constructs reveal nuclear localisation and apparently FRG2 overexpression causes a wide range of morphological changes. Conclusion: The localisation of FRG2 genes close to the D4Z4 repeats on chromosome 4 and 10, their transcriptional upregulation specifically in FSHD myoblast cultures, potential involvement in myogenesis, and promoter properties qualify FRG2 as an attractive candidate for FSHD pathogenesis. PMID:15520407

  17. FACS-purified myoblasts producing controlled VEGF levels induce safe and stable angiogenesis in chronic hind limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Thomas; Mujagic, Edin; Gianni-Barrera, Roberto; Fueglistaler, Philipp; Helmrich, Uta; Misteli, Heidi; Gurke, Lorenz; Heberer, Michael; Banfi, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We recently developed a method to control the in vivo distribution of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by high throughput Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) purification of transduced progenitors such that they homogeneously express specific VEGF levels. Here we investigated the long-term safety of this method in chronic hind limb ischemia in nude rats. Primary myoblasts were transduced to co-express rat VEGF-A(164) (rVEGF) and truncated ratCD8a, the latter serving as a FACS-quantifiable surface marker. Based on the CD8 fluorescence of a reference clonal population, which expressed the desired VEGF level, cells producing similar VEGF levels were sorted from the primary population, which contained cells with very heterogeneous VEGF levels. One week after ischemia induction, 12 × 10(6) cells were implanted in the thigh muscles. Unsorted myoblasts caused angioma-like structures, whereas purified cells only induced normal capillaries that were stable after 3 months. Vessel density was doubled in engrafted areas, but only approximately 0.1% of muscle volume showed cell engraftment, explaining why no increase in total blood flow was observed. In conclusion, the use of FACS-purified myoblasts granted the cell-by-cell control of VEGF expression levels, which ensured long-term safety in a model of chronic ischemia. Based on these results, the total number of implanted cells required to achieve efficacy will need to be determined before a clinical application. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Live Imaging Provides New Insights on Dynamic F-Actin Filopodia and Differential Endocytosis during Myoblast Fusion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Haralalka, Shruti; Shelton, Claude; Cartwright, Heather N.; Guo, Fengli; Trimble, Rhonda; Kumar, Ram P.; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The process of myogenesis includes the recognition, adhesion, and fusion of committed myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia. In the larval body wall muscles of Drosophila, this elaborate process is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs), and cell adhesion molecules Kin-of-IrreC (Kirre) and Sticks-and-stones (Sns) on their respective surfaces. The FCMs appear to provide the driving force for fusion, via the assembly of protrusions associated with branched F-actin and the WASp, SCAR and Arp2/3 pathways. In the present study, we utilize the dorsal pharyngeal musculature that forms in the Drosophila embryo as a model to explore myoblast fusion and visualize the fusion process in live embryos. These muscles rely on the same cell types and genes as the body wall muscles, but are amenable to live imaging since they do not undergo extensive morphogenetic movement during formation. Time-lapse imaging with F-actin and membrane markers revealed dynamic FCM-associated actin-enriched protrusions that rapidly extend and retract into the myotube from different sites within the actin focus. Ultrastructural analysis of this actin-enriched area showed that they have two morphologically distinct structures: wider invasions and/or narrow filopodia that contain long linear filaments. Consistent with this, formin Diaphanous (Dia) and branched actin nucleator, Arp3, are found decorating the filopodia or enriched at the actin focus, respectively, indicating that linear actin is present along with branched actin at sites of fusion in the FCM. Gain-of-function Dia and loss-of-function Arp3 both lead to fusion defects, a decrease of F-actin foci and prominent filopodia from the FCMs. We also observed differential endocytosis of cell surface components at sites of fusion, with actin reorganizing factors, WASp and SCAR, and Kirre remaining on the myotube surface and Sns preferentially taken up with other membrane proteins into early endosomes and lysosomes in the

  19. Electrically conductive graphene/polyacrylamide hydrogels produced by mild chemical reduction for enhanced myoblast growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyerim; Sim, Myeongbu; Kim, Semin; Yang, Sumi; Yoo, Youngjae; Park, Jin-Ho; Yoon, Tae Ho; Kim, Min-Gon; Lee, Jae Young

    2017-01-15

    Graphene and graphene derivatives, such as graphene oxide (GO) and reduced GO (rGO), have been extensively employed as novel components of biomaterials because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties. These materials have also been used to fabricate electrically conductive biomaterials that can effectively deliver electrical signals to biological systems. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to electrically conductive hydrogels that have both electrical activity and a tissue-like softness. In this study, we synthesized conductive graphene hydrogels by mild chemical reduction of graphene oxide/polyacrylamide (GO/PAAm) composite hydrogels to obtain conductive hydrogels. The reduced hydrogel, r(GO/PAAm), exhibited muscle tissue-like stiffness with a Young's modulus of approximately 50kPa. The electrochemical impedance of r(GO/PAAm) could be decreased by more than ten times compared to that of PAAm and unreduced GO/PAAm. In vitro studies with C2C12 myoblasts revealed that r(GO/PAAm) significantly enhanced proliferation and myogenic differentiation compared with unreduced GO/PAAm and PAAm. Moreover, electrical stimulation of myoblasts growing on r(GO/PAAm) graphene hydrogels for 7days significantly enhanced the myogenic gene expression compared to unstimulated controls. As results, our graphene-based conductive and soft hydrogels will be useful as skeletal muscle tissue scaffolds and can serve as a multifunctional platform that can simultaneously deliver electrical and mechanical cues to biological systems. Graphene-based conductive hydrogels presenting electrical conductance and a soft tissue-like modulus were successfully fabricated via mild reduction of graphene oxide/polyacrylamide composite hydrogels to study their potential to skeletal tissue scaffold applications. Significantly promoted myoblast proliferation and differentiation were obtained on our hydrogels. Additionally, electrical stimulation of myoblasts via the graphene hydrogels could

  20. Let-7b Regulates Myoblast Proliferation by Inhibiting IGF2BP3 Expression in Dwarf and Normal Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shumao; Luo, Wen; Ye, Yaqiong; Bekele, Endashaw J.; Nie, Qinghua; Li, Yugu; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    The sex-linked dwarf chicken is caused by the mutation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene and characterized by shorter shanks, lower body weight, smaller muscle fiber diameter and fewer muscle fiber number. However, the precise regulatory pathways that lead to the inhibition of skeletal muscle growth in dwarf chickens still remain unclear. Here we found a let-7b mediated pathway might play important role in the regulation of dwarf chicken skeletal muscle growth. Let-7b has higher expression in the skeletal muscle of dwarf chicken than in normal chicken, and the expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3), which is a translational activator of IGF2, showed opposite expression trend to let-7b. In vitro cellular assays validated that let-7b directly inhibits IGF2BP3 expression through binding to its 3′UTR region, and the protein level but not mRNA level of IGF2 would be reduced in let-7b overexpressed chicken myoblast. Let-7b can inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell cycle arrest in chicken myoblast through let-7b-IGF2BP3-IGF2 signaling pathway. Additionally, let-7b can also regulate skeletal muscle growth through let-7b-GHR-GHR downstream genes pathway, but this pathway is non-existent in dwarf chicken because of the deletion mutation of GHR 3′UTR. Notably, as the loss binding site of GHR for let-7b, let-7b has enhanced its binding and inhibition on IGF2BP3 in dwarf myoblast, suggesting that the miRNA can balance its inhibiting effect through dynamic regulate its binding to target genes. Collectively, these results not only indicate that let-7b can inhibit skeletal muscle growth through let-7b-IGF2BP3-IGF2 signaling pathway, but also show that let-7b regulates myoblast proliferation by inhibiting IGF2BP3 expression in dwarf and normal chickens. PMID:28736533

  1. T-type α1H Ca2+ channels are involved in Ca2+ signaling during terminal differentiation (fusion) of human myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bijlenga, Philippe; Liu, Jian-Hui; Espinos, Estelle; Haenggeli, Charles-Antoine; Fischer-Lougheed, Jacqueline; Bader, Charles R.; Bernheim, Laurent

    2000-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying Ca2+ signaling during human myoblast terminal differentiation were studied using cell cultures. We found that T-type Ca2+ channels (T-channels) are expressed in myoblasts just before fusion. Their inhibition by amiloride or Ni2+ suppresses fusion and prevents an intracellular Ca2+ concentration increase normally observed at the onset of fusion. The use of antisense oligonucleotides indicates that the functional T-channels are formed by α1H subunits. At hyperpolarized potentials, these channels allow a window current sufficient to increase [Ca2+]i. As hyperpolarization is a prerequisite to myoblast fusion, we conclude that the Ca2+ signal required for fusion is produced when the resting potential enters the T-channel window. A similar mechanism could operate in other cell types of which differentiation implicates membrane hyperpolarization. PMID:10861024

  2. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) promotes myoblast proliferation and skeletal muscle growth of embryonic chickens via the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Minli; Wang, Huan; Xu, Yali; Yu, Debing; Li, Dongfeng; Liu, Xiuhong; Du, Wenxing

    2015-08-01

    During embryonic development, IGF-1 fulfils crucial roles in skeletal myogenesis. However, the involvement of IGF-1-induced myoblast proliferation in muscle growth is still unclear. In the present study, we have characterised the role of IGF-1 in myoblast proliferation both in vitro and in vivo and have revealed novel details of how exogenous IGF-1 influences myogenic genes in chicken embryos. The results show that IGF-1 significantly induces the proliferation of cultured myoblasts in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the IGF-1 treatment significantly promoted myoblasts entering a new cell cycle and increasing the mRNA expression levels of cell cycle-dependent genes. However, these effects were inhibited by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and the Akt inhibitor KP372-1. These data indicated that the pro-proliferative effect of IGF-1 was mediated in response to the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. Moreover, we also showed that exogenous IGF-1 stimulated myoblast proliferation in vivo. IGF-1 administration obviously promoted the incorporation of BrdU and remarkably increased the number of PAX7-positive cells in the skeletal muscle of chicken embryos. Administration of IGF-1 also significantly induced the upregulation of myogenic factors gene, the enhancement of c-Myc and the inhibition of myostatin (Mstn) expression. These findings demonstrate that IGF-1 has strong activity as a promoter of myoblast expansion and muscle fiber formation during early myogenesis. Therefore, this study offers insight into the mechanisms responsible for IGF-1-mediated stimulation of embryonic skeletal muscle development, which could have important implications for the improvement of chicken meat production. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  3. The extracellular matrix regulates the effect of decorin and transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGF-β2) on myoblast migration.

    PubMed

    Goetsch, K P; Niesler, C U

    2016-10-14

    Muscular injuries that destroy the basal lamina result in poor functional recovery of skeletal muscle. This is due, in part, to the deposition of structural fibrotic proteins such as fibronectin and collagen by fibroblasts and other cells. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) promotes fibrosis, whereas the proteoglycan decorin is known to act as an anti-fibrotic agent, in part via the binding and neutralization of TGF-β. We have previously established that decorin can alter the migratory response of skeletal muscle myoblasts to the extracellular matrix (ECM) factor collagen, but not fibronectin. We have also shown that TGF-β reduces myoblast migration. In the current study we demonstrate that decorin can dramatically alter the inhibitory role of TGF-β on human myoblast migration and go on to shown that the extracellular matrix can significantly modify this effect. Decorin and TGF-β2 in combination were observed to significantly increase the rate of human myoblast migration, despite the inhibitory effect of TGF-β2 on its own. Furthermore, in the presence of fibronectin, TGF-β2 and decorin no longer acted synergistically to promote migration; while in the presence of collagen I, TGF-β2 failed to inhibit migration. These studies show, for the first time, that decorin can alter the bioactivity of TGF-β2 on human myoblast migration and emphasize the crucial regulatory role of the extracellular matrix in determining the response of skeletal muscle myoblasts to migratory cues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Glypican-1 regulates myoblast response to HGF via Met in a lipid raft-dependent mechanism: effect on migration of skeletal muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Via the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exerts key roles involving skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are critical modulators of HGF activity, but the role of specific HSPGs in HGF regulation is poorly understood. Glypican-1 is the only HSPG expressed in myoblasts that localize in lipid raft membrane domains, controlling cell responses to extracellular stimuli. We determined if glypican-1 in these domains is necessary to stabilize the HGF-Met signaling complex and myoblast response to HGF. Methods C2C12 myoblasts and a derived clone (C6) with low glypican-1 expression were used as an experimental model. The activation of Met, ERK1/2 and AKT in response to HGF was evaluated. The distribution of Met and its activated form in lipid raft domains, as well as its dependence on glypican-1, were characterized by sucrose density gradient fractionation in both cell types. Rescue experiments reexpressing glypican-1 or a chimeric glypican-1 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of mouse syndecan-1 or myoblast pretreatment with MβCD were conducted. In vitro and in vivo myoblast migration assays in response to HGF were also performed. Results Glypican-1 localization in membrane raft domains was required for a maximum cell response to HGF. It stabilized Met and HGF in lipid raft domains, forming a signaling complex where the active phospho-Met receptor was concentrated. Glypican-1 also stabilized CD44 in a HGF-dependent manner. In addition, glypican-1 was required for in vitro and in vivo HGF-dependent myoblast migration. Conclusions Glypican-1 is a regulator of HGF-dependent signaling via Met in lipid raft domains. PMID:24517345

  5. Glypican-1 regulates myoblast response to HGF via Met in a lipid raft-dependent mechanism: effect on migration of skeletal muscle precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Jaime; Cabrera, Daniel; Brandan, Enrique

    2014-02-12

    Via the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exerts key roles involving skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are critical modulators of HGF activity, but the role of specific HSPGs in HGF regulation is poorly understood. Glypican-1 is the only HSPG expressed in myoblasts that localize in lipid raft membrane domains, controlling cell responses to extracellular stimuli. We determined if glypican-1 in these domains is necessary to stabilize the HGF-Met signaling complex and myoblast response to HGF. C2C12 myoblasts and a derived clone (C6) with low glypican-1 expression were used as an experimental model. The activation of Met, ERK1/2 and AKT in response to HGF was evaluated. The distribution of Met and its activated form in lipid raft domains, as well as its dependence on glypican-1, were characterized by sucrose density gradient fractionation in both cell types. Rescue experiments reexpressing glypican-1 or a chimeric glypican-1 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of mouse syndecan-1 or myoblast pretreatment with MβCD were conducted. In vitro and in vivo myoblast migration assays in response to HGF were also performed. Glypican-1 localization in membrane raft domains was required for a maximum cell response to HGF. It stabilized Met and HGF in lipid raft domains, forming a signaling complex where the active phospho-Met receptor was concentrated. Glypican-1 also stabilized CD44 in a HGF-dependent manner. In addition, glypican-1 was required for in vitro and in vivo HGF-dependent myoblast migration. Glypican-1 is a regulator of HGF-dependent signaling via Met in lipid raft domains.

  6. Disruption of GLUT1 glucose carrier trafficking in L6E9 and Sol8 myoblasts by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin.

    PubMed Central

    Kaliman, P; Viñals, F; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1995-01-01

    In this study we have used wortmannin, a highly specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, to assess the role of this enzyme on GLUT1 glucose carrier distribution and glucose transport activity in myoblasts from two skeletal-muscle cell lines, L6E9 and Sol8. As detected in L6E9 cells, myoblasts exhibited basal and insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activities. Incubation of intact myoblasts with wortmannin resulted in a marked inhibition of both basal and insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activities. L6E9 and Sol8 myoblasts showed basal and insulin-stimulated glucose transport activities, both of them inhibited by wortmannin in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 approximately 10-20 nM). Concomitantly, immunofluorescence analysis revealed that 1 h treatment with wortmannin led to a dramatic intracellular accumulation of GLUT1 carriers (the main glucose transporter expressed in L6E9 and Sol8 myoblasts) in both cell systems. The effect of wortmannin on GLUT1 cellular redistribution was independent of the presence of insulin. The cellular distribution of two structural plasma-membrane components such as beta 1-integrin or the alpha 1 subunit of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase were unaffected by wortmannin in both the absence and the presence of insulin. As a whole, our results indicate that PI 3-kinase is necessary to basal and insulin-stimulated glucose transport in L6E9 and Sol8 myoblasts. Moreover, immunofluorescence assays suggest that in both cellular models there is a constitutive GLUT 1 trafficking pathway (independent of insulin) that involves PI 3-kinase and which, when blocked, locks GLUT1 in a perinuclear compartment. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8526858

  7. The regulation of total creatine content in a myoblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Odoom, J E; Kemp, G J; Radda, G K

    1996-05-24

    Total cellular creatine content is an important bioenergetic parameter in skeletal muscle. To understand its regulation we investigated creatine transport and accumulation in the G8 cultured skeletal myoblast line. Like other cell types, these contain a creatine transporter, whose activity, measured using a radiolabelling technique, was saturable (Km = 110 +/- 25 microM) and largely dependent on extracellular [Na+]. To study sustained influences on steady state creatine concentration we measured total cellular creatine content using a fluorimetric method in 48 h incubations. We found that the total cellular creatine content was relatively independent of extracellular creatine concentration, consistent with high affinity sodium-dependent uptake balanced by slow passive efflux. Accordingly, in creatine-free incubations net creatine efflux was slow (5 +/- 1% of basal creatine content per day over 6 days), while creatine content in 48 h incubations was reduced by 28 +/- 13% of control by the Na+, K(+)-ATPase inhibitor ouabain. Creatine accumulation after 48 h was stimulated by treatment with the mixed alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonist noradrenaline, the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol, the beta 2-agonist clenbuterol and the cAMP analogue N6,2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, but was unaffected by the alpha 1 adrenergic agonist methoxamine. The noradrenaline enhancement of creatine accumulation at 48 h was inhibited by the mixed alpha- and beta-antagonist labetalol and by the beta-antagonist propranolol, but was unaffected by the alpha 2 antagonist phentolamine; greater inhibition was caused by the beta 2 antagonist butoxamine than the beta 1 antagonist atenolol. Creatine accumulation at 48 h was increased to 230 +/- 6% of control by insulin and by 140 +/- 13% by IGF-I (both at 3 nM). Creatine accumulation at 48 h was also increased to 280 +/- 40% of control by 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (at 70 microM) and to 220 +/- 35% of control by amylin (60 n

  8. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Nordgren, Kendra K.S. Wallace, Kendall B.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  9. Rbfox2-coordinated alternative splicing of Mef2d and Rock2 controls myoblast fusion during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bland, Christopher S.; Kalsotra, Auinash; Scavuzzo, Marissa A.; Curk, Tomaz; Ule, Jernej; Li, Wei; Cooper, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Alternative splicing plays important regulatory roles during periods of physiological change. During development a large number of genes coordinately express protein isoform transitions regulated by alternative splicing, however, the mechanisms that coordinate splicing and the functional integration of the resultant tissue-specific protein isoforms are typically unknown. Here we show that the conserved Rbfox2 RNA binding protein regulates 30% of the splicing transitions observed during myogenesis and is required for the specific step of myoblast fusion. Integration of Rbfox2-dependent splicing outcomes from RNA-seq with Rbfox2 iCLIP data identified Mef2d and Rock2 as Rbfox2 splicing targets. Restored activities of Mef2d and Rock2 rescued myoblast fusion in Rbfox2 depleted cultures demonstrating functional cooperation of protein isoforms generated by coordinated alterative splicing. The results demonstrate that coordinated alternative splicing by a single RNA binding protein modulates transcription (Mef2d) and cell signaling (Rock2) programs to drive tissue-specific functions (cell fusion) to promote a developmental transition. PMID:25087874

  10. Anticancer activity of biologically synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles on mouse myoblast cancer cells and their toxicity against embryonic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rajan; Krishnaraj, Chandran; Sivakumar, Allur Subramaniyan; Prasannakumar, Palaniappan; Abhay Kumar, V K; Shim, Kwan Seob; Song, Chul-Gyu; Yun, Soon-Il

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer activity of bioinspired silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) against mouse myoblast cancer cells (C2C12). Both AgNPs and AuNPs were biologically synthesized using Spinacia oleracea Linn., aqueous leaves extract. UV-Vis. spectrophotometer, high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies supported the successful synthesis of AgNPs and AuNPs. Both these NPs have shown cytotoxicity against C2C12 cells even at very low concentration (5μg/mL). Acridine orange/Ethidium bromide (AO/EB) dual staining confirmed the apoptotic morphological features. The levels of caspase enzymes (caspase-3 and caspase-7) were significantly up-regulated in NPs treated myoblast cells than the plant extract. Furthermore, in zebrafish embryo toxicity study, AgNPs showed 100% mortality at 3μg/mL concentration while AuNPs exhibited the same at much higher concentration (300mg/mL). Taken together, these results provide a preliminary guidance for the development of biomaterials based drugs to fight against the fatal diseases for example cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling changes C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation by inducing Id3 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long; Shi, Songting; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Fangfang; Dijke, Peter ten

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Id3 but not Id1 is induced by Wnt3a stimulation in C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a induces Id3 expression via canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a-induced Id3 expression does not depend on BMP signaling activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Induction of Id3 expression is critical determinant in Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Canonical Wnt signaling plays important roles in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we report that inhibitor of differentiation (Id)3 is a Wnt-inducible gene in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Wnt3a induced Id3 expression in a {beta}-catenin-dependent manner. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) also potently induced Id3 expression. However, Wnt-induced Id3 expression occurred independent of the BMP/Smad pathway. Functional studies showed that Id3 depletion in C2C12 cells impaired Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity, an early marker of osteoblast cells. Id3 depletion elevated myogenin induction during myogenic differentiation and partially impaired Wnt3a suppressed myogenin expression in C2C12 cells. These results suggest that Id3 is an important Wnt/{beta}-catenin induced gene in myoblast cell fate determination.

  12. Cyclic Stretch Facilitates Myogenesis in C2C12 Myoblasts and Rescues Thiazolidinedione-Inhibited Myotube Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya-Ju; Chen, Yun-Ju; Huang, Chia-Wei; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Bu-Miin; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Tsai, Yau-Sheng; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Thiazolidinedione (TZD), a specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist, was developed to control blood glucose in diabetes patients. However, several side effects were reported that increased the risk of heart failure. We used C2C12 myoblasts to investigate the role of PPARs and their transcriptional activity during myotube formation. The role of mechanical stretch during myogenesis was also explored by applying cyclic stretch to the differentiating C2C12 myoblasts with 10% strain deformation at 1 Hz. The myogenesis medium (MM), composed of Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium with 2% horse serum, facilitated myotube formation with increased myosin heavy chain and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) protein expression. The PPARγ protein and PPAR response element (PPRE) promoter activity decreased during MM induction. Cyclic stretch further facilitated the myogenesis in MM with increased α-SMA and decreased PPARγ protein expression and inhibited PPRE promoter activity. Adding a PPARγ agonist (TZD) to the MM stopped the myogenesis and restored the PPRE promoter activity, whereas a PPARγ antagonist (GW9662) significantly increased the myotube number and length. During the myogenesis induction, application of cyclic stretch rescued the inhibitory effects of TZD. These results provide novel perspectives for mechanical stretch to interplay and rescue the dysfunction of myogenesis with the involvement of PPARγ and its target drugs. PMID:27047938

  13. Efficient Restoration of the Dystrophin Gene Reading Frame and Protein Structure in DMD Myoblasts Using the CinDel Method

    PubMed Central

    Iyombe-Engembe, Jean-Paul; Ouellet, Dominique L; Barbeau, Xavier; Rousseau, Joël; Chapdelaine, Pierre; Lagüe, Patrick; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a great revolution in biology. This technology allows the modification of genes in vitro and in vivo in a wide variety of living organisms. In most Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, expression of dystrophin (DYS) protein is disrupted because exon deletions result in a frame shift. We present here the CRISPR-induced deletion (CinDel), a new promising genome-editing technology to correct the DMD gene. This strategy is based on the use of two gRNAs targeting specifically exons that precede and follow the patient deletion in the DMD gene. This pair of gRNAs induced a precise large additional deletion leading to fusion of the targeted exons. Using an adequate pair of gRNAs, the deletion of parts of these exons and the intron separating them restored the DMD reading frame in 62% of the hybrid exons in vitro in DMD myoblasts and in vivo in electroporated hDMD/mdx mice. Moreover, adequate pairs of gRNAs also restored the normal spectrin-like repeat of the dystrophin rod domain; such restoration is not obtained by exon skipping or deletion of complete exons. The expression of an internally deleted DYS protein was detected following the formation of myotubes by the unselected, treated DMD myoblasts. Given that CinDel induces permanent reparation of the DMD gene, this treatment would not have to be repeated as it is the case for exon skipping induced by oligonucleotides. PMID:26812655

  14. Reliable and versatile immortal muscle cell models from healthy and myotonic dystrophy type 1 primary human myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Boris; Borgia, Doriana; Giunco, Silvia; Malena, Adriana; Kiyono, Tohru; Salvatori, Sergio; De Rossi, Anita; Giardina, Emiliano; Sangiuolo, Federica; Pegoraro, Elena; Vergani, Lodovica; Botta, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    Primary human skeletal muscle cells (hSkMCs) are invaluable tools for deciphering the basic molecular mechanisms of muscle-related biological processes and pathological alterations. Nevertheless, their use is quite restricted due to poor availability, short life span and variable purity of the cells during in vitro culture. Here, we evaluate a recently published method of hSkMCs immortalization, relying on ectopic expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and telomerase (TERT) in myoblasts from healthy donors (n=3) and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients (n=2). The efficacy to maintain the myogenic and non-transformed phenotype, as well as the main pathogenetic hallmarks of DM1, has been assessed. Combined expression of the three genes i) maintained the CD56(NCAM)-positive myoblast population and differentiation potential; ii) preserved the non-transformed phenotype and iii) maintained the CTG repeat length, amount of nuclear foci and aberrant alternative splicing in immortal muscle cells. Moreover, immortal hSkMCs displayed attractive additional features such as structural maturation of sarcomeres, persistence of Pax7-positive cells during differentiation and complete disappearance of nuclear foci following (CAG)7 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) treatment. Overall, the CCND1, CDK4 and TERT immortalization yields versatile, reliable and extremely useful human muscle cell models to investigate the basic molecular features of human muscle cell biology, to elucidate the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms and to test new therapeutic approaches for DM1 in vitro.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-α alters integrins and metalloprotease ADAM12 levels and signaling in differentiating myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Grzelkowska-Kowalczyk, K; Tokarska, J; Grabiec, K; Gajewska, M; Milewska, M; Błaszczyk, M

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is important in the regulation of myogenesis. We hypothesized that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) modifies ECM during differentiation of mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Exogenous TNF-α (1 ng/ml) stimulated myoblast fusion on the 3rd day (by 160% vs control) but not on the 5th day of myogenesis. The level of integrin α5 was significantly augmented by TNF-α during 5 day-differentiation; however, integrin β1 was higher than control only on the 3rd day of cytokine treatment. Both the abundance of integrin α5 bound to actin and the level of integrin β1 complexed with integrin α5 increased in the presence of TNF-α, especially on the 3rd day of differentiation. Similarly, the stimulatory effects of TNF-α on integrin α3, metalloprotease ADAM12 and kinases related to integrins, FAK and ILK, were limited to the 3rd day of differentiation. We concluded that TNF-α-induced changes in ECM components in differentiating myogenic cells, i.e. i) increased expression of integrin α5, β1, α3, and metalloprotease ADAM12, ii) enhanced formation of α5β1 integrin receptors and interaction of integrin α5-cytoskeleton, and iii) increased expression of kinases associated with integrin signaling, FAK and ILK, were temporarily associated with the onset of myocyte fusion.

  16. Action of lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin on sterol synthesis and their antiproliferative effect in cultured myoblasts from human striated muscle.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, A K; Nègre-Aminou, P; van Thiel, G C; Bolhuis, P A; Cohen, L H

    1996-11-08

    Lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin are fairly strong inhibitors of sterol synthesis in human myoblasts in culture. Lovastatin and simvastatin have IC50 values of 19 +/- 6 nM and 4.0 +/- 2.3 nM, respectively. Pravastatin is a weaker inhibitor of sterol synthesis (IC50 value of 110 +/- 38 nM). Through inhibition of mevalonate production, these compounds have a distinct inhibiting effect on cell proliferation. Because proliferation of myoblasts is important in the repair of damaged skeletal muscle, experiments were performed to investigate the effect of lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin on cell proliferation and cell viability. The more potent inhibitors of sterol synthesis, lovastatin, and simvastatin, were able to inhibit the proliferation of these cells during 3 days of incubation with drug concentrations of 1 microM for lovastatin and 0.1 microM or 1 microM for simvastatin. DNA synthesis was decreased by more than 80% in the presence of 1 microM of lovastatin or simvastatin. In contrast, under these conditions, pravastatin had no influence on cell proliferation or DNA synthesis, which is probably related to the lack of inhibition of sterol synthesis by pravastatin on extended incubation. The three 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors did not disturb cell viability because mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity and ATP content remained proportional to the number of cells in the culture at any concentration used.

  17. Thermal manipulations in late-term chick embryos have immediate and longer term effects on myoblast proliferation and skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Piestun, Yogev; Harel, Michal; Barak, Miriam; Yahav, Shlomo; Halevy, Orna

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the cellular and molecular bases for the promotion of muscle development and growth by temperature manipulations (TMs) during late-term chick embryogenesis. We show that incubation at 39.5°C (increase of 1.7°C from normal conditions) from embryonic days 16 to 18 (E16 to E18) for 3 or 6 h daily increased diameter of myofibers as of day 13 of age and enhanced absolute muscle growth relative to controls, until day 35 of age. TMs had immediate (E17) and later (up to 2 wk posthatch) effects in elevating muscle cell proliferation relative to controls. This was indicated by higher DNA incorporation of thymidine and a higher number of cells expressing PCNA in intact muscle, accompanied by higher Pax7 levels, all reflecting a higher number of myogenic cells, and suggesting that the increased hypertrophy can be attributed to a higher reservoir of myogenic progeny cells produced in response to the TM. IGF-I levels were higher in the TM groups than in controls, implying a mechanism by which heat manipulations in chicks affect muscle development, with locally secreted IGF-I playing a major role. Whereas hypertrophy was similar in both TM groups, cell proliferation and Pax7 levels were more robust in the 6-h muscle, mainly posthatch, suggesting a differential effect of various TM periods on cell reservoir vs. hypertrophy and a high sensitivity of myoblasts to relatively small changes in heat duration with respect to these processes, which is manifested in the short and long term. PMID:19023019

  18. Concordant but Varied Phenotypes among Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patient-Specific Myoblasts Derived using a Human iPSC-Based Model.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Young; Lim, HoTae; Estrellas, Kenneth; Mula, Jyothi; Cohen, Tatiana V; Zhang, Yuanfan; Donnelly, Christopher J; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Kim, Yong Jun; Kim, Hyesoo; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Li, Hongmei Lisa; Hotta, Akitsu; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Maragakis, Nicholas; Wagner, Kathryn R; Lee, Gabsang

    2016-06-07

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) remains an intractable genetic disease. Althogh there are several animal models of DMD, there is no human cell model that carries patient-specific DYSTROPHIN mutations. Here, we present a human DMD model using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Our model reveals concordant disease-related phenotypes with patient-dependent variation, which are partially reversed by genetic and pharmacological approaches. Our "chemical-compound-based" strategy successfully directs hiPSCs into expandable myoblasts, which exhibit a myogenic transcriptional program, forming striated contractile myofibers and participating in muscle regeneration in vivo. DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts show disease-related phenotypes with patient-to-patient variability, including aberrant expression of inflammation or immune-response genes and collagens, increased BMP/TGFβ signaling, and reduced fusion competence. Furthermore, by genetic correction and pharmacological "dual-SMAD" inhibition, the DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts and genetically corrected isogenic myoblasts form "rescued" multi-nucleated myotubes. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a human "DMD-in-a-dish" model using hiPSC-based disease modeling.

  19. The roles of supernatant of macrophage treated by excretory-secretory products from muscle larvae of Trichinella spiralis on the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Bai, X; Wang, X L; Tang, B; Shi, H N; Boireau, P; Rosenthal, B; Wu, X P; Liu, M Y; Liu, X L

    2016-11-15

    The excretory-secretory products (ESPs) released by the muscle-larvae (ML) stage of Trichinella spiralis have been suggested to be involved in nurse cell formation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ML-ESPs modulate nurse cell formation remain unclear. Macrophages exert either beneficial or deleterious effects on tissue repair, depending on their activation/polarization state. They are crucial for skeletal muscle repair, notably, via their actions on myogenic precursor cells. However, these interactions during T. spiralis infection have not been characterized. In the present study, the ability of conditioned medium (CM) from J774A.1 macrophages treated with ML-ESPs to influence the differentiation of murine myoblasts, and the mechanisms of this influence, were investigated in vitro. The results showed that the expression of Myogenic Regulatory Factors (MRFs) MyoD and myogenin, myosin heavy chain (MyHC), and the p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor were reduced in CM treated cells compared to their expression in the control group. These findings indicated that CM inhibited myoblast differentiation. Conversely, CM promoted myoblast proliferation and increased cyclin D1 levels. Taken together, results of our study suggested that CM can indirectly influence myoblast differentiation and proliferation, which provides a new method for the elucidation of the complex mechanisms involved in cell-parasite and cell-cell interactions during T. spiralis infection.

  20. Cellular senescence in human myoblasts is overcome by human telomerase reverse transcriptase and cyclin-dependent kinase 4: consequences in aging muscle and therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chun-Hong; Mouly, Vincent; Cooper, Racquel N; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Bigot, Anne; Shay, Jerry W; Di Santo, James P; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Wright, Woodring E

    2007-08-01

    Cultured human myoblasts fail to immortalize following the introduction of telomerase. The availability of an immortalization protocol for normal human myoblasts would allow one to isolate cellular models from various neuromuscular diseases, thus opening the possibility to develop and test novel therapeutic strategies. The parameters limiting the efficacy of myoblast transfer therapy (MTT) could be assessed in such models. Finally, the presence of an unlimited number of cell divisions, and thus the ability to clone cells after experimental manipulations, reduces the risks of insertional mutagenesis by many orders of magnitude. This opportunity for genetic modification provides an approach for creating a universal donor that has been altered to be more therapeutically useful than its normal counterpart. It can be engineered to function under conditions of chronic damage (which are very different than the massive regeneration conditions that recapitulate normal development), and to overcome the biological problems such as cell death and failure to proliferate and migrate that limit current MTT strategies. We describe here the production and characterization of a human myogenic cell line, LHCN-M2, that has overcome replicative aging due to the expression of telomerase and cyclin-dependent kinase 4. We demonstrate that it functions as well as young myoblasts in xenotransplant experiments in immunocompromized mice under conditions of regeneration following muscle damage.

  1. Long-Term Endurance Exercise in Humans Stimulates Cell Fusion of Myoblasts along with Fusogenic Endogenous Retroviral Genes In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Frese, Sebastian; Ruebner, Matthias; Suhr, Frank; Konou, Thierry M; Tappe, Kim A; Toigo, Marco; Jung, Hans H; Henke, Christine; Steigleder, Ruth; Strissel, Pamela L; Huebner, Hanna; Beckmann, Matthias W; van der Keylen, Piet; Schoser, Benedikt; Schiffer, Thorsten; Frese, Laura; Bloch, Wilhelm; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Myogenesis is defined as growth, differentiation and repair of muscles where cell fusion of myoblasts to multinucleated myofibers is one major characteristic. Other cell fusion events in humans are found with bone resorbing osteoclasts and placental syncytiotrophoblasts. No unifying gene regulation for natural cell fusions has been found. We analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies of competitive cyclists for muscle-specific attributes and expression of human endogenous retrovirus (ERV) envelope genes due to their involvement in cell fusion of osteoclasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Comparing muscle biopsies from post- with the pre-competitive seasons a significant 2.25-fold increase of myonuclei/mm fiber, a 2.38-fold decrease of fiber area/nucleus and a 3.1-fold decrease of satellite cells (SCs) occurred. We propose that during the pre-competitive season SC proliferation occurred following with increased cell fusion during the competitive season. Expression of twenty-two envelope genes of muscle biopsies demonstrated a significant increase of putative muscle-cell fusogenic genes Syncytin-1 and Syncytin-3, but also for the non-fusogenic erv3. Immunohistochemistry analyses showed that Syncytin-1 mainly localized to the sarcolemma of myofibers positive for myosin heavy-chain isotypes. Cellular receptors SLC1A4 and SLC1A5 of Syncytin-1 showed significant decrease of expression in post-competitive muscles compared with the pre-competitive season, but only SLC1A4 protein expression localized throughout the myofiber. Erv3 protein was strongly expressed throughout the myofiber, whereas envK1-7 localized to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1 transcription factors, PPARγ and RXRα, showed no protein expression in the myofiber, whereas the pCREB-Ser133 activator of Syncytin-1 was enriched to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1, Syncytin-3, SLC1A4 and PAX7 gene regulations along with MyoD1 and myogenin were verified during proliferating or actively-fusing human primary myoblast cell

  2. Long-Term Endurance Exercise in Humans Stimulates Cell Fusion of Myoblasts along with Fusogenic Endogenous Retroviral Genes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Suhr, Frank; Konou, Thierry M.; Tappe, Kim A.; Toigo, Marco; Jung, Hans H.; Henke, Christine; Steigleder, Ruth; Strissel, Pamela L.; Huebner, Hanna; Beckmann, Matthias W.; van der Keylen, Piet; Schoser, Benedikt; Schiffer, Thorsten; Frese, Laura; Bloch, Wilhelm; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Myogenesis is defined as growth, differentiation and repair of muscles where cell fusion of myoblasts to multinucleated myofibers is one major characteristic. Other cell fusion events in humans are found with bone resorbing osteoclasts and placental syncytiotrophoblasts. No unifying gene regulation for natural cell fusions has been found. We analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies of competitive cyclists for muscle-specific attributes and expression of human endogenous retrovirus (ERV) envelope genes due to their involvement in cell fusion of osteoclasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Comparing muscle biopsies from post- with the pre-competitive seasons a significant 2.25-fold increase of myonuclei/mm fiber, a 2.38-fold decrease of fiber area/nucleus and a 3.1-fold decrease of satellite cells (SCs) occurred. We propose that during the pre-competitive season SC proliferation occurred following with increased cell fusion during the competitive season. Expression of twenty-two envelope genes of muscle biopsies demonstrated a significant increase of putative muscle-cell fusogenic genes Syncytin-1 and Syncytin-3, but also for the non-fusogenic erv3. Immunohistochemistry analyses showed that Syncytin-1 mainly localized to the sarcolemma of myofibers positive for myosin heavy-chain isotypes. Cellular receptors SLC1A4 and SLC1A5 of Syncytin-1 showed significant decrease of expression in post-competitive muscles compared with the pre-competitive season, but only SLC1A4 protein expression localized throughout the myofiber. Erv3 protein was strongly expressed throughout the myofiber, whereas envK1-7 localized to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1 transcription factors, PPARγ and RXRα, showed no protein expression in the myofiber, whereas the pCREB-Ser133 activator of Syncytin-1 was enriched to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1, Syncytin-3, SLC1A4 and PAX7 gene regulations along with MyoD1 and myogenin were verified during proliferating or actively-fusing human primary myoblast cell

  3. Absence of Functional Leptin Receptor Isoforms in the POUND (Leprdb/lb) Mouse Is Associated with Muscle Atrophy and Altered Myoblast Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Arounleut, Phonepasong; Bowser, Matthew; Upadhyay, Sunil; Shi, Xing-Ming; Fulzele, Sadanand; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Stranahan, Alexis M.; Hill, William D.; Isales, Carlos M.; Hamrick, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Leptin receptors are abundant in human skeletal muscle, but the role of leptin in muscle growth, development and aging is not well understood. Here we utilized a novel mouse model lacking all functional leptin receptor isoforms (POUND mouse, Leprdb/lb) to determine the role of leptin in skeletal muscle. Methods and Findings Skeletal muscle mass and fiber diameters were examined in POUND mice, and primary myoblast cultures were used to determine the effects of altered leptin signaling on myoblast proliferation and differentiation. ELISA assays, integrated pathway analysis of mRNA microarrays, and reverse phase protein analysis were performed to identify signaling pathways impacted by leptin receptor deficiency. Results show that skeletal muscle mass and fiber diameter are reduced 30–40% in POUND mice relative to wild-type controls. Primary myoblast cultures demonstrate decreased proliferation and decreased expression of both MyoD and myogenin in POUND mice compared to normal mice. Leptin treatment increased proliferation in primary myoblasts from muscles of both adult (12 months) and aged (24 months) wild-type mice, and leptin increased expression of MyoD and myogenin in aged primary myoblasts. ELISA assays and protein arrays revealed altered expression of molecules associated with the IGF-1/Akt and MAPK/MEK signaling pathways in muscle from the hindlimbs of mice lacking functional leptin receptors. Conclusion These data support the hypothesis that the adipokine leptin is a key factor important for the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and that leptin can act directly on its receptors in peripheral tissues to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:23967295

  4. Absence of functional leptin receptor isoforms in the POUND (Lepr(db/lb)) mouse is associated with muscle atrophy and altered myoblast proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Arounleut, Phonepasong; Bowser, Matthew; Upadhyay, Sunil; Shi, Xing-Ming; Fulzele, Sadanand; Johnson, Maribeth H; Stranahan, Alexis M; Hill, William D; Isales, Carlos M; Hamrick, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Leptin receptors are abundant in human skeletal muscle, but the role of leptin in muscle growth, development and aging is not well understood. Here we utilized a novel mouse model lacking all functional leptin receptor isoforms (POUND mouse, Lepr(db/lb)) to determine the role of leptin in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle mass and fiber diameters were examined in POUND mice, and primary myoblast cultures were used to determine the effects of altered leptin signaling on myoblast proliferation and differentiation. ELISA assays, integrated pathway analysis of mRNA microarrays, and reverse phase protein analysis were performed to identify signaling pathways impacted by leptin receptor deficiency. Results show that skeletal muscle mass and fiber diameter are reduced 30-40% in POUND mice relative to wild-type controls. Primary myoblast cultures demonstrate decreased proliferation and decreased expression of both MyoD and myogenin in POUND mice compared to normal mice. Leptin treatment increased proliferation in primary myoblasts from muscles of both adult (12 months) and aged (24 months) wild-type mice, and leptin increased expression of MyoD and myogenin in aged primary myoblasts. ELISA assays and protein arrays revealed altered expression of molecules associated with the IGF-1/Akt and MAPK/MEK signaling pathways in muscle from the hindlimbs of mice lacking functional leptin receptors. These data support the hypothesis that the adipokine leptin is a key factor important for the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and that leptin can act directly on its receptors in peripheral tissues to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation.

  5. Co-transplantation of plasmid-transfected myoblasts and myotubes into rat brains enables high levels of gene expression long-term

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, S.; Williams, P.; Safda, N.; Schultz, E.; Wolff, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously proposed the use of primary muscle cells as a "platform," or "vehicle" for intracerebral transgene expression. Brain grafts of minced muscle, or cultured muscle cells persisted in rat brains for at least 6 mo without any decrease in graft size, or tumor formation. Stable, but moderate levels of intracerebral transgene expression were obtained by transplanting plasmid-transfected myotubes in culture. In the present study, high and stable levels of intracerebral transgene expression were achieved by the co-transplantation of plasmid-transfected myoblasts and myotubes in culture. Approximately 5 X 10(5) myoblasts and myotubes were transfected with 10 micrograms pRSVL plasmid DNA, and 30 micrograms Lipofectin (BRL), respectively. They were mixed together (total cell number was 1 million), and stereotactically injected into the caudate nucleus of an adult rat brain. The activity of luciferase, the product of transgene expression, was stable for at least 4 mo, and much higher than the levels in myotube grafts, or co-grafts of myoblasts and minced muscle. Presumably, the myotubes served as a framework on which the myoblasts can form myotubes. The sections of brains transplanted with co-graft of myoblasts, and myotubes transfected with pRSVLac-Z were stained immunofluorescently for beta-galactosidase activity. The muscle grafts contained beta-galactosidase positive myofibers 4 mo after transplantation. Such high and stable levels of in vivo expression after postnatal gene transfer have rarely been achieved. Primary muscle cells are useful vehicle for transgene expression in brains, and potentially valuable for gene therapy of degenerative neurological disorders.

  6. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Zuloaga, R.; Fuentes, E.N.; Molina, A.; Valdés, J.A.

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP{sub 3}/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation.

  7. Dock mediates Scar- and WASp-dependent actin polymerization through interaction with cell adhesion molecules in founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kaipa, Balasankara Reddy; Shao, Huanjie; Schäfer, Gritt; Trinkewitz, Tatjana; Groth, Verena; Liu, Jianqi; Beck, Lothar; Bogdan, Sven; Abmayr, Susan M.; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2013-01-01

    Summary The formation of the larval body wall musculature of Drosophila depends on the asymmetric fusion of two myoblast types, founder cells (FCs) and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs). Recent studies have established an essential function of Arp2/3-based actin polymerization during myoblast fusion, formation of a dense actin focus at the site of fusion in FCMs, and a thin sheath of actin in FCs and/or growing muscles. The formation of these actin structures depends on recognition and adhesion of myoblasts that is mediated by cell surface receptors of the immunoglobulin superfamily. However, the connection of the cell surface receptors with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization is poorly understood. To date only the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Crk has been suggested to link cell adhesion with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization in FCMs. Here, we propose that the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Dock, like Crk, links cell adhesion with actin polymerization. We show that Dock is expressed in FCs and FCMs and colocalizes with the cell adhesion proteins Sns and Duf at cell–cell contact points. Biochemical data in this study indicate that different domains of Dock are involved in binding the cell adhesion molecules Duf, Rst, Sns and Hbs. We emphasize the importance of these interactions by quantifying the enhanced myoblast fusion defects in duf dock, sns dock and hbs dock double mutants. Additionally, we show that Dock interacts biochemically and genetically with Drosophila Scar, Vrp1 and WASp. Based on these data, we propose that Dock links cell adhesion in FCs and FCMs with either Scar– or Vrp1–WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation. PMID:22992459

  8. Dock mediates Scar- and WASp-dependent actin polymerization through interaction with cell adhesion molecules in founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kaipa, Balasankara Reddy; Shao, Huanjie; Schäfer, Gritt; Trinkewitz, Tatjana; Groth, Verena; Liu, Jianqi; Beck, Lothar; Bogdan, Sven; Abmayr, Susan M; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the larval body wall musculature of Drosophila depends on the asymmetric fusion of two myoblast types, founder cells (FCs) and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs). Recent studies have established an essential function of Arp2/3-based actin polymerization during myoblast fusion, formation of a dense actin focus at the site of fusion in FCMs, and a thin sheath of actin in FCs and/or growing muscles. The formation of these actin structures depends on recognition and adhesion of myoblasts that is mediated by cell surface receptors of the immunoglobulin superfamily. However, the connection of the cell surface receptors with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization is poorly understood. To date only the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Crk has been suggested to link cell adhesion with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization in FCMs. Here, we propose that the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Dock, like Crk, links cell adhesion with actin polymerization. We show that Dock is expressed in FCs and FCMs and colocalizes with the cell adhesion proteins Sns and Duf at cell-cell contact points. Biochemical data in this study indicate that different domains of Dock are involved in binding the cell adhesion molecules Duf, Rst, Sns and Hbs. We emphasize the importance of these interactions by quantifying the enhanced myoblast fusion defects in duf dock, sns dock and hbs dock double mutants. Additionally, we show that Dock interacts biochemically and genetically with Drosophila Scar, Vrp1 and WASp. Based on these data, we propose that Dock links cell adhesion in FCs and FCMs with either Scar- or Vrp1-WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation.

  9. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Ameliorates Skeletal Muscle Dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Mice and Improves Proliferation of SOD1-G93A Myoblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rando, Amaya; Gasco, Samanta; de la Torre, Miriam; García-Redondo, Alberto; Zaragoza, Pilar; Toivonen, Janne M; Osta, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes loss of upper and lower motor neurons as well as skeletal muscle (SKM) dysfunction and atrophy. SKM is one of the tissues involved in the development of ALS pathology, and studies in a SOD1-G93A mouse model of ALS have demonstrated alterations in SKM degeneration/regeneration marker expression in vivo and defective mutant myoblast proliferation in vitro. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to alleviate SOD1-G93A pathology. However, it is unknown whether G-CSF may have a direct effect on SKM or derived myoblasts. To investigate effects of G-CSF and its analog pegfilgrastim (PEGF) on SOD1-G93A- associated SKM markers in vivo and those of G-CSF on myoblast proliferation in vitro. The effect of PEGF treatment on hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, survival, and motor function was determined. RNA expression of SKM markers associated with mutant SOD1 expression was quantified in response to PEGF treatment in vivo, and the effect of G-CSF on the proliferation of myoblasts derived from mutant and control muscles was determined in vitro. Positive effects of PEGF on hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, survival, and functional assays in SOD1-G93A animals were confirmed. In vivo PEGF treatment augmented the expression of its receptor Csf3r and alleviated typical markers for mutant SOD1 muscle. Additionally, G-CSF was found to directly increase the proliferation of SOD1-G93A, but not wild-type primary myoblasts in vitro. Our results support the beneficial role of the G-CSF analog PEGF in a SOD1-G93A model of ALS. Thus, G-CSF and its analogs may be directly beneficial in diseases where the SKM function is compromised. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. The CDM superfamily protein MBC directs myoblast fusion through a mechanism that requires phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate binding but is independent of direct interaction with DCrk.

    PubMed

    Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Chen, Mei-Hui; Geisbrecht, Erika R; Abmayr, Susan M

    2006-12-01

    Myoblast city (mbc), a member of the CDM superfamily, is essential in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo for fusion of myoblasts into multinucleate fibers. Using germ line clones in which both maternal and zygotic contributions were eliminated and rescue of the zygotic loss-of-function phenotype, we established that mbc is required in the fusion-competent subset of myoblasts. Along with its close orthologs Dock180 and CED-5, MBC has an SH3 domain at its N terminus, conserved internal domains termed DHR1 and DHR2 (or "Docker"), and C-terminal proline-rich domains that associate with the adapter protein DCrk. The importance of these domains has been evaluated by the ability of MBC mutations and deletions to rescue the mbc loss-of-function muscle phenotype. We demonstrate that the SH3 and Docker domains are essential. Moreover, ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutations that change amino acids within the MBC Docker domain to residues that are conserved in other CDM family members nevertheless eliminate MBC function in the embryo, which suggests that these sites may mediate interactions specific to Drosophila MBC. A functional requirement for the conserved DHR1 domain, which binds to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate, implicates phosphoinositide signaling in myoblast fusion. Finally, the proline-rich C-terminal sites mediate strong interactions with DCrk, as expected. These sites are not required for MBC to rescue the muscle loss-of-function phenotype, however, which suggests that MBC's role in myoblast fusion can be carried out independently of direct DCrk binding.

  11. Co-transplantation of plasmid-transfected myoblasts and myotubes into rat brains enables high levels of gene expression long-term

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, S.; Williams, P.; Safda, N.; Schultz, E.; Wolff, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously proposed the use of primary muscle cells as a "platform," or "vehicle" for intracerebral transgene expression. Brain grafts of minced muscle, or cultured muscle cells persisted in rat brains for at least 6 mo without any decrease in graft size, or tumor formation. Stable, but moderate levels of intracerebral transgene expression were obtained by transplanting plasmid-transfected myotubes in culture. In the present study, high and stable levels of intracerebral transgene expression were achieved by the co-transplantation of plasmid-transfected myoblasts and myotubes in culture. Approximately 5 X 10(5) myoblasts and myotubes were transfected with 10 micrograms pRSVL plasmid DNA, and 30 micrograms Lipofectin (BRL), respectively. They were mixed together (total cell number was 1 million), and stereotactically injected into the caudate nucleus of an adult rat brain. The activity of luciferase, the product of transgene expression, was stable for at least 4 mo, and much higher than the levels in myotube grafts, or co-grafts of myoblasts and minced muscle. Presumably, the myotubes served as a framework on which the myoblasts can form myotubes. The sections of brains transplanted with co-graft of myoblasts, and myotubes transfected with pRSVLac-Z were stained immunofluorescently for beta-galactosidase activity. The muscle grafts contained beta-galactosidase positive myofibers 4 mo after transplantation. Such high and stable levels of in vivo expression after postnatal gene transfer have rarely been achieved. Primary muscle cells are useful vehicle for transgene expression in brains, and potentially valuable for gene therapy of degenerative neurological disorders.

  12. Liquid Crystal Elastomer Microspheres as Three-Dimensional Cell Scaffolds Supporting the Attachment and Proliferation of Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Bera, Tanmay; Freeman, Ernest J; McDonough, Jennifer A; Clements, Robert J; Aladlaan, Asaad; Miller, Donald W; Malcuit, Christopher; Hegmann, Torsten; Hegmann, Elda

    2015-07-08

    We report that liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs), often portrayed as artificial muscles, serve as scaffolds for skeletal muscle cell. A simultaneous microemulsion photopolymerization and cross-linking results in nematic LCE microspheres 10-30 μm in diameter that when conjoined form a LCE construct that serves as the first proof-of-concept for responsive LCE muscle cell scaffolds. Confocal microscopy experiments clearly established that LCEs with a globular, porous morphology permit both attachment and proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts, while the nonporous elastomer morphology, prepared in the absence of a microemulsion, does not. In addition, cytotoxicity and proliferation assays confirm that the liquid crystal elastomer materials are biocompatible promoting cellular proliferation without any inherent cytotoxicity.

  13. Conessine Interferes with Oxidative Stress-Induced C2C12 Myoblast Cell Death through Inhibition of Autophagic Flux

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunju; Lee, Kang Il; Jang, Minsu; Namkoong, Sim; Park, Rackhyun; Ju, Hyunwoo; Choi, Inho; Oh, Won Keun

    2016-01-01

    Conessine, a steroidal alkaloid isolated from Holarrhena floribunda, has anti-malarial activity and interacts with the histamine H3 receptor. However, the cellular effects of conessine are poorly understood. Accordingly, we evaluated the involvement of conessine in the regulation of autophagy. We searched natural compounds that modulate autophagy, and conessine was identified as an inhibitor of autophagic flux. Conessine treatment induced the formation of autophagosomes, and p62, an autophagic adapter, accumulated in the autophagosomes. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) result in muscle cell death by inducing excessive autophagic flux. Treatment with conessine inhibited H2O2-induced autophagic flux in C2C12 myoblast cells and also interfered with cell death. Our results indicate that conessine has the potential effect to inhibit muscle cell death by interfering with autophagic flux. PMID:27257813

  14. Small molecules dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 inhibit myostatin/GDF8 signaling and promote functional myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horbelt, Daniel; Boergermann, Jan H; Chaikuad, Apirat; Alfano, Ivan; Williams, Eleanor; Lukonin, Ilya; Timmel, Tobias; Bullock, Alex N; Knaus, Petra

    2015-02-06

    GDF8, or myostatin, is a member of the TGF-β superfamily of secreted polypeptide growth factors. GDF8 is a potent negative regulator of myogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. We found that GDF8 signaling was inhibited by the small molecule ATP competitive inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189. These compounds were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of BMP signaling by binding to the BMP type I receptors ALK1/2/3/6. We present the crystal structure of the type II receptor ActRIIA with dorsomorphin and demonstrate that dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 target GDF8 induced Smad2/3 signaling and repression of myogenic transcription factors. As a result, both inhibitors rescued myogenesis in myoblasts treated with GDF8. As revealed by quantitative live cell microscopy, treatment with dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 promoted the contractile activity of myotubular networks in vitro. We therefore suggest these inhibitors as suitable tools to promote functional myogenesis.

  15. Poly(C)-binding protein 1 (Pcbp1) regulates skeletal muscle differentiation by modulating microRNA processing in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Lewis, Ramon A; Yang, Qiumei; Liu, Jianming; Huang, Zhan-Peng; Hu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Daiwen; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2017-04-05

    Control of muscle cell proliferation and differentiation is essential to proper muscle development, function, and regeneration, and numerous transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators are key to these processes. For example, recent studies have linked microRNAs (miRNAs) to muscle gene expression, development, and disease. The poly(C)-binding protein1 (Pcbp1, hnRNP-E1, or αCP-1) has been reported to bind the 3'UTRs of target genes to regulate mRNA stability and protein translation. However, Pcbp1's biological function in skeletal muscle and general mechanism of action remain largely undetermined. Here, we report that Pcbp1 is a component of the miRNA-processing pathway that regulates miRNA biogenesis. SiRNA-based inhibition of Pcbp1 transcript levels in mouse skeletal muscle myoblasts led to dysregulated cellular proliferation and differentiation. We also found that Pcbp1 null mutant mice exhibit early embryonic lethality, indicating that Pcbp1 is indispensable for embryonic development. Interestingly, hypomorphic Pcbp1 mutant mice displayed defects in muscle growth, a slow- to fast- myofibril switch and in the proliferation of myoblasts and muscle satellite cells. Moreover, Pcbp1 modulated the processing of muscle-enriched miR-1, miR-133, and miR-206 by physically interacting with Argonaute 2 (AGO2) and other miRNA pathway components. Our results therefore link the function of Pcbp1 to the miRNA pathway in skeletal muscle in mice. Future studies could help determine whether human Pbcp1 is involved in disorders such as muscular dystrophy or muscle degeneration.

  16. Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, stabilizes Numb protein through inhibition of mdm2 in C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Shen; Levine, Alice C; Kirschenbaum, Alexander; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Qin, Weiping; Collier, Lauren; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2012-01-01

    Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation atrophy of rat muscle, prevents denervation-induced nuclear accumulation of intracellular domain of the Notch receptor, and elevates expression of Numb. Numb acts as an inhibitor of Notch signaling and promotes myogenic differentiation of satellite cells. Turnover of Numb is regulated by mdm2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. With these considerations in mind, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on the expression of Numb and mdm2 proteins and determined the effect of mdm2 on nandrolone-induced alterations in Numb protein in C2C12 myoblasts. When C2C12 cells were cultured in a medium favoring differentiation (Dulbecco modified Eagle medium containing 2% horse serum), nandrolone up-regulated Numb protein levels in a time-dependent manner and prolonged Numb protein half-life from 10 to 18 hours. In contrast, nandrolone reduced the expression of mdm2 protein. To determine whether the decreased mdm2 expression induced by nandrolone was responsible for the increased levels and prolonged half-life of Numb protein in this cell line, mdm2-small interfering RNA (siRNA) was employed to inhibit mdm2 expression. Compared to cells transfected with scrambled siRNA (negative control), transfection with mdm2-siRNA increased basal Numb protein expression but abolished the further increase in Numb protein levels by nandrolone. In addition, transfection of mdm2-siRNA mimicked the effect of nandrolone to prolong the half-life of Numb protein. Moreover, when C2C12 cells were forced to overexpress mdm2, there was a significant decline in the expression of both basal and inducible Numb protein. Our data suggest that nandrolone, by a novel mechanism for this agent in a muscle cell type, increases Numb protein levels in C2C12 myoblasts by stabilizing Numb protein against degradation, at least in part, via suppression of mdm2 expression.

  17. Automated High-Content Assay for Compounds Selectively Toxic to Trypanosoma cruzi in a Myoblastic Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Cotillo, Ignacio; Presa, Jesús L.; Cantizani, Juan; Peña, Imanol; Bardera, Ana I.; Martín, Jose J.; Rodriguez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a very important public health problem in Latin America where it is endemic. Although mostly asymptomatic at its initial stage, after the disease becomes chronic, about a third of the infected patients progress to a potentially fatal outcome due to severe damage of heart and gut tissues. There is an urgent need for new drugs against Chagas disease since there are only two drugs available, benznidazole and nifurtimox, and both show toxic side effects and variable efficacy against the chronic stage of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Genetically engineered parasitic strains are used for high throughput screening (HTS) of large chemical collections in the search for new anti-parasitic compounds. These assays, although successful, are limited to reporter transgenic parasites and do not cover the wide T. cruzi genetic background. With the aim to contribute to the early drug discovery process against Chagas disease we have developed an automated image-based 384-well plate HTS assay for T. cruzi amastigote replication in a rat myoblast host cell line. An image analysis script was designed to inform on three outputs: total number of host cells, ratio of T. cruzi amastigotes per cell and percentage of infected cells, which respectively provides one host cell toxicity and two T. cruzi toxicity readouts. The assay was statistically robust (Z´ values >0.6) and was validated against a series of known anti-trypanosomatid drugs. Conclusions/Significance We have established a highly reproducible, high content HTS assay for screening of chemical compounds against T. cruzi infection of myoblasts that is amenable for use with any T. cruzi strain capable of in vitro infection. Our visual assay informs on both anti-parasitic and host cell toxicity readouts in a single experiment, allowing the direct identification of compounds selectively targeted to the parasite. PMID:25615687

  18. A TGFβ-Smad4-Fgf6 signaling cascade controls myogenic differentiation and myoblast fusion during tongue development

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dong; Zhao, Hu; Parada, Carolina; Hacia, Joseph G.; Bringas, Pablo; Chai, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The tongue is a muscular organ and plays a crucial role in speech, deglutition and taste. Despite the important physiological functions of the tongue, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of tongue muscle development. TGFβ family members play important roles in regulating myogenesis, but the functional significance of Smad-dependent TGFβ signaling in regulating tongue skeletal muscle development remains unclear. In this study, we have investigated Smad4-mediated TGFβ signaling in the development of occipital somite-derived myogenic progenitors during tongue morphogenesis through tissue-specific inactivation of Smad4 (using Myf5-Cre;Smad4flox/flox mice). During the initiation of tongue development, cranial neural crest (CNC) cells occupy the tongue buds before myogenic progenitors migrate into the tongue primordium, suggesting that CNC cells play an instructive role in guiding tongue muscle development. Moreover, ablation of Smad4 results in defects in myogenic terminal differentiation and myoblast fusion. Despite compromised muscle differentiation, tendon formation appears unaffected in the tongue of Myf5-Cre;Smad4flox/flox mice, suggesting that the differentiation and maintenance of CNC-derived tendon cells are independent of Smad4-mediated signaling in myogenic cells in the tongue. Furthermore, loss of Smad4 results in a significant reduction in expression of several members of the FGF family, including Fgf6 and Fgfr4. Exogenous Fgf6 partially rescues the tongue myoblast fusion defect of Myf5-Cre;Smad4flox/flox mice. Taken together, our study demonstrates that a TGFβ-Smad4-Fgf6 signaling cascade plays a crucial role in myogenic cell fate determination and lineage progression during tongue myogenesis. PMID:22438570

  19. Detection of Pancreatic Cancer-induced Cachexia using a Fluorescent Myoblast Reporter System and Analysis of Metabolite Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Winnard, Paul T.; Bharti, Santosh; Penet, Marie-France; Marik, Radharani; Mironchik, Yelena; Wildes, Flonne; Maitra, Anirban; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    The dire effects of cancer-induced cachexia undermine treatment and contribute to decreased survival rates. Therapeutic options for this syndrome are limited, and therefore efforts to identify signs of precachexia in cancer patients are necessary for early intervention. The applications of molecular and functional imaging that would enable a whole-body “holistic” approach to this problem may lead to new insights and advances for diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. Here we have developed a myoblast optical reporter system with the purpose of identifying early cachectic events. We generated a myoblast cell line expressing a dual tdTomato:GFP construct that was grafted onto the muscle of mice bearing human pancreatic cancer xenografts to provide noninvasive live imaging of events associated with cancer-induced cachexia (i.e., weight loss). Real time optical imaging detected a strong tdTomato fluorescent signal from skeletal muscle grafts in mice with weight loses of only 1.2 to 2.7% and tumor burdens of only ~79 to ~170 mm3. Weight loss in cachectic animals was also associated with a depletion of lipid, cholesterol, valine, and alanine levels, which may provide informative biomarkers of cachexia. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the utility of a reporter system that is capable of tracking tumor-induced weight loss, an early marker of cachexia. Future studies incorporating resected tissue from human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) into a reporter-carrying mouse may be able to provide a risk assessment of cachexia with possible implications for therapeutic development. PMID:26719527

  20. Degree of Suppression of Mouse Myoblast Cell Line C2C12 Differentiation Varies According to Chondroitin Sulfate Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Warita, Katsuhiko; Oshima, Nana; Takeda-Okuda, Naoko; Tamura, Jun-ichi; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z.

    2016-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS), a type of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), is a factor involved in the suppression of myogenic differentiation. CS comprises two repeating sugars and has different subtypes depending on the position and number of bonded sulfate groups. However, the effect of each subtype on myogenic differentiation remains unclear. In this study, we spiked cultures of C2C12 myoblasts, cells which are capable of undergoing skeletal muscle differentiation, with one of five types of CS (CS-A, -B, -C, -D, or -E) and induced differentiation over a fixed time. After immunostaining of the formed myotubes with an anti-MHC antibody, we counted the number of nuclei in the myotubes and then calculated the fusion index (FI) as a measure of myotube differentiation. The FI values of all the CS-treated groups were lower than the FI value of the control group, especially the group treated with CS-E, which displayed notable suppression of myotube formation. To confirm that the sugar chain in CS-E is important in the suppression of differentiation, chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), which catabolizes CS, was added to the media. The addition of ChABC led to the degradation of CS-E, and neutralized the suppression of myotube formation by CS-E. Collectively, it can be concluded that the degree of suppression of differentiation depends on the subtype of CS and that CS-E strongly suppresses myogenic differentiation. We conclude that the CS sugar chain has inhibitory action against myoblast cell fusion. PMID:27775651

  1. Enhanced contractile force generation by artificial skeletal muscle tissues using IGF-I gene-engineered myoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanori; Ito, Akira; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Nagamori, Eiji; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I gene delivery to myoblast cells promotes the contractile force generated by hydrogel-based tissue-engineered skeletal muscles in vitro. Two retroviral vectors allowing doxycycline (Dox)-inducible expression of the IGF-I gene were transduced into mouse myoblast C2C12 cells to evaluate the effects of IGF-I gene expression on these cells. IGF-I gene expression stimulated the proliferation of C2C12 cells, and a significant increase in the growth rate was observed for IGF-I-transduced C2C12 cells with Dox addition, designated C2C12/IGF (Dox+) cells. Quantitative morphometric analyses showed that the myotubes induced from C2C12/IGF (Dox+) cells had a larger area and a greater width than control myotubes induced from normal C2C12 cells. Artificial skeletal muscle tissues were prepared from the respective cells using hydrogels composed of type I collagen and Matrigel. Western blot analyses revealed that the C2C12/IGF (Dox+) tissue constructs showed activation of a skeletal muscle hypertrophy marker (Akt) and enhanced expression of muscle-specific markers (myogenin, myosin heavy chain and tropomyosin). Moreover, the creatine kinase activity was increased in the C2C12/IGF (Dox+) tissue constructs. The C2C12/IGF (Dox+) tissue constructs contracted in response to electrical pulses, and generated a significantly higher physical force than the control C2C12 tissue constructs. These findings indicate that IGF-I gene transfer has the potential to yield functional skeletal muscle substitutes that are capable of in vivo restoration of the load-bearing function of injured muscle or acting as in vitro electrically-controlled bio-actuators. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A synthetic compound that potentiates bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced transdifferentiation of myoblasts into the osteoblastic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kato, Satoshi; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Tomita, Katsuro; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D

    2011-03-01

    There is an urgent need to develop methods that lower costs of using recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) to promote bone induction. In this study, we demonstrate the osteogenic effect of a low-molecular weight compound, SVAK-12, that potentiated the effects of BMP-2 in inducing transdifferentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into the osteoblastic phenotype. Here, we report a specific compound, SVAK-12, which was selected based on in silico screenings of small-molecule databases using the homology modeled interaction motif of Smurf1-WW2 domain. The enhancement of BMP-2 activity by SVAK-12 was characterized by evaluating a BMP-specific reporter activity and by monitoring the BMP-2-induced expression of mRNA for osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), which are widely accepted marker genes of osteoblast differentiation. Finally, we confirmed these results by also measuring the enhancement of BMP-2-induced activity of ALP. Smurf1 is an E3 ligase that targets osteogenic Smads for ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. Smurf1 is an interesting potential target to enhance bone formation based on the positive effects on bone of proteins that block Smurf1-binding to Smad targets or in Smurf1-/- knockout mice. Since Smads bind Smurf1 via its WW2 domain, we performed in silico screening to identify compounds that might interact with the Smurf1-WW2 domain. We recently reported the activity of a compound, SVAK-3. However, SVAK-3, while exhibiting BMP-potentiating activity, was not stable and thus warranted a new search for a more stable and efficacious compound among a selected group of candidates. In addition to being more stable, SVAK-12 exhibited a dose-dependent activity in inducing osteoblastic differentiation of myoblastic C2C12 cells even when multiple markers of the osteoblastic phenotype were parallelly monitored.

  3. A synthetic compound that potentiates bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced transdifferentiation of myoblasts into the osteoblastic phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Satoshi; Tomita, Katsuro; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D.

    2011-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop methods that lower costs of using recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) to promote bone induction. In this study, we demonstrate the osteogenic effect of a low-molecular weight compound, SVAK-12, that potentiated the effects of BMP-2 in inducing transdifferentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into the osteoblastic phenotype. Here, we report a specific compound, SVAK-12, which was selected based on in silico screenings of small-molecule databases using the homology modeled interaction motif of Smurf1-WW2 domain. The enhancement of BMP-2 activity by SVAK-12 was characterized by evaluating a BMP-specific reporter activity and by monitoring the BMP-2-induced expression of mRNA for osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), which are widely accepted marker genes of osteoblast differentiation. Finally, we confirmed these results by also measuring the enhancement of BMP-2-induced activity of ALP. Smurf1 is an E3 ligase that targets osteogenic Smads for ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. Smurf1 is an interesting potential target to enhance bone formation based on the positive effects on bone of proteins that block Smurf1-binding to Smad targets or in Smurf1−/− knockout mice. Since Smads bind Smurf1 via its WW2 domain, we performed in silico screening to identify compounds that might interact with the Smurf1-WW2 domain. We recently reported the activity of a compound, SVAK-3. However, SVAK-3, while exhibiting BMP-potentiating activity, was not stable and thus warranted a new search for a more stable and efficacious compound among a selected group of candidates. In addition to being more stable, SVAK-12 exhibited a dose-dependent activity in inducing osteoblastic differentiation of myoblastic C2C12 cells even when multiple markers of the osteoblastic phenotype were parallelly monitored. PMID:21110071

  4. A Pitx2-MicroRNA Pathway Modulates Cell Proliferation in Myoblasts and Skeletal-Muscle Satellite Cells and Promotes Their Commitment to a Myogenic Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Velasco, Estefanía; Vallejo, Daniel; Esteban, Francisco J; Doherty, Chris; Hernández-Torres, Francisco; Franco, Diego; Aránega, Amelia Eva

    2015-09-01

    The acquisition of a proliferating-cell status from a quiescent state as well as the shift between proliferation and differentiation are key developmental steps in skeletal-muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to provide proper muscle regeneration. However, how satellite cell proliferation is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we report that the c-isoform of the transcription factor Pitx2 increases cell proliferation in myoblasts by downregulating microRNA 15b (miR-15b), miR-23b, miR-106b, and miR-503. This Pitx2c-microRNA (miRNA) pathway also regulates cell proliferation in early-activated satellite cells, enhancing Myf5(+) satellite cells and thereby promoting their commitment to a myogenic cell fate. This study reveals unknown functions of several miRNAs in myoblast and satellite cell behavior and thus may have future applications in regenerative medicine.

  5. Small Heat Shock Protein αB-Crystallin Controls Shape and Adhesion of Glioma and Myoblast Cells in the Absence of Stress

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell shape and adhesion and their proper controls are fundamental for all biological systems. Mesenchymal cells migrate at an average rate of 6 to 60 μm/hr, depending on the extracellular matrix environment and cell signaling. Myotubes, fully differentiated muscle cells, are specialized for power-generation and therefore lose motility. Cell spreading and stabilities of focal adhesion are regulated by the critical protein vinculin from immature myoblast to mature costamere of differentiated myotubes where myofibril Z-band linked to sarcolemma. The Z-band is constituted from microtubules, intermediate filaments, cell adhesion molecules and other adapter proteins that communicate with the outer environment. Mesenchymal cells, including myoblast cells, convert actomyosin contraction forces to tension through mechano-responsive adhesion assembly complexes as Z-band equivalents. There is growing evidence that microtubule dynamics are involved in the generation of contractile forces; however, the roles of microtubules in cell adhesion dynamics are not well determined. Here, we show for the first time that αB-crystallin, a molecular chaperon for tubulin/microtubules, is involved in cell shape determination. Moreover, knockdown of this molecule caused myoblasts and glioma cells to lose their ability for adhesion as they tended to behave like migratory cells. Surprisingly, αB-crystallin knockdown in both C6 glial cells and L6 myoblast permitted cells to migrate more rapidly (2.7 times faster for C6 and 1.3 times faster for L6 cells) than dermal fibroblast. On the other hand, overexpression of αB-crystallin in cells led to an immortal phenotype because of persistent adhesion. Position of matured focal adhesion as visualized by vinculin immuno-staining, stress fiber direction, length, and density were clearly αB-crystallin dependent. These results indicate that the small HSP αB-crystallin has important roles for cell adhesion, and thus microtubule dynamics are necessary

  6. Myosin heavy chain-like localizes at cell contact sites during Drosophila myoblast fusion and interacts in vitro with Rolling pebbles 7

    SciTech Connect

    Bonn, Bettina R.; Rudolf, Anja; Hornbruch-Freitag, Christina; Daum, Gabor; Kuckwa, Jessica; Kastl, Lena; Buttgereit, Detlev; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2013-02-15

    Besides representing the sarcomeric thick filaments, myosins are involved in many cellular transport and motility processes. Myosin heavy chains are grouped into 18 classes. Here we show that in Drosophila, the unconventional group XVIII myosin heavy chain-like (Mhcl) is transcribed in the mesoderm of embryos, most prominently in founder cells (FCs). An ectopically expressed GFP-tagged Mhcl localizes in the growing muscle at cell–cell contacts towards the attached fusion competent myoblast (FCM). We further show that Mhcl interacts in vitro with the essential fusion protein Rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7), which is part of a protein complex established at cell contact sites (Fusion-restricted Myogenic-Adhesive Structure or FuRMAS). Here, branched F-actin is likely needed to widen the fusion pore and to integrate the myoblast into the growing muscle. We show that the localization of Mhcl is dependent on the presence of Rols7, and we postulate that Mhcl acts at the FuRMAS as an actin motor protein. We further show that Mhcl deficient embryos develop a wild-type musculature. We thus propose that Mhcl functions redundantly to other myosin heavy chains in myoblasts. Lastly, we found that the protein is detectable adjacent to the sarcomeric Z-discs, suggesting an additional function in mature muscles. - Highlights: ► The class XVIII myosin encoding gene Mhcl is transcribed in the mesoderm. ► Mhcl localization at contact sites of fusing myoblasts depends on Rols7. ► Mhcl interacts in vitro with Rols7 which is essential for myogenesis. ► Functional redundancy with other myosins is likely as mutants show no muscle defects. ► Mhcl localizes adjacent to Z-discs of sarcomeres and might support muscle integrity.

  7. IGF-1 induces IP3 -dependent calcium signal involved in the regulation of myostatin gene expression mediated by NFAT during myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Juan A; Flores, Sylvia; Fuentes, Eduardo N; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Jaimovich, Enrique; Molina, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation is a complex and highly regulated process characterized by cell cycle arrest, which is associated with morphological changes including myoblast alignment, elongation, and fusion into multinucleated myotubes. This is a balanced process dynamically coordinated by positive and negative signals such as the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) and myostatin (MSTN), respectively. In this study, we report that the stimulation of skeletal myoblasts during differentiation with IGF-1 induces a rapid and transient calcium increase from intracellular stores, which are principally mediated through the phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ)/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 )-dependent signaling pathways. This response was completely blocked when myoblasts were incubated with LY294002 or transfected with the dominant-negative p110 gamma, suggesting a fundamental role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in PLCγ activation. Additionally, we show that calcium released via IP3 and induced by IGF-1 stimulates NFAT-dependent gene transcription and nuclear translocation of the GFP-labeled NFATc3 isoform. This activation was independent of extracellular calcium influx and calcium release mediated by ryanodine receptor (RyR). Finally, we examined mstn mRNA levels and mstn promoter activity in myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents and in reporter activity, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A, 11R-VIVIT, and by inhibitors of the PI3Kγ, PLCγ, and IP3 receptor. Our results strongly suggest that IGF-1 regulates myostatin transcription through the activation of the NFAT transcription factor in an IP3 /calcium-dependent manner. This is the first study to demonstrate a role of calcium-dependent signaling pathways in the mRNA expression of myostatin.

  8. Sustained and therapeutic delivery of factor IX in nude haemophilia B mice by encapsulated C2C12 myoblasts: concurrent tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hortelano, G; Wang, L; Xu, N; Ofosu, F A

    2001-03-01

    This study reports the generation of an immunodeficient murine model for haemophilia B, obtained by breeding factor IX-deficient mice with an immunodeficient mouse strain, and use of this mouse model to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of a gene therapy strategy for treating haemophilia B. Nude haemophilic mice were implanted with biocompatible microcapsules enclosing recombinant myoblasts secreting human factor IX. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) of plasma of mice thus treated was invariably shortened 3 weeks after microcapsule implantation, and remained shortened for at least 77 days. Shortening of the APTT of the haemophilia mice coincided with the appearance of human factor IX in mice plasmas (up to 600 ng mL(-1) on day 77), and normalization of the tail-bleeding time. Thus, the microencapsulated myoblasts reversed the clinical phenotype of haemophilia B. In contrast, plasmas of immunocompetent haemophilic mice similarly implanted with microcapsules only showed a transient shortening of APTT, and coincident transient delivery of human factor IX antigen. Rapid disappearance of human factor IX from plasmas of immunocompetent mice also coincided with production of antibodies to the human transgene. Significantly, 86% of the nude haemophilia mice developed tumours of myoblast origin. Thus, while this study revealed the feasibility of this gene therapy approach to treat severe haemophilia B, it also highlights the importance of using safer cell lines to prevent tumour development.

  9. Stimulating effect of graphene oxide on myogenesis of C2C12 myoblasts on RGD peptide-decorated PLGA nanofiber matrices.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Kim, Min Jeong; Hong, Suck Won; Kim, Bongju; Hyun, Jung Keun; Choi, Yu Suk; Park, Jong-Chul; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    In the field of biomedical engineering, many studies have focused on the possible applications of graphene and related nanomaterials due to their potential for use as scaffolds, coating materials and delivery carriers. On the other hand, electrospun nanofiber matrices composed of diverse biocompatible polymers have attracted tremendous attention for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, their combination is intriguing and still challenging. In the present study, we fabricated nanofiber matrices composed of M13 bacteriophage with RGD peptide displayed on its surface (RGD-M13 phage) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and characterized their physicochemical properties. In addition, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) on the cellular behaviors of C2C12 myoblasts, which were cultured on PLGA decorated with RGD-M13 phage (RGD/PLGA) nanofiber matrices, was investigated. Our results revealed that the RGD/PLGA nanofiber matrices have suitable physicochemical properties as a tissue engineering scaffold and the growth of C2C12 myoblasts were significantly enhanced on the matrices. Moreover, the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts was substantially stimulated when they were cultured on the RGD/PLGA matrices in the presence of GO. In conclusion, these findings propose that the combination of RGD/PLGA nanofiber matrices and GO can be used as a promising strategy for skeletal tissue engineering and regeneration.

  10. Effects of B-Cell Lymphoma 2 Gene Transfer to Myoblast Cells on Skeletal Muscle Tissue Formation Using Magnetic Force-Based Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masanori; Ito, Akira; Akiyama, Hirokazu; Kawabe, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Tissue-engineered skeletal muscle should possess a high cell-dense structure with unidirectional cell alignment. However, limited nutrient and/or oxygen supply within the artificial tissue constructs might restrict cell viability and muscular functions. In this study, we genetically modified myoblast cells with the anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) gene and evaluated their function in artificial skeletal muscle tissue constructs. Magnetite cationic liposomes were used to magnetically label C2C12 myoblast cells for the construction of skeletal muscle bundles by applying a magnetic force. Bcl-2-overexpressing muscle bundles formed highly cell-dense and viable tissue constructs, while muscle bundles without Bcl-2 overexpression exhibited substantial necrosis/apoptosis at the central region of the bundle. Bcl-2-overexpressing muscle bundles contracted in response to electrical pulses and generated a significantly higher physical force. These findings indicate that the incorporation of anti-apoptotic gene-transduced myoblast cells into tissue constructs significantly enhances skeletal muscle formation and function. PMID:23088454

  11. The histone demethylase KDM4B interacts with MyoD to regulate myogenic differentiation in C2C12 myoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang Hyun; Song, Young Joon; Lee, Hansol

    2015-01-24

    Enzymes that mediate posttranslational modifications of histone and nonhistone proteins have been implicated in regulation of skeletal muscle differentiation. However, functions of histone demethylases that could counter the actions of H3-K9 specific histone methyltransferases remain still obscure. Here we present evidences that KDM4B histone demethylase regulates expression of myogenic regulators such as MyoD and thereby controls myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblast cells. We demonstrate that expression of KDM4B gradually increases during myogenic differentiation and depletion of KDM4B using shRNA results in inhibition of differentiation in C2C12 myoblast cells, which is correlated with decreased expression of MyoD and myogenin. In addition, we find that KDM4B shRNA represses expression of MyoD promoter-driven luciferase reporter and exogenous expression of MyoD rescues myogenic potential in KDM4B-depleted myoblast cells. We further show that KDM4B interacts with MyoD, binds to MyoD and myogenin promoters in vivo, and finally, is involved in demethylation of tri-methylated H3-K9 on promoters of MyoD and myogenin. Taken together, our data suggest that KDM4B plays key roles in myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells, presumably by its function as a H3-K9 specific histone demethylase.

  12. Preliminary Quantitative Profile of Differential Expression between Rat L6 Myoblasts and Myotubes by Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ziyou; Chen, Xiulan; Lu, Bingwen; Park, Sung Kyu; Xu, Tao; Xie, Zhensheng; Xue, Peng; Hou, Junjie; Hang, Haiying; Yates, John R.; Yang, Fuquan

    2010-01-01

    Defining the mechanisms governing myogenesis has advanced in recent years. Skeletal-muscle differentiation is a multi-step process controlled spatially and temporally by various factors at the transcription level. To explore those factors involved in myogenesis, stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), coupled with high accuracy mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap), was applied successfully. Rat L6 cell line is an excellent model system for studying muslce myogenesis in vitro. When mononucleate L6 myoblast cells reach confluent in culture plate, they could transform into multinucleate myotubes by serum starvation. By comparing protein expression of L6 myoblasts and terminally differentiated multinucleated myotubes, 1170 proteins were quantified and 379 proteins changed significantly in fully differentiated myotubes in contrast to myoblasts. These differentially expressed proteins are mainly involved in inter-or intracellular signaling, protein synthesis and degradation, protein folding, cell adhesion and extracelluar matrix, cell structure and motility, metabolism, substance transportation, etc. These findings were supported by many previous studies on myogenic differentiation, of which many up-regulated proteins were found to be involved in promoting skeletal muscle differentiation for the first time in our study. In sum, our results provide new clues for understanding the mechanism of myogenesis. PMID:19253283

  13. Astragalus Polysaccharide Inhibits Autophagy and Apoptosis from Peroxide-Induced Injury in C2C12 Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yi; Lu, Lu; Wang, Dongtao; Shi, Ying; Wang, Ming; Huang, Yanfeng; Chen, Dexiu; Deng, Cong; Chen, Jiebin; Lv, Peijia; Wang, Yanjing; Li, Chengjie; Wei, Lian-Bo

    2015-11-01

    The aim is to study the effects and underlying mechanisms of astragalus polysaccharide (APS) on the peroxide-induced injury in C2C12 myoblasts in vitro. Cell viability in the presence or absence of APS was detected by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium colorimetric assay. The autophagosomes were observed by electron microscopy to examine the influence of APS on autophagy caused by H2O2 in C2C12 cells, and the percentage of apoptosis cells was measured by flow cytometry. To further confirm the effect of H2O2 on C2C12 cells, the protein expression of LC3 and RARP, which are the markers of autophagy and apoptosis, respectively, was analyzed by Western blot, as well as the expression levels of p-p70S6K, p70S6K, Bcl-2, Bax, cyto-C, and Caspase-3, to reveal the underlying mechanisms. We observed multiple effects of APS on C2C12 functionality. APS treatment of C2C12 cells at 1 mg/mL reduced cell viability to less than 70 %, and analysis by electron microscopy revealed that APS also reduced the number of H2O2-induced autophagosome formation. Similarly, APS abated the H2O2-mediated increase in cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by the inhibition of LC3 II and RARP that are normally upregulated by H2O2. The expression of p-p70S6K and p70S6K, however, remained unchanged in C2C12 cells in the Control, H2O2 and H2O2 + APS groups. In addition, APS promoted the expression of protein Bcl-2 in H2O2-treated C2C12 cells, but did not change Bax, thus reducing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio that in turn prevented the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-3. APS inhibits the autophagy and apoptosis induced by peroxide injury in C2C12 myoblasts through two independent signaling pathways: the mTOR-independent pathway for the inhibition of autophagy, and the caspase-3-dependent pathway for the suppression of apoptosis.

  14. Mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based substrates for cell directed delivery of Notch signalling modulators to control myoblast differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böcking, Dominique; Wiltschka, Oliver; Niinimäki, Jenni; Shokry, Hussein; Brenner, Rolf; Lindén, Mika; Sahlgren, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical cues are critical to control stem cell function and can be utilized to develop smart biomaterials for stem cell engineering. The challenge is to deliver these cues in a restricted manner with spatial and temporal control. Here we have developed bilayer films of mesoporous silica nanoparticles for delayed cellular delivery of Notch modulators to promote muscle stem cell differentiation. We demonstrate that drug-loaded particles are internalized from the particle-covered surface, which allows for direct delivery of the drug into the cell and a delayed and confined drug release. Substrates of particles loaded with γ-secretase-inhibitors, which block the Notch signalling pathway, promoted efficient differentiation of myoblasts. The particle substrates were fully biocompatible and did not interfere with the inherent differentiation process. We further demonstrate that impregnating commercially available, biocompatible polymer scaffolds with MSNs allows for a free standing substrate for cell directed drug delivery.Biochemical cues are critical to control stem cell function and can be utilized to develop smart biomaterials for stem cell engineering. The challenge is to deliver these cues in a restricted manner with spatial and temporal control. Here we have developed bilayer films of mesoporous silica nanoparticles for delayed cellular delivery of Notch modulators to promote muscle stem cell differentiation. We demonstrate that drug-loaded particles are internalized from the particle-covered surface, which allows for direct delivery of the drug into the cell and a delayed and confined drug release. Substrates of particles loaded with γ-secretase-inhibitors, which block the Notch signalling pathway, promoted efficient differentiation of myoblasts. The particle substrates were fully biocompatible and did not interfere with the inherent differentiation process. We further demonstrate that impregnating commercially available, biocompatible polymer scaffolds with

  15. Oxidative stress-induced S100B accumulation converts myoblasts into brown adipocytes via an NF-κB/YY1/miR-133 axis and NF-κB/YY1/BMP-7 axis.

    PubMed

    Morozzi, Giulio; Beccafico, Sara; Bianchi, Roberta; Riuzzi, Francesca; Bellezza, Ilaria; Giambanco, Ileana; Arcuri, Cataldo; Minelli, Alba; Donato, Rosario

    2017-09-08

    Muscles of sarcopenic people show hypotrophic myofibers and infiltration with adipose and, at later stages, fibrotic tissue. The origin of infiltrating adipocytes resides in fibro-adipogenic precursors and nonmyogenic mesenchymal progenitor cells, and in satellite cells, the adult stem cells of skeletal muscles. Myoblasts and brown adipocytes share a common Myf5(+) progenitor cell: the cell fate depends on levels of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7), a TGF-β family member. S100B, a Ca(2+)-binding protein of the EF-hand type, is expressed at relatively high levels in myoblasts from sarcopenic humans and exerts anti-myogenic effects via NF-κB-dependent inhibition of MyoD, a myogenic transcription factor acting upstream of the essential myogenic factor, myogenin. Adipogenesis requires high levels of ROS, and myoblasts of sarcopenic subjects show elevated ROS levels. Here we show that: (1) ROS overproduction in myoblasts results in upregulation of S100B levels via NF-κB activation; and (2) ROS/NF-κB-induced accumulation of S100B causes myoblast transition into brown adipocytes. S100B activates an NF-κB/Ying Yang 1 axis that negatively regulates the promyogenic and anti-adipogenic miR-133 with resultant accumulation of the brown adipogenic transcription regulator, PRDM-16. S100B also upregulates BMP-7 via NF-κB/Ying Yang 1 with resultant BMP-7 autocrine activity. Interestingly, myoblasts from sarcopenic humans show features of brown adipocytes. We also show that S100B levels and NF-κB activity are elevated in brown adipocytes obtained by culturing myoblasts in adipocyte differentiation medium and that S100B knockdown or NF-κB inhibition in myoblast-derived brown adipocytes reconverts them into fusion-competent myoblasts. At last, interstitial cells and, unexpectedly, a subpopulation of myofibers in muscles of geriatric but not young mice co-express S100B and the brown adipocyte marker, uncoupling protein-1. These results suggest that S100B is an important

  16. Differentiation-Associated Downregulation of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Expression in Myoblasts Serves to Increase Their Resistance to Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Gábor; Szczesny, Bartosz; Brunyánszki, Attila; López-García, Isabel A; Gerö, Domokos; Radák, Zsolt; Szabo, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), the major isoform of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase family, is a constitutive nuclear and mitochondrial protein with well-recognized roles in various essential cellular functions such as DNA repair, signal transduction, apoptosis, as well as in a variety of pathophysiological conditions including sepsis, diabetes and cancer. Activation of PARP-1 in response to oxidative stress catalyzes the covalent attachment of the poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) groups on itself and other acceptor proteins, utilizing NAD+ as a substrate. Overactivation of PARP-1 depletes intracellular NAD+ influencing mitochondrial electron transport, cellular ATP generation and, if persistent, can result in necrotic cell death. Due to their high metabolic activity, skeletal muscle cells are particularly exposed to constant oxidative stress insults. In this study, we investigated the role of PARP-1 in a well-defined model of murine skeletal muscle differentiation (C2C12) and compare the responses to oxidative stress of undifferentiated myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. We observed a marked reduction of PARP-1 expression as myoblasts differentiated into myotubes. This alteration correlated with an increased resistance to oxidative stress of the myotubes, as measured by MTT and LDH assays. Mitochondrial function, assessed by measuring mitochondrial membrane potential, was preserved under oxidative stress in myotubes compared to myoblasts. Moreover, basal respiration, ATP synthesis, and the maximal respiratory capacity of mitochondria were higher in myotubes than in myoblasts. Inhibition of the catalytic activity of PARP-1 by PJ34 (a phenanthridinone PARP inhibitor) exerted greater protective effects in undifferentiated myoblasts than in differentiated myotubes. The above observations in C2C12 cells were also confirmed in a rat-derived skeletal muscle cell line (L6). Forced overexpression of PARP1 in C2C12 myotubes sensitized the cells to oxidant

  17. PAX3-FOXO1 is essential for tumour initiation and maintenance but not recurrence in a human myoblast model of rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Puspa R; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Olanich, Mary E; Khan, Javed; Miettinen, Markku M; Hewitt, Stephen M; Barr, Frederic G

    2017-01-31

    The PAX3-FOXO1 fusion gene is generated by a 2;13 chromosomal translocation and is a characteristic feature of an aggressive subset of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). To dissect the mechanism of oncogene action during RMS tumourigenesis and progression, doxycycline-inducible PAX3-FOXO1 and constitutive MYCN expression constructs were introduced into immortalised human myoblasts. Though myoblasts expressing PAX3-FOXO1 or MYCN alone were not transformed in focus formation assays, combined PAX3-FOXO1 and MYCN expression resulted in transformation. Following intramuscular injection into immunodeficient mice, myoblasts expressing PAX3-FOXO1 and MYCN formed rapidly growing RMS tumours whereas myoblasts expressing only PAX3-FOXO1 formed tumours after a longer latency period. Doxycycline withdrawal in myoblasts expressing inducible PAX3-FOXO1 and constitutive MYCN following tumour formation in vivo or focus formation in vitro resulted in tumour regression or smaller foci associated with myogenic differentiation and cell death. Following regression, most tumours recurred in the absence of doxycycline. Analysis of recurrent tumours revealed a subset without PAX3-FOXO1 expression, and cell lines derived from these recurrent tumours demonstrated transformation in the absence of doxycycline. The doxycycline-independent oncogenicity in these recurrent tumour-derived lines persisted even after PAX3-FOXO1 was inactivated by a CRISPR-Cas9 editing strategy. Whereas cell lines derived from primary tumours were dependent on PAX3-FOXO1 and differentiated following doxycycline withdrawal, recurrent tumour-derived cells without PAX3-FOXO1 expression did not differentiate under these conditions. These findings indicate that PAX3-FOXO1 collaborates with MYCN during early RMS tumourigenesis to dysregulate proliferation and inhibit myogenic differentiation and cell death. Although most cells in the primary tumours are dependent on PAX3-FOXO1, recurrent tumours can develop by a PAX3-FOXO1

  18. TEAD transcription factors are required for normal primary myoblast differentiation in vitro and muscle regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Shilpy; Davidson, Guillaume; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Watanabe, Shuichi; Braun, Thomas; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin

    2017-02-01

    The TEAD family of transcription factors (TEAD1-4) bind the MCAT element in the regulatory elements of both growth promoting and myogenic differentiation genes. Defining TEAD transcription factor function in myogenesis has proved elusive due to overlapping expression of family members and their functional redundancy. We show that silencing of either Tead1, Tead2 or Tead4 did not effect primary myoblast (PM) differentiation, but that their simultaneous knockdown strongly impaired differentiation. In contrast, Tead1 or Tead4 silencing impaired C2C12 differentiation showing their different contributions in PMs and C2C12 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation identified enhancers associated with myogenic genes bound by combinations of Tead4, Myod1 or Myog. Tead4 regulated distinct gene sets in C2C12 cells and PMs involving both activation of the myogenic program and repression of growth and signaling pathways. ChIP-seq from mature mouse muscle fibres in vivo identified a set of highly transcribed muscle cell-identity genes and sites bound by Tead1 and Tead4. Although inactivation of Tead4 in mature muscle fibres caused no obvious phenotype under normal conditions, notexin-induced muscle regeneration was delayed in Tead4 mutants suggesting an important role in myogenic differentiation in vivo. By combining knockdown in cell models in vitro with Tead4 inactivation in muscle in vivo, we provide the first comprehensive description of the specific and redundant roles of Tead factors in myogenic differentiation.

  19. TEAD transcription factors are required for normal primary myoblast differentiation in vitro and muscle regeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shilpy; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Watanabe, Shuichi; Braun, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The TEAD family of transcription factors (TEAD1-4) bind the MCAT element in the regulatory elements of both growth promoting and myogenic differentiation genes. Defining TEAD transcription factor function in myogenesis has proved elusive due to overlapping expression of family members and their functional redundancy. We show that silencing of either Tead1, Tead2 or Tead4 did not effect primary myoblast (PM) differentiation, but that their simultaneous knockdown strongly impaired differentiation. In contrast, Tead1 or Tead4 silencing impaired C2C12 differentiation showing their different contributions in PMs and C2C12 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation identified enhancers associated with myogenic genes bound by combinations of Tead4, Myod1 or Myog. Tead4 regulated distinct gene sets in C2C12 cells and PMs involving both activation of the myogenic program and repression of growth and signaling pathways. ChIP-seq from mature mouse muscle fibres in vivo identified a set of highly transcribed muscle cell-identity genes and sites bound by Tead1 and Tead4. Although inactivation of Tead4 in mature muscle fibres caused no obvious phenotype under normal conditions, notexin-induced muscle regeneration was delayed in Tead4 mutants suggesting an important role in myogenic differentiation in vivo. By combining knockdown in cell models in vitro with Tead4 inactivation in muscle in vivo, we provide the first comprehensive description of the specific and redundant roles of Tead factors in myogenic differentiation. PMID:28178271

  20. Creatine supplementation prevents the inhibition of myogenic differentiation in oxidatively injured C2C12 murine myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sestili, Piero; Barbieri, Elena; Martinelli, Chiara; Battistelli, Michela; Guescini, Michele; Vallorani, Luciana; Casadei, Lucia; D'Emilio, Alessandra; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Piccoli, Giovanni; Agostini, Deborah; Annibalini, Giosuè; Paolillo, Marco; Gioacchini, Anna Maria; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2009-09-01

    Creatine (Cr), one of the most popular nutritional supplements among athletes, has been recently shown to prevent the cytotoxicity caused by different oxidative stressors in various mammalian cell lines, including C2C12 myoblasts, via a direct antioxidant activity. Here, the effect of Cr on the differentiating capacity of C2C12 cells exposed to H(2)O(2) has been investigated. Differentiation into myotubes was monitored using morphological, ultrastructural, and molecular techniques. Treatment with H(2)O(2) (1 h) not only caused a significant (30%) loss of cell viability, but also abrogated the myogenic ability of surviving C2C12. Cr-supplementation (24 h prior to H(2)O(2) treatment) was found to prevent these effects. Interestingly, H(2)O(2)-challenged cells preconditioned with the established antioxidants trolox or N-acetyl-cysteine, although cytoprotected, did not display the same differentiating ability characterizing oxidatively-injured, Cr-supplemented cells. Besides acting as an antioxidant, Cr increased the level of muscle regulatory factors and IGF1 (an effect partly refractory to oxidative stress), the cellular availability of phosphocreatine and seemed to exert some mitochondrially-targeted protective activity. It is concluded that Cr preserves the myogenic ability of oxidatively injured C2C12 via a pleiotropic mechanism involving not only its antioxidant capacity, but also the contribution to cell energy charge and effects at the transcriptional level which common bona fide antioxidants lack.

  1. Specific deletion of CMF1 nuclear localization domain causes incomplete cell cycle withdrawal and impaired differentiation in avian skeletal myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, Ellen . E-mail: ellen.dees@vanderbilt.edu; Robertson, J. Brian; Zhu, Tianli; Bader, David

    2006-10-01

    CMF1 is a protein expressed in embryonic striated muscle with onset of expression preceding that of contractile proteins. Disruption of CMF1 in myoblasts disrupts muscle-specific protein expression. Preliminary studies indicate both nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of CMF1 protein, suggesting functional roles in both cellular compartments. Here we examine the nuclear function of CMF1, using a newly characterized antibody generated against the CMF1 nuclear localization domain and a CMF1 nuclear localization domain-deleted stable myocyte line. The antibody demonstrates nuclear distribution of the CMF1 protein both in vivo and in cell lines, with clustering of CMF1 protein around chromatin during mitosis. In more differentiated myocytes, the protein shifts to the cytoplasm. The CMF1 NLS-deleted cell lines have markedly impaired capacity to differentiate. Specifically, these cells express less contractile protein than wild-type or full-length CMF1 stably transfected cells, and do not fuse properly into multinucleate syncytia with linear nuclear alignment. In response to low serum medium, a signal to differentiate, CMF1 NLS-deleted cells enter G0, but continue to express proliferation markers and will reenter the cell cycle when stimulated by restoring growth medium. These data suggest that CMF1 is involved in regulation the transition from proliferation to differentiation in embryonic muscle.

  2. Skeletal myoblasts for heart regeneration and repair: state of the art and perspectives on the mechanisms for functional cardiac benefits.

    PubMed

    Formigli, L; Zecchi-Orlandini, S; Meacci, E; Bani, D

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, skeletal myoblasts (SkMBs) have been the most widely used cells in basic research and clinical trials of cell based therapy for cardiac repair and regeneration. Although SkMB engraftment into the post-infarcted heart has been consistently found to improve cardiac contractile function, the underlying therapeutic mechanisms remain still a matter of controversy and debate. This is basically because SkMBs do not attain a cardiac-like phenotype once homed into the diseased heart nor they form a contractile tissue functionally coupled with the surrounding viable myocardium. This issue of concern has generated the idea that the cardiotropic action of SkMBs may depend on the release of paracrine factors. However, the paracrine hypothesis still remains ill-defined, particularly concerning the identification of the whole spectrum of cell-derived soluble factors and details on their cardiac effects. In this context, the possibility to genetically engineering SkMBs to potentate their paracrine attitudes appears particularly attractive and is actually raising great expectation. Aim of the present review is not to cover all the aspects of cell-based therapy with SkMBs, as this has been the object of previous exhaustive reviews in this field. Rather, we focused on novel aspects underlying the interactions between SkMBs and the host cardiac tissues which may be relevant for directing the future basic and applied research on SkMB transplantation for post ischemic cardiac dysfunction.

  3. Characterization of viability and proliferation of alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate encapsulated myoblasts using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Ajit; Sengupta, Ruchira; Matsui, Hideto; Lillicrap, David; Jones, Kim; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2010-08-01

    Genetically modified cells encapsulated in alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA) are being developed to deliver therapeutic products to treat a variety of diseases. The characterization of the encapsulated cells thus becomes paramount. This study reports a novel method to assess the viability, granularity and proliferation of encapsulated cells based on flow cytometry. The in vitro viability of encapsulated G8 murine myoblasts secreting canine FVIII (cFVIII) measured by flow cytometry was comparable to the traditional trypan blue exclusion method and both correlated with cFVIII secretion levels. In contrast, after implantation into mice, only viability measured by flow cytometry correlated with cFVIII secretion. Further, flow cytometry analysis of encapsulated cells maintained in vitro and in vivo revealed a greater fraction of granular cells compared to free cells, suggesting that encapsulation influences the morphology (cytoplasmic composition) of cells within APA microcapsules. Interestingly, the proliferation study showed that encapsulated cells proliferate faster, on average, and were more heterogeneous in vivo compared to in vitro culture conditions, suggesting that encapsulated cell proliferation is complex and environment-dependent. In conclusion, we show that flow cytometry analysis allows for a more consistent and comprehensive examination of encapsulated cells to aid in the development of cell therapy protocols.

  4. Signal mingle: Micropatterns of BMP-2 and fibronectin on soft biopolymeric films regulate myoblast shape and SMAD signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Vincent; Fourel, Laure; Destaing, Olivier; Gilde, Flora; Albigès-Rizo, Corinne; Picart, Catherine; Boudou, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In vivo, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) exists both in solution and bound to the extracellular matrix (ECM). While these two modes of presentation are known to influence cell behavior distinctly, their role in the niche microenvironment and their functional relevance in the genesis of a biological response has sparsely been investigated at a cellular level. Here we used the natural affinity of BMP-2 for fibronectin (FN) to engineer cell-sized micropatterns of BMP-2. This technique allowed the simultaneous control of the spatial presentation of fibronectin-bound BMP-2 and cell spreading. These micropatterns induced a specific actin and adhesion organization around the nucleus, and triggered the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of SMAD1/5/8 in C2C12 myoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells, an early indicator of their osteoblastic trans-differentiation. We found that cell spreading itself potentiated a BMP-2-dependent phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8. Finally, we demonstrated that FN/BMP-2-mediated early SMAD signaling depended on LIM kinase 2 and ROCK, rather than myosin II activation. Altogether, our results show that FN/BMP-2 micropatterns are a useful tool to study the mechanisms underlying BMP-2-mediated mechanotransduction. More broadly, our approach could be adapted to other combinations of ECM proteins and growth factors, opening an exciting avenue to recreate tissue-specific niches in vitro.

  5. Selective androgen receptor modulator, YK11, regulates myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts by follistatin expression.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Ota, Rumi; Someya, Kousuke; Kusakabe, Taichi; Kato, Keisuke; Inouye, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblast cells is induced by the novel androgen receptor (AR) partial agonist, (17α,20E)-17,20-[(1-methoxyethylidene)bis-(oxy)]-3-oxo-19-norpregna-4,20-diene-21-carboxylic acid methyl ester (YK11), as well as by dihydrotestosterone (DHT). YK11 is a selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM), which activates AR without the N/C interaction. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism by which YK11 induces myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells. The induction of key myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), such as myogenic differentiation factor (MyoD), myogenic factor 5 (Myf5) and myogenin, was more significant in the presence of YK11 than in the presence of DHT. YK11 treatment of C2C12 cells, but not DHT, induced the expression of follistatin (Fst), and the YK11-mediated myogenic differentiation was reversed by anti-Fst antibody. These results suggest that the induction of Fst is important for the anabolic effect of YK11.

  6. Intracellular Distribution and Nuclear Activity of Antisense Oligonucleotides After Unassisted Uptake in Myoblasts and Differentiated Myotubes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    González-Barriga, Anchel; Nillessen, Bram; Kranzen, Julia; van Kessel, Ingeborg D G; Croes, Huib J E; Aguilera, Begoña; de Visser, Peter C; Datson, Nicole A; Mulders, Susan A M; van Deutekom, Judith C T; Wieringa, Bé; Wansink, Derick G

    2017-04-04

    Clinical efficacy of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) for the treatment of neuromuscular disorders depends on efficient cellular uptake and proper intracellular routing to the target. Selection of AONs with highest in vitro efficiencies is usually based on chemical or physical methods for forced cellular delivery. Since these methods largely bypass existing natural mechanisms for membrane passage and intracellular trafficking, spontaneous uptake and distribution of AONs in cells are still poorly understood. Here, we report on the unassisted uptake of naked AONs, so-called gymnosis, in muscle cells in culture. We found that gymnosis works similarly well for proliferating myoblasts as for terminally differentiated myotubes. Cell biological analyses combined with microscopy imaging showed that a phosphorothioate backbone promotes efficient gymnosis, that uptake is clathrin mediated and mainly results in endosomal-lysosomal accumulation. Nuclear localization occurred at a low level, but the gymnotically delivered AONs effectively modulated the expression of their nuclear RNA targets. Chloroquine treatment after gymnotic delivery helped increase nuclear AON levels. In sum, we demonstrate that gymnosis is feasible in proliferating and non-proliferating muscle cells and we confirm the relevance of AON chemistry for uptake and intracellular trafficking with this method, which provides a useful means for bio-activity screening of AONs in vitro.

  7. H19 Antisense RNA Can Up-Regulate Igf2 Transcription by Activation of a Novel Promoter in Mouse Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Duputié, Anne; Antoine, Etienne; Aptel, Nathalie; Milligan, Laura; Carbonell, Françoise; Lelay-Taha, Marie-Noëlle; Piette, Jacques; Weber, Michaël; Montarras, Didier; Pinset, Christian; Dandolo, Luisa; Forné, Thierry; Cathala, Guy

    2012-01-01

    It was recently shown that a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), that we named the 91H RNA (i.e. antisense H19 transcript), is overexpressed in human breast tumours and contributes in trans to the expression of the Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) gene on the paternal chromosome. Our preliminary experiments suggested that an H19 antisense transcript having a similar function may also be conserved in the mouse. In the present work, we further characterise the mouse 91H RNA and, using a genetic complementation approach in H19 KO myoblast cells, we show that ectopic expression of the mouse 91H RNA can up-regulate Igf2 expression in trans despite almost complete unmethylation of the Imprinting-Control Region (ICR). We then demonstrate that this activation occurs at the transcriptional level by activation of a previously unknown Igf2 promoter which displays, in mouse tissues, a preferential mesodermic expression (Pm promoter). Finally, our experiments indicate that a large excess of the H19 transcript can counteract 91H-mediated Igf2 activation. Our work contributes, in conjunction with other recent findings, to open new horizons to our understanding of Igf2 gene regulation and functions of the 91H/H19 RNAs in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:22662250

  8. Comparative Proteomic Study of Fatty Acid-treated Myoblasts Reveals Role of Cox-2 in Palmitate-induced Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulan; Xu, Shimeng; Wei, Shasha; Deng, Yaqin; Li, Yiran; Yang, Fuquan; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-02-22

    Accumulated studies demonstrate that saturated fatty acids (FAs) such as palmitic acid (PA) inhibit insulin signaling in skeletal muscle cells and monounsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid (OA) reverse the effect of